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Sample records for mdx mouse duodenum

  1. Plantarflexion Contracture in the mdx Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Garlich, Michael W.; Baltgalvis, Kristen A.; Call, Jarrod A.; Dorsey, Lisa L.; Lowe, Dawn A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Contractures are a major clinical issue for patients with muscular dystrophies. However, it is unknown whether contractures are present in the widely used mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to develop methods to measure muscle contractures in mice, to determine whether plantarflexion contractures are present in mdx mice, and to analyze the composition of the major muscles involved. Design Hindlimbs of eight wild type and six mdx mice were assessed every 2 wks during the course of a 12-wk study. Assessments included range of motion and in vivo torques about the ankle. At the end of the study, mice were euthanized, and muscles were analyzed for composition. Results The mdx mice had ~10 degrees less dorsiflexion, increased passive torque moving the ankle into dorsiflexion, and an increased passive-to-active torque ratio relative to wild type mice. Gastrocnemius muscle composition alterations included increased wet mass, decreased protein content, and increased collagen. Conclusions The results indicate that mdx mice have plantarflexion contractures similar to those seen in children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In future studies, these measures can be used to assess strategies to slow the progression of contractures that occur with muscular dystrophies. PMID:21403594

  2. Disease course in mdx:utrophin+/- mice: comparison of three mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Abby A; Hebert, Sadie L; Kunz, Matthew D; Ralles, Steven J; McLoon, Linda K

    2015-04-01

    The mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is used to study disease mechanisms and potential treatments, but its pathology is less severe than DMD patients. Other mouse models were developed to more closely mimic the human disease based on knowledge that upregulation of utrophin has a protective effect in mdx muscle. An mdx:utrophin(-/-) (dko) mouse was created, which had a severe disease phenotype and a shortened life span. An mdx:utrophin(+/-) mouse was also created, which had an intermediate disease phenotype compared to the mdx and dko mice. To determine the usefulness of mdx:utrophin(+/-) mice for long-term DMD studies, limb muscle pathology and function were assessed across the life span of wild-type, mdx, mdx:utrophin(+/-), and dko mice. Muscle function assessment, specifically grip duration and rotarod performance, demonstrated that mdx:utrophin(+/-) mice were weaker for a longer time than mdx mice. Mean myofiber area was smaller in mdx:utrophin(+/-) mice compared to mdx mice at 12 months. Mdx:utrophin(+/-) mice had a higher percentage of centrally nucleated myofibers compared to mdx mice at 6 and 12 months. Collagen I and IV density was significantly higher in mdx:utrophin(+/-) muscle compared to mdx at most ages examined. Generally, mdx:utrophin(+/-) mice showed an intermediate disease phenotype over a longer time course compared to the mdx and dko mice. While they do not genetically mirror human DMD, mdx:utrophin(+/-) mice may be a more useful animal model than mdx or dko mice for investigating long-term efficacy of potential treatments when fibrosis or muscle function is the focus.

  3. The Molecular Basis of Muscular Dystrophy in the mdx Mouse: A Point Mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicinski, Piotr; Geng, Yan; Ryder-Cook, Allan S.; Barnard, Eric A.; Darlison, Mark G.; Barnard, Pene J.

    1989-06-01

    The mdx mouse is an X-linked myopathic mutant, an animal model for human Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In both mouse and man the mutations lie within the dystrophin gene, but the phenotypic differences of the disease in the two species confer much interest on the molecular basis of the mdx mutation. The complementary DNA for mouse dystrophin has been cloned, and the sequence has been used in the polymerase chain reaction to amplify normal and mdx dystrophin transcripts in the area of the mdx mutation. Sequence analysis of the amplification products showed that the mdx mouse has a single base substitution within an exon, which causes premature termination of the polypeptide chain.

  4. Fibrosis and inflammation are greater in muscles of beta-sarcoglycan-null mouse than mdx mouse.

    PubMed

    Gibertini, Sara; Zanotti, Simona; Savadori, Paolo; Curcio, Maurizio; Saredi, Simona; Salerno, Franco; Andreetta, Francesca; Bernasconi, Pia; Mantegazza, Renato; Mora, Marina

    2014-05-01

    The Sgcb-null mouse, with knocked-down β-sarcoglycan, develops severe muscular dystrophy as in type 2E human limb girdle muscular dystrophy. The mdx mouse, lacking dystrophin, is the most used model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Unlike DMD, the mdx mouse has mild clinical features and shows little fibrosis in limb muscles. To characterize ECM protein deposition and the progression of muscle fibrosis, we evaluated protein and transcript levels of collagens I, III and VI, decorin, and TGF-β1, in quadriceps and diaphragm, at 2, 4, 8, 12, 26, and 52 weeks in Sgcb-null mice, and protein levels at 12, 26, and 52 weeks in mdx mice. In Sgcb-null mice, severe morphological disruption was present from 4 weeks in both quadriceps and diaphragm, and included conspicuous deposition of extracellular matrix components. Histopathological features of Sgcb-null mouse muscles were similar to those of age-matched mdx muscles at all ages examined, but, in the Sgcb-null mouse, the extent of connective tissue deposition was generally greater than mdx. Furthermore, in the Sgcb-null mouse, the amount of all three collagen isoforms increased steadily, while, in the mdx, they remained stable. We also found that, at 12 weeks, macrophages were significantly more numerous in mildly inflamed areas of Sgcb-null quadriceps compared to mdx quadriceps (but not in highly inflamed regions), while, in the diaphragm, macrophages did not differ significantly between the two models, in either region. Osteopontin mRNA was also significantly greater at 12 weeks in laser-dissected highly inflamed areas of the Sgcb-null quadriceps compared to the mdx quadriceps. TGF-β1 was present in areas of degeneration-regeneration, but levels were highly variable and in general did not differ significantly between the two models and controls. The roles of the various subtypes of macrophages in muscle repair and fibrosis in the two models require further study. The Sgcb-null mouse, which develops early fibrosis

  5. Disease course in mdx:utrophin+/− mice: comparison of three mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Abby A; Hebert, Sadie L; Kunz, Matthew D; Ralles, Steven J; McLoon, Linda K

    2015-01-01

    The mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is used to study disease mechanisms and potential treatments, but its pathology is less severe than DMD patients. Other mouse models were developed to more closely mimic the human disease based on knowledge that upregulation of utrophin has a protective effect in mdx muscle. An mdx:utrophin−/− (dko) mouse was created, which had a severe disease phenotype and a shortened life span. An mdx:utrophin+/− mouse was also created, which had an intermediate disease phenotype compared to the mdx and dko mice. To determine the usefulness of mdx:utrophin+/− mice for long-term DMD studies, limb muscle pathology and function were assessed across the life span of wild-type, mdx, mdx:utrophin+/−, and dko mice. Muscle function assessment, specifically grip duration and rotarod performance, demonstrated that mdx:utrophin+/− mice were weaker for a longer time than mdx mice. Mean myofiber area was smaller in mdx:utrophin+/− mice compared to mdx mice at 12 months. Mdx:utrophin+/− mice had a higher percentage of centrally nucleated myofibers compared to mdx mice at 6 and 12 months. Collagen I and IV density was significantly higher in mdx:utrophin+/− muscle compared to mdx at most ages examined. Generally, mdx:utrophin+/− mice showed an intermediate disease phenotype over a longer time course compared to the mdx and dko mice. While they do not genetically mirror human DMD, mdx:utrophin+/− mice may be a more useful animal model than mdx or dko mice for investigating long-term efficacy of potential treatments when fibrosis or muscle function is the focus. PMID:25921779

  6. X-irradiation improves mdx mouse muscle as a model of myofiber loss in DMD

    SciTech Connect

    Wakeford, S.; Watt, D.J.; Partridge, T.A. )

    1991-01-01

    The mdx mouse, although a genetic and biochemical homologue of human Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), presents a comparatively mild histopathological and clinical phenotype. These differences are partially attributable to the greater efficacy of regeneration in the mdx mouse than in DMD muscle. To lessen this disparity, we have used a single dose of X-irradiation (16 Gy) to inhibit regeneration in one leg of mdx mice. The result is an almost complete block of muscle fiber regeneration leading to progressive loss of muscle fibers and their replacement by loose connective tissue. Surviving fibers are mainly peripherally nucleated and, surprisingly, of large diameter. Thus, X-irradiation converts mdx muscle to a model system in which the degenerative process can be studied in isolation from the complicating effect of myofiber regeneration. This system should be of use for testing methods of alleviating the myofiber degeneration which is common to mdx and DMD.

  7. Defective regulation of energy metabolism in mdx-mouse skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Even, P C; Decrouy, A; Chinet, A

    1994-12-01

    Our previous finding of a reduced energy metabolism in slow- and fast-twitch skeletal muscle fibres from the murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (the mdx mouse) led us to examine the importance of intracellular glucose availability for a normal energy turnover. To this end, basal and KCl-stimulated (20.9 mM total extracellular K+) rates of glucose uptake (GUP) and heat production were measured in isolated, glucose-incubated (5 mM) soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles from mdx and control C57B1/10 mice, in the presence and in the absence of insulin (1.7 nM). Under all conditions and for both muscle types, glucose uptake values for mdx and control muscles were similar although heat production was lower in mdx muscles. The marked stimulation of GUP by insulin in both mdx and control muscles had only minor effects on heat production. In contrast, glucose deprivation or inhibition of glycolysis with 2-deoxy-D-glucose (5 mM) significantly decreased heat production in control muscles only, which attenuated, although did not suppress, the difference in basal heat production between mdx and control muscles. Stimulation of heat production by a short-chain fatty acid salt (octanoate, 2 mM) was significantly less marked in mdx than in control muscles. Increased cytoplasmic synthesis of CoA by addition of 5 mM pantothenate (vitamin B5) increased the thermogenic response to glucose more in mdx than in control muscles. We conclude that the low energy turnover in mdx-mouse muscle fibres is not due to a decrease of intracellular glucose availability, but rather to a decreased oxidative utilization of glucose and free fatty acids. We suggest that some enzyme complex of the tricarboxylic acid cycle or inefficiency of CoA transport in the mitochondria could be involved. PMID:7999003

  8. Normal myogenic cells from newborn mice restore normal histology to degenerating muscles of the mdx mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, J.E.; Hoffman, E.P.; Partridge, T.A. )

    1990-12-01

    Dystrophin deficiency in skeletal muscle of the x-linked dystrophic (mdx) mouse can be partially remedied by implantation of normal muscle precursor cells (mpc). However, it is difficult to determine whether this biochemical rescue results in any improvement in the structure or function of the treated muscle, because the vigorous regeneration of mdx muscle more than compensates for the degeneration. By using x-ray irradiation to prevent mpc proliferation, it is possible to study loss of mdx muscle fibers without the complicating effect of simultaneous fiber regeneration. Thus, improvements in fiber survival resulting from any potential therapy can be detected easily. Here, we have implanted normal mpc, obtained from newborn mice, into such preirradiated mdx muscles, finding that it is far more extensively permeated and replaced by implanted mpc than is nonirradiated mdx muscle; this is evident both from analysis of glucose-6-phosphate isomerase isoenzyme markers and from immunoblots and immunostaining of dystrophin in the treated muscles. Incorporation of normal mpc markedly reduces the loss of muscle fibers and the deterioration of muscle structure which otherwise occurs in irradiated mdx muscles. Surprisingly, the regenerated fibers are largely peripherally nucleated, whereas regenerated mouse skeletal muscle fibers are normally centrally nucleated. We attribute this regeneration of apparently normal muscle to the tendency of newborn mouse mpc to recapitulate their neonatal ontogeny, even when grafted into 3-wk-old degenerating muscle.

  9. Dietary phosphorus overload aggravates the phenotype of the dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse.

    PubMed

    Wada, Eiji; Yoshida, Mizuko; Kojima, Yoriko; Nonaka, Ikuya; Ohashi, Kazuya; Nagata, Yosuke; Shiozuka, Masataka; Date, Munehiro; Higashi, Tetsuo; Nishino, Ichizo; Matsuda, Ryoichi

    2014-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a lethal X-linked disease with no effective treatment. Progressive muscle degeneration, increased macrophage infiltration, and ectopic calcification are characteristic features of the mdx mouse, a murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Because dietary phosphorus/phosphate consumption is increasing and adverse effects of phosphate overloading have been reported in several disease conditions, we examined the effects of dietary phosphorus intake in mdx mice phenotypes. On weaning, control and mdx mice were fed diets containing 0.7, 1.0, or 2.0 g phosphorus per 100 g until they were 90 days old. Dystrophic phenotypes were evaluated in cryosections of quadriceps and tibialis anterior muscles, and maximal forces and voluntary activity were measured. Ectopic calcification was analyzed by electron microscopy to determine the cells initially responsible for calcium deposition in skeletal muscle. Dietary phosphorus overload dramatically exacerbated the dystrophic phenotypes of mdx mice by increasing inflammation associated with infiltration of M1 macrophages. In contrast, minimal muscle necrosis and inflammation were observed in exercised mdx mice fed a low-phosphorus diet, suggesting potential beneficial therapeutic effects of lowering dietary phosphorus intake on disease progression. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that dietary phosphorus intake directly affects muscle pathological characteristics of mdx mice. Dietary phosphorus overloading promoted dystrophic disease progression in mdx mice, whereas restricting dietary phosphorus intake improved muscle pathological characteristics and function.

  10. Assessing Functional Performance in the Mdx Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; van Putten, Maaike

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe and progressive muscle wasting disorder for which no cure is available. Nevertheless, several potential pharmaceutical compounds and gene therapy approaches have progressed into clinical trials. With improvement in muscle function being the most important end point in these trials, a lot of emphasis has been placed on setting up reliable, reproducible, and easy to perform functional tests to pre clinically assess muscle function, strength, condition, and coordination in the mdx mouse model for DMD. Both invasive and noninvasive tests are available. Tests that do not exacerbate the disease can be used to determine the natural history of the disease and the effects of therapeutic interventions (e.g. forelimb grip strength test, two different hanging tests using either a wire or a grid and rotarod running). Alternatively, forced treadmill running can be used to enhance disease progression and/or assess protective effects of therapeutic interventions on disease pathology. We here describe how to perform these most commonly used functional tests in a reliable and reproducible manner. Using these protocols based on standard operating procedures enables comparison of data between different laboratories. PMID:24747372

  11. Decrease in Prosaposin in the Dystrophic mdx Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hui-ling; Li, Cheng; Nabeka, Hiroaki; Shimokawa, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Naoto; Saito, Shouichiro; Wang, Zhan-You; Cao, Ya-ming; Matsuda, Seiji

    2013-01-01

    Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy caused by a mutation in the X-linked dystrophin gene induces metabolic and structural disorders in the brain. A lack of dystrophin in brain structures is involved in impaired cognitive function. Prosaposin (PS), a neurotrophic factor, is abundant in the choroid plexus and various brain regions. We investigated whether PS serves as a link between dystrophin loss and gross and/or ultrastructural brain abnormalities. Methodology/Principal Findings The distribution of PS in the brains of juvenile and adult mdx mice was investigated by immunochemistry, Western blotting, and in situ hybridization. Immunochemistry revealed lower levels of PS in the cytoplasm of neurons of the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, and choroid plexus in mdx mice. Western blotting confirmed that PS levels were lower in these brain regions in both juveniles and adults. Even with low PS production in the choroids plexus, there was no significant PS decrease in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In situ hybridization revealed that the primary form of PS mRNA in both normal and mdx mice was Pro+9, a secretory-type PS, and the hybridization signals for Pro+9 in the above-mentioned brain regions were weaker in mdx mice than in normal mice. We also investigated mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling. Stronger activation of ERK1/2 was observed in mdx mice, ERK1/2 activity was positively correlated with PS activity, and exogenous PS18 stimulated both p-ERK1/2 and PS in SH-SY5Y cells. Conclusions/Significance Low levels of PS and its receptors suggest the participation of PS in some pathological changes in the brains of mdx mice. PMID:24244600

  12. Metabolic profile of dystrophic mdx mouse muscles analyzed with in vitro magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS).

    PubMed

    Martins-Bach, Aurea B; Bloise, Antonio C; Vainzof, Mariz; Rahnamaye Rabbani, Said

    2012-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive X-linked form of muscular dystrophy characterized by progressive and irreversible degeneration of the muscles. The mdx mouse is the classical animal model for DMD, showing similar molecular and protein defects. The mdx mouse, however, does not show significant muscle weakness, and the diaphragm muscle is significantly more degenerated than skeletal muscles. In this work, (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to study the metabolic profile of quadriceps and diaphragm muscles from mdx and control mice. Using principal components analysis (PCA), the animals were separated into groups according to age and lineages. The classification was compared to histopathological analysis. Among the 24 metabolites identified from the nuclear MR spectra, only 19 were used by the PCA program for classification purposes. These can be important key biomarkers associated with the progression of degeneration in mdx muscles and with natural aging in control mice. Glutamate, glutamine, succinate, isoleucine, acetate, alanine and glycerol were increased in mdx samples as compared to control mice, in contrast to carnosine, taurine, glycine, methionine and creatine that were decreased. These results suggest that MRS associated with pattern recognition analysis can be a reliable tool to assess the degree of pathological and metabolic alterations in the dystrophic tissue, thereby affording the possibility of evaluation of beneficial effects of putative therapies. PMID:22673895

  13. Dystropathology increases energy expenditure and protein turnover in the Mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The skeletal muscles in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and the mdx mouse model lack functional dystrophin and undergo repeated bouts of necrosis, regeneration, and growth. These processes have a high metabolic cost. However, the consequences for whole body energy and protein metabolism, and on the diet...

  14. Identification of Disease Specific Pathways Using in Vivo SILAC Proteomics in Dystrophin Deficient mdx Mouse*

    PubMed Central

    Rayavarapu, Sree; Coley, William; Cakir, Erdinc; Jahnke, Vanessa; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Grodish-Dressman, Heather; Jaiswal, Jyoti K.; Hoffman, Eric P.; Brown, Kristy J.; Hathout, Yetrib; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked neuromuscular disorder caused by a mutation in the dystrophin gene. DMD is characterized by progressive weakness of skeletal, cardiac, and respiratory muscles. The molecular mechanisms underlying dystrophy-associated muscle weakness and damage are not well understood. Quantitative proteomics techniques could help to identify disease-specific pathways. Recent advances in the in vivo labeling strategies such as stable isotope labeling in mouse (SILAC mouse) with 13C6-lysine or stable isotope labeling in mammals (SILAM) with 15N have enabled accurate quantitative analysis of the proteomes of whole organs and tissues as a function of disease. Here we describe the use of the SILAC mouse strategy to define the underlying pathological mechanisms in dystrophin-deficient skeletal muscle. Differential SILAC proteome profiling was performed on the gastrocnemius muscles of 3-week-old (early stage) dystrophin-deficient mdx mice and wild-type (normal) mice. The generated data were further confirmed in an independent set of mdx and normal mice using a SILAC spike-in strategy. A total of 789 proteins were quantified; of these, 73 were found to be significantly altered between mdx and normal mice (p < 0.05). Bioinformatics analyses using Ingenuity Pathway software established that the integrin-linked kinase pathway, actin cytoskeleton signaling, mitochondrial energy metabolism, and calcium homeostasis are the pathways initially affected in dystrophin-deficient muscle at early stages of pathogenesis. The key proteins involved in these pathways were validated by means of immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry in independent sets of mdx mice and in human DMD muscle biopsies. The specific involvement of these molecular networks early in dystrophic pathology makes them potential therapeutic targets. In sum, our findings indicate that SILAC mouse strategy has uncovered previously unidentified pathological pathways in mouse models of human

  15. Identification of disease specific pathways using in vivo SILAC proteomics in dystrophin deficient mdx mouse.

    PubMed

    Rayavarapu, Sree; Coley, William; Cakir, Erdinc; Jahnke, Vanessa; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Grodish-Dressman, Heather; Jaiswal, Jyoti K; Hoffman, Eric P; Brown, Kristy J; Hathout, Yetrib; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2013-05-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked neuromuscular disorder caused by a mutation in the dystrophin gene. DMD is characterized by progressive weakness of skeletal, cardiac, and respiratory muscles. The molecular mechanisms underlying dystrophy-associated muscle weakness and damage are not well understood. Quantitative proteomics techniques could help to identify disease-specific pathways. Recent advances in the in vivo labeling strategies such as stable isotope labeling in mouse (SILAC mouse) with (13)C6-lysine or stable isotope labeling in mammals (SILAM) with (15)N have enabled accurate quantitative analysis of the proteomes of whole organs and tissues as a function of disease. Here we describe the use of the SILAC mouse strategy to define the underlying pathological mechanisms in dystrophin-deficient skeletal muscle. Differential SILAC proteome profiling was performed on the gastrocnemius muscles of 3-week-old (early stage) dystrophin-deficient mdx mice and wild-type (normal) mice. The generated data were further confirmed in an independent set of mdx and normal mice using a SILAC spike-in strategy. A total of 789 proteins were quantified; of these, 73 were found to be significantly altered between mdx and normal mice (p < 0.05). Bioinformatics analyses using Ingenuity Pathway software established that the integrin-linked kinase pathway, actin cytoskeleton signaling, mitochondrial energy metabolism, and calcium homeostasis are the pathways initially affected in dystrophin-deficient muscle at early stages of pathogenesis. The key proteins involved in these pathways were validated by means of immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry in independent sets of mdx mice and in human DMD muscle biopsies. The specific involvement of these molecular networks early in dystrophic pathology makes them potential therapeutic targets. In sum, our findings indicate that SILAC mouse strategy has uncovered previously unidentified pathological pathways in mouse models of

  16. A Mathematical Model of Skeletal Muscle Disease and Immune Response in the mdx Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Nicholas P.; Grange, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disease that results in the death of affected boys by early adulthood. The genetic defect responsible for DMD has been known for over 25 years, yet at present there is neither cure nor effective treatment for DMD. During early disease onset, the mdx mouse has been validated as an animal model for DMD and use of this model has led to valuable but incomplete insights into the disease process. For example, immune cells are thought to be responsible for a significant portion of muscle cell death in the mdx mouse; however, the role and time course of the immune response in the dystrophic process have not been well described. In this paper we constructed a simple mathematical model to investigate the role of the immune response in muscle degeneration and subsequent regeneration in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Our model suggests that the immune response contributes substantially to the muscle degeneration and regeneration processes. Furthermore, the analysis of the model predicts that the immune system response oscillates throughout the life of the mice, and the damaged fibers are never completely cleared. PMID:25013809

  17. [Intracellular recording of myotonia in mdx mouse and the effect of Ca antagonist in myotonia].

    PubMed

    Kishi, M; Kurihara, T; Uchida, H; Kinoshita, M

    1989-05-01

    Bulfield and others found X-linked muscular dystrophic (mdx) mouse by screening C57 BL/10 mice. The serum CK and PK are high in mdx mice, and they develop muscle degeneration 10-15 days after birth. The regeneration is vigorous in mdx mice and almost all the muscle fibers are replaced by regenerated fibers by 60 days after birth. Although mdx mice have been developed as a model for X-linked muscular dystrophy we have found that myotonic bursts are recorded when a glass microelectrode is inserted into the muscle fibers of hemidiaphragm preparations of mdx mice. Insertion myotonia is ceased by addition of the Na channel blocker tetrotoxin. Myotonia is not reduced, nor ceased by lowering the extracellular Ca to 1/15 of the volume of ordinary Tyrode's solution. Calcium antagonist, nicardipine at the dose of 10(-7), and 10(-6)M/L do not reduce myotonic bursts. Higher dose of nicardipine up to 2 x 10(-5)M/L abolished myotonic bursts. These results indicate that myotonic bursts are related to muscle membrane abnormalities, and each action potential occurs through Na channel, but not through Ca channel Higher dose of calcium antagonist can abolish myotonia by affecting Na channel in addition to their primary effects of Ca channel. The clinical effects of the Ca antagonist for myotonia was reported in one study. Since previous medications for myotonia including quinine HCl, procaine amide, diphenylhydantoin, and carbamazepine have some side effects such as tinnitus, headache, nausea, cardiac blocks, and bone marrow suppression, Ca antagonist may be used as a safe therapeutic drug for myotonia.

  18. Fast skeletal myofibers of mdx mouse, model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, express connexin hemichannels that lead to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Cea, Luis A; Puebla, Carlos; Cisterna, Bruno A; Escamilla, Rosalba; Vargas, Aníbal A; Frank, Marina; Martínez-Montero, Paloma; Prior, Carmen; Molano, Jesús; Esteban-Rodríguez, Isabel; Pascual, Ignacio; Gallano, Pía; Lorenzo, Gustavo; Pian, Héctor; Barrio, Luis C; Willecke, Klaus; Sáez, Juan C

    2016-07-01

    Skeletal muscles of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) show numerous alterations including inflammation, apoptosis, and necrosis of myofibers. However, the molecular mechanism that explains these changes remains largely unknown. Here, the involvement of hemichannels formed by connexins (Cx HCs) was evaluated in skeletal muscle of mdx mouse model of DMD. Fast myofibers of mdx mice were found to express three connexins (39, 43 and 45) and high sarcolemma permeability, which was absent in myofibers of mdx Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl):Myo-Cre mice (deficient in skeletal muscle Cx43/Cx45 expression). These myofibers did not show elevated basal intracellular free Ca(2+) levels, immunoreactivity to phosphorylated p65 (active NF-κB), eNOS and annexin V/active Caspase 3 (marker of apoptosis) but presented dystrophin immunoreactivity. Moreover, muscles of mdx Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl):Myo-Cre mice exhibited partial decrease of necrotic features (big cells and high creatine kinase levels). Accordingly, these muscles showed similar macrophage infiltration as control mdx muscles. Nonetheless, the hanging test performance of mdx Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl):Myo-Cre mice was significantly better than that of control mdx Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl) mice. All three Cxs found in skeletal muscles of mdx mice were also detected in fast myofibers of biopsy specimens from patients with muscular dystrophy. Thus, reduction of Cx expression and/or function of Cx HCs may be potential therapeutic approaches to abrogate myofiber apoptosis in DMD. PMID:26803842

  19. Fast skeletal myofibers of mdx mouse, model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, express connexin hemichannels that lead to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Cea, Luis A; Puebla, Carlos; Cisterna, Bruno A; Escamilla, Rosalba; Vargas, Aníbal A; Frank, Marina; Martínez-Montero, Paloma; Prior, Carmen; Molano, Jesús; Esteban-Rodríguez, Isabel; Pascual, Ignacio; Gallano, Pía; Lorenzo, Gustavo; Pian, Héctor; Barrio, Luis C; Willecke, Klaus; Sáez, Juan C

    2016-07-01

    Skeletal muscles of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) show numerous alterations including inflammation, apoptosis, and necrosis of myofibers. However, the molecular mechanism that explains these changes remains largely unknown. Here, the involvement of hemichannels formed by connexins (Cx HCs) was evaluated in skeletal muscle of mdx mouse model of DMD. Fast myofibers of mdx mice were found to express three connexins (39, 43 and 45) and high sarcolemma permeability, which was absent in myofibers of mdx Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl):Myo-Cre mice (deficient in skeletal muscle Cx43/Cx45 expression). These myofibers did not show elevated basal intracellular free Ca(2+) levels, immunoreactivity to phosphorylated p65 (active NF-κB), eNOS and annexin V/active Caspase 3 (marker of apoptosis) but presented dystrophin immunoreactivity. Moreover, muscles of mdx Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl):Myo-Cre mice exhibited partial decrease of necrotic features (big cells and high creatine kinase levels). Accordingly, these muscles showed similar macrophage infiltration as control mdx muscles. Nonetheless, the hanging test performance of mdx Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl):Myo-Cre mice was significantly better than that of control mdx Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl) mice. All three Cxs found in skeletal muscles of mdx mice were also detected in fast myofibers of biopsy specimens from patients with muscular dystrophy. Thus, reduction of Cx expression and/or function of Cx HCs may be potential therapeutic approaches to abrogate myofiber apoptosis in DMD.

  20. Towards developing standard operating procedures for pre-clinical testing in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Grounds, Miranda D.; Radley, Hannah G.; Lynch, Gordon S.; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; De Luca, Annamaria

    2008-01-01

    This review discusses various issues to consider when developing standard operating procedures for pre-clinical studies in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The review describes and evaluates a wide range of techniques used to measure parameters of muscle pathology in mdx mice and identifies some basic techniques that might comprise standardised approaches for evaluation. While the central aim is to provide a basis for the development of standardised procedures to evaluate efficacy of a drug or a therapeutic strategy, a further aim is to gain insight into pathophysiological mechanisms in order to identify other therapeutic targets. The desired outcome is to enable easier and more rigorous comparison of pre-clinical data from different laboratories around the world, in order to accelerate identification of the best pre-clinical therapies in the mdx mouse that will fast-track translation into effective clinical treatments for DMD. PMID:18499465

  1. Taurine deficiency, synthesis and transport in the mdx mouse model for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Terrill, Jessica R; Grounds, Miranda D; Arthur, Peter G

    2015-09-01

    The amino acid taurine is essential for the function of skeletal muscle and administration is proposed as a treatment for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Taurine homeostasis is dependent on multiple processes including absorption of taurine from food, endogenous synthesis from cysteine and reabsorption in the kidney. This study investigates the cause of reported taurine deficiency in the dystrophic mdx mouse model of DMD. Levels of metabolites (taurine, cysteine, cysteine sulfinate and hypotaurine) and proteins (taurine transporter [TauT], cysteine deoxygenase and cysteine sulfinate dehydrogenase) were quantified in juvenile control C57 and dystrophic mdx mice aged 18 days, 4 and 6 weeks. In C57 mice, taurine content was much higher in both liver and plasma at 18 days, and both cysteine and cysteine deoxygenase were increased. As taurine levels decreased in maturing C57 mice, there was increased transport (reabsorption) of taurine in the kidney and muscle. In mdx mice, taurine and cysteine levels were much lower in liver and plasma at 18 days, and in muscle cysteine was low at 18 days, whereas taurine was lower at 4: these changes were associated with perturbations in taurine transport in liver, kidney and muscle and altered metabolism in liver and kidney. These data suggest that the maintenance of adequate body taurine relies on sufficient dietary intake of taurine and cysteine availability and metabolism, as well as retention of taurine by the kidney. This research indicates dystrophin deficiency not only perturbs taurine metabolism in the muscle but also affects taurine metabolism in the liver and kidney, and supports targeting cysteine and taurine deficiency as a potential therapy for DMD.

  2. Quantitative T2 combined with texture analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance images identify different degrees of muscle involvement in three mouse models of muscle dystrophy: mdx, Largemyd and mdx/Largemyd.

    PubMed

    Martins-Bach, Aurea B; Malheiros, Jackeline; Matot, Béatrice; Martins, Poliana C M; Almeida, Camila F; Caldeira, Waldir; Ribeiro, Alberto F; Loureiro de Sousa, Paulo; Azzabou, Noura; Tannús, Alberto; Carlier, Pierre G; Vainzof, Mariz

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been considered a promising non-invasive tool for monitoring therapeutic essays in small size mouse models of muscular dystrophies. Here, we combined MRI (anatomical images and transverse relaxation time constant-T2-measurements) to texture analyses in the study of four mouse strains covering a wide range of dystrophic phenotypes. Two still unexplored mouse models of muscular dystrophies were analyzed: The severely affected Largemyd mouse and the recently generated and worst double mutant mdx/Largemyd mouse, as compared to the mildly affected mdx and normal mice. The results were compared to histopathological findings. MRI showed increased intermuscular fat and higher muscle T2 in the three dystrophic mouse models when compared to the wild-type mice (T2: mdx/Largemyd: 37.6±2.8 ms; mdx: 35.2±4.5 ms; Largemyd: 36.6±4.0 ms; wild-type: 29.1±1.8 ms, p<0.05), in addition to higher muscle T2 in the mdx/Largemyd mice when compared to mdx (p<0.05). The areas with increased muscle T2 in the MRI correlated spatially with the identified histopathological alterations such as necrosis, inflammation, degeneration and regeneration foci. Nevertheless, muscle T2 values were not correlated with the severity of the phenotype in the 3 dystrophic mouse strains, since the severely affected Largemyd showed similar values than both the mild mdx and worst mdx/Largemyd lineages. On the other hand, all studied mouse strains could be unambiguously identified with texture analysis, which reflected the observed differences in the distribution of signals in muscle MRI. Thus, combined T2 intensity maps and texture analysis is a powerful approach for the characterization and differentiation of dystrophic muscles with diverse genotypes and phenotypes. These new findings provide important noninvasive tools in the evaluation of the efficacy of new therapies, and most importantly, can be directly applied in human translational research.

  3. Quantitative T2 Combined with Texture Analysis of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Images Identify Different Degrees of Muscle Involvement in Three Mouse Models of Muscle Dystrophy: mdx, Largemyd and mdx/Largemyd

    PubMed Central

    Martins-Bach, Aurea B.; Malheiros, Jackeline; Matot, Béatrice; Martins, Poliana C. M.; Almeida, Camila F.; Caldeira, Waldir; Ribeiro, Alberto F.; Loureiro de Sousa, Paulo; Azzabou, Noura; Tannús, Alberto; Carlier, Pierre G.; Vainzof, Mariz

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been considered a promising non-invasive tool for monitoring therapeutic essays in small size mouse models of muscular dystrophies. Here, we combined MRI (anatomical images and transverse relaxation time constant—T2—measurements) to texture analyses in the study of four mouse strains covering a wide range of dystrophic phenotypes. Two still unexplored mouse models of muscular dystrophies were analyzed: The severely affected Largemyd mouse and the recently generated and worst double mutant mdx/Largemyd mouse, as compared to the mildly affected mdx and normal mice. The results were compared to histopathological findings. MRI showed increased intermuscular fat and higher muscle T2 in the three dystrophic mouse models when compared to the wild-type mice (T2: mdx/Largemyd: 37.6±2.8 ms; mdx: 35.2±4.5 ms; Largemyd: 36.6±4.0 ms; wild-type: 29.1±1.8 ms, p<0.05), in addition to higher muscle T2 in the mdx/Largemyd mice when compared to mdx (p<0.05). The areas with increased muscle T2 in the MRI correlated spatially with the identified histopathological alterations such as necrosis, inflammation, degeneration and regeneration foci. Nevertheless, muscle T2 values were not correlated with the severity of the phenotype in the 3 dystrophic mouse strains, since the severely affected Largemyd showed similar values than both the mild mdx and worst mdx/Largemyd lineages. On the other hand, all studied mouse strains could be unambiguously identified with texture analysis, which reflected the observed differences in the distribution of signals in muscle MRI. Thus, combined T2 intensity maps and texture analysis is a powerful approach for the characterization and differentiation of dystrophic muscles with diverse genotypes and phenotypes. These new findings provide important noninvasive tools in the evaluation of the efficacy of new therapies, and most importantly, can be directly applied in human translational research

  4. Long-term treatment with naproxcinod significantly improves skeletal and cardiac disease phenotype in the mdx mouse model of dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Uaesoontrachoon, Kitipong; Quinn, James L; Tatem, Kathleen S; Van Der Meulen, Jack H; Yu, Qing; Phadke, Aditi; Miller, Brittany K; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Ongini, Ennio; Miglietta, Daniela; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2014-01-01

    In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients and the mouse model of DMD, mdx, dystrophin deficiency causes a decrease and mislocalization of muscle-specific neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOSμ), leading to functional impairments. Previous studies have shown that nitric oxide (NO) donation associated with anti-inflammatory action has beneficial effects in dystrophic mouse models. In this study, we have systematically investigated the effects of naproxcinod, an NO-donating naproxen derivative, on the skeletal and cardiac disease phenotype in mdx mice. Four-week-old mdx and C57BL/10 mice were treated with four different concentrations (0, 10, 21 and 41 mg/kg) of naproxcinod and 0.9 mg/kg of prednisolone in their food for 9 months. All mice were subjected to twice-weekly treadmill sessions, and functional and behavioral parameters were measured at 3, 6 and 9 months of treatment. In addition, we evaluated in vitro force contraction, optical imaging of inflammation, echocardiography and blood pressure (BP) at the 9-month endpoint prior to sacrifice. We found that naproxcinod treatment at 21 mg/kg resulted in significant improvement in hindlimb grip strength and a 30% decrease in inflammation in the fore- and hindlimbs of mdx mice. Furthermore, we found significant improvement in heart function, as evidenced by improved fraction shortening, ejection fraction and systolic BP. In addition, the long-term detrimental effects of prednisolone typically seen in mdx skeletal and heart function were not observed at the effective dose of naproxcinod. In conclusion, our results indicate that naproxcinod has significant potential as a safe therapeutic option for the treatment of muscular dystrophies. PMID:24463621

  5. Discovery of serum protein biomarkers in the mdx mouse model and cross-species comparison to Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients.

    PubMed

    Hathout, Yetrib; Marathi, Ramya L; Rayavarapu, Sree; Zhang, Aiping; Brown, Kristy J; Seol, Haeri; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Cirak, Sebahattin; Bello, Luca; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Partridge, Terry; Hoffman, Eric P; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Mah, Jean K; Henricson, Erik; McDonald, Craig

    2014-12-15

    It is expected that serum protein biomarkers in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) will reflect disease pathogenesis, progression and aid future therapy developments. Here, we describe use of quantitative in vivo stable isotope labeling in mammals to accurately compare serum proteomes of wild-type and dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. Biomarkers identified in serum from two independent dystrophin-deficient mouse models (mdx-Δ52 and mdx-23) were concordant with those identified in sera samples of DMD patients. Of the 355 mouse sera proteins, 23 were significantly elevated and 4 significantly lower in mdx relative to wild-type mice (P-value < 0.001). Elevated proteins were mostly of muscle origin: including myofibrillar proteins (titin, myosin light chain 1/3, myomesin 3 and filamin-C), glycolytic enzymes (aldolase, phosphoglycerate mutase 2, beta enolase and glycogen phosphorylase), transport proteins (fatty acid-binding protein, myoglobin and somatic cytochrome-C) and others (creatine kinase M, malate dehydrogenase cytosolic, fibrinogen and parvalbumin). Decreased proteins, mostly of extracellular origin, included adiponectin, lumican, plasminogen and leukemia inhibitory factor receptor. Analysis of sera from 1 week to 7 months old mdx mice revealed age-dependent changes in the level of these biomarkers with most biomarkers acutely elevated at 3 weeks of age. Serum analysis of DMD patients, with ages ranging from 4 to 15 years old, confirmed elevation of 20 of the murine biomarkers in DMD, with similar age-related changes. This study provides a panel of biomarkers that reflect muscle activity and pathogenesis and should prove valuable tool to complement natural history studies and to monitor treatment efficacy in future clinical trials. PMID:25027324

  6. Multivariate Data EXplorer (MDX)

    SciTech Connect

    Steed, Chad Allen

    2012-08-01

    The MDX toolkit facilitates exploratory data analysis and visualization of multivariate datasets. MDX provides and interactive graphical user interface to load, explore, and modify multivariate datasets stored in tabular forms. MDX uses an extended version of the parallel coordinates plot and scatterplots to represent the data. The user can perform rapid visual queries using mouse gestures in the visualization panels to select rows or columns of interest. The visualization panel provides coordinated multiple views whereby selections made in one plot are propagated to the other plots. Users can also export selected data or reconfigure the visualization panel to explore relationships between columns and rows in the data.

  7. Preclinical studies in the mdx mouse model of duchenne muscular dystrophy with the histone deacetylase inhibitor givinostat.

    PubMed

    Consalvi, Silvia; Mozzetta, Chiara; Bettica, Paolo; Germani, Massimiliano; Fiorentini, Francesco; Del Bene, Francesca; Rocchetti, Maurizio; Leoni, Flavio; Monzani, Valmen; Mascagni, Paolo; Puri, Pier Lorenzo; Saccone, Valentina

    2013-01-01

    Previous work has established the existence of dystrophin-nitric oxide (NO) signaling to histone deacetylases (HDACs) that is deregulated in dystrophic muscles. As such, pharmacological interventions that target HDACs (that is, HDAC inhibitors) are of potential therapeutic interest for the treatment of muscular dystrophies. In this study, we explored the effectiveness of long-term treatment with different doses of the HDAC inhibitor givinostat in mdx mice--the mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). This study identified an efficacy for recovering functional and histological parameters within a window between 5 and 10 mg/kg/d of givinostat, with evident reduction of the beneficial effects with 1 mg/kg/d dosage. The long-term (3.5 months) exposure of 1.5-month-old mdx mice to optimal concentrations of givinostat promoted the formation of muscles with increased cross-sectional area and reduced fibrotic scars and fatty infiltration, leading to an overall improvement of endurance performance in treadmill tests and increased membrane stability. Interestingly, a reduced inflammatory infiltrate was observed in muscles of mdx mice exposed to 5 and 10 mg/kg/d of givinostat. A parallel pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis confirmed the relationship between the effective doses of givinostat and the drug distribution in muscles and blood of treated mice. These findings provide the preclinical basis for an immediate translation of givinostat into clinical studies with DMD patients. PMID:23552722

  8. Preclinical Studies in the mdx Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy with the Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Givinostat

    PubMed Central

    Consalvi, Silvia; Mozzetta, Chiara; Bettica, Paolo; Germani, Massimiliano; Fiorentini, Francesco; Del Bene, Francesca; Rocchetti, Maurizio; Leoni, Flavio; Monzani, Valmen; Mascagni, Paolo; Puri, Pier Lorenzo; Saccone, Valentina

    2013-01-01

    Previous work has established the existence of dystrophin–nitric oxide (NO) signaling to histone deacetylases (HDACs) that is deregulated in dystrophic muscles. As such, pharmacological interventions that target HDACs (that is, HDAC inhibitors) are of potential therapeutic interest for the treatment of muscular dystrophies. In this study, we explored the effectiveness of long-term treatment with different doses of the HDAC inhibitor givinostat in mdx mice—the mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). This study identified an efficacy for recovering functional and histological parameters within a window between 5 and 10 mg/kg/d of givinostat, with evident reduction of the beneficial effects with 1 mg/kg/d dosage. The long-term (3.5 months) exposure of 1.5-month-old mdx mice to optimal concentrations of givinostat promoted the formation of muscles with increased cross-sectional area and reduced fibrotic scars and fatty infiltration, leading to an overall improvement of endurance performance in treadmill tests and increased membrane stability. Interestingly, a reduced inflammatory infiltrate was observed in muscles of mdx mice exposed to 5 and 10 mg/kg/d of givinostat. A parallel pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis confirmed the relationship between the effective doses of givinostat and the drug distribution in muscles and blood of treated mice. These findings provide the preclinical basis for an immediate translation of givinostat into clinical studies with DMD patients. PMID:23552722

  9. Reduction in mdx mouse muscle degeneration by low-intensity endurance exercise: a proteomic analysis in quadriceps muscle of exercised compared with sedentary mdx mice

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Simona; Schillaci, Odessa; Frinchi, Monica; Giallombardo, Marco; Morici, Giuseppe; Liberto, Valentina Di; Alessandro, Riccardo; De Leo, Giacomo; Perciavalle, Vincenzo; Belluardo, Natale; Mudò, Giuseppa

    2015-01-01

    In our recent study was shown a significant recovery of damaged skeletal muscle of mice with X-linked muscular dystrophy (mdx) following low-intensity endurance exercise, probably by reducing the degeneration of dystrophic muscle. Consequently, in the present work, we aimed to identify proteins involved in the observed reduction in degenerating fibres. To this end, we used proteomic analysis to evaluate changes in the protein profile of quadriceps dystrophic muscles of exercised compared with sedentary mdx mice. Four protein spots were found to be significantly changed and were identified as three isoforms of carbonic anhydrase 3 (CA3) and superoxide dismutase [Cu-Zn] (SODC). Protein levels of CA3 isoforms were significantly up-regulated in quadriceps of sedentary mdx mice and were completely restored to wild–type (WT) mice values, both sedentary and exercised, in quadriceps of exercised mdx mice. Protein levels of SODC were down-regulated in quadriceps of sedentary mdx mice and were significantly restored to WT mice values, both sedentary and exercised, in quadriceps of exercised mdx mice. Western blot data were in agreement with those obtained using proteomic analysis and revealed the presence of one more CA3 isoform that was significantly changed. Based on data found in the present study, it seems that low-intensity endurance exercise may in part contribute to reduce cell degeneration process in mdx muscles, by counteracting oxidative stress. PMID:26182375

  10. Reduction in mdx mouse muscle degeneration by low-intensity endurance exercise: a proteomic analysis in quadriceps muscle of exercised compared with sedentary mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Simona; Schillaci, Odessa; Frinchi, Monica; Giallombardo, Marco; Morici, Giuseppe; Di Liberto, Valentina; Alessandro, Riccardo; De Leo, Giacomo; Perciavalle, Vincenzo; Belluardo, Natale; Mudò, Giuseppa

    2015-01-01

    In our recent study was shown a significant recovery of damaged skeletal muscle of mice with X-linked muscular dystrophy (mdx) following low-intensity endurance exercise, probably by reducing the degeneration of dystrophic muscle. Consequently, in the present work, we aimed to identify proteins involved in the observed reduction in degenerating fibres. To this end, we used proteomic analysis to evaluate changes in the protein profile of quadriceps dystrophic muscles of exercised compared with sedentary mdx mice. Four protein spots were found to be significantly changed and were identified as three isoforms of carbonic anhydrase 3 (CA3) and superoxide dismutase [Cu-Zn] (SODC). Protein levels of CA3 isoforms were significantly up-regulated in quadriceps of sedentary mdx mice and were completely restored to wild-type (WT) mice values, both sedentary and exercised, in quadriceps of exercised mdx mice. Protein levels of SODC were down-regulated in quadriceps of sedentary mdx mice and were significantly restored to WT mice values, both sedentary and exercised, in quadriceps of exercised mdx mice. Western blot data were in agreement with those obtained using proteomic analysis and revealed the presence of one more CA3 isoform that was significantly changed. Based on data found in the present study, it seems that low-intensity endurance exercise may in part contribute to reduce cell degeneration process in mdx muscles, by counteracting oxidative stress. PMID:26182375

  11. Intrinsic laryngeal muscles are spared from myonecrosis in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Marques, Maria Julia; Ferretti, Renato; Vomero, Viviane Urbini; Minatel, Elaine; Neto, Humberto Santo

    2007-03-01

    Intrinsic laryngeal muscles share many anatomical and physiological properties with extraocular muscles, which are unaffected in both Duchenne muscular dystrophy and mdx mice. We hypothesized that intrinsic laryngeal muscles are spared from myonecrosis in mdx mice and may serve as an additional tool to understand the mechanisms of muscle sparing in dystrophinopathy. Intrinsic laryngeal muscles and tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of adult and aged mdx and control C57Bl/10 mice were investigated. The percentage of central nucleated fibers, as a sign of muscle fibers that had undergone injury and regeneration, and myofiber labeling with Evans blue dye, as a marker of myofiber damage, were studied. Except for the cricothyroid muscle, none of the intrinsic laryngeal muscles from adult and old mdx mice showed signs of myofiber damage or Evans blue dye labeling, and all appeared to be normal. Central nucleation was readily visible in the TA of the same mdx mice. A significant increase in the percentage of central nucleated fibers was observed in adult cricothyroid muscle compared to the other intrinsic laryngeal muscles, which worsened with age. Thus, we have shown that the intrinsic laryngeal muscles are spared from the lack of dystrophin and may serve as a useful model to study the mechanisms of muscle sparing in dystrophinopathy.

  12. Focal but reversible diastolic sheet dysfunction reflects regional calcium mishandling in dystrophic mdx mouse hearts

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ya-Jian; Lang, Di; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Efimov, Igor R.; Chen, Junjie

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac dysfunction is a primary cause of patient mortality in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, potentially related to elevated cytosolic calcium. However, the regional versus global functional consequences of cellular calcium mishandling have not been defined in the whole heart. Here we sought for the first time to elucidate potential regional dependencies between calcium mishandling and myocardial fiber/sheet function as a manifestation of dystrophin-deficient (mdx) cardiomyopathy. Isolated-perfused hearts from 16-mo-old mdx (N = 10) and wild-type (WT; N = 10) were arrested sequentially in diastole and systole for diffusion tensor MRI quantification of myocardial sheet architecture and function. When compared with WT hearts, mdx hearts exhibited normal systolic sheet architecture but a lower diastolic sheet angle magnitude (|β|) in the basal region. The regional diastolic sheet dysfunction was normalized by reducing perfusate calcium concentrations. Optical mapping of calcium transients in isolated hearts (3 mdx and 4 WT) revealed a stretch-inducible regional defect of intracellular calcium reuptake, reflected by a 25% increase of decay times (T50) and decay constants, at the base of mdx hearts. The basal region of mdx hearts also exhibited greater fibrosis than did the apex, which matched the regional sheet dysfunction. We conclude that myocardial diastolic sheet dysfunction is observed initially in basal segments along with calcium mishandling, ultimately culminating in increased fibrosis. The preservation of relatively normal calcium reuptake and diastolic/systolic sheet mechanics throughout the rest of the heart, together with the rapid reversibility of functional defects by reducing cytosolic calcium, points to the significance of regional mechanical factors in the progression of the disease. PMID:22777417

  13. Identification of muscle necrosis in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy using three-dimensional optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyen, Blake R.; Shavlakadze, Thea; Radley-Crabb, Hannah G.; Grounds, Miranda D.; Sampson, David D.

    2011-07-01

    Three-dimensional optical coherence tomography (3D-OCT) was used to image the structure and pathology of skeletal muscle tissue from the treadmill-exercised mdx mouse model of human Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of excised muscle samples were compared with co-registered hematoxylin and eosin-stained and Evans blue dye fluorescence histology. We show, for the first time, structural 3D-OCT images of skeletal muscle dystropathology well correlated with co-located histology. OCT could identify morphological features of interest and necrotic lesions within the muscle tissue samples based on intrinsic optical contrast. These findings demonstrate the utility of 3D-OCT for the evaluation of small-animal skeletal muscle morphology and pathology, particularly for studies of mouse models of muscular dystrophy.

  14. Tissue distribution of the dystrophin-related gene product and expression in the mdx and dy mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Love, D.R.; Marsden, R.F.; Bloomfield, J.F.; Davies, K.E. ); Morris, G.E.; Ellis, J.M. ); Fairbrother, U.; Edwards, Y.H. ); Slater, C.P. ); Parry, D.J. )

    1991-04-15

    The authors have previously reported a dystrophin-related locus (DMDL for Duchenne muscular dystrophy-like) on human chromosome 6 that maps close to the dy mutation on mouse chromosome 10. Here they show that this gene is expressed in a wide range of tissues at varying levels. The transcript is particularly abundant in several human fetal tissues, including heart, placenta, and intestine. Studies with antisera raised against a DMDL fusion protein identify a 400,000 M{sub r} protein in all mouse tissues tested, including those of mdx and dy mice. Unlike the dystrophin gene, the DMDL gene transcript is not differentially spliced at the 3{prime} end in either fetal muscle or brain.

  15. Lack of the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase SGK1 improves muscle force characteristics and attenuates fibrosis in dystrophic mdx mouse muscle.

    PubMed

    Steinberger, Martin; Föller, Michael; Vogelgesang, Silke; Krautwald, Mirjam; Landsberger, Martin; Winkler, Claudia K; Kasch, Joachim; Füchtbauer, Ernst-Martin; Kuhl, Dietmar; Voelkl, Jakob; Lang, Florian; Brinkmeier, Heinrich

    2015-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a human genetic disease characterized by fibrosis and severe muscle weakness. Currently, there is no effective treatment available to prevent progressive fibrosis in skeletal muscles. The serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase SGK1 regulates a variety of physiological functions and participates in fibrosis stimulation. Here, we investigated whether SGK1 influences structure, function and/or fibrosis of the muscles from the mdx mouse, an animal model for DMD. As expected, mdx muscles showed the typical pathological features of muscular dystrophy including fiber size variations, central nuclei of muscle fibers, fibrosis in the diaphragm, and force reduction by 30-50 %. Muscles from sgk1 (-/-) mice were histologically overall intact and specific force was only slightly reduced compared to wild-type muscles. Surprisingly, soleus and diaphragm muscles of mdx/sgk1 (-/-) mice displayed forces close to wild-type levels. Most muscle fibers of the double mutants contained central nuclei, but fibrosis was not observed in any of the tested limb and diaphragm muscles. We conclude that the sole lack of SGK1 in mouse muscle does not lead to pronounced changes in muscle structure and function. However, dystrophin-deficient mdx muscle seems to benefit from SGK1 deficiency. SGK1 appears to be an important enzyme in the process of fibrotic remodeling and subsequent weakness of dystrophin-deficient mouse muscle. PMID:25394886

  16. Lack of the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase SGK1 improves muscle force characteristics and attenuates fibrosis in dystrophic mdx mouse muscle.

    PubMed

    Steinberger, Martin; Föller, Michael; Vogelgesang, Silke; Krautwald, Mirjam; Landsberger, Martin; Winkler, Claudia K; Kasch, Joachim; Füchtbauer, Ernst-Martin; Kuhl, Dietmar; Voelkl, Jakob; Lang, Florian; Brinkmeier, Heinrich

    2015-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a human genetic disease characterized by fibrosis and severe muscle weakness. Currently, there is no effective treatment available to prevent progressive fibrosis in skeletal muscles. The serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase SGK1 regulates a variety of physiological functions and participates in fibrosis stimulation. Here, we investigated whether SGK1 influences structure, function and/or fibrosis of the muscles from the mdx mouse, an animal model for DMD. As expected, mdx muscles showed the typical pathological features of muscular dystrophy including fiber size variations, central nuclei of muscle fibers, fibrosis in the diaphragm, and force reduction by 30-50 %. Muscles from sgk1 (-/-) mice were histologically overall intact and specific force was only slightly reduced compared to wild-type muscles. Surprisingly, soleus and diaphragm muscles of mdx/sgk1 (-/-) mice displayed forces close to wild-type levels. Most muscle fibers of the double mutants contained central nuclei, but fibrosis was not observed in any of the tested limb and diaphragm muscles. We conclude that the sole lack of SGK1 in mouse muscle does not lead to pronounced changes in muscle structure and function. However, dystrophin-deficient mdx muscle seems to benefit from SGK1 deficiency. SGK1 appears to be an important enzyme in the process of fibrotic remodeling and subsequent weakness of dystrophin-deficient mouse muscle.

  17. Normal photoresponses and altered b-wave responses to APB in the mdxCv3 mouse isolated retina ERG supports role for dystrophin in synaptic transmission

    PubMed Central

    GREEN, DANIEL G.; GUO, HAO

    2005-01-01

    The mdxCv3 mouse is a model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). DMD is an X-linked disorder with defective expression of the protein dystrophin, and which is associated with a reduced b-wave and has other electroretinogram (ERG) abnormalities. To assess potential causes for the abnormalities, we recorded ERGs from pieces of isolated C57BL/6J and mdxCv3 mouse retinas, including measurements of transretinal and intraretinal potentials. The ERGs from the isolated mdxCv3 retina differ from those of control retinas in that they show reduced b-wave amplitudes and increased b-wave implicit times. Photovoltages obtained by recording across the photoreceptor outer segments of the retinas did not differ from normal, suggesting that the likely causes of the reduced b-wave are localized to the photoreceptor to ON-bipolar synapse. At a concentration of 50 μM, the glutamate analog DL-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (APB) blocks the b-wave component of the ERG, by binding to sites on the postsynaptic membrane. The On-bipolar cell contribution to the ERG was inferred by extracting the component that was blocked by APB. We found that this component was smaller in amplitude and had longer response latencies in the mdxCv3 mice, but was of similar overall time course. To assess the sensitivity of sites on the postsynaptic membrane to glutamate, the concentration of APB in the media was systematically varied, and the magnitude of blockage of the light response was quantified. We found that the mdxCv3 retina was 5-fold more sensitive to APB than control retinas. The ability of lower concentrations of APB to block the b-wave in mdxCv3 suggests that the ERG abnormalities may reflect alterations in either glutamate release, the glutamate postsynaptic binding sites, or in other proteins that modulate glutamate function in ON-bipolar cells. PMID:15683561

  18. Therapeutic effects of mouse adipose-derived stem cells and losartan in the skeletal muscle of injured mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Mi; Kim, Ah-Young; Lee, Eun-Joo; Park, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Myeong-Mi; Hwang, Meeyul; Kim, Choong-Yong; Kim, Shin-Yoon; Jeong, Kyu-Shik

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked genetic disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are an attractive source of cells for stem cell therapy. Losartan has been reported to improve ASC transplantation in injured mouse muscles. In the present study, we investigated whether the combined treatment of losartan and ASCs in the injured muscles of mdx mice improves regeneration. The combined treatment of ASCs and losartan remarkably improved muscle regeneration and induced muscle hypertrophy. In addition, ASCs and losartan treatment downregulated transforming growth factor-β and inhibited muscle fibrosis. We observed cells coexpressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) and dystrophin in the muscle samples of mice transplanted with GFP-positive ASCs. In the coculture in vitro experiment, we also observed that the GFP ASCs differentiated into dystrophin-expressing myotubes. The present study shows that the combination of transplanted ASCs and treatment with losartan ameliorated muscle fibrosis and improved muscle regeneration in injured mdx mice. Thus, we suggest that combined treatment with losartan and ASCs could help to improve muscle regeneration in the muscles of injured patients, including DMD patients.

  19. The use of urinary and kidney SILAM proteomics to monitor kidney response to high dose morpholino oligonucleotides in the mdx mouse

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Aiping; Uaesoontrachoon, Kitipong; Shaughnessy, Conner; Das, Jharna R.; Rayavarapu, Sree; Brown, Kristy J; Ray, Patricio E.; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; van den Anker, John N.; Hoffman, Eric P; Hathout, Yetrib

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligonucleotides (PMO) are used as a promising exon-skipping gene therapy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). One potential complication of high dose PMO therapy is its transient accumulation in the kidneys. Therefore new urinary biomarkers are needed to monitor this treatment. Here, we carried out a pilot proteomic profiling study using stable isotope labeling in mammals (SILAM) strategy to identify new biomarkers to monitor the effect of PMO on the kidneys of the dystrophin deficient mouse model for DMD (mdx-23). We first assessed the baseline renal status of the mdx-23 mouse compared to the wild type (C57BL10) mouse, and then followed the renal outcome of mdx-23 mouse treated with a single high dose intravenous PMO injection (800 mg/kg). Surprisingly, untreated mdx-23 mice showed evidence of renal injury at baseline, which was manifested by albuminuria, increased urine output, and changes in established urinary biomarker of acute kidney injury (AKI). The PMO treatment induced further transient renal injury, which peaked at 7 days, and returned to almost the baseline status at 30 days post-treatment. In the kidney, the SILAM approach followed by western blot validation identified changes in Meprin A subunit alpha at day 2, then returned to normal levels at day 7 and 30 after PMO injection. In the urine, SILAM approach identified an increase in Clusterin and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase 1 as potential candidates to monitor the transient renal accumulation of PMO. These results, which were confirmed by Western blots or ELISA, demonstrate the value of the SILAM approach to identify new candidate biomarkers of renal injury in mdx-23 mice treated with high dose PMO. Chemical compounds studied in this article: Phosphorodiamidate morpholino (PubChem CID: 22140692); isoflurane (PubChem CID: 3763); formic acid (PubChem CID: 284); acetonitrile (PubChem CID: 6342); acetone (PubChem CID: 180); methanol (PubChem CID: 887) PMID:26213685

  20. Antibody against the C-terminal portion of dystrophin crossreacts with the 400 kDa protein in the pia mater of dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Ishiura, S; Arahata, K; Tsukahara, T; Koga, R; Anraku, H; Yamaguchi, M; Kikuchi, T; Nonaka, I; Sugita, H

    1990-04-01

    The mdx mouse is an animal model for X-linked Duchenne muscular dystrophy. A polyclonal antibody against a synthetic peptide IV equivalent to the C-terminal portion (amino acids 3495-3544) of dystrophin crossreacted with a 400 kDa protein in the brain and the spinal cord of mdx mouse, as well as in the control B10 mouse. However, the protein did not crossreact with the polyclonal antibody raised against the N-terminal portion of dystrophin peptide I (amino acids 215-264). Immunofluorescent micrography revealed that the outside of the small arteries and the pia mater of the brain strongly reacted with the anti-peptide IV antibody. These results strongly suggest the presence of a crossreactive protein other than dystrophin, possibly a dystrophin-related autosomal gene product, in the pia mater.

  1. Multivariate Data EXplorer (MDX)

    2012-08-01

    The MDX toolkit facilitates exploratory data analysis and visualization of multivariate datasets. MDX provides and interactive graphical user interface to load, explore, and modify multivariate datasets stored in tabular forms. MDX uses an extended version of the parallel coordinates plot and scatterplots to represent the data. The user can perform rapid visual queries using mouse gestures in the visualization panels to select rows or columns of interest. The visualization panel provides coordinated multiple views wherebymore » selections made in one plot are propagated to the other plots. Users can also export selected data or reconfigure the visualization panel to explore relationships between columns and rows in the data.« less

  2. Comparative proteomic profiling of soleus, extensor digitorum longus, flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscles from the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Carberry, Steven; Brinkmeier, Heinrich; Zhang, Yaxin; Winkler, Claudia K; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2013-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is due to genetic abnormalities in the dystrophin gene and represents one of the most frequent genetic childhood diseases. In the X-linked muscular dystrophy (mdx) mouse model of dystrophinopathy, different subtypes of skeletal muscles are affected to a varying degree albeit the same single base substitution within exon 23 of the dystrophin gene. Thus, to determine potential muscle subtype-specific differences in secondary alterations due to a deficiency in dystrophin, in this study, we carried out a comparative histological and proteomic survey of mdx muscles. We intentionally included the skeletal muscles that are often used for studying the pathomechanism of muscular dystrophy. Histological examinations revealed a significantly higher degree of central nucleation in the soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles compared with the flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscles. Muscular hypertrophy of 20-25% was likewise only observed in the soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles from mdx mice, but not in the flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscles. For proteomic analysis, muscle protein extracts were separated by fluorescence two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis. Proteins with a significant change in their expression were identified by mass spectrometry. Proteomic profiling established an altered abundance of 24, 17, 19 and 5 protein species in the dystrophin-deficient soleus, extensor digitorum longus, flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscle, respectively. The key proteomic findings were verified by immunoblot analysis. The identified proteins are involved in the contraction-relaxation cycle, metabolite transport, muscle metabolism and the cellular stress response. Thus, histological and proteomic profiling of muscle subtypes from mdx mice indicated that distinct skeletal muscles are differentially affected by the loss of the membrane cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. Varying degrees of perturbed protein

  3. Resveratrol ameliorates muscular pathology in the dystrophic mdx mouse, a model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hori, Yusuke S; Kuno, Atsushi; Hosoda, Ryusuke; Tanno, Masaya; Miura, Tetsuji; Shimamoto, Kazuaki; Horio, Yoshiyuki

    2011-09-01

    Muscular dystrophies are inherited myogenic disorders accompanied by progressive skeletal muscle weakness and degeneration. We previously showed that resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene), an antioxidant and activator of the NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase SIRT1, delays the progression of heart failure and prolongs the lifespan of δ-sarcoglycan-deficient hamsters. Because a defect of dystroglycan complex causes muscular dystrophies, and δ-sarcoglycan is a component of this complex, we hypothesized that resveratrol might be a new therapeutic tool for muscular dystrophies. Here, we examined resveratrol's effect in mdx mice, an animal model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. mdx mice that received resveratrol in the diet for 32 weeks (4 g/kg diet) showed significantly less muscle mass loss and nonmuscle interstitial tissue in the biceps femoris compared with mdx mice fed a control diet. In the muscles of these mice, resveratrol significantly decreased oxidative damage shown by the immunostaining of nitrotyrosine and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and suppressed the up-regulation of NADPH oxidase subunits Nox4, Duox1, and p47(phox). Resveratrol also reduced the number of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)(+) myofibroblast cells and endomysial fibrosis in the biceps femoris, although the infiltration of CD45(+) inflammatory cells and increase in transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) were still observed. In C2C12 myoblast cells, resveratrol pretreatment suppressed the TGF-β1-induced increase in reactive oxygen species, fibronectin production, and expression of α-SMA, and SIRT1 knockdown blocked these inhibitory effects. SIRT1 small interfering RNA also increased the expression of Nox4, p47(phox), and α-SMA in C2C12 cells. Taken together, these findings indicate that SIRT1 activation may be a useful strategy for treating muscular dystrophies. PMID:21652783

  4. Alteration of excitation-contraction coupling mechanism in extensor digitorum longus muscle fibres of dystrophic mdx mouse and potential efficacy of taurine

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, Annamaria; Pierno, Sabata; Liantonio, Antonella; Cetrone, Michela; Camerino, Claudia; Simonetti, Simonetta; Papadia, Francesco; Camerino, Diana Conte

    2001-01-01

    No clear data is available about functional alterations in the calcium-dependent excitation-contraction (e-c) coupling mechanism of dystrophin-deficient muscle of mdx mice. By means of the intracellular microelectrode ‘point' voltage clamp method, we measured the voltage threshold for contraction (mechanical threshold; MT) in intact extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle fibres of dystrophic mdx mouse of two different ages: 8–12 weeks, during the active regeneration of hind limb muscles, and 6–8 months, when regeneration is complete. The EDL muscle fibres of 8–12-week-old wildtype animals had a more negative rheobase voltage (potential of equilibrium for contraction- and relaxation-related calcium movements) with respect to control mice of 6–8 months. However, at both ages, the EDL muscle fibres of mdx mice contracted at more negative potentials with respect to age-matched controls and had markedly slower time constants to reach the rheobase. The in vitro application of 60 mM taurine, whose normally high intracellular muscle levels play a role in e-c coupling, was without effect on 6–8-month-old wildtype EDL muscle, while it significantly ameliorated the MT of mdx mouse. HPLC determination of taurine content at 6–8 months showed a significant 140% rise of plasma taurine levels and a clear trend toward a decrease in amino acid levels in hind limb muscles, brain and heart, suggesting a tissue difficulty in retaining appropriate levels of the amino acid. The data is consistent with a permanent alteration of e-c coupling in mdx EDL muscle fibres. The alteration could be related to the proposed increase in intracellular calcium, and can be ameliorated by taurine, suggesting a potential therapeutic role of the amino acid. PMID:11226135

  5. Expression analysis in multiple muscle groups and serum reveals complexity in the microRNA transcriptome of the mdx mouse with implications for therapy.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Thomas C; Blomberg, K Emelie M; McClorey, Graham; El Andaloussi, Samir; Godfrey, Caroline; Betts, Corinne; Coursindel, Thibault; Gait, Michael J; Smith, C I Edvard; Wood, Matthew J A

    2012-08-14

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small RNAs that regulate gene expression and are implicated in wide-ranging cellular processes and pathological conditions including Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We have compared differential miRNA expression in proximal and distal limb muscles, diaphragm, heart and serum in the mdx mouse relative to wild-type controls. Global transcriptome analysis revealed muscle-specific patterns of differential miRNA expression as well as a number of changes common between tissues, including previously identified dystromirs. In the case of miR-31 and miR-34c, upregulation of primary-miRNA transcripts, precursor hairpins and all mature miRNAs derived from the same transcript or miRNA cluster, strongly suggests transcriptional regulation of these miRNAs. The most striking differences in differential miRNA expression were between muscle tissue and serum. Specifically, miR-1, miR-133a, and miR-206 were highly abundant in mdx serum but downregulated or modestly upregulated in muscle, suggesting that these miRNAs are promising disease biomarkers. Indeed, the relative serum levels of these miRNAs were normalized in response to peptide-phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligonucleotide (PMO) mediated dystrophin restoration therapy. This study has revealed further complexity in the miRNA transcriptome of the mdx mouse, an understanding of which will be valuable in the development of novel therapeutics and for monitoring their efficacy.

  6. Nitric oxide donors improve prednisone effects on muscular dystrophy in the mdx mouse diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Mizunoya, Wataru; Upadhaya, Ritika; Burczynski, Frank J; Wang, Guqi; Anderson, Judy E

    2011-05-01

    In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), palliative glucocorticoid therapy can produce myopathy or calcification. Since increased nitric oxide synthase activity in dystrophic mice promotes regeneration, the outcome of two nitric oxide (NO) donor drugs, MyoNovin (M) and isosorbide dinitrate (I), on the effectiveness of the anti-inflammatory drug prednisone (P) in alleviating progression of dystrophy was tested. Dystrophic mdx mice were treated (18 days) as controls or with an NO donor ± P. Fiber permeability and DNA synthesis were labeled by Evans blue dye (EBD) and bromodeoxyuridine uptake, respectively. P decreased body weight gain, M increased quadriceps mass, and I increased heart mass. P increased fiber permeability (%EBD+ fibers) and calcification in diaphragm. Treatment with NO donors + P (M+P, I+P) reduced %EBD+ fibers and calcification vs. P alone. %EBD+ fibers in M+P diaphragm did not differ from control. NO donor treatment reduced proliferation and the population of c-met+ cells and accelerated fiber regeneration. Concurrent with P, NO donor treatment suppressed two important detrimental effects of P in mice, possibly by accelerating regeneration, rebalancing satellite cell quiescence and activation in dystrophy, and/or increasing perfusion. Results suggest that NO donors could improve current therapy for DMD.

  7. An in vivo and in vitro H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy study of mdx mouse brain: abnormal development or neural necrosis?

    PubMed

    Tracey, I; Dunn, J F; Parkes, H G; Radda, G K

    1996-09-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked genetic disorder primarily affecting young boys, often causing mental retardation in addition to the well-known progressive muscular weakness. Normal dystrophin expression is lacking in skeletal muscle and the central nervous system (CNS) of both DMD children and the mdx mouse model. The underlying biochemical lesion causing mental impairment in DMD is unknown. 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) detects choline-containing compounds, creatine and N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) in vivo. NAA is commonly used as a chemical marker for neurons, and a decline in NAA is thought to correlate with neuronal loss. Control mice were compared to mdx using a combination of in vivo and in vitro 1H-MRS methods to determine whether neural necrosis or developmental abnormalities occur in dystrophic brain. NAA levels were normal in mdx brain compared to controls suggesting minor, if any, neuronal necrosis in dystrophic brain. In contrast, choline compounds and myo-inositol levels were increased, indicative of gliosis or developmental abnormalities in dystrophic brain. PMID:8880686

  8. The effect of respiratory muscle training with CO2 breathing on cellular adaptation of mdx mouse diaphragm

    PubMed Central

    Matécki, Stefan; Rivier, François; Hugon, Gerald; Koechlin, Christelle; Michel, Alain; Préfaut, Christian; Mornet, Dominique; Ramonatxo, Michèle

    2005-01-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the cellular mechanisms induced by hypercapnic stimulation of ventilation, during 6 weeks/30 min per day, in 10 mdx and 8 C57BL10 mice (10G0.2 months old). Ten mdx and eight C57BL10 mice served as control group. This respiratory training increases in vitro maximal tetanic tension of the diaphragm only in mdx mice. Western blot analysis of diaphragm showed: (1) an over-expression of a-dystrobrevin in mdx and C57BL10 training group compared to control group (8100G710 versus 6100G520 and 2800G400 versus 2200G250 arbitrary units); (2) a decrease in utrophin expression only in mdx training group compared to control group (2100G320 versus 3100G125 arbitrary units). Daily respiratory muscle training in mdx mice, induces a beneficial effect on diaphragm strength, with an over-expression of a-dystrobrevin. Further studies are needed to determine if, in absence of dystrophin, the over-expression of a-dystrobrevin could be interpreted as a possible pathway to improve function of dystrophic muscle. PMID:15907290

  9. The effect of respiratory muscle training with CO2 breathing on cellular adaptation of mdx mouse diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Matecki, Stefan; Rivier, François; Hugon, Gerald; Koechlin, Christelle; Michel, Alain; Prefaut, Christian; Mornet, Dominique; Ramonatxo, Michele

    2005-06-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the cellular mechanisms induced by hypercapnic stimulation of ventilation, during 6 weeks/30 min per day, in 10 mdx and 8 C57BL10 mice (10+/-0.2 months old). Ten mdx and eight C57BL10 mice served as control group. This respiratory training increases in vitro maximal tetanic tension of the diaphragm only in mdx mice. Western blot analysis of diaphragm showed: (1) an over-expression of alpha-dystrobrevin in mdx and C57BL10 training group compared to control group (8100+/-710 versus 6100+/-520 and 2800+/-400 versus 2200+/-250 arbitrary units); (2) a decrease in utrophin expression only in mdx training group compared to control group (2100+/-320 versus 3100+/-125 arbitrary units). Daily respiratory muscle training in mdx mice, induces a beneficial effect on diaphragm strength, with an over-expression of alpha-dystrobrevin. Further studies are needed to determine if, in absence of dystrophin, the over-expression of alpha-dystrobrevin could be interpreted as a possible pathway to improve function of dystrophic muscle. PMID:15907290

  10. The mdx mouse model as a surrogate for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Partridge, Terence A.

    2014-01-01

    Research into fundamental principles and the testing of therapeutic hypotheses for treatment of human disease is commonly conducted on mouse models of human diseases. Although this is often the only practicable approach, it carries a number of caveats arising from differences between the two species. This article is centred on the example of skeletal muscle disease, in particular muscular dystrophy, to identify some of the principal classes of obstacle to the translation of data from mouse to man. Of these, the difference in scale is one of the most commonly ignored and is of particular interest because it has quite major repercussions for evaluation of some classes of intervention and of assessment criteria while having comparatively little bearing on others. Likewise, interspecies differences and similarities in cell and molecular biological mechanisms underlying development, growth and response to pathological processes should be considered on an individual basis. An awareness of such distinctions is crucial if we are to avoid misjudgement of the likely efficacy in man of results obtained on mouse models. PMID:23551987

  11. Read-through compound 13 restores dystrophin expression and improves muscle function in the mdx mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kayali, Refik; Ku, Jin-Mo; Khitrov, Gregory; Jung, Michael E.; Prikhodko, Olga; Bertoni, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Molecules that induce ribosomal read-through of nonsense mutations in mRNA and allow production of a full-length functional protein hold great therapeutic potential for the treatment of many genetic disorders. Two such read-through compounds, RTC13 and RTC14, were recently identified by a luciferase-independent high-throughput screening assay and were shown to have potential therapeutic functions in the treatment of nonsense mutations in the ATM and the dystrophin genes. We have now tested the ability of RTC13 and RTC14 to restore dystrophin expression into skeletal muscles of the mdx mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Direct intramuscular injection of compound RTC14 did not result in significant read-through activity in vivo and demonstrated the levels of dystrophin protein similar to those detected using gentamicin. In contrast, significant higher amounts of dystrophin were detected after intramuscular injection of RTC13. When administered systemically, RTC13 was shown to partially restore dystrophin protein in different muscle groups, including diaphragm and heart, and improved muscle function. An increase in muscle strength was detected in all treated animals and was accompanied by a significant decrease in creatine kinase levels. These studies establish the therapeutic potential of RTC13 in vivo and advance this newly identified compound into preclinical application for DMD. PMID:22692682

  12. Gene expression in mdx mouse muscle in relation to age and exercise: aberrant mechanical-metabolic coupling and implications for pre-clinical studies in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Camerino, Giulia Maria; Cannone, Maria; Giustino, Arcangela; Massari, Ada Maria; Capogrosso, Roberta Francesca; Cozzoli, Anna; De Luca, Annamaria

    2014-11-01

    Weakness and fatigability are typical features of Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients and are aggravated in dystrophic mdx mice by chronic treadmill exercise. Mechanical activity modulates gene expression and muscle plasticity. Here, we investigated the outcome of 4 (T4, 8 weeks of age) and 12 (T12, 16 weeks of age) weeks of either exercise or cage-based activity on a large set of genes in the gastrocnemius muscle of mdx and wild-type (WT) mice using quantitative real-time PCR. Basal expression of the exercise-sensitive genes peroxisome-proliferator receptor γ coactivator 1α (Pgc-1α) and Sirtuin1 (Sirt1) was higher in mdx versus WT mice at both ages. Exercise increased Pgc-1α expression in WT mice; Pgc-1α was downregulated by T12 exercise in mdx muscles, along with Sirt1, Pparγ and the autophagy marker Bnip3. Sixteen weeks old mdx mice showed a basal overexpression of the slow Mhc1 isoform and Serca2; T12 exercise fully contrasted this basal adaptation as well as the high expression of follistatin and myogenin. Conversely, T12 exercise was ineffective in WT mice. Damage-related genes such as gp91-phox (NADPH-oxidase2), Tgfβ, Tnfα and c-Src tyrosine kinase were overexpressed in mdx muscles and not affected by exercise. Likewise, the anti-inflammatory adiponectin was lower in T12-exercised mdx muscles. Chronic exercise with minor adaptive effects in WT muscles leads to maladaptation in mdx muscles with a disequilibrium between protective and damaging signals. Increased understanding of the pathways involved in the altered mechanical-metabolic coupling may help guide appropriate physical therapies while better addressing pharmacological interventions in translational research.

  13. Myogenin Regulates Exercise Capacity but Is Dispensable for Skeletal Muscle Regeneration in Adult mdx Mice

    PubMed Central

    Klein, William H.

    2011-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most prevalent inherited childhood muscle disorder in humans. mdx mice exhibit a similar pathophysiology to the human disorder allowing for an in-depth investigation of DMD. Myogenin, a myogenic regulatory factor, is best known for its role in embryonic myogenesis, but its role in adult muscle maintenance and regeneration is still poorly understood. Here, we generated an mdx:Myogflox/flox mouse harboring a tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase transgene, which was used to conditionally delete Myog during adult life. After tamoxifen treatment, three groups of mice were created to study the effects of Myog deletion: mdx:Myogflox/flox mice (mdx), Myogflox/flox mice (wild-type), and mdx:MyogfloxΔ/floxΔ:Cre-ER mice (mdx:Myog-deleted). mdx:Myog-deleted mice exhibited no adverse phenotype and behaved normally. When run to exhaustion, mdx:Myog-deleted mice demonstrated an enhanced capacity for exercise compared to mdx mice, running nearly as far as wild-type mice. Moreover, these mice showed the same signature characteristics of muscle regeneration as mdx mice. Unexpectedly, we found that myogenin was dispensable for muscle regeneration. Factors associated with muscle fatigue, metabolism, and proteolysis were significantly altered in mdx:Myog-deleted mice, and this might contribute to their increased exercise capacity. Our results reveal novel functions for myogenin in adult muscle and suggest that reducing Myog expression in other muscle disease models may partially restore muscle function. PMID:21264243

  14. EPA protects against muscle damage in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy by promoting a shift from the M1 to M2 macrophage phenotype.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Samara Camaçari de; Apolinário, Leticia Montanholi; Matheus, Selma Maria Michelin; Santo Neto, Humberto; Marques, Maria Julia

    2013-11-15

    In dystrophic mdx mice and in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, inflammation contributes to myonecrosis. Previously, we demonstrated that eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) decreased inflammation and necrosis in dystrophic muscle. In the present study, we examined the effects of EPA and the corticoid deflazacort (DFZ) as modulators of M1 (iNOS-expressing cells) and M2 (CD206-expressing cells) macrophages. Mdx mice (14 days old) received EPA or DFZ for 16 days. The diaphragm, biceps brachii and quadriceps muscles were studied. Immunofluorescence, immunoblotting and ELISA assays showed that EPA increased interleucin-10, reduced interferon-γ and was more effective than DFZ in promoting a shift from M1 to M2.

  15. Comparative Label-Free Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Mildly versus Severely Affected mdx Mouse Skeletal Muscles Identifies Annexin, Lamin, and Vimentin as Universal Dystrophic Markers.

