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Sample records for mean-square charge radii

  1. Changes in the mean square charge radii and electromagnetic moments of neutron-deficient Bi isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Barzakh, A. E. Batist, L. Kh.; Fedorov, D. V.; Ivanov, V. S.; Molkanov, P. L.; Moroz, F. V.; Orlov, S. Yu.; Panteleev, V. N.; Seliverstov, M. D.; Volkov, Yu. M.

    2015-10-15

    In-source laser spectroscopy experiments for neutron deficient bismuth isotopes at the 306.77 nm atomic transition were carried out at the IRIS (Investigation of Radioactive Isotopes on Synchrocyclotron) facility of Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI). New data on isotope shifts and hyperfine structure for {sup 189–198,} {sup 211}Bi isotopes and isomers were obtained. The changes in the mean-square charge radii and the magnetic moment values were deduced. Marked deviation from the nearly spherical behavior for ground states of bismuth isotopes at N < 109 is demonstrated, in contrast to the lead and thallium isotopic chains. The big isomer shift between I = 1/2 (intruder) and I = 9/2 (normal) states for odd Bi isotopes (A = 193, 195, 197) was found.

  2. Changes in mean-squared charge radii and magnetic moments of Tl-184179 measured by in-source laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzakh, A. E.; Andreyev, A. N.; Cocolios, T. E.; de Groote, R. P.; Fedorov, D. V.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Ferrer, R.; Fink, D. A.; Ghys, L.; Huyse, M.; Köster, U.; Lane, J.; Liberati, V.; Lynch, K. M.; Marsh, B. A.; Molkanov, P. L.; Procter, T. J.; Rapisarda, E.; Rothe, S.; Sandhu, K.; Seliverstov, M. D.; Sjödin, A. M.; Van Beveren, C.; Van Duppen, P.; Venhart, M.; Veselský, M.

    2017-01-01

    Hyperfine structure and isotope shifts have been measured for the ground and isomeric states in the neutron-deficient isotopes Tl-184179 using the 276.9-nm transition. The experiment has been performed at the CERN-Isotope Separator On-Line facility using the in-source resonance-ionization laser spectroscopy technique. Spins for the ground states in 179,181,183Tl have been determined as I =1 /2 . Magnetic moments and changes in the nuclear mean-square charge radii have been deduced. By applying the additivity relation for magnetic moments of the odd-odd Tl nuclei the leading configuration assignments were confirmed. A deviation of magnetic moments for isomeric states in Tl,184182 from the trend of the heavier Tl nuclei is observed. The charge radii of the ground states of the isotopes Tl-184179 follow the trend for isotonic (spherical) lead nuclei. The noticeable difference in charge radii for ground and isomeric states of Tl,184183 has been observed, suggesting a larger deformation for the intruder-based 9 /2- and 10- states compared to the ground states. An unexpected growth of the isomer shift for 183Tl has been found.

  3. Changes in the mean-square charge radii and magnetic moments of neutron-deficient Tl isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzakh, A. E.; Batist, L. Kh.; Fedorov, D. V.; Ivanov, V. S.; Mezilev, K. A.; Molkanov, P. L.; Moroz, F. V.; Orlov, S. Yu.; Panteleev, V. N.; Volkov, Yu. M.

    2013-08-01

    In-source laser spectroscopy experiments for neutron-deficient thallium isotopes at the 276.9-nm atomic transition have been carried out at the Investigation of Radioactive Isotopes on Synchrocyclotron facility of Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute. New data on isotope shifts and the hyperfine structure for 183-207Tl isotopes and isomers are presented. The changes in the mean-square charge radii and magnetic-moment values are deduced. It is shown that nuclear properties of Tl isotopes and isomers smoothly change at the neutron midshell and beyond without development of strong deformation in contrast to the adjacent Hg nuclei. A rather great isomer shift between I = 1/2 and I = 9/2 states for odd Tl isotopes is preserved for both sides of the previously investigated mass range. For the first time, a similar isomer shift is found for the odd-odd isotope 186Tl. The close resemblance of the charge radii isotopic behavior for the Tl and Pb ground states is demonstrated.

  4. Mean-square radii of two-component three-body systems in two spatial dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval, J. H.; Bellotti, F. F.; Jensen, A. S.; Yamashita, M. T.

    2016-08-01

    We calculate root-mean-square radii for a three-body system confined to two spatial dimensions and consisting of two identical bosons (A ) and one distinguishable particle (B ). We use zero-range two-body interactions between each of the pairs, and focus thereby directly on universal properties. We solve the Faddeev equations in momentum space and express the mean-square radii in terms of first-order derivatives of the Fourier transforms of densities. The strengths of the interactions are adjusted for each set of masses to produce equal two-body bound-state energies between different pairs. The mass ratio, A =mB/mA , between particles B and A are varied from 0.01 to 100, providing a number of bound states decreasing from 8 to 2. Energies and mean-square radii of these states are analyzed for small A by use of the Born-Oppenheimer potential between the two heavy A particles. For large A the radii of the two bound states are consistent with a slightly asymmetric three-body structure. When A approaches thresholds for binding of the three-body excited states, the corresponding mean-square radii diverge inversely proportional to the deviation of the three-body energy from the two-body thresholds. The structures at these three-body thresholds correspond to bound A B dimers and one loosely bound A particle.

  5. Predictions of nuclear charge radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, M.; Lu, Y.; Zhao, Y. M.; Arima, A.

    2016-12-01

    The nuclear charge radius is a fundamental property of an atomic nucleus. In this article we study the predictive power of empirical relations for experimental nuclear charge radii of neighboring nuclei and predict the unknown charge radii of 1085 nuclei based on the experimental CR2013 database within an uncertainty of 0.03 fm.

  6. Table of experimental nuclear ground state charge radii: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Angeli, I.; Marinova, K.P.

    2013-01-15

    The present table contains experimental root-mean-square (rms) nuclear charge radii R obtained by combined analysis of two types of experimental data: (i) radii changes determined from optical and, to a lesser extent, K{sub α} X-ray isotope shifts and (ii) absolute radii measured by muonic spectra and electronic scattering experiments. The table combines the results of two working groups, using respectively two different methods of evaluation, published in ADNDT earlier. It presents an updated set of rms charge radii for 909 isotopes of 92 elements from {sub 1}H to {sub 96}Cm together, when available, with the radii changes from optical isotope shifts. Compared with the last published tables of R-values from 2004 (799 ground states), many new data are added due to progress recently achieved by laser spectroscopy up to early 2011. The radii changes in isotopic chains for He, Li, Be, Ne, Sc, Mn, Y, Nb, Bi have been first obtained in the last years and several isotopic sequences have been recently extended to regions far off stability, (e.g., Ar, Mo, Sn, Te, Pb, Po)

  7. Nuclear moments and charge radii of neutron-deficient francium isotopes and isomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, A.; Buchinger, F.; Cheal, B.; Crawford, J. E.; Dilling, J.; Kortelainen, M.; Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Leary, A.; Levy, C. D. P.; Mooshammer, F.; Ojeda, M. L.; Pearson, M. R.; Procter, T. J.; Tamimi, W. Al

    2015-04-01

    Collinear laser fluorescence spectroscopy has been performed on the ground and isomeric states of Fr,206204 in order to determine their spins, nuclear moments, and changes in mean-squared charge radii. A new experimental technique has been developed as part of this work which much enhances the data collection rate while maintaining the high resolution. This has permitted the extension of this study to the two isomeric states in each nucleus. The investigation of nuclear g factors and mean-squared charge radii indicates that the neutron-deficient Fr isotopes lie in a transitional region from spherical towards more collective structures.

  8. Charge radii of neon isotopes across the sd neutron shell

    SciTech Connect

    Marinova, K.; Geithner, W.; Kappertz, S.; Kloos, S.; Kotrotsios, G.; Neugart, R.; Wilbert, S.; Kowalska, M.; Keim, M.; Blaum, K.; Lievens, P.; Simon, H.

    2011-09-15

    We report on the changes in mean square charge radii of unstable neon nuclei relative to the stable {sup 20}Ne, based on the measurement of optical isotope shifts. The studies were carried out using collinear laser spectroscopy on a fast beam of neutral neon atoms. High sensitivity on short-lived isotopes was achieved thanks to nonoptical detection based on optical pumping and state-selective collisional ionization, which was complemented by an accurate determination of the beam kinetic energy. The new results provide information on the structural changes in the sequence of neon isotopes all across the neutron sd shell, ranging from the proton drip line nucleus and halo candidate {sup 17}Ne up to the neutron-rich {sup 28}Ne in the vicinity of the ''island of inversion.'' Within this range the charge radius is smallest for {sup 24}Ne with N=14 corresponding to the closure of the neutron d{sub 5/2} shell, while it increases toward both neutron shell closures, N=8 and N=20. The general trend of the charge radii correlates well with the deformation effects which are known to be large for several neon isotopes. In the neutron-deficient isotopes, structural changes arise from the onset of proton-halo formation for {sup 17}Ne, shell closure in {sup 18}Ne, and clustering effects in {sup 20,21}Ne. On the neutron-rich side the transition to the island of inversion plays an important role, with the radii in the upper part of the sd shell confirming the weakening of the N=20 magic number. The results add new information to the radii systematics of light nuclei where data are scarce because of the small contribution of nuclear-size effects to the isotope shifts which are dominated by the finite-mass effect.

  9. Changes in nuclear structure along the Mn isotopic chain studied via charge radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heylen, H.; Babcock, C.; Beerwerth, R.; Billowes, J.; Bissell, M. L.; Blaum, K.; Bonnard, J.; Campbell, P.; Cheal, B.; Day Goodacre, T.; Fedorov, D.; Fritzsche, S.; Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Geithner, W.; Geppert, Ch.; Gins, W.; Grob, L. K.; Kowalska, M.; Kreim, K.; Lenzi, S. M.; Moore, I. D.; Maass, B.; Malbrunot-Ettenauer, S.; Marsh, B.; Neugart, R.; Neyens, G.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Otsuka, T.; Papuga, J.; Rossel, R.; Rothe, S.; Sánchez, R.; Tsunoda, Y.; Wraith, C.; Xie, L.; Yang, X. F.; Yordanov, D. T.

    2016-11-01

    The hyperfine spectra of 51,53 -64Mn were measured in two experimental runs using collinear laser spectroscopy at ISOLDE, CERN. Laser spectroscopy was performed on the atomic 3 d54 s25/2 6S →3 d54 s 4 p 3/2 6P and ionic 3 d54 s 5S2→3 d54 p 5P3 transitions, yielding two sets of isotope shifts. The mass and field shift factors for both transitions have been calculated in the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock framework and were combined with a King plot analysis in order to obtain a consistent set of mean-square charge radii which, together with earlier work on neutron-deficient Mn, allow the study of nuclear structure changes from N =25 across N =28 up to N =39 . A clear development of deformation is observed towards N =40 , confirming the conclusions of the nuclear moments studies. From a Monte Carlo shell-model study of the shape in the Mn isotopic chain, it is suggested that the observed development of deformation is not only due to an increase in static prolate deformation but also due to shape fluctuations and triaxiality. The changes in mean-square charge radii are well reproduced using the Duflo-Zuker formula except in the case of large deformation.

  10. Nuclear charge radii: density functional theory meets Bayesian neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utama, R.; Chen, Wei-Chia; Piekarewicz, J.

    2016-11-01

    The distribution of electric charge in atomic nuclei is fundamental to our understanding of the complex nuclear dynamics and a quintessential observable to validate nuclear structure models. The aim of this study is to explore a novel approach that combines sophisticated models of nuclear structure with Bayesian neural networks (BNN) to generate predictions for the charge radii of thousands of nuclei throughout the nuclear chart. A class of relativistic energy density functionals is used to provide robust predictions for nuclear charge radii. In turn, these predictions are refined through Bayesian learning for a neural network that is trained using residuals between theoretical predictions and the experimental data. Although predictions obtained with density functional theory provide a fairly good description of experiment, our results show significant improvement (better than 40%) after BNN refinement. Moreover, these improved results for nuclear charge radii are supplemented with theoretical error bars. We have successfully demonstrated the ability of the BNN approach to significantly increase the accuracy of nuclear models in the predictions of nuclear charge radii. However, as many before us, we failed to uncover the underlying physics behind the intriguing behavior of charge radii along the calcium isotopic chain.

  11. Charge radii of odd-A191-211Po isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seliverstov, M. D.; Cocolios, T. E.; Dexters, W.; Andreyev, A. N.; Antalic, S.; Barzakh, A. E.; Bastin, B.; Büscher, J.; Darby, I. G.; Fedorov, D. V.; Fedoseyev, V. N.; Flanagan, K. T.; Franchoo, S.; Fritzsche, S.; Huber, G.; Huyse, M.; Keupers, M.; Köster, U.; Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Marsh, B. A.; Molkanov, P. L.; Page, R. D.; Sjødin, A. M.; Stefan, I.; Van de Walle, J.; Van Duppen, P.; Venhart, M.; Zemlyanoy, S. G.

    2013-02-01

    Isotope shifts have been measured for the odd-A polonium isotopes 191-211Po and changes in the nuclear mean square charge radii δ have been deduced. The measurements were performed at CERN-ISOLDE using the in-source resonance-ionization spectroscopy technique. The combined analysis of these data and our recent results for even-A polonium isotopes indicates an onset of deformation already at 197,198Po, when going away from stability. This is significantly earlier than was suggested by previous theoretical and experimental studies of the polonium isotopes. Moreover and in contrast to the mercury isotopes, where a strong odd-even staggering of the charge radii of the ground states was observed by approaching the neutron mid-shell at N = 104, no such effect is present in polonium down to 191Po. Consequently the charge radii of both isomeric and ground states of the odd-A polonium isotopes follow the same trend as the even-A isotopes.

  12. The 3H-3He Charge Radii Difference

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Luke S.; Arrington, John R.; Higinbotham, Douglas W.

    2016-03-01

    The upcoming E12-14-009 [1] experiment at Jefferson Lab will determine the ratio of the electric form factors for the A=3 mirror nuclei 3He and 3H. The measurement will use a 1.1 GeV electron beam, a special collimator plate to allow for simultaneous optics measurements, and the low-activity tritium target being prepared for Jefferson Lab. By observing the dependence of the form factor ratio as a function of Q2 over 0.05–0.09 GeV2, the dependence of the radii extraction on the shape of the form factors is minimized. As a result, we anticipate the uncertainty of the extracted charge radii difference to be 0.03 fm, a reduction of 70% from the current measurement. Using precise measurements of the 3He charge radius from isotopic shift or μHe measurements [2–4], we can deduce the absolute 3H charge radius. The results will provide a direct comparison to recent calculations of the charge radii.

  13. Unexpectedly large charge radii of neutron-rich calcium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Bissell, M. L.; Blaum, K.; Ekström, A.; Frömmgen, N.; Hagen, G.; Hammen, M.; Hebeler, K.; Holt, J. D.; Jansen, G. R.; Kowalska, M.; Kreim, K.; Nazarewicz, W.; Neugart, R.; Neyens, G.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Papenbrock, T.; Papuga, J.; Schwenk, A.; Simonis, J.; Wendt, K. A.; Yordanov, D. T.

    2016-06-01

    Despite being a complex many-body system, the atomic nucleus exhibits simple structures for certain `magic’ numbers of protons and neutrons. The calcium chain in particular is both unique and puzzling: evidence of doubly magic features are known in 40,48Ca, and recently suggested in two radioactive isotopes, 52,54Ca. Although many properties of experimentally known calcium isotopes have been successfully described by nuclear theory, it is still a challenge to predict the evolution of their charge radii. Here we present the first measurements of the charge radii of 49,51,52Ca, obtained from laser spectroscopy experiments at ISOLDE, CERN. The experimental results are complemented by state-of-the-art theoretical calculations. The large and unexpected increase of the size of the neutron-rich calcium isotopes beyond N = 28 challenges the doubly magic nature of 52Ca and opens new intriguing questions on the evolution of nuclear sizes away from stability, which are of importance for our understanding of neutron-rich atomic nuclei.

  14. Charge Radii of Neutron Deficient ^{52,53}Fe Produced by Projectile Fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Minamisono, K; Rossi, D M; Beerwerth, R; Fritzsche, S; Garand, D; Klose, A; Liu, Y; Maaß, B; Mantica, P F; Miller, A J; Müller, P; Nazarewicz, W; Nörtershäuser, W; Olsen, E; Pearson, M R; Reinhard, P-G; Saperstein, E E; Sumithrarachchi, C; Tolokonnikov, S V

    2016-12-16

    Bunched-beam collinear laser spectroscopy is performed on neutron deficient ^{52,53}Fe prepared through in-flight separation followed by a gas stopping. This novel scheme is a major step to reach nuclides far from the stability line in laser spectroscopy. Differential mean-square charge radii δ⟨r^{2}⟩ of ^{52,53}Fe are determined relative to stable ^{56}Fe as δ⟨r^{2}⟩^{56,52}=-0.034(13)  fm^{2} and δ⟨r^{2}⟩^{56,53}=-0.218(13)  fm^{2}, respectively, from the isotope shift of atomic hyperfine structures. The multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method is used to calculate atomic factors to deduce δ⟨r^{2}⟩. The values of δ⟨r^{2}⟩ exhibit a minimum at the N=28 neutron shell closure. The nuclear density functional theory with Fayans and Skyrme energy density functionals is used to interpret the data. The trend of δ⟨r^{2}⟩ along the Fe isotopic chain results from an interplay between single-particle shell structure, pairing, and polarization effects and provides important data for understanding the intricate trend in the δ⟨r^{2}⟩ of closed-shell Ca isotopes.

  15. Charge Radii of Neutron Deficient Fe,5352 Produced by Projectile Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamisono, K.; Rossi, D. M.; Beerwerth, R.; Fritzsche, S.; Garand, D.; Klose, A.; Liu, Y.; Maaß, B.; Mantica, P. F.; Miller, A. J.; Müller, P.; Nazarewicz, W.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Olsen, E.; Pearson, M. R.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Saperstein, E. E.; Sumithrarachchi, C.; Tolokonnikov, S. V.

    2016-12-01

    Bunched-beam collinear laser spectroscopy is performed on neutron deficient Fe,5352 prepared through in-flight separation followed by a gas stopping. This novel scheme is a major step to reach nuclides far from the stability line in laser spectroscopy. Differential mean-square charge radii δ ⟨r2⟩ of Fe,5352 are determined relative to stable 56Fe as δ ⟨r2⟩56 ,52=-0.034 (13 ) fm2 and δ ⟨r2⟩56 ,53=-0.218 (13 ) fm2 , respectively, from the isotope shift of atomic hyperfine structures. The multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method is used to calculate atomic factors to deduce δ ⟨r2⟩. The values of δ ⟨r2⟩ exhibit a minimum at the N =28 neutron shell closure. The nuclear density functional theory with Fayans and Skyrme energy density functionals is used to interpret the data. The trend of δ ⟨r2⟩ along the Fe isotopic chain results from an interplay between single-particle shell structure, pairing, and polarization effects and provides important data for understanding the intricate trend in the δ ⟨r2⟩ of closed-shell Ca isotopes.

  16. Charge radii of neutron deficient Fe52,53 produced by projectile fragmentation

    DOE PAGES

    Minamisono, K.; Rossi, D. M.; Beerwerth, R.; ...

    2016-12-15

    Bunched-beam collinear laser spectroscopy is performed on neutron deficient 52,53Fe prepared through in-flight separation followed by a gas stopping. This novel scheme is a major step to reach nuclides far from the stability line in laser spectroscopy. Differential mean-square charge radii δmore » $$\\langle$$r2$$\\rangle$$ of 52,53Fe are determined relative to stable 56Fe as δ$$\\langle$$r2$$\\rangle$$56,52=$-$0.034(13) fm2 and δ$$\\langle$$r2$$\\rangle$$56,53=$-$0.218(13) fm2, respectively, from the isotope shift of atomic hyperfine structures. The multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method is used to calculate atomic factors to deduce δ$$\\langle$$r2$$\\rangle$$. The values of δ$$\\langle$$r2$$\\rangle$$ exhibit a minimum at the N=28 neutron shell closure. The nuclear density functional theory with Fayans and Skyrme energy density functionals is used to interpret the data. As a result, the trend of δ$$\\langle$$r2$$\\rangle$$ along the Fe isotopic chain results from an interplay between single-particle shell structure, pairing, and polarization effects and provides important data for understanding the intricate trend in the δ$$\\langle$$r2$$\\rangle$$ of closed-shell Ca isotopes« less

  17. Nuclear Charge Radii of Neutron-Deficient Lead Isotopes Beyond N=104 Midshell Investigated by In-Source Laser Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, H. de; Cocolios, T. E.; Dean, S.; Huyse, M.; Lesher, S. R.; Mukha, I.; Stefanescu, I.; Vel, K. van de; Walle, J. van de; Duppen, P. van; Andreyev, A. N.; Barre, N.; Roussiere, B.; Sauvage, J.; Bender, M.; Fedoseyev, V. N.; Fraile, L. M.; Jeppessen, H.

    2007-03-16

    The shape of exotic even-mass {sup 182-190}Pb isotopes was probed by measurement of optical isotope shifts providing mean square charge radii ({delta}). The experiment was carried out at the isolde (cern) on-line mass separator, using in-source laser spectroscopy. Small deviations from the spherical droplet model are observed, but when compared to model calculations, those are explained by high sensitivity of {delta} to beyond mean-field correlations and small admixtures of intruder configurations in the ground state. The data support the predominantly spherical shape of the ground state of the proton-magic Z=82 lead isotopes near neutron midshell (N=104)

  18. Correlations Between Charge Radii, E0 Transitions, and M1 Strength

    SciTech Connect

    Van Isacker, P.

    2014-06-15

    In the framework of the interacting boson model, relations are derived between nuclear charge radii, electric monopole transition rates, and summed magnetic dipole transition in even-even nuclei. The proposed correlations are tested in the rare-earth region.

  19. Effect of deformation and the neutron skin on RMS charge radii

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, W.D.; Schmidt, K.H.

    1981-05-01

    Droplet Model predictions for nuclear RMS charge radii are compared with measured values in order to determine whether or not there is any evidence for volume shell effects. After corrections for deformation, diffuseness, and the central depression have been applied, some evidence for such effects remains, but it is at about the same level as the experimental uncertainty.

  20. Charge radii and nuclear moments of neutron-deficient potassium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamisono, K.; Barquest, B. R.; Bollen, G.; Hughes, M.; Strum, R.; Tarazona, D.; Asberry, H. B.; Cooper, K.; Hammerton, K.; Klose, A.; Mantica, P. F.; Morrissey, D. J.; Geppert, Ch.; Harris, J.; Ringle, R.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Rossi, D. M.; Ryder, C. A.; Smith, A.; Schwarz, S.; Sumithrarachchi, C.

