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Sample records for mdv-derived lymphoblastoid cell

  1. Changes in the nucleosomal structure of the Marek's disease virus genome in lymphoblastoid cell line MDCC-MSB1 induced by 5-azacytidine.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, M; Io, K; Furuichi, T; Ren, S; Isogai, E; Watanabe, T; Namioka, S

    1995-02-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) DNA in latently infected lymphoblastoid cell lines is considerably methylated. Treatment of the MDV-derived lymphoblastoid cell lines MDCC-MSB1 (MSB1) and MDCC-RP1 (RP1) with 5-azacytidine (5-AzC) results in hypomethylation of MDV DNA. An increase in mRNA from certain portions of MDV DNA, including the BamHI-H region, was observed in 5-AzC-treated MSB1 cells, but not in the agent-treated RP1 cells. After the treatment of cells with 5-AzC, a site hypersensitive to digestion with DNaseI appeared in the BamHI-H region of MDV DNA in MSB1 but not in RP1. These results suggested that the enhancement of mRNA synthesis by 5-AzC is associated with changes in the nucleosomal structure of MDV DNA in lymphoblastoid cell line MSB1.

  2. Method for cloning lymphoblastoid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerling, U.; Kosinski, S.

    1989-02-14

    A method is described for increasing cloning frequency of human lymphocyte or lumphoblastoid cells which have been transformed with Epstein Barr virus comprising growing the transformed cells in a semi-solid agarose medium. A lower and an upper layer of agarose are used, the lower layer comprising fibroblasts suspended in the agarose layer and the upper layer comprising irradiated fibroblasts and the transformed cells suspended in the agarose layer wherein the upper agarose layer is added after the lower layer has gelled.

  3. Induction of lymphomas by inoculation of Marek's disease virus-derived lymphoblastoid cell lines: prevention by CVI988 vaccination.

    PubMed

    Mwangi, William N; Smith, Lorraine P; Baigent, Susan J; Smith, Adrian L; Nair, Venugopal

    2012-12-01

    Lymphoblastoid cell lines 265(L) and 990(O) are monoclonal lymphomas, derived respectively from liver and ovarian tumours, generated in inbred P-line (MHC B(19)/B(19)) chickens infected with RB-1B strain of Marek's disease virus (MDV) and pRB-1B5 BAC clone respectively. These were inoculated into inbred, MDV-susceptible, P-line chickens by intra-venous or intra-abdominal routes. Additional groups of birds were vaccinated using 1000 plaque-forming units of CVI988 vaccine 8 days prior to inoculation of the cell lines. Non-vaccinated birds developed visceral Marek's disease tumours with an increased rate 30 to 60 days post inoculation. Vaccination prevented tumour and disease development in challenged birds. TCRβ repertoire analysis by spectratyping and sequencing of the inoculum was used to track tumour identity in primary tumours and tumour cell lines derived from inoculated birds. These data revealed that the tumours were a consequence of de novo virus infection and not metastasis and expansion of the inoculated tumour cells. Moreover, the data showed that the two MDV-derived cell lines were not transplantable even in syngeneic P-line birds. The data also demonstrated the application of spectratyping as a tool to track tumour identity in lymphoma transplantation studies.

  4. [Production of a dialysable transfer factor of cell mediated immunity by lymphoblastoid cells in continuous proliferation].

    PubMed

    Goust, J M; Viza, D; Moulias, R; Trejdosiewicz, L; Lesourd, B; Marescot, M R; Prévot, A

    1975-01-20

    Four lymphoblastoid cell lines tested in this work contain normally a dialysable moiety having by ultraviolet spectroscopy, column chromatography (Biogel P 10) and chemically the same properties than human dialysable Transfer Factor (TFd), but unable to transfer cell mediated immune response against common antigens. Two of them are able to do so after incubation with minimal amounts of TFd. Production of a molecule identical to human TFd is possible in some lymphoblastoid cell lines after induction with TFd.

  5. Molecular signatures in response to Isoliquiritigenin in lymphoblastoid cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae-Eun; Hong, Eun-Jung; Nam, Hye-Young; Hwang, Meeyul; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Han, Bok-Ghee; Jeon, Jae-Pil

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We identified the inhibitory effect of ISL on cell proliferation of LCLs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found ISL-induced genes and miRNAs through microarray approach. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ISL-treated LCLs represented gene expression changes in cell cycle and p53 pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We revealed 12 putative mRNA-miRNA functional pairs associated with ISL effect. -- Abstract: Isoliquiritigenin (ISL) has been known to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of various cancer cells. However, genetic factors regulating ISL effects remain unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the molecular signatures involved in ISL-induced cell death of EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) using microarray analyses. For gene expression and microRNA (miRNA) microarray experiments, each of 12 LCL strains was independently treated with ISL or DMSO as a vehicle control for a day prior to total RNA extraction. ISL treatment inhibited cell proliferation of LCLs in a dose-dependent manner. Microarray analysis showed that ISL-treated LCLs represented gene expression changes in cell cycle and p53 signaling pathway, having a potential as regulators in LCL survival and sensitivity to ISL-induced cytotoxicity. In addition, 36 miRNAs including five miRNAs with unknown functions were differentially expressed in ISL-treated LCLs. The integrative analysis of miRNA and gene expression profiles revealed 12 putative mRNA-miRNA functional pairs. Among them, miR-1207-5p and miR-575 were negatively correlated with p53 pathway- and cell cycle-associated genes, respectively. In conclusion, our study suggests that miRNAs play an important role in ISL-induced cytotoxicity in LCLs by targeting signaling pathways including p53 pathway and cell cycle.

  6. Heterogeneity of a human T-lymphoblastoid cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, K.; Judd, W.

    1987-08-01

    A human T-lymphoblastoid cell line (Jurkat) was cloned, and four resulting sublines were characterized in a variety of ways with the objective of gaining information on heterogeneity in cell lines. Within a few weeks of cloning, distinct cellular morphologies and growth patterns became apparent in the four sublines. Growth rate measurements made over 3 months did not show any significant differences between the sublines. Surface protein profiles obtained by radioimmunoprecipitation using antisera in conjunction with extracts from (/sup 35/S)Met and /sup 125/I-labeled cells revealed differences between the sublines. Analysis of total cell DNA showed that one of the sublines possessed only half the chromosome complement of the other sublines and the parental line. Karyotyping confirmed this result and, in addition, demonstrated that chromosome numbers fluctuated around a mean value for each subline. Karyotypic variability became apparent within 2 months of cloning and tended to increase with time in culture. G-banding analysis showed that the analyzed cell populations contained distinctive cytogenetic aberrations. Properties of the cloned sublines were monitored over a 9-month period. One of the sublines that had shown heterogeneous morphology even after 6 weeks maintained the heterogeneity throughout this time. Another subline underwent a marked change in morphology (round to irregular) and growth habit (single cells to large clumps) with increasing time in culture. Interestingly, several alterations to surface proteins accompanied these growth changes. A third subline had relatively stable morphology and chromosome number throughout the 9-month period. The modal chromosome number was hypotetraploid for three sublines and the parent line, but was diploid for another subline.

  7. Different toxic effects of YTX in tumor K-562 and lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Araujo, Andrea; Sánchez, Jon A; Alfonso, Amparo; Vieytes, Mercedes R; Botana, Luis M

    2015-01-01

    Yessotoxin (YTX) modulates cellular phosphodiesterases (PDEs). In this regard, opposite effects had been described in the tumor model K-562 cell line and fresh human lymphocytes in terms of cell viability, cyclic adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) production and protein expression after YTX treatment. Studies in depth of the pathways activated by YTX in K-562 cell line, have demonstrated the activation of two different cell death types, apoptosis, and autophagy after 24 and 48 h of treatment, respectively. Furthermore, the key role of type 4A PDE (PDE4A) in both pathways activated by YTX was demonstrated. Therefore, taking into account the differences between cellular lines and fresh cells, a study of cell death pathways activated by YTX in a non-tumor cell line with mitotic activity, was performed. The cellular model used was the lymphoblastoid cell line that represents a non-tumor model with normal apoptotic and mitotic machinery. In this context, cell viability and cell proliferation, expression of proteins involved in cell death activated by YTX and mitochondrial mass, were studied after the incubation with the toxin. Opposite to the tumor model, no cell death activation was observed in lymphoblastoid cell line in the presence of YTX. In this sense, variations in apoptosis hallmarks were not detected in the lymphoblastoid cell line after YTX incubation, whereas this type I of programmed cell death was observed in K-562 cells. On the other hand, autophagy cell death was triggered in this cellular line, while other autophagic process is suggested in lymphoblastoid cells. These YTX effects are related to PDE4A in both cellular lines. In addition, while cell death is triggered in K-562 cells after YTX treatment, in lymphoblastoid cells the toxin stops cellular proliferation. These results point to YTX as a specific toxic compound of tumor cells, since in the non-tumor lymphoblastoid cell line, no cell death hallmarks are observed.

  8. Different toxic effects of YTX in tumor K-562 and lymphoblastoid cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Araujo, Andrea; Sánchez, Jon A.; Alfonso, Amparo; Vieytes, Mercedes R.; Botana, Luis M.

    2015-01-01

    Yessotoxin (YTX) modulates cellular phosphodiesterases (PDEs). In this regard, opposite effects had been described in the tumor model K-562 cell line and fresh human lymphocytes in terms of cell viability, cyclic adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) production and protein expression after YTX treatment. Studies in depth of the pathways activated by YTX in K-562 cell line, have demonstrated the activation of two different cell death types, apoptosis, and autophagy after 24 and 48 h of treatment, respectively. Furthermore, the key role of type 4A PDE (PDE4A) in both pathways activated by YTX was demonstrated. Therefore, taking into account the differences between cellular lines and fresh cells, a study of cell death pathways activated by YTX in a non-tumor cell line with mitotic activity, was performed. The cellular model used was the lymphoblastoid cell line that represents a non-tumor model with normal apoptotic and mitotic machinery. In this context, cell viability and cell proliferation, expression of proteins involved in cell death activated by YTX and mitochondrial mass, were studied after the incubation with the toxin. Opposite to the tumor model, no cell death activation was observed in lymphoblastoid cell line in the presence of YTX. In this sense, variations in apoptosis hallmarks were not detected in the lymphoblastoid cell line after YTX incubation, whereas this type I of programmed cell death was observed in K-562 cells. On the other hand, autophagy cell death was triggered in this cellular line, while other autophagic process is suggested in lymphoblastoid cells. These YTX effects are related to PDE4A in both cellular lines. In addition, while cell death is triggered in K-562 cells after YTX treatment, in lymphoblastoid cells the toxin stops cellular proliferation. These results point to YTX as a specific toxic compound of tumor cells, since in the non-tumor lymphoblastoid cell line, no cell death hallmarks are observed. PMID:26136685

  9. Radiation quality and mutagenesis in human lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Liber, Howard L; Idate, Rupa; Warner, Christy; Bailey, Susan M

    2014-10-01

    An interesting problem associated with studying the effects of low doses of high atomic number and energy (HZE) particles, as found in space, is that not all cells will necessarily be similarly traversed during exposure, a scenario that greatly complicates the measurement of end points that require time to develop, gene-locus mutation being a perfect example. The standard protocol for measuring mutations at the heterozygous thymidine kinase locus in human lymphoblastoid cells involves waiting three days after treatment for newly induced mutants to fully express, at which time cells are then plated in the presence of the selective agent, and mutants are counted three weeks later. This approach is acceptable as long as all cells are uniformly affected, as is the case with low-linear energy transfer (LET) ionizing radiation. However, for HZE particles some fraction of cells may not be traversed or perhaps would receive fewer than the average number of "hits", and they would continue to grow at or closer to the normal rate, thus outpacing cells that received more damage. As a result, at three days post-treatment, more heavily damaged cells will have been "diluted" by the less damaged ones, and thus the measured mutant frequency (MF) will underestimate actual mutant frequency. We therefore developed a modified approach for measuring mutation that eliminates this problem and demonstrates that the mutagenicity of 1 GeV/n Fe ions are underestimated by a factor of two when using the standard MF protocol. Furthermore, we determined the mutagenic effects of a variety of heavy ions, all of which induced mutations in a linear fashion. We found that the maximal yield of mutations (i.e., highest relative biological efficiency) was about 7.5 times higher at an LET of 70 keV/μ (400 MeV/n Si) than for gamma rays. Nontargeted mutagenicity after treatment with ionizing radiation was also investigated. For each particular ion/energy examined and in agreement with many previous studies

  10. Perspectives on fast-neutron mutagenesis of human lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, A

    1991-10-01

    The effects of low-fluence exposures to (Pu, Be) neutrons (En = 4.2 MeV) have been studied in a sensitive human B-lymphoblastoid cell line, TK6. Mutations were scored for two genetic loci, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (hgprt) and thymidine kinase (tk), as a function of dose and dose rate. For exposures limited to less than one cell cycle, the mutation frequency for the hgprt locus was 1.92 X 10(-7)/cGy. When exposures were protracted over multiple cell generations, mutation yields were increased to 6.07 X 10(-7)/cGy. Similar yields were obtained for the induction of tk-deficient mutants with a normal cell generation time (tk-ng) when exposures were carried out at very low dose rates over multiple cell generations. In the series of data presented here, the results obtained for short-duration neutron exposures are compared with data obtained for monoenergetic heavy charged particles of defined linear energy transfer (LET) produced at the BEVALAC accelerator at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. TK6 cells have been exposed to beams ranging in atomic number from 20Ne to 40Ar over an energy range from 330 to 670 MeV/amu. Mutation induction was evaluated for both loci for a subset of these beams. The results obtained with 20Ne ions of 425 MeV/amu (LET = 32 keV/microns) and 28Si ions of 670 MeV/amu (LET = 50 keV/microns) closely resemble the mutation yields obtained for brief exposures to (Pu, Be) neutrons. The nature of alterations in DNA structure induced within the tk locus of tk-ng mutants is reviewed for a series of neutron-induced mutants and a series of mutants induced by exposure to 40Ar ions (470 MeV/amu, LET = 95 keV/microns). The mutational spectra for these two types of mutants were similar and were dominated by allele loss mutations. Multilocus deletions inclusive of the c-erbA1 locus were common among tk-deficient mutants induced by these densely ionizing radiations. For the mutants induced by 40Ar ions, it is likely that the mutations were produced by

  11. Network signatures of cellular immortalization in human lymphoblastoid cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Sung-Mi; Jung, So-Young; Nam, Hye-Young; Kim, Hye-Ryun; Lee, Mee-Hee; Kim, Jun-Woo; Han, Bok-Ghee; Jeon, Jae-Pil

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •We identified network signatures of LCL immortalization from transcriptomic profiles. •More than 41% of DEGs are possibly regulated by miRNAs in LCLs. •MicroRNA target genes in LCLs are involved in apoptosis and immune-related functions. •This approach is useful to find functional miRNA targets in specific cell conditions. -- Abstract: Human lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL) has been used as an in vitro cell model in genetic and pharmacogenomic studies, as well as a good model for studying gene expression regulatory machinery using integrated genomic analyses. In this study, we aimed to identify biological networks of LCL immortalization from transcriptomic profiles of microRNAs and their target genes in LCLs. We first selected differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and microRNAs (DEmiRs) between early passage LCLs (eLCLs) and terminally differentiated late passage LCLs (tLCLs). The in silico and correlation analysis of these DEGs and DEmiRs revealed that 1098 DEG–DEmiR pairs were found to be positively (n = 591 pairs) or negatively (n = 507 pairs) correlated with each other. More than 41% of DEGs are possibly regulated by miRNAs in LCL immortalizations. The target DEGs of DEmiRs were enriched for cellular functions associated with apoptosis, immune response, cell death, JAK–STAT cascade and lymphocyte activation while non-miRNA target DEGs were over-represented for basic cell metabolisms. The target DEGs correlated negatively with miR-548a-3p and miR-219-5p were significantly associated with protein kinase cascade, and the lymphocyte proliferation and apoptosis, respectively. In addition, the miR-106a and miR-424 clusters located in the X chromosome were enriched in DEmiR–mRNA pairs for LCL immortalization. In this study, the integrated transcriptomic analysis of LCLs could identify functional networks of biologically active microRNAs and their target genes involved in LCL immortalization.

  12. Use of lymphoblastoid cell lines to evaluate the hypersensitivity to ultraviolet radiation in Cockayne syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, F.; Tarone, R.E.; Cayeux, S.; Robbins, J.H.

    1984-05-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by acute sun sensitivity, cachectic dwarfism, and neurologic and skeletal abnormalities. Cultured skin fibroblasts from patients with this disease are known to be hypersensitive to the lethal effects of 254-nm UV radiation. The authors have studied the sensitivity of 254-nm UV radiation of lymphoblastoid lines derived from 3 typical CS patients, 1 atypical CS patient who had a very late age of onset of clinical manifestations, 2 patients who had both xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and typical CS, and 3 heterozygous parents of these patients. Post-UV survival was determined by the trypan-blue dye-exclusion method. The lymphoblastoid lines from the 3 typical CS patients, the atypical CS patient, and the 2 patients with both CS and XP had decreased post-UV viability in comparison with lines from normal donors. Lines from the heterozygous parents had normal post-UV viability. The post-UV viability of the typical CS lines was similar to that of a XP complementation group C line. The relative post-UV viability of lymphoblastoid lines from the typical CS patients was similar to the relative post-UV survival of their fibroblast lines. The lymphoblastoid line from the atypical CS patient had a post-UV viability similar to that of the typical CS patients. Thus, the relative hypersensitivity of CS patients cells in vitro does not reflect the severity or age of onset of the patients clinical manifestations. The lymphoblastoid lines from the 2 patients who had both CS and XP were significantly more sensitive to the UV radiation than those from patients with only CS. Our studies demonstrate that lymphoblastoid lines from patients with CS are appropriate and useful cell lines for the study of the inherited hypersensitivity to UV radiation.

  13. Utilization of Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines as a System for the Molecular Modeling of Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron, Colin A.; Liu, Stephenie Y.; Hicks, Chindo; Gregg, Jeffrey P.

    2006-01-01

    In order to provide an alternative approach for understanding the biology and genetics of autism, we performed statistical analysis of gene expression profiles of lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from children with autism and their families. The goal was to assess the feasibility of using this model in identifying autism-associated genes.…

  14. Utilization of Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines as a System for the Molecular Modeling of Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron, Colin A.; Liu, Stephenie Y.; Hicks, Chindo; Gregg, Jeffrey P.

    2006-01-01

    In order to provide an alternative approach for understanding the biology and genetics of autism, we performed statistical analysis of gene expression profiles of lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from children with autism and their families. The goal was to assess the feasibility of using this model in identifying autism-associated genes.…

  15. Distribution of sensitivity to 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide among Japanese lymphoblastoid cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Kiyohara, Chikako; Hirohata, Tomio; Nagayama, Junya ); Kuratsune, Masanori Nakamura Junior Coll., Fukuoka )

    1991-01-01

    The processes through which the UV-mimic chemical carcinogen, 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO), leads to the DNA lesions are well characterized in E. coli, where the formation of stable 4NQO-purine adducts is critical. The DNA excision-repair mechanisms similar to those for E. coli occur in normal human cells. Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is an example of a rare recessive autosomal skin disorder which is characterized biochemically as a DNA repair-deficient disease. The fluorescein diacetate (FDA) method was recently used to determine the sensitivity of lymphoblastoid cell lines 4NQO. Viable cells take up, non-fluorescent chemical, FDA and convert it to, a fluorescent molecule, fluorescein by intracellular esterases. DNA damage produced by 4NQO could be evaluated on the basis of the cell lethality by this FDA method. In the present study the authors describe the distribution of sensitivity to 4NQO among lymphoblastoid cell lines established from Japanese.

  16. Duck lymphocytes. VIII. T-lymphoblastoid cell lines from reticuloendotheliosis virus-induced tumours.

    PubMed

    Chan, S W; Bando, Y; Warr, G W; Middleton, D L; Higgins, D A

    1999-04-01

    The T strain of reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV-T) obtained, along with the helper chicken syncytia virus (CSV), from the CSO4 cell line was highly oncogenic and rapidly fatal in ducks. Tumours were mainly seen in spleen, but neoplastic cells were observed microscopically in many organs. In vitro REV transformation of duck lymphocytes failed to yield stable cell lines, so cells from organs (blood, bone marrow, spleen, lymph node, bursa of Fabricius) of infected birds were used to establish cell lines. Some of these cell lines have been cloned. The success rates of establishment and cloning were increased if cells were cultured in a range of media containing different supplements; however, medium containing 5% foetal calf serum (FCS) and 5% duck serum was generally most efficacious for initial establishment, while spent medium from the parental line supplemented with a further 20% FCS gave best results for cloning. Cloned cell lines had the morphology of lymphoblastoid cells, with irregular nuclei and diffuse chromatin. Analysis of mRNA extracted from these cell lines showed that the uncloned lines were strongly expressing the β chain of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) and weakly expressing immunoglobulin (Ig) polypeptides [λ light chain and μ, υ, υ (ΔFc) and α heavy chains in various proportions], suggesting the presence of T and B cells. The cloned cell lines that could be classified were TCR β+ ve T cells. This is the first report of the establishment, cloning and partial characterization of duck lymphoblastoid cell lines.

  17. Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines as a Tool to Study Inter-Individual Differences in the Response to Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Michael A.; Rao, Vidhya R.; Chen, Siquan; Cao, Dingcai; Gao, Xiaoyu; Cleary, Patricia A.; Huang, R. Stephanie; Paterson, Andrew D.; Natarajan, Rama; Rehman, Jalees; Kern, Timothy S.

    2016-01-01

    Background White blood cells have been shown in animal studies to play a central role in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. Lymphoblastoid cells are immortalized EBV-transformed primary B-cell leukocytes that have been extensively used as a model for conditions in which white blood cells play a primary role. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether lymphoblastoid cell lines, by retaining many of the key features of primary leukocytes, can be induced with glucose to demonstrate relevant biological responses to those found in diabetic retinopathy. Methods Lymphoblastoid cell lines were obtained from twenty-three human subjects. Differences between high and standard glucose conditions were assessed for expression, endothelial adhesion, and reactive oxygen species. Results Collectively, stimulation of the lymphoblastoid cell lines with high glucose demonstrated corresponding changes on molecular, cellular and functional levels. Lymphoblastoid cell lines up-regulated expression of a panel of genes associated with the leukocyte-mediated inflammation found in diabetic retinopathy that include: a cytokine (IL-1B fold change = 2.11, p-value = 0.02), an enzyme (PKCB fold change = 2.30, p-value = 0.01), transcription factors (NFKB-p50 fold change = 2.05, p-value = 0.01), (NFKB-p65 fold change = 2.82, p-value = 0.003), and an adhesion molecule (CD18 fold change = 2.59, 0.02). Protein expression of CD18 was also increased (p-value = 2.14x10-5). The lymphoblastoid cell lines demonstrated increased adhesiveness to endothelial cells (p = 1.28x10-5). Reactive oxygen species were increased (p = 2.56x10-6). Significant inter-individual variation among the lymphoblastoid cell lines in these responses was evident (F = 18.70, p < 0.0001). Conclusions Exposure of lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from different human subjects to high glucose demonstrated differential and heterogeneous gene expression, adhesion, and cellular effects that recapitulated features found in

  18. Intrinsic mitochondrial dysfunction in ATM-deficient lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, Mark; Goldstine, Jimena V; Gatti, Richard A

    2007-09-15

    One of the characteristic features of cells from patients with ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is that they are in a state of continuous oxidative stress and exhibit constitutive activation of pathways that normally respond to oxidative damage. In this report, we investigated whether the oxidative stress phenotype of A-T cells might be a reflection of an intrinsic mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitotracker Red staining showed that the structural organization of mitochondria in A-T cells was abnormal compared to wild-type. Moreover, A-T cells harbored a much larger population of mitochondria with decreased membrane potential (DeltaPsi) than control cells. In addition, the basal expression levels of several nuclear DNA-encoded oxidative damage responsive genes whose proteins are targeted to the mitochondria--polymerase gamma, mitochondrial topoisomerase I, peroxiredoxin 3 and manganese superoxide dismutase--are elevated in A-T cells. Consistent with these results, we found that overall mitochondrial respiratory activity was diminished in A-T compared to wild-type cells. Treating A-T cells with the antioxidant, alpha lipoic acid (ALA), restored mitochondrial respiration rates to levels approaching those of wild-type. When wild-type cells were transfected with ATM-targeted siRNA, we observed a small but significant reduction in the respiration rates of mitochondria. Moreover, mitochondria in A-T cells induced to stably express full-length ATM, exhibited respiration rates approaching those of wild-type cells. Taken together, our results provide evidence for an intrinsic mitochondrial dysfunction in A-T cells, and implicate a requirement for ATM in the regulation of mitochondrial function.

  19. Cytotoxic effect of anti-idiotype antibody-chlorambucil conjugates against human lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tung, E; Goust, J M; Chen, W Y; Kang, S S; Wang, I Y; Wang, A C

    1983-01-01

    The secreted IgMs of two human lymphoblastoid cell lines, RPMI-6410 and RPMI-8392, were purified. Antisera against these two IgMs were raised in rabbits and made idiotypically specific to the respective antigens through various absorption procedures. By immunofluorescence and radioimmunoassay techniques, the purified anti-idiotype antibodies were found to react also with the membrane Igs of the respective cell lines, but not with those of other cell lines. The purified anti-idiotype antibodies were then coupled with Chlorambucil to form antibody-drug conjugates, whose effectiveness in the in-vitro killing of target cells was evaluated by a chromium-release cytotoxicity assay. The results showed that these anti-idiotype antibody-Chlorambucil conjugates were specifically cytotoxic to lymphoblastoid cells that bore membrane Igs carrying the respective idiotypic determinant(s). Furthermore, the conjugates were far more effective in causing cytolysis to the target cells than either Chlorambucil or the anti-idiotype antibodies alone. PMID:6350169

  20. Cytotoxic effect of anti-idiotype antibody-chlorambucil conjugates against human lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Tung, E; Goust, J M; Chen, W Y; Kang, S S; Wang, I Y; Wang, A C

    1983-09-01

    The secreted IgMs of two human lymphoblastoid cell lines, RPMI-6410 and RPMI-8392, were purified. Antisera against these two IgMs were raised in rabbits and made idiotypically specific to the respective antigens through various absorption procedures. By immunofluorescence and radioimmunoassay techniques, the purified anti-idiotype antibodies were found to react also with the membrane Igs of the respective cell lines, but not with those of other cell lines. The purified anti-idiotype antibodies were then coupled with Chlorambucil to form antibody-drug conjugates, whose effectiveness in the in-vitro killing of target cells was evaluated by a chromium-release cytotoxicity assay. The results showed that these anti-idiotype antibody-Chlorambucil conjugates were specifically cytotoxic to lymphoblastoid cells that bore membrane Igs carrying the respective idiotypic determinant(s). Furthermore, the conjugates were far more effective in causing cytolysis to the target cells than either Chlorambucil or the anti-idiotype antibodies alone.

  1. Autophagy is the predominant process induced by arsenite in human lymphoblastoid cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Bolt, Alicia M.; Byrd, Randi M.; Klimecki, Walter T.

    2010-05-01

    Arsenic is a widespread environmental toxicant with a diverse array of molecular targets and associated diseases, making the identification of the critical mechanisms and pathways of arsenic-induced cytotoxicity a challenge. In a variety of experimental models, over a range of arsenic exposure levels, apoptosis is a commonly identified arsenic-induced cytotoxic pathway. Human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) have been used as a model system in arsenic toxicology for many years, but the exact mechanism of arsenic-induced cytotoxicity in LCL is still unknown. We investigated the cytotoxicity of sodium arsenite in LCL 18564 using a set of complementary markers for cell death pathways. Markers indicative of apoptosis (phosphatidylserine externalization, PARP cleavage, and sensitivity to caspase inhibition) were uniformly negative in arsenite exposed cells. Interestingly, electron microscopy, acidic vesicle fluorescence, and expression of LC3 in LCL 18564 identified autophagy as an arsenite-induced process that was associated with cytotoxicity. Autophagy, a cellular programmed response that is associated with both cellular stress adaptation as well as cell death appears to be the predominant process in LCL cytotoxicity induced by arsenite. It is unclear, however, whether LCL autophagy is an effector mechanism of arsenite cytotoxicity or alternatively a cellular compensatory mechanism. The ability of arsenite to induce autophagy in lymphoblastoid cell lines introduces a potentially novel mechanistic explanation of the well-characterized in vitro and in vivo toxicity of arsenic to lymphoid cells.

  2. Cellular and mitochondrial glutathione redox imbalance in lymphoblastoid cells derived from children with autism

    PubMed Central

    James, S. Jill; Rose, Shannon; Melnyk, Stepan; Jernigan, Stefanie; Blossom, Sarah; Pavliv, Oleksandra; Gaylor, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Research into the metabolic phenotype of autism has been relatively unexplored despite the fact that metabolic abnormalities have been implicated in the pathophysiology of several other neurobehavioral disorders. Plasma biomarkers of oxidative stress have been reported in autistic children; however, intracellular redox status has not yet been evaluated. Lymphoblastoid cells (LCLs) derived from autistic children and unaffected controls were used to assess relative concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH) and oxidized disulfide glutathione (GSSG) in cell extracts and isolated mitochondria as a measure of intracellular redox capacity. The results indicated that the GSH/GSSG redox ratio was decreased and percentage oxidized glutathione increased in both cytosol and mitochondria in the autism LCLs. Exposure to oxidative stress via the sulfhydryl reagent thimerosal resulted in a greater decrease in the GSH/GSSG ratio and increase in free radical generation in autism compared to control cells. Acute exposure to physiological levels of nitric oxide decreased mitochondrial membrane potential to a greater extent in the autism LCLs, although GSH/GSSG and ATP concentrations were similarly decreased in both cell lines. These results suggest that the autism LCLs exhibit a reduced glutathione reserve capacity in both cytosol and mitochondria that may compromise antioxidant defense and detoxification capacity under prooxidant conditions.—James, S. J., Rose, S., Melnyk, S., Jernigan, S., Blossom, S., Pavliv, O., Gaylor, D. W. Cellular and mitochondrial glutathione redox imbalance in lymphoblastoid cells derived from children with autism. PMID:19307255

  3. Cell culture-induced aberrant methylation of the imprinted IG DMR in human lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Saferali, Aabida; Grundberg, Elin; Berlivet, Soizik; Beauchemin, Hugues; Morcos, Lisanne; Polychronakos, Constantin; Pastinen, Tomi; Graham, Jinko; McNeney, Brad; Naumova, Anna K

    2010-01-01

    DNA methylation patterns are often poorly conserved through cell culturing. To determine the effect of cell immortalization and culture on DNA methylation profiles, we analyzed methylation in the differentially methylated regions (DMR) of five imprinted domains: the intergenic (IG) DMR on chromosome 14q32; potassium voltage-gated channel, KQT-like subfamily, member 1, (KCNQ1); small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N (SNRPN), mesoderm specific transcript homolog (MEST); and H19 in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). In the IG DMR we found an aberrant methylation pattern that was consistent through all the cell lines tested and significantly different from that of noncultured peripheral blood cells. Using a generalized linear mixed model to compare methylation profiles, we show that recently derived LCLs significantly differ from the CEPH LCLs. This implies a gradual cell-culture related deterioration of DNA methylation in the IG DMR with at least two steps that may be identified: loss of methylation at CG sites 1 and 8; and loss of allelic differences in DNA methylation. The IG DMR methylation profile also confirms the high level of clonality of the CEPH LCLs. We conclude that non-transformed primary cells may be less susceptible to epigenetic anomalies and therefore may provide a more accurate reflection of gene expression in vivo.

  4. Costimulatory signal provided by a B-lymphoblastoid cell line and its Ia-negative variant.

    PubMed Central

    Reiser, H; Benacerraf, B

    1989-01-01

    We have analyzed the requirements of highly purified, resting murine CD4+ T lymphocytes for activation mediated by the lectin Con A and by monoclonal antibodies against the CD3 and Thy-1 molecules. Our results indicate that both the Ia-positive B-lymphoblastoid cell line M12 and its Ia-negative variant M12.C3 can provide the costimulatory activity necessary for these activation pathways. The costimulatory function is preserved upon fixation with paraformaldehyde, indicating that the costimulatory molecule(s) is (are) constitutively expressed on the cell surface. Our experiments also point to interesting differences between the M12 cell line and syngeneic Ia-positive antigen-presenting cells in generating a syngeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction. Finally, we show that the CD4+ T cell-M12.C3 cell interaction can be used to screen for interesting monoclonal antibodies that affect cell function. Images PMID:2532358

  5. Use of RAPD to detect sodium arsenite-induced DNA damage in human lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yuan-Cho; Yang, Vivian C; Wang, Tsu-Shing

    2007-09-24

    Inorganic arsenic is a known human carcinogen, yet its mechanism of action remains unclear. Our previous study showed that arsenite significantly induces oxidative DNA adducts and DNA-protein cross-links in several mammalian cell lines. In the present study, we used the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) assay to evaluate the possible target in the genomic DNA of human lymphoblastoid cells that were exposed to sodium arsenite. Treatment with both 10 and 80 microM arsenite for 4h induced significant changes in RAPD profiles compared with the control pattern. Two 10-mer RAPD primers (D11 and F1) produced the most distinguishable banding profiles between arsenite-treated and control genomic DNA. The sequencing of four arsenite-sensitive RAPD bands showed that the RB1CC1 and PACE4 genes might be the DNA targets of sodium arsenite treatment. We propose that arsenite may induce sequence- or gene-specific damage and then change the RAPD profile in human lymphoblastoid cells. The results of our study also show that RAPD combined with other techniques is a good tool for detecting alterations in genomic DNA and for the direct screening of new molecular markers related to arsenite-induced carcinogenesis.

  6. Control of cell respiration by nitric oxide in Ataxia Telangiectasia lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Masci, Alessandra; Mastronicola, Daniela; Arese, Marzia; Piane, Maria; De Amicis, Andrea; Blanck, Thomas J J; Chessa, Luciana; Sarti, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    Ataxia Telangiectasia (AT) patients are particularly sensitive to oxidative-nitrosative stress. Nitric oxide (NO) controls mitochondrial respiration via the reversible inhibition of complex IV. The mitochondrial response to NO of AT lymphoblastoid cells was investigated. Cells isolated from three patients and three intrafamilial healthy controls were selected showing within each group a normal diploid karyotype and homogeneous telomere length. Different complex IV NO-inhibition patterns were induced by varying the electron flux through the respiratory chain, using exogenous cell membrane permeable electron donors. Under conditions of high electron flux the mitochondrial NO inhibition of respiration was greater in AT than in control cells (P< or =0.05). This property appears peculiar to AT, and correlates well to the higher concentration of cytochrome c detected in the AT cells. This finding is discussed on the basis of the proposed mechanism of reaction of NO with complex IV. It is suggested that the peculiar response of AT mitochondria to NO stress may be relevant to the mitochondrial metabolism of AT patients.

  7. Induction of apoptosis by epigallocatechin-3-gallate in human lymphoblastoid B cells

    SciTech Connect

    Noda, Chiseko He, Jinsong; Takano, Tomoko; Tanaka, Chisato; Kondo, Toshinori; Tohyama, Kaoru; Yamamura, Hirohei; Tohyama, Yumi

    2007-11-03

    (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a major constituent of green tea polyphenols, has been shown to suppress cancer cell proliferation and induce apoptosis. In this study we investigated its efficacy and the mechanism underlying its effect using human B lymphoblastoid cell line Ramos, and effect of co-treatment with EGCG and a chemotherapeutic agent on apoptotic cell death. EGCG induced dose- and time-dependent apoptotic cell death accompanied by loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, release of cytochrome c into the cytosol, and cleavage of pro-caspase-9 to its active form. EGCG also enhanced production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Pretreatment with diphenylene iodonium chloride, an inhibitor of NAD(P)H oxidase and an antioxidant, partially suppressed both EGCG-induced apoptosis and production of ROS, implying that oxidative stress is involved in the apoptotic response. Furthermore, we showed that combined-treatment with EGCG and a chemotherapeutic agent, etoposide, synergistically induced apoptosis in Ramos cells.

  8. Human iPSC-derived neurons and lymphoblastoid cells for personalized medicine research in neuropsychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gurwitz, David

    2016-01-01

    The development and clinical implementation of personalized medicine crucially depends on the availability of high-quality human biosamples; animal models, although capable of modeling complex human diseases, cannot reflect the large variation in the human genome, epigenome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome. Although the biosamples available from public biobanks that store human tissues and cells may represent the large human diversity for most diseases, these samples are not always sufficient for developing biomarkers for patient-tailored therapies for neuropsychiatric disorders. Postmortem human tissues are available from many biobanks; nevertheless, collections of neuronal human cells from large patient cohorts representing the human diversity remain scarce. Two tools are gaining popularity for personalized medicine research on neuropsychiatric disorders: human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons and human lymphoblastoid cell lines. This review examines and contrasts the advantages and limitations of each tool for personalized medicine research. PMID:27757061

  9. Study of nuclear proteins in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum lymphoblastoid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Amari, N.M.B.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear histone and nonhistone (NHP) proteins from normal human and xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group A (XP-A) lymphoblastoid cells were compared both qualitatively, quantitatively and for binding affinity for DNA. Histones and four NHP fractions (NHP/sub 1-4/) were isolated from purified cell nuclei. Binding affinity to (/sup 3/H) melanoma DNA of histones and each NHP fraction was then determined using gradient dialysis followed by a filter assay. Histones and each NHP fraction were then sub-fractionated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Densitometric scans of the separation of these proteins on the gels were qualitatively, and quantitatively analyzed and compared between the two cell lines. No qualitative or quantitative differences were observed between histones from XP-A or normal cells.

  10. Human iPSC-derived neurons and lymphoblastoid cells for personalized medicine research in neuropsychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Gurwitz, David

    2016-09-01

    The development and clinical implementation of personalized medicine crucially depends on the availability of high-quality human biosamples; animal models, although capable of modeling complex human diseases, cannot reflect the large variation in the human genome, epigenome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome. Although the biosamples available from public biobanks that store human tissues and cells may represent the large human diversity for most diseases, these samples are not always sufficient for developing biomarkers for patient-tailored therapies for neuropsychiatric disorders. Postmortem human tissues are available from many biobanks; nevertheless, collections of neuronal human cells from large patient cohorts representing the human diversity remain scarce. Two tools are gaining popularity for personalized medicine research on neuropsychiatric disorders: human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons and human lymphoblastoid cell lines. This review examines and contrasts the advantages and limitations of each tool for personalized medicine research.

  11. Sorting of chromosome 13 from lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from patients with Wilson disease

    SciTech Connect

    Nasedkina, T.V.; Polesskaya, A.N.; Surkov, S.A.; Poletaev, A.I. ); Aksenov, N.; Zenin, V.V. )

    1993-01-01

    Lymphoblastoid cell lines were established from patients with Wilson disease (WD) which maps to human chromosome 13 and served as a source of chromosomes. The authors used a modified isolation procedure to increase the yield of metaphase chromosomes and additional purification of the chromosome suspension on Percoll gradient to achieve more stable sorting conditions. Vibariate flow analysis using dual laser cell-sorter, ATC-3000, showed a sufficient resolution of the flow karyotype and a low level of debris. They sorted chromosome 13 at a speed of up to 5,000 chr/sec, providing about 2 million chromosomes per day. The purity of the sorted fraction was about 90%. The fractions will be further used to construct cosmid libraries to facilitate studies of the WD locus.

  12. Fast neutrons-induced apoptosis is Fas-independent in lymphoblastoid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Barbara; Benzina, Sami; Jeannequin, Pierre; Dufour, Patrick; Bergerat, Jean-Pierre; Denis, Jean-Marc; Gueulette, John; Bischoff, Pierre L. . E-mail: Pierre.Bischoff@ircad.u-strasbg.fr

    2005-08-26

    We have previously shown that ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis in human lymphoblastoid cells differs according to their p53 status, and that caspase 8-mediated cleavage of BID is involved in the p53-dependent pathway. In the present study, we investigated the role of Fas signaling in caspase 8 activation induced by fast neutrons irradiation in these cells. Fas and FasL expression was assessed by flow cytometry and by immunoblot. We also measured Fas aggregation after irradiation by fluorescence microscopy. We found a decrease of Fas expression after irradiation, but no change in Fas ligand expression. We also showed that, in contrast to the stimulation of Fas by an agonistic antibody, Fas aggregation did not occur after irradiation. Altogether, our data strongly suggest that fast neutrons induced-apoptosis is Fas-independent, even in p53-dependent apoptosis.

  13. Upregulation of TFAM and mitochondria copy number in human lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Sanjiban; D'Souza, Reena Reshma; Kabekkodu, Shama Prasada; Gopinath, Puthiya M; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu

    2014-03-01

    Mitochondria are central to several physiological and pathological conditions in humans. In the present study, we performed copy number analysis of nuclear encoded mitochondrial genes, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and its representative lymphoblastoid cells (LCLs). We have observed hyper diploid copies of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) gene in the LCLs along with increased mtDNA copy number, mitochondrial mass, intracellular ROS and mitochondrial membrane potential, suggesting elevated mitochondrial biogenesis in LCLs. Gene expression analysis confirmed TFAM over-expression in LCLs when compared to PBMC. Based on our observation, we suggest that increased copy number of TFAM gene upregulates its expression, increases mtDNA copy numbers and protects it from oxidative stress induced damage in the transformed LCLs.

  14. Phorbol diesters and transferrin modulate lymphoblastoid cell transferrin receptor expression by two different mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Alcantara, O.; Phillips, J.L.; Boldt, D.H.

    1986-12-01

    Expression of transferrin receptors (TfR) by activated lymphocytes is necessary for lymphocyte DNA synthesis and proliferation. Regulation of TfR expression, therefore, is a mechanism by which the lymphocyte's proliferative potential may be directed and controlled. The authors studied mechanisms by which lymphoblastoid cells modulate TfR expression during treatment with phorbol diesters or iron transferrin (FeTf), agents which cause downregulation of cell surface TfR. Phorbol diester-induced TfR downregulation occurred rapidly, being detectable at 2 min and reaching maximal decreases of 50% by 15 min. It was inhibited by cold but not by agents that destabilize cytoskeletal elements. Furthermore, this downregulation was reversed rapidly by washing or by treatment with the membrane interactive agent, chlorpromazine. In contrast, FeTf-induced TfR downregulation occurred slowly. Decreased expression of TfR was detectable only after 15 min and maximal downregulation was achieved after 60 min. Although FeTf-induced downregulation also was inhibited by cold, it was inhibited in addition by a group of microtubule destabilizing agents (colchicine, vinblastine, podophyllotoxin) or cytochalasin B, a microfilament inhibitor. Furthermore, FeTf-induced downregulation was not reversed readily by washing or by treatment with chlorpromazine. Phorbol diesters cause TfR downregulation by a cytoskeleton-independent mechanism. These data indicate that TfR expression is regulated by two independent mechanisms in lymphoblastoid cells, and they provide the possibility that downregulation of TfR by different mechanisms may result in different effects in these cells.

  15. The TP53 dependence of radiation-induced chromosome instability in human lymphoblastoid cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Jordan, Robert; Evans, Helen H.; Lenarczyk, Marek; Liber, Howard

    2003-01-01

    The dose and TP53 dependence for the induction of chromosome instability were examined in cells of three human lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from WIL2 cells: TK6, a TP53-normal cell line, NH32, a TP53-knockout created from TK6, and WTK1, a WIL2-derived cell line that spontaneously developed a TP53 mutation. Cells of each cell line were exposed to (137)Cs gamma rays, and then surviving clones were isolated and expanded in culture for approximately 35 generations before the frequency and characteristics of the instability were analyzed. The presence of dicentric chromosomes, formed by end-to-end fusions, served as a marker of chromosomal instability. Unexposed TK6 cells had low levels of chromosomal instability (0.002 +/- 0.001 dicentrics/cell). Exposure of TK6 cells to doses as low as 5 cGy gamma rays increased chromosome instability levels nearly 10-fold to 0.019 +/- 0.008 dicentrics/cell. There was no further increase in instability levels beyond 5 cGy. In contrast to TK6 cells, unexposed cultures of WTK1 and NH32 cells had much higher levels of chromosome instability of 0.034 +/- 0.007 and 0.041 +/- 0.009, respectively, but showed little if any effect of radiation on levels of chromosome instability. The results suggest that radiation exposure alters the normal TP53-dependent cell cycle checkpoint controls that recognize alterations in telomere structure and activate apoptosis.

  16. The TP53 dependence of radiation-induced chromosome instability in human lymphoblastoid cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Jordan, Robert; Evans, Helen H.; Lenarczyk, Marek; Liber, Howard

    2003-01-01

    The dose and TP53 dependence for the induction of chromosome instability were examined in cells of three human lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from WIL2 cells: TK6, a TP53-normal cell line, NH32, a TP53-knockout created from TK6, and WTK1, a WIL2-derived cell line that spontaneously developed a TP53 mutation. Cells of each cell line were exposed to (137)Cs gamma rays, and then surviving clones were isolated and expanded in culture for approximately 35 generations before the frequency and characteristics of the instability were analyzed. The presence of dicentric chromosomes, formed by end-to-end fusions, served as a marker of chromosomal instability. Unexposed TK6 cells had low levels of chromosomal instability (0.002 +/- 0.001 dicentrics/cell). Exposure of TK6 cells to doses as low as 5 cGy gamma rays increased chromosome instability levels nearly 10-fold to 0.019 +/- 0.008 dicentrics/cell. There was no further increase in instability levels beyond 5 cGy. In contrast to TK6 cells, unexposed cultures of WTK1 and NH32 cells had much higher levels of chromosome instability of 0.034 +/- 0.007 and 0.041 +/- 0.009, respectively, but showed little if any effect of radiation on levels of chromosome instability. The results suggest that radiation exposure alters the normal TP53-dependent cell cycle checkpoint controls that recognize alterations in telomere structure and activate apoptosis.

  17. Human NK cells activated by EBV+ lymphoblastoid cells overcome anti-apoptotic mechanisms of drug resistance in haematological cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Martínez, Diego; Azaceta, Gemma; Muntasell, Aura; Aguiló, Nacho; Núñez, David; Gálvez, Eva M; Naval, Javier; Anel, Alberto; Palomera, Luis; Vilches, Carlos; Marzo, Isabel; Villalba, Martín; Pardo, Julián

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells recognize and eliminate transformed or infected cells that have downregulated MHC class-I and express specific activating ligands. Recent evidence indicates that allogeneic NK cells are useful to eliminate haematological cancer cells independently of MHC-I expression. However, it is unclear if transformed cells expressing mutations that confer anti-apoptotic properties and chemoresistance will be susceptible to NK cells. Allogeneic primary human NK cells were activated using different protocols and prospectively tested for their ability to eliminate diverse mutant haematological and apoptotic-resistant cancer cell lines as well as patient-derived B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells with chemotherapy multiresistance. Here, we show that human NK cells from healthy donors activated in vitro with Epstein Barr virus positive (EBV+)-lymphoblastoid cells display an enhanced cytotoxic and proliferative potential in comparison to other protocols of activation such a K562 cells plus interleukin (IL)2. This enhancement enables them to kill more efficiently a variety of haematological cancer cell lines, including a panel of transfectants that mimic natural mutations leading to oncogenic transformation and chemoresistance (e.g., overexpression of Bcl-2, Bcl-XL and Mcl-1 or downregulation of p53, Bak/Bax or caspase activity). The effect was also observed against blasts from B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients showing multi-resistance to chemotherapy. Our findings demonstrate that particular in vitro activated NK cells may overcome anti-apoptotic mechanisms and oncogenic alterations frequently occurring in transformed cells, pointing toward the use of EBV+-lymphoblastoid cells as a desirable strategy to activate NK cells in vitro for the purpose of treating haematological neoplasia with poor prognosis. PMID:25949911

  18. Ciprofloxacin-induced inhibition of topoisomerase II in human lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bredberg, A; Brant, M; Jaszyk, M

    1991-01-01

    The antibacterial activities of the fluorinated 4-quinolones (e.g., ciprofloxacin) have been ascribed to a marked inhibition of bacterial DNA gyrase. In contrast, the influence on purified mammalian DNA enzymes, including topoisomerases, has been reported to be several orders of magnitude weaker, occurring at concentrations higher than 100 micrograms of ciprofloxacin per ml. In this study, using a nondenaturing filter elution method, a marked induction of double-strand DNA breaks in human lymphoblastoid cells exposed to 80 micrograms of ciprofloxacin per ml was seen. The proportion of single-strand versus double-strand DNA breaks was similar to that seen with the topoisomerase II inhibitory antitumor agent VP-16. The cellular recovery was more rapid after treatment with ciprofloxacin than after treatment with VP-16, displaying a normal elution profile within 15 min at 37 degrees C (60 min for VP-16). These data indicate that ciprofloxacin has an effect on intracellularly located topoisomerase II in humans. PMID:1645508

  19. The role of mitochondria in the radiation-induced bystander effect in human lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Sountharia; Harrison, Scott H; Thomas, Robert A; Tucker, James D

    2011-02-01

    Cells without intact mitochondrial DNA have been shown to lack the bystander effect, which is an energy-dependent process. We hypothesized that cells harboring mutations in mitochondrial genes responsible for ATP synthesis would show a decreased bystander effect compared to normal cells. Radiation-induced bystander effects were analyzed in two normal and four mitochondrial mutant human lymphoblastoid cells. Medium from previously irradiated cells (conditioned medium) was transferred to unirradiated cells from the respective cell lines and evaluated for the bystander effect using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay. Unlike normal cells that were used as a control, mitochondrial mutant cells neither generated nor responded to the bystander signals. The bystander effect was inhibited in normal cells by adding the mitochondrial inhibitors rotenone and oligomycin to the culture medium. Time-controlled blocking of the bystander effect by inhibitors was found to occur either for prolonged exposure to the inhibitor prior to irradiation with an immediate and subsequent removal of the inhibitors or immediate post-application of the inhibitor. Adding the inhibitors just prior to irradiation and removing them immediately after irradiation was uneventful. Fully functional mitochondrial metabolic capability may therefore be essential for the bystander effect.

  20. P53 alters the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity for oxidized graphene in human B-lymphoblastoid cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petibone, Dayton Matthew

    Widespread use of oxidized graphene nanomaterials in industry, medicine, and consumer products raises concern about potential adverse impacts on human health. The p53 tumor suppressor protein is crucial to maintaining cellular and genetic stability to prevent carcinogenesis. Here, we show that oxygen functionalized graphene (f-G) absorption and p53 functional status correlate with cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in human B-lymphoblastoid cells. Trends in f-G absorption by were dose-dependent. Cells with functional p53 exposed to f-G arrested in G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle, suppressed f-G induced reactive oxygen species (ROS), and had elevated apoptosis. While compared to p53 competent cells, the p53 deficient cells exposed to f-G accumulated in S-phase of the cell cycle, had elevated ROS levels, and evaded apoptosis. The f-G genotoxicity was evident as increased loss-of-heterozygosity mutants independent of p53 status, and structural chromosome damage in p53 deficient cells. These findings have broad implications for the safety and efficacy of oxidized graphene nanomaterials in industrial, consumer products and biomedical applications.

  1. Characterization of an antigen associated with the Marek's disease lymphoblastoid cell line MSB-1.

    PubMed

    Ross, L J

    1982-06-01

    A Marek's disease lymphoblastoid cell line (MSB-1) has been analysed by immunoprecipitation for expression of tumour-associated antigen, Marek's disease virus (MDV)-specific antigens and antigens specific to avian leukosis-sarcoma viruses. Rabbit antisera raised against two independently derived cell lines after extensive absorption with normal chick cells reacted with a polypeptide of mol. wt. 40 000 (40K) in extracts of MSB-1 cells. The 40K polypeptide was not present in myeloblasts or in chick embryo fibroblasts (CEF) infected with MDV and did not react with antiserum raised against normal chicken thymus antigens. The possibility that the 40K polypeptide is a tumour-associated antigen is discussed. Seven MDV-specific antigens were noted in infected CEF (mol. wt. 110K, 100K, 80K, 70K, 50K, 35K and 32K) but none of these was detected in MSB-1 cells. The avian leukosis-sarcoma group-specific antigen P27gag and its precursor Pr76gag were not found in MSB-1 cells, confirming that expression of mature gag protein is not required for transformation by MDV. However, two polypeptides of unknown origin and function (mol. wt. 180K and 110K) were precipitated from MSB-1 cells with a rabbit anti-Rous sarcoma (Schmidt-Rupin, subgroup D) antiserum.

  2. Cytogenetic characterization of low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity in Cobalt-60 irradiated human lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Gnanada S; Joiner, Michael C; Tucker, James D

    2014-12-01

    The dose-effect relationships of cells exposed to ionizing radiation are frequently described by linear quadratic (LQ) models over an extended dose range. However, many mammalian cell lines, when acutely irradiated in G2 at doses ≤0.3Gy, show hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) as measured by reduced clonogenic cell survival, thereby indicating greater cell lethality than is predicted by extrapolation from high-dose responses. We therefore hypothesized that the cytogenetic response in G2 cells to low doses would also be steeper than predicted by LQ extrapolation from high doses. We tested our hypothesis by exposing four normal human lymphoblastoid cell lines to 0-400cGy of Cobalt-60 gamma radiation. The cytokinesis block micronucleus assay was used to determine the frequencies of micronuclei and nucleoplasmic bridges. To characterize the dependence of the cytogenetic damage on dose, univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to compare the responses in the low- (HRS) and high-dose response regions. Our data indicate that the slope of the response for all four cell lines at ≤20cGy during G2 is greater than predicted by an LQ extrapolation from the high-dose responses for both micronuclei and bridges. These results suggest that the biological consequences of low-dose exposures could be underestimated and may not provide accurate risk assessments following such exposures.

  3. Effect of duration and intensity of ganciclovir exposure on lymphoblastoid cell toxicity.

    PubMed

    Janoly-Dumenil, Audrey; Rouvet, Isabelle; Bleyzac, Nathalie; Bertrand, Yves; Aulagner, Gilles; Zabot, Marie-Thérèse

    2009-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus infection is still a major complication after pediatric bone marrow transplantation and could be fatal in some cases. The toxicity of the drug in dividing transplanted haematopoietic cells combined with the suppression of cell growth caused by the virus remains a major problem in managing human cytomegalovirus infection. The aim of the current in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of the intensity (1-20 mg/l) and duration (1, 2, 7 or 14 days) of ganciclovir exposure on toxicity in B lymphoblastoid cells (using cell counting and viability measurements). A correlation was found between the dose of ganciclovir exposure and a decrease in total cell number when duration exceeded 2 days (r(2)=0.92 and 0.93 after 7 and 14 days, respectively). High levels (20 mg/l) of ganciclovir were not more toxic than lowest levels (1 mg/l) for the shortest durations of ganciclovir exposure (1 and 2 days). Moreover, 50% cytotoxic concentrations markedly decreased with the duration of ganciclovir exposure (374-3 mg/l from 1 to 14 days respectively) after 14 days of culture. This in vitro study demonstrated for the first time that ganciclovir exhibited an in vitro duration-dependent toxicity on haematopoietic-derived cells when in vivo doses of the drug were used.

  4. Effects of Simulated Microgravity on the Expression Profile of Microrna in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ye; Wu, Honglu; Ramesh, Govindarajan; Rohde, Larry; Story, Michael; Mangala, Lingegowda

    2012-07-01

    EFFECTS OF SIMULATED MICROGRAVITY ON THE EXPRESSION PROFILE OF MICRORNA IN HUMAN LYMPHOBLASTOID CELLS Lingegowda S. Mangala1,2, Ye Zhang1,3, Zhenhua He2, Kamal Emami1, Govindarajan T. Ramesh4, Michael Story 5, Larry H. Rohde2, and Honglu Wu1 1 NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, USA 2 University of Houston Clear Lake, Houston, Texas, USA 3 Wyle Integrated Science and Engineering Group, Houston, Texas, USA 4 Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA, USA 5 University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA This study explores the changes in expression of microRNA (miRNA) and related genes under simulated microgravity conditions. In comparison to static 1g, microgravity has been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels in cultured cells or animals. miRNA has recently emerged as an important regulator of gene expression, possibly regulating as many as one-third of all human genes. However, very little is known about the effect of altered gravity on miRNA expression. To test the hypothesis that the miRNA expression profile would be altered in zero gravity resulting in altered regulation of gene expression leading to metabolic or functional changes in cells, we cultured TK6 human lymphoblastoid cells in a High Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV; bioreactor) for 72 h either in the rotating condition to model microgravity in space or in the static condition as a control. Expression of several miRNA was changed significantly in the simulated microgravity condition including miR-150, miR-34a, miR-423-5p, miR-22 and miR-141, miR-618 and miR-222. To confirm whether this altered miRNA expression correlates with gene expression and functional changes of the cells, we performed DNA microarray and validated the related genes using q-RT PCR. Network and pathway analysis of gene and miRNA expression profiles indicates that the regulation of cell communication and catalytic activities, as well as pathways involved in immune response_IL-15

  5. Proliferation-dependent positioning of individual centromeres in the interphase nucleus of human lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ollion, Jean; Loll, François; Cochennec, Julien; Boudier, Thomas; Escudé, Christophe

    2015-07-01

    The cell nucleus is a highly organized structure and plays an important role in gene regulation. Understanding the mechanisms that sustain this organization is therefore essential for understanding genome function. Centromeric regions (CRs) of chromosomes have been known for years to adopt specific nuclear positioning patterns, but the significance of this observation is not yet completely understood. Here, using a combination of fluorescence in situ hybridization and immunochemistry on fixed human cells and high-throughput imaging, we directly and quantitatively investigated the nuclear positioning of specific human CRs. We observe differential attraction of individual CRs toward both the nuclear border and the nucleoli, the former being enhanced in nonproliferating cells and the latter being enhanced in proliferating cells. Similar positioning patterns are observed in two different lymphoblastoid cell lines. Moreover, the positioning of CRs differs from that of noncentromeric regions, and CRs display specific orientations within chromosome territories. These results suggest the existence of not-yet-characterized mechanisms that drive the nuclear positioning of CRs and therefore pave the way toward a better understanding of how CRs affect nuclear organization.

  6. The impact of FANCD2 deficiency on formaldehyde-induced toxicity in human lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xuefeng; Ji, Zhiying; McHale, Cliona M; Yuh, Jessica; Bersonda, Jessica; Tang, Maycky; Smith, Martyn T; Zhang, Luoping

    2013-01-01

    Formaldehyde (FA), a major industrial chemical and ubiquitous environmental pollutant, has recently been classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer as a human leukemogen. The major mode of action of FA is thought to be the formation of DNA-protein cross-links (DPCs). Repair of DPCs may be mediated by the Fanconi anemia pathway; however, data supporting the involvement of this pathway are limited, particularly in human hematopoietic cells. Therefore, we assessed the role of FANCD2, a critical component of the Fanconi anemia pathway, in FA-induced toxicity in human lymphoblast cell models of FANCD2 deficiency (PD20 cells) and FANCD2 sufficiency (PD20-D2 cells). After treatment of the cells with 0-150 μM FA for 24 h, DPCs were increased in a dose-dependent manner in both cell lines, with greater increases in FANCD2-deficient PD20 cells. FA also induced cytotoxicity, micronuclei, chromosome aberrations, and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in both cell lines, with greater increases in cytotoxicity and apoptosis in PD20 cells. Increased levels of γ-ATR and γ-H2AX in both cell lines suggested the recognition of FA-induced DNA damage; however, the induction of BRCA2 was compromised in FANCD2-deficient PD20 cells, potentially reducing the capacity to repair DPCs. Together, these findings suggest that FANCD2 protein and the Fanconi anemia pathway are essential to protect human lymphoblastoid cells against FA toxicity. Future studies are needed to delineate the role of this pathway in mitigating FA-induced toxicity, particularly in hematopoietic stem cells, the target cells in leukemia.

  7. Suppression of Epstein-Barr virus reactivation in lymphoblastoid cells cultured in simulated microgravity.

    PubMed

    Long, J P; Pierson, S; Hughes, J H

    1999-01-01

    Rotating-wall vessels allow for the growth of cells in simulated microgravity. Lymphoblastoid cells cultured in rotating-wall vessels exhibited significant differences in the expression of both early and late Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) antigens. Viral protein expression (as measured by indirect immunofluorescence) was significantly suppressed in cells cultured in simulated microgravity. A significantly greater percentage of P3HR-1 cells and Daudi cells were positive for the expression of BamH1-Z-DNA fragment of Epstein-Barr replication activator (ZEBRA), early antigen restricted (EA-R), and viral capsid antigen (VCA) in cells cultured in static tissue culture flasks as compared to cells cultured in rotating-wall vessels. We observed a 7, 11, and 25-fold reduction, respectively, for EA-R, VCA, and ZEBRA protein in P3HR-1 cells cultured in simulated microgravity. Additionally, suspension cultures of P3HR-1 cells exhibited significantly greater ZEBRA antigen expression than cells cultured in rotating-wall vessels. As an independent confirmation of the reduction in ZEBRA-protein production in simulated microgravity in P3HR-1 cells, ZEBRA-mRNA was quantitated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. We observed between a 4 to 10-fold reduction in ZEBRA-mRNA in cells cultured in simulated microgravity as compared to cells cultured at 1 x g in tissue culture flasks. Rotating-wall vessels, by virtue of providing a simple culture environment triggering marked differences in viral activation, provide a model whereby both host and viral factors involved in regulating the maintenance of EBV latency can be examined.

  8. Expression of genes and proteins in human cultured lymphoblastoid cells during spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Suzuki, Hiromi; Omori, Katsunori; Seki, Masaya; Hashizume, Toko; Shimazu, Toru; Ishioka, Noriaki; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2012-07-01

    The space environment contains two major biologically significant influences: space radiations and microgravity. The aim of this study was to clarify the biological effects of space radiations, microgravity and a space environment on the gene and protein expression. Space experiments were performed with human cultured lymphoblastoid cell lines at the first life science experiment to be conducted on the Japanese Experimental Module "Kibo" of the International Space Station (ISS). Under one gravity or microgravity condition, the cells were grown in the cell biology experimental facility (CBEF) of the ISS for 8 days without experiencing the stress during launching and landing because the cells were frozen during these periods. Ground control samples also were cultured for 8 days in the CBEF on the ground during the spaceflight. Gene and protein expression was analyzed by using DNA chip (a 44k whole human genome microarray, Agilent Technologies Inc.) and protein chip (Panorama ^{TM} Ab MicroArray, Sigma-Aldrich Co.), respectively. We already reported the behavior of p53-dependent regulated genes and proteins after exposure to space radiations, microgravity, and the space environment during spaceflight. Next stage, we will profile the expression except for the p53 gene status and discuss the biological meaning during spaceflight

  9. Characterization of the microDNA through the response to chemotherapeutics in lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Mehanna, Pamela; Gagné, Vincent; Lajoie, Mathieu; Spinella, Jean-François; St-Onge, Pascal; Sinnett, Daniel; Brukner, Ivan; Krajinovic, Maja

    2017-01-01

    Recently, a new class of extrachromosomal circular DNA, called microDNA, was identified. They are on average 100 to 400 bp long and are derived from unique non-repetitive genomic regions with high gene density. MicroDNAs are thought to arise from DNA breaks associated with RNA metabolism or replication slippage. Given the paucity of information on this entirely novel phenomenon, we aimed to get an additional insight into microDNA features by performing the microDNA analysis in 20 independent human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) prior and after treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs. The results showed non-random genesis of microDNA clusters from the active regions of the genome. The size periodicity of 190 bp was observed, which matches DNA fragmentation typical for apoptotic cells. The chemotherapeutic drug-induced apoptosis of LCLs increased both number and size of clusters further suggesting that part of microDNAs could result from the programmed cell death. Interestingly, proportion of identified microDNA sequences has common loci of origin when compared between cell line experiments. While compatible with the original observation that microDNAs originate from a normal physiological process, obtained results imply complementary source of its production. Furthermore, non-random genesis of microDNAs depicted by redundancy between samples makes these entities possible candidates for new biomarker generation.

  10. Characterization of the microDNA through the response to chemotherapeutics in lymphoblastoid cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Mehanna, Pamela; Gagné, Vincent; Lajoie, Mathieu; Spinella, Jean-François; St-Onge, Pascal; Sinnett, Daniel; Brukner, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Recently, a new class of extrachromosomal circular DNA, called microDNA, was identified. They are on average 100 to 400 bp long and are derived from unique non-repetitive genomic regions with high gene density. MicroDNAs are thought to arise from DNA breaks associated with RNA metabolism or replication slippage. Given the paucity of information on this entirely novel phenomenon, we aimed to get an additional insight into microDNA features by performing the microDNA analysis in 20 independent human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) prior and after treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs. The results showed non-random genesis of microDNA clusters from the active regions of the genome. The size periodicity of 190 bp was observed, which matches DNA fragmentation typical for apoptotic cells. The chemotherapeutic drug-induced apoptosis of LCLs increased both number and size of clusters further suggesting that part of microDNAs could result from the programmed cell death. Interestingly, proportion of identified microDNA sequences has common loci of origin when compared between cell line experiments. While compatible with the original observation that microDNAs originate from a normal physiological process, obtained results imply complementary source of its production. Furthermore, non-random genesis of microDNAs depicted by redundancy between samples makes these entities possible candidates for new biomarker generation. PMID:28877255

  11. Porcine circovirus type 2 morphogenesis in a clone derived from the l35 lymphoblastoid cell line.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cariño, C; Duffy, C; Sánchez-Chardi, A; McNeilly, F; Allan, G M; Segalés, J

    2011-01-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is the essential infectious agent of post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS), one of the most important diseases of swine. Although several studies have described different biological properties of the virus, some aspects of its replication cycle, including ultrastructural alterations, remain unknown. The aim of the present study was to describe for the first time a complete morphogenesis study of PCV2 in a clone of the lymphoblastoid L35 cell line at the ultrastructural level using electron microscopy techniques. Cells were infected with PCV2 at a multiplicity of infection of 10 and examined at 0, 6, 12, 24, 48, 60 and 72h post-infection. PCV2 was internalized by endocytosis, after which the virus aggregated in intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies (ICIs). Subsequently, PCV2 was closely associated with mitochondria, completing a first cytoplasmic phase. The virus entered the nucleus for replication and virus assembly and encapsidation occurred with the participation of the nuclear membrane. Immature virions left the nucleus and formed ICIs in a second cytoplasmic phase. The results suggest that at the end of the replication cycle (between 24 and 48h), PCV2 was released either by budding of mature virion clusters or by lysis of apoptotic or dead cells. In conclusion, the L35-derived clone represents a suitable in-vitro model for PCV2 morphogenesis studies and characterization of the PCV2 replication cycle.

  12. Lithium-induced Clock Gene Expression in Lymphoblastoid Cells of Bipolar Affective Patients.

    PubMed

    Kittel-Schneider, S; Schreck, S; Ziegler, C; Weißflog, L; Hilscher, M; Schwarz, R; Schnetzler, L; Neuner, M; Reif, A

    2015-07-01

    Disturbances of circadian rhythms occur in all episodes of bipolar disorder (BD). Lithium, as gold-standard in the maintenance treatment of BD, is known to influence circadian processes. In a pilot study lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) were generated from 8 BD patients and 6 healthy controls. The LCLs were treated with lithiumchloride (LiCl) for 3 weeks. Cell cycles were then synchronized and expressional analysis by quantitative Real Time PCR was done. BD and controls differed in the period length regarding DBP (albumin D-box binding protein) expression and DBP expression was also influenced by lithium treatment. Furthermore, baseline DBP expression was significantly different between non-treated BD and healthy controls. None of the other analyzed circadian genes showed to be influenced by chronic lithium treatment or to be differentially regulated due to the diagnosis. We here show that chronic lithium treatment of LCLs leads to decreased expression of the clock gene DBP, rendering DBP a lithium-regulated gene. We could confirm the role of the circadian clock as well in lithium mode of action as in the pathomechanisms of BD although future studies with a greater number of participants and cell lines are needed. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Proteomic analysis of lymphoblastoid cells derived from monozygotic twins discordant for bipolar disorder: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Kazuno, An-a; Ohtawa, Kenji; Otsuki, Kaori; Usui, Masaya; Sugawara, Hiroko; Okazaki, Yuji; Kato, Tadafumi

    2013-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a severe mental illness characterized by recurrent manic and depressive episodes. In bipolar disorder, family and twin studies suggest contributions from genetic and environmental factors; however, the detailed molecular pathogenesis is yet unknown. Thus, identification of biomarkers may contribute to the clinical diagnosis of bipolar disorder. Monozygotic twins discordant for bipolar disorder are relatively rare but have been reported. Here we performed a comparative proteomic analysis of whole cell lysate derived from lymphoblastoid cells of monozygotic twins discordant for bipolar disorder by using two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE). We found approximately 200 protein spots to be significantly differentially expressed between the patient and the co-twin (t test, p<0.05). Some of the proteins were subsequently identified by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and included proteins involved in cell death and glycolysis. To examine whether these proteins could serve as biomarkers of bipolar disorder, we performed Western blot analysis using case-control samples. Expression of phosphoglycerate mutase 1 (PGAM1), which is involved in glycolysis, was significantly up-regulated in patients with bipolar disorder (t test, p<0.05). Although PGAM1 cannot be regarded as a qualified biomarker of bipolar disorder from this preliminary finding, it could be one of the candidates for further study to identify biomarkers of bipolar disorder.

  14. Diarylheptanoids from Alpinia officinarum Cause Distinct but Overlapping Effects on the Translatome of B Lymphoblastoid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kakegawa, Tomohito; Takase, Saeko; Masubuchi, Eri; Yasukawa, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Diarylheptanoids (AO-0001, AO-0002, and AO-0003) isolated from Alpinia officinarum inhibit proinflammatory mediators and exhibit cytotoxic and antiviral activity. However, the precise mechanisms of action of these diarylheptanoids are unknown as are their effects on expression of specific genes. Here, we used a translatome analysis to investigate the mechanisms and modes of action of these three diarylheptanoids. Polysome-associated messenger RNAs (mRNAs) were prepared from diarylheptanoids-treated and control cells from a human B lymphoblastoid cell line; these mRNA samples were then used for microarray analysis. Microarray Data Analysis Tool version 3.2 was used to analyze the microarray data analysis; this software uses pathway information of the WikiPathways for gene ontology analysis. Each of the diarylheptanoids caused upregulation or downregulation of the same 37 and 286 genes, respectively. Among the 37 upregulated genes, 16 were related to mRNA processing based on the WikiPathways analysis. Our findings provided new insights into the mode of action of diarylheptanoids from A. officinarum. PMID:25254051

  15. Arsenite exposure in human lymphoblastoid cell lines induces autophagy and coordinated induction of lysosomal genes.

    PubMed

    Bolt, Alicia M; Douglas, Randi M; Klimecki, Walter T

    2010-11-30

    Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic is associated with diverse, complex diseases, making the identification of the mechanism underlying arsenic-induced toxicity a challenge. An increasing body of literature from epidemiological and in vitro studies has demonstrated that arsenic is an immunotoxicant, but the mechanism driving arsenic-induced immunotoxicity is not well established. We have previously demonstrated that in human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), arsenic-induced cell death is strongly associated with the induction of autophagy. In this study we utilized genome-wide gene expression analysis and functional assays to characterize arsenic-induced effects in seven LCLs that were exposed to an environmentally relevant, minimally cytotoxic, concentration of arsenite (0.75 μM) over an eight-day time course. Arsenic exposure resulted in inhibition of cellular growth and induction of autophagy (measured by expansion of acidic vesicles) over the eight-day exposure duration. Gene expression analysis revealed that arsenic exposure increased global lysosomal gene expression, which was associated with increased functional activity of the lysosome protease, cathepsin D. The arsenic-induced expansion of the lysosomal compartment in LCL represents a novel target that may offer insight into the immunotoxic effects of arsenic.

  16. Lymphoblastoid interferon-alpha inhibits T cell proliferation and expression of eosinophil-activating cytokines.

    PubMed

    Krishnaswamy, G; Smith, J K; Srikanth, S; Chi, D S; Kalbfleisch, J H; Huang, S K

    1996-10-01

    T cell-derived cytokines, such as interleukin-5 (IL-5) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) activate eosinophils, whereas other cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and IL-13, determine eosinophil recruitment. Interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha), a leukocyte-derived cytokine, has been shown to have beneficial effects in eosinophil-mediated disorders, such as the hypereosinophilic syndrome and a murine model of allergic asthma, where it inhibited eosinophil recruitment. We tested the hypothesis that IFN-alpha acted in eosinophil-mediated disorders by modulating T cell cytokine expression. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or human ragweed-specific TH1 (2B8) and TH2 (2D2) T cell clones were cultured in the presence of 5 micrograms/ml of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or 25 micrograms/ml of antigen Amb a 1 (short ragweed allergen), respectively, and lymphoblastoid IFN-alpha (varying from 0 to 10,000 U/ml). We assessed T cell proliferation by [3H]thymidine incorporation and production of IL-5 and GM-CSF by ELISA. Expression of cytokine transcripts was analyzed by the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction technique (RT-PCR). IFN-alpha induced a dose-dependent suppression of T cell proliferation of both PBMC (p < 0.001) and the T cell clones (p < 0.001). IFN-alpha inhibited gene expression of IL-5, GM-CSF, TNF-alpha, and IL-13 in PBMC. Furthermore, IFN-alpha significantly inhibited mitogen-induced and antigen-induced production of IL-5 and GM-CSF. IFN-alpha may benefit eosinophil-mediated disorders by inhibiting T cell function and production of cytokines active on human eosinophils.

  17. Integration sites of Epstein-Barr virus genome on chromosomes of human lymphoblastoid cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Wuu, K.D.; Chen, Y.J.; Wang-Wuu, S.

    1994-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is the pathogen of infectious mononucleosis. The viral genome is present in more than 95% of the African cases of Burkitt lymphoma and it is usually maintained in episomal form in the tumor cells. Viral integration has been described only for Nanalwa which is a Burkitt lymphoma cell line lacking episomes. In order to examine the role of EBV in the immortalization of human Blymphocytes, we investigated whether the EBV integration into the human genome is essential. If the integration does occur, we would like to know whether the integration is randomly distributed or whether the viral DNA integrates preferentially at certain sites. Fourteen in vitro immortalized human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) were examined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a biotinylated EBV BamHI w DNA fragment as probe. The episomal form of EBV DNA was found in all cells of these cell lines, while only about 65% of the cells have the integrated viral DNA. This might suggest that integration is not a pre-requisite for cell immortalization. Although all chromosomes, except Y, have been found with integrated viral genome, chromsomes 1 and 5 are the most frequent EBV DNA carrier (p<0.05). Nine chromosome bands, namely, 1p31, 1q31, 2q32, 3q13, 3q26, 5q14, 6q24, 7q31 and 12q21, are preferential targets for EBV integration (p<0.001). Eighty percent of the total 938 EBV hybridization signals were found to be at G-band-positive area. This suggests that the mechanism of EBV integration might be different from that of the retroviruses, which specifically integrate to G-band-negative areas. Thus, we conclude that the integration of EBV to host genome is non-random and it may have something to do with the structure of chromosome and DNA sequences.

  18. A combination of in vitro comet assay and micronucleus test using human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Aoi; Miyata, Atsuro; Honma, Masamitsu

    2013-09-01

    The comet assay has been widely used as a genotoxicity test for detecting primary DNA damage in individual cells. The micronucleus (MN) test is also a well-established assay for detecting clastogenicity and aneugenicity. A combination of the comet assay (COM) and MN test is capable of detecting a variety of genotoxic potentials as an in vitro screening system. Although the in vitro MN test has a robust protocol and Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) test guideline, the in vitro COM does not. To establish a robust protocol for the COM and to compare its sensitivity with that of the MN, we conducted COM and MN concurrently for five genotoxic agents (ethyl methanesulfonate, methyl methanesulfonate, hydrogen peroxide, gamma-rays and mitomycin C) and one non-genotoxic agent (triton X-100), using human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells. Relative cell count (RCC), relative population doubling (RPD), relative increase in cell count (RICC) and relative cell viability determined by trypan blue dye-exclusion assay (TBDE) were employed as cytotoxic measurements. However, the relative cell viability determined by TBDE just after the treatment was not an appropriate parameter of cytotoxicity for the genotoxic agents because it remained constant even at the highest doses, which showed severe cytotoxicity by RCC, RPD and RICC. The results of the COM showed qualitative agreement (positive or negative) with those of the MN except for mitomycin C, which is an interstrand cross-linker. The COM always required higher doses than the MN to detect the genotoxic potential of the genotoxic agents under the test conditions applied here. The doses that induced a comet tail always yielded <50% RICC, and do not accord to the OECD test guideline for MN because of their high cytotoxicity. These results are helpful for interpreting the results of the COM and MN in in vitro genotoxic hazard assessments. Further investigation is required to standardise the COM.