    PubMed

    Holland, Ashling; Henry, Michael; Meleady, Paula; Winkler, Claudia K; Krautwald, Mirjam; Brinkmeier, Heinrich; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2015-01-01

    The primary deficiency in the membrane cytoskeletal protein dystrophin results in complex changes in dystrophic muscles. In order to compare the degree of secondary alterations in differently affected subtypes of skeletal muscles, we have conducted a global analysis of proteome-wide changes in various dystrophin-deficient muscles. In contrast to the highly degenerative mdx diaphragm muscle, which showed considerable alterations in 35 distinct proteins, the spectrum of mildly to moderately dystrophic skeletal muscles, including interosseus, flexor digitorum brevis, soleus, and extensor digitorum longus muscle, exhibited a smaller number of changed proteins. Compensatory mechanisms and/or cellular variances may be responsible for differing secondary changes in individual mdx muscles. Label-free mass spectrometry established altered expression levels for diaphragm proteins associated with contraction, energy metabolism, the cytoskeleton, the extracellular matrix and the cellular stress response. Comparative immunoblotting verified the differences in the degree of secondary changes in dystrophin-deficient muscles and showed that the up-regulation of molecular chaperones, the compensatory increase in proteins of the intermediate filaments, the fibrosis-related increase in collagen levels and the pathophysiological decrease in calcium binding proteins is more pronounced in mdx diaphragm as compared to the less severely affected mdx leg muscles. Annexin, lamin, and vimentin were identified as universal dystrophic markers. PMID:26102067

  16. Dystrophin-deficient mdx mice display a reduced life span and are susceptible to spontaneous rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Jeffrey S; Metzger, Joseph; Reyes, Morayma; Townsend, DeWayne; Faulkner, John A

    2007-07-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common, lethal genetic disorder of children. A number of animal models of muscular dystrophy exist, but the most effective model for characterizing the structural and functional properties of dystrophin and therapeutic interventions has been the mdx mouse. Despite the approximately 20 years of investigations of the mdx mouse, the impact of the disease on the life span of mdx mice and the cause of death remain unresolved. Consequently, a life span study of the mdx mouse was designed that included cohorts of male and female mdx and wild-type C57BL/10 mice housed under specific pathogen-free conditions with deaths restricted to natural causes and with examination of the carcasses for pathology. Compared with wild-type mice, both mdx male and female mice had reduced life spans and displayed a progressively dystrophic muscle histopathology. Surprisingly, old mdx mice were prone to develop muscle tumors that resembled the human form of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, a cancer associated with poor prognosis. Rhabdomyosarcomas have not been observed previously in nontransgenic mice. The results substantiate the mdx mouse as an important model system for studies of the pathogenesis of and potential remedies for DMD. PMID:17360850

  17. Chronic Dosing with Membrane Sealant Poloxamer 188 NF Improves Respiratory Dysfunction in Dystrophic Mdx and Mdx/Utrophin-/- Mice.

    PubMed

    Markham, Bruce E; Kernodle, Stace; Nemzek, Jean; Wilkinson, John E; Sigler, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Poloxamer 188 NF (national formulary (NF) grade of P-188) improves cardiac muscle function in the mdx mouse and golden retriever muscular dystrophy models. However in vivo effects on skeletal muscle have not been reported. We postulated that P-188 NF might protect diaphragm muscle membranes from contraction-induced injury in mdx and mdx/utrophin-/- (dko) muscular dystrophy models. In the first study 7-month old mdx mice were treated for 22 weeks with subcutaneous (s.c.) injections of saline or P-188 NF at 3 mg/Kg. In the second, dkos were treated with saline or P-188 NF (1 mg/Kg) for 8 weeks beginning at age 3 weeks. Prednisone was the positive control in both studies. Respiratory function was monitored using unrestrained whole body plethysmography. P-188 NF treatment affected several respiratory parameters including tidal volume/BW and minute volume/BW in mdx mice. In the more severe dko model, P-188 NF (1 mg/Kg) significantly slowed the decline in multiple respiratory parameters compared with saline-treated dko mice. Prednisone's effects were similar to those seen with P-188 NF. Diaphragms from P-188 NF or prednisone treated mdx and dko mice showed signs of muscle fiber protection including less centralized nuclei, less variation in fiber size, greater fiber density, and exhibited a decreased amount of collagen deposition. P-188 NF at 3 mg/Kg s.c. also improved parameters of systolic and diastolic function in mdx mouse hearts. These results suggest that P-188 NF may be useful in treating respiratory and cardiac dysfunction, the leading causes of death in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. PMID:26248188

  18. Chronic Dosing with Membrane Sealant Poloxamer 188 NF Improves Respiratory Dysfunction in Dystrophic Mdx and Mdx/Utrophin-/- Mice

    PubMed Central

    Markham, Bruce E.; Kernodle, Stace; Nemzek, Jean; Wilkinson, John E.; Sigler, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Poloxamer 188 NF (national formulary (NF) grade of P-188) improves cardiac muscle function in the mdx mouse and golden retriever muscular dystrophy models. However in vivo effects on skeletal muscle have not been reported. We postulated that P-188 NF might protect diaphragm muscle membranes from contraction-induced injury in mdx and mdx/utrophin-/- (dko) muscular dystrophy models. In the first study 7-month old mdx mice were treated for 22 weeks with subcutaneous (s.c.) injections of saline or P-188 NF at 3 mg/Kg. In the second, dkos were treated with saline or P-188 NF (1 mg/Kg) for 8 weeks beginning at age 3 weeks. Prednisone was the positive control in both studies. Respiratory function was monitored using unrestrained whole body plethysmography. P-188 NF treatment affected several respiratory parameters including tidal volume/BW and minute volume/BW in mdx mice. In the more severe dko model, P-188 NF (1 mg/Kg) significantly slowed the decline in multiple respiratory parameters compared with saline-treated dko mice. Prednisone’s effects were similar to those seen with P-188 NF. Diaphragms from P-188 NF or prednisone treated mdx and dko mice showed signs of muscle fiber protection including less centralized nuclei, less variation in fiber size, greater fiber density, and exhibited a decreased amount of collagen deposition. P-188 NF at 3 mg/Kg s.c. also improved parameters of systolic and diastolic function in mdx mouse hearts. These results suggest that P-188 NF may be useful in treating respiratory and cardiac dysfunction, the leading causes of death in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. PMID:26248188

  19. Adaptive and nonadaptive responses to voluntary wheel running by mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Landisch, Rachel M; Kosir, Allison M; Nelson, Steven A; Baltgalvis, Kristen A; Lowe, Dawn A

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which hindlimb muscles of mdx mice adapt to a voluntary endurance type of exercise. mdx and C57BL mice engaged in 8 weeks of wheel running or maintained normal cage activities. Beneficial adaptations that occurred in mdx mice included changes in muscle mass, fiber size, and fiber types based on myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform expression. These adaptations occurred without increases in fiber central nuclei and embryonic MHC expression. An undesirable outcome, however, was that muscle mitochondrial enzyme activities did not improve with exercise in mdx mice as they did in C57BL mice. Cellular remodeling of dystrophic muscle following exercise has not been studied adequately. In this study we found that some, but not all, of the expected adaptations occurred in mdx mouse muscle. We must better understand these (non)adaptations in order to inform individuals with DMD about the benefits of exercise.

  20. Delayed cardiomyopathy in dystrophin deficient mdx mice relies on intrinsic glutathione resource.

    PubMed

    Khouzami, Lara; Bourin, Marie-Claude; Christov, Christo; Damy, Thibaud; Escoubet, Brigitte; Caramelle, Philippe; Perier, Magali; Wahbi, Karim; Meune, Christophe; Pavoine, Catherine; Pecker, Françoise

    2010-09-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Although they have been a model for DMD, mdx mice exhibit slowly developing cardiomyopathy. We hypothesized that disease process was delayed owing to the development of an adaptive mechanism against oxidative stress, involving glutathione synthesis. At 15 to 20 weeks of age, mdx mice displayed a 33% increase in blood glutathione levels compared with age-matched C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, cardiac glutathione content was similar in mdx and C57BL/6 mice as a result of the balanced increased expression of glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic and regulatory subunits ensuring glutathione synthesis in the mdx mouse heart, as well as increased glutathione peroxidase-1 using glutathione. Oral administration from 10 weeks of age of the glutamate cysteine ligase inhibitor, l-buthionine(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO, 5 mmol/L), led to a 33% and 50% drop in blood and cardiac glutathione, respectively, in 15- to 20-week-old mdx mice. Moreover, 20-week-old BSO-treated mdx mice displayed left ventricular hypertrophy associated with diastolic dysfunction, discontinuities in beta-dystroglycan expression, micronecrosis and microangiopathic injuries. Examination of the glutathione status in four DMD patients showed that three displayed systemic glutathione deficiency as well. In conclusion, low glutathione resource hastens the onset of cardiomyopathy linked to a defect in dystrophin in mdx mice. This is relevant to the glutathione deficiency that DMD patients may suffer.

  1. Delayed Cardiomyopathy in Dystrophin Deficient mdx Mice Relies on Intrinsic Glutathione Resource

    PubMed Central

    Khouzami, Lara; Bourin, Marie-Claude; Christov, Christo; Damy, Thibaud; Escoubet, Brigitte; Caramelle, Philippe; Perier, Magali; Wahbi, Karim; Meune, Christophe; Pavoine, Catherine; Pecker, Françoise

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Although they have been a model for DMD, mdx mice exhibit slowly developing cardiomyopathy. We hypothesized that disease process was delayed owing to the development of an adaptive mechanism against oxidative stress, involving glutathione synthesis. At 15 to 20 weeks of age, mdx mice displayed a 33% increase in blood glutathione levels compared with age-matched C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, cardiac glutathione content was similar in mdx and C57BL/6 mice as a result of the balanced increased expression of glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic and regulatory subunits ensuring glutathione synthesis in the mdx mouse heart, as well as increased glutathione peroxidase-1 using glutathione. Oral administration from 10 weeks of age of the glutamate cysteine ligase inhibitor, l-buthionine(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO, 5 mmol/L), led to a 33% and 50% drop in blood and cardiac glutathione, respectively, in 15- to 20-week-old mdx mice. Moreover, 20-week-old BSO-treated mdx mice displayed left ventricular hypertrophy associated with diastolic dysfunction, discontinuities in β-dystroglycan expression, micronecrosis and microangiopathic injuries. Examination of the glutathione status in four DMD patients showed that three displayed systemic glutathione deficiency as well. In conclusion, low glutathione resource hastens the onset of cardiomyopathy linked to a defect in dystrophin in mdx mice. This is relevant to the glutathione deficiency that DMD patients may suffer. PMID:20696779

  2. Effects of octylphenol and bisphenol A on the expression of calcium transport genes in the mouse duodenum and kidney during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun; An, Beum-Soo; Yang, Hyun; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2013-01-01

    Octylphenol (OP) is the degradative product of alkylphenol ethoxylates that are widely used to produce rubber, pesticides, and paints. Bisphenol A (BPA) is an organic compound with two functional phenol groups, and used for manufacturing polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resins, as well as other applications. OP and BPA are known as endocrine disruptors (EDs) with estrogenic activities, and may disturb natural calcium (Ca) metabolism. In the present study, the effects of OP and BPA on Ca levels in the serum and expression of Ca transport genes in the duodenum, and kidney were investigated in pregnant mice. Calbindin refers to several Ca-binding proteins originally described as vitamin D-dependent Ca-binding factors in the intestine, and kidney of birds and mammals. Transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 6 (TRPV6) and transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 5 (TRPV5) are Ca entry channels responsible for Ca absorption in the kidney and intestine, respectively. From 6.5 to 16.5 day post coitus (dpc), pregnant mice were given oral doses of 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE, 0.2mg/kg/day), BPA (5 or 50mg/kg/day), or OP (3, 12, or 48 mg/kg/day) dissolved in corn oil. Samples of the duodenum, kidney, and blood were obtained from the mice on day 17.5 of pregnancy. Serum Ca levels were decreased in the groups treated with OP and BPA. The expression levels of Ca transport genes, TRPV5 and calbindin-D9k (CaBP-9k), in the kidney were decreased after treatment with OP and BPA. Duodenal expression of TRPV6 was also reduced by BPA and OP administration. CaBP-9k expression was differentially regulated by BPA and OP. Transcriptional and translational levels of CaBP-9k were decreased by EE and BPA but increased by a high dose of OP. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that OP and BPA regulated the expression of genes associated with Ca transport in the pregnant mice, which may result in the decreased serum Ca levels.

  3. Sparing of the extraocular muscles in mdx mice with absent or reduced utrophin expression: A life span analysis.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Abby A; Hebert, Sadie L; McLoon, Linda K

    2015-11-01

    Sparing of the extraocular muscles in muscular dystrophy is controversial. To address the potential role of utrophin in this sparing, mdx:utrophin(+/-) and mdx:utrophin(-/-) mice were examined for changes in myofiber size, central nucleation, and Pax7-positive and MyoD-positive cell density at intervals over their life span. Known to be spared in the mdx mouse, and contrary to previous reports, the extraocular muscles from both the mdx:utrophin(+/-) and mdx:utrophin(-/-) mice were also morphologically spared. In the mdx:utrophin(+/)(-) mice, which have a normal life span compared to the mdx:utrophin(-/-) mice, the myofibers were larger at 3 and 12 months than the wild type age-matched eye muscles. While there was a significant increase in central nucleation in the extraocular muscles from all mdx:utrophin(+/)(-) mice, the levels were still very low compared to age-matched limb skeletal muscles. Pax7- and MyoD-positive myogenic precursor cell populations were retained and were similar to age-matched wild type controls. These results support the hypothesis that utrophin is not involved in extraocular muscle sparing in these genotypes. In addition, it appears that these muscles retain the myogenic precursors that would allow them to maintain their regenerative capacity and normal morphology over a lifetime even in these more severe models of muscular dystrophy. PMID:26429098

  4. Sparing of the extraocular muscles in mdx mice with absent or reduced utrophin expression: A life span analysis.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Abby A; Hebert, Sadie L; McLoon, Linda K

    2015-11-01

    Sparing of the extraocular muscles in muscular dystrophy is controversial. To address the potential role of utrophin in this sparing, mdx:utrophin(+/-) and mdx:utrophin(-/-) mice were examined for changes in myofiber size, central nucleation, and Pax7-positive and MyoD-positive cell density at intervals over their life span. Known to be spared in the mdx mouse, and contrary to previous reports, the extraocular muscles from both the mdx:utrophin(+/-) and mdx:utrophin(-/-) mice were also morphologically spared. In the mdx:utrophin(+/)(-) mice, which have a normal life span compared to the mdx:utrophin(-/-) mice, the myofibers were larger at 3 and 12 months than the wild type age-matched eye muscles. While there was a significant increase in central nucleation in the extraocular muscles from all mdx:utrophin(+/)(-) mice, the levels were still very low compared to age-matched limb skeletal muscles. Pax7- and MyoD-positive myogenic precursor cell populations were retained and were similar to age-matched wild type controls. These results support the hypothesis that utrophin is not involved in extraocular muscle sparing in these genotypes. In addition, it appears that these muscles retain the myogenic precursors that would allow them to maintain their regenerative capacity and normal morphology over a lifetime even in these more severe models of muscular dystrophy.

  5. Acute relaxation of mouse duodenum [correction of duodenun] by estrogens. Evidence for an estrogen receptor-independent modulation of muscle excitability.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Mario; Ramírez, Cristina M; Marin, Raquel; Marrero-Alonso, Jorge; Gómez, Tomás; Alonso, Rafael

    2004-10-01

    17-beta-Estradiol, the stereoisomer 17-alpha-estradiol and the synthetic estrogen diethylstilbestrol (DES), all caused a rapid (<3 min) dose-dependent reversible relaxation of mouse duodenal spontaneous activity, reduced basal tone and depressed the responses to CaCl(2) and KCl. The steroidal antiestrogen 7alpha-[9-[(4,4,5,5,5,-pentafluoropenty)sulphinyl]nonyl]-estra-1,3,5(19)-triene-3,17beta-diol (ICI182,780) failed to either mimic or prevent the effect of 17-beta-estradiol. The effect of estrogens was unrelated to activation of nitric oxide (NO), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase G (PKG) or protein kinase C (PKC). Estrogen-induced relaxation was partially reversed by 1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-5-nitro-4-[2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-pyridine-3-carboxilic acid methyl ester (BAY-K8644), depolarization, or by application of tetraethylammonium or 4-aminopyridine, but not by glibenclamide, apamin, charybdotoxin, paxilline or verruculogen. The effects of BAY-K8644 and K(+) channel blockers were synergistic, and allowed relaxed tissues to recover spontaneous activity and basal tone. We hypothesize that the rapid non-genomic spasmolytic effect of estrogens on mouse duodenal muscle might be triggered by an estrogen-receptor-independent mechanism likely involving activation of tetraethylamonium- and 4-aminopyridine-sensitive K(+) channels and inhibition of L-type Ca2(+) channels on the smooth muscle cells. PMID:15464075

  6. Vascular compression of the duodenum.

    PubMed Central

    Moskovich, R; Cheong-Leen, P

    1986-01-01

    Compression of the third or fourth part of the duodenum by the superior mesenteric artery or one of its branches is the anatomic basis for some cases of duodenal obstruction. Two cases of vascular obstruction of the duodenum after surgical correction of scoliosis are presented. The embryologic and pathoanatomic bases for this condition, and the rationale for treatment, are described. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:3761291

  7. Prolonged high fat diet ingestion, obesity, and type 2 diabetes symptoms correlate with phenotypic plasticity in myenteric neurons and nerve damage in the mouse duodenum.

    PubMed

    Stenkamp-Strahm, Chloe M; Nyavor, Yvonne E A; Kappmeyer, Adam J; Horton, Sarah; Gericke, Martin; Balemba, Onesmo B

    2015-08-01

    Symptoms of diabetic gastrointestinal dysmotility indicate neuropathy of the enteric nervous system. Long-standing diabetic enteric neuropathy has not been fully characterized, however. We used prolonged high fat diet ingestion (20 weeks) in a mouse model to mimic human obese and type 2 diabetic conditions, and analyzed changes seen in neurons of the duodenal myenteric plexus. Ganglionic and neuronal size, number of neurons per ganglionic area, density indices of neuronal phenotypes (immunoreactive nerve cell bodies and varicosities per ganglion or tissue area) and nerve injury were measured. Findings were compared with results previously seen in mice fed the same diet for 8 weeks. Compared to mice fed standard chow, those on a prolonged high fat diet had smaller ganglionic and cell soma areas. Myenteric VIP- and ChAT-immunoreactive density indices were also reduced. Myenteric nerve fibers were markedly swollen and cytoskeletal protein networks were disrupted. The number of nNOS nerve cell bodies per ganglia was increased, contrary to the reduction previously seen after 8 weeks, but the density index of nNOS varicosities was reduced. Mice fed high fat and standard chow diets experienced an age-related reduction in total neurons, with bias towards neurons of sensory phenotype. Meanwhile, ageing was associated with an increase in excitatory neuronal markers. Collectively, these results support a notion that nerve damage underlies diabetic symptoms of dysmotility, and reveals adaptive ENS responses to the prolonged ingestion of a high fat diet. This highlights a need to mechanistically study long-term diet-induced nerve damage and age-related impacts on the ENS.

  8. Non-Invasive MRI and Spectroscopy of mdx Mice Reveal Temporal Changes in Dystrophic Muscle Imaging and in Energy Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Heier, Christopher R.; Guerron, Alfredo D.; Korotcov, Alexandru; Lin, Stephen; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Fricke, Stanley; Sze, Raymond W.; Hoffman, Eric P.; Wang, Paul; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2014-01-01

    In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a genetic disruption of dystrophin protein expression results in repeated muscle injury and chronic inflammation. Magnetic resonance imaging shows promise as a surrogate outcome measure in both DMD and rehabilitation medicine that is capable of predicting clinical benefit years in advance of functional outcome measures. The mdx mouse reproduces the dystrophin deficiency that causes DMD and is routinely used for preclinical drug testing. There is a need to develop sensitive, non-invasive outcome measures in the mdx model that can be readily translatable to human clinical trials. Here we report the use of magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy techniques for the non-invasive monitoring of muscle damage in mdx mice. Using these techniques, we studied dystrophic mdx muscle in mice from 6 to 12 weeks of age, examining both the peak disease phase and natural recovery phase of the mdx disease course. T2 and fat-suppressed imaging revealed significant levels of tissue with elevated signal intensity in mdx hindlimb muscles at all ages; spectroscopy revealed a significant deficiency of energy metabolites in 6-week-old mdx mice. As the mdx mice progressed from the peak disease stage to the recovery stage of disease, each of these phenotypes was either eliminated or reduced, and the cross-sectional area of the mdx muscle was significantly increased when compared to that of wild-type mice. Histology indicates that hyper-intense MRI foci correspond to areas of dystrophic lesions containing inflammation as well as regenerating, degenerating and hypertrophied myofibers. Statistical sample size calculations provide several robust measures with the ability to detect intervention effects using small numbers of animals. These data establish a framework for further imaging or preclinical studies, and they support the development of MRI as a sensitive, non-invasive outcome measure for muscular dystrophy. PMID:25390038

  9. Muscle genome-wide expression profiling during disease evolution in mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Marotta, Mario; Ruiz-Roig, Claudia; Sarria, Yaris; Peiro, Jose Luis; Nuñez, Fatima; Ceron, Julian; Munell, Francina; Roig-Quilis, Manuel

    2009-04-10

    Mdx mice show a milder phenotype than Duchenne patients despite bearing an analogous genetic defect. Our aim was to sort out genes, differentially expressed during the evolution of skeletal muscle mdx mouse disease, to elucidate the mechanisms by which these animals overcome the lack of dystrophin. Genome-wide microarray-based gene expression analysis was carried out at 3 wk and 1.5 and 3 mo of life. Candidate genes were selected by comparing: 1) mdx vs. controls at each point in time, and 2) mdx mice and 3) control mice among the three points in time. The first analysis showed a strong upregulation (96%) of inflammation-related genes and in >75% of genes related to cell adhesion, muscle structure/regeneration, and extracellular matrix remodeling during mdx disease evolution. Lgals3, Postn, Ctss, and Sln genes showed the strongest variations. The analysis performed among points in time demonstrated significant changes in Ecm1, Spon1, Thbs1, Csrp3, Myo10, Pde4b, and Adamts-5 exclusively during mdx mice lifespan. RT-PCR analysis of Postn, Sln, Ctss, Thbs1, Ecm1, and Adamts-5 expression from 3 wk to 9 mo, confirmed microarray data and demonstrated variations beyond 3 mo of age. A high-confidence functional network analysis demonstrated a strong relationship between them and showed two main subnetworks, having Dmd-Utrn-Myo10 and Adamts5-Thbs1-Spon1-Postn as principal nodes, which are functionally linked to Abca1, Actn4, Crebbp, Csrp3, Lama1, Lama3, Mical2, Mical3, Myf6, Pxn, and Sparc genes. Candidate genes may participate in the decline of muscle necrosis in mdx mice and could be considered potential therapeutic targets for Duchenne patients. PMID:19223608

  10. Activation of Wnt3a signaling promotes myogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells in mdx mice

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Yan-chang; Wang, Shu-hui; Xiong, Fu; Peng, Fu-ning; Liu, Zhen-shan; Geng, Jia; Zhang, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked genetic muscular disorder with no effective treatment at present. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation has been used to treat DMD, but the efficiency is low. Our previous studies show that activation of Wnt3a signaling promotes myogenic differentiation of MSCs in vitro. Here we report an effective MSC transplantation therapy in mdx mice by activation of Wnt3a signaling. Methods: MSCs were isolated from mouse bone marrow, and pretreated with Wnt3a-conditioned medium (Wnt3a-CM), then transplanted into mdx mice. The recipient mice were euthanized at 4, 8, 12, 16 weeks after the transplantation, and muscle pathological changes were examined. The expression of dystrophin in muscle was detected using immunofluorescence staining, RT-PCR and Western blotting. Results: Sixteen weeks later, transplantation of Wnt3a-pretreated MSCs in mdx mice improved the characteristics of dystrophic muscles evidenced by significant reductions in centrally nucleated myofibers, the variability range of cross-sectional area (CSA) and the connective tissue area of myofibers. Furthermore, transplantation of Wnt3a-pretreated MSCs in mdx mice gradually and markedly increased the expression of dystrophin in muscle, and improved the efficiency of myogenic differentiation. Conclusion: Transplantation of Wnt3a-pretreated MSCs in mdx mice results in long-term amelioration of the dystrophic phenotype and restores dystrophin expression in muscle. The results suggest that Wnt3a may be a promising candidate for the treatment of DMD. PMID:27133298

  11. The mdx Mutation in the 129/Sv Background Results in a Milder Phenotype: Transcriptome Comparative Analysis Searching for the Protective Factors.

    PubMed

    Calyjur, Priscila Clara; Almeida, Camila de Freitas; Ayub-Guerrieri, Danielle; Ribeiro, Antonio Fernando; Fernandes, Stephanie de Alcântara; Ishiba, Renata; Santos, Andre Luis Fernandes Dos; Onofre-Oliveira, Paula; Vainzof, Mariz

    2016-01-01

    The mdx mouse is a good genetic and molecular murine model for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), a progressive and devastating muscle disease. However, this model is inappropriate for testing new therapies due to its mild phenotype. Here, we transferred the mdx mutation to the 129/Sv strain with the aim to create a more severe model for DMD. Unexpectedly, functional analysis of the first three generations of mdx129 showed a progressive amelioration of the phenotype, associated to less connective tissue replacement, and more regeneration than the original mdxC57BL. Transcriptome comparative analysis was performed to identify what is protecting this new model from the dystrophic characteristics. The mdxC57BL presents three times more differentially expressed genes (DEGs) than the mdx129 (371 and 137 DEGs respectively). However, both models present more overexpressed genes than underexpressed, indicating that the dystrophic and regenerative alterations are associated with the activation rather than repression of genes. As to functional categories, the DEGs of both mdx models showed a predominance of immune system genes. Excluding this category, the mdx129 model showed a decreased participation of the endo/exocytic pathway and homeostasis categories, and an increased participation of the extracellular matrix and enzymatic activity categories. Spp1 gene overexpression was the most significant DEG exclusively expressed in the mdx129 strain. This was confirmed through relative mRNA analysis and osteopontin protein quantification. The amount of the 66 kDa band of the protein, representing the post-translational product of the gene, was about 4,8 times higher on western blotting. Spp1 is a known DMD prognostic biomarker, and our data indicate that its upregulation can benefit phenotype. Modeling the expression of the DEGs involved in the mdx mutation with a benign course should be tested as a possible therapeutic target for the dystrophic process.

  12. The mdx Mutation in the 129/Sv Background Results in a Milder Phenotype: Transcriptome Comparative Analysis Searching for the Protective Factors.

    PubMed

    Calyjur, Priscila Clara; Almeida, Camila de Freitas; Ayub-Guerrieri, Danielle; Ribeiro, Antonio Fernando; Fernandes, Stephanie de Alcântara; Ishiba, Renata; Santos, Andre Luis Fernandes Dos; Onofre-Oliveira, Paula; Vainzof, Mariz

    2016-01-01

    The mdx mouse is a good genetic and molecular murine model for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), a progressive and devastating muscle disease. However, this model is inappropriate for testing new therapies due to its mild phenotype. Here, we transferred the mdx mutation to the 129/Sv strain with the aim to create a more severe model for DMD. Unexpectedly, functional analysis of the first three generations of mdx129 showed a progressive amelioration of the phenotype, associated to less connective tissue replacement, and more regeneration than the original mdxC57BL. Transcriptome comparative analysis was performed to identify what is protecting this new model from the dystrophic characteristics. The mdxC57BL presents three times more differentially expressed genes (DEGs) than the mdx129 (371 and 137 DEGs respectively). However, both models present more overexpressed genes than underexpressed, indicating that the dystrophic and regenerative alterations are associated with the activation rather than repression of genes. As to functional categories, the DEGs of both mdx models showed a predominance of immune system genes. Excluding this category, the mdx129 model showed a decreased participation of the endo/exocytic pathway and homeostasis categories, and an increased participation of the extracellular matrix and enzymatic activity categories. Spp1 gene overexpression was the most significant DEG exclusively expressed in the mdx129 strain. This was confirmed through relative mRNA analysis and osteopontin protein quantification. The amount of the 66 kDa band of the protein, representing the post-translational product of the gene, was about 4,8 times higher on western blotting. Spp1 is a known DMD prognostic biomarker, and our data indicate that its upregulation can benefit phenotype. Modeling the expression of the DEGs involved in the mdx mutation with a benign course should be tested as a possible therapeutic target for the dystrophic process. PMID:26954670

  13. The mdx Mutation in the 129/Sv Background Results in a Milder Phenotype: Transcriptome Comparative Analysis Searching for the Protective Factors

    PubMed Central

    Calyjur, Priscila Clara; Almeida, Camila de Freitas; Ayub-Guerrieri, Danielle; Ribeiro, Antonio Fernando; Fernandes, Stephanie de Alcântara; Ishiba, Renata; dos Santos, Andre Luis Fernandes; Onofre-Oliveira, Paula; Vainzof, Mariz

    2016-01-01

    The mdx mouse is a good genetic and molecular murine model for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), a progressive and devastating muscle disease. However, this model is inappropriate for testing new therapies due to its mild phenotype. Here, we transferred the mdx mutation to the 129/Sv strain with the aim to create a more severe model for DMD. Unexpectedly, functional analysis of the first three generations of mdx129 showed a progressive amelioration of the phenotype, associated to less connective tissue replacement, and more regeneration than the original mdxC57BL. Transcriptome comparative analysis was performed to identify what is protecting this new model from the dystrophic characteristics. The mdxC57BL presents three times more differentially expressed genes (DEGs) than the mdx129 (371 and 137 DEGs respectively). However, both models present more overexpressed genes than underexpressed, indicating that the dystrophic and regenerative alterations are associated with the activation rather than repression of genes. As to functional categories, the DEGs of both mdx models showed a predominance of immune system genes. Excluding this category, the mdx129 model showed a decreased participation of the endo/exocytic pathway and homeostasis categories, and an increased participation of the extracellular matrix and enzymatic activity categories. Spp1 gene overexpression was the most significant DEG exclusively expressed in the mdx129 strain. This was confirmed through relative mRNA analysis and osteopontin protein quantification. The amount of the 66 kDa band of the protein, representing the post-translational product of the gene, was about 4,8 times higher on western blotting. Spp1 is a known DMD prognostic biomarker, and our data indicate that its upregulation can benefit phenotype. Modeling the expression of the DEGs involved in the mdx mutation with a benign course should be tested as a possible therapeutic target for the dystrophic process. PMID:26954670

  14. Fetal muscle-derived cells can repair dystrophic muscles in mdx mice

    SciTech Connect

    Auda-Boucher, Gwenola; Rouaud, Thierry; Lafoux, Aude; Levitsky, Dmitri; Huchet-Cadiou, Corinne; Feron, Marie; Guevel, Laetitia; Talon, Sophie; Fontaine-Perus, Josiane; Gardahaut, Marie-France . E-mail: Marie-France.Gardahaut@univ-nantes.fr

    2007-03-10

    We have previously reported that CD34{sup +} cells purified from mouse fetal muscles can differentiate into skeletal muscle in vitro and in vivo when injected into muscle tissue of dystrophic mdx mice. In this study, we investigate the ability of such donor cells to restore dystrophin expression, and to improve the functional muscle capacity of the extensor digitorum longus muscle (EDL) of mdx mice. For this purpose green fluorescent-positive fetal GFP{sup +}/CD34{sup +} cells or desmin{sup +}/{sup -}LacZ/CD34{sup +} cells were transplanted into irradiated or non-irradiated mdx EDL muscle. Donor fetal muscle-derived cells predominantly fused with existing fibers. Indeed more than 50% of the myofibers of the host EDL contained donor nuclei delivering dystrophin along 80-90% of the length of their sarcolemma. The presence of significant amounts of dystrophin (about 60-70% of that found in a control wild-type mouse muscle) was confirmed by Western blot analyses. Dystrophin expression also outcompeted that of utrophin, as revealed by a spatial shift in the distribution of utrophin. At 1 month post-transplant, the recipient muscle appeared to have greater resistance to fatigue than control mdx EDL muscle during repeated maximal contractions.

  15. Increased levels of interleukin-6 exacerbate the dystrophic phenotype in mdx mice

    PubMed Central

    Pelosi, Laura; Berardinelli, Maria Grazia; Forcina, Laura; Spelta, Elisa; Rizzuto, Emanuele; Nicoletti, Carmine; Camilli, Carlotta; Testa, Erika; Catizone, Angela; De Benedetti, Fabrizio; Musarò, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is characterized by progressive lethal muscle degeneration and chronic inflammatory response. The mdx mouse strain has served as the animal model for human DMD. However, while DMD patients undergo extensive necrosis, the affected muscles of adult mdx mice rapidly regenerates and regains structural and functional integrity. The basis for the mild effects observed in mice compared with the lethal consequences in humans remains unknown. In this study, we provide evidence that interleukin-6 (IL-6) is causally linked to the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophy. We report that forced expression of IL-6, in the adult mdx mice, recapitulates the severe phenotypic characteristics of DMD in humans. Increased levels of IL-6 exacerbate the dystrophic muscle phenotype, sustaining inflammatory response and repeated cycles of muscle degeneration and regeneration, leading to exhaustion of satellite cells. The mdx/IL6 mouse closely approximates the human disease and more faithfully recapitulates the disease progression in humans. This study promises to significantly advance our understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms that lead to DMD. PMID:26251044

  16. Increased taurine in pre-weaned juvenile mdx mice greatly reduces the acute onset of myofibre necrosis and dystropathology and prevents inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Terrill, Jessica R.; Grounds, Miranda D; Arthur, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The mdx mouse model for the fatal muscle wasting disease Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) shows a very mild pathology once growth has ceased, with low levels of myofibre necrosis in adults. However, from about 3 weeks of post-natal age, muscles of juvenile mdx mice undergo an acute bout of severe necrosis and inflammation: this subsequently decreases and stabilises to lower adult levels by about 6 weeks of age. Prior to the onset of this severe dystropathology, we have shown that mdx mice are deficient in the amino acid taurine (potentially due to weaning), and we propose that this exacerbates myofibre necrosis and inflammation in juvenile mdx mice. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to increase taurine availability to pre-weaned juvenile mdx mice (from 14 days of age), to evaluate the impact on levels of myofibre necrosis and inflammation (at 22 days) during the acute period of severe dystropathology. Results: Untreated 22 day old mdx muscle was not deficient in taurine, with similar levels to normal C57 control muscle. However taurine treatment, which increased the taurine content of young dystrophic muscle (by 40%), greatly reduced myofibre necrosis (by 75%) and prevented significant increases in 3 markers of inflammation. Conclusion: Taurine was very effective at preventing the acute phase of muscle damage that normally results in myofibre necrosis and inflammation in juvenile mdx mice, supporting continued research into the use of taurine as a therapeutic intervention for protecting growing muscles of young DMD boys

  17. Malignant tumours of the duodenum.

    PubMed

    Ryska, M; Hrabal, P

    2015-12-01

    No comprehensive knowledge of duodenal tumours exists in the current literature; individual types of malignant tumours may be described within malignancies of the small bowel, sets of case reports, or individual cases. Ampullary carcinomas are the exception and they are detailed in the current WHO histological classification of tumours of digestive system. Neither national nor international literature sources provide a comprehensive review of their therapy. The situation is similar when searching for surgical procedures. Resection procedures on the duodenum should thus be performed in specialized centres with sufficient experience with hepato-pancreato-biliary surgery. PMID:26767899

  18. The artificial gene Jazz, a transcriptional regulator of utrophin, corrects the dystrophic pathology in mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Di Certo, Maria Grazia; Corbi, Nicoletta; Strimpakos, Georgios; Onori, Annalisa; Luvisetto, Siro; Severini, Cinzia; Guglielmotti, Angelo; Batassa, Enrico Maria; Pisani, Cinzia; Floridi, Aristide; Benassi, Barbara; Fanciulli, Maurizio; Magrelli, Armando; Mattei, Elisabetta; Passananti, Claudio

    2010-03-01

    The absence of the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin results in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The utrophin protein is the best candidate for dystrophin replacement in DMD patients. To obtain therapeutic levels of utrophin expression in dystrophic muscle, we developed an alternative strategy based on the use of artificial zinc finger transcription factors (ZF ATFs). The ZF ATF 'Jazz' was recently engineered and tested in vivo by generating a transgenic mouse specifically expressing Jazz at the muscular level. To validate the ZF ATF technology for DMD treatment we generated a second mouse model by crossing Jazz-transgenic mice with dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. Here, we show that the artificial Jazz protein restores sarcolemmal integrity and prevents the development of the dystrophic disease in mdx mice. This exclusive animal model establishes the notion that utrophin-based therapy for DMD can be efficiently developed using ZF ATF technology and candidates Jazz as a novel therapeutic molecule for DMD therapy.

  19. Muscle regeneration in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice studied by gene expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Turk, R; Sterrenburg, E; de Meijer, EJ; van Ommen, G-JB; den Dunnen, JT; 't Hoen, PAC

    2005-01-01

    Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, is lethal. In contrast, dystrophin-deficient mdx mice recover due to effective regeneration of affected muscle tissue. To characterize the molecular processes associated with regeneration, we compared gene expression levels in hindlimb muscle tissue of mdx and control mice at 9 timepoints, ranging from 1–20 weeks of age. Results Out of 7776 genes, 1735 were differentially expressed between mdx and control muscle at at least one timepoint (p < 0.05 after Bonferroni correction). We found that genes coding for components of the dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex are generally downregulated in the mdx mouse. Based on functional characteristics such as membrane localization, signal transduction, and transcriptional activation, 166 differentially expressed genes with possible functions in regeneration were analyzed in more detail. The majority of these genes peak at the age of 8 weeks, where the regeneration activity is maximal. The following pathways are activated, as shown by upregulation of multiple members per signalling pathway: the Notch-Delta pathway that plays a role in the activation of satellite cells, and the Bmp15 and Neuregulin 3 signalling pathways that may regulate proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells. In DMD patients, only few of the identified regeneration-associated genes were found activated, indicating less efficient regeneration processes in humans. Conclusion Based on the observed expression profiles, we describe a model for muscle regeneration in mdx mice, which may provide new leads for development of DMD therapies based on the improvement of muscle regeneration efficacy. PMID:16011810

  20. Chemical and mechanistic toxicology evaluation of exon skipping phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers in mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Sazani, Peter; Ness, Kirk P Van; Weller, Doreen L; Poage, Duane; Nelson, Keith; Shrewsbury, And Stephen B

    2011-05-01

    AVI-4658 is a phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) designed to induce skipping of dystrophin exon 51 and restore its expression in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Preclinically, restoration of dystrophin in the dystrophic mdx mouse model requires skipping of exon 23, achieved with the mouse-specific PMO, AVI-4225. Herein, we report the potential toxicological consequences of exon skipping and dystrophin restoration in mdx mice using AVI-4225. We also evaluated the toxicological effects of AVI-4658 in both mdx and wild-type mice. In both studies, animals were dosed once weekly for 12 weeks up to the maximum feasible dose of 960 mg/kg per injection. Both AVI-4658 and AVI-4225 were well-tolerated at all doses. Findings in AVI-4225-treated animals were generally limited to mild renal tubular basophilia/vacuolation, without any significant changes in renal function and with evidence of reversing. No toxicity associated with the mechanism of action of AVI-4225 in a dystrophic animal was observed.

  1. Pseudomelanosis of stomach, duodenum, and jejunum.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Mansoor, Muhammad S; Gibson, Joanna A; Kapadia, Cyrus R

    2015-02-01

    Pseudomelanosis is a rare finding during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, and is most commonly seen in the duodenum. Involvement of other organs in the upper gastrointestinal tract is extremely rare, with only 1 reported case involving the stomach, duodenum, and jejunum. We present a case of a 60-year-old woman with mild anemia and hematemesis, who was found to have characteristic speckled pattern of gray-black pigmentation on endoscopic examination. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second reported case of pseudomelanosis involving the stomach, duodenum, and jejunum.

  2. Label-free mass spectrometric analysis of the mdx-4cv diaphragm identifies the matricellular protein periostin as a potential factor involved in dystrophinopathy-related fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Holland, Ashling; Dowling, Paul; Meleady, Paula; Henry, Michael; Zweyer, Margit; Mundegar, Rustam R; Swandulla, Dieter; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2015-07-01

    Proteomic profiling plays a decisive role in the identification of novel biomarkers of muscular dystrophy and the elucidation of new pathobiochemical mechanisms that underlie progressive muscle wasting. Building on the findings of recent comparative analyses of tissue samples and body fluids from dystrophic animals and patients afflicted with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, we have used here label-free MS to study the severely dystrophic diaphragm from the not extensively characterized mdx-4cv mouse. This animal model of progressive muscle wasting exhibits less dystrophin-positive revertant fibers than the conventional mdx mouse, making it ideal for the future monitoring of experimental therapies. The pathoproteomic signature of the mdx-4cv diaphragm included a significant increase in the fibrosis marker collagen and related extracellular matrix proteins (asporin, decorin, dermatopontin, prolargin) and cytoskeletal proteins (desmin, filamin, obscurin, plectin, spectrin, tubulin, vimentin, vinculin), as well as decreases in proteins of ion homeostasis (parvalbumin) and the contractile apparatus (myosin-binding protein). Importantly, one of the most substantially increased proteins was identified as periostin, a matricellular component and apparent marker of fibrosis and tissue damage. Immunoblotting confirmed a considerable increase of periostin in the dystrophin-deficient diaphragm from both mdx and mdx-4cv mice, suggesting an involvement of this matricellular protein in dystrophinopathy-related fibrosis.

  3. The Dietary Supplement Protandim® Decreases Plasma Osteopontin and Improves Markers of Oxidative Stress in Muscular Dystrophy Mdx Mice

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Muhammad Muddasir; McClure, Warren C.; Arevalo, Nicole L.; Rabon, Rick E.; Mohr, Benjamin; Bose, Swapan K.; McCord, Joe M.; Tseng, Brian S.

    2010-01-01

    Therapeutic options for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most common and lethal neuromuscular disorder in children, remain elusive. Oxidative damage is implicated as a pertinent factor involved in its pathogenesis. Protandim® is an over-the-counter supplement with the ability to induce antioxidant enzymes. In this study we investigated whether Protandim® provided benefit using surrogate markers and functional measures in the dystrophin-deficient (mdx)mouse model of DMD. Male 3-week-old mdx mice were randomized into two treatment groups: control (receiving standard rodent chow) and Protandim®-supplemented standard rodent chow. The diets were continued for 6-week and 6-month studies. The endpoints included the oxidative stress marker thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), plasma osteopontin (OPN), plasma paraoxonase (PON1) activity, H&E histology, gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of leg muscle and motor functional measurements. The Protandim® chow diet in mdx mice for 6 months was safe and well tolerated. After 6 months of Protandim®, a 48% average decrease in plasma TBARS was seen; 0.92 nmol/mg protein in controls versus 0.48 nmol/mg protein in the Protandim® group (p = .006). At 6 months, plasma OPN was decreased by 57% (p = .001) in the Protandim®-treated mice. Protandim® increased the plasma antioxidant enzyme PON1 activity by 35% (p = .018). After 6 months, the mdx mice with Protandim® showed 38% less MRI signal abnormality (p = .07) than mice on control diet. In this 6-month mdx mouse study, Protandim® did not significantly alter motor function nor histological criteria. PMID:20740052

  4. Utrophins compensate for Dp71 absence in mdx3cv in adhered platelets.

    PubMed

    Cerecedo, Doris; Mondragón, Ricardo; Candelario, Aurora; García-Sierra, Francisco; Mornet, Dominique; Rendón, Alvaro; Martínez-Rojas, Dalila

    2008-01-01

    Platelet adhesion is a critical step due to its hemostatic role in stopping bleeding after vascular damage. Short dystrophins are the most abundant dmd gene products in nonmuscle tissues, and in association with cytoskeleton proteins contribute to their intrinsic function; while utrophins are dystrophin-homologous related family proteins with structural and functional similarities. We previously demonstrated the presence of Dp71 isoforms, utrophins, and various dystrophin-associated proteins and their participation in cytoskeleton re-organization, filopodia and lamellipodia extension, and in centralizing cytoplasmic granules during the adhesion process of human platelets. To evaluate the morphologic changes and actin-based structures of mdx(3cv) platelets during the adhesion process, we compared the topographic distribution of Dp71d/Dp71Delta110(m) and dystrophin-associated protein in adhered platelets from dystrophic mdx(3cv) mouse. By confocal microscopy, we showed that absence of Dp71 isoforms in platelets from this animal model disrupted dystrophin-associated protein expression and distribution without modifying the platelet morphology displayed during the glass-adhesion process. By immunoprecipitation assays, we proved that up-regulated utrophins were associated with dystrophin-associated proteins to conform the dystrophin-associated protein complex corresponding to utrophins, which might compensate for Dp71 absence in mdx(3cv) platelets.

  5. Novel Adeno-Associated Viral Vector Delivering the Utrophin Gene Regulator Jazz Counteracts Dystrophic Pathology in mdx Mice

    PubMed Central

    Strimpakos, Georgios; Corbi, Nicoletta; Pisani, Cinzia; Di Certo, Maria Grazia; Onori, Annalisa; Luvisetto, Siro; Severini, Cinzia; Gabanella, Francesca; Monaco, Lucia; Mattei, Elisabetta; Passananti, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Over-expression of the dystrophin-related gene utrophin represents a promising therapeutic strategy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The strategy is based on the ability of utrophin to functionally replace defective dystrophin. We developed the artificial zinc finger transcription factor “Jazz” that up-regulates both the human and mouse utrophin promoter. We observed a significant recovery of muscle strength in dystrophic Jazz-transgenic mdx mice. Here we demonstrate the efficacy of an experimental gene therapy based on the systemic delivery of Jazz gene in mdx mice by adeno-associated virus (AAV). AAV serotype 8 was chosen on the basis of its high affinity for skeletal muscle. Muscle-specific expression of the therapeutic Jazz gene was enhanced by adding the muscle α-actin promoter to the AAV vector (mAAV). Injection of mAAV8-Jazz viral preparations into mdx mice resulted in muscle-specific Jazz expression coupled with up-regulation of the utrophin gene. We show a significant recovery from the dystrophic phenotype in mAAV8-Jazz-treated mdx mice. Histological and physiological analysis revealed a reduction of fiber necrosis and inflammatory cell infiltration associated with functional recovery in muscle contractile force. The combination of ZF-ATF technology with the AAV delivery can open a new avenue to obtain a therapeutic strategy for treatment of DMD. J. Cell. Physiol. 229: 1283–1291, 2014. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24469912

  6. Novel adeno-associated viral vector delivering the utrophin gene regulator jazz counteracts dystrophic pathology in mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Strimpakos, Georgios; Corbi, Nicoletta; Pisani, Cinzia; Di Certo, Maria Grazia; Onori, Annalisa; Luvisetto, Siro; Severini, Cinzia; Gabanella, Francesca; Monaco, Lucia; Mattei, Elisabetta; Passananti, Claudio

    2014-09-01

    Over-expression of the dystrophin-related gene utrophin represents a promising therapeutic strategy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The strategy is based on the ability of utrophin to functionally replace defective dystrophin. We developed the artificial zinc finger transcription factor "Jazz" that up-regulates both the human and mouse utrophin promoter. We observed a significant recovery of muscle strength in dystrophic Jazz-transgenic mdx mice. Here we demonstrate the efficacy of an experimental gene therapy based on the systemic delivery of Jazz gene in mdx mice by adeno-associated virus (AAV). AAV serotype 8 was chosen on the basis of its high affinity for skeletal muscle. Muscle-specific expression of the therapeutic Jazz gene was enhanced by adding the muscle α-actin promoter to the AAV vector (mAAV). Injection of mAAV8-Jazz viral preparations into mdx mice resulted in muscle-specific Jazz expression coupled with up-regulation of the utrophin gene. We show a significant recovery from the dystrophic phenotype in mAAV8-Jazz-treated mdx mice. Histological and physiological analysis revealed a reduction of fiber necrosis and inflammatory cell infiltration associated with functional recovery in muscle contractile force. The combination of ZF-ATF technology with the AAV delivery can open a new avenue to obtain a therapeutic strategy for treatment of DMD.

  7. Proteomics reveals drastic increase of extracellular matrix proteins collagen and dermatopontin in the aged mdx diaphragm model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Carberry, Steven; Zweyer, Margit; Swandulla, Dieter; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2012-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a lethal genetic disease of childhood caused by primary abnormalities in the gene coding for the membrane cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. The mdx mouse is an established animal model of various aspects of X-linked muscular dystrophy and is widely used for studying fundamental mechanisms of dystrophinopathy and testing novel therapeutic approaches to treat one of the most frequent gender-specific diseases in humans. In order to determine global changes in the muscle proteome with the progressive deterioration of mdx tissue with age, we have characterized diaphragm muscle from mdx mice at three ages (8-weeks, 12-months and 22-months) using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. Altered expression levels in diaphragm of 8-week vs. 22-month mice were shown to occur in 11 muscle-associated proteins. Aging in the mdx diaphragm seems to be associated with a drastic increase in the extracellular matrix proteins, collagen and dermatopontin, the molecular chaperone αB-crystallin, and the intermediate filament protein vimentin, suggesting increased accumulation of connective tissue, an enhanced cellular stress response and compensatory stabilization of the weakened membrane cytoskeleton. These proteomic findings establish the aged mdx diaphragm as an excellent model system for studying secondary effects of dystrophin deficiency in skeletal muscle tissue.

  8. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 ablation in dystrophin-deficient mdx muscles reduces angiogenesis resulting in impaired growth of regenerated muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Daigo; Nakamura, Akinori; Fukushima, Kazuhiro; Yoshida, Kunihiro; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Ikeda, Shu-ichi

    2011-05-01

    Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) are a family of endopeptidases classified into subgroups based on substrate preference in normal physiological processes such as embryonic development and tissue remodeling, as well as in various disease processes via degradation of extracellular matrix components. Among the MMPs, MMP-9 and MMP-2 have been reported to be up-regulated in skeletal muscles in the lethal X-linked muscle disorder Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), which is caused by loss of dystrophin. A recent study showed that deletion of the MMP9 gene in mdx, a mouse model for DMD, improved skeletal muscle pathology and function; however, the role of MMP-2 in the dystrophin-deficient muscle is not well known. In this study, we aimed at verifying the role of MMP-2 in the dystrophin-deficient muscle by using mdx mice with genetic ablation of MMP-2 (mdx/MMP-2(-/-)). We found impairment of regenerated muscle fiber growth with reduction of angiogenesis in mdx/MMP-2(-/-) mice at 3 months of age. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), an important angiogenesis-related factor, decreased in mdx/MMP-2(-/-) mice at 3 months of age. MMP-2 had not a critical role in the degradation of dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC) components such as β-dystroglycan and β-sarcoglycan in the regeneration process of the dystrophic muscle. Accordingly, MMP-2 may be essential for growth of regenerated muscle fibers through VEGF-associated angiogenesis in the dystrophin-deficient skeletal muscle.

  9. Selective activation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRα7) inhibits muscular degeneration in mdx dystrophic mice.

    PubMed

    Leite, Paulo Emílio Correa; Gandía, Luís; de Pascual, Ricardo; Nanclares, Carmen; Colmena, Inés; Santos, Wilson C; Lagrota-Candido, Jussara; Quirico-Santos, Thereza

    2014-07-21

    Amount evidence indicates that α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRα7) activation reduces production of inflammatory mediators. This work aimed to verify the influence of endogenous nAChRα7 activation on the regulation of full-blown muscular inflammation in mdx mouse with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We used mdx mice with 3 weeks-old at the height myonecrosis, and C57 nAChRα7(+/+) wild-type and nAChRα7(-/-) knockout mice with muscular injury induced with 60µL 0.5% bupivacaine (bp) in the gastrocnemius muscle. Pharmacological treatment included selective nAChRα7 agonist PNU282987 (0.3mg/kg and 1.0mg/kg) and the antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA at 1.0mg/kg) injected intraperitoneally for 7 days. Selective nAChRα7 activation of mdx mice with PNU282987 reduced circulating levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, a marker of cell death by necrosis) and the area of perivascular inflammatory infiltrate, and production of inflammatory mediators TNFα and metalloprotease MMP-9 activity. Conversely, PNU282987 treatment increased MMP-2 activity, an indication of muscular tissue remodeling associated with regeneration, in both mdx mice and WTα7 mice with bp-induced muscular lesion. Treatment with PNU282987 had no effect on α7KO, and MLA abolished the nAChRα7 agonist-induced anti-inflammatory effect in both mdx and WT. In conclusion, nAChRα7 activation inhibits muscular inflammation and activates tissue remodeling by increasing muscular regeneration. These effects were not accompanied with fibrosis and/or deposition of non-functional collagen. The nAChRα7 activation may be considered as a potential target for pharmacological strategies to reduce inflammation and activate mechanisms of muscular regeneration. PMID:24833065

  10. Lack of Dystrophin Affects Bronchial Epithelium in mdx Mice.

    PubMed

    Morici, Giuseppe; Rappa, Francesca; Cappello, Francesco; Pace, Elisabetta; Pace, Andrea; Mudò, Giuseppa; Crescimanno, Grazia; Belluardo, Natale; Bonsignore, Maria R

    2016-10-01

    Mild exercise training may positively affect the course of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Training causes mild bronchial epithelial injury in both humans and mice, but no study assessed the effects of exercise in mdx mice, a well known model of DMD. The airway epithelium was examined in mdx (C57BL/10ScSn-Dmdmdx) mice, and in wild type (WT, C57BL/10ScSc) mice either under sedentary conditions (mdx-SD, WT-SD) or during mild exercise training (mdx-EX, WT-EX). At baseline, and after 30 and 45 days of training (5 d/wk for 6 weeks), epithelial morphology and markers of regeneration, apoptosis, and cellular stress were assessed. The number of goblet cells in bronchial epithelium was much lower in mdx than in WT mice under all conditions. At 30 days, epithelial regeneration (PCNA positive cells) was higher in EX than SD animals in both groups; however, at 45 days, epithelial regeneration decreased in mdx mice irrespective of training, and the percentage of apoptotic (TUNEL positive) cells was higher in mdx-EX than in WT-EX mice. Epithelial expression of HSP60 (marker of stress) progressively decreased, and inversely correlated with epithelial apoptosis (r = -0.66, P = 0.01) only in mdx mice. Lack of dystrophin in mdx mice appears associated with defective epithelial differentiation, and transient epithelial regeneration during mild exercise training. Hence, lack of dystrophin might impair repair in bronchial epithelium, with potential clinical consequences in DMD patients. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2218-2223, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Long-Term Therapy With Omega-3 Ameliorates Myonecrosis and Benefits Skeletal Muscle Regeneration in Mdx Mice.

    PubMed

    Apolinário, Leticia Montanholi; De Carvalho, Samara Camaçari; Santo Neto, Humberto; Marques, Maria Julia

    2015-09-01

    In Duchenne muscle dystrophy (DMD) and in the mdx mouse model of DMD, a lack of dystrophin leads to myonecrosis and cardiorespiratory failure. Several lines of evidence suggest a detrimental role of the inflammatory process in the dystrophic process. Previously, we demonstrated that short-term therapy with eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), at early stages of disease, ameliorated dystrophy progression in the mdx mouse. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of a long-term therapy with omega-3 later in dystrophy progression. Three-month-old mdx mice received omega-3 (300 mg/kg) or vehicle by gavage for 5 months. The quadriceps and diaphragm muscles were removed and processed for histopathology and Western blot. Long-term therapy with omega-3 increased the regulatory protein MyoD and muscle regeneration and reduced markers of inflammation (TNF-α and NF-kB) in both muscles studied. The present study supports the long-term use of omega-3 at later stages of dystrophy as a promising option to be investigated in DMD clinical trials.

  12. SERCA1 overexpression minimizes skeletal muscle damage in dystrophic mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Mázala, Davi A. G.; Pratt, Stephen J. P.; Chen, Dapeng; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; Lovering, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is characterized by progressive muscle wasting secondary to repeated muscle damage and inadequate repair. Elevations in intracellular free Ca2+ have been implicated in disease progression, and sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase 1 (SERCA1) overexpression has been shown to ameliorate the dystrophic phenotype in mdx mice. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of SERCA1 overexpression in the more severe mdx/Utr−/− mouse model of DMD. Mice overexpressing SERCA1 were crossed with mdx/Utr+/− mice to generate mdx/Utr−/−/+SERCA1 mice and compared with wild-type (WT), WT/+SERCA1, mdx/+SERCA1, and genotype controls. Mice were assessed at ∼12 wk of age for changes in Ca2+ handling, muscle mass, quadriceps torque, markers of muscle damage, and response to repeated eccentric contractions. SERCA1-overexpressing mice had a two- to threefold increase in maximal sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase activity compared with WT which was associated with normalization in body mass for both mdx/+SERCA1 and mdx/Utr−/−/+SERCA1. Torque deficit in the quadriceps after eccentric injury was 2.7-fold greater in mdx/Utr−/− vs. WT mice, but only 1.5-fold greater in mdx/Utr−/−/+SERCA1 vs. WT mice, an attenuation of 44%. Markers of muscle damage (% centrally nucleated fibers, necrotic area, and serum creatine kinase levels) were higher in both mdx and mdx/Utr−/− vs. WT, and all were attenuated by overexpression of SERCA1. These data indicate that SERCA1 overexpression ameliorates functional impairments and cellular markers of damage in a more severe mouse model of DMD. These findings support targeting intracellular Ca2+ control as a therapeutic approach for DMD. PMID:25652448

  13. Pregnancy-Induced Amelioration of Muscular Dystrophy Phenotype in mdx Mice via Muscle Membrane Stabilization Effect of Glucocorticoid

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu-Motohashi, Yuko; Asakura, Yoko; Motohashi, Norio; Belur, Nandkishore R.; Baumrucker, Michael G.; Asakura, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most common and severe type of dystrophinopathy, is an X-linked recessive genetic disease caused by the absence of dystrophin, which leads to fragility and vulnerability of the sarcolemma to mechanical stretching with increased membrane permeability. Currently, glucocorticoids such as prednisolone are the only medication available for DMD. However, molecular pathways responsible for this effect are still unclear. In addition, it remains unclear whether sex-related factors, including pregnancy and the postpartum period, affect the phenotype of dystrophinopathy. Here, we report the amelioration of muscle membrane permeability in the diaphragm muscle of pregnant and postpartum, but not in nulliparous, mdx mice, an animal model for DMD, during the physiological surge of corticosterone, the most abundant glucocorticoid in rodents. Cultures of single muscle fibers and myotubes isolated from mdx mouse diaphragm demonstrate resistance to hypo-osmotic shock when treated with corticosterone but not with estradiol or progesterone. This corticosterone-mediated resistance was diminished by an antagonist of corticosterone, indicating that the glucocorticoid-glucocorticoid receptor axis plays a role in this membrane stabilization effect on muscle. Moreover, subcutaneous injection of corticosterone into mdx mice showed decreased membrane permeability. This is the first report to demonstrate that pregnancy-related resistance to muscle fiber damage in mdx mice due to the membrane stabilization effect of corticosterone. We also propose that this membrane stabilization effect is exerted through annexin A1 up-regulation as the molecular mechanisms of glucocorticoid effects on DMD muscle. Furthermore, single muscle fiber culture studies provide a sensitive chemical screening platform for muscular dystrophies. PMID:25775477

  14. Whole Body Periodic Acceleration Is an Effective Therapy to Ameliorate Muscular Dystrophy in mdx Mice

    PubMed Central

    Altamirano, Francisco; Perez, Claudio F.; Liu, Min; Widrick, Jeffrey; Barton, Elisabeth R.; Allen, Paul D.; Adams, Jose A.; Lopez, Jose R.

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disorder caused by the absence of dystrophin in both skeletal and cardiac muscles. This leads to severe muscle degeneration, and dilated cardiomyopathy that produces patient death, which in most cases occurs before the end of the second decade. Several lines of evidence have shown that modulators of nitric oxide (NO) pathway can improve skeletal muscle and cardiac function in the mdx mouse, a mouse model for DMD. Whole body periodic acceleration (pGz) is produced by applying sinusoidal motion to supine humans and in standing conscious rodents in a headward-footward direction using a motion platform. It adds small pulses as a function of movement frequency to the circulation thereby increasing pulsatile shear stress to the vascular endothelium, which in turn increases production of NO. In this study, we examined the potential therapeutic properties of pGz for the treatment of skeletal muscle pathology observed in the mdx mouse. We found that pGz (480 cpm, 8 days, 1 hr per day) decreased intracellular Ca2+ and Na+ overload, diminished serum levels of creatine kinase (CK) and reduced intracellular accumulation of Evans Blue. Furthermore, pGz increased muscle force generation and expression of both utrophin and the carboxy-terminal PDZ ligand of nNOS (CAPON). Likewise, pGz (120 cpm, 12 h) applied in vitro to skeletal muscle myotubes reduced Ca2+ and Na+ overload, diminished abnormal sarcolemmal Ca2+ entry and increased phosphorylation of endothelial NOS. Overall, this study provides new insights into the potential therapeutic efficacy of pGz as a non-invasive and non-pharmacological approach for the treatment of DMD patients through activation of the NO pathway. PMID:25181488

  15. Whole body periodic acceleration is an effective therapy to ameliorate muscular dystrophy in mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Altamirano, Francisco; Perez, Claudio F; Liu, Min; Widrick, Jeffrey; Barton, Elisabeth R; Allen, Paul D; Adams, Jose A; Lopez, Jose R

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disorder caused by the absence of dystrophin in both skeletal and cardiac muscles. This leads to severe muscle degeneration, and dilated cardiomyopathy that produces patient death, which in most cases occurs before the end of the second decade. Several lines of evidence have shown that modulators of nitric oxide (NO) pathway can improve skeletal muscle and cardiac function in the mdx mouse, a mouse model for DMD. Whole body periodic acceleration (pGz) is produced by applying sinusoidal motion to supine humans and in standing conscious rodents in a headward-footward direction using a motion platform. It adds small pulses as a function of movement frequency to the circulation thereby increasing pulsatile shear stress to the vascular endothelium, which in turn increases production of NO. In this study, we examined the potential therapeutic properties of pGz for the treatment of skeletal muscle pathology observed in the mdx mouse. We found that pGz (480 cpm, 8 days, 1 hr per day) decreased intracellular Ca(2+) and Na(+) overload, diminished serum levels of creatine kinase (CK) and reduced intracellular accumulation of Evans Blue. Furthermore, pGz increased muscle force generation and expression of both utrophin and the carboxy-terminal PDZ ligand of nNOS (CAPON). Likewise, pGz (120 cpm, 12 h) applied in vitro to skeletal muscle myotubes reduced Ca(2+) and Na(+) overload, diminished abnormal sarcolemmal Ca(2+) entry and increased phosphorylation of endothelial NOS. Overall, this study provides new insights into the potential therapeutic efficacy of pGz as a non-invasive and non-pharmacological approach for the treatment of DMD patients through activation of the NO pathway. PMID:25181488

  16. Laryngeal Muscles Are Spared in the Dystrophin Deficient "mdx" Mouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Lisa B.; Joseph, Gayle L.; Adkins, Tracey D.; Andrade, Francisco H.; Stemple, Joseph C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: "Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD)" is caused by the loss of the cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. The disease leads to severe and progressive skeletal muscle wasting. Interestingly, the disease spares some muscles. The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of dystrophin deficiency on 2 intrinsic laryngeal muscles, the…

  17. Overview of MDX-A System for Medical Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, S.; Chandrasekaran, B.; Smith, J.

    1979-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of MDX, an experimental medical diagnosis system, which currently diagnoses in the syndrome called Cholestasis. The needed medical knowledge is represented in a scheme called conceptual structures, which can be viewed as a collection of conceptual experts interacting according to certain well-defined principles. MDX has three components: the diagnostic system, a patient data base and a radiology consultant. We describe these components, the inter-expert communication system and the query language used by these components. The system is illustrated by means of its performance on a real case.

  18. d-Amino Acid Substitution of Peptide-Mediated NF-κB Suppression in mdx Mice Preserves Therapeutic Benefit in Skeletal Muscle, but Causes Kidney Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Reay, Daniel P; Bastacky, Sheldon I; Wack, Kathryn E; Stolz, Donna B; Robbins, Paul D; Clemens, Paula R

    2015-01-01

    In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients and the mdx mouse model of DMD, chronic activation of the classical nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway contributes to the pathogenesis that causes degeneration of muscle fibers, inflammation and fibrosis. Prior studies demonstrate that inhibition of inhibitor of κB kinase (IKK)-mediated NF-κB activation using l-isomer NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO)-binding domain (NBD) peptide-based approaches reduce muscle pathology in the mdx mouse. For our studies, the NBD peptide is synthesized as a fusion peptide with an eight-lysine (8K) protein transduction domain to facilitate intracellular delivery. We hypothesized that the d-isoform peptide could have a greater effect than the naturally occurring l-isoform peptide due to the longer persistence of the d-isoform peptide in vivo. In this study, we compared systemic treatment with low (1 mg/kg) and high (10 mg/kg) doses of l- and d-isomer 8K-wild-type-NBD peptide in mdx mice. Treatment with both l- or d-isoform 8K-wild-type-NBD peptide resulted in decreased activation of NF-κB and improved histology in skeletal muscle of the mdx mouse. However, we observed kidney toxicity (characterized by proteinuria), increased serum creatinine, activation of NF-κB and pathological changes in kidney cortex that were most severe with treatment with the d-isoform of 8K-wild-type-NBD peptide. The observed toxicity was also seen in normal mice. PMID:26018805

  19. Company profile: QuantuMDx group limited.

    PubMed

    Burn, Jamie

    2013-07-01

    QuantuMDx Group Ltd (QMDx) is a group of companies based in the International Centre for Life, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. The Group owns the founding patent and the exclusive worldwide license for, among others, the use of nanowires and nanotubes in DNA detection. It has further developed a patent estate around the functionalization of nanowires for DNA detection, and is working with commercial partners globally to produce the Q-POC™, a handheld point-of-care genetic testing device. This novel lab-on-a-chip technology integrates and automates the sample-to-result genetic testing process in a single microfluidic channel, incorporating novel lysis technologies, the filtration of cellular constituents to achieve DNA extraction and fractionation, a rapid, thermal PCR system, and nanowires functionalized with nucleic acid probes to capture targeted sequences of genetic material. The device further makes use of novel chemistries to boost the charge of nucleotides binding to the isolated material, increasing the sensitivity and read length of the device and making it capable of robust SNP and pathogen detection. Complete with a sophisticated software package, the Q-POC™ can detect binding events through changes in resistance and effectively convert genetic code into binary code, providing a simple display of the results, complete with treatment options. The competitive advantages of this system are the sensitivity and specificity of the nanowire detection system, the extremely low cost profile of the technology, and the speed of the process, which will allow the sample-to-result detection of targeted genetic material in less than 15 min. PMID:23837475

  20. Laparoscopic duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiayu; Zhou, Yucheng; Mou, Yiping; Xia, Tao; Xu, Xiaowu; Jin, Weiwei; Zhang, Renchao; Lu, Chao; Chen, Ronggao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Solid pseudopapillary neoplasms (SPNs) of the pancreas are uncommon neoplasms and are potentially malignant. Complete resection is advised due to rare recurrence and metastasis. Duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR) is indicated for SPNs located in the pancreatic head and is only performed using the open approach. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reports describing laparoscopic DPPHR (LDPPHR) for SPNs. Methods: Herein, we report a case of 41-year-old female presented with a 1-week history of epigastric abdominal discomfort, and founded an SPN of the pancreatic head by abdominal computed tomography/magnetic resonance, who was treated by radical LDPPHR without complications, such as pancreatic fistula and bile leakage. Histological examination of the resected specimen confirmed the diagnosis of SPN. Results: The patient was discharged 1 week after surgery following an uneventful postoperative period. She was followed up 3 months without readmission and local recurrence according to abdominal ultrasound. Conclusion: LDPPHR is a safe, feasible, and effective surgical procedure for SPNs. PMID:27512859

  1. Electroretinographic genotype-phenotype correlations for mouse and man at the dmd/DMD locus

    SciTech Connect

    Millers, D.M.; Weleber, R.G.; Woodward, W.R.

    1994-09-01

    Reduced or absent b-waves in the dark-adapted electroretinogram (ERG) of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD) patients led to the identification of dystrophin in human retina and the proposal that it plays a role in retinal electrophysiology. Study of a large group of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy males to determine their ocular characteristics indicated that there were position-specific effects of deletions, with 3{prime} defects associated with severe electroretinographic changes, whereas some 5{prime} patients demonstrated less severe, or even normal, ERGs. We studied the mdx mouse, a model with X-linked muscular dystrophy and defective full-length dystrophin, which failed to show any ERG abnormalities. Given the presence of alternate isoforms of dystrophin in retina, and the 5{prime} deletion DMD/BMD patients with normal ERGs, we studied mouse models with differing dystrophin mutations (mdx{sup Cv3}, mdx{sup Cv5}) to determine the usefulness of alternate strains as models for the visual effects of dystropin. Abnormal ERGs similar to those seen in DMD/BMS patients exist in the mdx{sup Cv3} strain of muscular dystrophy mice. Normal ERGs were found the mdx{sup Cv5} strain. The mutations in the mdx and mdx{sup Cv5} mice have been mapped to the 5{prime} end of the dmd gene, while the mutation in the mdx{sup Cv3} mouse is in the 3{prime} end. Thus, there are position effects of the gene defect on the ERG phenotype that are conserved in the mouse. Such genotype-phenotype correlations may reflect differential expression of shorter isoforms of dystrophin.

  2. Alterations in Notch signalling in skeletal muscles from mdx and dko dystrophic mice and patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Church, Jarrod E; Trieu, Jennifer; Chee, Annabel; Naim, Timur; Gehrig, Stefan M; Lamon, Séverine; Angelini, Corrado; Russell, Aaron P; Lynch, Gordon S

    2014-04-01

    New Findings What is the central question of this study? The Notch signalling pathway plays an important role in muscle regeneration, and activation of the pathway has been shown to enhance muscle regeneration in aged mice. It is unknown whether Notch activation will have a similarly beneficial effect on muscle regeneration in the context of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). What is the main finding and its importance? Although expression of Notch signalling components is altered in both mouse models of DMD and in human DMD patients, activation of the Notch signalling pathway does not confer any functional benefit on muscles from dystrophic mice, suggesting that other signalling pathways may be more fruitful targets for manipulation in treating DMD. Abstract In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), muscle damage and impaired regeneration lead to progressive muscle wasting, weakness and premature death. The Notch signalling pathway represents a central regulator of gene expression and is critical for cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptotic signalling during all stages of embryonic muscle development. Notch activation improves muscle regeneration in aged mice, but its potential to restore regeneration and function in muscular dystrophy is unknown. We performed a comprehensive examination of several genes involved in Notch signalling in muscles from dystrophin-deficient mdx and dko (utrophin- and dystrophin-null) mice and DMD patients. A reduction of Notch1 and Hes1 mRNA in tibialis anterior muscles of dko mice and quadriceps muscles of DMD patients and a reduction of Hes1 mRNA in the diaphragm of the mdx mice were observed, with other targets being inconsistent across species. Activation and inhibition of Notch signalling, followed by measures of muscle regeneration and function, were performed in the mouse models of DMD. Notch activation had no effect on functional regeneration in C57BL/10, mdx or dko mice. Notch inhibition significantly depressed the

  3. Muscle reorganisation through local injection of stem cells in the diaphragm of mdx mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The diaphragm is the major respiratory muscle affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and is responsible for causing 80% of deaths. The use of mechanical forces that act on the body or intermittent pressure on the airways improves the quality of life of patients but does not prevent the progression of respiratory failure. Thus, diseases that require tissue repair, such as DMD, represent a group of pathologies that have great potential for cell therapy. The application of stem cells directly into the diaphragm instead of systemic application can reduce cell migration to other affected areas and increase the chances of muscle reorganisation. The mdx mouse is a suitable animal model for this research because its diaphragmatic phenotype is similar to human DMD. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the potential cell implantation in the diaphragm muscle after the xenotransplantation of stem cells. Methods A total of 9 mice, including 3 control BALB/Cmice, 3 5-month-old mdx mice without stem cell injections and 3 mdx mice injected with stem cells, were used. The animals injected with stem cells underwent laparoscopy so that stem cells from GFP-labelled rabbit olfactory epithelium could be locally injected into the diaphragm muscle. After 8 days, all animals were euthanised, and the diaphragm muscle was dissected and subjected to histological and immunohistochemical analyses. Results Both the fresh diaphragm tissue and immunohistochemical analyses showed immunopositive GFP labelling of some of the cells and immunonegativity of myoblast bundles. In the histological analysis, we observed a reduction in the inflammatory infiltrate as well as the presence of a few peripheral nuclei and myoblast bundles. Conclusion We were able to implant stem cells into the diaphragm via local injection, which promoted moderate muscle reorganisation. The presence of myoblast bundles cannot be attributed to stem cell incorporation because there was no immunopositive

  4. Beneficial versus adverse effects of long-term use of clenbuterol in mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Dupont-Versteegden, E E; Katz, M S; McCarter, R J

    1995-12-01

    Long-term administration of the beta 2-adrenergic agonist clenbuterol in mdx mice was used to test the hypothesis that increasing contractile protein content in skeletal muscle will decrease the progression of muscular dystrophy. C57BL/10SNJ (control) and dystrophic (mdx) mice were given clenbuterol (1.0-1.5 mg/kg body weight/day) in the drinking water. Ventilatory function and morphological and functional characteristics of soleus (SOL) and diaphragm (DIA) muscles were evaluated. Clenbuterol administration was associated with increased SOL muscle weight, and SOL muscle weight to body weight ratio in control and mdx mice at both ages. There was a 22% increase in myosin concentration of mdx DIA at 1 year of age, correlating well with increased normalized active tension in mdx DIA at this age. Also, absolute tetanic tension increased in control and mdx SOL with clenbuterol at both ages. Ventilatory function was significantly impaired in mdx mice at both ages and clenbuterol administration did not alleviate this. Clenbuterol treatment was associated with a 30-40% increase in fatigability in DIA and SOL muscles of control and mdx mice at both ages. Furthermore, 1-year-old mdx mice receiving clenbuterol exhibited deformities in hindlimbs and spine. These results suggest that long-term clenbuterol treatment has a positive effect on muscle growth and force generation, but has adverse side effects such as increased muscle fatigability and development of deformities. PMID:7477069

  5. Myoid cell density in the thymus is reduced during mdx dystrophy and after muscle crush.

    PubMed

    Wong, A; Garrett, K L; Anderson, J E

    1999-01-01

    Thymic myoid cells share structural and behavioural features with cells of the skeletal muscle lineage: they express regulatory genes and contractile proteins, and they can form myofibers in culture. Historically, those features suggested that myoid cells could be precursors for muscle repair in addition to the satellite cells in muscle that are typically designated as the only muscle precursors. Muscles of the mutant mdx dystrophic mouse strain have a large demand for precursors, which is greatest at a young age. In the present study, immunostaining for troponin T was used to localize myoid cells. We tested the hypothesis that the myoid cell population changes when there is a demand for muscle precursors and that these changes would be anticipated if myoid cells have a role as myogenic precursors or stem cells in muscle. Chronic demands for muscle precursors in mdx dystrophic mice were accompanied by lower myoid cell density in comparison with density in two normal strains (C57BL10/ScSn and Swiss Webster). Acute demand for precursors was accompanied by a sharp decline in thymic myoid cell density within 2 days after a crush injury to one tibialis anterior muscle in normal but not dystrophic animals. To standardize the developmental age of the thymus, density was determined in all animals at 28 days of age. Given the current interest in nonmuscle sources of myogenic stem cells, these data suggest that changes in the density of thymic myoid cells may accompany acute and chronic demands for muscle precursors. Further experiments are required to determine whether thymic myoid cells are participants in distant muscle cell proliferation, new fiber formation, or the establishment of new stem cells in regenerated muscle.

  6. Lack of dystrophin functionally affects α3β2/β4-nicotinic acethylcholine receptors in sympathetic neurons of dystrophic mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Di Angelantonio, Silvia; De Stefano, Maria Egle; Piccioni, Alessio; Lombardi, Loredana; Gotti, Cecilia; Paggi, Paola

    2011-02-01

    In the sympathetic superior cervical ganglion (SCG), nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) mediate fast synaptic transmission. We previously demonstrated that in SCG neurons of mdx mice, an animal model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, lack of dystrophin causes a decrease, compared to the wild-type, in post-synaptic nAChRs containing the α3 subunit associated with β2 and/or β4 (α3β2/β4-nAChRs), but not in those containing the α7 subunit. Here we show, by whole cell patch-clamp recordings from cultured SCG neurons, that both nicotine and acetylcholine-evoked currents through α3β2/β4-nAChRs are significantly reduced in mdx mice compared to the wild-type, while those through α7-nAChR are unaffected. This reduction associates with that of protein levels of α3, β2 and β4 subunits. Therefore, we suggest that, in mdx mouse SCG neurons, lack of dystrophin, by specifically affecting membrane stabilization of α3β2/β4-nAChRs, could determine an increase in receptor internalization and degradation, with consequent reduction in the fast intraganglionic cholinergic transmission.

  7. Beneficial cilostazol therapeutic effects in mdx dystrophic skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hermes, Túlio de Almeida; Macedo, Aline Barbosa; Fogaça, Aline Reis; Moraes, Luis Henrique Rapucci; de Faria, Felipe Meira; Kido, Larissa Akemi; Cagnon, Valéria Helena Alves; Minatel, Elaine

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the possible protective effects of cilostazol against myonecrosis in dystrophic diaphragm muscle in vivo, focusing on oxidative stress, the inflammatory response and angiogenesis. Young mdx mice, the experimental animal for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, received cilostazol for 14 days. A second group of mdx mice and a control group of C57BL/10 mice received a saline solution. In the mdx mice, cilostazol treatment was associated with reduced loss of muscle strength (-34.4%), decreased myonecrosis, reduced creatine kinase levels (-63.3%) and muscle fibres stained for immunoglobulin G in dystrophic diaphragm muscle (-81.1%), and a reduced inflammatory response, with a decreased inflammatory area (-22%), macrophage infiltration (-44.9%) and nuclear factor-κB (-24%) and tumour necrosis factor-α (-48%) content in dystrophic diaphragm muscle. Furthermore, cilostazol decreased oxidative stress and attenuated reactive oxygen species production (-74%) and lipid peroxidation (-17%) in dystrophic diaphragm muscle, and promoted the up-regulation of angiogenesis, increasing the number of microvessels (15%). In conclusion, the present results show that cilostazol has beneficial effects in dystrophic muscle. More research into the potential of cilostazol as a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of dystrophinopathies is required.