    2014-09-01

    The monotonic change of charge radii of K isotopes across N = 20 suggests a reduction of the shell gap. A systematic study of the charge radii and ground state magnetic and quadrupole moments of neutron-deficient 35-37K isotopes is underway at the BEam COoling and LAser spectroscopy (BECOLA) facility at NSCL/MSU to investigate the anomalous trend in charge radii. The K isotopes were produced by fragmentation of a 40Ca beam, thermalized in a linear gas cell, extracted at an energy of 30 keV, and transported to BECOLA. The K ion beam was cooled and bunched, and neutralized in a Na vapor cell. Laser-induced fluorescence was detected as a function of the Doppler-tuned laser frequency and time relative to the release of the beam bunch. The beta-NMR technique was used to determine ground-state nuclear moments, where hyperfine splittings are too small to resolve using collinear laser spectroscopy. The monotonic change of charge radii of K isotopes across N = 20 suggests a reduction of the shell gap. A systematic study of the charge radii and ground state magnetic and quadrupole moments of neutron-deficient 35-37K isotopes is underway at the BEam COoling and LAser spectroscopy (BECOLA) facility at NSCL/MSU to investigate the anomalous trend in charge radii. The K isotopes were produced by fragmentation of a 40Ca beam, thermalized in a linear gas cell, extracted at an energy of 30 keV, and transported to BECOLA. The K ion beam was cooled and bunched, and neutralized in a Na vapor cell. Laser-induced fluorescence was detected as a function of the Doppler-tuned laser frequency and time relative to the release of the beam bunch. The beta-NMR technique was used to determine ground-state nuclear moments, where hyperfine splittings are too small to resolve using collinear laser spectroscopy. This work was supported in part by NSF Grant No. PHY-11-02511.

  1. An implicit solvent model for SCC-DFTB with Charge-Dependent Radii

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Guanhua; Zhu, Xiao; Cui, Qiang

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by the need of rapidly exploring the potential energy surface of chemical reactions that involve highly charged species, we have developed an implicit solvent model for the approximate density functional theory, SCC-DFTB. The solvation free energy is calculated using the popular model that employs Poisson-Boltzmann for electrostatics and a surface-area term for non-polar contributions. To balance the treatment of species with different charge distributions, we make the atomic radii that define the dielectric boundary and solute cavity depend on the solute charge distribution. Specifically, the atomic radii are assumed to be linearly dependent on the Mulliken charges and solved self-consistently together with the solute electronic structure. Benchmark calculations indicate that the model leads to solvation free energies of comparable accuracy to the SM6 model (especially for ions), which requires much more expensive DFT calculations. With analytical first derivatives and favorable computational speed, the SCC-DFTB based solvation model can be effectively used, in conjunction with high-level QM calculations, to explore the mechanism of solution reactions. This is illustrated with a brief analysis of the hydrolysis of mono-methyl mono-phosphate ester (MMP) and tri-methyl mono-phosphate ester (TMP). Possible future improvements are also briefly discussed. PMID:20711513

  2. Protein diffusion through charged nanopores with different radii at low ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Stroeve, Pieter; Rahman, Masoud; Naidu, Lekkala Dev; Chu, Gilbert; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Ramirez, Patricio; Mafe, Salvador

    2014-10-21

    The diffusion of two similar molecular weight proteins, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and bovine haemoglobin (BHb), through nanoporous charged membranes with a wide range of pore radii is studied at low ionic strength. The effects of the solution pH and the membrane pore diameter on the pore permeability allow quantifying the electrostatic interaction between the charged pore and the protein. Because of the large screening Debye length, both surface and bulk diffusion occur simultaneously. By increasing the pore diameter, the permeability tends to the bulk self-diffusion coefficient for each protein. By decreasing the pore diameter, the charges on the pore surface electrostatically hinder the transport even at the isoelectric point of the protein. Surprisingly, even at pore sizes 100 times larger than the protein, the electrostatic hindrance still plays a major role in the transport. The experimental data are qualitatively explained using a two-region model for the membrane pore and approximated equations for the pH dependence of the protein and pore charges. The experimental and theoretical results should be useful for designing protein separation processes based on nanoporous charged membranes.

  3. SEP events and wake region lunar dust charging with grain radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandran, S. B. Rakesh; Rajesh, S. R.; Abraham, A.; Renuka, G.; Venugopal, Chandu

    2017-01-01

    Our lunar surface is exposed to all kinds of radiations from the Sun, since it lacks a global magnetic field. Like lunar surface, dust particles are also exposed to plasmas and UV radiation and, consequently they carry electrostatic charges. During Solar Energetic Particle events (SEPs) secondary electron emission plays a vital role in charging of lunar dusts. To study the lunar dust charging during SEPs on lunar wake region, we derived an expression for lunar dust potential and analysed how it varies with different electron temperatures and grain radii. Because of high energetic solar fluxes, secondary yield (δ) values reach up to 2.3 for 0.5 μm dust grain. We got maximum yield at an energy of 550 eV which is in well agreement with lunar sample experimental observation (Anderegg et al., 1972). It is observed that yield value increases with electron energy, reaches to a maximum value and then decreases. During SEPs heavier dust grains show larger yield values because of the geometry of the grains. On the wake region, the dust potential reaches up to -497 V for 0.5 μm dust grain. The electric field of these grains could present a significant threat to manned and unmanned missions to the Moon.

  4. Nuclear charge and neutron radii and nuclear matter: Trend analysis in Skyrme density-functional-theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhard, P.-G.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2016-05-01

    Background: Radii of charge and neutron distributions are fundamental nuclear properties. They depend on both nuclear interaction parameters related to the equation of state of infinite nuclear matter and on quantal shell effects, which are strongly impacted by the presence of nuclear surface. Purpose: In this work, by studying the correlation of charge and neutron radii, and neutron skin, with nuclear matter parameters, we assess different mechanisms that drive nuclear sizes. Method: We apply nuclear density functional theory using a family of Skyrme functionals obtained by means of optimization protocols, which do not include any radius information. By performing the Monte Carlo sampling of reasonable functionals around the optimal parametrization, we scan all correlations between nuclear matter properties and observables characterizing charge and neutron distributions of spherical closed-shell nuclei 48Ca,208Pb, and 298Fl. Results: By considering the influence of various nuclear matter properties on charge and neutron radii in a multidimensional parameter space of Skyrme functionals, we demonstrate the existence of two strong relationships: (i) between the nuclear charge radii and the saturation density of symmetric nuclear matter ρ0, and (ii) between the neutron skins and the slope of the symmetry energy L . The impact of other nuclear matter properties on nuclear radii is weak or nonexistent. For functionals optimized to experimental binding energies only, proton and neutron radii are found to be weakly correlated due to canceling trends from different nuclear matter characteristics. Conclusion: The existence of only two strong relations connecting nuclear radii with nuclear matter properties has important consequences. First, by requiring that the nuclear functional reproduces the empirical saturation point of symmetric nuclear matter practically fixes the charge (or proton) radii, and vice versa. This explains the recent results of ab initio calculations

  5. Charge radii and electromagnetic moments of Li and Be isotopes from the ab initio no-core shell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forssén, C.; Caurier, E.; Navrátil, P.

    2009-02-01

    Recently, charge radii and ground-state electromagnetic moments of Li and Be isotopes were measured precisely. We have performed large-scale ab initio no-core shell model calculations for these isotopes using high-precision nucleon-nucleon potentials. The isotopic trends of our computed charge radii and quadrupole and magnetic-dipole moments are in good agreement with experimental results with the exception of the Li11 charge radius. The magnetic moments are in particular well described, whereas the absolute magnitudes of the quadrupole moments are about 10% too small. The small magnitude of the Li6 quadrupole moment is reproduced, and with the CD-Bonn NN potential, also its correct sign.

  6. Masses and Charge Radii of {sup 17-22}Ne and the Two-Proton-Halo Candidate {sup 17}Ne

    SciTech Connect

    Geithner, W.; Kappertz, S.; Keim, M.; Neugart, R.; Wilbert, S.; Neff, T.; Feldmeier, H.; Herfurth, F.; Yazidjian, C.; Audi, G.; Guenaut, C.; Lunney, D.; Blaum, K.; George, S.; Delahaye, P.; Kellerbauer, A.; Kowalska, M.; Herlert, A.; Kluge, H.-J.; Lievens, P.

    2008-12-19

    High-precision mass and charge radius measurements on {sup 17-22}Ne, including the proton-halo candidate {sup 17}Ne, have been performed with Penning trap mass spectrometry and collinear laser spectroscopy. The {sup 17}Ne mass uncertainty is improved by factor 50, and the charge radii of {sup 17-19}Ne are determined for the first time. The fermionic molecular dynamics model explains the pronounced changes in the ground-state structure. It attributes the large charge radius of {sup 17}Ne to an extended proton configuration with an s{sup 2} component of about 40%. In {sup 18}Ne the smaller radius is due to a significantly smaller s{sup 2} component. The radii increase again for {sup 19-22}Ne due to cluster admixtures.

  7. Charge radii and electromagnetic moments of Li and Be isotopes from the ab initio no-core shell model

    SciTech Connect

    Forssen, C.; Caurier, E.; Navratil, P.

    2009-02-15

    Recently, charge radii and ground-state electromagnetic moments of Li and Be isotopes were measured precisely. We have performed large-scale ab initio no-core shell model calculations for these isotopes using high-precision nucleon-nucleon potentials. The isotopic trends of our computed charge radii and quadrupole and magnetic-dipole moments are in good agreement with experimental results with the exception of the {sup 11}Li charge radius. The magnetic moments are in particular well described, whereas the absolute magnitudes of the quadrupole moments are about 10% too small. The small magnitude of the {sup 6}Li quadrupole moment is reproduced, and with the CD-Bonn NN potential, also its correct sign.

  8. Theoretical assessment of the disparity in the electrostatic forces between two point charges and two conductive spheres of equal radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolikov, Kiril

    2016-11-01

    The Coulomb's formula for the force FC of electrostatic interaction between two point charges is well known. In reality, however, interactions occur not between point charges, but between charged bodies of certain geometric form, size and physical structure. This leads to deviation of the estimated force FC from the real force F of electrostatic interaction, thus imposing the task to evaluate the disparity. In the present paper the problem is being solved theoretically for two charged conductive spheres of equal radii and arbitrary electric charges. Assessment of the deviation is given as a function of the ratio of the distance R between the spheres centers to the sum of their radii. For the purpose, relations between FC and F derived in a preceding work of ours, are employed to generalize the Coulomb's interactions. At relatively short distances between the spheres, the Coulomb force FC, as estimated to be induced by charges situated at the centers of the spheres, differ significantly from the real force F of interaction between the spheres. In the case of zero and non-zero charge we prove that with increasing the distance between the two spheres, the force F decrease rapidly, virtually to zero values, i.e. it appears to be short-acting force.

  9. Application of Least Mean Square Algorithms to Spacecraft Vibration Compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard , Stanley E.; Nagchaudhuri, Abhijit

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the Least Mean Square (LMS) algorithm in tandem with the Filtered-X Least Mean Square algorithm for controlling a science instrument's line-of-sight pointing. Pointing error is caused by a periodic disturbance and spacecraft vibration. A least mean square algorithm is used on-orbit to produce the transfer function between the instrument's servo-mechanism and error sensor. The result is a set of adaptive transversal filter weights tuned to the transfer function. The Filtered-X LMS algorithm, which is an extension of the LMS, tunes a set of transversal filter weights to the transfer function between the disturbance source and the servo-mechanism's actuation signal. The servo-mechanism's resulting actuation counters the disturbance response and thus maintains accurate science instrumental pointing. A simulation model of the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite is used to demonstrate the algorithms.

  10. Determination of the charge radii of several light nuclei from precision, high-energy electron elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kabir, Al Amin

    2015-12-01

    Analysis of high-energy electron scattering has been used to determine the charge radii of nuclei for several decades. Recent analysis of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen found an r.m.s. radius significantly different than the electron scattering result. To understand this puzzle we have analyzed the "LEDEX" data for the (e, e'p) reaction. This experiment includes measurements on several light nuclei, hydrogen, deuterium, lithium, boron, and carbon. To test our ability to measure absolute cross sections, as well as our ability to extract the charge radius, we tested our technique against the extremely well-measured carbon case and found excellent agreement using the Fourier-Bessel parametrization. We then extended the procedure to boron and lithium, which show nice agreement with the latest theoretical calculations. For hydrogen, we see clearly the limits of this technique and therefore, the charge radius is determined from the traditional extrapolation to q2 = 0. We will show that there is a model dependence in extracting the charge radius of hydrogen and its unambiguous determination is very difficult with available electron-scattering measurements.

  11. VR-SCOSMO: A smooth conductor-like screening model with charge-dependent radii for modeling chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuechler, Erich R.; Giese, Timothy J.; York, Darrin M.

    2016-04-01

    To better represent the solvation effects observed along reaction pathways, and of ionic species in general, a charge-dependent variable-radii smooth conductor-like screening model (VR-SCOSMO) is developed. This model is implemented and parameterized with a third order density-functional tight binding quantum model, DFTB3/3OB-OPhyd, a quantum method which was developed for organic and biological compounds, utilizing a specific parameterization for phosphate hydrolysis reactions. Unlike most other applications with the DFTB3/3OB model, an auxiliary set of atomic multipoles is constructed from the underlying DFTB3 density matrix which is used to interact the solute with the solvent response surface. The resulting method is variational, produces smooth energies, and has analytic gradients. As a baseline, a conventional SCOSMO model with fixed radii is also parameterized. The SCOSMO and VR-SCOSMO models shown have comparable accuracy in reproducing neutral-molecule absolute solvation free energies; however, the VR-SCOSMO model is shown to reduce the mean unsigned errors (MUEs) of ionic compounds by half (about 2-3 kcal/mol). The VR-SCOSMO model presents similar accuracy as a charge-dependent Poisson-Boltzmann model introduced by Hou et al. [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 6, 2303 (2010)]. VR-SCOSMO is then used to examine the hydrolysis of trimethylphosphate and seven other phosphoryl transesterification reactions with different leaving groups. Two-dimensional energy landscapes are constructed for these reactions and calculated barriers are compared to those obtained from ab initio polarizable continuum calculations and experiment. Results of the VR-SCOSMO model are in good agreement in both cases, capturing the rate-limiting reaction barrier and the nature of the transition state.

  12. VR-SCOSMO: A smooth conductor-like screening model with charge-dependent radii for modeling chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Kuechler, Erich R; Giese, Timothy J; York, Darrin M

    2016-04-28

    To better represent the solvation effects observed along reaction pathways, and of ionic species in general, a charge-dependent variable-radii smooth conductor-like screening model (VR-SCOSMO) is developed. This model is implemented and parameterized with a third order density-functional tight binding quantum model, DFTB3/3OB-OPhyd, a quantum method which was developed for organic and biological compounds, utilizing a specific parameterization for phosphate hydrolysis reactions. Unlike most other applications with the DFTB3/3OB model, an auxiliary set of atomic multipoles is constructed from the underlying DFTB3 density matrix which is used to interact the solute with the solvent response surface. The resulting method is variational, produces smooth energies, and has analytic gradients. As a baseline, a conventional SCOSMO model with fixed radii is also parameterized. The SCOSMO and VR-SCOSMO models shown have comparable accuracy in reproducing neutral-molecule absolute solvation free energies; however, the VR-SCOSMO model is shown to reduce the mean unsigned errors (MUEs) of ionic compounds by half (about 2-3 kcal/mol). The VR-SCOSMO model presents similar accuracy as a charge-dependent Poisson-Boltzmann model introduced by Hou et al. [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 6, 2303 (2010)]. VR-SCOSMO is then used to examine the hydrolysis of trimethylphosphate and seven other phosphoryl transesterification reactions with different leaving groups. Two-dimensional energy landscapes are constructed for these reactions and calculated barriers are compared to those obtained from ab initio polarizable continuum calculations and experiment. Results of the VR-SCOSMO model are in good agreement in both cases, capturing the rate-limiting reaction barrier and the nature of the transition state.

  13. Charge radii of neutron deficient Fe52,53 produced by projectile fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Minamisono, K.; Rossi, D. M.; Beerwerth, R.; Fritzsche, S.; Garand, D.; Klose, A.; Liu, Y.; MaaB, B.; Mantica, P. F.; Miller, A. J.; Muller, P.; Nazarewicz, W.; Nortershauser, W.; Olsen, E.; Pearson, M. R.; Reinhard, P. -G.; Saperstein, E. E.; Sumithrarachchi, C.; Tolokonnikov, S. V.

    2016-12-15

    Bunched-beam collinear laser spectroscopy is performed on neutron deficient 52,53Fe prepared through in-flight separation followed by a gas stopping. This novel scheme is a major step to reach nuclides far from the stability line in laser spectroscopy. Differential mean-square charge radii δ$\\langle$r2$\\rangle$ of 52,53Fe are determined relative to stable 56Fe as δ$\\langle$r2$\\rangle$56,52=$-$0.034(13) fm2 and δ$\\langle$r2$\\rangle$56,53=$-$0.218(13) fm2, respectively, from the isotope shift of atomic hyperfine structures. The multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method is used to calculate atomic factors to deduce δ$\\langle$r2$\\rangle$. The values of δ$\\langle$r2$\\rangle$ exhibit a minimum at the N=28 neutron shell closure. The nuclear density functional theory with Fayans and Skyrme energy density functionals is used to interpret the data. As a result, the trend of δ$\\langle$r2$\\rangle$ along the Fe isotopic chain results from an interplay between single-particle shell structure, pairing, and polarization effects and provides important data for understanding the intricate trend in the δ$\\langle$r2$\\rangle$ of closed-shell Ca isotopes

  14. Application of linear mean-square estimation in ocean engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li-ping; Chen, Bai-yu; Chen, Chao; Chen, Zheng-shou; Liu, Gui-lin

    2016-03-01

    The attempt to obtain long-term observed data around some sea areas we concern is usually very hard or even impossible in practical offshore and ocean engineering situations. In this paper, by means of linear mean-square estimation method, a new way to extend short-term data to long-term ones is developed. The long-term data about concerning sea areas can be constructed via a series of long-term data obtained from neighbor oceanographic stations, through relevance analysis of different data series. It is effective to cover the insufficiency of time series prediction method's overdependence upon the length of data series, as well as the limitation of variable numbers adopted in multiple linear regression model. The storm surge data collected from three oceanographic stations located in Shandong Peninsula are taken as examples to analyze the number-selection effect of reference oceanographic stations (adjacent to the concerning sea area) and the correlation coefficients between sea sites which are selected for reference and for engineering projects construction respectively. By comparing the N-year return-period values which are calculated from observed raw data and processed data which are extended from finite data series by means of the linear mean-square estimation method, one can draw a conclusion that this method can give considerably good estimation in practical ocean engineering, in spite of different extreme value distributions about raw and processed data.

  15. Digital image gathering and minimum mean-square error restoration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Stephen K.; Reichenbach, Stephen E.

    1990-01-01

    Most digital image restoration algorithms are inherently incomplete because they are conditioned on a discrete-input, discrete-output model which only accounts for blurring during image gathering and additive noise. For those restoration applications where sampling and reconstruction are important, the restoration algorithm should be based on a more comprehensive end-to-end model which also accounts for the potentially important noiselike effects of aliasing and the low-pass filtering effects of interpolative reconstruction. It is demonstrated that although the mathematics of this more comprehensive model is more complex, the increase in complexity is not so great as to prevent a complete development and analysis of the associated minimum mean-square error (Wiener) restoration filter.

  16. Mean-squared-displacement statistical test for fractional Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, Grzegorz; Burnecki, Krzysztof; Wyłomańska, Agnieszka

    2017-03-01

    Anomalous diffusion in crowded fluids, e.g., in cytoplasm of living cells, is a frequent phenomenon. A common tool by which the anomalous diffusion of a single particle can be classified is the time-averaged mean square displacement (TAMSD). A classical mechanism leading to the anomalous diffusion is the fractional Brownian motion (FBM). A validation of such process for single-particle tracking data is of great interest for experimentalists. In this paper we propose a rigorous statistical test for FBM based on TAMSD. To this end we analyze the distribution of the TAMSD statistic, which is given by the generalized chi-squared distribution. Next, we study the power of the test by means of Monte Carlo simulations. We show that the test is very sensitive for changes of the Hurst parameter. Moreover, it can easily distinguish between two models of subdiffusion: FBM and continuous-time random walk.

  17. Mean-square convergence analysis of ADALINE training with minimum error entropy criterion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Badong; Zhu, Yu; Hu, Jinchun

    2010-07-01

    Recently, the minimum error entropy (MEE) criterion has been used as an information theoretic alternative to traditional mean-square error criterion in supervised learning systems. MEE yields nonquadratic, nonconvex performance surface even for adaptive linear neuron (ADALINE) training, which complicates the theoretical analysis of the method. In this paper, we develop a unified approach for mean-square convergence analysis for ADALINE training under MEE criterion. The weight update equation is formulated in the form of block-data. Based on a block version of energy conservation relation, and under several assumptions, we carry out the mean-square convergence analysis of this class of adaptation algorithm, including mean-square stability, mean-square evolution (transient behavior) and the mean-square steady-state performance. Simulation experimental results agree with the theoretical predictions very well.

  18. Correlating double-difference of charge radii with quadrupole deformation and B (E 2 ) in atomic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, B. H.; Liu, C. Y.; Wang, H. X.

    2017-01-01

    A good linear correlation is found between the double-difference of charge radius δ R2 p -2 n(Z ,N ) with that of quadrupole deformation data in even-even nuclei. This results in a further improved charge radius relation that holds in a precision of about 5 ×10-3 fm. The new relation can be generalized to the reduced electric quadrupole transition probability B (E 2 ) between the first 2+ state and the 0+ ground state, and the mean lifetime τ of the first 2+ state. Same correlations are also seen in global nuclear models such as Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB-24) and relativistic mean field (RMF); however, they are not consistent with the experimental data.

  19. Proton radii of {sup 4,6,8}He isotopes from high-precision nucleon-nucleon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Caurier, E.; Navratil, P.

    2006-02-15

    Recently, precision laser spectroscopy on {sup 6}He atoms determined accurately the isotope shift between {sup 4}He and {sup 6}He and, consequently, the charge radius of {sup 6}He. A similar experiment for {sup 8}He is under way. We have performed large-scale ab initio calculations for {sup 4,6,8}He isotopes using high-precision nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions within the no-core shell model (NCSM) approach. With the CD-Bonn 2000 NN potential we found point-proton root-mean-square (rms) radii of {sup 4}He and {sup 6}He 1.45(1) fm and 1.89(4), respectively, in agreement with experiment and predict the {sup 8}He point-proton rms radius to be 1.88(6) fm. At the same time, our calculations show that the recently developed nonlocal INOY NN potential gives binding energies closer to experiment, but underestimates the charge radii.