  19. IsomiR expression profiles in human lymphoblastoid cell lines exhibit population and gender dependencies.

    PubMed

    Loher, Phillipe; Londin, Eric R; Rigoutsos, Isidore

    2014-09-30

    For many years it was believed that each mature microRNA (miRNA) existed as a single entity with fixed endpoints and a 'static' and unchangeable primary sequence. However, recent evidence suggests that mature miRNAs are more 'dynamic' and that each miRNA precursor arm gives rise to multiple isoforms, the isomiRs. Here we report on our identification of numerous and abundant isomiRs in the lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) of 452 men and women from five different population groups. Unexpectedly, we find that these isomiRs exhibit an expression profile that is population-dependent and gender-dependent. This is important as it indicates that the LCLs of each gender/population combination have their own unique collection of mature miRNA transcripts. Moreover, each identified isomiR has its own characteristic abundance that remains consistent across biological replicates indicating that these are not degradation products. The primary sequences of identified isomiRs differ from the known miRBase miRNA either at their 5´-endpoint (leads to a different 'seed' sequence and suggests a different targetome), their 3´-endpoint, or both simultaneously. Our analysis of Argonaute PAR-CLIP data from LCLs supports the association of many of these newly identified isomiRs with the Argonaute silencing complex and thus their functional roles through participation in the RNA interference pathway.

  20. Epstein-Barr virus genetic variation in lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from Kenyan pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Simbiri, Kenneth O; Smith, Nicholas A; Otieno, Richard; Wohlford, Eric E M; Daud, Ibrahim I; Odada, Sumba P; Middleton, Frank; Rochford, Rosemary

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with Burkitt's lymphoma (BL), and in regions of sub-Saharan Africa where endemic BL is common, both the EBV Type 1 (EBV-1) and EBV Type 2 strains (EBV-2) are found. Little is known about genetic variation of EBV strains in areas of sub-Saharan Africa. In the present study, spontaneous lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) were generated from samples obtained from Kenya. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the EBV genome was done using multiple primers and sequenced by next-generation sequencing (NGS). Phylogenetic analyses against the published EBV-1 and EBV-2 strains indicated that one sample, LCL10 was closely related to EBV-2, while the remaining 3 LCL samples were more closely related to EBV-1. Moreover, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analyses showed clustering of LCL variants. We further show by analysis of EBNA-1, BLLF1, BPLF1, and BRRF2 that latent genes are less conserved than lytic genes in these LCLs from a single geographic region. In this study we have shown that NGS is highly useful for deciphering detailed inter and intra-variations in EBV genomes and that within a geographic region different EBV genetic variations can co-exist, the implications of which warrant further investigation. The findings will enhance our understanding of potential pathogenic variants critical to the development and maintenance of EBV-associated malignancies.

  1. Genome-wide survey of interindividual differences of RNA stability in human lymphoblastoid cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jubao; Shi, Jianxin; Ge, Xijin; Dölken, Lars; Moy, Winton; He, Deli; Shi, Sandra; Sanders, Alan R.; Ross, Jeff; Gejman, Pablo V.

    2013-01-01

    The extent to which RNA stability differs between individuals and its contribution to the interindividual expression variation remain unknown. We conducted a genome-wide analysis of RNA stability in seven human HapMap lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) and analyzed the effect of DNA sequence variation on RNA half-life differences. Twenty-six percent of the expressed genes exhibited RNA half-life differences between LCLs at a false discovery rate (FDR) < 0.05, which accounted for ~ 37% of the gene expression differences between individuals. Nonsense polymorphisms were associated with reduced RNA half-lives. In genes presenting interindividual RNA half-life differences, higher coding GC3 contents (G and C percentages at the third-codon positions) were correlated with increased RNA half-life. Consistently, G and C alleles of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in protein coding sequences were associated with enhanced RNA stability. These results suggest widespread interindividual differences in RNA stability related to DNA sequence and composition variation. PMID:23422947

  2. IsomiR expression profiles in human lymphoblastoid cell lines exhibit population and gender dependencies

    PubMed Central

    Loher, Phillipe; Londin, Eric R.; Rigoutsos, Isidore

    2014-01-01

    For many years it was believed that each mature microRNA (miRNA) existed as a single entity with fixed endpoints and a ‘static’ and unchangeable primary sequence. However, recent evidence suggests that mature miRNAs are more ‘dynamic’ and that each miRNA precursor arm gives rise to multiple isoforms, the isomiRs. Here we report on our identification of numerous and abundant isomiRs in the lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) of 452 men and women from five different population groups. Unexpectedly, we find that these isomiRs exhibit an expression profile that is population-dependent and gender-dependent. This is important as it indicates that the LCLs of each gender/population combination have their own unique collection of mature miRNA transcripts. Moreover, each identified isomiR has its own characteristic abundance that remains consistent across biological replicates indicating that these are not degradation products. The primary sequences of identified isomiRs differ from the known miRBase miRNA either at their 5´-endpoint (leads to a different ‘seed’ sequence and suggests a different targetome), their 3´-endpoint, or both simultaneously. Our analysis of Argonaute PAR-CLIP data from LCLs supports the association of many of these newly identified isomiRs with the Argonaute silencing complex and thus their functional roles through participation in the RNA interference pathway. PMID:25229428

  3. Arsenite-induced autophagy is associated with proteotoxicity in human lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Bolt, Alicia M; Zhao, Fei; Pacheco, Samantha; Klimecki, Walter T

    2012-10-15

    Epidemiological studies of arsenic-exposed populations have provided evidence that arsenic exposure in humans is associated with immunosuppression. Previously, we have reported that arsenite-induced toxicity is associated with the induction of autophagy in human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL). Autophagy is a cellular process that functions in the degradation of damaged cellular components, including protein aggregates formed by misfolded or damaged proteins. Accumulation of misfolded or damaged proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen causes ER stress and activates the unfolded protein response (UPR). In an effort to investigate the mechanism of autophagy induction by arsenite in the LCL model, we examined the potential contribution of ER stress and activation of the UPR. LCL exposed to sodium arsenite for 8-days induced expression of UPR-activated genes, including CHOP and GRP78, at the RNA and the protein level. Evidence for activation of the three arms of the UPR was observed. The arsenite-induced activation of the UPR was associated with an accumulation of protein aggregates containing p62 and LC3, proteins with established roles in the sequestration and autophagic clearance of protein aggregates. Taken together, these data provide evidence that arsenite-induced autophagy is associated with the generation of ER stress, activation of the UPR, and formation of protein aggregates that may be targeted to the lysosome for degradation.

  4. Biscoclaurine alkaloid cepharanthine protects DNA in TK6 lymphoblastoid cells from constitutive oxidative damage

    PubMed Central

    Halicka, H. Dorota; Ita, Masamichi; Tanaka, Toshiki; Kurose, Akira; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2008-01-01

    Cepharanthine (CEP), a biscoclaurine (bisbenzylisoquinoline) alkaloid isolated from Stephania cepharantha Hayata, is widely used in Japan to treat variety of diseases. Among a plethora of its biological activities CEP was reported to be able to scavenge radicals and prevent lipid peroxidation. We have recently described the phenomenon of constitutive ATM activation (CAA) and histone H2AX phosphorylation (CHP), the events that report DNA damage induced by endogenously generated radicals, the product of oxidative metabolism in otherwise healthy, untreated cells. The aim of the present study was to explore whether CEP can attenuate the level of CAA and CHP, which would indicate on its ability to protect DNA against endogenous oxidants. The data show that indeed the levels of CAA and CHP in human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells were distinctly lowered upon treatment with CEP. Thus, exposure of cells to 8.3 μM CEP for 4 h led to a reduction of the mean level of CAA and CHP by up to 60% and 50%, respectively. At 1.7 μM CEP the reduction of CAA and CHP after 4 h was 35% and 25%, respectively. Cells exposure to CEP led to a decrease in the level of ondogenous oxidants as measured by the ability to oxidate the fluorescent probe 5-(and-6)-carboxy-2′,7′-dichlorodihydro-fluorescein diacetate. No evidence of apoptosis was seen during the first 8 h of treatment with CEP but initiation of apoptosis (caspase-3 activation) was detected in relatively few (< 10%) cells after exposure to 8.3 μM CEP for 24 h. The data strongly suggest that the scavenging properties of CEP provide a protection of DNA from the radicals generated endogenously during oxidative metabolism. PMID:18276990

  5. Effects of inorganic and organic arsenic compounds on growth and apoptosis of human T-lymphoblastoid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Hikita, Eri; Arai, Mariko; Tanaka, Sachiko; Onda, Kenji; Utsumi, Hiroya; Yuan, Bo; Toyoda, Hiroo; Hirano, Toshihiko

    2011-12-01

    To investigate the effects of inorganic and organic arsenic compounds on human T-lymphoblastoid leukemia cells. Cell proliferation was analyzed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5¬diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Apoptotic cell morphology was examined by cell staining with Hoechst 33342. Cellular caspase-3/7 activities were measured after arsenic treatment. The inhibitory concentration by 50% (IC(50)) values of As(2)O(3) towards MOLT-4 and daunorubicin- resistant MOLT-4/DNR cell proliferation were 0.87 and 0.92 μM, while the values for arsenic acid were 69.1 and 116.6 μM, respectively. These arsenic compounds also inhibited mitogen-induced proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Six organic arsenic compounds did not inhibit leukemia cell proliferation. As(2)O(3) and arsenic acid induced apoptotic cell morphology and increased caspase-3/7 activity in the leukemia cells. Ascorbic acid and buthionine sulfoxide enhanced, while N-acetyl-L-cysteine abated, the suppressive effects of inorganic arsenic compounds on leukemia cell proliferation. As(2)O(3) and arsenic acid inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in MOLT-4 and daunorubicine-resistant MOLT-4/DNR cells via glutathione-depletion and subsequent caspase-3/7 activation. Organic arsenic compounds have no inhibitory activity on the leukemia cell proliferation. Inorganic arsenic compounds are suggested as useful agents for treatment of T-lymphoblastoid leukemia.

  6. Distinct lithium-induced gene expression effects in lymphoblastoid cell lines from patients with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Fries, Gabriel R; Colpo, Gabriela D; Monroy-Jaramillo, Nancy; Zhao, Junfei; Zhao, Zhongming; Arnold, Jodi G; Bowden, Charles L; Walss-Bass, Consuelo

    2017-09-19

    Lithium is the most commonly prescribed medication for the treatment of bipolar disorder (BD), yet the mechanisms underlying its beneficial effects are still unclear. We aimed to compare the effects of lithium treatment in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from BD patients and controls. LCLs were generated from sixty-two BD patients (based on DSM-IV) and seventeen healthy controls matched for age, sex, and ethnicity. Patients were recruited from outpatient clinics from February 2012 to October 2014. LCLs were treated with 1mM lithium for 7 days followed by microarray gene expression assay and validation by real-time quantitative PCR. Baseline differences between groups, as well as differences between vehicle- and lithium-treated cells within each group were analyzed. The biological significance of differentially expressed genes was examined by pathway enrichment analysis. No significant differences in baseline gene expression (adjusted p-value < 0.05) were detected between groups. Lithium treatment of LCLs from controls did not lead to any significant differences. However, lithium altered the expression of 236 genes in LCLs from patients; those genes were enriched for signaling pathways related to apoptosis. Among those genes, the alterations in the expression of PIK3CG, SERP1 and UPP1 were validated by real-time PCR. A significant correlation was also found between circadian functioning and CEBPG and FGF2 expression levels. In summary, our results suggest that lithium treatment induces expression changes in genes associated with the apoptosis pathway in BD LCLs. The more pronounced effects of lithium in patients compared to controls suggest a disease-specific effect of this drug. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  7. Forward subtractive libraries containing genes transactivated by dexamethasone in ataxia-telangiectasia lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Biagiotti, Sara; Menotta, Michele; Giacomini, Elisa; Radici, Lucia; Bianchi, Marzia; Bozzao, Cristina; Chessa, Luciana; Magnani, Mauro

    2014-07-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by biallelic mutations in the Ataxia Telangiectasia-mutated gene. A-T shows a complex phenotype ranging from early-onset progressive neurodegeneration to immunodeficiencies, high incidence of infections, and tumors. Unfortunately, no therapy is up to now available for treating this condition. Recently, the short term treatment of ataxia-telangiectasia patients with glucocorticoids was shown to improve their neurological symptoms and possibly reverse cerebellar atrophy. Thus, corticosteroids represent an attractive approach for the treatment of this neurodegenerative disease. However, the molecular mechanism involved in glucocorticoid action in A-T is yet unknown. The aim of our work is to construct cDNA libraries containing those genes which are transactivated by the glucocorticoid analogue, dexamethasone, in A-T human cells. For this purpose, suppression subtractive hybridization has been performed on ATM-null lymphoblastoid cell transcriptome extracted following drug administration. Annotation of whole genes contained in the libraries has been obtained by coupling subtractive hybridization with microarray analysis. Positive transcripts have been validated by quantitative PCR. Through in silico analyses, identified genes have been classified on the basis of the pathway in which they are involved, being able to address signaling required for dexamethasone action. Most of the induced transcripts are involved in metabolic processes and regulation of cellular processes. Our results can help to unravel the mechanism of glucocorticoid action in the reversion of A-T phenotype. Moreover, the induction of a specific region of the ATM transcript has been identified as putative biomarker predictive of dexamethasone efficacy on ataxic patients.

  8. Effects of Modeled Microgravity on Expression Profiles of Micro RNA in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangala, Lingegowda S.; Emami, Kamal; Story, Michael; Ramesh, Govindarajan; Rohde, Larry; Wu, Honglu

    2010-01-01

    Among space radiation and other environmental factors, microgravity or an altered gravity is undoubtedly the most significant stress experienced by living organisms during flight. In comparison to the static 1g, microgravity has been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels in cultured cells or animals. Micro RNA (miRNA) has recently emerged as an important regulator of gene expression, possibly regulating as many as one-third of all human genes. miRNA represents a class of single-stranded noncoding regulatory RNA molecules ( 22 nt) that control gene expressions by inhibiting the translation of mRNA to proteins. However, very little is known on the effect of altered gravity on miRNA expression. We hypothesized that the miRNA expression profile will be altered in zero gravity resulting in regulation of the gene expression and functional changes of the cells. To test this hypothesis, we cultured TK6 human lymphoblastoid cells in Synthecon s Rotary cell culture system (bioreactors) for 72 h either in the rotating (10 rpm) to model the microgravity in space or in the static condition. The cell viability was determined before and after culturing the cells in the bioreactor using both trypan blue and guava via count. Expressions of a panel of 352 human miRNA were analyzed using the miRNA PCRarray. Out of 352 miRNAs, expressions of 75 were significantly altered by a change of greater than 1.5 folds and seven miRNAs were altered by a fold change greater than 2 under the rotating culture condition. Among these seven, miR-545 and miR-517a were down regulated by 2 folds, whereas miR-150, miR-302a, miR-139-3p, miR-515-3p and miR-564 were up regulated by 2 to 8 folds. To confirm whether this altered miRNA expression correlates with gene expression and functional changes of the cells, we performed DNA Illumina Microarray Analysis and validated the related genes using q-RT PCR.

  9. Oxidative stress induces mitochondrial dysfunction in a subset of autistic lymphoblastoid cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Rose, S; Frye, R E; Slattery, J; Wynne, R; Tippett, M; Melnyk, S; James, S J

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing recognition that mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with autism spectrum disorders. However, little attention has been given to the etiology of mitochondrial dysfunction and how mitochondrial abnormalities might interact with other physiological disturbances such as oxidative stress. Reserve capacity is a measure of the ability of the mitochondria to respond to physiological stress. In this study, we demonstrate, for the first time, that lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) derived from children with autistic disorder (AD) have an abnormal mitochondrial reserve capacity before and after exposure to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Ten (44%) of 22 AD LCLs exhibited abnormally high reserve capacity at baseline and a sharp depletion of reserve capacity when challenged with ROS. This depletion of reserve capacity was found to be directly related to an atypical simultaneous increase in both proton-leak respiration and adenosine triphosphate-linked respiration in response to increased ROS in this AD LCL subgroup. In this AD LCL subgroup, 48-hour pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine, a glutathione precursor, prevented these abnormalities and improved glutathione metabolism, suggesting a role for altered glutathione metabolism associated with this type of mitochondrial dysfunction. The results of this study suggest that a significant subgroup of AD children may have alterations in mitochondrial function, which could render them more vulnerable to a pro-oxidant microenvironment as well as intrinsic and extrinsic sources of ROS such as immune activation and pro-oxidant environmental toxins. These findings are consistent with the notion that AD is caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. PMID:24690598

  10. Arsenite-induced autophagy is associated with proteotoxicity in human lymphoblastoid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bolt, Alicia M.; Zhao, Fei; Pacheco, Samantha; Klimecki, Walter T.

    2012-10-15

    Epidemiological studies of arsenic-exposed populations have provided evidence that arsenic exposure in humans is associated with immunosuppression. Previously, we have reported that arsenite-induced toxicity is associated with the induction of autophagy in human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL). Autophagy is a cellular process that functions in the degradation of damaged cellular components, including protein aggregates formed by misfolded or damaged proteins. Accumulation of misfolded or damaged proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen causes ER stress and activates the unfolded protein response (UPR). In an effort to investigate the mechanism of autophagy induction by arsenite in the LCL model, we examined the potential contribution of ER stress and activation of the UPR. LCL exposed to sodium arsenite for 8-days induced expression of UPR-activated genes, including CHOP and GRP78, at the RNA and the protein level. Evidence for activation of the three arms of the UPR was observed. The arsenite-induced activation of the UPR was associated with an accumulation of protein aggregates containing p62 and LC3, proteins with established roles in the sequestration and autophagic clearance of protein aggregates. Taken together, these data provide evidence that arsenite-induced autophagy is associated with the generation of ER stress, activation of the UPR, and formation of protein aggregates that may be targeted to the lysosome for degradation. -- Highlights: ► Arsenite induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response. ► Arsenite induces the formation of protein aggregates that contain p62 and LC3-II. ► Time-course data suggests that arsenite-induced autophagy precedes ER stress.

  11. Mutagenic adaptive response to high-LET radiation in human lymphoblastoid cells exposed to X-rays.

    PubMed

    Varès, Guillaume; Wang, Bing; Tanaka, Kaoru; Kakimoto, Ayana; Eguchi-Kasai, Kyomi; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2011-01-10

    The ability of cells to adapt low-dose or low-dose rate radiation is well known. High-LET radiation has unique characteristics, and the data concerning low doses effects and high-LET radiation remain fragmented. In this study, we assessed in vitro the ability of low doses of X-rays to induce an adaptive response (AR) to a subsequent challenging dose of heavy-ion radiation. Lymphoblastoid cells (TK6, AHH-1, NH32) were exposed to priming 0.02-0.1Gy X-rays, followed 6h later by challenging 1Gy heavy-ion radiation (carbon-ion: 20 and 40keV/μm, neon-ion: 150keV/μm). Pre-exposure of p53-competent cells resulted in decreased mutation frequencies at hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus and different H2AX phosphorylation kinetics, as compared to cells exposed to challenging radiation alone. This phenomenon did not seem to be linked with cell cycle effects or radiation-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our results suggested the existence of an AR to mutagenic effects of heavy-ion radiation in lymphoblastoid cells and the involvement of double-strand break repair mechanisms.

  12. Genetic instability in lymphoblastoid cell lines expressing biallelic and monoallelic variants in the human MUTYH gene.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Francesca; Giacomini, Elisa; Sanchez, Massimo; Degan, Paolo; Gismondi, Viviana; Mazzei, Filomena; Varesco, Liliana; Viel, Alessandra; Bignami, Margherita

    2014-07-15

    The MUTYH DNA glycosylase counteracts mutagenesis by removing adenine misincorporated opposite DNA 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG). Biallelic germline mutations in MUTYH cause the autosomal recessive MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP). The impact on genetic instability of the p.Tyr179Cys and p.Arg245His MUTYH variants was evaluated in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) derived from MAP patients and their relatives in comparison to wild-type LCLs. No difference in MUTYH expression was identified between wild type and LCLs with the p.Tyr179Cys, while the p.Arg245His mutation was associated with an unstable MUTYH protein. LCLs homozygous for the p.Tyr179Cys or the p.Arg245His variant contained increased DNA 8-oxodG levels and exhibited a mutator phenotype at the PIG-A gene. The extent of the increased spontaneous mutation frequency was 3-fold (range 1.6- to 4.6-fold) in four independent LCLs carrying the p.Tyr179Cys variant, while a larger increase (6-fold) was observed in two p.Arg245His LCLs. A similar hypermutability and S-phase delay following treatment with KBrO3 was observed in LCLs homozygous for either variant. When genetic instability was investigated in monoallelic p.Arg245His carriers, mutant frequencies showed an increase which is intermediate between wild-type and homozygous cells, whereas the mutator effect in heterozygous p.Tyr179Cys LCLs was similar to that in homozygotes. These findings indicate that the type of MUTYH mutation can affect the extent of genome instability associated with MUTYH inactivation. In addition, the mild spontaneous mutator phenotype observed in monoallelic carriers highlights the biological importance of this gene in the protection of the genome against endogenous DNA damage. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Identification of low-dose responsive metabolites in X-irradiated human B lymphoblastoid cells and fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Tsuyama, Naohiro; Mizuno, Hajime; Katafuchi, Atsushi; Abe, Yu; Kurosu, Yumiko; Yoshida, Mitsuaki; Kamiya, Kenji; Sakai, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) induces cellular stress responses, such as signal transduction, gene expression, protein modification, and metabolite change that affect cellular behavior. We analyzed X-irradiated human Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B lymphoblastoid cells and normal fibroblasts to search for metabolites that would be suitable IR-responsive markers by Liquid Chromotography–Mass spectrometry (LC–MS). Mass spectra, as analyzed with principal component analysis, showed that the proportion of peaks with IR-induced change was relatively small compared with the influence of culture time. Dozens of peaks that had either been upregulated or downregulated by IR were extracted as candidate IR markers. The IR-changed peaks were identified by comparing mock-treated groups to 100 mGy-irradiated groups that had recovered after 10 h, and the results indicated that the metabolites involved in nucleoside synthesis increased and that some acylcarnitine levels decreased in B lymphoblastoids. Some peaks changed by as much as 20 mGy, indicating the presence of an IR-sensitive signal transduction/metabolism control mechanism in these cells. On the other hand, we could not find common IR-changed peaks in fibroblasts of different origin. These data suggest that cell phenotype-specific pathways exist, even in low-dose responses, and could determine cell behavior. PMID:25227127

  14. Effects of soluble and particulate Cr(VI) on genome-wide DNA methylation in human B lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jianlin; Wang, Yu; Chen, Junqiang; Ju, Li; Yu, Min; Jiang, Zhaoqiang; Feng, Lingfang; Jin, Lingzhi; Zhang, Xing

    2015-10-01

    Several previous studies highlighted the potential epigenetic effects of Cr(VI), especially DNA methylation. However, few studies have compared the effects of Cr(VI) on DNA methylation profiles between soluble and particulate chromate in vitro. Accordingly, Illumina Infinium Human Methylation 450K BeadChip array was used to analyze DNA methylation profiles of human B lymphoblastoid cells exposed to potassium dichromate or lead chromate, and the cell viability was also studied. Array based DNA methylation analysis showed that the impacts of Cr(VI) on DNA methylation were limited, only about 40 differentially methylated CpG sites, with an overlap of 15CpG sites, were induced by both potassium dichromate and lead chromate. The results of mRNA expression showed that after Cr(VI) treatment, mRNA expression changes of four genes (TBL1Y, FZD5, IKZF2, and KIAA1949) were consistent with their DNA methylation alteration, but DNA methylation changes of other six genes did not correlate with mRNA expression. In conclusion, both of soluble and particulate Cr(VI) could induce a small amount of differentially methylated sites in human B lymphoblastoid cells, and the correlations between DNA methylation changes and mRNA expression varied between different genes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of cell-derived growth factors and cytokines on the clonal outgrowth of EBV-infected B cells and established lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ifversen, P; Zhang, X M; Ohlin, M; Zeuthen, J; Borrebaeck, C A

    1993-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a potent inducer of polyclonal B lymphocyte proliferation and is widely used as a tool for the establishment of B cell lines producing human monoclonal antibodies. However, because of low transformability, low clonability, and the inherent instability of EBV-infected B cells, valuable antibody-producing B cells are often lost during this procedure. We have here examined various cell-derived cytokines for their ability to enhance both the cellular outgrowth of newly infected B cells and the clonability of infected B cells and lymphoblastoid cell lines. Our results show that the murine thymoma cell line EL-4 is superior to peripheral blood mononuclear cells in both cellular outgrowth and cloning experiments, whereas monocyte-derived factors and monocyte cell lines were less capable than peripheral blood mononuclear cells in enhancing cellular outgrowth and cloning. Furthermore, the human T cell hybridoma cell line MP6 that secretes a B cell growth and differentiation factor, recently identified as an isoform of thioredoxin, is also capable of stimulating EBV-infected B cells and lymphoblastoid cell lines. Co-cultivation of EBV-infected B cells with MP6 cells significantly enhanced the cloning efficiency at the 1 cell/well level. The present results also suggest that one potential role of the MP6-derived thioredoxin could be the up regulation of IL-6 receptor expression in EBV-infected B cells.

  16. Protein degradation in a LAMP-2-deficient B-lymphoblastoid cell line from a patient with Danon disease.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Lanzas, Raul; Alvarez-Castelao, Beatriz; Bermejo, Teresa; Ayuso, Teresa; Tuñón, Teresa; Castaño, José G

    2016-08-01

    Danon disease, a condition characterized by cardiomyopathy, myopathy, and intellectual disability, is caused by mutations in the LAMP-2 gene. Lamp-2A protein, generated by alternative splicing from the Lamp-2 pre-mRNA, is reported to be the lysosomal membrane receptor essential for the chaperone-mediated autophagic pathway (CMA) aimed to selective protein targeting and translocation into the lysosomal lumen for degradation. To study the relevance of Lamp-2 in protein degradation, a lymphoblastoid cell line was obtained by EBV transformation of B-cells from a Danon patient. The derived cell line showed no significant expression of Lamp-2 protein. The steady-state mRNA and protein levels of alpha-synuclein, IΚBα, Rcan1, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, four proteins reported to be selective substrates of the CMA pathway, were similar in control and Lamp-2-deficient cells. Inhibition of protein synthesis showed that the half-life of alpha-synuclein, IΚBα, and Rcan1 was similar in control and Lamp-2-deficient cells, and its degradation prevented by proteasome inhibitors. Both in control and Lamp-2-deficient cells, induction of CMA and macroautophagy by serum and aminoacid starvation of cells for 8h produced a similar decrease in IΚBα and Rcan1 protein levels and was prevented by the addition of lysosome and autophagy inhibitors. In conclusion, the results presented here showed that Lamp-2 deficiency in human lymphoblastoid cells did not modify the steady-state levels or the degradation of several protein substrates reported as selective substrates of the CMA pathway.

  17. Gene expression analysis of whole blood, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and lymphoblastoid cell lines from the Framingham Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Joehanes, Roby; Johnson, Andrew D.; Barb, Jennifer J.; Raghavachari, Nalini; Liu, Poching; Woodhouse, Kimberly A.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Munson, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Despite a growing number of reports of gene expression analysis from blood-derived RNA sources, there have been few systematic comparisons of various RNA sources in transcriptomic analysis or for biomarker discovery in the context of cardiovascular disease (CVD). As a pilot study of the Systems Approach to Biomarker Research (SABRe) in CVD Initiative, this investigation used Affymetrix Exon arrays to characterize gene expression of three blood-derived RNA sources: lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL), whole blood using PAXgene tubes (PAX), and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Their performance was compared in relation to identifying transcript associations with sex and CVD risk factors, such as age, high-density lipoprotein, and smoking status, and the differential blood cell count. We also identified a set of exons that vary substantially between participants, but consistently in each RNA source. Such exons are thus stable phenotypes of the participant and may potentially become useful fingerprinting biomarkers. In agreement with previous studies, we found that each of the RNA sources is distinct. Unlike PAX and PBMC, LCL gene expression showed little association with the differential blood count. LCL, however, was able to detect two genes related to smoking status. PAX and PBMC identified Y-chromosome probe sets similarly and slightly better than LCL. PMID:22045913

  18. Lymphoblastoid Cell lines: a Continuous in Vitro Source of Cells to Study Carcinogen Sensitivity and DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Tabish; Mulherkar, Rita

    2012-01-01

    Obtaining a continuous source of normal cells or DNA from a single individual has always been a rate limiting step in biomedical research. Availability of Lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) as a surrogate for isolated or cryopreserved peripheral blood lymphocytes has substantially accelerated the process of biological investigations. LCLs can be established by in vitro infection of resting B cells from peripheral blood with Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) resulting in a continuous source, bearing negligible genetic and phenotypic alterations. Being a spontaneous replicating source, LCLs fulfil the requirement of constant supply of starting material for variety of assays, sparing the need of re-sampling. There is a reason to believe that LCLs are in close resemblance with the parent lymphocytes based on the ample supporting observations from a variety of studies showing significant level of correlation at molecular and functional level. LCLs, which carry the complete set of germ line genetic material, have been instrumental in general as a source of biomolecules and a system to carry out various immunological and epidemiological studies. Furthermore, in recent times their utility for analysing the whole human genome has extensively been documented. This proves the usefulness of LCLs in various genetic and functional studies. There are a few contradictory reports that have questioned the employment of LCLs as parent surrogate. Regardless of some inherent limitations LCLs are increasingly being considered as an important resource for genetic and functional research. PMID:24551762

  19. Impact of 1.8-GHz radiofrequency radiation (RFR) on DNA damage and repair induced by doxorubicin in human B-cell lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Zhijian, Chen; Xiaoxue, Li; Yezhen, Lu; Shijie, Chen; Lifen, Jin; Jianlin, Lou; Deqiang, Lu; Jiliang, He

    2010-01-01

    In the present in vitro study, a comet assay was used to determine whether 1.8-GHz radiofrequency radiation (RFR, SAR of 2W/kg) can influence DNA repair in human B-cell lymphoblastoid cells exposed to doxorubicin (DOX) at the doses of 0microg/ml, 0.05microg/ml, 0.075microg/ml, 0.10microg/ml, 0.15microg/ml and 0.20microg/ml. The combinative exposures to RFR with DOX were divided into five categories. DNA damage was detected at 0h, 6h, 12h, 18h and 24h after exposure to DOX via the comet assay, and the percent of DNA in the tail (% tail DNA) served as the indicator of DNA damage. The results demonstrated that (1) RFR could not directly induce DNA damage of human B-cell lymphoblastoid cells; (2) DOX could significantly induce DNA damage of human B-cell lymphoblastoid cells with the dose-effect relationship, and there were special repair characteristics of DNA damage induced by DOX; (3) E-E-E type (exposure to RFR for 2h, then simultaneous exposure to RFR and DOX, and exposure to RFR for 6h, 12h, 18h and 24h after exposure to DOX) combinative exposure could obviously influence DNA repair at 6h and 12h after exposure to DOX for four DOX doses (0.075microg/ml, 0.10microg/ml, 0.15microg/ml and 0.20microg/ml) in human B-cell lymphoblastoid cells. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A genome-wide association analysis of temozolomide response using lymphoblastoid cell lines reveals a clinically relevant association with MGMT

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Chad C.; Havener, Tammy M.; Medina, Marisa Wong; Auman, J. Todd; Mangravite, Lara M.; Krauss, Ronald M.; McLeod, Howard L.; Motsinger-Reif, Alison A.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) have emerged as an innovative model system for mapping gene variants that predict dose response to chemotherapy drugs. In the current study, this strategy was expanded to the in vitro genome-wide association approach, using 516 LCLs derived from a Caucasian cohort to assess cytotoxic response to temozolomide. Genome-wide association analysis using approximately 2.1 million quality controlled single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified a statistically significant association (p < 10−8) with SNPs in the O6-methylguanine–DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene. We also demonstrate that the primary SNP in this region is significantly associated with differential gene expression of MGMT (p< 10−26) in LCLs, and differential methylation in glioblastoma samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas. The previously documented clinical and functional relationships between MGMT and temozolomide response highlight the potential of well-powered GWAS of the LCL model system to identify meaningful genetic associations. PMID:23047291

  1. [Growth factor production and autocrine mechanism of cell proliferation regulation in the RPMI-6410t lymphoblastoid line].

    PubMed

    Seregina, T M; Mekshenkov, M I

    1988-03-01

    The human lymphoblastoid B-cell line RPMI-6410t was found to synthesize and secrete into the growth medium a factor necessary to maintain the reproduction of these cells. In the condition of low plating density (concentration 1-1000 cells per ml) cell proliferation can be maintained only in the presence of a definite dose of medium conditioned by 6410t cell growth under high concentration. Using such a medium guaranteed almost 100% cloning efficiency of these cells by the method of limiting dilutions. The cloning of 6410t cells in the presence of feeder cells, such as mouse splenocytes and peritoneal cells, failed. The 6410t cells were shown to bind specifically the growth factor secreted by them, thus suggesting the presence of a growth factor acceptor on their surface. With the help of special selective method some clones were derived which did not secrete growth factor but were likely to have growth factor acceptors on their surface. A comparison of growth properties of clones GF- and GF+ supported the idea of autocrine control of proliferation as one of the mechanisms of malignant cell transformation.

  2. Genome-wide expression profiling of lymphoblastoid cell lines distinguishes different forms of autism and reveals shared pathways.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Yuhei; Martin, Christa L; Vazquez-Lopez, Araceli; Spence, Sarah J; Alvarez-Retuerto, Ana Isabel; Sigman, Marian; Steindler, Corinna; Pellegrini, Sandra; Schanen, N Carolyn; Warren, Stephen T; Geschwind, Daniel H

    2007-07-15

    Autism is a heterogeneous condition that is likely to result from the combined effects of multiple genetic factors interacting with environmental factors. Given its complexity, the study of autism associated with Mendelian single gene disorders or known chromosomal etiologies provides an important perspective. We used microarray analysis to compare the mRNA expression profile in lymphoblastoid cells from males with autism due to a fragile X mutation (FMR1-FM), or a 15q11-q13 duplication (dup(15q)), and non-autistic controls. Gene expression profiles clearly distinguished autism from controls and separated individuals with autism based on their genetic etiology. We identified 68 genes that were dysregulated in common between autism with FMR1-FM and dup(15q). We also identified a potential molecular link between FMR1-FM and dup(15q), the cytoplasmic FMR1 interacting protein 1 (CYFIP1), which was up-regulated in dup(15q) patients. We were able to confirm this link in vitro by showing common regulation of two other dysregulated genes, JAKMIP1 and GPR155, downstream of FMR1 or CYFIP1. We also confirmed the reduction of the Jakmip1 protein in Fmr1 knock-out mice, demonstrating in vivo relevance. Finally, we showed independent confirmation of roles for JAKMIP1 and GPR155 in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) by showing their differential expression in male sib pairs discordant for idiopathic ASD. These results provide evidence that blood derived lymphoblastoid cells gene expression is likely to be useful for identifying etiological subsets of autism and exploring its pathophysiology.

  3. An IgM-producing B lymphoblastoid cell line established from lymphomas induced by a non-defective reticuloendotheliosis virus.

    PubMed

    Nazerian, K; Witter, R L; Crittenden, L B; Noori-Dalloii, M R; Kung, H J

    1982-02-01

    Chick syncytial virus (CSV), a strain of avian reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) causes lymphoid tumours in chickens after a prolonged incubation period. A number of CSV-induced tumours were examined for cell surface antigen and were found to be of the B cell type and to produce immunoglobulin. Attempts were made to grow in vitro cell lines from CSV-induced tumours and a lymphoblastoid cell line was established from a liver tumour of a chicken that was inoculated with CSV via the yolk sac in embryo. The donor chicken was viraemic at the time the tumour was removed. The cell line is designated RECC-RP13, it produces non-defective REV, is a B cell type and it produces IgM. It is free from infection with endogenous and exogenous avian leukosis virus (ALV) and has an increased number of chromosomes. Sequences specific to REV were detected in at least four sites in cellular DNA from RECC-RP13. Sequences specific to ALV DNA, beyond that normally found in 151(5) X 7(1) cells, were not found in DNA from this cell line.

  4. The effect of uranyl acetate on human lymphoblastoid cells (RPMI 6410) and HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ghadially, F. N.; Yang-Steppuhn, S. E.; Lalonde, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    RPMI 6410 cells and HeLa cells were exposed to uranyl acetate. In RPMI 6410 cell cultures this produced single-membrane-bound presumably lysosomal bodies (called "uraniosomes") containing electron-dense crystals in the cultured cells and crystalline deposits in extracellular locations. Neither uraniosomes nor extracellular uranium deposits were found in HeLa cell cultures. All uraniosomes and extracellular uranium deposits analysed by electron-probed X-ray analysis were found to contain uranium, potassium and phosphorus. Traces of sulphur were detected in some but not all uraniosomes and extracellular uranium deposits. Traces of calcium were found in all extracellular uranium deposits and in some uraniosomes also. Images Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7093141

  5. Biomarkers of Exposure and Effect in Human Lymphoblastoid TK6 Cells Following [13C2]-Acetaldehyde Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Swenberg, James A.

    2013-01-01

    The dose-response relationship for biomarkers of exposure (N2-ethylidene-dG adducts) and effect (cell survival and micronucleus formation) was determined across 4.5 orders of magnitude (50nM–2mM) using [13C2]-acetaldehyde exposures to human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells for 12h. There was a clear increase in exogenous N 2-ethylidene-dG formation at exposure concentrations ≥ 1µM, whereas the endogenous adducts remained nearly constant across all exposure concentrations, with an average of 3.0 adducts/107 dG. Exogenous adducts were lower than endogenous adducts at concentrations ≤ 10µM and were greater than endogenous adducts at concentrations ≥ 250µM. When the endogenous and exogenous adducts were summed together, statistically significant increases in total adduct formation over the endogenous background occurred at 50µM. Cell survival and micronucleus formation were monitored across the exposure range and statistically significant decreases in cell survival and increases in micronucleus formation occurred at ≥ 1000µM. This research supports the hypothesis that endogenously produced reactive species, including acetaldehyde, are always present and constitute the majority of the observed biological effects following very low exposures to exogenous acetaldehyde. These data can replace default assumptions of linear extrapolation to very low doses of exogenous acetaldehyde for risk prediction. PMID:23425604

  6. Host Genetic Variants and Gene Expression Patterns Associated with Epstein-Barr Virus Copy Number in Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Houldcroft, Charlotte J.; Petrova, Velislava; Liu, Jimmy Z.; Frampton, Dan; Anderson, Carl A.; Gall, Astrid; Kellam, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) are commonly used in molecular genetics, supplying DNA for the HapMap and 1000 Genomes Projects, used to test chemotherapeutic agents, and informing the basis of a number of population genetics studies of gene expression. The process of transforming human B cells into LCLs requires the presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a double-stranded DNA virus which through B-cell immortalisation maintains an episomal virus genome in every cell of an LCL at variable copy numbers. Previous studies have reported that EBV alters host-gene expression and EBV copy number may be under host genetic control. We performed a genome-wide association study of EBV genome copy number in LCLs and found the phenotype to be highly heritable, although no individual SNPs achieved a significant association with EBV copy number. The expression of two host genes (CXCL16 and AGL) was positively correlated and expression of ADARB2 was negatively correlated with EBV copy number in a genotype-independent manner. This study shows an association between EBV copy number and the gene expression profile of LCLs, and suggests that EBV copy number should be considered as a covariate in future studies of host gene expression in LCLs. PMID:25290448

  7. Reduced interferon-alpha production by Epstein-Barr virus transformed B-lymphoblastoid cell lines and lectin-stimulated lymphocytes in congenital dyserythropoietic anaemia type I.

    PubMed

    Wickramasinghe, S N; Hasan, R; Smythe, J

    1997-08-01

    The concentrations of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) in supernatants from cultures of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) transformed B-lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from seven patients with congenital dyserythropoietic anaemia (CDA) type I were below the 95% confidence limits for those derived from six healthy subjects. In contrast, the concentrations of IFN-alpha in supernatants from cultures of EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from four patients with other types of CDA and four patients with hereditary sideroblastic anaemia were normal. Supernatants from cultures of peripheral blood lymphocytes stimulated with phytohaemagglutinin or pokeweed mitogen contained less IFN-alpha when the cells were derived from patients with CDA type I than when derived from healthy subjects. Since patients with CDA type I show a substantial haematological response to treatment with IFN-alpha, the data suggest that impaired IFN-alpha production may be an important pathogenetic mechanism in CDA type I.

  8. Establishment of clival chordoma cell line MUG-CC1 and lymphoblastoid cells as a model for potential new treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    Gellner, Verena; Tomazic, Peter Valentin; Lohberger, Birgit; Meditz, Katharina; Heitzer, Ellen; Mokry, Michael; Koele, Wolfgang; Leithner, Andreas; Liegl-Atzwanger, Bernadette; Rinner, Beate

    2016-01-01

    Chordomas are rare malignant tumors that develop from embryonic remnants of the notochord and arise only in the midline from the clivus to the sacrum. Surgery followed by radiotherapy is the standard treatment. As chordomas are resistant to standard chemotherapy, further treatment options are urgently needed. We describe the establishment of a clivus chordoma cell line, MUG-CC1. The cell line is characterized according to its morphology, immunohistochemistry, and growth kinetics. During establishment, cell culture supernatants were collected, and the growth factors HGF, SDF-1, FGF2, and PDGF analyzed using xMAP® technology. A spontaneous lymphoblastoid EBV-positive cell line was also developed and characterized. MUG-CC1 is strongly positive for brachyury, cytokeratin, and S100. The cell line showed gains of the entire chromosomes 7, 8, 12, 13, 16, 18, and 20, and high level gains on chromosomes 1q21–1q24 and 17q21–17q25. During cultivation, there was significant expression of HGF and SDF-1 compared to continuous chordoma cell lines. A new, well-characterized clival chordoma cell line, as well as a non-tumorigenic lymphoblastoid cell line should serve as an in vitro model for the development of potential new treatment strategies for patients suffering from this disease. PMID:27072875

  9. Fluoroquinolones Lower Constitutive H2AX and ATM Phosphorylation in TK6 Lymphoblastoid Cells via Modulation of Intracellular Redox Status

    PubMed Central

    Halicka, H. Dorota; Smart, Daniel J.; Traganos, Frank; Williams, Gary M.; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2008-01-01

    Accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced damage and mutations in genomic DNA is considered the primary etiology of aging and age-related pathologies including cancer. Strategies aimed at slowing these conditions often involve protecting against oxidative DNA damage via modulation of the intracellular redox state. Recently, a biomarker of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), serine-139-phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX), and its upstream mediator, activated PI-3-related kinase ATM (ATMP1981), were shown to be constitutively expressed in cells and modulated by antioxidant treatment. Thus, both constitutive histone H2AX phosphorylation (CHP) and constitutive ATM activation (CAA) are thought to reflect a cell’s response to endogenous ROS-induced DSBs. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a battery of fluoroquinolone (FQ) compounds, namely Ciprofloxacin, Enrofloxacin, Gatifloxacin, Lomefloxacin and Ofloxacin, on CHP and CAA in human TK6 lymphoblastoid cells. All FQs tested reduced CHP and CAA compared to controls following 6 and 24 h treatment, with CAA being more sensitive to their effects at both time points. In addition, intracellular ROS levels and mitochondrial activities were also lowered in FQ-treated cells at 6 and 24 h. We believe that FQs mediate this effect via a combination of ROS-scavenging and mitochondrial suppression, and therefore may protect against the onset or slow the progression of numerous oxidative pathophysiological conditions. PMID:19815954

  10. Characterization of human lymphoblastoid cell lines as a novel in vitro test system to predict the immunotoxicity of xenobiotics.

    PubMed

    Markovič, Tijana; Gobec, Martina; Gurwitz, David; Mlinarič-Raščan, Irena

    2015-02-17

    Evaluating immunomodulatory effects of xenobiotics is an important component of the toxicity studies. Herein we report on the establishment of a novel invitro test system for the immunotoxicity screening of xenobiotics based on human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). Four immunotoxic compounds; tributyltin chloride, cyclosporine A, benzo(a)pyrene and verapamil hydrochloride, as well as three immune-inert compounds; urethane, furosemide and mannitol were selected for characterization. The treatment of LCLs with immunosuppressive compounds resulted in reduced viability. The IC50 values determined in human LCLs were in agreement with the data obtained for human peripheral mononuclear cells. Since cytokine production reflects lymphocytes responses to external stimuli, we evaluated the functional responses of LCLs by monitoring their pro-inflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokine production. Our findings prove that LCLs allowed for reliable differentiation between immunomodulatory and immune-inert compounds. Hence, pre-treatment with immunomodulatory compounds led to a decrease in the production of pro-inflammatory TNFα, IL-6 and immunoregulatory IL-2, IL-4, IL-10 and IFNγ cytokines, when compared to untreated ionomycin/PMA stimulated cells. Moreover, testing a panel of ten LCLs derived from unrelated healthy individuals reflects inter-individual variability in response to immunomodulatory xenobiotics. In conclusion, LCLs provide a novel alternative method for the testing of the immunotoxic effects of xenobiotics.

  11. Constant splice-isoform ratios in human lymphoblastoid cells support the concept of a splico-stat.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Marcel; Huse, Klaus; Menzel, Uwe; Backhaus, Oliver; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schreiber, Stefan; Hampe, Jochen; Platzer, Matthias

    2011-03-01

    Splicing generates mature transcripts from genes in pieces in eukaryotic cells. Overwhelming evidence has accumulated that alternative routes in splicing are possible for most human and mammalian genes, thereby allowing formation of different transcripts from one gene. No function has been assigned to the majority of identified alternative splice forms, and it has been assumed that they compose inert or tolerated waste from aberrant or noisy splicing. Here we demonstrate that five human transcription units (WT1, NOD2, GNAS, RABL2A, RABL2B) have constant splice-isoform ratios in genetically diverse lymphoblastoid cell lines independent of the type of alternative splicing (exon skipping, alternative donor/acceptor, tandem splice sites) and gene expression level. Even splice events that create premature stop codons and potentially trigger nonsense-mediated mRNA decay are found at constant fractions. The analyzed alternative splicing events were qualitatively but not quantitatively conserved in corresponding chimpanzee cell lines. Additionally, subtle splicing at tandem acceptor splice sites (GNAS, RABL2A/B) was highly constrained and strongly depends on the upstream donor sequence content. These results also demonstrate that unusual and unproductive splice variants are produced in a regulated manner. © 2011 by the Genetics Society of America

  12. Utility of Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Generation

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Satish; Curran, Joanne E.; Glahn, David C.; Blangero, John

    2016-01-01

    A large number of EBV immortalized LCLs have been generated and maintained in genetic/epidemiological studies as a perpetual source of DNA and as a surrogate in vitro cell model. Recent successes in reprograming LCLs into iPSCs have paved the way for generating more relevant in vitro disease models using this existing bioresource. However, the overall reprogramming efficiency and success rate remain poor and very little is known about the mechanistic changes that take place at the transcriptome and cellular functional level during LCL-to-iPSC reprogramming. Here, we report a new optimized LCL-to-iPSC reprogramming protocol using episomal plasmids encoding pluripotency transcription factors and mouse p53DD (p53 carboxy-terminal dominant-negative fragment) and commercially available reprogramming media. We achieved a consistently high reprogramming efficiency and 100% success rate using this optimized protocol. Further, we investigated the transcriptional changes in mRNA and miRNA levels, using FC-abs ≥ 2.0 and FDR ≤ 0.05 cutoffs; 5,228 mRNAs and 77 miRNAs were differentially expressed during LCL-to-iPSC reprogramming. The functional enrichment analysis of the upregulated genes and activation of human pluripotency pathways in the reprogrammed iPSCs showed that the generated iPSCs possess transcriptional and functional profiles very similar to those of human ESCs. PMID:27375745

  13. Discovery of genetic biomarkers contributing to variation in drug response of cytidine analogues using human lymphoblastoid cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Two cytidine analogues, gemcitabine and cytosine arabinoside (AraC), are widely used in the treatment of a variety of cancers with a large individual variation in response. To identify potential genetic biomarkers associated with response to these two drugs, we used a human lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL) model system with extensive genomic data, including 1.3 million SNPs and 54,000 basal expression probesets to perform genome-wide association studies (GWAS) with gemcitabine and AraC IC50 values. Results We identified 11 and 27 SNP loci significantly associated with gemcitabine and AraC IC50 values, respectively. Eleven candidate genes were functionally validated using siRNA knockdown approach in multiple cancer cell lines. We also characterized the potential mechanisms of genes by determining their influence on the activity of 10 cancer-related signaling pathways using reporter gene assays. Most SNPs regulated gene expression in a trans manner, except 7 SNPs in the PIGB gene that were significantly associated with both the expression of PIGB and gemcitabine cytotoxicity. Conclusion These results suggest that genetic variation might contribute to drug response via either cis- or trans- regulation of gene expression. GWAS analysis followed by functional pharmacogenomics studies might help identify novel biomarkers contributing to variation in response to these two drugs and enhance our understanding of underlying mechanisms of drug action. PMID:24483146

  14. Arginine to lysine 108 substitution in recombinant CYP1A2 abolishes methoxyresorufin metabolism in lymphoblastoid cells

    PubMed Central

    Hadjokas, Nicholas E; Dai, Renke; Friedman, Fred K; Spence, Michael J; Cusack, Barry J; Vestal, Robert E; Ma, Yongsheng

    2002-01-01

    Cytochrome P4501A2 (CYP1A2) activates a large number of procarcinogens to carcinogens. Phytochemicals such as flavones can inhibit CYP1A2 activity competitively, and hydroxylated derivatives of flavone (galangin) may be potent, selective inhibitors of CYP1A2 activity relative to CYP1A1 activity. Molecular modelling of the CYP1A2 interaction with hydroxylated derivatives of flavone suggests that a number of hydrophobic residues of the substrate-binding domain engage in hydrogen bonding with such inhibitors.We have tested this model using site-directed mutagenesis of these residues in expression plasmids transfected into the human B-lymphoblastoid cell line, AHH-1 TK+/−.Consistent with the molecular model's predicted placement in the active site, amino acid substitutions at the predicted residues abolished CYP1A2 enzymatic activity.Transfected cell lines contained equal amounts of immunoreactive CYP1A2.Our results support the molecular model's prediction of the critical amino acid residues present in the hydrophobic active site, residues that can hydrogen bond with CYP1A2 inhibitors and modify substrate binding and/or turnover. PMID:12023936

  15. Molecular and cytogenetic analysis of lymphoblastoid and colon cancer cell lines from cotton-top tamarin (Sagiunus oedipus).

    PubMed

    Mao, X; McGuire, S; Hamoudi, R A

    2000-07-01

    The cotton-top tamarin (CTT) (Sagiunus oedipus) has been used as an animal model to investigate the etiology and pathophysiology of several human diseases, including ulcerative colitis and its associated colorectal carcinoma (CRC). Little is known, however, about genetic synteny between CTT and humans, and about chromosome aberrations in CTT CRC. To address these issues, we have analyzed CTT lymphoblastoid and CRC cell lines using cytogenetics, fluorescence in situ hybridization (Zoo-FISH), and direct sequencing. The CTT lymphocytes had pseudodiploid chromosomes of 46. The CTT CRC cells showed near-diploid chromosomes of 45. Several clonal structural aberrations were observed, including der(1), a marker chromosome, and double minutes. Zoo-FISH using human chromosome 2, 3, 5, 6, 9, 11, 13, 15, 16, 17, 19, 22, and X paints identified homologous chromosomes and subchromosomal regions in the CTT genome. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with human telomeric probe also detected a homologous sequence in CTT genome. Direct sequencing of CTT genomic DNA using primers amplifying exons 4 and 15 of the human APC gene identified DNA sequences in CTT genome with 99% and 95% homology, respectively. These results provide a basis for further comparative studies of CTT and human genome.

  16. RNA-sequencing of bipolar disorder lymphoblastoid cell lines implicates the neurotrophic factor HRP-3 in lithium's clinical efficacy.

    PubMed

    Milanesi, Elena; Voinsky, Irena; Hadar, Adva; Srouji, Ala; Maj, Carlo; Shekhtman, Tatyana; Gershovits, Michael; Gilad, Shlomit; Chillotti, Caterina; Squassina, Alessio; Potash, James B; Schulze, Thomas G; Goes, Fernando; Zandi, Peter; Kelsoe, John R; Gurwitz, David

    2017-08-31

    Lithium remains the oldest and most effective treatment for mood stabilization in bipolar disorder (BD) even though at least half of patients are only partially responsive or do not respond. This study aimed to identify biomarkers associated with lithium response in BD, based on comparing RNA-sequencing information derived from lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) of lithium responsive (LR) vs. lithium non-responsive (LNR) BD patients, to assess gene expression variations that might bear on treatment outcome. RNA-sequencing was carried out on 24 LCLs from female BD patients (12 LR and 12 LNR) followed by qPCR validation in two additional independent cohorts (41 and 17 BD patients, respectively). Fifty-six genes showed nominal differential expression comparing LR and LNR (FC≥|1.3|, p≤0.01). The differential expression of HDGFRP3 and ID2 was validated by qPCR in the independent cohorts. We observed higher expression levels of HDGFRP3 and ID2 in BD patients who favorably respond to lithium. Both of these genes are involved in neurogenesis and HDGFRP3 has been suggested to be a neurotrophic factor. Additional studies in larger BD cohorts are needed to confirm the potential of HDGFRP3 and ID2 expression levels in blood cells as tentative favorable lithium response biomarkers.

  17. Chromosome loss caused by DNA fragmentation induced in main nuclei and micronuclei of human lymphoblastoid cells treated with colcemid.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Mika; Wakata, Akihiro; Aoki, Yoshinobu; Miyamae, Yoichi; Kodama, Seiji

    2014-04-01

    Aneuploidy, a change in the number of chromosomes, plays an essential role in tumorigenesis. Our previous study demonstrated that a loss of a whole chromosome is induced in human lymphocytes by colcemid, a well-known aneugen. Here, to clarify the mechanism for colcemid-induced chromosome loss, we investigated the relationship between chromosome loss and DNA fragmentation in human lymphoblastoid cells treated with colcemid (an aneugen) compared with methyl methanesulfonate (MMS; a clastogen). We analyzed the number of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) signals targeted for a whole chromosome 2 in cytokinesis-blocked binucleated TK6 cells and WTK-1 cells treated with colcemid and MMS, and concurrently detected DNA fragmentation by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Results revealed that DNA fragmentation occurred in 60% of all binucleated TK6 cells harboring colcemid-induced chromosome loss (30% of micronuclei and 30% of main nuclei). DNA fragmentation was observed in colcemid-induced micronuclei containing a whole chromosome but not in MMS-induced micronuclei containing chromosome fragments. In contrast, colcemid-induced nondisjunction had no effect on induction of DNA fragmentation, suggesting that DNA fragmentation was triggered by micronuclei containing a whole chromosome but not by micronuclei containing chromosome fragments or nondisjunction. In addition, the frequency of binucleated cells harboring chromosome loss with DNA fragmentation in micronuclei or main nuclei was higher in wild-type p53 TK6 cells than in mutated-p53 WTK-1 cells treated with colcemid. Taken together, these present and previous results suggest that colcemid-induced chromosome loss is caused by DNA fragmentation, which is triggered by a micronucleus with a whole chromosome and controlled by the p53-dependent pathway. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. GDF-15 gene expression alterations in human lymphoblastoid cells and peripheral blood lymphocytes following exposure to ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuang; Zhang, Qing-Zhao; Zhang, De-Qin; Feng, Jiang-Bin; Luo, Qun; Lu, Xue; Wang, Xin-Ru; Li, Kun-Peng; Chen, De-Qing; Mu, Xiao-Feng; Gao, Ling; Liu, Qing-Jie

    2017-01-01

    The identification of rapid, sensitive and high-throughput biomarkers is imperative in order to identify individuals harmed by radiation accidents, and accurately evaluate the absorbed doses of radiation. DNA microarrays have previously been used to evaluate the alterations in growth/differentiation factor 15 (GDF15) gene expression in AHH-1 human lymphoblastoid cells, following exposure to γ-rays. The present study aimed to characterize the relationship between the dose of ionizing radiation and the produced effects in GDF-15 gene expression in AHH-1 cells and human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBLs). GDF-15 mRNA and protein expression levels following exposure to γ-rays and neutron radiation were assessed by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis in AHH-1 cells. In addition, alterations in GDF-15 gene expression in HPBLs following ex vivo irradiation were evaluated. The present results demonstrated that GDF-15 mRNA and protein expression levels in AHH-1 cells were significantly upregulated following exposure to γ-ray doses ranging between 1 and 10 Gy, regardless of the dose rate. A total of 48 h following exposure to neutron radiation, a dose-response relationship was identified in AHH-1 cells at γ-ray doses between 0.4 and 1.6 Gy. GDF-15 mRNA levels in HPBLs were significantly upregulated following exposure to γ-ray doses between 1 and 8 Gy, within 4–48 h following irradiation. These results suggested that significant time- and dose-dependent alterations in GDF-15 mRNA and protein expression occur in AHH-1 cells and HPBLs in the early phases following exposure to ionizing radiation. In conclusion, alterations in GDF-15 gene expression may have potential as a biomarker to evaluate radiation exposure. PMID:28440431

  19. A genome-wide association analysis of temozolomide response using lymphoblastoid cell lines shows a clinically relevant association with MGMT.

    PubMed

    Brown, Chad C; Havener, Tammy M; Medina, Marisa W; Auman, J Todd; Mangravite, Lara M; Krauss, Ronald M; McLeod, Howard L; Motsinger-Reif, Alison A

    2012-11-01

    Recently, lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) have emerged as an innovative model system for mapping gene variants that predict the dose response to chemotherapy drugs. In the current study, this strategy was expanded to the in-vitro genome-wide association approach, using 516 LCLs derived from a White cohort to assess the cytotoxic response to temozolomide. Genome-wide association analysis using ∼2.1 million quality-controlled single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified a statistically significant association (P<10(-8)) with SNPs in the O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene. We also show that the primary SNP in this region is significantly associated with the differential gene expression of MGMT (P<10(-26)) in LCLs and differential methylation in glioblastoma samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas. The previously documented clinical and functional relationships between MGMT and temozolomide response highlight the potential of well-powered genome-wide association studies of the LCL model system to identify meaningful genetic associations.

  20. Noninvolvement of the X chromosome in radiation-induced chromosome translocations in the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, R.; Schwartz, J.L. )

    1994-03-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization procedures were used to examine the influence of chromosome locus on the frequency and type of chromosome aberrations induced by [sup 60]Co [gamma] rays in the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6. Aberrations involving the X chromosome were compared to those involving the similarly sized autosome chromosome 7. When corrected for DNA content, acentric fragments were induced with equal frequency in the X and 7 chromosomes. Dose-dependent increases in chromosomal interchanges involving chromosome 7 were noted, and the frequencies of balanced translocations and dicentrics produced were approximately equal. Chromosome interchanges involving the X chromosome were rare and showed no apparent dose dependence. Thus, while chromosomes 7 and X are equally sensitive to the induction of chromosome breaks, the X chromosome is much less likely to interact with autosomes than chromosome 7. The noninvolvement of the X chromosome in translocations with autosomes may reflect a more peripheral and separate location for the X chromosome in the mammalian nucleus. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Genetic factors affecting EBV copy number in lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from the 1000 Genome Project samples

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Juan Antonio; Farré, Xavier; Layouni, Hafid; Marigorta, Urko M.; Cundiff, Caitlin; Heredia-Genestar, Jose Maria; Navarro, Arcadi

    2017-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), human herpes virus 4, has been classically associated with infectious mononucleosis, multiple sclerosis and several types of cancers. Many of these diseases show marked geographical differences in prevalence, which points to underlying genetic and/or environmental factors. Those factors may include a different susceptibility to EBV infection and viral copy number among human populations. Since EBV is commonly used to transform B-cells into lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) we hypothesize that differences in EBV copy number among individual LCLs may reflect differential susceptibility to EBV infection. To test this hypothesis, we retrieved whole-genome sequenced EBV-mapping reads from 1,753 LCL samples derived from 19 populations worldwide that were sequenced within the context of the 1000 Genomes Project. An in silico methodology was developed to estimate the number of EBV copy number in LCLs and validated these estimations by real-time PCR. After experimentally confirming that EBV relative copy number remains stable over cell passages, we performed a genome wide association analysis (GWAS) to try detecting genetic variants of the host that may be associated with EBV copy number. Our GWAS has yielded several genomic regions suggestively associated with the number of EBV genomes per cell in LCLs, unraveling promising candidate genes such as CAND1, a known inhibitor of EBV replication. While this GWAS does not unequivocally establish the degree to which genetic makeup of individuals determine viral levels within their derived LCLs, for which a larger sample size will be needed, it potentially highlighted human genes affecting EBV-related processes, which constitute interesting candidates to follow up in the context of EBV related pathologies. PMID:28654678

  2. Genetic factors affecting EBV copy number in lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from the 1000 Genome Project samples.

    PubMed

    Mandage, Rajendra; Telford, Marco; Rodríguez, Juan Antonio; Farré, Xavier; Layouni, Hafid; Marigorta, Urko M; Cundiff, Caitlin; Heredia-Genestar, Jose Maria; Navarro, Arcadi; Santpere, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), human herpes virus 4, has been classically associated with infectious mononucleosis, multiple sclerosis and several types of cancers. Many of these diseases show marked geographical differences in prevalence, which points to underlying genetic and/or environmental factors. Those factors may include a different susceptibility to EBV infection and viral copy number among human populations. Since EBV is commonly used to transform B-cells into lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) we hypothesize that differences in EBV copy number among individual LCLs may reflect differential susceptibility to EBV infection. To test this hypothesis, we retrieved whole-genome sequenced EBV-mapping reads from 1,753 LCL samples derived from 19 populations worldwide that were sequenced within the context of the 1000 Genomes Project. An in silico methodology was developed to estimate the number of EBV copy number in LCLs and validated these estimations by real-time PCR. After experimentally confirming that EBV relative copy number remains stable over cell passages, we performed a genome wide association analysis (GWAS) to try detecting genetic variants of the host that may be associated with EBV copy number. Our GWAS has yielded several genomic regions suggestively associated with the number of EBV genomes per cell in LCLs, unraveling promising candidate genes such as CAND1, a known inhibitor of EBV replication. While this GWAS does not unequivocally establish the degree to which genetic makeup of individuals determine viral levels within their derived LCLs, for which a larger sample size will be needed, it potentially highlighted human genes affecting EBV-related processes, which constitute interesting candidates to follow up in the context of EBV related pathologies.

  3. Transcriptome profiling of UPF3B/NMD-deficient lymphoblastoid cells from patients with various forms of intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, LS; Jolly, L; Shoubridge, C; Chan, WK; Huang, L; Laumonnier, F; Raynaud, M; Hackett, A; Field, M; Rodriguez, J; Srivastava, AK; Lee, Y; Long, R; Addington, AM; Rapoport, JL; Suren, S; Hahn, CN; Gamble, J; Wilkinson, MF; Corbett, MA; Gecz, J

    2014-01-01

    The nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway was originally discovered by virtue of its ability to rapidly degrade aberrant mRNAs with premature termination codons. More recently, it was shown that NMD also directly regulates subsets of normal transcripts, suggesting that NMD has roles in normal biological processes. Indeed, several NMD factors have been shown to regulate neurological events (for example, neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity) in numerous vertebrate species. In man, mutations in the NMD factor gene UPF3B, which disrupts a branch of the NMD pathway, cause various forms of intellectual disability (ID). Using Epstein Barr virus—immortalized B cells, also known as lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), from ID patients that have loss-of-function mutations in UPF3B, we investigated the genome-wide consequences of compromised NMD and the role of NMD in neuronal development and function. We found that ~5% of the human transcriptome is impacted in UPF3B patients. The UPF3B paralog, UPF3A, is stabilized in all UPF3B patients, and partially compensates for the loss of UPF3B function. Interestingly, UPF3A protein, but not mRNA, was stabilised in a quantitative manner that inversely correlated with the severity of patients’ phenotype. This suggested that the ability to stabilize the UPF3A protein is a crucial modifier of the neurological symptoms due to loss of UPF3B. We also identified ARHGAP24, which encodes a GTPase-activating protein, as a canonical target of NMD, and we provide evidence that deregulation of this gene inhibits axon and dendrite outgrowth and branching. Our results demonstrate that the UPF3B-dependent NMD pathway is a major regulator of the transcriptome and that its targets have important roles in neuronal cells. PMID:22182939

  4. All-trans Retinoic Acid Upregulates Reduced CD38 Transcription in Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines from Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Riebold, Mathias; Mankuta, David; Lerer, Elad; Israel, Salomon; Zhong, Songfa; Nemanov, Luba; Monakhov, Mikhail V; Levi, Shlomit; Yirmiya, Nurit; Yaari, Maya; Malavasi, Fabio; Ebstein, Richard P

    2011-01-01

    Deficits in social behavior in mice lacking the CD38 gene have been attributed to impaired secretion of oxytocin. In humans, similar deficits in social behavior are associated with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD), for which genetic variants of CD38 have been pinpointed as provisional risk factors. We sought to explore, in an in vitro model, the feasibility of the theory that restoring the level of CD38 in ASD patients could be of potential clinical benefit. CD38 transcription is highly sensitive to several cytokines and vitamins. One of these, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), a known inducer of CD38, was added during cell culture and tested on a large sample of N = 120 lymphoblastoid cell (LBC) lines from ASD patients and their parents. Analysis of CD38 mRNA levels shows that ATRA has an upmodulatory potential on LBC derived from ASD patients as well as from their parents. The next crucial issue addressed in our study was the relationship between levels of CD38 expression and psychological parameters. The results obtained indicate a positive correlation between CD38 expression levels and patient scores on the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale. In addition, analysis of the role of genetic polymorphisms in the dynamics of the molecule revealed that the genotype of a single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs6449182; C>G variation) in the CpG island of intron 1, harboring the retinoic-acid response element, exerts differential roles in CD38 expression in ASD and in parental LBC. In conclusion, our results provide an empirical basis for the development of a pharmacological ASD treatment strategy based on retinoids. PMID:21528155

  5. All-trans retinoic acid upregulates reduced CD38 transcription in lymphoblastoid cell lines from Autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Riebold, Mathias; Mankuta, David; Lerer, Elad; Israel, Salomon; Zhong, Songfa; Nemanov, Luba; Monakhov, Mikhail V; Levi, Shlomit; Yirmiya, Nurit; Yaari, Maya; Malavasi, Fabio; Ebstein, Richard P

    2011-01-01

    Deficits in social behavior in mice lacking the CD38 gene have been attributed to impaired secretion of oxytocin. In humans, similar deficits in social behavior are associated with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD), for which genetic variants of CD38 have been pinpointed as provisional risk factors. We sought to explore, in an in vitro model, the feasibility of the theory that restoring the level of CD38 in ASD patients could be of potential clinical benefit. CD38 transcription is highly sensitive to several cytokines and vitamins. One of these, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), a known inducer of CD38, was added during cell culture and tested on a large sample of N = 120 lymphoblastoid cell (LBC) lines from ASD patients and their parents. Analysis of CD38 mRNA levels shows that ATRA has an upmodulatory potential on LBC derived from ASD patients as well as from their parents. The next crucial issue addressed in our study was the relationship between levels of CD38 expression and psychological parameters. The results obtained indicate a positive correlation between CD38 expression levels and patient scores on the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale. In addition, analysis of the role of genetic polymorphisms in the dynamics of the molecule revealed that the genotype of a single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs6449182; C>G variation) in the CpG island of intron 1, harboring the retinoic-acid response element, exerts differential roles in CD38 expression in ASD and in parental LBC. In conclusion, our results provide an empirical basis for the development of a pharmacological ASD treatment strategy based on retinoids.

  6. Ye-1, a monoclonal antibody that cross-reacts with HLA-B27 lymphoblastoid cell lines and an arthritis causing bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Kono, D H; Ogasawara, M; Effros, R B; Park, M S; Waldord, R L; Yu, D T

    1985-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody, Ye-1, was generated by immunizing BALB/c mice with Yersinia enterocolitica. This antibody also reacted with all of 12 B27 positive lymphoblastoid cell lines, but only four of 31 B27 negative ones. Three of the four reactive B27 negative cell lines were B7 positive. A B27 positive cell line which has lost the B27 expression because of experimentally-induced mutation became unreactive with the Ye-1. These findings support the possibility that there is cross-reactivity between HLA-B27 antigens and Y. enterocolitica. PMID:3878239

  7. [Effects of aminophylline on proliferation and apoptosis in Raji lympho-blastoid cell line].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ze-Lin; Dong, Zuo-Ren; Zhang, Xue-Jun; Wang, Fu-Xu; Yang, Jing-Ci; Ma, Wei-Dong; Du, Xing-Yan; Yao, Li

    2003-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether and how phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors modulate the proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis in lymphoma cells. The effects of aminophylline (AM), a non-specific PDE inhibitor, on Raji cells were explored in vitro. MTT assay, light and transmission electron microscopy and annexin V staining were used to observe cell proliferation, morphologic changes and apoptosis rate in AM-treated cells, and FCM and RT-PCR techniques were adopted to detect the effect on cell cycle, the expression of cyclin B1 and Bcl-2 and mitochondrial transmembrane potential in AM-treated cells. The results showed that AM inhibited the growth of Raji cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Morphologic observations showed apoptosis changes in AM-treated cells, including cytoplamic shrinkage, cytoplasmic bubbling, karyopyknosis and nuclear fragmentation. FCM and RT-PCR detection showed that AM intervention increased the fraction of annexin V(+) cells, reduced the value of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, induced S phase arrest, and down-regulated the expression of Bcl-2 at both mRNA and protein level and cyclin B1 protein in a concentration-dependent manner. It is concluded that PDE inhibitor aminophylline may induce Raji cell growth inhibition, S phase arrest, apoptosis via down-regulation of Bcl-2 and reduction of mitochondrial transmembrane potential.

  8. In vitro evaluation of human hybrid cell lines generated by fusion of B-lymphoblastoid cells and ex vivo tumour cells as candidate vaccines for haematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Yehia S; Dunnion, Debbie; Teobald, Iryna; Walewska, Renata; Browning, Michael J

    2012-10-12

    Fusions of dendritic cells (DCs) and tumour cells have been shown to induce protective immunity to tumour challenge in animal models, and to represent a promising approach to cancer immunotherapy. The broader clinical application of this approach, however, is potentially constrained by the lack of replicative capacity and limited standardisation of fusion cell preparations. We show here that fusion of ex vivo tumour cells isolated from patients with a range of haematological malignancies with the human B-lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL), HMy2, followed by chemical selection of the hybridomas, generated stable, self-replicating human hybrid cell lines that grew continuously in tissue culture, and survived freeze/thawing cycles. The hybrid cell lines expressed HLA class I and class II molecules, and the major T-cell costimulatory molecules, CD80 and CD86. All but two of 14 hybrid cell lines generated expressed tumour-associated antigens that were not expressed by HMy2 cells, and were therefore derived from the parent tumour cells. The hybrid cell lines stimulated allogeneic T-cell proliferative responses and interferon-gamma release in vitro to a considerably greater degree than their respective parent tumour cells. The enhanced T-cell stimulation was inhibited by CTLA4-Ig fusion protein, and by blocking antibodies to MHC class I and class II molecules. Finally, all of five LCL/tumour hybrid cell lines tested induced tumour antigen-specific cytotoxic T-cell responses in vitro in PBL from healthy, HLA-A2+ individuals, as detected by HLA-A2-peptide pentamer staining and cellular cytotoxicity. These data show that stable hybrid cell lines, with enhanced immunostimulatory properties and potential for therapeutic vaccination, can be generated by in vitro fusion and chemical selection of B-LCL and ex vivo haematological tumour cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Oxidative metabolism of flunarizine and cinnarizine by microsomes from B-lymphoblastoid cell lines expressing human cytochrome P450 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kariya, S; Isozaki, S; Uchino, K; Suzuki, T; Narimatsu, S

    1996-11-01

    The oxidative metabolism of cinnarizine [(E)-1-(diphenylmethyl)-4-(3-phenyl-2-propyl)piperazine, CZ] and flunarizine [(E)-1-[bis(4-fluorophenyl)methyl]-4-(3-phenyl-2-propyl)piperazine, FZ] was examined in microsomes from lymphoblastoid cells that expressed human cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes. Among 10 kinds of CYP enzymes examined, only CYP2D6 catalyzed p-hydroxylation of the cinnamyl phenyl ring of CZ (C-2 formation) and FZ (F-2 formation), and only CYP2B6 exhibited activity for p-hydroxylation (C-4 formation) of the diphenylmethyl group of CZ at a substrate concentration of 50 microM. On the other hand, CYP2C9 together with CYP1A1, -1A2 and/or -2A6 mediated N-desalkylation at the 1- and 4-positions of the piperazine ring of the two drugs that formed C-1 and C-3 from CZ and F-1 and F-3 from FZ, respectively, whereas CYP2C8, -2C19, -2E1 or -3A4 did not show detectable activity for these reactions under the conditions used. We then examined kinetics for the oxidative metabolism of CZ and FZ using CYP2B6 and -2D6 that have considerable activities. CYP2D6 with Km values of 2 to 4 microM had intrinsic clearance values (Vmax/Km) of 0.31 and 0.14 ml/min/nmol CYP for C-2 and F-2 formation, respectively, while CYP2B6 with a Km value of 17 microM exhibited the clearance value of 0.10 ml/min/nmol CYP for C-4 formation. These results suggest that CYP2D6 mainly mediates p-hydroxylation of the cinnamyl phenyl rings of CZ and FZ, and CYP2B6 mediates that of the diphenylmethyl group of CZ.