  8. 100-fold but not 50-fold dystrophin overexpression aggravates electrocardiographic defects in the mdx model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yongping; Wasala, Nalinda B; Bostick, Brian; Duan, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Dystrophin gene replacement holds the promise of treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Supraphysiological expression is a concern for all gene therapy studies. In the case of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, Chamberlain and colleagues found that 50-fold overexpression did not cause deleterious side effect in skeletal muscle. To determine whether excessive dystrophin expression in the heart is safe, we studied two lines of transgenic mdx mice that selectively expressed a therapeutic minidystrophin gene in the heart at 50-fold and 100-fold of the normal levels. In the line with 50-fold overexpression, minidystrophin showed sarcolemmal localization and electrocardiogram abnormalities were corrected. However, in the line with 100-fold overexpression, we not only detected sarcolemmal minidystrophin expression but also observed accumulation of minidystrophin vesicles in the sarcoplasm. Excessive minidystrophin expression did not correct tachycardia, a characteristic feature of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Importantly, several electrocardiogram parameters (QT interval, QRS duration and the cardiomyopathy index) became worse than that of mdx mice. Our data suggests that the mouse heart can tolerate 50-fold minidystrophin overexpression, but 100-fold overexpression leads to cardiac toxicity. PMID:27419194

  9. Carcinoma of the duodenum after trauma, radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bayens, Y C; Wiggers, T; Meerwaldt, J H; Vroom, T M; Van Geel, A N

    1991-10-01

    The case history is reported of a patient with a carcinoma of the duodenum 30 years after blunt abdominal trauma at the site of the 'scar' in the duodenum. Thirteen years after the trauma the patient was treated with chemotherapy and abdominal irradiation for a relapse of Hodgkin's disease. At follow-up, 25 months after the operation, he had no local recurrence of Hodgkin's disease or duodenal cancer. The possible relation between the cancer and the abdominal trauma, chemotherapy and abdominal irradiation is discussed. PMID:1787905

  10. Carcinoma of the duodenum after trauma, radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bayens, Y C; Wiggers, T; Meerwaldt, J H; Vroom, T M; Van Geel, A N

    1991-10-01

    The case history is reported of a patient with a carcinoma of the duodenum 30 years after blunt abdominal trauma at the site of the 'scar' in the duodenum. Thirteen years after the trauma the patient was treated with chemotherapy and abdominal irradiation for a relapse of Hodgkin's disease. At follow-up, 25 months after the operation, he had no local recurrence of Hodgkin's disease or duodenal cancer. The possible relation between the cancer and the abdominal trauma, chemotherapy and abdominal irradiation is discussed.

  11. Muscle Structure Influences Utrophin Expression in mdx Mice

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Glen B.; Combs, Ariana C.; Odom, Guy L.; Bloch, Robert J.; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe muscle wasting disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. To examine the influence of muscle structure on the pathogenesis of DMD we generated mdx4cv:desmin double knockout (dko) mice. The dko male mice died of apparent cardiorespiratory failure at a median age of 76 days compared to 609 days for the desmin−/− mice. An ∼2.5 fold increase in utrophin expression in the dko skeletal muscles prevented necrosis in ∼91% of 1a, 2a and 2d/x fiber-types. In contrast, utrophin expression was reduced in the extrasynaptic sarcolemma of the dko fast 2b fibers leading to increased membrane fragility and dystrophic pathology. Despite lacking extrasynaptic utrophin, the dko fast 2b fibers were less dystrophic than the mdx4cv fast 2b fibers suggesting utrophin-independent mechanisms were also contributing to the reduced dystrophic pathology. We found no overt change in the regenerative capacity of muscle stem cells when comparing the wild-type, desmin−/−, mdx4cv and dko gastrocnemius muscles injured with notexin. Utrophin could form costameric striations with α-sarcomeric actin in the dko to maintain the integrity of the membrane, but the lack of restoration of the NODS (nNOS, α-dystrobrevin 1 and 2, α1-syntrophin) complex and desmin coincided with profound changes to the sarcomere alignment in the diaphragm, deposition of collagen between the myofibers, and impaired diaphragm function. We conclude that the dko mice may provide new insights into the structural mechanisms that influence endogenous utrophin expression that are pertinent for developing a therapy for DMD. PMID:24922526

  12. Interleukin-15 Administration Improves Diaphragm Muscle Pathology and Function in Dystrophic mdx Mice

    PubMed Central

    Harcourt, Leah J.; Holmes, Anna Greer; Gregorevic, Paul; Schertzer, Jonathan D.; Stupka, Nicole; Plant, David R.; Lynch, Gordon S.

    2005-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-15, a cytokine expressed in skeletal muscle, has been shown to have muscle anabolic effects in vitro and to slow muscle wasting in rats with cancer cachexia. Whether IL-15 has therapeutic potential for diseases such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is unknown. We examined whether IL-15 administration could ameliorate the dystrophic pathology in the diaphragm muscle of the mdx mouse, an animal model for DMD. Four weeks of IL-15 treatment improved diaphragm strength, a highly significant finding because respiratory function is a mortality predictor in DMD. Enhanced diaphragm function was associated with increased muscle fiber cross-sectional area and decreased collagen infiltration. IL-15 administration was not associated with changes in T-cell populations or alterations in specific components of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway. To determine the effects of IL-15 on myofiber regeneration, muscles of IL-15-treated and untreated wild-type mice were injured myotoxically, and their functional recovery was assessed. IL-15 had a mild anabolic effect, increasing fiber cross-sectional area after 2 and 6 days but not after 10 days. Our findings demonstrate that IL-15 administration improves the pathophysiology of dystrophic muscle and highlight a possible therapeutic role for IL-15 in the treatment of neuromuscular disorders especially in which muscle wasting is indicated. PMID:15793293

  13. Erythropoietin reduces the expression of myostatin in mdx dystrophic mice.

    PubMed

    Feder, D; Rugollini, M; Santomauro, A; Oliveira, L P; Lioi, V P; Santos, R dos; Ferreira, L G; Nunes, M T; Carvalho, M H; Delgado, P O; Carvalho, A A S; Fonseca, F L A

    2014-11-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) has been well characterized as a renal glycoprotein hormone regulating red blood cell production by inhibiting apoptosis of erythrocyte progenitors in hematopoietic tissues. EPO exerts regulatory effects in cardiac and skeletal muscles. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a lethal degenerative disorder of skeletal and cardiac muscle. In this study, we tested the possible therapeutic beneficial effect of recombinant EPO (rhEPO) in dystrophic muscles in mdx mice. Total strength was measured using a force transducer coupled to a computer. Gene expression for myostatin, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) was determined by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction. Myostatin expression was significantly decreased in quadriceps from mdx mice treated with rhEPO (rhEPO = 0.60 ± 0.11, control = 1.07 ± 0.11). On the other hand, rhEPO had no significant effect on the expression of TGF-β1 (rhEPO = 0.95 ± 0.14, control = 1.05 ± 0.16) and TNF-α (rhEPO = 0.73 ± 0.20, control = 1.01 ± 0.09). These results may help to clarify some of the direct actions of EPO on skeletal muscle. PMID:25296358

  14. Effect of the IL-1 Receptor Antagonist Kineret® on Disease Phenotype in mdx Mice

    PubMed Central

    Benny Klimek, Margaret E.; Sali, Arpana; Rayavarapu, Sree; Van der Meulen, Jack H.; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked muscle disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. The pathology of DMD manifests in patients with progressive muscle weakness, loss of ambulation and ultimately death. One of the characteristics of DMD is muscle inflammation, and dystrophin-deficient skeletal muscles produce higher levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 1β (IL-1β) in response to toll like receptor (TLR) stimulation compared to controls; therefore, blocking the IL-1β pathway could improve the disease phenotype in mdx mice, a mouse model of DMD. Kineret® or IL-1Ra is a recombinant IL-1 receptor antagonist approved by the FDA for treating rheumatoid arthritis. To determine the efficacy of IL-1Ra in a DMD model, we administered subcutaneous injections of saline control or IL-1Ra (25 mg/kg/day) to mdx mice daily for 45 days beginning at 5 weeks of age. Functional and histological parameters were measured at the conclusion of the study. IL-1Ra only partially inhibited this signaling pathway in this study; however, there were still interesting observations to be noted. For example, although not significantly changed, splenocytes from the IL-1Ra-treated group secreted less IL-1β after LPS stimulation compared to control mice indicating a blunted response and incomplete inhibition of the pathway (37% decrease). In addition, normalized forelimb grip strength was significantly increased in IL-1Ra-treated mice. There were no changes in EDL muscle-specific force measurements, histological parameters, or motor coordination assessments in the dystrophic mice after IL-1Ra treatment. There was a significant 27% decrease in the movement time and total distance traveled by the IL-1Ra treated mice, correlating with previous studies examining effects of IL-1 on behavior. Our studies indicate partial blocking of IL-1β with IL-1Ra significantly altered only a few behavioral and strength related disease parameters; however, treatment with

  15. Effect of the IL-1 Receptor Antagonist Kineret® on Disease Phenotype in mdx Mice.

    PubMed

    Benny Klimek, Margaret E; Sali, Arpana; Rayavarapu, Sree; Van der Meulen, Jack H; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked muscle disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. The pathology of DMD manifests in patients with progressive muscle weakness, loss of ambulation and ultimately death. One of the characteristics of DMD is muscle inflammation, and dystrophin-deficient skeletal muscles produce higher levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 1β (IL-1β) in response to toll like receptor (TLR) stimulation compared to controls; therefore, blocking the IL-1β pathway could improve the disease phenotype in mdx mice, a mouse model of DMD. Kineret® or IL-1Ra is a recombinant IL-1 receptor antagonist approved by the FDA for treating rheumatoid arthritis. To determine the efficacy of IL-1Ra in a DMD model, we administered subcutaneous injections of saline control or IL-1Ra (25 mg/kg/day) to mdx mice daily for 45 days beginning at 5 weeks of age. Functional and histological parameters were measured at the conclusion of the study. IL-1Ra only partially inhibited this signaling pathway in this study; however, there were still interesting observations to be noted. For example, although not significantly changed, splenocytes from the IL-1Ra-treated group secreted less IL-1β after LPS stimulation compared to control mice indicating a blunted response and incomplete inhibition of the pathway (37% decrease). In addition, normalized forelimb grip strength was significantly increased in IL-1Ra-treated mice. There were no changes in EDL muscle-specific force measurements, histological parameters, or motor coordination assessments in the dystrophic mice after IL-1Ra treatment. There was a significant 27% decrease in the movement time and total distance traveled by the IL-1Ra treated mice, correlating with previous studies examining effects of IL-1 on behavior. Our studies indicate partial blocking of IL-1β with IL-1Ra significantly altered only a few behavioral and strength related disease parameters; however, treatment with

  16. Major alteration of the pathological phenotype in gamma irradiated mdx soleus muscles

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, B.; Karpati, G.; Lehnert, S.; Carpenter, S. )

    1991-07-01

    Two thousand rads of gamma irradiation delivered to the lower legs of ten day old normal and x-chromosome linked muscular dystrophy (mdx) mice caused significant inhibition of tibial bone and soleus muscle fiber growth. In the irradiated mdx solei, there was a major loss of muscle fibers, lack of central nucleation, and some endomysial fibrosis. These features were caused by a failure of regeneration of muscle fibers due to impaired proliferative capacity of satellite cells. Gamma irradiation transforms the late pathological phenotype of mdx muscles, so that in one major aspect (muscle fiber loss) they resemble muscles in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. However, extensive endomysial fibrosis which is another characteristic feature of Duchenne muscular dystrophy did not develop. This experimental model could be useful for the functional investigation of possible beneficial effects of therapeutic interventions in mdx dystrophy.

  17. Gastric emptying, small intestinal transit and fecal output in dystrophic (mdx) mice.

    PubMed

    Mulè, Flavia; Amato, Antonella; Serio, Rosa

    2010-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), which results from deficiency in dystrophin, a sarcolemma protein of skeletal, cardiac and smooth muscle, is characterized by progressive striated muscle degeneration, but various gastrointestinal clinical manifestations have been observed. The aim was to evaluate the possible impact of the dystrophin loss on the gastrointestinal propulsion in mdx mice (animal model for DMD). The gastric emptying of a carboxymethyl cellulose/phenol red dye non-nutrient meal was not significantly different at 20 min from gavaging between wild-type and mdx mice. The intestinal transit and the fecal output were significantly decreased in mdx versus normal animals, although the length of the intestine was similar in both animals. The present results provide evidence for motor intestinal alterations in mdx mice in in vivo conditions. PMID:19784719

  18. Recovery of damaged skeletal muscle in mdx mice through low-intensity endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Frinchi, M; Macaluso, F; Licciardi, A; Perciavalle, V; Coco, M; Belluardo, N; Morici, G; Mudò, G

    2014-01-01

    The lack of dystrophin in mdx mice leads to cycles of muscle degeneration and regeneration processes. Various strategies have been proposed in order to reduce the muscle-wasting component of muscular dystrophy, including implementation of an exercise programme. The aim of this study was to examine how low-intensity endurance exercise affects the degeneration-regeneration process in dystrophic muscle of male mdx mice. Mice were subjected to low-intensity endurance exercise by running on a motorized Rota-Rod for 5 days/week for 6 weeks. Histomorphological analysis showed a significant reduction of measured inflammatory-necrotic areas in both gastrocnemius and quadriceps muscle of exercised mdx mice as compared to matched sedentary mdx mice. The degenerative-regenerative process was also evaluated by examining the protein levels of connexin 39 (Cx39), a specific gene expressed in injured muscles. Cx39 was not detected in sedentary wild type mice, whereas it was found markedly increased in sedentary mdx mice, revealing active muscle degeneration-regeneration process. These Cx39 protein levels were significantly reduced in muscles of mdx mice exercised for 30 and 40 days, revealing together with histomorphological analysis a strong reduction of degeneration process in mice subjected to low-intensity endurance exercise. Muscles of exercised mdx mice did not show significant changes in force and fatigue resistance as compared to sedentary mdx mice. Overall in this study we found that specific low-intensity endurance exercise induces a beneficial effect probably by reducing the degeneration of dystrophic muscle.

  19. Adenosquamous carcinoma of the duodenum. An immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    de la Cruz, A; de la Cruz, E; Sanchez, M J; Ortiz, S; Lobato, A; Merino, E

    1993-05-01

    A rare adenosquamous carcinoma of the duodenum occurred in an 84-year-old woman. Histologically the neoplasm showed evidence of glandular and squamous differentiation, and both components showed malignant characteristics. Intermediate elements sharing squamous and glandular features, were found and were immunoreactive for carcinoembryonic antigen, epithelial membrane antigen and cytokeratins of both low and high molecular weight. A review of the literature and discussion about the histogenesis is included.

  20. Expanding the MDx toolbox for filarial diagnosis and surveillance.

    PubMed

    Alhassan, Andy; Li, Zhiru; Poole, Catherine B; Carlow, Clotilde K S

    2015-08-01

    Filarial parasites are tissue-dwelling nematodes responsible for some of the most important neglected tropical diseases. All are transmitted by blood-sucking arthropod. Onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis in particular are the cause of much disfigurement and morbidity. Accurate parasite detection is essential for the success of filariasis control programs. The current toolbox for diagnosis and surveillance is limited because many of the available tools suffer from lack of sensitivity and specificity, and/or are cost-prohibitive. We review the methods currently in use and discuss the prospects for developing new molecular diagnostic (MDx) tools based on nucleic acid detection. We briefly describe recent developments in isothermal nucleic acid amplification and detection, and focus on emerging technologies that are field-deployable or suitable for low-resource settings.

  1. E2F transcription factor-1 deficiency reduces pathophysiology in the mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy through increased muscle oxidative metabolism.

    PubMed

    Blanchet, Emilie; Annicotte, Jean-Sébastien; Pradelli, Ludivine A; Hugon, Gérald; Matecki, Stéfan; Mornet, Dominique; Rivier, François; Fajas, Lluis

    2012-09-01

    E2F1 deletion leads to increased mitochondrial number and function, increased body temperature in response to cold and increased resistance to fatigue with exercise. Since E2f1-/- mice show increased muscle performance, we examined the effect of E2f1 genetic inactivation in the mdx background, a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). E2f1-/-;mdx mice demonstrated a strong reduction of physiopathological signs of DMD, including preservation of muscle structure, decreased inflammatory profile, increased utrophin expression, resulting in better endurance and muscle contractile parameters, comparable to normal mdx mice. E2f1 deficiency in the mdx genetic background increased the oxidative metabolic gene program, mitochondrial activity and improved muscle functions. Interestingly, we observed increased E2F1 protein levels in DMD patients, suggesting that E2F1 might represent a promising target for the treatment of DMD.

  2. Endogenous mesenchymal stromal cells in bone marrow are required to preserve muscle function in mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Ryo; Tamai, Katsuto; Aikawa, Eriko; Nimura, Keisuke; Ishino, Saki; Kikuchi, Yasushi; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2015-03-01

    The physiological role of "endogenous" bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in tissue regeneration is poorly understood. Here, we show the significant contribution of unique endogenous BM-MSC populations to muscle regeneration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) mice (mdx). Transplantation of BM cells (BMCs) from 10-week-old mdx into 3-4-week-old mdx mice increased inflammation and fibrosis and reduced muscle function compared with mdx mice that received BMCs from 10-week-old wild-type mice, suggesting that the alteration of BMC populations in mdx mice affects the progression of muscle pathology. Two distinct MSC populations in BM, that is, hematopoietic lineage (Lin)(-) /ckit(-) /CD106(+) /CD44(+) and Lin(-) /ckit(-) /CD106(+) /CD44(-) cells, were significantly reduced in 10-week-old mdx mice in disease progression. The results of a whole-transcriptome analysis indicated that these two MSC populations have distinct gene expression profiles, indicating that the Lin(-) /ckit(-) /CD106(+) /CD44(+) and Lin(-) /ckit(-) /CD106(+) /CD44(-) MSC populations are proliferative- and dormant-state populations in BM, respectively. BM-derived Lin(-) /CD106(+) /CD44(+) MSCs abundantly migrated to damaged muscles and highly expressed tumor necrosis factor-alpha-stimulated gene/protein-6 (TSG-6), an anti-inflammatory protein, in damaged muscles. We also demonstrated that TSG-6 stimulated myoblast proliferation. The injection of Lin(-) /ckit(-) /CD106(+) /CD44(+) MSCs into the muscle of mdx mice successfully ameliorated muscle dysfunction by decreasing inflammation and enhancing muscle regeneration through TSG-6-mediated activities. Thus, we propose a novel function of the unique endogenous BM-MSC population, which countered muscle pathology progression in a DMD model.

  3. Secondary Extramedullary Plasmacytoma of the Duodenum: An Unusual Endoscopic Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Gravina, Antonietta Gerarda; Federico, Alessandro; Sica, Antonello; D’Armiento, Francesco Paolo; Ferrara, Maria Giovanna; Falcone, Umberto; Dallio, Marcello; Cozzolino, Domenico; Guastafierro, Salvatore; Loguercio, Carmela; Romano, Marco

    2013-01-01

    We describe an unusual case (a 79-year-old woman) of secondary extramedullary plasmacytoma (EMP) involving the duodenum. While all the previously reported cases of duodenal involvement by EMP (namely 20 cases) were characterized by the presence of ulcerative masses or ischemic necrotic lesions, in our case EMP led to the unusual finding of several non-polypoid lesions with a depressed central area. The final diagnosis was multiple myeloma IgA lambda, stage II A, with secondary duodenal EMP. To our knowledge this is the first report showing duodenal involvement by EMP with the aspect of multiple non-polypoid lesions.

  4. Dystrophic Changes in Extraocular Muscles after Gamma Irradiation in mdx:utrophin+/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Abby A.; Kunz, Matthew D.; McLoon, Linda K.

    2014-01-01

    Extraocular muscles (EOM) have a strikingly different disease profile than limb skeletal muscles. It has long been known that they are spared in Duchenne (DMD) and other forms of muscular dystrophy. Despite many studies, the cause for this sparing is not understood. We have proposed that differences in myogenic precursor cell properties in EOM maintain normal morphology over the lifetime of individuals with DMD due to either greater proliferative potential or greater resistance to injury. This hypothesis was tested by exposing wild type and mdx:utrophin+/− (het) mouse EOM and limb skeletal muscles to 18 Gy gamma irradiation, a dose known to inhibit satellite cell proliferation in limb muscles. As expected, over time het limb skeletal muscles displayed reduced central nucleation mirrored by a reduction in Pax7-positive cells, demonstrating a significant loss in regenerative potential. In contrast, in the first month post-irradiation in the het EOM, myofiber cross-sectional areas first decreased, then increased, but ultimately returned to normal compared to non-irradiated het EOM. Central nucleation significantly increased in the first post-irradiation month, resembling the dystrophic limb phenotype. This correlated with decreased EECD34 stem cells and a concomitant increase and subsequent return to normalcy of both Pax7 and Pitx2-positive cell density. By two months, normal het EOM morphology returned. It appears that irradiation disrupts the normal method of EOM remodeling, which react paradoxically to produce increased numbers of myogenic precursor cells. This suggests that the EOM contain myogenic precursor cell types resistant to 18 Gy gamma irradiation, allowing return to normal morphology 2 months post-irradiation. This supports our hypothesis that ongoing proliferation of specialized regenerative populations in the het EOM actively maintains normal EOM morphology in DMD. Ongoing studies are working to define the differences in the myogenic precursor cells

  5. Influence of Botulinumtoxin A on the Expression of Adult MyHC Isoforms in the Masticatory Muscles in Dystrophin-Deficient Mice (Mdx-Mice)

    PubMed Central

    Todorov, Teodor

    2016-01-01

    The most widespread animal model to investigate Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the mdx-mouse. In contrast to humans, phases of muscle degeneration are replaced by regeneration processes; hence there is only a restricted time slot for research. The aim of the study was to investigate if an intramuscular injection of BTX-A is able to break down muscle regeneration and has direct implications on the gene expression of myosin heavy chains in the corresponding treated and untreated muscles. Therefore, paralysis of the right masseter muscle was induced in adult healthy and dystrophic mice by a specific intramuscular injection of BTX-A. After 21 days the mRNA expression and protein content of MyHC isoforms of the right and left masseter, temporal, and the tongue muscle were determined using quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot technique. MyHC-IIa and MyHC-I-mRNA expression significantly increased in the paralyzed masseter muscle of control-mice, whereas MyHC-IIb and MyHC-IIx/d-mRNA were decreased. In dystrophic muscles no effect of BTX-A could be detected at the level of MyHC. This study suggests that BTX-A injection is a suitable method to simulate DMD-pathogenesis in healthy mice but further investigations are necessary to fully analyse the BTX-A effect and to generate sustained muscular atrophy in mdx-mice.

  6. Influence of Botulinumtoxin A on the Expression of Adult MyHC Isoforms in the Masticatory Muscles in Dystrophin-Deficient Mice (Mdx-Mice)

    PubMed Central

    Todorov, Teodor

    2016-01-01

    The most widespread animal model to investigate Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the mdx-mouse. In contrast to humans, phases of muscle degeneration are replaced by regeneration processes; hence there is only a restricted time slot for research. The aim of the study was to investigate if an intramuscular injection of BTX-A is able to break down muscle regeneration and has direct implications on the gene expression of myosin heavy chains in the corresponding treated and untreated muscles. Therefore, paralysis of the right masseter muscle was induced in adult healthy and dystrophic mice by a specific intramuscular injection of BTX-A. After 21 days the mRNA expression and protein content of MyHC isoforms of the right and left masseter, temporal, and the tongue muscle were determined using quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot technique. MyHC-IIa and MyHC-I-mRNA expression significantly increased in the paralyzed masseter muscle of control-mice, whereas MyHC-IIb and MyHC-IIx/d-mRNA were decreased. In dystrophic muscles no effect of BTX-A could be detected at the level of MyHC. This study suggests that BTX-A injection is a suitable method to simulate DMD-pathogenesis in healthy mice but further investigations are necessary to fully analyse the BTX-A effect and to generate sustained muscular atrophy in mdx-mice. PMID:27689088

  7. Large gangliocytic paraganglioma of the duodenum: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Alejandra Gordillo; Lanuza, Eduardo Dominguez-Adame; Matias, Auxiliadora Cano; Huertas, Rosario Perez; Rodriguez, Katherine Maria Gallardo; Perez, Purificacion Gallinato; Mompean, Fernando Oliva

    2015-01-01

    Gangliocytic paragangliomas are rare tumors that almost exclusively occur within the second portion of the duodenum. Although these tumors generally have a benign clinical course, they have the potential to recur or metastasize to regional lymph nodes. The case report presented here describes a 57-year-old female patient with melena, progressive asthenia, anemia, and a mass in the second-third portion of the duodenum that was treated by local excision. The patient was diagnosed with a friable bleeding tumor. The histologic analysis showed that the tumor was a 4 cm gangliocytic paraganglioma without a malignant cell pattern. In the absence of local invasion or distant metastasis, endoscopic resection represents a feasible, curative therapy. Although endoscopic polypectomy is currently considered the treatment of choice, it is not recommended if the size of the tumor is > 3 cm and/or there is active or recent bleeding. Patients diagnosed with a gangliocytic paraganglioma should be closely followed-up for possible local recurrence. PMID:26328037

  8. Malformed mdx myofibers have normal cytoskeletal architecture yet altered EC coupling and stress-induced Ca2+ signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Christopher W.

    2009-01-01

    Skeletal muscle function is dependent on its highly regular structure. In studies of dystrophic (dy/dy) mice, the proportion of malformed myofibers decreases after prolonged whole muscle stimulation, suggesting that the malformed myofibers are more prone to injury. The aim of this study was to assess morphology and to measure excitation-contraction (EC) coupling (Ca2+ transients) and susceptibility to osmotic stress (Ca2+ sparks) of enzymatically isolated muscle fibers of the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscles from young (2–3 mo) and old (8–9 mo) mdx and age-matched control mice (C57BL10). In young mdx EDL, 6% of the myofibers had visible malformations (i.e., interfiber splitting, branched ends, midfiber appendages). In contrast, 65% of myofibers in old mdx EDL contained visible malformations. In the mdx FDB, malformation occurred in only 5% of young myofibers and 11% of old myofibers. Age-matched control mice did not display the altered morphology of mdx muscles. The membrane-associated and cytoplasmic cytoskeletal structures appeared normal in the malformed mdx myofibers. In mdx FDBs with significantly branched ends, an assessment of global, electrically evoked Ca2+ signals (indo-1PE-AM) revealed an EC coupling deficit in myofibers with significant branching. Interestingly, peak amplitude of electrically evoked Ca2+ release in the branch of the bifurcated mdx myofiber was significantly decreased compared with the trunk of the same myofiber. No alteration in the basal myoplasmic Ca2+ concentration (i.e., indo ratio) was seen in malformed vs. normal mdx myofibers. Finally, osmotic stress induced the occurrence of Ca2+ sparks to a greater extent in the malformed portions of myofibers, which is consistent with deficits in EC coupling control. In summary, our data show that aging mdx myofibers develop morphological malformations. These malformations are not associated with gross disruptions in cytoskeletal or t

  9. Wnt signaling pathway improves central inhibitory synaptic transmission in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Fuenzalida, Marco; Espinoza, Claudia; Pérez, Miguel Ángel; Tapia-Rojas, Cheril; Cuitino, Loreto; Brandan, Enrique; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2016-02-01

    The dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex (DGC) that connects the cytoskeleton, plasma membrane and the extracellular matrix has been related to the maintenance and stabilization of channels and synaptic receptors, which are both essential for synaptogenesis and synaptic transmission. The dystrophin-deficient (mdx) mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) exhibits a significant reduction in hippocampal GABA efficacy, which may underlie the altered synaptic function and abnormal hippocampal long-term plasticity exhibited by mdx mice. Emerging studies have implicated Wnt signaling in the modulation of synaptic efficacy, neuronal plasticity and cognitive function. We report here that the activation of the non-canonical Wnt-5a pathway and Andrographolide, improves hippocampal mdx GABAergic efficacy by increasing the number of inhibitory synapses and GABA(A) receptors or GABA release. These results indicate that Wnt signaling modulates GABA synaptic efficacy and could be a promising novel target for DMD cognitive therapy. PMID:26626079

  10. [Clinical-epidemiological aspects of gastric and duodenum ulcer].

    PubMed

    Larichev, A B; Maĭorov, M I; Favstov, S V; Shalop'ev, A G

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of reporting and statistical data showed the considerable changes in clinical-epidemiological indices of gastric and duodenum ulcer at the period from 1998 to 2012. The prevalence of the disease and the number of primary patients decreased in 2-3 times. The reduction of the rate of perforations and ulcerous bleeding had been observed. However, the authors noted, that a tendency of frequency of occurrence increased and efficacy indices reduced in the last years. The rate of postoperative lethality raised in the cases of perforated ulcer. On this basis, the authors recommend to reconsider the existing opinion about further extension of out-patient treatment of patients with given pathology.

  11. What do mouse models of muscular dystrophy tell us about the DAPC and its components?

    PubMed Central

    Whitmore, Charlotte; Morgan, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    There are over 30 mouse models with mutations or inactivations in the dystrophin-associated protein complex. This complex is thought to play a crucial role in the functioning of muscle, as both a shock absorber and signalling centre, although its role in the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophy is not fully understood. The first mouse model of muscular dystrophy to be identified with a mutation in a component of the dystrophin-associated complex (dystrophin) was the mdx mouse in 1984. Here, we evaluate the key characteristics of the mdx in comparison with other mouse mutants with inactivations in DAPC components, along with key modifiers of the disease phenotype. By discussing the differences between the individual phenotypes, we show that the functioning of the DAPC and consequently its role in the pathogenesis is more complicated than perhaps currently appreciated. PMID:25270874

  12. Adenocarcinoma arising from heterotopic pancreas at the third portion of the duodenum.

    PubMed

    Fukino, Nobutada; Oida, Takatsugu; Mimatsu, Kenji; Kuboi, Youichi; Kida, Kazutoshi

    2015-04-01

    A 62-year-old Japanese man presented to our hospital with a history of weight loss of 6 kg in 4 mo. Imaging examinations revealed a tumor located on the third portion of the duodenum with stenosis. We suspected duodenal carcinoma and performed pancreas-preserving segmental duodenectomy. Adenocarcinoma arising from a heterotopic pancreas at the third portion of the duodenum was finally diagnosed by immunohistochemical staining. Malignant transformation in the duodenum arising from a heterotopic pancreas is extremely rare; to our knowledge, only 13 cases have been reported worldwide, including the present case. The most common location of malignancy is the proximal duodenum at the first and descending portion. Herein, we describe the first case of adenocarcinoma arising from a heterotopic pancreas, which was located in the third portion of the duodenum, with a review of the literature.

  13. Adenocarcinoma arising from heterotopic pancreas at the third portion of the duodenum

    PubMed Central

    Fukino, Nobutada; Oida, Takatsugu; Mimatsu, Kenji; Kuboi, Youichi; Kida, Kazutoshi

    2015-01-01

    A 62-year-old Japanese man presented to our hospital with a history of weight loss of 6 kg in 4 mo. Imaging examinations revealed a tumor located on the third portion of the duodenum with stenosis. We suspected duodenal carcinoma and performed pancreas-preserving segmental duodenectomy. Adenocarcinoma arising from a heterotopic pancreas at the third portion of the duodenum was finally diagnosed by immunohistochemical staining. Malignant transformation in the duodenum arising from a heterotopic pancreas is extremely rare; to our knowledge, only 13 cases have been reported worldwide, including the present case. The most common location of malignancy is the proximal duodenum at the first and descending portion. Herein, we describe the first case of adenocarcinoma arising from a heterotopic pancreas, which was located in the third portion of the duodenum, with a review of the literature. PMID:25852297

  14. Strangulation of the duodenum by the uterus during late pregnancy in two cows.

    PubMed

    Koller, U; Lischer, C; Geyer, H; Dressel, C; Braun, U

    2001-07-01

    Two Swiss Braunvieh cows in late pregnancy underwent surgery because of a rare form of ileus due to strangulation of the duodenum at its caudal flexure by the gravid uterus. The whole uterus had passed through a gap between the mesoduodenum and duodenum and with increasing weight had led to strangulation of the duodenum. This was possible since the mesoduodenum and both walls of the greater omentum adjacent to its caudal edge were not connected with the duodenum, probably due to a congenital inhibitory malformation. A transsection and an end-to-end anastomosis of the duodenum were necessary in both cases since it was impossible to retract the gravid uterus through the defect. Postoperative recovering was uneventful in both cows, which were discharged after seven and five days respectively and calved normally about two months later.

  15. Structural and Functional Alterations of Skeletal Muscle Microvasculature in Dystrophin-Deficient mdx Mice.

    PubMed

    Latroche, Claire; Matot, Béatrice; Martins-Bach, Aurea; Briand, David; Chazaud, Bénédicte; Wary, Claire; Carlier, Pierre G; Chrétien, Fabrice; Jouvion, Grégory

    2015-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive neuromuscular disease, caused by an absence of dystrophin, inevitably leading to death. Although muscle lesions are well characterized, blood vessel alterations that may have a major impact on muscle regeneration remain poorly understood. Our aim was to elucidate alterations of the vascular network organization, taking advantage of Flk1(GFP/+) crossed with mdx mice (model for human DMD where all blood vessels express green fluorescent protein) and functional repercussions using in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance, combining arterial spin-labeling imaging of perfusion, and (31)P-spectroscopy of phosphocreatine kinetics. For the first time, our study focused on old (12-month-old) mdx mice, displaying marked chronic muscle lesions, similar to the lesions observed in human DMD, in comparison to young-adult (3-month-old) mdx mice displaying only mild muscle lesions with no fibrosis. By using an original approach combining a specific animal model, state-of-the-art histology/morphometry techniques, and functional nuclear magnetic resonance, we demonstrated that the microvascular system is almost normal in young-adult in contrast to old mdx mice, displaying marked microvessel alterations, and the functional repercussions on muscle perfusion and bioenergetics after a hypoxic stress vary depending on stage of pathology. This original approach clarifies disease evolution and paves the way for setting up new diagnostic markers or therapeutic strategies. PMID:26193666

  16. Increased sphingosine-1-phosphate improves muscle regeneration in acutely injured mdx mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Presently, there is no effective treatment for the lethal muscle wasting disease Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Here we show that increased sphingosine-1-phoshate (S1P) through direct injection or via the administration of the small molecule 2-acetyl-4(5)-tetrahydroxybutyl imidazole (THI), an S1P lyase inhibitor, has beneficial effects in acutely injured dystrophic muscles of mdx mice. Methods We treated mdx mice with and without acute injury and characterized the histopathological and functional effects of increasing S1P levels. We also tested exogenous and direct administration of S1P on mdx muscles to examine the molecular pathways under which S1P promotes regeneration in dystrophic muscles. Results Short-term treatment with THI significantly increased muscle fiber size and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle specific force in acutely injured mdx limb muscles. In addition, the accumulation of fibrosis and fat deposition, hallmarks of DMD pathology and impaired muscle regeneration, were lower in the injured muscles of THI-treated mdx mice. Furthermore, increased muscle force was observed in uninjured EDL muscles with a longer-term treatment of THI. Such regenerative effects were linked to the response of myogenic cells, since intramuscular injection of S1P increased the number of Myf5nlacz/+ positive myogenic cells and newly regenerated myofibers in injured mdx muscles. Intramuscular injection of biotinylated-S1P localized to muscle fibers, including newly regenerated fibers, which also stained positive for S1P receptor 1 (S1PR1). Importantly, plasma membrane and perinuclear localization of phosphorylated S1PR1 was observed in regenerating muscle fibers of mdx muscles. Intramuscular increases of S1P levels, S1PR1 and phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 (P-rpS6), and elevated EDL muscle specific force, suggest S1P promoted the upregulation of anabolic pathways that mediate skeletal muscle mass and function. Conclusions These data show that S1P is

  17. Hemostasis Achieved Endoscopically for Diverticular Bleeding from the Horizontal Portion of the Duodenum

    PubMed Central

    Matuso, Yasumasa; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Midori; Ishigooka, Shinya; Ozawa, Shun-ichiro; Yamashita, Masaki; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    Diverticulum of the horizontal portion of the duodenum is a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Since it is difficult to access the horizontal portion of the duodenum by standard upper GI endoscopy, only a very few cases of endoscopic hemostasis have been reported. Herein, we report a case of diverticular bleeding from the horizontal portion of the duodenum for which hemostasis was achieved using a small-caliber colonoscope, which has an insertion part designed with a passive-bending function/high-force transmission and a transparent tip hood. PMID:26692767

  18. Retroperitoneal perforation of the duodenum from biliary stent erosion.

    PubMed

    Miller, George; Yim, Duke; Macari, Michael; Harris, Marsha; Shamamian, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Endoscopically placed biliary stents have supplanted surgical decompression as the preferred treatment option for patients with obstructive jaundice from advanced pancreatic cancer. An unusual complication of indewelling biliary stents is duodenal perforation into the retroperitoneum. We describe the case of a patient with end-stage pancreatic cancer who presented with an acute abdomen from erosion of a previously placed bile duct stent through the wall of the second portion of the duodenum. Although our patient presented with advanced symptoms, clinical presentations can vary from mild abdominal discomfort and general malaise to overt septic shock. Definitive diagnosis is best made with computed tomography (CT) imaging, which can detect traces of retroperitoneal air and fluid. Treatment options vary from nonoperative management with antibiotics, bowel rest, and parenteral alimentation in the most stable patients to definitive surgery with complete diversion of gastric contents and biliary flow from the affected area in patients with clinical symptoms or radiologic evidence suggesting extensive contamination. Complications of management can include duodenal fistulization, residual retroperitoneal or intrabdominal abscess, and ongoing sepsis. This report highlights the salient issues in the presentation, diagnosis, and modern management of patients with this rare complication of indwelling biliary stents.

  19. Acquired constricting and restricting lesions of the descending duodenum.

    PubMed

    Carbo, Alberto I; Sangster, Guillermo P; Caraway, Jessica; Heldmann, Maureen G; Thomas, Jaiyeola; Takalkar, Amol

    2014-01-01

    The descending duodenum is a structure with distinct pathologic processes and anatomic relationships that requires a systematic approach to the differential diagnosis. Because of its tubular shape and fixed position in the retroperitoneum, both intrinsic duodenal and juxtaduodenal diseases are capable of producing luminal narrowing and obstruction. Duodenal lesions may be located in the mucosa or submucosa. Extraduodenal lesions may originate in adjacent structures--such as the pancreas, liver, gallbladder, colon, and lymph nodes--or from other retroperitoneal structures. Causes of duodenal obstruction include intraluminal masses, such as bezoars; duodenal inflammation, such as as peptic ulcers and Crohn disease; hematomas; and benign or malignant mucosal and intramural tumors. Pancreatic inflammation; tumors; and extrinsic compression caused by gallbladder processes, hepatic masses, retroperitoneal fluid collections, and tumors, including lymphoma, may produce duodenal obstruction. Abdominal radiography, barium studies, multidetector computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography may be used to depict and characterize duodenal strictures. Integration of imaging, clinical, laboratory, and endoscopic findings plays a major role in establishing a diagnosis of obstructive duodenal strictures. PMID:25208276

  20. Simultaneous Clear Cell Sarcomas of the Duodenum and Jejunum

    PubMed Central

    Cruise, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Clear cell sarcoma (CCS) is an uncommon tumor that usually presents as an extremity mass but can rarely manifest as a gastrointestinal tumor with a diverse spectrum of symptoms, most commonly related to a mass effect or ulceration. Herein we report a case in which two separate tumors, one in the duodenum and the other in the jejunum, present concurrently. The subject presented with symptomatic anemia and underwent imaging and endoscopic studies that culminated in the discovery of the two lesions. He subsequently underwent operative treatment with resection of both tumors and made an unremarkable recovery. The resection specimen consisted of two separate clear cell sarcomas with negative margins. Under microscopic evaluation, they demonstrated nested growths of epithelioid cells with scattered spindled cells infiltrating the enteric wall. The neoplastic cells were positive for S100 with scattered expression of Melan A. Florescence in situ hybridization revealed a translocation at the EWRS1 locus. He was disease-free for 30 months following the procedure; then he developed a rapidly progressing metastatic disease with subsequent death 4 months later. PMID:27375743

  1. Nifedipine treatment reduces resting calcium concentration, oxidative and apoptotic gene expression, and improves muscle function in dystrophic mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Altamirano, Francisco; Valladares, Denisse; Henríquez-Olguín, Carlos; Casas, Mariana; López, Jose R; Allen, Paul D; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive X-linked genetic disease, caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin. DMD is characterized in humans and in mdx mice by a severe and progressive destruction of muscle fibers, inflammation, oxidative/nitrosative stress, and cell death. In mdx muscle fibers, we have shown that basal ATP release is increased and that extracellular ATP stimulation is pro-apoptotic. In normal fibers, depolarization-induced ATP release is blocked by nifedipine, leading us to study the potential therapeutic effect of nifedipine in mdx muscles and its relation with extracellular ATP signaling. Acute exposure to nifedipine (10 µM) decreased [Ca(2+)]r, NF-κB activity and iNOS expression in mdx myotubes. In addition, 6-week-old mdx mice were treated with daily intraperitoneal injections of nifedipine, 1 mg/Kg for 1 week. This treatment lowered the [Ca(2+)]r measured in vivo in the mdx vastus lateralis. We demonstrated that extracellular ATP levels were higher in adult mdx flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) fibers and can be significantly reduced after 1 week of treatment with nifedipine. Interestingly, acute treatment of mdx FDB fibers with apyrase, an enzyme that completely degrades extracellular ATP to AMP, reduced [Ca(2+)]r to a similar extent as was seen in FDB fibers after 1-week of nifedipine treatment. Moreover, we demonstrated that nifedipine treatment reduced mRNA levels of pro-oxidative/nitrosative (iNOS and gp91(phox)/p47(phox) NOX2 subunits) and pro-apoptotic (Bax) genes in mdx diaphragm muscles and lowered serum creatine kinase (CK) levels. In addition, nifedipine treatment increased muscle strength assessed by the inverted grip-hanging test and exercise tolerance measured with forced swimming test in mdx mice. We hypothesize that nifedipine reduces basal ATP release, thereby decreasing purinergic receptor activation, which in turn reduces [Ca(2+)]r in mdx skeletal muscle cells. The results in this work open new perspectives

  2. Nifedipine Treatment Reduces Resting Calcium Concentration, Oxidative and Apoptotic Gene Expression, and Improves Muscle Function in Dystrophic mdx Mice

    PubMed Central

    Henríquez-Olguín, Carlos; Casas, Mariana; López, Jose R.; Allen, Paul D.; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive X-linked genetic disease, caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin. DMD is characterized in humans and in mdx mice by a severe and progressive destruction of muscle fibers, inflammation, oxidative/nitrosative stress, and cell death. In mdx muscle fibers, we have shown that basal ATP release is increased and that extracellular ATP stimulation is pro-apoptotic. In normal fibers, depolarization-induced ATP release is blocked by nifedipine, leading us to study the potential therapeutic effect of nifedipine in mdx muscles and its relation with extracellular ATP signaling. Acute exposure to nifedipine (10 µM) decreased [Ca2+]r, NF-κB activity and iNOS expression in mdx myotubes. In addition, 6-week-old mdx mice were treated with daily intraperitoneal injections of nifedipine, 1 mg/Kg for 1 week. This treatment lowered the [Ca2+]r measured in vivo in the mdx vastus lateralis. We demonstrated that extracellular ATP levels were higher in adult mdx flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) fibers and can be significantly reduced after 1 week of treatment with nifedipine. Interestingly, acute treatment of mdx FDB fibers with apyrase, an enzyme that completely degrades extracellular ATP to AMP, reduced [Ca2+]r to a similar extent as was seen in FDB fibers after 1-week of nifedipine treatment. Moreover, we demonstrated that nifedipine treatment reduced mRNA levels of pro-oxidative/nitrosative (iNOS and gp91phox/p47phox NOX2 subunits) and pro-apoptotic (Bax) genes in mdx diaphragm muscles and lowered serum creatine kinase (CK) levels. In addition, nifedipine treatment increased muscle strength assessed by the inverted grip-hanging test and exercise tolerance measured with forced swimming test in mdx mice. We hypothesize that nifedipine reduces basal ATP release, thereby decreasing purinergic receptor activation, which in turn reduces [Ca2+]r in mdx skeletal muscle cells. The results in this work open new perspectives towards

  3. Nifedipine treatment reduces resting calcium concentration, oxidative and apoptotic gene expression, and improves muscle function in dystrophic mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Altamirano, Francisco; Valladares, Denisse; Henríquez-Olguín, Carlos; Casas, Mariana; López, Jose R; Allen, Paul D; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive X-linked genetic disease, caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin. DMD is characterized in humans and in mdx mice by a severe and progressive destruction of muscle fibers, inflammation, oxidative/nitrosative stress, and cell death. In mdx muscle fibers, we have shown that basal ATP release is increased and that extracellular ATP stimulation is pro-apoptotic. In normal fibers, depolarization-induced ATP release is blocked by nifedipine, leading us to study the potential therapeutic effect of nifedipine in mdx muscles and its relation with extracellular ATP signaling. Acute exposure to nifedipine (10 µM) decreased [Ca(2+)]r, NF-κB activity and iNOS expression in mdx myotubes. In addition, 6-week-old mdx mice were treated with daily intraperitoneal injections of nifedipine, 1 mg/Kg for 1 week. This treatment lowered the [Ca(2+)]r measured in vivo in the mdx vastus lateralis. We demonstrated that extracellular ATP levels were higher in adult mdx flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) fibers and can be significantly reduced after 1 week of treatment with nifedipine. Interestingly, acute treatment of mdx FDB fibers with apyrase, an enzyme that completely degrades extracellular ATP to AMP, reduced [Ca(2+)]r to a similar extent as was seen in FDB fibers after 1-week of nifedipine treatment. Moreover, we demonstrated that nifedipine treatment reduced mRNA levels of pro-oxidative/nitrosative (iNOS and gp91(phox)/p47(phox) NOX2 subunits) and pro-apoptotic (Bax) genes in mdx diaphragm muscles and lowered serum creatine kinase (CK) levels. In addition, nifedipine treatment increased muscle strength assessed by the inverted grip-hanging test and exercise tolerance measured with forced swimming test in mdx mice. We hypothesize that nifedipine reduces basal ATP release, thereby decreasing purinergic receptor activation, which in turn reduces [Ca(2+)]r in mdx skeletal muscle cells. The results in this work open new perspectives

  4. Pre-exercise low-level laser therapy improves performance and levels of oxidative stress markers in mdx mice subjected to muscle fatigue by high-intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Silva, Andreia Aparecida de Oliveira; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; D'Avila, Katia de Angelis Lobo; Serra, Andrey Jorge; Albertini, Regiane; França, Cristiane Miranda; Nishida, Joen Akemi; de Carvalho, Paulo de Tarso Camillo

    2015-08-01

    This study was designed to determine if the levels of oxidative stress markers are influenced by low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in mdx mice subjected to high-intensity exercise training on an electric treadmill. We used 21 C57BL/10ScSn-Dmdmdx/J mice and 7 C57BL/10ScSn mice, all aged 4 weeks. The mice were divided into four groups: a positive control group of normal, wild-type mice (WT); a negative control group of untreated mdx mice; a group of mdx mice that underwent forced high-intensity exercise on a treadmill (mdx fatigue); and another group of mdx mice with the same characteristics that were treated with LLLT at a single point on the gastrocnemius muscle of the hind paw and underwent forced high-intensity exercise on a treadmill. The mdx mice treated with LLLT showed significantly lower levels of creatine kinase (CK) and oxidative stress than mdx mice that underwent forced high-intensity exercise on a treadmill. The activities of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) were higher in control mdx mice than in WT mice. LLLT also significantly reduced the level of this marker. LLLT had a beneficial effect also on the skeletal muscle performance of mdx mice. However, the single application of LLLT and the dose parameters used in this study were not able to change the morphology of a dystrophic muscle.

  5. Use of water ingestion to distinguish the gallbladder and duodenum on cholescintigrams

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, I.A.; Weissmann, H.S.; Kaplun, L.L.; Freeman, L.M.

    1984-09-01

    Cholescintigraphic diagnosis of acute cholecystitis requires accurate assessment of gallbladder nonvisualization. Confusion may occur when the gallbladder overlies the duodenal sweep or when labeled bile pools in the duodenum. Gallbladder activity could not be differentiated from duodenal activity in 21 patients. The oral ingestion of 225 ml of water permitted successful differentiation of the gallbladder from the duodenum. In 25 control subjects, it was demonstrated that that volume of water did not have a cholecystokinetic effect.

  6. Intra Luminal Metastasis to Duodenum: A Histological Surprise

    PubMed Central

    Aroul, Tirou; Kuppusamy, Sasikumar; Gunashekaran, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoma cervix is one of the most common malignancies seen in women worldwide and more so in the Indian subcontinent. Carcinoma cervix is known for its orderly lymphatic spread. Skip metastasis or intraluminal metastasis is not a frequent occurrence. A 50-year-old diabetic and hypertensive female patient who was diagnosed to have carcinoma cervix (stage II A 2) Grade II to III and post radiotherapy (3 years back) presented to the surgical outpatient with dyspeptic symptoms and vague abdominal pain. On examination she was found to have a 1x1cm hard, fixed, left supraclavicular node and a palpable liver. Ultrasound abdomen revealed multiple retro peritoneal lymphadenopathy and Contrast Enhanced Computerised Tomography (CECT) abdomen revealed secondary deposits in the pancreatico-duodenal groove infiltrating the duodenal C-loop and pancreatic head, with multiple retroperitoneal nodes with necrosis. Fine needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC) from left supraclavicular node revealed metastatic squamous cell carcinoma. Oesophagogastroduodenoscopy showed 2 sessile lesions in the anterior wall of duodenum with mucosa stretched and central umbilication with almost complete luminal obstruction. Biopsy from the duodenal lesion also turned out positive for metastatic squamous cell carcinoma. Gynaecological examination was negative for any local recurrence. Patient was managed symptomatically for dyspepsia and is currently undergoing chemotherapy. She is at present on regular follow-up and is asymptomatic for the bowel metastasis. Given the frequency of cancer cervix and the rarity of intra luminal metastasis, this case report serves to reiterate the fact that the abdomen is truly a pandora’s box. PMID:27790514

  7. Laser microdissection-based expression analysis of key genes involved in muscle regeneration in mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Marotta, Mario; Sarria, Yaris; Ruiz-Roig, Claudia; Munell, Francina; Roig-Quilis, Manuel

    2007-10-01

    We have used the mdx mice strain (C57BL/10ScSn-mdx) as an experimental subject for the study of reiterative skeletal muscle necrosis-regeneration with basement membrane preservation. In young mdx muscle, by means of Hematoxylin-Eosin staining, different types of degenerative-regenerative groups (DRG) can be recognized and assigned to a defined muscle regeneration phase. To evaluate the expression of known key-regulatory genes in muscle regeneration, we have applied Laser Capture Microdissection technique to obtain tissue from different DRGs encompassing the complete skeletal muscle regenerative process. The expression of MyoD, Myf-5 and Myogenin showed a rapid increase in the first two days post-necrosis, which were followed by MRF4 expression, when newly regenerating fibers started to appear (3-5days post-necrosis). MHCd mRNA levels, undetectable in mature non-injured fibers, increased progressively from the first day post-necrosis and reached its maximum level of expression in DRGs showing basophilic regenerating fibers. TGFbeta-1 mRNA expression showed a prompt and strong increase following fiber necrosis that persisted during the inflammatory phase, and progressively decreased when new regenerating fibers began to appear. In contrast, IGF-2 mRNA expression decreased during the first days post-necrosis but was followed by a progressive rise in its expression coinciding with the appearance of the newly formed myofibers, reaching the maximum expression levels in DRGs composed of medium caliber basophilic regenerating myofibers (5-7 days post-necrosis). mdx degenerative-regenerative group typing, in conjunction with laser microdissection-based gene expression analysis, opens up a new approach to the molecular study of skeletal muscle regeneration.

  8. The first exon duplication mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy: A tool for therapeutic development.

    PubMed

    Vulin, Adeline; Wein, Nicolas; Simmons, Tabatha R; Rutherford, Andrea M; Findlay, Andrew R; Yurkoski, Jacqueline A; Kaminoh, Yuuki; Flanigan, Kevin M

    2015-11-01

    Exon duplication mutations account for up to 11% of all cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), and a duplication of exon 2 is the most common duplication in patients. For use as a platform for testing of duplication-specific therapies, we developed a mouse model that carries a Dmd exon 2 duplication. By using homologous recombination we duplicated exon 2 within intron 2 at a location consistent with a human duplication hotspot. mRNA analysis confirms the inclusion of a duplicated exon 2 in mouse muscle. Dystrophin expression is essentially absent by immunofluorescent and immunoblot analysis, although some muscle specimens show very low-level trace dystrophin expression. Phenotypically, the mouse shows similarities to mdx, the standard laboratory model of DMD. In skeletal muscle, areas of necrosis and phagocytosis are seen at 3 weeks, with central nucleation prominent by four weeks, recapitulating the "crisis" period in mdx. Marked diaphragm fibrosis is noted by 6 months, and remains unchanged at 12 months. Our results show that the Dup2 mouse is both pathologically (in degree and distribution) and physiologically similar to mdx. As it recapitulates the most common single exon duplication found in DMD patients, this new model will be a useful tool to assess the potential of duplicated exon skipping.

  9. Resveratrol improves muscle function but not oxidative capacity in young mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Bradley S; Delgado-Diaz, Diana C; Carson, James; Fayad, Raja; Wilson, L Britt; Kostek, Matthew C

    2014-03-01

    Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) have reduced muscle function due to chronic muscle damage, inflammation, oxidative stress, and reduced oxidative capacity. Resveratrol reduces inflammation and oxidative stress, and increases oxidative capacity in other disease models. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of resveratrol on muscle function, muscle pathology, and oxidative capacity in young mdx mice. For this, 4- to 5-week-old male mdx mice were randomized into control or resveratrol-treated groups and given resveratrol (100 mg/kg body mass) or an equal volume of water by gavage every other day for 8 weeks. Muscle function was assessed pre- and post-treatment. Central nucleation, total immune cell infiltrate, oxidative stress, and oxidative capacity were measured post-treatment. Resveratrol mediated substantial improvements in rotarod performance and in-situ peak tension by 53% and 17%, respectively, and slight improvements in central nucleation and oxidative stress. Resveratrol did not affect total immune cell infiltrate at 12 weeks of age, and had no effect on oxidative capacity. Resveratrol improves muscle function in mdx mice despite small changes in muscle pathology. The likely mechanism is a resveratrol-mediated reduction in immune cell infiltrate at the early stages of this disease, as previously reported by our laboratory.

  10. Effect of Dystrophin Deficiency on Selected Intrinsic Laryngeal Muscles of the "mdx" Mouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, Lisa T.; Stemple, Joseph C.; Andreatta, Richard D.; Harrison, Anne L.; Andrade, Francisco H.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Intrinsic laryngeal muscles (ILM) show biological differences from the broader class of skeletal muscles. Yet most research regarding ILM specialization has been completed on a few muscles, most notably the thyroarytenoid and posterior cricoarytenoid. Little information exists regarding the biology of other ILM. Early evidence suggests…

  11. MMP-10 is required for efficient muscle regeneration in mouse models of injury and muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Bobadilla, Míriam; Sáinz, Neira; Rodriguez, José Antonio; Abizanda, Gloria; Orbe, Josune; de Martino, Alba; García Verdugo, José Manuel; Páramo, José A; Prósper, Felipe; Pérez-Ruiz, Ana

    2014-02-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), a family of endopeptidases that are involved in the degradation of extracellular matrix components, have been implicated in skeletal muscle regeneration. Among the MMPs, MMP-2 and MMP-9 are upregulated in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a fatal X-linked muscle disorder. However, inhibition or overexpression of specific MMPs in a mouse model of DMD (mdx) has yielded mixed results regarding disease progression, depending on the MMP studied. Here, we have examined the role of MMP-10 in muscle regeneration during injury and muscular dystrophy. We found that skeletal muscle increases MMP-10 protein expression in response to damage (notexin) or disease (mdx mice), suggesting its role in muscle regeneration. In addition, we found that MMP-10-deficient muscles displayed impaired recruitment of endothelial cells, reduced levels of extracellular matrix proteins, diminished collagen deposition, and decreased fiber size, which collectively contributed to delayed muscle regeneration after injury. Also, MMP-10 knockout in mdx mice led to a deteriorated dystrophic phenotype. Moreover, MMP-10 mRNA silencing in injured muscles (wild-type and mdx) reduced muscle regeneration, while addition of recombinant human MMP-10 accelerated muscle repair, suggesting that MMP-10 is required for efficient muscle regeneration. Furthermore, our data suggest that MMP-10-mediated muscle repair is associated with VEGF/Akt signaling. Thus, our findings indicate that MMP-10 is critical for skeletal muscle maintenance and regeneration during injury and disease. PMID:24123596

  12. Fibroadipogenic progenitors mediate the ability of HDAC inhibitors to promote regeneration in dystrophic muscles of young, but not old Mdx mice

    PubMed Central

    Mozzetta, Chiara; Consalvi, Silvia; Saccone, Valentina; Tierney, Matthew; Diamantini, Adamo; Mitchell, Kathryn J; Marazzi, Giovanna; Borsellino, Giovanna; Battistini, Luca; Sassoon, David; Sacco, Alessandra; Puri, Pier Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) exert beneficial effects in mdx mice, by promoting endogenous regeneration; however, the cellular determinants of HDACi activity on dystrophic muscles have not been determined. We show that fibroadipogenic progenitors (FAP) influence the regeneration potential of satellite cells during disease progression in mdx mice and mediate HDACi ability to selectively promote regeneration at early stages of disease. FAPs from young mdx mice promote, while FAPs from old mdx mice repress, satellite cell-mediated formation of myotubes. In young mdx mice HDACi inhibited FAP adipogenic potential, while enhancing their ability to promote differentiation of adjacent satellite cells, through upregulation of the soluble factor follistatin. By contrast, FAPs from old mdx mice were resistant to HDACi-mediated inhibition of adipogenesis and constitutively repressed satellite cell-mediated formation of myotubes. We show that transplantation of FAPs from regenerating young muscles restored HDACi ability to increase myofibre size in old mdx mice. These results reveal that FAPs are key cellular determinants of disease progression in mdx mice and mediate a previously unappreciated stage-specific beneficial effect of HDACi in dystrophic muscles. PMID:23505062

  13. In vivo gene editing in dystrophic mouse muscle and muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tabebordbar, Mohammadsharif; Zhu, Kexian; Cheng, Jason K W; Chew, Wei Leong; Widrick, Jeffrey J; Yan, Winston X; Maesner, Claire; Wu, Elizabeth Y; Xiao, Ru; Ran, F Ann; Cong, Le; Zhang, Feng; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Church, George M; Wagers, Amy J

    2016-01-22

    Frame-disrupting mutations in the DMD gene, encoding dystrophin, compromise myofiber integrity and drive muscle deterioration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Removing one or more exons from the mutated transcript can produce an in-frame mRNA and a truncated, but still functional, protein. In this study, we developed and tested a direct gene-editing approach to induce exon deletion and recover dystrophin expression in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Delivery by adeno-associated virus (AAV) of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 endonucleases coupled with paired guide RNAs flanking the mutated Dmd exon23 resulted in excision of intervening DNA and restored the Dmd reading frame in myofibers, cardiomyocytes, and muscle stem cells after local or systemic delivery. AAV-Dmd CRISPR treatment partially recovered muscle functional deficiencies and generated a pool of endogenously corrected myogenic precursors in mdx mouse muscle.

  14. In vivo gene editing in dystrophic mouse muscle and muscle stem cells#

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jason K.W.; Chew, Wei Leong; Widrick, Jeffrey J.; Yan, Winston X.; Maesner, Claire; Wu, Elizabeth Y.; Xiao, Ru; Ran, F. Ann; Cong, Le; Zhang, Feng; Vandenberghe, Luk H.; Church, George M.; Wagers, Amy J.

    2016-01-01

    Frame-disrupting mutations in the DMD gene, encoding dystrophin, compromise myofiber integrity and drive muscle deterioration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Removing one or more exons from the mutated transcript can produce an in-frame mRNA and a truncated but still functional protein. In this study, we develop and test a direct gene editing approach to induce exon deletion and recover dystrophin expression in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Delivery by adeno-associated virus (AAV) of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 endonucleases coupled with paired guide RNAs flanking the mutated Dmd exon23 resulted in excision of intervening DNA and restored Dystrophin reading frame in myofibers, cardiomyocytes and muscle stem cells following local or systemic delivery. AAV-Dmd CRISPR-treatment partially recovered muscle functional deficiencies and generated a pool of endogenously corrected myogenic precursors in mdx mouse muscle. PMID:26721686

  15. Variant arterial supply to the lesser curvature of the stomach and duodenum from double inferior phrenic arteries.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Rongyao; Yao, Zhihua; Chen, Yihui; Xu, Zheng; Chen, Yongyi; Liu, Jing

    2015-09-01

    A rare case of the left accessory inferior phrenic artery (IPA) supplying the lesser curvature of the stomach and the right accessory IPA supplying the duodenum was observed during interventional radiography. To our knowledge, variation arteries supplying the stomach and duodenum have never been reported in English literature; herein, we report the first case of variant arterial supply to the lesser curvature of the stomach and duodenum from double IPAs.

  16. Myogenic Akt signaling attenuates muscular degeneration, promotes myofiber regeneration and improves muscle function in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Michelle H.; Kay, Danielle I.; Rudra, Renuka T.; Chen, Bo Ming; Hsu, Nigel; Izumiya, Yasuhiro; Martinez, Leonel; Spencer, Melissa J.; Walsh, Kenneth; Grinnell, Alan D.; Crosbie, Rachelle H.

    2011-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the most common form of childhood muscular dystrophy, is caused by X-linked inherited mutations in the dystrophin gene. Dystrophin deficiencies result in the loss of the dystrophin–glycoprotein complex at the plasma membrane, which leads to structural instability and muscle degeneration. Previously, we induced muscle-specific overexpression of Akt, a regulator of cellular metabolism and survival, in mdx mice at pre-necrotic (<3.5 weeks) ages and demonstrated upregulation of the utrophin–glycoprotein complex and protection against contractile-induced stress. Here, we found that delaying exogenous Akt treatment of mdx mice after the onset of peak pathology (>6 weeks) similarly increased the abundance of compensatory adhesion complexes at the extrasynaptic sarcolemma. Akt introduction after onset of pathology reverses the mdx histopathological measures, including decreases in blood serum albumin infiltration. Akt also improves muscle function in mdx mice as demonstrated through in vivo grip strength tests and in vitro contraction measurements of the extensor digitorum longus muscle. To further explore the significance of Akt in myofiber regeneration, we injured wild-type muscle with cardiotoxin and found that Akt induced a faster regenerative response relative to controls at equivalent time points. We demonstrate that Akt signaling pathways counteract mdx pathogenesis by enhancing endogenous compensatory mechanisms. These findings provide a rationale for investigating the therapeutic activation of the Akt pathway to counteract muscle wasting. PMID:21245083

  17. Afterhyperpolarization current in myenteric neurons of the guinea pig duodenum.

    PubMed

    Vogalis, F; Furness, J B; Kunze, W A

    2001-05-01

    Whole cell patch and cell-attached recordings were obtained from neurons in intact ganglia of the myenteric plexus of the guinea pig duodenum. Two classes of neuron were identified electrophysiologically: phasically firing AH neurons that had a pronounced slow afterhyperpolarization (AHP) and tonically firing S neurons that lacked a slow AHP. We investigated the properties of the slow AHP and the underlying current (I(AHP)) to address the roles of Ca(2+) entry and Ca(2+) release in the AHP and the characteristics of the K(+) channels that are activated. AH neurons had a resting potential of -54 mV and the AHP, which followed a volley of three suprathreshold depolarizing current pulses delivered at 50 Hz through the pipette, averaged 11 mV at its peak, which occurred 0.5-1 s following the stimulus. The duration of these AHPs averaged 7 s. Under voltage-clamp conditions, I(AHP)'s were recorded at holding potentials of -50 to -65 mV, following brief depolarization of AH neurons (20-100 ms) to positive potentials (+35 to +50 mV). The null potential of the I(AHP) at its peak was -89 mV. The AHP and I(AHP) were largely blocked by omega-conotoxin GVIA (0.6-1 microM). Both events were markedly decreased by caffeine (2-5 mM) and by ryanodine (10-20 microM) added to the bathing solution. Pharmacological suppression of the I(AHP) with TEA (20 mM) or charybdotoxin (50-100 nM) unmasked an early transient inward current at -55 mV following step depolarization that reversed at -34 mV and was inhibited by niflumic acid (50-100 microM). Mean-variance analysis performed on the decay of the I(AHP) revealed that the AHP K(+) channels have a mean chord conductance of ~10 pS, and there are ~4,000 per AH neuron. Spectral analysis showed that the AHP channels have a mean open dwell time of 2.8 ms. Cell-attached patch recordings from AH neurons confirmed that the channels that open following action currents have a small unitary conductance (10-17 pS) and open with a high probability (

  18. Laparoscopic partial resection for hemangioma in the third portion of the duodenum

    PubMed Central

    Kanaji, Shingo; Nakamura, Tetsu; Nishi, Masayasu; Yamamoto, Masashi; Kanemitu, Kiyonori; Yamashiita, Kimihiro; Imanishi, Tatsuya; Sumi, Yasuo; Suzuki, Satoshi; Tanaka, Kenichi; Kakeji, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Benign duodenal tumors are rare and less common than malignant tumors. Furthermore, vascular lesions of the duodenum, including hemangiomas, are rare causes of gastrointestinal bleeding. This report describes a case with bleeding hemangiomas in the third portion of the duodenum and jejunum and their successful treatment using a laparoscopic approach. There is no report of totally laparoscopic resection for tumor in the third portion of duodenum. After performing a laparoscopic Kocher maneuver, the location of the duodenal hemangioma was confirmed by endoscopic and laparoscopic observation. The lesion was excised using ultrasonic coagulating shears and the defect in the duodenal wall was sutured laparoscopically. The hemangioma of the jejunum was treated extracorporeally through a 3.0 cm umbilical incision. The operating time was 241 min and blood loss was negligible. The postoperative course was uneventful. For benign duodenal tumors in the third portion, if endoscopic resection is not adapted, this less invasive technique may be a standard treatment. PMID:25232270

  19. Age-dependent expression of forkhead box O proteins in the duodenum of rats*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Pan; Zhou, Zhen-qi; Huang, Rui-hua; Zhou, Bo; Wei, Quan-wei; Shi, Fang-xiong

    2011-01-01

    The O subfamily of forkhead box (FoxO) proteins is the downstream effector of the insulin-like growth factor-1/phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B (IGF-1/PI3K/PKB) signal pathway. The objective of the present study was to examine the expressions of three members of FoxO proteins, FoxO1, FoxO3a, and FoxO4 in the duodenum of Sprague-Dawley rats at different ages. The result demonstrated that the expression of FoxO4 in rat duodenum showed an age-dependent manner. At Day 21, there were no detectable localization and expression of FoxO4 in the duodenum, while, at Months 2 and 6, localization and expression of FoxO4 were distinct. In addition, FoxO4 staining was primarily concentrated in the cell nuclei of the lamina propria around the intestinal gland of the duodenum in 2-month-old rats, but was not detectable in the same area in 6-month-old rats. Our results showed also that although FoxO3a existed in the cytoplasm of the lamina propria at a low level at the 2- and 6-month marks, it was still not detectable at Day 21. Besides, FoxO1 was not detectable in all parts and stages. Taken together, our findings suggested that the cell-specific and age-dependent expressional patterns of FoxO4 and FoxO3a proteins in the duodenum play some roles in the development and growth performance of the rat duodenum. PMID:21887848

  20. Laparoscopic Pancreaticoduodenectomy for the Management of Localized Crohn's Disease of the Duodenum.

    PubMed

    Xingjun, Guo; Feng, Zhu; Min, Wang; Renyi, Qin

    2016-08-01

    Crohn's disease of the duodenum is an uncommon condition. Our case was an extremely rare manifestation of Crohn's disease, who presented with obstruction of the pylorus and the first and the second parts of the duodenum. Because of the severity of the obstruction, he underwent laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy. Postoperative pancreatic leakage and bowel fistula were not observed, and there was no morbidity during the follow-up period. There was also no disturbance in digestive function, postoperatively. This is the first case employing laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy to cure benign lesions leading to duodenal obstruction. Minimally invasive laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy technology shows a very big advantage in treating this rare benign Crohn's disease.

  1. Laparoscopic Pancreaticoduodenectomy for the Management of Localized Crohn's Disease of the Duodenum.

    PubMed

    Xingjun, Guo; Feng, Zhu; Min, Wang; Renyi, Qin

    2016-08-01

    Crohn's disease of the duodenum is an uncommon condition. Our case was an extremely rare manifestation of Crohn's disease, who presented with obstruction of the pylorus and the first and the second parts of the duodenum. Because of the severity of the obstruction, he underwent laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy. Postoperative pancreatic leakage and bowel fistula were not observed, and there was no morbidity during the follow-up period. There was also no disturbance in digestive function, postoperatively. This is the first case employing laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy to cure benign lesions leading to duodenal obstruction. Minimally invasive laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy technology shows a very big advantage in treating this rare benign Crohn's disease. PMID:27574357

  2. Regression of follicular lymphoma of the duodenum following eradication of H. pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hiroki; Onishi, Yutaka; Mitsuoka, Hiroshi; Ogura, Takeshi; Maeda, Mitsuo; Nishigami, Takashi; Harada, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    A 64-year-old woman was referred for an examination of the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Endoscopy showed an elevated lesion in the duodenum with central depression and multiple white granules. Biopsy specimens revealed lymphoid follicles composed predominantly of centrocytes with scattered centroblasts. The tumor cells were positive for bcl-2. The patient was diagnosed with follicular lymphoma and underwent antibiotic therapy for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. The regression of the lesion was obvious. After 5.5 years of follow-up, there has been no evidence of recurrence. This case suggests that H. pylori eradication therapy is effective for treating follicular lymphoma in the duodenum. PMID:24292749

  3. Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Invading the Duodenum and Presenting as Idiopathic Gastroparesis with Nausea and Vomiting

    PubMed Central

    Cengia, Brent T.; Stuart, Paula S.

    2016-01-01

    A 65-year-old woman presented with a 5-month history of nausea, vomiting, and weight loss. Prior esophagogastrodudenoscopy showed retained food and delayed gastric emptying, but abdominal computed tomography was normal. The working diagnosis was idiopathic gastroparesis. Subsequently, an electrogastrogram test showed normal 3-cycle-per-minute activity, although it was suggestive of obstructive gastroparesis. Repeat esophagogastrodudenoscopy showed obstruction at the postbulbar duodenum. Repeat abdominal computed tomography revealed a 2.2 x 1.6-cm mass in the pancreaticoduodenal groove narrowing the descending duodenum and aspiration of the mass revealed adenocarcinoma. PMID:27807571

  4. [The effect of NADP+ on electrophysiological properties of cardiomyocytes of C57BL/6 and mdx mice].

    PubMed

    Mikhaĭlov, V M; Mamaeva, G I

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the influence of NADP+ on routine ECG in 6 months old C57BL/6 and mdx mice. The animals were anestheized by ether before ECG recording. ECG registration was made with the speed of 100 mm per sec. The first ECG recording was made before intraperitoneal NADP+ injection in a dose of 13 or 80 mg/kg. The second ECG recording was made in 10 min after NADP+ injection. Then anesthesia was cut off. The mice were occasionally anestheized 45-60 min later and the third ECG was recorded in 1 h after injection of NADP+. ECG recording was made at a speed of 100 mm/s in the standard leads I, II and III and in the unipolar leads AvR, AvL and AvF. Values of standard ECG characteristics such as the P wave, intervals PQ, QT, RR, and QRS complex in milliseconds were measured in standard lead II. We did not observe any differences between ECG magnitudes of 2-3 months old C57BL/6 and mdx mice during trial experiments. Mice of both lines had sinus rhythm of heart rate. QRS complex in mdx mice had a tendency to be larger compared with that in C57BL/6 mice. Heart rates fluctuated between 722 ± 22 and 681 ± 23 beats per minute. NADP+ influences was studied in 6 months old mice male. The increase in the RR interval and decreased heart rate from 697 ± 2 to 461 ± 23 and 491 ± 28 beats per min for C57BL/6 mice (P < 0.01) and from 722 ± 28 beats per minute to 454 ± 31 beats per min for mdx mice were registered in 10 min after NADP+ injection in a dose of 80 mg/kg. The increase in the RR interval can be explained by an increase in the interval QT. A statistically significant reduction in the QT interval leading to a decrease in the RR interval was observed in mdx mice in 1 h after NADP+ injection. NADP+ in a dose 13 mg/kg did not change mdx mice ECG properties significantly. ECG of mdx mice were characterized by negative repolarization of T wave in 37% between all leads. A deal of leads with the negative T wave repolarization decreased up to 3% in 1 h after NADP+ injection

  5. Linking cytoarchitecture to metabolism: sarcolemma-associated plectin affects glucose uptake by destabilizing microtubule networks in mdx myofibers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most frequent forms of muscular disorders. It is caused by the absence of dystrophin, a core component of the sarcolemma-associated junctional complex that links the cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix. We showed previously that plectin 1f (P1f), one of the major muscle-expressed isoforms of the cytoskeletal linker protein plectin, accumulates at the sarcolemma of DMD patients as well as of mdx mice, a widely studied animal model for DMD. Based on plectin’s dual role as structural protein and scaffolding platform for signaling molecules, we speculated that the dystrophic phenotype observed after loss of dystrophin was caused, at least to some extent, by excess plectin. Thus, we hypothesized that elimination of plectin expression in mdx skeletal muscle, while probably resulting in an overall more severe phenotype, may lead to a partial phenotype rescue. In particular, we wanted to assess whether excess sarcolemmal plectin contributes to the dysregulation of sugar metabolism in mdx myofibers. Methods We generated plectin/dystrophin double deficient (dKO) mice by breeding mdx with conditional striated muscle-restricted plectin knockout (cKO) mice. The phenotype of these mice was comparatively analyzed with that of mdx, cKO, and wild-type mice, focusing on structural integrity and dysregulation of glucose metabolism. Results We show that the accumulation of plectin at the sarcolemma of mdx muscle fibers hardly compensated for their loss of structural integrity. Instead, it led to an additional metabolic deficit by impairing glucose uptake. While dKO mice suffered from an overall more severe form of muscular dystrophy compared to mdx or plectin-deficient mice, sarcolemmal integrity as well as glucose uptake of their myofibers were restored to normal levels upon ablation of plectin. Furthermore, microtubule (MT) networks in intact dKO myofibers, including subsarcolemmal areas, were found to be more robust

  6. Treatment with a Nitric Oxide-Donating NSAID Alleviates Functional Muscle Ischemia in the Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Gail D.; Ye, Jianfeng; De Nardi, Claudio; Monopoli, Angela; Ongini, Ennio; Victor, Ronald G.

    2012-01-01

    In patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and the standard mdx mouse model of DMD, dystrophin deficiency causes loss of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOSμ) from the sarcolemma, producing functional ischemia when the muscles are exercised. We asked if functional muscle ischemia would be eliminated and normal blood flow regulation restored by treatment with an exogenous nitric oxide (NO)-donating drug. Beginning at 8 weeks of age, mdx mice were fed a standard diet supplemented with 1% soybean oil alone or in combination with a low (15 mg/kg) or high (45 mg/kg) dose of HCT 1026, a NO-donating nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent which has previously been shown to slow disease progression in the mdx model. After 1 month of treatment, vasoconstrictor responses to intra-arterial norepinephrine (NE) were compared in resting and contracting hindlimbs. In untreated mdx mice, the usual effect of muscle contraction to attenuate NE-mediated vasoconstriction was impaired, resulting in functional ischemia: NE evoked similar decreases in femoral blood flow velocity and femoral vascular conductance (FVC) in the contracting compared to resting hindlimbs (ΔFVC contraction/ΔFVC rest = 0.88±0.03). NE-induced functional ischemia was unaffected by low dose HCT 1026 (ΔFVC ratio = 0.92±0.04; P>0.05 vs untreated), but was alleviated by the high dose of the drug (ΔFVC ratio = 0.22±0.03; P<0.05 vs untreated or low dose). The beneficial effect of high dose HCT 1026 was maintained with treatment up to 3 months. The effect of the NO-donating drug HCT 1026 to normalize blood flow regulation in contracting mdx mouse hindlimb muscles suggests a putative novel treatment for DMD. Further translational research is warranted. PMID:23139842

  7. Treatment with a nitric oxide-donating NSAID alleviates functional muscle ischemia in the mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Gail D; Ye, Jianfeng; De Nardi, Claudio; Monopoli, Angela; Ongini, Ennio; Victor, Ronald G

    2012-01-01

    In patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and the standard mdx mouse model of DMD, dystrophin deficiency causes loss of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOSμ) from the sarcolemma, producing functional ischemia when the muscles are exercised. We asked if functional muscle ischemia would be eliminated and normal blood flow regulation restored by treatment with an exogenous nitric oxide (NO)-donating drug. Beginning at 8 weeks of age, mdx mice were fed a standard diet supplemented with 1% soybean oil alone or in combination with a low (15 mg/kg) or high (45 mg/kg) dose of HCT 1026, a NO-donating nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent which has previously been shown to slow disease progression in the mdx model. After 1 month of treatment, vasoconstrictor responses to intra-arterial norepinephrine (NE) were compared in resting and contracting hindlimbs. In untreated mdx mice, the usual effect of muscle contraction to attenuate NE-mediated vasoconstriction was impaired, resulting in functional ischemia: NE evoked similar decreases in femoral blood flow velocity and femoral vascular conductance (FVC) in the contracting compared to resting hindlimbs (ΔFVC contraction/ΔFVC rest=0.88 ± 0.03). NE-induced functional ischemia was unaffected by low dose HCT 1026 (ΔFVC ratio=0.92 ± 0.04; P>0.05 vs untreated), but was alleviated by the high dose of the drug (ΔFVC ratio=0.22 ± 0.03; P<0.05 vs untreated or low dose). The beneficial effect of high dose HCT 1026 was maintained with treatment up to 3 months. The effect of the NO-donating drug HCT 1026 to normalize blood flow regulation in contracting mdx mouse hindlimb muscles suggests a putative novel treatment for DMD. Further translational research is warranted.

  8. cDNA cloning and mRNA expression of canine pancreatic and duodenum homeobox 1 (Pdx-1).

    PubMed

    Takemitsu, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Ichiro; Lee, Peter; Ohta, Taizo; Mori, Nobuko; Arai, Toshiro

    2012-10-01

    Pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (Pdx-1) is a critical insulin transcription factor expressed by pancreatic β-cells, and is crucial in the early stage of pancreas development. Unfortunately, nothing concerning Pdx-1 in canine has been elucidated yet. In this study, full length canine Pdx-1 cDNA was cloned and it was 1498 bp in length, consisting of a 99 bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR), a 849 bp coding region, and a 550 bp 3'-UTR region. A deduced 282 amino acid sequence of canine PDX-1 displayed high overall sequence identity with human, bovine, and mouse PDX-1. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that a high level of Pdx1 mRNA expression is exists in the duodenum and pancreas of canines. In addition, functional canine insulin promoter-luciferase reporter constructs with various canine insulin promoter region fragments revealed that our Pdx-1 isolated cDNA sequence encodes for a functionally active PDX-1 protein. Significant promoter activity was observed within the -583 bp 5'-upstream region of canine insulin gene with Chinese hamster ovary cells. In addition, Pdx-1 appears to have a synergistic effect with beta cell transactivator 2 (BETA2) and V-maf avian musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog A (MafA), which also have important roles in the activation of the insulin gene promoter. Our results confirm that similar to humans, Pdx1 plays an important role in expression of insulin gene in canines.