  20. Universal Dependence of the Mean Square Displacement in Equilibrium Point Vortex Systems without Boundary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Takeshi

    2009-02-01

    The diffusion processes of point vortex systems with no boundary are studied numerically and analytically. The mean square displacements in the radial direction are observed in equilibrium states corresponding to several parameters. It is shown that point vortex systems display an anomalous diffusion and that the mean square displacements exhibit a universal time dependence. The exponent of this time dependence corresponds to the results with circular boundary conditions reported by Kawahara and Nakanishi. On the other hand, the mean square displacement is dependent on system energy exponentially. The energy dependence of the mean square displacement is explained by the rough scaling theory. The probability distribution functions of the velocity field are also investigated numerically, and the results reinforce the theory of the dependence on system energy.

  1. Mean squared error performance of MFBD nonlinear scene reconstruction using speckle imaging in horizontal imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, Glen E.; Bos, Jeremy P.; Roggemann, Michael C.

    2012-05-01

    Terrestrial imaging over very long horizontal paths is increasingly common in surveillance and defense systems. All optical systems that operate in or through the atmosphere suffer from turbulence induced image blur. This paper explores the Mean-Square-Error (MSE) performance of a multi-frame-blind-deconvolution-based reconstruction technique using a non-linear optimization strategy to recover a reconstructed object. Three sets of 70 images representing low, moderate and severe turbulence degraded images were simulated from a diffraction limited image taken with a professional digital camera. Reconstructed objects showed significant, 54, 22 and 14 percent improvement in mean squared error for low, moderate, and severe turbulence cases respectively.

  2. On the Expectations of Mean Squares Based on Nonindependent Variates in Factorials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, John F.

    A study was made of the problem of representing the expectations of mean squares associated with analysis of variance sources of variation for experimental designs. These designs have a factorial structure over repeated measures or, for some other reason, have variates within a factorial design not all of which are mutually independent. A simple…

  3. RESEARCH NOTE: Orthogonality and mean squares of the vector fields given by spherical cap harmonic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowes, F. J.

    1999-03-01

    It is well known that the vector fields derived from spherical harmonics are orthogonal over the sphere. It is now shown that the vector fields derived from spherical cap harmonics are orthogonal over the cap, to the same extent as the cap potentials are, and expressions are given for their mean squares.

  4. Mean square delay dependent-probability-distribution stability analysis of neutral type stochastic neural networks.

    PubMed

    Muralisankar, S; Manivannan, A; Balasubramaniam, P

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this manuscript is to investigate the mean square delay dependent-probability-distribution stability analysis of neutral type stochastic neural networks with time-delays. The time-delays are assumed to be interval time-varying and randomly occurring. Based on the new Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional and stochastic analysis approach, a novel sufficient condition is obtained in the form of linear matrix inequality such that the delayed stochastic neural networks are globally robustly asymptotically stable in the mean-square sense for all admissible uncertainties. Finally, the derived theoretical results are validated through numerical examples in which maximum allowable upper bounds are calculated for different lower bounds of time-delay.

  5. Lower Bounds Applied to the Mean-Square Tracking Error of an Amplitude- Comparison Monopulse Radar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    Position, Velocity and Range . ........................... 35 12. (a) Example Plots of the Error Squared per Observation for One SNR Level; (b...Example Plot of the MSE per Observation for One SNR Level ....... .............. .. 37 13. Sketch of MSE Becoming Unbounded at Breaklock...Zakai bounds. At high signal-to-noise ratios ( SNR ), the Cramer- Rao bound is useful in lower bounding the mean-square error. At low SNR levels a

  6. Determination of ensemble-average pairwise root mean-square deviation from experimental B-factors.

    PubMed

    Kuzmanic, Antonija; Zagrovic, Bojan

    2010-03-03

    Root mean-square deviation (RMSD) after roto-translational least-squares fitting is a measure of global structural similarity of macromolecules used commonly. On the other hand, experimental x-ray B-factors are used frequently to study local structural heterogeneity and dynamics in macromolecules by providing direct information about root mean-square fluctuations (RMSF) that can also be calculated from molecular dynamics simulations. We provide a mathematical derivation showing that, given a set of conservative assumptions, a root mean-square ensemble-average of an all-against-all distribution of pairwise RMSD for a single molecular species, (1/2), is directly related to average B-factors () and (1/2). We show this relationship and explore its limits of validity on a heterogeneous ensemble of structures taken from molecular dynamics simulations of villin headpiece generated using distributed-computing techniques and the Folding@Home cluster. Our results provide a basis for quantifying global structural diversity of macromolecules in crystals directly from x-ray experiments, and we show this on a large set of structures taken from the Protein Data Bank. In particular, we show that the ensemble-average pairwise backbone RMSD for a microscopic ensemble underlying a typical protein x-ray structure is approximately 1.1 A, under the assumption that the principal contribution to experimental B-factors is conformational variability.

  7. Docking to RNA via Root-Mean-Square-Deviation-Driven Energy Minimization with Flexible Ligands and Flexible Targets

    PubMed Central

    Guilbert, Christophe; James, Thomas L.

    2010-01-01

    Structure-based drug design is now well-established for proteins as a key first step in the lengthy process of developing new drugs. In many ways, RNA may be a better target to treat disease than a protein because it is upstream in the translation pathway, so inhibiting a single mRNA molecule could prevent the production of thousands of protein gene products. Virtual screening is often the starting point for structure-based drug design. However, computational docking of a small molecule to RNA seems to be more challenging than that to protein due to the higher intrinsic flexibility and highly charged structure of RNA. Previous attempts at docking to RNA showed the need for a new approach. We present here a novel algorithm using molecular simulation techniques to account for both nucleic acid and ligand flexibility. In this approach, with both the ligand and the receptor permitted some flexibility, they can bind one another via an induced fit, as the flexible ligand probes the surface of the receptor. A possible ligand can explore a low-energy path at the surface of the receptor by carrying out energy minimization with root-mean-square-distance constraints. Our procedure was tested on 57 RNA complexes (33 crystal and 24 NMR structures); this is the largest data set to date to reproduce experimental RNA binding poses. With our procedure, the lowest-energy conformations reproduced the experimental binding poses within an atomic root-mean-square deviation of 2.5 Å for 74% of tested complexes. PMID:18510306

  8. Nuclear matter radii determined by interaction cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Ozawa, A.

    2005-10-19

    Experimental studies on nuclear matter radii determined by the interaction cross sections ({sigma}I) are reviewed. In particular, the procedure to determine the root-mean square matter radii from the measured {sigma}I by Galuber model analysis is described. Future {sigma}I measurements at the RI beam factory (RIBF) in RIKEN are introduced. As new calculations, the sensitivity of the skin is discussed in the case with a proton target based on Glauber-model calculations. In the energy region of RIBF, {sigma}I is sensitive for the skin; however, measurements with high accuracies are needed.

  9. Optical pattern recognition architecture implementing the mean-square error correlation algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Molley, P.A.

    1991-10-22

    This patent describes an optical architecture implementing the mean-square error correlation algorithm, MSE = {Sigma}(I {minus} R){sup 2} for discriminating the presence of a reference image R in an input image scene I by computing the mean-square-error between a time-varying reference image signal s{sub 1}(t) and a time-varying input image signal s{sub 2}(t) includes a laser diode light source which is temporally modulated by a double-sideband suppressed-carrier source modulation signal I{sub 1}(t) having the form I{sub 1}(t) = A{sub 1}(1 = sq. root 2m{sub 1}s{sub 1}(t)cos (2{pi} f{sub 0}t)) and the modulated light output from the laser diode source is diffracted by an acousto-optic deflector. The resultant intensity of the +1 diffracted order from the acousto-optic device is given by I{sub 2}(t) = A{sub 2}(+2m{sub 2}{sup 2}s{sub 2}{sup 2}(t) {minus} 2 sq. root 2m{sub 2}(t) cos (2{pi}f{sub 0}t)). The time integration of the two signals I{sub 1}(t) and I{sub 2}(t) on the CCD deflector plane produces the result R{tau} of the mean-square error having the form: R({tau}) = A{sub 1}A{sub 2}{l brace}(T) +(2m{sub 2}{sup 2 {integral} s}{sub 2}{sup 2}(t {minus} {tau})dt) {minus} (2m{sub 1}m{sub 2} cos (2{tau}f{sub 0}{tau}) {integral} s{sub 1}(t)s{sub 2}(t {minus} {tau}) dt){r brace}.

  10. Analysis of S-box in Image Encryption Using Root Mean Square Error Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Iqtadar; Shah, Tariq; Gondal, Muhammad Asif; Mahmood, Hasan

    2012-07-01

    The use of substitution boxes (S-boxes) in encryption applications has proven to be an effective nonlinear component in creating confusion and randomness. The S-box is evolving and many variants appear in literature, which include advanced encryption standard (AES) S-box, affine power affine (APA) S-box, Skipjack S-box, Gray S-box, Lui J S-box, residue prime number S-box, Xyi S-box, and S8 S-box. These S-boxes have algebraic and statistical properties which distinguish them from each other in terms of encryption strength. In some circumstances, the parameters from algebraic and statistical analysis yield results which do not provide clear evidence in distinguishing an S-box for an application to a particular set of data. In image encryption applications, the use of S-boxes needs special care because the visual analysis and perception of a viewer can sometimes identify artifacts embedded in the image. In addition to existing algebraic and statistical analysis already used for image encryption applications, we propose an application of root mean square error technique, which further elaborates the results and enables the analyst to vividly distinguish between the performances of various S-boxes. While the use of the root mean square error analysis in statistics has proven to be effective in determining the difference in original data and the processed data, its use in image encryption has shown promising results in estimating the strength of the encryption method. In this paper, we show the application of the root mean square error analysis to S-box image encryption. The parameters from this analysis are used in determining the strength of S-boxes

  11. Performance characteristics of an adaptive controller based on least-mean-square filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, R. S.; Merhav, S. J.

    1986-01-01

    A closed-loop, adaptive-control scheme that uses a least-mean-square filter as the controller model is presented, along with simulation results that demonstrate the excellent robustness of this scheme. It is shown that the scheme adapts very well to unknown plants, even those that are marginally stable, responds appropriately to changes in plant parameters, and is not unduly affected by additive noise. A heuristic argument for the conditions necessary for convergence is presented. Potential applications and extensions of the scheme are also discussed.

  12. Performance characteristics of an adaptive controller based on least-mean-square filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Rajiv S.; Merhav, Shmuel J.

    1986-01-01

    A closed loop, adaptive control scheme that uses a least mean square filter as the controller model is presented, along with simulation results that demonstrate the excellent robustness of this scheme. It is shown that the scheme adapts very well to unknown plants, even those that are marginally stable, responds appropriately to changes in plant parameters, and is not unduly affected by additive noise. A heuristic argument for the conditions necessary for convergence is presented. Potential applications and extensions of the scheme are also discussed.

  13. Lower Bound on the Mean Square Displacement of Particles in the Hard Disk Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richthammer, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    The hard disk model is a 2D Gibbsian process of particles interacting via pure hard core repulsion. At high particle density the model is believed to show orientational order, however, it is known not to exhibit positional order. Here we investigate to what extent particle positions may fluctuate. We consider a finite volume version of the model in a box of dimensions 2 n × 2 n with arbitrary boundary configuration, and we show that the mean square displacement of particles near the center of the box is bounded from below by c log n. The result generalizes to a large class of models with fairly arbitrary interaction.

  14. An efficient implementation of Forward-Backward Least-Mean-Square Adaptive Line Enhancers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H.-G.; Nguyen, T. M.

    1995-01-01

    An efficient implementation of the forward-backward least-mean-square (FBLMS) adaptive line enhancer is presented in this article. Without changing the characteristics of the FBLMS adaptive line enhancer, the proposed implementation technique reduces multiplications by 25% and additions by 12.5% in two successive time samples in comparison with those operations of direct implementation in both prediction and weight control. The proposed FBLMS architecture and algorithm can be applied to digital receivers for enhancing signal-to-noise ratio to allow fast carrier acquisition and tracking in both stationary and nonstationary environments.

  15. Performance measure of image and video quality assessment algorithms: subjective root-mean-square error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuutinen, Mikko; Virtanen, Toni; Häkkinen, Jukka

    2016-03-01

    Evaluating algorithms used to assess image and video quality requires performance measures. Traditional performance measures (e.g., Pearson's linear correlation coefficient, Spearman's rank-order correlation coefficient, and root mean square error) compare quality predictions of algorithms to subjective mean opinion scores (mean opinion score/differential mean opinion score). We propose a subjective root-mean-square error (SRMSE) performance measure for evaluating the accuracy of algorithms used to assess image and video quality. The SRMSE performance measure takes into account dispersion between observers. The other important property of the SRMSE performance measure is its measurement scale, which is calibrated to units of the number of average observers. The results of the SRMSE performance measure indicate the extent to which the algorithm can replace the subjective experiment (as the number of observers). Furthermore, we have presented the concept of target values, which define the performance level of the ideal algorithm. We have calculated the target values for all sample sets of the CID2013, CVD2014, and LIVE multiply distorted image quality databases.The target values and MATLAB implementation of the SRMSE performance measure are available on the project page of this study.

  16. Mean square error approximation for wavelet-based semiregular mesh compression.

    PubMed

    Payan, Frédéric; Antonini, Marc

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to propose an efficient model-based bit allocation process optimizing the performances of a wavelet coder for semiregular meshes. More precisely, this process should compute the best quantizers for the wavelet coefficient subbands that minimize the reconstructed mean square error for one specific target bitrate. In order to design a fast and low complex allocation process, we propose an approximation of the reconstructed mean square error relative to the coding of semiregular mesh geometry. This error is expressed directly from the quantization errors of each coefficient subband. For that purpose, we have to take into account the influence of the wavelet filters on the quantized coefficients. Furthermore, we propose a specific approximation for wavelet transforms based on lifting schemes. Experimentally, we show that, in comparison with a "naive" approximation (depending on the subband levels), using the proposed approximation as distortion criterion during the model-based allocation process improves the performances of a wavelet-based coder for any model, any bitrate, and any lifting scheme.

  17. Electric field gradient and mean square displacement of iron sites in cubic iron sulphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, V. K.

    1981-01-01

    Mössbauer absorption of Fe57, for four equivalent but differently oriented sites, in naturally occuring single crystals of FeS2 (pyrite) has been studied as a function of the orientation of the crystal axes with respect to the γ-ray beam from a Co57/Pd source. Polarization effects for our absorbers of ˜0.1 mm thickness were found not to be appreciable. Experimental peak area ratio of ˜1 in the case of powdered absorber and monocrystalline absorbers in (111), (110), and (100) planes has been analyzed to obtain the principal axes of the electric-field-gradient and the mean-square displacement as ‖1,1,1‖, ‖-1,1,1‖, ‖1,1,-1‖, and ‖1,-1,1‖ direction for the Fe sites corresponding to 000, 1/2 1/2 0, 1/2 0 1/2 , and 0 1/2 1/2, respectively. The angular independent recoilless fraction at 298 K has been obtained to be 0.20±0.02 and for the mean-square displacement =< y2>=, and its value at 298 K is 4.34±0.23×10-19 cm2.

  18. Optical pattern recognition architecture implementing the mean-square error correlation algorithm

    DOEpatents

    Molley, Perry A.

    1991-01-01

    An optical architecture implementing the mean-square error correlation algorithm, MSE=.SIGMA.[I-R].sup.2 for discriminating the presence of a reference image R in an input image scene I by computing the mean-square-error between a time-varying reference image signal s.sub.1 (t) and a time-varying input image signal s.sub.2 (t) includes a laser diode light source which is temporally modulated by a double-sideband suppressed-carrier source modulation signal I.sub.1 (t) having the form I.sub.1 (t)=A.sub.1 [1+.sqroot.2m.sub.1 s.sub.1 (t)cos (2.pi.f.sub.o t)] and the modulated light output from the laser diode source is diffracted by an acousto-optic deflector. The resultant intensity of the +1 diffracted order from the acousto-optic device is given by: I.sub.2 (t)=A.sub.2 [+2m.sub.2.sup.2 s.sub.2.sup.2 (t)-2.sqroot.2m.sub.2 (t) cos (2.pi.f.sub.o t] The time integration of the two signals I.sub.1 (t) and I.sub.2 (t) on the CCD deflector plane produces the result R(.tau.) of the mean-square error having the form: R(.tau.)=A.sub.1 A.sub.2 {[T]+[2m.sub.2.sup.2.multidot..intg.s.sub.2.sup.2 (t-.tau.)dt]-[2m.sub.1 m.sub.2 cos (2.tau.f.sub.o .tau.).multidot..intg.s.sub.1 (t)s.sub.2 (t-.tau.)dt]} where: s.sub.1 (t) is the signal input to the diode modulation source: s.sub.2 (t) is the signal input to the AOD modulation source; A.sub.1 is the light intensity; A.sub.2 is the diffraction efficiency; m.sub.1 and m.sub.2 are constants that determine the signal-to-bias ratio; f.sub.o is the frequency offset between the oscillator at f.sub.c and the modulation at f.sub.c +f.sub.o ; and a.sub.o and a.sub.1 are constant chosen to bias the diode source and the acousto-optic deflector into their respective linear operating regions so that the diode source exhibits a linear intensity characteristic and the AOD exhibits a linear amplitude characteristic.

  19. Mean square optimal NUFFT approximation for efficient non-Cartesian MRI reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhili; Jacob, Mathews

    2014-05-01

    The fast evaluation of the discrete Fourier transform of an image at non-uniform sampling locations is key to efficient iterative non-Cartesian MRI reconstruction algorithms. Current non-uniform fast Fourier transform (NUFFT) approximations rely on the interpolation of oversampled uniform Fourier samples. The main challenge is high memory demand due to oversampling, especially when multidimensional datasets are involved. The main focus of this work is to design an NUFFT algorithm with minimal memory demands. Specifically, we introduce an analytical expression for the expected mean square error in the NUFFT approximation based on our earlier work. We then introduce an iterative algorithm to design the interpolator and scale factors. Experimental comparisons show that the proposed optimized NUFFT scheme provides considerably lower approximation errors than the previous designs [1] that rely on worst case error metrics. The improved approximations are also seen to considerably reduce the errors and artifacts in non-Cartesian MRI reconstruction.

  20. Linear adaptive noise-reduction filters for tomographic imaging: Optimizing for minimum mean square error

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, W Y

    1993-04-01

    This thesis solves the problem of finding the optimal linear noise-reduction filter for linear tomographic image reconstruction. The optimization is data dependent and results in minimizing the mean-square error of the reconstructed image. The error is defined as the difference between the result and the best possible reconstruction. Applications for the optimal filter include reconstructions of positron emission tomographic (PET), X-ray computed tomographic, single-photon emission tomographic, and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Using high resolution PET as an example, the optimal filter is derived and presented for the convolution backprojection, Moore-Penrose pseudoinverse, and the natural-pixel basis set reconstruction methods. Simulations and experimental results are presented for the convolution backprojection method.

  1. Mean-square-displacement distribution in crystals and glasses: An analysis of the intrabasin dynamics.

    PubMed

    Flores-Ruiz, Hugo M; Naumis, Gerardo G

    2012-04-01

    In the energy landscape picture, the dynamics of glasses and crystals is usually decomposed into two separate contributions: interbasin and intrabasin dynamics. The intrabasin dynamics depends partially on the quadratic displacement distribution on a given metabasin. Here we show that such a distribution can be approximated by a Gamma function, with a mean that depends linearly on the temperature and on the inverse second moment of the density of vibrational states. The width of the distribution also depends on this last quantity, and thus the contribution of the boson peak in glasses is evident on the tail of the distribution function. It causes the distribution of the mean-square displacement to decay slower in glasses than in crystals. When a statistical analysis is performed under many energy basins, we obtain a Gaussian in which the width is regulated by the mean inverse second moment of the density of states. Simulations performed in binary glasses are in agreement with such a result.

  2. An improved filter-u least mean square vibration control algorithm for aircraft framework.

    PubMed

    Huang, Quanzhen; Luo, Jun; Gao, Zhiyuan; Zhu, Xiaojin; Li, Hengyu

    2014-09-01

    Active vibration control of aerospace vehicle structures is very a hot spot and in which filter-u least mean square (FULMS) algorithm is one of the key methods. But for practical reasons and technical limitations, vibration reference signal extraction is always a difficult problem for FULMS algorithm. To solve the vibration reference signal extraction problem, an improved FULMS vibration control algorithm is proposed in this paper. Reference signal is constructed based on the controller structure and the data in the algorithm process, using a vibration response residual signal extracted directly from the vibration structure. To test the proposed algorithm, an aircraft frame model is built and an experimental platform is constructed. The simulation and experimental results show that the proposed algorithm is more practical with a good vibration suppression performance.

  3. Measured and predicted root-mean-square errors in square and triangular antenna mesh facets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichter, W. B.

    1989-01-01

    Deflection shapes of square and equilateral triangular facets of two tricot-knit, gold plated molybdenum wire mesh antenna materials were measured and compared, on the basis of root mean square (rms) differences, with deflection shapes predicted by linear membrane theory, for several cases of biaxial mesh tension. The two mesh materials contained approximately 10 and 16 holes per linear inch, measured diagonally with respect to the course and wale directions. The deflection measurement system employed a non-contact eddy current proximity probe and an electromagnetic distance sensing probe in conjunction with a precision optical level. Despite experimental uncertainties, rms differences between measured and predicted deflection shapes suggest the following conclusions: that replacing flat antenna facets with facets conforming to parabolically curved structural members yields smaller rms surface error; that potential accuracy gains are greater for equilateral triangular facets than for square facets; and that linear membrane theory can be a useful tool in the design of tricot knit wire mesh antennas.

  4. Mean square stabilisation of complex oscillatory regimes in nonlinear stochastic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkirtseva, Irina; Ryashko, Lev

    2016-04-01

    A problem of stabilisation of the randomly forced periodic and quasiperiodic modes for nonlinear dynamic systems is considered. For this problem solution, we propose a new theoretical approach to consider these modes as invariant manifolds of the stochastic differential equations with control. The aim of the control is to provide the exponential mean square (EMS) stability for these manifolds. A general method of the stabilisation based on the algebraic criterion of the EMS-stability is elaborated. A constructive technique for the design of the feedback regulators stabilising various types of oscillatory regimes is proposed. A detailed parametric analysis of the problem of the stabilisation for stochastically forced periodic and quasiperiodic modes is given. An illustrative example of stochastic Hopf system is included to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed technique.

  5. Sea surface mean square slope from Ku-band backscatter data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, F. C.; Walton, W. T.; Hines, D. E.; Walter, B. A.; Peng, C. Y.