  10. Molecular Signatures of Cardiac Defects in Down Syndrome Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines Suggest Altered Ciliome and Hedgehog Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ripoll, Clémentine; Rivals, Isabelle; Ait Yahya-Graison, Emilie; Dauphinot, Luce; Paly, Evelyne; Mircher, Clothilde; Ravel, Aimé; Grattau, Yann; Bléhaut, Henri; Mégarbane, André; Dembour, Guy; de Fréminville, Bénédicte; Touraine, Renaud; Créau, Nicole; Potier, Marie Claude; Delabar, Jean Maurice

    2012-01-01

    Forty percent of people with Down syndrome exhibit heart defects, most often an atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD) and less frequently a ventricular septal defect (VSD) or atrial septal defect (ASD). Lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) were established from lymphocytes of individuals with trisomy 21, the chromosomal abnormality causing Down syndrome. Gene expression profiles generated from DNA microarrays of LCLs from individuals without heart defects (CHD−; n = 22) were compared with those of LCLs from patients with cardiac malformations (CHD+; n = 21). After quantile normalization, principal component analysis revealed that AVSD carriers could be distinguished from a combined group of ASD or VSD (ASD+VSD) carriers. From 9,758 expressed genes, we identified 889 and 1,016 genes differentially expressed between CHD− and AVSD and CHD− and ASD+VSD, respectively, with only 119 genes in common. A specific chromosomal enrichment was found in each group of affected genes. Among the differentially expressed genes, more than 65% are expressed in human or mouse fetal heart tissues (GEO dataset). Additional LCLs from new groups of AVSD and ASD+VSD patients were analyzed by quantitative PCR; observed expression ratios were similar to microarray results. Analysis of GO categories revealed enrichment of genes from pathways regulating clathrin-mediated endocytosis in patients with AVSD and of genes involved in semaphorin-plexin-driven cardiogenesis and the formation of cytoplasmic microtubules in patients with ASD-VSD. A pathway-oriented search revealed enrichment in the ciliome for both groups and a specific enrichment in Hedgehog and Jak-stat pathways among ASD+VSD patients. These genes or related pathways are therefore potentially involved in normal cardiogenesis as well as in cardiac malformations observed in individuals with trisomy 21. PMID:22912673

  11. The patterns of histone modifications in the vicinity of transcription factor binding sites in human lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yumin; Liu, Hongde; Sun, Xiao

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factor (TF) binding at specific DNA sequences is the fundamental step in transcriptional regulation and is highly dependent on the chromatin structure context, which may be affected by specific histone modifications and variants, known as histone marks. The lack of a global binding map for hundreds of TFs means that previous studies have focused mainly on histone marks at binding sites for several specific TFs. We therefore studied 11 histone marks around computationally-inferred and experimentally-determined TF binding sites (TFBSs), based on 164 and 34 TFs, respectively, in human lymphoblastoid cell lines. For H2A.Z, methylation of H3K4, and acetylation of H3K27 and H3K9, the mark patterns exhibited bimodal distributions and strong pairwise correlations in the 600-bp region around enriched TFBSs, suggesting that these marks mainly coexist within the two nucleosomes proximal to the TF sites. TFs competing with nucleosomes to access DNA at most binding sites, contributes to the bimodal distribution, which is a common feature of histone marks for TF binding. Mark H3K79me2 showed a unimodal distribution on one side of TFBSs and the signals extended up to 4000 bp, indicating a longer-distance pattern. Interestingly, H4K20me1, H3K27me3, H3K36me3 and H3K9me3, which were more diffuse and less enriched surrounding TFBSs, showed unimodal distributions around the enriched TFBSs, suggesting that some TFs may bind to nucleosomal DNA. Besides, asymmetrical distributions of H3K36me3 and H3K9me3 indicated that repressors might establish a repressive chromatin structure in one direction to repress gene expression. In conclusion, this study demonstrated the ranges of histone marks associated with TF binding, and the common features of these marks around the binding sites. These findings have epigenetic implications for future analysis of regulatory elements.

  12. NKG2A-Expressing Natural Killer Cells Dominate the Response to Autologous Lymphoblastoid Cells Infected with Epstein–Barr Virus

    PubMed Central

    Hatton, Olivia; Strauss-Albee, Dara Marie; Zhao, Nancy Q.; Haggadone, Mikel D.; Pelpola, Judith Shanika; Krams, Sheri M.; Martinez, Olivia M.; Blish, Catherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is a human γ-herpesvirus that establishes latency and lifelong infection in host B cells while achieving a balance with the host immune response. When the immune system is perturbed through immunosuppression or immunodeficiency, however, these latently infected B cells can give rise to aggressive B cell lymphomas. Natural killer (NK) cells are regarded as critical in the early immune response to viral infection, but their role in controlling expansion of infected B cells is not understood. Here, we report that NK cells from healthy human donors display increased killing of autologous B lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) harboring latent EBV compared to primary B cells. Coculture of NK cells with autologous EBV+ LCL identifies an NK cell population that produces IFNγ and mobilizes the cytotoxic granule protein CD107a. Multi-parameter flow cytometry and Boolean analysis reveal that these functional cells are enriched for expression of the NK cell receptor NKG2A. Further, NKG2A+ NK cells more efficiently lyse autologous LCL than do NKG2A− NK cells. More specifically, NKG2A+2B4+CD16−CD57−NKG2C−NKG2D+ cells constitute the predominant NK cell population that responds to latently infected autologous EBV+ B cells. Thus, a subset of NK cells is enhanced for the ability to recognize and eliminate autologous, EBV-infected transformed cells, laying the groundwork for harnessing this subset for therapeutic use in EBV+ malignancies. PMID:28018364

  13. RECEPTOR FOR SOLUBLE C3 AND C3b ON HUMAN LYMPHOBLASTOID (RAJI) CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Theofilopoulos, Argyrios N.; Bokisch, Viktor A.; Dixon, Frank J.

    1974-01-01

    This study describes the presence of a receptor for fluid phase human C3 and C3b on Raji cell membranes. The binding of C3 and C3b was demonstrated indirectly by a fluoresceinated anti-C3 serum and directly by using radioiodinated proteins. No other complement proteins or serum factors were needed to mediate binding of C3 and C3b to the receptor. The possibility of enzymatic cleavage of C3 before or after its attachment on the cell membrane was ruled out by the demonstration of antigenically intact C3 on Raji cells. Inhibition and dissociation of Raji cell-EAC1423 rosettes by C3 and C3b indicated that both of these proteins bind to the same receptor site or closely associated receptor sites on Raji cells. C3b-bearing Raji cells were immune adherence negative, indicating that C3b binding to the receptor is brought about through the immune adherence region of the molecule and not the C3d portion. The C3 receptor on Raji cell membranes is uniformly distributed and can move on the membrane plane. Approximately 4 x 105 molecules of C3 or C3b bind per Raji cell. The receptor had a higher affinity for C3 than C3b, as was shown by uptake experiments and inhibition of Raji cell-EAC1423 rosette formation. Apart from the described receptor for C3 and C3b another specific receptor for C3b inactivator-cleaved C3b (C3d) bound to red cells was shown to be present on Raji cells. Raji cells cultured in medium containing fresh normal human serum and cobra venom factor were lysed. Similar results were obtained when C3b-bearing Raji cells were cultured in medium with fresh normal human serum. The lytic effect could be abolished by inactivating serum C3 proactivator (C3PA) and required C6. It was concluded that C3b bound to the Raji cell membrane activates the complement system through the alternate pathway and results in membrane damage and cytolysis. It is postulated that cell destruction by this mechanism may play an important role in vivo in controlling cell growth. PMID:4591176

  14. Analysis of cellular response by exposure to acute or chronic radiation in human lymphoblastoid TK-6 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, T.; Yasumoto, J.; Takahashi, A.; Ohnishi, K.

    To clarify the biological effects of low-dose rate radiation on human health for long-term stay in space, we analyzed the induction of apoptosis and apoptosis-related gene expression after irradiation with different dose-rate in human lymphoblastoid TK-6 cells harboring wild-type p53 gene. We irradiated TK-6 cells by X-ray at 1.5 Gy (1 Gy/min) and then sampled at 25 hr after culturing. We also irradiated by gamma-ray at 1.5 Gy (1 mGy/min) and then sampled immediately or 25 hr after irradiation. For DNA ladder analysis, we extracted DNA from these samples and electrophoresed with 2% agarose gel. In addition, we extracted mRNA from these samples for DNA-array analysis. mRNA from non-irradiated cells was used as a control. After labeling the cDNA against mRNA with [α -33P]-dCTP and hybridizing onto DNA array (Human Apoptosis Expression Array, R&D Systems), we scanned the profiles of the spots by a phosphorimager (BAS5000, FUJI FILM) and calculated using a NIH Image program. The data of each DNA-array were normalized with eight kinds of house keeping genes. We analyzed the expression level of apoptosis-related genes such as p53-related, Bcl-2 family, Caspase family and Fas-related genes. DNA ladders were obviously detected in the cells exposed to a high dose-rate radiation. We detected the induction of the gene expression of apoptosis-promotive genes. In contrast, almost no apoptosis was observed in the cells exposed to the chronic radiation at a low dose-rate. In addition, we detected the induction of the gene expression of apoptosis-suppressive genes as compared with apoptosis promotive-genes immediately after chronic irradiation. These results lead the importance of biological meaning of exposure to radiation at low dose-rate from an aspect of carcinogenesis. Finally, the effects of chronic irradiation become a highly important issue in space radiation biology for human health.

  15. Inhibitory activities of microalgal extracts against Epstein-Barr virus DNA release from lymphoblastoid cells*

    PubMed Central

    Kok, Yih-Yih; Chu, Wan-Loy; Phang, Siew-Moi; Mohamed, Shar Mariam; Naidu, Rakesh; Lai, Pey-Jiun; Ling, Shui-Nyuk; Mak, Joon-Wah; Lim, Patricia Kim-Chooi; Balraj, Pauline; Khoo, Alan Soo-Beng

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the inhibitory activities of methanol extracts from the microalgae Ankistrodesmus convolutus, Synechococcus elongatus, and Spirulina platensis against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in three Burkitt’s lymphoma (BL) cell lines, namely Akata, B95-8, and P3HR-1. The antiviral activity was assessed by quantifying the cell-free EBV DNA using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. The methanol extracts from Ankistrodesmus convolutus and Synechococcus elongatus displayed low cytotoxicity and potent effect in reducing cell-free EBV DNA (EC50<0.01 µg/ml) with a high therapeutic index (>28 000). After fractionation by column chromatography, the fraction from Synechococcus elongatus (SEF1) reduced the cell-free EBV DNA most effectively (EC50=2.9 µg/ml, therapeutic index>69). Upon further fractionation by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), the sub-fraction SEF1’a was most active in reducing the cell-free EBV DNA (EC50=1.38 µg/ml, therapeutic index>14.5). This study suggests that microalgae could be a potential source of antiviral compounds that can be used against EBV. PMID:21528487

  16. Inhibitory activities of microalgal extracts against Epstein-Barr virus DNA release from lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Kok, Yih-Yih; Chu, Wan-Loy; Phang, Siew-Moi; Mohamed, Shar Mariam; Naidu, Rakesh; Lai, Pey-Jiun; Ling, Shui-Nyuk; Mak, Joon-Wah; Lim, Patricia Kim-Chooi; Balraj, Pauline; Khoo, Alan Soo-Beng

    2011-05-01

    This study aimed to assess the inhibitory activities of methanol extracts from the microalgae Ankistrodesmus convolutus, Synechococcus elongatus, and Spirulina platensis against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in three Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) cell lines, namely Akata, B95-8, and P3HR-1. The antiviral activity was assessed by quantifying the cell-free EBV DNA using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. The methanol extracts from Ankistrodesmus convolutus and Synechococcus elongatus displayed low cytotoxicity and potent effect in reducing cell-free EBV DNA (EC(50)<0.01 µg/ml) with a high therapeutic index (>28000). After fractionation by column chromatography, the fraction from Synechococcus elongatus (SEF1) reduced the cell-free EBV DNA most effectively (EC(50)=2.9 µg/ml, therapeutic index>69). Upon further fractionation by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), the sub-fraction SEF1'a was most active in reducing the cell-free EBV DNA (EC(50)=1.38 µg/ml, therapeutic index>14.5). This study suggests that microalgae could be a potential source of antiviral compounds that can be used against EBV.

  17. In vitro adverse effects of iron ore dusts on human lymphoblastoid cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Wang, He; Wang, Jing J; Sanderson, Barbara J S

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the adverse effects produced by four types of iron (Fe) ore dust using cultured human cells. Genotoxicity and cytotoxicity induced by Fe ore dusts were determined by assays including cytokinesis block micronucleus (CBMN), population growth, and methyl tetrazolium (MTT). Four iron ore dusts were tested, namely, 1002 Limonite & Goethite (1002), HG2 hematite (HG2), HG1 Soutlem Pit (HG1), and HG4. WIL2 -NS cells were incubated for 10 h with extracts from a range of concentrations (0, 75, or 150 μg/ml) of Fe ore dust. Significant decreases in percent cell viability were seen at 150 μg/ml HG2 and 1002 as measured by MTT, with viability that decreased to 75 and 73%, respectively, compared to untreated controls. The cell population regrew to a different extent after Fe ore dust was removed, except for HG1, where population remained declined. An approximately twofold significant increase in the frequency of micronucleated binucleated cells (MNBNC) was seen with 1002, HG2, and HG1 at 150 μg/ml. A significant rise in apoptosis induction was observed at 150 μg/ml HG1. Data indicate that Fe ore dusts at 150 μg/ml produced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity.

  18. Modulation of a human lymphoblastoid B cell line by cyclic AMP. Ig secretion and phosphatidylcholine metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Shearer, W.T.; Patke, C.L.; Gilliam, E.B.; Rosenblatt, H.M.; Barron, K.S.; Orson, F.M.

    1988-09-01

    A transformed human B cell line, LA350, was found to be sensitive to cAMP-elevating agents by responding with rapid (0 to 2 h) severalfold elevations of intracellular cAMP to treatment with cholera toxin, isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX), forskolin, and dibutyryl cAMP (all p less than 0.001). These cAMP-elevating agents also produced significant inhibitions of subsequent (48 to 72 h) Ig secretion by the same B cells as measured by a reverse hemolytic plaque assay and an enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay for IgM (both p less than 0.001). PMA- and IBMX-treated cells were particularly responsive to the effects of cholera toxin, showing a doubling of cAMP content and profound decrease in Ig production (p less than 0.001). Because our previous studies had correlated activation of the metabolic turnover of the phosphatidylcholine (PC) fraction of membrane phospholipids with enhanced Ig secretion, we examined the sensitivity of PC metabolism to cAMP in control and PMA-stimulated cells. Formation of PC was found to be inhibited by forskolin and IBMX (both p less than 0.002) but breakdown of PC was stimulated (p less than 0.001). These findings imply that as the enzymatic products of PC, choline phosphate and diacylglycerol, are depleted due to the combined effects of cAMP upon synthesis and turnover of PC, there is a decrease in Ig secretion. Since diacylglycerol activates protein kinase C, it appears reasonable that Ig secretion is at least partially regulated by cAMP-responsive alterations in PC metabolism produced by protein kinase C-induced phosphorylation. We conclude that the early cAMP-sensitive changes in PC metabolism in this activated B cell line may signal for subsequent alterations in Ig secretion.

  19. Epstein–Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C regulated genes in lymphoblastoid cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bo; Mar, Jessica C.; Maruo, Seiji; Lee, Sungwook; Gewurz, Benjamin E.; Johannsen, Eric; Holton, Kristina; Rubio, Renee; Takada, Kenzo; Quackenbush, John; Kieff, Elliott

    2011-01-01

    EBV nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA3C) is an essential transcription factor for EBV transformed lymphoblast cell line (LCL) growth. To identify EBNA3C-regulated genes in LCLs, microarrays were used to measure RNA abundances in each of three different LCLs that conditionally express EBNA3C fused to a 4-OH-Tamoxifen–dependent estrogen receptor hormone binding domain (EBNA3CHT). At least three RNAs were assayed for each EBNA3CHT LCL under nonpermissive conditions, permissive conditions, and nonpermissive conditions with wild-type EBNA3C transcomplementation. Using a two-way ANOVA model of EBNA3C levels, we identified 550 regulated genes that were at least 1.5-fold up- or down-regulated with false discovery rates < 0.01. EBNA3C-regulated genes overlapped significantly with genes regulated by EBNA2 and EBNA3A consistent with coordinated effects on cell gene transcription. Of the 550 EBNA3C-regulated genes, 106 could be placed in protein networks. A seeded Bayesian network analysis of the 80 most significant EBNA3C-regulated genes suggests that RAC1, LYN, and TNF are upstream of other EBNA3C-regulated genes. Gene set enrichment analysis found enrichment for MAP kinase signaling, cytokine–cytokine receptor interactions, JAK-STAT signaling, and cell adhesion molecules, implicating these pathways in EBNA3C effects on LCL growth or survival. EBNA3C significantly up-regulated the CXCL12 ligand and its CXCR4 receptor and increased LCL migration. CXCL12 up-regulation depended on EBNA3C's interaction with the cell transcription factor, RBPJ, which is essential for LCL growth. EBNA3C also up-regulated MYC 1.3-fold and down-regulated CDKN2A exons 2 and 3, shared by p16 and p14, 1.4-fold, with false discovery rates < 5 × 10−4. PMID:21173222

  20. Intracellular accumulation of Praziquantel in T lymphoblastoid cell lines, CEM (parental) and CEMVBL(P-gp-overexpressing).

    PubMed

    Kigen, Gabriel; Edwards, Geoffrey

    2016-08-14

    P-gp in T-lymphoblastoid cells, CEM and CEMVBL. We also report a simple, accurate and precise method for simultaneous quantification of PZQ and SQV.

  1. Mutational spectrum of ICR-191 at the hprt locus in human lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Taft, S A; Liber, H L; Skopek, T R

    1994-01-01

    Human TK6 lymphoblasts were treated with the acridine derivative ICR-191, and mutants at the hprt locus were isolated. Mutant hprt cDNA was reverse-transcribed from mRNA, amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and sequenced. Additions of single G:C base pairs (+1 frameshift mutations) in repetitive G:C sequences were found in 82% (32/39) of the mutants. Sixteen of the +1 frameshifts analyzed were located in a single sequence of six consecutive guanine bases in exon 3. The remaining +1 frameshifts occurred at six different GGG sequences (14 mutants) and a single GGGG sequence (2 mutants) in other hprt exons. The repetitive guanine sequences that underwent frameshift mutagenesis were located in both the transcribed and nontranscribed strands of hprt. No single base deletions (-1 frameshift mutations) were observed. Base substitutions were observed in 13% (5/39) of the clones analyzed and occurred at both G:C and A:T bases. Loss of exon 4 from the cDNA was also observed in 5% (2/39) of the mutants. Hprt mutants containing seven consecutive guanines (produced from a +1 frameshift in a GGGGGG sequence) were treated with ICR-191 and wild-type revertants selected in CHAT medium. Revertants were recovered at a frequency of approximately 10(-7) and contained the wild-type sequence (GGGGGG) in all clones analyzed. The observed frequency of ICR-191-induced-1 frameshift reversion in the GGGGGGG sequence was approximately 500-fold lower than the estimated frequency of +1 frameshifts observed in the wild-type GGGGGG sequence following the same ICR-191 treatment. These results suggest that ICR-191 produces predominantly +1 frameshift mutations at the hprt locus in human cells.

  2. High-potentiality preliminary selection criteria and transformation time-dependent factors analysis for establishing Epstein-Barr virus transformed human lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Chang, I-C; Wu, J-Y; Lu, H-I; Ko, H-W; Kuo, J-L; Wang, C-Y; Shen, P-S; Hwang, S-M

    2006-12-01

    Infection of freshly isolated and cryopreserved lymphocytes with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) leads to the establishment of human B lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). Techniques for optimal infection of the lymphocytes are vital for the establishment of a human biobank. The present study found that more than half (58-86%) of such established LCLs had transport times of less than 48 h, cell densities exceeding 10(6) cells/ml and cell viabilities greater than 90%. After EBV infection, 3306 freshly isolated lymphocytes required 30.0 +/- 0.1 days to become LCLs. Conversely, 1210 cryopreserved lymphocytes required 36.2 +/- 0.4 days. Cell density and viability of the culture affected transformation time in freshly isolated lymphocytes. On the other hand, blood transport time, cryopreservation time and initial cell viability were major factors in cryopreserved specimens. These results contribute to general information concerning the establishment of a human biobank for EBV infected cells.

  3. Leukemia patient-derived lymphoblastoid cell lines exhibit increased induction of leukemia-associated transcripts following high-dose irradiation.

    PubMed

    Spencer, A; Granter, N

    1999-09-01

    Improvement in diagnostic cytogenetic techniques has led to the recognition of an increasing number of leukemia-associated chromosomal translocations and inversions. These genetic lesions frequently are associated with the disruption of putative transcription factors and the production of hybrid transcripts that are implicated in leukemogenesis. Epidemiologic evidence suggests that some, but not all, individuals with a history of gamma-irradiation exposure are at increased risk of developing chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). CML is characterized by the Philadelphia chromosome and transcription of the resulting hybrid BCR-ABL gene. Utilizing the leukemia-associated BCR-ABL p210 transcript as a marker, we sought differences in the induction of illegitimate genetic recombination following high-dose gamma-irradiation of karyotypically normal lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) derived from individuals with and without a history of myeloid leukemias. Six LCL [4 leukemia patient derived [2 acute myeloid leukemia and 2 CML] and 2 from normal individuals were analyzed with reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for BCR-ABL under stringent conditions following exposure to 0, 50, or 100 Gy of LET gamma-irradiation delivered via a Varian linear accelerator at 4 MV. Transcripts identical to disease-associated b2a2 and b3a2 transcripts were detected both spontaneously (background illegitimate genetic recombination) and following gamma-irradiation. Background BCR-ABL positivity was demonstrable in 4 of the 6 LCL, with no significant difference in detection between leukemic- and nonleukemic-derived LCL. Overall, increasing gamma-irradiation dose resulted in an increased frequency of BCR-ABL transcript detection (0 Gy vs 50 Gy vs 100 Gy,p = 0.0023, Chi-square test). Within the leukemic- but not the nonleukemic-derived LCL there was significantly greater BCR-ABL positivity after gamma-irradiation compared to unirradiated equivalents. Furthermore, the BCR-ABL positivity of both

  4. Studying the protein expression in human B lymphoblastoid cells exposed to 1.8-GHz (GSM) radiofrequency radiation (RFR) with protein microarray.

    PubMed

    Zhijian, Chen; Xiaoxue, Li; Wei, Zheng; Yezhen, Lu; Jianlin, Lou; Deqiang, Lu; Shijie, Chen; Lifen, Jin; Jiliang, He

    2013-03-29

    In the present study, the protein microarray was used to investigate the protein expression in human B-cell lymphoblastoid cells intermittently exposed to 1.8-GHz GSM radiofrequency radiation (RFR) at the specific absorption rate (SAR) of 2.0 W/kg for 24 h. The differential expression of 27 proteins was found, which were related to DNA damage repair, apoptosis, oncogenesis, cell cycle and proliferation (ratio >1.5-fold, P<0.05). The results validated with Western blot assay indicated that the expression of RPA32 was significantly down-regulated (P<0.05) while the expression of p73 was significantly up-regulated in RFR exposure group (P<0.05). Because of the crucial roles of those proteins in DNA repair and cell apoptosis, the results of present investigation may explain the biological effects of RFR on DNA damage/repair and cell apoptosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Activation of 3-nitrobenzanthrone and its metabolites to DNA-damaging species in human B lymphoblastoid MCL-5 cells.

    PubMed

    Arlt, Volker M; Cole, Kathleen J; Phillips, David H

    2004-03-01

    3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) is one of the most potent mutagens in the Ames Salmonella typhimurium assay and a suspected human carcinogen recently identified in diesel exhaust and in airborne particulate matter. 3-Aminobenzanthrone (3-ABA), 3-acetylaminobenzanthrone (3-Ac-ABA) and N-acetyl-N-hydroxy-3-aminobenzanthrone (N-Ac-N-OH-ABA) have been identified as 3-NBA metabolites. In the present study we investigated the genotoxic effects of 3-NBA and its metabolites in the human B lymphoblastoid cell line MCL-5. DNA strand breaks were measured using the Comet assay, chromosomal damage was assessed using the micronucleus assay and DNA adduct formation was determined by 32P-post-labelling analysis. DNA strand-breaking activity was observed with each compound in a concentration-dependent manner (1-50 microM, 2 h incubation time). At 50 microM median comet tail lengths (CTLs) were 25.0 microm for 3-NBA, 48.0 microm for 3-ABA, 54.5 microm for 3-Ac-ABA and 65.0 microm for N-Ac-N-OH-ABA. Median CTLs in control incubations were in the range 7.7-13.1 micro m. Moreover, the strand-breaking activity of 3-NBA was more pronounced in the presence of a DNA repair inhibitor, hydroxyurea. Depending on the concentration used (1-20 microM, 24 h incubation time), 3-NBA and its metabolites also showed clastogenic activity in the micronucleus assay. 3-NBA and N-Ac-N-OH-ABA were the most active at low concentrations; at 1 microM the total number of micronuclei per 500 binucleate cells was 4.7 +/- 0.6 in both cases, compared with 1.7-3.0 for controls (P < 0.05). Furthermore, multiple DNA adducts were detected with each compound (1 microM, 24 h incubation time), essentially similar to those found recently in vivo in rats treated with 3-NBA or its metabolites. DNA adduct levels ranged from 1.3 to 42.8 and from 2.0 to 39.8 adducts/10(8) nt using the nuclease P1 and butanol enrichment procedures, respectively. DNA binding was highest for N-Ac-N-OH-ABA, followed by 3-NBA, and much lower for 3-ABA

  6. Apoptotic death induced by the cyclophosphamide analogue mafosfamide in human lymphoblastoid cells: Contribution of DNA replication, transcription inhibition and Chk/p53 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, Michael; Roos, Wynand P. Kaina, Bernd

    2008-05-15

    Cyclophosphamide is one of the most often used anticancer drugs. Although DNA interstrand cross-links are considered responsible for its cytotoxicity, the mechanism of initiation and execution of cell death is largely unknown. Using the cyclophosphamide analogue mafosfamide, which does not need metabolic activation, we show that mafosfamide induces apoptosis dose and time dependently in lymphoblastoid cells, with clearly more apoptosis in p53{sup wt} cells. We identified two upstream processes that initiate apoptosis, DNA replication blockage and transcriptional inhibition. In lymphoblastoid cells, wherein DNA replication can be switched off by tetracycline, proliferation is required for inducing apoptosis at low dose mafosfamide. At high dose, transcriptional inhibition also contributes to cell death. The RNA synthesis inhibitor {alpha}-amanitin induced similar to mafosfamide more apoptosis in p53{sup wt} than in p53{sup mt} cells. In combination with mafosfamide, however, {alpha}-amanitin had no additive effect. Mafosfamide caused p53 stabilization by phosphorylation of Ser15, 20 and 37, and activation of ATM/ATR and Chk1/Chk2. Inhibition of ATM/ATR, PI3-kinase and Chk1/Chk2 by CGK733, wortmannin and DBH, respectively, attenuated the apoptotic response in p53{sup wt} but not p53{sup mt} cells. Mafosfamide induced caspase dependent apoptosis and, for low dose treated cells, caspases were preferentially activated in the S-phase, whereas at high dose caspases were activated in all cell cycle stages. These data support the conclusion that at low dose level of mafosfamide, DNA replication blockage is the dominant apoptosis-inducing event, while at high dose, transcriptional inhibition comes into play. The data provide a mechanistic explanation of why cyclophosphamide applied at therapeutic doses preferentially kills replicating tumor cells.

  7. EBV Zta protein induces the expression of interleukin-13, promoting the proliferation of EBV-infected B cells and lymphoblastoid cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shu-Chun; Lin, Sue-Jane; Chen, Po-Wen; Luo, Wen-Yi; Yeh, Te-Huei; Wang, Hsei-Wei; Chen, Chi-Ju

    2009-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection can modify the cytokine expression profiles of host cells and determine the fate of those cells. Of note, expression of interleukin-13 (IL-13) may be detected in EBV-associated Hodgkin lymphoma and the natural killer (NK) cells of chronic active EBV-infected patients, but its biologic role and regulatory mechanisms are not understood. Using cytokine antibody arrays, we found that IL-13 production is induced in B cells early during EBV infection. Furthermore, the EBV lytic protein, Zta (also known as the BZLF-1 product), which is a transcriptional activator, was found to induce IL-13 expression following transfection. Mechanistically, induction of IL-13 expression by Zta is mediated directly through its binding to the IL-13 promoter, via a consensus AP-1 binding site. Blockade of IL-13 by antibody neutralization showed that IL-13 is required at an early stage of EBV-induced proliferation and for long-term maintenance of the growth of EBV immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). Thus, Zta-induced IL-13 production facilitates B-cell proliferation and may contribute to the pathogenesis of EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders, such as posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) and Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:19417211

  8. Use of lymphoblastoid cells for the estimation of environmental insults to DNA. Comprehensive report of the overall activities of the contract during the past three years. Progress report, August 1, 1978-June 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    Research progress is reported on a study to detect chronic low-level exposure of individuals to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by analysis of DNA in cells with low turnover rates. The technique used was to measure the level of excision repair activity in lymphoblastoid and lymphoma cell lines. (ACR)

  9. Host cell reactivation of uv- and X-ray-damaged herpes simplex virus by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, E.E.; Long, W.K.

    1981-12-01

    The efficacy of using an infected centers assay, employing herpes simplex virus-infected, Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) as components, to study host cell reactivation has been explored. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was shown through the infected centers assay to have detectable but varying ability to lytically infect LCLs established from chromosomal breakage syndromes or closely related genetic disorders. The rate of HSV inactivation by ultraviolet (uv) irradiation was faster in LCLs established from Cockaynes's syndrome than in normal LCLs, and faster still in LCLs established from xeroderma pigmentosum. These results indicate that Cockayne's syndrome, while having what appears to be quantitatively normal levels of uv-induced DNA repair replication, shows decreased ability to host cell reactivated uv-damaged HSV. In direct contrast, X-irradiated HSV showed identical survival when assayed on normal LCLs or LCLs established from ataxia telangiectasia showing increased sensitivity to X irradiation as measured by colony formation. Through the infected centers assay, it has also been possible to demonstrate low levels of multiplicity reactivation of mutagen-damaged HSV in permanently proliferating LCLs.

  10. The human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Rex regulatory protein exhibits an impaired functionality in human lymphoblastoid Jurkat T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hamaia, S; Cassé, H; Gazzolo, L; Duc Dodon, M

    1997-01-01

    The Rex protein of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) intervenes in the posttranscriptional regulation of proviral gene expression. Its binding to the Rex response element (XRE) present in the 3' long terminal repeat ensures the coordinate cytoplasmic accumulation of spliced and unspliced forms of viral messengers. Consequently, synthesis of viral structural and enzymatic proteins is strictly dependent on the Rex posttranscriptional activity. Here we report that synthesis of HTLV-1 envelope glycoproteins by Jurkat T cells could be detected only when they were regulated in a Rex-independent manner. Indeed, Jurkat T cells transfected with a Rex-dependent env expression vector (encompassing both the env and pX open reading frames) do not produce significant levels of envelope glycoproteins despite the production of significant amounts of Rex protein. The analysis of levels and distribution patterns of the unspliced env and of the singly spliced tax/rex transcripts suggests that the failure in envelope glycoprotein synthesis may be ascribed to a deficiency of Rex in mediating the nucleocytoplasmic transport of unspliced env RNAs in these cells. Furthermore, despite the synthesis of regulatory proteins, HTLV-1 structural proteins were not detected in Jurkat T cells transfected with an HTLV-1 infectious provirus. Conversely, and as expected, structural proteins were produced by Jurkat cells transfected by a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infectious provirus. This phenotype appeared to be linked to a specific dysfunction of Rex, since the functionally equivalent Rev protein of HIV-1 was shown to be fully efficient in promoting the synthesis of HTLV-1 envelope glycoproteins in Jurkat cells. Therefore, it seems likely that the block to Rex function in these lymphoblastoid T cells is determined by inefficient Rex-XRE interactions. These observations suggest that the acquisition of this Rex-deficient phenotype by in vivo-infected HTLV-1 T cells may

  11. Low Dose Radiation Response Curves, Networks and Pathways in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells Exposed from 1 to 10 cGy of Acute Gamma Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrobek, A. J.; Manohar, C. F.; Nelson, D. O.; Furtado, M. R.; Bhattacharya, M. S.; Marchetti, F.; Coleman, M.A.

    2011-04-18

    We investigated the low dose dependency of the transcriptional response of human cells to characterize the shape and biological functions associated with the dose response curve and to identify common and conserved functions of low dose expressed genes across cells and tissues. Human lymphoblastoid (HL) cells from two unrelated individuals were exposed to graded doses of radiation spanning the range of 1-10 cGy were analyzed by transcriptome profiling, qPCR and bioinformatics, in comparison to sham irradiated samples. A set of {approx}80 genes showed consistent responses in both cell lines; these genes were associated with homeostasis mechanisms (e.g., membrane signaling, molecule transport), subcellular locations (e.g., Golgi, and endoplasmic reticulum), and involved diverse signal transduction pathways. The majority of radiation-modulated genes had plateau-like responses across 1-10 cGy, some with suggestive evidence that transcription was modulated at doses below 1 cGy. MYC, FOS and TP53 were the major network nodes of the low-dose response in HL cells. Comparison our low dose expression findings in HL cells with those of prior studies in mouse brain after whole body exposure, in human keratinocyte cultures, and in endothelial cells cultures, indicates that certain components of the low dose radiation response are broadly conserved across cell types and tissues, independent of proliferation status.

  12. Low dose radiation response curves, networks and pathways in human lymphoblastoid cells exposed from 1 to 10cGy of acute gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Wyrobek, A J; Manohar, C F; Krishnan, V V; Nelson, D O; Furtado, M R; Bhattacharya, M S; Marchetti, F; Coleman, M A

    2011-06-17

    We investigated the low dose dependency of the transcriptional response of human cells to characterize the shape and biological functions associated with the dose-response curve and to identify common and conserved functions of low dose expressed genes across cells and tissues. Human lymphoblastoid (HL) cells from two unrelated individuals were exposed to graded doses of radiation spanning the range of 1-10cGy were analyzed by transcriptome profiling, qPCR and bioinformatics, in comparison to sham irradiated samples. A set of ∼80 genes showed consistent responses in both cell lines; these genes were associated with homeostasis mechanisms (e.g., membrane signaling, molecule transport), subcellular locations (e.g., Golgi, and endoplasmic reticulum), and involved diverse signal transduction pathways. The majority of radiation-modulated genes had plateau-like responses across 1-10cGy, some with suggestive evidence that transcription was modulated at doses below 1cGy. MYC, FOS and TP53 were the major network nodes of the low-dose-response in HL cells. Comparison our low dose expression findings in HL cells with those of prior studies in mouse brain after whole body exposure, in human keratinocyte cultures, and in endothelial cells cultures, indicates that certain components of the low dose radiation response are broadly conserved across cell types and tissues, independent of proliferation status. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Analysis of genome-wide RNA-sequencing data suggests age of the CEPH/Utah (CEU) lymphoblastoid cell lines systematically biases gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuan; Tian, Lei; Lu, Dongsheng; Xu, Shuhua

    2015-01-22

    In human, Lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from the CEPH/CEU (Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain - Utah) family resource have been extensively used for examining the genetics of gene expression levels. However, we noted that CEU/CEPH cell lines were collected and transformed approximately thirty years ago, much earlier than the other cell lines from the pertaining individuals, which we suspected could potentially affect gene expression, data analysis and results interpretation. In this study, by analyzing RNA sequencing data of CEU and the other three European populations as well as an African population, we systematically examined and evaluated the potential confounding effect of LCL age on gene expression levels and patterns. Our results indicated that gene expression profiles of CEU samples have been biased by the older age of CEU cell lines. Interestingly, most of CEU-specific expressions are associated with functions related to cell proliferation, which are more likely due to older age of cell lines than intrinsic characters of the population. We suggested the results be carefully explained when CEU LCLs are used for transcriptomic data analysis in future studies.

  14. Studying the protein expression in human B lymphoblastoid cells exposed to 1.8-GHz (GSM) radiofrequency radiation (RFR) with protein microarray

    SciTech Connect

    Zhijian, Chen; Xiaoxue, Li; Wei, Zheng; Yezhen, Lu; Jianlin, Lou; Deqiang, Lu; Shijie, Chen; Lifen, Jin; Jiliang, He

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► Protein microarray shows the differential expression of 27 proteins induced by RFR. ► RPA32 related to DNA repair is down-regulated in Western blot. ► p73 related to cell genome stability and apoptosis is up-regulated in Western blot. -- Abstract: In the present study, the protein microarray was used to investigate the protein expression in human B-cell lymphoblastoid cells intermittently exposed to 1.8-GHz GSM radiofrequency radiation (RFR) at the specific absorption rate (SAR) of 2.0 W/kg for 24 h. The differential expression of 27 proteins was found, which were related to DNA damage repair, apoptosis, oncogenesis, cell cycle and proliferation (ratio >1.5-fold, P < 0.05). The results validated with Western blot assay indicated that the expression of RPA32 was significantly down-regulated (P < 0.05) while the expression of p73 was significantly up-regulated in RFR exposure group (P < 0.05). Because of the crucial roles of those proteins in DNA repair and cell apoptosis, the results of present investigation may explain the biological effects of RFR on DNA damage/repair and cell apoptosis.

  15. Fluoroquinolones lower constitutive H2AX and ATM phosphorylation in TK6 lymphoblastoid cells via modulation of the intracellular redox status.

    PubMed

    Halicka, H Dorota; Smart, Daniel J; Traganos, Frank; Williams, Gary M; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2009-01-01

    Accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced damage and mutations in the genomic DNA is considered the primary etiology of aging and age-related pathologies including cancer. Strategies aimed at slowing these conditions often involve protecting against oxidative DNA damage via modulation of the intracellular redox state. Recently, a biomarker of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), serine 139-phosphorylated histone H2AX (gammaH2AX), and its upstream mediator, activated PI-3-related kinase, ATM (ATM(P1981)), were shown to be constitutively expressed in cells and modulated by antioxidant treatment. Thus, both constitutive histone H2AX phosphorylation (CHP) and constitutive ATM activation (CAA) are thought to reflect a cell's response to endogenous ROS-induced DSBs. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a battery of fluoroquinolone (FQ) compounds, namely ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, gatifloxacin, lomefloxacin and ofloxacin, on CHP and CAA in human TK6 lymphoblastoid cells. All FQs tested reduced CHP and CAA compared to controls following 6 and 24 h treatment with CAA being more sensitive to their effects at both time points. In addition, intracellular ROS levels and mitochondrial activities were also lowered in FQ-treated cells at 6 and 24 h.We presume that FQs mediate this effect via a combination of ROS-scavenging and mitochondrial suppression and therefore may protect against the onset or may slow the progression of numerous oxidative pathophysiological conditions.

  16. Different DNA damage response of cis and trans isomers of commonly used UV filter after the exposure on adult human liver stem cells and human lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anežka; Bányiová, Katarína; Babica, Pavel; El Yamani, Naouale; Collins, Andrew Richard; Čupr, Pavel

    2017-09-01

    2-ethylhexyl 4-methoxycinnamate (EHMC), used in many categories of personal care products (PCPs), is one of the most discussed ultraviolet filters because of its endocrine-disrupting effects. EHMC is unstable in sunlight and can be transformed from trans-EHMC to emergent cis-EHMC. Toxicological studies are focusing only on trans-EHMC; thus the toxicological data for cis-EHMC are missing. In this study, the in vitro genotoxic effects of trans- and cis-EHMC on adult human liver stem cells HL1-hT1 and human-derived lymphoblastoid cells TK-6 using a high-throughput comet assay were studied. TK-6 cells treated with cis-EHMC showed a high level of DNA damage when compared to untreated cells in concentrations 1.56 to 25μgmL(-1). trans-EHMC showed genotoxicity after exposure to the two highest concentrations 12.5 and 25μgmL(-1). The increase in DNA damage on HL1-hT1 cells induced by cis-EHMC and trans-EHMC was detected at the concentration 25μgmL(-1). The No observed adverse effect level (NOAEL, mg kg(-1)bwday(-1)) was determined using a Quantitative in vitro to in vivo extrapolation (QIVIVE) approach: NOAELtrans-EHMC=3.07, NOAELcis-EHMC=0.30 for TK-6 and NOAELtrans-EHMC=26.46, NOAELcis-EHMC=20.36 for HL1-hT1. The hazard index (HI) was evaluated by comparing the reference dose (RfD, mgkg(-1)bwday(-1)) obtained from our experimental data with the chronic daily intake (CDI) of the female population. Using comet assay experimental data with the more sensitive TK-6 cells, HIcis-EHMC was 7 times higher than HItrans-EHMC. In terms of CDI, relative contributions were; dermal exposure route>oral>inhalation. According to our results we recommend the RfDtrans-EHMC=0.20 and RfDcis-EHMC=0.02 for trans-EHMC and cis-EHMC, respectively, to use for human health risk assessment. The significant difference in trans-EHMC and cis-EHMC response points to the need for toxicological reevaluation and application reassessment of both isomers in PCPs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  17. Synergistic Effects of Incubation in Rotating Bioreactors and Cumulative Low Dose 60Co γ-ray Irradiation on Human Immortal Lymphoblastoid Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Lijun; Han, Fang; Yue, Lei; Zheng, Hongxia; Yu, Dan; Ma, Xiaohuan; Cheng, Huifang; Li, Yu

    2012-11-01

    The complex space environments can influence cell structure and function. The research results on space biology have shown that the major mutagenic factors in space are microgravity and ionizing radiation. In addition, possible synergistic effects of radiation and microgravity on human cells are not well understood. In this study, human immortal lymphoblastoid cells were established from human peripheral blood lymphocytes and the cells were treated with low dose (0.1, 0.15 and 0.2 Gy) cumulative 60Co γ-irradiation and simulated weightlessness [obtained by culturing cells in the Rotating Cell Culture System (RCCS)]. The commonly used indexes of cell damage such as micronucleus rate, cell cycle and mitotic index were studied. Previous work has proved that Gadd45 (growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible protein 45) gene increases with a dose-effect relationship, and will possibly be a new biological dosimeter to show irradiation damage. So Gadd45 expression is also detected in this study. The micronucleus rate and the expression of Gadd45α gene increased with irradiation dose and were much higher after incubation in the rotating bioreactor than that in the static irradiation group, while the cell proliferation after incubation in the rotating bioreactor decreased at the same time. These results indicate synergetic effects of simulated weightlessness and low dose irradiation in human cells. The cell damage inflicted by γ-irradiation increased under simulated weightlessness. Our results suggest that during medium- and long-term flight, the human body can be damaged by cumulative low dose radiation, and the damage will even be increased by microgravity in space.

  18. Efficient and reliable establishment of lymphoblastoid cell lines by Epstein-Barr virus transformation from a limited amount of peripheral blood

    PubMed Central

    Omi, Natsue; Tokuda, Yuichi; Ikeda, Yoko; Ueno, Morio; Mori, Kazuhiko; Sotozono, Chie; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Nakano, Masakazu; Tashiro, Kei

    2017-01-01

    Lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) transformed by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) serve as an unlimited resource of human genomic DNA. The protocol that is widely used to establish LCLs involves peripheral blood mononuclear cell isolation by density gradient centrifugation, however, that method requires as much as 5 ml of peripheral blood. In this study, in order to provide a more simple and efficient method for the generation of LCLs, we developed a new protocol using hemolytic reaction to enrich white blood cells for EBV transformation and found that the hemolytic protocol successfully generated LCLs from a small volume (i.e., 0.1 ml) of peripheral blood. To assess the quality of genomic DNA extracted from LCLs established by the hemolytic protocol (LCL-hemolytic), we performed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray genotyping using the GeneChip® 100 K Array Set (Affymetrix, Inc.). The concordances of the SNP genotyping resulting from genomic DNA from LCL-hemolytic (99.92%) were found to be as good as the technical replicate (99.90%), and Kappa statistics results confirmed the reliability. The findings of this study reveal that the hemolytic protocol is a simple and reliable method for the generation of LCLs, even from a small volume of peripheral blood. PMID:28272413

  19. Microwave electromagnetic field regulates gene expression in T-lymphoblastoid leukemia CCRF-CEM cell line exposed to 900 MHz.

    PubMed

    Trivino Pardo, Juan Carlos; Grimaldi, Settimio; Taranta, Monia; Naldi, Ilaria; Cinti, Caterina

    2012-03-01

    Electric, magnetic, and electromagnetic fields are ubiquitous in our society, and concerns have been expressed regarding possible adverse effects of these exposures. Research on Extremely Low-Frequency (ELF) magnetic fields has been performed for more than two decades, and the methodology and quality of studies have improved over time. Studies have consistently shown increased risk for childhood leukemia associated with ELF magnetic fields. There are still inadequate data for other outcomes. More recently, focus has shifted toward Radio Frequencies (RF) exposures from mobile telephony. There are no persuasive data suggesting a health risk, but this research field is still immature with regard to the quantity and quality of available data. This technology is constantly changing and there is a need for continued research on this issue. To investigate whether exposure to high-frequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) could induce adverse health effects, we cultured acute T-lymphoblastoid leukemia cells (CCRF-CEM) in the presence of 900 MHz MW-EMF generated by a transverse electromagnetic (TEM) cell at short and long exposure times. We evaluated the effect of high-frequency EMF on gene expression and we identified functional pathways influenced by 900 MHz MW-EMF exposure.

  20. Gene expression profiling of lymphoblastoid cell lines from monozygotic twins discordant in severity of autism reveals differential regulation of neurologically relevant genes

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Valerie W; Frank, Bryan C; Heine, Shannon; Lee, Norman H; Quackenbush, John

    2006-01-01

    Background The autism spectrum encompasses a set of complex multigenic developmental disorders that severely impact the development of language, non-verbal communication, and social skills, and are associated with odd, stereotyped, repetitive behavior and restricted interests. To date, diagnosis of these neurologically based disorders relies predominantly upon behavioral observations often prompted by delayed speech or aberrant behavior, and there are no known genes that can serve as definitive biomarkers for the disorders. Results Here we demonstrate, for the first time, that lymphoblastoid cell lines from monozygotic twins discordant with respect to severity of autism and/or language impairment exhibit differential gene expression patterns on DNA microarrays. Furthermore, we show that genes important to the development, structure, and/or function of the nervous system are among the most differentially expressed genes, and that many of these genes map closely in silico to chromosomal regions containing previously reported autism candidate genes or quantitative trait loci. Conclusion Our results provide evidence that novel candidate genes for autism may be differentially expressed in lymphoid cell lines from individuals with autism spectrum disorders. This finding further suggests the possibility of developing a molecular screen for autism based on expressed biomarkers in peripheral blood lymphocytes, an easily accessible tissue. In addition, gene networks are identified that may play a role in the pathophysiology of autism. PMID:16709250

  1. Serological studies of HL-A on continuous lymphoblastoid cell lines (CLC) and the definition of an antigen on CLC determined by a heat-labile antibody*

    PubMed Central

    Dumble, Lynette; Jack, I.; Morris, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Continuous lymphoblastoid cell lines (CLC) are more reactive with HL-A antisera in a complement-dependent cytotoxic test than are peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). This additional reactivity leads to assignment to a given CLC of more than four HL-A antigens, the maximum allowable under the two locus concept of the genetic control of HL-A. However, absorption of antisera by CLC shows that no more than four HL-A antigens exist on any of the CLC used in this laboratory. The additional reactivity of these cells lines can be explained in three ways. Firstly, it may be due to the presence of sublytic amounts of HL-A antibody in operationally monospecific antisera. Secondly, it may be due to cross-reactivity between HL-A antigens. Both these findings can be explained on the basis of the increased quantity of HL-A antigens on CLC compared to PBL. Thirdly, it may be due to the presence of a heat-labile (56° for 30 min) complement-dependent cytotoxic antibody which is present in 90% of normal human sera, and detects an antigen group tentatively labelled `D'. PMID:4466611

  2. Zinc carnosine protects against hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage in WIL2-NS lymphoblastoid cell line independent of poly (ADP-Ribose) polymerase expression.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Theng Choon; Mohammad, Nur Hafiza; Sharif, Razinah

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the ability of zinc carnosine to protect the human lymphoblastoid (WIL2-NS) cell line from hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage. Cells were cultured with medium containing zinc carnosine at the concentrations of 0.4, 4, 16 and 32 μM for 9 days prior to treatment with 30 μM of hydrogen peroxide (30 min). Zinc carnosine at the concentration 16 μM was optimal in protecting cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity and gave the lowest percentage of apoptotic and necrotic cells. Results showed that zinc carnosine was able to induce glutathione production and protect cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress at all concentration and the highest protection was observed at 32-μM zinc carnosine culture. Cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay showed that cells cultured with 4-32 μM of zinc carnosine showed significant reduction in micronuclei formation, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear bud frequencies (p < 0.05), suggesting that these concentrations maybe optimal in protecting cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage. However, after being challenged with hydrogen peroxide, no increase in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase expression was observed. Thus, results from this study demonstrate that zinc carnosines possess antioxidant properties and are able to reduce hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage in vitro independent of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Further studies are warranted to understand the mechanism of protection of zinc carnosine against hydrogen peroxide-induced damage.

  3. Exposure to 900 MHz electromagnetic field induces an unbalance between pro-apoptotic and pro-survival signals in T-lymphoblastoid leukemia CCRF-CEM cells.

    PubMed

    Marinelli, F; La Sala, D; Cicciotti, G; Cattini, L; Trimarchi, C; Putti, S; Zamparelli, A; Giuliani, L; Tomassetti, G; Cinti, Caterina

    2004-02-01

    It has been recently established that low-frequency electromagnetic field (EMFs) exposure induces biological changes and could be associated with increased incidence of cancer, while the issue remains unresolved as to whether high-frequency EMFs can have hazardous effect on health. Epidemiological studies on association between childhood cancers, particularly leukemia and brain cancer, and exposure to low- and high-frequency EMF suggested an etiological role of EMFs in inducing adverse health effects. To investigate whether exposure to high-frequency EMFs could affect in vitro cell survival, we cultured acute T-lymphoblastoid leukemia cells (CCRF-CEM) in the presence of unmodulated 900 MHz EMF, generated by a transverse electromagnetic (TEM) cell, at various exposure times. We evaluated the effects of high-frequency EMF on cell growth rate and apoptosis induction, by cell viability (MTT) test, FACS analysis and DNA ladder, and we investigated pro-apoptotic and pro-survival signaling pathways possibly involved as a function of exposure time by Western blot analysis. At short exposure times (2-12 h), unmodulated 900 MHz EMF induced DNA breaks and early activation of both p53-dependent and -independent apoptotic pathways while longer continuous exposure (24-48 h) determined silencing of pro-apoptotic signals and activation of genes involved in both intracellular (Bcl-2) and extracellular (Ras and Akt1) pro-survival signaling. Overall our results indicate that exposure to 900 MHz continuous wave, after inducing an early self-defense response triggered by DNA damage, could confer to the survivor CCRF-CEM cells a further advantage to survive and proliferate. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Instability of the expanded (CTG){sub n} repeats in the myotonin protein kinase gene in cultured lymphoblastoid cell lines from patients with myotonic dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Ashizawa, Tetsuo; Patel, B.J.; Monckton, D.G.

    1996-08-15

    The mutation associated with myotonic dystrophy (DM) is the expansion of an unstable trinucleotide repeat, (CTG){sub n}, in the 3{prime}-untranslated region of the myotonin protein kinase gene. Although expanded repeats show both germline and somatic instability, the mechanisms of the instability are poorly understood. To establish a model system in which somatic instability of the DM repeat could be studied in more detail, we established lymphoblastoid cell lines (LBCL) from DM patients. Analysis of the DNA from DM LBCL using Southern blotting showed that the (CTG). repeats were apparently stable up to 29 passages in culture. To study infrequent repeat size mutations that are undetectable due to the size heterogeneity, we established LBCL of single-cell origins by cloning using multiple steps of limiting dilution. After expansion to approximately 10{sup 6} cells (equivalent to approximately 20 cell cycles), the DNAs of these cell lines were analyzed by the small pool PCR technique using primers flanking the (CTG), repeat region. Two types of mutations of the expanded (CTG){sub n} repeat alleles were detected: (1) frequent mutations that show small changes of the (CTG){sub n} repeat size, resulting in alleles in a normal distribution around the progenitor allele, and (2) relatively rare mutations with large changes of the (CTG){sub n} repeat size, with a bias toward contraction. The former may represent the mechanism responsible for the so matic heterogeneity of the (CTG), repeat size observe in blood cells of DM patients. This in vitro experimental system will be useful for further studies on mechanisms involved in the regulation of the somatic stability of the (CTG). repeats in DM. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  5. A factor shed by lymphoblastoid cell lines of HLA-B27 positive patients with ankylosing spondylitis, specifically modifies the cells of HLA-B27 positive normal individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Orban, P; Sullivan, J S; Geczy, A F; Upfold, L I; Coulits, N; Bashir, H V

    1983-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines from HLA-B27 positive individuals with ankylosing spondylitis (B27+AS+) release, into the culture medium, a factor capable of specifically modifying the HLA-B27 positive lymphocytes of normal individuals (B27+AS-); this modification results in a phenotypic change similar to that seen on B27+AS+ lymphocytes. This lymphoblastoid cell line derived factor appears to be physically and functionally similar to a factor present in the culture filtrate of certain Klebsiella isolates. Biogel P-100 chromatography of the material released from the cell line indicated a mol.wt of 25,000-30,000, similar to that of the Klebsiella derived factor. Chromatofocusing on a PBE 94 column revealed that cell line derived factor had an isoelectric point of 5.5 (cf. pI 5.4 for the Klebsiella derived factor). Immunoadsorption experiments suggest that the factor from the B27+AS+ cell line shares antigenic determinants with a cell surface component present on certain Klebsiella isolates. These results will form the basis for future studies on the nature of the interaction between HLA-B27 and certain enteric organisms and their products. A better understanding of this association should elucidate some of the early events in the pathogenesis of the seronegative arthropathies. PMID:6191893

  6. Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 Differentially Affects Lithium Sensitivity of Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines from Lithium Responder and Non-responder Bipolar Disorder Patients.

    PubMed

    Milanesi, Elena; Hadar, Adva; Maffioletti, Elisabetta; Werner, Haim; Shomron, Noam; Gennarelli, Massimo; Schulze, Thomas G; Costa, Marta; Del Zompo, Maria; Squassina, Alessio; Gurwitz, David

    2015-07-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic psychiatric illness with an unknown etiology. Lithium is considered the cornerstone in the management of BD, though about 50-60 % of patients do not respond sufficiently to chronic treatment. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) has been identified as a candidate gene for BD susceptibility, and its low expression has been suggested as a putative biomarker for lithium unresponsiveness. In this study, we examined the in vitro effects of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) on lithium sensitivity in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from lithium responder (R) and non-responder (NR) bipolar patients. Moreover, we evaluated levels of microRNA let-7c, a small RNA predicted to target IGF1. We found that exogenous IGF-1 added to serum-free media increased lithium sensitivity selectively in LCLs from NR BD patients. However, no significant differences were observed when comparing let-7c expression in LCLs from R vs. NR BD patients. Our data support a key role for IGF-1 in lithium resistance/response in the treatment of bipolar disorder.

  7. Statin-induced expression change of INSIG1 in lymphoblastoid cell lines correlates with plasma triglyceride statin response in a sex-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    Theusch, Elizabeth; Kim, Kyungpil; Stevens, Kristen; Smith, Joshua D.; Chen, Yii-Der I.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Medina, Marisa W.

    2016-01-01

    Statins are widely prescribed to lower plasma LDL cholesterol levels. They also modestly reduce plasma triglycerides (TG), an independent cardiovascular disease risk factor, in most people. The mechanism and inter-individual variability of TG statin response is poorly understood. We measured statin-induced gene expression changes in lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from 150 participants of a simvastatin clinical trial and identified 23 genes (FDR=15%) with expression changes correlated to plasma TG response. The correlation of insulin-induced gene 1 (INSIG1) expression changes with TG response (rho=0.32, q=0.11) was driven by men (interaction p=0.0055). rs73161338 was associated with INSIG1 expression changes (p=5.4×10−5) and TG response in two statin clinical trials (p=0.0048), predominantly in men. A combined model including INSIG1 expression level and splicing changes accounted for 29.5% of plasma TG statin response variance in men (p=5.6×10−6). Our results suggest that INSIG1 variation may contribute to statin-induced changes in plasma TG in a sex-specific manner. PMID:26927283

  8. RNA sequencing of transformed lymphoblastoid cells from siblings discordant for autism spectrum disorders reveals transcriptomic and functional alterations: Evidence for sex-specific effects.

    PubMed

    Tylee, Daniel S; Espinoza, Alfred J; Hess, Jonathan L; Tahir, Muhammad A; McCoy, Sarah Y; Rim, Joshua K; Dhimal, Totadri; Cohen, Ori S; Glatt, Stephen J

    2017-03-01

    Genome-wide expression studies of samples derived from individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and their unaffected siblings have been widely used to shed light on transcriptomic differences associated with this condition. Females have historically been under-represented in ASD genomic studies. Emerging evidence from studies of structural genetic variants and peripheral biomarkers suggest that sex-differences may exist in the biological correlates of ASD. Relatively few studies have explicitly examined whether sex-differences exist in the transcriptomic signature of ASD. The present study quantified genome-wide expression values by performing RNA sequencing on transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines and identified transcripts differentially expressed between same-sex, proximal-aged sibling pairs. We found that performing separate analyses for each sex improved our ability to detect ASD-related transcriptomic differences; we observed a larger number of dysregulated genes within our smaller set of female samples (n = 12 sibling pairs), as compared with the set of male samples (n = 24 sibling pairs), with small, but statistically significant overlap between the sexes. Permutation-based gene-set analyses and weighted gene co-expression network analyses also supported the idea that the transcriptomic signature of ASD may differ between males and females. We discuss our findings in the context of the relevant literature, underscoring the need for future ASD studies to explicitly account for differences between the sexes. Autism Res 2017, 10: 439-455. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Growth of diploid, Epstein-Barr virus-carrying human lymphoblastoid cell lines heterotransplanted into nude mice under immunologically privileged conditions.

    PubMed

    Giovanella, B; Nilsson, K; Zech, L; Yim, O; Klein, G; Stehlin, J S

    1979-07-15

    Human Epstein-Barr virus-carrying lymphoid cell lines which have been classified on the basis of studies on clonality and morphological, chromosomal and functional parameters as lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) of presumed non-neoplastic origin were inoculated intracerebrally into nude mice. All eighteen of them grew, killing the host mice within 7 to 25 days, except for 2 which grew more slowly. At autopsy, the brain of the nudes was found to be invaded by infiltrating lymphomas. Sixteen of these lymphomas, when recultured in vitro, gave rise to cell lines with growth properties and morphology indistinguishable from those of the inoculated LCL. Chromosomal examinations showed that 3/7 cell lines injected, which grew as lymphomas in the brain, were still normal diploid on reexplantation whereas the remaining four had become aneuploid. Four lines derived from intracerebral lymphomas (2 diploid, 1 aneuploid and 1 untested) were inoculated subcutaneously into adult nude mice. None of them grew. When the corresponding four original LCL lines were inoculated subcutaneously into newborn nude mice, they grew rapidly, but failed to do so in newborn normal mice or intracerebrally in adult normal mice. One such line, U-1450, was treated with anti-lymphocyte serum (ALS). Small nodules developed at the site of inoculation. From one nodule a cell line was cultured, 1450 ALSAD. It was morphologically indistinguishable from the line of origin. The lines obtained from nude mice inoculated with polyclonal LCL seem to have a restricted clonal representation, but were not monoclonal, as evidenced by analyses of their pattern of immunoglobulin synthesis.

  10. Molecular characterization of the GM 4672 human lymphoblastoid cell line and analysis of its use as a fusion partner in the generation of human-human hybridoma autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Rioux, J D; Rauch, J; Zdarsky, E; Newkirk, M M

    1993-07-01

    The GM 4672 lymphoblastoid cell line has been used in cell hybridization experiments with peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) in order to generate human-human hybridomas that secrete immunoglobulins directed against a number of different autoantigens. The GM 4672 cells were fused with PBLs isolated from patients with rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosus, or from normal individuals, and the resulting hybridomas were screened for reactivity to platelets, erythrocytes, DNA, cardiolipin, human IgG-Fc, phosphatidylethanolamine, and for lupus anticoagulant activity. This report analyzes the results from 149 fusion experiments completed over a period of nine years. Fifty to sixty-six percent of the fusion experiments resulted in immunoglobulin-secreting clones, with an average of 15 clones/fusion. The hybridoma antibodies were predominantly of the IgM heavy chain isotype, and 67% expressed kappa light chains. Although most hybridoma antibodies (78%) recognized a single autoantigen, 22% recognized more than one autoantigen and were considered polyreactive. In addition, the light and heavy chain variable regions of the antibody secreted by the GM 4672 cell line were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction technique and sequenced. The GM 4672 light chain was encoded by a VkI gene and used a Jk4 minigene. The GM 4672 heavy chain was derived for the rearrangement of a gene from the VH4 subgroup and used a JH4 minigene. The 8 amino acid long diversity region was generated by the fusion of the DK1 and DLR2 genes. The hybridomas generated in fusion experiments, when examined, did not appear to secrete antibodies using the immunoglobulin variable regions derived from the GM 4672 cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Proliferation rates and gene expression profiles in human lymphoblastoid cell lines from patients with depression characterized in response to antidepressant drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Breitfeld, J; Scholl, C; Steffens, M; Brandenburg, K; Probst-Schendzielorz, K; Efimkina, O; Gurwitz, D; Ising, M; Holsboer, F; Lucae, S; Stingl, J C

    2016-11-15

    The current therapy success of depressive disorders remains in need of improvement due to low response rates and a delay in symptomatic improvement. Reliable functional biomarkers would be necessary to predict the individual treatment outcome. On the basis of the neurotrophic hypothesis of antidepressant's action, effects of antidepressant drugs on proliferation may serve as tentative individual markers for treatment efficacy. We studied individual differences in antidepressant drug effects on cell proliferation and gene expression in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) derived from patients treated for depression with documented clinical treatment outcome. Cell proliferation was characterized by EdU (5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine) incorporation assays following a 3-week incubation with therapeutic concentrations of fluoxetine. Genome-wide expression profiling was conducted by microarrays, and candidate genes such as betacellulin-a gene involved in neuronal stem cell regeneration-were validated by quantitative real-time PCR. Ex vivo assessment of proliferation revealed large differences in fluoxetine-induced proliferation inhibition between donor LCLs, but no association with clinical response was observed. Genome-wide expression analyses followed by pathway and gene ontology analyses identified genes with different expression before vs after 21-day incubation with fluoxetine. Significant correlations between proliferation and gene expression of WNT2B, FZD7, TCF7L2, SULT4A1 and ABCB1 (all involved in neurogenesis or brain protection) were also found. Basal gene expression of SULT4A1 (P=0.029), and gene expression fold changes of WNT2B by ex vivo fluoxetine (P=0.025) correlated with clinical response and clinical remission, respectively. Thus, we identified potential gene expression biomarkers eventually being useful as baseline predictors or as longitudinal targets in antidepressant therapy.

  12. Proliferation rates and gene expression profiles in human lymphoblastoid cell lines from patients with depression characterized in response to antidepressant drug therapy

    PubMed Central

    Breitfeld, J; Scholl, C; Steffens, M; Brandenburg, K; Probst-Schendzielorz, K; Efimkina, O; Gurwitz, D; Ising, M; Holsboer, F; Lucae, S; Stingl, J C

    2016-01-01

    The current therapy success of depressive disorders remains in need of improvement due to low response rates and a delay in symptomatic improvement. Reliable functional biomarkers would be necessary to predict the individual treatment outcome. On the basis of the neurotrophic hypothesis of antidepressant's action, effects of antidepressant drugs on proliferation may serve as tentative individual markers for treatment efficacy. We studied individual differences in antidepressant drug effects on cell proliferation and gene expression in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) derived from patients treated for depression with documented clinical treatment outcome. Cell proliferation was characterized by EdU (5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine) incorporation assays following a 3-week incubation with therapeutic concentrations of fluoxetine. Genome-wide expression profiling was conducted by microarrays, and candidate genes such as betacellulin—a gene involved in neuronal stem cell regeneration—were validated by quantitative real-time PCR. Ex vivo assessment of proliferation revealed large differences in fluoxetine-induced proliferation inhibition between donor LCLs, but no association with clinical response was observed. Genome-wide expression analyses followed by pathway and gene ontology analyses identified genes with different expression before vs after 21-day incubation with fluoxetine. Significant correlations between proliferation and gene expression of WNT2B, FZD7, TCF7L2, SULT4A1 and ABCB1 (all involved in neurogenesis or brain protection) were also found. Basal gene expression of SULT4A1 (P=0.029), and gene expression fold changes of WNT2B by ex vivo fluoxetine (P=0.025) correlated with clinical response and clinical remission, respectively. Thus, we identified potential gene expression biomarkers eventually being useful as baseline predictors or as longitudinal targets in antidepressant therapy. PMID:27845776

  13. Mutagenicity and clastogenicity of extracts of Helicobacter pylori detected by the Ames test and in the micronucleus test using human lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Arimoto-Kobayashi, Sakae; Ohta, Kaori; Yuhara, Yuta; Ayabe, Yuka; Negishi, Tomoe; Okamoto, Keinosuke; Nakajima, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Oguma, Keiji; Otsuka, Takanao

    2015-07-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated a close association between infection with Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) and the development of gastric carcinoma. Chronic H.pylori infection increases the frequency of mutation in gastric epithelial cells. However, the mechanism by which infection of H.pylori leads to mutation in gastric epithelial cells is unclear. We suspected that components in H.pylori may be related to the mutagenic response associated with DNA alkylation, and could be detected with the Ames test using a more sensitive strain for alkylating agents. Our investigation revealed that an extract of H.pylori was mutagenic in the Ames test with Salmonella typhimurium YG7108, which is deficient in the DNA repair of O(6)-methylguanine. The extract of H.pylori may contain methylating or alkylating agents, which might induce O (6)-alkylguanine in DNA. Mutagenicity of the alkylating agents N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine in the Ames test with S.typhimurium TA1535 was enhanced significantly in the presence of the extract of H.pylori. The tested extracts of H.pylori resulted in a significant induction of micronuclei in human-derived lymphoblastoid cells. Heat instability and dialysis resistance of the extracts of H.pylori suggest that the mutagenic component in the extracts of H.pylori is a heat-unstable large molecule or a heat-labile small molecule strongly attached or adsorbed to a large molecule. Proteins in the extracts of H.pylori were subsequently fractionated using ammonium sulphate precipitation. However, all fractions expressed enhancing effects toward MNU mutagenicity. These results suggest the mutagenic component is a small molecule that is absorbed into proteins in the extract of H.pylori, which resist dialysis. Continuous and chronic exposure of gastric epithelial cells to the alkylative mutagenic component from H.pylori chronically infected in the stomach might be a causal factor in the gastric carcinogenesis

  14. Necrosis is increased in lymphoblastoid cell lines from children with autism compared with their non-autistic siblings under conditions of oxidative and nitrosative stress.

    PubMed

    Main, Penelope A E; Thomas, Philip; Esterman, Adrian; Fenech, Michael F

    2013-07-01

    Autism spectrum disorders are a heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental conditions characterised by impairments in reciprocal social interaction, communication and stereotyped behaviours. As increased DNA damage events have been observed in a range of other neurological disorders, it was hypothesised that they would be elevated in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) obtained from children with autism compared with their non-autistic siblings. Six case-sibling pairs of LCLs from children with autistic disorder and their non-autistic siblings were obtained from the Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE) and cultured in standard RPMI-1640 tissue culture medium. Cells were exposed to medium containing either 0, 25, 50, 100 and 200 µM hydrogen peroxide (an oxidative stressor) or 0, 5, 10, 20 and 40 µM s-nitroprusside (a nitric oxide producer) for 1h. Following exposure, the cells were microscopically scored for DNA damage, cytostasis and cytotoxicity biomarkers as measured using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay. Necrosis was significantly increased in cases relative to controls when exposed to oxidative and nitrosative stress (P = 0.001 and 0.01, respectively). Nuclear division index was significantly lower in LCLs from children with autistic disorder than their non-autistic siblings when exposed to hydrogen peroxide (P = 0.016), but there was no difference in apoptosis, micronucleus frequency, nucleoplasmic bridges or nuclear buds. Exposure to s-nitroprusside significantly increased the number of micronuclei in non-autistic siblings compared with cases (P = 0.003); however, other DNA damage biomarkers, apoptosis and nuclear division did not differ significantly between groups. The findings of this study show (i) that LCLs from children with autism are more sensitive to necrosis under conditions of oxidative and nitrosative stress than their non-autistic siblings and (ii) refutes the hypothesis that children with autistic disorder are abnormally

  15. Necrosis is increased in lymphoblastoid cell lines from children with autism compared with their non-autistic siblings under conditions of oxidative and nitrosative stress

    PubMed Central

    Fenech, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders are a heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental conditions characterised by impairments in reciprocal social interaction, communication and stereotyped behaviours. As increased DNA damage events have been observed in a range of other neurological disorders, it was hypothesised that they would be elevated in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) obtained from children with autism compared with their non-autistic siblings. Six case–sibling pairs of LCLs from children with autistic disorder and their non-autistic siblings were obtained from the Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE) and cultured in standard RPMI-1640 tissue culture medium. Cells were exposed to medium containing either 0, 25, 50, 100 and 200 µM hydrogen peroxide (an oxidative stressor) or 0, 5, 10, 20 and 40 µM s-nitroprusside (a nitric oxide producer) for 1h. Following exposure, the cells were microscopically scored for DNA damage, cytostasis and cytotoxicity biomarkers as measured using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay. Necrosis was significantly increased in cases relative to controls when exposed to oxidative and nitrosative stress (P = 0.001 and 0.01, respectively). Nuclear division index was significantly lower in LCLs from children with autistic disorder than their non-autistic siblings when exposed to hydrogen peroxide (P = 0.016), but there was no difference in apoptosis, micronucleus frequency, nucleoplasmic bridges or nuclear buds. Exposure to s-nitroprusside significantly increased the number of micronuclei in non-autistic siblings compared with cases (P = 0.003); however, other DNA damage biomarkers, apoptosis and nuclear division did not differ significantly between groups. The findings of this study show (i) that LCLs from children with autism are more sensitive to necrosis under conditions of oxidative and nitrosative stress than their non-autistic siblings and (ii) refutes the hypothesis that children with autistic disorder are abnormally

  16. The effect of zinc sulphate and zinc carnosine on genome stability and cytotoxicity in the WIL2-NS human lymphoblastoid cell line.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Razinah; Thomas, Philip; Zalewski, Peter; Graham, Robin D; Fenech, Michael

    2011-02-28

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential cofactor required by numerous enzymes that are essential for cell metabolism and the maintenance of DNA integrity. We investigated the effect of Zn deficiency or excess on genomic instability events and determined the optimal concentration of two Zn compounds that minimize DNA-damage events. The effects of Zn sulphate (ZnSO(4)) and Zn carnosine (ZnC) on cell proliferation were investigated in the WIL2-NS human lymphoblastoid cell line. DNA damage was determined by the use of both the comet assay and the cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome (CBMN-Cyt) assay. Zn-deficient medium (0μM) was produced using Chelex treatment, and the two Zn compounds (i.e. ZnSO(4) and ZnC) were tested at concentrations of 0.0, 0.4, 4.0, 16.0, 32.0 and 100.0μM. Results from an MTT assay showed that cell growth and viability were decreased in Zn-depleted cells (0μM) as well as at 32μM and 100μM for both Zn compounds (P<0.0001). DNA strand-breaks, as measured by the comet assay, were found to be increased in Zn-depleted cells compared with the other treatment groups (P<0.05). The CBMN-Cyt assay showed a significant increase in the frequency of both apoptotic and necrotic cells under Zn-deficient conditions (P<0.0001). Elevated frequencies of micronuclei (MNi), nucleoplasmic bridges (NPBs) and nuclear buds (NBuds) were induced in Zn-depleted cells (P<0.0001), whereas genome damage was reduced in supplemented cultures for both Zn compounds at 4μM and 16μM, possibly suggesting that these concentrations may be optimal for genome stability. The potential protective effect of ZnSO(4) and ZnC was also investigated following exposure to 1.0Gy γ-radiation. Culture in medium containing these compounds at 4-32μM prior to irradiation displayed significantly reduced frequencies of MNi, NPBs and NBuds compared with cells maintained in 0μM medium (P<0.0001). Expression of γ-H2AX and 8-oxoguanine glycosylase measured by western blotting was increased in Zn

  17. Biased dA/dT somatic hypermutation as regulated by the heavy chain intronic iEmu enhancer and 3'Ealpha enhancers in human lymphoblastoid B cells.

    PubMed

    Komori, Atsumasa; Xu, Zhenming; Wu, Xiaoping; Zan, Hong; Casali, Paolo

    2006-04-01

    Somatic hypermutation (SHM) in immunoglobulin gene (Ig) variable (V) regions is critical for the maturation of the antibody response. It is dependent on the expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and translesion DNA polymerases in germinal center B cells as well as Ig V transcription, as regulated by the Ig heavy chain (H) intronic enhancer (iEmu) and the 3' enhancer (3'Ealpha) region. We analyzed the role of these cis elements in SHM by stably transfecting Ramos human lymphoblastoid B cells with a rearranged human IgH chain VD (diversity) J (joining) DNA construct containing a V(H) promoter at the 5' end and C(H)1 and C(H)2 exons of Cgamma1 at the 3' end. In this construct, mutations preferentially targeted dA/dT basepairs in the RGYW/WRCY hotspot. Most of the dA/dT mutations and accompanying dC/dG mutations were transitions. Deletion of iEmu resulted in decreased SHM which could be partially restored by insertion of the IgH hs1,2 enhancer. Other two 3'Ealpha enhancers, hs3-hs4, did not significantly increase the mutation frequency, but further strengthened the dA/dT bias. The frequency and spectrum of the mutations were independent of the genomic integration of the transgene or V gene transcription level. Thus, we have established a novel in vitro system to analyze SHM and identify the role of multiple cis-regulatory elements in regulating dA/dT biased SHM. This model system will be useful to further address the role of other cis-regulating elements and recruited trans-acting factors in expressing the modalities of SHM.

  18. Class I major histocompatibility complex-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B lymphoblastoid cell lines against which they were raised.

    PubMed

    Hill, A B; Lee, S P; Haurum, J S; Murray, N; Yao, Q Y; Rowe, M; Signoret, N; Rickinson, A B; McMichael, A J

    1995-06-01

    We have raised CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) from three Epstein-Barr virus-seropositive donors by incubating peripheral blood lymphocytes with irradiated autologous B95.8-strain EBV-transformed B lymphoblastoid cells (LCL). However, to detect lysis in a standard 51Cr release assay of the LCL against which these CTL were raised, superinfection with recombinant vaccinia expressing the appropriate EBV protein or incubation with the peptide epitope was necessary. The untreated LCL were not lysed, even though Western blotting demonstrated that they expressed the EBV antigens containing the CTL epitopes. We have found CTL of this phenotype that are restricted by human leukocyte antigen-A2, -A3, -B7, or -B39, and which recognize the EBV latent proteins, EBV nuclear antigen (EBNA)-3A, EBNA-3C, or terminal protein. During these experiments, we identified a new human leukocyte antigen-A3-restricted EBNA-3A epitope, residues 603-611, RLRAEAGVK. We raised a spontaneous LCL, transformed by endogenous EBV, from one donor, but this was also not lysed. For at least one of the epitopes, CTL from another donor lysed the LCL without superinfection or addition of peptides. We conclude that the CTL were unable to achieve a high enough avidity of interaction with untreated LCL to trigger effector function, although the LCL were able to stimulate them to grow in vitro for up to 4 mo. To assess whether a small percentage of the LCL might possess a higher antigen density, we used an assay of tumor necrosis factor release from a CTL clone, which was able to detect antigen-bearing cells representing only 1% of a stimulating LCL population. Nevertheless, the untreated autologous LCL line failed to stimulate tumor necrosis factor release.