  9. Adenocarcinoma of the third and fourth portions of the duodenum: The capsule endoscopy value

    PubMed Central

    Paquissi, Feliciano Chanana; Lima, Ana Henriqueta Filipe Bunga Pimentel; Lopes, Maria de Fátima do Nascimento Vieira; Diaz, Francisco Viamontes

    2015-01-01

    Primary adenocarcinoma of the small intestine occurs in over 50% of cases in the duodenum. However, its location in the third and fourth duodenal portions occurs rarely and is a diagnostic challenge. The aim of this work is to report an adenocarcinoma of the third and fourth duodenal portions, emphasizing its diagnostic difficulty and the value of video capsule endoscopy. A man, 40 years old, with no medical history, with abdominal discomfort and progressive fatigue, presented four months ago with one episode of moderate melena. The physical examination was normal, except for mucosal pallor. Blood tests were consistent with microcytic, hypochromic iron deficiency anemia with 7.8 g/dL hemoglobin. The upper and lower endoscopy were normal. Additional work-up with video capsule endoscopy showed a polypoid lesion involving the third and fourth portions of the duodenum. Biopsy showed a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Abdominal computed tomography showed a wall thickening from the third duodenal portion to the proximal jejunum, without distant metastasis. The patient underwent segmental resection (distal duodenum and proximal jejunum) with duodenojejunostomy. The surgical specimen histology confirmed the biopsy diagnosis, with transmural infiltration, without nodal involvement. Conclusion: Adenocarcinoma of the third and fourth portions of the duodenum is difficult to diagnose and capsule endoscopy is of great value. PMID:26309371

  10. [Morphological changes in the stomach and duodenum in chronic liver diseases of HB viral etiology].

    PubMed

    Alekseevskikh, Iu G; Klochkov, S A; Nazarov, Kh T; Potapov, A S; Pelikh, S T

    1994-01-01

    Morphologic investigation of 72 gastroduodenal biopsy samples from 29 children with chronic persistent and chronic active hepatitis, hepatic cirrhosis, revealed signs of chronic gastroduodenitis. The degree of the gastroduodenal zone lesion was directly related to severity of the primary condition. Comparative data on histopathological changes in the stomach and duodenum in concurrent pathologies suggest that chronic duodenitis may be the primary condition. PMID:7831915

  11. [A case of tuberculous lymphadenitis found as an abdominal mass penetrating the duodenum].

    PubMed

    Tokiwa, Kayoko; Hozawa, Shigenari; Kojima, Seiichirou; Kobayashi, Keinji; Watanabe, Kenichi; Mine, Tetsuya; Kijima, Hiroshi; Imai, Yutaka; Miyachi, Hayato

    2006-08-01

    A 42-year-old woman who complained of epigastralgia was referred to our hospital because of an abdominal mass found by ultrasonography. CT and MRI scans revealed that the abdominal mass, 4 cm in diameter, located on the left side of the right kidney. Gastroduodenoscopy detected a deep ulcerative lesion covered with a yellowish coat in the second portion of duodenum. A sonolucent area at the bottom of the ulcerative lesion seemed to expand to the abdominal mass on ultrasonic endoscopy. Tuberculosis was one possible differential diagnosis. Pathological examination including Ziehl-Neelsen staining using biopsy specimens taken from the bottom of the ulcerative lesion did not show tuberculosis infection. However, polymerase chain reaction analysis using the biopsy specimens revealed that gene expression of tuberculosis was positive. We determined that tuberculous lymphadenitis penetrated the duodenum forming an ulcerative lesion in the duodenum. The administration of anti-tubercular medicine for 6 months male the abdominal mass disappeared and the duodenal ulcerative lesion formed an ulcer scar. We report here a case of tuberculous lymphadenitis penetrating the duodenum which was successfully treated by conservative therapy without surgical treatment.

  12. Ventilation during air breathing and in response to hypercapnia in 5 and 16 month-old mdx and C57 mice

    PubMed Central

    Gayraud, Jérome; Matécki, Stefan; Hnia, Karim; Mornet, Dominique; Préfaut, Christian; Mercier, Jacques; Michel, Alain; Ramonatxo, Michèle

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have shown a blunted ventilatory response to hypercapnia in mdx mice older than 7 months. We test the hypothesis that in the mdx mice ventilatory response changes with age, concomitantly with the increased functional impairment of the respiratory muscles. We thus studied the ventilatory response to CO2 in 5 and 16 month-old mdx and C57BL10 mice (n = 8 for each group). Respiratory rate (RR), tidal volume (VT), and minute ventilation (VE) were measured, using whole-body plethysmography, during air breathing and in response to hypercapnia (3, 5 and 8% CO2). The ventilatory protocol was completed by histological analysis of the diaphragm and intercostals muscles. During air breathing, the 16 month-old mdx mice showed higher RR and, during hypercapnia (at 8% CO2 breathing), significantly lower RR (226 ± 26 vs. 270 ± 21 breaths/min) and VE (1.81 ± 0.35 vs. 3.96 ± 0.59 ml min−1 g−1)(P < 0.001) in comparison to C57BL10 controls. On the other hand, 5 month-old C57BL10 and mdx mice did not present any difference in their ventilatory response to air breathing and to hypercapnia. In conclusion, this study shows similar ventilation during air breathing and in response to hypercapnia in the 5 month-old mdx and control mice, in spite of significant pathological structural changes in the respiratory muscles of the mdx mice. However in the 16 month-old mdx mice we observed altered ventilation under air and blunted ventilation response to hypercapnia compared to age-matched control mice. Ventilatory response to hypercapnia thus changes with age in mdx mice, in line with the increased histological damage of their respiratory muscles. PMID:17431804

  13. Phase I Study Evaluating the Safety and Pharmacokinetics of MDX-1303, a Fully Human Monoclonal Antibody against Bacillus anthracis Protective Antigen, in Healthy Volunteers▿

    PubMed Central

    Riddle, Valerie; Leese, Phillip; Blanset, Diann; Adamcio, Melany; Meldorf, Matthew; Lowy, Israel

    2011-01-01

    MDX-1303 (Valortim) is a fully human monoclonal antibody (hMAb) with a high affinity for Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA). MDX-1303 binds to PA and interferes with the activity of the anthrax toxin; it was selected based on its superior functional activity in the toxin neutralization activity (TNA) assay. MDX-1303 has demonstrated efficacy in the postexposure and therapeutic settings in New Zealand White rabbits, cynomolgus monkeys, and African green monkeys. This phase I study sought to characterize the safety, tolerability, immunogenicity, and pharmacokinetics (PK)/pharmacodynamics (PD) of MDX-1303 in healthy human subjects. Cohorts of 3 to 10 subjects were administered MDX-1303 as either a single intravenous (i.v.) dose at dose levels of 0.3, 1, 3, 10, and 20 mg/kg of body weight or as a single intramuscular (i.m.) dose at 100 mg. Forty-six subjects were enrolled, and 16 (35%) of these subjects experienced one or more grade 1 adverse events considered to be related to treatment with MDX-1303. There were no grade 2 to 4 adverse events or serious adverse events (SAEs) considered to be related to treatment. The mean half-life of MDX-1303 ranged from 22 to 33 days across the i.v. administration cohorts and was approximately 32 days following i.m. administration. Systemic exposure following 100-mg i.m. administration was within the range of exposure following 1-mg/kg i.v. administration with a relative bioavailability of approximately 65%. MDX-1303 was generally well tolerated, and no anti-MDX-1303 antibodies were detected following a single dose. PMID:21976227

  14. Calcium-binding proteins in skeletal muscles of the mdx mice: potential role in the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Pertille, Adriana; de Carvalho, Candida Luiza Tonizza; Matsumura, Cintia Yuri; Neto, Humberto Santo; Marques, Maria Julia

    2010-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is one of the most common hereditary diseases. Abnormal ion handling renders dystrophic muscle fibers more susceptible to necrosis and a rise in intracellular calcium is an important initiating event in dystrophic muscle pathogenesis. In the mdx mice, muscles are affected with different intensities and some muscles are spared. We investigated the levels of the calcium-binding proteins calsequestrin and calmodulin in the non-spared axial (sternomastoid and diaphragm), limb (tibialis anterior and soleus), cardiac and in the spared extraocular muscles (EOM) of control and mdx mice. Immunoblotting analysis showed a significant increase of the proteins in the spared mdx EOM and a significant decrease in the most affected diaphragm. Both proteins were comparable to the cardiac muscle controls. In limb and sternomastoid muscles, calmodulin and calsequestrin were affected differently. These results suggest that differential levels of the calcium-handling proteins may be involved in the pathogenesis of myonecrosis in mdx muscles. Understanding the signaling mechanisms involving Ca(2+)-calmodulin activation and calsequestrin expression may be a valuable way to develop new therapeutic approaches to the dystrophinopaties.

  15. Fructose Promotes Uptake and Activity of Oligonucleotides With Different Chemistries in a Context-dependent Manner in mdx Mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, Limin; Han, Gang; Lin, Caorui; Gu, Ben; Gao, Xianjun; Moulton, Hong M; Seow, Yiqi; Yin, HaiFang

    2016-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotide (AO)-mediated exon-skipping therapeutics shows great promise in correcting frame-disrupting mutations in the DMD gene for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. However, insufficient systemic delivery limits clinical adoption. Previously, we showed that a glucose/fructose mixture augmented AO delivery to muscle in mdx mice. Here, we evaluated if fructose alone could enhance the activities of AOs with different chemistries in mdx mice. The results demonstrated that fructose improved the potency of AOs tested with the greatest effect on phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO), resulted in a 4.25-fold increase in the number of dystrophin-positive fibres, compared to PMO in saline in mdx mice. Systemic injection of lissamine-labeled PMO with fructose at 25 mg/kg led to increased uptake and elevated dystrophin expression in peripheral muscles, compared to PMO in saline, suggesting that fructose potentiates PMO by enhancing uptake. Repeated intravenous administration of PMO in fructose at 50 mg/kg/week for 3 weeks and 50 mg/kg/month for 5 months restored up to 20% of wild-type dystrophin levels in skeletal muscles with improved functions without detectable toxicity, compared to untreated mdx controls. Collectively, we show that fructose can potentiate AOs of different chemistries in vivo although the effect diminished over repeated administration. PMID:27351681

  16. Fructose Promotes Uptake and Activity of Oligonucleotides With Different Chemistries in a Context-dependent Manner in mdx Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Limin; Han, Gang; Lin, Caorui; Gu, Ben; Gao, Xianjun; Moulton, Hong M; Seow, Yiqi; Yin, HaiFang

    2016-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotide (AO)-mediated exon-skipping therapeutics shows great promise in correcting frame-disrupting mutations in the DMD gene for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. However, insufficient systemic delivery limits clinical adoption. Previously, we showed that a glucose/fructose mixture augmented AO delivery to muscle in mdx mice. Here, we evaluated if fructose alone could enhance the activities of AOs with different chemistries in mdx mice. The results demonstrated that fructose improved the potency of AOs tested with the greatest effect on phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO), resulted in a 4.25-fold increase in the number of dystrophin-positive fibres, compared to PMO in saline in mdx mice. Systemic injection of lissamine-labeled PMO with fructose at 25 mg/kg led to increased uptake and elevated dystrophin expression in peripheral muscles, compared to PMO in saline, suggesting that fructose potentiates PMO by enhancing uptake. Repeated intravenous administration of PMO in fructose at 50 mg/kg/week for 3 weeks and 50 mg/kg/month for 5 months restored up to 20% of wild-type dystrophin levels in skeletal muscles with improved functions without detectable toxicity, compared to untreated mdx controls. Collectively, we show that fructose can potentiate AOs of different chemistries in vivo although the effect diminished over repeated administration. PMID:27351681

  17. Therapeutic effects of exon skipping and losartan on skeletal muscle of mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Joo; Kim, Ah-Young; Lee, Eun-Mi; Lee, Myeong-Mi; Min, Chang-Woo; Kang, Kyung-Ku; Park, Jin-Kyu; Hwang, Meeyul; Kwon, Soon-Hak; Tremblay, Jacques P; Jeong, Kyu-Shik

    2014-08-01

    Various attempts have been made to find treatments for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients. Exon skipping is one of the promising technologies for DMD treatment by restoring dystropin protein, which is one of the muscle components. It is well known that losartan, an angiotensin II type1 receptor blocker, promotes muscle regeneration and differentiation by lowering the level of transforming growth factor-beta1 signaling. In this study, we illustrated the combined effects of exon skipping and losartan on skeletal muscle of mdx mice. We supplied mdx mice with losartan for 2 weeks before exon skipping treatment. The losartan with the exon skipping group showed less expression of myf5 than the losartan treated group. Also the losartan with exon skipping group recovered normal muscle architecture, in contrast to the losartan group which still showed many central nuclei. However, the exon skipping efficiency and the restoration of dystrophin protein were lower in the losartan with exon skipping group compared to the exon skipping group. We reveal that losartan promotes muscle regeneration and shortens the time taken to restore normal muscle structure when combined with exon skipping. However, combined treatment of exon skipping and losartan decreases the restoration of dystrophin protein meaning decrease of exon skipping efficiency.

  18. Inhibiting TGF-β activity improves respiratory function in mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Carol A; Hunter, R Bridge; Quigley, Lindsay A; Girgenrath, Stefan; Weber, William D; McCullough, Jennifer A; Dinardo, Carol J; Keefe, Kelly A; Ceci, Lorena; Clayton, Nicholas P; McVie-Wylie, Alison; Cheng, Seng H; Leonard, John P; Wentworth, Bruce M

    2011-06-01

    Respiratory function is the main cause of mortality in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Elevated levels of TGF-β play a key role in the pathophysiology of DMD. To determine whether therapeutic attenuation of TGF-β signaling improves respiratory function, mdx mice were treated from 2 weeks of age to 2 months or 9 months of age with either 1D11 (a neutralizing antibody to all three isoforms of TGF-β), losartan (an angiotensin receptor antagonist), or a combination of the two agents. Respiratory function was measured in nonanesthetized mice by plethysmography. The 9-month-old mdx mice had elevated Penh values and decreased breathing frequency, due primarily to decreased inspiratory flow rate. All treatments normalized Penh values and increased peak inspiratory flow, leading to decreased inspiration times and breathing frequency. Additionally, forelimb grip strength was improved after 1D11 treatment at both 2 and 9 months of age, whereas, losartan improved grip strength only at 2 months. Decreased serum creatine kinase levels (significant improvement for all groups), increased diaphragm muscle fiber density, and decreased hydroxyproline levels (significant improvement for 1D11 only) also suggested improved muscle function after treatment. For all endpoints, 1D11 was equivalent or superior to losartan; coadministration of the two agents was not superior to 1D11 alone. In conclusion, TGF-β antagonism may be a useful therapeutic approach for treating DMD patients. PMID:21641384

  19. Andrographolide attenuates skeletal muscle dystrophy in mdx mice and increases efficiency of cell therapy by reducing fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is characterized by the absence of the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin, muscle wasting, increased transforming growth factor type beta (TGF-β) signaling, and fibrosis. At the present time, the only clinically validated treatments for DMD are glucocorticoids. These drugs prolong muscle strength and ambulation of patients for a short term only and have severe adverse effects. Andrographolide, a bicyclic diterpenoid lactone, has traditionally been used for the treatment of colds, fever, laryngitis, and other infections with no or minimal side effects. We determined whether andrographolide treatment of mdx mice, an animal model for DMD, affects muscle damage, physiology, fibrosis, and efficiency of cell therapy. Methods mdx mice were treated with andrographolide for three months and skeletal muscle histology, creatine kinase activity, and permeability of muscle fibers were evaluated. Fibrosis and TGF-β signaling were evaluated by indirect immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses. Muscle strength was determined in isolated skeletal muscles and by a running test. Efficiency of cell therapy was determined by grafting isolated skeletal muscle satellite cells onto the tibialis anterior of mdx mice. Results mdx mice treated with andrographolide exhibited less severe muscular dystrophy than untreated dystrophic mice. They performed better in an exercise endurance test and had improved muscle strength in isolated muscles, reduced skeletal muscle impairment, diminished fibrosis and a significant reduction in TGF-β signaling. Moreover, andrographolide treatment of mdx mice improved grafting efficiency upon intramuscular injection of dystrophin-positive satellite cells. Conclusions These results suggest that andrographolide could be used to improve quality of life in individuals with DMD. PMID:24655808

  20. The Effects of Experimental Sleep Apnea on Cardiac and Respiratory Functions in 6 and 18 Month Old Dystrophic (mdx) Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fallavollita, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal disease where over 90% of patients succumb to respiratory or cardiac failure. Sleep apnea and sleep disordered breathing (SDB) are noted in a plurality of DMD patients, and the resulting nocturnal episodic hypoxia (EH) cannot be ruled out as a contributing factor to cardiac and respiratory dysfunction. In this study, we investigated the impact of long-term episodic hypoxia, which mimics the cyclic hypoxia seen in sleep apnea, on cardiac and respiratory function in a murine model of DMD (mdx mice). Since the severity and prevalence of sleep apnea in DMD increases with age, we studied the impact of EH on young (6-month) and on older (18-month) mdx mice. Mice were either exposed for 12 weeks to EH (8 hours/day, 5 days/week) or to room air. We noted a significant increase in left ventricular (LV) dilatation (transthoracic echocardiography) on EH exposure in both age groups, but reduced LV contractility was seen only in 6-month old mice. With EH exposure, an increased fibrosis (hydroxyproline) was noted in both cardiac and diaphragm muscle in 18-month but not 6-month old mice. No significant change in relative diaphragm strength (in-vitro) was noted on EH exposure in 18-month old mice. In contrast, EH exposed 6-month old mice showed a significant increase in relative diaphragm strength. EH exposure did not result in any significant change in ventilatory parameters (barometric plethysmography) in awake 6-month old mdx mice. In contrast, 18-month old mdx mice showed considerable ventilatory dysfunction, consistent with reduced ventilatory reserve. Our findings highlight that sleep apnea impacts respiratory and cardiac function in muscular dystrophy, and that EH can have divergent effects on both systems. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive study to investigate the impact of EH on cardiac and respiratory function in mdx mice. PMID:26808526

  1. The Effects of Experimental Sleep Apnea on Cardiac and Respiratory Functions in 6 and 18 Month Old Dystrophic (mdx) Mice.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Milind R; Fallavollita, James A; Farkas, Gaspar A

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal disease where over 90% of patients succumb to respiratory or cardiac failure. Sleep apnea and sleep disordered breathing (SDB) are noted in a plurality of DMD patients, and the resulting nocturnal episodic hypoxia (EH) cannot be ruled out as a contributing factor to cardiac and respiratory dysfunction. In this study, we investigated the impact of long-term episodic hypoxia, which mimics the cyclic hypoxia seen in sleep apnea, on cardiac and respiratory function in a murine model of DMD (mdx mice). Since the severity and prevalence of sleep apnea in DMD increases with age, we studied the impact of EH on young (6-month) and on older (18-month) mdx mice. Mice were either exposed for 12 weeks to EH (8 hours/day, 5 days/week) or to room air. We noted a significant increase in left ventricular (LV) dilatation (transthoracic echocardiography) on EH exposure in both age groups, but reduced LV contractility was seen only in 6-month old mice. With EH exposure, an increased fibrosis (hydroxyproline) was noted in both cardiac and diaphragm muscle in 18-month but not 6-month old mice. No significant change in relative diaphragm strength (in-vitro) was noted on EH exposure in 18-month old mice. In contrast, EH exposed 6-month old mice showed a significant increase in relative diaphragm strength. EH exposure did not result in any significant change in ventilatory parameters (barometric plethysmography) in awake 6-month old mdx mice. In contrast, 18-month old mdx mice showed considerable ventilatory dysfunction, consistent with reduced ventilatory reserve. Our findings highlight that sleep apnea impacts respiratory and cardiac function in muscular dystrophy, and that EH can have divergent effects on both systems. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive study to investigate the impact of EH on cardiac and respiratory function in mdx mice. PMID:26808526

  2. Positive effects of bisphosphonates on bone and muscle in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sung-Hee; Sugamori, Kim S; Grynpas, Marc D; Mitchell, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy are at increased risk of decreased bone mineral density and bone fracture as a result of inactivity. To determine if antiresorptive bisphosphonates could improve bone quality and their effects on muscle we studied the Mdx mouse, treated with pamidronate during peak bone growth at 5 and 6 weeks of age, and examined the outcome at 13 weeks of age. Pamidronate increased cortical bone architecture and strength in femurs with increased resistance to fracture. While overall long bone growth was not affected by pamidronate, there was significant inhibition of remodeling in metaphyseal trabecular bone with evidence of residual calcified cartilage. Pamidronate treatment had positive effects on skeletal muscle in the Mdx mice with decreased serum and muscle creatine kinase and evidence of improved muscle histology and grip strength.

  3. [Duodenojejunostomy in the symptomatic treatment of neoplastic obstruction of the duodenum--clinical observations].

    PubMed

    Górka, Z; Lesiecka, M; Kuśnierz, K; Mrowiec, S; Leidgens, M

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the value of duodenojejunostomy and gastrojejunostomy in the treatment of neoplastic obstruction in the distal part of the duodenum. From 1992-1996, 37 patients (15 women, 22 men, aged 31-76 years) underwent a palliative operation for pancreatic cancer infiltrating the distal part of duodenum. Roux-en-Y procedure was used to create anastomoses between the duodenal bulb and jejunal loop. In 13 patients only alimentary by-pass was made whereas in the remaining 24 biliary decompression was also performed. The results were compared with the outcome in 26 patients in whom gastrojejunal side-to-side anastomosis been made. The advantage of Roux-en-Y duodenojejunostomy is that it does not interfere with gastric emptying and thus prevents jejuno biliary reflux and the consequent complications. Improvement of nutrition and quality of life in patients with inoperable pancreatic cancer, were noticed with this method.

  4. Stomach and duodenum ulcer: comparing the efficiency of three laser therapeutic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myslovich, L. V.

    2001-04-01

    An investigation was made of how effective various therapeutic techniques are in treating stomach and duodenum ulcers. The investigation was made on 105 patients (70 patients were affected by duodenum ulcer and 25 patients suffered from stomach ulcer). Three different complex laser therapeutic techniques were compared with each other and with a generally accepted drug treatment. It was found that the most pronounced therapeutic effect was observed in patients administered a complex laser technique that included drug therapy, the intravenous laser irradiation of blood, and the focal-segmental laser therapy. This complex laser therapy enabled ulcer scarring within 8 to 15 days after the beginning of the treatment (with the average scarring term of 9 days).

  5. Endoscopic Resection of a Pedunculated Brunner's Gland Hamartoma of the Duodenum

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takehiro; Ando, Satoko; Gotoda, Tatsuhiro; Kanzaki, Hiromitsu; Kawano, Seiji; Kawahara, Yoshiro; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    A 68-year-old Japanese woman presented with a solitary pedunculated polyp in the duodenum. Endoscopic ultrasonography showed multiple cystic structures in the polyp. The polyp was successfully resected by endoscopic snare polypectomy and pathologically diagnosed as Brunner's gland hamartoma. Because hamartomatous components were not identified in the stalk of the polyp, we speculate that the stalk developed from traction of the normal duodenal mucosa. When a solitary, pedunculated polyp with cystic structure within the submucosa is found in the duodenum, Brunner's gland hamartoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis, despite the rarity of the disease. This case underscores the usefulness of endoscopic ultrasonography for the diagnosis of duodenal subepithelial tumors. PMID:27579190

  6. Effects of Mechanical Overloading on the Properties of Soleus Muscle Fibers, with or without Damage in MDX and Wild Type Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Masahiro; Kawano, Fuminori; Ohira, Takashi; Oke, Yoshihiko; Nakai, Naoya; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2008-06-01

    Effects of mechanical overloading on the characteristics of regenerating or not-regenerating soleus muscle fibers were studied. The muscle fibers of mdx mice were characterized by the localization of myonuclei. Muscle damage was also induced in wild type (WT) mice by injection of cardiotoxin (CTX) into soleus muscle. Overloading was applied for 14 days to the left soleus muscle in mdx and intact and CTX-injected WT mice by removing the distal tendons of plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles. The contralateral muscle served as the normal control. These animals were then allowed ambulation recovery in the cage. Central myonuclei were noted in many fibers of mdx and CTX-injected mice with or without overloading. In general, the fibers with central nuclei were considered as regenerating fibers. The fibers with more central nuclei were increased in mdx mice, but the fibers with more peripheral nuclei were increased in CTX-injected WT mice by overloading. The muscle satellite cells, neuromuscular junctions (NMJ), and myonuclei were stained. Most of the properties, such as number of myonuclei and satellite cells, size of NMJ, and fiber length, were not influenced by mechanical overloading in all mice. Approximately 0.6% branched fibers were seen in the intact soleus of mdx mice, although these fibers were not detected in WT mice. However, the percentage of these fibers was increased by overloading especially in mdx mice (~50% vs. ~2.5% in WT). In CTX-injected WT mice, these fibers were ~15% with or without overloading. The fiber cross sectional area in normal WT, but not in mdx and CTX-injected WT mice, was increased by overloading (p<0.05). These results suggested that the functional overload induced muscle damage in mdx mice, but promoted the regeneration in CTX-injected WT mice.

  7. [WEAK COMBINED MAGNETIC FIELDS ADJUSTED TO THE PARAMETRIC RESONANCE FOR Ca2+ INTENSIFY DYSTROPHIN SYNTHESIS IN MDX MICE SKELETAL MUSCLES AFTER CELL THERAPY].

    PubMed

    Sokolova, A V; Sokolov, G V; Mikhailov, V M

    2016-01-01

    The mdx mice are an X-linked myopathic mutants, an animal model for human Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Mdx mice muscles are characterized by high level of striated muscle fibers (SMF) death followed by regeneration. As a result most SMFs of mdx mice have centrally located nuclei. The possibility of using stem cells therapy for the correction of DMD is actively being studied. One of the approaches to the usage of bone marrow stem cells for cellular therapy of DMD is the replacement of bone marrow after irradiation by X-rays. This method however does not give significant increase of dystrophin synthesis in mdx mice muscles fibers. We have tried to affect the mice after bone marrow transplantation by weak combined magnetic fields adjusted to the parametric resonance for Ca2+(Ca(2+)-MF) based on the data that the weak combined magnetic fields influence on tissues regeneration. We observed a significant increase in the proportion of dystrophin-positive SMFs in group of mdx mice radiation chimera 5 Gy and 3 Gy which was additionally exposed in Ca(2+)-MF in comparison with the control mdx mice and the group of mdx mice radiation chimera 5 Gy and 3 Gy which was kept in terrestrial magnetic field 2 months after chimera preparation--up to 15.8 and 18.3%, respectively. Also, there was an accumulation of SMFs without central nuclei. These data indicate a significanly increased efficacy of cell therapy in the case of additional exposition in Ca(2+)-MF. Thus, the efficiency of bone marrow transplantation mdx mice after both in doses 3 and 5 Gy was considerably enhanced by additional exposition to Ca(2+)-MF. Apparently, such magnetic field can intensify functioning of donor's nuclei which had been incorporated into muscle fibers. PMID:27228662

  8. [An unusual complication after the partial resection of the ascending duodenum of a cow].

    PubMed

    Steiner, A; Müller, L; Pabst, B

    1989-01-01

    In a heifer portions of the ascending duodenum, which had been perforated by an obstructing phytobezoar, were resected. This resulted in an unexpected complication. The shortened ligamentum duodenocolicum exerted steady traction on the descending colon. This traction caused a kink and finally resulted in a total obstruction of the colon. The pathogenesis of this complication is illustrated. Surgical--possibly preventive--procedures are discussed.

  9. [Mega-duodenum and constipation after surgery for congenital atresia of the jejunum].

    PubMed

    Karstensen, John; Raahave, Dennis; Kirkegaard, Preben

    2011-06-20

    A 33 year-old female presented with constipation and a right-sided palpable abdominal mass, suspected to be the colon. The colonic transit time was prolonged, but the dilated organ was a mega duodenum that had developed after surgery for three jejunal atresies performed one day after birth. The colon was malrotated, being situated to the left of the columna. Renewed resection surgery was uneventful, and after such surgery the constipation receded and the colonic transit time returned to normal.

  10. Intramural hematoma of duodenum: An unusual complication after endoscopic therapy for a bleeding peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ramesh; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Bhatia, Vikram; Garg, Hitendra Kumar; Sundar, Shyam

    2011-01-01

    Intramural hematoma of duodenum (IDH) is a relatively unusual complication associated with endoscopic treatment of bleeding peptic ulcer. This unusual condition is usually seen in children following blunt trauma to the abdomen. We describe here a case of IDH occurring following endoscopic therapy for bleeding duodenal ulcer in an adult patient with end-stage renal disease. The hematomas appeared on the second day of endoscopic intervention, caused transient duodenal obstruction and resolved spontaneously with conservative treatment in a week. PMID:21814382

  11. Pdx-1 is required for activation in vivo from a duodenum-specific enhancer.

    PubMed

    Dusing, M R; Florence, E A; Wiginton, D A

    2001-04-27

    The purine metabolic gene adenosine deaminase (ADA) is expressed along a defined spatiotemporal pattern in the developing mammalian small intestine, where high-level expression is limited to the villous epithelium of the duodenum. This activation is observed in rodents as the intestine completes the final maturation resulting in adult crypt-villus structures at 2-3 weeks postpartum. A regulatory module responsible for this pattern of expression has been identified in the second intron of the human ADA gene. Of the multiple duodenal proteins that can interact with this small duodenal enhancer region, the studies contained in this work describe the identification of five of these proteins as the dispersed homeobox protein PDX-1. This transcription factor exhibits a profile of expression in the small intestine similar to that observed for ADA, making it an ideal candidate factor for the duodenum-specific ADA enhancer. Loss of PDX-1 binding, via a PDX-1 mutated enhancer transgenic construction, resulted in complete loss of high-level activation in the duodenum, demonstrating the absolute requirement for this factor in vivo. However, co-transfection experiments suggest that other proteins that bind the enhancer are also required for enhancer function because PDX-1 alone was incapable of significant transactivation.

  12. Short communication: Difructose anhydride III promotes calcium absorption from the duodenum in cattle.

    PubMed

    Teramura, M; Nakai, T; Itoh, M; Sato, T; Ohtani, M; Kawashima, C; Hanada, M

    2015-04-01

    Difructose anhydride (DFA) III promotes the intestinal absorption of calcium via a paracellular pathway in rats. In dairy cows, DFA III reaches the duodenum without being degraded by ruminal bacteria and hence could be used to control hypocalcemia. The aims of the present study were to investigate the percentage of DFA III that appears in the duodenum of cows and to determine the effect of DFA III on calcium absorption from duodenal fluid. The first experiment was performed in 3 ruminally and duodenally cannulated dry Holstein cows in a 3 × 3 Latin square design. Each experimental period lasted 7 d. On the first day, the cows were ruminally fed one of the following treatments: 0 (DFA0), 50 (DFA50), or 100 (DFA100) g/d of DFA III, using cobalt-EDTA as a liquid phase marker. Difructose anhydride III was detected in duodenal fluid 1 h after feeding, and its concentration peaked 4 h after feeding, in a dose-dependent manner. The percentages of DFA III that appeared in the duodenum after the DFA50 and DFA100 treatments were 69.1 ± 7.0% and 67.9 ± 5.6%, respectively. The second experiment used the everted duodenal sacs of cattle (n = 7 in each group). Sacs were incubated in artificial mucosal fluid containing 1 mM DFA III or no DFA III (control) for 60 min with 100% O2 in a water bath at 37 °C. After incubation, the calcium concentration of the artificial serosal fluid in the everted sacs was measured. Calcium absorption was higher in the DFA III-treated group than in the control group (803 ± 161 and 456 ± 74 nmol/cm of sac, respectively). The above results demonstrate that approximately 70% of administered DFA III reached the duodenum of cows intact. Moreover, similar to its effects on calcium absorption in rats, DFA III promoted calcium absorption via a paracellular pathway in the duodenum of cows. PMID:25648815

  13. Prevention of exercised induced cardiomyopathy following Pip-PMO treatment in dystrophic mdx mice

    PubMed Central

    Betts, Corinne A.; Saleh, Amer F.; Carr, Carolyn A.; Hammond, Suzan M.; Coenen-Stass, Anna M. L.; Godfrey, Caroline; McClorey, Graham; Varela, Miguel A.; Roberts, Thomas C.; Clarke, Kieran; Gait, Michael J.; Wood, Matthew J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal neuromuscular disorder caused by mutations in the Dmd gene. In addition to skeletal muscle wasting, DMD patients develop cardiomyopathy, which significantly contributes to mortality. Antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) are a promising DMD therapy, restoring functional dystrophin protein by exon skipping. However, a major limitation with current AOs is the absence of dystrophin correction in heart. Pip peptide-AOs demonstrate high activity in cardiac muscle. To determine their therapeutic value, dystrophic mdx mice were subject to forced exercise to model the DMD cardiac phenotype. Repeated peptide-AO treatments resulted in high levels of cardiac dystrophin protein, which prevented the exercised induced progression of cardiomyopathy, normalising heart size as well as stabilising other cardiac parameters. Treated mice also exhibited significantly reduced cardiac fibrosis and improved sarcolemmal integrity. This work demonstrates that high levels of cardiac dystrophin restored by Pip peptide-AOs prevents further deterioration of cardiomyopathy and pathology following exercise in dystrophic DMD mice. PMID:25758104

  14. Toward Integrated Molecular Diagnostic System (iMDx): Principles and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung-min; Sabour, Andrew F.; Son, Jun Ho; Lee, Sang Hun

    2014-01-01

    Integrated molecular diagnostic systems (iMDx), which are automated, sensitive, specific, user-friendly, robust, rapid, easy-to-use, and portable, can revolutionize future medicine. This review will first focus on the components of sample extraction, preservation, and filtration necessary for all point-of-care devices to include for practical use. Subsequently, we will look for low-powered and precise methods for both sample amplification and signal transduction, going in-depth to the details behind their principles. The final field of total device integration and its application to the clinical field will also be addressed to discuss the practicality for future patient care. We envision that microfluidic systems hold the potential to breakthrough the number of problems brought into the field of medical diagnosis today. PMID:24759281

  15. Differential roles of MMP-9 in early and late stages of dystrophic muscles in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Naoko; Miyazaki, Daigo; Yoshizawa, Takahiro; Fukushima, Kazuhiro; Shiba, Yuji; Inaba, Yuji; Imamura, Michihiro; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Koike, Kenichi; Nakamura, Akinori

    2015-10-01

    Matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-9 is an endopeptidase associated with the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The precise function of MMP-9 in DMD has not been elucidated to date. We investigated the effect of genetic ablation of MMP-9 in the mdx mouse model (mdx/Mmp9(-/-)). At the early disease stage, the muscles of mdx/Mmp9(-/-) mice showed reduced necrosis and neutrophil invasion, accompanied by down-regulation of chemokine MIP-2. In addition, muscle regeneration was enhanced, which coincided with increased macrophage infiltration and upregulation of MCP-1, and resulted in increased muscle strength. The mdx/Mmp9(-/-) mice also displayed accelerated upregulation of osteopontin expression in skeletal muscle at the acute onset phase of dystrophy. However, at a later disease stage, the mice exhibited muscle growth impairment through altered expression of myogenic factors, and increased fibroadipose tissue. These results showed that MMP-9 might have multiple functions during disease progression. Therapy targeting MMP-9 may improve muscle pathology and function at the early disease stage, but continuous inhibition of this protein may result in the accumulation of fibroadipose tissues and reduced muscle strength at the late disease stage.

  16. Dmdmdx/Largemyd: a new mouse model of neuromuscular diseases useful for studying physiopathological mechanisms and testing therapies.

    PubMed

    Martins, Poliana C M; Ayub-Guerrieri, Danielle; Martins-Bach, Aurea B; Onofre-Oliveira, Paula; Malheiros, Jackeline M; Tannus, Alberto; de Sousa, Paulo L; Carlier, Pierre G; Vainzof, Mariz

    2013-09-01

    Although muscular dystrophies are among the most common human genetic disorders, there are few treatment options available. Animal models have become increasingly important for testing new therapies prior to entering human clinical trials. The Dmd(mdx) mouse is the most widely used animal model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), presenting the same molecular and protein defect as seen in humans with the disease. However, this mouse is not useful for clinical trials because of its very mild phenotype. The mouse model for congenital myodystrophy type 1D, Large(myd), harbors a mutation in the glycosyltransferase Large gene and displays a severe phenotype. To help elucidate the role of the proteins dystrophin and LARGE in the organization of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex in muscle sarcolemma, we generated double-mutant mice for the dystrophin and LARGE proteins. The new Dmd(mdx)/Large(myd) mouse model is viable and shows a severe phenotype that is associated with the lack of dystrophin in muscle. We tested the usefulness of our new mouse model for cell therapy by systemically injecting them with normal murine mesenchymal adipose stem cells (mASCs). We verified that the mASCs were hosted in the dystrophic muscle. The new mouse model has proven to be very useful for the study of several other therapies, because injected cells can be screened both through DNA and protein analysis. Study of its substantial muscle weakness will also be very informative in the evaluation of functional benefits of these therapies.

  17. Severe stricturing Crohn's disease of the duodenum: A case report and review of surgical options

    PubMed Central

    Racz, Jennifer M.; Davies, Ward

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Duodenal Crohn's disease is a rare clinical entity that occurs in 0.5–4.0% of patients with Crohn's disease. A unique case of Crohn's disease of the upper gastrointestinal tract characterized by multiple strictures within the duodenum and jejunum is described in our review. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 41-year-old male presented with a 2-month history of intermittent, crampy abdominal pain accompanied by nausea, bilious emesis, early satiety, anorexia and weight loss. Physical examination revealed fullness in the epigastric region. Imaging demonstrated strictures in the proximal and distal duodenum with dilatation of the intervening segments. There was also gross dilatation of the proximal jejunum, which was followed by a 9 cm strictured segment. There was no evidence of acute Crohn's disease. Although a Whipple's resection was initially considered as a form of operative intervention given the extent of disease within the duodenum, the discovery of unexpected disease intra-operatively presented a surgical dilemma. In this case, strictureplasty, surgical resection and bypass were used to treat the patient. DISCUSSION Diffuse stricturing of the proximal gastrointestinal tract is a rare manifestation of Crohn's disease. Although imaging can aid in surgical planning, intra-operative decision-making to deal with unexpected findings will remain an important aspect of the management of this entity. CONCLUSION The fundamental goal of the surgical management of strictures secondary to Crohn's disease is to relieve obstruction while maximizing bowel conservation. A variety of operative techniques are currently described for the management of duodenal Crohn's disease and are reviewed in this case report. PMID:22503915

  18. Villous Adenocarcinoma of the Duodenum Invading the Ampulla of Vater: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Cardi, Francesco; Migliore, Marcello; Romeo, Gaetano

    1996-01-01

    We report a case of villous adenocarcinoma of duodenum arising from the ampulla of Vater with a review of the literature. Although preoperative endoscopic biopsies were performed, no malignancy was identified. Because of the pathological uncertainty we decided to perform a pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy. Microscopic examination demonstrated glandular dysplasia with aspects of villous adenoma and well differentiated adenocarcinoma. We conclude that both in malignant cases and in cases with uncertain diagnosis a pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy is the best surgical treatment because it results in better 5 year survival. PMID:9184865

  19. The electrical and motor actions of gastrointestinal hormones on the duodenum in man

    PubMed Central

    Waterfall, W. E.; Duthie, H. L.; Brown, B. H.

    1973-01-01

    The electrical and motor activity was recorded from the duodenum in 16 conscious human subjects in resting conditions. The main electrical wave form variously known as the pace-setter potential or slow wave was constantly present and periodically accompanied by a second electrical trace consisting of rapid bursts of fast waves or action potentials which were related to motor waves. Secretin and the synthetic analogue of gastrin, pentagastrin, were given in separate tests and their complementary actions on myoelectrical activity are reported. In general, secretin (in six subjects) depressed and pentagastrin (in eight subjects) enhanced motor activity and bursts of action potentials. PMID:4752032

  20. [Lipid peroxidation in patients with multiple peptic ulcers in the stomach and duodenum].

    PubMed

    Ioffe, I V

    2004-08-01

    Under the observation there were 62 patients with multiple ulcers of a stomach and duodenum from 23 till 65 years old, randomized under the sex, age and character of pathological process (sizes and localization of peptical ulcers). In all patients the parameters of lipids peroxidation were studied. The increase of intensity the peroxidation of lipids were revealed, at the expense of augmentation in a peripheric blood of the patients of concentration of a final metabolite peroxidation of lipids--malon's dialdehyde and intermediate products--dien's conjugates. The rising of a parameter hemolysis peroxidation of erythrocytes is marked also.

  1. Electrical Impedance Myography to Detect the Effects of Electrical Muscle Stimulation in Wild Type and Mdx Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; Yim, Sung; Pacheck, Adam; Sanchez, Benjamin; Rutkove, Seward B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Tools to better evaluate the impact of therapy on nerve and muscle disease are needed. Electrical impedance myography (EIM) is sensitive to neuromuscular disease progression as well as to therapeutic interventions including myostatin inhibition and antisense oligonucleotide-based treatments. Whether the technique identifies the impact of electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) is unknown. Methods Ten wild-type (wt) C57B6 mice and 10 dystrophin-deficient (mdx) mice underwent 2 weeks of 20 min/day EMS on left gastrocnemius and sham stimulation on the right gastrocnemius. Multifrequency EIM data and limb girth were obtained before and at the conclusion of the protocol. Muscle weight, in situ force measurements, and muscle fiber histology were also assessed at the conclusion of the study. Results At the time of sacrifice, muscle weight was greater on the EMS-treated side than on the sham-stimulated side (p = 0.018 for wt and p = 0.007 for mdx). Similarly, in wt animals, EIM parameters changed significantly compared to baseline (resistance (p = 0.009), reactance (p = 0.0003) and phase (p = 0.002); these changes were due in part to reductions in the EIM values on the EMS-treated side and elevations on the sham-simulated side. Mdx animals showed analogous but non-significant changes (p = 0.083, p = 0.064, and p = 0.57 for resistance, reactance and phase, respectively). Maximal isometric force trended higher on the stimulated side in wt animals only (p = 0.06). Myofiber sizes in wt animals were also larger on the stimulated side than on the sham-stimulated side (p = 0.034); no significant difference was found in the mdx mice (p = 0.79). Conclusion EIM is sensitive to stimulation-induced muscle alterations in wt animals; similar trends are also present in mdx mice. The mechanisms by which these EIM changes develop, however, remains uncertain. Possible explanations include longer-term trophic effects and shorter-term osmotic effects. PMID:26986564

  2. Surgical approach for tumours of the third and fourth part of the duodenum. Distal pancreas-sparing duodenectomy.

    PubMed

    García-Molina, Francisco J; Mateo-Vallejo, Francisco; Franco-Osorio, Juan de Dios; Esteban-Ramos, Juan L; Rivero-Henández, Iosvany

    2015-06-01

    The anatomic complexity of the duodenum makes surgical resection challenging. We describe our experience with distal pancreas-sparing duodenectomy (PSD) for tumours that arise in the third and fourth parts of the duodenum. Between July 2008 and January 2012 eight patients underwent surgical resection for tumours in the distal parts of the duodenum. Short and long-term outcomes of treatment are retrospectively analyzed. We used the Cattell and Braash surgical approach in six patients. Seven patients underwent a segmental resection of the distal duodenum with a duodenojejunal anastomosis and in one case we performed a wedge local excision with primary closure. There were 5 gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST), 1 primary duodenal adenocarcinoma, 1 metastasis of a lung adenocarcinoma and 1 patient with malignant duodenocolic fistula caused by advanced sigmoid colon carcinoma. Median operating time was 200 min and median intraoperatory blood loss 162 mL. Three patients showed postoperative complications and one of them died. There was no reoperation. Median hospital stay was 10 days (range, 7-28 days). The patient with primary adenocarcinoma died after 12 months due to hepatic metastases. All of five patients with GIST are alive without recurrence (mean follow up of 65.6 months), as well as the patient with metastatic duodenal infiltration (45 months after surgery). Segmental resection of the third and fourth portions of the duodenum is reliable and feasible. The Cattell and Braash manoeuvre provides a good exposure and makes this kind of resection easier.

  3. [Frequency dynamics of stomach and duodenum ulcer found in liquidators of consequence of Chernobyl accident (according to the data of long-term observation)].

    PubMed

    Gasanova, E V; Kovalenko, A N

    2004-01-01

    The authors have studied the frequency dynamics of stomach and duodenum ulcer occurrence revealed in liquidators of consequence of Chernobyl accident (1986-1987) after long-term medical observation with age and radiation absorbed dose variations. According to the findings, duodenum ulcer incidence prevails over stomach ulcer in all scale of age. The connection between the frequency dynamics of duodenum ulcer and age of the patients wasn't found.

  4. Bile exclusion from the duodenum. Its effect on gastric and pancreatic function in the dog.

    PubMed

    Davies, H A; Wheeler, M H; Psaila, J; Rhodes, J; Newcombe, R G; Jones, J M; Procter, D; Adrian, T E; Bloom, S R

    1985-10-01

    The effect of diverting bile from the duodenum in four dogs with cholecystojejunostomy was studied using a double-marker perfusion technique. After the diversion procedure, a liquid meal increased acid secretion from 0.8 mmol H+/min to 1.48 mmol H+/min (P less than 0.05, paired t test); there was an associated rise in serum levels of gastrin 120 min after feeding (P less than 0.001, paired t test). Pancreatic secretion of trypsin decreased from 3.91 IU/min to 2.66 IU/min after bile diversion (P less than 0.01, paired t test), and the level of CCK was significantly lower 60 min after feeding (P less than 0.05, paired t test). There was no significant change in the rate of gastric emptying after bile diversion, but the pH of duodenal contents was lower in the later stages of digestion. These changes may explain the reported increase of peptic ulcer after diverting bile from the duodenum, and the procedure should not be considered unless the consequences of acid hypersecretion and pancreatic inhibition have been anticipated.

  5. Plexiform schwannoma of the duodenum accompanying pyloric stenosis: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Aktekın, Ali; Özkara, Selvinaz; Merıç, Kaan; Günay Gürleyık, Meryem; Aker, Fügen; Sağlam, Abdullah

    2012-08-01

    Plexiform schwannoma is a benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor and is composed of Schwann cells arranged in a plexiform pattern. Most plexiform schwannomas are skin tumors, and there has been no case report of this tumor originating in the duodenum. We describe the first known case of plexiform schwannoma of the duodenum. A 60-year-old man presented with a short history of food intolerance, epigastric discomfort, fullness and bloatedness, sometimes vomiting, and weight loss, without any clinical picture of neurofibromatosis. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed pyloric stenosis with normal mucosal lining. The computed tomography demonstrated circumferentially and concentrically thickened pylorus up to 18 mm with narrowed lumen and limited contrast passage. Antrectomy and gastrojejunostomy were performed due to unknown etiology of the obstruction. The cut surface of the lesion revealed thickened pylorus up to 15 mm in a circumferential manner. It contained a 5 mm tumor consisted of multiple white nodules in the submucosal and subserosal layers with overlying duodenal mucosa. Microscopic examination revealed nodular structures composed of spindle cells within fascicular pattern without any atypia or mitosis. Immunohistochemical examination revealed that the cells diffusely and strongly expressed S100 proteins in a nuclear and cytoplasmic pattern, but not CD117, smooth muscle actin, desmin, or CD34, confirming plexiform schwannoma. PMID:22965512

  6. Pathologic effects of fractionated fast neutrons or photons on the pancreas, pylorus and duodenum of dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Zook, B.C.; Bradley, E.W.; Casarett, G.W.; Rogers, C.C.

    1983-10-01

    Thirty-nine adult male Beagles received either fast neutron or photon irradiation to the right thorax to determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of fast neutrons on normal pulmonary tissue. The right anterior abdomen was included in the field of radiation. Twenty-four dogs (six/group) received fast neutrons with an average energy of 15 MeV to total doses of 1000, 1500, 2250 or 3375 rad in four fractions per week for six weeks. Fifteen dogs received 3000, 4500, or 6750 rad of photons (five/group) in an identical fractionation pattern. All neutron irradiated dogs receiving 3375 and 2250 rad and one receiving 1500 rad developed clinical signs of pancreatic, hepatic and gastrointestinal disturbances. The liver enzymes of these dogs became elevated and they died or were euthanized in extremis 47-367 days after irradiation. Only one 6750 rad photon dog developed similar signs and died 708 days post-irradiation. Five neutron and 10 photon exposed dogs died of other causes. Neutron-induced lesions in the stomach and duodenum included hemorrhages, erosions, ulcerations and fibrosis. Ulcers perforated the GI tract of five dogs. Pancreatic lesions included degranulation and necrosis of acinar cells, fibrosis and atrophy. Islet cells were not obviously damaged. All lesions were associated with degenerative and occlusive vascular changes. The RBE of fast neutrons, assessed by clinical signs, gross and microscopic pathology, is approximately 3-4.5 for pancreas and about 4.5 for pylorus and duodenum.

  7. Pathways of abnormal stress-induced Ca2+ influx into dystrophic mdx cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fanchaouy, M.; Polakova, E.; Jung, C.; Ogrodnik, J.; Shirokova, N.; Niggli, E.

    2009-01-01

    In Duchenne muscular dystrophy, deficiency of the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin leads to well-described defects in skeletal muscle, but also to dilated cardiomyopathy, accounting for about 20% of the mortality. Mechanisms leading to cardiomyocyte cell death and cardiomyopathy are not well understood. One hypothesis suggests that the lack of dystrophin leads to membrane instability during mechanical stress and to activation of Ca2+ entry pathways. Using cardiomyocytes isolated from dystrophic mdx mice we dissected the contribution of various putative Ca2+ influx pathways with pharmacological tools. Cytosolic Ca2+ and Na+ signals as well as uptake of membrane impermeant compounds were monitored with fluorescent indicators using confocal microscopy and photometry. Membrane stress was applied as moderate osmotic challenges while membrane current was quantified using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Our findings suggest a major contribution of two primary Ca2+ influx pathways, stretch-activated membrane channels and short-lived microruptures. Furthermore, we found evidence for a secondary Ca2+ influx pathway, the Na+-Ca2+ exchange (NCX), which in cardiac muscle has a large transport capacity. After stress it contributes to Ca2+ entry in exchange for Na+ which had previously entered via primary stress-induced pathways, representing a previously not recognized mechanism contributing to subsequent cellular damage. This complexity needs to be considered when targeting abnormal Ca2+ influx as a treatment option for dystrophy. PMID:19604578

  8. The effects of endurance exercise on dystrophic mdx mice. II. Contractile properties of skinned muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Lynch, G S; Hayes, A; Lam, M H; Williams, D A

    1993-07-22

    Dystrophic (mdx) mice were subjected to a 15 week exercise programme consisting of endurance swimming. Single fibres from the extensor digitorum longus (EDL, fast-twitch) and soleus (SOL, mixed fast- and slow-twitch) muscles were attached to a sensitive force-recording apparatus, and activated in Ca(2+)- and Sr(2+)-buffered solutions. In addition to the normal well-defined fibre types in these muscles, a small number of fibres were also sampled from the soleus of both experimental groups, which were 'Intermediate' to the other two SOL fibre types. Type IIB fibres from the EDL and type IIA fibres from the soleus of the Swim group were significantly less sensitive to Ca2+ and Sr2+ compared with those fibres sampled from the sedentary (Sedent) group, suggesting that endurance exercise was able to modify Ca(2+)- and Sr(2+)-activated contractile characteristics. The swim-trained (Swim) group's increased incidence of SOL fibres with characteristics intermediate to those of the fast- and slow-twitch fibre types suggests a possible exercise-induced fibre type transformation as an adaptation to the functional demand. PMID:8396775

  9. Clinical map document based on XML (cMDX): document architecture with mapping feature for reporting and analysing prostate cancer in radical prostatectomy specimens

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The pathology report of radical prostatectomy specimens plays an important role in clinical decisions and the prognostic evaluation in Prostate Cancer (PCa). The anatomical schema is a helpful tool to document PCa extension for clinical and research purposes. To achieve electronic documentation and analysis, an appropriate documentation model for anatomical schemas is needed. For this purpose we developed cMDX. Methods The document architecture of cMDX was designed according to Open Packaging Conventions by separating the whole data into template data and patient data. Analogue custom XML elements were considered to harmonize the graphical representation (e.g. tumour extension) with the textual data (e.g. histological patterns). The graphical documentation was based on the four-layer visualization model that forms the interaction between different custom XML elements. Sensible personal data were encrypted with a 256-bit cryptographic algorithm to avoid misuse. In order to assess the clinical value, we retrospectively analysed the tumour extension in 255 patients after radical prostatectomy. Results The pathology report with cMDX can represent pathological findings of the prostate in schematic styles. Such reports can be integrated into the hospital information system. "cMDX" documents can be converted into different data formats like text, graphics and PDF. Supplementary tools like cMDX Editor and an analyser tool were implemented. The graphical analysis of 255 prostatectomy specimens showed that PCa were mostly localized in the peripheral zone (Mean: 73% ± 25). 54% of PCa showed a multifocal growth pattern. Conclusions cMDX can be used for routine histopathological reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens and provide data for scientific analysis. PMID:21078179

  10. Increased Resting Intracellular Calcium Modulates NF-κB-dependent Inducible Nitric-oxide Synthase Gene Expression in Dystrophic mdx Skeletal Myotubes*

    PubMed Central

    Altamirano, Francisco; López, Jose R.; Henríquez, Carlos; Molinski, Tadeusz; Allen, Paul D.; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disorder caused by dystrophin mutations, characterized by chronic inflammation and severe muscle wasting. Dystrophic muscles exhibit activated immune cell infiltrates, up-regulated inflammatory gene expression, and increased NF-κB activity, but the contribution of the skeletal muscle cell to this process has been unclear. The aim of this work was to study the pathways that contribute to the increased resting calcium ([Ca2+]rest) observed in mdx myotubes and its possible link with up-regulation of NF-κB and pro-inflammatory gene expression in dystrophic muscle cells. [Ca2+]rest was higher in mdx than in WT myotubes (308 ± 6 versus 113 ± 2 nm, p < 0.001). In mdx myotubes, both the inhibition of Ca2+ entry (low Ca2+ solution, Ca2+-free solution, and Gd3+) and blockade of either ryanodine receptors or inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors reduced [Ca2+]rest. Basal activity of NF-κB was significantly up-regulated in mdx versus WT myotubes. There was an increased transcriptional activity and p65 nuclear localization, which could be reversed when [Ca2+]rest was reduced. Levels of mRNA for TNFα, IL-1β, and IL-6 were similar in WT and mdx myotubes, whereas inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) expression was increased 5-fold. Reducing [Ca2+]rest using different strategies reduced iNOS gene expression presumably as a result of decreased activation of NF-κB. We propose that NF-κB, modulated by increased [Ca2+]rest, is constitutively active in mdx myotubes, and this mechanism can account for iNOS overexpression and the increase in reactive nitrogen species that promote damage in dystrophic skeletal muscle cells. PMID:22549782

  11. Increased resting intracellular calcium modulates NF-κB-dependent inducible nitric-oxide synthase gene expression in dystrophic mdx skeletal myotubes.

    PubMed

    Altamirano, Francisco; López, Jose R; Henríquez, Carlos; Molinski, Tadeusz; Allen, Paul D; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2012-06-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disorder caused by dystrophin mutations, characterized by chronic inflammation and severe muscle wasting. Dystrophic muscles exhibit activated immune cell infiltrates, up-regulated inflammatory gene expression, and increased NF-κB activity, but the contribution of the skeletal muscle cell to this process has been unclear. The aim of this work was to study the pathways that contribute to the increased resting calcium ([Ca(2+)](rest)) observed in mdx myotubes and its possible link with up-regulation of NF-κB and pro-inflammatory gene expression in dystrophic muscle cells. [Ca(2+)](rest) was higher in mdx than in WT myotubes (308 ± 6 versus 113 ± 2 nm, p < 0.001). In mdx myotubes, both the inhibition of Ca(2+) entry (low Ca(2+) solution, Ca(2+)-free solution, and Gd(3+)) and blockade of either ryanodine receptors or inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors reduced [Ca(2+)](rest). Basal activity of NF-κB was significantly up-regulated in mdx versus WT myotubes. There was an increased transcriptional activity and p65 nuclear localization, which could be reversed when [Ca(2+)](rest) was reduced. Levels of mRNA for TNFα, IL-1β, and IL-6 were similar in WT and mdx myotubes, whereas inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) expression was increased 5-fold. Reducing [Ca(2+)](rest) using different strategies reduced iNOS gene expression presumably as a result of decreased activation of NF-κB. We propose that NF-κB, modulated by increased [Ca(2+)](rest), is constitutively active in mdx myotubes, and this mechanism can account for iNOS overexpression and the increase in reactive nitrogen species that promote damage in dystrophic skeletal muscle cells. PMID:22549782

  12. Increased Intraepithelial Vα24 Invariant NKT Cells in the Celiac Duodenum.

    PubMed

    Montalvillo, Enrique; Bernardo, David; Martínez-Abad, Beatriz; Allegretti, Yessica; Fernández-Salazar, Luis; Calvo, Carmen; Chirdo, Fernando G; Garrote, José A; Arranz, Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    Celiac Disease (CD) is an interferon (IFN)γ-mediated duodenal hypersensitivity to wheat gluten occurring in genetically predisposed individuals. Gluten-free diet (GFD) leads to a complete remission of the disease. Vα24-restricted invariant NKT (iNKT) cells are important to maintain immune homeostasis in the gut mucosa because of their unique capacity to rapidly produce large quantities of both T-helper (Th)1 and Th2 cytokines upon stimulation. We studied the presence of these cells in the CD duodenum. Duodenal biopsies were obtained from 45 untreated-CD patients (uCD), 15 Gluten Free Diet-CD patients (GFD-CD), 44 non-inflamed non-CD controls (C-controls) and 15 inflamed non-CD controls (I-controls). Two populations from Spain and Argentina were recruited. Messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of Vα24-Jα18 (invariant TCRα chain of human iNKT cells), IFNγ and intracellular transcription factor Forkhead Box P3 (Foxp3), and flow cytometry intraepithelial lymphocyte (IEL) profile were determined. Both uCD and GFD-CD patients had higher Vα24-Jα18 mRNA levels than non-CD controls (I and C-controls). The expression of Vα24-Jα18 correlated with Marsh score for the severity of mucosal lesion and also with increased mRNA IFNγ levels. uCD and GFD-CD patients had decreased mRNA expression of FoxP3 but increased expression of Vα24-Jα18, which revealed a CD-like molecular profile. Increased numbers of iNKT cells were confirmed by flow cytometry within the intraepithelial lymphocyte compartment of uCD and GFD-CD patients and correlated with Vα24-Jα18 mRNA expression. In conclusion, we have found an increased number of iNKT cells in the duodenum from both uCD and GFD-CD patients, irrespective of the mucosal status. A CD-like molecular profile, defined by an increased mRNA expression of Vα24-Jα18 together with a decreased expression of FoxP3, may represent a pro-inflammatory signature of the CD duodenum. PMID:26529008

  13. Identification of novel, therapy-responsive protein biomarkers in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy by aptamer-based serum proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Coenen-Stass, Anna M. L.; McClorey, Graham; Manzano, Raquel; Betts, Corinne A.; Blain, Alison; Saleh, Amer F.; Gait, Michael J.; Lochmüller, Hanns; Wood, Matthew J. A.; Roberts, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    There is currently an urgent need for biomarkers that can be used to monitor the efficacy of experimental therapies for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) in clinical trials. Identification of novel protein biomarkers has been limited due to the massive complexity of the serum proteome and the presence of a small number of very highly abundant proteins. Here we have utilised an aptamer-based proteomics approach to profile 1,129 proteins in the serum of wild-type and mdx (dystrophin deficient) mice. The serum levels of 96 proteins were found to be significantly altered (P < 0.001, q < 0.01) in mdx mice. Additionally, systemic treatment with a peptide-antisense oligonucleotide conjugate designed to induce Dmd exon skipping and recover dystrophin protein expression caused many of the differentially abundant serum proteins to be restored towards wild-type levels. Results for five leading candidate protein biomarkers (Pgam1, Tnni3, Camk2b, Cycs and Adamts5) were validated by ELISA in the mouse samples. Furthermore, ADAMTS5 was found to be significantly elevated in human DMD patient serum. This study has identified multiple novel, therapy-responsive protein biomarkers in the serum of the mdx mouse with potential utility in DMD patients. PMID:26594036

  14. The role of mast cell in tissue morphogenesis. Thymus, duodenum, and mammary gland as examples.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico; Crivellato, Enrico

    2016-02-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are strategically located at host/environment interfaces like skin, airways, and gastro-intestinal and uro-genital tracts. MCs also populate connective tissues in association with blood and lymphatic vessels and nerves. MCs are absent in avascular tissues, such as mineralized bone, cartilage, and cornea. MCs have various functions and different functional subsets of MCs are encountered in different tissues. However, we do not' know exactly what is the physiological function of MC. Most of these functions are not essential for life, as various MC-deficient strains of mice and rats seems to have normal life spans. In this review article, we have reported and discussed the literature data concerning the role of MCs in tissue morphogenesis, and in particular their role in the development of thymus, duodenum, and mammary gland. PMID:26615957

  15. The role of mast cell in tissue morphogenesis. Thymus, duodenum, and mammary gland as examples.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico; Crivellato, Enrico

    2016-02-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are strategically located at host/environment interfaces like skin, airways, and gastro-intestinal and uro-genital tracts. MCs also populate connective tissues in association with blood and lymphatic vessels and nerves. MCs are absent in avascular tissues, such as mineralized bone, cartilage, and cornea. MCs have various functions and different functional subsets of MCs are encountered in different tissues. However, we do not' know exactly what is the physiological function of MC. Most of these functions are not essential for life, as various MC-deficient strains of mice and rats seems to have normal life spans. In this review article, we have reported and discussed the literature data concerning the role of MCs in tissue morphogenesis, and in particular their role in the development of thymus, duodenum, and mammary gland.

  16. Early right ventricular fibrosis and reduction in biventricular cardiac reserve in the dystrophin-deficient mdx heart.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Tatyana A; Townsend, DeWayne

    2015-02-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive disease of striated muscle deterioration. Respiratory and cardiac muscle dysfunction are particularly clinically relevant because they result in the leading causes of death in DMD patients. Despite the clinical and physiological significance of these systems, little has been done to understand the cardiorespiratory interaction in DMD. We show here that prior to the onset of global cardiac dysfunction, dystrophin-deficient mdx mice have increased cardiac fibrosis with the right ventricle being particularly affected. Using a novel biventricular cardiac catheterization technique coupled with cardiac stress testing, we demonstrate that both the right and left ventricles have significant reductions in both systolic and diastolic function in response to dobutamine. Unstimulated cardiac function is relatively normal except for a significant reduction in the ventricular pressure transient duration compared with controls. These biventricular analyses also reveal the absence of a dobutamine-induced increase in isovolumic relaxation in the right ventricle of control hearts. Simultaneous assessment of biventricular pressure demonstrates a dobutamine-dependent enhancement of coupling between the ventricles in control mice, which is absent in mdx mice. Furthermore, studies probing the passive-extension properties of the left ventricle demonstrate that the mdx heart is significantly more compliant compared with age-matched C57BL/10 hearts, which have an age-dependent stiffening that is completely absent from dystrophic hearts. These new results indicate that right ventricular fibrosis is an early indicator of the development of dystrophic cardiomyopathy, suggesting a mechanism by which respiratory insufficiency may accelerate the development of heart failure in DMD.

  17. Effect of chronic intake of liquid nutrition on stomach and duodenum morphology.

    PubMed

    Vrabcova, Michaela; Mikuska, Livia; Vazan, Rastislav; Miko, Michal; Varga, Ivan; Mravec, Boris

    2016-05-01

    Changes in the quantity and/or quality of food intake have been shown to be associated with morphological and functional alterations of the gastrointestinal system. To examine this, we investigated the effect of chronic liquid nutrition intake (Fresubin) on stomach and duodenum morphology in Wistar rats fed liquid nutrition during different developmental periods. We used four groups of rats: a) control group (CON) fed pelleted chow for 130days; b) liquid nutrition group (LN) fed liquid nutrition for 130days; c) liquid nutrition juvenile group (LNJ) fed liquid nutrition for 70days and then pelleted food for 60days; d) liquid nutrition adult group (LNA) fed pelleted chow for 70days and then liquid nutrition for 60days. We found that LN and LNA rats showed a significant reduction of empty stomach mass compared to CON animals, while stomach and duodenal longitudinal muscle layer thickness did not differ between groups. Villus height was increased only in LNA animals, while villus width was increased in both LN and LNA rats. Crypt depth was reduced in LNJ. However, liquid nutrition intake did not affect villus height/crypt depth ratio, nor number of goblet cells. We found that chronic intake of liquid nutrition affects some morphological parameters of the stomach and duodenum but these changes were not homogenous between experimental groups. Interestingly, transition from liquid nutrition to solid food reversed the alterations of stomach weight as well as villus width induced by intake of liquid nutrition in LNA rats. Our data indicate that morphological and functional changes in the gastrointestinal system induced by qualitative and quantitative changes in food intake are at least partially reversible. Therefore, specific diets may be used potentially as adjuvant treatment for modulating the progression of gastrointestinal diseases by affecting stomach and small intestine morphology.

  18. Treatment with human immunoglobulin G improves the early disease course in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Zschüntzsch, Jana; Zhang, Yaxin; Klinker, Florian; Makosch, Gregor; Klinge, Lars; Malzahn, Dörthe; Brinkmeier, Heinrich; Liebetanz, David; Schmidt, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe hereditary myopathy. Standard treatment by glucocorticosteroids is limited because of numerous side effects. The aim of this study was to test immunomodulation by human immunoglobulin G (IgG) as treatment in the experimental mouse model (mdx) of DMD. 2 g/kg human IgG compared to human albumin was injected intraperitoneally in mdx mice at the age of 3 and 7 weeks. Advanced voluntary wheel running parameters were recorded continuously. At the age of 11 weeks, animals were killed so that blood, diaphragm, and lower limb muscles could be removed for quantitative PCR, histological analysis and ex vivo muscle contraction tests. IgG compared to albumin significantly improved the voluntary running performance and reduced muscle fatigability in an ex vivo muscle contraction test. Upon IgG treatment, serum creatine kinase values were diminished and mRNA expression levels of relevant inflammatory markers were reduced in the diaphragm and limb muscles. Macrophage infiltration and myopathic damage were significantly ameliorated in the quadriceps muscle. Collectively, this study demonstrates that, in the early disease course of mdx mice, human IgG improves the running performance and diminishes myopathic damage and inflammation in the muscle. Therefore, IgG may be a promising approach for treatment of DMD. Two monthly intraperitoneal injections of human immunoglobulin G (IgG) improved the early 11-week disease phase of mdx mice. Voluntary running was improved and serum levels of creatine kinase were diminished. In the skeletal muscle, myopathic damage was ameliorated and key inflammatory markers such as mRNA expression of SPP1 and infiltration by macrophages were reduced. The study suggests that IgG could be explored as a potential treatment option for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and that pre-clinical long-term studies should be helpful.

  19. Duodenum has the greatest potential to absorb soluble non-ammonia nitrogen in the nonmesenteric gastrointestinal tissues of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ying-ming; Xu, Qing-biao; Wu, Yue-ming; Huang, Xin-bei; Liu, Jian-xin

    2015-06-01

    In cattle, dietary protein is gradually degraded into peptide-bound amino acids (PBAAs), free amino acids (FAAs), and ultimately into ammonia by the rumen microbes. Both PBAA and FAA are milk protein precursors, and the rumen and small intestines are the main sites where such precursors are produced and absorbed. This work was designed to investigate the expression of the peptide transporter PepT1 and the AA transporters ASCT2, y(+)LAT1, and ATB(0,+), and the concentrations of PBAA, FAA, and soluble protein in the rumen, omasum, and duodenum of dairy cows. Tissues and digesta were collected from six healthy Chinese Holstein dairy cows immediately after the animals were slaughtered. The expression of transporters was analyzed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The FAA concentration was assessed using an amino acid (AA) analyzer, PBAA concentration by quantification of AA before and after acid-hydrolysis by 6 mol/L HCl, and soluble protein concentration by quantification of the bicinchoninic acid content. The results showed that the relative abundance of mRNA of the transporters and the soluble non-ammonia nitrogen (SNAN) concentration of each fraction were greater in the duodenum than in the rumen or omasum. These results indicate that the duodenum is the predominant location within the nonmesenteric digestive tract for producing milk protein precursors. In addition, PBAA was the largest component of SNAN in the digesta from the rumen, omasum, and duodenum. In conclusion, the duodenum has the greatest concentrations of SNAN and PBAA, and the greatest potential for absorption of SNAN in the form of PBAA in the nonmesenteric gastrointestinal tissues of dairy cows.

  20. Duodenum has the greatest potential to absorb soluble non-ammonia nitrogen in the nonmesenteric gastrointestinal tissues of dairy cows*

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Ying-ming; Xu, Qing-biao; Wu, Yue-ming; Huang, Xin-bei; Liu, Jian-xin

    2015-01-01

    In cattle, dietary protein is gradually degraded into peptide-bound amino acids (PBAAs), free amino acids (FAAs), and ultimately into ammonia by the rumen microbes. Both PBAA and FAA are milk protein precursors, and the rumen and small intestines are the main sites where such precursors are produced and absorbed. This work was designed to investigate the expression of the peptide transporter PepT1 and the AA transporters ASCT2, y+LAT1, and ATB0,+, and the concentrations of PBAA, FAA, and soluble protein in the rumen, omasum, and duodenum of dairy cows. Tissues and digesta were collected from six healthy Chinese Holstein dairy cows immediately after the animals were slaughtered. The expression of transporters was analyzed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The FAA concentration was assessed using an amino acid (AA) analyzer, PBAA concentration by quantification of AA before and after acid-hydrolysis by 6 mol/L HCl, and soluble protein concentration by quantification of the bicinchoninic acid content. The results showed that the relative abundance of mRNA of the transporters and the soluble non-ammonia nitrogen (SNAN) concentration of each fraction were greater in the duodenum than in the rumen or omasum. These results indicate that the duodenum is the predominant location within the nonmesenteric digestive tract for producing milk protein precursors. In addition, PBAA was the largest component of SNAN in the digesta from the rumen, omasum, and duodenum. In conclusion, the duodenum has the greatest concentrations of SNAN and PBAA, and the greatest potential for absorption of SNAN in the form of PBAA in the nonmesenteric gastrointestinal tissues of dairy cows. PMID:26055912

  1. Low intensity training of mdx mice reduces carbonylation and increases expression levels of proteins involved in energy metabolism and muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Hyzewicz, Janek; Tanihata, Jun; Kuraoka, Mutsuki; Ito, Naoki; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2015-05-01

    High intensity training induces muscle damage in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice, an animal model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. However, low intensity training (LIT) rescues the mdx phenotype and even reduces the level of protein carbonylation, a marker of oxidative damage. Until now, beneficial effects of LIT were mainly assessed at the physiological level. We investigated the effects of LIT at the molecular level on 8-week-old wild-type and mdx muscle using 2D Western blot and protein-protein interaction analysis. We found that the fast isoforms of troponin T and myosin binding protein C as well as glycogen phosphorylase were overcarbonylated and downregulated in mdx muscle. Some of the mitochondrial enzymes of the citric acid cycle were overcarbonylated, whereas some proteins of the respiratory chain were downregulated. Of functional importance, ATP synthase was only partially assembled, as revealed by Blue Native PAGE analysis. LIT decreased the carbonylation level and increased the expression of fast isoforms of troponin T and of myosin binding protein C, and glycogen phosphorylase. In addition, it increased the expression of aconitate hydratase and NADH dehydrogenase, and fully restored the ATP synthase complex. Our study demonstrates that the benefits of LIT are associated with lowered oxidative damage as revealed by carbonylation and higher expression of proteins involved in energy metabolism and muscle contraction. Potentially, these results will help to design therapies for DMD based on exercise mimicking drugs. PMID:25660994

  2. Low intensity training of mdx mice reduces carbonylation and increases expression levels of proteins involved in energy metabolism and muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Hyzewicz, Janek; Tanihata, Jun; Kuraoka, Mutsuki; Ito, Naoki; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2015-05-01

    High intensity training induces muscle damage in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice, an animal model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. However, low intensity training (LIT) rescues the mdx phenotype and even reduces the level of protein carbonylation, a marker of oxidative damage. Until now, beneficial effects of LIT were mainly assessed at the physiological level. We investigated the effects of LIT at the molecular level on 8-week-old wild-type and mdx muscle using 2D Western blot and protein-protein interaction analysis. We found that the fast isoforms of troponin T and myosin binding protein C as well as glycogen phosphorylase were overcarbonylated and downregulated in mdx muscle. Some of the mitochondrial enzymes of the citric acid cycle were overcarbonylated, whereas some proteins of the respiratory chain were downregulated. Of functional importance, ATP synthase was only partially assembled, as revealed by Blue Native PAGE analysis. LIT decreased the carbonylation level and increased the expression of fast isoforms of troponin T and of myosin binding protein C, and glycogen phosphorylase. In addition, it increased the expression of aconitate hydratase and NADH dehydrogenase, and fully restored the ATP synthase complex. Our study demonstrates that the benefits of LIT are associated with lowered oxidative damage as revealed by carbonylation and higher expression of proteins involved in energy metabolism and muscle contraction. Potentially, these results will help to design therapies for DMD based on exercise mimicking drugs.

  3. Treatment of gastric and duodenum ulcers by means of copper laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averbush, G. I.; Beliy, K. P.; Berezin, J. D.; Gidkov, B. N.; Solovjov, A. F.

    1996-04-01

    One of the leading problems of gastroenterology of our country is the task of ulcerative disease of the stomach treatment, duodenum treatment and diseases of large intestinal treatment. In spite of introduction of clinical practice the new anti-ulcerous preparations, the process of ulcerative disease of the stomach treatment remains a long process and makes in average about 2 - 4 weeks for acute ulcers and 2 - 3 months for chronic ulcers. In accordance with a world statistics an ulcerative disease of the stomach remains a very spread sickness (on the average 5 cases on 1 thousand persons), and even in the majority of countries at the last decade an increase of number of illness, stipulated by breach of ecology, stress, general worsening of human living conditions took place. Notice that the growth of exposure of morbidity in the area of alimentary tract to a certain extent is connected with introduction into diagnostics practice the endoscopical methods during a checkup of patients. Within Russia the statistics data give the following picture: (1) 500 - 700 persons per 100 thousand of inhabitants have an ulcerative disease and 15 - 20 persons from them have a steady resistance to an anti- ulcerative medicamental therapy. (2) At complex and electoral treatment of ulcerative disease patients with various preparations an epithelization have 60 - 94% of patients in the time of 20 - 48 days. (3) Insufficient efficiency of means of a conservative treatment results in that 50% of the sicks need urgent operations, sometimes at complicated for them conditions.

  4. Perinatal administration of a bitter tastant influences gene expression in chicken palate and duodenum.

    PubMed

    Cheled-Shoval, Shira L; Behrens, Maik; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Niv, Masha Y; Uni, Zehava

    2014-12-31

    Bitter taste receptors (Tas2rs) and downstream effectors are responsible for mediating bitterness perception and regulation of food choice in mammals. Using RT-PCR, we demonstrated the expression of three Tas2rs and taste signal transduction molecules, α-gustducin, PLCβ2, and TRPM5, in the palate, tongue, and gastrointestinal tract sections in chicken. The bitter tastant quinine activates all three chicken Tas2rs in vitro as shown using calcium-imaging assays of transfected cells. Administration of quinine postnatally or perinatally (both pre- and posthatch) to chickens increased the expression of Tas2r genes in the palate by 6.45-fold (ggTas2r1 postnatal treatment), 4.86-fold (ggTas2r1 perinatal treatment), and 4.48-fold (ggTas2r7 postnatal treatment) compared to the genes' expression in the naı̈ve group respectively, and affected taste related gene expression in the duodenum. Whereas no-choice intake of quinine solution was not significantly lower than that of water in naı̈ve chicks, the treatment groups postnatal, prenatal, and perinatal showed significantly lower intake of quinine by 56.1, 47.7, and 50.2%, respectively, suggesting a possible trend toward sensitization. These results open new venues toward unraveling the formative stages shaping food intake and nutrition in chicken.

  5. A Rare Case of an Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of Pancreas Fistulizing Into Duodenum With Adult Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pipaliya, Nirav; Rathi, Chetan; Parikh, Pathik; Patel, Ruchir; Ingle, Meghraj; Sawant, Prabha

    2015-01-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) accounts for 20-50% of all cystic neoplasms of the pancreas. Rarely, IPMN, whether benign or malignant, can fistulize into adjacent organs like duodenum, stomach or common bile duct. IPMN can be associated with other diseases like Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and familial adenomatous polyposis. Association with adult polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is extremely rare. We report a case of a 60-year-old male with a large IPMN in the head of the pancreas diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic ultrasound and cyst fluid analysis. It was complicated by fistula formation into the second part of the duodenum. Patient was simultaneously having adult polycystic kidney disease. There is only one case report of uncomplicated IPMN with ADPKD in the literature so far. And even rarer, there is no any case report of fistulizing IPMN with ADPKD reported so far, to the best of our knowledge.

  6. Activation of epithelial proliferation induced by Eimeria acervulina infection in the duodenum may be associated with cholesterol metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lili; Dong, Haibo; Zhang, Zhenchao; Liu, Jie; Hu, Yun; Ni, Yingdong; Grossmann, Roland; Zhao, Ruqian

    2016-01-01

    Cell proliferation in the intestine is commonly occurred during infection and inflammation to replace damaged enterocytes, and cholesterol as an essential constituent of cell membrane, is required for cell proliferation and growth. Here we found that coccidium-challenged (CC) chickens showed severe damages in intestinal structure, a significant increase of cell proliferation, and an activation of genes expression involved in the innate immune response. Compared to control (CON), CC chickens showed a marked decrease of cholesterol (Tch) level in the circulating system, but a significant increase in local duodenum epithelium. Increase of LDLR protein combined with a significant decrease of CYP27A1 protein expression in duodenum epithelium may contribute to intestinal cholesterol accumulation in CC chickens. Moreover, we found miRNAs targeting to CYP27A1 gene participating in post-transcriptional regulation. Hence, these results provide a new insight for the intervention of epithelial proliferation and cholesterol metabolism in the gastrointestinal tracts. PMID:27050279

  7. Intractable duodenal ulcer caused by transmural migration of gossypiboma into the duodenum - a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gossypiboma is a term used to describe a mass that forms around a cotton sponge or abdominal compress accidentally left in a patient during surgery. Transmural migration of an intra-abdominal gossypiboma has been reported to occur in the digestive tract, bladder, vagina and diaphragm. Open surgery is the most common approach in the treatment of gossypiboma. However, gossypibomas can be extracted by endoscopy while migrating into the digestive tract. We report a case of intractable duodenal ulcer caused by transmural migration of gossypiboma successfully treated by duodenorrhaphy. A systemic literature review is provided and a scheme of the therapeutic approach is proposed. Case presentation A 61-year-old Han Chinese man presented with intermittent epigastric pain for the last 10 months. He had undergone laparoscopic cholecystectomy conversion to open cholecystectomy for acute gangrenous cholecystitis 10 months ago at another hospital. Transmural migration of gossypiboma into the duodenum was found. Endoscopic intervention failed to remove the entire gauze, and duodenal ulcer caused by the gauze persisted. Surgical intervention was performed and the gauze was removed successfully. The penetrated ulcer was repaired with duodenorrhaphy. The postoperative period was uneventful. We systematically reviewed the literature on transmural migration of gossypiboma into duodenum and present an overview of published cases. Our PubMed search yielded seven reports of transmural migration of retained surgical sponge into the duodenum. Surgical interventions were necessary in two patients. Conclusion Transmural migration of gossypiboma into the duodenum is a rare surgical complication. The treatment strategies include endoscopic extraction and surgical intervention. Prompt surgical intervention should be considered for emergent conditions such as active bleeding, gastrointestinal obstruction, or intra-abdominal sepsis. For non-emergent conditions, surgical intervention

  8. Mechanism for enhanced absorption of a solid dispersion formulation of LY2300559 using the artificial stomach duodenum model.