    1992-01-01

    A surface mean-square-slope parameter analysis is conducted for 14-GHz airborne radar altimeter near-nadir, quasi-specular backscatter data, which in raw form obtained by least-squares fitting of an optical scattering model to the return waveform show an approximately linear dependence over the 7-15 m/sec wind speed range. Slope data are used to draw inferences on the structure of the high-wavenumber portion of the spectrum. A directionally-integrated model height spectrum that encompasses wind speed-dependent k exp -5/2 and classical Phillips k exp -3 power laws subranges in the range of gravity waves is supported by the data.

  6. Evaluation of the Proton Charge Radius from Electron–Proton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Arrington, John; Sick, Ingo

    2015-09-15

    In light of the proton radius puzzle, the discrepancy between measurements of the proton charge radius from muonic hydrogen and those from electronic hydrogen and electron–proton (e–p) scattering measurements, we re-examine the charge radius extractions from electron scattering measurements. We provide a recommended value for the proton root-mean-square charge radius, r{sub E} = 0.879 ± 0.011 fm, based on a global examination of elastic e–p scattering data. The uncertainties include contributions to account for tension between different data sets and inconsistencies between radii using different extraction procedures.

  7. Decomposition of the Mean Squared Error and NSE Performance Criteria: Implications for Improving Hydrological Modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Hoshin V.; Kling, Harald; Yilmaz, Koray K.; Martinez-Baquero, Guillermo F.

    2009-01-01

    The mean squared error (MSE) and the related normalization, the Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE), are the two criteria most widely used for calibration and evaluation of hydrological models with observed data. Here, we present a diagnostically interesting decomposition of NSE (and hence MSE), which facilitates analysis of the relative importance of its different components in the context of hydrological modelling, and show how model calibration problems can arise due to interactions among these components. The analysis is illustrated by calibrating a simple conceptual precipitation-runoff model to daily data for a number of Austrian basins having a broad range of hydro-meteorological characteristics. Evaluation of the results clearly demonstrates the problems that can be associated with any calibration based on the NSE (or MSE) criterion. While we propose and test an alternative criterion that can help to reduce model calibration problems, the primary purpose of this study is not to present an improved measure of model performance. Instead, we seek to show that there are systematic problems inherent with any optimization based on formulations related to the MSE. The analysis and results have implications to the manner in which we calibrate and evaluate environmental models; we discuss these and suggest possible ways forward that may move us towards an improved and diagnostically meaningful approach to model performance evaluation and identification.

  8. Atomic motion from the mean square displacement in a monatomic liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Duane C.; De Lorenzi-Venneri, Giulia; Chisolm, Eric D.

    2016-04-08

    V-T theory is constructed in the many-body Hamiltonian formulation, and is being developed as a novel approach to liquid dynamics theory. In this theory the liquid atomic motion consists of two contributions, normal mode vibrations in a single representative potential energy valley, and transits, which carry the system across boundaries between valleys. The mean square displacement time correlation function (the MSD) is a direct measure of the atomic motion, and our goal is to determine if the V-T formalism can produce a physically sensible account of this motion. We employ molecular dynamics (MD) data for a system representing liquid Na, and find the motion evolves in three successive time intervals: on the first 'vibrational' interval, the vibrational motion alone gives a highly accurate account of the MD data; on the second 'crossover' interval, the vibrational MSD saturates to a constant while the transit motion builds up from zero; on the third 'random walk' interval, the transit motion produces a purely diffusive random walk of the vibrational equilibrium positions. Furthermore, this motional evolution agrees with, and adds refinement to, the MSD atomic motion as described by current liquid dynamics theories.

  9. Atomic motion from the mean square displacement in a monatomic liquid

    DOE PAGES

    Wallace, Duane C.; De Lorenzi-Venneri, Giulia; Chisolm, Eric D.

    2016-04-08

    V-T theory is constructed in the many-body Hamiltonian formulation, and is being developed as a novel approach to liquid dynamics theory. In this theory the liquid atomic motion consists of two contributions, normal mode vibrations in a single representative potential energy valley, and transits, which carry the system across boundaries between valleys. The mean square displacement time correlation function (the MSD) is a direct measure of the atomic motion, and our goal is to determine if the V-T formalism can produce a physically sensible account of this motion. We employ molecular dynamics (MD) data for a system representing liquid Na,more » and find the motion evolves in three successive time intervals: on the first 'vibrational' interval, the vibrational motion alone gives a highly accurate account of the MD data; on the second 'crossover' interval, the vibrational MSD saturates to a constant while the transit motion builds up from zero; on the third 'random walk' interval, the transit motion produces a purely diffusive random walk of the vibrational equilibrium positions. Furthermore, this motional evolution agrees with, and adds refinement to, the MSD atomic motion as described by current liquid dynamics theories.« less

  10. Detecting Blending End-Point Using Mean Squares Successive Difference Test and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Khorasani, Milad; Amigo, José M; Bertelsen, Poul; Van Den Berg, Frans; Rantanen, Jukka

    2015-08-01

    An algorithm based on mean squares successive difference test applied to near-infrared and principal component analysis scores was developed to monitor and determine the blending profile and to assess the end-point in the statistical stabile phase. Model formulations consisting of an active compound (acetylsalicylic acid), together with microcrystalline cellulose and two grades of calcium carbonate with dramatically different particle shapes, were prepared. The formulation comprising angular-shaped calcium carbonate reached blending end-point slower when compared with the formulation comprising equant-shaped calcium carbonate. Utilizing the ring shear test, this distinction in end-point could be related to the difference in flowability of the formulations. On the basis of the two model formulations, a design of experiments was conducted to characterize the blending process by studying the effect of CaCO3 grades and fill level of the bin on blending end-point. Calcium carbonate grades, fill level, and their interaction were shown to have a significant impact on the blending process.

  11. Estimating Root Mean Square Errors in Remotely Sensed Soil Moisture over Continental Scale Domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, Clara S.; Reichle, Rolf; de Jeu, Richard; Naeimi, Vahid; Parinussa, Robert; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Root Mean Square Errors (RMSE) in the soil moisture anomaly time series obtained from the Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E; using the Land Parameter Retrieval Model) are estimated over a continental scale domain centered on North America, using two methods: triple colocation (RMSETC ) and error propagation through the soil moisture retrieval models (RMSEEP ). In the absence of an established consensus for the climatology of soil moisture over large domains, presenting a RMSE in soil moisture units requires that it be specified relative to a selected reference data set. To avoid the complications that arise from the use of a reference, the RMSE is presented as a fraction of the time series standard deviation (fRMSE). For both sensors, the fRMSETC and fRMSEEP show similar spatial patterns of relatively highlow errors, and the mean fRMSE for each land cover class is consistent with expectations. Triple colocation is also shown to be surprisingly robust to representativity differences between the soil moisture data sets used, and it is believed to accurately estimate the fRMSE in the remotely sensed soil moisture anomaly time series. Comparing the ASCAT and AMSR-E fRMSETC shows that both data sets have very similar accuracy across a range of land cover classes, although the AMSR-E accuracy is more directly related to vegetation cover. In general, both data sets have good skill up to moderate vegetation conditions.

  12. Smoothness of In vivo Spectral Baseline Determined by Mean Squared Error

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Shen, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose A nonparametric smooth line is usually added to spectral model to account for background signals in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). The assumed smoothness of the baseline significantly influences quantitative spectral fitting. In this paper, a method is proposed to minimize baseline influences on estimated spectral parameters. Methods In this paper, the non-parametric baseline function with a given smoothness was treated as a function of spectral parameters. Its uncertainty was measured by root-mean-squared error (RMSE). The proposed method was demonstrated with a simulated spectrum and in vivo spectra of both short echo time (TE) and averaged echo times. The estimated in vivo baselines were compared with the metabolite-nulled spectra, and the LCModel-estimated baselines. The accuracies of estimated baseline and metabolite concentrations were further verified by cross-validation. Results An optimal smoothness condition was found that led to the minimal baseline RMSE. In this condition, the best fit was balanced against minimal baseline influences on metabolite concentration estimates. Conclusion Baseline RMSE can be used to indicate estimated baseline uncertainties and serve as the criterion for determining the baseline smoothness of in vivo MRS. PMID:24259436

  13. Observations of Sea Surface Mean Square Slope During the Southern Ocean Waves Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, E. J.; Vandemark, D. C.; Hines, D. E.; Banner, M. L.; Chen, W.; Swift, R. N.; Scott, J. F.; Jensen, J.; Lee, S.; Fandry, C.

    1999-01-01

    For the Southern Ocean Waves Experiment (SOWEX), conducted in June 1992 out of Hobart, Tasmania, the 36 GHz (8.3 mm) NASA Scanning Radar Altimeter (SRA) was shipped to Australia and installed on a CSIRO Fokker F-27 research aircraft instrumented to make comprehensive surface layer measurements of air-sea interaction fluxes. The sea surface mean square slope (mss), which is predominantly caused by the short waves, was determined from the backscattered power falloff with incidence angle measured by the SRA in the plane normal to the aircraft heading. On each flight, data were acquired at 240 m altitude while the aircraft was in a 7 deg roll attitude, interrogating off-nadir incidence angles from -15 deg through nadir to +29 deg. The aircraft turned azimuthally through 810 deg in this attitude, mapping the azimuthal dependence of the backscattered power falloff with incidence angle. Two sets of turning data were acquired on each day, before and after the aircraft measured wind stress at low altitude (12 m to 65 m). Wave topography and backscattered power for mss were also acquired during those level flight segments whenever the aircraft altitude was above the SRA minimum range of 35 m. A unique feature of this experiment was the use of a nadir-directed low-gain horn antenna (35 deg beamwidth) to acquire azimuthally integrated backscattered power data versus incidence angle before and after the turn data.

  14. Atomic motion from the mean square displacement in a monatomic liquid.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Duane C; De Lorenzi-Venneri, Giulia; Chisolm, Eric D

    2016-05-11

    V-T theory is constructed in the many-body Hamiltonian formulation, and is being developed as a novel approach to liquid dynamics theory. In this theory the liquid atomic motion consists of two contributions, normal mode vibrations in a single representative potential energy valley, and transits, which carry the system across boundaries between valleys. The mean square displacement time correlation function (the MSD) is a direct measure of the atomic motion, and our goal is to determine if the V-T formalism can produce a physically sensible account of this motion. We employ molecular dynamics (MD) data for a system representing liquid Na, and find the motion evolves in three successive time intervals: on the first 'vibrational' interval, the vibrational motion alone gives a highly accurate account of the MD data; on the second 'crossover' interval, the vibrational MSD saturates to a constant while the transit motion builds up from zero; on the third 'random walk' interval, the transit motion produces a purely diffusive random walk of the vibrational equilibrium positions. This motional evolution agrees with, and adds refinement to, the MSD atomic motion as described by current liquid dynamics theories.

  15. Optimal design of minimum mean-square error noise reduction algorithms using the simulated annealing technique.

    PubMed

    Bai, Mingsian R; Hsieh, Ping-Ju; Hur, Kur-Nan

    2009-02-01

    The performance of the minimum mean-square error noise reduction (MMSE-NR) algorithm in conjunction with time-recursive averaging (TRA) for noise estimation is found to be very sensitive to the choice of two recursion parameters. To address this problem in a more systematic manner, this paper proposes an optimization method to efficiently search the optimal parameters of the MMSE-TRA-NR algorithms. The objective function is based on a regression model, whereas the optimization process is carried out with the simulated annealing algorithm that is well suited for problems with many local optima. Another NR algorithm proposed in the paper employs linear prediction coding as a preprocessor for extracting the correlated portion of human speech. Objective and subjective tests were undertaken to compare the optimized MMSE-TRA-NR algorithm with several conventional NR algorithms. The results of subjective tests were processed by using analysis of variance to justify the statistic significance. A post hoc test, Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference, was conducted to further assess the pairwise difference between the NR algorithms.

  16. Sulfide bonded atomic radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, G. V.; Ross, N. L.; Cox, D. F.

    2017-03-01

    The bonded radius, r b(S), of the S atom, calculated for first- and second-row non-transition metal sulfide crystals and third-row transition metal sulfide molecules and crystals indicates that the radius of the sulfur atom is not fixed as traditionally assumed, but that it decreases systematically along the bond paths of the bonded atoms with decreasing bond length as observed in an earlier study of the bonded radius of the oxygen atom. When bonded to non-transition metal atoms, r b(S) decreases systematically with decreasing bond length from 1.68 Å when the S atom is bonded to the electropositive VINa atom to 1.25 Å when bonded to the more electronegative IVP atom. In the case of transition metal atoms, rb(S) likewise decreases with decreasing bond length from 1.82 Å when bonded to Cu and to 1.12 Å when bonded to Fe. As r b(S) is not fixed at a given value but varies substantially depending on the bond length and the field strength of the bonded atoms, it is apparent that sets of crystal and atomic sulfide atomic radii based on an assumed fixed radius for the sulfur atom are satisfactory in that they reproduce bond lengths, on the one hand, whereas on the other, they are unsatisfactory in that they fail to define the actual sizes of the bonded atoms determined in terms of the minima in the electron density between the atoms. As such, we urge that the crystal chemistry and the properties of sulfides be studied in terms of the bond lengths determined by adding the radii of either the atomic and crystal radii of the atoms but not in terms of existing sets of crystal and atomic radii. After all, the bond lengths were used to determine the radii that were experimentally determined, whereas the individual radii were determined on the basis of an assumed radius for the sulfur atom.

  17. Electromagnetic moments and radii near N = 32,34

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Ruiz, Ronald Fernando

    2016-09-01

    On behalf of the COLLAPS and CRIS collaborations at ISOLDE-CERN. Nuclei in the neighborhood of calcium isotopes play a key role in the development of many-body methods and provide an important test for current descriptions of the nuclear force. The properties of stable nuclei in the vicinity of the two naturally occurring doubly-magic calcium (Z = 20) isotopes, 40Ca (N = 20) and 48Ca (N = 28), have been extensively studied, both experimentally and theoretically. Recently, special attention has been given to the evolution of nuclear structure in exotic neutron-rich isotopes beyond N = 28 , where evidence of doubly-magic features have been reported at N = 32 and N = 34. This contribution presents the latest results obtained with laser spectroscopy in the region. Measurements of the hyperfine structure spectra and isotope shifts for the potassium (Z = 19) and calcium (Z = 20) isotopic chains were obtained by using optical detection at COLLAPS, ISOLDE-CERN. From these measurements, our knowledge of nuclear ground-state spins, ground-state electromagnetic moments and changes in the root-mean-squared charge radii has been extended up to N = 32. With relatively low production yields, the isotopes 51K ( 4000 ions/s) and 52Ca ( 250 ions/s) are at the limit of optical detection techniques. In order to extend laser spectroscopy studies further away from stability, a highly sensitive experimental setup has been developed at the COLLAPS beam line. The current developments in this direction and the perspectives for future experiments using collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy (CRIS) in the region towards N = 34 will be discussed.

  18. Augmented GNSS differential corrections minimum mean square error estimation sensitivity to spatial correlation modeling errors.

    PubMed

    Kassabian, Nazelie; Lo Presti, Letizia; Rispoli, Francesco

    2014-06-11

    Railway signaling is a safety system that has evolved over the last couple of centuries towards autonomous functionality. Recently, great effort is being devoted in this field, towards the use and exploitation of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals and GNSS augmentation systems in view of lower railway track equipments and maintenance costs, that is a priority to sustain the investments for modernizing the local and regional lines most of which lack automatic train protection systems and are still manually operated. The objective of this paper is to assess the sensitivity of the Linear Minimum Mean Square Error (LMMSE) algorithm to modeling errors in the spatial correlation function that characterizes true pseudorange Differential Corrections (DCs). This study is inspired by the railway application; however, it applies to all transportation systems, including the road sector, that need to be complemented by an augmentation system in order to deliver accurate and reliable positioning with integrity specifications. A vector of noisy pseudorange DC measurements are simulated, assuming a Gauss-Markov model with a decay rate parameter inversely proportional to the correlation distance that exists between two points of a certain environment. The LMMSE algorithm is applied on this vector to estimate the true DC, and the estimation error is compared to the noise added during simulation. The results show that for large enough correlation distance to Reference Stations (RSs) distance separation ratio values, the LMMSE brings considerable advantage in terms of estimation error accuracy and precision. Conversely, the LMMSE algorithm may deteriorate the quality of the DC measurements whenever the ratio falls below a certain threshold.

  19. Augmented GNSS Differential Corrections Minimum Mean Square Error Estimation Sensitivity to Spatial Correlation Modeling Errors

    PubMed Central

    Kassabian, Nazelie; Presti, Letizia Lo; Rispoli, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Railway signaling is a safety system that has evolved over the last couple of centuries towards autonomous functionality. Recently, great effort is being devoted in this field, towards the use and exploitation of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals and GNSS augmentation systems in view of lower railway track equipments and maintenance costs, that is a priority to sustain the investments for modernizing the local and regional lines most of which lack automatic train protection systems and are still manually operated. The objective of this paper is to assess the sensitivity of the Linear Minimum Mean Square Error (LMMSE) algorithm to modeling errors in the spatial correlation function that characterizes true pseudorange Differential Corrections (DCs). This study is inspired by the railway application; however, it applies to all transportation systems, including the road sector, that need to be complemented by an augmentation system in order to deliver accurate and reliable positioning with integrity specifications. A vector of noisy pseudorange DC measurements are simulated, assuming a Gauss-Markov model with a decay rate parameter inversely proportional to the correlation distance that exists between two points of a certain environment. The LMMSE algorithm is applied on this vector to estimate the true DC, and the estimation error is compared to the noise added during simulation. The results show that for large enough correlation distance to Reference Stations (RSs) distance separation ratio values, the LMMSE brings considerable advantage in terms of estimation error accuracy and precision. Conversely, the LMMSE algorithm may deteriorate the quality of the DC measurements whenever the ratio falls below a certain threshold. PMID:24922454

  20. Sea surface mean square slope from K u -band backscatter data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, F. C.; Walton, W. T.; Hines, D. E.; Walter, B. A.; Peng, C. Y.

    1992-07-01

    Near-nadir, quasi-specular backscatter data obtained with a 14-GHz airborne radar altimeter are analyzed in terms of the surface mean square slope (mss) parameter. The raw mss data, derived from a least squares fitting of a ray optical scattering model to the return waveform, show an approximately linear wind speed dependence over the wind speed range of 7-15 m s-1, with a slope of about one half that of the optically determined mss. Further analysis based on a simple two-scale scattering model indicates that, at the higher wind speeds, ˜20% of this apparent slope signal can be attributed to diffraction from waves shorter than the estimated diffraction limit of ˜0.10 m. The present slope data, as well as slope and other data from a variety of sources, are used to draw inferences on the structure of the high wavenumber portion of the wave spectrum. The data support a directionally integrated model height spectrum consisting of wind speed dependent k-5/2 and classical Phillips' k-3 power law subranges in the range of gravity waves, with a transition between the two subranges occurring around 10 times the peak wavenumber, and a Durden and Vesecky wind speed dependent spectrum in the gravity-capillary wave range. With a nominal value of the spectral constant Au = 0.002 in the first k-5/2 subrange, this equilibrium spectrum model predicts a mss wind speed dependence that accords with much of the available data at both microwave and optical frequencies.

  1. Resolution Effects on the Mean Square Displacement as Obtained by the Self-Distribution-Function Procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetto, A.; Magazù, S.; Migliardo, F.; Mondelli, C.; Gonzalez, M. A.

    2012-02-01

    In the present contribution, a procedure for molecular motion characterization based on the evaluation of the Mean Square Displacement (MSD), through the Self-Distribution Function (SDF), is presented. It is shown how MSD, which represents an important observable for the characterization of dynamical properties, can be decomposed into different partial contributions associated to system dynamical processes within a specific spatial scale. It is also shown how the SDF procedure allows us to evaluate both total MSD and partial MSDs through total and partial SDFs. As a result, total MSD is the weighed sum of partial MSDs in which the weights are obtained by the fitting procedure of measured Elastic Incoherent Neutron Scattering (EINS) intensity. We apply SDF procedure to data collected,by IN13, IN10 and IN4 spectrometers (Institute Laue Langevin), on aqueous mixtures of two homologous disaccharides (sucrose and trehalose) and on dry and hydrated (H2O and D2O) lysozyme with and without disaccharides. It emerges that the hydrogen bond imposed network of the water-trehalose mixture appears to be stronger with respect to that of the water-sucrose mixture. This result can justify the higher bioprotectant effectiveness of trehalose. Furthermore, it emerges that partial MSDs of sucrose and trehalose are equivalent in the low Q domain (0÷1.7) Å-1 whereas they are different in the high Q domain (1.7÷4) Å-1. This suggests that the higher structure sensitivity of sucrose should be related to the small spatial observation windows. Moreover, the role of the instrumental resolution in EINS is considered. The nature of the dynamical transition is highlighted and it is shown that it occurs when the system relaxation time becomes shorter than the instrumental energy time. Finally, the bioprotectants effect on protein dynamics and the amplitude of vibrations in lysozyme are presented.

  2. Protein structure validation by generalized linear model root-mean-square deviation prediction.

    PubMed

    Bagaria, Anurag; Jaravine, Victor; Huang, Yuanpeng J; Montelione, Gaetano T; Güntert, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Large-scale initiatives for obtaining spatial protein structures by experimental or computational means have accentuated the need for the critical assessment of protein structure determination and prediction methods. These include blind test projects such as the critical assessment of protein structure prediction (CASP) and the critical assessment of protein structure determination by nuclear magnetic resonance (CASD-NMR). An important aim is to establish structure validation criteria that can reliably assess the accuracy of a new protein structure. Various quality measures derived from the coordinates have been proposed. A universal structural quality assessment method should combine multiple individual scores in a meaningful way, which is challenging because of their different measurement units. Here, we present a method based on a generalized linear model (GLM) that combines diverse protein structure quality scores into a single quantity with intuitive meaning, namely the predicted coordinate root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) value between the present structure and the (unavailable) "true" structure (GLM-RMSD). For two sets of structural models from the CASD-NMR and CASP projects, this GLM-RMSD value was compared with the actual accuracy given by the RMSD value to the corresponding, experimentally determined reference structure from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). The correlation coefficients between actual (model vs. reference from PDB) and predicted (model vs. "true") heavy-atom RMSDs were 0.69 and 0.76, for the two datasets from CASD-NMR and CASP, respectively, which is considerably higher than those for the individual scores (-0.24 to 0.68). The GLM-RMSD can thus predict the accuracy of protein structures more reliably than individual coordinate-based quality scores.