  19. A Study of Alterations in DNA Epigenetic Modifications (5mC and 5hmC) and Gene Expression Influenced by Simulated Microgravity in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiping; Liu, Yunlong; Lossie, Amy C.; Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Cells alter their gene expression in response to exposure to various environmental changes. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation are believed to regulate the alterations in gene expression patterns. In vitro and in vivo studies have documented changes in cellular proliferation, cytoskeletal remodeling, signal transduction, bone mineralization and immune deficiency under the influence of microgravity conditions experienced in space. However microgravity induced changes in the epigenome have not been well characterized. In this study we have used Next-generation Sequencing (NGS) to profile ground-based “simulated” microgravity induced changes on DNA methylation (5-methylcytosine or 5mC), hydroxymethylation (5-hydroxymethylcytosine or 5hmC), and simultaneous gene expression in cultured human lymphoblastoid cells. Our results indicate that simulated microgravity induced alterations in the methylome (~60% of the differentially methylated regions or DMRs are hypomethylated and ~92% of the differentially hydroxymethylated regions or DHMRs are hyperhydroxymethylated). Simulated microgravity also induced differential expression in 370 transcripts that were associated with crucial biological processes such as oxidative stress response, carbohydrate metabolism and regulation of transcription. While we were not able to obtain any global trend correlating the changes of methylation/ hydroxylation with gene expression, we have been able to profile the simulated microgravity induced changes of 5mC over some of the differentially expressed genes that includes five genes undergoing differential methylation over their promoters and twenty five genes undergoing differential methylation over their gene-bodies. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first NGS-based study to profile epigenomic patterns induced by short time exposure of simulated microgravity and we believe that our findings can be a valuable resource for future explorations. PMID:26820575

  20. Effects of Vitamin K3 and K5 on Daunorubicin-resistant Human T Lymphoblastoid Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Nakaoka, Eri; Tanaka, Sachiko; Onda, Kenji; Sugiyama, Kentaro; Hirano, Toshihiko

    2015-11-01

    Anticancer efficacy of vitamin K derivatives on multidrug-resistant cancer cells has been scarcely investigated. The effects of vitamins K3 and K5 on proliferation of human leukemia MOLT-4 cells and on daunorubicin-resistant MOLT-4/DNR cells were estimated by a WST assay. Apoptotic cells were detected by Annexin V and propidium iodide staining, followed by flow cytometry. Vitamins K3 and K5 significantly inhibited proliferation of leukemic cells at 10 and 100 μM (p<0.05), and these effects were almost equally observed in both MOLT-4 and MOLT/DNR drug-resistant cells. Vitamin K3 induced cell apoptosis at 10 and 100 μM in both MOLT-4 and MOLT-4/DNR cells (p<0.05). Vitamin K5 also increased apoptotic cells, while rather inducing necrotic cell death. Vitamins K3 and K5 suppress MOLT-4 and MOLT-4/DNR cell-proliferation partially through induction of apoptosis, and these vitamin derivatives can overcome drug resistance due to P-glycoprotein expression. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  1. Oxidative Stress Induces Mitochondrial Dysfunction in a Subset of Autism Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines in a Well-Matched Case Control Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Shannon; Frye, Richard E.; Slattery, John; Wynne, Rebecca; Tippett, Marie; Pavliv, Oleksandra; Melnyk, Stepan; James, S. Jill

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing recognition that mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with the autism spectrum disorders. However, little attention has been given to the etiology of mitochondrial dysfunction or how mitochondrial abnormalities might interact with other physiological disturbances associated with autism, such as oxidative stress. In the current study we used respirometry to examine reserve capacity, a measure of the mitochondrial ability to respond to physiological stress, in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) derived from children with autistic disorder (AD) as well as age and gender-matched control LCLs. We demonstrate, for the first time, that LCLs derived from children with AD have an abnormal mitochondrial reserve capacity before and after exposure to increasingly higher concentrations of 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-napthoquinone (DMNQ), an agent that increases intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Specifically, the AD LCLs exhibit a higher reserve capacity at baseline and a sharper depletion of reserve capacity when ROS exposure is increased, as compared to control LCLs. Detailed investigation indicated that reserve capacity abnormalities seen in AD LCLs were the result of higher ATP-linked respiration and maximal respiratory capacity at baseline combined with a marked increase in proton leak respiration as ROS was increased. We further demonstrate that these reserve capacity abnormalities are driven by a subgroup of eight (32%) of 25 AD LCLs. Additional investigation of this subgroup of AD LCLs with reserve capacity abnormalities revealed that it demonstrated a greater reliance on glycolysis and on uncoupling protein 2 to regulate oxidative stress at the inner mitochondria membrane. This study suggests that a significant subgroup of AD children may have alterations in mitochondrial function which could render them more vulnerable to a pro-oxidant microenvironment derived from intrinsic and extrinsic sources of ROS such as immune activation and pro

  2. Comparative study of the metabolism of drug substrates by human cytochrome P450 3A4 expressed in bacterial, yeast and human lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Andrews, J; Abd-Ellah, M F; Randolph, N L; Kenworthy, K E; Carlile, D J; Friedberg, T; Houston, J B

    2002-11-01

    1. The aim was to compare the metabolic activity of human CYP3A4 expressed in bacteria (E. coli), yeast (S. cerevisiae) and human lymphoblastoid cells (hBl), with the native CYP3A4 activity observed in a panel of human livers. 2. Three CYP3A4 substrates were selected for study: dextromethorphan (DEM), midazolam (MDZ) and diazepam (DZ). The substrate metabolism in each of the four systems was characterized by deriving the kinetic parameters K(m) or S(50), V(max) and intrinsic clearance (CL(int)) or maximum clearance (CL(max)) from the kinetic profiles; the latter differing by 100-fold across the three substrates. 3. The K(m) or S(50) for the formation of metabolites 3-methoxymorphinan (MEM), 1'-hydroxymidazolam (1'-OH MDZ) and 3-hydroxydiazepam (3HDZ) compared well in all systems. For CYP3A4-mediated metabolism of DEM, MDZ and DZ, the V(max) for hBl microsomes were generally 2-9-fold higher than the respective yeast and human liver microsomes and E. coli membrane preparations, resulting in greater CL(int) or CL(max). In the case of 3HDZ formation, non-linear kinetics were observed for E. coli, hBl microsomes and human liver microsomes, whereas the kinetics observed for S. cerevisiae were linear. 4. The use of native human liver microsomes for drug metabolic studies will always be preferable. However, owing to the limited availability of human tissues, we find it is reasonable to use any of the recombinant systems described herein, since all three recombinant systems gave good predictions of the native human liver enzyme activities.

  3. The use of genome-wide eQTL associations in lymphoblastoid cell lines to identify novel genetic pathways involved in complex traits.

    PubMed

    Min, Josine L; Taylor, Jennifer M; Richards, J Brent; Watts, Tim; Pettersson, Fredrik H; Broxholme, John; Ahmadi, Kourosh R; Surdulescu, Gabriela L; Lowy, Ernesto; Gieger, Christian; Newton-Cheh, Chris; Perola, Markus; Soranzo, Nicole; Surakka, Ida; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Morris, Andrew P; Cardon, Lon R; Spector, Tim D; Zondervan, Krina T

    2011-01-01

    The integrated analysis of genotypic and expression data for association with complex traits could identify novel genetic pathways involved in complex traits. We profiled 19,573 expression probes in Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from 299 twins and correlated these with 44 quantitative traits (QTs). For 939 expressed probes correlating with more than one QT, we investigated the presence of eQTL associations in three datasets of 57 CEU HapMap founders and 86 unrelated twins. Genome-wide association analysis of these probes with 2.2 m SNPs revealed 131 potential eQTLs (1,989 eQTL SNPs) overlapping between the HapMap datasets, five of which were in cis (58 eQTL SNPs). We then tested 535 SNPs tagging the eQTL SNPs, for association with the relevant QT in 2,905 twins. We identified nine potential SNP-QT associations (P<0.01) but none significantly replicated in five large consortia of 1,097-16,129 subjects. We also failed to replicate previous reported eQTL associations with body mass index, plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides levels derived from lymphocytes, adipose and liver tissue. Our results and additional power calculations suggest that proponents may have been overoptimistic in the power of LCLs in eQTL approaches to elucidate regulatory genetic effects on complex traits using the small datasets generated to date. Nevertheless, larger tissue-specific expression data sets relevant to specific traits are becoming available, and should enable the adoption of similar integrated analyses in the near future.

  4. Modulation of the DNA damage response in UV-exposed human lymphoblastoid cells through genetic-versus functional-inactivation of the p53 tumor suppressor.

    PubMed

    Léger, Caroline; Drobetsky, Elliot A

    2002-10-01

    The global cellular response to UV-induced DNA damage has been analyzed in the p53-proficient human lymphoblastoid strain TK6 versus two isogenic derivatives wherein p53 activity was abrogated by diverse experimental approaches: (i) NH32, carrying a homozygous genetic knockout of p53; and (ii) TK6-5E, expressing the human papillomavirus E6 oncoprotein which binds and functionally inactivates p53 protein. Although widely employed as such, the extent to which intracellular E6 expression faithfully models the p53 deficient state still remains uncertain. Following irradiation with UV (either monochromatic 254 nm UV or broad-spectrum simulated sunlight), relative to wild-type TK6, p53-null NH32 exhibited virtually identical clonogenic survival and kinetics of G1-S progression but was nonetheless profoundly resistant to apoptosis. In addition, there were significant qualitative and quantitative differences between NH32 and TK6 with respect to UV mutagenesis at the endogenous hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) locus. However, important disparities were observed between genetically p53-deficient NH32 and E6-expressing TK6-5E regarding the manner in which they responded to UV-induced genotoxic stress in relation to wild-type TK6. Indeed, although NH32 and TK6-5E behaved similarly with respect to UV mutagenesis at the hprt locus, there were significant differences between these strains in clonogenic survival, apoptosis, and G1-S progression. Using a well-defined isogenic system, our data clearly reveal the influence of p53 inactivation on the global response of human cells to UV-induced DNA damage, and highlight an important caveat in the field of p53 biology by directly demonstrating that this influence varies substantially depending upon whether p53 function is abrogated genetically, or through E6 oncoprotein expression.

  5. Identification of genes modulated in rheumatoid arthritis using complementary DNA microarray analysis of lymphoblastoid B cell lines from disease-discordant monozygotic twins.

    PubMed

    Haas, Christian S; Creighton, Chad J; Pi, Xiujun; Maine, Ira; Koch, Alisa E; Haines, G Kenneth; Ling, Song; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Holoshitz, Joseph

    2006-07-01

    To identify disease-specific gene expression profiles in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), using complementary DNA (cDNA) microarray analyses on lymphoblastoid B cell lines (LCLs) derived from RA-discordant monozygotic (MZ) twins. The cDNA was prepared from LCLs derived from the peripheral blood of 11 pairs of RA-discordant MZ twins. The RA twin cDNA was labeled with cy5 fluorescent dye, and the cDNA of the healthy co-twin was labeled with cy3. To determine relative expression profiles, cDNA from each twin pair was combined and hybridized on 20,000-element microarray chips. Immunohistochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction were used to detect the expression of selected gene products in synovial tissue from patients with RA compared with patients with osteoarthritis and normal healthy controls. In RA twin LCLs compared with healthy co-twin LCLs, 1,163 transcripts were significantly differentially expressed. Of these, 747 were overexpressed and 416 were underexpressed. Gene ontology analysis revealed many genes known to play a role in apoptosis, angiogenesis, proteolysis, and signaling. The 3 most significantly overexpressed genes were laeverin (a novel enzyme with sequence homology to CD13), 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (a steroid pathway enzyme), and cysteine-rich, angiogenic inducer 61 (a known angiogenic factor). The products of these genes, heretofore uncharacterized in RA, were all abundantly expressed in RA synovial tissues. Microarray cDNA analysis of peripheral blood-derived LCLs from well-controlled patient populations is a useful tool to detect RA-relevant genes and could help in identifying novel therapeutic targets.

  6. Buparvaquone but not cyclosporin A prevents Theileria annulata-infected bovine lymphoblastoid cells from stimulating uninfected lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Rintelen, M; Schein, E; Ahmed, J S

    1990-06-01

    The influence of Buparvaquone on the morphology, proliferation, and stimulation with T and B cell mitogens of Theileria annulata-infected cells was studied. In addition, the stimulatory capacity of the infected cells before and after treatment with Buparvaquone or cyclosporin A (CsA) was also examined and compared to that of ConA-stimulated bovine peripheral blood cells (PBL). After incubation of the cells for 4 days with Buparvaquone only few schizonts were detectable in the cells. Prolongation of the incubation time to 8, 12, or 14 days eliminated completely the parasites. Despite the elimination of the parasites, the cells were still unable to undergo a proliferative response to Con A or PWM. However, the drug did not interfere with the response of normal PBL to these mitogens. Furthermore, Buparvaquone but not CsA inhibits the generation of mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). None of the drugs could prevent ConA-blasts from stimulating autologous PBL. These results suggest that the antigen expressed by the infected cells and recognised by the responder PBL was induced by the schizonts.

  7. Interferon-dependent induction of mRNA for the major histocompatibility antigens in human fibroblasts and lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fellous, M; Nir, U; Wallach, D; Merlin, G; Rubinstein, M; Revel, M

    1982-01-01

    In human cells treated with interferons, there is an increase in the amount of HLA-A,B,C and beta 2-microglobulin exposed on the cell surface. We have used a cloned HLA-A,B,C cDNA probe to demonstrate by molecular hybridization that this effect of interferon is preceded by a large increase in the amount of HLA mRNA in the cell. This effect was found in five different human cell lines, with purified leukocyte and fibroblast interferons. The increase in HLA mRNA is comparable in its kinetics and dose-response to the induction of (2'-5') oligo(A) synthetase mRNA by interferons. Therefore, interferons seem to activate at least two cellular genes which have different biochemical functions. Images PMID:6179076

  8. Theileria-mediated constitutive expression of the casein kinase II-alpha subunit in bovine lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Shayan, P; Ahmed, J S

    1997-01-01

    Theileria-infected cells are induced to undergo a transformation that is reversible, since their proliferation is inhibited after elimination of the schizonts by the theilericidal drug buparvaquone. The molecular mechanisms of the transformation remain unknown. The experiments described in the present report deal with the role of casein kinase (CK) II, a serine/threonine protein kinase, in the permanent proliferation of the parasitized cells and show that the CK II-alpha subunit is expressed in both T. annulata- and T. parva-infected cells and that its expression is closely related to the presence of the parasites in the host-cell cytoplasm. Thus, elimination of the schizonts by buparvaquone leads to the inhibition of CK II-alpha subunit mRNA expression without affecting the expression of actin. Cells treated with 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB) are inhibited in a dose-dependent manner from under-going DNA synthesis as measured by [3H]-thymidine incorporation and from expressing CK II. Furthermore, a host-cell-specific CK II-alpha antisense inhibits DNA synthesis in a dose-dependent manner. In the present study, 6 microM antisense reduced [3H]-thymidine incorporation by Theileria-infected bovine cells to about 50%. Using a primer derived from T. parva CK II, we detected a parasite-specific CK II mRNA in T. parva-infected cell lines. Interestingly. DRB also inhibited the expression of the parasite-specific CK II. However, to date we have not detected a target sequence for this primer in T. annulata schizonts.

  9. Induction of anti-EBNA-1 protein by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatment of human lymphoblastoid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Longthung; Tanaka, Akiko; Nonoyama, Meihan )

    1989-08-01

    Binding of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen (EBNA-1) to BamHI-C DNA was studied by affinity column chromatography followed by immunoblotting with human serum specific for EBNA-1. Two species of EBNA-1 (68 and 70 kilodaltons) were identified in nuclear extracts of the EBV-positive Burkitt's lymphoma cell line Raji and not in nuclear extracts of the EBV-negative Burkitt's lymphoma cell line BJAB. Both EBNA-1s bound specifically to the region required for EBV plasmid DNA maintenance (oriP) located in the BamHI-C fragment. Upon treatment with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, which activates latent EBV genome in Raji cells, the 68-kilodalton EBNA-1 was uncoupled from binding to EBV oriP. Nuclear extracts from 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-treated BJAB cells also uncoupled the binding of both EBNA-1s to oriP. DNA-cellulose column chromatography identified two protein species which competed for and uncoupled the binding of EBNA-1 to oriP. The two cellular competitors the authors called anti-EBNA-1 proteins had molecular masses of 60 and 40 kilodaltons, respectively. They were not found in nuclear extracts of BJAB cells not activated by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate.

  10. Transfer and expression of three cloned human non-HLA-A,B,C class I major histocompatibility complex genes in mutant lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Y; Geraghty, D E; Koller, B H; Orr, H T; DeMars, R

    1988-01-01

    The HLA-A, -B, and -C class I human histocompatibility antigens and the genes that encode them have been isolated and characterized. Apparently complete class I non-HLA-A, B, C genes have been identified on HindIII-generated 5.4-kilobase (kb), 6.0-kb, and 6.2-kb DNA fragments derived from lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL) 721. We studied the expressibility of these genes by subcloning them into the nonintegrating pHeBo vector and transferring the chimeric plasmids into mutant LCL 721.221. This mutant was derived from LCL 721 by means of immunoselections following gamma-ray mutagenesis that eliminated expressions of the HLA-A, -B, and -C alpha chains. The HLA-A, B, C-null phenotype of mutant 721.221 made it possible to monitor the expression of class I genes transferred into it by assaying cell surface binding of monoclonal antibodies BBM.1 and W6/32, which recognize beta 2-microglobulin and HLA class I alpha-chain epitopes, respectively. Increased binding of BBM.1 and W6/32 was clearly observed in transferents containing the class I gene of the 6.0-kb DNA fragment but not in transferents containing the class I genes of the 5.4- and 6.2-kb DNA fragments. However, one-dimensional gel electrophoresis of BBM.1 and W6/32 immunoprecipitates made with [35S]methionine-labeled cell lysates showed that transfer of each non-HLA-A, B, C class I gene into 721.221 resulted in the appearance of an alpha chain that coprecipitated with beta 2-microglobulin. The three previously unreported alpha chains differed from each other in size and were smaller than HLA-A, -B, and -C alpha chains. These observations clearly show that these three cloned, nonallelic, non-HLA-A, B, C class I genes encode alpha chains that can be expressed in human cells. Images PMID:3257565

  11. Epitope analysis of peanut allergen Ara h1 with oligoclonal IgM antibody from human B-lymphoblastoid cells.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To analyze epitopes of peanut allergen Ara h1, Epstein-Barr virus-transformed human peripheral oligoclonal B-cells were cultured to obtain antibodies to Ara h1. The combined reaction pattern with six oligoclonal antibodies showed there were six antibody binding areas named a to f in Ara h1. We found...

  12. The NRF2-KEAP1 Pathway Is an Early Responsive Gene Network in Arsenic Exposed Lymphoblastoid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Córdova, Emilio J.; Martínez-Hernández, Angélica; Uribe-Figueroa, Laura; Centeno, Federico; Morales-Marín, Mirna; Koneru, Harsha; Coleman, Matthew A.; Orozco, Lorena

    2014-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs), a major environmental contaminant, has risen as an important health problem worldwide. More detailed identification of the molecular mechanisms associated with iAs exposure would help to establish better strategies for prevention and treatment. Although chronic iAs exposures have been previously studied there is little to no information regarding the early events of exposure to iAs. To better characterize the early mechanisms of iAs exposure we conducted gene expression studies using sublethal doses of iAs at two different time-points. The major transcripts differentially regulated at 2 hrs of iAs exposure included antioxidants, detoxificants and chaperones. Moreover, after 12 hrs of exposure many of the down-regulated genes were associated with DNA replication and S phase cell cycle progression. Interestingly, the most affected biological pathway by both 2 or 12 hrs of iAs exposure were the Nrf2-Keap1 pathway, represented by the highly up-regulated HMOX1 transcript, which is transcriptionally regulated by the transcription factor Nrf2. Additional Nrf2 targets included SQSTM1 and ABCB6, which were not previously associated with acute iAs exposure. Signalling pathways such as interferon, B cell receptor and AhR route were also responsive to acute iAs exposure. Since HMOX1 expression increased early (20 min) and was responsive to low iAs concentrations (0.1 µM), this gene could be a suitable early biomarker for iAs exposure. In addition, the novel Nrf2 targets SQSTM1 and ABCB6 could play an important and previously unrecognized role in cellular protection against iAs. PMID:24516582

  13. Difference in susceptibility to morphological changes in the nucleus to aneugens between p53-competent and p53-abrogated lymphoblastoid cell lines (TK6 and NH32 cells) in the in vitro micronucleus assay.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kiyohiro; Nakajima, Yumi; Uematsu, Rieko; Chatani, Fumio

    2012-05-01

    We previously reported that the proportion of large-size micronuclei (MN) can be a reliable parameter to discriminate aneugens from clastogens in the in vitro MN assay using Chinese hamster lung cells. The frequencies of polynuclear (PN) and mitotic (M) cells are also supposed to be useful parameters for the same purpose since they are known to be increased by aneugens. In the present study, we investigated whether morphological observations of the cell nucleus can be applied for the in vitro MN assay using the p53-competent human lymphoblastoid cell line, TK6 cells. Our present MN assay with six clastogens and six aneugens revealed that the frequencies of large-size MN or PN cells cannot distinguish aneugens from clastogens, while the frequencies of M cells can distinguish them, suggesting that the M-cell frequency is a recommended parameter to determine a mode of action for MN induction in the in vitro MN assay using TK6 cells. Our further investigation using p53-null mutant NH32 cells showed that the frequencies of large-size MN or PN cells induced by aneugen treatments were higher than those in TK6 cells but not by clastogen treatments. These findings suggest that p53 abrogation promotes the susceptibility for morphological changes in the nucleus to aneugens and that morphological observation of the cell nucleus including size-classifying MN counting could distinguish aneugens from clastogens in the MN assay using NH32 cells.

  14. Global methylation profiling of lymphoblastoid cell lines reveals epigenetic contributions to autism spectrum disorders and a novel autism candidate gene, RORA, whose protein product is reduced in autistic brain

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, AnhThu; Rauch, Tibor A.; Pfeifer, Gerd P.; Hu, Valerie W.

    2010-01-01

    Autism is currently considered a multigene disorder with epigenetic influences. To investigate the contribution of DNA methylation to autism spectrum disorders, we have recently completed large-scale methylation profiling by CpG island microarray analysis of lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from monozygotic twins discordant for diagnosis of autism and their nonautistic siblings. Methylation profiling revealed many candidate genes differentially methylated between discordant MZ twins as well as between both twins and nonautistic siblings. Bioinformatics analysis of the differentially methylated genes demonstrated enrichment for high-level functions including gene transcription, nervous system development, cell death/survival, and other biological processes implicated in autism. The methylation status of 2 of these candidate genes, BCL-2 and retinoic acid-related orphan receptor alpha (RORA), was further confirmed by bisulfite sequencing and methylation-specific PCR, respectively. Immunohistochemical analyses of tissue arrays containing slices of the cerebellum and frontal cortex of autistic and age- and sex-matched control subjects revealed decreased expression of RORA and BCL-2 proteins in the autistic brain. Our data thus confirm the role of epigenetic regulation of gene expression via differential DNA methylation in idiopathic autism, and furthermore link molecular changes in a peripheral cell model with brain pathobiology in autism.—Nguyen, A., Rauch, T. A., Pfeifer, G. P., Hu, V. W. Global methylation profiling of lymphoblastoid cell lines reveals epigenetic contributions to autism spectrum disorders and a novel autism candidate gene, RORA, whose protein product is reduced in autistic brain. PMID:20375269

  15. Investigation of post-transcriptional gene regulatory networks associated with autism spectrum disorders by microRNA expression profiling of lymphoblastoid cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by abnormalities in reciprocal social interactions and language development and/or usage, and by restricted interests and repetitive behaviors. Differential gene expression of neurologically relevant genes in lymphoblastoid cell lines from monozygotic twins discordant in diagnosis or severity of autism suggested that epigenetic factors such as DNA methylation or microRNAs (miRNAs) may be involved in ASD. Methods Global miRNA expression profiling using lymphoblasts derived from these autistic twins and unaffected sibling controls was therefore performed using high-throughput miRNA microarray analysis. Selected differentially expressed miRNAs were confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis, and the putative target genes of two of the confirmed miRNA were validated by knockdown and overexpression of the respective miRNAs. Results Differentially expressed miRNAs were found to target genes highly involved in neurological functions and disorders in addition to genes involved in gastrointestinal diseases, circadian rhythm signaling, as well as steroid hormone metabolism and receptor signaling. Novel network analyses of the putative target genes that were inversely expressed relative to the relevant miRNA in these same samples further revealed an association with ASD and other co-morbid disorders, including muscle and gastrointestinal diseases, as well as with biological functions implicated in ASD, such as memory and synaptic plasticity. Putative gene targets (ID3 and PLK2) of two RT-PCR-confirmed brain-specific miRNAs (hsa-miR-29b and hsa-miR-219-5p) were validated by miRNA overexpression or knockdown assays, respectively. Comparisons of these mRNA and miRNA expression levels between discordant twins and between case-control sib pairs show an inverse relationship, further suggesting that ID3 and PLK2 are in vivo targets of the

  16. Identification of differentially transcribed genes in human lymphoblastoid cells irradiated with 0.5 Gy of gamma-ray and the involvement of low dose radiation inducible CHD6 gene in cell proliferation and radiosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, H P; Long, X H; Sun, Z Z; Rigaud, O; Xu, Q Z; Huang, Y C; Sui, J L; Bai, B; Zhou, P K

    2006-03-01

    To identify candidate genes specifically involved in response to low-dose irradiation in human lymphoblastoid cells; to better clarify the role of the human chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 6 gene (CHD6), one of these genes, in cell proliferation and radiosensitivity. DNA microarray technology was used to analyse global transcriptional profile in human lymphoblastoid AHH-1 cells at 4 h after exposure to 0.5 Gy of gamma-ray. Gene expression changes were confirmed by semi-quantitative reverse transcription--polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Northern blot. RNA interfering technology was employed to knock-down the CHD6 gene in A549 cells. Colony-forming ability was used to analyse radiosensitivity. The microarray assay revealed a set of 0.5 Gy-responsive genes, including 30 up-regulated genes and 45 down-regulated genes. The up-regulated genes include a number of genes involved in: signal transduction pathways, e.g., STAT3, CAMKK2, SIRT1, CREM, MAPK3K7IP2 and GPR56; transcription or DNA-binding, e.g., CHD6, CRSP3, SNURF, SH2 domain binding protein 1 and MIZF. Some of the down-regulated genes are involved in: cytoskeleton and cell movement (WASF2, LCP1, MSN, NIPSNAP1, KIF2C); DNA replication and repair (MCM2, MCM3, MCM7 and XRCC-4). Radiation-increased expression of CHD6 was also found in A549 cells and HeLa cells. The sustained CHD6 induction was restricted to relatively low doses (0.2 Gy or 0.5 Gy), no change occurring after 4 Gy irradiation. Silencing of CHD6 mediated by siRNA increased the growth rate of A549 cells by 40 approximately 60%. Most importantly, silencing CHD6 led to an increased radioresistance of A459 cells to radiation doses up to 2 Gy, but barely affected the sensitivity of cells at 4 and 8 Gy. This study has identified a set of genes responsive to 0.5 Gy of gamma-rays. CDH6 gene can be specifically up-regulated by low dose irradiation, and its inducible expression could be involved in a low dose hypersensitive response.

  17. Cadmium chloride, benzo[a]pyrene and cyclophosphamide tested in the in vitro mammalian cell micronucleus test (MNvit) in the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6 at Covance laboratories, Harrogate UK in support of OECD draft Test Guideline 487.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Paul; Whitwell, James; Jeffrey, Laura; Young, Jamie; Smith, Katie; Kirkland, David

    2010-10-29

    The following genotoxic chemicals were tested in the in vitro micronucleus assay, at Covance Laboratories, Harrogate, UK in the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6. Cadmium chloride (an inorganic carcinogen), benzo[a]pyrene (a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon requiring metabolic activation) and cyclophosphamide (an alkylating agent requiring metabolic activation) were treated with and without cytokinesis block (by addition of cytochalasin B). This work formed part of a collaborative evaluation of the toxicity measures recommended in the draft OECD Test Guideline 487 for the in vitro micronucleus test. The toxicity measures used, capable of detecting both cytostasis and cell death, were relative population doubling, relative increase in cell counts and relative cell counts for treatments in the absence of cytokinesis block, and replication index or cytokinesis blocked proliferation index in the presence of cytokinesis block. All of the chemicals tested gave significant increases in the percentage of micronucleated cells with and without cytokinesis block at concentrations giving approximately 60% toxicity (cytostasis and cell death) or less by all of the toxicity measures used. The outcomes from this series of tests support the use of relative increase in cell counts and relative population doubling, as well as relative cell counts, as appropriate measures of cytotoxicity for the non-cytokinesis blocked in the in vitro micronucleus assay. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Mitomycin C, 5-fluoruracil, colchicine and etoposide tested in the in vitro mammalian cell micronucleus test (MNvit) in the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6 at Novartis in support of OECD draft Test Guideline 487.

    PubMed

    Elhajouji, Azeddine

    2010-10-29

    The following reference genotoxic agents were tested in the in vitro micronucleus test, at Novartis, Basel, Switzerland. Mitomycin C, 5-fluoruracil, colchicine and etoposide were tested in the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6, with and without cytokinesis block (in the presence of cytochalasin B). This was done in support of the toxicity measures recommended in the draft OECD Test Guideline on In Vitro Mammalian Cell Micronucleus Test (MNvit) and was part of an international collaborative work. As toxicity measures, detecting cytostasis and cell death, relative cell counts (RCC), relative increase in cell counts (RICC), and relative population doubling (RPD) were used for treatments in the absence of cytokinesis block, and replication index (RI) or cytokinesis-blocked proliferation in the presence of cytokinesis block. All four reference agents were positive in the assay with and without cytokinesis block at concentrations giving approximately 50% toxicity or less as assessed by all of the toxicity measures used. Accordingly, the results of this work support the use of relative population doubling and relative increase in cell counts, as well as relative cell counts, as appropriate measures of toxicity for the non-cytokinesis-blocked in vitro micronucleus assay.

  19. Endogenous antigen presentation by autoantigen-transfected Epstein-Barr virus-lymphoblastoid cells. I. Generation of human thyroid peroxidase-reactive T cells and their T cell receptor repertoire.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, A; Magnusson, R P; Kendler, D L; Concepcion, E; Ben-Nun, A; Davies, T F

    1993-01-01

    To develop a model for endogenous thyroid autoantigen presentation, we transfected EBV-transformed B lymphoblastoid cell lines (EBV-LCL), established from patients with autoimmune thyroid disease and normal controls, with cDNA for the human thyroid autoantigen thyroid peroxidase (hTPO). hTPO-antigen presentation to patient peripheral blood T cells was demonstrated after stimulation in vitro for 7 d with irradiated hTPO-transfected or untransfected autologous EBV-LCL. Anti-hTPO-reactive T cells were subsequently cloned in the presence of irradiated, autologous hTPO-transfected EBV-LCL and IL-2.10 T cell-cloned lines exhibited specific hTPO-induced proliferation (stimulation indices of 2.1-7.9) towards autologous hTPO-transfected EBV-LCL, and were subjected to human T cell receptor (hTCR) V gene analysis, using the PCR for the detection of V alpha and V beta hTcR gene families. The results indicated a preferential use of hTCR V alpha 1 and/or V alpha 3 in 9 of the 10 lines. In contrast, hTCR V beta gene family use was more variable. These data demonstrate a model for the endogenous presentation of human thyroid peroxidase in the absence of other thyroid specific antigens. The high frequency of antigen-specific T cells obtained from PBMC using this technique will facilitate further studies at both the functional and hTCR V gene level. Images PMID:7682574

  20. Levels of Epstein-Barr virus DNA in lymphoblastoid cell lines are correlated with frequencies of spontaneous lytic growth but not with levels of expression of EBNA-1, EBNA-2, or latent membrane protein.

    PubMed Central

    Metzenberg, S

    1990-01-01

    The process of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-induced transformation of human B lymphocytes results in a cell line that is a mixture of latently and lytically infected cells, with the lytic cells composing roughly 5% to less than 0.0001% of the overall population. A set of nine normal lymphoblastoid cell lines that span a 100- to 200-fold range in average EBV DNA content were studied, and the frequency with which these cells entered a lytic phase of viral growth correlated with their EBV DNA copy number (as a population average). However, neither factor correlated with the levels of expression of transcript for the viral genes EBNA-1, EBNA-2, and latent membrane protein, nor did they correlate with the levels of EBNA-2 protein and latent membrane protein. The rate at which a cell line enters into lytic growth spontaneously is therefore not dependent on the overall steady-state levels of expression of these latent-phase genes. Images PMID:2152830

  1. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation enhances H-RAS protein stability and causes abnormal cell cycle progression in human TK6 lymphoblastoid cells treated with hydroquinone.

    PubMed

    Liu, Linhua; Ling, Xiaoxuan; Tang, Huanwen; Chen, Jialong; Wen, Qiaosheng; Zou, Fei

    2015-08-05

    Hydroquinone (HQ), one of the most important benzene-derived metabolites, can induce aberrant cell cycle progression; however, the mechanism of this induction remains unclear. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation), which is catalysed primarily by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), participates in various biological processes, including cell cycle control. The results of the present study show an accumulation in G1 phase versus S phase of TK6 human lymphoblast cells treated with HQ for 48h compared with PBS-treated cells; after 72h of HQ treatment, the cells transitioned from G1 arrest to S phase arrest. We examined the expression of six genes related to the cell cycle or leukaemia to further explore the reason for this phenomenon. Among these genes, H-RAS was found to be associated with this phenomenon because its mRNA and protein expression decreased at 48h and increased at 72h. Experiments for PARP activity induction and inhibition revealed that the observed PARylation was positively associated with H-RAS expression. Moreover, in cells treated with HQ in conjunction with PARP-1 knockdown, expression of the H-RAS protein decreased and the number of cells in G1 phase increased. The degree of poly(ADP-ribosyl) modification of the H-RAS protein increased in cells treated with HQ for 72h, further supporting that changes in PARylation contributed to the rapid alteration of H-RAS protein expression, followed by abnormal progression of the cell cycle. Co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) assays were employed to determine whether protein complexes were formed by PARP-1 and H-RAS proteins, and the direct interaction between these proteins indicated that PARylation regulated H-RAS expression. As detected by confocal microscopy, the H-RAS protein was found in the nucleus and cytoplasm. To our knowledge, this study is the first to reveal that H-RAS protein can be modified by PARylation.

  2. Global methylation profiling of lymphoblastoid cell lines reveals epigenetic contributions to autism spectrum disorders and a novel autism candidate gene, RORA, whose protein product is reduced in autistic brain.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, AnhThu; Rauch, Tibor A; Pfeifer, Gerd P; Hu, Valerie W

    2010-08-01

    Autism is currently considered a multigene disorder with epigenetic influences. To investigate the contribution of DNA methylation to autism spectrum disorders, we have recently completed large-scale methylation profiling by CpG island microarray analysis of lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from monozygotic twins discordant for diagnosis of autism and their nonautistic siblings. Methylation profiling revealed many candidate genes differentially methylated between discordant MZ twins as well as between both twins and nonautistic siblings. Bioinformatics analysis of the differentially methylated genes demonstrated enrichment for high-level functions including gene transcription, nervous system development, cell death/survival, and other biological processes implicated in autism. The methylation status of 2 of these candidate genes, BCL-2 and retinoic acid-related orphan receptor alpha (RORA), was further confirmed by bisulfite sequencing and methylation-specific PCR, respectively. Immunohistochemical analyses of tissue arrays containing slices of the cerebellum and frontal cortex of autistic and age- and sex-matched control subjects revealed decreased expression of RORA and BCL-2 proteins in the autistic brain. Our data thus confirm the role of epigenetic regulation of gene expression via differential DNA methylation in idiopathic autism, and furthermore link molecular changes in a peripheral cell model with brain pathobiology in autism.

  3. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear protein 3C binds to the N-terminal (NTD) and beta trefoil domains (BTD) of RBP/CSL; Only the NTD interaction is essential for lymphoblastoid cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Calderwood, Michael A.; Lee, Sungwook; Holthaus, Amy M.; Blacklow, Stephen C.; Kieff, Elliott; Johannsen, Eric

    2011-05-25

    Association of EBV nuclear proteins EBNA2, EBNA3A and EBNA3C with RBP/CSL, is essential for lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL) proliferation. Conserved residues in the EBNA3 homology domain, required for RBP/CSL interaction, lack the W{Phi}P motif that mediates EBNA2 and Notch binding to the RBP/CSL beta-trefoil domain (BTD). We map RBP/CSL interacting residues within EBNA3A(aa128-204) and EBNA3C(aa211-233). The EBNA3A results are consistent with an earlier report (aa125-222), but the EBNA3C domain is unexpectedly small and includes a 'WTP' sequence. This EBNA3C WTP motif confers RBP/CSL binding in vitro, in yeast, and in mammalian cells. Further, an EBNA3C WTP {yields} STP(W227S) mutation impaired BTD binding whereas EBNA3 homology domain mutations disrupted RBP/CSL N-terminal domain (NTD) binding. WTP was not essential for EBNA3C repression of EBNA2 in reporter assays or for maintenance of LCL growth. Our results indicate that EBNA3 proteins interact with multiple RBP/CSL domains, but only NTD interactions are required for LCL growth.

  4. Comparative investigations of sodium arsenite, arsenic trioxide and cadmium sulphate in combination with gamma-radiation on apoptosis, micronuclei induction and DNA damage in a human lymphoblastoid cell line.

    PubMed

    Hornhardt, Sabine; Gomolka, Maria; Walsh, Linda; Jung, Thomas

    2006-08-30

    In the field of radiation protection the combined exposure to radiation and other toxic agents is recognised as an important research area. To elucidate the basic mechanisms of simultaneous exposure, the interaction of the carcinogens and environmental toxicants cadmium and two arsenic compounds, arsenite and arsenic trioxide, in combination with gamma-radiation in human lymphoblastoid cells (TK6) were investigated. Gamma-radiation induced significant genotoxic effects such as micronuclei formation, DNA damage and apoptosis, whereas arsenic and cadmium had no significant effect on these indicators of cellular damage at non-toxic concentrations. However, in combination with gamma-radiation arsenic trioxide induced a more than additive apoptotic rate compared to the sum of the single effects. Here, the level of apoptotic cells was increased, in a dose-dependent way, up to two-fold compared to the irradiated control cells. Arsenite did not induce a significant additive effect at any of the concentrations or radiation doses tested. On the other hand, arsenic trioxide was less effective than arsenite in the induction of DNA protein cross-links. These data indicate that the two arsenic compounds interact through different pathways in the cell. Cadmium sulphate, like arsenite, had no significant effect on apoptosis in combination with gamma-radiation at low concentrations and, at high concentrations, even reduced the radiation-induced apoptosis. An additive effect on micronuclei induction was observed with 1muM cadmium sulphate with an increase of up to 80% compared to the irradiated control cells. Toxic concentrations of cadmium and arsenic trioxide seemed to reduce micronuclei induction. The results presented here indicate that relatively low concentrations of arsenic and cadmium, close to those occuring in nature, may interfere with radiation effects. Differences in action of the two arsenic compounds were identified.

  5. Genetic association with overall survival of taxane-treated lung cancer patients - a genome-wide association study in human lymphoblastoid cell lines followed by a clinical association study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Taxane is one of the first line treatments of lung cancer. In order to identify novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that might contribute to taxane response, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for two taxanes, paclitaxel and docetaxel, using 276 lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), followed by genotyping of top candidate SNPs in 874 lung cancer patient samples treated with paclitaxel. Methods GWAS was performed using 1.3 million SNPs and taxane cytotoxicity IC50 values for 276 LCLs. The association of selected SNPs with overall survival in 76 small or 798 non-small cell lung cancer (SCLC, NSCLC) patients were analyzed by Cox regression model, followed by integrated SNP-microRNA-expression association analysis in LCLs and siRNA screening of candidate genes in SCLC (H196) and NSCLC (A549) cell lines. Results 147 and 180 SNPs were associated with paclitaxel or docetaxel IC50s with p-values <10-4 in the LCLs, respectively. Genotyping of 153 candidate SNPs in 874 lung cancer patient samples identified 8 SNPs (p-value < 0.05) associated with either SCLC or NSCLC patient overall survival. Knockdown of PIP4K2A, CCT5, CMBL, EXO1, KMO and OPN3, genes within 200 kb up-/downstream of the 3 SNPs that were associated with SCLC overall survival (rs1778335, rs2662411 and rs7519667), significantly desensitized H196 to paclitaxel. SNPs rs2662411 and rs1778335 were associated with mRNA expression of CMBL or PIP4K2A through microRNA (miRNA) hsa-miR-584 or hsa-miR-1468. Conclusions GWAS in an LCL model system, joined with clinical translational and functional studies, might help us identify genetic variations associated with overall survival of lung cancer patients treated paclitaxel. PMID:23006423

  6. Biased dA/dT somatic hypermutation as regulated by the heavy chain intronic iEµ enhancer and 3′Eα enhancers in human lymphoblastoid B cells

    PubMed Central

    Komori, Atsumasa; Xu, Zhenming; Wu, Xiaoping; Zan, Hong; Casali, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Somatic hypermutation (SHM) in immunoglobulin gene (Ig) variable (V) regions is critical for the maturation of the antibody response. It is dependent on the expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and translesion DNA polymerases in germinal center B cells as well as Ig V transcription, as regulated by the Ig heavy chain (H) intronic enhancer (iEµ) and the 3′ enhancer (3′Eα) region. We analyzed the role of these cis elements in SHM by stably transfecting Ramos human lymphoblastoid B cells with a rearranged human IgH chain VD (diversity) J (joining) DNA construct containing a VH promoter at the 5′ end and CH1 and CH2 exons of Cγ1 at the 3′ end. In this construct, mutations preferentially targeted dA/dT basepairs in the RGYW/WRCY hotspot. Most of the dA/dT mutations and accompanying dC/dG mutations were transitions. Deletion of iEµ resulted in decreased SHM which could be partially restored by insertion of the IgH hs1,2 enhancer. Other two 3′Eα enhancers, hs3-hs4, did not significantly increase the mutation frequency, but further strengthened the dA/dT bias. The frequency and spectrum of the mutations were independent of the genomic integration of the transgene or V gene transcription level. Thus, we have established a novel in vitro system to analyze SHM and identify the role of multiple cis-regulatory elements in regulating dA/dT biased SHM. This model system will be useful to further address the role of other cis-regulating elements and recruited trans-acting factors in expressing the modalities of SHM. PMID:16412510

  7. Characterization of a lymphoblastoid line deleted for lambda immunoglobulin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Hough, C.A., White, B.N., Holden, J.A.

    1995-04-01

    While characterizing the cat eye syndrome (CES) supernumerary chromosome for the presence of {lambda} immunoglobulin gene region sequences, a lymphoblastoid cell line from one CES patient was identified in which there was selection of cells deleted from some IGLC and IGLV genes. Two distinct deletions, one on each chromosome 22, were identified, presumably arising from independent somatic recombination events occurring during B-lymphocyte differentiation. The extent of the deleted regions was determined using probes from the various IGLV subgroups and they each covered at least 82 kilobases. The precise definition of the deletions was not possible because of conservation of some restriction sites in the IGLV region. The cell line was used to map putative IGLV genes within the recombinant phage {lambda}V{lambda}135 to the distal part of the IGLV gene region. 35 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Persistent reversal of P-glycoprotein-mediated daunorubicin resistance by tetrandrine in multidrug-resistant human T lymphoblastoid leukemia MOLT-4 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen-Li; Hirano, Toshihiko; Tanaka, Sachiko; Onda, Kenji; Oka, Kitaro

    2003-11-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) represents a major problem in cancer chemotherapy. P-glycoprotein (P-gp), the drug efflux pump that mediates this resistance, can be inhibited by compounds with a variety of pharmacological functions, thus circumventing the MDR phenotype. The present study was performed to evaluate a unique MDR-reversal feature of a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid tetrandrine (TET) in a P-gp expressing MOLT-4 MDR line (MOLT-4/DNR) established in our laboratory. Cell viability was determined by an MTT assay. P-gp function was characterized by determining the Rh123 accumulation/efflux capacity. P-gp overexpression in resistant MOLT-4/DNR cells was confirmed by flow cytometry analysis after staining with phycoerythrin-conjugated anti-P-gp monoclonal antibody 17F9. Compared to ciclosporin A (CsA), TET exhibited stronger activity to reverse drug resistance to daunorubicin (DNR), vinblastine (VLB) and doxorubicin (DOX) in MOLT-4/DNR cells. TET showed no cytotoxic effects on parental MOLT-4 cells lacking P-gp expression or on the resistant MOLT-4/DNR cells. TET modulated DNR cytotoxicity even after it was washed with the medium for 24 h, while CsA almost completely lost its reversal capability 24 h after washing. TET and CsA similarly increased the accumulation of Rh123 in resistant MOLT-4/DNR cells. However, TET inhibited Rh123 efflux from resistant cells even after washing with the medium, while CsA rapidly lost its ability to inhibit Rh123 efflux after washing. The current study suggests that TET enhances the cytotoxicity of anticancer drugs in the P-gp expressing MDR cell line by modulating P-gp in a different manner to the well-known P-gp inhibitor CsA.

  9. Correction of interleukin-2 receptor function in X-SCID lymphoblastoid cells by retrovirally mediated transfer of the gamma-c gene.

    PubMed

    Taylor, N; Uribe, L; Smith, S; Jahn, T; Kohn, D B; Weinberg, K

    1996-04-15

    X-SCID, the most common form of human SCID, is due to mutations in the common gamma chain gene (gamma-c) that encodes an essential component of the cytokine receptors for interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, and IL-15. Activation of the Janus family tyrosine kinases Jak1 and Jak3 is necessary for appropriate signalling through the IL-2 receptor (IL-2R). Neither Jak1 nor Jak3 was phosphorylated after IL-2 stimulation of an Epstein-Barr virus-transformed cell line (LCL) from an X-SCID patient with a gamma-c null mutation. However, we now show that appropriate IL-2R function can be restored in an X-SCID LCL by transduction of a wild-type gamma-c gene. A retroviral vector, G1gamma-cSvNa, was constructed and produced in the PG13 packaging line. Transduced X-SCID LCL expressed the G1gamma-cSvNa transcript. IL-2 stimulation of the transduced cell line resulted in appropriate tyrosine phosphorylation of both Jak1 and Jak3. Thus, retroviral-mediated transduction of normal gamma-c can reconstitute downstream signalling through the IL-2R in X-SCID cell lines, suggesting that gene therapy may be a treatment for this disease.

  10. Altered kinetic properties of the branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase complex due to mutation of the beta-subunit of the branched-chain alpha-keto acid decarboxylase (E1) component in lymphoblastoid cells derived from patients with maple syrup urine disease.

    PubMed Central

    Indo, Y; Kitano, A; Endo, F; Akaboshi, I; Matsuda, I

    1987-01-01

    Branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKDH) complexes of lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from patients with classical maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) phenotypes were studied in terms of their catalytic functions and analyzed by immunoblotting, using affinity purified anti-bovine BCKDH antibody. Kinetic studies on three cell lines derived from patients with the classical phenotype showed sigmoidal or near sigmoidal kinetics for overall BCKDH activity and a deficiency of the E1 component activity. An immunoblot study revealed a markedly decreased amount of the E1 beta subunit accompanied by weak staining of the E1 alpha subunit. The E2 and E3 component exhibited a cross-reactive peptide. Thus, in at least some patients with MSUD, mutations of the E1 beta subunit might provide an explanation for the altered kinetic properties of the BCKDH complex. Images PMID:3597778

  11. Differential gene expression profiles in neurons generated from lymphoblastoid B-cell line-derived iPS cells from monozygotic twin cases with treatment-resistant schizophrenia and discordant responses to clozapine.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Takanobu; Kikuchi, Masataka; Ishikawa, Mitsuru; Yamamori, Hidenaga; Nagayasu, Kazuki; Matsumoto, Takuya; Fujimoto, Michiko; Yasuda, Yuka; Fujiwara, Mikiya; Okada, Shota; Matsumura, Kensuke; Kasai, Atsushi; Hayata-Takano, Atsuko; Shintani, Norihito; Numata, Shusuke; Takuma, Kazuhiro; Akamatsu, Wado; Okano, Hideyuki; Nakaya, Akihiro; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Hashimoto, Ryota

    2017-03-01

    Schizophrenia is a chronic psychiatric disorder with complex genetic and environmental origins. While many antipsychotics have been demonstrated as effective in the treatment of schizophrenia, a substantial number of schizophrenia patients are partially or fully unresponsive to the treatment. Clozapine is the most effective antipsychotic drug for treatment-resistant schizophrenia; however, clozapine has rare but serious side-effects. Furthermore, there is inter-individual variability in the drug response to clozapine treatment. Therefore, the identification of the molecular mechanisms underlying the action of clozapine and drug response predictors is imperative. In the present study, we focused on a pair of monozygotic twin cases with treatment-resistant schizophrenia, in which one twin responded well to clozapine treatment and the other twin did not. Using induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-based technology, we generated neurons from iPS cells derived from these patients and subsequently performed RNA-sequencing to compare the transcriptome profiles of the mock or clozapine-treated neurons. Although, these iPS cells similarly differentiated into neurons, several genes encoding homophilic cell adhesion molecules, such as protocadherin genes, showed differential expression patterns between these two patients. These results, which contribute to the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms of clozapine action, establish a new strategy for the use of monozygotic twin studies in schizophrenia research.

  12. Increased levels of glucocorticoid receptors and enhanced glucocorticoid receptor auto-regulation after hydrocortisone challenge in B-lymphoblastoids from patients with affective disorders.

    PubMed

    Henning, Uwe; Krieger, Klaus; Loeffler, Stefan; Rivas, Fabio; Orozco, Guillermo; de Castro, Manuel G; Rietschel, Marcella; Noethen, Markus M; Klimke, Ansgar

    2005-05-01

    The stress response is mediated by a negative feedback effect of glucocorticoids on corticosteroid receptors. Here, we examine the potential contribution of these receptors and their response to a glucocorticoid challenge to dysfunctions of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis reported for patients with affective disorders. In a pilot-study, we established B-lymphoblastoid cell lines from patients suffering from affective disorders and healthy subjects and measured the quantity of glucocorticoid receptors at steady state conditions after 12-weeks cell culture. After short-term incubation with 0.1 microM hydrocortisone for 48 h, the decrease of glucocorticoid receptors was also investigated. After 12-weeks cell culture, we found a significantly higher number of cytosolic glucocorticoid receptors in B-lymphoblastoids from patients (B(max)=804.9+/-342.5 fmol/mg protein) compared to those from healthy subjects (B(max)=576.9+/-190.3 fmol/mg protein: p=0.045; t-test). The increase of the glucocorticoid receptor level in the group of patients could be attributed largely to the higher number of these receptors measured in B-lymphoblastoids of patients suffering from major depressive disorder. The in vitro regulation of glucocorticoid receptors in response to 0.1 microM hydrocortisone for 48 h resulted in a significantly larger decrease in cultures of B-lymphoblastoids derived from patients (to 32.9+/-7.5%) than in those from healthy subjects (to 45.8+/-8.2%). The stronger decrease of glucocorticoid receptors in the group of patients (p=0.0001; t-test) was independent of the duration of illness and medication, suggesting a trait-like characteristic of the response.

  13. Radiation Induced Bystander Effects in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    34 observ6 peut etre caus6 par les interactions cellulaires via les prot~ines s~cr~toires 1ib~r~es par les cellules irradi~es en agissant sur les...l’accident du r~acteur de Chernobyl. Nous avons formulk l’hypoth~se que l’effet "bystander" observ6 pouvait 6tre une consdquence d’interactions cellulaires ...qui seraient indicatifs d’expositions biologiques ou chimiques. 11 est pr~vu que certains de ces marqueurs seront communs aux trois agents stressants

  14. Lymphoblastoid lines and skin fibroblasts from patients with tuberous sclerosis are abnormally sensitive to ionizing radiation and to a radiomimetic chemical

    SciTech Connect

    Scudiero, D.A.; Moshell, A.N.; Scarpinato, R.G.; Meyer, S.A.; Clatterbuck, B.E.; Tarone, R.E.; Robbins, J.H.

    1982-03-01

    Lymphoblastoid lines, derived by transforming peripheral blood lymphocytes with Epstein-Barr virus, and skin fibroblast lines were established from two patients with tuberous sclerosis. The number of viable lymphoblastoid cells was determined by their ability to exclude the vital dye trypan blue after their irradiation with x-rays or 254 nm ultraviolet light. The growth of fibroblasts was determined by their ability to form colonies after treatment with the radiomimetic, DNA-damaging chemical N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. The tuberous sclerosis lymphoblastoid lines were hypersensitive to x-rays but had normal sensitivity to the ultraviolet radiation. The tuberous sclerosis fibroblast lines were hypersensitive to the N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. The hypersensitivity of tuberous sclerosis cells to x-rays and to N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine is believed to reflect defective repair of DNA damaged by these agents and may provide the basis for in vitro, including prenatal, diagnostic tests for tuberous sclerosis.

  15. THE PRODUCTION OF VESICULAR STOMATITIS VIRUS BY ANTIGEN- OR MITOGEN-STIMULATED LYMPHOCYTES AND CONTINUOUS LYMPHOBLASTOID LINES

    PubMed Central

    Nowakowski, Maja; Feldman, Joseph D.; Kano, Shogo; Bloom, Barry R.

    1973-01-01

    A variety of lymphoid cell populations were examined in terms of their ability to replicate vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), a lytic, RNA-containing virus maturing at the cell surface. The number of cells capable of producing VSV was estimated in terms of infectious centers by the virus plaque assay (VPA), and morphologically by electron microscopy (EM). The lymphoid cells examined in this study included: (a) lymph node cells from delayed hypersensitive guinea pigs stimulated by specific antigen, (b) mouse spleen cells activated by selective bone marrow-derived (B) cell and thymus derived (T) cell mitogens, and (c) cells of human and murine continuous lymphoblastoid or lymphoma lines. In unstimulated cultures of guinea pig lymph node cells there is a background of approximately 1 in 1,000 cells which produces VSV; in purified protein derivative (PPD)-stimulated cultures the number of cells producing virus was 1.6% in the VPA and 1.9% by EM. These cells were large lymphocytes with some morphological features of transformed lymphocytes but were not typical blast cells. A few macrophages were associated with virus in both stimulated and control cultures. These observations indicate that (a) cells responsive to antigens, as detected by a marker virus, were lymphocytes; (b) cells other than lymphocytes (macrophages) were capable of replicating VSV even without antigenic stimulation; and (c) the correlation of results obtained by VPA and morphologic examination was usually quite good. Of the total number of mouse spleen cells stimulated with concanavalin (Con A), a T cell mitogen, 4.5 (EM)–5.7% (VPA) were associated with VSV. These were characteristic transformed lymphocytes, similar to phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated human lymphocytes. In contrast Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated mouse spleen cultures contained lower numbers of virus plaque-forming cells. The majority of such cells associated with virus displayed extensive rough endoplasmic

  16. Efficacy of human lymphoblastoid interferon in the therapy of resistant condyloma acuminata.

    PubMed

    Gall, S A; Hughes, C E; Mounts, P; Segriti, A; Weck, P K; Whisnant, J K

    1986-05-01

    The efficacy and tolerance of human lymphoblastoid interferon (Wellferon) were studied in an open label trial of 17 patients with resistant and persistent condyloma acuminata. Patients were treated intramuscularly with 5 X 10(6) U (5 MU)/m2 daily for 28 days followed by thrice weekly injections for two weeks. Sixteen patients were considered evaluable; eight experienced complete clearance, seven had significant reduction (greater than 50%) in lesion size, and one showed no response during the course of this trial. Biologic side effects of interferon occurred in all patients during initial dosing and diminished during thrice weekly therapy. Intramuscular injections and associated side effects were tolerated well. This study shows that systemic human lymphoblastoid interferon is active in treating severe recurrent genital warts in women with a history of recalcitrant disease.

  17. Abnormal segregation of alleles in CEPH pedigree DNAs arising from allele loss in lymphoblastoid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Royle, N.J.; Armour, J.A.L.; Crosier, M.; Jeffreys, A.J. )

    1993-01-01

    Somatic events that result in the reduction to hemior homozygosity at all loci affected by the event have been identified in lymphoblastoid DNA from mothers of two CEPH families. Using suitably informative probes, the allele deficiencies were detected by the abnormal transmission of alleles from grandparents to grandchildren, with the apparent absence of the alleles from the parent. Undetected somatic deficiencies in family DNAs could result in misscoring of recombination events and consequently introduce errors into linkage analysis. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Reduction of immunoglobulin G secretion in vitro following long term lymphoblastoid interferon (Wellferon) treatment in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed Central

    O'Gorman, M R; Oger, J; Kastrukoff, L F

    1987-01-01

    Pokeweed-mitogen-induced IgG secretion, Con A suppression and T cell surface markers were measured in 30 chronic progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and 21 healthy controls. Mean IgG secretion was higher in the MS patients than in the controls (2392 +/- 270 vs 1499 +/- 243); Con A suppression was lower (4 +/- 5% vs 24 +/- 4%) and the CD4/CD8 ratio was higher (4.1 +/- 0.4 vs 2.9 +/- 0.4). The above assays were used in vitro to monitor the effects of Wellferon (lymphoblastoid interferon) injections on this group of MS patients. Before treatment the INF-group (n = 14) did not differ from the PLA-group (n = 16). After 1 week of daily injections the level of IgG secreted was dramatically reduced in the INF group (629 +/- 96 ng/ml) compared to the PLA-group (1756 +/- 319 ng/ml). There was no change in either Con A suppression or T cell surface markers. IgG secretion remained lower in the INF-group for the 6 month treatment period. Following cessation of the injections and a 6 month washout period, IgG secretion in the INF-group rose and was equivalent to that observed in the PLA-group. A series of lymphocyte subset mixing experiments implicates the B lymphocyte subset as being directly affected by interferon injections in vitro. PMID:2957131

  19. Randomised controlled trial of lymphoblastoid interferon for chronic active hepatitis B.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, M G; Harrison, T J; Alexander, G; Zuckerman, A J; Murray-Lyon, I M

    1987-01-01

    Thirty male patients (27 homosexual) with biopsy proven chronic active hepatitis B were randomised to receive lymphoblastoid interferon (Wellferon) or no treatment. All patients were HBeAg positive and had continuing viral replication. Patients receiving treatment were given a single daily intramuscular injection of interferon for 28 days at a starting dose of 2.5 MU/m2 increasing to a maximum of 7.5 MU/m2/day. Transient side effects of malaise and influenza like symptoms occurred in all patients and resolved rapidly after treatment. Hepatitis B viral replication was suppressed during interferon treatment in all patients but the effect was limited to the period of therapy. After one year there was no appreciable difference in viral markers between the two groups of patients and this treatment schedule appears less effective than the thrice weekly, three month regimes recently reported from other centres. PMID:3297940

  20. Genetic instability on chromosome 16 in a Human B lymphoblastoid cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.E.; Grosovsky, A.J. )

    1993-11-01

    Mutagenesis at the aprt locus in TK6 human lymphoblasts has been found to occur at an unusually high rate (1.2 [times] 10[sup [minus]9]) for a homozygous diploid locus. Evaluation of linked microsatellite polymorphisms demonstrated that loss of heterozygosity (LOH) accompanies conventional intragenic sequence alterations in each APRT[sup [minus

  1. Group C adenovirus DNA sequences in human lymphoid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, J.; Palkonyay, L.; Weber, J.

    1986-07-01

    Human peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy adults, cord blood lymphocytes, and lymphoblastoid cell lines were screened by hybridization for the presence of group C adenovirus DNA sequences. In 13 of 17 peripheral blood lymphocyte samples from adults, 1 of 10 cord blood samples, and seven of seven lymphoblastoid cell lines tested, results were positive for Group C adenovirus DNA (adenovirus 1 (Ad1), Ad2, Ad5, or Ad6). About 1 to 2% of the lymphocytes carried 50 to 100 viral genome copies per positive cell, as estimated by in situ hybridization. Infectious virus representing all members of group C were recovered, but cultivation in the presence of adenovirus antibody did not cure the cells of free viral genomes. Viral DNA was found in B, T, and N cells but only in 1 of 10 cord blood samples. The results suggest that group C adenovirus infectious in childhood result in the persistence of the viral genome in circulating lymphocytes.

  2. Lymphotoxin is an autocrine growth factor for Epstein-Barr virus- infected B cell lines

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Because human lymphotoxin (LT) was originally isolated from a lymphoblastoid cell line, we investigated the role of this molecule in three newly established Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected human B cell lines. These lines were derived from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Z- 6), myelodysplastic syndrome (Z-43), and acute myelogenous leukemia (Z- 55) patients who had a prior EBV infection. Each lymphoblastoid cell line had a karyotype that was different from that of the original parent leukemic cells, and all expressed B cell, but not T cell or myeloid surface markers. In all three lines, rearranged immunoglobulin heavy chain joining region (JH) bands were found, and the presence of EBV DNA was confirmed by Southern blotting. Z-6, Z-43, and Z-55 cell lines constitutively produced 192, 48, and 78 U/ml LT, respectively, as assessed by a cytotoxicity assay and antibody neutralization. Levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) were undetectable. Scatchard analysis revealed that all the cell lines expressed high-affinity TNF/LT receptors with receptor densities of 4197, 1258, and 1209 sites/cell on Z-6, Z-43, and Z-55, respectively. Furthermore, labeled TNF binding could be reversed by both unlabeled TNF, as well as by LT. Studies with p60 and p80 receptor-specific antibodies revealed that the three lines expressed primarily the p80 form of the TNF receptor. When studied in a clonogenic assay, exogenous LT stimulated proliferation of all three cell lines in a dose-dependent fashion at concentrations ranging from 25 to 500 U/ml. Similar results were obtained with [3H]TdR incorporation. Monoclonal anti-LT neutralizing antibodies at concentrations of 25-500 U/ml inhibited cellular multiplication in a dose-dependent manner. It is interesting that in spite of a common receptor, TNF (1,000 U/ml) had no direct effect on Z-55 cell growth, whereas it partially reversed the stimulatory effect of exogenous LT. In addition, TNF inhibited Z-6 and Z-43 cell proliferation, and its

  3. Hsp90 inhibitors block outgrowth of EBV-infected malignant cells in vitro and in vivo through an EBNA1-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoping; Barlow, Elizabeth A; Ma, Shidong; Hagemeier, Stacy R; Duellman, Sarah J; Burgess, Richard R; Tellam, Judy; Khanna, Rajiv; Kenney, Shannon C

    2010-02-16

    EBV causes infectious mononucleosis and is associated with certain malignancies. EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) mediates EBV genome replication, partition, and transcription, and is essential for persistence of the viral genome in host cells. Here we demonstrate that Hsp90 inhibitors decrease EBNA1 expression and translation, and that this effect requires the Gly-Ala repeat domain of EBNA1. Hsp90 inhibitors induce the death of established, EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines at doses nontoxic to normal cells, and this effect is substantially reversed when lymphoblastoid cell lines are stably infected with a retrovirus expressing a functional EBNA1 mutant lacking the Gly-Ala repeats. Hsp90 inhibitors prevent EBV transformation of primary B cells, and strongly inhibit the growth of EBV-induced lymphoproliferative disease in SCID mice. These results suggest that Hsp90 inhibitors may be particularly effective for treating EBV-induced diseases requiring the continued presence of the viral genome.

  4. Hsp90 inhibitors block outgrowth of EBV-infected malignant cells in vitro and in vivo through an EBNA1-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoping; Barlow, Elizabeth A.; Ma, Shidong; Hagemeier, Stacy R.; Duellman, Sarah J.; Burgess, Richard R.; Tellam, Judy; Khanna, Rajiv; Kenney, Shannon C.

    2010-01-01

    EBV causes infectious mononucleosis and is associated with certain malignancies. EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) mediates EBV genome replication, partition, and transcription, and is essential for persistence of the viral genome in host cells. Here we demonstrate that Hsp90 inhibitors decrease EBNA1 expression and translation, and that this effect requires the Gly-Ala repeat domain of EBNA1. Hsp90 inhibitors induce the death of established, EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines at doses nontoxic to normal cells, and this effect is substantially reversed when lymphoblastoid cell lines are stably infected with a retrovirus expressing a functional EBNA1 mutant lacking the Gly-Ala repeats. Hsp90 inhibitors prevent EBV transformation of primary B cells, and strongly inhibit the growth of EBV-induced lymphoproliferative disease in SCID mice. These results suggest that Hsp90 inhibitors may be particularly effective for treating EBV-induced diseases requiring the continued presence of the viral genome. PMID:20133771

  5. Diverse delayed effects in human lymphoblastoid cells surviving exposure to high-LET (56)Fe particles or low-LET (137)Cs gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, H. H.; Horng, M. F.; Ricanati, M.; Diaz-Insua, M.; Jordan, R.; Schwartz, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    To obtain information on the origin of radiation-induced genomic instability, we characterized a total of 166 clones that survived exposure to (56)Fe particles or (137)Cs gamma radiation, isolated approximately 36 generations after exposure, along with their respective control clones. Cytogenetic aberrations, growth alterations, responses to a second irradiation, and mutant frequencies at the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase and thymidine kinase loci were determined. A greater percentage of clones that survived exposure to (56)Fe particles exhibited instability (defined as clones showing one or more outlying characteristics) than in the case of those that survived gamma irradiation. The phenotypes of the unstable clones that survived exposure to (56)Fe particles were also qualitatively different from those of the clones that survived gamma irradiation. A greater percentage (20%) of the unstable clones that survived gamma irradiation than those that survived exposure to (56)Fe particles (4%) showed an altered response to the second irradiation, while an increase in the percentage of clones that had an outlying frequency of ouabain-resistant and thymidine kinase mutants was more evident in the clones exposed to (56)Fe particles than in those exposed to gamma rays. Growth alterations and increases in dicentric chromosomes were found only in clones with more than one alteration. These results underscore the complex nature of genomic instability and the likelihood that radiation-induced genomic instability arises from different original events.

  6. Diverse delayed effects in human lymphoblastoid cells surviving exposure to high-LET (56)Fe particles or low-LET (137)Cs gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, H. H.; Horng, M. F.; Ricanati, M.; Diaz-Insua, M.; Jordan, R.; Schwartz, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    To obtain information on the origin of radiation-induced genomic instability, we characterized a total of 166 clones that survived exposure to (56)Fe particles or (137)Cs gamma radiation, isolated approximately 36 generations after exposure, along with their respective control clones. Cytogenetic aberrations, growth alterations, responses to a second irradiation, and mutant frequencies at the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase and thymidine kinase loci were determined. A greater percentage of clones that survived exposure to (56)Fe particles exhibited instability (defined as clones showing one or more outlying characteristics) than in the case of those that survived gamma irradiation. The phenotypes of the unstable clones that survived exposure to (56)Fe particles were also qualitatively different from those of the clones that survived gamma irradiation. A greater percentage (20%) of the unstable clones that survived gamma irradiation than those that survived exposure to (56)Fe particles (4%) showed an altered response to the second irradiation, while an increase in the percentage of clones that had an outlying frequency of ouabain-resistant and thymidine kinase mutants was more evident in the clones exposed to (56)Fe particles than in those exposed to gamma rays. Growth alterations and increases in dicentric chromosomes were found only in clones with more than one alteration. These results underscore the complex nature of genomic instability and the likelihood that radiation-induced genomic instability arises from different original events.

  7. Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease: hypersensitivity to X rays in cultured cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, J H; Otsuka, F; Tarone, R E; Polinsky, R J; Brumback, R A; Nee, L E

    1985-01-01

    Fibroblast and/or lymphoblastoid lines from patients with several inherited primary neuronal degenerations are hypersensitive to DNA-damaging agents. Therefore, lymphoblastoid lines were irradiated from patients with sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The mean survival values of the eight Parkinson's disease and of the six Alzheimer's disease lines, but not of the five amyotrophic lateral sclerosis lines, were less than that of the 28 normal lines. Our results with Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease cells can be explained by a genetic defect arising as a somatic mutation during embryogenesis, causing defective repair of the X-ray type of DNA damage. Such a DNA repair defect could cause an abnormal accumulation of spontaneously occurring DNA damage in Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease neurons in vivo, resulting in their premature death. PMID:3876409

  8. Ultraviolet mutagenesis in a plasmid vector replicated in lymphoid cells from patient with the melanoma-prone disorder dysplastic nevus syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Seetharam, S.; Waters, H.L.; Seidman, M.M.; Kraemer, K.H. )

    1989-11-01

    The hereditary dysplastic nevus syndrome (DNS) is an autosomal dominant disorder in which affected individuals have increased numbers of dysplastic (premalignant) nevi and a greater than 100-fold increased risk of developing cutaneous melanoma. Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines from patients with hereditary DNS have been shown to be hypermutable to UV radiation. To examine the mechanism involved in this UV hypermutability, we used a shuttle vector plasmid, pZ189, which carries a 160-base pair marker gene, supF, and can replicate in human cells. pZ189 was treated with UV radiation and transfected into DNS6BE, a lymphoblastoid cell line from a patient with hereditary DNS. Plasmid survival after UV was similar with the DNS6BE line and with a lymphoblastoid cell line from a normal donor. Plasmid mutation frequency was greater with the DNS line in accord with the DNS cellular hypermutability. Base sequence analysis was performed on 69 mutated plasmids recovered from the DNS line. There were significantly more plasmids with single base substitution mutations (P less than 0.01) in comparison to UV-treated plasmids passed through normal fibroblasts. pZ189 hypermutability and an increased frequency of single base substitutions was previously found with a cell line from a melanoma-prone xeroderma pigmentosum patient. These differences may be related to the increased melanoma susceptibility in both DNS and xeroderma pigmentosum.

  9. Both necrosis and apoptosis contribute to HIV-1-induced killing of CD4 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plymale, D. R.; Tang, D. S.; Comardelle, A. M.; Fermin, C. D.; Lewis, D. E.; Garry, R. F.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data currently available on HIV-1-induced cytopathology is unclear regarding the mechanism of cell killing. OBJECTIVE: To clarify the extent to which apoptosis or necrosis is involved in HIV-1-induced cell death in view of conflicting existing data. METHODS: T lymphoblastoid cells or peripheral blood mononuclear cells were infected by various strains of HIV-1 and the numbers of apoptotic or necrotic cells were quantified at various times after infection using video-image analysis techniques; the results were compared with the amount of fragmented DNA using a quantitative method. Measurement of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (deltapsi(m)) and intracellular calcium concentrations [Ca2+]i was performed with fluorescent probes and fluorescence concentration analysis (FCA). RESULTS: Although lymphoblastoid and monocytoid cells acutely infected by HIV-1 had increased levels of fragmented DNA, a marker of apoptotic cell death, few (<12%) had condensed chromatin and fragmented nuclei, the morphological features of apoptosis. The predominant alterations in acutely infected cells were distended endoplasmic reticulum and abnormal mitochondria; these ultrastructural changes are consistent with necrosis, although some infected cells simultaneously displayed features of both necrosis and apoptosis. Viability of cells persistently infected by HIV-1 was only minimally reduced from that of uninfected cells. This reduction was accounted for by an increased propensity of the persistently infected cells to die by apoptosis. Alterations in [Ca2+]i and deltapsi(m) occurred in both acutely and persistently infected cells. CONCLUSION: Both necrosis and apoptosis contribute to HIV-1-induced killing of CD4 cells.

  10. Both necrosis and apoptosis contribute to HIV-1-induced killing of CD4 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plymale, D. R.; Tang, D. S.; Comardelle, A. M.; Fermin, C. D.; Lewis, D. E.; Garry, R. F.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data currently available on HIV-1-induced cytopathology is unclear regarding the mechanism of cell killing. OBJECTIVE: To clarify the extent to which apoptosis or necrosis is involved in HIV-1-induced cell death in view of conflicting existing data. METHODS: T lymphoblastoid cells or peripheral blood mononuclear cells were infected by various strains of HIV-1 and the numbers of apoptotic or necrotic cells were quantified at various times after infection using video-image analysis techniques; the results were compared with the amount of fragmented DNA using a quantitative method. Measurement of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (deltapsi(m)) and intracellular calcium concentrations [Ca2+]i was performed with fluorescent probes and fluorescence concentration analysis (FCA). RESULTS: Although lymphoblastoid and monocytoid cells acutely infected by HIV-1 had increased levels of fragmented DNA, a marker of apoptotic cell death, few (<12%) had condensed chromatin and fragmented nuclei, the morphological features of apoptosis. The predominant alterations in acutely infected cells were distended endoplasmic reticulum and abnormal mitochondria; these ultrastructural changes are consistent with necrosis, although some infected cells simultaneously displayed features of both necrosis and apoptosis. Viability of cells persistently infected by HIV-1 was only minimally reduced from that of uninfected cells. This reduction was accounted for by an increased propensity of the persistently infected cells to die by apoptosis. Alterations in [Ca2+]i and deltapsi(m) occurred in both acutely and persistently infected cells. CONCLUSION: Both necrosis and apoptosis contribute to HIV-1-induced killing of CD4 cells.

  11. Videomicrofluorometry on living cells and discriminant factorial analysis to study cell cycle distributions.

    PubMed

    Savatier, J; Gbankoto, A; Vigo, J; Salmon, J M

    2004-01-01

    After a rapid overview of the approaches used to study cell cycle, a fluorescent digital imaging microscopy method is proposed. This method is improved by a factorial analysis relying on the evaluation of several parameters recorded on each living cell. Single lympho-blastoid living cells are labeled with three fluorescent markers: Hoechst 33342 for nuclear DNA, Rhodamine 123 for mitochondria and Nile Red for plasma membrane. For each cell, morphological and functional information parameters are obtained. A typological analysis is used to separate control cells into four groups: G0-G1, S, G2+M and polyploid cells Gn. These control cells define a learning population used to analyze untreated and adriamycine treated cells as supplementary individuals in a discriminant factorial analysis. Such an approach allows to accurately evidence the change of the values of some cellular parameters.

  12. Complement-dependent antibody cytotoxicity test of chicken antibody with duck complement used against cells of a Marek's disease lymphoma-derived cell line (MSB-1).

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, C; Kodama, H; Mikami, T

    1979-01-01

    Complement-dependent antibody cytotoxicity (CDAC) against cells of a lymphoblastoid cell line (MSB-1) derived from Marek's disease lymphoma was investigated in a chicken antibody system using complements from several animal species. Cytotoxicity was seldom observed when rabbit, guinea pig, or chicken complements were used in the presence of hyperimmune chicken serum against MSB-1. With duck complement, however, cytotoxicity was always observed. Therefore, duck complement appears to be suitable for assay of hyperimmune chicken serum against MSB-1 cells by the CDAC test.

  13. Accurate Detection of Carcinoma Cells by Use of a Cell Microarray Chip

    PubMed Central

    Yamamura, Shohei; Yatsushiro, Shouki; Yamaguchi, Yuka; Abe, Kaori; Shinohara, Yasuo; Tamiya, Eiichi; Baba, Yoshinobu; Kataoka, Masatoshi

    2012-01-01

    Background Accurate detection and analysis of circulating tumor cells plays an important role in the diagnosis and treatment of metastatic cancer treatment. Methods and Findings A cell microarray chip was used to detect spiked carcinoma cells among leukocytes. The chip, with 20,944 microchambers (105 µm width and 50 µm depth), was made from polystyrene; and the formation of monolayers of leukocytes in the microchambers was observed. Cultured human T lymphoblastoid leukemia (CCRF-CEM) cells were used to examine the potential of the cell microarray chip for the detection of spiked carcinoma cells. A T lymphoblastoid leukemia suspension was dispersed on the chip surface, followed by 15 min standing to allow the leukocytes to settle down into the microchambers. Approximately 29 leukocytes were found in each microchamber when about 600,000 leukocytes in total were dispersed onto a cell microarray chip. Similarly, when leukocytes isolated from human whole blood were used, approximately 89 leukocytes entered each microchamber when about 1,800,000 leukocytes in total were placed onto the cell microarray chip. After washing the chip surface, PE-labeled anti-cytokeratin monoclonal antibody and APC-labeled anti-CD326 (EpCAM) monoclonal antibody solution were dispersed onto the chip surface and allowed to react for 15 min; and then a microarray scanner was employed to detect any fluorescence-positive cells within 20 min. In the experiments using spiked carcinoma cells (NCI-H1650, 0.01 to 0.0001%), accurate detection of carcinoma cells was achieved with PE-labeled anti-cytokeratin monoclonal antibody. Furthermore, verification of carcinoma cells in the microchambers was performed by double staining with the above monoclonal antibodies. Conclusion The potential application of the cell microarray chip for the detection of CTCs was shown, thus demonstrating accurate detection by double staining for cytokeratin and EpCAM at the single carcinoma cell level. PMID:22396762

  14. Broad target cell selectivity of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus glycoprotein-mediated cell fusion and virion entry

    SciTech Connect

    Kaleeba, Johnan A.R.; Berger, Edward A. . E-mail: edward_berger@nih.gov

    2006-10-10

    The molecular mechanism of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, human herpesvirus 8) entry is poorly understood. We tested a broad variety of cell types of diverse species and tissue origin for their ability to function as targets in a quantitative reporter gene assay for KSHV-glycoprotein-mediated cell fusion. Several human, non-human primate, and rabbit cell lines were efficient targets, whereas rodent and all human lymphoblastoid cell lines were weak targets. Parallel findings were obtained with a virion entry assay using a recombinant KSHV encoding a reporter gene. No correlation was observed between target cell activity and surface expression of {alpha}3{beta}1 integrin, a proposed KSHV receptor. We hypothesize that target cell permissiveness in both the cell fusion and virion entry assays reflects the presence of a putative KSHV fusion-entry receptor.