    PubMed

    Polster, Christopher S; Wu, Sy-Juen; Gueorguieva, Ivelina; Sperry, David C

    2015-04-01

    An artificial stomach duodenum (ASD) model has been used to demonstrate the performance difference between two formulations of LY2300559, a low-solubility acidic developmental drug. The two formulations investigated were a conventional high-shear wet granulation (HSWG) formulation and a solid dispersion formulation. A pharmacokinetic study in humans demonstrated the enhanced performance of the solid dispersion formulation relative to the HSWG formulation. The Cmax and AUC of the solid dispersion was 2.6 and 1.9 times greater, respectively, compared to the HSWG formulation. In the ASD, the solid dispersion formulation performance was characterized by three main phases: (1) rapid release in the stomach, creating a supersaturated concentration of drug, (2) precipitation in the stomach, and (3) rapid redissolution of the precipitate in the duodenum to concentration levels that are supersaturated relative to crystalline drug. A series of complementary experiments were employed to describe this performance behavior mechanistically. Imaging experiments with a pH indicating dye showed that local pH gradients from meglumine in the solid dispersion formulation were responsible for creating a high initial supersaturation concentration in the stomach. Upon dissipation of meglumine, the drug precipitated in the stomach as an amorphous solid. Because the precipitated drug is in an amorphous form, it can then rapidly redissolve as it transits to the more neutral environment of the duodenum. This unexpected sequence of physical state changes gives a mechanistic explanation for the enhanced in vivo performance of the solid dispersion formulation relative to the HSWG formulation. PMID:25723790

  9. Intrathoracic major duodenal papilla with transhiatal herniation of the pancreas and duodenum: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Tarkan; Neureiter, Daniel; Nawara, Clemens; Dinnewitzer, Adam; Öfner, Dietmar; Lamadé, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    Transhiatal herniation of the pancreas is an extremely rare condition. In the published literature we found only eleven cases reported in the period of 1958 to 2011. A coincidental hiatal herniation of the duodenum is described in two cases only. To our knowledge, we report the first case with a hiatal herniation of the complete duodenum and proximal pancreas presenting an intrathoracic major duodenal papilla with consecutive intrahepatic and extrahepatic cholestasis. A 72-year-old Caucasian woman was admitted to our department with a hiatal hernia grade IV for further evaluation. According to our recommendation of surgical hernia repair soon after the diagnosis of a transhiatal herniation of the proximal pancreas and entire duodenum, we had to respect the declared intention of the patient for a conservative procedure. So we were forced to wait for surgical repair within an emergency situation complicated by a myocardial infarction and reduced general condition. We discuss the therapeutic decision making process and a complete literature review of this rare entity. PMID:23805366

  10. IDX-1: a new homeodomain transcription factor expressed in rat pancreatic islets and duodenum that transactivates the somatostatin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, C P; McGehee, R E; Habener, J F

    1994-01-01

    We describe the cloning from a rat islet somatostatin-producing cell line of a 1.4 kb cDNA encoding a new homeoprotein, IDX-1 (islet/duodenum homeobox-1), with close sequence similarity to the Drosophila melanogaster homeobox protein Antennapedia (Antp) and the Xenopus laevis endoderm-specific homeoprotein XlHbox8. Analyses of IDX-1 mRNA and protein in rat tissues show that IDX-1 is expressed in pancreatic islets and ducts and in the duodenum. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays IDX-1 binds to three sites in the 5' flanking region of the rat somatostatin gene. In co-transfection experiments IDX-1 transactivates reporter constructs containing somatostatin promoter sequences, and mutation of the IDX-1 binding sites attenuates transactivation. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction of islet RNA using degenerate amplimers for mRNAs encoding homeoproteins indicates that IDX-1 is the most abundant of 12 different Antp-like homeodomain mRNAs expressed in adult rat islets. The pattern of expression, relative abundance and transcriptional regulatory activity suggests that IDX-1 may be involved in the regulation of islet hormone genes and in cellular differentiation in the endocrine pancreas and the duodenum. Images PMID:7907546

  11. An immunocytochemical study of the endocrine cells in the stomach and duodenum of Zonotrichia capensis subtorquata (Passeriformes, Emberizidae).

    PubMed

    Mendes, Rosa Maria Marcos; do Nascimento, Aparecida Alves; Dos Santos, Clarice Machado; Cardoso, Tânia Regina Dantas; Pinheiro, Nadja Lima; Sales, Armando

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the regional distribution pattern and relative frequency of some endocrine cells in the three portions of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT)--the proventriculus, gizzard and duodenum- of the rufous-collared sparrow (Zonotrichia capensis subtorquata), by immunohistochemical methods using six types of polyclonal antisera, specific for serotonin (5-HT), somatostatin (D cells), glucagon, motilin, polypeptide YY (PYY) and insulin. In the proventriculus, endocrine cells immunoreactive for all of these markers were observed. The somatostatin-immunoreactive cells were found with greater frequency, with the presence of cytoplasmic processes. In the gizzard, endocrine cells secreting somatostatin, 5-HT and PYY were detected, while those secreting glucagon and insulin were not. In the final part of the gizzard, endocrine cells secreting 5-HT were more frequent, and cells secreting somatostatin and insulin were not detected. All of the cell types studied were observed in the duodenum in different frequencies, except for cells immunoreactive for glucagon and insulin. The somatostatin-positive (D cells) were the most numerous, being more prevalent in the intestinal glands. The other endocrine cells were identified in smaller numbers, some of them located in the intestinal villi and Lieberkuhn glands. The finding of these cell types in the duodenum confirms their preferential location in the final portions of the principal segments of the digestive system and suggests control by feedback of its functions. In conclusion, some interesting distributional patterns of gastrointestinal endocrine cells were found in this species of sparrow.

  12. A gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the third portion of the duodenum treated by wedge resection: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Acar, Fahrettin; Sahin, Mustafa; Ugras, Serdar; Calisir, Akın

    2013-01-01

    A 65-year old woman was admitted to our hospital with abdominal pain. Computed tomography showed a tumor measuring about 3 cm in diameter with no metastatic lesion or signs of local infiltration. Gastroduodenal endoscopy revealed the presence of a submucosal tumor in the third portion of the duodenum and biopsy revealed tumor cells stained positive for c-kit. These findings were consistent with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) and we performed a wedge resection of the duodenum, sparing the pancreas. The postoperative course was uneventful and she was discharged on day 6. Surgical margins were negative. Histology revealed a GIST with a diameter of 3.2 cm and < 5 mitoses/50 high power fields, indicating a low risk of malignancy. Therefore, adjuvant therapy with imatinib was not initiated. Wedge resection with primary closure is a surgical procedure that can be used to treat low malignant potential neoplasms of the duodenum and avoid extensive surgery, with significant morbidity and possible mortality, such as pancreatoduodenectomy. PMID:24392185

  13. Mechanism for enhanced absorption of a solid dispersion formulation of LY2300559 using the artificial stomach duodenum model.

    PubMed

    Polster, Christopher S; Wu, Sy-Juen; Gueorguieva, Ivelina; Sperry, David C

    2015-04-01

    An artificial stomach duodenum (ASD) model has been used to demonstrate the performance difference between two formulations of LY2300559, a low-solubility acidic developmental drug. The two formulations investigated were a conventional high-shear wet granulation (HSWG) formulation and a solid dispersion formulation. A pharmacokinetic study in humans demonstrated the enhanced performance of the solid dispersion formulation relative to the HSWG formulation. The Cmax and AUC of the solid dispersion was 2.6 and 1.9 times greater, respectively, compared to the HSWG formulation. In the ASD, the solid dispersion formulation performance was characterized by three main phases: (1) rapid release in the stomach, creating a supersaturated concentration of drug, (2) precipitation in the stomach, and (3) rapid redissolution of the precipitate in the duodenum to concentration levels that are supersaturated relative to crystalline drug. A series of complementary experiments were employed to describe this performance behavior mechanistically. Imaging experiments with a pH indicating dye showed that local pH gradients from meglumine in the solid dispersion formulation were responsible for creating a high initial supersaturation concentration in the stomach. Upon dissipation of meglumine, the drug precipitated in the stomach as an amorphous solid. Because the precipitated drug is in an amorphous form, it can then rapidly redissolve as it transits to the more neutral environment of the duodenum. This unexpected sequence of physical state changes gives a mechanistic explanation for the enhanced in vivo performance of the solid dispersion formulation relative to the HSWG formulation.

  14. Increased sarcolipin expression and decreased sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+ uptake in skeletal muscles of mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Joel S; Shanmugam, Mayilvahanan; Gonzalez, James Patrick; Lopez, Henderson; Gordan, Richard; Fraidenraich, Diego; Babu, Gopal J

    2013-12-01

    Abnormal intracellular Ca(2+) handling is an important factor in the progressive functional decline of dystrophic muscle. In the present study, we investigated the function of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) ATPase (SERCA) in various dystrophic muscles of mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Our studies show that the protein expression of sarcolipin, a key regulator of the SERCA pump is abnormally high and correlates with decreased maximum velocity of SR Ca(2+) uptake in the soleus, diaphragm and quadriceps of mild (mdx) and severe (mdx:utr-/-) dystrophic mice. These changes are more pronounced in the muscles of mdx:utr-/- mice. We also found increased expression of SERCA2a and calsequestrin specifically in the dystrophic quadriceps. Immunostaining analysis further showed that SERCA2a expression is associated both with fibers expressing slow-type myosin and regenerating fibers expressing embryonic myosin. Together, our data suggest that sarcolipin upregulation is a common secondary alteration in all dystrophic muscles and contributes to the abnormal elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration via SERCA inhibition.

  15. Effects of trimebutine maleate (TM-906) on the spontaneous contraction of isolated duodenum and ileum in both guinea pigs and rabbits.

    PubMed

    Takenaga, H; Magaribuchi, T; Tamaki, H

    1986-01-01

    Effects of trimebutine maleate (TM-906) on the spontaneous contraction of isolated duodenum and ileum were studied in both guinea pigs and rabbits. In the duodenum and ileum of both guinea pigs and rabbits, TM-906 (10(-6) g/ml, 10(-5) g/ml) produced a potentiation of the spontaneous contraction in preparations with low contractile activity (low tone or small contraction), while it caused an inhibition of the spontaneous contraction in preparations with high contractile activity (high tone or large contraction). The potentiation of spontaneous contraction by TM-906 was more pronounced in the ileum than in the duodenum of both guinea pigs and rabbits. When the spontaneous contraction of duodenum and ileum was decreased by atropine, the potentiation of spontaneous contraction by TM-906 was further augmented and was more pronounced in the ileum than in the duodenum. When the spontaneous contraction was remarkably potentiated by physostigmine or acetylcholine, TM-906 markedly inhibited the potentiated spontaneous contraction, and the potentiation by TM-906 seen in preparations with low contractile activity disappeared. From these results, it is concluded that TM-906 produces, depending on the contractile activity of the preparations, a potentiation or an inhibition of the spontaneous contraction of duodenum and ileum in both guinea pigs and rabbits and that the potentiation by TM-906 is more pronounced in the ileum than in the duodenum. It is suggested that the endogenous acetylcholine partly modifies the effects of TM-906, but that it does not relate to the more pronounced potentiation by TM-906 in the ileum than in the duodenum. PMID:3959348

  16. Metagenomics Reveals Dysbiosis and a Potentially Pathogenic N. flavescens Strain in Duodenum of Adult Celiac Patients

    PubMed Central

    D'Argenio, Valeria; Casaburi, Giorgio; Precone, Vincenza; Pagliuca, Chiara; Colicchio, Roberta; Sarnataro, Daniela; Discepolo, Valentina; Kim, Sangman M; Russo, Ilaria; Del Vecchio Blanco, Giovanna; Horner, David S; Chiara, Matteo; Pesole, Graziano; Salvatore, Paola; Monteleone, Giovanni; Ciacci, Carolina; Caporaso, Gregory J; Jabrì, Bana; Salvatore, Francesco; Sacchetti, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Celiac disease (CD)-associated duodenal dysbiosis has not yet been clearly defined, and the mechanisms by which CD-associated dysbiosis could concur to CD development or exacerbation are unknown. In this study, we analyzed the duodenal microbiome of CD patients. METHODS: The microbiome was evaluated in duodenal biopsy samples of 20 adult patients with active CD, 6 CD patients on a gluten-free diet, and 15 controls by DNA sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA libraries. Bacterial species were cultured, isolated and identified by mass spectrometry. Isolated bacterial species were used to infect CaCo-2 cells, and to stimulate normal duodenal explants and cultured human and murine dendritic cells (DCs). Inflammatory markers and cytokines were evaluated by immunofluorescence and ELISA, respectively. RESULTS: Proteobacteria was the most abundant and Firmicutes and Actinobacteria the least abundant phyla in the microbiome profiles of active CD patients. Members of the Neisseria genus (Betaproteobacteria class) were significantly more abundant in active CD patients than in the other two groups (P=0.03). Neisseria flavescens (CD-Nf) was the most abundant Neisseria species in active CD duodenum. Whole-genome sequencing of CD-Nf and control-Nf showed genetic diversity of the iron acquisition systems and of some hemoglobin-related genes. CD-Nf was able to escape the lysosomal compartment in CaCo-2 cells and to induce an inflammatory response in DCs and in ex-vivo mucosal explants. CONCLUSIONS: Marked dysbiosis and an abundance of a peculiar CD-Nf strain characterize the duodenal microbiome in active CD patients thus suggesting that the CD-associated microbiota could contribute to the many inflammatory signals in this disorder. PMID:27045926

  17. Detailed ordering of markers localizing to the Xq26-Xqter region of the human X chromosome by the use of an interspecific Mus spretus mouse cross

    SciTech Connect

    Avner, P.; Amar, L.; Arnaud, D.; Hanauer, A.; Cambrou, J.

    1987-03-01

    Five probes localizing to the Xq26-Xqter region of the human X chromosome have been genetically mapped on the mouse X chromosome using an interspecific cross involving Mus spretus to a contiguous region lying proximally to the Tabby (Ta) locus. Pedigree and recombinational analysis establish the marker order as being Hprt-FIX-c11-G6PD-St14-1. The size of this contiguous region is such that the X-linked muscular dystrophy (mdx) mouse mutation probably maps within this segment. This in turn suggests that it is highly improbable that the mouse mdx locus represents a model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). It is, however, compatible with the idea that this mutation may correspond in man to Emery Dreifuss muscular dystrophy. The high frequency of restriction fragment length polymorphisms found in this interspecific system for all the human cross-reacting probes examined up until now, using only a limited number of restriction enzymes, suggests that the Mus spretus mapping system may be of great potential value for establishing the linkage relationships existing in man when conserved chromosomal regions are concerned and human/mouse cross-reacting probes are available or can be obtained.

  18. Revertant Fibers in the mdx Murine Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: An Age- and Muscle-Related Reappraisal

    PubMed Central

    Pigozzo, Sarah R.; Da Re, Lorena; Romualdi, Chiara; Mazzara, Pietro G.; Galletta, Eva; Fletcher, Sue; Wilton, Stephen D.; Vitiello, Libero

    2013-01-01

    Muscles in Duchenne dystrophy patients are characterized by the absence of dystrophin, yet transverse sections show a small percentage of fibers (termed “revertant fibers”) positive for dystrophin expression. This phenomenon, whose biological bases have not been fully elucidated, is present also in the murine and canine models of DMD and can confound the evaluation of therapeutic approaches. We analyzed 11 different muscles in a cohort of 40 mdx mice, the most commonly model used in pre-clinical studies, belonging to four age groups; such number of animals allowed us to perform solid ANOVA statistical analysis. We assessed the average number of dystrophin-positive fibers, both absolute and normalized for muscle size, and the correlation between their formation and the ageing process. Our results indicate that various muscles develop different numbers of revertant fibers, with different time trends; besides, they suggest that the biological mechanism(s) behind dystrophin re-expression might not be limited to the early development phases but could actually continue during adulthood. Importantly, such finding was seen also in cardiac muscle, a fact that does not fit into the current hypothesis of the clonal origin of “revertant” myonuclei from satellite cells. This work represents the largest, statistically significant analysis of revertant fibers in mdx mice so far, which can now be used as a reference point for improving the evaluation of therapeutic approaches for DMD. At the same time, it provides new clues about the formation of revertant fibers/cardiomyocytes in dystrophic skeletal and cardiac muscle. PMID:24015212

  19. Lack of dystrophin in mdx mice modulates the expression of genes involved in neuron survival and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Licursi, Valerio; Caiello, Ivan; Lombardi, Loredana; De Stefano, Maria Egle; Negri, Rodolfo; Paggi, Paola

    2012-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is an X-linked disease characterized by progressive and lethal muscular wasting. Dystrophic patients, however, are also afflicted by several neurological disorders, the importance of which is generally underestimated. As promising therapies for muscles are currently in clinical trial stages, with the potential to provide an increase in the lifespan of young patients, determination of the genetic and molecular aspects characterizing this complex disease is crucial in order to allow the development of therapeutic approaches specifically designed for the nervous system. In this study, differences in gene expression in the superior cervical ganglion of postnatal day (P)5, P10 and 6-7-week-old wild-type and genetically dystrophic mdx mice were evaluated by DNA microarray analysis. The main aim was to verify whether the lack of dystrophin affected the transcript levels of genes related to different aspects of neuron development and differentiation. Ontological analysis of more than 500 modulated genes showed significant differences in genetic class enrichment at each postnatal date. Upregulated genes mainly fell in the categories of vesicular trafficking, and cytoskeletal and synaptic organization, whereas downregulated genes were associated with axon development, growth factors, intracellular signal transduction, metabolic processes, gene expression regulation, synapse morphogenesis, and nicotinic receptor clustering. These data strongly suggest that the structural and functional alterations previously described in both the autonomic and central nervous systems of mdx mice with respect to wild-type mice and related to crucial aspects of neuron life (i.e. postnatal development, differentiation, and plasticity) result not only from protein post-translational modifications, but also from direct and/or indirect modulation of gene expression.

  20. Altered ROS production, NF-κB activation and Interleukin-6 gene expression induced by electrical stimulation of in dystrophic mdx skeletal muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Henríquez-Olguín, Carlos; Altamirano, Francisco; Valladares, Denisse; López, José R.; Allen, Paul D.; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal X-linked genetic disease, caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, which cause functional loss of this protein. DMD pathology is associated with an increased production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS). The aim of this work was to study the alterations in NF-κB activation and Interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression induced by membrane depolarization in dystrophic mdx myotubes. Membrane depolarization elicited by electrical stimulation (ES) increased p65 phosphorylation, NF-κB transcriptional activity and NF-κB-dependent IL-6 expression in wt myotubes, whereas in mdx myotubes it had the opposite effect. We have previously shown that depolarization-induced intracellular Ca2+ increases and ROS production are necessary for NF-κB activation and stimulation of gene expression in wt myotubes. Dystrophic myotubes showed a reduced amplitude and area under the curve of the Ca2+ transient elicited by ES. On the other hand, ES induced higher ROS production in mdx than wt myotubes, which were blocked by NOX2 inhibitors. Moreover, mRNA expression and protein levels of the NADPH oxidase subunits; p47phox and gp91phox were increased in mdx myotubes. Looking at ROS-dependence of NF-κB activation we found that in wt myotubes external administration of 50µM H2O2 increased NF-κB activity; after administration of 100 and 200 µM H2O2 there was no effect. In mdx myotubes there was a dose-dependent reduction in NF-κB activity in response to external administration of H2O2, with a significant effect of 100 µM and 200 µM, suggesting that ROS levels are critical for NF-κB activity. Prior blockage with NOX2 inhibitors blunted the effects of ES in both NF-κB activation and IL-6 expression. Finally, to ascertain whether stimulation of NF-κB and IL-6 gene expression by the inflammatory pathway is also impaired in mdx myotubes, we studied the effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on both NF-κB activation and IL-6 expression

  1. Altered ROS production, NF-κB activation and interleukin-6 gene expression induced by electrical stimulation in dystrophic mdx skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Henríquez-Olguín, Carlos; Altamirano, Francisco; Valladares, Denisse; López, José R; Allen, Paul D; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2015-07-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a fatal X-linked genetic disease, caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, which cause functional loss of this protein. This pathology is associated with an increased production of reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen species. The aim of this work was to study the alterations in NF-κB activation and interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression induced by membrane depolarization in dystrophic mdx myotubes. Membrane depolarization elicited by electrical stimulation increased p65 phosphorylation, NF-κB transcriptional activity and NF-κB-dependent IL-6 expression in wt myotubes, whereas in mdx myotubes it had the opposite effect. We have previously shown that depolarization-induced intracellular Ca2+ increases and ROS production are necessary for NF-κB activation and stimulation of gene expression in wt myotubes. Dystrophic myotubes showed a reduced amplitude and area under the curve of the Ca2+ transient elicited by electrical stimulation. On the other hand, electrical stimuli induced higher ROS production in mdx than wt myotubes, which were blocked by NOX2 inhibitors. Moreover, mRNA expression and protein levels of the NADPH oxidase subunits: p47phox and gp91phox were increased in mdx myotubes. Looking at ROS-dependence of NF-κB activation we found that in wt myotubes external administration of 50 μM H2O2 increased NF-κB activity; after administration of 100 and 200 μM H2O2 there was no effect. In mdx myotubes there was a dose-dependent reduction in NF-κB activity in response to external administration of H2O2, with a significant effect of 100 μM and 200 μM, suggesting that ROS levels are critical for NF-κB activity. Prior blockage with NOX2 inhibitors blunted the effects of electrical stimuli in both NF-κB activation and IL-6 expression. Finally, to ascertain whether stimulation of NF-κB and IL-6 gene expression by the inflammatory pathway is also impaired in mdx myotubes, we studied the effect of lipopolysaccharide on both NF

  2. Distal mdx muscle groups exhibiting up-regulation of utrophin and rescue of dystrophin-associated glycoproteins exemplify a protected phenotype in muscular dystrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, Paul; Culligan, Kevin; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2002-02-01

    Unique unaffected skeletal muscle fibres, unlike necrotic torso and limb muscles, may pave the way for a more detailed understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of inherited neuromuscular disorders and help to develop new treatment strategies for muscular dystrophies. The sparing of extraocular muscle in Duchenne muscular dystrophy is mostly attributed to the special protective properties of extremely fast-twitching small-diameter fibres, but here we show that distal muscles also represent a particular phenotype that is more resistant to necrosis. Immunoblot analysis of membranes isolated from the well established dystrophic animal model mdx shows that, in contrast to dystrophic limb muscles, the toe musculature exhibits an up-regulation of the autosomal dystrophin homologue utrophin and a concomitant rescue of dystrophin-associated glycoproteins. Thus distal mdx muscle groups provide a cellular system that naturally avoids myofibre degeneration which might be useful in the search for naturally occurring compensatory mechanisms in inherited skeletal muscle diseases.

  3. Altered ROS production, NF-κB activation and interleukin-6 gene expression induced by electrical stimulation in dystrophic mdx skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Henríquez-Olguín, Carlos; Altamirano, Francisco; Valladares, Denisse; López, José R; Allen, Paul D; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2015-07-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a fatal X-linked genetic disease, caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, which cause functional loss of this protein. This pathology is associated with an increased production of reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen species. The aim of this work was to study the alterations in NF-κB activation and interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression induced by membrane depolarization in dystrophic mdx myotubes. Membrane depolarization elicited by electrical stimulation increased p65 phosphorylation, NF-κB transcriptional activity and NF-κB-dependent IL-6 expression in wt myotubes, whereas in mdx myotubes it had the opposite effect. We have previously shown that depolarization-induced intracellular Ca2+ increases and ROS production are necessary for NF-κB activation and stimulation of gene expression in wt myotubes. Dystrophic myotubes showed a reduced amplitude and area under the curve of the Ca2+ transient elicited by electrical stimulation. On the other hand, electrical stimuli induced higher ROS production in mdx than wt myotubes, which were blocked by NOX2 inhibitors. Moreover, mRNA expression and protein levels of the NADPH oxidase subunits: p47phox and gp91phox were increased in mdx myotubes. Looking at ROS-dependence of NF-κB activation we found that in wt myotubes external administration of 50 μM H2O2 increased NF-κB activity; after administration of 100 and 200 μM H2O2 there was no effect. In mdx myotubes there was a dose-dependent reduction in NF-κB activity in response to external administration of H2O2, with a significant effect of 100 μM and 200 μM, suggesting that ROS levels are critical for NF-κB activity. Prior blockage with NOX2 inhibitors blunted the effects of electrical stimuli in both NF-κB activation and IL-6 expression. Finally, to ascertain whether stimulation of NF-κB and IL-6 gene expression by the inflammatory pathway is also impaired in mdx myotubes, we studied the effect of lipopolysaccharide on both NF

  4. Lipid Peroxidation Inhibition Blunts Nuclear Factor-κB Activation, Reduces Skeletal Muscle Degeneration, and Enhances Muscle Function in mdx Mice

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Sonia; Altavilla, Domenica; Aguennouz, M’hammed; Seminara, Paolo; Minutoli, Letteria; Monici, Maria C.; Bitto, Alessandra; Mazzeo, Anna; Marini, Herbert; Squadrito, Francesco; Vita, Giuseppe

    2006-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive muscle-wasting disease resulting from lack of the sarcolemmal protein dystrophin. However, the mechanism leading to the final disease status is not fully understood. Several lines of evidence suggest a role for nuclear factor (NF)-κB in muscle degeneration as well as regeneration in DMD patients and mdx mice. We investigated the effects of blocking NF-κB by inhibition of oxidative stress/lipid peroxidation on the dystrophic process in mdx mice. Five-week-old mdx mice received three times a week for 5 weeks either IRFI-042 (20 mg/kg), a strong antioxidant and lipid peroxidation inhibitor, or its vehicle. IRFI-042 treatment increased forelimb strength (+22%, P < 0.05) and strength normalized to weight (+23%, P < 0.05) and decreased fatigue (−45%, P < 0.05). It also reduced serum creatine kinase levels (P < 0.01) and reduced muscle-conjugated diene content and augmented muscle-reduced glutathione (P < 0.01). IRFI-042 blunted NF-κB DNA-binding activity and tumor necrosis factor-α expression in the dystrophic muscles (P < 0.01), reducing muscle necrosis (P < 0.01) and enhancing regeneration (P < 0.05). Our data suggest that oxidative stress/lipid peroxidation represents one of the mechanisms activating NF-κB and the consequent pathogenetic cascade in mdx muscles. Most importantly, these new findings may have clinical implications for the pharmacological treatment of patients with DMD. PMID:16507907

  5. Effect of neonatal MSG treatment on day-night alkaline phosphatase activity in the rat duodenum.

    PubMed

    Martinková, A; Lenhardt, L; Mozes, S

    2000-01-01

    The day-night variation of food intake and alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity was studied in the duodenum of rats neonatally treated with monosodium glutamate (MSG) and saline-treated (control) rats. The animals were kept under light-dark conditions (light phase from 09:00 h to 21:00 h) with free access to food. AP activity was cytophotometrically analyzed in the brush-border of enterocytes separated from the tip, middle and cryptal part of the villi every 6 h over a 24-hour period. In comparison with the controls, MSG-treated rats consumed about 40% less food during the dark period and their 24-hour food intake was thus significantly lowered (P<0.001). On the other hand, the nocturnal feeding habit showed a similar pattern: food consumption was high during the night (65% vs. 75%) and the lowest consumption was found during the light phase (35% vs. 25%) in MSG-treated and control rats, respectively. In agreement with the rhythm of food intake, the highest AP activity was observed during the dark phase and was lowest during the light phase in both groups of animals. These significant day-night variations showed nearly the same pattern in the enterocytes of all observed parts along the villus axis. In comparison with the controls, a permanent increase of AP activity was observed in neonatal MSG-treated rats. This increase was more expressive during the dark phase of the day in the cryptal (P<0.001) and middle part of the villus (P<0.01). From the viewpoint of feeding, this enzyme in MSG-treated rats was enhanced in an inverse relation to the amount of food eaten i.e. despite sustained hypophagia the mean AP activity in the enterocytes along the villus axis was higher than in the control animals during all investigated periods. The present results suggest that the increased AP activity in MSG-treated rats is probably not a consequence of actual day-night eating perturbations but could be a component of a more general effect of MSG. This information contributes to

  6. Change of genes in calcium transport channels caused by hypoxic stress in the placenta, duodenum, and kidney of pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hyun; An, Beum-Soo; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2013-02-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-specific disease characterized by concurrent development of hypertension, proteinuria, and oxidative stress in the placenta. In this study, we induced hypoxic stress in rats during pregnancy to reproduce physiological conditions associated with preeclampsia. The maternal weight of hypoxic pregnant rats was lower than that of normoxic animals. The level of calcium ions were also increased in urine collected from the hypoxic animals. In contrast, urinary concentrations of sodium, chloride, and potassium ions declined in hypoxic rats, and developed to proteinuria. The expression of genes known as two biomarkers, sFLT1 (for preeclampsia) and HIF-1alpha (for hypoxia), were highly induced in the placenta, duodenum, and kidney by hypoxic stress. The overexpression of sFLT1 and HIF-1alpha demonstrated that our experimental conditions closely mimicked ones that are associated with preeclampsia. In the present study, we measured the expression of calcium transporters (TRPV5, TRPV6, PMCA1, NCKX3, NCX1, and CaBP-9k) in the placenta, duodenum, and kidney under hypoxic conditions on Gestational Day 19.5 in rats. Placental TRPV5, TRPV6, and PMCA1 expression was up-regulated in the hypoxic rats, whereas the levels of NCX1 and CaBP-9k were unchanged. In addition, NCKX3 expression was increased in the placenta of hypoxic rats. Duodenal expression of CaBP-9k, TRPV5, TRPV 6, and PMCA1 was decreased in the hypoxic rats, whereas levels of NCXs were not altered. Renal expression of NCKX3 and TRPV6 was increased, whereas NCX1 was decreased in the hypoxic rats compared to the normoxic controls. Taken together, these results indicate that physiological changes observed in the hypoxic rats were similar to ones associated with preeclampsia. Expression of calcium transport genes in the placenta, duodenum, and kidney perturbed by hypoxic stress during pregnancy may cause calcium loss in the urine, and thereby induce calcium-deficient characteristics of preeclampsia.

  7. Retrospective evaluation of endoscopic stenting of combined malignant common bile duct and gastric outlet-duodenum obstructions.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jianfeng; Hao, Jianyu; Wu, Dongfang; Lang, Haibo

    2014-10-01

    Malignant dual obstruction in the common bile duct and gastric outlet-duodenum can cause difficulties in palliative treatment. The purpose of this study was to summarize our successful experience with the endoscopic stenting procedure for the palliative treatment of malignant biliary and gastric outlet-duodenum obstruction. Seventeen patients who underwent dual stenting procedures for the common bile duct and duodenum were retrospectively reviewed. The success rate of placement, palliative effect for biliary and duodenal obstruction, incidence of complication and restricture and stent patency were analyzed. Stent placement achieved a 100% success rate. Total bilirubin decreased from 263.4±62.5 to 157.6±25.1 μmol/l, direct bilirubin decreased from 233.2±66.5 to 130.9±27.7 μmol/l and alkaline phosphatase from 534.2±78.7 to 216.3±23.3 IU/l. The differences between the preoperative and postoperative results were statistically significant (P<0.01). The gastric outlet obstruction score increased significantly from 0.9±1.1 to 2.1±0.7 points (P<0.01). The general nutritional status of the patients was improved. No serious complications occurred in any of the patients, and the survival time of patients following stenting ranged between 70 and 332 days with a mean survival time of 192 days. In conclusion, our methodology for combined biliary and enteral stenting is highly effective for the palliation of malignant biliary and gastric outlet-duodenal obstruction.

  8. Distribution and chemical coding of calretinin- and calbindin-expressing enteric neurons in the duodenum of the sheep.

    PubMed

    Arciszewski, M B; Całka, J; Wasowicz, K; Majewski, M

    2009-01-01

    Recent decades has brought significant advances in our knowledge of the chemical coding and function of enteric neurons. Calcium ions are important second messenger involved in many aspects of neuron physiology. In the present study, we analyzed immunohistochemically the presence of calcium binding proteins (calretinin and calbindin) in various subpopulations of enteric neurons from the ovine duodenum. Ten percent of submucous neurons were immunoreactive (IR) to calretinin. The presence of calretinin was not detected in myenteric neurons. Calretinin-expressing nerve fibres were found in both myenteric and submucous ganglia, between the circular and longitudinal smooth muscle layers and in the lamina muscularis mucosae. Calretinin-IR submucous neurons did not exhibit the presence of SP, NPY and VIP. Co-localization of calretinin and serotonin was found only in a small number of submucous neurons. Calbindin was expressed in 35% of myenteric neurons and in 60% of submucous neurons. Nerve fibres containing calbindin were localized in myenteric and submucous ganglia where they frequently formed basket-like formations. Calbindin-positive nerve fibres emerging from myenteric ganglia ran between the circular and longitudinal smooth muscle layers. Immunoreactivity to calbindin was also visualized in the lamina muscularis mucosae, around mucosal glands and blood vessels. None of calbindin-IR myenteric neurons revealed immunoreactivity to SP, NPY, VIP and serotonin. Virtually all calbindin-expressing submucous neurons were SP-positive. In moderate numbers of submucous perikarya, co-incidence of calbindin and NPY, calbindin and VIP or calbindin and serotonin was observed. We conclude that in the ovine duodenum, the expression of calretinin and calbindin is species specific. Co-localization studies and distribution patterns indicate that in the duodenum of the sheep, calretinin and calbindin may be present in several functional subclasses of enteric neurons. PMID:20169914

  9. Postruminal synthesis modifies the odd- and branched-chain fatty acid profile from the duodenum to milk.

    PubMed

    Vlaeminck, B; Gervais, R; Rahman, M M; Gadeyne, F; Gorniak, M; Doreau, M; Fievez, V

    2015-07-01

    Milk odd- and branched-chain fatty acids (OBCFA) have been suggested as potential biomarkers for rumen function. The potential of milk OBCFA as a biomarker depends on whether their profile reflects the profile observed in the duodenum. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the OBCFA profile in duodenum samples is reflected in plasma and milk. For this, 2 dairy cattle experiments were used. In experiment 1, 4 Holstein cows fitted with rumen and proximal duodenum cannulas were used in a 4×4 Latin square design. The treatments consisted of 2 nitrogen levels (143 vs. 110g of crude protein/kg of dry matter for high and low N, respectively) combined with either 1 of the 2 energy sources (i.e., starch from barley, corn, and wheat or fiber from soybean hulls and dehydrated beet pulp). In experiment 2, 4 Holstein cows fitted with rumen and proximal duodenum cannulas were used in a 3×3 Latin square design, with the treatments consisting of 3 diets: (1) RNB-, a diet with a crude protein content of 122g/kg of dry matter, predicted to provide protein digested in the small intestine according to the requirement of the animals, but with a shortage of rumen degradable protein; (2) RNB- to which 6g/d of niacin was added through inclusion in the mineral and vitamin premix, and (3) RNB- to which urea was added to balance rumen degradable N supply resulting in a CP content of 156g/kg of dry matter. In both experiments, samples of duodenal digesta, plasma, and milk were collected and analyzed for fatty acids. Additionally, lipids in plasma samples were separated in lipid classes and analyzed for fatty acids. The OBCFA profile in milk was enriched in 15:0, iso-17:0, anteiso-17:0, and cis-9-17:1 as compared with duodenal samples, and milk secretions even exceeded duodenal flows, which suggests occurrence of postruminal synthesis, such as de novo synthesis, desaturation, and elongation. The postruminal modification of the OBCFA profile might hamper the application of OBCFA

  10. Use of artificial stomach-duodenum model for investigation of dosing fluid effect on clinical trial variability.

    PubMed

    Polster, Christopher S; Atassi, Faraj; Wu, Sy-Juen; Sperry, David C

    2010-10-01

    Lilly Compound X (LCX) is an oncology drug that was tested in a phase I clinical study using starch blend capsules. The drug was given to a small patient population (4 patients) and showed large inter- and intra-patient variability. In order to evaluate the possible effect of stomach pH on exposure and ways to mitigate the variability issue, artificial stomach-duodenum (ASD) experiments were conducted to investigate the hypothesis that carefully selected dosing fluids would have an impact in minimizing exposure variability caused by the formulation, which could lead to more consistent evaluation of drug absorption in patients. The ASD data corroborates the observed variability, and was a good tool to investigate the effect of stomach pH and potential dosing solutions on duodenal concentrations. Administering capsules co-formulated with Captisol (10% drug load) along with Sprite was shown by the ASD to be an effective way to increase duodenal concentrations as well as to reduce the difference between duodenal concentrations for different gastric pH. The reduction in variability of duodenum AUC (in ASD) is expected to correlate well with a reduction of variability in patient exposure. The dosing regimen of Sprite/Captisol is therefore suggested for future clinical trials involving LCX. Furthermore, for design of early phase clinical trials, ASD technology can be used to assist in choosing the proper dosing solution to mitigate absorption and exposure variability issues. PMID:20669969

  11. A case of primary adenocarcinoma of the third portion of the duodenum resected by laparoscopic and endoscopic cooperating surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tamaki, Ichiro; Obama, Kazutaka; Matsuo, Koichi; Kami, Kazuhiro; Uemoto, Yusuke; Sato, Teruyuki; Ito, Tetsuo; Tamaki, Nobuyuki; Kubota, Keiko; Inoue, Hidenobu; Yamamoto, Eiji; Morimoto, Taisuke

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We report a case of primary adenocarcinoma in the third portion of the duodenum (D3) curatively resected by laparoscopic and endoscopic cooperating surgery (LECS). Presentation of case A 65-year-old woman had a routine visit to our hospital for a follow-up of rectal cancer resected curatively 2 years ago. A routine screening gastroduodenal endoscopy revealed an elevated lesion of 20 mm in diameter in the D3. The preoperative diagnosis was adenoma with high-grade dysplasia; however, suspicion about potential adenocarcinoma was undeniable. Curative resection was performed by LECS. Pathological examination revealed intramucosal adenocarcinoma arising from normal duodenal mucosa. The tumor was stage I (T1/N0/M0) in terms of the tumor, nodes, metastasis (TNM) classification. LECS for duodenal tumor has seldom been reported previously, and this is the first report of LECS for primary adenocarcinoma in the D3. The transverse mesocolon was removed from the head of pancreas to expose the duodenum, and the accessory right colic vein was cut; this was followed by the Kocher maneuver for mobilization of the lesion site. Discussion LECS enabled en bloc resection with adequate surgical margins and secure intra-abdominal suturing. Thorough mobilization of the mesocolon and pancreas head is essential for this procedure because it facilitates correct resection and suturing. Conclusion LECS is a feasible treatment option for duodenal neoplasms, including intramucosal adenocarcinoma, even though it exists in the D3. PMID:25723745

  12. Reflux of bile acids from the duodenum into the rumen of cows with a reduced intestinal passage.

    PubMed

    Braun, U; Hausammann, K; Forrer, R

    1989-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out whether the concentration of bile acids in the rumen of healthy cows differs from that of cows with a reduced gastrointestinal passage. The investigations were performed on 277 heifers and cows of the Swiss Braunvieh, Simmental and Swiss Holstein breeds. Forty of these had traumatic reticuloperitonitis, 30 had right or left abomasal displacement, 14 had an ileus of the duodenum, 36 had an ileus of the jejunum and 54 had a caecal dilatation. The other 103 animals had disorders which did not affect the digestive system and were used as controls. The mean (+/- se) bile acid concentration in the rumen fluid of the control animals was 1.0 +/- 0.30 mumol/litre. The bile acid concentrations in the rumen fluid of the cows with a duodenal or jejunal ileus were significantly higher than those of the other groups, demonstrating that bile acids may reflux from the duodenum into the rumen of cows with an ileus in the small intestine.

  13. Motilin-immunoreactive cells in the duodenum, pyloric stomach and pancreas of caimans (Caiman latirostris and Caiman crocodilus, alligatorinae): a further comparison using region-specific motilin antisera.

    PubMed

    Yamada, J; Rodrigues, M A; Kitamura, N; Pai, V D; Yamashita, T; Motizuki, T; Yanaihara, N

    1991-07-01

    Motilin-immunoreactive cells in the duodenum, pyloric stomach and pancreas of Caiman latirostris and Caiman crocodilus were investigated using region specific antisera for porcine and canine motilin molecules. Motilin-immunoreactive cells were found in the duodenum, pyloric stomach and pancreas of both caiman species. These cells were primarily open-type endocrine ones in the epithelium of the duodenum and pyloric stomach. Motilin-immunoreactive cells were observed in both the exocrine and endocrine portions of the pancreas, and frequently exhibited one or more cytoplasmic processes of variable length. Since motilin-immunoreactive cells do not cross-react with serotonin or any of the other pancreatic and gut hormones, they are considered to be cell type independent from any of the other known pancreatic or gut endocrine cells. The molecular similarity between caiman motilin and porcine and canine motilins and the heterogeneity of the motilin molecule in the caiman digestive system is discussed.

  14. Effects of Food Components That Activate TRPA1 Receptors on Mucosal Ion Transport in the Mouse Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Fothergill, Linda J.; Callaghan, Brid; Rivera, Leni R.; Lieu, TinaMarie; Poole, Daniel P.; Cho, Hyun-Jung; Bravo, David M.; Furness, John B.

    2016-01-01

    TRPA1 is a ligand-activated cation channel found in the intestine and other tissues. Components of food that stimulate TRPA1 receptors (phytonutrients) include allyl isothiocyanate, cinnamaldehyde and linalool, but these may also act at other receptors. Cells lining the intestinal mucosa are immunoreactive for TRPA1 and Trpa1 mRNA occurs in mucosal extracts, suggesting that the TRPA1 receptor is the target for these agonists. However, in situ hybridisation reveals Trpa1 expression in 5-HT containing enteroendocrine cells, not enterocytes. TRPA1 agonists evoke mucosal secretion, which may be indirect (through release of 5-HT) or direct by activation of enterocytes. We investigated effects of the phytonutrients on transmucosal ion currents in mouse duodenum and colon, and the specificity of the phytonutrients in cells transfected with Trpa1, and in Trpa1-deficient mice. The phytonutrients increased currents in the duodenum with the relative potencies: allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) > cinnamaldehyde > linalool (0.1 to 300 μM). The rank order was similar in the colon, but linalool was ineffective. Responses to AITC were reduced by the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 (100 μM), and were greatly diminished in Trpa1−/− duodenum and colon. Responses were not reduced by tetrodotoxin, 5-HT receptor antagonists, or atropine, but inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis reduced responses. Thus, functional TRPA1 channels are expressed by enterocytes of the duodenum and colon. Activation of enterocyte TRPA1 by food components has the potential to facilitate nutrient absorption. PMID:27735854

  15. Lack of dystrophin is associated with altered integration of the mitochondria and ATPases in slow-twitch muscle cells of MDX mice.

    PubMed

    Braun, U; Paju, K; Eimre, M; Seppet, E; Orlova, E; Kadaja, L; Trumbeckaite, S; Gellerich, F N; Zierz, S; Jockusch, H; Seppet, E K

    2001-06-01

    The potential role of dystrophin-mediated control of systems integrating mitochondria with ATPases was assessed in muscle cells. Mitochondrial distribution and function in skinned cardiac and skeletal muscle fibers from dystrophin-deficient (MDX) and wild-type mice were compared. Laser confocal microscopy revealed disorganized mitochondrial arrays in m. gastrocnemius in MDX mice, whereas the other muscles appeared normal in this group. Irrespective of muscle type, the absence of dystrophin had no effect on the maximal capacity of oxidative phosphorylation, nor on coupling between oxidation and phosphorylation. However, in the myocardium and m. soleus, the coupling of mitochondrial creatine kinase to adenine nucleotide translocase was attenuated as evidenced by the decreased effect of creatine on the Km for ADP in the reactions of oxidative phosphorylation. In m. soleus, a low Km for ADP compared to the wild-type counterpart was found, which implies increased permeability for that nucleotide across the mitochondrial outer membrane. In normal cardiac fibers 35% of the ADP flux generated by ATPases was not accessible to the external pyruvate kinase-phosphoenolpyruvate system, which suggests the compartmentalized (direct) channeling of that fraction of ADP to mitochondria. Compared to control, the direct ADP transfer was increased in MDX ventricles. In conclusion, our data indicate that in slow-twitch muscle cells, the absence of dystrophin is associated with the rearrangement of the intracellular energy and feedback signal transfer systems between mitochondria and ATPases. As the mechanisms mediated by creatine kinases become ineffective, the role of diffusion of adenine nucleotides increases due to the higher permeability of the mitochondrial outer membrane for ADP and enhanced compartmentalization of ADP flux. PMID:11334790

  16. Serotonin and Histamine Therapy Increases Tetanic Forces of Myoblasts, Reduces Muscle Injury, and Improves Grip Strength Performance of Dmd(mdx) Mice.

    PubMed

    Gurel, Volkan; Lins, Jeremy; Lambert, Kristyn; Lazauski, Joan; Spaulding, James; McMichael, John

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive X-linked fatal disorder caused by a mutation in the dystrophin gene. Although several therapeutic approaches have been studied, none has led to substantial long-term effects in patients. The aim of this study was to test a serotonin and histamine (S&H) combination on human skeletal myoblasts and Dmd(mdx) mice for its effects on muscle strength and injury. Normal human bioartificial muscles (BAMs) were treated, and muscle tetanic forces and muscle injury tests were performed using the MyoForce Analysis System. Dmd(mdx) mice, the murine model of DMD, were administered serotonin, histamine, or S&H combination twice daily for 6 weeks, and functional performance tests were conducted once a week. The S&H combination treatment caused significant increases in tetanic forces at all time points and concentrations tested as compared to the saline controls. Dose response of the BAMs to the treatment demonstrated a significant increase in force generation at all concentrations compared to the controls after 3 to 4 days of drug treatment. The highest 3 concentrations had a significant effect on lowering contractile-induced injury as measured by a reduction in the release of adenylate kinase. Histamine-only and S&H treatments improved grip strength of Dmd(mdx) mice, whereas serotonin-only treatment resulted in no significant improvement in muscle strength. The results of this study indicate that S&H therapy might be a promising new strategy for muscular dystrophies and that the mechanism should be further investigated. PMID:26740813

  17. Differential expression of calcium transport genes caused by COMT inhibition in the duodenum, kidney and placenta of pregnant mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hyun; Ahn, Changhwan; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2015-02-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-specific disease characterized by concurrent development of hypertension, proteinuria, and oxidative stress in the placenta. Preeclampsia-like genetic models were also developed by modification of preeclampsia-related genes, such as catechol-O-methyltranferase (COMT). In this study, we induced COMT inhibition in mice during pregnancy in order to reproduce physiological conditions associated with preeclampsia. Expression of the gene known as hypoxia biomarker, HIF-1α, was highly induced in the placenta of this model. The over-expression of HIF-1α demonstrates that our experimental conditions were similar to those of preeclampsia. We measured the expression of several calcium transport genes (CTGs; TRPV5, TRPV6, PMCA1 and CaBP-9k) in the placenta, duodenum and kidney after COMT inhibition on gestation day 17.5 (GD 17.5). In addition, we evaluated the calcium transporters in the kidney, duodenum of non-pregnant female mice. Placental TRPV5, TRPV6 and PMCA1 expressions were down-regulated by COMT inhibitor (ro41-0960). In addition, the reduced PMCA1 expression in the placenta was reversed by calcium supplementation. Duodenal expressions of TRPV5, TRPV6, and PMCA1 were decreased in COMT-inhibited mice, and recovered slightly after calcium supplementation. Renal expression of TRPV5, TRPV6, and PMCA1 was also decreased by COMT inhibition, while it was reversed by calcium supplementation to the level of control. Duodenal- and renal calcium transporting genes, TRPV5, TPRV6, PMCA1 and CaBP-9k, were down-regulated by COMT treatment in female mice. Taken together, these results indicate that physiological changes observed in COMT inhibition were similar to symptoms of preeclampsia, which may be related to disturbance of calcium metabolism during pregnancy.

  18. Phospholipid Profile of the Stomach and Duodenum of Normal Rabbits Fed with Supplements of Unripe Pawpaw (Carica papaya) and Unripe Plantain (Musa sapientum) Extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriyamremu, G. E.; Asagba, S. O.; Osagie, V. E.; Ojeaburu, S. I.; Lolodi, O.

    This study reports the effect of unripe pawpaw and/or unripe plantain extracts on the phospholipid profile of the stomach and duodenum of normal rabbits. Supplementation of chow with unripe pawpaw or plantain extract significantly reduced (p< 0.05) the weight gained by rabbits compared with the control. The total phospholipids content in the stomach and duodenum were significantly increased (p< 0.05) in the test groups compared to the control. In the stomach and duodenum, phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and sphingomyelin (SGM) were significantly increased (p< 0.05) in the test groups compared to the control. Pawpaw occasioned a decrease in the PE/PC ratio in both tissues as against an increase observed in the SGM/PC ratio. The results presented suggests that unripe pawpaw meal and unripe plantain extract alter the phospholipid profile of the stomach and duodenum in ways which may affect membrane fluidity of these tissues and would have profound effect on the gastro-duodenal mucosa and thus have implication(s) for gastric and duodenal ulcers in rabbits.

  19. In vivo genome editing improves muscle function in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Christopher E; Hakim, Chady H; Ousterout, David G; Thakore, Pratiksha I; Moreb, Eirik A; Castellanos Rivera, Ruth M; Madhavan, Sarina; Pan, Xiufang; Ran, F Ann; Yan, Winston X; Asokan, Aravind; Zhang, Feng; Duan, Dongsheng; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-01-22

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a devastating disease affecting about 1 out of 5000 male births and caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Genome editing has the potential to restore expression of a modified dystrophin gene from the native locus to modulate disease progression. In this study, adeno-associated virus was used to deliver the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 system to the mdx mouse model of DMD to remove the mutated exon 23 from the dystrophin gene. This includes local and systemic delivery to adult mice and systemic delivery to neonatal mice. Exon 23 deletion by CRISPR-Cas9 resulted in expression of the modified dystrophin gene, partial recovery of functional dystrophin protein in skeletal myofibers and cardiac muscle, improvement of muscle biochemistry, and significant enhancement of muscle force. This work establishes CRISPR-Cas9-based genome editing as a potential therapy to treat DMD.

  20. In vivo genome editing improves muscle function in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Christopher E; Hakim, Chady H; Ousterout, David G; Thakore, Pratiksha I; Moreb, Eirik A; Castellanos Rivera, Ruth M; Madhavan, Sarina; Pan, Xiufang; Ran, F Ann; Yan, Winston X; Asokan, Aravind; Zhang, Feng; Duan, Dongsheng; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-01-22

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a devastating disease affecting about 1 out of 5000 male births and caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Genome editing has the potential to restore expression of a modified dystrophin gene from the native locus to modulate disease progression. In this study, adeno-associated virus was used to deliver the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 system to the mdx mouse model of DMD to remove the mutated exon 23 from the dystrophin gene. This includes local and systemic delivery to adult mice and systemic delivery to neonatal mice. Exon 23 deletion by CRISPR-Cas9 resulted in expression of the modified dystrophin gene, partial recovery of functional dystrophin protein in skeletal myofibers and cardiac muscle, improvement of muscle biochemistry, and significant enhancement of muscle force. This work establishes CRISPR-Cas9-based genome editing as a potential therapy to treat DMD. PMID:26721684

  1. Human adipose tissue derived pericytes increase life span in Utrn (tm1Ked) Dmd (mdx) /J mice.

    PubMed

    Valadares, M C; Gomes, J P; Castello, G; Assoni, A; Pellati, M; Bueno, C; Corselli, M; Silva, H; Bartolini, P; Vainzof, M; Margarido, P F; Baracat, E; Péault, B; Zatz, M

    2014-12-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is still an untreatable lethal X-linked disorder, which affects 1 in 3500 male births. It is caused by the absence of muscle dystrophin due to mutations in the dystrophin gene. The potential regenerative capacity as well as immune privileged properties of mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) has been under investigation for many years in an attempt to treat DMD. One of the questions to be addressed is whether stem cells from distinct sources have comparable clinical effects when injected in murine or canine muscular dystrophy animal models. Many studies comparing different stem cells from various sources were reported but these cells were obtained from different donors and thus with different genetic backgrounds. Here we investigated whether human pericytes obtained from 4 different tissues (muscle, adipose tissue, fallopian tube and endometrium) from the same donor have a similar clinical impact when injected in double mutant Utrn (tm1Ked) Dmd (mdx) /J mice, a clinically relevant model for DMD. After a weekly regimen of intraperitoneal injections of 10(6) cells per 8 weeks we evaluated the motor ability as well as the life span of the treated mice as compared to controls. Our experiment showed that only adipose tissue derived pericytes are able to increase significantly (39 days on average) the life span of affected mice. Microarray analysis showed an inhibition of the interferon pathway by adipose derived pericytes. Our results suggest that the clinical benefit associated with intraperitoneal injections of these adult stem cells is related to immune modulation rather than tissue regeneration.

  2. Poly(ester amine) Composed of Polyethylenimine and Pluronic Enhance Delivery of Antisense Oligonucleotides In Vitro and in Dystrophic mdx Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingxing; Wu, Bo; Tucker, Jason D; Bollinger, Lauren E; Lu, Peijuan; Lu, Qilong

    2016-01-01

    A series of poly(esteramine)s (PEAs) constructed from low molecular weight polyethyleneimine (LPEI) and Pluronic were evaluated for the delivery of antisense oligonuclotides (AOs), 2′-O-methyl phosphorothioate RNA (2′-OMePS) and phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) in cell culture and dystrophic mdx mice. Improved exon-skipping efficiency of both 2′-OMePS and PMO was observed in the C2C12E50 cell line with all PEA polymers compared with PEI 25k or LF-2k. The degree of efficiency was found in the order of PEA 01, PEA 04 > PEA 05 > others. The in vivo study in mdx mice demonstrated enhanced exon-skipping of 2′-OMePS with the order of PEA 06 > PEA 04, PEA 07 > PEA 03 > PEA 01 > others, and much higher than PEI 25k formulated 2′-OMePS. Exon-skipping efficiency of PMO in formulation with the PEAs were significantly enhanced in the order of PEA 02 > PEA 10 > PEA 01, PEA 03 > PEA 05, PEA 07, PEA 08 > others, with PEA 02 reaching fourfold of Endo-porter formulated PMO. PEAs improve PMO delivery more effectively than 2′-OMePS delivery in vivo, and the systemic delivery evaluation further highlight the efficiency of PEA for PMO delivery in all skeletal muscle. The results suggest that the flexibility of PEA polymers could be explored for delivery of different AO chemistries, especially for antisense therapy. PMID:27483024

  3. Poly(ester amine) Composed of Polyethylenimine and Pluronic Enhance Delivery of Antisense Oligonucleotides In Vitro and in Dystrophic mdx Mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingxing; Wu, Bo; Tucker, Jason D; Bollinger, Lauren E; Lu, Peijuan; Lu, Qilong

    2016-01-01

    A series of poly(esteramine)s (PEAs) constructed from low molecular weight polyethyleneimine (LPEI) and Pluronic were evaluated for the delivery of antisense oligonuclotides (AOs), 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate RNA (2'-OMePS) and phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) in cell culture and dystrophic mdx mice. Improved exon-skipping efficiency of both 2'-OMePS and PMO was observed in the C2C12E50 cell line with all PEA polymers compared with PEI 25k or LF-2k. The degree of efficiency was found in the order of PEA 01, PEA 04 > PEA 05 > others. The in vivo study in mdx mice demonstrated enhanced exon-skipping of 2'-OMePS with the order of PEA 06 > PEA 04, PEA 07 > PEA 03 > PEA 01 > others, and much higher than PEI 25k formulated 2'-OMePS. Exon-skipping efficiency of PMO in formulation with the PEAs were significantly enhanced in the order of PEA 02 > PEA 10 > PEA 01, PEA 03 > PEA 05, PEA 07, PEA 08 > others, with PEA 02 reaching fourfold of Endo-porter formulated PMO. PEAs improve PMO delivery more effectively than 2'-OMePS delivery in vivo, and the systemic delivery evaluation further highlight the efficiency of PEA for PMO delivery in all skeletal muscle. The results suggest that the flexibility of PEA polymers could be explored for delivery of different AO chemistries, especially for antisense therapy. PMID:27483024

  4. Biodistribution and Molecular Studies on Orally Administered Nanoparticle-AON Complexes Encapsulated with Alginate Aiming at Inducing Dystrophin Rescue in mdx Mice

    PubMed Central

    Falzarano, Maria Sofia; Passarelli, Chiara; Bassi, Elena; Fabris, Marina; Perrone, Daniela; Sabatelli, Patrizia; Maraldi, Nadir M.; Donà, Silvia; Bonaldo, Paolo; Sparnacci, Katia; Laus, Michele; Rimessi, Paola; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that intraperitoneal injections of 2′-O-methyl-phosphorothioate (2′OMePS) antisense oligoribonucleotides adsorbed onto a cationic core-shell nanoparticles (NPs), termed ZM2, provoke dystrophin restoration in the muscles of mdx mice. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the oral route as an alternative way of administration for ZM2-antisense oligoribonucleotides complexes. The biodistribution and elimination of nanoparticles were evaluated after single and multiple oral doses of IR-dye conjugated nanoparticles. Labeled nanoparticles were tracked in vivo as well as in tissue cryosections, urines and feces by Odyssey infrared imaging system, and revealed a permanence in the intestine and abdominal lymph nodes for 72 hours to 7 days before being eliminated. We subsequently tested alginate-free and alginate-encapsulated ZM2-antisense oligoribonucleotides (AON) complexes orally administered 2 and 3 times per week, respectively, in mdx mice for a total of 12 weeks. Treatment with alginate ZM2-AON induced a slight dystrophin rescue in diaphragm and intestine smooth muscles, while no dystrophin was detected in alginate-free ZM2-AON treated mice. These data encourage further experiments on oral administration testing of NP and AON complexes, possibly translatable in oligoribonucleotides-mediated molecular therapies. PMID:24392452

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of a Novel Bacillus sp. VT 712 Strain Isolated from the Duodenum of a Patient with Intestinal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tetz, Victor

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of the spore-forming Bacillus sp. strain VT 712 isolated from the duodenum of a patient with intestinal cancer. The genome is 3,921,583 bp, with 37.9% G+C content. It contains 3,768 predicted protein-coding genes for multidrug resistance transporters, virulence factors, and daunorubicin resistance. PMID:27491975

  6. Lipidomic and Spatio-Temporal Imaging of Fat by Mass Spectrometry in Mice Duodenum during Lipid Digestion

    PubMed Central

    Seyer, Alexandre; Cantiello, Michela; Bertrand-Michel, Justine; Roques, Véronique; Nauze, Michel; Bézirard, Valérie; Touboul, David; Coméra, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal absorption of dietary fat is a complex process mediated by enterocytes leading to lipid assembly and secretion of circulating lipoproteins as chylomicrons, vLDL and intestinal HDL (iHDL). Understanding lipid digestion is of importance knowing the correlation between excessive fat absorption and atherosclerosis. By using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), we illustrated a spatio-temporal localization of fat in mice duodenum, at different times of digestion after a lipid gavage, for the first time. Fatty acids progressively increased in enterocytes as well as taurocholic acid, secreted by bile and engaged in the entero-hepatic re-absorption cycle. Cytosolic lipid droplets (CLD) from enterocytes were originally purified separating chylomicron-like, intermediate droplets and smaller HDL-like. A lipidomic quantification revealed their contents in triglycerides, free and esterified cholesterol, phosphatidylcholine, sphingomyelin and ceramides but also in free fatty acids, mono- and di-acylglycerols. An acyl-transferase activity was identified and the enzyme monoacylglycerol acyl transferase 2 (MGAT2) was immunodetected in all CLD. The largest droplets was also shown to contain the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP), the acyl-coenzyme A-cholesterol acyltransferases (ACAT) 1 and 2, hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) and adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL). This highlights the fact that during the digestion of fats, enterocyte CLD contain some enzymes involved in the different stages of the metabolism of diet fatty acids and cholesterol, in anticipation of the crucial work of endoplasmic reticulum in the process. The data further underlines the dual role of chylomicrons and iHDL in fat digestion which should help to efficiently complement lipid-lowering therapy. PMID:23560035

  7. Adenovirus 12 E1A gene detection by polymerase chain reaction in both the normal and coeliac duodenum.

    PubMed Central

    Lawler, M; Humphries, P; O'Farrelly, C; Hoey, H; Sheils, O; Jeffers, M; O'Briain, D S; Kelleher, D

    1994-01-01

    A 12 amino acid sequence from the adenovirus 12 E1B protein is homologous at the protein level with a similar 12-mer derived from the wheat protein A-gliadin. It has been suggested that exposure to Ad 12 could sensitise individuals to gliadins with resultant gluten sensitive enteropathy. In this study, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to analyse duodenal biopsy tissue from patients with coeliac disease for the presence of Ad 12. The sensitivity of the assay system was at least 1 in 10(5) cells and specificity was confirmed both by probing with an internal oligonucleotide and by direct sequencing. Ad 12 sequences were detected in three of 17 patients with adult coeliac disease and in five of 16 adult controls with normal duodenal biopsies. Since exposure to the virus would be predicted to occur in infancy we also studied patients with childhood coeliac disease diagnosed at less than 1 year of age. Ad 12 was positive in three of 10 childhood coeliac patients and one of seven controls. In addition, we studied a cohort of patients who presented with a diarrhoeal illness and associated anti alpha gliadin antibodies in 1983. These patients had duodenal biopsies performed at this time. One of three patients with abnormal histology had detectable Ad 12 while two of 14 with normal findings were positive for Ad 12. Finally, the potential oncogenic nature of Ad 12 prompted examination of a group of patients with intestinal tumours. Ad 12 DNA was, however, in only two of 19 tumour samples tested. These data indicate that Ad 12 can be successfully detected using PCR on paraffin embedded tissue. Furthermore, Ad 12 was detected at a relatively high level in normal duodenum. The results do not, however, support the hypothesis that prior exposure to Ad 12 is implicated in the pathogenesis of coeliac disease. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7959228

  8. Prolactin stimulates the L-type calcium channel-mediated transepithelial calcium transport in the duodenum of male rats.

    PubMed

    Dorkkam, Nitita; Wongdee, Kannikar; Suntornsaratoon, Panan; Krishnamra, Nateetip; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol

    2013-01-11

    Elevated plasma levels of prolactin (PRL) have been reported in several physiological and pathological conditions, such as lactation, prolactinoma, and dopaminergic antipsychotic drug uses. Although PRL is a calcium-regulating hormone that stimulates intestinal calcium absorption in lactating rats, whether PRL is capable of stimulating calcium absorption in male rats has been elusive. Herein, the transepithelial calcium transport and electrical characteristics were determined in ex vivo duodenal tissues of male rats by Ussing chamber technique. We found that PRL receptors were abundantly present in the basolateral membrane of the duodenal epithelial cells. PRL (200-800 ng/mL) markedly increased the active duodenal calcium transport in a dose-dependent fashion without effect on the transepithelial resistance. The PRL-enhanced active duodenal calcium transport was completely abolished by L-type calcium channel blocker (nifedipine) as well as inhibitors of the major basolateral calcium transporters, namely plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase and Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger. Several intracellular mediators, such as JAK2, MEK, PI3K and Src kinase, were involved in the PRL-enhanced transcellular calcium transport. Moreover, PRL also stimulated the paracellular calcium transport in the duodenum of male rats in a PI3K-dependent manner. In conclusion, PRL appeared to be a calcium-regulating hormone in male rats by enhancing the L-type calcium channel-mediated transcellular and the paracellular passive duodenal calcium transport. This phenomenon could help restrict or alleviate negative calcium balance and osteoporosis that often accompany hyperprolactinemia in male patients. PMID:23206706

  9. Differential gene expression in the duodenum, jejunum and ileum among crossbred beef steers with divergent gain and feed intake phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Lindholm-Perry, A K; Butler, A R; Kern, R J; Hill, R; Kuehn, L A; Wells, J E; Oliver, W T; Hales, K E; Foote, A P; Freetly, H C

    2016-08-01

    Small intestine mass and cellularity were previously associated with cattle feed efficiency. The small intestine is responsible for the digestion of nutrients and absorption of fatty acids, amino acids and carbohydrates, and it contributes to the overall feed efficiency of cattle. The objective of this study was to evaluate transcriptome differences among the small intestine from cattle with divergent gain and feed intake. Animals most divergent from the bivariate mean in each of the four phenotypic Cartesian quadrants for gain × intake were selected, and the transcriptomes of duodenum, jejunum and ileum were evaluated. Gene expression analyses were performed comparing high gain vs. low gain animals, high intake vs. low intake animals and each of the phenotypic quadrants to all other groups. Genes differentially expressed within the high gain-low intake and low gain-high intake groups of animals included those involved in immune function and inflammation in all small intestine sections. The high gain-high intake group differed from the high gain-low intake group by immune response genes in all sections of the small intestine. In all sections of small intestine, animals with low gain-low intake displayed greater abundance of heat-shock genes compared to other groups. Several over-represented pathways were identified. These include the antigen-processing/presentation pathway in high gain animals and PPAR signaling, starch/sucrose metabolism, retinol metabolism and melatonin degradation pathways in the high intake animals. Genes with functions in immune response, inflammation, stress response, influenza pathogenesis and melatonin degradation pathways may have a relationship with gain and intake in beef steers. PMID:27226174

  10. Electrical stimuli are anti-apoptotic in skeletal muscle via extracellular ATP. Alteration of this signal in Mdx mice is a likely cause of dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Valladares, Denisse; Almarza, Gonzalo; Contreras, Ariel; Pavez, Mario; Buvinic, Sonja; Jaimovich, Enrique; Casas, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    ATP signaling has been shown to regulate gene expression in skeletal muscle and to be altered in models of muscular dystrophy. We have previously shown that in normal muscle fibers, ATP released through Pannexin1 (Panx1) channels after electrical stimulation plays a role in activating some signaling pathways related to gene expression. We searched for a possible role of ATP signaling in the dystrophy phenotype. We used muscle fibers from flexor digitorum brevis isolated from normal and mdx mice. We demonstrated that low frequency electrical stimulation has an anti-apoptotic effect in normal muscle fibers repressing the expression of Bax, Bim and PUMA. Addition of exogenous ATP to the medium has a similar effect. In dystrophic fibers, the basal levels of extracellular ATP were higher compared to normal fibers, but unlike control fibers, they do not present any ATP release after low frequency electrical stimulation, suggesting an uncoupling between electrical stimulation and ATP release in this condition. Elevated levels of Panx1 and decreased levels of Cav1.1 (dihydropyridine receptors) were found in triads fractions prepared from mdx muscles. Moreover, decreased immunoprecipitation of Cav1.1 and Panx1, suggest uncoupling of the signaling machinery. Importantly, in dystrophic fibers, exogenous ATP was pro-apoptotic, inducing the transcription of Bax, Bim and PUMA and increasing the levels of activated Bax and cytosolic cytochrome c. These evidence points to an involvement of the ATP pathway in the activation of mechanisms related with cell death in muscular dystrophy, opening new perspectives towards possible targets for pharmacological therapies.

  11. Electrical Stimuli Are Anti-Apoptotic in Skeletal Muscle via Extracellular ATP. Alteration of This Signal in Mdx Mice Is a Likely Cause of Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Valladares, Denisse; Almarza, Gonzalo; Contreras, Ariel; Pavez, Mario; Buvinic, Sonja; Jaimovich, Enrique; Casas, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    ATP signaling has been shown to regulate gene expression in skeletal muscle and to be altered in models of muscular dystrophy. We have previously shown that in normal muscle fibers, ATP released through Pannexin1 (Panx1) channels after electrical stimulation plays a role in activating some signaling pathways related to gene expression. We searched for a possible role of ATP signaling in the dystrophy phenotype. We used muscle fibers from flexor digitorum brevis isolated from normal and mdx mice. We demonstrated that low frequency electrical stimulation has an anti-apoptotic effect in normal muscle fibers repressing the expression of Bax, Bim and PUMA. Addition of exogenous ATP to the medium has a similar effect. In dystrophic fibers, the basal levels of extracellular ATP were higher compared to normal fibers, but unlike control fibers, they do not present any ATP release after low frequency electrical stimulation, suggesting an uncoupling between electrical stimulation and ATP release in this condition. Elevated levels of Panx1 and decreased levels of Cav1.1 (dihydropyridine receptors) were found in triads fractions prepared from mdx muscles. Moreover, decreased immunoprecipitation of Cav1.1 and Panx1, suggest uncoupling of the signaling machinery. Importantly, in dystrophic fibers, exogenous ATP was pro-apoptotic, inducing the transcription of Bax, Bim and PUMA and increasing the levels of activated Bax and cytosolic cytochrome c. These evidence points to an involvement of the ATP pathway in the activation of mechanisms related with cell death in muscular dystrophy, opening new perspectives towards possible targets for pharmacological therapies. PMID:24282497

  12. Differential expression of utrophin-A and -B promoters in the central nervous system (CNS) of normal and dystrophic mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Baby, Santhosh M; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Willmann, Gabriel; Basu, Utpal; Lozynska, Olga; Khurana, Tejvir S

    2010-03-01

    Utrophin (Utrn) is the autosomal homolog of dystrophin, the Duchene Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) locus product and of therapeutic interest, as its overexpression can compensate dystrophin's absence. Utrn is transcribed by Utrn-A and -B promoters with mRNAs differing at their 5' ends. However, previous central nervous system (CNS) studies used C-terminal antibodies recognizing both isoforms. As this distinction may impact upregulation strategies, we generated Utrn-A and -B promoter-specific antibodies, Taqman Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based absolute copy number assays, and luciferase-reporter constructs to study CNS of normal and dystrophic mdx mice. Differential expression of Utrn-A and -B was noted in microdissected and capillary-enriched fractions. At the protein level, Utrn-B was predominantly expressed in vasculature and ependymal lining, whereas Utrn-A was expressed in neurons, astrocytes, choroid plexus and pia mater. mRNA quantification demonstrated matching patterns of differential expression; however, transcription-translation mismatch was noted for Utrn-B in caudal brain regions. Utrn-A and Utrn-B proteins were significantly upregulated in olfactory bulb and cerebellum of mdx brain. Differential promoter activity, mRNA and protein expressions were studied in cultured C2C12, bEnd3, neurons and astrocytes. Promoter activity ranking for Utrn-A and -B was neurons > astrocytes > C2C12 > bEnd3 and bEnd3 > astrocytes > neurons > C2C12, respectively. Our results identify promoter usage patterns for therapeutic targeting and define promoter-specific differential distribution of Utrn isoforms in normal and dystrophic CNS.

  13. Differential expression of utrophin-A and -B promoters in the central nervous system (CNS) of normal and dystrophic mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Baby, Santhosh M; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Willmann, Gabriel; Basu, Utpal; Lozynska, Olga; Khurana, Tejvir S

    2010-03-01

    Utrophin (Utrn) is the autosomal homolog of dystrophin, the Duchene Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) locus product and of therapeutic interest, as its overexpression can compensate dystrophin's absence. Utrn is transcribed by Utrn-A and -B promoters with mRNAs differing at their 5' ends. However, previous central nervous system (CNS) studies used C-terminal antibodies recognizing both isoforms. As this distinction may impact upregulation strategies, we generated Utrn-A and -B promoter-specific antibodies, Taqman Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based absolute copy number assays, and luciferase-reporter constructs to study CNS of normal and dystrophic mdx mice. Differential expression of Utrn-A and -B was noted in microdissected and capillary-enriched fractions. At the protein level, Utrn-B was predominantly expressed in vasculature and ependymal lining, whereas Utrn-A was expressed in neurons, astrocytes, choroid plexus and pia mater. mRNA quantification demonstrated matching patterns of differential expression; however, transcription-translation mismatch was noted for Utrn-B in caudal brain regions. Utrn-A and Utrn-B proteins were significantly upregulated in olfactory bulb and cerebellum of mdx brain. Differential promoter activity, mRNA and protein expressions were studied in cultured C2C12, bEnd3, neurons and astrocytes. Promoter activity ranking for Utrn-A and -B was neurons > astrocytes > C2C12 > bEnd3 and bEnd3 > astrocytes > neurons > C2C12, respectively. Our results identify promoter usage patterns for therapeutic targeting and define promoter-specific differential distribution of Utrn isoforms in normal and dystrophic CNS. PMID:19486009

  14. Electrical stimuli are anti-apoptotic in skeletal muscle via extracellular ATP. Alteration of this signal in Mdx mice is a likely cause of dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Valladares, Denisse; Almarza, Gonzalo; Contreras, Ariel; Pavez, Mario; Buvinic, Sonja; Jaimovich, Enrique; Casas, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    ATP signaling has been shown to regulate gene expression in skeletal muscle and to be altered in models of muscular dystrophy. We have previously shown that in normal muscle fibers, ATP released through Pannexin1 (Panx1) channels after electrical stimulation plays a role in activating some signaling pathways related to gene expression. We searched for a possible role of ATP signaling in the dystrophy phenotype. We used muscle fibers from flexor digitorum brevis isolated from normal and mdx mice. We demonstrated that low frequency electrical stimulation has an anti-apoptotic effect in normal muscle fibers repressing the expression of Bax, Bim and PUMA. Addition of exogenous ATP to the medium has a similar effect. In dystrophic fibers, the basal levels of extracellular ATP were higher compared to normal fibers, but unlike control fibers, they do not present any ATP release after low frequency electrical stimulation, suggesting an uncoupling between electrical stimulation and ATP release in this condition. Elevated levels of Panx1 and decreased levels of Cav1.1 (dihydropyridine receptors) were found in triads fractions prepared from mdx muscles. Moreover, decreased immunoprecipitation of Cav1.1 and Panx1, suggest uncoupling of the signaling machinery. Importantly, in dystrophic fibers, exogenous ATP was pro-apoptotic, inducing the transcription of Bax, Bim and PUMA and increasing the levels of activated Bax and cytosolic cytochrome c. These evidence points to an involvement of the ATP pathway in the activation of mechanisms related with cell death in muscular dystrophy, opening new perspectives towards possible targets for pharmacological therapies. PMID:24282497

  15. Expression patterns and potential action of the calcium transport genes Trpv5, Trpv6, Ncx1 and Pmca1b in the canine duodenum, kidney and uterus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Ah; Yang, Hyun; Hwang, Inho; Jung, Eui-Man; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2011-01-01

    Four membrane calcium (Ca²⁺) channels are known to play an important role in calcium transport: transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V members 5 and 6 (Trpv5/6), Na⁺/Ca²⁺ exchanger 1 (Ncx1) and plasma membrane Ca²⁺-transporting ATPase1 (Pmca1b). These channels have been shown to mediate the transport of Ca²⁺ between the cytosol and bloodstream in multiple tissues, including the duodenum, kidney, and uterus. Trpv5 and Trpv6 are known to selectively import Ca²⁺ into cells, while Ncx1 and Pmca1b function to extrude Ca²⁺. The present study examined and compared expression patterns of these genes in the canine duodenum, kidney and uterus. We confirmed expression of all four genes in this canine model. To collect tissues for analysis, two adult (2.5-year-old) female dogs were euthanized and tissue samples were collected from an abdominal incision. Expression of Trpv5/6, Ncx1 and Pmca1b was analyzed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry. Trpv5, Trpv6 and Ncx1 mRNA were highly expressed in the kidney, while Pmca1b mRNA was primarily detected in the uterus. Protein expression was verified by Western blot analysis and localized by immunohistochemistry. Protein expression showed patterns similar to those of mRNA expression. Taken together, these results indicate that transcriptional and transitional expression of Tprv5, Trpv6, Ncx1 and Pmca1b may play a critical role in calcium transport in the canine duodenum, kidney and uterus.