  3. Macrocyclic lanthanide complexes as artificial nucleases and ribonucleases: effects of pH, metal ionic radii, number of coordinated water molecules, charge, and concentrations of the metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Chang, C Allen; Wu, Bo Hong; Kuan, Bu Yuan

    2005-09-19

    We have been interested in the design, synthesis, and characterization of artificial nucleases and ribonucleases by employing macrocyclic lanthanide complexes because their high thermodynamic stability, low kinetic lability, high coordination number, and charge density (Lewis acidity) allow more design flexibility and stability. In this paper, we report the study of the use of the europium(III) complex, EuDO2A+ (DO2A is 1,7-dicarboxymethyl-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane) and other lanthanide complexes (i.e., LaDO2A+, YbDO2A+, EuK21DA+, EuEDDA+, and EuHEDTA where K21DA is 1,7-diaza-4,10,13-trioxacyclopentadecane-N,N'-diacetic acid, EDDA is ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid, and HEDTA is N-hydroxyethyl-ethylenediamine-N,N',N'-triacetic acid), as potential catalysts for the hydrolysis of the phosphodiester bond of BNPP (sodium bis(4-nitrophenyl)-phosphate). For the pH range 7.0-11.0 studied, EuDO2A+ promotes BNPP hydrolysis with the quickest rates among LaDO2A+, EuDO2A+, and YbDO2A+. This indicates that charge density is not the only factor affecting the reaction rates. Among the four complexes, EuDO2A+, EuK21DA+, EuEDDA+, and EuHEDTA, with their respective number of inner-sphere coordinated water molecules three, two, five, and three, EuEDDA+, with the greatest number of inner-sphere coordinated water molecules and a positive charge, promotes BNPP hydrolysis more efficiently at pH below 8.4, and the observed rate trend is EuEDDA+ > EuDO2A+ > EuK21DA+ > EuHEDTA. At pH > 8.4, the EuEDDA+ solution becomes misty and precipitates form. At pH 11.0, the hydrolysis rate of BNPP in the presence of EuDO2A+ is 100 times faster than that of EuHEDTA, presumably because the positively charged EuDO2A+ is more favorable for binding with the negatively charged phosphodiester compounds. The logarithmic hydrolysis constants (pKh) were determined, and are reported in the parentheses, by fitting the kinetic k(obs) data vs pH for EuDO2A+ (8.4), LaDO2A+ (8.4), YbDO2A+ (9.4), EuK21DA+ (7

  4. Observations of Sea Surface Mean Square Slope During the Southern Ocean Waves Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, E. J.; Vandemark, D. C.; Wright, C. W.; Banner, M. L.; Chen, W.; Swift, R. N.; Scott, J. F.; Hines, D. E.; Jensen, J.; Lee, S.; Gerlach, John C. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    For the Southern Ocean Waves Experiment (SOWEX), conducted in June 1992 out of Hobart, Tasmania, the NASA Scanning Radar Altimeter (SRA) was shipped to Australia and installed on a CSIRO Fokker F-27 research aircraft instrumented to make comprehensive surface layer measurements of air-sea interaction fluxes. The SRA sweeps a radar beam of P (two-way) half-power width across the aircraft ground track over a swath equal to 0.8 of the aircraft height, simultaneously measuring the backscattered power at its 36 GHz (8.3 mm) operating frequency and the range to the sea surface at 64 cross-track positions. In realtime, the slant ranges are multiplied by the cosine of the off-nadir incidence angles (including the effect of aircraft roll attitude) to determine the vertical distances from the aircraft to the sea surface. These distances are subtracted from the aircraft height to produce a sea-surface elevation map, which is displayed on a monitor in the aircraft to enable real-time assessments of data quality and wave properties. The sea surface mean square slope (mss), which is predominantly caused by the short waves, was determined from the backscattered power falloff with incidence angle measured by the SRA in the plane normal to the aircraft heading. On each flight, data were acquired at 240 m altitude while the aircraft was in a 7 degree roll attitude, interrogating off-nadir incidence angles from -15 degrees through nadir to +29 degrees. The aircraft turned azimuthally through 810 degrees in this attitude, mapping the azimuthal dependence of the backscattered power falloff with incidence angle. Two sets of turning data were acquired on each day, before and after the aircraft measured wind stress at low altitude (12 meters to 65 meters). Wave topography and backscattered power for mss were also acquired during those level flight segments whenever the aircraft altitude was above the SRA minimum range of 35 m. Data were collected over a wide range of wind and sea

  5. Charge Radius Changes Of Even-even Neutron-Rich Tellurium Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Sifi, R.; Le Blanc, F.; Barre, N.; Ducourtieux, M.; Essabaa, S.; Lau, C.; Oms, J.; Roussiere, B.; Sauvage, J.; Cabaret, L.; Pinard, J.; Crawford, J.; Lee, J. K. P.; Genevey, J.; Huber, G.; Kowalska, M.; Seliverstov, M.; Le Scornet, G.; Stroke, H.

    2006-04-26

    Laser spectroscopy based on resonant ionization of laser-desorbed atoms has been used to study the neutron-rich tellurium isotopes with the COMPLIS facility at ISOLDE-CERN. The isotope shift and the hyperfine structure of several neutron-rich Te isotopes: 120-136Te and 123m-133mTe have been measured. From the hyperfine structure and the isotope shift we can extract the magnetic and quadrupole moments and the change in the mean square charge radius respectively. The mean square charge radii of the even-even isotopes have been deduced and their comparison with the known data for the other elements near Z=50 is presented. The experimental {delta} is compared with that obtained from the relativistic mean field calculations.

  6. Accuracy in Parameter Estimation for the Root Mean Square Error of Approximation: Sample Size Planning for Narrow Confidence Intervals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Ken; Lai, Keke

    2011-01-01

    The root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) is one of the most widely reported measures of misfit/fit in applications of structural equation modeling. When the RMSEA is of interest, so too should be the accompanying confidence interval. A narrow confidence interval reveals that the plausible parameter values are confined to a relatively…

  7. Modes of Diffusion of Cholera Toxin Bound to GM1 on Live Cell Membrane by Image Mean Square Displacement Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Moens, Pierre D.J.; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    The image-mean square displacement technique applies the calculation of the mean square displacement commonly used in single-molecule tracking to images without resolving single particles. The image-mean square displacement plot obtained is similar to the mean square displacement plot obtained using the single-particle tracking technique. This plot is then used to reconstruct the protein diffusion law and to identify whether the labeled molecules are undergoing pure isotropic, restricted, corralled, transiently confined, or directed diffusion. In our study total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy images were taken of Cholera toxin subunit B (CtxB) membrane-labeled NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblasts and MDA 231 MB cells. We found a population of CTxB undergoing purely isotropic diffusion and one displaying restricted diffusion with corral sizes ranging from 150 to ∼1800 nm. We show that the diffusion rate of CTxB bound to GM1 is independent of the size of the confinement, suggesting that the mechanism of confinement is different from the mechanism controlling the diffusion rate of CtxB. We highlight the potential effect of continuous illumination on the diffusion mode of CTxB. We also show that aggregation of CTxB/GM1 in large complexes occurs and that these aggregates tend to have slower diffusion rates. PMID:25809257

  8. The Relationship between Root Mean Square Error of Approximation and Model Misspecification in Confirmatory Factor Analysis Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savalei, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    The fit index root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) is extremely popular in structural equation modeling. However, its behavior under different scenarios remains poorly understood. The present study generates continuous curves where possible to capture the full relationship between RMSEA and various "incidental parameters," such as…

  9. Modes of diffusion of cholera toxin bound to GM1 on live cell membrane by image mean square displacement analysis.

    PubMed

    Moens, Pierre D J; Digman, Michelle A; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-03-24

    The image-mean square displacement technique applies the calculation of the mean square displacement commonly used in single-molecule tracking to images without resolving single particles. The image-mean square displacement plot obtained is similar to the mean square displacement plot obtained using the single-particle tracking technique. This plot is then used to reconstruct the protein diffusion law and to identify whether the labeled molecules are undergoing pure isotropic, restricted, corralled, transiently confined, or directed diffusion. In our study total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy images were taken of Cholera toxin subunit B (CtxB) membrane-labeled NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblasts and MDA 231 MB cells. We found a population of CTxB undergoing purely isotropic diffusion and one displaying restricted diffusion with corral sizes ranging from 150 to ∼1800 nm. We show that the diffusion rate of CTxB bound to GM1 is independent of the size of the confinement, suggesting that the mechanism of confinement is different from the mechanism controlling the diffusion rate of CtxB. We highlight the potential effect of continuous illumination on the diffusion mode of CTxB. We also show that aggregation of CTxB/GM1 in large complexes occurs and that these aggregates tend to have slower diffusion rates.

  10. First Leptonic Probe of Neutron Radii in Lead (Lead-82) at Low-Q Square

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, Chun-Min

    Over the past decade, in Hall-A of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), both the HAPPEX and PREx collaborations have carried out various high-precision polarized elastic electron scattering experiments to explore the nuclear structure, the nucleon form factor and the weak charge of proton and electron. They have done so through the technique of the parity-violating asymmetry measurement with limited theoretical uncertainties. My dissertation focuses on the study of nuclear structure, namely the thickness of the neutron skin, using elastic electron scattering experiments. The direct measurement of the thickness of the neutron skin in heavy nuclei, where neutron are two-fold more than protons, constrains the slope of changes in binding energies of every single heavy nucleus with respect to the full nucleus density, including proton and neutron densities. In addition, a more precise description of the neutron density profile for each heavy nucleus can help us gain better understanding of nuclear binding energies and has astrophysical implications for neutron stars. As far as we know, the proton and charge RMS (root-mean-square) radii in heavy nuclei such as Lead ( P20882b ) have been measured with an accuracy of 0.02 fm and 0.002 fm, respectively. However, there is no clear picture of the neutron density profile through a high precision neutron RMS radii measurement free from the strong interaction until now. Through a series simulations, both theorists and experimentalists have studied the sensitivity of the parity-violating asymmetry to the extraction of the neutron radii in heavy nuclei. Under some specific conditions, for instance, a fixed scattering angle of 5 degrees and a fixed Q 2 of 0.0088 GeV2, a 3% statistic uncertainty of parity-violating asymmetries corresponds to a merely 1% error of the neutron radii in Lead ( P20882b ). That is, the uncertainties of neutron radii in Lead ( P20882b ) is three-fold smaller than the error of the

  11. Complex linear minimum mean-squared-error equalization of spatially quadrature-amplitude-modulated signals in holographic data storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Takanori; Kanno, Kazutaka; Bunsen, Masatoshi

    2016-09-01

    We applied complex linear minimum mean-squared-error equalization to spatially quadrature-amplitude-modulated signals in holographic data storage (HDS). The equalization technique can improve dispersion in constellation outputs due to intersymbol interference. We confirm the effectiveness of the equalization technique in numerical simulations and basic optical experiments. Our numerical results have shown that intersymbol interference of a retrieved signal in a HDS system can be improved by using the equalization technique. In our experiments, a mean squared error (MSE), which indicates the deviation from an ideal signal, has been used for quantitatively evaluating the dispersion of equalized signals. Our equalization technique has been able to improve the MSE. However, symbols in the equalized signal have remained inseparable. To further improve the MSE and make the symbols separable, reducing errors in repeated measurements is our future task.

  12. Moments and Root-Mean-Square Error of the Bayesian MMSE Estimator of Classification Error in the Gaussian Model.

    PubMed

    Zollanvari, Amin; Dougherty, Edward R

    2014-06-01

    The most important aspect of any classifier is its error rate, because this quantifies its predictive capacity. Thus, the accuracy of error estimation is critical. Error estimation is problematic in small-sample classifier design because the error must be estimated using the same data from which the classifier has been designed. Use of prior knowledge, in the form of a prior distribution on an uncertainty class of feature-label distributions to which the true, but unknown, feature-distribution belongs, can facilitate accurate error estimation (in the mean-square sense) in circumstances where accurate completely model-free error estimation is impossible. This paper provides analytic asymptotically exact finite-sample approximations for various performance metrics of the resulting Bayesian Minimum Mean-Square-Error (MMSE) error estimator in the case of linear discriminant analysis (LDA) in the multivariate Gaussian model. These performance metrics include the first, second, and cross moments of the Bayesian MMSE error estimator with the true error of LDA, and therefore, the Root-Mean-Square (RMS) error of the estimator. We lay down the theoretical groundwork for Kolmogorov double-asymptotics in a Bayesian setting, which enables us to derive asymptotic expressions of the desired performance metrics. From these we produce analytic finite-sample approximations and demonstrate their accuracy via numerical examples. Various examples illustrate the behavior of these approximations and their use in determining the necessary sample size to achieve a desired RMS. The Supplementary Material contains derivations for some equations and added figures.

  13. Thermochemical Radii of Complex Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roobottom, Helen K.; Jenkins, H. Donald B.; Passmore, Jack; Glasser, Leslie

    1999-11-01

    Using rectilinear correlations of lattice energy with the inverse cubic root of the volume per molecule of complex salts of type MX (1:1), M2X (2:1), and MX2 (1:2) we have generated a comprehensive self-consistent tabulation of more than 400 thermochemical radii for complex ions. These radii can be used in the Kapustinskii equation to generate lattice energies and also as ion size parameters.

  14. Central depression of nuclear charge density distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Chu Yanyun; Ren Zhongzhou; Wang Zaijun; Dong Tiekuang

    2010-08-15

    The center-depressed nuclear charge distributions are investigated with the parametrized distribution and the relativistic mean-field theory, and their corresponding charge form factors are worked out with the phase shift analysis method. The central depression of nuclear charge distribution of {sup 46}Ar and {sup 44}S is supported by the relativistic mean-field calculation. According to the calculation, the valence protons in {sup 46}Ar and {sup 44}S prefer to occupy the 1d{sub 3/2} state rather than the 2s{sub 1/2} state, which is different from that in the less neutron-rich argon and sulfur isotopes. As a result, the central proton densities of {sup 46}Ar and {sup 44}S are highly depressed, and so are their central charge densities. The charge form factors of some argon and sulfur isotopes are presented, and the minima of the charge form factors shift upward and inward when the central nuclear charge distributions are more depressed. Besides, the effect of the central depression on the charge form factors is studied with a parametrized distribution, when the root-mean-square charge radii remain constant.

  15. Statistical mechanics of helical wormlike chains. XVI. Excluded-volume effect on the mean-square electric dipole moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizaki, Takenao; Yamakawa, Hiromi

    1993-03-01

    The expansion factor αμ for the mean-square electric dipole moment is studied on the basis of the helical wormlike chain with the excluded-volume effect incorporated in the Yamakawa-Stockmayer-Shimada scheme. A general expression is formulated for the first-order perturbation coefficient Kμ(L) for the chain of total contour length L. The asymptotic solution for Kμ(L) in the limit of L→∞ is evaluated analytically in the Daniels approximation by an application of the operational method. In contradiction to the common notion, it is found that, in the case of κ0τ0≠0 with κ0 and τ0 being the constant curvature and torsion, respectively, of the characteristic helix, Kμ(∞) does not vanish even for the chain having a local electric dipole moment vector perpendicular to the chain contour, indicating that αμ diverges with increasing molecular weight.

  16. Indirect Determinations of Atomic Radii

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Noojin

    1976-01-01

    Describes laboratory activities which relate the mass, volume, density, and radii of atoms through the assumption that the smallest unit of matter is a cubic box containing one atom. From calculations based on macroscopic materials, the author feels that the concept of an atom may be better developed. (CP)

  17. Particle-number fluctuations and neutron-proton pairing effects on proton and neutron radii of even-even N Almost-Equal-To Z nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Douici, M.; Allal, N. H.; Fellah, M.; Benhamouda, N.; Oudih, M. R.

    2012-10-20

    The particle-number fluctuation effect on the root-mean-square (rms) proton and neutron radii of even-even N Almost-Equal-To Z nuclei is studied in the isovector neutron-proton (np) pairing case using an exact particle-number projection method and the Woods-Saxon model.

  18. Outcome analysis after helmet therapy using 3D photogrammetry in patients with deformational plagiocephaly: the role of root mean square.

    PubMed

    Moghaddam, Mahsa Bidgoli; Brown, Trevor M; Clausen, April; DaSilva, Trevor; Ho, Emily; Forrest, Christopher R

    2014-02-01

    Deformational plagiocephaly (DP) is a multifactorial non-synostotic cranial deformity with a reported incidence as high as 1 in 7 infants in North America. Treatment options have focused on non-operative interventions including head repositioning and the use of an orthotic helmet device. Previous studies have used linear and two dimensional outcome measures to assess changes in cranial symmetry after helmet therapy. Our objective was to demonstrate improvement in head shape after treatment with a cranial molding helmet by using Root Mean Square (RMS), a measure unique to 3D photogrammetry, which takes into account both changes in volume and shape over time. Three dimensional photographs were obtained before and after molding helmet treatment in 40 infants (4-10 months old) with deformational plagiocephaly. Anatomical reference planes and measurements were recorded using the 3dMD Vultus(®) analysis software. RMS was used to quantify symmetry by superimposing left and right quadrants and calculating the mean value of aggregate distances between surfaces. Over 95% of the patients demonstrated an improvement in symmetry with helmet therapy. Furthermore, when the sample of infants was divided into two treatment subgroups, a statistically significant correlation was found between the age at the beginning of treatment and the change in the RMS value. When helmet therapy was started before 7 months of age a greater improvement in symmetry was seen. This work represents application of the technique of RMS analysis to demonstrate the efficacy of treatment of deformational plagiocephaly with a cranial molding helmet.

  19. Minimization of the mean square velocity response of dynamic structures using an active-passive dynamic vibration absorber.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Y L; Wong, W O; Cheng, L

    2012-07-01

    An optimal design of a hybrid vibration absorber (HVA) with a displacement and a velocity feedback for minimizing the velocity response of the structure based on the H(2) optimization criterion is proposed. The objective of the optimal design is to reduce the total vibration energy of the vibrating structure under wideband excitation, i.e., the total area under the velocity response spectrum is minimized in this criterion. One of the inherent limitations of the traditional passive vibration absorber is that its vibration suppression is low if the mass ratio between the absorber mass and the mass of the primary structure is low. The active element of the proposed HVA helps further reduce the vibration of the controlled structure, and it can provide very good vibration absorption performance even at a low mass ratio. Both the passive and active elements are optimized together for the minimization of the mean square velocity of the primary system as well as the active force required in the HVA. The proposed HVA was tested on single degree-of-freedom (SDOF) and continuous vibrating structures and compared to the traditional passive vibration absorber.

  20. Accurate human limb angle measurement: sensor fusion through Kalman, least mean squares and recursive least-squares adaptive filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares, A.; Górriz, J. M.; Ramírez, J.; Olivares, G.

    2011-02-01

    Inertial sensors are widely used in human body motion monitoring systems since they permit us to determine the position of the subject's limbs. Limb angle measurement is carried out through the integration of the angular velocity measured by a rate sensor and the decomposition of the components of static gravity acceleration measured by an accelerometer. Different factors derived from the sensors' nature, such as the angle random walk and dynamic bias, lead to erroneous measurements. Dynamic bias effects can be reduced through the use of adaptive filtering based on sensor fusion concepts. Most existing published works use a Kalman filtering sensor fusion approach. Our aim is to perform a comparative study among different adaptive filters. Several least mean squares (LMS), recursive least squares (RLS) and Kalman filtering variations are tested for the purpose of finding the best method leading to a more accurate and robust limb angle measurement. A new angle wander compensation sensor fusion approach based on LMS and RLS filters has been developed.

  1. Three-dimensional relationship between high-order root-mean-square wavefront error, pupil diameter, and aging

    PubMed Central

    Applegate, Raymond A.; Donnelly, William J.; Marsack, Jason D.; Koenig, Darren E.; Pesudovs, Konrad

    2007-01-01

    We report root-mean-square (RMS) wavefront error (WFE) for individual aberrations and cumulative high-order (HO) RMS WFE for the normal human eye as a function of age by decade and pupil diameter in 1 mm steps from 3 to 7 mm and determine the relationship among HO RMS WFE, mean age for each decade of life, and luminance for physiologic pupil diameters. Subjects included 146 healthy individuals from 20 to 80 years of age. Ocular aberration was measured on the preferred eye of each subject (for a total of 146 eyes through dilated pupils; computed for 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 mm pupils; and described with a tenth-radial-order normalized Zernike expansion. We found that HO RMS WFE increases faster with increasing pupil diameter for any given age and pupil diameter than it does with increasing age alone. A planar function accounts for 99% of the variance in the 3-D space defined by mean log HO RMS WFE, mean age for each decade of life, and pupil diameter. When physiologic pupil diameters are used to estimate HO RMS WFE as a function of luminance and age, at low luminance (9 cd/m2) HO RMS WFE decreases with increasing age. This normative data set details (1) the 3-D relationship between HO RMS WFE and age for fixed pupil diameters and (2) the 3-D relationship among HO RMS WFE, age, and luminance for physiologic pupil diameters. PMID:17301847

  2. Experimental determination of optimal root-mean-square deviations of macromolecular bond lengths and angles from their restrained ideal values.

    PubMed

    Tickle, Ian J

    2007-12-01

    A number of inconsistencies are apparent in the recent research paper by Jaskolski et al. [(2007), Acta Cryst. D63, 611-620] concerning their recommendations for the values of the magnitude and resolution-dependence of the root-mean-square deviations (RMSDs) of bond lengths and angles from their restrained ideal values in macromolecular refinement, as well as their suggestions for the use of variable standard uncertainties dependent on atomic displacement parameters (ADPs) and occupancies. Whilst many of the comments and suggestions in the paper regarding updates for the ideal geometry values proposed by Engh and Huber are entirely reasonable and supported by the experimental evidence, the recommendations concerning the optimal values of RMSDs appear to be in conflict with previous experimental and theoretical work in this area [Tickle et al. (1998), Acta Cryst. D54, 243-252] and indeed appear to be based on a misunderstanding of the distinction between RMSD and standard uncertainty (SU). In contrast, it is proposed here that the optimal values of all desired weighting parameters, in particular the weighting parameters for the ADP differences and for the diffraction terms, be estimated by the purely objective procedure of maximizing the experiment-based log(free likelihood). In principle, this allows all weighting parameters that are not known accurately a priori to be scaled globally, relative to those that are known accurately, for an optimal refinement. The RMS Z score (RMSZ) is recommended as a more satisfactory statistic than the RMSD to assess the extent to which the geometry deviates from the ideal values and a theoretical rationale for the results obtained is presented in which the optimal RMSZ is identified as the calculated versus true Z-score correlation coefficient, the latter being a monotonic function of the resolution cutoff of the data. Regarding the proposal to use variable standard uncertainties, it is suggested that any departure from the current

  3. Characterization and assessment of different algorithms for retrieval of mean square slopes from GNSS-R measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarizia, Maria Paola; Ruf, Christopher; Gommenginger, Christine

    2013-04-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System-Reflectometry (GNSS-R) exploits signals of opportunity from navigation constellations (e.g. GPS, GLONASS, Galileo), scattered by the surface of the ocean, to retrieve the surface wind and wave fields. GNSS-R represents a true innovation in remote sensing, and it is receiving a growing interest from the scientific community. Its main advantages lie in the dense space-time sampling capabilities, the ability of L-band signals to penetrate well through rain, and the possibility of simple, low-cost/low-power GNSS receivers. These recognized strengths of GNSS-R recently led to the approval of the NASA EV-2 Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS), a spaceborne mission focused on tropical cyclone (TC) inner core process studies. CYGNSS attempts to resolve the problem of inadequate observations and modeling of the inner core, which represents the principal deficiency with current TC intensity forecasts, and which can be overcome with GNSS-R. The present study focuses on the information content about the sea surface roughness and wind speed, that is contained in spaceborne GNSS-R Delay-Doppler Maps (DDMs). A number of algorithms for the retrieval of Mean Square Slopes (MSS) - representative of the surface roughness - are analyzed. These include existing algorithms based on least-square fitting procedures (e.g. 2D least-square fitting of DDMs, using the Zavorotny-Voronovich DDM theoretical model), or based on direct observables (e.g. DDM volume), as well as "new" algorithms, which make use of waveforms derived from the DDM, which have thusfar been unexploited (e.g. integrated delay and Doppler waveforms). The analysis is carried out using simulated DDMs generated by the mature forward model end-to-end simulator developed for CYGNSS. A comparison of the results obtained for different retrieval algorithms will be presented. In particular, the performance of the algorithms considered is investigated and characterized for the case of

  4. Proton Radii of B12-17 Define a Thick Neutron Surface in B17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estradé, A.; Kanungo, R.; Horiuchi, W.; Ameil, F.; Atkinson, J.; Ayyad, Y.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Dillmann, I.; Evdokimov, A.; Farinon, F.; Geissel, H.; Guastalla, G.; Janik, R.; Kimura, M.; Knöbel, R.; Kurcewicz, J.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Marta, M.; Mostazo, M.; Mukha, I.; Nociforo, C.; Ong, H. J.; Pietri, S.; Prochazka, A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Sitar, B.; Strmen, P.; Suzuki, Y.; Takechi, M.; Tanaka, J.; Tanihata, I.; Terashima, S.; Vargas, J.; Weick, H.; Winfield, J. S.