  15. Influence of fusion cell ratio and cell plating density on production of human-human hybridomas secreting anti-DNA autoantibodies from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Massicotte, H; Rauch, J; Shoenfeld, Y; Tannenbaum, H

    1984-01-01

    The utilization of one human lymphoblastoid cell line in fusion experiments with peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has made it possible to define efficient and reproducible conditions for the production of anti-DNA-secreting human-human hybridomas. This investigation, using the human lymphoblastoid cell line GM 4672 fused in the presence of 44% polyethylene glycol with lymphocytes from SLE patients, demonstrated a maximal yield of 22.8% hybridomas, 17% of which produced anti-DNA antibodies. We were able to define, in two independent laboratories, that the maximal yield of hybridomas occurred when the lymphocyte to GM 4672 cell ratio was 1:1 and cells were seeded in 2.0 ml wells at a concentration of 4 X 10(5) cells/well. This report demonstrates the reproducibility of human-human hybridoma production with the GM 4672 cell line and the establishment of efficient conditions for the production of anti-DNA autoantibodies from SLE patients.

  16. Reduced DNA topoisomerase II activity in ataxia-telangiectasia cells.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, S P; Mohamed, R; Salmond, C; Lavin, M F

    1988-01-01

    Considerable evidence supports a defect at the level of chromatin structure or recognition of that structure in cells from patients with the human genetic disorder ataxia-telangiectasia. Accordingly, we have investigated the activities of enzymes that alter the topology of DNA in Epstein Barr Virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cells from patients with this syndrome. Reduced activity of DNA topoisomerase II, determined by unknotting of P4 phage DNA, was observed in partially purified extracts from 5 ataxia-telangiectasia cell lines. The levels of enzyme activity was reduced substantially in 4 of these cell lines and to a lesser extent in the other cell line compared to controls. DNA topoisomerase I, assayed by relaxation of supercoiled DNA, was found to be present at comparable levels in both cell types. Reduced activity of topoisomerase II in ataxia-telangiectasia is compatible with the molecular, cellular and clinical changes described in this syndrome. Images PMID:2836804

  17. [Detection of hybrid DQ molecules by the use of T cell clone and 2D-gel analyses].

    PubMed

    Hawkin, S

    1986-11-01

    The HLA-D region incorporates three subregions, DR, DQ and DP, encoding for three sets of Ia molecules. Whereas DR antigens consist of a constant alpha chain and an extremely polymorphic beta chain, both of alpha and beta chain of DQ antigens show moderate polymorphism. This indicated us the existence of hybrid HLA-DQ molecules in HLA-D heterozygous cells, resulting from the association of an alpha chain and a beta chain encoded by genes located on the two separate haplotypes. In this report, hybrid DQ antigens were demonstrated by using cytotoxic T cell-clone. A cytotoxic T cell clone, which was generated by mixed lymphocyte reaction against a lymphoblastoid B cell line, EBV-Fuk (HLA-DR1/4, DQw1/Wa), recognized only heterogenous lymphoblastoid B cell lines (HLA-DR1/4, DQw1/Wa). Cytotoxic T cell clone, however, didn't react with B cell lines which are homozygous for HLA-DR1, DQw1 or DR4/DQWa. This suggests the T cell clone recognized the hybrid DQ molecules expressed only on heterozygous cell lines. Further confirmation was obtained by inhibition test using monoclonal antibody and biochemically by 2-D gel analyses. Biological significance of hybrid DQ antigens were discussed.

  18. Novel function of the unique N-terminal region of RUNX1c in B cell growth regulation

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Gareth; Elgueta Karstegl, Claudio; Farrell, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    RUNX family proteins are expressed from alternate promoters, giving rise to different N-terminal forms, but the functional difference of these isoforms is not understood. Here, we show that growth of a human B lymphoblastoid cell line infected with Epstein–Barr virus is inhibited by RUNX1c but not by RUNX1b. This gives a novel functional assay for the unique N-terminus of RUNX1c, and amino acids of RUNX1c required for the effect have been identified. Primary resting B cells contain RUNX1c, consistent with the growth inhibitory effect in B cells. The oncogene TEL–RUNX1 lacks the N-terminus of RUNX1c because of the TEL fusion and does not inhibit B cell growth. Mouse Runx1c lacks some of the sequences required for human RUNX1c to inhibit B cell growth, indicating that this aspect of human B cell growth control may differ in mice. Remarkably, a cell-penetrating peptide containing the N-terminal sequence of RUNX1c specifically antagonizes the growth inhibitory effect in B lymphoblastoid cells and might be used to modulate the function of human RUNX1c. PMID:23254331

  19. Human lymphocyte markers defined by antibodies derived from somatic cell hybrids. I. A hybridoma secreting antibody against a marker specific for human B lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, D A; Beckman, I; Bradley, J; McNamara, P J; Thomas, M E; Zola, H

    1980-01-01

    A hybridoma has been isolated from the products of fusion of a myeloma cell line with spleen cells from mice immunized with a human B cell line. After cloning, the hybridoma secretes antibody with the following properties: (i) Human B-lymphoblastoid cell lines react with the antibody while T and null cell lines do not. (ii) The antibody reacts with the majority of leucocytes in the blood of patients with CLL, but with a minority of cells in the blood of patients with AML or ALL of the null or T type. (iii) The antibody reacts with 9-21% of mononuclear cells in normal peripheral blood. The reacting cells are not T cells and overlap extensively with cells identified as B cells by other markers. The antigen identified by this antibody appears to be distinct from known B cell markers, and is put forward as a new B cell marker with diagnostic potential. PMID:6966995

  20. Lymphocyte culture: induction of colonies by conditioned medium from human lymphoid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, R M; Goust, J M; Fudenberg, H H

    1977-12-01

    The presence of phytohemagglutinin or pokeweed mitogen in cultures of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in agar is known to stimulate the formation of lymphoid colonies. We now report that similar colonies can be induced in the absence of plant lectins upon addition of filtered and ultracentrifuged conditioned medium (CM) obtained from certain human lymphoblastoid cell lines. Colony formation required at least 6 X 10(5) mononuclear cells per milliliter, and optimum results were obtained at concentrations of 1 X 10(6) cells/ml in the presence of 20% CM (50-500 colonies per 10(6) cells cultured). Individual cells within colonies displayed uniform morphological characteristics of lymphoid cells, and the majority formed rosettes with sheep erythrocytes, suggesting that they were of T-cell type.

  1. Herpesvirus saimiri transformed T cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells restimulate identical antigen-specific human T cell clones.

    PubMed

    Daubenberger, C A; Nickel, B; Hübner, B; Siegler, U; Meinl, E; Pluschke, G

    2001-08-01

    Panels of human antigen-specific T cell clones (TCC) have been established by limiting dilution using Herpesvirus saimiri (HVS) subtype C transformed T cells as antigen presenting cells (APC). They showed antigen-specific proliferation when peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), HVS-transformed T cells and Epstein Barr Virus transformed lymphoblastoid B cell lines (EBV-LCL) were used as APC. All T cell clones were CD4+ and HLA class II restricted. For a detailed analysis, two panels of T cell clones specific for an epitope located in the N-terminus of the Merozoite Surface Protein 1 (MSP-1) of Plasmodium falciparum were established from the same founder T cell line using either PBMC or HVS-transformed T cells as APC. TCR analysis of the two panels of TCC demonstrated that the same founder cells could be propagated in both culture systems. Furthermore, no difference in the cytokine expression pattern or antigen processing and co-stimulatory requirements was observed between TCC established on PBMC or HVS-transformed T cells. Based on the finding that HVS-transformed T cells can replace PBMC as APC for isolation and propagation of antigen-specific TCC, a protocol was developed and successfully executed, which allows to establish and maintain vaccine-specific T cell clones from 20 ml of blood. This method might be particularly significant in clinical trials of immune intervention strategies.

  2. CD80 (B7.1) and CD86 (B7.2) induce EBV-transformed B cell apoptosis through the Fas/FasL pathway.

    PubMed

    Park, Ga Bin; Kim, Yeong Seok; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Cho, Dae-Ho; Kim, Daejin; Hur, Dae Young

    2013-11-01

    CD80 and CD86 expression is strongly regulated in B cells and is induced by various stimuli (e.g., cytokines, ligation of MHC class II and CD40 ligand). Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection activates B lymphocytes and transforms them into lymphoblastoid cells. However, the role of CD80 and CD86 in EBV infection of B cells remains unclear. Here, we observed that cross-linking of CD80 and CD86 in EBV-transformed B cells induced apoptosis through caspase-dependent release of apoptosis-related molecules, cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from mitochondria, because Z-VAD-fmk (N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) blocked apoptosis and disruption of mitochondria. Stimulation of CD80 and CD86 induced expression of Fas ligand (FasL) on EBV-transformed B cells and upregulated Fas and FasL expression in IM-9 cells. Apoptosis through Fas-FasL interactions was blocked by treatment of cells with ZB4, an antagonistic anti-Fas antibody. These results suggest that the co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 induced by EBV infection stimulate apoptosis of EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid B cells via the Fas/FasL pathway.

  3. Epstein-Barr virus latently infected cells are selectively deleted in simulated-microgravity cultures.

    PubMed

    Long, J P; Hughes, J H

    2001-04-01

    Rotating-wall vessels (RWVs) allow for the cultivation of cells in simulated microgravity. Previously, we showed that the cultivation of lymphoblastoid cells in simulated microgravity results in the suppression of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation. To determine if the suppression generated by simulated microgravity could be reversed by changing to static culture conditions, cells were cultured in an RRWV for 5 d, and then switched to static conditions. Following the switch to static conditions, viral reactivation remained suppressed (significantly lower) relative to static control cultures over a 4-d period. Additionally, experiments were conducted to determine if chemical treatment could induce viral reactivation in cells from simulated-microgravity cultures. Cells were cultured in static flask cultures and in simulated microgravity in RWVs for 4-7 d. The cells were then transferred to 50-cm3 tubes, and treated with 3 mM n-butyrate for 48 h, or 18 ng/ml of phorbol ester, viz., 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13 acetate (TPA) for either 2 or 48 h, under static conditions. Although EBV was inducible, the cells from simulated-microgravity cultures treated with n-butyrate displayed significantly lower levels of viral-antigen expression compared with the treated cells from static cultures. Also, incubation with TPA for 2-3 h, but not for 48 h, reactivated EBV in cells from RWV cultures. In contrast, EBV was inducible in cells from static cultures treated for either 2-3 or 48 h with TPA. TPA reactivation of EBV following a 2-3-h period of treatment indicates that the protein kinase C signal-transduction pathway is not impaired in lymphoblastoid cells cultured in simulated microgravity. However, the exposure of B-lymphoblastoid cells from simulated-microgravity cultures to TPA for more than 3-4 h triggered a lytic event (apoptosis or necrosis), which prevented replication of the virus. Thus, EBV-infected cells in simulated microgravity were negatively selected in the

  4. F-box protein FBXL2 targets cyclin D2 for ubiquitination and degradation to inhibit leukemic cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bill B.; Glasser, Jennifer R.; Coon, Tiffany A.; Zou, Chunbin; Miller, Hannah L.; Fenton, Moon; McDyer, John F.; Boyiadzis, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Hematologic maligancies exhibit a growth advantage by up-regulation of components within the molecular apparatus involved in cell-cycle progression. The SCF (Skip-Cullin1-F-box protein) E3 ligase family provides homeostatic feedback control of cell division by mediating ubiquitination and degradation of cell-cycle proteins. By screening several previously undescribed E3 ligase components, we describe the behavior of a relatively new SCF subunit, termed FBXL2, that ubiquitinates and destabilizes cyclin D2 protein leading to G0 phase arrest and apoptosis in leukemic and B-lymphoblastoid cell lines. FBXL2 expression was strongly suppressed, and yet cyclin D2 protein levels were robustly expressed in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patient samples. Depletion of endogenous FBXL2 stabilized cyclin D2 levels, whereas ectopically expressed FBXL2 decreased cyclin D2 lifespan. FBXL2 did not bind a phosphodegron within its substrate, which is typical of other F-box proteins, but uniquely targeted a calmodulin-binding signature within cyclin D2 to facilitate its polyubiquitination. Calmodulin competes with the F-box protein for access to this motif where it bound and protected cyclin D2 from FBXL2. Calmodulin reversed FBXL2-induced G0 phase arrest and attenuated FBXL2-induced apoptosis of lymphoblastoid cells. These results suggest an antiproliferative effect of SCFFBXL2 in lymphoproliferative malignancies. PMID:22323446

  5. From single-cell to cell-pool transcriptomes: stochasticity in gene expression and RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Marinov, Georgi K; Williams, Brian A; McCue, Ken; Schroth, Gary P; Gertz, Jason; Myers, Richard M; Wold, Barbara J

    2014-03-01

    Single-cell RNA-seq mammalian transcriptome studies are at an early stage in uncovering cell-to-cell variation in gene expression, transcript processing and editing, and regulatory module activity. Despite great progress recently, substantial challenges remain, including discriminating biological variation from technical noise. Here we apply the SMART-seq single-cell RNA-seq protocol to study the reference lymphoblastoid cell line GM12878. By using spike-in quantification standards, we estimate the absolute number of RNA molecules per cell for each gene and find significant variation in total mRNA content: between 50,000 and 300,000 transcripts per cell. We directly measure technical stochasticity by a pool/split design and find that there are significant differences in expression between individual cells, over and above technical variation. Specific gene coexpression modules were preferentially expressed in subsets of individual cells, including one enriched for mRNA processing and splicing factors. We assess cell-to-cell variation in alternative splicing and allelic bias and report evidence of significant differences in splice site usage that exceed splice variation in the pool/split comparison. Finally, we show that transcriptomes from small pools of 30-100 cells approach the information content and reproducibility of contemporary RNA-seq from large amounts of input material. Together, our results define an experimental and computational path forward for analyzing gene expression in rare cell types and cell states.

  6. Development of a cell microarray chip for detection of circulating tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamura, S.; Yatsushiro, S.; Abe, K.; Baba, Y.; Kataoka, M.

    2012-03-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the peripheral blood of metastatic cancer patients has clinical significance in earlier diagnosis of metastases. In this study, a novel cell microarray chip for accurate and rapid detection of tumor cells from human leukocytes was developed. The chip with 20,944 microchambers (105 μm diameter and 50 μm depth) was made from polystyrene, and the surface was rendered to hydrophilic by means of reactive-ion etching, which led to the formation of mono-layers of leukocytes on the microchambers. As the model of CTCs detection, we spiked human bronchioalveolar carcinoma (H1650) cells into human T lymphoblastoid leukemia (CEM) cells suspension and detected H1650 cells using the chip. A CEM suspension contained with H1650 cells was dispersed on the chip surface, followed by 10 min standing to allow the cells to settle down into the microchambers. About 30 CEM cells were accommodated in each microchamber, over 600,000 CEM cells in total being on a chip. We could detect 1 H1650 cell per 106 CEM cells on the microarray by staining with fluorescence-conjugated antibody (Anti-Cytokeratin) and cell membrane marker (DiD). Thus, this cell microarray chip has highly potential to be a novel tool of accurate and rapid detection of CTCs.

  7. High-level expression of a cloned HLA heavy chain gene introduced into mouse cells on a bovine papillomavirus vector.

    PubMed

    DiMaio, D; Corbin, V; Sibley, E; Maniatis, T

    1984-02-01

    A gene encoding the heavy chain of an HLA human histocompatibility antigen was isolated from a library of human DNA by recombination and selection in vivo. After insertion into a bovine papillomavirus (BPV) DNA expression vector, the gene was introduced into cultured mouse cells. Cells transformed with the HLA-BPV plasmids did not appear to contain extrachromosomal viral DNA, whereas BPV recombinants usually replicated as plasmids in transformed cell lines. Large amounts of HLA RNA were produced by the transformed cells, and the rate of synthesis of human heavy chain was several-fold higher than in the JY cell line, a well-characterized human lymphoblastoid cell line which expresses high levels of surface HLA antigen. Substantial amounts of human heavy chain accumulated in the transformed cells, and HLA antigen was present at the cell surface. These observations establish the feasibility of using BPV vectors to study the structure and function of HLA antigens and the expression of cloned HLA genes.

  8. Comparison of DNA fragmentation and color thresholding for objective quantitation of apoptotic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plymale, D. R.; Ng Tang, D. S.; Fermin, C. D.; Lewis, D. E.; Martin, D. S.; Garry, R. F.

    1995-01-01

    Apoptosis is a process of cell death characterized by distinctive morphological changes and fragmentation of cellular DNA. Using video imaging and color thresholding techniques, we objectively quantitated the number of cultured CD4+ T-lymphoblastoid cells (HUT78 cells, RH9 subclone) displaying morphological signs of apoptosis before and after exposure to gamma-irradiation. The numbers of apoptotic cells measured by objective video imaging techniques were compared to numbers of apoptotic cells measured in the same samples by sensitive apoptotic assays that quantitate DNA fragmentation. DNA fragmentation assays gave consistently higher values compared with the video imaging assays that measured morphological changes associated with apoptosis. These results suggest that substantial DNA fragmentation can precede or occur in the absence of the morphological changes which are associated with apoptosis in gamma-irradiated RH9 cells.

  9. Comparison of DNA fragmentation and color thresholding for objective quantitation of apoptotic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plymale, D. R.; Ng Tang, D. S.; Fermin, C. D.; Lewis, D. E.; Martin, D. S.; Garry, R. F.

    1995-01-01

    Apoptosis is a process of cell death characterized by distinctive morphological changes and fragmentation of cellular DNA. Using video imaging and color thresholding techniques, we objectively quantitated the number of cultured CD4+ T-lymphoblastoid cells (HUT78 cells, RH9 subclone) displaying morphological signs of apoptosis before and after exposure to gamma-irradiation. The numbers of apoptotic cells measured by objective video imaging techniques were compared to numbers of apoptotic cells measured in the same samples by sensitive apoptotic assays that quantitate DNA fragmentation. DNA fragmentation assays gave consistently higher values compared with the video imaging assays that measured morphological changes associated with apoptosis. These results suggest that substantial DNA fragmentation can precede or occur in the absence of the morphological changes which are associated with apoptosis in gamma-irradiated RH9 cells.

  10. Activated Allogeneic NK Cells Preferentially Kill Poor Prognosis B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martínez, Diego; Lanuza, Pilar M; Gómez, Natalia; Muntasell, Aura; Cisneros, Elisa; Moraru, Manuela; Azaceta, Gemma; Anel, Alberto; Martínez-Lostao, Luis; Villalba, Martin; Palomera, Luis; Vilches, Carlos; García Marco, José A; Pardo, Julián

    2016-01-01

    Mutational status of TP53 together with expression of wild-type (wt) IGHV represents the most widely accepted biomarkers, establishing a very poor prognosis in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) patients. Adoptive cell therapy using allogeneic HLA-mismatched Natural killer (NK) cells has emerged as an effective and safe alternative in the treatment of acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemias that do not respond to traditional therapies. We have described that allogeneic activated NK cells eliminate hematological cancer cell lines with multidrug resistance acquired by mutations in the apoptotic machinery. This effect depends on the activation protocol, being B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) the most effective stimulus to activate NK cells. Here, we have further analyzed the molecular determinants involved in allogeneic NK cell recognition and elimination of B-CLL cells, including the expression of ligands of the main NK cell-activating receptors (NKG2D and NCRs) and HLA mismatch. We present preliminary data suggesting that B-CLL susceptibility significantly correlates with HLA mismatch between NK cell donor and B-CLL patient. Moreover, we show that the sensitivity of B-CLL cells to NK cells depends on the prognosis based on TP53 and IGHV mutational status. Cells from patients with worse prognosis (mutated TP53 and wt IGHV) are the most susceptible to activated NK cells. Hence, B-CLL prognosis may predict the efficacy of allogenic activated NK cells, and, thus, NK cell transfer represents a good alternative to treat poor prognosis B-CLL patients who present a very short life expectancy due to lack of effective treatments.

  11. Activated Allogeneic NK Cells Preferentially Kill Poor Prognosis B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Martínez, Diego; Lanuza, Pilar M.; Gómez, Natalia; Muntasell, Aura; Cisneros, Elisa; Moraru, Manuela; Azaceta, Gemma; Anel, Alberto; Martínez-Lostao, Luis; Villalba, Martin; Palomera, Luis; Vilches, Carlos; García Marco, José A.; Pardo, Julián

    2016-01-01

    Mutational status of TP53 together with expression of wild-type (wt) IGHV represents the most widely accepted biomarkers, establishing a very poor prognosis in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) patients. Adoptive cell therapy using allogeneic HLA-mismatched Natural killer (NK) cells has emerged as an effective and safe alternative in the treatment of acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemias that do not respond to traditional therapies. We have described that allogeneic activated NK cells eliminate hematological cancer cell lines with multidrug resistance acquired by mutations in the apoptotic machinery. This effect depends on the activation protocol, being B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) the most effective stimulus to activate NK cells. Here, we have further analyzed the molecular determinants involved in allogeneic NK cell recognition and elimination of B-CLL cells, including the expression of ligands of the main NK cell-activating receptors (NKG2D and NCRs) and HLA mismatch. We present preliminary data suggesting that B-CLL susceptibility significantly correlates with HLA mismatch between NK cell donor and B-CLL patient. Moreover, we show that the sensitivity of B-CLL cells to NK cells depends on the prognosis based on TP53 and IGHV mutational status. Cells from patients with worse prognosis (mutated TP53 and wt IGHV) are the most susceptible to activated NK cells. Hence, B-CLL prognosis may predict the efficacy of allogenic activated NK cells, and, thus, NK cell transfer represents a good alternative to treat poor prognosis B-CLL patients who present a very short life expectancy due to lack of effective treatments. PMID:27833611

  12. Nonylphenol decreases viability and arrests cell cycle via reactive oxygen species in Raji cells.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yongmei; Zhang, Yingmei; Liu, Yingxia; Zhang, Wenya

    2013-01-01

    4-Nonylphenol (NP), an environmental contaminant commonly found in water systems, has been documented to have adverse effects on human health. In the current study, the effects of NP on the survival, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and cell cycle distribution of human Raji cells, a human lymphoblastoid cell line with B cell characteristics, were investigated. Furthermore, N-Acetyl-Cysteine (NAC) was used to explore the underlying mechanisms. The results showed that NP dramatically reduced cell viability along with the induction of ROS in a dose dependent manner, and cell survival was recovered by NAC pretreatment. Most strikingly, NP exposure altered the cell cycle profile, mainly leading to the accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase. Pretreatment of Raji cells with NAC attenuated the NP-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest. Taken together, the results suggest NP exhibits cytotoxic effects on Raji cells by decreasing cell viability and inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest, in a ROS dependent manner. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Blastoid variants of mantle cell lymphoma: frequent bcl-1 rearrangements at the major translocation cluster region and tetraploid chromosome clones.

    PubMed

    Ott, G; Kalla, J; Ott, M M; Schryen, B; Katzenberger, T; Müller, J G; Müller-Hermelink, H K

    1997-02-15

    Sixty-four cases of mantle cell (centrocytic) non-Hodgkin's lymphomas have been analyzed for their cytomorphologic features, proliferation indices, bcl-1 rearrangements, p53 expression patterns, and DNA content by both interphase cytogenetic and DNA flow cytometric analyses. According to cytomorphology, three subtypes were recognized: a common, a lymphoblastoid, and a pleomorphic variant of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). Blastoid MCL subtypes were characterized by distinctly elevated mitotic counts (57 and 51/10 HPF v 21/10 high-power fields in common MCL), proliferation indices (58% and 53% v 27% in common types, respectively; P < .001), frequent bcl-1 rearrangements at the major translocation cluster locus (59% v 40%), and overexpression of p53 (21% v 6%). However, the most interesting finding was a striking tendency of blastoid MCL subtypes to harbor chromosome numbers in the tetraploid range (36% of lymphoblastoid and 80% of pleomorphic types v 8% of common variants, P < .001), a feature clearly separating these neoplasms from other types of B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and possibly being related to cyclin D1 overexpression. Our data indicate that, although characterized by a uniform immunophenotype and common biologic background, MCL shows a broad spectrum of morphologic features ranging from small cell to blastoid types and that the morphologic spectrum is mirrored by distinct biologic features.

  14. The effect of bleomycin on DNA synthesis in ataxia telangiectasia lymphoid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.M.; Simpson, S.J.

    1982-01-01

    Bleomycin, a radiomimetic glycopeptide, inhibits de novo DNA synthesis in ataxia telangiectasia lymphoblastoid B cells to a markedly lesser extent than in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum lymphoid cells. This observation is similar to that following ionizing radiation; however, the effect is slower following the chemical treatment. Recovery of the normal cells occurs 15-18 hours after treatment, whereas the ataxia telangiectasia lines do not attain normal levels of DNA synthesis during the entire 24-hour observation period. Similar differences were not observed following treatment with mitomycin C, a bifunctional alkylating agent, indicating a specific effect of bleomycin on DNA synthesis in ataxia telangiectasia cells. Following bleomycin treatment and preincubation with hydroxyurea, residual DNA synthesis in ataxia telangiectasia cells was similar to that in both normal and xeroderma pigmentosum lymphoid lines, suggesting that the capacity to repair the induced DNA lesion is present.

  15. Assay of immunoglobulins in supernatants of lymphoid cell lines by conventional laser nephelometry.

    PubMed

    Virella, G; Muñoz, J; Robinson, J E; Goust, J M

    1979-03-01

    An adaptation of the nephelometric assay for serum immunoglobulins has been developed for detection and quantitation of extracellular immunoglobulins in cultures of lymphoblastoid cell lines. This assay employs the standard equipment for laser nephelometry and commercial reagents for immunoglobulin quantitation. By adjusting dilutions of controls and sample volumes of culture supernatants, amounts of IgG and IgM below 1 microgram/ml can be detected in culture supernatants. At concentrations between 1 and 4 microgram/ml, day-to-day and within-run variations for IgM assays were 16 and 11% respectively. The possibility of measuring immunoglobulins secreted by cell lines by conventional laser nephelometry opens several areas of application in the study of the functional activity of B cells and of cell-cell interactions.

  16. Lithium response in bipolar disorder: No difference in GADL1 gene expression between cell lines from excellent-responders and non-responders.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Jeverson; Courtin, Cindie; Geoffroy, Pierre A; Curis, Emmanuel; Bellivier, Frank; Marie-Claire, Cynthia

    2017-05-01

    Previous association studies have shown mixed results between glutamic acid decarboxylase like-1 (GADL1) gene polymorphism and prophylactic lithium response in bipolar disorder (BD) patients. In the present study, GADL1 gene expression was investigated in regard to lithium response, using Alda scale, in lymphoblastoid cells (LCLs) of 36 Caucasian BD patients. No difference in GADL1 expression was observed among LCLs from excellent-responders, non-responders or controls. Furthermore, lithium did not induce significant changes in GADL1 expression levels after 4 or 8 days. These results did not support an association of GADL1 expression in the determination of a lithium response in BD patients.

  17. Human B-cell alloantigens DC1, MT1, and LB12 are identical to each other but distinct from the HLA-DR antigen

    PubMed Central

    Shackelford, Deborah A.; Mann, Dean L.; van Rood, Jon J.; Ferrara, G. B.; Strominger, Jack L.

    1981-01-01

    Some human B-lymphoblastoid cell lines are shown to express at least two types of Ia-like antigens. One antigen is defined by alloantisera to HLA-DR, and the other antigen is defined by alloantisera and a monoclonal antibody to the specificities DC1, MT1 (MB1), and LB12, which are in linkage disequilibrium with HLA-DR. The subunits of the DC1 molecule differ from those of the DR molecule. The light chains of both molecules are structurally polymorphic. Images PMID:6974868

  18. Enhanced oncogenic behavior of human and mouse cells after cellular hybridization with Burkitt tumor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, R; Ablashi, D V; Nonoyama, M; Henle, W; Easton, J

    1977-01-01

    Studies were made of the expression of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in somatic hybrids of Burkitt tumor cells and human or mouse cells to determine whether EBV genetic information associated with the capacity to transform leukocytes of human and non-human primates could be maintained and expressed in nonlymphoblastoid cells. Data obtained thus far suggest that at least one characteristic associated with cellular transformation (loss of contact inhibition) is expressed only in nonlymphoblastoid cells in which the EBV genome is maintained. In addition, we have demonstrated that human epithelial/Burkitt hybrid cells (D98/HR-1 and D98/Raji) are more oncogenic in nude (athymic) mice than are cells of the human epithelial parental line, D98, or one of the Burkitt lymphoblastoid parent cell lines (Raji); the HR-1 Burkitt parent cell line was as oncogenic as the hybrid cell lines but the time required to induce tumors was much longer. Thus, human epithelial cells show alteration of growth properties in vitro and in vivo after cellular hybridization with Burkitt tumor cells. Images PMID:196293

  19. EBV Latency II-derived peptides induce a specific CD4+ cytotoxic T-cell activity and not a CD4+ regulatory T-cell response.

    PubMed

    Moralès, Olivier; Depil, Stéphane; Mrizak, Dhafer; Martin, Nathalie; Ndour, Papa Alioune; Dufosse, Françoise; Miroux, Céline; Coll, Jean; de Launoit, Yvan; Auriault, Claude; Pancre, Véronique; Delhem, Nadira

    2012-04-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with several malignant diseases that can be distinguished by their patterns of viral latent gene expression. We developed here an original peptidic approach to favor the induction of a specific CD4+ T-cell response against EBV latency II malignancies (Hodgkin's lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, T/NK lymphoma). Previously, we selected 6 peptides derived from EBV nuclear antigen-1, latency membrane proteins (LMP)-1, and LMP-2 highly promiscuous for major histocompatibility complex class II molecules and showed their ability to induce interferon-γ-secreting CD4+ T cells. We confirmed here that all peptides used in cocktail are recognized by human CD4+ memory T cells from healthy donors, inducing a broad T-helper (Th)1 cytokine secretion interferon-γ, interleukin-2. Furthermore, we have generated EBV-specific CD4+ T-cell lines and proved their cytotoxic potential, not only on original models expressing latency II antigens (EBV-transformed T cell or monocyte), but also on lymphoblastoid cell lines expressing latency III antigens (lymphoblastoid cell lines). In addition, granzyme B enzyme-linked immunospot assays suggested that a part of this specific cytotoxic activity could be linked to the granule lytic pathway. Very importantly, we have showed that neither phenotypical changes nor functional activities of CD4+CD25+CD127(low)-regulatory T cells were observed in response to EBV+ peptides, avoiding any risk of aggravation of the preexisting immunosuppressive environment reported in EBV-associated malignancies. In conclusion, our promiscuous peptide cocktail could be used safely in immunotherapeutic approaches against EBV latency II malignancies, mainly to prevent relapse in high-risk patients further to classic treatments.

  20. A supporting role of Chinese National Immortalized Cell Bank in life science research.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chong-feng; Duan, Zi-yuan

    2017-01-20

    A biorepository of human samples is essential to support the research of life science. Lymphoblastoid B cell line (LCL), which is easy to be prepared and can reproduce indefinitely, is a convenient form of sample preservation. LCLs are established from human B cells transformed by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Chinese National Immortalized Cell Bank has preserved human LCLs from different ethnic groups in China. As there are many studies on the nature of LCLs and public available resources with genome-wide data for LCLs, they have been widely applied in genetics, immunology, pharmacogenetics/genomics, regenerative medicine, cancer pathogenesis and immunotherapy, screening and generation of fully human neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and study on EBV pathogenesis. Here, we review the characteristics of LCLs and their contributions to scientific research, and introduce preserved samples in Chinese National Immortalized Cell Bank to the scientific community. We hope this bank can support more areas in the scientific research.

  1. Replication of the resident Marek's Disease virus genome in synchronized nonproducer MKT-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Lau, R Y; Nonoyama, M

    1980-02-01

    MKT-1, a virus nonproducer lymphoblastoid cell line established from a Marek's disease tumor, was synchronized by double thymidine block to determine the sequence of events in the synthesis of cellular and latent marek's disease virus DNA. Cellular DNA synthesis was measured by incorporation of [3H]thymidine, whereas viral DNA synthesis was determined by DNA-DNA reassociation kinetics. The results of these studies indicate that the resident Marek's disease viral DNA in MKT-1 cells replicates during the early S phase of the cell cycle, before the onset of active cellular DNA synthesis. This observation is similar to that seen in the replication of resident Epstein-Barr virus DNA in synchronized Raji cells.

  2. Establishment of the DU.528 human lymphohemopoietic stem cell line

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    We have established the DU.528 cell line from the pretreatment leukemia cells of a patient who underwent a T lymphoblastic-to-promyelocytic phenotype conversion during treatment with the adenosine deaminase inhibitor, deoxycoformycin. The cell line and clones obtained from it by limiting dilution have the same karyotype previously found in the patient's pretreatment T lymphoblasts and post-deoxycoformycin treatment promyelocytes. DU.528 cells in continuous culture for greater than 2 yr display a predominant undifferentiated T lymphoblastoid phenotype. These cells spontaneously generate progeny of at least three lineages, T lymphoid, granulocytic/monocytic, and erythroid. The surface marker most consistently expressed by DU.528 cells in the undifferentiated state is the 3A1 antigen, which has been found on prothymocytes in the embryonic thymus. Some undifferentiated DU.528 cells also expressed the IL-2 receptor, but no other T cell differentiation antigens. Exposure of DU.528 cells to a variety of agents induced myeloid maturation; adenosine and deoxyadenosine, in the presence of deoxycoformycin, induced expression of myeloid differentiation antigens. Our results suggest that DU.528 is a lymphohematopoietic stem cell line and support the hypothesis that differentiation of pluripotent stem cells may be altered by genetic deficiency of adenosine deaminase. DU.528 cells may provide a useful model for examining factors that regulate stem cell proliferation and differentiation. PMID:4056659

  3. DNA damage in dihydroartemisinin-resistant Molt-4 cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jungsoo; Lai, Henry C; Sasaki, Tomikazu; Singh, Narendra P

    2015-03-01

    Artemisinin generates carbon-based free radicals when it reacts with iron, and induces molecular damage and apoptosis. Its toxicity is more selective toward cancer cells because cancer cells contain a higher level of intracellular free iron. Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), an analog of artemisinin, has selective cytotoxicity toward Molt-4 human lymphoblastoid cells. A major concern is whether cancer cells could develop resistance to DHA, thus limiting its therapeutic efficacy. We have developed a DHA-resistant Molt-4 cell line (RTN) and found out that these cells exhibited resistance to DHA but no significant cross- resistance to artemisinin-tagged holotransferrin (ART-TF), a synthetic artemisinin compound. In the present study, we investigated DNA damage induced by DHA and ART-TF in both Molt-4 and RTN cells using the comet assay. RTN cells exhibited a significantly lower level of basal and X-ray-induced DNA damage compared to Molt-4 cells. Both DHA and ART-TF induced DNA damage in Molt-4 cells, whereas DNA damage was induced in RTN cells by ART-TF, and not DHA. The result of this study shows that by the cell selection method, it is possible to generate a Molt-4 cell line which is not sensitive to DHA, but sensitive to ART-TF, as measured by DNA damage.

  4. Involvement of class II beta-chain amino acid residues 85 and 86 in T-cell allorecognition.

    PubMed

    Eckels, D D; Geiger, M J; Sell, T W; Gorski, J A

    1990-03-01

    Alloreactive T-cell clones were derived by limiting dilution following priming to allogeneic cells bearing HLA-DR1 alloantigens. Clonal specificities were determined by extensive testing on a panel of allogeneic lymphoblastoid cell lines and by blocking studies with monoclonal antibodies specific for HLA-DR, -DQ, and -DP class II molecules. Out of nine DR1-positive cell lines, three failed to stimulate a subset of the T-cell clones in conventional proliferation assays. Proliferation by all of the clones was blocked by anti-DR antibodies, not by anti-DQ or anti-DP, which was consistent with the conclusion that the HLA-DR molecule was recognized. This DR1-associated polymorphism has been identified as Dw20 by the Tenth International Histocompatibility Workshop. The molecular basis for this altered recognition of the DR1 molecule was determined by allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization and by DNA sequencing studies. The first, second, and third hypervariable regions of all nine DR1-positive cell lines were identical. Valine and glycine were found at positions 85 and 86 of the DR1 beta 1 chain in DR1 molecules from six of the nine lymphoblastoid cell lines, whereas alanine and valine were found in the three variant (Dw20) DR1-positive cells. By analogy with class I structure, residues 85 and 86 would be located at the extreme C-terminal end of the beta-chain alpha helix. Together or separately, these amino acid differences may define a T-cell recognition element on the DR1 molecule serving to contact allospecific T-cell receptors. Alternatively, if allorecognition involves recognition of a self peptide complexed with an allogeneic MHC molecule, then it is possible that the differences T cells recognize on DR1 class II proteins arise from peptide-specific interactions with residues 85 and 86.

  5. Assay for mutagenesis in heterozygous diploid human lymphoblasts

    DOEpatents

    Skopek, Thomas R.; Liber, Howard L.; Penman, Bruce W.; Thilly, William G.; Hoppe, IV, Henry

    1981-01-01

    An assay is disclosed for determining mutagenic damage caused by the administration of a known or suspected mutagen to diploid human lymphoblastoid cell lines. The gene locus employed for this assay is the gene for thymidine kinase, uridine kinase, or cytidine deaminase. Since human lymphoblastoid cells contain two genes for these enzymes, heterozygotes of human lymphoblastoid cells are used in this assay.

  6. Human lymphocyte markers defined by antibodies derived from somatic cell hybrids. II. A hybridoma secreting antibody against an antigen expressed by human B and null lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Beckman, I G; Bradley, J; Brooks, D A; Kupa, A; McNamara, P J; Thomas, M E; Zola, H

    1980-06-01

    A hybridoma (FMC4) has been derived which secretes antibody showing selective reaction with human B lymphocytes, monocytes and some null lymphocytes. Few, if any, T lymphocytes in normal blood are stained, although stimulation of lymphocytes with PHA leads to an increase in the proportion of cells reacting with the hybridoma antibody. The antibody reacts with B and null lymphoblastoid cell lines but not with T cell lines. B chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) cells but not T-CLLs are stained and null-type acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) cells but not T-type ALL also react. Normal blood myeloid cells do not react with FMC4 supernatant whilst some myeloid leukaemias do. The expression of the antigen reacting with FMC4 supernatant suggests that FMC4 may secrete an antibody against the human equivalent of the Ia antigen.

  7. Human lymphocyte markers defined by antibodies derived from somatic cell hybrids. II. A hybridoma secreting antibody against an antigen expressed by human B and null lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Beckman, I G; Bradley, J; Brooks, D A; Kupa, A; McNamara, P J; Thomas, M E; Zola, H

    1980-01-01

    A hybridoma (FMC4) has been derived which secretes antibody showing selective reaction with human B lymphocytes, monocytes and some null lymphocytes. Few, if any, T lymphocytes in normal blood are stained, although stimulation of lymphocytes with PHA leads to an increase in the proportion of cells reacting with the hybridoma antibody. The antibody reacts with B and null lymphoblastoid cell lines but not with T cell lines. B chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) cells but not T-CLLs are stained and null-type acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) cells but not T-type ALL also react. Normal blood myeloid cells do not react with FMC4 supernatant whilst some myeloid leukaemias do. The expression of the antigen reacting with FMC4 supernatant suggests that FMC4 may secrete an antibody against the human equivalent of the Ia antigen. PMID:6968260

  8. Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Human Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Howard L. Liber; Jeffrey L. Schwartz

    2005-10-31

    There are many different model systems that have been used to study chromosome instability. What is clear from all these studies is that conclusions concerning chromosome instability depend greatly on the model system and instability endpoint that is studied. The model system for our studies was the human B-lymphoblastoid cell line TK6. TK6 was isolated from a spontaneously immortalized lymphoblast culture. Thus there was no outside genetic manipulation used to immortalize them. TK6 is a relatively stable p53-normal immortal cell line (37). It shows low gene and chromosome mutation frequencies (19;28;31). Our general approach to studying instability in TK6 cells has been to isolate individual clones and analyze gene and chromosome mutation frequencies in each. This approach maximizes the possibility of detecting low frequency events that might be selected against in mass cultures.

  9. G{sub 2}/M-phase arrest and release in ataxia telangiectasia and normal cells after exposure to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, J.H.; Gatti, R.A.; Huo, Y.K.; Chiang, C.S.; McBride, W.H.

    1994-10-01

    Cells from patients with ataxia telangiectasia (AT) are abnormal in their response to irradiation as judged by clonogenic survival and accumulation in G{sub 2} phase. The relationship of the results of these two assays, however, is still a matter of controversy. Flow cytometry was used to measure the distribution of cells in the phases of the cell cycle after 2 Gy irradiation in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) and SV40-transformed fibroblasts. AT cells showed increased and prolonged accumulation in G{sub 2}/M phase regardless of the cell type (lymphoblastoid or fibroblast) or complementation group (A, C or D). To test the hypothesis that prolonged accumulation of AT cells in G{sub 2} phase after irradiation was not simply a reflection of their radiosensitivity, we gave iso-survival radiation doses to SV40-transformed fibroblasts of two AT and one control cell lines. The two AT cell lines exited from the G{sub 2}/M-phase block more slowly than control cells after each dose tested. This implies that prolonged accumulation in G{sub 2}/M phase in AT cells is not directly related to radiosensitivity as measured by clonogenic survival, but that factors involved in the exit from G{sub 2} phase after irradiation may be abnormally regulated. We found that G{sub 2}-phase arrest of AT cells did not necessarily result in a fatal consequence in the first cell cycle after irradiation. Furthermore, G{sub 2}-phase arrest did not lead to detectable DNA fragmentation characteristic of apoptosis as judged by gel electrophoresis. 37 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Persistent use of false myeloma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Drexler, Hans G; Matsuo, Yoshinobu; MacLeod, Roderick A E

    2003-09-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a neoplasm of a terminally differentiated B-cell. Human myeloma cell lines were shown to be suitable model systems for use in various fields of the biological sciences. Within the last 20 years more than 100 cell lines have been established. So-called 'myeloma cell lines' have been previously reported and are still widely used which are in reality Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive B-lymphoblastoid cell lines. The presence of the EBV-genome in residual normal B-cells provides them with a selective growth advantage after explantation. Cell lines represent an extremely important resource for research in a variety of fields and disciplines. As the cell lines are used as in vitro model systems in lieu of primary material, it is crucial that the cells in the culture flasks faithfully correspond to the purported objects of study. On closer examination, the use of false cell lines may be seen to invalidate a significant percentage of scientific work, or at least cast doubts on the relevance of these in vitro results to the cell type or tumor in vivo. Ultimately, use of cross-contaminated cell lines is a waste of human and material resources. Henceforth, it should be mandatory to prove the proper derivation of each new cell line by comparing DNA fingerprints or karyotypes of the patient's primary cells and the cultured cells. The availability of well characterized and authenticated bona fide MM cell lines is of great importance for the study of the biology, etiology and treatment of the disease.

  11. Differential expression of TP53 associated genes in Fanconi anemia cells after mitomycin C and hydroxyurea treatment.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Angélica; Hinz, John M; Gómez, Laura; Molina, Bertha; Acuña, Hilda; Jones, Irene M; Frias, Sara; Coleman, Matthew A

    2008-10-30

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare, heritable chromosomal instability disease characterized by several congenital defects and cancer predisposition. Functional interactions between specific FA proteins and DNA damage response and repair activities have been reported, but the interplay between these mechanisms for maintaining genomic stability are not well understood. Many DNA damage response proteins are transcriptionally regulated by the tumor suppressor protein p53 (TP53), suggesting an important regulatory role for the DNA damage and stress response pathway. To better understand the association between FA and the DNA damage stress response we analyzed the levels of chromosomal damage and damage mediated gene transcription responses in lymphoblastoid cells derived from normal individuals and patients carrying the most common FA complementation group (FA-A). Chromosomal aberrations were first measured after exposure to mitomicyn C (MMC) or hydroxyurea (HU). Aliquots of the same cell were than assayed for the transcriptional response of 21 DNA damage and stress response genes using quantitative real-time PCR. The FA-A lymphoblastoid cells showed significant increases in the frequency of chromosome aberrations relative to non-FA-A lymphoblastoid lines after MMC treatment. The MMC induced damage was correlated with a general increase in expression of TP53-modulated DNA damage stress response genes involved in processes such as DNA repair, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. Following HU treatment FA cells showed a decreased induction of CAs with much less transcriptional differences between targeted genes. Overall, the differences between the normal and FA-A cells after genotoxic treatments imply an increased activation and reliance of FA cells on the down-stream activities of TP53 for prevention of cell killing and chromosome damage from interstrand crosslinks but not for general replication arrest and double strand breaks. Furthermore, these results imply a

  12. Interaction of N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) with owl monkey kidney cells in enhancing the yields of Herpesvirus saimiri (HVS) and its antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Faggioni, A.; Ablashi, D.V.; Dahlberg, J.; Armstrong, G.; Sundar, S.K.

    1984-05-01

    Pre- and posttreatment with N-methyl-N'-nitro-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) of owl monkey kidney (OMK) cells infected with Herpesvirus saimiri (HVS) resulted in one to three logs higher yields of virus, depending upon the dose of MNNG. A higher percentage of cells also showed HVS early antigen (EA) and late antigen (LA) by immunofluorescence when OMK cells infected with HVS were fed with medium containing MNNG. The high yields of HVS were also observed by electron microscopy. MNNG did not induce HVS-EA in HVS nonproducer lymphoblastoid T cells, nor did it enhance TPA-induced EA to LA. The data suggest that MNNG could be useful in obtaining high yields of virus and/or antigen-producing cells for immunofluorescence or other biomedical experiments, especially from those strains of HVS which grow poorly in vitro. The interaction of MNNG and HVS could also be useful for in vitro transformation or in vivo enhancement of the malignant process.

  13. Ultraviolet light-induced chromosomal aberrations in cultured cells from Cockayne syndrome and complementation group C xeroderma pigmentosum patients: lack of correlation with cancer susceptibility

    SciTech Connect

    Seguin, L.R.; Tarone, R.E.; Liao, K.H.; Robbins, J.H.

    1988-03-01

    Both Cockayne syndrome (CS) and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are inherited diseases with defective repair of damage induced in DNA by UV. Patients with XP, but not those with CS, have an increased susceptibility to formation of sunlight-induced skin tumors. We determined the frequency of UV-induced chromosomal aberrations in cultured lymphoblastoid cell lines from five CS patients and three complementation-group-C XP patients to determine whether such aberrations were abnormally increased only in the XP cells. We found that CS cells had the same abnormally increased number of induced aberrations as the XP cells, indicating that the number of UV-induced aberrations in XP group C cells does not account for the susceptibility of these XP patients to sunlight-induced skin cancer.

  14. Characterization of null cells in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia with B-cell allo- and hetero-antisera.

    PubMed

    Kirov, S M; Kwant, W O; Fernandez, L A; MacSween, J M; Langley, G R

    1980-02-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia peripheral blood mononuclear cells (CLL-PBMN) were separated into B, T and Null-enriched lymphocyte sub-populations using sequential mouse and sheep red blood cell rosetting depletions on Hypaque-Ficoll gradients. The procedure produced viable cell populations with mean percentage purities of 90, 87 and 75 for B, T and non-rosetting (Null-enriched) sub-populations, respectively. More than 80% of PBMN cells were generally accounted for by mouse and sheep rosetting. The purified lymphocyte sub-populations were examined with a panel of B-cell specific alloantisera obtained from kidney transplant recipients and a rabbit antiserum to B cell antigen isolated from a human B-lymphoblastoid line. The results illustrated that the antigens detected by these sera also have potential as a marker for characterizing the CLL population. Where conventional markers were weak or absent, B cell antigens were readily detected in both fluorescent and cytotoxic tests. The majority of the non-rosetting cells (less than 90%) in CLL followed similar patterns of reactivity to the purified B cells, suggesting they are a subset of B cells. A small residual population (0--5% of PBMN) did not react with the antisera, the significance of which is unknown.

  15. Induction of proliferation in vitro of resting human natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    London, L.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments examined the cellular and humoral factors necessary to induce proliferation of purified NK cells in vitro and analyzed the phenotypic characteristics of these proliferating cells. The authors experiments demonstrated that NK cells do not proliferate in response to typical T cell mitogens or to allogeneic stimulation. However, NK cells are readily induced to proliferate in response to either natural or recombinant IL-2. The proliferative response of NK cells to IL-2 is enhanced in the presence of irradiated B lymphoblastoid ell lines. Proliferating NK cells maintain the expression of surface markers characteristic of freshly isolated NK cells which newly expressing surface activation antigens including the IL-2 and transferric receptors and the HLA-DR antigen. The majority of NK cells initiate proliferation in response to IL-2. Greater than 50 U/ml of IL-2 is necessary to induce maximal tritiated thymidine (/sup 3/H-TdR) incorporation by NK cells, and the interaction of IL-2 with the Tac IL-2 receptor is required for the maintenance of NK cell proliferation. NK cells do not proliferate in response to irradiated Daudi cells alone, which, in the presence of IL-2, may act by maintaining continuous proliferation of the cells originally responsive to IL-2. Unlike NK cells, the authors have shown that only a minor subset of T cells proliferate in response to IL-2 alone.

  16. Identification of a novel gene expressed in activated natural killer cells and T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, C.A.; Schall, R.P.; He, H.; Cairns, J.S. )

    1992-01-15

    The authors have isolated a cDNA clone from a human activated NK cell-derived cDNA library that identifies a transcript [NK4] that is selectively expressed in lymphocytes. The expression of this transcript is increased after activation of T cells by mitogens or activation of NK cells by IL-2 (lymphokine-activated killer cells). The transcript levels demonstrated by Northern blot analysis increase by 12 h after activation, remain high for at least 48 h, and require protein synthesis for expression. Southern blot analysis of B lymphoblastoid lines derived from 18 unrelated individuals reveal variable banding patterns suggestive of polymorphism within the NK4 gene. No homology was found between the sequence of the coding region of this transcript and any sequences in the GenBank data base. Sequence homology to the U1 small nuclear RNA was found within the 3[prime] untranslated region immediately upstream of the site of polyadenylation, suggesting a possible role for U1 in the polyadenylation process. Sequence analysis indicates the transcript would encode a protein having a mass of 27 kDa. The presence of a signal sequence and lack of a transmembrane region suggests that the protein is secreted. In addition, the protein contains an RGD sequence that may be involved in cellular adhesion. This transcript appears to encode a novel product common to the activation pathways of both NK cells and T cells. 50 refs., 8 figs.

  17. Reprogramming human B cells into induced pluripotent stem cells and its enhancement by C/EBPα.

    PubMed

    Bueno, C; Sardina, J L; Di Stefano, B; Romero-Moya, D; Muñoz-López, A; Ariza, L; Chillón, M C; Balanzategui, A; Castaño, J; Herreros, A; Fraga, M F; Fernández, A; Granada, I; Quintana-Bustamante, O; Segovia, J C; Nishimura, K; Ohtaka, M; Nakanishi, M; Graf, T; Menendez, P

    2016-03-01

    B cells have been shown to be refractory to reprogramming and B-cell-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) have only been generated from murine B cells engineered to carry doxycycline-inducible Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and Myc (OSKM) cassette in every tissue and from EBV/SV40LT-immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines. Here, we show for the first time that freshly isolated non-cultured human cord blood (CB)- and peripheral blood (PB)-derived CD19+CD20+ B cells can be reprogrammed to iPSCs carrying complete VDJH immunoglobulin (Ig) gene monoclonal rearrangements using non-integrative tetracistronic, but not monocistronic, OSKM-expressing Sendai Virus. Co-expression of C/EBPα with OSKM facilitates iPSC generation from both CB- and PB-derived B cells. We also demonstrate that myeloid cells are much easier to reprogram than B and T lymphocytes. Differentiation potential back into the cell type of their origin of B-cell-, T-cell-, myeloid- and fibroblast-iPSCs is not skewed, suggesting that their differentiation does not seem influenced by 'epigenetic memory'. Our data reflect the actual cell-autonomous reprogramming capacity of human primary B cells because biased reprogramming was avoided by using freshly isolated primary cells, not exposed to cytokine cocktails favoring proliferation, differentiation or survival. The ability to reprogram CB/PB-derived primary human B cells offers an unprecedented opportunity for studying developmental B lymphopoiesis and modeling B-cell malignancies.

  18. DNA double-strand breaks measured in individual cells subjected to gel electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, P.L.; Wlodek, D.; Banath, J.P. )

    1991-09-01

    Microscopic examination of individual mammalian cells embedded in agarose, subjected to electrophoresis, and stained with a fluorescent DNA-binding dye provides a novel way of measuring DNA damage and more importantly, of assessing heterogeneity in DNA damage within a mixed population of cells. With this method, DNA double-strand breaks can be detected in populations of cells exposed to X-ray doses as low as 5 Gy. The radiation dose-response relationship for initial formation of double-strand breaks was identical for cell lines irradiated in G1, regardless of their sensitivity to killing by ionizing radiation. However, for cells irradiated in S phase, DNA migration was significantly reduced. For Chinese hamster V79 cells, Chinese hamster ovary cells, WiDr human colon carcinoma cells, and L5178Y-R mouse lymphoblastoid cells, S-phase DNA appeared to be about 3 times less sensitive to X-ray damage than DNA from other phases of the cell cycle. However, for the very radiosensitive L5178Y-S cells, the migration of replicating DNA was reduced only slightly. For Chinese hamster V79 and Chinese hamster ovary cells, damage was repaired at a similar rate in all cells of the population, and 85% of the breaks were rejoined within 2 h after irradiation. The radiosensitive L5178Y-S cells repaired damage more slowly than V79 or Chinese hamster ovary cells; 2 h after exposure to 50 Gy, approximately 50% of the damage was still present.

  19. Isolation and establishment in in vitro culture of a Theileria annulata--infected cell line from Spain.

    PubMed

    Viseras, J; García-Fernández, P; Adroher, F J

    1997-01-01

    The isolation of Theileria annulata-infected lymphocytes using blood from an animal suffering from Mediterranean theileriosis as a source of parasites is described. The present work reports the first isolation and establishment in in vitro culture of a T. annulata-infected cell line from southwestern Europe, where Mediterranean theileriosis causes important economic losses, especially in southern Spain. The parasite was identified by staining of cells from culture with Giemsa, by immunofluorescent antibody techniques (IFAT), and by isoenzyme characterization. The possibility of using this T. annulata-infected lymphoblastoid cell line to obtain an antigen for diagnosis of Mediterranean theileriosis by IFAT and to develop a tissue-culture vaccine against this disease in our geographic area shows the significance of this isolation and culture.

  20. Cytotoxicity of dihydroartemisinin toward Molt-4 cells attenuated by N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone and deferoxamine.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ho Wing; Singh, Narendra P; Lai, Henry C

    2013-10-01

    Derivatives of artemisinin, a compound extracted from the wormwood Artemisia annua L, have potent anticancer properties. The anticancer mechanisms of artemisinin derivatives have not been fully-elucidated. We hypothesize that the cytotoxicity of these compounds is due to the free radicals formed by interaction of their endoperoxide moiety with intracellular iron in cancer cells. The effects of N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone (PBN), a spin-trap free radical scavenger, and deferoxamine (DX), an iron chelating agent, on the in vitro cytotoxicity of dihyroartemisinin (DHA) toward Molt-4 human T-lymphoblastoid leukemia cells were investigated in the present study. Dihydroartemisinin effectively killed Molt-4 cells in vitro. Its cytotoxicity was significantly attenuated by PBN and DX. Based on the data of our present and previous studies, we conclude that one anticancer mechanism of dihydroartemisinin is the formation of toxic-free radicals via an iron-mediated process.

  1. Human cell mutagenicity of chlorinated and unchlorinated water and the disinfection byproduct 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MX).

    PubMed

    Woodruff, N W; Durant, J L; Donhoffner, L L; Penman, B W; Crespi, C L

    2001-08-22

    Extracts of three water samples--humic acid-enriched water-both peatland water and drinking water, both with and without chlorination were tested for mutagenicity at the tk locus in MCL-5 cells, a line of human B-lymphoblastoid cells that express cytochrome P450 enzymes and microsomal epoxide hydrolase. Our results show that chlorination caused a 5.5-fold increase (P<0.0001) in the mutagenicity of the humic acid-enriched water. The unchlorinated peatland water was mutagenic at the two highest doses (240 and 480 microg equivalent total organic carbon (TOC)/ml), possibly due to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) that were measured in the peat. In contrast, the chlorinated peatland water was non-mutagenic at low doses, while at the highest dose (240 microg equivalent TOC/ml) the sample was so toxic that an insufficient number of cells survived treatment to allow plating. The chlorinated and unchlorinated drinking water were both non-mutagenic. 3-Chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MX), a potent bacterial mutagen and chlorine-disinfection byproduct, was also tested in MCL-5 cells as well as in two other human B-lymphoblastoid cell-lines, AHH-1 TK+/- and h1A1v2 cells, which differ from each other and from MCL-5 cells in the amounts of cytochrome P450 enzymes they can express. MX was mutagenic to all three cell-lines, but there was no apparent correlation between cytochrome P450 enzyme expression and the mutagenicity of MX. Overall, our results show that samples of chlorinated humic acid-enriched water and MX, a model chlorine-disinfection byproduct, are moderately mutagenic to human cells.

  2. Evaluation of EBV transformation of human memory B-cells isolated by FACS and MACS techniques.

    PubMed

    Sadreddini, Sanam; Jadidi-Niaragh, Farhad; Younesi, Vahid; Pourlak, Tala; Afkham, Amir; Shokri, Fazel; Yousefi, Mehdi

    2016-07-01

    Several studies have been performed to develop effective neutralizing monoclonal antibodies. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can efficiently immortalize B-cells to establish lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) and so it has been used extensively for transformation of B-cells to produce and secrete immunoglobulin. The present study addressed the effect of TLR7/8 agonist (R848), feeder cells layer and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) cell separation methods on the transformation efficiency of antibody-producing memory B-cells. For these studies, the antigen used for analyses of antibody formation was the tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) derived from Clostridium tetani. The results here showed that employing an HFFF.PI6 feeder cell layer, R848 agonist and FACS-mediated purification of memory B-cells led to increased transformation efficiency. Altogether, the effects of the R848 and the feeder cells provided an efficient method for EBV transformation of human B-cells. Moreover, there was an advantage in using FACS sorting of B-cells over the MACS method in the context of EBV transformation and immortalization of precursors of antigen-specific B-cells.

  3. Mutagenic Effects of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles on Biological Cells.

    PubMed

    Dissanayake, Niluka M; Current, Kelley M; Obare, Sherine O

    2015-09-30

    In recent years, there has been an increased interest in the design and use of iron oxide materials with nanoscale dimensions for magnetic, catalytic, biomedical, and electronic applications. The increased manufacture and use of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) in consumer products as well as industrial processes is expected to lead to the unintentional release of IONPs into the environment. The impact of IONPs on the environment and on biological species is not well understood but remains a concern due to the increased chemical reactivity of nanoparticles relative to their bulk counterparts. This review article describes the impact of IONPs on cellular genetic components. The mutagenic impact of IONPs may damage an organism's ability to develop or reproduce. To date, there has been experimental evidence of IONPs having mutagenic interactions on human cell lines including lymphoblastoids, fibroblasts, microvascular endothelial cells, bone marrow cells, lung epithelial cells, alveolar type II like epithelial cells, bronchial fibroblasts, skin epithelial cells, hepatocytes, cerebral endothelial cells, fibrosarcoma cells, breast carcinoma cells, lung carcinoma cells, and cervix carcinoma cells. Other cell lines including the Chinese hamster ovary cells, mouse fibroblast cells, murine fibroblast cells, Mytilus galloprovincialis sperm cells, mice lung cells, murine alveolar macrophages, mice hepatic and renal tissue cells, and vero cells have also shown mutagenic effects upon exposure to IONPs. We further show the influence of IONPs on microorganisms in the presence and absence of dissolved organic carbon. The results shed light on the OPEN ACCESS Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2015, 16 23483 transformations IONPs undergo in the environment and the nature of the potential mutagenic impact on biological cells.

  4. Mutagenic Effects of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles on Biological Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dissanayake, Niluka M.; Current, Kelley M.; Obare, Sherine O.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increased interest in the design and use of iron oxide materials with nanoscale dimensions for magnetic, catalytic, biomedical, and electronic applications. The increased manufacture and use of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) in consumer products as well as industrial processes is expected to lead to the unintentional release of IONPs into the environment. The impact of IONPs on the environment and on biological species is not well understood but remains a concern due to the increased chemical reactivity of nanoparticles relative to their bulk counterparts. This review article describes the impact of IONPs on cellular genetic components. The mutagenic impact of IONPs may damage an organism’s ability to develop or reproduce. To date, there has been experimental evidence of IONPs having mutagenic interactions on human cell lines including lymphoblastoids, fibroblasts, microvascular endothelial cells, bone marrow cells, lung epithelial cells, alveolar type II like epithelial cells, bronchial fibroblasts, skin epithelial cells, hepatocytes, cerebral endothelial cells, fibrosarcoma cells, breast carcinoma cells, lung carcinoma cells, and cervix carcinoma cells. Other cell lines including the Chinese hamster ovary cells, mouse fibroblast cells, murine fibroblast cells, Mytilus galloprovincialis sperm cells, mice lung cells, murine alveolar macrophages, mice hepatic and renal tissue cells, and vero cells have also shown mutagenic effects upon exposure to IONPs. We further show the influence of IONPs on microorganisms in the presence and absence of dissolved organic carbon. The results shed light on the transformations IONPs undergo in the environment and the nature of the potential mutagenic impact on biological cells. PMID:26437397

  5. [Mechanisms of gamma-inducible death of Jurkat cells line].

    PubMed

    Gamkrelidze, M M; Bezhitashvili, N D; Pavliashvili, A T; Mchedlishvili, T V; Sanikidze, T V

    2008-06-01

    Mechanisms of radio-inducible death of Jurkat cells were investigated. Human lymphoblastoid T-cell line Jurkat is widely established model for studying apoptosis mechanisms. The cell was radiated by "Teragam" (Czech Republic) by dose 2 g during 1 minute. After radiation cells were incubated at standard conditions during 24 hours. After gamma radiation in cell population amount of cells in gaplois (apoptotic G 0) stage was increased 8,2 folds, in diplois (G 0/G1) stage - by 17%, in synthetic (S) stage decreased by 35% and tetraploid (G2/M) stage by 73% in comparison to control group. It was revealed intensive production of free radicals of oxygen and nitric oxide and decreasing activity of antioxidant enzymes (superoxidismutasa, catalasa and glutathione peroxidase). Revealed dependence between intensification of apoptosis and radiation-induced arrest of cell cycle G2/M phase may be determined by excess amount of free oxygen and nitrogen radicals generated in Jurkat cells as a result of nondirect effects of low doses of gamma radiation.

  6. Relationships among micronuclei, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds within individual cells in the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Han S J; Seth, Isheeta; Joiner, Michael C; Tucker, James D

    2013-07-01

    Micronuclei have been used extensively in studies as an easily evaluated indicator of DNA damage but little is known about their association with other types of damage such as nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds. Here, radiation-induced clastogenic events were evaluated via the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay in two normal human lymphoblastoid cell lines exposed to neutrons or γ-radiation. DNA damage induced by the chemical agents mitomycin C and phleomycin was also evaluated in two normal and two mitochondrial mutant human lymphoblastoid cell lines. In addition to micronuclei, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds were enumerated by recording the coincident presence of these end points within individual cells, and the associations among these three end points were evaluated for all treatment conditions. The common odds ratios for micronuclei and nucleoplasmic bridges were found to be significantly larger than unity, indicating that the presence of one or more micronuclei in a cell imposes a significant risk of having one or more nucleoplasmic bridges in that same cell, and vice versa. The strength of this association did not change significantly with radiation dose or concentration of the chemical clastogens. Common odds ratios for association between micronuclei and buds, and between bridges and buds were also found to be significantly higher than unity. However, associations between micronuclei and buds could not be calculated for some treatments due to heterogeneity in the odds ratios and hence may depend on chemical clastogen concentration or radiation dose. This study provides evidence of how paired analyses among genetic end points in the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay can provide information concerning abnormalities of cell division and possibly about structural chromosomal rearrangements induced by clastogens.

  7. Estimation by limiting dilution analysis of human IL 2-secreting T cells: detection of IL 2 produced by single lymphokine-secreting T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Vie, H.; Miller, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    We present here a culture method for the estimation, in human blood, of the number of lymphocytes that can respond to mitogen by producing interleukin 2 (IL 2). T cells are cultured at limiting dilutions with PHA or Con A in the presence of Epstein Barr virus-transformed human lymphoblastoid cells (EB-LCL), and supernatants are tested 3 days later for IL 2 content by a cell proliferation assay. The distribution of negative wells follows the expected Poisson single-hit relationship, suggesting that the assay is sensitive to single cells of a single limiting cell type. On average, 16.3% of peripheral blood mononuclear cells can produce IL 2 in such clonal cultures (mean of 12 determinations; SD = 5.6%). Surprisingly, irradiation (up to 2000 rad) of the titrated responder cell population diminishes the estimated frequencies by less than 50%. The ability to detect IL 2 levels in cultures containing only a single, nonproliferating T lymphocyte allows us to estimate the amount of IL 2 generated by an individual effector cell during a 3-day culture interval after mitogen stimulation. The average responding, irradiated T cell generates 0.92 pg of IL 2 (median) within 3 days. The method presented provides a straightforward way to provide independent estimates of responding cell number and of lymphokine production per cell in a variety of clinical situations.

  8. Development of a dihydroartemisinin-resistant Molt-4 leukemia cell line.

    PubMed

    Park, Jungsoo; Lai, Henry C; Singh, Mallika; Sasaki, Tomikazu; Singh, Narendra P

    2014-06-01

    Artemisinin generates cytotoxic free radicals when it reacts with iron. Its toxicity is more selective toward cancer cells because cancer cells contain a higher level of intracellular-free iron. We previously reported that dihydroartemisinin (DHA), an active metabolite of artemisinin, has selective cytotoxicity toward Molt-4 human lymphoblastoid cells. A concern is whether cancer cells could develop resistance to DHA after repeated administration, thus limiting its therapeutic efficacy. In the present study, we developed a DHA-resistant Molt-4 cell line (RTN) by exposing Molt-4 cells to gradually increasing concentrations of DHA in vitro. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of DHA for RTN cells is 7.1-times higher than that of Molt-4 cells. RTN cells have a higher growth rate than Molt-4 cells. In addition, we investigated the toxicities of two more potent synthetic artemisinin compounds, artemisinin dimer-alcohol and artemisinin-tagged holotransferrin toward RTN cells; RTN cells showed no significant cross-resistance to these compounds.

  9. Transplantability of human lymphoid cell line, lymphoma, and leukemia in splenectomized and/or irradiated nude mice

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, S.; Shimosato, Y.; Kuroki, M.; Sato, Y.; Nakajima, T.

    1980-07-01

    The effects of splenectomy and/or whole-body irradiation of nude mice before xenotransplantation of lymphoid cell lines, lymphoma, and leukemia were studied. Transplantation after whole-body irradiation resulted in the increased ''take'' rate of three cultured cell lines (two of T-cell-derived acute lymphocytic leukemia and one of B-cell derived acute lymphocytic leukemia) and in the tumorous growth of Burkitt-derived Raji and spontaneously transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines. With splenectomy plus irradiation as a pretreatment, tumorous growth occurred in four other cell lines which were not transplantable after irradiation only (two cell lines of Epstein-Barr virus-transformed cord blood cells and one each of null acute lymphocytic leukemia and nodular lymphoma-derived cell lines). Direct transplantation of leukemia and lymphoma cells into the pretreated mice was successful in 7 of 24 cases (29%). B-cell-derived diffuse large lymphoid lymphoma was transplantable in three of seven cases (43%). However, lymphoma and leukemia of peripheral T-cell origin was difficult to transplant even with pretreatment, and only one pleomorphic T-cell lymphoma grew to a significant size (2 cm). One tumor each of B-cell-derived diffuse large lymphoid and T-cell diffuse lymphoblastic lymphoma became transplantable.

  10. Generation of EBV-specific T cells for adoptive immunotherapy: a novel protocol using formalin-fixed stimulator cells to increase biosafety.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Markus H; Brestrich, Gordon; Mittenzweig, Alexa; Roemhild, Andy; Zwinger, Sandra; Subklewe, Marion; Beier, Carola; Kurtz, Andreas; Babel, Nina; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Reinke, Petra

    2007-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with in vitro generated Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific T cells is a safe and effective treatment in patients with EBV-related complications after transplantation. More frequent use of EBV-specific T cells is held back by their cost and time-intensive generation under good manufacturing practice (GMP) conditions. Currently, EBV-specific T cells are produced by repetitive stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with EBV-infected lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), a protocol that requires several open GMP-handling steps. The aim of the present study was to improve T-cell generation under GMP conditions. We introduce a novel generation protocol that replaces repetitive with short-term LCL stimulation of PMBCs. Vital and formalin-fixed LCLs were used to further increase biosafety. Stimulated T cells were selected by the clinically approved cytokine secretion assay followed by nonspecific expansion. Sufficient numbers of EBV-specific T-cell lines were generated with all protocols. Specific recognition and killing of EBV-infected targets was found and was independent of the generation protocol applied. The novel protocol based on formalin-fixed cells, selection, and expansion reduced open GMP-handling steps and increased biosafety. Furthermore, fixation will allow the use of transgenic LCLs (eg, with cytomegalovirus or tumor antigens) and thereby facilitate the generation of antigen-specific T cells directed against pathogens other than EBV.

  11. Caffeic Acid Phenylethyl Ester and MG-132 Have Apoptotic and Antiproliferative Effects on Leukemic Cells But Not on Normal Mononuclear Cells12

    PubMed Central

    Cavaliere, Victoria; Papademetrio, Daniela L; Lorenzetti, Mario; Valva, Pamela; Preciado, María Victoria; Gargallo, Patricia; Larripa, Irene; Monreal, Mariela B; Pardo, María Laura; Hajos, Silvia E; Blanco, Guillermo AC; Álvarez, Élida MC

    2009-01-01

    Chemotherapy aims to limit proliferation and induce apoptotic cell death in tumor cells. Owing to blockade of signaling pathways involved in cell survival and proliferation, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) inhibitors can induce apoptosis in a number of hematological malignancies. The efficacy of conventional chemotherapeutic drugs, such as vincristine (VCR) and doxorubicine (DOX), may be enhanced with combined therapy based on NF-κB modulation. In this study, we evaluated the effect of caffeic acid phenylethyl ester (CAPE) and MG-132, two nonspecific NF-κB inhibitors, and conventional chemotherapeutics drugs DOX and VCR on cell proliferation and apoptosis induction on a lymphoblastoid B-cell line, PL104, established and characterized in our laboratory. CAPE and MG-132 treatment showed a strong antiproliferative effect accompanied by clear cell cycle deregulation and apoptosis induction. Doxorubicine and VCR showed antiproliferative effects similar to those of CAPE and MG-132, although the latter drugs showed an apoptotic rate two-fold higher than DOX and VCR. None of the four compounds showed cytotoxic effect on peripheral mononuclear cells from healthy volunteers. CAPE- and MG-132-treated bone marrow cells from patients with myeloid and lymphoid leukemias showed 69% (P < .001) and 25% decrease (P < .01) in cell proliferation and 42% and 34% (P < .01) apoptosis induction, respectively. Overall, our results indicate that CAPE and MG-132 had a strong and selective apoptotic effect on tumor cells that may be useful in future treatment of hematological neoplasias. PMID:19252751

  12. A Metabolic Biofuel Cell: Conversion of Human Leukocyte Metabolic Activity to Electrical Currents

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    An investigation of the electrochemical activity of human white blood cells (WBC) for biofuel cell (BFC) applications is described. WBCs isolated from whole human blood were suspended in PBS and introduced into the anode compartment of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The cathode compartment contained a 50 mM potassium ferricyanide solution. Average current densities between 0.9 and 1.6 μA cm-2 and open circuit potentials (Voc) between 83 and 102 mV were obtained, which were both higher than control values. Cyclic voltammetry was used to investigate the electrochemical activity of the activated WBCs in an attempt to elucidate the mechanism of electron transfer between the cells and electrode. Voltammograms were obtained for the WBCs, including peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs - a lymphocyte-monocyte mixture isolated on a Ficoll gradient), a B lymphoblastoid cell line (BLCL), and two leukemia cell lines, namely K562 and Jurkat. An oxidation peak at about 363 mV vs. SCE for the PMA (phorbol ester) activated primary cells, with a notable absence of a reduction peak was observed. Oxidation peaks were not observed for the BLCL, K562 or Jurkat cell lines. HPLC confirmed the release of serotonin (5-HT) from the PMA activated primary cells. It is believed that serotonin, among other biochemical species released by the activated cells, contributes to the observed BFC currents. PMID:21569243

  13. Radiation sensitivity of Merkel cell carcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, J.H.; Ramsay, J.R.; Birrell, G.W.

    1995-07-30

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), being a small cell carcinoma, would be expected to be sensitive to radiation. Clinical analysis of patients at our center, especially those with macroscopic disease, would suggest the response is quite variable. We have recently established a number of MCC cell lines from patients prior to radiotherapy, and for the first time are in a position to determine their sensitivity under controlled conditions. Some of the MCC lines grew as suspension cultures and could not be single cell cloned; therefore, it was not possible to use clonogenic survival for all cell lines. A tetrazolium based (MTT) assay was used for these lines, to estimate cell growth after {gamma} irradiation. Control experiments were conducted on lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) and the adherent MCC line, MCC13, to demonstrate that the two assays were comparable under the conditions used. We have examined cell lines from MCC, small cell lung cancer (SCLC), malignant melanomas, Epstein Barr virus (EBV) transformed lymphocytes (LCL), and skin fibroblasts for their sensitivity to {gamma} irradiation using both clonogenic cell survival and MTT assays. The results show that the tumor cell lines have a range of sensitivities, with melanoma being more resistant (surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) 0.57 and 0.56) than the small cell carcinoma lines, MCC (SF2 range 0.21-0.45, mean SF2 0.30, n = 8) and SCLC (SF2 0.31). Fibroblasts were the most sensitive (SF2 0.13-0.20, mean 0.16, n = 5). The MTT assay, when compared to clonogenic assay for the MCC13 adherent line and the LCL, gave comparable results under the conditions used. Both assays gave a range of SF2 values for the MCC cell lines, suggesting that these cancers would give a heterogeneous response in vivo. The results with the two derivative clones of MCC14 (SF2 for MCC14/1 0.38, MCC14/2 0.45) would further suggest that some of them may develop resistance during clonogenic evolution. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. A unique cell-surface protein phenotype distinguishes human small-cell from non-small-cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Baylin, S.B.; Gazdar, A.F.; Minna, J.D.; Bernal, S.D.; Sharper, J.H.