  16. Fructus ligustri lucidi ethanol extract improves bone mineral density and properties through modulating calcium absorption-related gene expression in kidney and duodenum of growing rats.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xin; Lyu, Ying; Wu, Zhenghao; Fang, Yuehui; Xu, Hao; Zhao, Pengling; Xu, Yajun; Feng, Haotian

    2014-04-01

    Optimizing peak bone mass in early life is one of key preventive strategies against osteoporosis. Fructus ligustri lucidi (FLL), the fruit of Ligustrum lucidum Ait., is a commonly prescribed herb in many kidney-tonifying traditional Chinese medicinal formulas to alleviate osteoporosis. Previously, FLL extracts have been shown to have osteoprotective effect in aged or ovariectomized rats. In the present study, we investigated the effects of FLL ethanol extract on bone mineral density (BMD) and mechanical properties in growing male rats and explored the underlying mechanisms. Male weaning Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into four groups and orally administrated for 4 months an AIN-93G formula-based diet supplementing with different doses of FLL ethanol extract (0.40, 0.65, and 0.90 %) or vehicle control, respectively. Then calcium balance, serum level of Ca, P, 25(OH)2D3, 1,25(OH)2D3, osteocalcin (OCN), C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX-I), and parathyroid hormone, bone microarchitecture, and calcium absorption-related genes expression in duodenum and kidney were analyzed. The results demonstrated that FLL ethanol extract increased BMD of growing rats and improved their bone microarchitecture and mechanical properties. FLL ethanol extract altered bone turnover, as evidenced by increasing a bone formation maker, OCN, and decreasing a bone resorption maker, CTX-I. Intriguingly, both Ca absorption and Ca retention rate were elevated by FLL ethanol extract treatment, possibly through the mechanisms of up-regulating the transcriptions of calcitropic genes in kidney (1α-hydroxylase) and duodenum (vitamin D receptor, calcium transporter calbindin-D9k, and transient receptor potential vanilloid 6). In conclusion, FLL ethanol extract increased bone mass gain and improved bone properties via modulating bone turnover and up-regulating calcium absorption-related gene expression in kidney and duodenum, which could then activate 1,25(OH)2D3-dependent calcium

  17. Fructus ligustri lucidi ethanol extract improves bone mineral density and properties through modulating calcium absorption-related gene expression in kidney and duodenum of growing rats.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xin; Lyu, Ying; Wu, Zhenghao; Fang, Yuehui; Xu, Hao; Zhao, Pengling; Xu, Yajun; Feng, Haotian

    2014-04-01

    Optimizing peak bone mass in early life is one of key preventive strategies against osteoporosis. Fructus ligustri lucidi (FLL), the fruit of Ligustrum lucidum Ait., is a commonly prescribed herb in many kidney-tonifying traditional Chinese medicinal formulas to alleviate osteoporosis. Previously, FLL extracts have been shown to have osteoprotective effect in aged or ovariectomized rats. In the present study, we investigated the effects of FLL ethanol extract on bone mineral density (BMD) and mechanical properties in growing male rats and explored the underlying mechanisms. Male weaning Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into four groups and orally administrated for 4 months an AIN-93G formula-based diet supplementing with different doses of FLL ethanol extract (0.40, 0.65, and 0.90 %) or vehicle control, respectively. Then calcium balance, serum level of Ca, P, 25(OH)2D3, 1,25(OH)2D3, osteocalcin (OCN), C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX-I), and parathyroid hormone, bone microarchitecture, and calcium absorption-related genes expression in duodenum and kidney were analyzed. The results demonstrated that FLL ethanol extract increased BMD of growing rats and improved their bone microarchitecture and mechanical properties. FLL ethanol extract altered bone turnover, as evidenced by increasing a bone formation maker, OCN, and decreasing a bone resorption maker, CTX-I. Intriguingly, both Ca absorption and Ca retention rate were elevated by FLL ethanol extract treatment, possibly through the mechanisms of up-regulating the transcriptions of calcitropic genes in kidney (1α-hydroxylase) and duodenum (vitamin D receptor, calcium transporter calbindin-D9k, and transient receptor potential vanilloid 6). In conclusion, FLL ethanol extract increased bone mass gain and improved bone properties via modulating bone turnover and up-regulating calcium absorption-related gene expression in kidney and duodenum, which could then activate 1,25(OH)2D3-dependent calcium

  18. Superpulsed Low-Level Laser Therapy Protects Skeletal Muscle of mdx Mice against Damage, Inflammation and Morphological Changes Delaying Dystrophy Progression

    PubMed Central

    Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; de Almeida, Patrícia; Tomazoni, Shaiane Silva; de Carvalho, Paulo de Tarso Camillo; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Álvaro Brandão; Frigo, Lucio; Joensen, Jon; Johnson, Mark I.; Bjordal, Jan Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the effects of preventive treatment with low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on progression of dystrophy in mdx mice. Methods Ten animals were randomly divided into 2 experimental groups treated with superpulsed LLLT (904 nm, 15 mW, 700 Hz, 1 J) or placebo-LLLT at one point overlying the tibialis anterior muscle (bilaterally) 5 times per week for 14 weeks (from 6th to 20th week of age). Morphological changes, creatine kinase (CK) activity and mRNA gene expression were assessed in animals at 20th week of age. Results Animals treated with LLLT showed very few morphological changes in skeletal muscle, with less atrophy and fibrosis than animals treated with placebo-LLLT. CK was significantly lower (p = 0.0203) in animals treated with LLLT (864.70 U.l−1, SEM 226.10) than placebo (1708.00 U.l−1, SEM 184.60). mRNA gene expression of inflammatory markers was significantly decreased by treatment with LLLT (p<0.05): TNF-α (placebo-control = 0.51 µg/µl [SEM 0.12], - LLLT = 0.048 µg/µl [SEM 0.01]), IL-1β (placebo-control = 2.292 µg/µl [SEM 0.74], - LLLT = 0.12 µg/µl [SEM 0.03]), IL-6 (placebo-control = 3.946 µg/µl [SEM 0.98], - LLLT = 0.854 µg/µl [SEM 0.33]), IL-10 (placebo-control = 1.116 µg/µl [SEM 0.22], - LLLT = 0.352 µg/µl [SEM 0.15]), and COX-2 (placebo-control = 4.984 µg/µl [SEM 1.18], LLLT = 1.470 µg/µl [SEM 0.73]). Conclusion Irradiation of superpulsed LLLT on successive days five times per week for 14 weeks decreased morphological changes, skeletal muscle damage and inflammation in mdx mice. This indicates that LLLT has potential to decrease progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. PMID:24599021

  19. Comparative analysis of the morphology and histochemistry of the duodenum of the coypu (Myocastor coypus bonariensis) during its prenatal and postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Tano de la Hoz, María Florencia; Eyheramendy, Verónica; Felipe, Antonio Eduardo; Díaz, Alcira Ofelia

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study focused on the comparative morphological and histochemical analysis of the duodenum of fetuses, juveniles and adult coypu (Myocastor coypus bonariensis), the major socioeconomic wildlife resource of Argentina. Histological and histochemical procedures for in situ characterization of glycoconjugates (GCs) were used. This study evidenced that fetal mucins differ histochemically in many respects from their adult counterparts. Only in fetuses from 90 days-post coitus (dpc) glycogen-rich sites were observed throughout the duodenal epithelium. The goblet cells appeared from 105 dpc and their secretory content varied considerably after birth. Duodenal glands presented scanty neutral and sulphated GCs in the 30-day juveniles; in adults the proportion of these GCs increased, and carboxylated and sialylated GCs were also observed. The results obtained in this work may be used in future studies to evaluate the effects of diet and intestinal pathologies in the glycosylation pattern of GCs. Also, knowledge of the normal glycoprofile of the duodenum of M. coypus bonariensis during its ontogenetic development may constitute a basis for the study of this organ in other Hystricognathi rodents. PMID:26777308

  20. Mouse Curve Biometrics

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, Douglas A.

    2007-10-08

    A biometric system suitable for validating user identity using only mouse movements and no specialized equipment is presented. Mouse curves (mouse movements with little or no pause between them) are individually classied and used to develop classication histograms, which are representative of an individual's typical mouse use. These classication histograms can then be compared to validate identity. This classication approach is suitable for providing continuous identity validation during an entire user session.

  1. Building a Brainier Mouse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsien, Joe Z.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a genetic engineering project to build an intelligent mouse. Cites understanding the molecular basis of learning and memory as a very important step. Concludes that while science will never create a genius mouse that plays the stock market, it can turn a mouse into a quick learner with a better memory. (YDS)

  2. Effect of niacin supplementation on rumen fermentation characteristics and nutrient flow at the duodenum in lactating dairy cows fed a diet with a negative rumen nitrogen balance.

    PubMed

    Aschemann, Martina; Lebzien, Peter; Hüther, Liane; Südekum, Karl-Heinz; Dänicke, Sven

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the present experiment was to ascertain if a daily niacin supplementation of 6 g/cow to lactating dairy cow diets can compensate for the decrease in rumen microbial fermentation due to a negative rumen nitrogen balance (RNB). A total of nine ruminally and duodenally fistulated lactating multiparous German Holstein cows was used. The diets consisted of 10 kg dry matter (DM) maize silage and 7 kg DM concentrate and differed as follows: (i) Diet RNB- (n = 6) with energy and utilisable crude protein (CP) at the duodenum (uCP) according to the average requirement of the animals, but with a negative RNB (-0.41 g N/MJ metabolisable energy [ME]); (ii) Diet RNB0 (n = 7) with energy, uCP, and RNB (0.08 g N/MJ ME) according to the average requirement of the animals; and (iii) Diet NA (nicotinic acid; n = 5), which was the same diet as RNB-, but supplemented with 6 g niacin/d. The negative RNB affected the rumen fermentation pattern and reduced ammonia content in rumen fluid and the daily duodenal flows of microbial CP (MP) and uCP. Niacin supplementation increased the apparent ruminal digestibility of neutral detergent fibre. The efficiency of microbial protein synthesis per unit of rumen degradable CP was higher, whereby the amount of MP reaching the duodenum was unaffected by niacin supplementation. The number of protozoa in rumen fluid was higher in NA treatment. The results indicated a more efficient use of rumen degradable N due to changes in the microbial population in the rumen when niacin was supplemented to diets deficient in RNB for lactating dairy cows. PMID:22924176

  3. KRAS and GNAS Mutations in Pancreatic Juice Collected From the Duodenum of Patients at High Risk for Neoplasia Undergoing Endoscopic Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Eshleman, James R.; Norris, Alexis L.; Sadakari, Yoshihiko; Debeljak, Marija; Borges, Michael; Harrington, Colleen; Lin, Elaine; Brant, Aaron; Barkley, Thomas; Almario, J. Alejandro; Topazian, Mark; Farrell, James; Syngal, Sapna; Lee, Jeffrey H.; Yu, Jun; Hruban, Ralph H.; Kanda, Mitsuro; Canto, Marcia Irene; Goggins, Michael

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Pancreatic imaging can identify neoplastic cysts but not microscopic neoplasms. Mutation analysis of pancreatic fluid following secretin stimulation might identify microscopic neoplasias in the pancreatic duct system. We determined the prevalence of mutations in KRAS and GNAS genes in pancreatic juice from subjects undergoing endoscopic ultrasound for suspected pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN), intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, or pancreatic adenocarcinoma. METHODS Secretin-stimulated juice samples were collected from the duodenum of 272 subjects enrolled in Cancer of the Pancreas Screening studies; 194 subjects were screened because of a family history of, or genetic predisposition to, pancreatic cancer and 78 were evaluated for pancreatic cancer (n=30) or other disorders (controls: pancreatic cysts, pancreatitis, or normal pancreata, n=48). Mutations were detected by digital high-resolution melt-curve analysis and pyrosequencing. The number of replicates containing a mutation determined the mutation score. RESULTS KRAS mutations were detected in pancreatic juice from larger percentages of subjects with pancreatic cancer (73%) or undergoing cancer screening (50%) than controls (19%) (P=.0005). A greater proportion of patients with pancreatic cancer had at least 1 KRAS mutation detected 3 or more times (47%) than screened subjects (21%) or controls (6%, P=.002). Among screened subjects, mutations in KRAS (but not GNAS) were found in similar percentages of patients with or without pancreatic cysts. However, a greater proportion of patients over 50 ys old had KRAS mutations (54.6%) than younger patients (36.3%) (P=.032); the older subjects also more mutations in KRAS (P=.02). CONCLUSIONS Mutations in KRAS are detected in pancreatic juice from the duodenum of 73% of patients with pancreatic cancer, and 50% of asymptomatic individuals with a high risk for pancreatic cancer. However, KRAS mutations are detected in pancreatic juice

  4. Effect of niacin supplementation on rumen fermentation characteristics and nutrient flow at the duodenum in lactating dairy cows fed a diet with a negative rumen nitrogen balance.

    PubMed

    Aschemann, Martina; Lebzien, Peter; Hüther, Liane; Südekum, Karl-Heinz; Dänicke, Sven

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the present experiment was to ascertain if a daily niacin supplementation of 6 g/cow to lactating dairy cow diets can compensate for the decrease in rumen microbial fermentation due to a negative rumen nitrogen balance (RNB). A total of nine ruminally and duodenally fistulated lactating multiparous German Holstein cows was used. The diets consisted of 10 kg dry matter (DM) maize silage and 7 kg DM concentrate and differed as follows: (i) Diet RNB- (n = 6) with energy and utilisable crude protein (CP) at the duodenum (uCP) according to the average requirement of the animals, but with a negative RNB (-0.41 g N/MJ metabolisable energy [ME]); (ii) Diet RNB0 (n = 7) with energy, uCP, and RNB (0.08 g N/MJ ME) according to the average requirement of the animals; and (iii) Diet NA (nicotinic acid; n = 5), which was the same diet as RNB-, but supplemented with 6 g niacin/d. The negative RNB affected the rumen fermentation pattern and reduced ammonia content in rumen fluid and the daily duodenal flows of microbial CP (MP) and uCP. Niacin supplementation increased the apparent ruminal digestibility of neutral detergent fibre. The efficiency of microbial protein synthesis per unit of rumen degradable CP was higher, whereby the amount of MP reaching the duodenum was unaffected by niacin supplementation. The number of protozoa in rumen fluid was higher in NA treatment. The results indicated a more efficient use of rumen degradable N due to changes in the microbial population in the rumen when niacin was supplemented to diets deficient in RNB for lactating dairy cows.

  5. Cytokine and Antioxidant Regulation in the Intestine of the Gray Mouse Lemur (Microcebus murinus) During Torpor

    PubMed Central

    Tessier, Shannon N.; Katzenback, Barbara A.; Pifferi, Fabien; Perret, Martine; Storey, Kenneth B.

    2015-01-01

    During food shortages, the gray mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus) of Madagascar experiences daily torpor thereby reducing energy expenditures. The present study aimed to understand the impacts of torpor on the immune system and antioxidant response in the gut of these animals. This interaction may be of critical importance given the trade-off between the energetically costly immune response and the need to defend against pathogen entry during hypometabolism. The protein levels of cytokines and antioxidants were measured in the small intestine (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum) and large intestine of aroused and torpid lemurs. While there was a significant decrease of some pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-α) in the duodenum and jejunum during torpor as compared to aroused animals, there was no change in anti-inflammatory cytokines. We observed decreased levels of cytokines (IL-12p70 and M-CSF), and several chemokines (MCP-1 and MIP-2) but an increase in MIP-1α in the jejunum of the torpid animals. In addition, we evaluated antioxidant response by examining the protein levels of antioxidant enzymes and total antioxidant capacity provided by metabolites such as glutathione (and others). Our results indicated that levels of antioxidant enzymes did not change between torpor and aroused states, although antioxidant capacity was significantly higher in the ileum during torpor. These data suggest a suppression of the immune response, likely as an energy conservation measure, and a limited role of antioxidant defenses in supporting torpor in lemur intestine. PMID:26092185

  6. Cytokine and Antioxidant Regulation in the Intestine of the Gray Mouse Lemur (Microcebus murinus) During Torpor.

    PubMed

    Tessier, Shannon N; Katzenback, Barbara A; Pifferi, Fabien; Perret, Martine; Storey, Kenneth B

    2015-04-01

    During food shortages, the gray mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus) of Madagascar experiences daily torpor thereby reducing energy expenditures. The present study aimed to understand the impacts of torpor on the immune system and antioxidant response in the gut of these animals. This interaction may be of critical importance given the trade-off between the energetically costly immune response and the need to defend against pathogen entry during hypometabolism. The protein levels of cytokines and antioxidants were measured in the small intestine (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum) and large intestine of aroused and torpid lemurs. While there was a significant decrease of some pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-α) in the duodenum and jejunum during torpor as compared to aroused animals, there was no change in anti-inflammatory cytokines. We observed decreased levels of cytokines (IL-12p70 and M-CSF), and several chemokines (MCP-1 and MIP-2) but an increase in MIP-1α in the jejunum of the torpid animals. In addition, we evaluated antioxidant response by examining the protein levels of antioxidant enzymes and total antioxidant capacity provided by metabolites such as glutathione (and others). Our results indicated that levels of antioxidant enzymes did not change between torpor and aroused states, although antioxidant capacity was significantly higher in the ileum during torpor. These data suggest a suppression of the immune response, likely as an energy conservation measure, and a limited role of antioxidant defenses in supporting torpor in lemur intestine. PMID:26092185

  7. A long-term high-fat diet changes iron distribution in the body, increasing iron accumulation specifically in the mouse spleen.

    PubMed

    Yamano, Noriko; Ikeda, Yasumasa; Sakama, Minoru; Izawa-Ishizawa, Yuki; Kihira, Yoshitaka; Ishizawa, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Licht; Tomita, Shuhei; Tsuchiya, Koichiro; Tamaki, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Although iron is an essential trace metal, its presence in excess causes oxidative stress in the human body. Recent studies have indicated that iron storage is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Dietary iron restriction or iron chelation ameliorates symptoms of type 2 diabetes in mouse models. However, whether iron content in the body changes with the development of diabetes is unknown. Here, we investigated the dynamics of iron accumulation and changes in iron absorption-related genes in mice that developed obesity and diabetes by consuming a high-fat diet (HFD-fed mice). HFD-fed mice (18-20 wk) were compared with control mice for hematologic features, serum ferritin levels, and iron contents in the gastrocnemius muscle, heart, epididymal fat, testis, liver, duodenum, and spleen. In addition, the spleen was examined histologically. Iron absorption-related gene expression in the liver and duodenum was also examined. Hemoglobin and serum ferritin levels were increased in HFD-fed mice. The HFD-fed mice showed iron accumulation in the spleen, but not in the heart or liver. Increased percentages of the splenic red pulp and macrophages were observed in HFD-fed mice and iron accumulation in the spleen was found mainly in the splenic red pulp. The HFD-fed mice also showed decreased iron content in the duodenum. The mRNA expression of divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT-1), an iron absorption-related gene, was elevated in the duodenum of HFD-fed mice. These results indicate that iron accumulation (specifically accumulation in the spleen) is enhanced by the development of type 2 diabetes induced by HFD. PMID:25994136

  8. Characterization of the mouse TFF1 (pS2) gene promoter region.

    PubMed

    Terada, T; Sakagami, R; Tabuchi, Y; Maeda, M

    2001-02-01

    Trefoil peptides (TFFs) with a unique trefoil domain(s) are presumed to function in protection and repair of the gastrointestinal epithelial layer. Three peptide family members are differently distributed in the mouse gastrointestinal tract: TFF1/pS2 specifically in stomach, TFF2/SP mainly in stomach, pancreas and duodenum, and TFF3/ITF in intestine. We cloned and sequenced the mouse TFF1 gene 5'-upstream region by means of the genomic walking procedure. The cloned region was ligated to the luciferase reporter gene and then introduced into mouse gastric surface mucous GSM10 cells which express TFF1 and TFF2. The minimum promoter was located in the region containing the TATA-box between -39 and the transcriptional start site. Further upstream regions stimulated (-2192-- -1630bp, -641-- -243bp, -137-- -39bp) and inhibited (-1630-- -641bp, -243-- -137 bp) luciferase gene expression. These regions as well as short segments conserved in the mouse and human 5'-upstream sequences may be important for modulation of the mRNA level of the TFF1 gene.

  9. Proteomic profiling of antisense-induced exon skipping reveals reversal of pathobiochemical abnormalities in dystrophic mdx diaphragm

    PubMed Central

    Doran, Philip; Wilton, Steve D.; Fletcher, Sue; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2009-01-01

    The disintegration of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex represents the initial pathobiochemical insult in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. However, secondary changes in signalling, energy metabolism and ion homeostasis are probably the main factors that eventually cause progressive muscle wasting. Thus, for the proper evaluation of novel therapeutic approaches, it is essential to analyse the reversal of both primary and secondary abnormalities in treated muscles. Antisense oligomer-mediated exon skipping promises functional restoration of the primary deficiency in dystrophin. In this study, an established phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer coupled to a cell-penetrating peptide was employed for the specific removal of exon 23 in the mutated mouse dystrophin gene transcript. Using DIGE analysis, we could show the reversal of secondary pathobiochemical abnormalities in the dystrophic diaphragm following exon-23 skipping. In analogy to the restoration of dystrophin, β-dystroglycan and neuronal nitric oxide synthase, the muscular dystrophy-associated differential expression of calsequestrin, adenylate kinase, aldolase, mitochondrial creatine kinase and cvHsp was reversed in treated muscle fibres. Hence, the re-establishment of Dp427 coded by the transcript missing exon 23 has counter-acted dystrophic alterations in Ca2+-handling, nucleotide metabolism, bioenergetic pathways and cellular stress response. This clearly establishes the exon-skipping approach as a realistic treatment strategy for diminishing diverse downstream alterations in dystrophinopathy. PMID:19132684

  10. An encyclopedia of mouse DNA elements (Mouse ENCODE).

    PubMed

    Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Snyder, Michael; Hardison, Ross; Ren, Bing; Gingeras, Thomas; Gilbert, David M; Groudine, Mark; Bender, Michael; Kaul, Rajinder; Canfield, Theresa; Giste, Erica; Johnson, Audra; Zhang, Mia; Balasundaram, Gayathri; Byron, Rachel; Roach, Vaughan; Sabo, Peter J; Sandstrom, Richard; Stehling, A Sandra; Thurman, Robert E; Weissman, Sherman M; Cayting, Philip; Hariharan, Manoj; Lian, Jin; Cheng, Yong; Landt, Stephen G; Ma, Zhihai; Wold, Barbara J; Dekker, Job; Crawford, Gregory E; Keller, Cheryl A; Wu, Weisheng; Morrissey, Christopher; Kumar, Swathi A; Mishra, Tejaswini; Jain, Deepti; Byrska-Bishop, Marta; Blankenberg, Daniel; Lajoie, Bryan R; Jain, Gaurav; Sanyal, Amartya; Chen, Kaun-Bei; Denas, Olgert; Taylor, James; Blobel, Gerd A; Weiss, Mitchell J; Pimkin, Max; Deng, Wulan; Marinov, Georgi K; Williams, Brian A; Fisher-Aylor, Katherine I; Desalvo, Gilberto; Kiralusha, Anthony; Trout, Diane; Amrhein, Henry; Mortazavi, Ali; Edsall, Lee; McCleary, David; Kuan, Samantha; Shen, Yin; Yue, Feng; Ye, Zhen; Davis, Carrie A; Zaleski, Chris; Jha, Sonali; Xue, Chenghai; Dobin, Alex; Lin, Wei; Fastuca, Meagan; Wang, Huaien; Guigo, Roderic; Djebali, Sarah; Lagarde, Julien; Ryba, Tyrone; Sasaki, Takayo; Malladi, Venkat S; Cline, Melissa S; Kirkup, Vanessa M; Learned, Katrina; Rosenbloom, Kate R; Kent, W James; Feingold, Elise A; Good, Peter J; Pazin, Michael; Lowdon, Rebecca F; Adams, Leslie B

    2012-08-13

    To complement the human Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project and to enable a broad range of mouse genomics efforts, the Mouse ENCODE Consortium is applying the same experimental pipelines developed for human ENCODE to annotate the mouse genome.

  11. The anticancer drug tamoxifen counteracts the pathology in a mouse model of duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Dorchies, Olivier M; Reutenauer-Patte, Julie; Dahmane, Elyes; Ismail, Heham M; Petermann, Olivier; Patthey- Vuadens, Ophélie; Comyn, Sophie A; Gayi, Elinam; Piacenza, Tony; Handa, Robert J; Décosterd, Laurent A; Ruegg, Urs T

    2013-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe disorder characterized by progressive muscle wasting,respiratory and cardiac impairments, and premature death. No treatment exists so far, and the identification of active substances to fight DMD is urgently needed. We found that tamoxifen, a drug used to treat estrogen-dependent breast cancer, caused remarkable improvements of muscle force and of diaphragm and cardiac structure in the mdx(5Cv) mouse model of DMD. Oral tamoxifen treatment from 3 weeks of age for 15 months at a dose of 10 mg/kg/day stabilized myofiber membranes, normalized whole body force, and increased force production and resistance to repeated contractions of the triceps muscle above normal values. Tamoxifen improved the structure of leg muscles and diminished cardiac fibrosis by~ 50%. Tamoxifen also reduced fibrosis in the diaphragm, while increasing its thickness,myofiber count, and myofiber diameter, thereby augmenting by 72% the amount of contractile tissue available for respiratory function. Tamoxifen conferred a markedly slower phenotype to the muscles.Tamoxifen and its metabolites were present in nanomolar concentrations in plasma and muscles,suggesting signaling through high-affinity targets. Interestingly, the estrogen receptors ERa and ERb were several times more abundant in dystrophic than in normal muscles, and tamoxifen normalized the relative abundance of ERb isoforms. Our findings suggest that tamoxifen might be a useful therapy for DMD.

  12. Duodenum inclusion in alimentary transit for preventing or correcting nutritional deficiencies resulting from Roux-en-y gastric bypass in obesity treatment.

    PubMed

    Ceneviva, Reginaldo

    2016-01-01

    Nutritional and metabolic complications can develop after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) when there is an exaggerated response to the anatomical and functional changes or when there is inadequate nutritional supplementation. Severe malnutrition is rare, but deficiencies of vitamin B12, iron, calcium and thiamin, metabolic bone disease and gallstones are common after RYGB. Shortage of vitamin B12, iron, calcium and also cholelithiasis are caused at least partially by excluding the duodenum and proximal jejunum from food transit. We designed a new procedure, with the maintenance of the duodenum and proximal jejunum in the gastrointestinal transit through interposition of jejunal loop, as a primary operation to prevent such deficiencies or as corrective surgery for severe malnutrition after RYGB with failure in responding to conservative treatment. Complicações nutricionais e metabólicas podem se desenvolver após a derivação gástrica em Y de Roux (DGYR) quando há uma resposta exagerada às mudanças anatômicas e funcionais ou quando há suplementação nutricional inadequada. A desnutrição grave é rara, mas deficiências de vitamina B12, ferro, cálcio e tiamina, doença óssea metabólica e cálculos biliares são comuns após a DGYR. Dessas deficiências mencionadas, a de vitamina B12, de ferro, de cálcio e também a colelitíase, são causadas, ao menos parcialmente, pela exclusão do duodeno e jejuno proximal. Um novo procedimento com a manutenção do duodeno e do jejuno proximal no trânsito gastrointestinal, mediante interposição de alça jejunal, foi idealizado como operação primária para prevenir essas deficiências ou como cirurgia corretiva de desnutrição grave após DGYR com falha na resposta a exaustivas tentativas de tratamento conservador. PMID:27275596

  13. Duodenum inclusion in alimentary transit for preventing or correcting nutritional deficiencies resulting from Roux-en-y gastric bypass in obesity treatment.

    PubMed

    Ceneviva, Reginaldo

    2016-01-01

    Nutritional and metabolic complications can develop after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) when there is an exaggerated response to the anatomical and functional changes or when there is inadequate nutritional supplementation. Severe malnutrition is rare, but deficiencies of vitamin B12, iron, calcium and thiamin, metabolic bone disease and gallstones are common after RYGB. Shortage of vitamin B12, iron, calcium and also cholelithiasis are caused at least partially by excluding the duodenum and proximal jejunum from food transit. We designed a new procedure, with the maintenance of the duodenum and proximal jejunum in the gastrointestinal transit through interposition of jejunal loop, as a primary operation to prevent such deficiencies or as corrective surgery for severe malnutrition after RYGB with failure in responding to conservative treatment. Complicações nutricionais e metabólicas podem se desenvolver após a derivação gástrica em Y de Roux (DGYR) quando há uma resposta exagerada às mudanças anatômicas e funcionais ou quando há suplementação nutricional inadequada. A desnutrição grave é rara, mas deficiências de vitamina B12, ferro, cálcio e tiamina, doença óssea metabólica e cálculos biliares são comuns após a DGYR. Dessas deficiências mencionadas, a de vitamina B12, de ferro, de cálcio e também a colelitíase, são causadas, ao menos parcialmente, pela exclusão do duodeno e jejuno proximal. Um novo procedimento com a manutenção do duodeno e do jejuno proximal no trânsito gastrointestinal, mediante interposição de alça jejunal, foi idealizado como operação primária para prevenir essas deficiências ou como cirurgia corretiva de desnutrição grave após DGYR com falha na resposta a exaustivas tentativas de tratamento conservador.

  14. The spasmolytic effect of Aloysia citriodora, Palau (South American cedrón) is partially due to its vitexin but not isovitexin on rat duodenums.

    PubMed

    Ragone, María Inés; Sella, Mariana; Conforti, Paula; Volonté, María G; Consolini, Alicia E

    2007-09-01

    The spasmolytic effects of an acqueous extract of cedrón (AEC) were studied on rat isolated duodenums. This plant (Aloysia citriodora Palau, Verbenaceae) is widely used for gastrointestinal disorders and as eupeptic in South America. AEC non-competitively inhibited the dose-response curve (DRC) of Ach (IC50 of 1.34 +/- 0.49 mg lyophilized/mL) and the DRC of Ca(2+) in high-[K(2-)](o) (IC50 of 2.64 +/- 0.23 mg/mL). AEC potentiated the non-competitive inhibition of either 30 micromol/L W-7 (a calmodulin blocker) and 5-15 micromol/L papaverine on the Ca(2+)-DRC. Also, AEC relaxed the contracture produced by high-[K(+)](o) (IC50 of 2.6 +/- 0.2 mg/mL) until 81.0 +/- 3.2% of the maximal effect of papaverine and 78.1+/- 5.0% of the quercetin, the most selective inhibitor of PDE. The AEC relaxation was non-competitively inhibited by 10-30 micromol/L methylene blue and competitively antagonized by 40 mmol/L TEA. The relaxation of 1mg/mL AEC was inhibited by hypoxia, but not that of 2mg/mL. Two flavonoids were identified by HPLC in the AEC: vitexin and isovitexin. Vitexin non-competitively inhibited the Ach-DRC (pD(2') of 5.7 +/- 0.4) but significantly run leftward the DRC of Ca(2+). Isovitexin did not significantly inhibit the DRC of Ach nor Ca(2+). The results suggest that the spasmolytic effect of AEC could be mostly associated to the increase in cGMP (target shared with the PDE inhibitors) and the activation of K(+)-channels. At low concentrations, AEC also inhibits the aerobic metabolism. The flavonoid vitexin is partially responsible for the effect, since it non-competitively inhibits Ach but not the Ca(2+) influx. Isovitexin was devoid of activity on duodenums. PMID:17640836

  15. The spasmolytic effect of Aloysia citriodora, Palau (South American cedrón) is partially due to its vitexin but not isovitexin on rat duodenums.

    PubMed

    Ragone, María Inés; Sella, Mariana; Conforti, Paula; Volonté, María G; Consolini, Alicia E

    2007-09-01

    The spasmolytic effects of an acqueous extract of cedrón (AEC) were studied on rat isolated duodenums. This plant (Aloysia citriodora Palau, Verbenaceae) is widely used for gastrointestinal disorders and as eupeptic in South America. AEC non-competitively inhibited the dose-response curve (DRC) of Ach (IC50 of 1.34 +/- 0.49 mg lyophilized/mL) and the DRC of Ca(2+) in high-[K(2-)](o) (IC50 of 2.64 +/- 0.23 mg/mL). AEC potentiated the non-competitive inhibition of either 30 micromol/L W-7 (a calmodulin blocker) and 5-15 micromol/L papaverine on the Ca(2+)-DRC. Also, AEC relaxed the contracture produced by high-[K(+)](o) (IC50 of 2.6 +/- 0.2 mg/mL) until 81.0 +/- 3.2% of the maximal effect of papaverine and 78.1+/- 5.0% of the quercetin, the most selective inhibitor of PDE. The AEC relaxation was non-competitively inhibited by 10-30 micromol/L methylene blue and competitively antagonized by 40 mmol/L TEA. The relaxation of 1mg/mL AEC was inhibited by hypoxia, but not that of 2mg/mL. Two flavonoids were identified by HPLC in the AEC: vitexin and isovitexin. Vitexin non-competitively inhibited the Ach-DRC (pD(2') of 5.7 +/- 0.4) but significantly run leftward the DRC of Ca(2+). Isovitexin did not significantly inhibit the DRC of Ach nor Ca(2+). The results suggest that the spasmolytic effect of AEC could be mostly associated to the increase in cGMP (target shared with the PDE inhibitors) and the activation of K(+)-channels. At low concentrations, AEC also inhibits the aerobic metabolism. The flavonoid vitexin is partially responsible for the effect, since it non-competitively inhibits Ach but not the Ca(2+) influx. Isovitexin was devoid of activity on duodenums.

  16. The MOUSE Squad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borja, Rhea R.

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a New York city after-school program started by MOUSE (Making Opportunities for Upgrading Schools and Education), a national nonprofit group that teaches students how to fix computers, and equips them with the communication and problem-solving skills to help them in the working world. The MOUSE program is part of a trend…

  17. Mouse genome database 2016.

    PubMed

    Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data.

  18. Mouse genome database 2016

    PubMed Central

    Bult, Carol J.; Eppig, Janan T.; Blake, Judith A.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data. PMID:26578600

  19. Mouse genome database 2016.

    PubMed

    Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data. PMID:26578600

  20. Characterisation of mixing in the proximal duodenum of the rat during longitudinal contractions and comparison with a fluid mechanical model based on spatiotemporal motility data.

    PubMed

    de Loubens, Clément; Lentle, Roger G; Hulls, Corrin; Janssen, Patrick W M; Love, Richard J; Chambers, J Paul

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of mixing and mass transfers of nutrients and drugs in the small intestine is of prime importance in creating formulations that manipulate absorption and digestibility. We characterised mixing using a dye tracer methodology during spontaneous longitudinal contractions, i.e. pendular activity, in 10 cm segments of living proximal duodenum of the rat maintained ex-vivo. The residence time distribution (RTD) of the tracer was equivalent to that generated by a small number (8) of continuous stirred tank reactors in series. Fluid mechanical modelling, that was based on real sequences of longitudinal contractions, predicted that dispersion should occur mainly in the periphery of the lumen. Comparison with the experimental RTD showed that centriluminal dispersion was accurately simulated whilst peripheral dispersion was underestimated. The results therefore highlighted the potential importance of micro-phenomena such as microfolding of the intestinal mucosa in peripheral mixing. We conclude that macro-scale modeling of intestinal flow is useful in simulating centriluminal mixing, whereas multi-scales strategies must be developed to accurately model mixing and mass transfers at the periphery of the lumen. PMID:24747714

  1. [Treatment and prevention of erosive and ulcerative lesions in the stomach and duodenum caused by intake of non-steroidalanti-inflammatory drugs].

    PubMed

    Luzina, E V

    2014-01-01

    Therapy with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is a diffcult task. Good anti-inflammatory effect increases the risk of gastrointestinal complications with a frequency of 10-50%. The risk further increases with age (above 60-70 yr), the history of ulcer disease concomitant intake of acetylsalicylic acid, anticoagulants, and glucocorticosteroids. Long-term antisecretory therapy with proton pump inhibitors, e.g., esomeprazole, was shown to be an effective prophylactic tool. This drug maintains the intragastric pH value above 4 for 15 hr on the average. The risk of erosive and ulceraive lesions in the stomach and duodenum significantly decreases by selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, e.g., coxibs, that however increase the risk of thrombotic cardiovascular complications. The author proposes recommendations on the use of NSAIDs in the patients at risk of serious gastrointestinal and cardiovascular pathology. Naproxen in combination with proton pitmp inhibitors is the drug of choice among NSAIDs. Vimovo is a fixed combination of naproxen and esomeprazole. Results of comparative studies on the efficacy of vimovo and celecoxib are presented along with the data on the safety of this. combination compared with that of naproxen monotherapy

  2. Characterisation of Mixing in the Proximal Duodenum of the Rat during Longitudinal Contractions and Comparison with a Fluid Mechanical Model Based on Spatiotemporal Motility Data

    PubMed Central

    de Loubens, Clément; Lentle, Roger G.; Hulls, Corrin; Janssen, Patrick W. M.; Love, Richard J.; Chambers, J. Paul

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of mixing and mass transfers of nutrients and drugs in the small intestine is of prime importance in creating formulations that manipulate absorption and digestibility. We characterised mixing using a dye tracer methodology during spontaneous longitudinal contractions, i.e. pendular activity, in 10 cm segments of living proximal duodenum of the rat maintained ex-vivo. The residence time distribution (RTD) of the tracer was equivalent to that generated by a small number (8) of continuous stirred tank reactors in series. Fluid mechanical modelling, that was based on real sequences of longitudinal contractions, predicted that dispersion should occur mainly in the periphery of the lumen. Comparison with the experimental RTD showed that centriluminal dispersion was accurately simulated whilst peripheral dispersion was underestimated. The results therefore highlighted the potential importance of micro-phenomena such as microfolding of the intestinal mucosa in peripheral mixing. We conclude that macro-scale modeling of intestinal flow is useful in simulating centriluminal mixing, whereas multi-scales strategies must be developed to accurately model mixing and mass transfers at the periphery of the lumen. PMID:24747714

  3. Addition of charcoals to broilers feeds did not impact Salmonella Typhimurium colonization or persistence, or the pH of the crop or duodenum during a 6 wk growout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of 3 types of charcoals added to feeds at 0.3% on Salmonella colonization and persistence, and the pH of the crop and duodenum during a 6 wk growout. A total of 1,280 male chicks (32/pen) were placed into 40 pens (10 pens for each of the 4 diet...

  4. Innervation of Extrahepatic Biliary Tract, With Special Reference to the Direct Bidirectional Neural Connections of the Gall Bladder, Sphincter of Oddi and Duodenum in Suncus murinus, in Whole-Mount Immunohistochemical Study.

    PubMed

    Yi, S-Q; Ren, K; Kinoshita, M; Takano, N; Itoh, M; Ozaki, N

    2016-06-01

    Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction is one of the most important symptoms in post-cholecystectomy syndrome. Using either electrical or mechanical stimulation and retrogradely transported neuronal dyes, it has been demonstrated that there are direct neural pathways connecting gall bladder and the sphincter of Oddi in the Australian opossum and the golden hamster. In the present study, we employed whole-mount immunohistochemistry staining to observe and verify that there are two different plexuses of the extrahepatic biliary tract in Suncus murinus. One, named Pathway One, showed a fine, irregular but dense network plexus that ran adhesively and resided on/in the extrahepatic biliary tract wall, and the plexus extended into the intrahepatic area. On the other hand, named Pathway Two, exhibiting simple, thicker and straight neural bundles, ran parallel to the surface of the extrahepatic biliary tract and passed between the gall bladder and duodenum, but did not give off any branches to the liver. Pathway Two was considered to involve direct bidirectional neural connections between the duodenum and the biliary tract system. For the first time, morphologically, we demonstrated direct neural connections between gall bladder and duodenum in S. murinus. Malfunction of the sphincter of Oddi may be caused by injury of the direct neural pathways between gall bladder and duodenum by cholecystectomy. From the viewpoint of preserving the function of the major duodenal papilla and common bile duct, we emphasize the importance of avoiding kocherization of the common bile duct so as to preserve the direct neural connections between gall bladder and sphincter of Oddi. PMID:26179953

  5. Mouse Cleaning Apparatus and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Glenn L. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The method of using the mouse pad cleaning apparatus is disclosed and claimed. The method comprises the steps of uncovering the mouse cleaning surface, applying the mouse and ball of the mouse to the cleaning surface, moving the mouse in a rotational pattern on the mouse cleaning surface, removing the mouse form the mouse cleaning surface, washing the cleaning surface, and covering the mouse cleaning surface. A mouse pad cleaning apparatus comprising a plurality of substrates, each said substrate having adhesive thereon, said plurality of substrates residing in and affixed to a receptacle. A single substrate having adhesive, which may be washable or non-washable, thereon may be employed. The washable adhesive may be an organopolysiloxane or gelatinous elastomer.

  6. Ultrasound imaging of the mouse pancreatic duct using lipid microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, B.; McKeown, K. R.; Skovan, B.; Ogram, E.; Ingram, P.; Ignatenko, N.; Paine-Murrieta, G.; Witte, R.; Matsunaga, T. O.

    2012-03-01

    Research requiring the murine pancreatic duct to be imaged is often challenging due to the difficulty in selectively cannulating the pancreatic duct. We have successfully catheterized the pancreatic duct through the common bile duct in severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mice and imaged the pancreatic duct with gas filled lipid microbubbles that increase ultrasound imaging sensitivity due to exquisite scattering at the gas/liquid interface. A SCID mouse was euthanized by CO2, a midline abdominal incision made, the common bile duct cut at its midpoint, a 2 cm, 32 gauge tip catheter was inserted about 1 mm into the duct and tied with suture. The duodenum and pancreas were excised, removed in toto, embedded in agar and an infusion pump was used to instill normal saline or lipid-coated microbubbles (10 million / ml) into the duct. B-mode images before and after infusion of the duct with microbubbles imaged the entire pancreatic duct (~ 1 cm) with high contrast. The microbubbles were cavitated by high mechanical index (HMI) ultrasound for imaging to be repeated. Our technique of catheterization and using lipid microbubbles as a contrast agent may provide an effective, affordable technique of imaging the murine pancreatic duct; cavitation with HMI ultrasound would enable repeated imaging to be performed and clustering of targeted microbubbles to receptors on ductal cells would allow pathology to be localized accurately. This research was supported by the Experimental Mouse Shared Service of the AZ Cancer Center (Grant Number P30CA023074, NIH/NCI and the GI SPORE (NIH/NCI P50 CA95060).

  7. A transgenic red fluorescent protein-expressing nude mouse for color-coded imaging of the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meng; Reynoso, Jose; Bouvet, Michael; Hoffman, Robert M

    2009-02-01

    The tumor microenvironment (TME) is critical for tumor growth and progression. We have previously developed color-coded imaging of the TME using a green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic nude mouse as a host. However, most donor sources of cell types appropriate for study in the TME are from mice expressing GFP. Therefore, a nude mouse expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) would be an appropriate host for transplantation of GFP-expressing stromal cells as well as double-labeled cancer cells expressing GFP in the nucleus and RFP in the cytoplasm, thereby creating a three-color imaging model of the TME. The RFP nude mouse was obtained by crossing non-transgenic nude mice with the transgenic C57/B6 mouse in which the beta-actin promoter drives RFP (DsRed2) expression in essentially all tissues. In crosses between nu/nu RFP male mice and nu/+ RFP female mice, the embryos fluoresced red. Approximately 50% of the offspring of these mice were RFP nude mice. In the RFP nude mouse, the organs all brightly expressed RFP, including the heart, lungs, spleen, pancreas, esophagus, stomach, duodenum, the male and female reproductive systems; brain and spinal cord; and the circulatory system, including the heart, and major arteries and veins. The skinned skeleton highly expressed RFP. The bone marrow and spleen cells were also RFP positive. GFP-expressing human cancer cell lines, including HCT-116-GFP colon cancer and MDA-MB-435-GFP breast cancer were orthotopically transplanted to the transgenic RFP nude mice. These human tumors grew extensively in the transgenic RFP nude mouse. Dual-color fluorescence imaging enabled visualization of human tumor-host interaction. The RFP nude mouse model should greatly expand our knowledge of the TME. PMID:19097136

  8. Cysteamine induces cholecystokinin release from the duodenum. Evidence for somatostatin as an inhibitory paracrine regulator of cholecystokinin secretion in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Abucham, J.; Reichlin, S. )

    1990-12-01

    To determine whether cholecystokinin secretion is regulated by endogenous somatostatin, somatostatin deficiency was induced in vivo with cysteamine (250 mg/kg body wt, IV) or anti-somatostatin antiserum in anaesthetized rats and in vitro with cysteamine (30 micrograms/mL) in a rat duodenum-incubation system. Cholecystokinin secretion was assessed in vivo by measuring amylase in duodenal perfusates collected at 10-minute intervals for 1 hour and in vitro by a carboxy-terminal radioimmunoassay. Cysteamine induced a marked decrease in duodenal immunoreactive somatostatin both in vivo (50%) and in vitro (60%). The rate of amylase secretion increased from 9.7 +/- 2.1 U (mean +/- SE) to 28.0 +/- 4.8 U at 20 minutes (P less than 0.001). The cholecystokinin-receptor antagonist CR-1392 abolished amylase response for 30 minutes, whereas the more potent antagonists Asperlicin (18.0 mg/kg body wt, IV) and L-364,718 (0.25 mg/kg body wt, IV) caused prolonged blockade. The rate of amylase secretion in gastrectomized animals increased from 7.2 +/- 2.0 U to 15.0 +/- 2.2 U 20 minutes after cysteamine administration (P less than 0.01), indicating that the effect was not due to the presence of gastrin. In vitro, cysteamine caused a nearly fourfold increase in cholecystokinin secretion compared with controls (63.1 +/- 4.9 vs. 15.2 +/- 3.7, respectively; P less than 0.001). In vivo immunoneutralization of circulating somatostatin with a high-affinity and high-capacity antiserum produced no significant change in the rate of amylase secretion. These results suggest that cholecystokinin secretion is tonically inhibited by somatostatin and that this effect is mediated by locally secreted (paracrine) but not by circulating somatostatin.

  9. Synchrotron-based imaging of chromium and γ-H2AX immunostaining in the duodenum following repeated exposure to Cr(VI) in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Chad M; Seiter, Jennifer; Chappell, Mark A; Tappero, Ryan V; Proctor, Deborah M; Suh, Mina; Wolf, Jeffrey C; Haws, Laurie C; Vitale, Rock; Mittal, Liz; Kirman, Christopher R; Hays, Sean M; Harris, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Current drinking water standards for chromium are for the combined total of both hexavalent and trivalent chromium (Cr(VI) and Cr(III)). However, recent studies have shown that Cr(III) is not carcinogenic to rodents, whereas mice chronically exposed to high levels of Cr(VI) developed duodenal tumors. These findings may suggest the need for environmental standards specific for Cr(VI). Whether the intestinal tumors arose through a mutagenic or non-mutagenic mode of action (MOA) greatly impacts how drinking water standards for Cr(VI) are derived. Herein, X-ray fluorescence (spectro)microscopy (µ-XRF) was used to image the Cr content in the villus and crypt regions of duodena from B6C3F1 mice exposed to 180 mg/l Cr(VI) in drinking water for 13 weeks. DNA damage was also assessed by γ-H2AX immunostaining. Exposure to Cr(VI) induced villus blunting and crypt hyperplasia in the duodenum--the latter evidenced by lengthening of the crypt compartment by ∼2-fold with a concomitant 1.5-fold increase in the number of crypt enterocytes. γ-H2AX immunostaining was elevated in villi, but not in the crypt compartment. µ-XRF maps revealed mean Cr levels >30 times higher in duodenal villi than crypt regions; mean Cr levels in crypt regions were only slightly above background signal. Despite the presence of Cr and elevated γ-H2AX immunoreactivity in villi, no aberrant foci indicative of transformation were evident. These findings do not support a MOA for intestinal carcinogenesis involving direct Cr-DNA interaction in intestinal stem cells, but rather support a non-mutagenic MOA involving chronic wounding of intestinal villi and crypt cell hyperplasia. PMID:25352572

  10. Synchrotron-based imaging of chromium and γ-H2AX immunostaining in the duodenum following repeated exposure to Cr(VI) in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Chad M; Seiter, Jennifer; Chappell, Mark A; Tappero, Ryan V; Proctor, Deborah M; Suh, Mina; Wolf, Jeffrey C; Haws, Laurie C; Vitale, Rock; Mittal, Liz; Kirman, Christopher R; Hays, Sean M; Harris, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Current drinking water standards for chromium are for the combined total of both hexavalent and trivalent chromium (Cr(VI) and Cr(III)). However, recent studies have shown that Cr(III) is not carcinogenic to rodents, whereas mice chronically exposed to high levels of Cr(VI) developed duodenal tumors. These findings may suggest the need for environmental standards specific for Cr(VI). Whether the intestinal tumors arose through a mutagenic or non-mutagenic mode of action (MOA) greatly impacts how drinking water standards for Cr(VI) are derived. Herein, X-ray fluorescence (spectro)microscopy (µ-XRF) was used to image the Cr content in the villus and crypt regions of duodena from B6C3F1 mice exposed to 180 mg/l Cr(VI) in drinking water for 13 weeks. DNA damage was also assessed by γ-H2AX immunostaining. Exposure to Cr(VI) induced villus blunting and crypt hyperplasia in the duodenum--the latter evidenced by lengthening of the crypt compartment by ∼2-fold with a concomitant 1.5-fold increase in the number of crypt enterocytes. γ-H2AX immunostaining was elevated in villi, but not in the crypt compartment. µ-XRF maps revealed mean Cr levels >30 times higher in duodenal villi than crypt regions; mean Cr levels in crypt regions were only slightly above background signal. Despite the presence of Cr and elevated γ-H2AX immunoreactivity in villi, no aberrant foci indicative of transformation were evident. These findings do not support a MOA for intestinal carcinogenesis involving direct Cr-DNA interaction in intestinal stem cells, but rather support a non-mutagenic MOA involving chronic wounding of intestinal villi and crypt cell hyperplasia.

  11. Changes in calsequestrin, TNF-α, TGF-β and MyoD levels during the progression of skeletal muscle dystrophy in mdx mice: a comparative analysis of the quadriceps, diaphragm and intrinsic laryngeal muscles.

    PubMed

    Barros Maranhão, Juliana; de Oliveira Moreira, Drielen; Maurício, Adriana Fogagnolo; de Carvalho, Samara Camaçari; Ferretti, Renato; Pereira, Juliano Alves; Santo Neto, Humberto; Marques, Maria Julia

    2015-10-01

    In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the search for new biomarkers to follow the evolution of the disease is of fundamental importance in the light of the evolving gene and pharmacological therapies. In addition to the lack of dystrophin, secondary events including changes in calcium levels, inflammation and fibrosis greatly contribute to DMD progression and the molecules involved in these events may represent potential biomarkers. In this study, we performed a comparative evaluation of the progression of dystrophy within muscles that are differently affected by dystrophy (diaphragm; DIA and quadriceps; QDR) or spared (intrinsic laryngeal muscles) using the mdx mice model of DMD. We assessed muscle levels of calsequestrin (calcium-related protein), tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α; pro-inflammatory cytokine), tumour growth factor (TGF-β; pro-fibrotic factor) and MyoD (muscle proliferation) vs. histopathology at early (1 and 4 months of age) and late (9 months of age) stages of dystrophy. Fibrosis was the primary feature in the DIA of mdx mice (9 months: 32% fibrosis), which was greater than in the QDR (9 months: 0.6% fibrosis). Muscle regeneration was the primary feature in the QDR (9 months: 90% of centrally nucleated fibres areas vs. 33% in the DIA). The QDR expressed higher levels of calsequestrin than the DIA. Laryngeal muscles showed normal levels of TNF-α, TGF-β and MyoD. A positive correlation between histopathology and cytokine levels was observed only in the diaphragm, suggesting that TNF-α and TGF-β serve as markers of dystrophy primarily for the diaphragm.

  12. The characterization of the first anti-mouse Muc6 antibody shows an increased expression of the mucin in pancreatic tissue of Cftr-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Gouyer, Valérie; Leir, Shih-Hsing; Tetaert, Daniel; Liu, Yamin; Gottrand, Frédéric; Harris, Ann; Desseyn, Jean-Luc

    2010-05-01

    Gel-forming mucins are large high-molecular weight secreted O-glycoproteins responsible for the gel-properties of the mucus blanket. Five orthologous gel-forming mucins have been cloned in human and mouse. Among them, the mucin MUC6 has been less studied, particularly in rodents and no anti rodent-Muc6 antibody has been reported yet. In order to further study Muc6 in mice, our aims were to obtain a specific Muc6 antibody, to validate it and to test it in Cftr deficient mice. A polyclonal serum named CP4 was isolated from a rabbit immunized by a mouse Muc6 peptide. In Western blot experiments, the antibody detected a high-molecular weight molecule secreted by the gastric tissue. Using immunohistochemistry, we showed that the antibody reacted strongly with deep glands of duodenum and ileum and mucous neck cells of gastric body. CP4 also recognized Muc6 protein secreted at the surface of the stomach and renal collecting tubules. The centroacinar cells of pancreatic tissue also reacted with the antibody. Cftr-/- mice showed a higher expression of Muc6 at both protein and RNA levels compared with their control Cftr+/+ littermates suggesting that as in the human disease, Muc6 may contribute to the formation of materials that block pancreatic acini and ducts in mouse models of cystic fibrosis. The rabbit anti-mouse Muc6 polyclonal antibody seems highly specific to the mouse mucin and will be useful to study pancreatic pathology in cystic fibrosis.

  13. Mouse bladder wall injection.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chi-Ling; Apelo, Charity A; Torres, Baldemar; Thai, Kim H; Hsieh, Michael H

    2011-07-12

    Mouse bladder wall injection is a useful technique to orthotopically study bladder phenomena, including stem cell, smooth muscle, and cancer biology. Before starting injections, the surgical area must be cleaned with soap and water and antiseptic solution. Surgical equipment must be sterilized before use and between each animal. Each mouse is placed under inhaled isoflurane anesthesia (2-5% for induction, 1-3% for maintenance) and its bladder exposed by making a midline abdominal incision with scissors. If the bladder is full, it is partially decompressed by gentle squeezing between two fingers. The cell suspension of interest is intramurally injected into the wall of the bladder dome using a 29 or 30 gauge needle and 1 cc or smaller syringe. The wound is then closed using wound clips and the mouse allowed to recover on a warming pad. Bladder wall injection is a delicate microsurgical technique that can be mastered with practice.

  14. Long-term prolactin exposure differentially stimulated the transcellular and solvent drag-induced calcium transport in the duodenum of ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Tudpor, Kukiat; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol; Saengamnart, Wasana; Krishnamra, Nateetip

    2005-12-01

    Prolactin, having been shown to stimulate transcellular active and solvent drag-induced calcium transport in the duodenum of female rats, was postulated to improve duodenal calcium transport in estrogen-deficient rats. The aim of the present study was, therefore, to demonstrate the effects of long-term prolactin exposure produced by anterior pituitary (AP) transplantation on the duodenal calcium transport in young (9-week-old) and adult (22-week-old) ovariectomized rats. We found that ovariectomy did not alter the transcellular active duodenal calcium transport in young and adult rats fed normal calcium diet (1.0% w/w Ca) but decreased the solvent drag-induced duodenal calcium transport from 75.50 +/- 10.12 to 55.75 +/- 4.77 nmol.hr(-1).cm(-2) (P < 0.05) only in adult rats. Long-term prolactin exposure stimulated the transcellular active calcium transport in young and adult AP-grafted ovariectomized rats fed with normal calcium diet by more than 2-fold from 7.56 +/- 0.79 to 16.54 +/- 2.05 (P < 0.001) and 9.78 +/- 0.72 to 15.99 +/- 1.75 (P < 0.001) nmol.hr(-1).cm(-2), respectively. However, only the solvent drag-induced duodenal calcium transport in young rats was enhanced by prolactin from 95.51 +/- 10.64 to 163.20 +/- 18.03 nmol.hr(-1).cm(-2) (P < 0.001) whereas that in adult rats still showed a decreased flux from 75.50 +/- 10.12 to 47.77 +/- 5.42 nmol.hr(-1).cm(-2) (P < 0.05). Because oral calcium supplement has been widely used to improve calcium balance in estrogen-deficient animals, the effect of a high-calcium diet (2.0% w/w Ca) was also investigated. The results showed that stimulatory action of long-term prolactin on the transcellular active duodenal calcium transport in both young and adult rats was diminished after being fed a high-calcium diet. The same diet also abolished prolactin-enhanced solvent drag-induced duodenal calcium transport in young and further decreased that in adult AP-grafted ovariectomized rats. We concluded that the solvent drag

  15. Cysteamine-colon and cysteamine-duodenum lesions in rats. Attenuation by gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157, cimetidine, ranitidine, atropine, omeprazole, sulphasalazine and methylprednisolone.

    PubMed

    Sikiric, P; Seiwerth, S; Grabarevic, Z; Balen, I; Aralica, G; Gjurasin, M; Komericki, L; Perovic, D; Ziger, T; Anic, T; Prkacin, I; Separovic, J; Stancic-Rokotov, D; Lovric-Bencic, M; Mikus, D; Staresinic, M; Aralica, J; DiBiaggio, N; Simec, Z; Turkovic, B; Rotkvic, I; Mise, S; Rucman, R; Petek, M; Sebecic, B; Ivasovic, Z; Boban-Blagaic, A; Sjekavica, I

    2001-01-01

    also attenuated by these agents application (given in the same doses, i.p., 1 h before cysteamine), with only exception to sulphasalazine. Thus, the extended cysteamine specific ulcerogenic effect, cysteamine colon/duodenum lesion-link and an extenuation of agents protection from upper to lower part of gastrointestinal tract (i.e. stomach pentadecapeptide BPC 157, standard antiulcer agents, cimetidine, ranitidine, atropine, omeprazole) and vice versa (remedies for inflammatory bowel disease) evidenced in the present study may be potentially important for both further experimental and clinical research. PMID:11595448

  16. Expression of genes involved in energy homeostasis in the duodenum and liver of Holstein-Friesian and Jersey cows and their F(1) hybrid.

    PubMed

    Alam, Tanweer; Kenny, David A; Sweeney, Torres; Buckley, Frank; Prendiville, Robert; McGee, Mark; Waters, Sinead M

    2012-02-01

    Differences in feed intake and production efficiency in lactating Holstein-Friesian (HF), Jersey (JE), and JE × HF (F(1)) dairy cows have been reported. The liver-gut axis is important in the regulation of energy homeostasis, appetite behaviour, and production efficiency. The objectives of this study were to determine: 1) the effect of dairy cow genotype on the expression profiles of genes involved in energy homeostasis in duodenal and hepatic tissue, and 2) the association between the expression of these genes across both tissues and with economically important production efficiency traits. The expression of 27 candidate genes involved in energy homeostasis, feed intake, and energy storage was measured by qPCR. Duodenal expression of the pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP1R), and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) genes was highest in HF. In contrast, hepatic expression of the leptin receptor (LEPR), insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R), protein kinase, AMP-activated, beta 1 (AMPKB1), and POMC genes was highest in the F(1) cross. In the duodenum, positive correlations were observed between mRNA expression of anorectic peptides (POMC and GLP1R), whereas a negative correlation was detected between orexigenic (ghrelin) and anorectic (peptide YY) gene expression. A negative correlation was observed between duodenal POMC gene expression and both residual feed intake and milk production efficiency traits, while GLP1R gene expression was negatively correlated with milk production efficiency traits. A heterotic effect was observed in hepatic expression of AMKPB1, IGF1R, LEPR, POMC in the F(1) genotype, possibly mediating improved feed efficiency in cross-bred cows. In conclusion, key genes involved in energy homeostasis and appetite behaviour are differentially expressed due to cow genotype in a tissue-dependent fashion. POMC and GLP1R are potential candidate genes for the identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms

  17. The Mouse SAGE Site: database of public mouse SAGE libraries.

    PubMed

    Divina, Petr; Forejt, Jirí

    2004-01-01

    The Mouse SAGE Site is a web-based database of all available public libraries generated by the Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE) from various mouse tissues and cell lines. The database contains mouse SAGE libraries organized in a uniform way and provides web-based tools for browsing, comparing and searching SAGE data with reliable tag-to-gene identification. A modified approach based on the SAGEmap database is used for reliable tag identification. The Mouse SAGE Site is maintained on an ongoing basis at the Institute of Molecular Genetics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic and is accessible at the internet address http://mouse.biomed.cas.cz/sage/.

  18. ISOLATION OF MOUSE NEUTROPHILS

    PubMed Central

    Swamydas, Muthulekha; Luo, Yi; Dorf, Martin E.; Lionakis, Michail S.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils represent the first line of defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Indeed, patients with inherited and acquired qualitative and quantitative neutrophil defects are at high risk for developing bacterial and fungal infections and suffering adverse outcomes from these infections. Therefore, research aiming at defining the molecular factors that modulate neutrophil effector function under homeostatic conditions and during infection is essential for devising strategies to augment neutrophil function and improve the outcome of infected individuals. This unit describes a reproducible density gradient centrifugation-based protocol that can be applied in any laboratory to harvest large numbers of highly enriched and highly viable neutrophils from the bone marrow of mice both at the steady state and following infection with Candida albicans as described in UNIT 19.6. In another protocol, we also present a method that combines gentle enzymatic tissue digestion with a positive immunomagnetic selection technique or Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) to harvest highly pure and highly viable preparations of neutrophils directly from mouse tissues such as the kidney, the liver or the spleen. Finally, methods for isolating neutrophils from mouse peritoneal fluid and peripheral blood are included. Mouse neutrophils isolated by these protocols can be used for examining several aspects of cellular function ex vivo including pathogen binding, phagocytosis and killing, neutrophil chemotaxis, oxidative burst, degranulation and cytokine production, and for performing neutrophil adoptive transfer experiments. PMID:26237011

  19. RIKEN mouse genome encyclopedia.

    PubMed

    Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2003-01-01

    We have been working to establish the comprehensive mouse full-length cDNA collection and sequence database to cover as many genes as we can, named Riken mouse genome encyclopedia. Recently we are constructing higher-level annotation (Functional ANnoTation Of Mouse cDNA; FANTOM) not only with homology search based annotation but also with expression data profile, mapping information and protein-protein database. More than 1,000,000 clones prepared from 163 tissues were end-sequenced to classify into 159,789 clusters and 60,770 representative clones were fully sequenced. As a conclusion, the 60,770 sequences contained 33,409 unique. The next generation of life science is clearly based on all of the genome information and resources. Based on our cDNA clones we developed the additional system to explore gene function. We developed cDNA microarray system to print all of these cDNA clones, protein-protein interaction screening system, protein-DNA interaction screening system and so on. The integrated database of all the information is very useful not only for analysis of gene transcriptional network and for the connection of gene to phenotype to facilitate positional candidate approach. In this talk, the prospect of the application of these genome resourced should be discussed. More information is available at the web page: http://genome.gsc.riken.go.jp/.

  20. Functional genomics in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Archibald S

    2002-08-01

    The mouse is the premier genetic model organism for the study of human disease and development. With the recent advances in sequencing of the human and mouse genomes, there is strong interest now in large-scale approaches to decipher the function of mouse genes using various mutagenesis technologies. This review discusses what tools are currently available for manipulating and mutagenizing the mouse genome, such as ethylnitrosourea and gene trap mutagenesis, engineered inversions and deletions using the cre-lox system, and proviral insertional mutagenesis in somatic cells, and how these are being used to uncover gene function.

  1. High-Level Recombinant Human Lysozyme Expressed in Milk of Transgenic Pigs Can Inhibit the Growth of Escherichia coli in the Duodenum and Influence Intestinal Morphology of Sucking Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Dan; Li, Qiuyan; Wu, Zhibin; Shang, Shengzhe; Liu, Shen; Wen, Xiao; Li, Zhiyuan; Wu, Fangfang; Li, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Lysozyme is often used as a feed additive and acts as an antimicrobial protein that enhances immune function and defends against pathogenic bacteria in pigs. In this study, we genetically added recombinant human lysozyme (rhLZ) to sow milk by somatic cell nuclear transfer and investigated whether the presence of recombinant human lysozyme can influence intestinal microbiota and mophology in sucking pigs. We generated transgenic cloned pigs and the first-generation hybrids (F1) produced high levels of rhLZ in milk. The average concentration of rhLZ was 116.34±24.46 mg/L in the milk of F1 sows, which was 1500-fold higher than that of the native pig lysozyme. In vitro, it was demonstrated that rhLZ in milk of transgenic pigs had enzyme levels at 92,272±26,413 U/mL. In a feeding experiment, a total of 40 newborn piglets were nursed by four transgenic sows and four sibling non-transgenic sows (F1), with five piglets per gilt. The piglets were allowed to nurse for 21 days and the sow milk was the only source of nutrition for the piglets. All piglets were slaughtered on postnatal day 22. Six types of bacteria were cultured and analyzed to detect the impact of rhLZ on gut microbiota. The number of Escherichia coli in the duodenum of piglets reared by transgenic sows was significantly decreased (p<0.001) and their villus height to crypt depth ratio in the intestine were increased due to the significant decrease of crypt depth in the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum (p<0.001). Together, we successfully generated rhLZ transgenic cloned pigs and elevated lysozyme level in nuring piglets. The results of the feeding experiments demonstrated that rhLZ-enhanced milk can inhibit the growth of E. coli in the duodenum and positively influence intestinal morphology without adversely affecting weight gain or piglet growth. PMID:24586544

  2. High-level recombinant human lysozyme expressed in milk of transgenic pigs can inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli in the duodenum and influence intestinal morphology of sucking pigs.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dan; Li, Qiuyan; Wu, Zhibin; Shang, Shengzhe; Liu, Shen; Wen, Xiao; Li, Zhiyuan; Wu, Fangfang; Li, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Lysozyme is often used as a feed additive and acts as an antimicrobial protein that enhances immune function and defends against pathogenic bacteria in pigs. In this study, we genetically added recombinant human lysozyme (rhLZ) to sow milk by somatic cell nuclear transfer and investigated whether the presence of recombinant human lysozyme can influence intestinal microbiota and morphology in sucking pigs. We generated transgenic cloned pigs and the first-generation hybrids (F1) produced high levels of rhLZ in milk. The average concentration of rhLZ was 116.34 ± 24.46 mg/L in the milk of F1 sows, which was 1500-fold higher than that of the native pig lysozyme. In vitro, it was demonstrated that rhLZ in milk of transgenic pigs had enzyme levels at 92,272 ± 26,413 U/mL. In a feeding experiment, a total of 40 newborn piglets were nursed by four transgenic sows and four sibling non-transgenic sows (F1), with five piglets per gilt. The piglets were allowed to nurse for 21 days and the sow milk was the only source of nutrition for the piglets. All piglets were slaughtered on postnatal day 22. Six types of bacteria were cultured and analyzed to detect the impact of rhLZ on gut microbiota. The number of Escherichia coli in the duodenum of piglets reared by transgenic sows was significantly decreased (p<0.001) and their villus height to crypt depth ratio in the intestine were increased due to the significant decrease of crypt depth in the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum (p<0.001). Together, we successfully generated rhLZ transgenic cloned pigs and elevated lysozyme level in nuring piglets. The results of the feeding experiments demonstrated that rhLZ-enhanced milk can inhibit the growth of E. coli in the duodenum and positively influence intestinal morphology without adversely affecting weight gain or piglet growth.

  3. An endoderm-specific transcriptional enhancer from the mouse Gata4 gene requires GATA and homeodomain protein binding sites for function in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Anabel; Schachterle, William; Xu, Shan-Mei; Black, Brian L.

    2009-01-01

    Several transcription factors function in the specification and differentiation of the endoderm, including the zinc finger transcription factor GATA4. Despite its essential r ole in endoderm development, the transcriptional control of the Gata4 gene in the developing endoderm and its derivatives remains incompletely understood. Here, we identify a distal enhancer from the Gata4 gene, which directs expression exclusively to the visceral and definitive endoderm of transgenic mouse embryos. The activity of this enhancer is initially broad within the definitive endoderm but later restricts to developing endoderm-derived tissues, including pancreas, glandular stomach, and duodenum. The activity of this enhancer in vivo is dependent on evolutionarily-conserved HOX and GATA binding sites, which are bound by PDX-1 and GATA4, respectively. These studies establish Gata4 as a direct transcriptional target of homeodomain and GATA transcription factors in the endoderm and support a model in which GATA4 functions in the transcriptional network for pancreas formation. PMID:19777593

  4. Chandra Catches the `Mouse'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Astronomers have used an x-ray image to make the first detailed study of the behavior of high-energy particles around a fast moving pulsar. This image, from NASA's Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO), shows the shock wave created as a pulsar plows supersonically through interstellar space. These results will provide insight into theories for the production of powerful winds of matter and antimatter by pulsars. Chandra's image of the glowing cloud, known as the Mouse, shows a stubby bright column of high-energy particles, about four light years in length, swept back by the pulsar's interaction with interstellar gas. The intense source at the head of the X-ray column is the pulsar, estimated to be moving through space at about 1.3 million miles per hour. A cone-shaped cloud of radio-wave-emitting particles envelopes the x-ray column. The Mouse, a.k.a. G359.23-0.82, was discovered in 1987 by radio astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array in New Mexico. G359.23-0.82 gets its name from its appearance in radio images that show a compact snout, a bulbous body, and a remarkable long, narrow, tail that extends for about 55 light years. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama manages the Chandler program.

  5. Assessment of resveratrol, apocynin and taurine on mechanical-metabolic uncoupling and oxidative stress in a mouse model of duchenne muscular dystrophy: A comparison with the gold standard, α-methyl prednisolone.

    PubMed

    Capogrosso, Roberta Francesca; Cozzoli, Anna; Mantuano, Paola; Camerino, Giulia Maria; Massari, Ada Maria; Sblendorio, Valeriana Teresa; De Bellis, Michela; Tamma, Roberto; Giustino, Arcangela; Nico, Beatrice; Montagnani, Monica; De Luca, Annamaria

    2016-04-01

    Antioxidants have a great potential as adjuvant therapeutics in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, although systematic comparisons at pre-clinical level are limited. The present study is a head-to-head assessment, in the exercised mdx mouse model of DMD, of natural compounds, resveratrol and apocynin, and of the amino acid taurine, in comparison with the gold standard α-methyl prednisolone (PDN). The rationale was to target the overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via disease-related pathways that are worsened by mechanical-metabolic impairment such as inflammation and over-activity of NADPH oxidase (NOX) (taurine and apocynin, respectively) or the failing ROS detoxification mechanisms via sirtuin-1 (SIRT1)-peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) (resveratrol). Resveratrol (100mg/kg i.p. 5days/week), apocynin (38mg/kg/day per os), taurine (1g/kg/day per os), and PDN (1mg/kg i.p., 5days/week) were administered for 4-5 weeks to mdx mice in parallel with a standard protocol of treadmill exercise and the outcome was evaluated with a multidisciplinary approach in vivo and ex vivo on pathology-related end-points and biomarkers of oxidative stress. Resveratrol≥taurine>apocynin enhanced in vivo mouse force similarly to PDN. All the compounds reduced the production of superoxide anion, assessed by dihydroethidium staining, with apocynin being as effective as PDN, and ameliorated electrophysiological biomarkers of oxidative stress. Resveratrol also significantly reduced plasma levels of creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase. Force of isolated muscles was little ameliorated. However, the three compounds improved histopathology of gastrocnemius muscle more than PDN. Taurine>apocynin>PDN significantly decreased activated NF-kB positive myofibers. Thus, compounds targeting NOX-ROS or SIRT1/PGC-1α pathways differently modulate clinically relevant DMD-related endpoints according to their mechanism of action. With the

  6. Assessment of resveratrol, apocynin and taurine on mechanical-metabolic uncoupling and oxidative stress in a mouse model of duchenne muscular dystrophy: A comparison with the gold standard, α-methyl prednisolone.

    PubMed

    Capogrosso, Roberta Francesca; Cozzoli, Anna; Mantuano, Paola; Camerino, Giulia Maria; Massari, Ada Maria; Sblendorio, Valeriana Teresa; De Bellis, Michela; Tamma, Roberto; Giustino, Arcangela; Nico, Beatrice; Montagnani, Monica; De Luca, Annamaria

    2016-04-01

    Antioxidants have a great potential as adjuvant therapeutics in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, although systematic comparisons at pre-clinical level are limited. The present study is a head-to-head assessment, in the exercised mdx mouse model of DMD, of natural compounds, resveratrol and apocynin, and of the amino acid taurine, in comparison with the gold standard α-methyl prednisolone (PDN). The rationale was to target the overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via disease-related pathways that are worsened by mechanical-metabolic impairment such as inflammation and over-activity of NADPH oxidase (NOX) (taurine and apocynin, respectively) or the failing ROS detoxification mechanisms via sirtuin-1 (SIRT1)-peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) (resveratrol). Resveratrol (100mg/kg i.p. 5days/week), apocynin (38mg/kg/day per os), taurine (1g/kg/day per os), and PDN (1mg/kg i.p., 5days/week) were administered for 4-5 weeks to mdx mice in parallel with a standard protocol of treadmill exercise and the outcome was evaluated with a multidisciplinary approach in vivo and ex vivo on pathology-related end-points and biomarkers of oxidative stress. Resveratrol≥taurine>apocynin enhanced in vivo mouse force similarly to PDN. All the compounds reduced the production of superoxide anion, assessed by dihydroethidium staining, with apocynin being as effective as PDN, and ameliorated electrophysiological biomarkers of oxidative stress. Resveratrol also significantly reduced plasma levels of creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase. Force of isolated muscles was little ameliorated. However, the three compounds improved histopathology of gastrocnemius muscle more than PDN. Taurine>apocynin>PDN significantly decreased activated NF-kB positive myofibers. Thus, compounds targeting NOX-ROS or SIRT1/PGC-1α pathways differently modulate clinically relevant DMD-related endpoints according to their mechanism of action. With the

  7. Comparative toxicogenomic analysis of oral Cr(VI) exposure effects in rat and mouse small intestinal epithelia

    SciTech Connect

    Kopec, Anna K.; Thompson, Chad M.; Kim, Suntae; Forgacs, Agnes L.; Zacharewski, Timothy R.

    2012-07-15

    Continuous exposure to high concentrations of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in drinking water results in intestinal tumors in mice but not rats. Concentration-dependent gene expression effects were evaluated in female F344 rat duodenal and jejunal epithelia following 7 and 90 days of exposure to 0.3–520 mg/L (as sodium dichromate dihydrate, SDD) in drinking water. Whole-genome microarrays identified 3269 and 1815 duodenal, and 4557 and 1534 jejunal differentially expressed genes at 8 and 91 days, respectively, with significant overlaps between the intestinal segments. Functional annotation identified gene expression changes associated with oxidative stress, cell cycle, cell death, and immune response that were consistent with reported changes in redox status and histopathology. Comparative analysis with B6C3F1 mouse data from a similarly designed study identified 2790 differentially expressed rat orthologs in the duodenum compared to 5013 mouse orthologs at day 8, and only 1504 rat and 3484 mouse orthologs at day 91. Automated dose–response modeling resulted in similar median EC{sub 50}s in the rodent duodenal and jejunal mucosae. Comparative examination of differentially expressed genes also identified divergently regulated orthologs. Comparable numbers of differentially expressed genes were observed at equivalent Cr concentrations (μg Cr/g duodenum). However, mice accumulated higher Cr levels than rats at ≥ 170 mg/L SDD, resulting in a ∼ 2-fold increase in the number of differentially expressed genes. These qualitative and quantitative differences in differential gene expression, which correlate with differences in tissue dose, likely contribute to the disparate intestinal tumor outcomes. -- Highlights: ► Cr(VI) elicits dose-dependent changes in gene expression in rat intestine. ► Cr(VI) elicits less differential gene expression in rats compared to mice. ► Cr(VI) gene expression can be phenotypically anchored to intestinal changes. ► Species

  8. Staphylococcus aureus Colonization of the Mouse Gastrointestinal Tract Is Modulated by Wall Teichoic Acid, Capsule, and Surface Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Misawa, Yoshiki; Kelley, Kathryn A.; Wang, Xiaogang; Wang, Linhui; Park, Wan Beom; Birtel, Johannes; Saslowsky, David; Lee, Jean C.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus colonizes the nose, throat, skin, and gastrointestinal (GI) tract of humans. GI carriage of S. aureus is difficult to eradicate and has been shown to facilitate the transmission of the bacterium among individuals. Although staphylococcal colonization of the GI tract is asymptomatic, it increases the likelihood of infection, particularly skin and soft tissue infections caused by USA300 isolates. We established a mouse model of persistent S. aureus GI colonization and characterized the impact of selected surface antigens on colonization. In competition experiments, an acapsular mutant colonized better than the parental strain Newman, whereas mutants defective in sortase A and clumping factor A showed impaired ability to colonize the GI tract. Mutants lacking protein A, clumping factor B, poly-N-acetyl glucosamine, or SdrCDE showed no defect in colonization. An S. aureus wall teichoic acid (WTA) mutant (ΔtagO) failed to colonize the mouse nose or GI tract, and the tagO and clfA mutants showed reduced adherence in vitro to intestinal epithelial cells. The tagO mutant was recovered in lower numbers than the wild type strain in the murine stomach and duodenum 1 h after inoculation. This reduced fitness correlated with the in vitro susceptibility of the tagO mutant to bile salts, proteases, and a gut-associated defensin. Newman ΔtagO showed enhanced susceptibility to autolysis, and an autolysin (atl) tagO double mutant abrogated this phenotype. However, the atl tagO mutant did not survive better in the mouse GI tract than the tagO mutant. Our results indicate that the failure of the tagO mutant to colonize the GI tract correlates with its poor adherence and susceptibility to bactericidal factors within the mouse gut, but not to enhanced activity of its major autolysin. PMID:26201029

  9. The mouse genome informatics and the mouse genome database

    SciTech Connect

    Maltais, L.J.; Blackburn, R.E.; Bradt, D.W.

    1994-09-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD) is a centralized, comprehensive database of the mouse genome that includes genetic mapping data, comparative mapping data, gene descriptions, mutant phenotype descriptions, strains and allelic polymorphism data, inbred strain characteristics, physical mapping data, and molecular probes and clones data. Data in MGD are obtained from the published literature and by electronic transfer from laboratories working on large backcross panels of mice. MGD provides tools that enable the user to search the database, retrieve data, generate reports, analyze data, annotate records, and build genetic maps. The Encyclopedia of the Mouse Genome provides a graphic user interface to mouse genome data. It consists of software tools including: LinkMap, a graphic display of genetic linkage maps with the ability to magnify regions of high locus density: CytoMap, a graphic display of cytogenetic maps showing banded chromosomes with cytogenetic locations of genes and chromosomal aberrations; CATS, a catalog searching tool for text retrieval of mouse locus descriptions. These software tools provide access to the following data sets: Chromosome Committee Reports, MIT Genome Center data, GBASE reports, Mouse Locus Catalog (MLC), and Mouse Cytogenetic Mapping Data. The MGD is available to the scientific community through the World Wide Web (WWW) and Gopher. In addition GBASE can be accessed via the Internet.

  10. Cloning the laboratory mouse.

    PubMed

    Wakayama, T; Yanagimachi, R

    1999-06-01

    A brief account is given of early attempts to clone mammals (mice) by transferring cells (nuclei) of preimplantation embryos into enucleated oocytes, zygotes or blastomeres of two-cell embryos. This is followed by a brief review of recent successes using adult somatic cells: mammary gland cells for sheep, muscle cells for cattle and cumulus cells for mice. We have developed a technique for cloning the laboratory mouse by transferring cumulus cell nuclei into enucleated oocytes. With this technique, we have produced a population of over 80 cloned animals, and have carried the process over four generations. Development and fertility of these appear normal. However, the yield is very low; only approximately 1% of injected oocytes are carried to term. The challenge is now to understand the reason for this high loss. Is it a problem of technique, genomic reprogramming, somatic mutation, imprinting or incompatible cell cycle phases?

  11. Whole mouse cryo-imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, David; Roy, Debashish; Steyer, Grant; Gargesha, Madhusudhana; Stone, Meredith; McKinley, Eliot

    2008-03-01

    The Case cryo-imaging system is a section and image system which allows one to acquire micron-scale, information rich, whole mouse color bright field and molecular fluorescence images of an entire mouse. Cryo-imaging is used in a variety of applications, including mouse and embryo anatomical phenotyping, drug delivery, imaging agents, metastastic cancer, stem cells, and very high resolution vascular imaging, among many. Cryo-imaging fills the gap between whole animal in vivo imaging and histology, allowing one to image a mouse along the continuum from the mouse -> organ -> tissue structure -> cell -> sub-cellular domains. In this overview, we describe the technology and a variety of exciting applications. Enhancements to the system now enable tiled acquisition of high resolution images to cover an entire mouse. High resolution fluorescence imaging, aided by a novel subtraction processing algorithm to remove sub-surface fluorescence, makes it possible to detect fluorescently-labeled single cells. Multi-modality experiments in Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Cryo-imaging of a whole mouse demonstrate superior resolution of cryo-images and efficiency of registration techniques. The 3D results demonstrate the novel true-color volume visualization tools we have developed and the inherent advantage of cryo-imaging in providing unlimited depth of field and spatial resolution. The recent results continue to demonstrate the value cryo-imaging provides in the field of small animal imaging research.

  12. Angiotensin II modulates mouse skeletal muscle resting conductance to chloride and potassium ions and calcium homeostasis via the AT1 receptor and NADPH oxidase.

    PubMed

    Cozzoli, Anna; Liantonio, Antonella; Conte, Elena; Cannone, Maria; Massari, Ada Maria; Giustino, Arcangela; Scaramuzzi, Antonia; Pierno, Sabata; Mantuano, Paola; Capogrosso, Roberta Francesca; Camerino, Giulia Maria; De Luca, Annamaria

    2014-10-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II) plays a role in muscle wasting and remodeling; however, little evidence shows its direct effects on specific muscle functions. We presently investigated the acute in vitro effects of ANG II on resting ionic conductance and calcium homeostasis of mouse extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle fibers, based on previous findings that in vivo inhibition of ANG II counteracts the impairment of macroscopic ClC-1 chloride channel conductance (gCl) in the mdx mouse model of muscular dystrophy. By means of intracellular microelectrode recordings we found that ANG II reduced gCl in the nanomolar range and in a concentration-dependent manner (EC50 = 0.06 μM) meanwhile increasing potassium conductance (gK). Both effects were inhibited by the ANG II receptors type 1 (AT1)-receptor antagonist losartan and the protein kinase C inhibitor chelerythrine; no antagonism was observed with the AT2 antagonist PD123,319. The scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS) N-acetyl cysteine and the NADPH-oxidase (NOX) inhibitor apocynin also antagonized ANG II effects on resting ionic conductances; the ANG II-dependent gK increase was blocked by iberiotoxin, an inhibitor of calcium-activated potassium channels. ANG II also lowered the threshold for myofiber and muscle contraction. Both ANG II and the AT1 agonist L162,313 increased the intracellular calcium transients, measured by fura-2, with a two-step pattern. These latter effects were not observed in the presence of losartan and of the phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 and the in absence of extracellular calcium, disclosing a Gq-mediated calcium entry mechanism. The data show for the first time that the AT1-mediated ANG II pathway, also involving NOX and ROS, directly modulates ion channels and calcium homeostasis in adult myofibers.