    2014-09-01

    The first determination of radii of point proton distribution (proton radii) of B12-17 from charge-changing cross sections (σCC) measurements at the FRS, GSI, Darmstadt is reported. The proton radii are deduced from a finite-range Glauber model analysis of the σCC. The radii show an increase from B13 to B17 and are consistent with predictions from the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics model for the neutron-rich nuclei. The measurements show the existence of a thick neutron surface with neutron-proton radius difference of 0.51(0.11) fm in B17.

  5. Nuclear radii calculations in various theoretical approaches for nucleus-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Merino, C.; Novikov, I. S.; Shabelski, Yu.

    2009-12-15

    The information about sizes and nuclear density distributions in unstable (radioactive) nuclei is usually extracted from the data on interaction of radioactive nuclear beams with a nuclear target. We show that in the case of nucleus-nucleus collisions the values of the parameters depend somewhat strongly on the considered theoretical approach and on the assumption about the parametrization of the nuclear density distribution. The obtained values of root-mean-square radii (R{sub rms}) for stable nuclei with atomic weights A=12-40 vary by approximately 0.1 fm when calculated in the optical approximation, in the rigid target approximation, and using the exact expression of the Glauber theory. We present several examples of R{sub rms} radii calculations using these three theoretical approaches and compare these results with the data obtained from electron-nucleus scattering.

  6. DETERMINATION OF STELLAR RADII FROM ASTEROSEISMIC DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Sarbani; Chaplin, William J.; Elsworth, Yvonne E-mail: w.j.chaplin@bham.ac.u

    2010-02-20

    The NASA Kepler mission is designed to find planets through transits. Accurate and precise radii of the detected planets depend on knowing the radius of the host star accurately, which is difficult unless the temperature and luminosity of the star are known precisely. Kepler, however, has an asteroseismology program that will provide seismic variables that can characterize stellar radii easily, accurately, and extremely precisely. In this paper, we describe the Yale-Birmingham (YB) method to determine stellar radii using a combination of seismic and conventional variables and analyze the effect of these variables on the result. We find that for main-sequence stars, a knowledge of the parallax is not important to get accurate radii using the YB method: we can get results to an accuracy and precision of better than a few percent if we know the effective temperature and the seismic parameters for these stars. Metallicity does not make much difference either. However, good estimates of the effective temperature and metallicity, along with those of the seismic parameters, are essential to determine radii of subgiants properly. On the other hand, for red giants we find that determining radii properly is not possible without a good estimate of the parallax. We find that the so-called 'surface term' in the seismic data has minimal effect on the inferred radii. Uncertainties in the convective mixing length can matter under some circumstances and can cause a systematic shift in the inferred radii. Blind tests with data simulated to match those expected from the asteroseismic survey phase of Kepler show that it will be possible to infer stellar radii successfully using our method.

  7. Determination of Stellar Radii from Asteroseismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Sarbani; Chaplin, William J.; Elsworth, Yvonne

    2010-02-01

    The NASA Kepler mission is designed to find planets through transits. Accurate and precise radii of the detected planets depend on knowing the radius of the host star accurately, which is difficult unless the temperature and luminosity of the star are known precisely. Kepler, however, has an asteroseismology program that will provide seismic variables that can characterize stellar radii easily, accurately, and extremely precisely. In this paper, we describe the Yale-Birmingham (YB) method to determine stellar radii using a combination of seismic and conventional variables and analyze the effect of these variables on the result. We find that for main-sequence stars, a knowledge of the parallax is not important to get accurate radii using the YB method: we can get results to an accuracy and precision of better than a few percent if we know the effective temperature and the seismic parameters for these stars. Metallicity does not make much difference either. However, good estimates of the effective temperature and metallicity, along with those of the seismic parameters, are essential to determine radii of subgiants properly. On the other hand, for red giants we find that determining radii properly is not possible without a good estimate of the parallax. We find that the so-called "surface term" in the seismic data has minimal effect on the inferred radii. Uncertainties in the convective mixing length can matter under some circumstances and can cause a systematic shift in the inferred radii. Blind tests with data simulated to match those expected from the asteroseismic survey phase of Kepler show that it will be possible to infer stellar radii successfully using our method.

  8. Photometric radii of Io and Europa.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, M. J.; Hall, J. S.; Boyce, P. B.; Albrecht, R.

    1971-01-01

    Simultaneous two-color photoelectric photometry of Io and Europa performed during their eclipse by Jupiter on the night of April 5/6, 1971, is reported and discussed. The results are compared with satellite radii obtained using other observational techniques. It is concluded that the eclipse technique can be used to infer satellite radii accurate to plus or minus 10 per cent. In principle the eclipse technique can also be applied to the satellites of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune for early objective determinations of their radii.

  9. Mean-square exponential input-to-state stability of delayed Cohen-Grossberg neural networks with Markovian switching based on vector Lyapunov functions.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhihong; Liu, Lei; Zhu, Quanxin

    2016-12-01

    This paper studies the mean-square exponential input-to-state stability of delayed Cohen-Grossberg neural networks with Markovian switching. By using the vector Lyapunov function and property of M-matrix, two generalized Halanay inequalities are established. By means of the generalized Halanay inequalities, sufficient conditions are also obtained, which can ensure the exponential input-to-state stability of delayed Cohen-Grossberg neural networks with Markovian switching. Two numerical examples are given to illustrate the efficiency of the derived results.

  10. Hypervelocity, minimum-radii, coordinated turns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tauber, Michael E.

    1990-01-01

    An analytic solution is presented for the most basic powered-flight maneuver, consisting of a constant-altitude coordinated turn and expressions for minimum-turn radii; associated flight conditions are derived. It is shown that the formulation for hypervelocity turns differs from that for subsonic and hypersonic speeds. Illustrative calculations using approximate aerodynamics based on Newtonian theory are presented, and these demonstrate the differences of hypersonic flight conditions and their associated turning radii from those at lower speeds.

  11. Study of muonic atoms in the A = 40 to 70 and A = 100 to 130 mass regions (nuclear charge radii, isotope and isotone shifts) and in the Sm-Gd and W-Os-Pt transition regions (electric monopole and quadrupole moments). Progress report No. 5, December 1, 1979-October 15, 1980. [Dept. of Physics, Purdue Univ. , 12/1/79-10/15/80

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, R M

    1980-10-01

    The muonic x-ray spectra of the stable Ru and Pd isotope have been measured, and the data have been analyzed in terms of the effective Barrett radii and in terms of isotope shifts. The effects of the neutron subshell closure on the ..delta..N = 2 isotopes shifts at N = 56 is much smaller in the Ru (Z = 44) isotopes as compared to the recently observed effect in the Mo (Z = 42) isotope shifts. This is the first time a pronounced difference in ..delta..N = 2 isotope shifts has been observed for different values of Z. The muonic x-ray measurements on 24 stable isotopes of Cd, Sn, Te, and Ba have been completed and the analysis of the 74 spectra (including calibration spectra) is progressing. The work on the quadrupole parameters of the even-A Os nuclei has been completed. The analysis of the muonic x-ray spectra of the even-A Gd isotopes is near completion. Monopole and quadrupole charge parameters of the 0/sub g//sup +/ and 2/sub g//sup +/ states (and in the case of /sup 160/Gd, of the 3/sup -/ state) have been determined. The model dependence of extracting point-quadrupole matrix elements from muonic x-ray measurements has been carefully investigated. It was found that neither the ..beta..-vibration nor the ..gamma..-vibration modes influence the value of the extracted point moments by more than 2 percent. The problem of nuclear polarization corrections was examined.

  12. Comment on "Relative variance of the mean squared pressure in multimode media: rehabilitating former approaches" [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 136, 2621-2629 (2014)].

    PubMed

    Davy, John L; Weaver, Richard L

    2015-03-01

    Models for the statistics of responses in finite reverberant structures, and in particular, for the variance of the mean square pressure in reverberation rooms, have been studied for decades. It is therefore surprising that a recent communication has claimed that the literature has gotten the simplest of such calculations very wrong. Monsef, Cozza, Rodrigues, Cellard, and Durocher [(2014). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 136, 2621-2629] have derived a modal-based expression for the relative variance that differs significantly from expressions that have been accepted since 1969. This Comment points out that the Monsef formula is clearly incorrect, and then for the interested reader, points out the subtle place where they made their mistake.

  13. Derivation of formulas for root-mean-square errors in location, orientation, and shape in triangulation solution of an elongated object in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, S. A. T.

    1974-01-01

    Formulas are derived for the root-mean-square (rms) displacement, slope, and curvature errors in an azimuth-elevation image trace of an elongated object in space, as functions of the number and spacing of the input data points and the rms elevation error in the individual input data points from a single observation station. Also, formulas are derived for the total rms displacement, slope, and curvature error vectors in the triangulation solution of an elongated object in space due to the rms displacement, slope, and curvature errors, respectively, in the azimuth-elevation image traces from different observation stations. The total rms displacement, slope, and curvature error vectors provide useful measure numbers for determining the relative merits of two or more different triangulation procedures applicable to elongated objects in space.

  14. Dislocation core radii near elastic stability limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, C. A.; Morris, J. W., Jr.; Chrzan, D. C.

    2013-04-01

    Recent studies of transition metal alloys with compositions that place them near their limits of elastic stability [e.g., near the body-centered-cubic (BCC) to hexagonal-close-packed (HCP) transition] suggest interesting behavior for the dislocation cores. Specifically, the dislocation core size is predicted to diverge as the stability limit is approached. Here a simple analysis rooted in elasticity theory and the computation of ideal strength is used to analyze this divergence. This analysis indicates that dislocation core radii should diverge as the elastic limits of stability are approached in the BCC, HCP, and face-centered-cubic (FCC) structures. Moreover, external stresses and dislocation-induced stresses also increase the core radii. Density functional theory based total-energy calculations are combined with anisotropic elasticity theory to compute numerical estimates of dislocation core radii.

  15. Study of the charge radii of the stable lead isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Borchert, G.L.; Schult, O.W.B.; Speth, J.; Hansen, P.G.; Jonson, B.; Ravn, H.; McGrory, J.B.

    1982-01-01

    Isotope shifts have been measured of the K/sub ..cap alpha..l/ x-ray lines emitted after photo ionization of /sup 204/Pb, /sup 206/Pb, /sup 207/Pb and /sup 208/Pb samples. The results are compared with theoretical values for delta < r/sup 2/> calculated with a microscopic model. The x-ray shift data are also compared with optical data and the nuclear parameters lambda derived from electron scattering results.

  16. Observable consequences of event-by-event fluctuations of HBT radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumberg, Christopher; Heinz, Ulrich

    2016-12-01

    We explore the effects of event-by-event fluctuations of Hanbury Brown-Twiss (HBT) radii and show how they can be observed experimentally. The relation of measured HBT radii extracted from ensemble-averaged correlation functions to the mean of their event-by-event probability distribution is clarified. We propose a method to experimentally determine the mean and variance of this distribution and test it on an ensemble of fluctuating events generated with the viscous hydrodynamic code VISH2+1. Using the same code, the sensitivity of the mean and variance of the HBT radii to the specific QGP shear viscosity η / s is studied. We report sensitivity of the mean pion HBT radii and their variances to the temperature dependence of η / s near the quark-hadron transition at a level similar (10-20%) to that which was previously observed for elliptic and quadrangular flow of charged hadrons [1].

  17. Hot Jupiter Radii: A Turbulent History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youdin, Andrew N.; Komacek, Thaddeus D.

    2014-11-01

    Many hot Jupiters, i.e. giant exoplanets with short orbital periods, are bloated, with radii that greatly exceed those of colder gas giants. In models that neglect atmospheric motion, the enhanced irradiation of hot Jupiters is insufficient to explain their large radii. However uneven surface irradiation drives atmospheric circulation. These atmospheric motions deposit heat at deeper layers than irradiation alone, and can explain their large radii. The specific dissipation mechanism for atmospheric circulation can involve a turbulent cascade and/or the driving of electric currents that undergo Ohmic dissipation. The “Mechanical Greenhouse” model (Youdin & Mitchell, 2010) showed that turbulence in hot Jupiter atmospheres does mechanical work against the stable stratification of upper radiative zones, thereby driving a heat flux deeper into the interior. This poster will describe the first efforts to include this turbulent heat flux in planetary structure models. The goal is to understand the effects of turbulent mixing on hot Jupiter radius evolution. To perform these calculations we modify the publicly available stellar structure code MESA. We show how the effects of turbulence can be included in MESA — and understood physically — as an effective dissipation profile. We compare the radius evolution of hot Jupiters for different dissipation prescriptions, including our turbulent mixing model and others from the literature. We find that turbulent mixing is an energetically efficient way to explain the bloated radii of hot Jupiters.

  18. Autocorrelation standard deviation and root mean square frequency analysis of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell to monitor for hydrogen and air undersupply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joo Gon; Mukherjee, Santanu; Bates, Alex; Zickel, Benjamin; Park, Sam; Son, Byung Rak; Choi, Jae Sung; Kwon, Osung; Lee, Dong Ha; Chung, Hyun-Youl

    2015-12-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells are a promising energy conversion device which can help to solve urgent environmental and economic problems. Among the various types of fuel cells, the air breathing proton exchange membrane fuel cell, which minimizes the balance of plant, has drawn a lot of attention due to its superior energy density. In this study a compact, air breathing, proton exchange membrane fuel cell based on Nafion and a Pt/C membrane electrode assembly was designed. The fuel cell was tested using a Scribner Associates 850e fuel cell test station. Specifically, the hydrogen fuel and oxygen starvation of the fuel cell were accurately and systematically tested and analyzed using a frequency analysis method which can analyze the input and output frequency. The analysis of the frequency variation under a fuel starvation condition was done using RMSF (root mean square frequency) and ACSD (autocorrelation standard deviation). The study reveals two significant results: first, the fuel starvations show entirely different phenomenon in both RMSF and ACSD and second, the results of the Autocorrelation show clearer results for fuel starvation detection than the results with RMSF.

  19. Evolution of few-cycle pulses in nonlinear dispersive media: Velocity of the center of mass and root-mean-square duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapoyko, Yury A.; Drozdov, Arkadiy A.; Kozlov, Sergei A.; Zhang, Xi-Cheng

    2016-09-01

    Simple arithmetic dependencies of the velocity of the mass center motion and the root-mean-square duration of initially single-cycle, two-cycle, and Gaussian pulses with a random number of oscillations under the pulse envelope are derived depending on their center frequency, initial duration, and peak field amplitude, as well as on dispersive and nonlinear characteristics of homogeneous isotropic dielectric media. In media with normal group dispersion, it is shown that due to nonresonant dispersion the square of the few-cycle pulse duration increases with distance inversely proportional to the fourth power of the number of input pulse cycles. In media with normal group dispersion, the square of the pulse duration is inversely proportional to the number of input pulse cycles due to cubic nonlinearity. In media with anomalous group dispersion, it is shown that due to cubic nonlinearity, few-cycle pulse self-compression decreases with the reduction of the number of cycles in the initial pulse. This pulse self-compression effect has a threshold nature and terminates at a fixed number of cycles of the input pulse. Such a number of cycles is determined by the input intensity and the central frequency of the pulse, as well as by the dispersive and nonlinear characteristics of the medium.

  20. 1.5% root-mean-square flat-intensity laser beam formed using a binary-amplitude spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jinyang; Kohn, Rudolph N; Becker, Michael F; Heinzen, Daniel J

    2009-04-01

    We demonstrate a digital micromirror device (DMD)-based optical system that converts a spatially noisy quasi-Gaussian to an eighth-order super-Lorentzian flat-top beam. We use an error-diffusion algorithm to design the binary pattern for the Texas Instruments DLP device. Following the DMD, a telescope with a pinhole low-pass filters the beam and scales it to the desired sized image. Experimental measurements show a 1% root-mean-square (RMS) flatness over a diameter of 0.28 mm in the center of the flat-top beam and better than 1.5% RMS flatness over its entire 1.43 mm diameter. The power conversion efficiency is 37%. We develop an alignment technique to ensure that the DMD pattern is correctly positioned on the incident beam. An interferometric measurement of the DMD surface flatness shows that phase uniformity is maintained in the output beam. Our approach is highly flexible and is able to produce not only flat-top beams with different parameters, but also any slowly varying target beam shape. It can be used to generate the homogeneous optical lattice required for Bose-Einstein condensate cold atom experiments.

  1. Proton radii of neutron-rich B isotopes and neutron surface thickness in 17B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanungo, Rituparna; Estrade, Alfredo; Horiuchi, Wataru

    2014-09-01

    As the neutron to proton asymmetry increases nuclei develop exotic structures such as neutron skin and halo. It is important to investigate how this asymmetry affects the proton distribution. The matter and proton radii have started unfolding a complete picture of the halo. For two-neutron halos the correlation between the halo neutrons and their distance from the core can be derived to define the average halo geometry. The proton radii are crucial information to extract the neutron skin thickness to constrain the equation of state of asymmetric nuclear matter. Very limited information is available on the proton radii of very neutron-rich nuclei. In this presentation, we will describe the new technique of extracting proton radii from charge changing cross sections using relativistic beams at GSI, Germany. The presentation will show first measurements of proton radii of the neutron-rich boron isotopes. The implications of the results in understanding the neutron surface thickness in the Borromean 17B and its possible halo structure will be discussed. As the neutron to proton asymmetry increases nuclei develop exotic structures such as neutron skin and halo. It is important to investigate how this asymmetry affects the proton distribution. The matter and proton radii have started unfolding a complete picture of the halo. For two-neutron halos the correlation between the halo neutrons and their distance from the core can be derived to define the average halo geometry. The proton radii are crucial information to extract the neutron skin thickness to constrain the equation of state of asymmetric nuclear matter. Very limited information is available on the proton radii of very neutron-rich nuclei. In this presentation, we will describe the new technique of extracting proton radii from charge changing cross sections using relativistic beams at GSI, Germany. The presentation will show first measurements of proton radii of the neutron-rich boron isotopes. The implications

  2. Temperature variation of ultralow frequency modes and mean square displacements in solid lasamide (diuretic drug) studied by 35Cl-NQR, X-ray and DFT/QTAIM.

    PubMed

    Latosińska, Jolanta Natalia; Latosińska, Magdalena; Kasprzak, Jerzy; Tomczak, Magdalena; Maurin, Jan Krzysztof

    2012-10-25

    The application of combined (35)Cl-NQR/X-ray/DFT/QTAIM methods to study the temperature variation of anisotropic displacement parameters and ultralow frequency modes of anharmonic torsional vibrations in the solid state is illustrated on the example of 2,4-dichloro-5-sulfamolybenzoic acid (lasamide, DSBA) which is a diuretic and an intermediate in the synthesis of furosemide and thus its common impurity. The crystallographic structure of lasamide is solved by X-ray diffraction and refined to a final R-factor of 3.06% at room temperature. Lasamide is found to crystallize in the triclinic space group P-1, with two equivalent molecules in the unit cell a = 7.5984(3) Å, b = 8.3158(3) Å, c = 8.6892(3) Å; α = 81.212(3)°, β = 73.799(3)°, γ = 67.599(3)°. Its molecules form symmetric dimers linked by two short and linear intermolecular hydrogen bonds O-H···O (O-H···O = 2.648 Å and ∠OHO = 171.5°), which are further linked by weaker and longer intermolecular hydrogen bonds N-H···O (N-H···O = 2.965 Å and ∠NHO = 166.4°). Two (35)Cl-NQR resonance frequencies, 36.899 and 37.129 MHz, revealed at room temperature are assigned to chlorine sites at the ortho and para positions, relative to the carboxyl functional group, respectively. The difference in C-Cl(1) and C-Cl(2) bond lengths only slightly affects the value of (35)Cl-NQR frequencies, which results mainly from chemical inequivalence of chlorine atoms but also involvement in different intermolecular interactions pattern. The smooth decrease in both (35)Cl-NQR frequencies with increasing temperature in the range of 77-300 K testifies to the averaging of EFG tensor at each chlorine site due to anharmonic torsional vibrations. Lasamide is thermally stable; no temperature-induced release of chlorine or decomposition of this compound is detected. The temperature dependence of ultralow frequency modes of anharmonic small-angle internal torsional vibrations averaging EFG tensor and mean square angle

  3. On the relationship between the Hurst exponent, the ratio of the mean square successive difference to the variance, and the number of turning points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarnopolski, Mariusz

    2016-11-01

    The long range dependence of the fractional Brownian motion (fBm), fractional Gaussian noise (fGn), and differentiated fGn (DfGn) is described by the Hurst exponent H. Considering the realizations of these three processes as time series, they might be described by their statistical features, such as half of the ratio of the mean square successive difference to the variance, A, and the number of turning points, T. This paper investigates the relationships between A and H, and between T and H. It is found numerically that the formulae A(H) = aebH in case of fBm, and A(H) = a + bHc for fGn and DfGn, describe well the A(H) relationship. When T(H) is considered, no simple formula is found, and it is empirically found that among polynomials, the fourth and second order description applies best. The most relevant finding is that when plotted in the space of (A , T) , the three process types form separate branches. Hence, it is examined whether A and T may serve as Hurst exponent indicators. Some real world data (stock market indices, sunspot numbers, chaotic time series) are analyzed for this purpose, and it is found that the H's estimated using the H(A) relations (expressed as inverted A(H) functions) are consistent with the H's extracted with the well known wavelet approach. This allows to efficiently estimate the Hurst exponent based on fast and easy to compute A and T, given that the process type: fBm, fGn or DfGn, is correctly classified beforehand. Finally, it is suggested that the A(H) relation for fGn and DfGn might be an exact (shifted) 3 / 2 power-law.