    1982-08-01

    Radioiodination (/sup 125/I) and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to determine that small-(oat) cell lung carcinoma (SCC)-a tumor with neuroedocrine features-possesses a surface protein pattern distinct from the other types of lung cancer cells (squamous, adeno-, and large-cell undifferentiated carcinoma). Twelve distinguishing proteins, 40 to 70 kilodaltons (kDal), characterized four separate lines of SCC; three of these, designated E (60 kDal; pI = 7.3), S (30 kDal; pI = 6.0), and U 57 kDal; pI = 5.6), may be unique SCC gene products and were identified only in (/sup 35/S)methionine labeling of SCC and not in non-SCC or human fibroblasts. Two lines of adeno-, one of squamous, and one of undifferentiated large-cell lung carcinoma exhibited similar surface protein patterns to one another. Nine distinguishing proteins (40 to 100 kDal) and at least five large proteins (>100 kDal) were unique to these lines. The surface protein phenotypes for SCC and non-SCC were distinct from those for human lymphoblastoid cells and fibroblasts. However, the neuroendocrine features of SCC were further substantiated because 6 of the 12 distinguishing SCC surface proteins, including E and U, were identified on human neuroblastoma cells. The proteins identified should (i) help define differentiation steps for normal and neoplastic bronchial epithelial cells, (ii) prove useful in better classifying lung cancers, and (iii) be instrumental in tracing formation of neuroendocrine cells.

  15. {sub p}53-Dependent Adaptive Responses in Human Cells Exposed to Space Radiations

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Su Xiaoming; Suzuki, Hiromi; Omori, Katsunori; Seki, Masaya; Hashizume, Toko; Shimazu, Toru; Ishioka, Noriaki; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: It has been reported that priming irradiation or conditioning irradiation with a low dose of X-rays in the range of 0.02-0.1 Gy induces a p53-dependent adaptive response in mammalian cells. The aim of the present study was to clarify the effect of space radiations on the adaptive response. Methods and Materials: Two human lymphoblastoid cell lines were used; one cell line bears a wild-type p53 (wtp53) gene, and another cell line bears a mutated p53 (mp53) gene. The cells were frozen during transportation on the space shuttle and while in orbit in the International Space Station freezer for 133 days between November 15, 2008 and March 29, 2009. After the frozen samples were returned to Earth, the cells were cultured for 6 h and then exposed to a challenging X-ray-irradiation (2 Gy). Cellular sensitivity, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations were scored using dye-exclusion assays, Hoechst33342 staining assays, and chromosomal banding techniques, respectively. Results: In cells exposed to space radiations, adaptive responses such as the induction of radioresistance and the depression of radiation-induced apoptosis and chromosome aberrations were observed in wtp53 cells but not in mp53 cells. Conclusion: These results have confirmed the hypothesis that p53-dependent adaptive responses are apparently induced by space radiations within a specific range of low doses. The cells exhibited this effect owing to space radiations exposure, even though the doses in space were very low.

  16. Identification of a Cell Surface Protein, p97, in Human Melanomas and Certain Other Neoplasms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodbury, Richard G.; Brown, Joseph P.; Yeh, Ming-Yang; Hellstrom, Ingegerd; Hellstrom, Karl Erik

    1980-04-01

    BALB/c mice were immunized with a human melanoma cell line, SK-MEL 28, and their spleen cells were fused with mouse NS-1 myeloma cells. Hybrid cells were tested in an indirect 125I-labeled protein A assay for production of antibodies that bound to surface antigens of SK-MEL 28 melanoma cells but not to autologous skin fibroblasts. One hybridoma, designated 4.1, had the required specificity. It was cloned and grown in mice as an ascites tumor. The monoclonal IgG1 antibody produced by the hybridoma was purified from the ascites fluid and labeled with 125I. The labeled antibody bound, at significant levels, to approximately 90% of the melanomas tested and to approximately 55% of other tumor cells, but not to three B-lymphoblastoid cell lines or to cultivated fibroblasts from 15 donors. Immunoprecipitation and sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis were used to detect the target antigen in 125I-labeled cell membranes of both cultivated cells and tumor biopsy samples. A protein with a molecular weight of 97,000 was identified. This protein, designated p97, was present in both cultured cells and biopsy material from melanomas and certain other tumors, but it was not detected in eight different samples of normal adult epithelial or mesenchymal tissues obtained from five donors.

  17. Specificity and isotype of Rh specific antibodies produced by human B-cell lines established from alloimmunized Rh negative women.

    PubMed

    Pasha, Roya Payam Khaja; Bahrami, Zahra Samadi; Niroomanesh, Shirin; Ramzi, Fereshteh; Razavi, Ali Reza; Shokri, Fazel

    2005-10-01

    Despite the successful outcome of anti-D prophylaxis program, alloimmunization still occurs. The aim of this study was to examine the specificity and isotype of anti-Rh antibodies in plasma samples of Rh negative alloimmunized individuals and to study the same parameters in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) generated from the same donors. Specificity of anti-Rh antibodies was determined in plasma of nine alloimmunized subjects by direct hemagglutination using a panel of known RBC genotypes and isotype of specific antibodies were identified by an antigen specific ELISA. Similar methods were employed to determine specificity and isotype of antibodies produced by Rh specific LCLs established from four donors. LCLs were generated by Epstein-Barr virus transformation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from each donor followed by their culture over a feeder of human fetal fibroblasts. Upon emergence of lymphoblastoid cells, culture supernatants were assayed for presence of Rh specific antibody by hemagglutination assay. Anti-D was the predominant antibody in both plasma samples and among the 128 established LCLs; however, antibodies to other Rh specificities namely C and E were also produced. The isotype of anti-Rh antibody in all plasma samples was found to be IgG, predominantly IgG1, combined in 7 samples with IgM. Similarly 76%, 9.2% and 14.8% of LCLs were determined to produce antibody of IgG, IgM and of both isotypes, respectively. The data supported that the D antigen is the immunodominant component of the Rh system as indicated by the in vitro and in vivo profiles of Rh specificities in our alloimmunized subjects.

  18. Expression of HLA-DR antigen in human class II mutant B-cell lines by double infection with retrovirus vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z.; Korman, A.J.; Cooper, J.; Pious, D.; Accolla, R.S.; Mulligan, R.C.; Strominger, J.L.

    1987-11-01

    A new retrovirus vector containing the gene for hygromycin B resistance (hyg) as a selectable marker under the control of an internal simian virus 40 promoter was constructed. It was used, together with an analogous previously described vector, DO1, which contains the gene for G418 resistance, to introduce and express the genes for the two chains of a human class II major histocompatibility complex antigen in NIH 3T3 cells. In addition, these vectors were used to express DR antigens in two human mutant B-lymphoblastoid cell lines, one of which was deleted for both alleles of the DR..cap alpha.. gene and the other of which expressed no class II antigens because of a genetic defect in a putative trans-acting regulatory factor.

  19. Heparanase regulates secretion, composition, and function of tumor cell-derived exosomes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Camilla A; Purushothaman, Anurag; Ramani, Vishnu C; Vlodavsky, Israel; Sanderson, Ralph D

    2013-04-05

    Emerging evidence indicates that exosomes play a key role in tumor-host cross-talk and that exosome secretion, composition, and functional capacity are altered as tumors progress to an aggressive phenotype. However, little is known regarding the mechanisms that regulate these changes. Heparanase is an enzyme whose expression is up-regulated as tumors become more aggressive and is associated with enhanced tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis. We have discovered that in human cancer cells (myeloma, lymphoblastoid, and breast cancer), when expression of heparanase is enhanced or when tumor cells are exposed to exogenous heparanase, exosome secretion is dramatically increased. Heparanase enzyme activity is required for robust enhancement of exosome secretion because enzymatically inactive forms of heparanase, even when present in high amounts, do not dramatically increase exosome secretion. Heparanase also impacts exosome protein cargo as reflected by higher levels of syndecan-1, VEGF, and hepatocyte growth factor in exosomes secreted by heparanase-high expressing cells as compared with heparanase-low expressing cells. In functional assays, exosomes from heparanase-high cells stimulated spreading of tumor cells on fibronectin and invasion of endothelial cells through extracellular matrix better than did exosomes secreted by heparanase-low cells. These studies reveal that heparanase helps drive exosome secretion, alters exosome composition, and facilitates production of exosomes that impact both tumor and host cell behavior, thereby promoting tumor progression.

  20. Heparanase Regulates Secretion, Composition, and Function of Tumor Cell-derived Exosomes*♦

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Camilla A.; Purushothaman, Anurag; Ramani, Vishnu C.; Vlodavsky, Israel; Sanderson, Ralph D.

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that exosomes play a key role in tumor-host cross-talk and that exosome secretion, composition, and functional capacity are altered as tumors progress to an aggressive phenotype. However, little is known regarding the mechanisms that regulate these changes. Heparanase is an enzyme whose expression is up-regulated as tumors become more aggressive and is associated with enhanced tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis. We have discovered that in human cancer cells (myeloma, lymphoblastoid, and breast cancer), when expression of heparanase is enhanced or when tumor cells are exposed to exogenous heparanase, exosome secretion is dramatically increased. Heparanase enzyme activity is required for robust enhancement of exosome secretion because enzymatically inactive forms of heparanase, even when present in high amounts, do not dramatically increase exosome secretion. Heparanase also impacts exosome protein cargo as reflected by higher levels of syndecan-1, VEGF, and hepatocyte growth factor in exosomes secreted by heparanase-high expressing cells as compared with heparanase-low expressing cells. In functional assays, exosomes from heparanase-high cells stimulated spreading of tumor cells on fibronectin and invasion of endothelial cells through extracellular matrix better than did exosomes secreted by heparanase-low cells. These studies reveal that heparanase helps drive exosome secretion, alters exosome composition, and facilitates production of exosomes that impact both tumor and host cell behavior, thereby promoting tumor progression. PMID:23430739

  1. Gene Transfer from Targeted Liposomes to Specific Lymphoid Cells by Electroporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machy, Patrick; Lewis, Florence; McMillan, Lynette; Jonak, Zdenka L.

    1988-11-01

    Large unilamellar liposomes, coated with protein A and encapsulating the gene that confers resistance to mycophenolic acid, were used as a model system to demonstrate gene transfer into specific lymphoid cells. Protein A, which selectively recognizes mouse IgG2a antibodies, was coupled to liposomes to target them specifically to defined cell types coated with IgG2a antibody. Protein A-coated liposomes bound human B lymphoblastoid cells preincubated with a mouse IgG2a anti-HLA monoclonal antibody but failed to adhere to cells challenged with an irrelevant (anti-H-2) antibody of the same isotype or to cells incubated in the absence of antibody. Transfection of target cells bound to protein A-coated liposomes was achieved by electroporation. This step was essential since only electroporated cells survived in a selective medium containing mycophenolic acid. Transfection efficiency with electroporation and targeted liposomes was as efficient as conventional procedures that used unencapsulated plasmids free in solution but, in the latter case, cell selectivity is not possible. This technique provides a methodology for introducing defined biological macromolecules into specific cell types.

  2. Two classes of single-stranded regions evident in deproteinized preparations of replicating DNA isolated from mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, B.W.; Kavallaris, M.; Catchpoole, D.; Norris, M.D. )

    1991-02-01

    In DNA isolated from proliferating human lymphoblastoid CCRF-CEM cells which had been pulse-labeled by exposure to (3H)thymidine for periods from 30 s to 10 min, single-stranded regions were analyzed by caffeine-gradient elution from benzoylated DEAE-cellulose. Two classes of structural defect were evident. Some replicating DNA exhibited single-stranded regions of approximately 200 nucleotides, while most newly incorporated radioactivity was associated with DNA containing single-stranded regions from 900 to approximately 4000 nucleotides. The distribution of thymidine-derived radioactivity did not suggest sequential or preferential labeling of these DNA fractions as the incorporation time was varied. The findings may be correlated with recent proposals regarding the structural basis of eukaryotic DNA replication.

  3. Discovery of novel hematopoietic cell adhesion molecules from human bone marrow stromal cell membrane protein extracts by a new cell-blotting technique.

    PubMed

    Seshi, B

    1994-05-01

    In an attempt to define the role of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) within the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment in normal hematopoiesis and in leukemia development, a novel cell-blotting technique that involved cell adhesion to protein bands after separation by lithium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (LDS-PAGE) and blotting onto polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane has been developed. Human BM stromal cell membrane fractions have been prepared from Dexter-type cultures after cell lysis by sonification and differential centrifugations of the sonification contents. The 20,000 g pellets representing membrane fractions have been solubilized by 2% Triton X-100, 0.575% LDS, and 8 mol/L urea in sequential order. The protein extracts are fractionated by LDS-PAGE and screened for CAMs by the new cell-blotting technique. This led to identification of nine protein bands in lanes containing LDS extracts showing adhesion of KG1a (CD34+ progenitor myeloid) cells. Evidence that the BM proteins exhibiting KG1a cell adhesion are novel CAMs is based on the observations that these proteins, in comparison with known CAMs, specifically VCAM-1, CD54, and CD44, show (1) contrasting detergent-solubility properties, (2) different temperature requirement for mediating cell adhesion function, and (3) markedly distinct electrophoretic mobilities. The various cell types tested, notably KG1a, NALM-6, WIL-2, Ramos, HS-Sultan, K562, JY B lymphoblastoid cells, and T lymphoblasts, showed distinctive patterns of binding to different subsets of BM CAMs. These results demonstrate a new approach to studies of molecular mechanisms that may determine specificity of hematopoietic cellular localization within BM microenvironment and may play an important role in controlling hematopoiesis.

  4. Major histocompatibility complex-unrestricted cytolytic activity of human T cells: analysis of precursor frequency and effector phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, S.S.; Thiele, D.L.; Lipsky, P.E.

    1987-12-01

    The frequency and phenotype of human T cells that mediate major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-unrestricted cytolysis were analyzed. T cell clones were generated by culturing adherent cell-depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cells at a density of 0.3 cell/well with phytohemagglutinin, recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL-2), and irradiated autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells and/or Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines. All of the 198 clones generated by this method were T cells (CD2/sup +/, CD3/sup +/, CD4/sup +/ or CD2/sup +/, CD3/sup +/, CD8/sup +/) that possessed potent lytic activity against K562, an erythroleukemia line sensitive to lysis by human natural killer cells, and Cur, a renal carcinoma cell line resistant to human natural killer activity. Cytolysis, measured by /sup 51/Cr release, was MHC-unrestricted, since the clones were able to lyse MHC class I or class II negative targets, as well as MHC class I and class II negative targets. Although the clones produced tissue necrosis factor/lymphotoxin-like molecules, lysis of Cur of K562 was not mediated by a soluble factor secreted by the clones. These data indicate that the capacity for MHC-unrestricted tumoricidal activity and expression of NKH1 and CD11b, but not CD 16, are properties common to all or nearly all human peripheral blood-derived T cell clones regardless of CD4 or CD8 phenotype.

  5. Thymoquinone efficiently inhibits the survival of EBV-infected B cells and alters EBV gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zihlif, Malek A; Mahmoud, Ismail S; Ghanim, Majd T; Zreikat, Manar S; Alrabadi, Nasr; Imraish, Amer; Odeh, Fadwa; Abbas, Manal A; Ismail, Said I

    2013-05-01

    Epstein--Barr virus (EBV) is a human virus with oncogenic potentials that is implicated in various human diseases and malignancies. In this study, the modulator activity of the potent herbal extract drug thymoquinone on EBV was assessed in vitro. Thymoquinone was tested for cytotoxicity on human cells of lymphoblastoid cells, Raji Burkitt's lymphoma, DG-75 Burkitt's lymphoma, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and periodontal ligament fibroblast. Apoptosis induction was analyzed via TUNEL assay and activity studies of caspase-3. The effect of thymoquinone on EBV gene expression was determined using real-time polymerase chain reaction. We report here, for the first time, a promising selective inhibitory affect of thymoquinone on EBV-infected B cell lines in vitro, compared with lower activity on EBV negative B cell line and very low toxicity on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and periodontal ligament fibroblasts. Moreover, the drug was found to efficiently suppress the RNA expression of EBNA2, LMP1, and EBNA1 genes. Specifically, EBNA2 expression levels were the most affected indicating that this gene might have a major contribution to thymoquinone potency against EBV infected cells. Overall, our results suggest that thymoquinone has the potential to suppress the growth of EBV-infected B cells efficiently.

  6. Effect of caffeine on radiation-induced apoptosis in TK6 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen, W.; Vaughan, A.T.M.

    1995-02-01

    Apoptosis has been measured in cells of the human TK6 lymphoblastoid cell line by recording the release of endonuclease-digested DNA from affected cells using flow cytometry. In asynchronously dividing cells, DNA degradation characteristic of apoptosis was first seen 12 h after irradiation as a defined DNA fluorescent peak of sub-G{sub 1}-phase content, reaching a maximum of 30-50% of the population by 24-72 h. Treating cells with 2 mM caffeine either before or up to 3 h after irradiation eliminated the degradation of DNA entirely. In addition, the percentage of cells in which apoptosis could be detected microscopically decreased from 62.4 {+-} 0.95% to 16.7 {+-} 1.5% 72 h after caffeine treatment. Delaying caffeine treatment for 12 h after irradiation reduced DNA degradation by approximately 50% compared to cells receiving radiation alone. DNA degradation induced by serum deprivation was unaffected by caffeine treatment. These data support the contention that irradiation of TK6 cells produces a long-lived cellular signal which triggers apoptosis. Apoptosis produced by serum deprivation does not operate through the same pathway. 36 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Epstein-Barr virus-carrying B cells are large, surface IgM, IgD-bearing cells in normal individuals and acute malaria patients.

    PubMed Central

    Lam, K M; Whittle, H; Grzywacz, M; Crawford, D H

    1994-01-01

    In this study the presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) carrying B lymphocytes in different B-cell subpopulations from peripheral blood was determined by spontaneous outgrowth which gives rise to lymphoblastoid cell lines. In healthy seropositive adults, the EBV-carrying B cell was predominantly within the IgM- and IgD-positive but not the IgG-positive subpopulations. Furthermore, these B lymphocytes were in the low-density (large cell) Percoll fraction. The IgM- and IgD-positive B cell phenotype suggests the EBV-carrying B cells to be circulating virgin B cells recently released from the bone marrow. These B cells have an estimated life span of only 6-8 weeks suggesting that long-term EBV persistence in the body may be the result of infection of a more primitive B-cell type. Similar experiments were carried out in children with acute malaria from the Gambia, West Africa, where Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is endemic in order to determine whether a population of EBV-carrying B cells could be identified which had a similar phenotype to the BL cell. The EBV-carrying B cells in this patient group were also found in the IgM-positive, IgG-negative B-cell subpopulation. The majority of these cells were found in the low-density (large cell) Percoll fraction although in some patients a proportion was derived from the high-density (small cell) fraction. This cellular phenotype is not representative of a BL cell. PMID:7959872

  8. High expression of the CC chemokine TARC in Reed-Sternberg cells. A possible explanation for the characteristic T-cell infiltratein Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, A; Visser, L; Poppema, S

    1999-06-01

    Hodgkin's lymphoma is characterized by the combination of Reed-Sternberg (R-S) cells and a prominent inflammatory cell infiltrate. One of the intriguing questions regarding this disease is what is causing the influx of T lymphocytes into the involved tissues. We applied the serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) technique on the Hodgkin's lymphoma-derived cell line L428 and on an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphoblastoid B-cell line. A frequently expressed tag in L428 corresponded to the T-cell-directed CC chemokine TARC. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analyses demonstrated expression of TARC in nodular sclerosis (NS) and mixed cellularity (MC) classical Hodgkin's lymphomas but not in NLP Hodgkin's lymphoma, anaplastic large-cell lymphomas, and large-B-cell lymphomas with CD30 positivity. Two of five cases of T-cell-rich B-cell lymphoma (TCRBCL) were TARC positive. RNA in situ hybridization (ISH) showed a strong signal for TARC in the cytoplasm of R-S cells, and immunohistochemical staining confirmed the presence of the TARC protein in the R-S cells of NS and MC Hodgkin's lymphomas. The lymphocytic and histiocytic (L&H)-type cells of nodular lymphocyte predominance Hodgkin's lymphoma and the neoplastic cells of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas with the exception of two cases of TCRBCL did not stain for TARC. TARC is known to bind to the CCR4 receptor, which is expressed on activated Th2 lymphocytes. The immunophenotype of lymphocytes surrounding R-S cells is indeed Th2-like, and by RNA ISH these lymphocytes showed a positive signal for the chemokine receptor CCR4. The findings suggest that production of TARC by the R-S cells may explain the characteristic T-cell infiltrate in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  9. Defective T-cell control of Epstein–Barr virus infection in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Pender, Michael P; Csurhes, Peter A; Burrows, Jacqueline M; Burrows, Scott R

    2017-01-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that infection with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) has a major role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). Defective elimination of EBV-infected B cells by CD8+ T cells might cause MS by allowing EBV-infected autoreactive B cells to accumulate in the brain. Here we undertake a comprehensive analysis of the T-cell response to EBV in MS, using flow cytometry and intracellular IFN-γ staining to measure T-cell responses to EBV-infected autologous lymphoblastoid cell lines and pools of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-class-I-restricted peptides from EBV lytic or latent proteins and cytomegalovirus (CMV), in 95 patients and 56 EBV-seropositive healthy subjects. In 20 HLA-A2+ healthy subjects and 20 HLA-A2+ patients we also analysed CD8+ T cells specific for individual peptides, measured by binding to HLA-peptide complexes and production of IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2. We found a decreased CD8+ T-cell response to EBV lytic, but not CMV lytic, antigens at the onset of MS and at all subsequent disease stages. CD8+ T cells directed against EBV latent antigens were increased but had reduced cytokine polyfunctionality indicating T-cell exhaustion. During attacks the EBV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell populations expanded, with increased functionality of latent-specific CD8+ T cells. With increasing disease duration, EBV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells progressively declined, consistent with T-cell exhaustion. The anti-EBNA1 IgG titre correlated inversely with the EBV-specific CD8+ T-cell frequency. We postulate that defective CD8+ T-cell control of EBV reactivation leads to an expanded population of latently infected cells, including autoreactive B cells. PMID:28197337

  10. Distance calibration of fluorescence energy-transfer values on cell surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salga, Peter; Bodnar, Andrea; Damjanovich, Sandor; Matyus, Laszlo

    1998-06-01

    Different kinds of cell surface receptor clusters have been discovered recently using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements. This method is capable for identifying molecular interactions, however the exact distances remain obscure, because the classical Foerster efficiency-distance relationship is valid only in the case of one donor one acceptor systems. This condition can not be fulfilled when cell surface molecules are labeled with monoclonal antibodies carrying different number of fluorescent donor and acceptor molecules. Our aim was to carry out FRET measurements on such cell surface receptors, where the distances are constant, and the only changing parameter is the donor-acceptor ratio of the used labels. For our experiments we used JY B lymphoblastoid cells, and we labeled the MHC class I heavy chain with KE-2 or W6/32 monoclonal antibodies and the length chain with L-368 monoclonal antibody tagged with different numbers of donor or acceptor molecules. The FRET efficiencies were measured either in a microscope using the photobleaching method or in a fluorescence activated cell sorter. We changed the donor acceptor ratio in a wide range in order to make a suitable calibration curve for other FRET experiments. The obtained calibration curve gives us the possibility to relate FRET efficiencies to real distances of cell surface receptors. Another source of deviation in the FRET efficiencies arise from the selected method. There was a marked difference between the FRET efficiencies measured by flow cytometry and with the photobleaching method even on same cells and between same epitopes.

  11. Enkephalins stimulate leukemia cell migration and surface expression of CD9.

    PubMed Central

    Heagy, W; Duca, K; Finberg, R W

    1995-01-01

    Opioid peptides have been implicated in the regulation of tumor growth and biology; however, little attention has been given to the mechanisms that are involved. In this study we show that physiological concentrations of the endogenous opioid neuropeptide methionine-enkephalin (MET-ENK) and the synthetic enkephalins D-Ala2, Me-Phe4, Gly(ol)5 and D-Ala2, D-Leu5 are stimulants for the in vitro migration of pre-B acute lymphoblastoid leukemia (ALL) cells. Activation of the human pre-B ALL cell lines NALM 6 and LAZ 221 with MET-ENK resulted in both an increase in their migration and an augmentation in the surface expression of the leukemia cell marker CD9. The opiate receptor antagonist naloxone reversed these enkephalin-induced effects on the leukemia cells. When the pre-B ALL cells were preincubated with an anti-CD9 mAb before challenge with MET-ENK their migration to the enkephalin was markedly reduced. These studies show that endogenous and synthetic opioid peptides are stimulants for pre-B ALL cell migration and suggest that CD9 is important in the regulation of leukemia cell motility. Images PMID:7657811

  12. Epstein-Barr virus-positive T/NK-cell lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qingqing; Chen, Kailin; Young, Ken H

    2015-01-23

    Epstein-Barr virus, a ubiquitous human herpesvirus, can induce both lytic and latent infections that result in a variety of human diseases, including lymphoproliferative disorders. The oncogenic potential of Epstein-Barr virus is related to its ability to infect and transform B lymphocytes into continuously proliferating lymphoblastoid cells. However, Epstein-Barr virus has also been implicated in the development of T/natural killer cell lymphoproliferative diseases. Epstein-Barr virus encodes a series of products that mimic several growth, transcription and anti-apoptotic factors, thus usurping control of pathways that regulate diverse homeostatic cellular functions and the microenvironment. However, the exact mechanism by which Epstein-Barr virus promotes oncogenesis and inflammatory lesion development remains unclear. Epstein-Barr virus-associated T/natural killer cell lymphoproliferative diseases often have overlapping clinical symptoms as well as histologic and immunophenotypic features because both lymphoid cell types derive from a common precursor. Accurate classification of Epstein-Barr virus-associated T/natural killer cell lymphoproliferative diseases is a prerequisite for appropriate clinical management. Currently, the treatment of most T/natural killer cell lymphoproliferative diseases is less than satisfactory. Novel and targeted therapies are strongly required to satisfy clinical demands. This review describes our current knowledge of the genetics, oncogenesis, biology, diagnosis and treatment of Epstein-Barr virus-associated T/natural killer cell lymphoproliferative diseases.

  13. Detection of ≥1Mb microdeletions and microduplications in a single cell using custom oligonucleotide arrays.

    PubMed

    Bi, Weimin; Breman, Amy; Shaw, Chad A; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Gambin, Tomasz; Lu, Xinyan; Cheung, Sau Wai; Jackson, Laird G; Lupski, James R; Van den Veyver, Ignatia B; Beaudet, Arthur L

    2012-01-01

    High resolution detection of genomic copy number abnormalities in a single cell is relevant to preimplantation genetic diagnosis and potentially to noninvasive prenatal diagnosis. Our objective is to develop a reliable array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) platform to detect genomic imbalances as small as ~1Mb ina single cell. We empirically optimized the conditions for oligonucleotide-based array CGH using single cells from multiple lymphoblastoid cell lines with known copy number abnormalities. To improve resolution, we designed custom arrays with high density probes covering clinically relevant genomic regions. The detection of megabase-sized copy number variations (CNVs) in a single cell was influenced by the number of probes clustered in the interrogated region. Using our custom array, we reproducibly detected multiple chromosome abnormalities including trisomy 21, a 1.2Mb Williams syndrome deletion, and a 1.3Mb CMT1A duplication. Replicate analyses yielded consistent results. Aneuploidy and genomic imbalances with CNVs as small as 1.2Mb in a single cell are detectable by array CGH using arrays with high-density coverage in the targeted regions. This approach has the potential to be applied for preimplantation genetic diagnosis to detect aneuploidy and common microdeletion/duplication syndromes and for noninvasive prenatal diagnosis if single fetal cells can be isolated. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Theileria-infected cell line from an African buffalo (Syncerus caffer).

    PubMed

    Zweygarth, Erich; Koekemoer, Otto; Josemans, Antoinette I; Rambritch, Natasha; Pienaar, Ronel; Putterill, John; Latif, Abdalla; Potgieter, Fred T

    2009-08-01

    Mononuclear cells were isolated from the peripheral blood of a buffalo infected with a Theileria sp. using density gradient centrifugation, and the cells were put into culture flasks covered by a monolayer of bovine endothelial cells. Twenty days after culture initiation, cells containing macroschizonts were detected in Giemsa-stained smears. The first subculture was carried out on day 45 of culture propagation. Subsequently, infected cells were subcultured twice a week, and each time 1 to 2 x 10(6) per milliliter cells were harvested. DNA was extracted from culture material and a partial polymerase chain reaction amplification of the 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene was carried out using Theileria genus-specific primers. Sequence data and phylogenetic analysis using the 18S rRNA gene indicated a close relationship to Theileria sp. buffalo, previously described in literature. Here, the first successful attempt to establish a macroschizont-infected lymphoblastoid cell line of Theileria sp. (buffalo) from an African buffalo is described.

  15. Epstein–Barr virus-positive T/NK-cell lymphoproliferative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qingqing; Chen, Kailin; Young, Ken H

    2015-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus, a ubiquitous human herpesvirus, can induce both lytic and latent infections that result in a variety of human diseases, including lymphoproliferative disorders. The oncogenic potential of Epstein–Barr virus is related to its ability to infect and transform B lymphocytes into continuously proliferating lymphoblastoid cells. However, Epstein–Barr virus has also been implicated in the development of T/natural killer cell lymphoproliferative diseases. Epstein–Barr virus encodes a series of products that mimic several growth, transcription and anti-apoptotic factors, thus usurping control of pathways that regulate diverse homeostatic cellular functions and the microenvironment. However, the exact mechanism by which Epstein–Barr virus promotes oncogenesis and inflammatory lesion development remains unclear. Epstein–Barr virus-associated T/natural killer cell lymphoproliferative diseases often have overlapping clinical symptoms as well as histologic and immunophenotypic features because both lymphoid cell types derive from a common precursor. Accurate classification of Epstein–Barr virus-associated T/natural killer cell lymphoproliferative diseases is a prerequisite for appropriate clinical management. Currently, the treatment of most T/natural killer cell lymphoproliferative diseases is less than satisfactory. Novel and targeted therapies are strongly required to satisfy clinical demands. This review describes our current knowledge of the genetics, oncogenesis, biology, diagnosis and treatment of Epstein–Barr virus-associated T/natural killer cell lymphoproliferative diseases. PMID:25613730

  16. Measles virus transmembrane fusion protein synthesized de novo or presented in immunostimulating complexes is endogenously processed for HLA class I- and class II-restricted cytotoxic T cell recognition

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The routes used by antigen-presenting cells (APC) to convert the transmembrane fusion glycoprotein (F) of measles virus (MV) to HLA class I and class II presentable peptides have been examined, using cloned cytotoxic T lymphocytes in functional assays. Presentation by Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B lymphoblastoid cell lines was achieved using live virus, ultraviolet light-inactivated virus, and purified MV- F delivered either as such or incorporated in immunostimulating complexes (MV-F-ISCOM). Only live virus and MV-F-ISCOM allow presentation by class I molecules, while all antigen preparations permit class II-restricted presentation. We observe presentation of MV- F from live virus and as MV-F-ISCOM by class II molecules in a fashion that is not perturbed by chloroquine. Our studies visualize novel presentation pathways of type I transmembrane proteins. PMID:1613454

  17. The Sonoda–Tajima Cell Collection: A Human Genetics Research Resource with Emphasis on South American Indigenous Populations

    PubMed Central

    Danjoh, Inaho; Saijo, Kaoru; Hiroyama, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    The Sonoda–Tajima Cell Collection includes cell samples obtained from a range of ethnic minority groups across the world but in particular from South America. The collection is made all the more valuable by the fact that some of these ethnic populations have since died out, and thus it will be impossible to prepare a similar cell collection again. The collection was donated to our institute, a public cell bank in Japan, by Drs Sonoda and Tajima to make it available to researchers throughout the world. The original cell collection was composed of cryopreserved peripheral blood samples that would obviously have been rapidly exhausted if used directly. We, therefore, immortalized some samples with the Epstein–Barr virus and established B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (B-LCLs). As there is continuing controversy over whether the B-LCL genome is stably maintained, we performed an array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis to confirm the genomic stability of the cell lines. The array CGH analysis of the B-LCL lines and their parental B cells demonstrated that genomic stability was maintained in the long-term cell cultures. The B-LCLs of the Sonoda–Tajima Collection will therefore be made available to interested scientists around the world. At present, 512 B-LCLs have been developed, and we are willing to increase the number if there is sufficient demand. PMID:21383383

  18. DNA excision repair in cell extracts from human cell lines exhibiting hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hansson, J.; Keyse, S.M.; Lindahl, T.; Wood, R.D. )

    1991-07-01

    Whole cell extracts from human lymphoid cell lines can perform in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids damaged by agents including UV or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP). Extracts from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells are defective in repair synthesis. We have now studied in vitro DNA repair synthesis using extracts from lymphoblastoid cell lines representing four human hereditary syndromes with increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Extracts of cell lines from individuals with the sunlight-sensitive disorders dysplastic nevus syndrome or Cockayne's syndrome (complementation groups A and B) showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids with UV photoproducts. This is consistent with in vivo measurements of the overall DNA repair capacity in such cell lines. A number of extracts were prepared from two cell lines representing the variant form of XP (XP-V). Half of the extracts prepared showed normal levels of in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing UV lesions, but the remainder of the extracts from the same cell lines showed deficient repair synthesis, suggesting the possibility of an unusually labile excision repair protein in XP-V. Fanconi's anemia (FA) cells show cellular hypersensitivity to cross-linking agents including cis-DDP. Extracts from cell lines belonging to two different complementation groups of FA showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing cis-DDP or UV adducts. Thus, there does not appear to be an overall excision repair defect in FA, but the data do not exclude a defect in the repair of interstrand DNA cross-links.

  19. Cytokines and Epstein Barr virus (EBV) genes expression in blood chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) cells and their immortalised CLL cell lines.

    PubMed

    Laytragoon-Lewin, Nongnit; Chen, Fu; Castro, Juan; Avila-Carino, Javier; Lewin, Freddi

    2003-01-01

    We have encountered two unique chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) patients, PG and NN. Some blood CLL cells of these patients have been infected and carry Epstein Barr virus (EBV) in vivo. In spite of their early-activated G0/G1 stage of post germinal center (GC) memory cells, ex vivo EBV-carrying blood CLL cells of PG clone expressed LMPs and used specific QUK splice for their EBNA1 expression, similar to the EBV-carrying cells of non-B origin. Interestingly, EBV-carrying CLL cells of NN clone expressed LMP2a and used UK-splice for their EBNA1 expression, similar to the in vivo EBV-carrying high density normal B cells in the blood of healthy individuals. The CLL-derived lines but not normal lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL) used QUK- and YUK-splice for their EBNA1 expression. As expected, LCL and their permanent CLL-derived lines used Cp promoter and up-regulated their EBNA2 expression. Blood CLL cells and the CLL-derived cell lines of these patients spontaneously produced cytokines as shown by microarray assay. The types and quantities of cytokines might relate to their CLL origin and viral strain in the given CLL cells. Neither blood CLL nor their CLL-derived cell lines express any detectable apoptosis-inducer ligands, CD95L or Apo 3L. As a consequence of cell cycle progression, CLL-derived cell lines up-regulated their co-stimulator molecules CD80 and apoptosis-related receptor CD95. Since only the rare EBV-carrying CLL cells grew in vitro, the combination of viral genome and cytokines seems to be critical for the outgrowth of EBV-carrying CLL cells over their EBV-negative counterpart in vitro but not in vivo.

  20. Generation of tumor-specific, HLA class I-restricted human Th1 and Tc1 cells by cell engineering with tumor peptide-specific T-cell receptor genes.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Takemasa; Yasukawa, Masaki; Matsuzaki, Junko; Ohkuri, Takayuki; Chamoto, Kenji; Wakita, Daiko; Azuma, Taichi; Niiya, Hironari; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Kuzushima, Kiyotaka; Oka, Yoshihiro; Sugiyama, Haruo; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Nishimura, Takashi

    2005-07-15

    Tumor antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes, especially interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)-producing type-1 helper T (Th1) and type-1 cytotoxic T (Tc1) cells, play a crucial role in tumor eradication. Adoptive transfer using tumor-specific Th1 and Tc1 cells is a promising therapeutic strategy for tumor immunotherapy. However, its clinical application has been hampered because of difficulties in generating tumor-specific Th1 cells from patients with tumors. To overcome this problem, we have developed an efficient method to prepare tumor-specific Th1 and Tc1 cells. T-cell receptor (TCR) alpha and beta genes obtained from an HLA-A24-restricted, Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) peptide-specific Tc clone were lentivirally transduced to polyclonally activated Th1 and Tc1 cells. As expected, TCR gene-modified Tc1 cells showed cytotoxicity and IFN-gamma production in response to peptide-loaded lymphoblastoid cell lines, WT1 gene-transduced cells, and freshly isolated leukemia cells expressing both WT1 and HLA-A24. Surprisingly, we further demonstrated that Th1 cells transduced with HLA-class I-restricted TCR genes also showed both cytotoxicity and cytokine production in an HLA-A24-restricted manner. In contrast to gene-modified Tc1 cells, Th1 cells produced high amounts of interleukin-2 (IL-2) in addition to IFN-gamma, which is beneficial for induction of antitumor cellular immunity. Thus, TCR gene-modified HLA-class I-restricted Th1 and Tc1 cells are a powerful strategy for the application to adoptive immunotherapy of human cancer.

  1. Genetic Regulation of Charged Particle Mutagenesis in Human Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, Amy; Gauny, S.; Cherbonnel-Lasserre, C.; Liu, W.; Wiese, C.

    1999-01-01

    Our studies use a series of syngeneic, and where possible, isogenic human B-lymphoblastoid cell lines to assess the genetic factors that modulate susceptibility apoptosis and their impact on the mutagenic risks of low fluence exposures to 1 GeV Fe ions and 55 MeV protons. These ions are representative of the types of charged particle radiation that are of particular significance for human health in the space radiation environment. The model system employs cell lines derived from the male donor WIL-2. These cells have a single X chromosome and they are hemizygous for one mutation marker, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT). TK6 and WTK1 cells were each derived from descendants of WIL-2 and were each selected as heterozygotes for a second mutation marker, the thymidine kinase (TK) gene located on chromosome 17q. The HPRT and TK loci can detect many different types of mutations, from single basepair substitutions up to large scale loss of heterozygosity (LOH). The single expressing copy of TK in the TK6 and WTKI cell lines is found on the same copy of chromosome 17, and this allele can be identified by a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) identified when high molecular weight DNA is digested by the SacI restriction endonuclease and hybridized against the cDNA probe for TK. A large series of polymorphic linked markers has been identified that span more than 60 cM of DNA (approx. 60 megabasepairs) and distinguish the copy of chromosome 17 bearing the initially active TK allele from the copy of chromosome 17 bearing the silent TK allele in both TK6 and WTKI cells. TK6 cells express normal p53 protein while WTKI cells express homozygous mutant p53. Expression of mutant p53 can increase susceptibility to x-ray-induced mutations. It's been suggested that the increased mutagenesis in p53 mutant cells might be due to reduced apoptosis.

  2. Genetic Regulation of Charged Particle Mutagenesis in Human Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, Amy; Gauny, S.; Cherbonnel-Lasserre, C.; Liu, W.; Wiese, C.

    1999-01-01

    Our studies use a series of syngeneic, and where possible, isogenic human B-lymphoblastoid cell lines to assess the genetic factors that modulate susceptibility apoptosis and their impact on the mutagenic risks of low fluence exposures to 1 GeV Fe ions and 55 MeV protons. These ions are representative of the types of charged particle radiation that are of particular significance for human health in the space radiation environment. The model system employs cell lines derived from the male donor WIL-2. These cells have a single X chromosome and they are hemizygous for one mutation marker, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT). TK6 and WTK1 cells were each derived from descendants of WIL-2 and were each selected as heterozygotes for a second mutation marker, the thymidine kinase (TK) gene located on chromosome 17q. The HPRT and TK loci can detect many different types of mutations, from single basepair substitutions up to large scale loss of heterozygosity (LOH). The single expressing copy of TK in the TK6 and WTKI cell lines is found on the same copy of chromosome 17, and this allele can be identified by a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) identified when high molecular weight DNA is digested by the SacI restriction endonuclease and hybridized against the cDNA probe for TK. A large series of polymorphic linked markers has been identified that span more than 60 cM of DNA (approx. 60 megabasepairs) and distinguish the copy of chromosome 17 bearing the initially active TK allele from the copy of chromosome 17 bearing the silent TK allele in both TK6 and WTKI cells. TK6 cells express normal p53 protein while WTKI cells express homozygous mutant p53. Expression of mutant p53 can increase susceptibility to x-ray-induced mutations. It's been suggested that the increased mutagenesis in p53 mutant cells might be due to reduced apoptosis.

  3. A T-cell specific transcriptional enhancer element 3 prime of C sub. alpha. in the human T-cell receptor. alpha. locus

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Icheng; Yang, Lihsuan; Morle, G.; Leiden, J.M. )

    1989-09-01

    A transcriptional enhancer element has been identified 4.5 kilobases 3{prime} of C{sub {alpha}} (constant region {alpha} chain) in the human T-cell receptor (TCR) {alpha}-chain locus. This enhancer is active on both a TCR V{sub {alpha}} (variable region {alpha} chain) promoter and the minimal simian virus 40 promoter in TCR {alpha}/{beta} Jurkat and EL4 cells but is inactive on a V{sub {alpha}} promoter TCR {gamma}/{delta} PEER and Molt-13 cells, clone 13 B cells, and HeLa fibroblasts. The enhancer has been localized to a 116-base-pair BstXI/Dra I restriction enzyme fragment, which lacks immunoglobulin octamer and {kappa}B enhancer motifs but does contain a consensus cAMP-response element (CRE). DNase I footprint analyses demonstrated that the minimal enhancer contains two binding sites for Jurkat nuclear proteins. One of these sites corresponds to the CRE, while the other does not correspond to a known transcriptional enhancer motif. These data support a model in which TCR {alpha} gene transcription is regulated by a unique set of cis-acting sequences and trans-acting factors, which are differentially active in cells of the TCR {alpha}/{beta} lineage. In addition, the TCR {alpha} enhancer may play a role in activating oncogene expression in T-lymphoblastoid tumors that have previously been shown to display chromosomal translocations into the human TCR {alpha} locus.

  4. Role of EBNA-3 Family Proteins in EBV Associated B-cell Lymphomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Shaoni; Ghosh Roy, Shatadru; Bose, Priyanka; Saha, Abhik

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is highly ubiquitous in human population and establishes a lifelong asymptomatic infection within the infected host unless the immune system is compromised. Following initial infection in the oropharyngeal epithelial cells, EBV primarily infects naive B-lymphocytes and develops a number of B-cell lymphomas particularly in immune-deficient individuals. In vitro, EBV can also infect and subsequently transform quiescent B-lymphocytes into continuously proliferating lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) resembling EBV-induced lymphoproliferative disorders in which a subset of latent transcripts are detected. Genetic studies revealed that EBNA-3 family comprising of three adjacent genes in the viral genome—EBNA-3A and -3C, but not -3B, are critical for B-cell transformation. Nevertheless, all three proteins appear to significantly contribute to maintain the overall proliferation and viability of transformed cells, suggesting a critical role in lymphoma development. Apart from functioning as important viral transcriptional regulators, EBNA-3 proteins associate with many cellular proteins in different signaling networks, providing a suitable platform for lifelong survival of the virus and concurrent lymphoma development in the infected host. The chapter describes the function of each these EBV nuclear antigen 3 proteins employed by the virus as a means to understand viral pathogenesis of several EBV-associated B-cell malignancies. PMID:27092119

  5. Nitroxide TEMPO: a genotoxic and oxidative stress inducer in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoqing; Mittelstaedt, Roberta A; Guo, Lei; Shaddock, Joseph G; Heflich, Robert H; Bigger, Anita H; Moore, Martha M; Mei, Nan

    2013-08-01

    2,2,6,6-Tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO) is a low molecular weight nitroxide and stable free radical. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of TEMPO in mammalian cells using the mouse lymphoma assay (MLA) and in vitro micronucleus assay. In the absence of metabolic activation (S9), 3mM TEMPO produced significant cytotoxicity and marginal mutagenicity in the MLA; in the presence of S9, treatment of mouse lymphoma cells with 1-2mM TEMPO resulted in dose-dependent decreases of the relative total growth and increases in mutant frequency. Treatment of TK6 human lymphoblastoid cells with 0.9-2.3mM TEMPO increased the frequency of both micronuclei (a marker for clastogenicity) and hypodiploid nuclei (a marker of aneugenicity) in a dose-dependent manner; greater responses were produced in the presence of S9. Within the dose range tested, TEMPO induced reactive oxygen species and decreased glutathione levels in mouse lymphoma cells. In addition, the majority of TEMPO-induced mutants had loss of heterozygosity at the Tk locus, with allele loss of ⩽34Mbp. These results indicate that TEMPO is mutagenic in the MLA and induces micronuclei and hypodiploid nuclei in TK6 cells. Oxidative stress may account for part of the genotoxicity induced by TEMPO in both cell lines.

  6. Induction of heme oxygenase: A general response to oxidant stress in cultured mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Applegate, L.A.; Luscher, P.; Tyrrell, R.M. )

    1991-02-01

    Accumulation of heme oxygenase mRNA is strongly stimulated by treatment of cultured human skin fibroblasts with ultraviolet radiation, hydrogen peroxide, or the sulfhydryl reagent sodium arsenite. Since this will result in a transient reduction in the prooxidant state of cells, the phenomenon may represent an important inducible antioxidant defense mechanism. To examine the generality of the response, we have measured the accumulation of the specific mRNA in a variety of human and mammalian cell types after inducing treatments. Induction by sodium arsenite is observed in all additional human cell types tested. This includes primary epidermal keratinocytes and lung and colon fibroblasts as well as established cell lines such as HeLa, TK6 lymphoblastoid, and transformed fetal keratinocytes. Strong induction of heme oxygenase mRNA is also observed following sodium arsenite treatment of cell lines of rat, hamster, mouse, monkey, and marsupial origin. The agents which lead to induction in cultured human skin fibroblasts fall into two categories: (a) those which are oxidants or can generate active intermediates (ultraviolet A radiation, hydrogen peroxide, menadione, and the tumor promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate); (b) agents which are known to interact with or modify cellular glutathione levels (buthionine sulfoximine, sodium arsenite, iodoacetamide, diamide, and cadmium chloride). These observations strongly support the hypothesis that induction of the enzyme is a general response to oxidant stress in mammalian cells and are consistent with the possibility that the cellular redox state plays a key role.

  7. Isolation of a T-cell clone showing HLA-DRB1*0405-restricted cytotoxicity for hematopoietic cells in a patient with aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Nakao, S; Takami, A; Takamatsu, H; Zeng, W; Sugimori, N; Yamazaki, H; Miura, Y; Ueda, M; Shiobara, S; Yoshioka, T; Kaneshige, T; Yasukawa, M; Matsuda, T

    1997-05-15

    The existence of T cells capable of inhibiting in vitro hematopoiesis has been shown in aplastic anemia (AA), although whether such inhibition is mediated by a specific immune reaction involving an HLA allele remained unknown. We isolated a CD4+ Vbeta21+ T-cell clone that was most dominant among Vbeta21+ T cells in the bone marrow (BM) of an AA patient whose HLA-DRB1 alleles included 1501 and 0405. The T-cell clone named NT4.2 lysed an autologous Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL) and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes (PHA-blasts) as well as allogeneic LCLs sharing HLA-DRB1*0405. Cytotoxicity against LCL cells and PHA-blasts by NT4.2 was blocked by anti-HLA-DR monoclonal antibody (MoAb) or anti-CD3 MoAb. NT4.2 also lysed autologous BM mononuclear cells enriched with CD34+ cells that had been cultured for one week in the presence of colony-stimulating factors as well as allogeneic CD34+ cells of a normal individual carrying HLA-DRB1*0405, cultured in the same way. Moreover, NT4.2 strongly inhibited colony formation by hematopoietic progenitor cells derived from cultured CD34+ cells sharing HLA-DRB1*0405. These results indicate that the AA patient has T cells capable of killing hematopoietic cells in an HLA-DRB1*0405-restricted manner and that such cytotoxic T cells may contribute to the pathogenesis of AA.

  8. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) A*1101-Restricted Epstein-Barr Virus-Specific T-cell Receptor Gene Transfer to Target Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yong; Parsonage, Greg; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Machado, Lee R; James, Christine H; Salman, Asmaa; Searle, Peter F; Hui, Edwin P; Chan, Anthony T C; Lee, Steven P

    2015-10-01

    Infusing virus-specific T cells is effective treatment for rare Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated posttransplant lymphomas, and more limited success has been reported using this approach to treat a far more common EBV-associated malignancy, nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, current approaches using EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines to reactivate EBV-specific T cells for infusion take 2 to 3 months of in vitro culture and favor outgrowth of T cells targeting viral antigens expressed within EBV(+) lymphomas, but not in NPC. Here, we explore T-cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer to rapidly and reliably generate T cells specific for the NPC-associated viral protein LMP2. We cloned a human leukocyte antigen (HLA) A*1101-restricted TCR, which would be widely applicable because 40% of NPC patients carry this HLA allele. Studying both the wild-type and modified forms, we have optimized expression of the TCR and demonstrated high-avidity antigen-specific function (proliferation, cytotoxicity, and cytokine release) in both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. The engineered T cells also inhibited LMP2(+) epithelial tumor growth in a mouse model. Furthermore, transduced T cells from patients with advanced NPC lysed LMP2-expressing NPC cell lines. Using this approach, within a few days large numbers of high-avidity LMP2-specific T cells can be generated reliably to treat NPC, thus providing an ideal clinical setting to test TCR gene transfer without the risk of autoimmunity through targeting self-antigens.

  9. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) A*1101-restricted Epstein-Barr Virus-specific T-cell Receptor Gene Transfer to Target Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yong; Parsonage, Greg; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Machado, Lee R; James, Christine H.; Salman, Asmaa; Searle, Peter F.; Hui, Edwin P.; Chan, Anthony T.C.; Lee, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    Infusing virus-specific T cells is effective treatment for rare Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated post-transplant lymphomas and more limited success has been reported using this approach to treat a far more common EBV-associated malignancy, nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, current approaches using EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines to reactivate EBV-specific T cells for infusion take 2 to 3 months of in vitro culture and favour outgrowth of T cells targeting viral antigens expressed within EBV+ lymphomas but not in NPC. Here we explore T-cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer to rapidly and reliably generate T cells specific for the NPC-associated viral protein LMP2. We cloned a HLA A*1101-restricted TCR, which would be widely applicable since 40% of NPC patients carry this HLA allele. Studying both the wild-type and modified forms we have optimised expression of the TCR and demonstrated high avidity antigen-specific function (proliferation, cytotoxicity, cytokine release) in both CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. The engineered T cells also inhibited LMP2+ epithelial tumour growth in a mouse model. Furthermore, transduced T cells from patients with advanced NPC lysed LMP2-expressing NPC cell lines. Using this approach, within a few days large numbers of high avidity LMP2-specific T cells can be generated reliably to treat NPC, thus providing an ideal clinical setting to test TCR gene transfer without the risk of autoimmunity through targeting self-antigens. PMID:25711537

  10. Treatment with a BH3 mimetic overcomes the resistance of latency III EBV (+) cells to p53-mediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Pujals, A; Renouf, B; Robert, A; Chelouah, S; Hollville, É; Wiels, J

    2011-01-01

    P53 inactivation is often observed in Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) cells due to mutations in the p53 gene or overexpression of its negative regulator, murine double minute-2 (MDM2). This event is now considered an essential part of the oncogenic process. Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is strongly associated with BL and is a cofactor in its development. We previously showed that nutlin-3, an antagonist of MDM2, activates the p53 pathway in BL cell lines harboring wild-type p53. However, nutlin-3 strongly induced apoptosis in EBV (−) or latency I EBV (+) cells, whereas latency III EBV (+) cells were much more resistant. We show here that this resistance to apoptosis is also observed in latency III EBV (+) lymphoblastoid cell lines. We also show that, in latency III EBV (+) cells, B-cell lymphona 2 (Bcl-2) is selectively overproduced and interacts with Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax), preventing its activation. The treatment of these cells with the Bcl-2-homology domain 3 mimetic ABT-737 disrupts Bax/Bcl-2 interaction and allows Bax activation by nutlin-3. Furthermore, treatment with these two compounds strongly induces apoptosis. Thus, a combination of Mdm2 and Bcl-2 inhibitors might be a useful anti-cancer strategy for diseases linked to EBV infection. PMID:21796156

  11. Treatment with a BH3 mimetic overcomes the resistance of latency III EBV (+) cells to p53-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Pujals, A; Renouf, B; Robert, A; Chelouah, S; Hollville, E; Wiels, J

    2011-07-28

    P53 inactivation is often observed in Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) cells due to mutations in the p53 gene or overexpression of its negative regulator, murine double minute-2 (MDM2). This event is now considered an essential part of the oncogenic process. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is strongly associated with BL and is a cofactor in its development. We previously showed that nutlin-3, an antagonist of MDM2, activates the p53 pathway in BL cell lines harboring wild-type p53. However, nutlin-3 strongly induced apoptosis in EBV (-) or latency I EBV (+) cells, whereas latency III EBV (+) cells were much more resistant. We show here that this resistance to apoptosis is also observed in latency III EBV (+) lymphoblastoid cell lines. We also show that, in latency III EBV (+) cells, B-cell lymphona 2 (Bcl-2) is selectively overproduced and interacts with Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax), preventing its activation. The treatment of these cells with the Bcl-2-homology domain 3 mimetic ABT-737 disrupts Bax/Bcl-2 interaction and allows Bax activation by nutlin-3. Furthermore, treatment with these two compounds strongly induces apoptosis. Thus, a combination of Mdm2 and Bcl-2 inhibitors might be a useful anti-cancer strategy for diseases linked to EBV infection.

  12. Activity and Phenotype of Natural Killer Cells in Peptide Transporter (TAP)-deficient Patients (Type I Bare Lymphocyte Syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Jacques; Donato, Lionel; Hanau, Daniel; Cazenave, Jean-Pierre; Tongio, Marie-Marthe; Moretta, Alessandro; Salle, Henri de la

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we describe the function and phenotype of natural killer (NK) lymphocytes from HLA class I–deficient patients. These cells are, as has been previously reported, unable to lyse HLA class I− K562 cells, but are able to perform antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), although with lower efficiency as compared to NK cells from normal individuals. Transporter associated to antigen processing (TAP)− NK cells proliferate when cultured in the presence of lymphoblastoid B cells (B-LCs) and interleukin 2 and develop a spectrum of cytotoxicity similar to that of activated normal NK cells. Importantly, activation of the TAP− NK cells induces strong cytotoxicity to autologous B-LCs. Analysis of the phenotype of circulating TAP− NK lymphocytes showed them to display a normal diverse repertoire of HLA class I–specific NK receptors. These receptors were expressed at normal levels, apart from the CD94–NKG2A complex, which appeared to be overexpressed. This latter finding could reflect an adaptation to the low expression of HLA class I molecules. Finally, functional analyses indicated that the inhibitory receptors in TAP− individuals can transduce inhibitory signals. Our results suggest that in vivo, the NK cells of TAP− patients could participate in immune defense, at least through ADCC, but upon activation, may be involved in autoimmune processes. PMID:9419217

  13. Abnormal T cell subpopulations and circulating immune complexes in the Guillain-Barré syndrome and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Goust, J M; Chenais, F; Carnes, J E; Hames, C G; Fudenberg, H H; Hogan, E L

    1978-05-01

    Immunologic studies were performed in 21 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and 16 with the Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). Levels of thymus-derived (T) cells measured by "total" and "active" rosette formation between sheep erythrocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (TEt, TEa) were within normal limits in all the patients, with the exception of four GBS patients, including one who also had received chemotherapy for lymphoma and three who were receiving steroids. When lymphocytes from the 21 patients were incubated with the bone-marrow-derived (B) lymphoblastoid cell line PGLC-33H, there were, for 12 of 18 MS patients and 11 of 16 GBS patients, significant decreases in a subpopulation of peripheral blood T lymphocytes that form "PGLC rosettes" (PGR) with the PGLC-33H cells. (Peripheral blood T cells from normal individuals formed PGR with 23.9 +/- 3.8 percent of PGLC-33H cells.) Using the 125l-C1q binding assay, immune complexes were detected in the serum of 14 of 19 MS patients and 15 of 16 GBS patients. An association between increased C1q binding and decreased PGR values was found in 10 of 18 MS patients and 12 of 17 GBS patients. The results suggest that in both diseases the etiology may involve a decrease in the subset of T cells that bind to the IgM-producing cell line PGLC-33H, in association with the appearance of circulating immune complexes containing the infectious viral agent.

  14. Role of DNA methylation in cell cycle arrest induced by Cr (VI) in two cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jianlin; Wang, Yu; Yao, Chunji; Jin, Lingzhi; Wang, Xiuzhi; Xiao, Yun; Wu, Nanxiang; Song, Peng; Song, Yang; Tan, Yufeng; Gao, Ming; Liu, Kecheng; Zhang, Xing

    2013-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(IV)], a well-known industrial waste product and an environmental pollutant, is recognized as a human carcinogen. But its mechanisms of carcinogenicity remain unclear, and recent studies suggest that DNA methylation may play an important role in the carcinogenesis of Cr(IV). The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of Cr(IV) on cell cycle progress, global DNA methylation, and DNA methylation of p16 gene. A human B lymphoblastoid cell line and a human lung cell line A549 were exposed to 5-15 µM potassium dichromate or 1.25-5 µg/cm² lead chromate for 2-24 hours. Cell cycle was arrested at G₁ phase by both compounds in 24 hours exposure group, but global hypomethylation occurred earlier than cell cycle arrest, and the hypomethylation status maintained for more than 20 hours. The mRNA expression of p16 was significantly up-regulated by Cr(IV), especially by potassium dichromate, and the mRNA expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK4 and CDK6) was significantly down-regulated. But protein expression analysis showed very little change of p16 gene. Both qualitative and quantitative results showed that DNA methylation status of p16 remained unchanged. Collectively, our data suggested that global hypomethylation was possibly responsible for Cr(IV)-induced G₁ phase arrest, but DNA methylation might not be related to up-regulation of p16 gene by Cr(IV).

  15. Role of DNA Methylation in Cell Cycle Arrest Induced by Cr (VI) in Two Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Jianlin; Wang, Yu; Yao, Chunji; Jin, Lingzhi; Wang, Xiuzhi; Xiao, Yun; Wu, Nanxiang; Song, Peng; Song, Yang; Tan, Yufeng; Gao, Ming; Liu, Kecheng; Zhang, Xing

    2013-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(IV)], a well-known industrial waste product and an environmental pollutant, is recognized as a human carcinogen. But its mechanisms of carcinogenicity remain unclear, and recent studies suggest that DNA methylation may play an important role in the carcinogenesis of Cr(IV). The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of Cr(IV) on cell cycle progress, global DNA methylation, and DNA methylation of p16 gene. A human B lymphoblastoid cell line and a human lung cell line A549 were exposed to 5–15 µM potassium dichromate or 1.25–5 µg/cm2 lead chromate for 2–24 hours. Cell cycle was arrested at G1 phase by both compounds in 24 hours exposure group, but global hypomethylation occurred earlier than cell cycle arrest, and the hypomethylation status maintained for more than 20 hours. The mRNA expression of p16 was significantly up-regulated by Cr(IV), especially by potassium dichromate, and the mRNA expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK4 and CDK6) was significantly down-regulated. But protein expression analysis showed very little change of p16 gene. Both qualitative and quantitative results showed that DNA methylation status of p16 remained unchanged. Collectively, our data suggested that global hypomethylation was possibly responsible for Cr(IV) - induced G1 phase arrest,but DNA methylation might not be related to up-regulation of p16 gene by Cr(IV). PMID:23940686

  16. Neutron exposures in human cells: bystander effect and relative biological effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Seth, Isheeta; Schwartz, Jeffrey L; Stewart, Robert D; Emery, Robert; Joiner, Michael C; Tucker, James D

    2014-01-01

    Bystander effects have been observed repeatedly in mammalian cells following photon and alpha particle irradiation. However, few studies have been performed to investigate bystander effects arising from neutron irradiation. Here we asked whether neutrons also induce a bystander effect in two normal human lymphoblastoid cell lines. These cells were exposed to fast neutrons produced by targeting a near-monoenergetic 50.5 MeV proton beam at a Be target (17 MeV average neutron energy), and irradiated-cell conditioned media (ICCM) was transferred to unirradiated cells. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay was used to quantify genetic damage in radiation-naïve cells exposed to ICCM from cultures that received 0 (control), 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3 or 4 Gy neutrons. Cells grown in ICCM from irradiated cells showed no significant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei or nucleoplasmic bridges compared to cells grown in ICCM from sham irradiated cells for either cell line. However, the neutron beam has a photon dose-contamination of 5%, which may modulate a neutron-induced bystander effect. To determine whether these low doses of contaminating photons can induce a bystander effect, cells were irradiated with cobalt-60 at doses equivalent to the percent contamination for each neutron dose. No significant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei or bridges was observed at these doses of photons for either cell line when cultured in ICCM. As expected, high doses of photons induced a clear bystander effect in both cell lines for micronuclei and bridges (p<0.0001). These data indicate that neutrons do not induce a bystander effect in these cells. Finally, neutrons had a relative biological effectiveness of 2.0 ± 0.13 for micronuclei and 5.8 ± 2.9 for bridges compared to cobalt-60. These results may be relevant to radiation therapy with fast neutrons and for regulatory agencies setting standards for neutron radiation protection and safety.

  17. Quantitative proteomic analysis of HIV-1 infected CD4+ T cells reveals an early host response in important biological pathways: Protein synthesis, cell proliferation, and T-cell activation

    SciTech Connect

    Navare, Arti T.; Sova, Pavel; Purdy, David E.; Weiss, Jeffrey M.; Wolf-Yadlin, Alejandro; Korth, Marcus J.; Chang, Stewart T.; Proll, Sean C.; Jahan, Tahmina A.; Krasnoselsky, Alexei L.; Palermo, Robert E.; Katze, Michael G.

    2012-07-20

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) depends upon host-encoded proteins to facilitate its replication while at the same time inhibiting critical components of innate and/or intrinsic immune response pathways. To characterize the host cell response on protein levels in CD4+ lymphoblastoid SUP-T1 cells after infection with HIV-1 strain LAI, we used mass spectrometry (MS)-based global quantitation with iTRAQ (isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification). We found 266, 60 and 22 proteins differentially expressed (DE) (P-value{<=}0.05) at 4, 8, and 20 hours post-infection (hpi), respectively, compared to time-matched mock-infected samples. The majority of changes in protein abundance occurred at an early stage of infection well before the de novo production of viral proteins. Functional analyses of these DE proteins showed enrichment in several biological pathways including protein synthesis, cell proliferation, and T-cell activation. Importantly, these early changes before the time of robust viral production have not been described before.

  18. An Efficient Method for Electroporation of Small Interfering RNAs into ENCODE Project Tier 1 GM12878 and K562 Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Ryan Y.; Hammond, Ming C.

    2015-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project aims to identify all functional sequence elements in the human genome sequence by use of high-throughput DNA/cDNA sequencing approaches. To aid the standardization, comparison, and integration of data sets produced from different technologies and platforms, the ENCODE Consortium selected several standard human cell lines to be used by the ENCODE Projects. The Tier 1 ENCODE cell lines include GM12878, K562, and H1 human embryonic stem cell lines. GM12878 is a lymphoblastoid cell line, transformed with the Epstein-Barr virus, that was selected by the International HapMap Project for whole genome and transcriptome sequencing by use of the Illumina platform. K562 is an immortalized myelogenous leukemia cell line. The GM12878 cell line is attractive for the ENCODE Projects, as it offers potential synergy with the International HapMap Project. Despite the vast amount of sequencing data available on the GM12878 cell line through the ENCODE Project, including transcriptome, chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing for histone marks, and transcription factors, no small interfering siRNA-mediated knockdown studies have been performed in the GM12878 cell line, as cationic lipid-mediated transfection methods are inefficient for lymphoid cell lines. Here, we present an efficient and reproducible method for transfection of a variety of siRNAs into the GM12878 and K562 cell lines, which subsequently results in targeted protein depletion. PMID:26543439

  19. An Efficient Method for Electroporation of Small Interfering RNAs into ENCODE Project Tier 1 GM12878 and K562 Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Muller, Ryan Y; Hammond, Ming C; Rio, Donald C; Lee, Yeon J

    2015-12-01

    The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project aims to identify all functional sequence elements in the human genome sequence by use of high-throughput DNA/cDNA sequencing approaches. To aid the standardization, comparison, and integration of data sets produced from different technologies and platforms, the ENCODE Consortium selected several standard human cell lines to be used by the ENCODE Projects. The Tier 1 ENCODE cell lines include GM12878, K562, and H1 human embryonic stem cell lines. GM12878 is a lymphoblastoid cell line, transformed with the Epstein-Barr virus, that was selected by the International HapMap Project for whole genome and transcriptome sequencing by use of the Illumina platform. K562 is an immortalized myelogenous leukemia cell line. The GM12878 cell line is attractive for the ENCODE Projects, as it offers potential synergy with the International HapMap Project. Despite the vast amount of sequencing data available on the GM12878 cell line through the ENCODE Project, including transcriptome, chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing for histone marks, and transcription factors, no small interfering siRNA-mediated knockdown studies have been performed in the GM12878 cell line, as cationic lipid-mediated transfection methods are inefficient for lymphoid cell lines. Here, we present an efficient and reproducible method for transfection of a variety of siRNAs into the GM12878 and K562 cell lines, which subsequently results in targeted protein depletion.

  20. Reduction of misleading ("false") positive results in mammalian cell genotoxicity assays. I. Choice of cell type.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Paul; Smith, Katie; Young, Jamie; Jeffrey, Laura; Kirkland, David; Pfuhler, Stefan; Carmichael, Paul

    2012-02-18

    Current in vitro mammalian cell genotoxicity assays show a high rate of positive results, many of which are misleading when compared with in vivo genotoxicity or rodent carcinogenicity data. P53-deficiency in many of the rodent cell lines may be a key factor in this poor predictivity. As part of an European Cosmetics Industry Association initiative for improvement of in vitro mammalian cell assays, we have compared several rodent cell lines (V79, CHL, CHO) with p53-competent human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HuLy), TK6 human lymphoblastoid cells, and the human liver cell line, HepG2. We have compared in vitro micronucleus (MN) induction following treatment with 19 compounds that were accepted as producing misleading or "false" positive results in in vitro mammalian cell assays [6]. Of these, six chemicals (2-ethyl-1,3-hexandiol, benzyl alcohol, urea, sodium saccharin, sulfisoxazole and isobutyraldehyde) were not toxic and did not induce any MN at concentrations up to 10mM. d,l-Menthol and ethionamide induced cytotoxicity, but did not induce MN. o-Anthranilic acid was not toxic and did not induce MN in V79, CHL, CHO, HuLy and HepG2 cells up to 10mM. Toxicity was induced in TK6 cells, although there were no increases in MN frequency up to and above the 55% toxicity level. The other 10 chemicals (1,3-dihydroxybenzene, curcumin, propyl gallate, p-nitrophenol, ethyl acrylate, eugenol, tert-butylhydroquinone, 2,4-dichlorophenol, sodium xylene sulfonate and phthalic anhydride) produced cytotoxicity in at least one cell type, and were evaluated further for MN induction in most or all of the cell types listed above. All these chemicals induced MN at concentrations <10mM, with levels of cytotoxicity below 60% (measured as the replication index) in at least one cell type. The rodent cell lines (V79, CHO and CHL) were consistently more susceptible to cytotoxicity and MN induction than p53-competent cells, and are therefore more susceptible to giving misleading positive

  1. Constituents of French Marigold (Tagetes patula L.) Flowers Protect Jurkat T-Cells against Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Chkhikvishvili, Irakli; Sanikidze, Tamar; Gogia, Nunu; Enukidze, Maia; Machavariani, Marine; Kipiani, Nana; Vinokur, Yakov; Rodov, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The flowers of French marigold (Tagetes patula L.) are widely used in folk medicine, in particular for treating inflammation-related disorders. However, cellular mechanisms of this activity demand further investigation. In the present work, we studied the potential of T. patula compounds to alleviate the oxidative stress in hydrogen peroxide-challenged human lymphoblastoid Jurkat T-cells. Crude extracts of marigold flowers and purified fractions containing flavonoids patuletin, quercetagetin, and quercetin and their derivatives, as well as the carotenoid lutein, were brought in contact with Jurkat cells challenged with 25 or 50 μM H2O2. Hydrogen peroxide caused oxidative stress in the cells, manifested as generation of superoxide and peroxyl radicals, reduced viability, arrested cell cycle, and enhanced apoptosis. The stress was alleviated by marigold ingredients that demonstrated high radical-scavenging capacity and enhanced the activity of antioxidant enzymes involved in neutralization of reactive oxygen species. Flavonoid fraction rich in quercetin and quercetagetin showed the highest cytoprotective activity, while patuletin in high dose exerted a cytotoxic effect associated with its anticancer potential. T. patula compounds enhanced the production of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant interleukin-10 (IL-10) in Jurkat cells. Both direct radical-scavenging capacity and stimulation of protective cellular mechanisms can underlay the anti-inflammatory properties of marigold flowers.

  2. Novel radiation response genes identified in gene-trapped MCF10A mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Malone, Jennifer; Ullrich, Robert

    2007-02-01

    We have used a gene-trapping strategy to screen human mammary epithelial cells for radiation response genes. Relative mRNA expression levels of five candidate genes in MCF10A cells were analyzed, both with and without exposure to radiation. In all five cases, the trapped genes were significantly down-regulated after radiation treatment. Sequence analysis of the fusion transcripts identified the trapped genes: (1) the human androgen receptor, (2) the uncharacterized DREV1 gene, which has known homology to DNA methyltransferases, (3) the human creatine kinase gene, (4) the human eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 beta 2, and (5) the human ribosomal protein L27. All five genes were down-regulated significantly after treatment with varying doses of ionizing radiation (0.10 to 4.0 Gy) and at varying times (2-30 h after treatment). The genes were also analyzed in human fibroblast and lymphoblastoid cell lines to determine whether the radiation response being observed was cell-type specific. The results verified that the observed radiation response was not a cell-type-specific phenomenon, suggesting that the genes play essential roles in the radiation damage control pathways. This study demonstrates the potential of the gene-trap approach for the identification and functional analysis of novel radiation response genes.

  3. Class I major histocompatibility proteins as cell surface receptors for simian virus 40.

    PubMed Central

    Atwood, W J; Norkin, L C

    1989-01-01

    Class I major histocompatibility complex proteins appear to be the major cell surface receptors for simian virus 40 (SV40), as implied by the following observations. Adsorption of SV40 to LLC-MK2 rhesus monkey kidney cells specifically inhibited binding of a monoclonal antibody (MAb) against class I human lymphocyte antigen (HLA) proteins. Conversely, pretreatment of LLC-MK2 cells with anti-HLA MAbs inhibited infection by SV40. The ability of anti-HLA to inhibit infection was greatly reduced when the order of addition of the anti-HLA and the virus was reversed. Infection was also inhibited by preincubating SV40 with purified soluble class I protein. Finally, human lymphoblastoid cells of the Daudi line, which do not express class I major histocompatibility complex proteins, were infected at relatively low levels with SV40 virions. In a control experiment, we found that pretreatment of cells with a MAb specific for the leukocytic-function-associated antigen LFA-3 actually enhanced infection. This finding may also support the premise that class I major histocompatibility complex proteins are receptors for SV40. PMID:2476575

  4. Constituents of French Marigold (Tagetes patula L.) Flowers Protect Jurkat T-Cells against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Chkhikvishvili, Irakli; Sanikidze, Tamar; Gogia, Nunu; Enukidze, Maia; Machavariani, Marine; Kipiani, Nana; Vinokur, Yakov; Rodov, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The flowers of French marigold (Tagetes patula L.) are widely used in folk medicine, in particular for treating inflammation-related disorders. However, cellular mechanisms of this activity demand further investigation. In the present work, we studied the potential of T. patula compounds to alleviate the oxidative stress in hydrogen peroxide-challenged human lymphoblastoid Jurkat T-cells. Crude extracts of marigold flowers and purified fractions containing flavonoids patuletin, quercetagetin, and quercetin and their derivatives, as well as the carotenoid lutein, were brought in contact with Jurkat cells challenged with 25 or 50 μM H2O2. Hydrogen peroxide caused oxidative stress in the cells, manifested as generation of superoxide and peroxyl radicals, reduced viability, arrested cell cycle, and enhanced apoptosis. The stress was alleviated by marigold ingredients that demonstrated high radical-scavenging capacity and enhanced the activity of antioxidant enzymes involved in neutralization of reactive oxygen species. Flavonoid fraction rich in quercetin and quercetagetin showed the highest cytoprotective activity, while patuletin in high dose exerted a cytotoxic effect associated with its anticancer potential. T. patula compounds enhanced the production of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant interleukin-10 (IL-10) in Jurkat cells. Both direct radical-scavenging capacity and stimulation of protective cellular mechanisms can underlay the anti-inflammatory properties of marigold flowers. PMID:27433287

  5. Reovirus type 3 synthesizes proteins in interferon-treated HeLa cells without reversing the antiviral state.

    PubMed

    Feduchi, E; Esteban, M; Carrasco, L

    1988-06-01

    Treatment of HeLa cells with human lymphoblastoid interferon (IFN-alpha) does not inhibit reovirus type 3 protein synthesis during virus infection. In contrast, reovirus translation is blocked by treatment of L cells with mouse IFN-alpha. The (2'-5')A synthetase activity is induced in HeLa cells by IFN-alpha treatment and is activated after reovirus infection, since cell lysates from these cells synthesize in vitro (2'-5')A oligonucleotides. The IFN-induced protein kinase activity is also triggered in those lysates upon dsRNA addition. Thus, contrary to DNA-containing viruses, such as vaccinia virus or adenovirus, reovirus infection does not destroy or reverse the IFN-induced antiviral state. In support of this conclusion, superinfection with poliovirus or vesicular stomatitis virus of reovirus-infected HeLa cells treated with IFN leads only to a blockade of translation of the former viruses. These results provide a remarkable example where in the same cells doubly infected with two different viruses, the antiviral state induced by IFN-alpha is manifested by selectively inhibiting translation of one kind of virus (poliovirus or vesicular stomatitis virus) without affecting the translation of reovirus type 3. In addition, these results indicate that the resistance of reovirus translation to inhibition by IFN is different from the mechanism of resistance induced by DNA-containing viruses.