  13. Angiotensin II modulates mouse skeletal muscle resting conductance to chloride and potassium ions and calcium homeostasis via the AT1 receptor and NADPH oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Cozzoli, Anna; Liantonio, Antonella; Conte, Elena; Cannone, Maria; Massari, Ada Maria; Giustino, Arcangela; Scaramuzzi, Antonia; Pierno, Sabata; Mantuano, Paola; Capogrosso, Roberta Francesca; Camerino, Giulia Maria

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II) plays a role in muscle wasting and remodeling; however, little evidence shows its direct effects on specific muscle functions. We presently investigated the acute in vitro effects of ANG II on resting ionic conductance and calcium homeostasis of mouse extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle fibers, based on previous findings that in vivo inhibition of ANG II counteracts the impairment of macroscopic ClC-1 chloride channel conductance (gCl) in the mdx mouse model of muscular dystrophy. By means of intracellular microelectrode recordings we found that ANG II reduced gCl in the nanomolar range and in a concentration-dependent manner (EC50 = 0.06 μM) meanwhile increasing potassium conductance (gK). Both effects were inhibited by the ANG II receptors type 1 (AT1)-receptor antagonist losartan and the protein kinase C inhibitor chelerythrine; no antagonism was observed with the AT2 antagonist PD123,319. The scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS) N-acetyl cysteine and the NADPH-oxidase (NOX) inhibitor apocynin also antagonized ANG II effects on resting ionic conductances; the ANG II-dependent gK increase was blocked by iberiotoxin, an inhibitor of calcium-activated potassium channels. ANG II also lowered the threshold for myofiber and muscle contraction. Both ANG II and the AT1 agonist L162,313 increased the intracellular calcium transients, measured by fura-2, with a two-step pattern. These latter effects were not observed in the presence of losartan and of the phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 and the in absence of extracellular calcium, disclosing a Gq-mediated calcium entry mechanism. The data show for the first time that the AT1-mediated ANG II pathway, also involving NOX and ROS, directly modulates ion channels and calcium homeostasis in adult myofibers. PMID:25080489

  14. Computer Workstation: Pointer/Mouse

    MedlinePlus

    ... and long term use. Potential Hazards: When the sensitivity for the input device is not appropriately set, ... provide adequate control. A mouse that has insufficient sensitivity may require large deviation of the wrist to ...

  15. Mouse models for cancer research

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Moore, Lynette; Ji, Ping

    2011-01-01

    Mouse models of cancer enable researchers to learn about tumor biology in complicated and dynamic physiological systems. Since the development of gene targeting in mice, cancer biologists have been among the most frequent users of transgenic mouse models, which have dramatically increased knowledge about how cancers form and grow. The Chinese Journal of Cancer will publish a series of papers reporting the use of mouse models in studying genetic events in cancer cases. This editorial is an overview of the development and applications of mouse models of cancer and directs the reader to upcoming papers describing the use of these models to be published in coming issues, beginning with three articles in the current issue. PMID:21352691

  16. Mouse Models of Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Sungsook; Yang, Mijeong

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. Animal models have been used to elucidate the details of the molecular mechanisms of various cancers. However, most inbred strains of mice have resistance to gastric carcinogenesis. Helicobacter infection and carcinogen treatment have been used to establish mouse models that exhibit phenotypes similar to those of human gastric cancer. A large number of transgenic and knockout mouse models of gastric cancer have been developed using genetic engineering. A combination of carcinogens and gene manipulation has been applied to facilitate development of advanced gastric cancer; however, it is rare for mouse models of gastric cancer to show aggressive, metastatic phenotypes required for preclinical studies. Here, we review current mouse models of gastric carcinogenesis and provide our perspectives on future developments in this field. PMID:25061535

  17. Reactivity of mouse antibodies against bromelain-treated mouse erythrocytes with thrombin-treated mouse platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, S

    1989-01-01

    The reactivity of mouse antibodies against bromelain-treated mouse erythrocytes (BrMRBC) with mouse platelets before and after thrombin treatment was assessed by flow cytometry. Anti-BrMRBC antibodies could bind to thrombin-treated platelets, although normal platelets were also weakly reactive with the antibodies. The binding of anti-BrMRBC antibodies to platelets was confirmed by complement-dependent lysis. It is suggested that thrombin-activated platelets may be a real target for anti-BrMRBC antibodies. PMID:2467876

  18. Construction of mouse adenovirus type 1 mutants.

    PubMed

    Cauthen, Angela N; Welton, Amanda R; Spindler, Katherine R

    2007-01-01

    Mouse adenovirus provides a model for studying adenovirus pathogenesis in the natural host. The ability to make viral mutants allows the investigation of specific mouse adenoviral gene contributions to virus-host interactions. Methods for propagation and titration of wild-type mouse adenovirus, production of viral DNA and viral DNA-protein complex, and transfection of mouse cells to obtain mouse adenovirus mutants are described in this chapter. Plaque purification, propagation, and titration of the mutant viruses are also presented.

  19. Mink-mouse interspecific hybridomas.

    PubMed

    Ufimtseva, E G; Galakhar, N L; Matjakhina, L D; Khlebodarova, T M; Djatchenko, S N

    1991-08-01

    Mink-mouse interspecific hybridomas were produced by fusion of the american mink spleen cells with the NSO cells. Seven cloned lines of the mink-mouse hybridoma were isolated, and their functional mink Ig secretion and karyological characteristics are given. During cytogenetic analysis of mink-mouse hybridoma cell lines, we observed the elimination of mink chromosomes, and inter- and intralineral variability of the numbers of the cells with particular quantities of mink DNA. We did not find that the characteristic peculiarities of mink DNA distribution in the hybridoma cell lines had any bearing upon the secretion or non-secretion of mink Ig. There was no synthesis of lambda-L-chains of mink Ig in line 7 cells because the line lost the lambda-gene. With the aid of in situ hybridization with 3H-labeled total mink DNA, a considerable transformation of hybridoma cell karyotype was observed. Multiple integration of the mink DNA into mouse chromosomes and the appearance of chromosomes not characteristic for either the mink or mouse parent cells were noted. Increasing numbers of cells with translocations of mink chromosomes fragments into mouse chromosomes were found in the hybridoma lines cultivated for lengthy periods. PMID:1937502

  20. Mouse genetics: Catalogue and scissors

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Young Hoon; Baek, In-Jeoung; Seong, Je Kyung; Kim, Jin-Soo; Lee, Han-Woong

    2012-01-01

    Phenotypic analysis of gene-specific knockout (KO) mice has revolutionized our understanding of in vivo gene functions. As the use of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells is inevitable for conventional gene targeting, the generation of knockout mice remains a very time-consuming and expensive process. To accelerate the large-scale production and phenotype analyses of KO mice, international efforts have organized global consortia such as the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) and International Mouse Phenotype Consortium (IMPC), and they are persistently expanding the KO mouse catalogue that is publicly available for the researches studying specific genes of interests in vivo. However, new technologies, adopting zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) or Transcription Activator-Like Effector (TALE) Nucleases (TALENs) to edit the mouse genome, are now emerging as valuable and effective shortcuts alternative for the conventional gene targeting using ES cells. Here, we introduce the recent achievement of IKMC, and evaluate the significance of ZFN/TALEN technology in mouse genetics. [BMB Reports 2012; 45(12): 686-692] PMID:23261053

  1. Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction Analysis of the Mouse Cyp2j Subfamily: Tissue Distribution and Regulation.

    PubMed

    Graves, Joan P; Gruzdev, Artiom; Bradbury, J Alyce; DeGraff, Laura M; Li, Huiling; House, John S; Hoopes, Samantha L; Edin, Matthew L; Zeldin, Darryl C

    2015-08-01

    Members of the cytochrome P450 CYP2J subfamily are expressed in multiple tissues in mice and humans. These enzymes are active in the metabolism of fatty acids to generate bioactive compounds. Herein we report new methods and results for quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis for the seven genes (Cyp2j5, Cyp2j6, Cyp2j8, Cyp2j9, Cyp2j11, Cyp2j12, and Cyp2j13) of the mouse Cyp2j subfamily. SYBR Green primer sets were developed and compared with commercially available TaqMan primer/probe assays for specificity toward mouse Cyp2j cDNA, and analysis of tissue distribution and regulation of Cyp2j genes. Each TaqMan primer/probe set and SYBR Green primer set were shown to be specific for their intended mouse Cyp2j cDNA. Tissue distribution of the mouse Cyp2j isoforms confirmed similar patterns of expression between the two qPCR methods. Cyp2j5 and Cyp2j13 were highly expressed in male kidneys, and Cyp2j11 was highly expressed in both male and female kidneys. Cyp2j6 was expressed in multiple tissues, with the highest expression in the small intestine and duodenum. Cyp2j8 was detected in various tissues, with highest expression found in the skin. Cyp2j9 was highly expressed in the brain, liver, and lung. Cyp2j12 was predominately expressed in the brain. We also determined the Cyp2j isoform expression in Cyp2j5 knockout mice to determine whether there was compensatory regulation of other Cyp2j isoforms, and we assessed Cyp2j isoform regulation during various inflammatory models, including influenza A, bacterial lipopolysaccharide, house dust mite allergen, and corn pollen. Both qPCR methods detected similar suppression of Cyp2j6 and Cyp2j9 during inflammation in the lung.

  2. [A Case of Von Hippel-Lindau Disease with Nonfunctioning Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors Treated by Duodenum-Preserving Resection of the Head of the Pancreas and Spleen-Preserving Resection of the Tail of the Pancreas].

    PubMed

    Umehara, Yutaka; Umehara, Minoru; Tokura, Tomohisa; Yachi, Takafumi; Takahashi, Kenichi; Morita, Takayuki; Hakamada, Kenichi

    2015-10-01

    A 26-year-old woman presented to our department with a diagnosis of multiple nonfunctioning pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. She had a family history of pheochromocytoma and a medical history of bilateral adrenalectomy for pheochromocytoma at the age of 25 years. During follow-up treatment for adrenal insufficiency after the surgery, highly enhanced tumors in the pancreas were detected on contrast-enhanced CT. Other examinations found that the patient did not satisfy the clinical criteria for von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease. Considering her age and risk of developing multiple heterotopic and heterochronous tumors, we performed a duodenum-preserving resection of the head of the pancreas and spleen-preserving resection of the tail of the pancreas with informed consent. The histopathological findings revealed that all of the tumors were NET G1. She underwent genetic testing postoperatively and was diagnosed with VHL disease. This diagnosis meant that we were able to create an optimal treatment plan for the patient. If a tumor predisposition syndrome is suspected, VHL disease should be borne in mind and genetic testing after genetic counseling should be duly considered.

  3. The mRNA and Protein Levels of Tubulin and β-Actin Are Greatly Reduced in the Proximal Duodenum of Mice Relative to the Rest of the Small Intestines.

    PubMed

    Yu, Sungsook; Hwang, Hyekyung E; Yun, Nakhyeon; Goldenring, James R; Nam, Ki Taek

    2015-09-01

    To accurately quantify mRNA and protein levels, it is critical to choose appropriate internal standards. As the expression of housekeeping genes is assumed to remain constant, they are often employed to normalize signals to correct for sample-to-sample variations. However, recent studies have documented that β-actin and Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) expression levels change in response to various stimuli during proliferation, activation, and differentiation. We investigated levels of α-, β-, γ-tubulin, β-actin, and GAPDH vary across the gastrointestinal tract of mice. We found that different regions of the small intestines had dramatically different expression profiles, as measured by western blot, quantitative Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and immunohistochemical staining. These results revealed that the expression levels of tubulins and β-actin were dramatically lower in the proximal duodenum, relative to the rest of the small intestines. These varying levels of housekeeping genes may reflect differences in the activities of specialized tissues and suggest unique requirements for tubulins in these tissue types. We conclude that the use of a single housekeeping gene to normalize gene expression in the gastrointestinal tracts of mice may introduce errors, as measured differences in gene expression may reflect regulation of the internal control rather than the mRNA or protein under investigation.

  4. 10. international mouse genome conference

    SciTech Connect

    Meisler, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    Ten years after hosting the First International Mammalian Genome Conference in Paris in 1986, Dr. Jean-Louis Guenet presided over the Tenth Conference at the Pasteur Institute, October 7--10, 1996. The 1986 conference was a satellite to the Human Gene Mapping Workshop and had approximately 50 attendees. The 1996 meeting was attended by 300 scientists from around the world. In the interim, the number of mapped loci in the mouse increased from 1,000 to over 20,000. This report contains a listing of the program and its participants, and two articles that review the meeting and the role of the laboratory mouse in the Human Genome project. More than 200 papers were presented at the conference covering the following topics: International mouse chromosome committee meetings; Mutant generation and identification; Physical and genetic maps; New technology and resources; Chromatin structure and gene regulation; Rate and hamster genetic maps; Informatics and databases; and Quantitative trait analysis.

  5. Teratology studies in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Marsden, Edward; Leroy, Mariline

    2013-01-01

    The rat is the routine species of choice as the rodent model for regulatory safety testing of xenobiotics such as medicinal products, food additives, and other chemicals. However, the rat is not always suitable for pharmacological, toxicological, immunogenic, pharmacokinetic, or even practical reasons. Under such circumstances, the mouse offers an alternative for finding a suitable rodent model acceptable to the regulatory authorities. Since all essential routes of administration are possible, the short reproductive cycle and large litter size of the mouse make it a species well adapted for use in teratology studies. Given that good quality animals, including virgin mated females, can be acquired relatively easily and inexpensively, the mouse has been used in reproductive toxicity studies for decades and study protocols are well established.

  6. Modeling metastasis in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Bos, Paula D.; Nguyen, Don X.; Massagué, Joan

    2010-01-01

    Metastasis is a complex clinical and biological problem presently under intense study, and several model systems are in use to experimentally recapitulate and dissect the various steps of the metastatic process. Genetically engineered mouse models provide faithful renditions of events in tumor progression, angiogenesis, and local invasion that set the stage for metastasis, whereas engrafting of human or mouse tumor tissues into mouse hosts has been successfully exploited to investigate metastatic dissemination and colonization of distant organs. Real-time, high-resolution microscopy in live animals, and comprehensive genetic and molecular profiling are effective tools to interrogate diverse metastatic cancer cell phenotypes as well as the metastatic tumor microenvironment in different organs. By integrating the information obtained with these complementary approaches the field is currently obtaining an unprecedented level of understanding of the biology, molecular basis, and therapeutic vulnerabilities of metastasis. PMID:20598638

  7. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD): mouse biology and model systems.

    PubMed

    Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E; Blake, Judith A

    2008-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database, (MGD, http://www.informatics.jax.org/), integrates genetic, genomic and phenotypic information about the laboratory mouse, a primary animal model for studying human biology and disease. MGD data content includes comprehensive characterization of genes and their functions, standardized descriptions of mouse phenotypes, extensive integration of DNA and protein sequence data, normalized representation of genome and genome variant information including comparative data on mammalian genes. Data within MGD are obtained from diverse sources including manual curation of the biomedical literature, direct contributions from individual investigator's laboratories and major informatics resource centers such as Ensembl, UniProt and NCBI. MGD collaborates with the bioinformatics community on the development of data and semantic standards such as the Gene Ontology (GO) and the Mammalian Phenotype (MP) Ontology. MGD provides a data-mining platform that enables the development of translational research hypotheses based on comparative genotype, phenotype and functional analyses. Both web-based querying and computational access to data are provided. Recent improvements in MGD described here include the association of gene trap data with mouse genes and a new batch query capability for customized data access and retrieval.

  8. International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) —

    Cancer.gov

    The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) comprises a group of major mouse genetics research institutions along with national funding organisations formed to address the challenge of developing an encyclopedia of mammalian gene function.

  9. Lipid Extraction from Mouse Feces

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Daniel; Yang, Qin; Kahn, Barbara B.

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of feces composition is important for the study of energy metabolism, which comprises various measurements of energy intake, energy expenditure, and energy wasting. The current protocol describes how to measure energy-dense lipids in mouse feces using a modification of the method proposed by Folch et al. (1957). PMID:27110587

  10. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients.

  11. APOPTOSIS IN WHOLE MOUSE OVARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Apoptosis in Whole Mouse Ovaries
    Robert M. Zucker Susan C. Jeffay and Sally D. Perreault
    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, 27711.

  12. Mouse Models of Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Phillipe D.; Sakowski, Stacey A.; Feldman, Eva L.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is the most common complication of diabetes and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. DPN is characterized by progressive, distal-to-proximal degeneration of peripheral nerves that leads to pain, weakness, and eventual loss of sensation. The mechanisms underlying DPN pathogenesis are uncertain, and other than tight glycemic control in type 1 patients, there is no effective treatment. Mouse models of type 1 (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are critical to improving our understanding of DPN pathophysiology and developing novel treatment strategies. In this review, we discuss the most widely used T1DM and T2DM mouse models for DPN research, with emphasis on the main neurologic phenotype of each model. We also discuss important considerations for selecting appropriate models for T1DM and T2DM DPN studies and describe the promise of novel emerging diabetic mouse models for DPN research. The development, characterization, and comprehensive neurologic phenotyping of clinically relevant mouse models for T1DM and T2DM will provide valuable resources for future studies examining DPN pathogenesis and novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:24615439

  13. Mouse models of myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Beachy, Sarah H.; Aplan, Peter D.

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Three general approaches have been used in an attempt to model myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) in mice, including treatment with mutagens or carcinogens, xenotransplantation of human MDS cells, and genetic engineering of mouse hematopoietic cells. Xenotransplantation of cells from MDS patients has proved difficult, possibly due to the innate characteristics of the MDS clone and microenvironmental influences, including adverse effects of a host immune response. Genetic engineering of hematopoietic cells or mice has been accomplished by in vitro transfer of genes to mouse hematopoietic cells with subsequent transplantation into an irradiated host, or by modification of the mouse germline to generate mice with altered expression of genes of interest. A number of genes have been studied using these approaches, including RUNX1, Evi1, Npm1, SALL4B, NUP98-HOXD13, BCL2/NRAS, Arid4a, Polg and Dido. This review discusses the phenotypes observed in available mouse models for MDS with a concentration on a model that leads to aberrant expression of conserved homeobox (HOX) genes that are important regulators of normal hematopoiesis. Utilizing these models of MDS should allow a more complete understanding of the disease process and provide a platform for pre-clinical testing of therapeutic approaches. PMID:20359631

  14. Mouse Cochlear Whole Mount Immunofluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Akil, Omar; Lustig, Lawrence R.

    2016-01-01

    This protocol comprises the entire process of immunofluorescence staining on mouse cochlea whole mount, starting from tissue preparation to the mounting of the tissue. This technique provides “three-dimensional” views of the stained components in order to determine the localization of a protein of interest in the tissue in its natural state and environment. PMID:27547786

  15. Mouse models of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Ban, Joanne; Phillips, William D

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a muscle weakness disease characterized by autoantibodies that target components of the neuromuscular junction, impairing synaptic transmission. The most common form of myasthenia gravis involves antibodies that bind the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the postsynaptic membrane. Many of the remaining cases are due to antibodies against muscle specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK). Recently, autoantibodies against LRP4 (another component of the MuSK signaling complex in the postsynaptic membrane) were identified as the likely cause of myasthenia gravis in some patients. Fatiguing weakness is the common symptom in all forms of myasthenia gravis, but muscles of the body are differentially affected, for reasons that are not fully understood. Much of what we have learnt about the immunological and neurobiological aspects of the pathogenesis derives from mouse models. The most widely used mouse models involve either passive transfer of autoantibodies, or active immunization of the mouse with acetylcholine receptors or MuSK protein. These models can provide a robust replication of many of the features of the human disease. Depending upon the protocol, acute fatiguing weakness develops 2 - 14 days after the start of autoantibody injections (passive transfer) or might require repeated immunizations over several weeks (active models). Here we review mouse models of myasthenia gravis, including what they have contributed to current understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms and their current application to the testing of therapeutics.

  16. Quantitative Targeted Absolute Proteomics of Transporters and Pharmacoproteomics-Based Reconstruction of P-Glycoprotein Function in Mouse Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Akazawa, Takanori; Uchida, Yasuo; Tachikawa, Masanori; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a pharmacokinetic model integrating in vitro mdr1a efflux activity (which we previously reported) with in vitro/in vivo differences in protein expression level can reconstruct intestinal mdr1a function. In situ intestinal permeability-surface area product ratio between wild-type and mdr1a/1b (-/-) mice is one of the parameters used to describe intestinal mdr1a function. The reconstructed ratios of six mdr1a substrates (dexamethasone, digoxin, loperamide, quinidine, verapamil, vinblastine) and one nonsubstrate (diazepam) were consistent with the observed values reported by Adachi et al. within 2.1-fold difference. Thus, intestinal mdr1a function can be reconstructed by our pharmacoproteomic modeling approach. Furthermore, we evaluated regional differences in protein expression levels of mouse intestinal transporters. Sixteen (mdr1a, mrp4, bcrp, abcg5, abcg8, glut1, 4f2hc, sglt1, lat2, pept1, mct1, slc22a18, ostβ, villin1, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, γ-gtp) out of 46 target molecules were detected by employing our established quantitative targeted absolute proteomics technique. The protein expression amounts of mdr1a and bcrp increased progressively from duodenum to ileum. Sglt1, lat2, and 4f2hc were highly expressed in jejunum and ileum. Mct1 and ostβ were highly expressed in ileum. The quantitative expression profiles established here should be helpful to understand and predict intestinal transporter functions. PMID:27276518

  17. The Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitor Lisinopril Improves Muscle Histopathology but not Contractile Function in a Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Jeovanna; Wodarcyk, Andrew J.; Floyd, Kyle T.; Rastogi, Neha; Schultz, Eric J.; Swager, Sarah A.; Chadwick, Jessica A.; Tran, Tam; Raman, Subha V.

    2016-01-01

    Background Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) are the current standard of care treatment for cardiac dysfunction in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. We previously showed treatment with an ACEi plus mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist improves limb and respiratory skeletal muscles, in addition to cardiac muscles, in a dystrophic mouse model at 20 weeks-of-age. Objective To determine whether previously observed preclinical benefits of an ACEi plus MR antagonist on dystrophic skeletal muscles can be reproduced by increasing ACEi dosage alone. We also compared functional and histological outcome measures at 10 and 20 weeks-of-age. Methods Dystrophin deficient utrophin haplo-insufficient (utrn+/−; mdx) “het” mice were treated with 10, 20, or 50 mg/kg × day of the ACEi lisinopril from 4 to 10 weeks-of-age via water bottles and compared with C57BL/10 wild-type control mice and untreated hets. Data from 10 week-old het mice were also compared to data collected from an untreated het group at 20 weeks-old. In vivo cardiac and grip strength measurements, in vitro diaphragm and extensor digitorum longus muscle force measurements, and histopathological analyses were performed. One-way ANOVA followed by Dunnett post hoc comparison was used to determine significance. Results ACEi treatment reduced skeletal muscle damage but had no significant effect on muscle force. Body weight, heart rate, grip strength and blood pressure were unaffected by treatment. Limb muscle histopathology was more informative at 10 than 20 weeks-of-age. Conclusions These results suggest increased ACEi dosage alone cannot improve all dystrophic parameters. Further optimization of MR antagonists in 20 week-old mice is warranted. PMID:27110493

  18. Mouse Models of Human Phenylketonuria

    PubMed Central

    Shedlovsky, A.; McDonald, J. D.; Symula, D.; Dove, W. F.

    1993-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) results from a deficiency in phenylalanine hydroxylase, the enzyme catalyzing the conversion of phenylalanine (PHE) to tyrosine. Although this inborn error of metabolism was among the first in humans to be understood biochemically and genetically, little is known of the mechanism(s) involved in the pathology of PKU. We have combined mouse germline mutagenesis with screens for hyperphenylalaninemia to isolate three mutants deficient in phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) activity and cross-reactive protein. Two of these have reduced PAH mRNA and display characteristics of untreated human PKU patients. A low PHE diet partially reverses these abnormalities. Our success in using high frequency random germline point mutagenesis to obtain appropriate disease models illustrates how such mutagenesis can complement the emergent power of targeted mutagenesis in the mouse. The mutants now can be used as models in studying both maternal PKU and somatic gene therapy. PMID:8375656

  19. Aging Research Using Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L.; Anderson, Laura; Sheehan, Susan; Hill, Warren G.; Chang, Bo; Churchill, Gary A.; Chesler, Elissa J.; Korstanje, Ron; Peters, Luanne L.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the dramatic increase in human lifespan over the past century, there remains pronounced variability in “health-span”, or the period of time in which one is generally healthy and free of disease. Much of the variability in health-span and lifespan is thought to be genetic in origin. Understanding the genetic mechanisms of aging and identifying ways to boost longevity is a primary goal in aging research. Here, we describe a pipeline of phenotypic assays for assessing mouse models of aging. This pipeline includes behavior/cognition testing, body composition analysis, and tests of kidney function, hematopoiesis, immune function and physical parameters. We also describe study design methods for assessing lifespan and health-span, and other important considerations when conducting aging research in the laboratory mouse. The tools and assays provided can assist researchers with understanding the correlative relationships between age-associated phenotypes and, ultimately, the role of specific genes in the aging process. PMID:26069080

  20. Genealogies of mouse inbred strains.

    PubMed

    Beck, J A; Lloyd, S; Hafezparast, M; Lennon-Pierce, M; Eppig, J T; Festing, M F; Fisher, E M

    2000-01-01

    The mouse is a prime organism of choice for modelling human disease. Over 450 inbred strains of mice have been described, providing a wealth of different genotypes and phenotypes for genetic and other studies. As new strains are generated and others become extinct, it is useful to review periodically what strains are available and how they are related to each other, particularly in the light of available DNA polymorphism data from microsatellite and other markers. We describe the origins and relationships of inbred mouse strains, 90 years after the generation of the first inbred strain. Given the large collection of inbred strains available, and that published information on these strains is incomplete, we propose that all genealogical and genetic data on inbred strains be submitted to a common electronic database to ensure this valuable information resource is preserved and used efficiently.

  1. Retinofugal Projections in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Lawrence P.; Studholme, Keith M.

    2014-01-01

    The laboratory mouse is increasingly a subject for visual system investigation, but there has been no comprehensive evaluation of this species’ visual projections. Here, projections were visualized and mapped following intraocular injection of cholera toxin B subunit. Tissue was processed using standard procedures applied to 30 Am free floating sections with diaminobenzidine as the chromogen. The mouse retina projects to approximately 46 brain regions, including 14 not previously described in this species. These include two amygdaloid nuclei, the horizontal limb of the diagonal band, the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus, several visual thalamic nuclei, the paranigral nucleus, several pretectal nuclei, and the dorsal cortex of the inferior colliculus. Dense retinal patches were also observed in a narrow portion of the ipsilateral intermediate layer of the superior colliculus. The superior fasciculus of the accessory optic tract, which innervates the medial terminal nucleus, was also determined to be a terminal zone throughout its length. The results are compared with previous descriptions of projections from mouse intrinsically photoreceptive retinal ganglion cells, and with data from the hamster, Nile grass rat and laboratory rat. The retinal projection patterns are similar in all four species, although there are many differences with respect to the details. The specific visual functions of most retinorecipient areas are unknown, but there is substantial convergence of retinal projections onto regions concerned with olfaction and audition. PMID:24889098

  2. Mouse Models of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Yoku; Fox, James G.; Gonda, Tamas; Worthley, Daniel L.; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Wang, Timothy C.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models have greatly enriched our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of numerous types of cancers. Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, with a poor prognosis and high incidence of drug-resistance. However, most inbred strains of mice have proven resistant to gastric carcinogenesis. To establish useful models which mimic human gastric cancer phenotypes, investigators have utilized animals infected with Helicobacter species and treated with carcinogens. In addition, by exploiting genetic engineering, a variety of transgenic and knockout mouse models of gastric cancer have emerged, such as INS-GAS mice and TFF1 knockout mice. Investigators have used the combination of carcinogens and gene alteration to accelerate gastric cancer development, but rarely do mouse models show an aggressive and metastatic gastric cancer phenotype that could be relevant to preclinical studies, which may require more specific targeting of gastric progenitor cells. Here, we review current gastric carcinogenesis mouse models and provide our future perspectives on this field. PMID:24216700

  3. The mouse Muc5b mucin gene: cDNA and genomic structures, chromosomal localization and expression.

    PubMed Central

    Escande, Fabienne; Porchet, Nicole; Aubert, Jean-Pierre; Buisine, Marie-Pierre

    2002-01-01

    We report here the isolation and characterization of the mouse Muc5b mucin gene (mMuc5b). We determined its complete cDNA sequence, its genomic organization, and chromosomal localization. Moreover, we analyzed the expression of this gene by reverse-transcription PCR and in situ hybridization. The structure of the gene was determined from a genomic cosmid clone that encompasses the entire mMuc5b gene, including the 5'-flanking region. The mMuc5b gene spans approximately 36 kb and contains 49 exons. It is located on mouse distal chromosome 7. mMuc5b encodes at least two transcripts by alternative splicing of the second exon, the longest one being 14.9 kb in length. The deduced peptide contains 4782 amino acids. Its central region can be subdivided into 10 imperfect repeats, each composed of a cysteine-rich domain followed by a threonine, serine, and proline-rich mucin-type domain. It is flanked by cysteine-rich domains similar to cysteine-rich domains of pre-pro-von Willebrand factor. Comparison with its human homologue MUC5B revealed common features including high sequence similarities in the 5' and 3' regions, and the conservation of the genomic organization. In contrast, mMuc5b differs from its human homologue, since no highly tandemly repeated sequences could be identified within its central region. mMuc5b is expressed mainly in laryngeal mucous glands, and at a lesser extend in stomach and duodenum. PMID:11964160

  4. Establishment of a non-invasive mouse reporter model for monitoring in vivo pdx-1 promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Shiraiwa, Toshihiko; Kaneto, Hideaki; Miyatsuka, Takeshi; Kato, Ken; Yamamoto, Kaoru; Kawashima, Ayaha; Kajimoto, Yoshitaka; Matsuoka, Taka-Aki; Matsuhisa, Munehide; Yamasaki, Yoshimitsu; Fujitani, Yoshio

    2007-09-28

    It is well known that pancreatic and duodenal homeobox gene-1 (PDX-1) plays a crucial role in beta-cell differentiation, and maintaining mature beta-cell function. Thus, it is important to understand how pdx-1 gene is regulated under various pathophysiological conditions in vivo. In this study, to non-invasively and quantitatively monitor pdx-1 promoter activity in vivo, we constructed a pdx-1 promoter-SEAP-IRES-GFP reporter plasmid. In this construct, the -4.6kb pdx-1 promoter region sufficient for driving beta-cell-selective PDX-1 expression was inserted to the upstream of the secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) reporter gene. It is noted here that the pdx-1 promoter-mediated SEAP activity can be distinguished from endogenous alkaline phosphatase activity. First, we transfected the construct in mouse beta-cell line MIN6 and human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2. SEAP activity was readily detected in the media of MIN6 cells, but not in HepG2 cells. These results indicate that this construct specifically reports beta-cell-specific pdx-1 promoter activity in a cell culture system. Based on these in vitro findings, we next generated transgenic mice using the same construct. SEAP activity was readily detected in serum of the transgenic mice, but not in their littermate mice. Furthermore, SEAP activity was detected in protein extract from the transgenic pancreas and slightly from the transgenic duodenum, but not from the liver, and brain. These results indicate that serum SEAP activity likely represents in vivo pdx-1 promoter activity. This transgenic mouse model would be useful to non-invasively monitor in vivo pdx-1 promoter activity and to screen new molecules which regulate PDX-1 expression.

  5. Mouse embryonic stem cells with a multi-integrase mouse artificial chromosome for transchromosomic mouse generation.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Yuki; Nakamura, Kazuomi; Endo, Takeshi; Kajitani, Naoyo; Kazuki, Kanako; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Kugoh, Hiroyuki; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Ohbayashi, Tetsuya

    2015-08-01

    The mouse artificial chromosome (MAC) has several advantages as a gene delivery vector, including stable episomal maintenance of the exogenous genetic material and the ability to carry large and/or multiple gene inserts including their regulatory elements. Previously, a MAC containing multi-integration site (MI-MAC) was generated to facilitate transfer of multiple genes into desired cells. To generate transchromosomic (Tc) mice containing a MI-MAC with genes of interest, the desired genes were inserted into MI-MAC in CHO cells, and then the MI-MAC was transferred to mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells via microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (MMCT). However, the efficiency of MMCT from CHO to mES cells is very low (<10(-6)). In this study, we constructed mES cell lines containing a MI-MAC vector to directly insert a gene of interest into the MI-MAC in mES cells via a simple transfection method for Tc mouse generation. The recombination rate of the GFP gene at each attachment site (FRT, PhiC31attP, R4attP, TP901-1attP and Bxb1attP) on MI-MAC was greater than 50% in MI-MAC mES cells. Chimeric mice with high coat colour chimerism were generated from the MI-MAC mES cell lines and germline transmission from the chimera was observed. As an example for the generation of Tc mice with a desired gene by the MI-MAC mES approach, a Tc mouse strain ubiquitously expressing Emerald luciferase was efficiently established. Thus, the findings suggest that this new Tc strategy employing mES cells and a MI-MAC vector is efficient and useful for animal transgenesis.

  6. Mouse embryonic stem cells with a multi-integrase mouse artificial chromosome for transchromosomic mouse generation.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Yuki; Nakamura, Kazuomi; Endo, Takeshi; Kajitani, Naoyo; Kazuki, Kanako; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Kugoh, Hiroyuki; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Ohbayashi, Tetsuya

    2015-08-01

    The mouse artificial chromosome (MAC) has several advantages as a gene delivery vector, including stable episomal maintenance of the exogenous genetic material and the ability to carry large and/or multiple gene inserts including their regulatory elements. Previously, a MAC containing multi-integration site (MI-MAC) was generated to facilitate transfer of multiple genes into desired cells. To generate transchromosomic (Tc) mice containing a MI-MAC with genes of interest, the desired genes were inserted into MI-MAC in CHO cells, and then the MI-MAC was transferred to mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells via microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (MMCT). However, the efficiency of MMCT from CHO to mES cells is very low (<10(-6)). In this study, we constructed mES cell lines containing a MI-MAC vector to directly insert a gene of interest into the MI-MAC in mES cells via a simple transfection method for Tc mouse generation. The recombination rate of the GFP gene at each attachment site (FRT, PhiC31attP, R4attP, TP901-1attP and Bxb1attP) on MI-MAC was greater than 50% in MI-MAC mES cells. Chimeric mice with high coat colour chimerism were generated from the MI-MAC mES cell lines and germline transmission from the chimera was observed. As an example for the generation of Tc mice with a desired gene by the MI-MAC mES approach, a Tc mouse strain ubiquitously expressing Emerald luciferase was efficiently established. Thus, the findings suggest that this new Tc strategy employing mES cells and a MI-MAC vector is efficient and useful for animal transgenesis. PMID:26055730

  7. Mouse mammary tumor biology: a short history.

    PubMed

    Cardiff, Robert D; Kenney, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    For over a century, mouse mammary tumor biology and the associated Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) have served as the foundation for experimental cancer research, in general, and, in particular, experimental breast cancer research. Spontaneous mouse mammary tumors were the basis for studies of the natural history of neoplasia, oncogenic viruses, host responses, endocrinology, and neoplastic progression. However, lacking formal proof of a human mammary tumor virus, the preeminence of the mouse model faded in the 1980s. Since the late 1980s, genetically engineered mice (GEM) have proven extremely useful for studying breast cancer and have become the animal model for human breast cancer. Hundreds of mouse models of human breast cancer have been developed since the first demonstration, in 1984, that the mouse mammary gland could be molecularly targeted and used to test the oncogenicity of candidate human genes. Now, very few scientists can avoid using a mouse model to test the biology of their favorite gene. The GEM have attracted a new generation of molecular and cellular biologists eager to apply their skills to these surrogates of the human disease. Newcomers often enter the field without an appreciation of the origins of mouse mammary tumor biology and the basis for many of the prevailing concepts. Our purpose in writing this short history of mouse mammary tumor biology is to provide a historical perspective for the benefit of the newcomers. If Einstein was correct in that "we stand on the shoulders of giants," the neophytes should meet their giants.

  8. Therapeutic cloning in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Mombaerts, Peter

    2003-09-30

    Nuclear transfer technology can be applied to produce autologous differentiated cells for therapeutic purposes, a concept termed therapeutic cloning. Countless articles have been published on the ethics and politics of human therapeutic cloning, reflecting the high expectations from this new opportunity for rejuvenation of the aging or diseased body. Yet the research literature on therapeutic cloning, strictly speaking, is comprised of only four articles, all in the mouse. The efficiency of derivation of embryonic stem cell lines via nuclear transfer is remarkably consistent among these reports. However, the efficiency is so low that, in its present form, the concept is unlikely to become widespread in clinical practice.

  9. Mouse models of the laminopathies

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Colin L. . E-mail: stewartc@ncifcrf.gov; Kozlov, Serguei; Fong, Loren G.; Young, Stephen G. . E-mail: sgyoung@mednet.ucla.edu

    2007-06-10

    The A and B type lamins are nuclear intermediate filament proteins that comprise the bulk of the nuclear lamina, a thin proteinaceous structure underlying the inner nuclear membrane. The A type lamins are encoded by the lamin A gene (LMNA). Mutations in this gene have been linked to at least nine diseases, including the progeroid diseases Hutchinson-Gilford progeria and atypical Werner's syndromes, striated muscle diseases including muscular dystrophies and dilated cardiomyopathies, lipodystrophies affecting adipose tissue deposition, diseases affecting skeletal development, and a peripheral neuropathy. To understand how different diseases arise from different mutations in the same gene, mouse lines carrying some of the same mutations found in the human diseases have been established. We, and others have generated mice with different mutations that result in progeria, muscular dystrophy, and dilated cardiomyopathy. To further our understanding of the functions of the lamins, we also created mice lacking lamin B1, as well as mice expressing only one of the A type lamins. These mouse lines are providing insights into the functions of the lamina and how changes to the lamina affect the mechanical integrity of the nucleus as well as signaling pathways that, when disrupted, may contribute to the disease.

  10. Mouse Models of Tumor Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ngiow, Shin Foong; Loi, Sherene; Thomas, David; Smyth, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is now evolving into a major therapeutic option for cancer patients. Such clinical advances also promote massive interest in the search for novel immunotherapy targets, and to understand the mechanism of action of current drugs. It is projected that a series of novel immunotherapy agents will be developed and assessed for their therapeutic activity. In light of this, in vivo experimental mouse models that recapitulate human malignancies serve as valuable tools to validate the efficacy and safety profile of immunotherapy agents, before their transition into clinical trials. In this review, we will discuss the major classes of experimental mouse models of cancer commonly used for immunotherapy assessment and provide examples to guide the selection of appropriate models. We present some new data concerning the utility of a carcinogen-induced tumor model for comparing immunotherapies and combining immunotherapy with chemotherapy. We will also highlight some recent advances in experimental modeling of human malignancies in mice that are leading towards personalized therapy in patients.

  11. Mouse models for liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Bakiri, Latifa; Wagner, Erwin F

    2013-04-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common form of primary liver cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related cell death in human and the fifth in women worldwide. The incidence of HCC is increasing despite progress in identifying risk factors, understanding disease etiology and developing anti-viral strategies. Therapeutic options are limited and survival after diagnosis is poor. Therefore, better preventive, diagnostic and therapeutic tools are urgently needed, in particular given the increased contribution from systemic metabolic disease to HCC incidence worldwide. In the last three decades, technological advances have facilitated the generation of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) to mimic the alterations frequently observed in human cancers or to conduct intervention studies and assess the relevance of candidate gene networks in tumor establishment, progression and maintenance. Because these studies allow molecular and cellular manipulations impossible to perform in patients, GEMMs have improved our understanding of this complex disease and represent a source of great potential for mechanism-based therapy development. In this review, we provide an overview of the current state of HCC modeling in the mouse, highlighting successes, current challenges and future opportunities.

  12. Mouse Behavior: Conjectures about Adaptations for Survival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rop, Charles

    2001-01-01

    Presents an experiment on mouse behavior in which students learn to observe, pay attention to details, record field notes, and ask questions about their observations. Uses a white mouse to eliminate the risk of disease that a wild rodent might carry. Lists materials, set up, and procedure. (YDS)

  13. Measuring Viscoelastic Deformation with an Optical Mouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, T. W.

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of using an optical mouse to track the viscoelastic deformation of low-density polyethylene films that have a fixed attached load is presented. It is seen that using an optical mouse and with rudimentary experiment paraphernalia and arrangement, it is possible to get good measurements of viscoelastic deformation.

  14. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD): from genes to mice--a community resource for mouse biology.

    PubMed

    Eppig, Janan T; Bult, Carol J; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E; Blake, Judith A; Anagnostopoulos, A; Baldarelli, R M; Baya, M; Beal, J S; Bello, S M; Boddy, W J; Bradt, D W; Burkart, D L; Butler, N E; Campbell, J; Cassell, M A; Corbani, L E; Cousins, S L; Dahmen, D J; Dene, H; Diehl, A D; Drabkin, H J; Frazer, K S; Frost, P; Glass, L H; Goldsmith, C W; Grant, P L; Lennon-Pierce, M; Lewis, J; Lu, I; Maltais, L J; McAndrews-Hill, M; McClellan, L; Miers, D B; Miller, L A; Ni, L; Ormsby, J E; Qi, D; Reddy, T B K; Reed, D J; Richards-Smith, B; Shaw, D R; Sinclair, R; Smith, C L; Szauter, P; Walker, M B; Walton, D O; Washburn, L L; Witham, I T; Zhu, Y

    2005-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD) forms the core of the Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) system (http://www.informatics.jax.org), a model organism database resource for the laboratory mouse. MGD provides essential integration of experimental knowledge for the mouse system with information annotated from both literature and online sources. MGD curates and presents consensus and experimental data representations of genotype (sequence) through phenotype information, including highly detailed reports about genes and gene products. Primary foci of integration are through representations of relationships among genes, sequences and phenotypes. MGD collaborates with other bioinformatics groups to curate a definitive set of information about the laboratory mouse and to build and implement the data and semantic standards that are essential for comparative genome analysis. Recent improvements in MGD discussed here include the enhancement of phenotype resources, the re-development of the International Mouse Strain Resource, IMSR, the update of mammalian orthology datasets and the electronic publication of classic books in mouse genetics.

  15. The Mouse Forced Swim Test

    PubMed Central

    Can, Adem; Dao, David T.; Arad, Michal; Terrillion, Chantelle E.; Piantadosi, Sean C.; Gould, Todd D.

    2012-01-01

    The forced swim test is a rodent behavioral test used for evaluation of antidepressant drugs, antidepressant efficacy of new compounds, and experimental manipulations that are aimed at rendering or preventing depressive-like states. Mice are placed in an inescapable transparent tank that is filled with water and their escape related mobility behavior is measured. The forced swim test is straightforward to conduct reliably and it requires minimal specialized equipment. Successful implementation of the forced swim test requires adherence to certain procedural details and minimization of unwarranted stress to the mice. In the protocol description and the accompanying video, we explain how to conduct the mouse version of this test with emphasis on potential pitfalls that may be detrimental to interpretation of results and how to avoid them. Additionally, we explain how the behaviors manifested in the test are assessed. PMID:22314943

  16. Apoptotic Signaling in Mouse Odontogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Svandova, Eva; Tucker, Abigail S.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Apoptosis is an important morphogenetic event in embryogenesis as well as during postnatal life. In the last 2 decades, apoptosis in tooth development (odontogenesis) has been investigated with gradually increasing focus on the mechanisms and signaling pathways involved. The molecular machinery responsible for apoptosis exhibits a high degree of conservation but also organ and tissue specific patterns. This review aims to discuss recent knowledge about apoptotic signaling networks during odontogenesis, concentrating on the mouse, which is often used as a model organism for human dentistry. Apoptosis accompanies the entire development of the tooth and corresponding remodeling of the surrounding bony tissue. It is most evident in its role in the elimination of signaling centers within developing teeth, removal of vestigal tooth germs, and in odontoblast and ameloblast organization during tooth mineralization. Dental apoptosis is caspase dependent and proceeds via mitochondrial mediated cell death with possible amplification by Fas-FasL signaling modulated by Bcl-2 family members. PMID:22204278

  17. Apoptotic signaling in mouse odontogenesis.

    PubMed

    Matalova, Eva; Svandova, Eva; Tucker, Abigail S

    2012-01-01

    Apoptosis is an important morphogenetic event in embryogenesis as well as during postnatal life. In the last 2 decades, apoptosis in tooth development (odontogenesis) has been investigated with gradually increasing focus on the mechanisms and signaling pathways involved. The molecular machinery responsible for apoptosis exhibits a high degree of conservation but also organ and tissue specific patterns. This review aims to discuss recent knowledge about apoptotic signaling networks during odontogenesis, concentrating on the mouse, which is often used as a model organism for human dentistry. Apoptosis accompanies the entire development of the tooth and corresponding remodeling of the surrounding bony tissue. It is most evident in its role in the elimination of signaling centers within developing teeth, removal of vestigal tooth germs, and in odontoblast and ameloblast organization during tooth mineralization. Dental apoptosis is caspase dependent and proceeds via mitochondrial mediated cell death with possible amplification by Fas-FasL signaling modulated by Bcl-2 family members.

  18. The mouse forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Can, Adem; Dao, David T; Arad, Michal; Terrillion, Chantelle E; Piantadosi, Sean C; Gould, Todd D

    2012-01-29

    The forced swim test is a rodent behavioral test used for evaluation of antidepressant drugs, antidepressant efficacy of new compounds, and experimental manipulations that are aimed at rendering or preventing depressive-like states. Mice are placed in an inescapable transparent tank that is filled with water and their escape related mobility behavior is measured. The forced swim test is straightforward to conduct reliably and it requires minimal specialized equipment. Successful implementation of the forced swim test requires adherence to certain procedural details and minimization of unwarranted stress to the mice. In the protocol description and the accompanying video, we explain how to conduct the mouse version of this test with emphasis on potential pitfalls that may be detrimental to interpretation of results and how to avoid them. Additionally, we explain how the behaviors manifested in the test are assessed.

  19. Mouse model of intracerebellar haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tijjani Salihu, Abubakar; Muthuraju, Sangu; Aziz Mohamed Yusoff, Abdul; Ahmad, Farizan; Zulkifli Mustafa, Mohd; Jaafar, Hasnan; Idris, Zamzuri; Rahman Izaini Ghani, Abdul; Malin Abdullah, Jafri

    2016-10-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the behavior and neuronal morphological changes in the perihaemorrhagic tissue of the mouse intracerebellar haemorrhage experimental model. Adult male Swiss albino mice were stereotactically infused with collagenase type VII (0.4U/μl of saline) unilaterally in to the cerebellum, following anaesthesia. Motor deficits were assessed using open field and composite score for evaluating the mouse model of cerebellar ataxia at 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 days after collagenase infusion. The animals were sacrificed at the same time interval for evaluation of perihaematomal neuronal degeneration using haematoxylin and eosin staining and Annexin V-FITC/Propidium iodide assay. At the end of the study, it was found that infusion of 0.4U collagenase produces significant locomotor and ataxic deficit in the mice especially within the first week post surgery, and that this gradually improved within three weeks. Neuronal degeneration evident by cytoplasmic shrinkage and nuclear pyknosis was observed at the perihaematomal area after one day; especially at 3 and 7 days post haemorrhage. By 21 days, both the haematoma and degenerating neurons in the perihaematomal area were phagocytosed and the remaining neuronal cells around the scar tissue appeared normal. Moreover, Annexin-V/propidium iodide-positive cells were observed at the perihaematomal area at 3 and 7 days implying that the neurons likely die via apoptosis. It was concluded that a population of potentially salvageable neurons exist in the perihaematomal area after cerebellar haemorrhage throughout a wide time window that could be amenable to treatment. PMID:27327104

  20. Prion infection of mouse neurospheres

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Ranjit K.; Young, Rebecca; Pitstick, Rose; DeArmond, Stephen J.; Prusiner, Stanley B.; Carlson, George A.

    2006-01-01

    Only a few cell lines have been infected with prions, offering limited genetic diversity and sensitivity to several strains. Here we report that cultured neurospheres expressing cellular prion protein (PrPC) can be infected with prions. Neurosphere lines isolated from the brains of mice at embryonic day 13–15 grow as aggregates and contain CNS stem cells. We produced neurosphere cultures from FVB/NCr (FVB) mice, from transgenic (Tg) FVB mice that overexpress mouse PrP-A (Tg4053), and from congenic FVB mice with a targeted null mutation in the PrP gene (Prnp0/0) and incubated them with the Rocky Mountain Laboratory prion strain. While monitoring the levels of disease-causing PrP (PrPSc) at each passage, we observed a dramatic rise in PrPSc levels with time in the Tg4053 neurosphere cells, whereas the level of PrPSc decayed to undetectable levels in cell cultures lacking PrP. PrPSc levels in cultures from FVB mice initially declined but then increased with passage. Prions produced in culture were transmissible to mice and produced disease pathology. Intracellular aggregates of PrPSc were present in cells from infected cultures. The susceptibility of neurosphere cultures to prions mirrored that of the mice from which they were derived. Neurosphere lines from Tg4053 mice provide a sensitive in vitro bioassay for mouse prions; neurosphere lines from other Tg mice overexpressing PrP might be used to assay prions from other species, including humans. PMID:16495413

  1. Ultrasound biomicroscopy in mouse cardiovascular development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, Daniel H.

    2001-05-01

    The mouse is the preferred animal model for studying mammalian cardiovascular development and many human congenital heart diseases. Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM), utilizing high-frequency (40-50-MHz) ultrasound, is uniquely capable of providing in vivo, real-time microimaging and Doppler blood velocity measurements in mouse embryos and neonates. UBM analyses of normal and abnormal mouse cardiovascular function will be described to illustrate the power of this microimaging approach. In particular, real-time UBM images have been used to analyze dimensional changes in the mouse heart from embryonic to neonatal stages. UBM-Doppler has been used recently to examine the precise timing of onset of a functional circulation in early-stage mouse embryos, from the first detectable cardiac contractions. In other experiments, blood velocity waveforms have been analyzed to characterize the functional phenotype of mutant mouse embryos having defects in cardiac valve formation. Finally, UBM has been developed for real-time, in utero image-guided injection of mouse embryos, enabling cell transplantation and genetic gain-of-function experiments with transfected cells and retroviruses. In summary, UBM provides a unique and powerful approach for in vivo analysis and image-guided manipulation in normal and genetically engineered mice, over a wide range of embryonic to neonatal developmental stages.

  2. Humanization of the mouse mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Wronski, A; Arendt, L M; Kuperwasser, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Although mouse models have provided invaluable information on the mechanisms of mammary gland development, anatomical and developmental differences between human and mice limit full understanding of this fundamental process. Humanization of the mouse mammary gland by injecting immortalized human breast stromal cells into the cleared murine mammary fat pad enables the growth and development of human mammary epithelial cells or tissue. This facilitates the characterization of human mammary gland development or tumorigenesis by utilizing the mouse mammary fat pad. Here we describe the process of isolating human mammary stromal and epithelial cells as well as their introduction into the mammary fat pads of immunocompromised mice.

  3. Augmented Computer Mouse Would Measure Applied Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Larry C. H.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed computer mouse measures force of contact applied by user. Adds another dimension to two-dimensional-position-measuring capability of conventional computer mouse; force measurement designated to represent any desired continuously variable function of time and position, such as control force, acceleration, velocity, or position along axis perpendicular to computer video display. Proposed mouse enhances sense of realism and intuition in interaction between operator and computer. Useful in such applications as three-dimensional computer graphics, computer games, and mathematical modeling of dynamics.

  4. The effect of hibernation on the morphology and histochemistry of the intestine of the greater mouse-eared bat, Myotis myotis.

    PubMed

    Paksuz, Emine Pinar

    2014-10-01

    Seasonal variations in morphometry and histochemistry of the intestine have been examined in the active and hibernating greater mouse-eared bat, Myotis myotis, using histological and histochemical techniques. The results of morphometric analyses indicated that hibernation affected the villus height, villus width, crypt depth and crypt width of the duodenum, jejunum and ileum. Histochemical analysis showed that goblet cells of the small and large intestine contain acidic and neutral mucosubstances. According to the results obtained with Alcian Blue (pH 5.8)/PAS staining, hyaluronic acid is dominant in the goblet cells of the small and large intestine during both the hibernation and active periods. Chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate, which are sulfated GAGs, were dominant, and very little heparan sulfate, heparin and keratan sulfate were present. Moreover, sulfated glycoproteins were also detected in the goblet cells of the small intestine in the active animals. The present study demonstrates that hibernation altered the examined morphometric and histochemical parameters of the intestine.

  5. Finding mouse models of human lymphomas and leukemia's using the Jackson laboratory mouse tumor biology database.

    PubMed

    Begley, Dale A; Sundberg, John P; Krupke, Debra M; Neuhauser, Steven B; Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Morse, Herbert C; Ward, Jerrold M

    2015-12-01

    Many mouse models have been created to study hematopoietic cancer types. There are over thirty hematopoietic tumor types and subtypes, both human and mouse, with various origins, characteristics and clinical prognoses. Determining the specific type of hematopoietic lesion produced in a mouse model and identifying mouse models that correspond to the human subtypes of these lesions has been a continuing challenge for the scientific community. The Mouse Tumor Biology Database (MTB; http://tumor.informatics.jax.org) is designed to facilitate use of mouse models of human cancer by providing detailed histopathologic and molecular information on lymphoma subtypes, including expertly annotated, on line, whole slide scans, and providing a repository for storing information on and querying these data for specific lymphoma models. PMID:26302176

  6. The Mouse Gene Expression Database (GXD)

    PubMed Central

    Ringwald, Martin; Eppig, Janan T.; Begley, Dale A.; Corradi, John P.; McCright, Ingeborg J.; Hayamizu, Terry F.; Hill, David P.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.

    2001-01-01

    The Gene Expression Database (GXD) is a community resource of gene expression information for the laboratory mouse. By combining the different types of expression data, GXD aims to provide increasingly complete information about the expression profiles of genes in different mouse strains and mutants, thus enabling valuable insights into the molecular networks that underlie normal development and disease. GXD is integrated with the Mouse Genome Database (MGD). Extensive interconnections with sequence databases and with databases from other species, and the development and use of shared controlled vocabularies extend GXD’s utility for the analysis of gene expression information. GXD is accessible through the Mouse Genome Informatics web site at http://www.informatic s.jax.org/ or directly at http://www.informatics.jax.org/me nus/expression_menu.shtml. PMID:11125060

  7. Integration of Mouse Phenome Data Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, John M; Adams, Neils; Aidinis, Vassilis; Blake, Judith A; Bogue, Molly; Brown, Steve D M; Chesler, Elissa J; Davidson, Duncan; Duran, Christopher; Eppig, Janan T; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Gkoutos, Georgios V; Greenaway, Simon; Angelis, Martin Hrabe de; Kollias, George; Leblanc, Sophie; Lee, Kirsty; Lengger, Christoph; Maier, Holger; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Masuya, Hiroshi; Melvin, David; Muller, Werner; Parkinson, Helen; Proctor, Glenn; Reuveni, Eli; Schofield, Paul; Shukla, Aadya; Smith, Cynthia; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Vasseur, Laurent; Wakana, Shigeharu; Walling, Alison; White, Jacqui; Wood, Joe; Zouberakis, Michalis

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the functions encoded in the mouse genome will be central to an understanding of the genetic basis of human disease. To achieve this it will be essential to be able to characterise the phenotypic consequences of variation and alterations in individual genes. Data on the phenotypes of mouse strains are currently held in a number of different forms (detailed descriptions of mouse lines, first line phenotyping data on novel mutations, data on the normal features of inbred lines, etc.) at many sites worldwide. For the most efficient use of these data sets, we have set in train a process to develop standards for the description of phenotypes (using ontologies), and file formats for the description of phenotyping protocols and phenotype data sets. This process is ongoing, and needs to be supported by the wider mouse genetics and phenotyping communities to succeed. We invite interested parties to contact us as we develop this process further.

  8. A catalog of the mouse gut metagenome.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Liang; Feng, Qiang; Liang, Suisha; Sonne, Si Brask; Xia, Zhongkui; Qiu, Xinmin; Li, Xiaoping; Long, Hua; Zhang, Jianfeng; Zhang, Dongya; Liu, Chuan; Fang, Zhiwei; Chou, Joyce; Glanville, Jacob; Hao, Qin; Kotowska, Dorota; Colding, Camilla; Licht, Tine Rask; Wu, Donghai; Yu, Jun; Sung, Joseph Jao Yiu; Liang, Qiaoyi; Li, Junhua; Jia, Huijue; Lan, Zhou; Tremaroli, Valentina; Dworzynski, Piotr; Nielsen, H Bjørn; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Doré, Joël; Le Chatelier, Emmanuelle; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Lin, John C; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Wang, Jun; Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten

    2015-10-01

    We established a catalog of the mouse gut metagenome comprising ∼2.6 million nonredundant genes by sequencing DNA from fecal samples of 184 mice. To secure high microbiome diversity, we used mouse strains of diverse genetic backgrounds, from different providers, kept in different housing laboratories and fed either a low-fat or high-fat diet. Similar to the human gut microbiome, >99% of the cataloged genes are bacterial. We identified 541 metagenomic species and defined a core set of 26 metagenomic species found in 95% of the mice. The mouse gut microbiome is functionally similar to its human counterpart, with 95.2% of its Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) orthologous groups in common. However, only 4.0% of the mouse gut microbial genes were shared (95% identity, 90% coverage) with those of the human gut microbiome. This catalog provides a useful reference for future studies.

  9. Mouse models for human otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Trune, Dennis R.; Zheng, Qing Yin

    2010-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) remains the most common childhood disease and its annual costs exceed $5 billion. Its potential for permanent hearing impairment also emphasizes the need to better understand and manage this disease. The pathogenesis of OM is multifactorial and includes infectious pathogens, anatomy, immunologic status, genetic predisposition, and environment. Recent progress in mouse model development is helping to elucidate the respective roles of these factors and to significantly contribute toward efforts of OM prevention and control. Genetic predisposition is recognized as an important factor in OM and increasing numbers of mouse models are helping to uncover the potential genetic bases for human OM. Furthermore, the completion of the mouse genome sequence has offered a powerful set of tools for investigating gene function and is generating a rich resource of mouse mutants for studying the genetic factors underlying OM. PMID:19272362

  10. Acute pharmacokinetics of memantine in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Saab, Bechara J; Roder, John C

    2011-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of memantine, a widely prescribed medication in the United States and the European Union for the treatment of moderate-to-severe Alzheimer's disease (AD), have not been well explored in the mouse. Memantine is a highly unspecific blocker of many channels and how memantine may be of benefit in AD remains a mystery. Therefore, the investigation of memantine in the mouse, the most commonly chosen subject for modeling AD, has strong potential to lead to better therapies. Here, we present an acute pharmacokinetic analysis of memantine in mouse brain tissue and blood serum for a variety of experimentally relevant doses. The data help shed light on the mechanism of memantine action in vivo, and demonstrate that subcutaneous doses above 10 mg/kg in the mouse are most likely not therapeutically relevant to the human.

  11. Effects of endotoxin on the lactating mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    The regulation of endogenous mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) sequences in trans by a host gene, the Lps locus on mouse chromosome 4, was suspected from a genetic linkage analysis. The Lps locus mediates the mouse's response to the injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the responder mouse while mice with the deficient allele are incapable of responding. Others have found that endotoxin exposure reduces milk production in lactating animals. This observation was confirmed in mice and extended by examining /sup 125/I-prolactin binding to liver membranes of lactating mice. Endotoxin treatment of responder mice increases liver prolactin binding within 15 minutes, followed by a decline over 6 hours. Scatchard analysis shows that the immediate increase comes from both increased affinity and abundance of the prolactin receptor. No such change in prolactin binding is seen in the non-responder following endotoxin treatment nor in /sup 125/I-insulin binding in responders.

  12. Features of adenosine metabolism of mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Deussen, Andreas; Weichsel, Johannes; Pexa, Annette

    2006-11-01

    Adenosine metabolism and transport were evaluated in the isolated perfused mouse heart and compared with the well-established model of isolated perfused guinea pig heart. Coronary venous release of adenosine under well-oxygenated conditions in the mouse exceeds that in the guinea pig threefold when related to tissue mass. Total myocardial adenosine production rate under this condition was approximately 2 nmol/min per gramme and similar in both species. Coronary resistance vessels of mice are highly sensitive to exogenous adenosine, and the threshold for adenosine-induced vasodilation is approximately 30 nmol/l. Adenosine membrane transport was largely insensitive to nitrobenzyl-thioinosine (NBTI) in mouse heart, which is in contrast to guinea pig and several other species. This indicates the dominance of NBTI-insensitive transporters in mouse heart. For future studies, the assessment of cytosolic and extracellular adenosine metabolism and its relationship with coronary flow will require the use of more effective membrane transport blockers.

  13. Melatonin receptors: latest insights from mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Tosini, Gianluca; Owino, Sharon; Guillame, Jean-Luc; Jockers, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Summary Melatonin, the neuro-hormone synthesized during the night, has recently seen an unexpected extension of its functional implications towards type 2 diabetes development, visual functions, sleep disturbances and depression. Transgenic mouse models were instrumental for the establishment of the link between melatonin and these major human diseases. Most of the actions of melatonin are mediated by two types of G protein-coupled receptors, named MT1 and MT2, which are expressed in many different organs and tissues. Understanding the pharmacology and function of mouse MT1 and MT2 receptors, including MT1/MT2 heteromers, will be of crucial importance to evaluate the relevance of these mouse models for future therapeutic developments. This review will critically discuss these aspects, and give some perspectives including the generation of new mouse models. PMID:24903552

  14. Mouse homologues of human hereditary disease.

    PubMed Central

    Searle, A G; Edwards, J H; Hall, J G

    1994-01-01

    Details are given of 214 loci known to be associated with human hereditary disease, which have been mapped on both human and mouse chromosomes. Forty two of these have pathological variants in both species; in general the mouse variants are similar in their effects to the corresponding human ones, but exceptions include the Dmd/DMD and Hprt/HPRT mutations which cause little, if any, harm in mice. Possible reasons for phenotypic differences are discussed. In most pathological variants the gene product seems to be absent or greatly reduced in both species. The extensive data on conserved segments between human and mouse chromosomes are used to predict locations in the mouse of over 50 loci of medical interest which are mapped so far only on human chromosomes. In about 80% of these a fairly confident prediction can be made. Some likely homologies between mapped mouse loci and unmapped human ones are also given. Sixty six human and mouse proto-oncogene and growth factor gene homologies are also listed; those of confirmed location are all in known conserved segments. A survey of 18 mapped human disease loci and chromosome regions in which the manifestation or severity of pathological effects is thought to be the result of genomic imprinting shows that most of the homologous regions in the mouse are also associated with imprinting, especially those with homologues on human chromosomes 11p and 15q. Useful methods of accelerating the production of mouse models of human hereditary disease include (1) use of a supermutagen, such as ethylnitrosourea (ENU), (2) targeted mutagenesis involving ES cells, and (3) use of gene transfer techniques, with production of 'knockout mutations'. PMID:8151633

  15. Optical mouse acting as biospeckle sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Michel Melo; Nozela, Jose Roberto de Almeida; Chaves, Marcio Jose; Alves Braga, Roberto; Rabal, Hector Jorge

    2011-04-01

    In this work we propose some experiments with the use of optical computer mouse, associated to low cost lasers that can be used to perform several measurements with applications in industry and in human health monitoring. The mouse was used to grab the movements produced by speckle pattern changes and to get information through the adaptation of its structure. We measured displacements in wood samples under strain, variations of the diameter of an artery due to heart beat and, through a hardware simulation, the movement of an eye, an experiment that could be of low cost help for communication to severely handicapped motor patients. Those measurements were done in spite of the fact that the CCD sensor of the mice is monolithically included into an integrated circuit so that the raw image cannot be accessed. If, as was the case with primitive optical mouse, that signal could be accessed, the quality and usefulness of the measurements could be significantly increased. As it was not possible, a webcam sensor was used for measuring the drying of paint, a standard phenomenon for testing biospeckle techniques, in order to prove the usefulness of the mouse design. The results showed that the use of the mouse associated to a laser pointer could be the way to get metrological information from many phenomena involving the whole field spatial displacement, as well as the use of the mouse as in its prime version allowed to get images of the speckle patterns and to analyze them.

  16. Purification and Characterization of a Population of EGFP-Expressing Cells from the Developing Pancreas of a Neurogenin3/EGFP Transgenic Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Barrow, J; Bernardo, A S; Hay, C W; Blaylock, M; Duncan, L; MacKenzie, A; McCreath, K; Kind, A J; Schnieke, A E; Colman, A; Hart, A W

    2005-01-01

    Neurogenin 3 (ngn3) is a basic helix loop helix transcription factor that is transiently expressed in the developing mouse pancreas with peak expression around E15. In mice lacking the ngn3 gene the endocrine cells of the pancreas fail to develop suggesting that the ngn3-positive cell may represent a progenitor cell for the endocrine pancreas. In order to purify and characterize this cell in detail we have generated a transgenic mouse, in which the ngn3 promoter drives expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). In the E15.5 embryo EGFP was expressed in the dorsal and ventral pancreas, the duodenum, and lower intestine as well as in the brain. This pattern of expression was in keeping with the known expression profile of the endogenous ngn3 gene. Within the pancreas EGFP was localized in close proximity to cells that stained positive for ngn3, insulin, and glucagon, but was absent from regions of the pancreas that stained positive for amylase. EGFP was also present in the pancreas at E18.5, although there was no detectable expression of ngn3. At this stage EGFP did not colocalize with any of the hormones or exocrine markers. EGFP+ cells were FACS purified (96%) from the E15 pancreas yielding ∼ 10,000 cells or 1.6% of the total pancreatic cells from one litter. RT/PCR analysis confirmed that the purified cells expressed EGFP, ngn3, insulin, glucagon, somatostatin and pancreatic polypeptide. The ability to purify ngn3+ cells provides an invaluable source of material for charactering in detail their properties. PMID:19521525

  17. Mouse Models of Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Kelli A.; Hayes, John M.; Wiggin, Timothy D.; Backus, Carey; Oh, Sang Su; Lentz, Stephen I.; Brosius, Frank; Feldman, Eva L.

    2007-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is a debilitating complication of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Rodent models of DN do not fully replicate the pathology observed in human patients. We examined DN in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced [B6] and spontaneous type 1 diabetes [B6Ins2Akita] and spontaneous type 2 diabetes [B6-db/db, BKS-db/db]. DN was defined using the criteria of the Animal Models of Diabetic Complications Consortium (http://www.amdcc.org). Despite persistent hyperglycemia, the STZ-treated B6 and B6Ins2Akita mice were resistant to the development of DN. In contrast, DN developed in both type 2 diabetes models: the B6-db/db and BKS-db/db mice. The persistence of hyperglycemia and development of DN in the B6-db/db mice required an increased fat diet while the BKS-db/db mice developed severe DN and remained hyperglycemic on standard mouse chow. Our data support the hypothesis that genetic background and diet influence the development of DN and should be considered when developing new models of DN. PMID:17804249

  18. Ethical Considerations in Mouse Experiments.

    PubMed

    Baertschi, Bernard; Gyger, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    Mice count morally because they can be harmed. This raises a moral issue in animal experimentation. Three main ethical attitudes towards animals are reviewed here. The Kantian view denies moral value to animals because they lack reason. The second view, by Singer, considers animals as sentient creatures (i.e., able to suffer). Finally, Regan considers that animals are subjects of their own life; they are autonomous and therefore have moral rights. Singer is a reformist and allows animal experimentation under certain conditions. Regan is abolitionist, saying that animals have moral rights that cannot be negotiated. Current animal protection legislation strives to put in balance the human and animal interests to decide whether an animal experiment is morally justified or not. An ethical evaluation process is conducted based on the harm-benefit assessment of the experiment. The researcher has to implement the 3Rs (Replacement, Reduction, Refinement) to minimize the harms to the animals and make sure that the outcomes are scientifically significant and that the quality of the science is high, in order to maximize benefits to humans and animals. Curr. Protoc. Mouse Biol. 1:155-167. © 2011 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:26068990

  19. Expression and misexpression of members of the FGF and TGFbeta families of growth factors in the developing mouse pancreas.

    PubMed

    Dichmann, Darwin S; Miller, Christopher P; Jensen, Jan; Scott Heller, R; Serup, Palle

    2003-04-01

    We have performed a high-capacity, semiquantitative, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction screen for expression of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) family genes as well as their cognate receptors. By using cDNA prepared from embryonic day 12 to postnatal day 0 embryonic mouse pancreas, we have identified several factors potentially involved in the development of the endocrine pancreas. We find high-level early expression of TGFbeta-1 and -2, and constitutive expression of TGFbeta-3 and their receptors. Of the Inhibin/Activin members, we found exclusively Inhibin-alpha and Activin-betaB to be expressed, and the BMP family was represented by BMP4, BMP5, and BMP7. The predominant forms of the BMP and Activin type II receptors were ActR-IIB and BMPR-II and of the type I receptors, BMPR-1A and -1B were the highest expressed. FGF1, FGF7, FGF9, FGF10, FGF11, and FGF18 were also expressed in the pancreas at varying time points and levels, as well as FGF receptor forms FGFR1b, FGFR1c, FGFR2b, FGFR2c, FGFR3b, and FGFR4. To gain insight into the biological function, we misexpressed members of these families in the pancreas by using the early pancreas promoter Pdx1. Misexpression of FGF4 results in disruption of the pancreas morphology with epithelial structures interspersed in stroma tissue. The endocrine compartment was reduced to scattered single cells, and the exocrine consisted of unbranched ductal epithelia with acinar structures budding off. In contrast, misexpression of BMP-6 resulted in complete agenesis of the pancreas and reduced the size of the stomach and spleen dramatically and caused fusion of the liver and duodenum.

  20. Glucocorticoids differentially regulate expression of duodenal and renal calbindin-D9k through glucocorticoid receptor-mediated pathway in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Geun-Shik; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2006-02-01

    Dexamethasone (Dex) is a member of the glucocorticoids (GCs), and is broadly used as an anti-inflammatory medication. Continuous administration with GCs induces adverse effects and suffering in humans (i.e., osteoporosis) due to negative calcium balance derived from low re- and absorption in the duodenum and kidney. A cytosolic calcium-binding protein, calbindin-D9k (CaBP-9k), is dominantly expressed in the renal and intestinal tissues involved in calcium re- and absorption and plays an active role in calcium transport. In the present study, we employed adrenalectomized (ADX) and sham-treated (Sham) male mice to examine the effect of Dex on CaBP-9k gene expression in the duodenum and kidney. Dex significantly reduced the levels of duodenal CaBP-9k mRNA and protein, and it restored ADX-induced decrease in renal CaBP-9k protein compared with the level of Sham control. Dex treatment increased calcium and phosphate levels in the sera of both Sham and ADX mice. In a time course experiment, Dex significantly decreased duodenal CaBP-9k at the transcriptional and translational levels at 3 days, whereas it temporarily increased CaBP-9k mRNA and protein levels at 12 and 24 h. Altered CaBP-9k expression by Dex was completely reversed by mifepristone, an antagonist for the GC receptor (GR). In addition, duodenal CaBP-9k and GR were colocalized on the enterocyte (duodenocyte), supporting a role for GR in regulating CaBP-9k. In ovariectomized (OVX) and ADX female mice daily treated with Dex for 3 days, duodenal CaBP-9k was expressed at the same level as in male mice. Also, no cross-activity of progesterone and Dex on their receptors was observed. Taken together, these results indicate that mouse CaBP-9k gene may be regulated by Dex in a tissue-specific manner, and reduced duodenal CaBP-9k via the GR pathway may take part in negative calcium absorption of GC-induced osteoporosis, whereas renal CaBP-9k may not be involved in the regulation of calcium homeostasis. PMID:16219669

  1. Surfing the internet with a BCI mouse.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tianyou; Li, Yuanqing; Long, Jinyi; Gu, Zhenghui

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we present a new web browser based on a two-dimensional (2D) brain-computer interface (BCI) mouse, where our major concern is the selection of an intended target in a multi-target web page. A real-world web page may contain tens or even hundreds of targets, including hyperlinks, input elements, buttons, etc. In this case, a target filter designed in our system can be used to exclude most of those targets of no interest. Specifically, the user filters the targets of no interest out by inputting keywords with a P300-based speller, while keeps those containing the keywords. Such filtering largely facilitates the target selection task based on our BCI mouse. When there are only several targets in a web page (either an original sparse page or a target-filtered page), the user moves the mouse toward the target of interest using his/her electroencephalographic signal. The horizontal movement and vertical movement are controlled by motor imagery and P300 potential, respectively. If the mouse encounters a target of no interest, the user rejects it and continues to move the mouse. Otherwise the user selects the target and activates it. With the collaboration of the target filtering and a series of mouse movements and target selections/rejections, the user can select an intended target in a web page. Based on our browser system, common navigation functions, including history rolling forward and backward, hyperlink selection, page scrolling, text input, etc, are available. The system has been tested on seven subjects. Experimental results not only validated the efficacy of the proposed method, but also showed that free internet surfing with a BCI mouse is feasible.

  2. Surfing the internet with a BCI mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Tianyou; Li, Yuanqing; Long, Jinyi; Gu, Zhenghui

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we present a new web browser based on a two-dimensional (2D) brain-computer interface (BCI) mouse, where our major concern is the selection of an intended target in a multi-target web page. A real-world web page may contain tens or even hundreds of targets, including hyperlinks, input elements, buttons, etc. In this case, a target filter designed in our system can be used to exclude most of those targets of no interest. Specifically, the user filters the targets of no interest out by inputting keywords with a P300-based speller, while keeps those containing the keywords. Such filtering largely facilitates the target selection task based on our BCI mouse. When there are only several targets in a web page (either an original sparse page or a target-filtered page), the user moves the mouse toward the target of interest using his/her electroencephalographic signal. The horizontal movement and vertical movement are controlled by motor imagery and P300 potential, respectively. If the mouse encounters a target of no interest, the user rejects it and continues to move the mouse. Otherwise the user selects the target and activates it. With the collaboration of the target filtering and a series of mouse movements and target selections/rejections, the user can select an intended target in a web page. Based on our browser system, common navigation functions, including history rolling forward and backward, hyperlink selection, page scrolling, text input, etc, are available. The system has been tested on seven subjects. Experimental results not only validated the efficacy of the proposed method, but also showed that free internet surfing with a BCI mouse is feasible.

  3. The morphology of the mouse masticatory musculature

    PubMed Central

    Baverstock, Hester; Jeffery, Nathan S; Cobb, Samuel N

    2013-01-01

    The mouse has been the dominant model organism in studies on the development, genetics and evolution of the mammalian skull and associated soft-tissue for decades. There is the potential to take advantage of this well studied model and the range of mutant, knockin and knockout organisms with diverse craniofacial phenotypes to investigate the functional significance of variation and the role of mechanical forces on the development of the integrated craniofacial skeleton and musculature by using computational mechanical modelling methods (e.g. finite element and multibody dynamic modelling). Currently, there are no detailed published data of the mouse masticatory musculature available. Here, using a combination of micro-dissection and non-invasive segmentation of iodine-enhanced micro-computed tomography, we document the anatomy, architecture and proportions of the mouse masticatory muscles. We report on the superficial masseter (muscle, tendon and pars reflecta), deep masseter, zygomaticomandibularis (anterior, posterior, infraorbital and tendinous parts), temporalis (lateral and medial parts), external and internal pterygoid muscles. Additionally, we report a lateral expansion of the attachment of the temporalis onto the zygomatic arch, which may play a role in stabilising this bone during downwards loading. The data presented in this paper now provide a detailed reference for phenotypic comparison in mouse models and allow the mouse to be used as a model organism in biomechanical and functional modelling and simulation studies of the craniofacial skeleton and particularly the masticatory system. PMID:23692055

  4. Transgenic mouse model of cutaneous adnexal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kito, Yusuke; Saigo, Chiemi; Atsushi, Kurabayashi; Mutsuo, Furihata; Tamotsu, Takeuchi

    2014-01-01

    TMEM207 was first characterized as being an important molecule for the invasion activity of gastric signet-ring cell carcinoma cells. In order to unravel the pathological properties of TMEM207, we generated several transgenic mouse lines, designated C57BL/6-Tg (ITF-TMEM207), in which murine TMEM207 was ectopically expressed under a truncated (by ~200 bp) proximal promoter of the murine intestinal trefoil factor (ITF) gene (also known as Tff3). Unexpectedly, a C57BL/6-Tg (ITF-TMEM207) mouse line exhibited a high incidence of spontaneous intradermal tumors with histopathological features that resembled those of various human cutaneous adnexal tumors. These tumors were found in ~14% female and 13% of male 6- to 12-month-old mice. TMEM207 immunoreactivity was found in hair follicle bulge cells in non-tumorous skin, as well as in cutaneous adnexal tumors of the transgenic mouse. The ITF-TMEM207 construct in this line appeared to be inserted to a major satellite repeat sequence at chromosome 2, in which no definite coding molecule was found. In addition, we also observed cutaneous adnexal tumors in three other C57BL/6-Tg (ITF-TMEM207) transgenic mouse lines. We believe that the C57BL/6-Tg (ITF-TMEM207) mouse might be a useful model to understand human cutaneous adnexal tumors. PMID:25305140

  5. Pathology of Mouse Models of Accelerated Aging.

    PubMed

    Harkema, L; Youssef, S A; de Bruin, A

    2016-03-01

    Progeroid mouse models display phenotypes in multiple organ systems that suggest premature aging and resemble features of natural aging of both mice and humans. The prospect of a significant increase in the global elderly population within the next decades has led to the emergence of "geroscience," which aims at elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved in aging. Progeroid mouse models are frequently used in geroscience as they provide insight into the molecular mechanisms that are involved in the highly complex process of natural aging. This review provides an overview of the most commonly reported nonneoplastic macroscopic and microscopic pathologic findings in progeroid mouse models (eg, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, degenerative joint disease, intervertebral disc degeneration, kyphosis, sarcopenia, cutaneous atrophy, wound healing, hair loss, alopecia, lymphoid atrophy, cataract, corneal endothelial dystrophy, retinal degenerative diseases, and vascular remodeling). Furthermore, several shortcomings in pathologic analysis and descriptions of these models are discussed. Progeroid mouse models are valuable models for aging, but thorough knowledge of both the mouse strain background and the progeria-related phenotype is required to guide interpretation and translation of the pathology data. PMID:26864891

  6. Children computer mouse use and anthropometry.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Erin E; Johnson, Peter W

    2012-01-01

    Studies have shown that increased computer use among adults in occupational settings is associated with the development of cumulative trauma disorders; however, the need to address how adult-sized mice and keyboards are affecting children is becoming increasingly important as both access to and use of computers is increasing among today's youth. To address the potential mismatch that exists between child stature and computer input device size and activation force, we have applied existing, age-specific, anthropometric data to elements of device design, including mouse size (length, width, height, switch location), and mouse-button activation forces. Trends supported the development of smaller computer input devices with lower activation forces for smaller statured individuals including children. Distinct and consistent trends in size delineations were seen across gender and age groups-trends that correlate well with grades and schooling in the United States education system . Three to four mouse sizes would be recommended: a mouse sized for adult and high school males; one for adult and high school females and junior high males; one for elementary school children, aged 6 to 10 years; and possibly a mouse for the smallest users who are less than six years old. PMID:22316827

  7. Estrogen receptors in the wobbler mouse.

    PubMed

    Siegel, L I; Fox, T O

    1985-12-01

    Recent research has raised the interesting possibility that the neurological mutant mouse, wobbler (wr/wr), possesses an estrogen receptor deficit analogous to the androgen receptor deficiency found in androgen-resistant mice with testicular feminization. In the present report we examined estrogen-binding activity in cytosolic extracts of kidney, liver, and brain from wobbler mice, littermate control animals, and C57BL/6J mice, using DNA-cellulose chromatography. Estrogen binding components exhibiting properties of estrogen receptors were present in all tissues examined. Estrogen receptors adhered to DNA, displayed characteristic elution profiles from DNA-cellulose, and showed high affinity and limited capacity for estradiol, in contrast to non-receptor entities which bind estradiol. The qualitative elution patterns for estrogen receptors did not differ among groups within each tissue studied, and were similar to those reported previously in mouse kidney and brain. While estrogen receptors have been shown in mouse liver by other techniques, this is the first demonstration of putative estrogen receptors in mouse liver by DNA-cellulose chromatography. No consistent deficits in estrogen receptor concentration were found in wobblers compared to littermates. Thus, the data do not support the hypothesis that the wobbler mouse is an estrogen receptor-deficient mutant.