  4. Motion of chromosomal loci and the mean-squared displacement of a fractional Brownian motion in the presence of static and dynamic errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backlund, Mikael P.; Moerner, W. E.

    2015-03-01

    Mean-squared displacement (MSD) analysis is one of the most prevalent tools employed in the application of single-particle tracking to biological systems. In camera-based tracking, the effects of "static error" due to photon fluctuations and "dynamic error" due to motion blur on the MSD have been well-characterized for the case of pure Brownian motion, producing a known constant offset to the straight-line MSD. However, particles tracked in cellular environments often do not undergo pure Brownian motion, but instead can for instance exhibit anomalous diffusion wherein the MSD curve obeys a power law with respect to time, MSD=2D*τα, where D* is an effective diffusion coefficient and 0 < α <= 1. There are a number of models that can explain anomalous diffusive behavior in different subcellular contexts. Of these models, fractional Brownian motion (FBM) has been shown to accurately describe the motion of labeled particles such as mRNA and chromosomal loci as they traverse the cytoplasm or nucleoplasm (i.e. crowded viscoelastic environments). Despite the importance of FBM in biological tracking, there has yet to be a complete treatment of the MSD in the presence of static and dynamic errors analogous to the special case of pure Brownian motion. We here present a closed-form, analytical expression of the FBM MSD in the presence of both types of error. We have previously demonstrated its value in live-cell data by applying it to the study of chromosomal locus motion in budding yeast cells. Here we focus on validations in simulated data.

  5. Proton Distribution Radii of 12-19C Illuminate Features of Neutron Halos

    SciTech Connect

    Kanungo, R.; Horiuchi, W.; Hagen, Gaute; Jansen, Gustav R.; Navratil, Petr; Ameil, F.; Atkinson, J.; Ayyad, Y.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Dillmann, I.; Estradé, A.; Evdokimov, A.; Farinon, F.; Geissel, H.; Guastalla, G.; Janik, R.; Kimura, M.; Knöbel, R.; Kurcewicz, J.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Marta, M.; Mostazo, M.; Mukha, I.; Nociforo, C.; Ong, H. J.; Pietri, S.; Prochazka, A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Sitar, B.; Strmen, P.; Suzuki, Y.; Takechi, M.; Tanaka, J.; Tanihata, I.; Terashima, S.; Vargas, J.; Weick, H.; Winfield, J. S.

    2016-09-02

    We report proton radii of 12-19C densities derived from first accurate charge changing cross section measurements at 900A MeV with a carbon target. A thick neutron surface evolves from ~0.5 fm in 15C to ~1 fm in 19C. Also, the halo radius in 19C is found to be 6.4±0.7 fm as large as 11Li. Ab initio calculations based on chiral nucleon-nucleon and three-nucleon forces reproduce the radii well.

  6. Proton Distribution Radii of 12-19C Illuminate Features of Neutron Halos

    DOE PAGES

    Kanungo, R.; Horiuchi, W.; Hagen, Gaute; ...

    2016-09-02

    We report proton radii of 12-19C densities derived from first accurate charge changing cross section measurements at 900A MeV with a carbon target. A thick neutron surface evolves from ~0.5 fm in 15C to ~1 fm in 19C. Also, the halo radius in 19C is found to be 6.4±0.7 fm as large as 11Li. Ab initio calculations based on chiral nucleon-nucleon and three-nucleon forces reproduce the radii well.

  7. Proton Distribution Radii of ^{12-19}C Illuminate Features of Neutron Halos.

    PubMed

    Kanungo, R; Horiuchi, W; Hagen, G; Jansen, G R; Navratil, P; Ameil, F; Atkinson, J; Ayyad, Y; Cortina-Gil, D; Dillmann, I; Estradé, A; Evdokimov, A; Farinon, F; Geissel, H; Guastalla, G; Janik, R; Kimura, M; Knöbel, R; Kurcewicz, J; Litvinov, Yu A; Marta, M; Mostazo, M; Mukha, I; Nociforo, C; Ong, H J; Pietri, S; Prochazka, A; Scheidenberger, C; Sitar, B; Strmen, P; Suzuki, Y; Takechi, M; Tanaka, J; Tanihata, I; Terashima, S; Vargas, J; Weick, H; Winfield, J S

    2016-09-02

    Proton radii of ^{12-19}C densities derived from first accurate charge changing cross section measurements at 900A  MeV with a carbon target are reported. A thick neutron surface evolves from ∼0.5  fm in ^{15}C to ∼1  fm in ^{19}C. The halo radius in ^{19}C is found to be 6.4±0.7  fm as large as ^{11}Li. Ab initio calculations based on chiral nucleon-nucleon and three-nucleon forces reproduce the radii well.

  8. Change of caged dynamics at Tg in hydrated proteins: Trend of mean squared displacements after correcting for the methyl-group rotation contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngai, K. L.; Capaccioli, S.; Paciaroni, A.

    2013-06-01

    The question whether the dynamics of hydrated proteins changes with temperature on crossing the glass transition temperature like that found in conventional glassformers is an interesting one. Recently, we have shown that a change of temperature dependence of the mean square displacement (MSD) at Tg is present in proteins solvated with bioprotectants, such as sugars or glycerol with or without the addition of water, coexisting with the dynamic transition at a higher temperature Td. The dynamical change at Tg is similar to that in conventional glassformers at sufficiently short times and low enough temperatures, where molecules are mutually caged by the intermolecular potential. This is a general and fundamental property of glassformers which is always observed at or near Tg independent of the energy resolution of the spectrometer, and is also the basis of the dynamical change of solvated proteins at Tg. When proteins are solvated with bioprotectants they show higher Tg and Td than the proteins hydrated by water alone, due to the stabilizing action of excipients, thus the observation of the change of T-dependence of the MSD at Tg is unobstructed by the methyl-group rotation contribution at lower temperatures [S. Capaccioli, K. L. Ngai, S. Ancherbak, and A. Paciaroni, J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 1745 (2012)], 10.1021/jp2057892. On the other hand, in the case of proteins hydrated by water alone unambiguous evidence of the break at Tg is hard to find, because of their lower Tg and Td. Notwithstanding, in this paper, we provide evidence for the change at Tg of the T-dependence of proteins hydrated by pure water. This evidence turns out from (i) neutron scattering experimental investigations where the sample has been manipulated by either full or partial deuteration to suppress the methyl-group rotation contribution, and (ii) neutron scattering experimental investigations where the energy resolution is such that only motions with characteristic times shorter than 15 ps can be

  9. Novel algorithm and MATLAB-based program for automated power law analysis of single particle, time-dependent mean-square displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umansky, Moti; Weihs, Daphne

    2012-08-01

    In many physical and biophysical studies, single-particle tracking is utilized to reveal interactions, diffusion coefficients, active modes of driving motion, dynamic local structure, micromechanics, and microrheology. The basic analysis applied to those data is to determine the time-dependent mean-square displacement (MSD) of particle trajectories and perform time- and ensemble-averaging of similar motions. The motion of particles typically exhibits time-dependent power-law scaling, and only trajectories with qualitatively and quantitatively comparable MSD should be ensembled. Ensemble averaging trajectories that arise from different mechanisms, e.g., actively driven and diffusive, is incorrect and can result inaccurate correlations between structure, mechanics, and activity. We have developed an algorithm to automatically and accurately determine power-law scaling of experimentally measured single-particle MSD. Trajectories can then categorized and grouped according to user defined cutoffs of time, amplitudes, scaling exponent values, or combinations. Power-law fits are then provided for each trajectory alongside categorized groups of trajectories, histograms of power laws, and the ensemble-averaged MSD of each group. The codes are designed to be easily incorporated into existing user codes. We expect that this algorithm and program will be invaluable to anyone performing single-particle tracking, be it in physical or biophysical systems. Catalogue identifier: AEMD_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMD_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 25 892 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 5 572 780 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: MATLAB (MathWorks Inc.) version 7.11 (2010b) or higher, program

  10. Reexamination of proton rms radii from low-q power expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sick, Ingo; Trautmann, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    Several recent publications claim that the proton charge rms radius resulting from the analysis of electron-scattering data restricted to low-momentum transfer agrees with the radius determined from muonic hydrogen, in contrast to the radius resulting from analyses of the full (e ,e ) data set which is 0.04 fm larger. Here we show why these publications erroneously arrive at the low radii.

  11. Radii of the bound states in 16N from the asymptotic normalization coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, E. T.; Guo, B.; Li, Z. H.; Wang, Y. B.; Li, Y. J.; Wu, Z. D.; Su, J.; Pang, D. Y.; Bai, X. X.; Du, X. C.; Fan, Q. W.; Gan, L.; Han, Z. Y.; Hao, X.; Hu, S. P.; He, J. J.; Jing, L.; Jin, S. J.; Li, L.; Li, X. Y.; Li, Z. C.; Lian, G.; Liu, J. C.; Luo, Q.; Qiao, L. H.; Shen, Y. P.; Sun, H. B.; Yan, S. Q.; Yu, X. Q.; Zeng, S.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, L. Y.; Zhang, W. J.; Zhou, Y.; Liu, W. P.

    2016-11-01

    The asymptotic normalization coefficients (ANCs) of the virtual decay 16N → 15N + n are extracted from the 15N(7Li, 6Li)16N reaction populating the ground and first three excited states in 16N. The root-mean-square (rms) radii of the valence neutron in these four low-lying 16N states are then derived by using the ANCs. The probabilities of the valence neutron staying out of the core potentials are found to be 31% ± 8%, 58% ± 12%, 32% ± 8%, and 60% ± 12%. The present results support the conclusion that a one-neutron halo may be formed in the 16N first and third excited states, while the ground and second excited states do not have a one-neutron halo structure. However, the core excitation effect has a strong influence on the one-neutron halo structure of the ground and first excited states in 16N. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11505117, 11490560, 11475264, 11321064, 11375269), Natural Science Foundation of Guangdong Province (2015A030310012), 973 program of China (2013CB834406) National key Research and Development Province (2016YFA0400502)

  12. THERMAL PROCESSES GOVERNING HOT-JUPITER RADII

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegel, David S.; Burrows, Adam E-mail: burrows@astro.princeton.edu

    2013-07-20

    There have been many proposed explanations for the larger-than-expected radii of some transiting hot Jupiters, including either stellar or orbital energy deposition deep in the atmosphere or deep in the interior. In this paper, we explore the important influences on hot-Jupiter radius evolution of (1) additional heat sources in the high atmosphere, the deep atmosphere, and deep in the convective interior; (2) consistent cooling of the deep interior through the planetary dayside, nightside, and poles; (3) the degree of heat redistribution to the nightside; and (4) the presence of an upper atmosphere absorber inferred to produce anomalously hot upper atmospheres and inversions in some close-in giant planets. In particular, we compare the radius expansion effects of atmospheric and deep-interior heating at the same power levels and derive the power required to achieve a given radius increase when night-side cooling is incorporated. We find that models that include consistent day/night cooling are more similar to isotropically irradiated models when there is more heat redistributed from the dayside to the nightside. In addition, we consider the efficacy of ohmic heating in the atmosphere and/or convective interior in inflating hot Jupiters. Among our conclusions are that (1) the most highly irradiated planets cannot stably have uB {approx}> 10 km s{sup -1} G over a large fraction of their daysides, where u is the zonal wind speed and B is the dipolar magnetic field strength in the atmosphere, and (2) that ohmic heating cannot in and of itself lead to a runaway in planet radius.

  13. Systematics of binding energies and radii based on realistic two-nucleon plus phenomenological three-nucleon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, A.; Roth, R.; Reinhardt, S.; Hergert, H.

    2010-08-15

    We investigate the influence of phenomenological three-nucleon interactions on the systematics of ground-state energies and charge radii throughout the whole nuclear mass range from {sup 4}He to {sup 208}Pb. The three-nucleon interactions supplement unitarily transformed two-body interactions constructed within the unitary correlation operator method or the similarity renormalization group approach. To be able to address heavy nuclei as well, we treat the many-body problem in Hartree-Fock plus many-body perturbation theory, which is sufficient to assess the systematics of energies and radii, and limit ourselves to regularized three-body contact interactions. We show that even with such a simplistic three-nucleon interaction a simultaneous reproduction of the experimental ground-state energies and charge radii can be achieved, which is not possible with unitarily transformed two-body interactions alone.

  14. Total Galaxy Magnitudes and Effective Radii from Petrosian Magnitudes and Radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Alister W.; Driver, Simon P.; Petrosian, Vahé; Conselice, Christopher J.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Crawford, Steven M.; Goto, Tomotsugu

    2005-10-01

    Petrosian magnitudes were designed to help with the difficult task of determining a galaxy's total light. Although these magnitudes [taken here as the flux within 2RP, with the inverted Petrosian index 1/η(RP)=0.2] can represent most of an object's flux, they do of course miss the light outside the Petrosian aperture (2RP). The size of this flux deficit varies monotonically with the shape of a galaxy's light profile, i.e., its concentration. In the case of a de Vaucouleurs R1/4 profile, the deficit is 0.20 mag; for an R1/8 profile this figure rises to 0.50 mag. Here we provide a simple method for recovering total (Sérsic) magnitudes from Petrosian magnitudes using only the galaxy concentration (R90/R50 or R80/R20) within the Petrosian aperture. The corrections hold to the extent that Sérsic's model provides a good description of a galaxy's luminosity profile. We show how the concentration can also be used to convert Petrosian radii into effective half-light radii, enabling a robust measure of the mean effective surface brightness. Our technique is applied to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 2 (SDSS DR2) Petrosian parameters, yielding good agreement with the total magnitudes, effective radii, and mean effective surface brightnesses obtained from the New York University Value-Added Galaxy Catalog Sérsic R1/n fits by Blanton and coworkers. Although the corrective procedure described here is specifically applicable to the SDSS DR2 and DR3, it is generally applicable to all imaging data where any Petrosian index and concentration can be constructed.

  15. Atomic and Ionic Radii of Elements 1-96.

    PubMed

    Rahm, Martin; Hoffmann, Roald; Ashcroft, N W

    2016-10-04

    Atomic and cationic radii have been calculated for the first 96 elements, together with selected anionic radii. The metric adopted is the average distance from the nucleus where the electron density falls to 0.001 electrons per bohr(3) , following earlier work by Boyd. Our radii are derived using relativistic all-electron density functional theory calculations, close to the basis set limit. They offer a systematic quantitative measure of the sizes of non-interacting atoms, commonly invoked in the rationalization of chemical bonding, structure, and different properties. Remarkably, the atomic radii as defined in this way correlate well with van der Waals radii derived from crystal structures. A rationalization for trends and exceptions in those correlations is provided.

  16. Lightning energetics: Estimates of energy dissipation in channels, channel radii, and channel-heating risetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Borovsky, J.E.

    1998-05-01

    In this report, several lightning-channel parameters are calculated with the aid of an electrodynamic model of lightning. The electrodynamic model describes dart leaders and return strokes as electromagnetic waves that are guided along conducting lightning channels. According to the model, electrostatic energy is delivered to the channel by a leader, where it is stored around the outside of the channel; subsequently, the return stroke dissipates this locally stored energy. In this report this lightning-energy-flow scenario is developed further. Then the energy dissipated per unit length in lightning channels is calculated, where this quantity is now related to the linear charge density on the channel, not to the cloud-to-ground electrostatic potential difference. Energy conservation is then used to calculate the radii of lightning channels: their initial radii at the onset of return strokes and their final radii after the channels have pressure expanded. Finally, the risetimes for channel heating during return strokes are calculated by defining an energy-storage radius around the channel and by estimating the radial velocity of energy flow toward the channel during a return stroke. In three appendices, values for the linear charge densities on lightning channels are calculated, estimates of the total length of branch channels are obtained, and values for the cloud-to-ground electrostatic potential difference are estimated. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

  17. Hall Determination of Atomic Radii of Alkali Metals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houari, Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    I will propose here an alternative method for determining atomic radii of alkali metals based on the Hall measurements of their free electron densities and the knowledge of their crystal structure. (Contains 2 figures.)

  18. Consistent van der Waals radii for the whole main group.

    PubMed

    Mantina, Manjeera; Chamberlin, Adam C; Valero, Rosendo; Cramer, Christopher J; Truhlar, Donald G

    2009-05-14

    Atomic radii are not precisely defined but are nevertheless widely used parameters in modeling and understanding molecular structure and interactions. The van der Waals radii determined by Bondi from molecular crystals and data for gases are the most widely used values, but Bondi recommended radius values for only 28 of the 44 main-group elements in the periodic table. In the present Article, we present atomic radii for the other 16; these new radii were determined in a way designed to be compatible with Bondi's scale. The method chosen is a set of two-parameter correlations of Bondi's radii with repulsive-wall distances calculated by relativistic coupled-cluster electronic structure calculations. The newly determined radii (in A) are Be, 1.53; B, 1.92; Al, 1.84; Ca, 2.31; Ge, 2.11; Rb, 3.03; Sr, 2.49; Sb, 2.06; Cs, 3.43; Ba, 2.68; Bi, 2.07; Po, 1.97; At, 2.02; Rn, 2.20; Fr, 3.48; and Ra, 2.83.

  19. On the Anomalous Radii of the Transiting Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laughlin, Gregory; Crismani, Matteo; Adams, Fred C.

    2011-03-01

    We present a systematic evaluation of the agreement between the observed radii of 90 well-characterized transiting extrasolar giant planets and their corresponding model radii. Our model radii are drawn from previously published calculations of coreless giant planets that have attained their asymptotic radii, and which have been tabulated for a range of planet masses and equilibrium temperatures. (We report a two-dimensional polynomial fitting function that accurately represents the models.) As expected, the model radii provide a statistically significant improvement over a null hypothesis that the sizes of giant planets are completely independent of mass and effective temperature. As is well known, however, fiducial models provide an insufficient explanation; the planetary radius anomalies, R ≡ R_obs-R_pred, are strongly correlated with planetary equilibrium temperature. We find that the radius anomalies have a best-fit dependence, R∝ T_eff^{α}, with α = 1.4 ± 0.6. Incorporating this relation into the model radii leads to substantially less scatter in the radius correlation. The extra temperature dependence represents an important constraint on theoretical models for hot Jupiters. Using simple scaling arguments, we find support for the hypothesis of Batygin & Stevenson that this correlation can be attributed to a planetary heating mechanism that is mediated by magnetohydrodynamic coupling between the planetary magnetic field and near-surface flow that is accompanied by ohmic dissipation at adiabatic depth. Additionally, we find that the temperature dependence is likely too strong to admit kinetic heating as the primary source of anomalous energy generation within the majority of the observed transiting planets.

  20. ON THE ANOMALOUS RADII OF THE TRANSITING EXTRASOLAR PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Laughlin, Gregory; Crismani, Matteo

    2011-03-01

    We present a systematic evaluation of the agreement between the observed radii of 90 well-characterized transiting extrasolar giant planets and their corresponding model radii. Our model radii are drawn from previously published calculations of coreless giant planets that have attained their asymptotic radii, and which have been tabulated for a range of planet masses and equilibrium temperatures. (We report a two-dimensional polynomial fitting function that accurately represents the models.) As expected, the model radii provide a statistically significant improvement over a null hypothesis that the sizes of giant planets are completely independent of mass and effective temperature. As is well known, however, fiducial models provide an insufficient explanation; the planetary radius anomalies, R{identical_to}R{sub obs}-R{sub pred}, are strongly correlated with planetary equilibrium temperature. We find that the radius anomalies have a best-fit dependence, R{proportional_to}T{sub eff}{sup {alpha}}, with {alpha} = 1.4 {+-} 0.6. Incorporating this relation into the model radii leads to substantially less scatter in the radius correlation. The extra temperature dependence represents an important constraint on theoretical models for hot Jupiters. Using simple scaling arguments, we find support for the hypothesis of Batygin and Stevenson that this correlation can be attributed to a planetary heating mechanism that is mediated by magnetohydrodynamic coupling between the planetary magnetic field and near-surface flow that is accompanied by ohmic dissipation at adiabatic depth. Additionally, we find that the temperature dependence is likely too strong to admit kinetic heating as the primary source of anomalous energy generation within the majority of the observed transiting planets.

  1. A differential equation for the Generalized Born radii.

    PubMed

    Fogolari, Federico; Corazza, Alessandra; Esposito, Gennaro

    2013-06-28

    The Generalized Born (GB) model offers a convenient way of representing electrostatics in complex macromolecules like proteins or nucleic acids. The computation of atomic GB radii is currently performed by different non-local approaches involving volume or surface integrals. Here we obtain a non-linear second-order partial differential equation for the Generalized Born radius, which may be solved using local iterative algorithms. The equation is derived under the assumption that the usual GB approximation to the reaction field obeys Laplace's equation. The equation admits as particular solutions the correct GB radii for the sphere and the plane. The tests performed on a set of 55 different proteins show an overall agreement with other reference GB models and "perfect" Poisson-Boltzmann based values.

  2. The radii of SU Cas and TU Cas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niva, G. D.; Schmidt, E. G.

    1980-01-01

    It is possible to obtain the masses of Cepheid variables by several methods involving the pulsation theory. However, these masses are frequently smaller than those indicated by the theory of stellar evolution. The cause of this discrepancy is not fully understood. Since the pulsation theory indicates that there is a relation among the mass, the radius and the period, the discrepancy also manifests itself in the radii of these stars. With this in mind, radius determinations for two Cepheids, SU Cas and TU Cas, were undertaken. It is concluded that because of the agreement between the present radius and the beat radius of TU Cas, the pulsation theory is giving correct information about the radii of beat Cepheids. This implies that the luminosities of short period Cepheids have been overestimated. Thus, the solution to the mass discrepancy should perhaps be sought in the theory of stellar evolution or in the possibility of mass loss.

  3. Estimates of the radii, masses, and luminosities of LAMOST stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sichevskij, S. G.

    2017-01-01

    Based on the spectral observations of the LAMOST (DR2) survey, the radii, masses, and luminosities of 700 481 stars were estimated. These stars belong to spectral types A, F, G, and K, and have metallicities between -0.845 and 0.0. To determine the properties of the stars, we used up-to-date models of the stellar interior structure, computed with account for the stellar evolution rate and the initial mass function. The use of evolutionary estimates for two types of stars—with and without rotation—allowed us to account for the uncertainty associated with the lack of data on the rotation velocity of the stars under consideration. The obtained stellar radii, together with the photometric estimates of interstellar extinction and angular diameters can be used to study the dependence of interstellar extinction on distance as well as to estimate the stellar distances.