  6. Reduced cell surface expression of processed human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein in the presence of Nef.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, O; Rivière, Y; Heard, J M; Danos, O

    1993-01-01

    nef genes from two laboratory grown human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains and from two proviruses that had not been propagated in vitro were introduced into CD4+ lymphoblastoid CEM cells. The stable expression of all four Nef proteins was associated with an almost complete abrogation of CD4 cell surface localization. The consequences of the presence of Nef on gp160 cleavage, gp120 surface localization, and envelope-induced cytopathic effect were examined in CEM cells in which the HIV-1 env gene was expressed from a vaccinia virus vector. The presence of Nef did not modify the processing of gp160 into its subunits but resulted in a significant decrease of cell surface levels of gp120, associated with a dramatic reduction of the fusion-mediated cell death. Surface levels of mutant envelope glycoproteins unable to bind CD4 were not altered in Nef-expressing cells, suggesting that the phenomenon was CD4 dependent. The intracellular accumulation of fully processed envelope glycoproteins could significantly delay the cytopathic effect associated with envelope surface expression in HIV-infected cells and may be relevant to the selective advantage associated with Nef during the in vivo infectious process. Images PMID:8497051

  7. Analysis of the cross-talk of Epstein–Barr virus-infected B cells with T cells in the marmoset

    PubMed Central

    Dunham, Jordon; van Driel, Nikki; Eggen, Bart JL; Paul, Chaitali; ‘t Hart, Bert A; Laman, Jon D; Kap, Yolanda S

    2017-01-01

    Despite the well-known association of Epstein–Barr virus (EBV), a lymphocryptovirus (LCV), with multiple sclerosis, a clear pathogenic role for disease progression has not been established. The translationally relevant experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model in marmoset monkeys revealed that LCV-infected B cells have a central pathogenic role in the activation of T cells that drive EAE progression. We hypothesized that LCV-infected B cells induce T-cell functions relevant for EAE progression. In the current study, we examined the ex vivo cross-talk between lymph node mononuclear cells (MNCs) from EAE marmosets and (semi-) autologous EBV-infected B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (B-LCLs). Results presented here demonstrate that infection with EBV B95-8 has a strong impact on gene expression profile of marmoset B cells, particularly those involved with antigen processing and presentation or co-stimulation to T cells. At the cellular level, we observed that MNC co-culture with B-LCLs induced decrease of CCR7 expression on T cells from EAE responder marmosets, but not in EAE monkeys without clinically evident disease. B-LCL interaction with T cells also resulted in significant loss of CD27 expression and reduced expression of IL-23R and CCR6, which coincided with enhanced IL-17A production. These results highlight the profound impact that EBV-infected B-LCL cells can have on second and third co-stimulatory signals involved in (autoreactive) T-cell activation. PMID:28243437

  8. Long Noncoding RNA Expression Profiling in Normal B-Cell Subsets and Hodgkin Lymphoma Reveals Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg Cell-Specific Long Noncoding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Tayari, Mina Masoumeh; Winkle, Melanie; Kortman, Gertrud; Sietzema, Jantine; de Jong, Debora; Terpstra, Martijn; Mestdagh, Pieter; Kroese, Frans G M; Visser, Lydia; Diepstra, Arjan; Kok, Klaas; van den Berg, Anke; Kluiver, Joost

    2016-09-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a malignancy of germinal center (GC) B-cell origin. To explore the role of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in HL, we studied lncRNA expression patterns in normal B-cell subsets, HL cell lines, and tissues. Naive and memory B cells showed a highly similar lncRNA expression pattern, distinct from GC-B cells. Significant differential expression between HL and normal GC-B cells was observed for 475 lncRNA loci. For two validated lncRNAs, an enhanced expression was observed in HL, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and lymphoblastoid cell lines. For a third lncRNA, increased expression levels were observed in HL and part of Burkitt lymphoma cell lines. RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization on primary HL tissues revealed a tumor cell-specific expression pattern for all three lncRNAs. A potential cis-regulatory role was observed for 107 differentially expressed lncRNA-mRNA pairs localizing within a 60-kb region. Consistent with a cis-acting role, we showed a preferential nuclear localization for two selected candidates. Thus, we showed dynamic lncRNA expression changes during the transit of normal B cells through the GC reaction and widely deregulated lncRNA expression patterns in HL. Three lncRNAs showed a tumor cell-specific expression pattern in HL tissues and might therefore be of value as a biomarker. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The effects of ethidium bromide induced loss of mitochondrial DNA on mitochondrial phenotype and ultrastructure in a human leukemia T-cell line (MOLT-4 cells).

    PubMed

    Armand, Ray; Channon, Jacqueline Y; Kintner, Jennifer; White, Kristina A; Miselis, Kristin A; Perez, Raymond P; Lewis, Lionel D

    2004-04-01

    Mitochondrial DNA-deficient (rho(0)) cells were generated following a 26-day incubation of MOLT-4 lymphoblastoid T cells in ethidium bromide (3,8-diamino-5-ethyl-6-phenylphenanthridinium bromide). The absence of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the resultant MOLT-4 rho(0) cells was confirmed by Southern analysis and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). MOLT-4 rho(0) cells proliferated more slowly than parental cells (wild type) and produced significantly more lactate (approximately fourfold increase; P < 0.001) with concomitantly reduced oxygen consumption (12.3% vs. 100%; P < 0.001) compared with the wild type. MOLT-4 rho(0) cells also showed reduced cytochrome c oxidase activity and a reduced cytochrome c oxidase/citrate synthase activity ratio compared to parental wild-type MOLT-4 cells (P < 10(-11)). Electron microscopy showed elongated mitochondria with parallel cristae in MOLT-4 cells although the mitochondria in MOLT-4 rho(0) cells appeared enlarged, some were vacuolated with either an absent or a grossly distorted cristae pattern. Vital staining with 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolyl-carbocyanine iodide (JC-1) was used to image mitochondria in intact cells and study mitochondrial transmembrane potential (Deltapsi(m)). Flow cytometry using JC-1 indicated that MOLT-4 rho(0) had a lower Deltapsi(m) than MOLT-4. Sodium fluoride (an inhibitor of the glycolytic pathway) at a concentration of 20 mM further reduced the Deltapsi(m) in MOLT-4-rho(0) cells. This data suggested that a glycolytic pathway product, possibly ATP, was required for the maintenance of Deltapsi(m) in MOLT-4 rho(0) cells.

  10. Detection by Epitope-defined Monoclonal Antibodies of Werner DNA Helicases in the Nucleoplasm and Their Upregulation by Cell Transformation and Immortalization

    PubMed Central

    Shiratori, Miwa; Sakamoto, Sakae; Suzuki, Noriyuki; Tokutake, Yoshiki; Kawabe, Yoichi; Enomoto, Takemi; Sugimoto, Masanobu; Goto, Makoto; Matsumoto, Takehisa; Furuichi, Yasuhiro

    1999-01-01

    We prepared several monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for the NH2- and COOH-terminal regions of the DNA helicase (WRN helicase) responsible for Werner's syndrome known as a premature aging disease. With these antibodies, we detected by immunoblot analysis the endogenous WRN helicase of a relative mass of 180 kD in several lines of cultured cells, but not in patient cells with a defined mutation. Immunocytochemical staining of proliferating fibroblasts and tumor cells showed that the major part of WRN helicase is in the nucleoplasm and not in the nucleolus. Similar experiments with a rat mAb specific to the mouse homologue of human WRN helicase yielded an identical conclusion. Although this nucleoplasmic staining was evident in cells in interphase, the condensed chromatin structure in metaphase was not stained by the same mAbs, suggesting that WRN helicases exist perhaps in a soluble form or bound to the unfolded chromatin structure. From quantitative immunoblot analysis, higher levels of WRN helicase were observed in all transformed cells and tumor cells examined than those of normal cells. The expression of WRN helicase was enhanced consistently in fibroblasts and B-lymphoblastoid cells by transformation with SV-40 and Epstein-Barr virus, respectively, suggesting that rapidly proliferating cells require a high copy numbers of WRN helicase. PMID:9885239

  11. Leukosialin (CD43)-major histocompatibility class I molecule interactions involved in spontaneous T cell conjugate formation

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Resting T cells spontaneously adhere in a selective manner to potent accessory cells, such as dendritic cells (DC) and lymphoblastoid B blasts (LCL). Here we demonstrate that leukosialin (CD43) and major histocompatibility complex class I molecules (MHC-I) might play a critical role in this process. T cell conjugate formation with monocyte- derived DC (md-DC) and LCL could be strongly inhibited by either preincubating T cells with Fab fragments of CD43 monoclonal antibody (mAb) 6F5 or by preincubating md-DC or LCL with MHC-I mAb W6/32. Intact CD43 mAb 6F5, in contrast to monovalent Fab fragments, enhanced T cell adhesiveness by transactivating CD2 binding to CD58 molecules. Interestingly, induction of this proadhesive signal via CD43 with intact 6F5 mAb was found to revert mAb W6/32-mediated inhibition of T cell conjugate formation. These observations indicated that CD43 cross- linkage mimics and monovalent mAb 6F5 inhibits interaction of T cell CD43 with a stimulatory ligand on opposing cells, presumably MHC-I. For the demonstration of direct physical interaction between CD43 on T cells and MHC-I-coated beads it was necessary, however, to ligate CD2 on T cells with a stimulatory pair of CD2 mAbs (VIT13 plus TS2/18). This suggests that CD2 ligation crosswise upregulates CD43 binding avidity for MHC-I and that both adhesion molecule pairs (CD43/MHC-I and CD2/CD58) act in concert to induce and mediate T cell conjugate formation with certain cell types. PMID:8920865

  12. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can immortalize B-cll cells activated by cytokines.

    PubMed

    Wendel-Hansen, V; Sällström, J; De Campos-Lima, P O; Kjellström, G; Sandlund, A; Siegbahn, A; Carlsson, M; Nilsson, K; Rosén, A

    1994-03-01

    B-type of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) cells are inert to the potent transforming action of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The mitogenic action of Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I (SAC), MP6-thioredoxin, and interleukin 2 (IL-2), agents previously shown to induce proliferation in normal as well as in B-CLL cells, lifted this block, and EBV-positive cell lines could be established. It was not possible to establish cell lines of leukemic origin from cultures that were incubated with EBV alone or cytokine mix alone. CLL-cells infected with EBV only, expressed the viral nuclear antigen complex (EBNA), but not the viral latent membrane protein (LMP). They were not activated as measured by cell size and 3H-thymidine incorporation. In contrast, cells incubated with EBV and cytokine mix expressed both EBNA and LMP in parallel with enlargement and increased 3H-thymidine incorporation. These results emphasize that LMP expression is a prerequisite for growth transformation and immortalization and that cytokine activation signals are required for its expression in B-CLLs. Cells incubated with SAC/MP6-thioredoxin/IL-2 did not express any of the viral antigens, but were activated with regard to the mentioned parameters. Nine cell lines were established from six patients. From each of the three patients, we obtained 'twin'-pair lines: one corresponding to the malignant cell and the other to a normal B-lymphoblastoid cell. Thus, malignant and normal B-cell counterparts, from the very same donor, are at hand for comparative studies. The cell lines have been carried out for more than 12 months in culture. We conclude that B-CLL that are refractory to EBV-transformation can be rendered susceptible through in vitro cytokine activation.

  13. The in vitro generation of multi-tumor antigen-specific cytotoxic T cell clones: Candidates for leukemia adoptive immunotherapy following allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Yehia S; Bashawri, Layla A; Vatte, Chittibabu; Abu-Rish, Eman Y; Cyrus, Cyril; Khalaf, Wafaa S; Browning, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    Adoptive T-cell immunotherapy is a promising approach to manage and maintain relapse-free survival of leukemia patients, especially following allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Post-transplant adoptive immunotherapy using cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) of the donor origin provide graft-versus-tumor effects, with or without graft-versus-host disease. Myeloid leukemias express immunogenic leukemia associated antigens (LAAs); such as WT-1, PRAME, MAGE, h-TERT and others, most of them are able to induce specific T cell responses whenever associated with the proper co-stimulation. We investigated the ability of a LAA-expressing hybridoma cell line to induce CTL clones in PBMCs of HLA-matched healthy donors in vitro. The CTL clones were induced by repetitive co-culture with LAAs-expressing, HLA-A*0201(+) hybrid cell line, generated by fusion of leukemia blasts to human immortalized APC (EBV-sensitized B-lymphoblastoid cell line; HMy2). The induced cytotoxic T cell clones were phenotypically and functionally characterized by pentamer analysis, IFN-γ release ELISPOT and cellular cytotoxicity assays. All T cell lines showed robust peptide recognition and functional activity when sensitized with HLA-A*0201-restricted WT-1235-243, hTERT615-624 or PRAME100-108 peptides-pulsed T2 cells, in addition to partially HLA-matched leukemia blasts. This study demonstrates the feasibility of developing multi-tumor antigen-specific T cell lines in allogeneic PBMCs in vitro, using LAA-expressing tumor/HMy2 hybrid cell line model, for potential use in leukemia adoptive immunotherapy in partially matched donor-recipient setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Measurement of DNA damage and apoptosis in Molt-4 cells after in vitro exposure to radiofrequency radiation.

    PubMed

    Hook, Graham J; Zhang, Peng; Lagroye, I; Li, Li; Higashikubo, Ryuji; Moros, Eduardo G; Straube, William L; Pickard, William F; Baty, Jack D; Roti Roti, Joseph L

    2004-02-01

    To determine whether exposure to radiofrequency (RF) radiation can induce DNA damage or apoptosis, Molt-4 T lymphoblastoid cells were exposed with RF fields at frequencies and modulations of the type used by wireless communication devices. Four types of frequency/modulation forms were studied: 847.74 MHz code-division multiple-access (CDMA), 835.62 MHz frequency-division multiple-access (FDMA), 813.56 MHz iDEN(R) (iDEN), and 836.55 MHz time-division multiple-access (TDMA). Exponentially growing cells were exposed to RF radiation for periods up to 24 h using a radial transmission line (RTL) exposure system. The specific absorption rates used were 3.2 W/kg for CDMA and FDMA, 2.4 or 24 mW/kg for iDEN, and 2.6 or 26 mW/kg for TDMA. The temperature in the RTLs was maintained at 37 degrees C +/- 0.3 degrees C. DNA damage was measured using the single-cell gel electrophoresis assay. The annexin V affinity assay was used to detect apoptosis. No statistically significant difference in the level of DNA damage or apoptosis was observed between sham-treated cells and cells exposed to RF radiation for any frequency, modulation or exposure time. Our results show that exposure of Molt-4 cells to CDMA, FDMA, iDEN or TDMA modulated RF radiation does not induce alterations in level of DNA damage or induce apoptosis.

  15. Detection of Chromosomal Structural Alterations in Single Cells by SNP Arrays: A Systematic Survey of Amplification Bias and Optimized Workflow

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Kazuya; Bundo, Miki; Ueda, Junko; Nakano, Yoko; Ukai, Wataru; Hashimoto, Eri; Saito, Toshikazu; Kato, Tadafumi

    2007-01-01

    Background In single-cell human genome analysis using whole-genome amplified product, a strong amplification bias involving allele dropout and preferential amplification hampers the quality of results. Using an oligonucleotide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, we systematically examined the nature of this amplification bias, including frequency, degree, and preference for genomic location, and we assessed the effects of this amplification bias on subsequent genotype and chromosomal copy number analyses. Methodology/Principal Findings We found a large variability in amplification bias among the amplified products obtained by multiple displacement amplification (MDA), and this bias had a severe effect on the genotype and chromosomal copy number analyses. We established optimal experimental conditions for pre-screening for high-quality amplified products, processing array data, and analyzing chromosomal structural alterations. Using this optimized protocol, we successfully detected previously unidentified chromosomal structural alterations in single cells from a lymphoblastoid cell line. These alterations were subsequently confirmed by karyotype analysis. In addition, we successfully obtained reproducible chromosomal copy number profiles of single cells from the cell line with a complex karyotype, indicating the applicability and potential of our optimized workflow. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that the quality of amplification products should be critically assessed before using them for genomic analyses. The method of MDA-based whole-genome amplification followed by SNP array analysis described here will be useful for exploring chromosomal alterations in single cells. PMID:18074030

  16. Signal-peptide-peptidase-like 2a is required for CD74 intramembrane proteolysis in human B cells

    PubMed Central

    Schneppenheim, Janna; Hüttl, Susann; Kruchen, Anne; Fluhrer, Regina; Müller, Ingo; Saftig, Paul; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Martin, Christa L; Schröder, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    The invariant chain (CD74) mediates targeting of the MHCII complex to endosomal compartments, where CD74 undergoes degradation allowing MHCII to acquire peptides. We demonstrated recently that intramembrane proteolysis of the final membrane-bound N-terminal fragment (NTF) of CD74 is catalysed by Signal-peptide-peptidase-like 2a (SPPL2a) and that this process is indispensable for development and function of B lymphocytes in mice. In SPPL2a−/− mice, homeostasis of these cells is disturbed by the accumulation of the unprocessed CD74 NTF. So far, evidence for this essential role of SPPL2a is restricted to mice. Nevertheless, inhibition of SPPL2a has been suggested as novel approach to target B cells for treating autoimmunity. Here, we characterize human B cell lines with a homozygous microdeletion on chromosome 15. We demonstrate that this deletion disrupts the SPPL2a genomic locus and leads to loss of SPPL2a transcript. Lymphoblastoid cell lines from patients with this deletion exhibit absence of SPPL2a at the protein level and show an accumulation of the CD74 NTF comparable to B cells from SPPL2a−/− mice. By this means, we present evidence that the role of SPPL2a in CD74 proteolysis is conserved in human B cells and provide support for modulation of SPPL2a activity as a therapeutic concept. PMID:25035924

  17. Overexpression of the human BCL-2 gene product results in growth enhancement of Epstein-Barr virus-immortalized B cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujimoto, Yoshihide )

    1989-03-01

    The biological activity of the human BCL-2 gene product was analyzed in an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected human lymphoblastoid B-cell line transfected with BCL-2 sequences driven by the simian virus 40 promoter and enhancer. Overproduction of the BCL-2 protein conferred a selective growth advantage to the EBV-infected B cells as compared with control transfectants in low-serum medium and also after seeding at limiting dilution but did not render the cells tumorigenic in athymic nude mice. This growth enhancement was also seen in cells transfected with the BCL-2 gene with its own promoter juxtaposed to the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene enhancer, which represents the translocated form of the BCL-2 gene observed in follicular lymphomas with the t(14;18) translocation. The growth advantage of EBV-infected B cells overproducing the BCL-2 protein is neither due to the enhanced growth factor production nor due to an enhanced sensitivity of the BCL-2 transfectants to interleukins 1 or 6, although both lymphokines are known to stimulate proliferation of EBV-infected B-cell lines. The growth advantage of EBV-infected B-cell lines. The growth advantage of EBV-infected B cells by overproduction of the BCL-2 protein suggests the direct involvement of the BCL-2 gene product in the pathogenesis of follicular lymphoma.

  18. The CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Immunity Induced by HPV-E6 Uploaded in Engineered Exosomes Is Improved by ISCOMATRIXTM Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Manfredi, Francesco; di Bonito, Paola; Ridolfi, Barbara; Anticoli, Simona; Arenaccio, Claudia; Chiozzini, Chiara; Baz Morelli, Adriana; Federico, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    We recently described the induction of an efficient CD8+ T cell-mediated immune response against a tumor-associated antigen (TAA) uploaded in engineered exosomes used as an immunogen delivery tool. This immune response cleared tumor cells inoculated after immunization, and controlled the growth of tumors implanted before immunization. We looked for new protocols aimed at increasing the CD8+ T cell specific response to the antigen uploaded in engineered exosomes, assuming that an optimized CD8+ T cell immune response would correlate with a more effective depletion of tumor cells in the therapeutic setting. By considering HPV-E6 as a model of TAA, we found that the in vitro co-administration of engineered exosomes and ISCOMATRIXTM adjuvant, i.e., an adjuvant composed of purified ISCOPREPTM saponin, cholesterol, and phospholipids, led to a stronger antigen cross-presentation in both B- lymphoblastoid cell lines ( and monocyte-derived immature dendritic cells compared with that induced by the exosomes alone. Consistently, the co-inoculation in mice of ISCOMATRIXTM adjuvant and engineered exosomes induced a significant increase of TAA-specific CD8+ T cells compared to mice immunized with the exosomes alone. This result holds promise for effective usage of exosomes as well as alternative nanovesicles in anti-tumor therapeutic approaches. PMID:27834857

  19. Impact of the NK Cell Receptor LIR-1 (ILT-2/CD85j/LILRB1) on Cytotoxicity against Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Heidenreich, Silke; zu Eulenburg, Christine; Hildebrandt, York; Stübig, Thomas; Sierich, Heidi; Badbaran, Anita; Eiermann, Thomas H.; Binder, Thomas M. C.; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2012-01-01

    The role of different receptors in natural-killer- (NK-) cell-mediated cytotoxicity against multiple myeloma (MM) cells is unknown. We investigated if an enhancement of NK-cell-mediated cytotoxicity against MM could be reached by blocking of the inhibitory leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor 1 (LIR-1). Our investigations revealed high levels of LIR-1 expression not only on the NK cell line NK-92, but also on myeloma cells (MOLP-8, RPMI8226) as well as on a lymphoblastoid cell line (LBCL; IM-9). Subsequent cytotoxicity assays were designed to show the isolated effects of LIR-1 blocking on either the effector or the tumor side to rule out receptor-receptor interactions. Although NK-92 was shown to be capable of myeloma cell lysis, inhibition of LIR-1 on NK-92 did not enhance cytotoxicity. Targeting the receptor on MM and LBCL did not also alter NK-92-mediated lysis. We come to the conclusion that LIR-1 alone does not directly influence NK-cell-mediated cytotoxicity against myeloma. To our knowledge, this work provides the first investigation of the inhibitory capability of LIR-1 in NK-92-mediated cytotoxicity against MM and the first functional evaluation of LIR-1 on MM and LBCL. PMID:22844324

  20. Phorbol ester and B cell-stimulatory factor synergize to induce B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells to simultaneous immunoglobulin secretion and DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, M; Matsson, P; Rosén, A; Sundström, C; Tötterman, T H; Nilsson, K

    1988-11-01

    This paper discusses the response of two B cell-type chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) clones, 173 and 183, to the phorbol ester TPA combined with a B cell-stimulatory factor (BSF) derived from a T helper cell hybridoma (MP6). Previous studies with 173 and 183 cells have consistently shown that TPA alone induces differentiation but no proliferation. However, when the two clones were exposed to TPA plus BSF-MP6, not only differentiation but also DNA synthesis was observed. Compared with TPA exposure alone, the fraction of cells with induced lymphoblastoid-plasmacytoid morphology increased and Ig secretion was enhanced. By a 1-hr TPA pulse followed by BSF-MP6, the DNA synthesis was further augmented, but less maturation was observed. T cell and monocyte removal, using cell sorting, showed that the DNA synthesis induced was independent of these cell types, also under serum-free conditions. Quantitation of several cell cycle-associated surface Ags showed that the 4F2, Ba, Bac-1, and cD23 Ags increased while the CD37 decreased in expression upon addition of BSF-MP6. We conclude that B-CLLs are inducible by TPA and BSF-MP6 not only to differentiation, but also to DNA synthesis even under serum-free conditions in vitro. The results furthermore suggest that the very low proliferation activity in B-CLL tumors in vivo may reflect a relative deficiency of proper growth and differentiation factors or a subnormal response of B-CLL cells to such factors.

  1. Development of a serum-free and heat-sterilizable medium and continuous high-density cell culture.

    PubMed

    Minamoto, Y; Ogawa, K; Abe, H; Iochi, Y; Mitsugi, K

    1991-01-01

    We tried to establish a new serum-free and heat-sterilizable medium, based on our serum-free medium in which many lymphoblastoid cells and hybridoma could grow as well as in a conventional serum-containing medium.As is well-known, L-glutamine (L-Gln) is one of the most heat-labile but essential components for cell growth. As a substitute for L-Gln, dipeptide such as Gly-L-Gln or L-Ala-L-Gln, which was quite stable even after autoclaving, was found to be utilizable for mammalian cell growth. The L-Gln dipeptide-containing serum-free medium was quite stable in a solution even after storing at 37°C for 4 months. In the serum-free medium containing L-Ala-L-Gln, mouse hybridola could grow and produce more antibody than in RPMI 1640+10% FBS.It has been proved that BSA and transferrin, which are also heat-labile but essential for the growth of various cell lines, can be substituted by heat-stable alpha-cyclodextrin and cholesterol, and Fe-gluconate, respectively. Insulin has also proved to be heat stable in a solution of Fe-gluconate. We thus established a new serum-free medium, all the components of which could be heat-sterilizable.Moreover, by adding EGF and BSA but without the adhesion factor included in FBS, the serum-free medium was found to support a long-term serial culture of a human diploid fibroblast.Finally, with this auotoclavable serum-free medium in a perfusion culture apparatus, we were able to continuously cultivate a human lymphoblastoid cell line. The production rate of IgM was found to be markedly increased by feeding the serum-free medium enriched by glucose, bicarbonate, L-Cys, and approtinin. The cell density reached as high as 2×10(8)/ml in the serum-free medium. Although the working volume in the reactor was only 1 1, the rate of IgM production reached 480 mg/day.The new heat-sterilizable serum-free medium has several advantages, because L-Gln peptide is a heat-stable and available precursor of L-Gln.

  2. Development of a serum-free and heat-sterilizable medium and continuous high-density cell culture.

    PubMed

    Minamoto, Y; Ogawa, K; Abe, H; Iochi, Y; Mitsugi, K

    1991-01-01

    We tried to establish a new serum-free and heat-sterilizable medium, based on our serum-free medium in which many lymphoblastoid cells and hybridoma could grow as well as in a conventional serum-containing medium. As is well-known, L-glutamine (L-Gln) is one of the most heat-labile but essential components for cell growth. As a substitute for L-Gln, dipeptide such as Gly-L-Gln or L-Ala-L-Gln, which was quite stable even after autoclaving, was found to be utilizable for mammalian cell growth. The L-Gln dipeptide-containing serum-free medium was quite stable in a solution even after storing at 37 degrees C for 4 months. In the serum-free medium containing L-Ala-L-Gln, mouse hybridola could grow and produce more antibody than in RPMI 1640 + 10% FBS. It has been proved that BSA and transferrin, which are also heat-labile but essential for the growth of various cell lines, can be substituted by heat-stable alpha-cyclodextrin and cholesterol, and Fe-gluconate, respectively. Insulin has also proved to be heat stable in a solution of Fe-gluconate. We thus established a new serum-free medium, all the components of which could be heat-sterilizable. Moreover, by adding EGF and BSA but without the adhesion factor included in FBS, the serum-free medium was found to support a long-term serial culture of a human diploid fibroblast. Finally, with this auotoclavable serum-free medium in a perfusion culture apparatus, we were able to continuously cultivate a human lymphoblastoid cell line. The production rate of IgM was found to be markedly increased by feeding the serum-free medium enriched by glucose, bicarbonate, L-Cys, and approtinin. The cell density reached as high as 2 x 10(8)/ml in the serum-free medium. Although the working volume in the reactor was only 1 1, the rate of IgM production reached 480 mg/day. The new heat-sterilizable serum-free medium has several advantages, because L-Gln peptide is a heat-stable and available precursor of L-Gln.

  3. Prediction of PAH mutagenicity in human cells by QSAR classification.

    PubMed

    Papa, E; Pilutti, P; Gramatica, P

    2008-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous pollutants of high environmental concern. The experimental data of a mutagenicity test on human B-lymphoblastoid cells (alternative to the Ames bacterial test) for a set of 70 oxo-, nitro- and unsubstituted PAHs, detected in particulate matter (PM), were modelled by Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSAR) classification methods (k-NN, k-Nearest Neighbour, and CART, Classification and Regression Tree) based on different theoretical molecular descriptors selected by Genetic Algorithms. The best models were validated for predictivity both externally and internally. For external validation, Self Organizing Maps (SOM) were applied to split the original data set. The best models, developed on the training set alone, show good predictive performance also on the prediction set chemicals (sensitivity 69.2-87.1%, specificity 62.5-87.5%). The classification of PAHs according to their mutagenicity, based only on a few theoretical molecular descriptors, allows a preliminary assessment of the human health risk, and the prioritisation of these compounds.

  4. The IL-15R alpha chain signals through association with Syk in human B cells.

    PubMed

    Bulanova, E; Budagian, V; Pohl, T; Krause, H; Dürkop, H; Paus, R; Bulfone-Paus, S

    2001-12-01

    The alpha-chain of the IL-15R (IL-15Ralpha) serves as the specific, high-affinity receptor for IL-15. It is expressed by lymphoid and nonlymphoid cells, including B cell lymphoma lines. In this study, we have further explored IL-15Ralpha-mediated signaling in activated primary B cells and in Raji cells, a human B-lymphoblastoid cell line which expresses the IL-15Ralpha and IL-2Rgamma chains, but lacks the IL-2Rbeta chain. Stimulation of Raji cells with IL-15 induces their proliferation and rescues them from C2-ceramide-induced apoptosis. By immunoprecipitation and Western blotting, we show that treatment of Raji cells and activated primary B cells with IL-15 induces coprecipitation of Syk kinase with the IL-15Ralpha chain. Upon association, the activated Syk kinase phosphorylates the IL-15Ralpha chain as well as phospholipase Cgamma, which coprecipitates with Syk. Furthermore, transfection of Raji cells with stem-loop Syk antisense oligonucleotides prevents IL-15Ralpha and phospholipase Cgamma phosphorylation as well as the inhibition of apoptosis by IL-15. Mutation of a defined region of the intracellular signaling portion of IL-15Ralpha (Tyr227) abrogates both the IL-15Ralpha/Syk association and IL-15Ralpha phosphorylation. Taken together, this suggests that Syk kinase physically and functionally associates with the IL-15Ralpha chain in B cells and that Syk plays a key role in mediating IL-15-induced signal transduction, thus accounting for the distinct functional consequences of IL-15 vs IL-2 binding to B cells.

  5. Protective activity of C-geranylflavonoid analogs from Paulownia tomentosa against DNA damage in 137Cs irradiated AHH-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyung-In; Jeong, Min Ho; Jo, Wol Soon

    2014-09-01

    Radiotherapy is an important form of treatment for a wide range of cancers, but it can damage DNA and cause adverse effects. We investigated if the diplacone analogs of P. tomentosa were radio-protective in a human lymphoblastoid cell line (AHH-1). Four geranylated flavonoids, diplacone, 3'-O-methyl-5'-hydroxydiplacone, 3'-O-methyl-5'-O-methyldiplacone and 3'-O-methyldiplacol, were tested for their antioxidant and radio-protective effects. Diplacone analogs effectively scavenged free radicals and inhibited radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in vitro. They significantly decreased levels of reactive oxygen species and cellular DNA damage in 2 Gy-irradiated AHH-1 cells. Glutathione levels and superoxide dismutase activity in irradiated AHH-1 cells increased significantly after treatment with these analogs. The enhanced biological anti-oxidant activity and radioprotective activity of diplacone analogs maintained the survival of irradiated AHH-1 cells in a clonogenic assay. These data suggest that diplacone analogs may protect healthy tissue surrounding tumor cells during radiotherapy to ensure better control of radiotherapy and allow higher doses of radiotherapy to be employed.

  6. Comprehensive genomic analysis identifies SOX2 as a frequently amplified gene in small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rudin, Charles M; Durinck, Steffen; Stawiski, Eric W; Poirier, John T; Modrusan, Zora; Shames, David S; Bergbower, Emily A; Guan, Yinghui; Shin, James; Guillory, Joseph; Rivers, Celina Sanchez; Foo, Catherine K; Bhatt, Deepali; Stinson, Jeremy; Gnad, Florian; Haverty, Peter M; Gentleman, Robert; Chaudhuri, Subhra; Janakiraman, Vasantharajan; Jaiswal, Bijay S; Parikh, Chaitali; Yuan, Wenlin; Zhang, Zemin; Koeppen, Hartmut; Wu, Thomas D; Stern, Howard M; Yauch, Robert L; Huffman, Kenneth E; Paskulin, Diego D; Illei, Peter B; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Gazdar, Adi F; de Sauvage, Frederic J; Bourgon, Richard; Minna, John D; Brock, Malcolm V; Seshagiri, Somasekar

    2013-01-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an exceptionally aggressive disease with poor prognosis. Here, we obtained exome, transcriptome and copy-number alteration data from approximately 53 samples consisting of 36 primary human SCLC and normal tissue pairs and 17 matched SCLC and lymphoblastoid cell lines. We also obtained data for 4 primary tumors and 23 SCLC cell lines. We identified 22 significantly mutated genes in SCLC, including genes encoding kinases, G protein–coupled receptors and chromatin-modifying proteins. We found that several members of the SOX family of genes were mutated in SCLC. We also found SOX2 amplification in ~27% of the samples. Suppression of SOX2 using shRNAs blocked proliferation of SOX2-amplified SCLC lines. RNA sequencing identified multiple fusion transcripts and a recurrent RLF-MYCL1 fusion. Silencing of MYCL1 in SCLC cell lines that had the RLF-MYCL1 fusion decreased cell proliferation. These data provide an in-depth view of the spectrum of genomic alterations in SCLC and identify several potential targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:22941189

  7. Fatal cases of Theileria annulata infection in calves in Portugal associated with neoplastic-like lymphoid cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Orvalho, João; Leitão, Alexandre; Pereira, Isadora; Malta, Manuel; Mariano, Isabel; Carvalho, Tânia; Baptista, Rui; Shiels, Brian R.; Peleteiro, Maria C.

    2010-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate fifteen cases of acute lethal infection of calves (≤ 4 months of age) by the protozoan parasite Theileria (T.) annulata in the south of Portugal. Calves developed multifocal to coalescent nodular skin lesions, similar to multicentric malignant lymphoma. Infestation with ticks (genus Hyalomma) was intense. Theileria was seen in blood and lymph node smears, and T. annulata infection was confirmed by isolation of schizont-transformed cells and sequencing of hypervariable region 4 of the 18S rRNA gene. At necropsy, hemorrhagic nodules or nodules with a hemorrhagic halo were seen, particularly in the skin, subcutaneous tissue, skeletal and cardiac muscles, pharynx, trachea and intestinal serosa. Histologically, nodules were formed by large, round, lymphoblastoid neoplastic-like cells. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) identified these cells as mostly CD3 positive T lymphocytes and MAC387 positive macrophages. A marker for B lymphocytes (CD79αcy) labeled very few cells. T. annulata infected cells in these nodules were also identified by IHC through the use of two monoclonal antibodies (1C7 and 1C12) which are diagnostic for the parasite. It was concluded that the pathological changes observed in the different organs and tissues were caused by proliferation of schizont-infected macrophages, which subsequently stimulate a severe uncontrolled proliferation of uninfected T lymphocytes. PMID:20195062

  8. Comprehensive genomic analysis identifies SOX2 as a frequently amplified gene in small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Rudin, Charles M; Durinck, Steffen; Stawiski, Eric W; Poirier, John T; Modrusan, Zora; Shames, David S; Bergbower, Emily A; Guan, Yinghui; Shin, James; Guillory, Joseph; Rivers, Celina Sanchez; Foo, Catherine K; Bhatt, Deepali; Stinson, Jeremy; Gnad, Florian; Haverty, Peter M; Gentleman, Robert; Chaudhuri, Subhra; Janakiraman, Vasantharajan; Jaiswal, Bijay S; Parikh, Chaitali; Yuan, Wenlin; Zhang, Zemin; Koeppen, Hartmut; Wu, Thomas D; Stern, Howard M; Yauch, Robert L; Huffman, Kenneth E; Paskulin, Diego D; Illei, Peter B; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Gazdar, Adi F; de Sauvage, Frederic J; Bourgon, Richard; Minna, John D; Brock, Malcolm V; Seshagiri, Somasekar

    2012-10-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an exceptionally aggressive disease with poor prognosis. Here, we obtained exome, transcriptome and copy-number alteration data from approximately 53 samples consisting of 36 primary human SCLC and normal tissue pairs and 17 matched SCLC and lymphoblastoid cell lines. We also obtained data for 4 primary tumors and 23 SCLC cell lines. We identified 22 significantly mutated genes in SCLC, including genes encoding kinases, G protein-coupled receptors and chromatin-modifying proteins. We found that several members of the SOX family of genes were mutated in SCLC. We also found SOX2 amplification in ∼27% of the samples. Suppression of SOX2 using shRNAs blocked proliferation of SOX2-amplified SCLC lines. RNA sequencing identified multiple fusion transcripts and a recurrent RLF-MYCL1 fusion. Silencing of MYCL1 in SCLC cell lines that had the RLF-MYCL1 fusion decreased cell proliferation. These data provide an in-depth view of the spectrum of genomic alterations in SCLC and identify several potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

  9. Global methylation profiles in DNA from different blood cell types.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui-Chen; Delgado-Cruzata, Lissette; Flom, Julie D; Kappil, Maya; Ferris, Jennifer S; Liao, Yuyan; Santella, Regina M; Terry, Mary Beth

    2011-01-01

    DNA methylation measured in white blood cell DNA is increasingly being used as in studies of cancer susceptibility. However, little is known about the correlation between different assays to measure global methylation and whether the source of DNA matters when examining methylation profiles in different blood cell types. Using information from 620 women, 217 and 403 women with DNA available from granulocytes (Gran), and total white blood cells (WBC), respectively, and 48 women with DNA available from four different sources (WBC, Gran, mononuclear (MN), and lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL)), we compared DNA methylation for three repetitive elements (LINE1, Sat2, Alu) by MethyLight, luminometric methylation assay (LUMA), and [(3)H]-methyl acceptance assay. For four of the five assays, DNA methylation levels measured in Gran were not correlated with methylation in LBC, MN, or WBC; the exception was Sat2. DNA methylation in LCL was correlated with methylation in MN and WBC for the [(3)H]-methyl acceptance, LINE1, and Alu assays. Methylation in MN was correlated with methylation in WBC for the [(3)H]-methyl acceptance and LUMA assays. When we compared the five assays to each other by source of DNA, we observed statistically significant positive correlations ranging from 0.3-0.7 for each cell type with one exception (Sat2 and Alu in MN). Among the 620 women stratified by DNA source, correlations among assays were highest for the three repetitive elements (range 0.39-0.64). Results from the LUMA assay were modestly correlated with LINE1 (0.18-0.20). These results suggest that both assay and source of DNA are critical components in the interpretation of global DNA methylation patterns from WBC.

  10. The c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway is critical for cell transformation by the latent membrane protein 1 of Epstein-Barr virus

    SciTech Connect

    Kutz, Helmut; Reisbach, Gilbert; Schultheiss, Ute; Kieser, Arnd

    2008-02-20

    The latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) transforms cells activating signal transduction pathways such as NF-{kappa}B, PI3-kinase, or c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Here, we investigated the functional role of the LMP1-induced JNK pathway in cell transformation. Expression of a novel dominant-negative JNK1 allele caused a block of proliferation in LMP1-transformed Rat1 fibroblasts. The JNK-specific inhibitor SP600125 reproduced this effect in Rat1-LMP1 cells and efficiently interfered with proliferation of EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cells (LCLs). Inhibition of the LMP1-induced JNK pathway in LCLs caused the downregulation of c-Jun and Cdc2, the essential G2/M cell cycle kinase, which was accompanied by a cell cycle arrest of LCLs at G2/M phase transition. Moreover, SP600125 retarded tumor growth of LCLs in a xenograft model in SCID mice. Our data support a critical role of the LMP1-induced JNK pathway for proliferation of LMP1-transformed cells and characterize JNK as a potential target for intervention against EBV-induced malignancies.

  11. Ultraviolet-induced mutations in Cockayne syndrome cells are primarily caused by cyclobutane dimer photoproducts while repair of other photoproducts is normal

    SciTech Connect

    Parris, C.N.; Kraemer, K.H. )

    1993-08-01

    The authors compared the contribution to mutagenesis on Cockayne syndrome (CS) cells of the major class of UV photoproducts, the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer, to that of other DNA photoproducts by using the mutagenesis shuttle vector pZ189. Lymphoblastoid cell lines from the DNA repair-deficient disorders CS and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and a normal line were transfected with UV-treated pZ189. Cyclobutane dimers were selectively removed before transfection by photoreactivation (PR), leaving nondimer photoproducts intact. After UV exposure and replication in CS and XP cells, plasmid survival was abnormally elevated. After PR, plasmid survival increased and mutation frequency in CS cells decreased to normal levels but remained abnormal in XP cells. Sequence analysis of >200 mutant plasmids showed that with CS cells a major mutational hot spot was caused by unrepaired cyclobutane dimers. These data indicate that with both CS and XP cyclobutane dimers are major photoproducts generating reduced plasmid survival and increased mutation frequency. However, unlike XP, CS cells are proficient in repair of nondimer photoproducts. Since XP but not CS patients have a high frequency of UV-induced skin cancers, the data suggest that prevention of UV-induced skin cancers is associated with proficient repair of nondimer photoproducts. 38 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Withania somnifera Induces Cytotoxic and Cytostatic Effects on Human T Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Turrini, Eleonora; Calcabrini, Cinzia; Sestili, Piero; Catanzaro, Elena; de Gianni, Elena; Diaz, Anna Rita; Hrelia, Patrizia; Tacchini, Massimo; Guerrini, Alessandra; Canonico, Barbara; Papa, Stefano; Valdrè, Giovanni; Fimognari, Carmela

    2016-01-01

    Cancer chemotherapy is characterized by an elevated intrinsic toxicity and the development of drug resistance. Thus, there is a compelling need for new intervention strategies with an improved therapeutic profile. Immunogenic cell death (ICD) represents an innovative anticancer strategy where dying cancer cells release damage-associated molecular patterns promoting tumor-specific immune responses. The roots of Withania somnifera (W. somnifera) are used in the Indian traditional medicine for their anti-inflammatory, immunomodulating, neuroprotective, and anticancer activities. The present study is designed to explore the antileukemic activity of the dimethyl sulfoxide extract obtained from the roots of W. somnifera (WE). We studied its cytostatic and cytotoxic activity, its ability to induce ICD, and its genotoxic potential on a human T-lymphoblastoid cell line by using different flow cytometric assays. Our results show that WE has a significant cytotoxic and cytostatic potential, and induces ICD. Its proapoptotic mechanism involves intracellular Ca2+ accumulation and the generation of reactive oxygen species. In our experimental conditions, the extract possesses a genotoxic potential. Since the use of Withania is suggested in different contexts including anti-infertility and osteoarthritis care, its genotoxicity should be carefully considered for an accurate assessment of its risk–benefit profile. PMID:27187469

  13. Epstein–Barr virus–host cell interactions: an epigenetic dialog?

    PubMed Central

    Niller, Hans H.; Szenthe, Kalman; Minarovits, Janos

    2014-01-01

    Here, we wish to highlight the genetic exchange and epigenetic interactions between Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) and its host. EBV is associated with diverse lymphoid and epithelial malignancies. Their molecular pathogenesis is accompanied by epigenetic alterations which are distinct for each of them. While lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from B cells transformed by EBV in vitro are characterized by a massive demethylation and euchromatinization of the viral and cellular genomes, the primarily malignant lymphoid tumor Burkitt’s lymphoma and the epithelial tumors nasopharyngeal carcinoma and EBV-associated gastric carcinoma are characterized by hypermethylation of a multitude of cellular tumor suppressor gene loci and of the viral genomes. In some cases, the viral latency and oncoproteins including the latent membrane proteins LMP1 and LMP2A and several nuclear antigens affect the level of cellular DNA methyltransferases or interact with the histone modifying machinery. Specific molecular mechanisms of the epigenetic dialog between virus and host cell remain to be elucidated. PMID:25400657

  14. Epstein-Barr Virus oncoprotein super-enhancers control B cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hufeng; Schmidt, Stefanie CS; Jiang, Sizun; Willox, Bradford; Bernhardt, Katharina; Liang, Jun; Johannsen, Eric C; Kharchenko, Peter; Gewurz, Benjamin E; Kieff, Elliott; Zhao, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Super-enhancers are clusters of gene-regulatory sites bound by multiple transcription factors that govern cell transcription, development, phenotype, and oncogenesis. By examining Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), we identified four EBV oncoproteins and five EBV-activated NF-κB subunits co-occupying ~1800 enhancer sites. Of these, 187 had markedly higher and broader histone H3K27ac signals characteristic of super-enhancers, and were designated “EBV super-enhancers”. EBV super-enhancer-associated genes included the MYC and BCL2 oncogenes, enabling LCL proliferation and survival. EBV super-enhancers were enriched for B cell transcription factor motifs and had a high co-occupancy of the transcription factors STAT5 and NFAT. EBV super-enhancer-associated genes were more highly expressed than other LCL genes. Disrupting EBV super-enhancers by the bromodomain inhibitor, JQ1 or conditionally inactivating an EBV oncoprotein or NF-κB decreased MYC or BCL2 expression and arrested LCL growth. These findings provide insight into mechanisms of EBV-induced lymphoproliferation and identify potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:25639793

  15. Gene expression signatures but not cell cycle checkpoint functions distinguish AT carriers from normal individuals

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liwen; Simpson, Dennis A.; Innes, Cynthia L.; Chou, Jeff; Bushel, Pierre R.; Paules, Richard S.; Kaufmann, William K.

    2013-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) is a rare autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the ataxia telangiectasia-mutated gene (ATM). AT carriers with one mutant ATM allele are usually not severely affected although they carry an increased risk of developing cancer. There has not been an easy and reliable diagnostic method to identify AT carriers. Cell cycle checkpoint functions upon ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DNA damage and gene expression signatures were analyzed in the current study to test for differential responses in human lymphoblastoid cell lines with different ATM genotypes. While both dose- and time-dependent G1 and G2 checkpoint functions were highly attenuated in ATM−/− cell lines, these functions were preserved in ATM+/− cell lines equivalent to ATM+/+ cell lines. However, gene expression signatures at both baseline (consisting of 203 probes) and post-IR treatment (consisting of 126 probes) were able to distinguish ATM+/− cell lines from ATM+/+ and ATM−/− cell lines. Gene ontology (GO) and pathway analysis of the genes in the baseline signature indicate that ATM function-related categories, DNA metabolism, cell cycle, cell death control, and the p53 signaling pathway, were overrepresented. The same analyses of the genes in the IR-responsive signature revealed that biological categories including response to DNA damage stimulus, p53 signaling, and cell cycle pathways were overrepresented, which again confirmed involvement of ATM functions. The results indicate that AT carriers who have unaffected G1 and G2 checkpoint functions can be distinguished from normal individuals and AT patients by expression signatures of genes related to ATM functions. PMID:23943852

  16. Pre-stimulation of CD81 expression by resting B cells increases proliferation following EBV infection, but the overexpression of CD81 induces the apoptosis of EBV-transformed B cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Ga Bin; Kim, Daejin; Park, Sung Jae; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Ji Hyun; Kim, Yeong Seok; Park, Sae-Gwang; Choi, In-Hak; Yoon, Sung Ho; Lee, Youn Jae; Paeng, Sunghwa; Hur, Dae Young

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) E2 protein binds to CD81, which is a component of the B cell co-stimulatory complex. The E2-CD81 interaction leads to B cell proliferation, protein tyrosine phosphorylation and to the hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes. Epidemiological studies have reported a high prevalence of B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in HCV-positive patients, suggesting a potential association between HCV and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the genesis of B lymphocyte proliferative disorders. In the present study, in order to investigate the association between EBV and HCV in B cells, we created an in vitro EBV-induced B cell transformation model. CD81 was gradually overexpressed during transformation by EBV. B cells isolated from HCV-positive patients grew more rapidly and clumped together earlier than B cells isolated from healthy donors following EBV infection. Pre-stimulation of CD81 expressed by resting B cells with anti-CD81 monoclonal antibody (mAb) or HCV E2 accelerated the generation of lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) by EBV infection. These cells proliferated prominently through the early expression of interleukin-10 and intracellular latent membrane protein (LMP)-l. By contrast, the overexpression of CD81 on EBV-transformed B cells by anti-CD81 mAb or HCV E2 protein induced apoptosis through reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. These results suggest that the engagement of CD81 expressed by B cells has differential effects on B cell fate (proliferation or apoptosis) according to EBV infection and the expression level of CD81.

  17. Virus and Autoantigen-Specific CD4+ T Cells Are Key Effectors in a SCID Mouse Model of EBV-Associated Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Linnerbauer, Stefanie; Behrends, Uta; Adhikary, Dinesh; Witter, Klaus; Bornkamm, Georg W.; Mautner, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Polyclonal Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected B cell line (lymphoblastoid cell lines; LCL)-stimulated T-cell preparations have been successfully used to treat EBV-positive post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) in transplant recipients, but function and specificity of the CD4+ component are still poorly defined. Here, we assessed the tumor-protective potential of different CD4+ T-cell specificities in a PTLD-SCID mouse model. Injection of different virus-specific CD4+ T-cell clones showed that single specificities were capable of prolonging mouse survival and that the degree of tumor protection directly correlated with recognition of target cells in vitro. Surprisingly, some CD4+ T-cell clones promoted tumor development, suggesting that besides antigen recognition, still elusive functional differences exist among virus-specific T cells. Of several EBV-specific CD4+ T-cell clones tested, those directed against virion antigens proved most tumor-protective. However, enriching these specificities in LCL-stimulated preparations conferred no additional survival benefit. Instead, CD4+ T cells specific for unknown, probably self-antigens were identified as principal antitumoral effectors in LCL-stimulated T-cell lines. These results indicate that virion and still unidentified cellular antigens are crucial targets of the CD4+ T-cell response in this preclinical PTLD-model and that enriching the corresponding T-cell specificities in therapeutic preparations may enhance their clinical efficacy. Moreover, the expression in several EBV-negative B-cell lymphoma cell lines implies that these putative autoantigen(s) might also qualify as targets for T-cell-based immunotherapy of virus-negative B cell malignancies. PMID:24853673

  18. Maintenance of imprinting and nuclear architecture in cycling cells.

    PubMed

    Teller, Kathrin; Solovei, Irina; Buiting, Karin; Horsthemke, Bernhard; Cremer, Thomas

    2007-09-18

    Dynamic gene repositioning has emerged as an additional level of epigenetic gene regulation. An early example was the report of a transient, spatial convergence (< or =2 microm) of oppositely imprinted regions ("kissing"), including the Angelman syndrome/Prader-Willi syndrome (AS/PWS) locus and the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome locus in human lymphocytes during late S phase. It was argued that kissing is required for maintaining opposite imprints in cycling cells. Employing 3D-FISH with a BAC contig covering the AS/PWS region, light optical, serial sectioning, and quantitative 3D-image analysis, we observed that both loci always retained a compact structure and did not form giant loops. Three-dimensional distances measured among various, homologous AS/PWS segments in 393 human lymphocytes, 132 human fibroblasts, and 129 lymphoblastoid cells from Gorilla gorilla revealed a wide range of distances at any stage of interphase and in G(0). At late S phase, 4% of nuclei showed distances < or =2 microm, 49% showed distances >6 microm, and 18% even showed distances >8 microm. A similar distance variability was found for Homo sapiens (HSA) 15 centromeres in a PWS patient with a deletion of the maternal AS/PWS locus and for the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome loci in human lymphocytes. A transient kiss during late S phase between loci widely separated at other stages of the cell cycle seems incompatible with known global constraints of chromatin movements in cycling cells. Further experiments suggest that the previously observed convergence of AS/PWS loci during late S phase was most likely a side effect of the convergence of nucleolus organizer region-bearing acrocentric human chromosomes, including HSA 15.

  19. Deciphering the plasma membrane hallmarks of apoptotic cells: Phosphatidylserine transverse redistribution and calcium entry

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, M Carmen; Freyssinet, Jean-Marie

    2001-01-01

    Background During apoptosis, Ca2+-dependent events participate in the regulation of intracellular and morphological changes including phosphatidylserine exposure in the exoplasmic leaflet of the cell plasma membrane. The occurrence of phosphatidylserine at the surface of specialized cells, such as platelets, is also essential for the assembly of the enzyme complexes of the blood coagulation cascade, as demonstrated by hemorrhages in Scott syndrome, an extremely rare genetic deficiency of phosphatidylserine externalization, without other apparent pathophysiologic consequences. We have recently reported a reduced capacitative Ca2+ entry in Scott cells which may be part of the Scott phenotype. Results Taking advantage of these mutant lymphoblastoid B cells, we have studied the relationship between this mode of Ca2+ entry and phosphatidylserine redistribution during apoptosis. Ca2+ ionophore induced apoptosis in Scott but not in control cells. However, inhibition of store-operated Ca2+ channels led to caspase-independent DNA fragmentation and decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential in both control and Scott cells. Inhibition of cytochrome P450 also reduced capacitative Ca2+ entry and induced apoptosis at comparable extents in control and Scott cells. During the apoptotic process, both control and more markedly Scott cells externalized phosphatidylserine, but in the latter, this membrane feature was however dissociated from several other intracellular changes. Conclusions The present results suggest that different mechanisms account for phosphatidylserine transmembrane migration in cells undergoing stimulation and programmed death. These observations testify to the plasticity of the plasma membrane remodeling process, allowing normal apoptosis even when less fundamental functions are defective. PMID:11701087

  20. Dynamic Epstein-Barr virus gene expression on the path to B-cell transformation.

    PubMed

    Price, Alexander M; Luftig, Micah A

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an oncogenic human herpesvirus in the γ-herpesvirinae subfamily that contains a 170-180kb double-stranded DNA genome. In vivo, EBV commonly infects B and epithelial cells and persists for the life of the host in a latent state in the memory B-cell compartment of the peripheral blood. EBV can be reactivated from its latent state, leading to increased expression of lytic genes that primarily encode for enzymes necessary to replicate the viral genome and structural components of the virion. Lytic cycle proteins also aid in immune evasion, inhibition of apoptosis, and the modulation of other host responses to infection. In vitro, EBV has the potential to infect primary human B cells and induce cellular proliferation to yield effectively immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines, or LCLs. EBV immortalization of B cells in vitro serves as a model system for studying EBV-mediated lymphomagenesis. While much is known about the steady-state viral gene expression within EBV-immortalized LCLs and other EBV-positive cell lines, relatively little is known about the early events after primary B-cell infection. It was previously thought that upon latent infection, EBV only expressed the well-characterized latency-associated transcripts found in LCLs. However, recent work has characterized the early, but transient, expression of lytic genes necessary for efficient transformation and delayed responses in the known latency genes. This chapter summarizes these recent findings that show how dynamic and controlled expression of multiple EBV genes can control the activation of B cells, entry into the cell cycle, the inhibition of apoptosis, and innate and adaptive immune responses.

  1. Therapeutic doses of irradiation activate viral transcription and induce apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells.

    PubMed

    Iordanskiy, Sergey; Van Duyne, Rachel; Sampey, Gavin C; Woodson, Caitlin M; Fry, Kelsi; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao; Romerio, Fabio; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2015-11-01

    The highly active antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV-1 RNA in plasma to undetectable levels. However, the virus continues to persist in the long-lived resting CD4(+) T cells, macrophages and astrocytes which form a viral reservoir in infected individuals. Reactivation of viral transcription is critical since the host immune response in combination with antiretroviral therapy may eradicate the virus. Using the chronically HIV-1 infected T lymphoblastoid and monocytic cell lines, primary quiescent CD4(+) T cells and humanized mice infected with dual-tropic HIV-1 89.6, we examined the effect of various X-ray irradiation (IR) doses (used for HIV-related lymphoma treatment and lower doses) on HIV-1 transcription and viability of infected cells. Treatment of both T cells and monocytes with IR, a well-defined stress signal, led to increase of HIV-1 transcription, as evidenced by the presence of RNA polymerase II and reduction of HDAC1 and methyl transferase SUV39H1 on the HIV-1 promoter. This correlated with the increased GFP signal and elevated level of intracellular HIV-1 RNA in the IR-treated quiescent CD4(+) T cells infected with GFP-encoding HIV-1. Exposition of latently HIV-1infected monocytes treated with PKC agonist bryostatin 1 to IR enhanced transcription activation effect of this latency-reversing agent. Increased HIV-1 replication after IR correlated with higher cell death: the level of phosphorylated Ser46 in p53, responsible for apoptosis induction, was markedly higher in the HIV-1 infected cells following IR treatment. Exposure of HIV-1 infected humanized mice with undetectable viral RNA level to IR resulted in a significant increase of HIV-1 RNA in plasma, lung and brain tissues. Collectively, these data point to the use of low to moderate dose of IR alone or in combination with HIV-1 transcription activators as a potential application for the "Shock and Kill" strategy for latently HIV-1 infected cells.

  2. Folate metabolite profiling of different cell types and embryos suggests variation in folate one-carbon metabolism, including developmental changes in human embryonic brain.

    PubMed

    Leung, Kit-Yi; De Castro, Sandra C P; Cabreiro, Filipe; Gustavsson, Peter; Copp, Andrew J; Greene, Nicholas D E

    2013-06-01

    Folates act as co-factors for transfer of one-carbon units for nucleotide production, methylation and other biosynthetic reactions. Comprehensive profiling of multiple folates can be achieved using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, enabling determination of their relative abundance that may provide an indication of metabolic differences between cell types. For example, cell lines exposed to methotrexate showed a dose-dependent elevation of dihydrofolate, consistent with inhibition of dihydrofolate reductase. We analysed the folate profile of E. coli sub-types as well as cell lines and embryonic tissue from both human and mouse. The folate profile of bacteria differed markedly from those of all the mammalian samples, most notably in the greater abundance of formyl tetrahydrofolate. The overall profiles of mouse and human fibroblasts and mid-gestation mouse embryos were broadly similar, with specific differences. The major folate species in these cell types was 5-methyl tetrahydrofolate, in contrast to lymphoblastoid cell lines in which the predominant form was tetrahydrofolate. Analysis of embryonic human brain revealed a shift in folate profile with increasing developmental stage, with a decline in relative abundance of dihydrofolate and increase in 5-methyl tetrahydrofolate. These cell type-specific and developmental changes in folate profile may indicate differential requirements for the various outputs of folate metabolism.

  3. Multiple Sclerosis Risk Allele in CLEC16A Acts as an Expression Quantitative Trait Locus for CLEC16A and SOCS1 in CD4+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Leikfoss, Ingvild S; Keshari, Pankaj K; Gustavsen, Marte W; Bjølgerud, Anja; Brorson, Ina S; Celius, Elisabeth G; Spurkland, Anne; Bos, Steffan D; Harbo, Hanne F; Berge, Tone

    2015-01-01

    For multiple sclerosis, genome wide association studies and follow up studies have identified susceptibility single nucleotide polymorphisms located in or near CLEC16A at chromosome 16p13.13, encompassing among others CIITA, DEXI and SOCS1 in addition to CLEC16A. These genetic variants are located in intronic or intergenic regions and display strong linkage disequilibrium with each other, complicating the understanding of their functional contribution and the identification of the direct causal variant(s). Previous studies have shown that multiple sclerosis-associated risk variants in CLEC16A act as expression quantitative trait loci for CLEC16A itself in human pancreatic β-cells, for DEXI and SOCS1 in thymic tissue samples, and for DEXI in monocytes and lymphoblastoid cell lines. Since T cells are major players in multiple sclerosis pathogenesis, we have performed expression analyses of the CIITA-DEXI-CLEC16A-SOCS1 gene cluster in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells isolated from multiple sclerosis patients and healthy controls. We observed a higher expression of SOCS1 and CLEC16A in CD4+ T cells in samples homozygous for the risk allele of CLEC16A rs12927355. Pair-wise linear regression analysis revealed high correlation in gene expression in peripheral T cells of CIITA, DEXI, CLEC16A and SOCS1. Our data imply a possible regulatory role for the multiple sclerosis-associated rs12927355 in CLEC16A.

  4. Characterization of an adenosine deaminase-deficient human histiocytic lymphoma cell line (DHL-9) and selection of mutants deficient in adenosir kinase and deoxycytidine kinase.

    PubMed

    Kubota, M; Kamatani, N; Daddona, P E; Carson, D A

    1983-06-01

    The association of adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency with immunodeficiency disease has emphasized the importance of this purine metabolic enzyme for human lymphocyte growth and function. This report describes the natural occurrence of ADA deficiency in a human histiocytic lymphoma cell line, DHL-9. The minimal ADA activity in DHL-9 extracts, 0.028 nmol/min/mg protein, was less than 50% of the activity in two B-lymphoblastoid cell lines from ADA-deficient patients and was resistant to the potent ADA inhibitor deoxycoformycin. A sensitive radioimmunoassay failed to detect immunoreactive ADA in DHL-9 cells. Moreover, in DHL-9 cells, deoxycoformycin did not augment either the growth-inhibitory effects of adenosine and deoxyadenosine or the accumulation of deoxyadenosine triphosphate from deoxyadenosine. When compared to six other human hematopoietic cell lines, DHL-9 had 5.6-fold-higher levels of adenosylhomocysteinase. Chromosome 20, which bears the structural gene for ADA and adenosylhomocysteinase, was diploid and had a normal Giemsa banding pattern. The parental DHL-9 cell line was used for the selection and cloning of secondary mutants deficient in deoxycytidine kinase and adenosine kinase.

  5. Effects of Citrus aurantifolia concentrated extract on the spontaneous proliferation of MDA-MB-453 and RPMI-8866 tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Gharagozloo, M; Doroudchi, M; Ghaderi, A

    2002-07-01

    The in vitro effects of concentrated lime juice (CLJ) extract on the spontaneous proliferation of a human breast carcinoma cell line (MDA-MB-453) and a human lymphoblastoid B cell line (RPMI-8866) were investigated. CLJ extract was prepared by freeze-drying fresh fruit juice and dialyzing the concentrated extract against phosphate buffered saline in order to deplete low molecular weight micronutrients such as flavonoids as well as adjusting the pH of the extract to the physiological range. The effects of different concentrations of the CLJ extract on the spontaneous proliferative responses of the cell lines were determined by 3H-thymidine incorporation after 24 hrs of incubation. CLJ extract had no significant effect on MDA-MB-453 cell line, however, using the concentrations of 125, 250, and 500 microg/ml of CLJ extract a significant inhibition of the spontaneous proliferation of RPMI-8866 cell line was detected (P < 0.05). Due to the protein nature of the biologically active macromolecules of the CLJ extract (Gharagozloo and Ghaderi, 2001), it is reasonable to assume that the protein components of the CLJ extract may have anti-proliferative effects on tumor cell lines.

  6. SB subregion of the human major histocompatibility complex: gene organization, allelic polymorphism and expression in transformed cells.

    PubMed

    Okada, K; Prentice, H L; Boss, J M; Levy, D J; Kappes, D; Spies, T; Raghupathy, R; Mengler, R A; Auffray, C; Strominger, J L

    1985-03-01

    The SB region of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) has been cloned from cosmid and lambda phage libraries made from the human B-lymphoblastoid cell line Priess (DR4/4, DC4/4, SB3/4). Two alpha genes and two beta genes are encoded in the 100 kb long SB region in the order SB alpha-SB beta-SX alpha-SX beta. The SB alpha and SB beta genes encode the alpha and beta subunits of the SB subset of class II MHC molecules. Both the SX alpha and the SX beta genes are pseudogenes in the haplotype examined. From the isolated clones, the two haplotypes of the Priess cell line, SB3 and SB4, are distinguished by nucleotide sequencing and blot hybridization analyses. Restriction site polymorphisms between the SB3 and SB4 clones were observed only in relatively small regions of the SB beta and SX beta genes. A mouse macrophage cell line was transfected with one of the cosmid clones containing both SB alpha and SB beta genes. Expression of the alpha and beta genes was detected by fluorescene-activated cell sorting (FACS) and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis using SB-specific monoclonal antibodies.

  7. DNA Electrophoretic Migration Patterns Change after Exposure of Jurkat Cells to a Single Intense Nanosecond Electric Pulse

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Stefania; Zeni, Luigi; Sarti, Maurizio; Sannino, Anna; Scarfì, Maria Rosaria; Vernier, P. Thomas; Zeni, Olga

    2011-01-01

    Intense nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) interact with cellular membranes and intracellular structures. Investigating how cells respond to nanosecond pulses is essential for a) development of biomedical applications of nsPEFs, including cancer therapy, and b) better understanding of the mechanisms underlying such bioelectrical effects. In this work, we explored relatively mild exposure conditions to provide insight into weak, reversible effects, laying a foundation for a better understanding of the interaction mechanisms and kinetics underlying nsPEF bio-effects. In particular, we report changes in the nucleus of Jurkat cells (human lymphoblastoid T cells) exposed to single pulses of 60 ns duration and 1.0, 1.5 and 2.5 MV/m amplitudes, which do not affect cell growth and viability. A dose-dependent reduction in alkaline comet-assayed DNA migration is observed immediately after nsPEF exposure, accompanied by permeabilization of the plasma membrane (YO-PRO-1 uptake). Comet assay profiles return to normal within 60 minutes after pulse delivery at the highest pulse amplitude tested, indicating that our exposure protocol affects the nucleus, modifying DNA electrophoretic migration patterns. PMID:22164287

  8. Binding of /sup 125/I-labeled recombinant beta interferon (IFN-beta Ser17) to human cells

    SciTech Connect

    O'Rourke, E.C.; Drummond, R.J.; Creasey, A.A.

    1984-12-01

    The authors investigated the binding of /sup 125/I-labeled beta interferon (IFN-beta Ser17), a nonglycosylated recombinant human fibroblast interferon in which cysteine at position 17 is replaced by serine by site-specific mutagenesis. An optimized chloramine T radiolabeling method produced a highly labeled, fully active /sup 125/I-IFN suitable for these studies. Unlike the case with the chloramine T method, incorporation of a single mole of Bolton-Hunter reagent into a mole of IFN-beta Ser17 led to nearly complete loss of biological activity. /sup 125/I-IFN-beta Ser17, prepared by the chloramine T method, bound specifically to human lymphoblastoid cells (Daudi) with a dissociation constant of 0.24 nM. The number of binding sites per cell was 4,000. In competition assays, unlabeled beta interferons (native, recombinant IFN-beta Cys17, and various preparations of IFN-beta Ser17) equally displaced labeled IFN-beta Ser17 on Daudi cells. Recombinant IFN-alpha-1 displaced /sup 125/I-IFN-beta binding to Daudi cells less efficiently than did unlabeled native or recombinant beta interferon. However, at the concentrations tested, native gamma interferon showed no competition with /sup 125/I-IFN. The results indicate that IFN-beta Ser17 and native IFN-beta posses similar binding properties.

  9. Proteoglycan expression correlates with the phenotype of malignant and non-malignant EBV-positive B-cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Tsidulko, Alexandra Y.; Matskova, Liudmila; Astakhova, Lidiia A.; Ernberg, Ingemar; Grigorieva, Elvira V.

    2015-01-01

    The involvement of proteoglycans (PGs) in EBV-host interactions and lymphomagenesis remains poorly investigated. In this study, expression of major proteoglycans (syndecan-1, glypican-1, perlecan, versican, brevican, aggrecan, NG2, serglycin, decorin, biglycan, lumican, CD44), heparan sulphate (HS) metabolic system (EXT1/2, NDST1/2, GLCE, HS2ST1, HS3ST1/2, HS6ST1/2, SULF1/2, HPSE) and extracellular matrix (ECM) components (collagen 1A1, fibronectin, elastin) in primary B cells and EBV carrying cell lines with different phenotypes, patterns of EBV-host cell interaction and viral latency stages (type I-III) was investigated. Primary B cells expressed a wide repertoire of PGs (dominated by serglycin and CD44) and ECM components. Lymphoblastoid EBV+ B cell lines (LCLs) showed specific PG expression with down-regulation of CD44 and ECM components and up-regulation of serglycin and perlecan/HSPG2. For Burkitt's lymphoma cells (BL), serglycin was down-regulated in BL type III cells and perlecan in type I BL cells. The biosynthetic machinery for HS was active in all cell lines, with some tendency to be down-regulated in BL cells. 5′-aza-dC and/or Trichostatin A resulted in transcriptional upregulation of the genes, suggesting that low expression of ECM components, proteoglycan core proteins and HS biosynthetic system is due to epigenetic suppression in type I cells. Taken together, our data show that proteoglycans are expressed in primary B lymphocytes whereas they are not or only partly expressed in EBV-carrying cell lines, depending on their latency type program. PMID:26527314

  10. Recognition of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected cells by T cell colonies from a human chimera: restriction by allogeneic determinants.

    PubMed Central

    Plotnicky, H; Touraine, J L

    1993-01-01

    The anti-EBV T cell response was studied in a severe combined immunodeficiency patient (PS) who received two transplants of fetal liver cells. His peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were incubated with EBV and cultured during 15 days. Eleven colonies were derived from the T lymphocytes causing the regression of the infected cell foci: nine were constituted with CD3+ CD4+ CD8- lymphocytes and two with CD3+ CD4- CD8+ cells. HLA typing of six colonies showed that two of them derived from the first transplant and four from the second one. The colonies killed the cells of the lymphoblastoid line (LCL) derived from the recipient (PS-LCL), but failed to kill the LCL matched with the transplants. With only one exception, they all lysed also the LCL derived from the mother or from the father, but they were ineffective on the EBV-negative lymphoblasts. Two colonies recognized determinants which did not appear to be HLA antigens, although they were shared by PS and by one of his parents, two (CD4- CD8+) reacted against the LCL which shared HLA-A3 or -A33 with PS-LCL, and four (CD4+ CD8-) lysed the LCL sharing HLA-A3, -A33 or -DR5 with PS-LCL, among which only one was demonstrated to interact directly with host HLA-class I determinants. These data indicate that T lymphocytes differentiating in contact with histo-incompatible determinants may express the capability to recognize viral antigens and to lyse virus-infected cells in the context of allogeneic MHC or non-MHC molecules. PMID:7504600

  11. CD8+ T-cell clones specific for the 5T4 antigen target renal cell carcinoma tumor-initiating cells in a murine xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Tykodi, Scott S; Satoh, Shoko; Deming, Janise D; Chou, Jeffrey; Harrop, Richard; Warren, Edus H

    2012-09-01

    The tumor antigen 5T4 is frequently expressed at high levels on renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and other epithelial carcinomas. Surveys of normal tissues demonstrate abundant 5T4 expression on placental trophoblast cells with limited expression elsewhere. 5T4 is the target for a therapeutic cancer vaccine (MVA-5T4) that elicits 5T4-specific serological, proliferative, and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses. However, the antitumor activity of 5T4-specific CTL has not been extensively characterized. CD8 T cells from HLA-A2 healthy donors (n=4) or RCC patients (n=2) were stimulated in vitro with the HLA-A2-binding nonamer peptides 5T417-25 or 5T497-105 and screened by flow cytometry with specific tetramers (TET). CD8/TET T-cell clones specific for 5T417-25 or 5T497-105 peptide were isolated from 4/6 and 1/4 donors, respectively. A subset of clones specific for 5T417-25 was cytolytic for MVA-5T4-infected HLA-A2 EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell line target cells and for constitutively HLA-A2-expressing and 5T4-expressing RCC tumor cell lines (including A498 RCC). In a xenoengraftment assay, the coinoculation of a representative 5T417-25-specific CTL clone with A498 RCC tumors cells into immune-deficient mice completely prevented growth of A498 tumors. Taken together, these data demonstrate high-avidity CD8 CTL able to recognize the naturally processed 5T417-25 epitope on RCC tumor cells including putative tumor-initiating cells are present in peripheral blood of both healthy donors and RCC patients. CD8T-cell immunity targeting 5T417-25 is therefore of substantial interest both as a potential target for further development of vaccination or adoptive cellular immunotherapy and for immune monitoring studies in association with nonspecific immunotherapies.

  12. Involvement of recombination in x-ray mutagenesis of human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Amundson, S.A.; Xia, F.; Liber, H.L.

    1993-06-01

    Closely related human lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from WI-L2 differ greatly in their responses to X-irradiation. Compared with TK6 (ATCC CRL 8015), WI-L2-NS (ATCC CRL 8155) has an enhanced X-ray survival. The induction of mutation by X-rays is also markedly different. The hemizygous hprt locus is slightly more mutable in WI-L2-NS than in TK6, and the dose response fits best to a linear-quadratic curve rather than the linear fit of TK6X-ray induced mutation at the autosomal tk locus in heterozygotes derived from WI-L2-NS is 20-50 fold higher than in heterozygotes derived from TK6. A larger proportion of WI-L2-NS mutants had lost heterozygosity compared with mutants of TK6. , Fluorescence in situ hybridization indicated that loss of heterozygosity was due almost uniformly to deletion of an allele in mutants of TK6, and to recombination or gene conversion in mutants of WI-L2-NS. These results indicate that recombinational repair contributes to both cell survival and mutation following exposure to ionizing radiation.

  13. Involvement of recombination in x-ray mutagenesis of human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Amundson, S.A. ); Xia, F.; Liber, H.L. )

    1993-01-01

    Closely related human lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from WI-L2 differ greatly in their responses to X-irradiation. Compared with TK6 (ATCC CRL 8015), WI-L2-NS (ATCC CRL 8155) has an enhanced X-ray survival. The induction of mutation by X-rays is also markedly different. The hemizygous hprt locus is slightly more mutable in WI-L2-NS than in TK6, and the dose response fits best to a linear-quadratic curve rather than the linear fit of TK6X-ray induced mutation at the autosomal tk locus in heterozygotes derived from WI-L2-NS is 20-50 fold higher than in heterozygotes derived from TK6. A larger proportion of WI-L2-NS mutants had lost heterozygosity compared with mutants of TK6. , Fluorescence in situ hybridization indicated that loss of heterozygosity was due almost uniformly to deletion of an allele in mutants of TK6, and to recombination or gene conversion in mutants of WI-L2-NS. These results indicate that recombinational repair contributes to both cell survival and mutation following exposure to ionizing radiation.

  14. A cytoplasmic activator of DNA replication is involved in signal transduction in antigen-specific T cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wong, R L; Clark, R B; Gutowski, J K; Katz, M E; Fresa, K L; Cohen, S

    1990-05-01

    Cytoplasmic extracts prepared from T cell lines undergoing antigen-specific, interleukin-2 (IL-2)-dependent proliferation were tested for their ability to induce DNA synthesis in isolated, quiescent nuclei. A tetanus toxoid (TET)-specific T cell line, established from peripheral blood of a normal human volunteer, was stimulated in the presence of relevant antigen and 1 unit/ml IL-2. Cytoplasmic extracts prepared from these cells were capable of inducing DNA synthesis in isolated, quiescent nuclei. The ability of cytoplasmic extracts to induce DNA synthesis in isolated, quiescent nuclei. The ability of cytoplasmic extracts to induce DNA synthesis in isolated nuclei correlated positively with the degree of proliferation induced in these cells. In contrast, incubation of this T cell line in the absence of antigen failed to induce proliferation and cytoplasmic extracts prepared from these cells induced little to no DNA synthesis in isolated, quiescent nuclei. The factor present in the cytoplasm of T cells stimulated with relevant antigen in the presence of IL-2 is similar, if not identical, to a factor which we have previously demonstrated in cytoplasmic extracts prepared from transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines and from mitogenically stimulated normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. This factor, which we have called activator of DNA replication (ADR) is a heat-labile protein, and is inactivated by treatment with protease inhibitors, including aprotinin. The ability of cytoplasmic extracts from T cells undergoing antigen-specific, IL-2-dependent proliferation to induce DNA synthesis in isolated, quiescent nuclei was markedly inhibited in the presence of aprotinin, providing strong evidence that a cytoplasmic activator of DNA replication, ADR, is involved in the signal transduction process for antigen-specific, IL-2-dependent T cell proliferation. ADR may represent a common intracellular mediator of DNA synthesis in activated and transformed lymphocytes.

  15. Polyphenolic Profile and Targeted Bioactivity of Methanolic Extracts from Mediterranean Ethnomedicinal Plants on Human Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Pollio, Antonino; Zarrelli, Armando; Romanucci, Valeria; Di Mauro, Alfredo; Barra, Federica; Pinto, Gabriele; Crescenzi, Elvira; Roscetto, Emanuela; Palumbo, Giuseppe

    2016-03-23

    The methanol extracts of the aerial part of four ethnomedicinal plants of Mediterranean region, two non-seed vascular plants, Equisetum hyemale L. and Phyllitis scolopendrium (L.) Newman, and two Spermatophyta, Juniperus communis L. (J. communis) and Cotinus coggygria Scop. (C. coggygria), were screened against four human cells lines (A549, MCF7, TK6 and U937). Only the extracts of J. communis and C. coggygria showed marked cytotoxic effects, affecting both cell morphology and growth. A dose-dependent effect of these two extracts was also observed on the cell cycle distribution. Incubation of all the cell lines in a medium containing J. communis extract determined a remarkable accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase, whereas the C. coggygria extract induced a significant increase in the percentage of G1 cells. The novelty of our findings stands on the observation that the two extracts, consistently, elicited coherent effects on the cell cycle in four cell lines, independently from their phenotype, as two of them have epithelial origin and grow adherent and two are lymphoblastoid and grow in suspension. Even the expression profiles of several proteins regulating cell cycle progression and cell death were affected by both extracts. LC-MS investigation of methanol extract of C. coggygria led to the identification of twelve flavonoids (compounds 1-11, 19) and eight polyphenols derivatives (12-18, 20), while in J. communis extract, eight flavonoids (21-28), a α-ionone glycoside (29) and a lignin (30) were found. Although many of these compounds have interesting individual biological activities, their natural blends seem to exert specific effects on the proliferation of cell lines either growing adherent or in suspension, suggesting potential use in fighting cancer.