  8. Cognitive dysfunction in the dystrophin-deficient mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy: A reappraisal from sensory to executive processes.

    PubMed

    Chaussenot, Rémi; Edeline, Jean-Marc; Le Bec, Benoit; El Massioui, Nicole; Laroche, Serge; Vaillend, Cyrille

    2015-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is associated with language disabilities and deficits in learning and memory, leading to intellectual disability in a patient subpopulation. Recent studies suggest the presence of broader deficits affecting information processing, short-term memory and executive functions. While the absence of the full-length dystrophin (Dp427) is a common feature in all patients, variable mutation profiles may additionally alter distinct dystrophin-gene products encoded by separate promoters. However, the nature of the cognitive dysfunctions specifically associated with the loss of distinct brain dystrophins is unclear. Here we show that the loss of the full-length brain dystrophin in mdx mice does not modify the perception and sensorimotor gating of auditory inputs, as assessed using auditory brainstem recordings and prepulse inhibition of startle reflex. In contrast, both acquisition and long-term retention of cued and trace fear memories were impaired in mdx mice, suggesting alteration in a functional circuit including the amygdala. Spatial learning in the water maze revealed reduced path efficiency, suggesting qualitative alteration in mdx mice learning strategy. However, spatial working memory performance and cognitive flexibility challenged in various behavioral paradigms in water and radial-arm mazes were unimpaired. The full-length brain dystrophin therefore appears to play a role during acquisition of associative learning as well as in general processes involved in memory consolidation, but no overt involvement in working memory and/or executive functions could be demonstrated in spatial learning tasks. PMID:26190833

  9. Citrobacter rodentium mouse model of bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Crepin, Valerie F; Collins, James W; Habibzay, Maryam; Frankel, Gad

    2016-10-01

    Infection of mice with Citrobacter rodentium is a robust model to study bacterial pathogenesis, mucosal immunology, the health benefits of probiotics and the role of the microbiota during infection. C. rodentium was first isolated by Barthold from an outbreak of mouse diarrhea in Yale University in 1972 and was 'rediscovered' by Falkow and Schauer in 1993. Since then the use of the model has proliferated, and it is now the gold standard for studying virulence of the closely related human pathogens enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EPEC and EHEC, respectively). Here we provide a detailed protocol for various applications of the model, including bacterial growth, site-directed mutagenesis, mouse inoculation (from cultured cells and after cohabitation), monitoring of bacterial colonization, tissue extraction and analysis, immune responses, probiotic treatment and microbiota analysis. The main protocol, from mouse infection to clearance and analysis of tissues and host responses, takes ∼5 weeks to complete. PMID:27606775

  10. Peripheral Neuropathy in Mouse Models of Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jolivalt, Corinne G; Frizzi, Katie E; Guernsey, Lucie; Marquez, Alex; Ochoa, Joseline; Rodriguez, Maria; Calcutt, Nigel A

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a frequent complication of chronic diabetes that most commonly presents as a distal degenerative polyneuropathy with sensory loss. Around 20% to 30% of such patients may also experience neuropathic pain. The underlying pathogenic mechanisms are uncertain, and therapeutic options are limited. Rodent models of diabetes have been used for more than 40 years to study neuropathy and evaluate potential therapies. For much of this period, streptozotocin-diabetic rats were the model of choice. The emergence of new technologies that allow relatively cheap and routine manipulations of the mouse genome has prompted increased use of mouse models of diabetes to study neuropathy. In this article, we describe the commonly used mouse models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and provide protocols to phenotype the structural, functional, and behavioral indices of peripheral neuropathy, with a particular emphasis on assays pertinent to the human condition. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27584552

  11. Mouse behavioural analysis in systems biology

    PubMed Central

    van Meer, Peter; Raber, Jacob

    2005-01-01

    Molecular techniques allowing in vivo modulation of gene expression have provided unique opportunities and challenges for behavioural studies aimed at understanding the function of particular genes or biological systems under physiological or pathological conditions. Although various animal models are available, the laboratory mouse (Mus musculus) has unique features and is therefore a preferred animal model. The mouse shares a remarkable genetic resemblance and aspects of behaviour with humans. In this review, first we describe common mouse models for behavioural analyses. As both genetic and environmental factors influence behavioural performance and need to be carefully evaluated in behavioural experiments, considerations for designing and interpretations of these experiments are subsequently discussed. Finally, common behavioural tests used to assess brain function are reviewed, and it is illustrated how behavioural tests are used to increase our understanding of the role of histaminergic neurotransmission in brain function. PMID:16035954

  12. FISH probes for mouse chromosome identification

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Yu-Ping; Mohapatra, G.; Hanahan, D.; Miller, J.

    1997-10-01

    P1 clones near the telomeres and centromeres of each mouse chromosome except Y have been selected from a mouse genomic library and mapped using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Each clone was selected to contain a genetically mapped polymorphic DNA sequence as close as possible to the centromere or telomere of a chromosome. The genetic distance from the various P1 clones to the most distal genetically mapped polymorphic sequence ranged from 0 for about half of the clones to 6.7 cM for the probe at the telomere of chromosome 14. The average distance to the most distal or proximal chromosome marker was 1.5 cM. The use of FISH with these probes for mouse chromosome identification during comparative genomic hybridization is illustrated. 17 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. OCT guided microinjections for mouse embryonic research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larin, Kirill V.; Syed, Saba H.; Coughlin, Andrew J.; Wang, Shang; West, Jennifer L.; Dickinson, Mary E.; Larina, Irina V.

    2013-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is gaining popularity as live imaging tool for embryonic research in animal models. Recently we have demonstrated that OCT can be used for live imaging of cultured early mouse embryos (E7.5-E10) as well as later stage mouse embryos in utero (E12.5 to the end of gestation). Targeted delivery of signaling molecules, drugs, and cells is a powerful approach to study normal and abnormal development, and image guidance is highly important for such manipulations. Here we demonstrate that OCT can be used to guide microinjections of gold nanoshell suspensions in live mouse embryos. This approach can potentially be used for variety of applications such as guided injections of contrast agents, signaling molecules, pharmacological agents, cell transplantation and extraction, as well as other image-guided micromanipulations. Our studies also reveal novel potential for gold nanoshells in embryonic research.

  14. Sphingolipid metabolism in organotypic mouse keratinocyte cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Madison, K.C.; Swartzendruber, D.C.; Wertz, P.W.; Downing, D.T. )

    1990-12-01

    Ceramides are the dominant component of the stratum corneum intercellular lipid lamellae, which constitute the epidermal permeability barrier. Only pig and human epidermal ceramides have been extensively characterized and the structures of the ceramides of cultured keratinocytes have not been previously investigated. In the present studies, we have characterized the ceramides synthesized by organotypic lifted mouse keratinocyte cultures for the first time and compared them to the ceramides of intact mouse epidermis. Both mouse epidermis and cultures contained five ceramides, ceramide 1 being the least polar and ceramide 5 the most polar. Ceramide 1 was a group of acylceramides, i.e., very-long-chain omega-hydroxyceramides with an ester-linked nonhydroxy fatty acid. Ceramide 2 contained medium-length saturated nonhydroxy fatty acids. (In culture, the ceramide 2 band was split into two parts with the slightly more polar ceramide 2' containing short-chain saturated nonhydroxy fatty acids.) Ceramide 5 contained short-chain alpha-hydroxy fatty acids. The structures of ceramides 1, 2, and 5 were analagous to those of pig and human epidermis. Mouse epidermal ceramide 3 was quite unusual, containing beta-hydroxy fatty acids, a structure not previously identified among mammalian ceramides. In contrast, culture ceramide 3 was composed of omega-hydroxy fatty acids with a chain-length distribution similar to that of ceramide 1. Mouse ceramide 4 was composed of fatty acids with chromatographic mobility similar to hydroxy fatty acids but with different chemical reactivity; it remains only partially characterized. Culture ceramide 4 was present in quantities too small for analysis. All ceramides in mouse epidermis and cultures contained only sphingosine bases, whereas pig and human ceramides also contain phytosphingosine.

  15. Cancer mouse models: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Khaled, Walid T; Liu, Pentao

    2014-03-01

    The development and advances in gene targeting technology over the past three decades has facilitated the generation of cancer mouse models that recapitulate features of human malignancies. These models have been and still remain instrumental in revealing the complexities of human cancer biology. However, they will need to evolve in the post-genomic era of cancer research. In this review we will highlight some of the key developments over the past decades and will discuss the new possibilities of cancer mouse models in the light of emerging powerful gene manipulating tools.

  16. Development and characterization of mouse hybridomas.

    PubMed

    Mechetner, Eugene

    2007-01-01

    Cell fusion protocols that were developed by Kohler and Milstein in the mid-1970s and aimed at producing and characterization of mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) remain the gold standard of hybridoma development. Despite tremendous progress in using MAbs in multiple research, diagnostic, and therapeutic areas, major experimental flaws in designing and carrying out hybridoma experimentation often result in the production of hybridomas exhibiting poor growth parameters and secreting low-specificity and low-affinity antibodies. This methodology chapter is built around the conventional hybridoma protocol, with a special emphasis on tissue culture and biochemical techniques aimed at producing truly monospecific and highly active mouse MAbs.

  17. Islet Insulin Secretion Measurements in the Mouse.

    PubMed

    Hugill, Alison; Shimomura, Kenju; Cox, Roger D

    2016-01-01

    This article describes detailed protocols for in vitro measurements of insulin function and secretion in isolated mouse islets for the analysis of glucose homeostasis. We specify a method of enzyme digestion and hand picking to isolate and release the greatest number of high quality islets from the pancreas of the mouse. We describe an effective method for generating dynamic measurements of insulin secretion using a perifusion assay including a detailed protocol for constructing a peristaltic pump and tubing assembly. In addition we describe an alternative and simple technique for measuring insulin secretion using static incubation of isolated islets. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27584553

  18. The Riken mouse genome encyclopedia project.

    PubMed

    Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2003-01-01

    The Riken mouse genome encyclopedia a comprehensive full-length cDNA collection and sequence database. High-level functional annotation is based on sequence homology search, expression profiling, mapping and protein-protein interactions. More than 1000000 clones prepared from 163 tissues were end-sequenced and classified into 128000 clusters, and 60000 representative clones were fully sequenced representing 24000 clear protein-encoding genes. The application of the mouse genome database for positional cloning and gene network regulation analysis is reported.

  19. Mouse Genome Database: From sequence to phenotypes and disease models.

    PubMed

    Eppig, Janan T; Richardson, Joel E; Kadin, James A; Smith, Cynthia L; Blake, Judith A; Bult, Carol J

    2015-08-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD, www.informatics.jax.org) is the international scientific database for genetic, genomic, and biological data on the laboratory mouse to support the research requirements of the biomedical community. To accomplish this goal, MGD provides broad data coverage, serves as the authoritative standard for mouse nomenclature for genes, mutants, and strains, and curates and integrates many types of data from literature and electronic sources. Among the key data sets MGD supports are: the complete catalog of mouse genes and genome features, comparative homology data for mouse and vertebrate genes, the authoritative set of Gene Ontology (GO) annotations for mouse gene functions, a comprehensive catalog of mouse mutations and their phenotypes, and a curated compendium of mouse models of human diseases. Here, we describe the data acquisition process, specifics about MGD's key data areas, methods to access and query MGD data, and outreach and user help facilities. PMID:26150326

  20. The susceptibility of the hamster to mouse encephalomyelitis virus.

    PubMed

    DEAN, D J; DALLDORF, G

    1948-12-01

    The OT strain of mouse encephalomyelitis virus induces an inapparent infection in suckling hamsters associated with lesions of the central nervous system and skeletal muscles. The virus increases in pathogenicity after alternating mouse-hamster transfers and then induces both paralysis and encephalitis. Pathogenicity is lost through serial hamster passages but is restored by a single mouse transfer.

  1. 9 CFR 113.33 - Mouse safety tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mouse safety tests. 113.33 Section 113... Procedures § 113.33 Mouse safety tests. One of the mouse safety tests provided in this section shall be... or more ingredients makes the biological product lethal or toxic for mice but not lethal or toxic...

  2. 9 CFR 113.33 - Mouse safety tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mouse safety tests. 113.33 Section 113... Procedures § 113.33 Mouse safety tests. One of the mouse safety tests provided in this section shall be... or more ingredients makes the biological product lethal or toxic for mice but not lethal or toxic...

  3. Mouse Driven Window Graphics for Network Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makinson, G. J.; And Others

    Computer enhanced teaching of computational mathematics on a network system driving graphics terminals is being redeveloped for a mouse-driven, high resolution, windowed environment of a UNIX work station. Preservation of the features of networked access by heterogeneous terminals is provided by the use of the X Window environment. A dmonstrator…

  4. Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer in the Mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has become a unique and powerful tool for epigenetic reprogramming research and gene manipulation in animals since “Dolly,” the first animal cloned from an adult cell was reported in 1997. Although the success rates of somatic cloning have been inefficient and the mechanism of reprogramming is still largely unknown, this technique has been proven to work in more than 10 mammalian species. Among them, the mouse provides the best model for both basic and applied research of somatic cloning because of its abounding genetic resources, rapid sexual maturity and propagation, minimal requirements for housing, etc. This chapter describes a basic protocol for mouse cloning using cumulus cells, the most popular cell type for NT, in which donor nuclei are directly injected into the oocyte using a piezo-actuated micromanipulator. In particular, we focus on a new, more efficient mouse cloning protocol using trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, which increases both in vitro and in vivo developmental rates from twofold to fivefold. This new method including TSA will be helpful to establish mouse cloning in many laboratories.

  5. Large-scale mouse knockouts and phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Solis, Ramiro; Ryder, Edward; Houghton, Richard; White, Jacqueline K; Bottomley, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Standardized phenotypic analysis of mutant forms of every gene in the mouse genome will provide fundamental insights into mammalian gene function and advance human and animal health. The availability of the human and mouse genome sequences, the development of embryonic stem cell mutagenesis technology, the standardization of phenotypic analysis pipelines, and the paradigm-shifting industrialization of these processes have made this a realistic and achievable goal. The size of this enterprise will require global coordination to ensure economies of scale in both the generation and primary phenotypic analysis of the mutant strains, and to minimize unnecessary duplication of effort. To provide more depth to the functional annotation of the genome, effective mechanisms will also need to be developed to disseminate the information and resources produced to the wider community. Better models of disease, potential new drug targets with novel mechanisms of action, and completely unsuspected genotype-phenotype relationships covering broad aspects of biology will become apparent. To reach these goals, solutions to challenges in mouse production and distribution, as well as development of novel, ever more powerful phenotypic analysis modalities will be necessary. It is a challenging and exciting time to work in mouse genetics.

  6. Translating Mouse Vocalizations: Prosody and Frequency Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Lahvis, Garet P.; Alleva, Enrico; Scattoni, Maria Luisa

    2010-01-01

    Mental illness can include impaired abilities to express emotions or respond to the emotions of others. Speech provides a mechanism for expressing emotions, by both what words are spoken and by the melody or intonation of speech (prosody). Through the perception of variations in prosody, an individual can detect changes in another's emotional state. Prosodic features of mouse ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs), indicated by changes in frequency and amplitude, also convey information. Dams retrieve pups that emit separation calls, females approach males emitting solicitous calls, and mice can become fearful of a cue associated with the vocalizations of a distressed conspecific. Since acoustic features of mouse USVs respond to drugs and genetic manipulations that influence reward circuits, USV analysis can be employed to examine how genes influence social motivation, affect regulation, and communication. The purpose of this review is to discuss how genetic and developmental factors influence aspects of the mouse vocal repertoire and how mice respond to the vocalizations of their conspecifics. To generate falsifiable hypotheses about the emotional content of particular calls, this review addresses USV analysis within the framework of affective neuroscience (e.g. measures of motivated behavior such as conditioned place preference tests, brain activity, and systemic physiology). Suggested future studies include employment of an expanded array of physiological and statistical approaches to identify the salient acoustic features of mouse vocalizations. We are particularly interested in rearing environments that incorporate sufficient spatial and temporal complexity to familiarize developing mice with a broader array of affective states. PMID:20497235

  7. Having Fun with a Cordless Mouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunn, John

    2016-01-01

    A cordless mouse with an added reed switch is used as a wireless data logger to record every time the wheel of a trolley completes a revolution. The limitations of the system in terms of maximum clicking rate and spatial resolution are considered and data obtained from the descent of a trolley down a ramp at various different angles is analysed in…

  8. MMP responses in the MRL mouse

    PubMed Central

    Heber-Katz, Ellen; Gourevitch, Dmitri

    2013-01-01

    The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been implicated the regenerative response in amphibians and various mammalian models of regeneration. The neutrophil response is known to bring MMPs and other proteases to the wound to promote bacterial elimination and tissue remodeling. These issues in relation to what is occurring in the MRL mouse model of regeneration/wound healing is discussed. PMID:19735244

  9. Immunohistochemistry of Paraffin Sections from Mouse Ovaries.

    PubMed

    Akkoyunlu, Gokhan; Tepekoy, Filiz

    2016-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is an efficient technique to detect cellular localizations of the proteins in paraffin-embedded tissues. It allows specific proteins to be visualized by the interaction of antibodies with an enzyme-substrate-chromogen system. Here, we describe indirect immunohistochemistry method for paraffin-embedded mouse ovaries fixed with Bouin's Fixative. PMID:27557588

  10. MPHASYS: a mouse phenotype analysis system

    PubMed Central

    Calder, R Brent; Beems, Rudolf B; van Steeg, Harry; Mian, I Saira; Lohman, Paul HM; Vijg, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Background Systematic, high-throughput studies of mouse phenotypes have been hampered by the inability to analyze individual animal data from a multitude of sources in an integrated manner. Studies generally make comparisons at the level of genotype or treatment thereby excluding associations that may be subtle or involve compound phenotypes. Additionally, the lack of integrated, standardized ontologies and methodologies for data exchange has inhibited scientific collaboration and discovery. Results Here we introduce a Mouse Phenotype Analysis System (MPHASYS), a platform for integrating data generated by studies of mouse models of human biology and disease such as aging and cancer. This computational platform is designed to provide a standardized methodology for working with animal data; a framework for data entry, analysis and sharing; and ontologies and methodologies for ensuring accurate data capture. We describe the tools that currently comprise MPHASYS, primarily ones related to mouse pathology, and outline its use in a study of individual animal-specific patterns of multiple pathology in mice harboring a specific germline mutation in the DNA repair and transcription-specific gene Xpd. Conclusion MPHASYS is a system for analyzing multiple data types from individual animals. It provides a framework for developing data analysis applications, and tools for collecting and distributing high-quality data. The software is platform independent and freely available under an open-source license [1]. PMID:17553167

  11. A Comparison of Molecular and Histopathological Changes in Mouse Intestinal Tissue Following Whole-Body Proton- or Gamma-Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purgason, Ashley; Mangala, Lingegowda; Zhang, Ye; Hamilton, Stanley; Wu, Honglu

    2010-01-01

    There are many consequences following exposure to the space radiation environment which can adversely affect the health of a crew member. Acute radiation syndrome (ARS) involving nausea and vomiting, damage to radio-sensitive tissue such as the blood forming organs and gastrointestinal tract, and cancer are some of these negative effects. The space radiation environment is ample with protons and contains gamma rays as well. Little knowledge exists to this point, however, regarding the effects of protons on mammalian systems; conversely several studies have been performed observing the effects of gamma rays on different animal models. For the research presented here, we wish to compare our previous work looking at whole-body exposure to protons using a mouse model to our studies of mice experiencing whole-body exposure to gamma rays as part of the radio-adaptive response. Radio-adaptation is a well-documented phenomenon in which cells exposed to a priming low dose of radiation prior to a higher dose display a reduction in endpoints like chromosomal aberrations, cell death, micronucleus formation, and more when compared to their counterparts receiving high dose-irradiation only. Our group has recently completed a radio-adaptive experiment with C57BL/6 mice. For both this study and the preceding proton research, the gastrointestinal tract of each animal was dissected four hours post-irradiation and the isolated small intestinal tissue was fixed in formalin for histopathological examination or snap-frozen in liquid nitrogen for RNA isolation. Histopathologic observation of the tissue using standard H&E staining methods to screen for morphologic changes showed an increase in apoptotic lesions for even the lowest doses of 0.1 Gy of protons and 0.05 Gy of gamma rays, and the percentage of apoptotic cells increased with increasing dose. A smaller percentage of crypts showed 3 or more apoptotic lesions in animals that received 6 Gy of gamma-irradiation compared to mice

  12. Neuroanatomy and Neurochemistry of Mouse Cornea

    PubMed Central

    He, Jiucheng; Bazan, Haydee E. P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the entire nerve architecture and content of the two main sensory neuropeptides in mouse cornea to determine if it is a good model with similarities to human corneal innervation. Methods Mice aged 1 to 24 weeks were used. The corneas were stained with neuronal-class βIII-tubulin, calcitonin gene–related peptide (CGRP), and substance P (SP) antibodies; whole-mount images were acquired to build an entire view of corneal innervation. To test the origin of CGRP and SP, trigeminal ganglia (TG) were processed for immunofluorescence. Relative corneal nerve fiber densities or neuron numbers were assessed by computer-assisted analysis. Results Between 1 and 3 weeks after birth, mouse cornea was mainly composed of a stromal nerve network. At 4 weeks, a whorl-like structure (or vortex) appeared that gradually became more defined. By 8 weeks, anatomy of corneal nerves had reached maturity. Epithelial bundles converged into the central area to form the vortex. The number and pattern of whorl-like structures were different. Subbasal nerve density and nerve terminals were greater in the center than the periphery. Nerve fibers and terminals that were CGRP-positive were more abundant than SP-positive nerves and terminals. In trigeminal ganglia, the number of CGRP-positive neurons significantly outnumbered those positive for SP. Conclusions This is the first study to show a complete map of the entire corneal nerves and CGRP and SP sensory neuropeptide distribution in the mouse cornea. This finding shows mouse corneal innervation has many similarities to human cornea and makes the mouse an appropriate model to study pathologies involving corneal nerves. PMID:26906155

  13. Mouse Activity across Time Scales: Fractal Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Lima, G. Z. dos Santos; Lobão-Soares, B.; do Nascimento, G. C.; França, Arthur S. C.; Muratori, L.; Ribeiro, S.; Corso, G.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we devise a classification of mouse activity patterns based on accelerometer data using Detrended Fluctuation Analysis. We use two characteristic mouse behavioural states as benchmarks in this study: waking in free activity and slow-wave sleep (SWS). In both situations we find roughly the same pattern: for short time intervals we observe high correlation in activity - a typical 1/f complex pattern - while for large time intervals there is anti-correlation. High correlation of short intervals ( to : waking state and to : SWS) is related to highly coordinated muscle activity. In the waking state we associate high correlation both to muscle activity and to mouse stereotyped movements (grooming, waking, etc.). On the other side, the observed anti-correlation over large time scales ( to : waking state and to : SWS) during SWS appears related to a feedback autonomic response. The transition from correlated regime at short scales to an anti-correlated regime at large scales during SWS is given by the respiratory cycle interval, while during the waking state this transition occurs at the time scale corresponding to the duration of the stereotyped mouse movements. Furthermore, we find that the waking state is characterized by longer time scales than SWS and by a softer transition from correlation to anti-correlation. Moreover, this soft transition in the waking state encompass a behavioural time scale window that gives rise to a multifractal pattern. We believe that the observed multifractality in mouse activity is formed by the integration of several stereotyped movements each one with a characteristic time correlation. Finally, we compare scaling properties of body acceleration fluctuation time series during sleep and wake periods for healthy mice. Interestingly, differences between sleep and wake in the scaling exponents are comparable to previous works regarding human heartbeat. Complementarily, the nature of these sleep-wake dynamics could lead to a better

  14. New routes for transgenesis of the mouse.

    PubMed

    Belizário, José E; Akamini, Priscilla; Wolf, Philip; Strauss, Bryan; Xavier-Neto, José

    2012-08-01

    Transgenesis refers to the molecular genetic techniques for directing specific insertions, deletions and point mutations in the genome of germ cells in order to create genetically modified organisms (GMO). Genetic modification is becoming more practicable, efficient and predictable with the development and use of a variety of cell and molecular biology tools and DNA sequencing technologies. A collection of plasmidial and viral vectors, cell-type specific promoters, positive and negative selectable markers, reporter genes, drug-inducible Cre-loxP and Flp/FRT recombinase systems are available which ensure efficient transgenesis in the mouse. The technologies for the insertion and removal of genes by homologous-directed recombination in embryonic stem cells (ES) and generation of targeted gain- and loss-of function alleles have allowed the creation of thousands of mouse models of a variety of diseases. The engineered zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and small hairpin RNA-expressing constructs are novel tools with useful properties for gene knockout free of ES manipulation. In this review we briefly outline the different approaches and technologies for transgenesis as well as their advantages and disadvantages. We also present an overview on how the novel integrative mouse and human genomic databases and bioinformatics approaches have been used to understand genotype-phenotype relationships of hundreds of mutated and candidate disease genes in mouse models. The updating and continued improvements of the genomic technologies will eventually help us to unraveling the biological and pathological processes in such a way that they can be translated more efficiently from mouse to human and vise-versa.

  15. In vivo pattern of lipopolysaccharide and anti-CD3-induced NF-kappa B activation using a novel gene-targeted enhanced GFP reporter gene mouse.

    PubMed

    Magness, Scott T; Jijon, Humberto; Van Houten Fisher, Nancy; Sharpless, Ned E; Brenner, David A; Jobin, Christian

    2004-08-01

    NF-kappa B is a family of transcription factors involved in regulating cell death/survival, differentiation, and inflammation. Although the transactivation ability of NF-kappa B has been extensively studied in vitro, limited information is available on the spatial and temporal transactivation pattern in vivo. To investigate the kinetics and cellular localization of NF-kappa B-induced transcription, we created a transgenic mouse expressing the enhanced GFP (EGFP) under the transcriptional control of NF-kappa B cis elements (cis-NF-kappa B(EGFP)). A gene-targeting approach was used to insert a single copy of a NF-kappa B-dependent EGFP reporter gene 5' of the X-linked hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase locus in mouse embryonic stem cells. Embryonic fibroblasts, hepatic stellate cells, splenocytes, and dendritic cells isolated from cis-NF-kappa B(EGFP) mice demonstrated a strong induction of EGFP in response to LPS, anti-CD3, or TNF-alpha that was blocked by the NF-kappa B inhibitors BAY 11-7082 and NEMO-binding peptide. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated RelA binding to the cis-NF-kappa B(EGFP) promoter. Adenoviral delivery of NF-kappa B-inducing kinase strongly induced EGFP expression in the liver of cis-NF-kappa B(EGFP) mice. Similarly, mice injected with anti-CD3 or LPS showed increased EGFP expression in mononuclear cells, lymph node, spleen, and liver as measured by flow cytometry and/or fluorescence microscopy. Using whole organ imaging, LPS selectively induced EGFP expression in the duodenum and proximal jejunum, but not in the ileum and colon. Confocal analysis indicated EGFP expression was primarily found in lamina propria mononuclear cells. In summary, the cis-NF-kappa B(EGFP) mouse will serve as a valuable tool to address multiple questions regarding the cell-specific and real-time activation of NF-kappa B during normal and diseased states.

  16. The Mouse Genome Database: integration of and access to knowledge about the laboratory mouse.

    PubMed

    Blake, Judith A; Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2014-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD) (http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the community model organism database resource for the laboratory mouse, a premier animal model for the study of genetic and genomic systems relevant to human biology and disease. MGD maintains a comprehensive catalog of genes, functional RNAs and other genome features as well as heritable phenotypes and quantitative trait loci. The genome feature catalog is generated by the integration of computational and manual genome annotations generated by NCBI, Ensembl and Vega/HAVANA. MGD curates and maintains the comprehensive listing of functional annotations for mouse genes using the Gene Ontology, and MGD curates and integrates comprehensive phenotype annotations including associations of mouse models with human diseases. Recent improvements include integration of the latest mouse genome build (GRCm38), improved access to comparative and functional annotations for mouse genes with expanded representation of comparative vertebrate genomes and new loads of phenotype data from high-throughput phenotyping projects. All MGD resources are freely available to the research community.

  17. Eosinophilia of dystrophin-deficient muscle is promoted by perforin-mediated cytotoxicity by T cell effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, B.; Spencer, M. J.; Nakamura, G.; Tseng-Ong, L.; Tidball, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    Previous investigations have shown that cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) contribute to muscle pathology in the dystrophin-null mutant mouse (mdx) model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy through perforin-dependent and perforin-independent mechanisms. We have assessed whether the CTL-mediated pathology includes the promotion of eosinophilia in dystrophic muscle, and thereby provides a secondary mechanism through which CTLs contribute to muscular dystrophy. Quantitative immunohistochemistry confirmed that eosinophilia is a component of the mdx dystrophy. In addition, electron microscopic observations show that eosinophils traverse the basement membrane of mdx muscle fibers and display sites of close apposition of eosinophil and muscle membranes. The close membrane apposition is characterized by impingement of eosinophilic rods of major basic protein into the muscle cell membrane. Transfer of mdx splenocytes and mdx muscle extracts to irradiated C57 mice by intraperitoneal injection resulted in muscle eosinophilia in the recipient mice. Double-mutant mice lacking dystrophin and perforin showed less eosinophilia than was displayed by mdx mice that expressed perforin. Finally, administration of prednisolone, which has been shown previously to reduce the concentration of CTLs in dystrophic muscle, produced a significant reduction in eosinophilia. These findings indicate that eosinophilia is a component of the mdx pathology that is promoted by perforin-dependent cytotoxicity of effector T cells. However, some eosinophilia of mdx muscle is independent of perforin-mediated processes.

  18. MouseMine: a new data warehouse for MGI.

    PubMed

    Motenko, H; Neuhauser, S B; O'Keefe, M; Richardson, J E

    2015-08-01

    MouseMine (www.mousemine.org) is a new data warehouse for accessing mouse data from Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI). Based on the InterMine software framework, MouseMine supports powerful query, reporting, and analysis capabilities, the ability to save and combine results from different queries, easy integration into larger workflows, and a comprehensive Web Services layer. Through MouseMine, users can access a significant portion of MGI data in new and useful ways. Importantly, MouseMine is also a member of a growing community of online data resources based on InterMine, including those established by other model organism databases. Adopting common interfaces and collaborating on data representation standards are critical to fostering cross-species data analysis. This paper presents a general introduction to MouseMine, presents examples of its use, and discusses the potential for further integration into the MGI interface. PMID:26092688

  19. Elemental profiles in Emory mouse lens

    SciTech Connect

    Bagchi, M.; Emanuel, K. )

    1991-01-01

    Energy dispersive x-ray microprobe analysis was used to determine the distribution of chloride, potassium, phosphorus and sulfur in the epithelial cells of the lenses obtained from 3 to 7 month old Emory mice and 7 month old cataract resistant strain of Emory mice. Rapidly frozen lenses were fractured in the frozen state and lyophilized. The anterior epithelial cells were analyzed from equator to equator. The results show that the epithelial cells of the 7 month old Emory mouse lens have considerably higher amounts of chloride, sulfur, potassium and phosphorus. Presence of increased amount of potassium in the epithelial cells is intriguing. The data obtained from these experiments show that the changes in the elemental levels of epithelial cells are similar to observed alteration found in the lens fiber mass of 7 month old Emory mouse.

  20. Blood volume determination in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Riches, A. C.; Sharp, J. G.; Thomas, D. Brynmor; Smith, S. Vaughan

    1973-01-01

    1. The blood volume of the mouse has been measured using 59Fe-labelled red cells to determine the red cell volume and 131I-labelled human serum albumin to determine the plasma volume. 2. Values for the blood volume of 95·0 ± 1·5, 96·3 ± 2·7 and 84·7 ± 1·2 ml./kg body wt. were found for CSI female, CBA female and CBA male mice respectively. 3. A marked discrepancy was observed between the venous (cardiac) haematocrit and the whole body haematocrit. 4. The blood volume of the mouse must be determined from the red cell volume and the plasma volume, measured using appropriate labels, and not from the red cell volume or the plasma volume using the venous haematocrit. PMID:4687099

  1. Histomorphological Phenotyping of the Adult Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Mikhaleva, Anna; Kannan, Meghna; Wagner, Christel; Yalcin, Binnaz

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a series of standard operating procedures for morphological phenotyping of the mouse brain using basic histology. Many histological studies of the mouse brain use qualitative approaches based on what the human eye can detect. Consequently, some phenotypic information may be missed. Here we describe a quantitative approach for the assessment of brain morphology that is simple and robust. A total of 78 measurements are made throughout the brain at specific and well-defined regions, including the cortex, the hippocampus, and the cerebellum. Experimental design and timeline considerations, including strain background effects, the importance of sectioning quality, measurement variability, and efforts to correct human errors are discussed. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27584555

  2. Movement disorders in the Hfe knockout mouse.

    PubMed

    Golub, Mari S; Germann, Stacey L; Araiza, Renee S; Reader, J Rachel; Griffey, Stephen M; Lloyd, K C Kent

    2005-08-01

    The Hfe(- /-) mouse is a model for human hereditary hemochromatosis (HHH). The accumulation of tissue iron in this condition has led to the suggestion that HHH patients may be at higher risk for neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, adult male Hfe(-/-) mice and wildtype controls (n = 12/group) were evaluated for impairment with motor tests (stride length, landing footsplay, rotarod) as well as a general observational battery (Functional Observational Battery, FOB). Hfe(-/-) mice were characterized by more falls from the rotarod, wider forelimb landing footsplay and hypersensitivity to proximal stimulation. Iron accumulation in brain was not detected by histopathology. These data suggest that a motor syndrome may be associated with HHH that could be further understood through the Hfe(-/-) mouse model. PMID:16491649

  3. Spectral imaging of mouse calvaria undergoing craniosynstosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Nicole J.; Wang, Wei; Ignelzi, Michael A., Jr.; Morris, Michael D.

    2003-07-01

    Craniosynostosis, the premature fusion of the skull bones at the sutures, is the second most common human birth defect that affects the face and skull. The top most flat bones that comprise the skull, or calvaria, are most often affected. We previously showed that treatment of mouse calvaria with FGF2-soaked beads leads to craniosynostosis. In this study we treated mouse calvaria with FGF2-soaked beads and then used Raman imaging to demonstrate the spatial distribution of apatitic mineral and matrix in the sutures. There was no difference between FGF2 treated and control calvaria in the type of mineral produced (a lightly carbonated apatite), however we did observe increased mineral deposition in FGF2 treated calvaria. Raman imaging has great promise to detect the earliest mineral and matrix changes that occur in craniosynostosis.

  4. Having fun with a cordless mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunn, John

    2016-07-01

    A cordless mouse with an added reed switch is used as a wireless data logger to record every time the wheel of a trolley completes a revolution. The limitations of the system in terms of maximum clicking rate and spatial resolution are considered and data obtained from the descent of a trolley down a ramp at various different angles is analysed in different ways. The data is analysed to obtain initial accelerations (down the ramp) and subsequent decelerations (on the flat), as well as maximum velocities, and these results are used to compare the actual performance of the trolley (with friction) with the theoretical expectation. An agreement of better than 2% on the value of gravity is obtained. Encouraging agreement on frictional forces (and accelerations) is also obtained by considering the maximum kinetic energies reached at the bottom of the ramp. This paper includes the free provision of custom software to record the time history of the clicking of a mouse.

  5. Isolation of Mouse Pancreatic Islets of Langerhans.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Domínguez, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    The aim of any pancreatic islet isolation is obtaining pure, viable and functional pancreatic islets, either for in vitro or in vivo purposes. The islets of Langerhans are complex microorgans with the important role of regulating glucose homeostasis. Imbalances in glucose homeostasis lead to diabetes, which is defined by the American Diabetes Association as a "group of metabolic diseases characterized by hyperglycemia resulting from defects in insulin secretion, insulin action or both" (American Diabetes Association 2011). Currently, the rising demand of human islets is provoking a shortage of this tissue, limiting research and clinical practice on this field. In this scenario, it is essential to investigate and improve islet isolation procedures in animal models, while keeping in mind the anatomical and functional differences between species. This chapter discusses the main aspects of mouse islet isolation research, highlighting the critical factors and shortcomings to take into account for the selection and/or optimization of a mouse islet isolation protocol. PMID:27586420

  6. Development of amnesia in different mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Sinovyev, D R; Dubrovina, N I; Kulikov, A V

    2009-05-01

    We studied passive avoidance retrieval after amnestic stimulation (arrest in unsafe section of the experimental setup) in C57Bl/6J, BALB/c, CBA/Lac, AKR/J, DBA/2J, C3H/HeJ, and ASC/Icg mice. We demonstrated resistance to amnestic stimulation in mice with high predisposition to freezing reaction (ASC/Icg) and memory deficit in other mouse strains.

  7. Engineering a new mouse model for vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Manga, Prashiela; Orlow, Seth J

    2012-07-01

    Although the precise mechanisms that trigger vitiligo remain elusive, autoimmune responses mediate its progression. The development of therapies has been impeded by a paucity of animal models, since mice lack interfollicular melanocytes, the primary targets in vitiligo. In this issue, Harris et al. describe a mouse model in which interfollicular melanocytes are retained by Kit ligand overexpression and an immune response is initiated by transplanting melanocyte-targeting CD8+ T cells.

  8. 18th International Mouse Genome Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Darla R Miller

    2005-07-01

    The 18th International Mouse Genome Conference was held in Seattle, WA, US on October 18-22,2004. The meeting was partially supported by the Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG02-04ER63851. Abstracts can be seen at imgs.org and the summary of the meeting was published in “Mammalian Genome”, Vol 16, Number 7, Pages 471-475.

  9. Hedgehog Signalling in the Embryonic Mouse Thymus

    PubMed Central

    Saldaña, José Ignacio; Crompton, Tessa

    2016-01-01

    T cells develop in the thymus, which provides an essential environment for T cell fate specification, and for the differentiation of multipotent progenitor cells into major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted, non-autoreactive T cells. Here we review the role of the Hedgehog signalling pathway in T cell development, thymic epithelial cell (TEC) development, and thymocyte–TEC cross-talk in the embryonic mouse thymus during the last week of gestation. PMID:27504268

  10. Isolation of the mouse homologue of BRCA1 and genetic mapping to mouse chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, L.M.; Haugen-Strano, A.; Cochran, C.

    1995-10-10

    The BRCA1 gene is in large part responsible for hereditary human breast and ovarian cancer. Here we report the isolation of the murine Brca1 homologue cDNA clones. In addition, we identified genomic P1 clones that contain most, if not all, of the mouse Brca1 locus. DNA sequence analysis revealed that the mouse and human coding regions are 75% identical at the nucleotide level while the predicted amino acid identity is only 58%. A DNA sequence variant in the Brcal locus was identified and used to map this gene on a (Mus m. musculus Czech II x C57BL/KsJ)F1 x C57BL/KsJ intersubspecific backcross to distal mouse chromosome 11. The mapping of this gene to a region highly syntenic with human chromosome 17, coupled with Southern and Northern analyses, confirms that we isolated the murine Brcal homologue rather than a related RING finger gene. The isolation of the mouse Brca1 homologue will facilitate the creation of mouse models for germline BRCA1 defects. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Microcircuits for night vision in mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Y; Morigiwa, K; Ueda, M; Sterling, P

    2001-11-01

    Because the mouse retina has become an important model system, we have begun to identify its specific neuron types and their synaptic connections. Here, based on electron micrographs of serial sections, we report that the wild-type mouse retina expresses the standard rod pathways known in other mammals: (1) rod --> cone (via gap junctions) to inject rod signals into the cone bipolar circuit; and (2) rod --> rod bipolar --> AII amacrine --> cone bipolar --> ganglion cell. The mouse also expresses another rod circuit: a bipolar cell with cone input also receives rod input at symmetrical contacts that express ionotropic glutamate receptors (Hack et al., 1999, 2001). We show that this rod-cone bipolar cell sends an axon to the outer (OFF) strata of the inner plexiform layer to form ribbon synapses with ganglion and amacrine cells. This rod-cone bipolar cell receives direct contacts from only 20% of all rod terminals. However, we also found that rod terminals form gap junctions with each other and thus establish partial syncytia that could pool rod signals for direct chemical transmission to the OFF bipolar cell. This third rod pathway probably explains the rod responses that persist in OFF ganglion cells after the well known rod pathways are blocked (Soucy et al., 1998).

  12. The Gut Microbiome in the NOD Mouse.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jian; Hu, Youjia; Wong, F Susan; Wen, Li

    2016-01-01

    The microbiome (or microbiota) are an ecological community of commensal, symbiotic, and pathogenic microorganisms that outnumber the cells of the human body tenfold. These microorganisms are most abundant in the gut where they play an important role in health and disease. Alteration of the homeostasis of the gut microbiota can have beneficial or harmful consequences to health. There has recently been a major increase in studies on the association of the gut microbiome composition with disease phenotypes.The nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse is an excellent mouse model to study spontaneous type 1 diabetes development. We, and others, have reported that gut bacteria are critical modulators for type 1 diabetes development in genetically susceptible NOD mice.Here we present our standard protocol for gut microbiome analysis in NOD mice that has been routinely implemented in our research laboratory. This incorporates the following steps: (1) Isolation of total DNA from gut bacteria from mouse fecal samples or intestinal contents; (2) bacterial DNA sequencing, and (3) basic data analysis. PMID:27032947

  13. Experimental photoallergic contact dermatitis: a mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, H.C. Jr.; Kaidbey, K.

    1982-09-01

    We have induced photoallergic contact dermatitis in mice to 3,3',4',5 tetrachlorosalicylanilide (TCSA), chlorpromazine and 6-methylcoumarin. These compounds are known to produce photoallergic contact dermatitis in humans. The photoallergic contact dermatitis reaction in the mouse is immunologically specific viz. mice photosensitized to TCSA react, by photochallenge, to that compound and not to chlorpromazine, and conversely. The reaction requires UVA at both sensitization and challenge. It appears to be T-cell mediated in that it can be passively transferred to syngeneic mice by lymph node cells from actively sensitized mice, the histology of the reactions resembles that of classic allergic contact dermatitis in mice, challenge reactions are seen at 24 but not at 4 hr, and photoallergic contact dermatitis can be induced in B-cell deficient mice. The availability of a mouse model for the study of photo-ACD will facilitate the identification of pertinent control mechanisms and may aid in the management of the disease. It is likely that a bioassay for photoallergens of humans can be based on this mouse model.

  14. Mouse kidney transplantation: models of allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Tse, George H; Hesketh, Emily E; Clay, Michael; Borthwick, Gary; Hughes, Jeremy; Marson, Lorna P

    2014-01-01

    Rejection of the transplanted kidney in humans is still a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The mouse model of renal transplantation closely replicates both the technical and pathological processes that occur in human renal transplantation. Although mouse models of allogeneic rejection in organs other than the kidney exist, and are more technically feasible, there is evidence that different organs elicit disparate rejection modes and dynamics, for instance the time course of rejection in cardiac and renal allograft differs significantly in certain strain combinations. This model is an attractive tool for many reasons despite its technical challenges. As inbred mouse strain haplotypes are well characterized it is possible to choose donor and recipient combinations to model acute allograft rejection by transplanting across MHC class I and II loci. Conversely by transplanting between strains with similar haplotypes a chronic process can be elicited were the allograft kidney develops interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy. We have modified the surgical technique to reduce operating time and improve ease of surgery, however a learning curve still needs to be overcome in order to faithfully replicate the model. This study will provide key points in the surgical procedure and aid the process of establishing this technique.

  15. Structure of mouse IP-10, a chemokine

    SciTech Connect

    Jabeen, Talat; Leonard, Philip; Jamaluddin, Haryati; Acharya, K. Ravi

    2008-06-01

    The structure of mouse IP-10 shows a novel tetrameric association. Interferon-γ-inducible protein (IP-10) belongs to the CXC class of chemokines and plays a significant role in the pathophysiology of various immune and inflammatory responses. It is also a potent angiostatic factor with antifibrotic properties. The biological activities of IP-10 are exerted by interactions with the G-protein-coupled receptor CXCR3 expressed on Th1 lymphocytes. IP-10 thus forms an attractive target for structure-based rational drug design of anti-inflammatory molecules. The crystal structure of mouse IP-10 has been determined and reveals a novel tetrameric association. In the tetramer, two conventional CXC chemokine dimers are associated through their N-terminal regions to form a 12-stranded elongated β-sheet of ∼90 Å in length. This association differs significantly from the previously studied tetramers of human IP-10, platelet factor 4 and neutrophil-activating peptide-2. In addition, heparin- and receptor-binding residues were mapped on the surface of IP-10 tetramer. Two heparin-binding sites were observed on the surface and were present at the interface of each of the two β-sheet dimers. The structure supports the formation of higher order oligomers of IP-10, as observed in recent in vivo studies with mouse IP-10, which will have functional relevance.

  16. A mesoscale connectome of the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seung Wook; Harris, Julie A; Ng, Lydia; Winslow, Brent; Cain, Nicholas; Mihalas, Stefan; Wang, Quanxin; Lau, Chris; Kuan, Leonard; Henry, Alex M; Mortrud, Marty T; Ouellette, Benjamin; Nguyen, Thuc Nghi; Sorensen, Staci A; Slaughterbeck, Clifford R; Wakeman, Wayne; Li, Yang; Feng, David; Ho, Anh; Nicholas, Eric; Hirokawa, Karla E; Bohn, Phillip; Joines, Kevin M; Peng, Hanchuan; Hawrylycz, Michael J; Phillips, John W; Hohmann, John G; Wohnoutka, Paul; Gerfen, Charles R; Koch, Christof; Bernard, Amy; Dang, Chinh; Jones, Allan R; Zeng, Hongkui

    2014-04-10

    Comprehensive knowledge of the brain's wiring diagram is fundamental for understanding how the nervous system processes information at both local and global scales. However, with the singular exception of the C. elegans microscale connectome, there are no complete connectivity data sets in other species. Here we report a brain-wide, cellular-level, mesoscale connectome for the mouse. The Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas uses enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-expressing adeno-associated viral vectors to trace axonal projections from defined regions and cell types, and high-throughput serial two-photon tomography to image the EGFP-labelled axons throughout the brain. This systematic and standardized approach allows spatial registration of individual experiments into a common three dimensional (3D) reference space, resulting in a whole-brain connectivity matrix. A computational model yields insights into connectional strength distribution, symmetry and other network properties. Virtual tractography illustrates 3D topography among interconnected regions. Cortico-thalamic pathway analysis demonstrates segregation and integration of parallel pathways. The Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas is a freely available, foundational resource for structural and functional investigations into the neural circuits that support behavioural and cognitive processes in health and disease. PMID:24695228

  17. Transplantation Into the Mouse Ovarian Fat Pad.

    PubMed

    Flesken-Nikitin, Andrea; Harlan, Blaine A; Nikitin, Alexander Yu

    2016-01-01

    Orthotopic transplantation assays in mice are invaluable for studies of cell regeneration and neoplastic transformation. Common approaches for orthotopic transplantation of ovarian surface and tubal epithelia include intraperitoneal and intrabursal administration of cells. The respective limitations of these methods include poorly defined location of injected cells and limited space volume. Furthermore, they are poorly suited for long-term structural preservation of transplanted organs. To address these challenges, we have developed an alternative approach, which is based on the introduction of cells and tissue fragments into the mouse fat pad. The mouse ovarian fat pad is located in the immediate vicinity of the ovary and uterine tube (aka oviduct, fallopian tube), and provides a familiar microenvironment for cells and tissues of these organs. In our approach fluorescence-labeled mouse and human cells, and fragments of the uterine tube are engrafted by using minimally traumatic dorsal incision surgery. Transplanted cells and their outgrowths are easily located in the ovarian fat pad for over 40 days. Long-term transplantation of the entire uterine tube allows correct preservation of all principle tissue components, and does not result in adverse side effects, such as fibrosis and inflammation. Our approach should be uniquely applicable for answering important biological questions such as differentiation, regenerative and neoplastic potential of specific cell populations. Furthermore, it should be suitable for studies of microenvironmental factors in normal development and cancer. PMID:27684746

  18. Characterization of Bcor expression in mouse development.

    PubMed

    Wamstad, Joseph A; Bardwell, Vivian J

    2007-04-01

    Mutation of the gene encoding the transcriptional corepressor BCOR results in the X-linked disorder Oculofaciocardiodental syndrome (OFCD or MCOPS2). Female OFCD patients suffer from severe ocular, craniofacial, cardiac, and digital developmental defects and males do not survive through gestation. BCOR can mediate transcriptional repression by the oncoprotein BCL6 and has the ability to reduce transcriptional activation by AF9, a known mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) fusion partner. The essential role of BCOR in development and its ability to modulate activity of known oncogenic proteins prompted us to determine the expression profile of Bcor during mouse development. Identification of independently transcribed exons in the 5' untranslated region of Bcor suggests that three independent promoters control the expression of Bcor in mice. Although Bcor is widely expressed in adult mouse tissues, analysis of known spliced isoforms in the coding region of Bcor reveals differential isoform usage. Whole mount in situ hybridization of mouse embryos shows that Bcor is strongly expressed in the extraembryonic tissue during gastrulation and expression significantly increases throughout the embryo after embryonic turning. During organogenesis and fetal stages Bcor is differentially expressed in multiple tissue lineages, with a notable presence in the developing nervous system. Strikingly, we observed that Bcor expression in the eye, brain, neural tube, and branchial arches correlates with tissues affected in OFCD patients. PMID:17344103

  19. Digenic Inheritance in Cystinuria Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Espino, Meritxell; Font-Llitjós, Mariona; Vilches, Clara; Salido, Eduardo; Prat, Esther; López de Heredia, Miguel; Palacín, Manuel; Nunes, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Cystinuria is an aminoaciduria caused by mutations in the genes that encode the two subunits of the amino acid transport system b0,+, responsible for the renal reabsorption of cystine and dibasic amino acids. The clinical symptoms of cystinuria relate to nephrolithiasis, due to the precipitation of cystine in urine. Mutations in SLC3A1, which codes for the heavy subunit rBAT, cause cystinuria type A, whereas mutations in SLC7A9, which encodes the light subunit b0,+AT, cause cystinuria type B. By crossing Slc3a1-/- with Slc7a9-/- mice we generated a type AB cystinuria mouse model to test digenic inheritance of cystinuria. The 9 genotypes obtained have been analyzed at early (2- and 5-months) and late stage (8-months) of the disease. Monitoring the lithiasic phenotype by X-ray, urine amino acid content analysis and protein expression studies have shown that double heterozygous mice (Slc7a9+/-Slc3a1+/-) present lower expression of system b0,+ and higher hyperexcretion of cystine than single heterozygotes (Slc7a9+/-Slc3a1+/+ and Slc7a9+/+Slc3a1+/-) and give rise to lithiasis in 4% of the mice, demonstrating that cystinuria has a digenic inheritance in this mouse model. Moreover in this study it has been demonstrated a genotype/phenotype correlation in type AB cystinuria mouse model providing new insights for further molecular and genetic studies of cystinuria patients. PMID:26359869

  20. Mouse Kidney Transplantation: Models of Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Clay, Michael; Borthwick, Gary; Hughes, Jeremy; Marson, Lorna P.

    2014-01-01

    Rejection of the transplanted kidney in humans is still a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The mouse model of renal transplantation closely replicates both the technical and pathological processes that occur in human renal transplantation. Although mouse models of allogeneic rejection in organs other than the kidney exist, and are more technically feasible, there is evidence that different organs elicit disparate rejection modes and dynamics, for instance the time course of rejection in cardiac and renal allograft differs significantly in certain strain combinations. This model is an attractive tool for many reasons despite its technical challenges. As inbred mouse strain haplotypes are well characterized it is possible to choose donor and recipient combinations to model acute allograft rejection by transplanting across MHC class I and II loci. Conversely by transplanting between strains with similar haplotypes a chronic process can be elicited were the allograft kidney develops interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy. We have modified the surgical technique to reduce operating time and improve ease of surgery, however a learning curve still needs to be overcome in order to faithfully replicate the model. This study will provide key points in the surgical procedure and aid the process of establishing this technique. PMID:25350513

  1. A functional CFTR protein is required for mouse intestinal cAMP-, cGMP- and Ca(2+)-dependent HCO3- secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Seidler, U; Blumenstein, I; Kretz, A; Viellard-Baron, D; Rossmann, H; Colledge, W H; Evans, M; Ratcliff, R; Gregor, M

    1997-01-01

    1. Most segments of the gastrointestinal tract secrete HCO3-, but the molecular nature of the secretory mechanisms has not been identified. We had previously speculated that the regulator for intestinal electrogenic HCO3- secretion is the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) channel. To prove this hypothesis, we have now measured HCO3- secretion by pH-stat titration, and recorded the electrical parameters of in vitro duodenum, jejunum and ileum of mice deficient in the gene for the CFTR protein ('CF-mice') and their normal littermates. 2. Basal HCO3- secretory rates were reduced in all small intestinal segments of CF mice. Forskolin, PGE2, 8-bromo-cAMP and VIP (cAMP-dependent agonists), heat-stable enterotoxin of Escherichia coli (STa), guanylin and 8-bromo-cGMP (cGMP-dependent agonists) and carbachol (Ca2+ dependent) stimulated both the short-circuit current (Isc) and the HCO3- secretory rate (JHCO3-) in all intestinal segments in normal mice, whereas none of these agonists had any effect on JHCO3- in the intestine of CF mice. 3. To investigate whether Cl(-)-HCO3- exchangers, which have been implicated in mediating the response to some of these agonists in the intestine, were similarly active in the small intestine of normal and CF mice, we studied Cl- gradient-driven 36Cl- uptake into brush-border membrane (BBM) vesicles isolated from normal and CF mouse small intestine. Both the time course and the peak value for 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2',2-disulphonic acid (DIDS)-inhibited 36Cl- uptake was similar in normal and CF mice BBM vesicles. 4. In summary, the results demonstrate that the presence of the CFTR channel is necessary for agonist-induced stimulation of electrogenic HCO3- secretion in all segments of the small intestine, and all three intracellular signal transduction pathways stimulate HCO3- secretion exclusively via activation of the CFTR channel. PMID:9423183

  2. Cross-Platform Microarray Meta-Analysis for the Mouse Jejunum Selects Novel Reference Genes with Highly Uniform Levels of Expression

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Florian R. L.; Grausgruber, Heinrich; Binter, Claudia; Mair, Georg E.; Guelly, Christian; Vogl, Claus; Steinborn, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Reference genes (RGs) with uniform expression are used for normalization of reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) data. Their optimization for a specific biological context, e.g. a specific tissue, has been increasingly considered. In this article, we compare RGs identified by expression data meta-analysis restricted to the context tissue, the jejunum of Mus musculus domesticus, i) to traditional RGs, ii) to expressed interspersed repeated DNA elements, and iii) to RGs identified by meta-analysis of expression data from diverse tissues and conditions. To select the set of candidate RGs, we developed a novel protocol for the cross-platform meta-analysis of microarray data. The expression stability of twenty-four putative RGs was analysed by RT-qPCR in at least 14 jejunum samples of the mouse strains C57Bl/6N, CD1, and OF1. Across strains, the levels of expression of the novel RGs Plekha7, Zfx, and Ube2v1 as well as of Oaz1 varied less than two-fold irrespective of genotype, sex or their combination. The gene set consisting of Plekha7 and Oaz1 showed superior expression stability analysed with the tool RefFinder. The novel RGs are functionally diverse. This facilitates expression studies over a wide range of conditions. The highly uniform expression of the optimized RGs in the jejunum points towards their involvement in tightly regulated pathways in this tissue. We also applied our novel protocol of cross-microarray platform meta-analysis to the identification of RGs in the duodenum, the ileum and the entire small intestine. The selection of RGs with improved expression stability in a specific biological context can reduce the number of RGs for the normalization step of RT-qPCR expression analysis, thus reducing the number of samples and experimental costs. PMID:23671661

  3. Mouse activity across time scales: fractal scenarios.

    PubMed

    Lima, G Z dos Santos; Lobão-Soares, B; do Nascimento, G C; França, Arthur S C; Muratori, L; Ribeiro, S; Corso, G

    2014-01-01

    In this work we devise a classification of mouse activity patterns based on accelerometer data using Detrended Fluctuation Analysis. We use two characteristic mouse behavioural states as benchmarks in this study: waking in free activity and slowwave sleep (SWS). In both situations we find roughly the same pattern: for short time intervals we observe high correlation in activity--a typical 1/f complex pattern--while for large time intervals there is anti-correlation. High correlation of short intervals (0.01 s to 2 s: waking state and 0.01 s to 0.1 s: SWS) is related to highly coordinated muscle activity. In the waking state we associate high correlation both to muscle activity and to mouse stereotyped movements (grooming, waking, etc.). On the other side, the observed anti-correlation over large time scales (30 s to 300 s: waking state and 0.3 s to 5 s: SWS) during SWS appears related to a feedback autonomic response. The transition from correlated regime at short scales to an anti-correlated regime at large scales during SWS is given by the respiratory cycle interval, while during the waking state this transition occurs at the time scale corresponding to the duration of the stereotyped mouse movements. Furthermore, we find that the waking state is characterized by longer time scales than SWS and by a softer transition from correlation to anticorrelation. Moreover, this soft transition in the waking state encompass a behavioural time scale window that gives rise to a multifractal pattern. We believe that the observed multifractality in mouse activity is formed by the integration of several stereotyped movements each one with a characteristic time correlation. Finally, we compare scaling properties of body acceleration fluctuation time series during sleep and wake periods for healthy mice. Interestingly, differences between sleep and wake in the scaling exponents are comparable to previous works regarding human heartbeat. Complementarily, the nature of these sleep

  4. A Transgenic Tri-Modality Reporter Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xinrui; Ray, Pritha; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Tong, Ricky; Gong, Yongquan; Sathirachinda, Ataya; Wu, Joseph C.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic mouse with a stably integrated reporter gene(s) can be a valuable resource for obtaining uniformly labeled stem cells, tissues, and organs for various applications. We have generated a transgenic mouse model that ubiquitously expresses a tri-fusion reporter gene (fluc2-tdTomato-ttk) driven by a constitutive chicken β-actin promoter. This “Tri-Modality Reporter Mouse” system allows one to isolate most cells from this donor mouse and image them for bioluminescent (fluc2), fluorescent (tdTomato), and positron emission tomography (PET) (ttk) modalities. Transgenic colonies with different levels of tri-fusion reporter gene expression showed a linear correlation between all three-reporter proteins (R2=0.89 for TdTomato vs Fluc, R2=0.94 for Fluc vs TTK, R2=0.89 for TdTomato vs TTK) in vitro from tissue lysates and in vivo by optical and PET imaging. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from this transgenics showed high level of reporter gene expression, which linearly correlated with the cell numbers (R2=0.99 for bioluminescence imaging (BLI)). Both BLI (R2=0.93) and micro-PET (R2=0.94) imaging of the subcutaneous implants of Tri-Modality Reporter Mouse derived MSCs in nude mice showed linear correlation with the cell numbers and across different imaging modalities (R2=0.97). Serial imaging of MSCs transplanted to mice with acute myocardial infarction (MI) by intramyocardial injection exhibited significantly higher signals in MI heart at days 2, 3, 4, and 7 (p<0.01). MSCs transplanted to the ischemic hindlimb of nude mice showed significantly higher BLI and PET signals in the first 2 weeks that dropped by 4th week due to poor cell survival. However, laser Doppler perfusion imaging revealed that blood circulation in the ischemic limb was significantly improved in the MSCs transplantation group compared with the control group. In summary, this mouse can be used as a source of donor cells and organs in various research areas such as stem cell research

  5. Deletion of Galgt2 (B4Galnt2) Reduces Muscle Growth in Response to Acute Injury and Increases Muscle Inflammation and Pathology in Dystrophin-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rui; Singhal, Neha; Serinagaoglu, Yelda; Chandrasekharan, Kumaran; Joshi, Mandar; Bauer, John A.; Janssen, Paulus M.L.; Martin, Paul T.

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic overexpression of Galgt2 (official name B4Galnt2) in skeletal muscle stimulates the glycosylation of α dystroglycan (αDG) and the up-regulation of laminin α2 and dystrophin surrogates known to inhibit muscle pathology in mouse models of congenital muscular dystrophy 1A and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Skeletal muscle Galgt2 gene expression is also normally increased in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy compared with the wild-type mice. To assess whether this increased endogenous Galgt2 expression could affect disease, we quantified muscular dystrophy measures in mdx mice deleted for Galgt2 (Galgt2−/−mdx). Galgt2−/− mdx mice had increased heart and skeletal muscle pathology and inflammation, and also worsened cardiac function, relative to age-matched mdx mice. Deletion of Galgt2 in wild-type mice also slowed skeletal muscle growth in response to acute muscle injury. In each instance where Galgt2 expression was elevated (developing muscle, regenerating muscle, and dystrophic muscle), Galgt2-dependent glycosylation of αDG was also increased. Overexpression of Galgt2 failed to inhibit skeletal muscle pathology in dystroglycan-deficient muscles, in contrast to previous studies in dystrophin-deficient mdx muscles. This study demonstrates that Galgt2 gene expression and glycosylation of αDG are dynamically regulated in muscle and that endogenous Galgt2 gene expression can ameliorate the extent of muscle pathology, inflammation, and dysfunction in mdx mice. PMID:26435413

  6. Genetically Engineered Mouse Models for Studying Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mizoguchi, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Takahito; Himuro, Hidetomo; Okada, Toshiyuki; Mizoguchi, Emiko

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic intestinal inflammatory condition that is mediated by very complex mechanisms controlled by genetic, immune, and environmental factors. More than 74 kinds of genetically engineered mouse strains have been established since 1993 for studying IBD. Although mouse models cannot fully reflect human IBD, they have provided significant contributions for not only understanding the mechanism, but also developing new therapeutic means for IBD. Indeed, 20 kinds of genetically engineered mouse models carry the susceptibility genes identified in human IBD, and the functions of some other IBD susceptibility genes have also been dissected out using mouse models. Cutting-edge technologies such as cell-specific and inducible knockout systems, which were recently employed to mouse IBD models, have further enhanced the ability of investigators to provide important and unexpected rationales for developing new therapeutic strategies for IBD. In this review article, we briefly introduce 74 kinds of genetically engineered mouse models that spontaneously develop intestinal inflammation. PMID:26387641

  7. Orthology for comparative genomics in the mouse genome database.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Mary E; Baldarelli, Richard M; Bello, Susan M; Ni, Li; McAndrews, Monica S; Bult, Carol J; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E; Ringwald, Martin; Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A

    2015-08-01

    The mouse genome database (MGD) is the model organism database component of the mouse genome informatics system at The Jackson Laboratory. MGD is the international data resource for the laboratory mouse and facilitates the use of mice in the study of human health and disease. Since its beginnings, MGD has included comparative genomics data with a particular focus on human-mouse orthology, an essential component of the use of mouse as a model organism. Over the past 25 years, novel algorithms and addition of orthologs from other model organisms have enriched comparative genomics in MGD data, extending the use of orthology data to support the laboratory mouse as a model of human biology. Here, we describe current comparative data in MGD and review the history and refinement of orthology representation in this resource.

  8. A report from the Sixth International Mouse Genome Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.

    1992-12-31

    The Sixth Annual Mouse Genome Conference was held in October, 1992 at Buffalo, USA. The mouse is one of the primary model organisms in the Human Genome Project. Through the use of gene targeting studies the mouse has become a powerful biological model for the study of gene function and, in addition, the comparison of the many homologous mutations identified in human and mouse have widened our understanding of the biology of these two organisms. A primary goal in the mouse genome program has been to create a genetic map of STSs of high resolution (<1cM) that would form the basis for the physical mapping of the whole mouse genome. Buffalo saw substantial new progress towards the goal of a very high density genetic map and the beginnings of substantive efforts towards physical mapping in chromosome regions with a high density of genetic markers.

  9. Orthology for comparative genomics in the mouse genome database.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Mary E; Baldarelli, Richard M; Bello, Susan M; Ni, Li; McAndrews, Monica S; Bult, Carol J; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E; Ringwald, Martin; Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A

    2015-08-01

    The mouse genome database (MGD) is the model organism database component of the mouse genome informatics system at The Jackson Laboratory. MGD is the international data resource for the laboratory mouse and facilitates the use of mice in the study of human health and disease. Since its beginnings, MGD has included comparative genomics data with a particular focus on human-mouse orthology, an essential component of the use of mouse as a model organism. Over the past 25 years, novel algorithms and addition of orthologs from other model organisms have enriched comparative genomics in MGD data, extending the use of orthology data to support the laboratory mouse as a model of human biology. Here, we describe current comparative data in MGD and review the history and refinement of orthology representation in this resource. PMID:26223881

  10. Imaging Mouse Development with Confocal Time-Lapse Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nowotschin, Sonja; Ferrer-Vaquer, Anna; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina

    2012-01-01

    The gene expression, signaling, and cellular dynamics driving mouse embryo development have emerged through embryology and genetic studies. However, since mouse development is a temporally regulated three-dimensional process, any insight needs to be placed in this context of real-time visualization. Live imaging using genetically encoded fluorescent protein reporters is pushing the envelope of our understanding by uncovering unprecedented insights into mouse development and leading to the formulation of quantitative accurate models. PMID:20691876

  11. Whole-mount X-Gal staining of mouse tissues.

    PubMed

    Gierut, Jessica J; Jacks, Tyler E; Haigis, Kevin M

    2014-04-01

    Although the development of improved mouse models, including conditional deletions, marks an exciting time in mouse genetics, it is important to characterize and validate these models. Cre reporter strains allow researchers to assess the recombinase expression profile and function in individual Cre mouse lines. These strains are engineered to express a reporter gene (usually LacZ) following the removal of a floxed STOP cassette, thus marking cell lineages that can be targeted with a given Cre line. This protocol provides a detailed method for the histochemical detection of β-galactosidase activity in Cre mouse strains.

  12. Wnt signaling and gastrointestinal tumorigenesis in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Taketo, M M

    2006-12-01

    The canonical Wnt signaling plays important roles in embryonic development and tumorigenesis. For the latter, induced mutations in mice have greatly contributed to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of cancer initiation and progression. Here, I will review recent reports on gastrointestinal cancer model mice, with an emphasis on the roles of the Wnt signal pathway. They include: mouse models for familial adenomatous polyposis; modifying factors that affect mouse intestinal polyposis, including the genes that help cancer progression; Wnt target genes that affect mouse intestinal polyposis; and a mouse model of gastric cancer that mimics Helicobacter pyroli infection. PMID:17143296

  13. Pathophysiology of gene-targeted mouse models for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Grubb, B R; Boucher, R C

    1999-01-01

    Pathophysiology of Gene-Targeted Mouse Models for Cystic Fibrosis. Physiol. Rev. 79, Suppl.: S193-S214, 1999. - Mutations in the gene causing the fatal disease cystic fibrosis (CF) result in abnormal transport of several ions across a number of epithelial tissues. In just 3 years after this gene was cloned, the first CF mouse models were generated. The CF mouse models generated to date have provided a wealth of information on the pathophysiology of the disease in a variety of organs. Heterogeneity of disease in the mouse models is due to the variety of gene-targeting strategies used in the generation of the CF mouse models as well as the diversity of the murine genetic background. This paper reviews the pathophysiology in the tissues and organs (gastrointestinal, airway, hepatobiliary, pancreas, reproductive, and salivary tissue) involved in the disease in the various CF mouse models. Marked similarities to and differences from the human disease have been observed in the various murine models. Some of the CF mouse models accurately reflect the ion-transport abnormalities and disease phenotype seen in human CF patients, especially in gastrointestinal tissue. However, alterations in airway ion transport, which lead to the devastating lung disease in CF patients, appear to be largely absent in the CF mouse models. Reasons for these unexpected findings are discussed. This paper also reviews pharmacotherapeutic and gene therapeutic studies in the various mouse models. PMID:9922382

  14. Mouse Genome Editing using CRISPR/Cas System

    PubMed Central

    Harms, Donald W; Quadros, Rolen M; Seruggia, Davide; Ohtsuka, Masato; Takahashi, Gou

    2015-01-01

    The availability of techniques to create desired genetic mutations has enabled the laboratory mouse as an extensively used model organism in biomedical research including human genetics. A new addition to this existing technical repertoire is the CRISPR/Cas system. Specifically, this system allows editing of the mouse genome much faster than the previously used techniques and more importantly multiple mutations can be created in a single experiment. Here we provide protocols for preparation of CRISPR/Cas reagents and microinjection into one cell mouse embryos to create knockout or knock-in mouse models. PMID:25271839

  15. Significant determinants of mouse pain behaviour.

    PubMed

    Minett, Michael S; Eijkelkamp, Niels; Wood, John N

    2014-01-01

    Transgenic mouse behavioural analysis has furthered our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying damage sensing and pain. However, it is not unusual for conflicting data on the pain phenotypes of knockout mice to be generated by reputable groups. Here we focus on some technical aspects of measuring mouse pain behaviour that are often overlooked, which may help explain discrepancies in the pain literature. We examined touch perception using von Frey hairs and mechanical pain thresholds using the Randall-Selitto test. Thermal pain thresholds were measured using the Hargreaves apparatus and a thermal place preference test. Sodium channel Nav1.7 knockout mice show a mechanical deficit in the hairy skin, but not the paw, whilst shaving the abdominal hair abolished this phenotype. Nav1.7, Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 knockout mice show deficits in noxious mechanosensation in the tail, but not the paw. TRPA1 knockout mice, however, have a loss of noxious mechanosensation in the paw but not the tail. Studies of heat and cold sensitivity also show variability depending on the intensity of the stimulus. Deleting Nav1.7, Nav1.8 or Nav1.9 in Nav1.8-positive sensory neurons attenuates responses to slow noxious heat ramps, whilst responses to fast noxious heat ramps are only reduced when Nav1.7 is lost in large diameter sensory neurons. Deleting Nav1.7 from all sensory neurons attenuates responses to noxious cooling but not extreme cold. Finally, circadian rhythms dramatically influence behavioural outcome measures such as von Frey responses, which change by 80% over the day. These observations demonstrate that fully characterising the phenotype of a transgenic mouse strain requires a range of behavioural pain models. Failure to conduct behavioural tests at different anatomical locations, stimulus intensities, and at different points in the circadian cycle may lead to a pain behavioural phenotype being misinterpreted, or missed altogether. PMID:25101983

  16. A Reverse Stroop Task with Mouse Tracking.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Naohide; Incera, Sara; McLennan, Conor T

    2016-01-01

    In a reverse Stroop task, observers respond to the meaning of a color word irrespective of the color in which the word is printed-for example, the word red may be printed in the congruent color (red), an incongruent color (e.g., blue), or a neutral color (e.g., white). Although reading of color words in this task is often thought to be neither facilitated by congruent print colors nor interfered with incongruent print colors, this interference has been detected by using a response method that does not give any bias in favor of processing of word meanings or processing of print colors. On the other hand, evidence for the presence of facilitation in this task has been scarce, even though this facilitation is theoretically possible. By modifying the task such that participants respond to a stimulus color word by pointing to a corresponding response word on a computer screen with a mouse, the present study investigated the possibility that not only interference but also facilitation would take place in a reverse Stroop task. Importantly, in this study, participants' responses were dynamically tracked by recording the entire trajectories of the mouse. Arguably, this method provided richer information about participants' performance than traditional measures such as reaction time and accuracy, allowing for more detailed (and thus potentially more sensitive) investigation of facilitation and interference in the reverse Stroop task. These trajectories showed that the mouse's approach toward correct response words was significantly delayed by incongruent print colors but not affected by congruent print colors, demonstrating that only interference, not facilitation, was present in the current task. Implications of these findings are discussed within a theoretical framework in which the strength of association between a task and its response method plays a critical role in determining how word meanings and print colors interact in reverse Stroop tasks. PMID:27199881

  17. Structural covariance networks in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Pagani, Marco; Bifone, Angelo; Gozzi, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    The presence of networks of correlation between regional gray matter volume as measured across subjects in a group of individuals has been consistently described in several human studies, an approach termed structural covariance MRI (scMRI). Complementary to prevalent brain mapping modalities like functional and diffusion-weighted imaging, the approach can provide precious insights into the mutual influence of trophic and plastic processes in health and pathological states. To investigate whether analogous scMRI networks are present in lower mammal species amenable to genetic and experimental manipulation such as the laboratory mouse, we employed high resolution morphoanatomical MRI in a large cohort of genetically-homogeneous wild-type mice (C57Bl6/J) and mapped scMRI networks using a seed-based approach. We show that the mouse brain exhibits robust homotopic scMRI networks in both primary and associative cortices, a finding corroborated by independent component analyses of cortical volumes. Subcortical structures also showed highly symmetric inter-hemispheric correlations, with evidence of distributed antero-posterior networks in diencephalic regions of the thalamus and hypothalamus. Hierarchical cluster analysis revealed six identifiable clusters of cortical and sub-cortical regions corresponding to previously described neuroanatomical systems. Our work documents the presence of homotopic cortical and subcortical scMRI networks in the mouse brain, thus supporting the use of this species to investigate the elusive biological and neuroanatomical underpinnings of scMRI network development and its derangement in neuropathological states. The identification of scMRI networks in genetically homogeneous inbred mice is consistent with the emerging view of a key role of environmental factors in shaping these correlational networks.

  18. A Reverse Stroop Task with Mouse Tracking.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Naohide; Incera, Sara; McLennan, Conor T

    2016-01-01

    In a reverse Stroop task, observers respond to the meaning of a color word irrespective of the color in which the word is printed-for example, the word red may be printed in the congruent color (red), an incongruent color (e.g., blue), or a neutral color (e.g., white). Although reading of color words in this task is often thought to be neither facilitated by congruent print colors nor interfered with incongruent print colors, this interference has been detected by using a response method that does not give any bias in favor of processing of word meanings or processing of print colors. On the other hand, evidence for the presence of facilitation in this task has been scarce, even though this facilitation is theoretically possible. By modifying the task such that participants respond to a stimulus color word by pointing to a corresponding response word on a computer screen with a mouse, the present study investigated the possibility that not only interference but also facilitation would take place in a reverse Stroop task. Importantly, in this study, participants' responses were dynamically tracked by recording the entire trajectories of the mouse. Arguably, this method provided richer information about participants' performance than traditional measures such as reaction time and accuracy, allowing for more detailed (and thus potentially more sensitive) investigation of facilitation and interference in the reverse Stroop task. These trajectories showed that the mouse's approach toward correct response words was significantly delayed by incongruent print colors but not affected by congruent print colors, demonstrating that only interference, not facilitation, was present in the current task. Implications of these findings are discussed within a theoretical framework in which the strength of association between a task and its response method plays a critical role in determining how word meanings and print colors interact in reverse Stroop tasks.

  19. Mouse Model of Coxiella burnetii Aerosolization.

    PubMed

    Melenotte, Cléa; Lepidi, Hubert; Nappez, Claude; Bechah, Yassina; Audoly, Gilles; Terras, Jérôme; Raoult, Didier; Brégeon, Fabienne

    2016-07-01

    Coxiella burnetii is mainly transmitted by aerosols and is responsible for multiple-organ lesions. Animal models have shown C. burnetii pathogenicity, but long-term outcomes still need to be clarified. We used a whole-body aerosol inhalation exposure system to mimic the natural route of infection in immunocompetent (BALB/c) and severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. After an initial lung inoculum of 10(4) C. burnetii cells/lung, the outcome, serological response, hematological disorders, and deep organ lesions were described up to 3 months postinfection. C. burnetii-specific PCR, anti-C. burnetii immunohistochemistry, and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) targeting C. burnetii-specific 16S rRNA completed the detection of the bacterium in the tissues. In BALB/c mice, a thrombocytopenia and lymphopenia were first observed, prior to evidence of C. burnetii replication. In all SCID mouse organs, DNA copies increased to higher levels over time than in BALB/c ones. Clinical signs of discomfort appeared in SCID mice, so follow-up had to be shortened to 2 months in this group. At this stage, all animals presented bone, cervical, and heart lesions. The presence of C. burnetii could be attested in situ for all organs sampled using immunohistochemistry and FISH. This mouse model described C. burnetii Nine Mile strain spread using aerosolization in a way that corroborates the pathogenicity of Q fever described in humans and completes previously published data in mouse models. C. burnetii infection occurring after aerosolization in mice thus seems to be a useful tool to compare the pathogenicity of different strains of C. burnetii. PMID:27160294

  20. Immune Activity of BCG Infected Mouse Macrophages Treated with a Novel Recombinant Mouse Lactoferrin.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Kelly M; Hwang, Shen-An; Actor, Jeffrey K

    2015-01-01

    Lactoferrin has been investigated for its adjuvant action to boost the BCG vaccine. Previous studies demonstrated that lactoferrin (LF) enhanced efficacy of the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine to protect mice against the virulent Erdman Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge. The studies here investigate the hypothesis that a novel CHO-derived recombinant mouse LF can modify cytokine production and antigen presentation molecules on macrophages. The mouse LF (rmLF) was examined for effects on bone marrow derived macrophage (BMM) activities when cultured with BCG. Comparisons were made to CHO-derived recombinant human LF (rhLF). Inflammatory cytokine responses were investigated, as were antigen presentation and associated co-stimulatory molecules. Cytokine responses were subsequently measured when these cells were co-cultured with naïve or BCG sensitized CD4+ lymphocytes. While overall responses were similar between mouse, human, and bovine forms, the homologous rmLF treated infected BMMs showed unique activation patterns of cytokine production. These results indicate that species-specific LF can have different effects on mouse macrophages exposed to BCG, thus potentially affecting adjuvant activity when used in models of vaccination in mice.