  16. Human endothelial cells enhance human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication in CD4+ T cells in a Nef-dependent manner in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaehyuk; Walker, Jason; Boichuk, Sergei; Kirkiles-Smith, Nancy; Torpey, Nicholas; Pober, Jordan S; Alexander, Louis

    2005-01-01

    Infected CD4+ T cells are the primary sites of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in vivo. However, signals from professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs), such as dendritic cells and macrophages, greatly enhance HIV-1 replication in T cells. Here, we report that in cocultures, vascular endothelial cells (ECs), which in humans can also serve as APCs, can enhance HIV-1 production of both CCR5- and CXCR4-utilizing strains approximately 50,000-fold. The observed HIV-1 replication enhancement conferred by ECs occurred only in memory CD4+ T cells, required expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) molecules by the ECs, and could not be conferred by fixed ECs, all of which are consistent with a requirement for EC-mediated T-cell activation via T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling. Deletion of nef (Nef-) decreased HIV-1 production by approximately 100-fold in T cells cocultured with ECs but had no effect on virus production in T cells cocultured with professional APCs or fibroblasts induced to express MHC-II. Human ECs do not express B7 costimulators, but Nef- replication in CD4(+)-T-cell and EC cocultures could not be rescued by anti-CD28 antibody. ECs act in trans to enhance wild-type but not Nef- replication and facilitate enhanced wild-type replication in naive T cells when added to T-cell or B-lymphoblastoid cell cocultures, suggesting that ECs also provide a TCR-independent signal to infected T cells. Consistent with these in vitro observations, wild-type HIV-1 replicated 30- to 50-fold more than Nef- in human T cells infiltrating allogeneic human skin grafts on human huPBL-SCID/bg mice, an in vivo model of T-cell activation by ECs. Our studies suggest that ECs, which line the entire cardiovascular system and are, per force, in frequent contact with memory CD4+ T cells, provide signals to HIV-1-infected CD4+ T cells to greatly enhance HIV-1 production in a Nef-dependent manner, a mechanism that could contribute to the

  17. Tracking the processing of damaged DNA double-strand break ends by ligation-mediated PCR: increased persistence of 3'-phosphoglycolate termini in SCAN1 cells.

    PubMed

    Akopiants, Konstantin; Mohapatra, Susovan; Menon, Vijay; Zhou, Tong; Valerie, Kristoffer; Povirk, Lawrence F

    2014-03-01

    To track the processing of damaged DNA double-strand break (DSB) ends in vivo, a method was devised for quantitative measurement of 3'-phosphoglycolate (PG) termini on DSBs induced by the non-protein chromophore of neocarzinostatin (NCS-C) in the human Alu repeat. Following exposure of cells to NCS-C, DNA was isolated, and labile lesions were chemically stabilized. All 3'-phosphate and 3'-hydroxyl ends were enzymatically capped with dideoxy termini, whereas 3'-PG ends were rendered ligatable, linked to an anchor, and quantified by real-time Taqman polymerase chain reaction. Using this assay and variations thereof, 3'-PG and 3'-phosphate termini on 1-base 3' overhangs of NCS-C-induced DSBs were readily detected in DNA from the treated lymphoblastoid cells, and both were largely eliminated from cellular DNA within 1 h. However, the 3'-PG termini were processed more slowly than 3'-phosphate termini, and were more persistent in tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1-mutant SCAN1 than in normal cells, suggesting a significant role for tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 in removing 3'-PG blocking groups for DSB repair. DSBs with 3'-hydroxyl termini, which are not directly induced by NCS-C, were formed rapidly in cells, and largely eliminated by further processing within 1 h, both in Alu repeats and in heterochromatic α-satellite DNA. Moreover, absence of DNA-PK in M059J cells appeared to accelerate resolution of 3'-PG ends.

  18. Rare Circulating Cells in Familial Waldenström Macroglobulinemia Displaying the MYD88 L265P Mutation Are Enriched by Epstein-Barr Virus Immortalization

    PubMed Central

    Pertesi, Maroulio; Galia, Perrine; Nazaret, Nicolas; Vallée, Maxime; Garderet, Laurent; Leleu, Xavier; Avet-Loiseau, Hervé; Foll, Matthieu; Byrnes, Graham; Lachuer, Joel; McKay, James D.; Dumontet, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The MYD88 L265P is a recurrent somatic mutation in neoplastic cells from patients with Waldenström Macroglobulinemia (WM). We identified the MYD88 L265P mutation in three individuals from unrelated families, but its presence did not explain the disease segregation within these WM pedigrees. We observed the mutation in these three individuals at high allele fractions in DNA extracted from EBV-immortalized Lymphoblastoid cell lines established from peripheral blood (LCL), but at much lower allele fractions in DNA extracted directly from peripheral blood, suggesting that this mutation is present in a clonal cell subpopulation rather than of germ-line origin. Furthermore, we observed that the MYD88 L265P mutation is enriched in WM families, detected in 40.5% of patients with familial WM or MGUS (10/22 WM, 5/15 MGUS), compared to 3.5% of patients with familial MM or MGUS (0/72 MM, 4/41 MGUS) (p = 10−7). The mutant allele frequency increased with passages in vitro after immortalization with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) consistent with the MYD88 L265P described gain-of-function proposed for this mutation. The MYD88 L265P mutation appears to be frequently present in circulating cells in patients with WM, and MGUS, and these cells are amenable to immortalization by EBV. PMID:26352266

  19. Autocrine CCL3 and CCL4 Induced by the Oncoprotein LMP1 Promote Epstein-Barr Virus-Triggered B Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shu-Chun; Lin, Sue-Jane; Lin, Cheau-Jye; Chou, Ya-Ching; Lin, Jiun-Han; Yeh, Te-Huei; Chen, Mei-Ru; Huang, Li-Min; Lu, Meng-You; Huang, Ya-Chi; Chen, Huan-Yun

    2013-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) alters the regulation and expression of a variety of cytokines in its host cells to modulate host immune surveillance and facilitate viral persistence. Using cytokine antibody arrays, we found that, in addition to the cytokines reported previously, two chemotactic cytokines, CCL3 and CCL4, were induced in EBV-infected B cells and were expressed at high levels in all EBV-immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). Furthermore, EBV latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1)-mediated Jun N-terminal protein kinase activation was responsible for upregulation of CCL3 and CCL4. Inhibition of CCL3 and CCL4 in LCLs using a short hairpin RNA approach or by neutralizing antibodies suppressed cell proliferation and caused apoptosis, indicating that autocrine CCL3 and CCL4 are required for LCL survival and growth. Importantly, significant amounts of CCL3 were detected in EBV-positive plasma from immunocompromised patients, suggesting that EBV modulates this chemokine in vivo. This study reveals the regulatory mechanism and a novel function of CCL3 and CCL4 in EBV-infected B cells. CCL3 might be useful as a therapeutic target in EBV-associated lymphoproliferative diseases and malignancies. PMID:23760235

  20. Rare Circulating Cells in Familial Waldenström Macroglobulinemia Displaying the MYD88 L265P Mutation Are Enriched by Epstein-Barr Virus Immortalization.

    PubMed

    Pertesi, Maroulio; Galia, Perrine; Nazaret, Nicolas; Vallée, Maxime; Garderet, Laurent; Leleu, Xavier; Avet-Loiseau, Hervé; Foll, Matthieu; Byrnes, Graham; Lachuer, Joel; McKay, James D; Dumontet, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The MYD88 L265P is a recurrent somatic mutation in neoplastic cells from patients with Waldenström Macroglobulinemia (WM). We identified the MYD88 L265P mutation in three individuals from unrelated families, but its presence did not explain the disease segregation within these WM pedigrees. We observed the mutation in these three individuals at high allele fractions in DNA extracted from EBV-immortalized Lymphoblastoid cell lines established from peripheral blood (LCL), but at much lower allele fractions in DNA extracted directly from peripheral blood, suggesting that this mutation is present in a clonal cell subpopulation rather than of germ-line origin. Furthermore, we observed that the MYD88 L265P mutation is enriched in WM families, detected in 40.5% of patients with familial WM or MGUS (10/22 WM, 5/15 MGUS), compared to 3.5% of patients with familial MM or MGUS (0/72 MM, 4/41 MGUS) (p = 10-7). The mutant allele frequency increased with passages in vitro after immortalization with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) consistent with the MYD88 L265P described gain-of-function proposed for this mutation. The MYD88 L265P mutation appears to be frequently present in circulating cells in patients with WM, and MGUS, and these cells are amenable to immortalization by EBV.

  1. The effect of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) on in vitro proliferation of CD4+, CD8+, and CD19+ cell populations derived from allergic and healthy donors.

    PubMed

    Holen, E; Elsayed, S

    1995-03-01

    The effect of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) on in vitro proliferation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and CD19+ B cells, positively selected by immunomagnetic separation, was investigated. The cells were obtained from allergic patients with moderate serum IgE levels and mild to moderate atopic dermatitis, and healthy controls. The different cell subfractions were stimulated with mitogens or specific allergens, as well as cell supernatants from the lymphoblastoid B- (RPMI 8866) and T-hybridoma (166 A2) cell lines. Proliferative responses of T- and B-cell subsets stimulated with mitogens together with recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2) or accessory cells (AC) could be inhibited by DSCG. In allergic individuals, significant allergen-specific stimulation could be observed in the CD8-depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) fractions. Isolated CD4+ T cells, without AC or IL-2, could also be stimulated with specific allergen, but the responses were rather low. DSCG inhibited, concentration dependently, all allergen-induced responses. Interestingly, only atopic derived CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were stimulated by soluble low-affinity IgE receptor (Fc epsilon RII/sCD23) and IgE binding factor (IgEBF), including IgE enhancing factor, present in culture supernatants from RPMI 8866 and 166 A2, respectively. These responses were also inhibited by DSCG. This was in contrast to the amplifying effect of DSCG on spontaneously proliferating RPMI 8866 and 166 A2 cells, cultured in fresh cRPMI 1640 medium without sCD23 and IgE enhancing factor. Our results show that DSCG delivers an inhibitory signal or signals to PBMC subpopulations expressing Fc epsilon RII/sCD23, either upregulated by phytohemagglutinin in normal and atopic cells, or by allergens or sCD23 in atopic cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Bioenergetic and antiapoptotic properties of mitochondria from cultured human prostate cancer cell lines PC-3, DU145 and LNCaP.

    PubMed

    Panov, Alexander; Orynbayeva, Zulfiya

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to reveal the metabolic features of mitochondria that might be essential for inhibition of apoptotic potential in prostate cancer cells. We studied mitochondria isolated from normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC), metastatic prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP, PC-3, DU145; and non-prostate cancer cells - human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells; and normal human lymphoblastoid cells. PrEC cells contained 2 to 4 times less mitochondria per gram of cells than the three PC cell lines. Respiratory activities of PrEC cell mitochondria were 5-20-fold lower than PC mitochondria, depending on substrates and the metabolic state, due to lower content and lower activity of the respiratory enzyme complexes. Mitochondria from the three metastatic prostate cancer cell lines revealed several features that are distinctive only to these cells: low affinity of Complex I for NADH, 20-30 mV higher electrical membrane potential (ΔΨ). Unprotected with cyclosporine A (CsA) the PC-3 mitochondria required 4 times more Ca²⁺ to open the permeability transition pore (mPTP) when compared with the PrEC mitochondria, and they did not undergo swelling even in the presence of alamethicin, a large pore forming antibiotic. In the presence of CsA, the PC-3 mitochondria did not open spontaneously the mPTP. We conclude that the low apoptotic potential of the metastatic PC cells may arise from inhibition of the Ca²⁺-dependent permeability transition due to a very high ΔΨ and higher capacity to sequester Ca²⁺. We suggest that due to the high ΔΨ, mitochondrial metabolism of the metastatic prostate cancer cells is predominantly based on utilization of glutamate and glutamine, which may promote development of cachexia.

  3. Fluorinated 2-(4-amino-3-methylphenyl)benzothiazoles induce CYP1A1 expression, become metabolized, and bind to macromolecules in sensitive human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Brantley, Eileen; Trapani, Valentina; Alley, Michael C; Hose, Curtis D; Bradshaw, Tracey D; Stevens, Malcolm F G; Sausville, Edward A; Stinson, Sherman F

    2004-12-01

    Fluorinated 2-(4-amino-3-methylphenyl)benzothiazoles possess potent antiproliferative activity against certain cancer cells, similar to the unfluorinated 2-(4-amino-3-methylphenyl)benzothiazole (DF 203, NSC 674495). In "sensitive" cancer cells, DF 203 is metabolized by, can induce expression of, and binds covalently to CYP1A1. Metabolism appears to be essential for its antiproliferative activity through DNA adduct formation. However, a biphasic dose-response relationship compromises its straightforward development as a chemotherapeutic agent. We investigated whether fluorinated benzothiazoles inhibit cancer cell growth without the biphasic dose-response, and whether the fluorinated benzothiazoles are also metabolized into reactive species, with binding to macromolecules in sensitive cancer cells. One fluorinated benzothiazole, 2-(4-amino-methylphenyl)-5-fluorobenzothiazole (5F 203, NSC 703786) did exhibit potent, antiproliferative activity without a biphasic dose-response. The fluorinated benzothiazoles were also metabolized only in cells, which subsequently showed evidence of cell death. We used microsomes from genetically engineered human B-lymphoblastoid cells expressing cytochromes P450 (CYP1A1, CYP1A2, or CYP1B1) to clarify the basis for fluorinated benzothiazole metabolism. 5F 203 induced CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 mRNA expression in sensitive breast and renal cancer cells, whereas 5F 203 induced CYP1A1 mRNA but not CYP1B1 mRNA expression in sensitive ovarian cancer cells. 5F 203 did not induce CYP1A1 or CYP1B1 mRNA expression in any "resistant" cancer cells. The fluorinated benzothiazoles induced CYP1A1 protein expression exclusively in sensitive cells. [14C]5F 203 bound substantially to subcellular fractions in sensitive cells but only minimally in resistant cells. These data are concordant with the antiproliferative activity of fluorinated benzothiazoles deriving from their ability to become metabolized and bind to macromolecules within sensitive cells.

  4. Bioenergetic and Antiapoptotic Properties of Mitochondria from Cultured Human Prostate Cancer Cell Lines PC-3, DU145 and LNCaP

    PubMed Central

    Panov, Alexander; Orynbayeva, Zulfiya

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to reveal the metabolic features of mitochondria that might be essential for inhibition of apoptotic potential in prostate cancer cells. We studied mitochondria isolated from normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC), metastatic prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP, PC-3, DU145; and non-prostate cancer cells - human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells; and normal human lymphoblastoid cells. PrEC cells contained 2 to 4 times less mitochondria per gram of cells than the three PC cell lines. Respiratory activities of PrEC cell mitochondria were 5-20-fold lower than PC mitochondria, depending on substrates and the metabolic state, due to lower content and lower activity of the respiratory enzyme complexes. Mitochondria from the three metastatic prostate cancer cell lines revealed several features that are distinctive only to these cells: low affinity of Complex I for NADH, 20-30 mV higher electrical membrane potential (ΔΨ). Unprotected with cyclosporine A (CsA) the PC-3 mitochondria required 4 times more Ca2+ to open the permeability transition pore (mPTP) when compared with the PrEC mitochondria, and they did not undergo swelling even in the presence of alamethicin, a large pore forming antibiotic. In the presence of CsA, the PC-3 mitochondria did not open spontaneously the mPTP. We conclude that the low apoptotic potential of the metastatic PC cells may arise from inhibition of the Ca2+-dependent permeability transition due to a very high ΔΨ and higher capacity to sequester Ca2+. We suggest that due to the high ΔΨ, mitochondrial metabolism of the metastatic prostate cancer cells is predominantly based on utilization of glutamate and glutamine, which may promote development of cachexia. PMID:23951286

  5. Antigenic Properties and Processing Requirements of 65-Kilodalton Mannoprotein, a Major Antigen Target of Anti-Candida Human T-Cell Response, as Disclosed by Specific Human T-Cell Clones

    PubMed Central

    Nisini, Roberto; Romagnoli, Giulia; Gomez, Maria Jesus; La Valle, Roberto; Torosantucci, Antonella; Mariotti, Sabrina; Teloni, Raffaela; Cassone, Antonio

    2001-01-01

    T-cell-mediated immunity is known to play a central role in the host response to Candida albicans. T-cell clones are useful tools for the exact identification of fungal T-cell epitopes and the processing requirements of C. albicans antigens. We isolated human T-cell clones from an HLA-DRB1*1101 healthy donor by using an antigenic extract (MP-F2) of the fungus. Specific clones were T-cell receptor α/β and CD4+/CD8− and showed a T-helper type 1 cytokine profile (production of gamma interferon and not interleukin-4). The large majority of these clones recognized both the natural (highly glycosylated) and the recombinant (nonglycosylated) 65-kDa mannoprotein (MP65), an MP-F2 minor constituent that was confirmed to be an immunodominant antigen of the human T-cell response. Surprisingly, most of the clones recognized two synthetic peptides of different MP65 regions. However, the peptides shared the amino acid motif IXSXIXXL, which may be envisaged as a motif sequence representing the minimal epitope recognized by these clones. Three clones recognized natural and pronase-treated MP65 but did not detect nonglycosylated, recombinant MP65 or the peptides, suggesting a possible role for polysaccharides in T-cell recognition of C. albicans. Finally, lymphoblastoid B-cell lines were efficient antigen-presenting cells (APC) for recombinant MP65 and peptides but failed to present natural, glycosylated antigens, suggesting that nonprofessional APC might be defective in processing highly glycosylated yeast proteins. In conclusion, this study provides the first characterization of C. albicans-specific human T-cell clones and provides new clues for the definition of the cellular immune response against C. albicans. PMID:11349037

  6. Cell fixation in zinc salt solution is compatible with DNA damage response detection by phospho-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong; Li, Jiangwei; Traganos, Frank; Halicka, H Dorota; Zarebski, Mirosław; Dobrucki, Jurek; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2011-06-01

    By virtue of superior preservation of proteins and nucleic acids the zinc salt-based fixatives (ZBF) has been proposed as an alternative to precipitants and cross-linking fixatives in histopathology. It was recently reported that ZBF is compatible with analysis of cell surface immunophenotype and detection of intracellular epitopes by flow cytometry. The aim of this study was to explore whether ZBF is also compatible with the detection of DNA damage response assessed by phospho-specific antibodies (Abs) detecting phosphorylation of the key proteins of that pathway. DNA damage in human pulmonary adenocarcinoma A549 cells was induced by treatment with the DNA topoisomerase I inhibitor camptothecin and phosphorylation of histone H2AX on Ser139 (γH2AX) and of ATM on Ser1981 was detected with phospho-specific Abs; cellular fluorescence was measured by laser scanning cytometry (LSC). The sensitivity and accuracy of detection of H2AX and ATM phosphorylation concurrent with the detection of DNA replication by EdU incorporation and "click chemistry" was found in ZBF fixed cells to be comparable to that of cell fixed in formaldehyde. The accuracy of DNA content measurement as evident from the resolution of DNA content frequency histograms of cells stained with DAPI was somewhat better in ZBF- than in formaldehyde-fixed cells. The pattern of chromatin condensation revealed by the intensity of maximal pixel of DAPI that allows one to identify mitotic and immediately post-mitotic cells by LSC was preserved after ZBF fixation. ZBF fixation was also compatible with the detection of γH2AX foci considered to be the hallmarks of induction of DNA double-strand breaks. Analysis of cells by flow cytometry revealed that ZBF fixation of lymphoblastoid TK6 cells led to about 60 and 33% higher intensity of the side and forward light scatter, respectively, compared to formaldehyde fixed cells.

  7. Growth inhibitive effect of betulinic acid combined with tripterine on MSB-1 cells and its mechanism.

    PubMed

    An, N; Li, H Y; Zhang, X M

    2015-12-01

    Marek's disease (MD), a highly infectious lymphoproliferative disease in chickens, is caused by a cell-associated oncogenic herpesvirus, Marek's disease virus (MDV). MSB-1 is a MD-derived lymphoblastoid cell line and can induce tumors when inoculated into susceptible chickens. Betulinic acid, which is present as one of the major effective components in many traditional Chinese medicines, has recently been reported to inhibit growth of cancer cells and employed as a potential anticancer agent. Tripterine, a major active compound extracted from the Chinese herb Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F, has now also shown anti-tumor activities in various cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate the synergistic growth-inhibitive effect of betulinic acid combined with tripterine on MSB-1 cells and its mechanism. Viability of MSB-1 cells was assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-y1)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) method. Cell apoptotic analysis was performed by fluorescence detection. NF-κB transcription activity was detected by measuring luciferase activity. Western blotting was used to analyze the expression of p65, IκB and Meq. Our results showed that the proliferation in the combination group was significantly decreased as compared with that of monotherapy using betulinic acid or tripterine, accompanied by an induction of apoptosis, inhibition of NF-κB transcriptional activity and its targeting oncogenic gene Meq. The results suggest that the combination of betulinic acid and tripterine at lower concentration may produce a synergistic inhibitive effect on MSB-1 cells that warrants further investigation for its potential clinical applications.

  8. Apoptosis induced in Jurkat cells by several agents is preceded by intracellular acidification.

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, R A; Nordberg, J; Skowronski, E; Babior, B M

    1996-01-01

    We have previously shown that in neutrophils deprived of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, apoptosis is preceded by acidification and that the protection against apoptosis conferred on neutrophils by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor is dependent upon delay of this acidification. To test the hypothesis that acidification could be a general feature of apoptosis, we examined intracellular pH changes in another cell line. Jurkat cells, a T-lymphoblastoid line, were induced to undergo apoptosis with anti-Fas IgM, cycloheximide, or exposure to short-wavelength UV light. We found that acidification occurred in response to treatment with these agents and that acidification preceded DNA fragmentation. Jurkat cells were also found to possess an acid endonuclease that is active below pH 6.8, compatible with a possible role for this enzyme in chromatin digestion during apoptosis. Incubation of the cells with the bases imidazole or chloroquine during treatment with anti-Fas antibody or cycloheximide or after UV exposure decreased apoptosis as assessed by nuclear morphology and DNA content. The alkalinizing effect of imidazole and chloroquine was shown by the demonstration that the percentage of cells with an intracellular pH below 6.8 after treatment with anti-Fas antibody, cycloheximide, or UV was diminished in the presence of base as compared with similarly treated cells incubated in the absence of base. We conclude that acidification is an early event in programmed cell death and may be essential for genome destruction. Images Fig. 5 PMID:8570610

  9. Assessment of targeted and non-targeted responses in cells deficient in ATM function following exposure to low and high dose X-rays.

    PubMed

    Kiuru, Anne; Kämäräinen, Meerit; Heinävaara, Sirpa; Pylkäs, Katri; Chapman, Kim; Koivistoinen, Armi; Parviainen, Teuvo; Winqvist, Robert; Kadhim, Munira; Launonen, Virpi; Lindholm, Carita

    2014-01-01

    Radiation sensitivity at low and high dose exposure to X-rays was investigated by means of chromosomal aberration (CA) analysis in heterozygous ATM mutation carrier and A-T patient (biallelic ATM mutation) lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). Targeted and non-targeted responses to acutely delivered irradiation were examined by applying a co-culture system that enables study of both directly irradiated cells and medium-mediated bystander effects in the same experimental setting. No indication of radiation hypersensitivity was observed at doses of 0.01 Gy or 0.1 Gy for the ATM mutation carrier LCL. The A-T patient cells also did not show low-dose response. There was significant increase in unstable CA yields for both ATM mutation carrier and A-T LCLs at 1 and 2 Gy, the A-T cells displaying more distinct dose dependency. Both chromosome and chromatid type aberrations were induced at an increased rate in the irradiated A-T cells, whereas for ATM carrier cells, only unstable chromosomal aberrations were increased above the level observed in the wild type cell line. No bystander effect could be demonstrated in any of the cell lines or doses applied. Characteristics typical for the A-T cell line were detected, i.e., high baseline frequency of CA that increased with dose. In addition, dose-dependent loss of cell viability was observed. In conclusion, CA analysis did not demonstrate low-dose (≤100 mGy) radiosensitivity in ATM mutation carrier cells or A-T patient cells. However, both cell lines showed increased radiosensitivity at high dose exposure.

  10. EBV infection of B-CLL cells in vitro potentiates their allostimulatory capacity if accompanied by acquisition of the activated phenotype.

    PubMed

    Avila-Cariño, J; Lewin, N; Yamamoto, K; Tomita, Y; Mellstedt, H; Brodin, B; Rosén, A; Klein, E

    1994-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-carrying immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) stimulate autologous T lymphocytes in vitro. This T-cell response is independent of the EBV-specific cellular memory because it also occurs in experiments with cells of seronegative individuals. The question can be posed whether the T-cell-stimulatory potential of the LCL is coupled to its immortalized state. B-CLL cells were exploited to study this question because the majority of clones, represented by different patients, can be infected with EBV but they rarely become immortalized. We have investigated the phenotypic changes and the T-cell-stimulatory capacity of EBV-infected B-CLL cells. One aliquot of CLL cells was infected with EBV, another was activated with a mixture of Staphylococcus aureus (SAC), IL-2 and the supernatant from the T-cell hybridoma MP6 (activation mixture, AcMx) and the third aliquot received both treatments. In accordance with the individual features of the clonal populations represented by each patient, the immunophenotypic changes imposed by these treatments differed. With the samples of 3 patients the allo-stimulatory potential showed the following ranking order: EBV and AcMx-treated cells > AcMx-treated > EBV-infected. An analysis of several activation-related surface markers and adhesion molecules on the cells did not reveal any association between their expression and the EBV-imposed potentiation of allostimulatory capacity. These results may be extrapolated to EBV-genome-carrying normal B cells, suggesting that they can persist in vivo only as long as they have the resting phenotype. Once they are activated, these cells may be recognized and eliminated by T lymphocytes.

  11. Assessment of Targeted and Non-Targeted Responses in Cells Deficient in ATM Function following Exposure to Low and High Dose X-Rays

    PubMed Central

    Heinävaara, Sirpa; Pylkäs, Katri; Chapman, Kim; Koivistoinen, Armi; Parviainen, Teuvo; Winqvist, Robert; Kadhim, Munira; Launonen, Virpi; Lindholm, Carita

    2014-01-01

    Radiation sensitivity at low and high dose exposure to X-rays was investigated by means of chromosomal aberration (CA) analysis in heterozygous ATM mutation carrier and A-T patient (biallelic ATM mutation) lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). Targeted and non-targeted responses to acutely delivered irradiation were examined by applying a co-culture system that enables study of both directly irradiated cells and medium-mediated bystander effects in the same experimental setting. No indication of radiation hypersensitivity was observed at doses of 0.01 Gy or 0.1 Gy for the ATM mutation carrier LCL. The A-T patient cells also did not show low-dose response. There was significant increase in unstable CA yields for both ATM mutation carrier and A-T LCLs at 1 and 2 Gy, the A-T cells displaying more distinct dose dependency. Both chromosome and chromatid type aberrations were induced at an increased rate in the irradiated A-T cells, whereas for ATM carrier cells, only unstable chromosomal aberrations were increased above the level observed in the wild type cell line. No bystander effect could be demonstrated in any of the cell lines or doses applied. Characteristics typical for the A-T cell line were detected, i.e., high baseline frequency of CA that increased with dose. In addition, dose-dependent loss of cell viability was observed. In conclusion, CA analysis did not demonstrate low-dose (≤100 mGy) radiosensitivity in ATM mutation carrier cells or A-T patient cells. However, both cell lines showed increased radiosensitivity at high dose exposure. PMID:24681528

  12. NBS1 knockdown by small interfering RNA increases ionizing radiation mutagenesis and telomere association in human cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ying; Lim, Chang U K.; Williams, Eli S.; Zhou, Junqing; Zhang, Qinming; Fox, Michael H.; Bailey, Susan M.; Liber, Howard L.

    2005-01-01

    Hypomorphic mutations which lead to decreased function of the NBS1 gene are responsible for Nijmegen breakage syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disorder that imparts an increased predisposition to development of malignancy. The NBS1 protein is a component of the MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 complex that plays a critical role in cellular responses to DNA damage and the maintenance of chromosomal integrity. Using small interfering RNA transfection, we have knocked down NBS1 protein levels and analyzed relevant phenotypes in two closely related human lymphoblastoid cell lines with different p53 status, namely wild-type TK6 and mutated WTK1. Both TK6 and WTK1 cells showed an increased level of ionizing radiation-induced mutation at the TK and HPRT loci, impaired phosphorylation of H2AX (gamma-H2AX), and impaired activation of the cell cycle checkpoint regulating kinase, Chk2. In TK6 cells, ionizing radiation-induced accumulation of p53/p21 and apoptosis were reduced. There was a differential response to ionizing radiation-induced cell killing between TK6 and WTK1 cells after NBS1 knockdown; TK6 cells were more resistant to killing, whereas WTK1 cells were more sensitive. NBS1 deficiency also resulted in a significant increase in telomere association that was independent of radiation exposure and p53 status. Our results provide the first experimental evidence that NBS1 deficiency in human cells leads to hypermutability and telomere associations, phenotypes that may contribute to the cancer predisposition seen among patients with this disease.

  13. NBS1 knockdown by small interfering RNA increases ionizing radiation mutagenesis and telomere association in human cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ying; Lim, Chang U K.; Williams, Eli S.; Zhou, Junqing; Zhang, Qinming; Fox, Michael H.; Bailey, Susan M.; Liber, Howard L.

    2005-01-01

    Hypomorphic mutations which lead to decreased function of the NBS1 gene are responsible for Nijmegen breakage syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disorder that imparts an increased predisposition to development of malignancy. The NBS1 protein is a component of the MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 complex that plays a critical role in cellular responses to DNA damage and the maintenance of chromosomal integrity. Using small interfering RNA transfection, we have knocked down NBS1 protein levels and analyzed relevant phenotypes in two closely related human lymphoblastoid cell lines with different p53 status, namely wild-type TK6 and mutated WTK1. Both TK6 and WTK1 cells showed an increased level of ionizing radiation-induced mutation at the TK and HPRT loci, impaired phosphorylation of H2AX (gamma-H2AX), and impaired activation of the cell cycle checkpoint regulating kinase, Chk2. In TK6 cells, ionizing radiation-induced accumulation of p53/p21 and apoptosis were reduced. There was a differential response to ionizing radiation-induced cell killing between TK6 and WTK1 cells after NBS1 knockdown; TK6 cells were more resistant to killing, whereas WTK1 cells were more sensitive. NBS1 deficiency also resulted in a significant increase in telomere association that was independent of radiation exposure and p53 status. Our results provide the first experimental evidence that NBS1 deficiency in human cells leads to hypermutability and telomere associations, phenotypes that may contribute to the cancer predisposition seen among patients with this disease.

  14. Cell Type-Dependent Changes in CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dot Uptake and Toxic Endpoints

    PubMed Central

    Soenen, Stefaan J.; Al-Ali, Abdullah; Brown, Andy; Hondow, Nicole; Wills, John; Jenkins, Gareth J. S.; Doak, Shareen H.

    2015-01-01

    Toxicity of nanoparticles (NPs) is often correlated with the physicochemical characteristics of the materials. However, some discrepancies are noted in in-vitro studies on quantum dots (QDs) with similar physicochemical properties. This is partly related to variations in cell type. In this study, we show that epithelial (BEAS-2B), fibroblast (HFF-1), and lymphoblastoid (TK6) cells show different biological responses following exposure to QDs. These cells represented the 3 main portals of NP exposure: bronchial, skin, and circulatory. The uptake and toxicity of negatively and positively charged CdSe:ZnS QDs of the same core size but with different surface chemistries (carboxyl or amine polymer coatings) were investigated in full and reduced serum containing media following 1 and 3 cell cycles. Following thorough physicochemical characterization, cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and gross chromosomal damage were measured. Cellular damage mechanisms in the form of reactive oxygen species and the expression of inflammatory cytokines IL-8 and TNF-α were assessed. QDs uptake and toxicity significantly varied in the different cell lines. BEAS-2B cells demonstrated the highest level of QDs uptake yet displayed a strong resilience with minimal genotoxicity following exposure to these NPs. In contrast, HFF-1 and TK6 cells were more susceptible to toxicity and genotoxicity, respectively, as a result of exposure to QDs. Thus, this study demonstrates that in addition to nanomaterial physicochemical characterization, a clear understanding of cell type-dependent variation in uptake coupled to the inherently different capacities of the cell types to cope with exposure to these exogenous materials are all required to predict genotoxicity. PMID:25601991

  15. Analysis of HLA-DR glycoproteins by DNA-mediated gene transfer. Definition of DR2 beta gene products and antigen presentation to T cell clones from leprosy patients

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    We have used DNA-mediated gene transfer to express HLA class II molecules in mouse L cells for serological, biochemical, and functional analysis. cDNA clones encoding the DR2 beta a and DR2 beta b products of the DR2Dw2 haplotype were subcloned into a mouse Moloney leukemia virus-based expression vector (pJ4) and transfected separately into mouse L cells together with a HLA-DR alpha/pJ4 construct. These transfectants have allowed differential analysis of the two DR2 beta products in a manner normally prohibited by the concomitant expression seen in B cells. Two-dimensional SDS-PAGE analysis of the transfectants defines the more acidic beta chain as the product of the DR2 beta a sequence, and the more basic chain as the product of the DR2 beta b sequence. The LDR2a transfectants present antigen efficiently to M.leprae-specific T cell clones and are capable of presenting synthetic peptide, 65-kD recombinant mycobacterial antigen and M.leprae. Of the DR2Dw2-restricted T cell clones we have tested, all use the DR2 beta a chain as their restriction element. Inhibition studies with mAbs demonstrate the dependence of presentation by the transfectant on class II and CD4, while mAbs against LFA-1, which substantially inhibit presentation by B-lymphoblastoid cell lines, do not inhibit transfectant presentation. PMID:3128633

  16. The oncogene DEK promotes leukemic cell survival and is downregulated by both Nutlin-3 and chlorambucil in B-chronic lymphocytic leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Secchiero, Paola; Voltan, Rebecca; di Iasio, Maria Grazia; Melloni, Elisabetta; Tiribelli, Mario; Zauli, Giorgio

    2010-03-15

    To characterize the role of the oncogene DEK in modulating the response to either Nutlin-3, a small-molecule inhibitor of the MDM2/p53 interaction, or chlorambucil in primary B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) cells. DEK mRNA and protein levels were evaluated in primary B-CLL samples (n = 21), p53(wild-type) SKW6.4, p53(mutated) BJAB lymphoblastoid cell lines, and normal CD19(+) B lymphocytes-treated Nutlin-3 or chlorambucil (10 micromol/L, each). Knocking down experiments with either p53 or DEK small interfering RNA (siRNA) were done to investigate the potential role of p53 in controlling the expression of DEK and the role of DEK in leukemic cell survival/apoptosis. Both Nutlin-3 and chlorambucil downregulated DEK in primary B-CLL samples (n = 21) and SKW6.4 but not in BJAB cells. Knocking down p53 attenuated the effect of Nutlin-3 on DEK expression, whereas knocking down DEK significantly increased both spontaneous and Nutlin-3-induced apoptosis. Conversely, counteracting DEK downmodulation by using p53 small interfering RNA reduced Nutlin-3-mediated apoptosis. On the other hand, Nutlin-3 potently induced p53 accumulation, but it did not affect DEK levels in normal CD19(+) B lymphocytes. These data show that the downregulation of DEK in response to either Nutlin-3 or chlorambucil represents an important molecular determinant in the cytotoxic response of leukemic cells, and suggest that strategies aimed to downregulate DEK might improve the therapeutic potential of these drugs.

  17. Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B-cells as efficient antigen presenting cells to propagate Aspergillus-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Gamal

    2008-01-01

    To overcome the cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL) expansion limitations imposed by the lack of sufficient dendritic cells (DC) alternative sources of autologous antigen presenting cells (APC) such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (BLCL), which are easy to establish in vitro, have been considered and studied in the present work. Non-adherent peripheral blood mononuclear cells of three healthy donors were repeatedly primed with autologous Aspergillus fumigatus commercial culture-filtrate antigen-pulsed fast monocyte-derived DC (Aspf-CFA-DC) alone, Aspf-CFA-pulsed BLCL (Aspf-CFA-BLCL) alone or Aspf-CFA-BLCL after one, two, or three primings with Aspf-CFA-DC (1DC/BLCL, 2DC/BLCL or 3DCIBLCL; respectively). After 5th priming, lines generated by Aspf-CFA-BLCL only showed strong/weak lytic activity for EBV/Aspf; respectively. Aspf-specific lytic activity in all donors was increased by increasing the number of primings with Aspf-CFA-DC before switching to Aspf-CFA-BLCL (18.20 +/- 1.65% versus 35.67 +/- 1.02% and 40.03 +/- 1.41% in bulk cultures generated by 1DC/BLCL versus 2DC/BLCL and 3DC/BLCL, respectively). Bulk cultures generated by Aspf-CFA-BLCL after at least two primings with Aspf-CFA-DC showed approximately the same Aspf-specific lytic activity, effector cell phenotype, expansion level and percentage expression of IFN-gamma, CD69 and CD107a without any significant differences (p > 0.05) as standard bulk cultures generated by only Aspf-CFA-DC. Thus, this study explored the use of a combined DC/BLCL protocol to establish/propagate Aspf-specific CTL for adoptive immunotherapy to prevent or treat invasive pulmonary aspergillosis.

  18. Characterization of Epstein-Barr virus-induced lymphoproliferation derived from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells transferred to severe combined immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Okano, M.; Taguchi, Y.; Nakamine, H.; Pirruccello, S. J.; Davis, J. R.; Beisel, K. W.; Kleveland, K. L.; Sanger, W. G.; Fordyce, R. R.; Purtilo, D. T.

    1990-01-01

    Mice with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) received 6 X 10(7) fresh human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) intraperitoneally from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-seropositive and -seronegative donors. B95-8 EBV was inoculated intraperitoneally and intravenously to the mice 6 weeks after transfer of seronegative PBMC. Three of four mice transferred with PBMC from two EBV-seropositive donors and two of four mice from two EBV-seronegative donors inoculated with EBV developed fatal EBV-induced lymphoproliferative disease within 6 to 10 weeks. These tumors were oligoclonal or polyclonal by cytoplasmic immunoglobulin expression. Furthermore no consistent clonal chromosomal abnormalities were shown. Cell lines established from these tumors showed low cloning efficiency in soft agarose. In addition, latent membrane protein, B-lymphocyte activation antigen (CD23), and cell-adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, CD18) all were expressed in the EBV-positive infiltrating lymphoproliferative lesions in each mouse. These results suggest that lymphoid tumors are comparable to lymphoblastoid cell lines immortalized by EBV and are not malignant lymphomas such as Burkitt's lymphoma. This model may be useful for investigating mechanisms responsible for the growing numbers of lymphoproliferative diseases that are occurring in patients with inherited or acquired immunodeficiencies. Images Figure 1 PMID:1975985

  19. Endogenous DNA Damage and Risk of Testicular Germ Cell Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, M B; Sigurdson, A J; Jones, I M; Thomas, C B; Graubard, B I; Korde, L; Greene, M H; McGlynn, K A

    2008-01-18

    Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT) are comprised of two histologic groups, seminomas and nonseminomas. We postulated that the possible divergent pathogeneses of these histologies may be partially explained by variable endogenous DNA damage. To assess our hypothesis, we conducted a case-case analysis of seminomas and nonseminomas using the alkaline comet assay to quantify single-strand DNA breaks and alkali-labile sites. The Familial Testicular Cancer study and the U.S. Radiologic Technologists cohort provided 112 TGCT cases (51 seminomas & 61 nonseminomas). A lymphoblastoid cell line was cultured for each patient and the alkaline comet assay was used to determine four parameters: tail DNA, tail length, comet distributed moment (CDM) and Olive tail moment (OTM). Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were estimated using logistic regression. Values for tail length, tail DNA, CDM and OTM were modeled as categorical variables using the 50th and 75th percentiles of the seminoma group. Tail DNA was significantly associated with nonseminoma compared to seminoma (OR{sub 50th percentile} = 3.31, 95%CI: 1.00, 10.98; OR{sub 75th percentile} = 3.71, 95%CI: 1.04, 13.20; p for trend=0.039). OTM exhibited similar, albeit statistically non-significant, risk estimates (OR{sub 50th percentile} = 2.27, 95%CI: 0.75, 6.87; OR{sub 75th percentile} = 2.40, 95%CI: 0.75, 7.71; p for trend=0.12) whereas tail length and CDM showed no association. In conclusion, the results for tail DNA and OTM indicate that endogenous DNA damage levels are higher in patients who develop nonseminoma compared with seminoma. This may partly explain the more aggressive biology and younger age-of-onset of this histologic subgroup compared with the relatively less aggressive, later-onset seminoma.

  20. Mutagenic action of monochromatic UV radiation in the solar range on human cells.

    PubMed

    Tyrrell, R M

    1984-10-01

    Mutations to ouabain resistance (selecting for base modifications at the co-dominant Na+K+-dependent ATP-ase locus) and thioguanine resistance (selecting for a wide range of genetic changes at the recessive hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus) were measured in a repair-proficient human lymphoblastoid line with defined monochromatic radiations in the UVC (254 nm), UVB (302 nm, 313 nm), UVA (334 nm, 365 nm) and visible (405 nm) ranges. No mutations were detected at wavelengths in the range 334-405 nm. At 254 nm and 313 nm, both mutations to thioguanine resistance and survival were consistent with those expected from the relative levels of cyclobutane-type pyrimidine dimers induced. However, at 313 nm, the ratio of ouabain-resistant to thioguanine-resistant mutants is 10 times higher than at 254 nm, indicating that a unique type of pre-mutagenic base damage is induced at the longer wavelength. Radiation in the UVA (334 nm) range reduced the induction of mutations by a UVC (254 nm) wavelength at both mutation markers. These results suggest, first, that distinct types of biologically expressed genetic damage may be induced in the UVB region of sunlight and, second, that strong interactions may occur between the different wavelength regions of sunlight that can modify the expression of this genetic damage in human cells.

  1. Cell Lines Models of Drug Response: Successes and Lessons from this Pharmacogenomic Model

    PubMed Central

    Jack, J.; Rotroff, D.; Motsinger-Reif, A.

    2015-01-01

    A new standard for medicine is emerging that aims to improve individual drug responses through studying associations with genetic variations. This field, pharmacogenomics, is undergoing a rapid expansion due to a variety of technological advancements that are enabling higher throughput with reductions in cost. Here we review the advantages, limitations, and opportunities for using lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) as a model system for human pharmacogenomic studies. There are a wide range of publicly available resources with genome-wide data available for LCLs from both related and unrelated populations, removing the cost of genotyping the data for drug response studies. Furthermore, in contrast to human clinical trials or in vivo model systems, with high-throughput in vitro screening technologies, pharmacogenomics studies can easily be scaled to accommodate large sample sizes. An important component to leveraging genome-wide data in LCL models is association mapping. Several methods are discussed herein, and include multivariate concentration response modeling, issues with multiple testing, and successful examples of the ‘triangle model’ to identify candidate variants. Once candidate gene variants have been determined, their biological roles can be elucidated using pathway analyses and functionally confirmed using siRNA knockdown experiments. The wealth of genomics data being produced using related and unrelated populations is creating many exciting opportunities leading to new insights into the genetic contribution and heritability of drug response. PMID:25109794

  2. Dexamethasone improves redox state in ataxia telangiectasia cells by promoting an NRF2-mediated antioxidant response.

    PubMed

    Biagiotti, Sara; Menotta, Michele; Orazi, Sara; Spapperi, Chiara; Brundu, Serena; Fraternale, Alessandra; Bianchi, Marzia; Rossi, Luigia; Chessa, Luciana; Magnani, Mauro

    2016-11-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare incurable neurodegenerative disease caused by biallelic mutations in the gene for ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM). The lack of a functional ATM kinase leads to a pleiotropic phenotype, and oxidative stress is considered to have a crucial role in the complex physiopathology. Recently, steroids have been shown to reduce the neurological symptoms of the disease, although the molecular mechanism of this effect is largely unknown. In the present study, we have demonstrated that dexamethasone treatment of A-T lymphoblastoid cells increases the content of two of the most abundant antioxidants [glutathione (GSH) and NADPH] by up to 30%. Dexamethasone promoted the nuclear accumulation of the transcription factor nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 to drive expression of antioxidant pathways involved in GSH synthesis and NADPH production. The latter effect was via glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activation, as confirmed by increased enzyme activity and enhancement of the pentose phosphate pathway rate. This evidence indicates that glucocorticoids are able to potentiate antioxidant defenses to counteract oxidative stress in ataxia telangiectasia, and also reveals an unexpected role for dexamethasone in redox homeostasis and cellular antioxidant activity. © 2016 The Authors. The FEBS Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  3. TK{sup {minus}} mutants attributable to localized gene conversion in a human cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Giver, C.R.; Grosovsky, A.J.

    1995-11-01

    The human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6 is heterozygous at the tk gene, carrying an inactivating frameshift near the end of the coding sequence, within exon 7 of the functional allele. Here, we describe our use of sequence analyses at these polymorphic sites to identify 8 x-ray induced mutations, out of 184 examined, which exhibit partial conversion of the tk functional allele to the non-functional sequence. These mutants are characterized by loss of heterozygosity at the exon 4 frameshift polymorphism, and remain heterozgousity at exon 7. No restriction fragment length alterations were observed by Southern blotting, and sequencing of the tk cDNA in these mutants revealed the presence of two full length tk transcripts, both having the sequence of the non-functional allele in exon 4, but representing the two different sequences in exon 7. Therefore, the results cannot be explained by a partial deletion of the functional tk allele. Polymorphic microsatellite markers located both proximally and distally to tk on the q arm of chromosome 17 were found to remain heterozygous, ruling out the possibility of a single homologous exchange event. These mutants may be explained by single strand invasion coupled with mismatch repair of the resultant heteroduplex, or by recombinationally mediated repair of a double strand break or gap. We also present microsatellite mapping data which localizes the human tk gene to a 1cM region between markers D17S802 and D17S937.

  4. Comprehensive genetic analysis of cytarabine sensitivity in a cell-based model identifies polymorphisms associated with outcome in AML patients.

    PubMed

    Gamazon, Eric R; Lamba, Jatinder K; Pounds, Stanley; Stark, Amy L; Wheeler, Heather E; Cao, Xueyuan; Im, Hae K; Mitra, Amit K; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E; Ribeiro, Raul C; Raimondi, Susana; Campana, Dario; Crews, Kristine R; Wong, Shan S; Welsh, Marleen; Hulur, Imge; Gorsic, Lidija; Hartford, Christine M; Zhang, Wei; Cox, Nancy J; Dolan, M Eileen

    2013-05-23

    A whole-genome approach was used to investigate the genetic determinants of cytarabine-induced cytotoxicity. We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies involving 523 lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from individuals of European, African, Asian, and African American ancestry. Several of the highest-ranked single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were within the mutated in colorectal cancers (MCC) gene. MCC expression was induced by cytarabine treatment from 1.7- to 26.6-fold in LCLs. A total of 33 SNPs ranked at the top of the meta-analysis (P < 10(-5)) were successfully tested in a clinical trial of patients randomized to receive low-dose or high-dose cytarabine plus daunorubicin and etoposide; of these, 18 showed association (P < .05) with either cytarabine 50% inhibitory concentration in leukemia cells or clinical response parameters (minimal residual disease, overall survival (OS), and treatment-related mortality). This count (n = 18) was significantly greater than expected by chance (P = .016). For rs1203633, LCLs with AA genotype were more sensitive to cytarabine-induced cytotoxicity (P = 1.31 × 10(-6)) and AA (vs GA or GG) genotype was associated with poorer OS (P = .015), likely as a result of greater treatment-related mortality (P = .0037) in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). This multicenter AML02 study trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00136084.

  5. Comprehensive genetic analysis of cytarabine sensitivity in a cell-based model identifies polymorphisms associated with outcome in AML patients

    PubMed Central

    Gamazon, Eric R.; Lamba, Jatinder K.; Pounds, Stanley; Stark, Amy L.; Wheeler, Heather E.; Cao, Xueyuan; Im, Hae K.; Mitra, Amit K.; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Raimondi, Susana; Campana, Dario; Crews, Kristine R.; Wong, Shan S.; Welsh, Marleen; Hulur, Imge; Gorsic, Lidija; Hartford, Christine M.; Zhang, Wei; Cox, Nancy J.; Dolan, M. Eileen

    2013-01-01

    A whole-genome approach was used to investigate the genetic determinants of cytarabine-induced cytotoxicity. We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies involving 523 lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from individuals of European, African, Asian, and African American ancestry. Several of the highest-ranked single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were within the mutated in colorectal cancers (MCC) gene. MCC expression was induced by cytarabine treatment from 1.7- to 26.6-fold in LCLs. A total of 33 SNPs ranked at the top of the meta-analysis (P < 10−5) were successfully tested in a clinical trial of patients randomized to receive low-dose or high-dose cytarabine plus daunorubicin and etoposide; of these, 18 showed association (P < .05) with either cytarabine 50% inhibitory concentration in leukemia cells or clinical response parameters (minimal residual disease, overall survival (OS), and treatment-related mortality). This count (n = 18) was significantly greater than expected by chance (P = .016). For rs1203633, LCLs with AA genotype were more sensitive to cytarabine-induced cytotoxicity (P = 1.31 × 10−6) and AA (vs GA or GG) genotype was associated with poorer OS (P = .015), likely as a result of greater treatment-related mortality (P = .0037) in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). This multicenter AML02 study trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00136084. PMID:23538338

  6. Endocytosis of receptor-bound insulin-like growth factor II is enhanced by mannose-6-phosphate in IM9 cells.

    PubMed

    Polychronakos, C; Piscina, R

    1988-10-01

    The insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II), and glycoproteins containing mannose 6-phosphate (M6P), bind to two different sites of the same receptor molecule (Morgan et al, Nature 329:301, 1987). To study the interactions between the two ligands on their common receptor in intact cells, we examined the effect of free M6P on IGF-II binding and endocytosis in the IM9 human lymphoblastoid cell line. M6P, up to a 3 mM concentration, had no effect on the binding of IGF-II to the cell surface receptor of intact IM9 cells at 4 degrees C. By contrast, when IM9 cells were incubated with 125I-IGF-II at 37 degrees C, 1mM M6P increased cell-associated radioactivity by twofold. The increase was resistant to acid wash at 4 degrees C, and therefore assumed to represent endocytosed IGF-II. Acid-washable radioactivity was no different, confirming that, in intact cells, M6P does not affect IGF-II surface binding. In addition, preincubation of cells with M6P at 37 degrees C for up to 3 hours did not change the abundance of receptor on the cell surface, as measured by a subsequent 4 degrees C binding assay. We conclude that M6P causes a shift of IGF-II-occupied receptors form the cell surface to intracellular locations without affecting surface binding of this ligand in IM9 cells. The effect could be produced by the binding of M6P itself, or by the displacement of endogenous phosphomannosylated ligands.

  7. Endocytosis of receptor-bound insulin-like growth factor II is enhanced by mannose-6-phosphate in IM9 cells.

    PubMed

    Polychronakos, C; Piscina, R

    1988-12-01

    The insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II), and glycoproteins containing mannose 6-phosphate (M6P), bind to two different sites of the same receptor molecule (Morgan et al, Nature 329:301, 1987). To study the interactions between the two ligands on their common receptor in intact cells, we examined the effect of free M6P on IGF-II binding and endocytosis in the IM9 human lymphoblastoid cell line. M6P, up to a 3 mM concentration, had no effect on the binding of IGF-II to the cell surface receptor of intact IM9 cells at 4 degrees C. By contrast, when IM9 cells were incubated with 125I-IGF-II at 37 degrees C, 1 mM M6P increased cell-associated radioactivity by twofold. The increase was resistant to acid wash at 4 degrees C, and therefore assumed to represent endocytosed IGF-II. Acid-washable radioactivity was no different, confirming that, in intact cells, M6P does not affect IGF-II surface binding. In addition, preincubation of cells with M6P at 37 degrees C for up to 3 hours did not change the abundance of receptor on the cell surface, as measured by a subsequent 4 degrees C binding assay. We conclude that M6P causes a shift of IGF-II-occupied receptors form the cell surface to intracellular locations without affecting surface binding of this ligand in IM9 cells. The effect could be produced by the binding of M6P itself, or by the displacement of endogenous phosphomannosylated ligands.

  8. Tetravalent anti-CD20/CD3 bispecific antibody for the treatment of B cell lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Chia-Yen; Chen, Gregory J.; Tai, Pei-Han; Yang, Yu-Chen; Hsu, Yu-Shen; Chang, Mingi; Hsu, Chuan-Lung

    2016-05-13

    Bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) are second generation antibodies for therapeutic application in immunotherapy. One of the major strategies of the bsAb platform is the recruitment of immune effector T cells by incorporating an anti-CD3 domain. A bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE), with one end having an affinity for CD3 and the other end with affinity for CD19, has been approved in the US and Europe for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, due to their small size and lack of Fc region, these single-chain variable fragment (scFv) bsAbs have short half-lives in vivo. Additionally, poor solubility, structural instability, and low production yields have also become major challenges in the bulk production process. To overcome these challenges, we have engineered a tetravalent bsAb with bivalent binding specificity for the CD20 and CD3 antigen in an immunoglobulin G (IgG) format. The fusion of the anti-CD3 scFvs to the CD20 antibody via a linker-hinge domain (LHD) results in improved antibody stabilization and properties. Here we demonstrate this antibody's highly efficient cancer cell elimination in a dose-dependent manner in a CD20-expressing B lymphoblastoid cell line in vitro. Our data suggest the potential clinical application of this bsAb for the treatment of CD20-expressing B cell malignancies. - Highlights: • A bispecific antibody (bsAb) can increase immunotherapeutic efficacy. • A tetravalent bsAb with binding specificity for the CD20 and CD3 antigens is proposed. • A linker-hinge domain (LHD) within the bsAb results in improved antibody properties.

  9. The landscape of histone modifications across 1% of the human genome in five human cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Christoph M.; Andrews, Robert M.; Flicek, Paul; Dillon, Shane C.; Karaöz, Ulaş; Clelland, Gayle K.; Wilcox, Sarah; Beare, David M.; Fowler, Joanna C.; Couttet, Phillippe; James, Keith D.; Lefebvre, Gregory C.; Bruce, Alexander W.; Dovey, Oliver M.; Ellis, Peter D.; Dhami, Pawandeep; Langford, Cordelia F.; Weng, Zhiping; Birney, Ewan; Carter, Nigel P.; Vetrie, David; Dunham, Ian

    2007-01-01

    We generated high-resolution maps of histone H3 lysine 9/14 acetylation (H3ac), histone H4 lysine 5/8/12/16 acetylation (H4ac), and histone H3 at lysine 4 mono-, di-, and trimethylation (H3K4me1, H3K4me2, H3K4me3, respectively) across the ENCODE regions. Studying each modification in five human cell lines including the ENCODE Consortium common cell lines GM06990 (lymphoblastoid) and HeLa-S3, as well as K562, HFL-1, and MOLT4, we identified clear patterns of histone modification profiles with respect to genomic features. H3K4me3, H3K4me2, and H3ac modifications are tightly associated with the transcriptional start sites (TSSs) of genes, while H3K4me1 and H4ac have more widespread distributions. TSSs reveal characteristic patterns of both types of modification present and the position relative to TSSs. These patterns differ between active and inactive genes and in particular the state of H3K4me3 and H3ac modifications is highly predictive of gene activity. Away from TSSs, modification sites are enriched in H3K4me1 and relatively depleted in H3K4me3 and H3ac. Comparison between cell lines identified differences in the histone modification profiles associated with transcriptional differences between the cell lines. These results provide an overview of the functional relationship among histone modifications and gene expression in human cells. PMID:17567990

  10. Inferring a role for methylation of intergenic DNA in the regulation of genes aberrantly expressed in precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Almamun, Md; Kholod, Olha; Stuckel, Alexei J; Levinson, Benjamin T; Johnson, Nathan T; Arthur, Gerald L; Davis, J Wade; Taylor, Kristen H

    2017-01-17

    A complete understanding of the mechanisms involved in the development of pre-B ALL is lacking. In this study, we integrated DNA methylation data and gene expression data to elucidate the impact of aberrant intergenic DNA methylation on gene expression in pre-B ALL. We found a subset of differentially methylated intergenic loci that were associated with altered gene expression in pre-B ALL patients. Notably, 84% of these regions were also bound by transcription factors (TF) known to play roles in differentiation and B-cell development in a lymphoblastoid cell line. Further, an overall downregulation of eRNA transcripts was observed in pre-B ALL patients and these transcripts were associated with the downregulation of putative target genes involved in B-cell migration, proliferation, and apoptosis. The identification of novel putative regulatory regions highlights the significance of intergenic DNA sequences and may contribute to the identification of new therapeutic targets for the treatment of pre-B ALL.

  11. Study of the Cytotoxic Effects of the New Synthetic Isothiocyanate CM9 and Its Fullerene Derivative on Human T-Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    De Gianni, Elena; Turrini, Eleonora; Milelli, Andrea; Maffei, Francesca; Carini, Marco; Minarini, Anna; Tumiatti, Vincenzo; Da Ros, Tatiana; Prato, Maurizio; Fimognari, Carmela

    2015-01-01

    One important strategy to develop effective anticancer agents is based on natural products. Many active phytochemicals are in human clinical trials and have been used for a long time, alone and in association with conventional anticancer drugs, for the treatment of various types of cancers. A great number of in vitro, in vivo and clinical reports document the multi-target anticancer activities of isothiocyanates and of compounds characterized by a naphthalenetetracarboxylic diimide scaffold. In order to search for new anticancer agents with a better pharmaco-toxicological profile, we investigated hybrid compounds obtained by inserting isothiocyanate group(s) on a naphthalenetetracarboxylic diimide scaffold. Moreover, since water-soluble fullerene derivatives can cross cell membranes thus favoring the delivery of anticancer therapeutics, we explored the cytostatic and cytotoxic activity of hybrid compounds conjugated with fullerene. We studied their cytostatic and cytotoxic effects on a human T-lymphoblastoid cell line by using different flow cytometric assays. In order to better understand their pharmaco-toxicological potential, we also analyzed their genotoxicity. Our global results show that the synthesized compounds reduced significantly the viability of leukemia cells. However, the conjugation with a non-toxic vector did not increase their anticancer potential. This opens an interesting research pattern for certain fullerene properties. PMID:25679371

  12. Effector properties and glycosylation patterns of recombinant human anti-D-IgG1 antibodies produced by human PER.C6(®) cells.

    PubMed

    Olovnikova, N I; Grigorieva, O V; Petrov, A V

    2012-12-01

    Creation of effective monoclonal anti-D immunoglobulin for prevention of hemolytic disease of the newborn remains an unsolved problem because there is still no producer cell strain providing stable production and adequate glycosylation of antibodies. Recombinant anti-D have been obtained on the basis of human PER.C6(®) cells and characterized. Anti-D antibodies expressed in PER.C6(®) exhibited lower hemolytic activity in antibody-dependent cytotoxicity (ADCC) reaction mediated by low-affinity Fcγ receptors in comparison with identical antibodies of lymphoblastoid origin. Monoclonal antibodies produced by PER.C6(®) are completely fucosylated and desialylated, i.e. are characterized by abnormal glycosylation. Addition of kifunensine (α-mannosidase I inhibitor) to the medium led to production of antibodies with high hemolytic activity. Reduced activity of monoclonal antibodies in PER.C6(®) cells and the effect of kifunensine (causing synthesis of defucosylated glycans) suggest that the absence of fucose is the key factor responsible for Fc affinity for low-affinity receptors.

  13. Molecular basis for paradoxical carriers of adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency that show extremely low levels of ADA activity in peripheral blood cells without immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Ariga, T; Oda, N; Sanstisteban, I; Arredondo-Vega, F X; Shioda, M; Ueno, H; Terada, K; Kobayashi, K; Hershfield, M S; Sakiyama, Y

    2001-02-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency causes an autosomal recessive form of severe combined immunodeficiency and also less severe phenotypes, depending to a large degree on genotype. In general, ADA activity in cells of carriers is approximately half-normal. Unexpectedly, healthy first-degree relatives of two unrelated ADA-deficient severe combined immunodeficient patients (mother and brother in family I; mother in family II) had only 1-2% of normal ADA activity in PBMC, lower than has previously been found in PBMC of healthy individuals with so-called "partial ADA deficiency." The level of deoxyadenosine nucleotides in erythrocytes of these paradoxical carriers was slightly elevated, but much lower than levels found in immunodeficient patients with ADA deficiency. ADA activity in EBV-lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) and T cell lines established from these carriers was 10-20% of normal. Each of these carriers possessed two mutated ADA alleles. Expression of cloned mutant ADA cDNAs in an ADA-deletion strain of Escherichia coli indicated that the novel mutations G239S and M310T were responsible for the residual ADA activity. ADA activity in EBV-LCL extracts of the paradoxical carriers was much more labile than ADA from normal EBV-LCL. Immunoblotting suggested that this lability was due to denaturation rather than to degradation of the mutant protein. These results further define the threshold level of ADA activity necessary for sustaining immune function.

  14. Interferon-induced 56,000 Mr protein and its mRNA in human cells: molecular cloning and partial sequence of the cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Chebath, J; Merlin, G; Metz, R; Benech, P; Revel, M

    1983-01-01

    Treatment of responsive cells by interferons (IFNs) induces within a few hours a rise in the concentration of several proteins and mRNAs. In order to characterize these IFN-induced mRNA species, we have cloned in E. coli the cDNA made from a 17-18S poly(A)+ RNA of human fibroblastoid cells (SV80) treated with IFN-beta. We describe here a pBR322 recombinant plasmid (C56) which contains a 400 bp cDNA insert corresponding to a 18S mRNA species newly induced by IFN. The C56 mRNA codes for a 56,000 dalton protein easily detectable by hybridization-translation experiments. The sequence of 66 of the carboxy-terminal amino-acids of the protein can be deduced from the cDNA sequence. IFNs-alpha, beta or gamma are able to activate the expression of this gene in human fibroblasts as well as lymphoblastoid cells. The mRNA is not detectable without IFN; it reaches maximum levels (0.1% of the total poly(A)+ RNA) within 4-8 hrs and decreases after 16 hrs. Images PMID:6186990

  15. Enhanced susceptibility of B lymphoma cells to measles virus by Epstein-Barr virus type III latency that upregulates CD150/signaling lymphocytic activation molecule.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Satoshi; Kanbayashi, Daiki; Kurata, Takako; Yoshiyama, Hironori; Komano, Jun

    2014-02-01

    Measles virus (MV) is one of the candidates for the application of oncolytic virotherapy (OVT). Although an advanced clinical study has been reported on a T-cell lymphoma, the potential of MV OVT against B-cell lymphomas remains to be clarified. We found that an EBV-transformed B lymphoblastoid cell line, a model for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and EBV-positive Burkitt's lymphoma cells bearing type III latency were highly susceptible to the cytolysis induced by an MV vaccine strain CAM-70. As analyzed by EBV-positive and -negative counterparts of the same cytogenetic background, type III EBV latency, not type I, was shown to augment the susceptibility of B lymphoma cells to MV-induced cytolysis. Cell surface levels of CD150/signaling lymphocytic activation molecule, a receptor of MV, were upregulated in B lymphoma cell lines with type III EBV latency by 3.8-fold, on average. The cytolytic activity of CD150-tropic WT MV was akin to that of CD46- and CD150-tropic CAM-70, suggesting that CD150 is critical for the susceptibility to MV-induced cytolysis. Among EBV-encoded genes, latent membrane protein 1 was responsible for the CD150 upregulation. It was notable that the majority of B lymphoma cell lines of type III EBV latency showed higher susceptibility to the non-Edmonston-derived CAM-70 than to the Edmonston-derived Schwarz strain. This is the first report indicating the potential of non-Edmonston MV strain for the application of OVT. Furthermore, a cellular regulator of MV replication was implicated that functions in a vaccine strain-specific fashion. Altogether, the MV OVT should serve as an alternative therapy against EBV-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with type III EBV latency. © 2013 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  16. A bicistronic SIN-lentiviral vector containing G156A MGMT allows selection and metabolic correction of hematopoietic protoporphyric cell lines.

    PubMed

    Richard, Emmanuel; Géronimi, Fabien; Lalanne, Magalie; Ged, Cécile; Redonnet-Vernhet, Isabelle; Lamrissi-Garcia, Isabelle; Gerson, Stanton L; de Verneuil, Hubert; Moreau-Gaudry, François

    2003-09-01

    Erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP) is an inherited disease characterised by a ferrochelatase (FECH) deficiency, the latest enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway, leading to the accumulation of toxic protoporphyrin in the liver, bone marrow and spleen. We have previously shown that a successful gene therapy of a murine model of the disease was possible with lentiviral vectors even in the absence of preselection of corrected cells, but lethal irradiation of the recipient was necessary to obtain an efficient bone marrow engraftment. To overcome a preconditioning regimen, a selective growth advantage has to be conferred to the corrected cells. We have developed a novel bicistronic lentiviral vector that contains the human alkylating drug resistance mutant O(6)-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT G156A) and FECH cDNAs. We tested their capacity to protect hematopoietic cell lines efficiently from alkylating drug toxicity and correct enzymatic deficiency. EPP lymphoblastoid (LB) cell lines, K562 and cord-blood-derived CD34(+) cells were transduced at a low multiplicity of infection (MOI) with the bicistronic constructs. Resistance to O(6)-benzylguanine (BG)/N,N'-bis(2-chloroethyl)-N-nitrosourea (BCNU) was clearly shown in transduced cells, leading to the survival and expansion of provirus-containing cells. Corrected EPP LB cells were selectively amplified, leading to complete restoration of enzymatic activity and the absence of protoporphyrin accumulation. This study demonstrates that a lentiviral vector including therapeutic and G156A MGMT genes followed by BG/BCNU exposure can lead to a full metabolic correction of deficient cells. This vector might form the basis of new EPP mouse gene therapy protocols without a preconditioning regimen followed by in vivo selection of corrected hematopoietic stem cells. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Gene conversion is strongly induced in human cells by double-strand breaks and is modulated by the expression of BCL-XL

    SciTech Connect

    Wiese, Claudia; Pierce, Andrew J.; Gauny, Stacey S.; Jasin, Maria; Kronenberg, Amy

    2001-09-25

    Homology-directed repair (HDR) of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is a well-established mechanism that contributes to the maintenance of genomic stability in rodent cells, and it has been assumed that HDR is of similar importance in the repair of DSBs in human cells. However, in addition to promoting genomic stability, some outcomes of homologous recombination can be deleterious, suggesting that factors exist to regulate HDR. We previously demonstrated that overexpression of BCL-2 or BCL-xL enhanced the frequency of x-ray-induced mutations involving the TK1 locus, including loss of heterozygosity (LOH) events presumed to arise by mitotic recombination. The present study was designed to test whether HDR is a prominent DSB repair pathway in human cells, and to directly determine whether ectopic expression of BCL-xL affects HDR. We used the B-lymphoblastoid cell line TK6, which expresses wild-type TP53 and resembles normal lymphocytes in undergoing apoptosis following! genotoxic stress. U sing isogenic derivatives of TK6 cells (TK6-neo, TK6-bcl-xL), we find that a DSB in an integrated HDR reporter stimulates gene conversion 40-50-fold in TK6-neo cells, demonstrating that a DSB can be efficiently repaired by gene conversion in human cells. Significantly, DSB-induced gene conversion events are 3- to 4-fold more frequent in BCL-xL overexpressing cells. The results demonstrate that HDR plays an important role in maintaining genomic integrity in human cells and that ectopic expression of BCL-xL enhances HDR of DSBs. To our knowledge, this is the first study to highlight a function for BCL-xL in modulating DSB repair in human cells.

  18. Rb silencing mediated by the down-regulation of MeCP2 is involved in cell transformation induced by long-term exposure to hydroquinone.

    PubMed

    Liu, Linhua; Ling, Xiaoxuan; Wu, Minhua; Chen, Jialong; Chen, Shaoqiao; Tan, Qiang; Chen, Jiansong; Liu, Jiaxian; Zou, Fei

    2017-02-01

    Hydroquinone (HQ), a metabolite of benzene, is a well-known human carcinogen; however, its molecular mechanisms of action remain unclear. MeCP2 has been traditionally described as a transcriptional repressor, though growing evidence indicates that it also activates gene expression. Here, we investigated whether some epigenetic machinery genes are aberrantly expressed as target tumor suppressor genes in HQ-transformed TK6 lymphoblastoid cells. Our results showed that treatment with 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine or trichostatin A enhanced the expression of Rb, resulting in cell arrest in G1-phase, and subsequently, an increase in apoptosis and a decrease in cell growth. Moreover, we hypothesised that Rb was silenced by the down-regulation of MeCP2 in HQ-transformed cells, resulting in the dynamic expression of Rb and epigenetic machinery proteins in HQ-transformed cells at different time points. The expression of Rb and MeCP2 in patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (B-NHL) showed that positive staining for MeCP2 or Rb was significantly lower in B-NHL tumor tissues, and these changes were significantly and negatively correlated with the grade of B-NHL. The restoration of MeCP2 in HQ-transformed cells enhanced the expression of Rb, promoted cell apoptosis, and inhibited cell growth. The changes in the expression patterns of MeCP2 and Rb were inversely correlated with the degree of DNA methylation. A ChiP assay revealed that MeCP2 proteins were recruited to the Rb promoter with lower 5'-methylcytosine levels. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the down-regulation of MeCP2 silences Rb, a process involved in cell transformation resulting from long-term exposure to HQ. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Space experiment "Rad Gene"-report 1; p53-Dependent gene expression in human cultured cells exposed to space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Takeo; Suzuki, Hiromi; Omori, Katsunori; Seki, Masaya; Hashizume, Toko; Shimazu, Toru; Ishioka, Noriaki

    The space environment contains two major biologically significant influences: space radiations and microgravity. A p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a role as a guardian of the genome through the activity of p53-centered signal transduction pathways. The aim of this study was to clarify the biological effects of space radiations, microgravity and a space environment on the gene and protein expression of p53-dependent regulated genes. Space experiments were performed with two human cultured lymphoblastoid cell lines: one cells line (TSCE5) bears a wild-type p53 gene status, and another cells line (WTK1) bears a mutated p53 gene status. Un-der one gravity or microgravity condition, the cells were grown in the cell biology experimental facility (CBEF) of the International Space Station (ISS) for 8 days without experiencing the stress during launching and landing because the cells were frozen during these periods. Ground control samples also were cultured for 8 days in the CBEF on the ground during the same periods as space flight. Gene and protein expression was analyzed by using DNA chip (a 44k whole human genome microarray, Agilent Technologies Inc.) and protein chip (PanoramaTM Ab MicroArray, Sigma-Aldrich Co.), respectively. In addition, we analyzed the gene expression in cultured cells after space flight during 133 days with frozen condition. We report the results and discussion from the viewpoint of the functions of the up-regulated and down-regulated genes after an exposure to space radiations and/or microgravity. The initial goal of this space experiment was completely achieved. It is expected that data from this type of work will be helpful in designing physical protection from the deleterious effects of space radiations during long term stays in space.

  20. Short-term inhibition of TERT induces telomere length-independent cell cycle arrest and apoptotic response in EBV-immortalized and transformed B cells

    PubMed Central

    Celeghin, Andrea; Giunco, Silvia; Freguja, Riccardo; Zangrossi, Manuela; Nalio, Silvia; Dolcetti, Riccardo; De Rossi, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Besides its canonical role in stabilizing telomeres, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) may promote tumorigenesis through extra-telomeric functions. The possible therapeutic effects of BIBR1532 (BIBR), a powerful TERT inhibitor, have been evaluated in different cellular backgrounds, but no data are currently available regarding Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-driven B-cell malignancies. Our aim was to characterize the biological effects of TERT inhibition by BIBR on EBV-immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) and fully transformed Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) cell lines. We found that BIBR selectively inhibits telomerase activity in TERT-positive 4134/Late and 4134/TERT+ LCLs and EBV-negative BL41 and EBV-positive BL41/B95.8 BL cell lines. TERT inhibition led to decreased cell proliferation, accumulation of cells in the S-phase and ultimately to increased apoptosis, compared with mock-treated control cells. All these effects occurred within 72 h and were not observed in BIBR-treated TERT-negative 4134/TERT- and U2OS cells. The cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, consequent upon short-term TERT inhibition, were associated with and likely dependent on the activation of the DNA damage response (DDR), highlighted by the increased levels of γH2AX and activation of ATM and ATR pathways. Analyses of the mean and range of telomere lengths and telomere dysfunction-induced foci indicated that DDR after short-term TERT inhibition was not related to telomere dysfunction, thus suggesting that TERT, besides stabilizing telomere, may protect DNA via telomere-independent mechanisms. Notably, TERT-positive LCLs treated with BIBR in combination with fludarabine or cyclophosphamide showed a significant increase in the number of apoptotic cells with respect to those treated with chemotherapeutic agents alone. In conclusion, TERT inhibition impairs cell cycle progression and enhances the pro-apoptotic effects of chemotherapeutic agents in TERT-positive cells. These results support new

  1. Dendritic cells generated from blood precursors of chronic myelogenous leukemia patients carry the Philadelphia translocation and can induce a CML-specific primary cytotoxic T-cell response.

    PubMed

    Eibl, B; Ebner, S; Duba, C; Böck, G; Romani, N; Erdel, M; Gächter, A; Niederwieser, D; Schuler, G

    1997-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen-presenting cells specialized in the initiation of primary immune responses. We were interested to know whether mature DC can be grown in vitro from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), and whether they carry the Philadelphia (Ph) translocation. Using a method recently described, DC were generated from PBMC precursors of 12 patients with CML using GM-CSF, IL-4, and monocyte-conditioned medium. DC exhibited the typical morphology with thin cytoplasmatic processes and expressed high levels of MHC class II, CD86, and CD83 typical for mature DC. After sorting with the monoclonal antibody CD83, a cell population of more than 95% CD83 positive cells was obtained. The presence of the Ph translocation was analyzed in these cells, in PBMC, lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL), and in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced T blasts from the same patients by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In contrast to all other cells analyzed, the vast majority of DC (95.9 +/- 0.7%) displayed the Ph translocation, irrespective of disease stage or therapy. PBMC were predominantly positive for the Ph chromosome (67.6 +/- 7.3%), whereas only 11.4 +/- 1% of the B cells and 4.4 +/- 1.1% of the PHA blasts carried the Ph translocation. Using such leukemic DC as antigen-presenting cells, a primary CML-directed cytotoxic immune response in vitro was obtained, as shown by the specific recognition of Ph chromosome positive cells. We conclude that DC can be generated from blood progenitors of CML patients in vitro and exhibit, to a large extent, the Ph translocation. Such DC, which in a preliminary experiment have been able to induce a primary CML-directed cytotoxic immune response in vitro, might be ideal candidates for adoptive immunotherapy either by direct transfer of DC for in vivo generation of a T-cell response or by in vitro generation of CML-specific cytotoxic autologous or HLA

  2. Neutron Exposures in Human Cells: Bystander Effect and Relative Biological Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Isheeta; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Stewart, Robert D.; Emery, Robert; Joiner, Michael C.; Tucker, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Bystander effects have been observed repeatedly in mammalian cells following photon and alpha particle irradiation. However, few studies have been performed to investigate bystander effects arising from neutron irradiation. Here we asked whether neutrons also induce a bystander effect in two normal human lymphoblastoid cell lines. These cells were exposed to fast neutrons produced by targeting a near-monoenergetic 50.5 MeV proton beam at a Be target (17 MeV average neutron energy), and irradiated-cell conditioned media (ICCM) was transferred to unirradiated cells. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay was used to quantify genetic damage in radiation-naïve cells exposed to ICCM from cultures that received 0 (control), 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3 or 4 Gy neutrons. Cells grown in ICCM from irradiated cells showed no significant increase in the frequencies