  4. Accurate nuclear radii and binding energies from a chiral interaction

    DOE PAGES

    Ekstrom, Jan A.; Jansen, G. R.; Wendt, Kyle A.; ...

    2015-05-01

    With the goal of developing predictive ab initio capability for light and medium-mass nuclei, two-nucleon and three-nucleon forces from chiral effective field theory are optimized simultaneously to low-energy nucleon-nucleon scattering data, as well as binding energies and radii of few-nucleon systems and selected isotopes of carbon and oxygen. Coupled-cluster calculations based on this interaction, named NNLOsat, yield accurate binding energies and radii of nuclei up to 40Ca, and are consistent with the empirical saturation point of symmetric nuclear matter. In addition, the low-lying collective Jπ=3- states in 16O and 40Ca are described accurately, while spectra for selected p- and sd-shellmore » nuclei are in reasonable agreement with experiment.« less

  5. Accurate nuclear radii and binding energies from a chiral interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ekstrom, Jan A.; Jansen, G. R.; Wendt, Kyle A.; Hagen, Gaute; Papenbrock, Thomas F.; Carlsson, Boris; Forssen, Christian; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Navratil, Petr; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2015-05-01

    With the goal of developing predictive ab initio capability for light and medium-mass nuclei, two-nucleon and three-nucleon forces from chiral effective field theory are optimized simultaneously to low-energy nucleon-nucleon scattering data, as well as binding energies and radii of few-nucleon systems and selected isotopes of carbon and oxygen. Coupled-cluster calculations based on this interaction, named NNLOsat, yield accurate binding energies and radii of nuclei up to 40Ca, and are consistent with the empirical saturation point of symmetric nuclear matter. In addition, the low-lying collective Jπ=3- states in 16O and 40Ca are described accurately, while spectra for selected p- and sd-shell nuclei are in reasonable agreement with experiment.

  6. Centrality dependence of pion freeze-out radii in Pb-Pb collisions at √{sN N}=2.76 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahn, S. U.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaraz, J. R. M.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Audurier, B.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Barth, K.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biswas, R.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blair, J. T.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Butt, J. B.; Buxton, J. T.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carnesecchi, F.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Cerkala, J.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Chunhui, Z.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; de, S.; de Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; de Falco, A.; de Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; de Pasquale, S.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; di Bari, D.; di Mauro, A.; di Nezza, P.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Drozhzhova, T.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdemir, I.; Erhardt, F.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Feuillard, V. J. G.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fiore, E. M.; Fleck, M. G.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goméz Coral, D. M.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Graham, K. L.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hilden, T. E.; Hillemanns, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Hosokawa, R.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Izucheev, V.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jadlovska, S.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karayan, L.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.; Keil, M.; Khan, K. H.; Khan, M. M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, C.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Kondratyuk, E.; Konevskikh, A.; Kopcik, M.; Kour, M.; Kouzinopoulos, C.; Kovalenko, O.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kubera, A. M.; Kučera, V.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, J.; Kumar, L.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; Laudi, E.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, G. R.; Lee, S.; Legrand, I.; Lehas, F.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; León Monzón, I.; Leoncino, M.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loginov, V.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lowe, A.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Luz, P. H. F. N. D.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahajan, S.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Margutti, J.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martin, N. A.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martinez Pedreira, M.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Masui, H.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; McDonald, D.; Meddi, F.; Melikyan, Y.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mieskolainen, M. M.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Minervini, L. M.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Moreira de Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Mulligan, J. D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Naru, M. U.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nellen, L.; Ng, F.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Noris, J. C. C.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Ohlson, A.; Okatan, A.; Okubo, T.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira da Silva, A. C.; Oliver, M. H.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Orava, R.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, J.; Pandey, A. K.; Pant, D.; Papcun, P.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Paticchio, V.; Patra, R. N.; Paul, B.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira da Costa, H.; Pereira de Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Perez Lezama, E.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Poonsawat, W.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, J.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reidt, F.; Ren, X.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Ristea, C.; Rivetti, A.; Rocco, E.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, P.; Sahoo, R.; Sahoo, S.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Saleh, M. A.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sekihata, D.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Seo, J.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabanov, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shadura, O.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, N.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Sielewicz, K. M.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Snellman, T. W.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Song, Z.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Spacek, M.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szabo, A.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tambave, G. J.; Tanaka, N.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tarantola Peloni, A.; Tarhini, M.; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Teyssier, B.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trogolo, S.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Utrobicic, A.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; van der Maarel, J.; van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vanat, T.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Varga, D.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vauthier, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veen, A. M.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, Y.; Weber, M.; Weber, S. G.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yano, S.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yurchenko, V.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaborowska, A.; Zaccolo, V.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zanoli, H. J. C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zardoshti, N.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zyzak, M.; Alice Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    We report on the measurement of freeze-out radii for pairs of identical-charge pions measured in Pb-Pb collisions at √{sNN}=2.76 TeV as a function of collision centrality and the average transverse momentum of the pair kT. Three-dimensional sizes of the system (femtoscopic radii), as well as direction-averaged one-dimensional radii are extracted. The radii decrease with kT, following a power-law behavior. This is qualitatively consistent with expectations from a collectively expanding system, produced in hydrodynamic calculations. The radii also scale linearly with 1 /3. This behavior is compared to world data on femtoscopic radii in heavy-ion collisions. While the dependence is qualitatively similar to results at smaller √{sNN}, a decrease in the ratio Rout/Rside is seen, which is in qualitative agreement with a specific prediction from hydrodynamic models: a change from inside-out to outside-in freeze-out configuration. The results provide further evidence for the production of a collective, strongly coupled system in heavy-ion collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  7. Impact of surface imperfections on the Casimir force for lenses of centimeter-size curvature radii

    SciTech Connect

    Bezerra, V. B.; Romero, C.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mohideen, U.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2011-02-15

    The impact of imperfections, which are always present on surfaces of lenses with centimeter-size curvature radii, on the Casimir force in the lens-plate geometry is investigated. It is shown that the commonly used formulation of the proximity force approximation is inapplicable for spherical lenses with surface imperfections, such as bubbles and pits. More general expressions for the Casimir force are derived that take surface imperfections into account. Using these expressions, we show that surface imperfections can both increase and decrease the magnitude of the Casimir force up to a few tens percent when compared with the case of a perfectly spherical lens. We demonstrate that the Casimir force between a perfectly spherical lens and a plate described by the Drude model can be made approximately equal to the force between a sphere with some surface imperfection and a plate described by the plasma model, and vice versa. In the case of a metallic sphere and a semiconductor plate, approximately the same Casimir forces are obtained for four different descriptions of charge carriers in the semiconductor if appropriate surface imperfections on the lens surface are present. The conclusion is made that there is a fundamental problem in the interpretation of measurement data for the Casimir force using spherical lenses of centimeter-size radii.

  8. A novel instrumentation of study cavitation maximum radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Rui; Xu, Rong-qing; Chen, Xiao; Shen, Zhonghua; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiaowu

    2005-02-01

    Based on the optical beam deflection (OBD) technique, a fiber-optic diagnostic technique is applied to investigate the pulsation of a laser-induced cavitation bubble on the vicinity of an aluminum target in water. The sequence waveforms induced by the bubble pulsation is presented and analyzed in detail. The maximum radii corresponding to each pulsation are determined. Furthermore, by varying the acting laser energy, the variation of the maximum bubble radius and bubble energy with respect to acting laser energy is obtained. The theoretical and experimental results are in good agreement within a relative error.

  9. Matter radii of {sup 32-35}Mg

    SciTech Connect

    Kanungo, R.; Perro, C.; Prochazka, A.; Farinon, F.; Knoebel, R.; Horiuchi, W.; Nociforo, C.; Aumann, T.; Geissel, H.; Gerl, J.; Kindler, B.; Lommel, B.; Mahata, K.; Scheidenberger, C.; Weick, H.; Winkler, M.; Boutin, D.; Lenske, H.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Davids, B.

    2011-02-15

    The interaction cross sections of {sup 32-35}Mg at 900A MeV have been measured using the fragment separator at GSI. The deviation from the r{sub 0}A{sup 1/3} trend is slightly larger for {sup 35}Mg, signaling the possible formation of a longer tail in the neutron distribution for {sup 35}Mg. The radii extracted from a Glauber model analysis with Fermi densities are consistent with models predicting the development of neutron skins.

  10. Correlating hydrodynamic radii with that of two-dimensional nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Yuan; Kan, Yuwei; Clearfield, Abraham; Choi, Hyunho; Liang, Hong

    2015-12-21

    Dynamic light scattering (DLS) is one of the most adapted methods to measure the size of nanoparticles, as referred to the hydrodynamic radii (R{sub h}). However, the R{sub h} represents only that of three-dimensional spherical nanoparticles. In the present research, the size of two-dimensional (2D) nanoparticles of yttrium oxide (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and zirconium phosphate (ZrP) was evaluated through comparing their hydrodynamic diameters via DLS with lateral sizes obtained using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. We demonstrate that the hydrodynamic radii are correlated with the lateral sizes of both square and circle shaped 2D nanoparticles. Two proportional coefficients, i.e., correcting factors, are proposed for the Brownian motion status of 2D nanoparticles. The correction is possible by simplifying the calculation of integrals in the case of small thickness approximation. The correcting factor has great significance for investigating the translational diffusion behavior of 2D nanoparticles in a liquid and in effective and low-cost measurement in terms of size and morphology of shape-specific nanoparticles.

  11. Masses, Radii, and the Equation of State of Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özel, Feryal; Freire, Paulo

    2016-09-01

    We summarize our current knowledge of neutron-star masses and radii. Recent instrumentation and computational advances have resulted in a rapid increase in the discovery rate and precise timing of radio pulsars in binaries in the past few years, leading to a large number of mass measurements. These discoveries show that the neutron-star mass distribution is much wider than previously thought, with three known pulsars now firmly in the 1.9-2.0-M⊙ mass range. For radii, large, high-quality data sets from X-ray satellites as well as significant progress in theoretical modeling led to considerable progress in the measurements, placing them in the 10-11.5-km range and shrinking their uncertainties, owing to a better understanding of the sources of systematic errors. The combination of the massive-neutron-star discoveries, the tighter radius measurements, and improved laboratory constraints of the properties of dense matter has already made a substantial impact on our understanding of the composition and bulk properties of cold nuclear matter at densities higher than that of the atomic nucleus, a major unsolved problem in modern physics.

  12. Correlating hydrodynamic radii with that of two-dimensional nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Yuan; Kan, Yuwei; Choi, Hyunho; Clearfield, Abraham; Liang, Hong

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic light scattering (DLS) is one of the most adapted methods to measure the size of nanoparticles, as referred to the hydrodynamic radii (Rh). However, the Rh represents only that of three-dimensional spherical nanoparticles. In the present research, the size of two-dimensional (2D) nanoparticles of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) and zirconium phosphate (ZrP) was evaluated through comparing their hydrodynamic diameters via DLS with lateral sizes obtained using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. We demonstrate that the hydrodynamic radii are correlated with the lateral sizes of both square and circle shaped 2D nanoparticles. Two proportional coefficients, i.e., correcting factors, are proposed for the Brownian motion status of 2D nanoparticles. The correction is possible by simplifying the calculation of integrals in the case of small thickness approximation. The correcting factor has great significance for investigating the translational diffusion behavior of 2D nanoparticles in a liquid and in effective and low-cost measurement in terms of size and morphology of shape-specific nanoparticles.

  13. Automatic differentiation for Fourier series and the radii polynomial approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lessard, Jean-Philippe; Mireles James, J. D.; Ransford, Julian

    2016-11-01

    In this work we develop a computer-assisted technique for proving existence of periodic solutions of nonlinear differential equations with non-polynomial nonlinearities. We exploit ideas from the theory of automatic differentiation in order to formulate an augmented polynomial system. We compute a numerical Fourier expansion of the periodic orbit for the augmented system, and prove the existence of a true solution nearby using an a-posteriori validation scheme (the radii polynomial approach). The problems considered here are given in terms of locally analytic vector fields (i.e. the field is analytic in a neighborhood of the periodic orbit) hence the computer-assisted proofs are formulated in a Banach space of sequences satisfying a geometric decay condition. In order to illustrate the use and utility of these ideas we implement a number of computer-assisted existence proofs for periodic orbits of the Planar Circular Restricted Three-Body Problem (PCRTBP).

  14. Hypergravity effects on normal and avulsed developing avian radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negulesco, J. A.; Clark, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    Rhode Island red female chicks were subjected to complete closed fracture of the right radius at 2 weeks post-hatching. The animals were allowed to heal for 1 week at either earth-gravity or 2-G-hypergravity state with control and estrogen-injected groups. Intact and fractured radial length, weight, average epiphysial-diaphysial diameters, and length, width, and weight of healing fracture callus were measured. Daily 2000 IU estrogen administration for 7 d increased intact radial length. Estrogen augments the effects of the 2-G state by inhibiting growth and depleting the mass of both intact and fractured radii and by decreasing the average distal epiphysial diameter of fractured bones. Animals exposed to the hypergravity state without hormonal treatment showed decreased fractured radial length, weight, and smaller proximal epiphysial diameters. The measurable parameters of the fracture callus (width, length, and weight) were depressed by the hypergravity state regardless of whether the animal was untreated or supplemented with estrogen.

  15. Diversity of Debris Disks - Constraining the Disk Outer Radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieke, George; Smith, Paul; Su, Kate

    2008-03-01

    Existing Spitzer observations of debris disks show a wide range of diversity in disk morphologies and spectral energy distributions (SEDs). The majority of debris disks observed with Spitzer are not resolved, resulting in very few direct constraints on disk extent. In general, SEDs alone have little diagnostic power beyond some basic statistics. However, as demonstrated by some Spitzer observations of nearby systems (beta Leo and gamma Oph), the spectra of the excess emission in the IRS and MIPS-SED wavelength range can help to put tighter constraints on disk properties such as minimum/maximum grain sizes and inner/outer disk radii. The dust continuum slopes are very useful to differentiate between various disk structures and constrain the dust mass. We need to study sufficient numbers of disks to explore their characteristics systematically. Therefore, we propose to obtain MIPS-SED observations of 27 debris disks that already have IRS-LL spectra and MIPS 24 and 70 micron photometry.

  16. Masses and radii for thirteen chromospherically active ellipsoidal variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Douglas S.

    1990-01-01

    The amplitude of the ellipticity effect, the mass function, and the V sin i in ten long-period RS CVn SB1 binaries are used to compute limits on the masses of the two stars and the radius of the primary: zeta And, UV CrB, V1764 Cyg, V826 Her, V350 Lac, GX Lib, V1197 Ori, AP Psc, 33 Psc, and EE UMa. Explicit masses and radii are computed for three SB2 systems: BL CVn, V1817 Cyg, and TZ Tri. The primary in several is found to fill 95 percent or more of its Roche lobe. The two minima produced by the ellipticity effect are unequal in depth, with the effect largest when i is near 90 deg and the primary nearly fills its Roche lobe. The greatest inequality found, in UV CrB, was 0.08 mag.

  17. Cathode fall thickness of abnormal glow discharges between parallel-plane electrodes in different radii at low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yangyang; Luo, Haiyun; Zou, Xiaobing; Wang, Xinxin

    2015-02-15

    In order to investigate the influence of electrode radius on the characteristics of cathode fall thickness, experiments of low-pressure (20 Pa ≤ p ≤ 30 Pa) abnormal glow discharge were carried out between parallel-plane electrodes in different radii keeping gap distance unchanged. Axial distributions of light intensity were obtained from the discharge images captured using a Charge Coupled Device camera. The assumption that the position of the negative glow peak coincides with the edge of cathode fall layer was verified based on a two-dimensional model, and the cathode fall thicknesses, d{sub c}, were calculated from the axial distributions of light intensity. It was observed that the position of peak emission shifts closer to the cathode as current or pressure grows. The dependence of cathode fall thickness on the gas pressure and normalized current J/p{sup 2} was presented, and it was found that for discharges between electrodes in large radius the curves of pd{sub c} against J/p{sup 2} were superimposed on each other, however, this phenomenon will not hold for discharges between the smaller electrodes. The reason for this phenomenon is that the transverse diffusions of charged particles are not the same in two gaps between electrodes with different radii.

  18. Calculations of neutron and proton radii of cesium isotopes. Final report, April 23--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This task involved the calculation of neutron and proton radii of cesium isotopes. The author has written a computer code that calculates radii according to two models: Myers 1983 and FRDM 1992. Results of calculations in both these models for both cesium and francium isotopes are attached as figures. He is currently interpreting these results in collaboration with D. Vieira and J.R. Nix, and they expect to use the computer code for further studies of nuclear radii.

  19. Possible radii of compact stars: A relativistic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalam, Mehedi; Hossein, Sk Monowar; Molla, Sajahan

    2016-11-01

    The inner structure of compact stars is checked from theoretical as well as observational points of view. In this paper, we determine the possible radii of six compact stars: two binary millisecond pulsars, namely PSR J1614-2230 and PSR J1903+327, studied by [P. B. Demorest, T. Pennucci, S. M. Ransom, M. S. E. Roberts and W. T. Hessels, Nature 467, 1081 (2010)] and four X-ray binaries, namely Cen X-3, SMC X-1, Vela X-1 and Her X-1 studied by [M. L. Rawls et al., Astrophys. J. 730, 25 (2011)]. Interestingly, we see that density of the star does not vanishes at the boundary though it is maximum at the center which implies that these compact stars may be treated as strange stars rather than neutron stars. We propose a stiff equation of state (EoS) relating to pressure with matter density. We also obtain compactness (u) and surface redshift (Zs) for the above-mentioned stars and compare it with the recent observational data.

  20. Baade-Wesselink radii for NGC 1866 Cepheids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cote, Patrick; Welch, Douglas L.; Fischer, Philippe; Mateo, Mario; Madore, Barry F.

    1991-01-01

    Radial velocities and CCD photometry suitable for a Baade-Wesselink analysis are now available for six short-period Cepheids (HV12198, HV12199, HV12202, HV12203, HV12204, and V4) in the LMC cluster NGC 1866. As a prerequisite for such an analysis, O-C diagrams have been constructed and examined for seven of the NGC 1866 Cepheids (HV12197, HV12198, HV12199, HV12200, HV12202, HV12203, and HV12204), yielding improved periods and estimates of the rate of period change in these coeval variables. One star, HV12198, shows possible evidence for period change, but the phase mismatch due to that change is small enough to have negligible effect on its Baade-Wesselink radius. The computed radii are in good agreement with the Baade-Wesselink, theoretical and cluster/association period-radius relations of Fernie (1984) and the Galactic relation of Coulson and Caldwell (1989). The Flower (1977) color-effective temperature relation and the Becker et al. (1977) mass-luminosity relation lead to mean masses of 4.9 + or - 0.5 solar masses and 4.6 + or - 0.5 solar masses for the respective metallicities of (Y,Z) = (0.0273,0.0016) and (0.026,0.02). Pulsation constants are also computed for these stars.

  1. Measuring Neutron Star Radii via Pulse Profile Modeling with NICER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Morsink, Sharon; Bauböck, Michi

    2016-11-01

    The Neutron-star Interior Composition Explorer is an X-ray astrophysics payload that will be placed on the International Space Station. Its primary science goal is to measure with high accuracy the pulse profiles that arise from the non-uniform thermal surface emission of rotation-powered pulsars. Modeling general relativistic effects on the profiles will lead to measuring the radii of these neutron stars and to constraining their equation of state. Achieving this goal will depend, among other things, on accurate knowledge of the source, sky, and instrument backgrounds. We use here simple analytic estimates to quantify the level at which these backgrounds need to be known in order for the upcoming measurements to provide significant constraints on the properties of neutron stars. We show that, even in the minimal-information scenario, knowledge of the background at a few percent level for a background-to-source countrate ratio of 0.2 allows for a measurement of the neutron star compactness to better than 10% uncertainty for most of the parameter space. These constraints improve further when more realistic assumptions are made about the neutron star emission and spin, and when additional information about the source itself, such as its mass or distance, are incorporated.

  2. Charge-ordering transitions without charge differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Yundi; Pardo, Victor; Pickett, Warren

    2013-03-01

    The distorted perovskite nickelate system RNiO3 (R=rare earth except La) undergoes a metal-insulator transition (MIT) at a temperature that varies smoothly with the R ionic radius. This MIT is accompanied by structural transition which leads to two inequivalent Ni sites in the cell, and has been explained by charge ordering (CO): charge is transferred between the Ni1 and Ni2 sites in a long-range ordered fashion. Experimental data on core binding energies, ionic radii, and Mossbauer shifts are interpreted in terms of Ni cation charges of 3 +/- δ with, for example, δ ~ 0.3 for YNiO3. Making use of first principles DFT results and a new approach not invoking integration of the charge density, we find[2] that the Ni 3 d occupation is identical (to high accuracy) for the two Ni sites. We also present results for other compounds (La2VCuO6, YNiO3, CaFeO3, AgNiO2, V4O7), all of which have distinct ``charge states'' that have identical 3 d occupation. This quantitative procedure will be discussed and some implications will be outlined. DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-04ER46111 and Ramon y Cajal Program

  3. Bonded radii and the contraction of the electron density of the oxygen atom by bonded interactions.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Gerald V; Ross, Nancy L; Cox, David F; Rosso, Kevin M; Iversen, Bo B; Spackman, Mark A

    2013-02-21

    The bonded radii for more than 700 bonded pairs of atoms, comprising more than 50 oxide crystals, extracted from experimental and theoretical electron density distributions, are averaged and compared with the ionic radii for first, second, and third row atoms. At odds with the assumption of a "fixed" ionic radius of 1.40 Å for the oxide anion, the bonded radius for the anion, r(b)(O), decreases systematically from 1.40 to 0.65 Å as the electron density distribution of the atom is progressively polarized and contracted by its bonded interactions. The radii for the more electropositive metal atoms agree with the ionic radii when the electron density distribution of the anion is largely unpolarized by its bonded interactions. However, those for the more electronegative metal atoms are progressively larger than the ionic radii as the electron density distribution of the anion is progressively polarized and contracted along the bond vectors with decreasing bond length. The progressive decrease of r(b)(O) indicates that the compilation of sets of ionic radii, based on a fixed radius for the oxide anion, is problematic and impacts the accuracy of the ionic radii for the metal atoms. The assumption of a "fixed" radius for the anion, made in the derivation of sets of radii, not only results in unrealistic negative ionic radii for the more electronegative atoms but also in ionic radii that are as much as 0.5 Å smaller than the bonded radii, particularly for the more electronegative M atoms. The lack of agreement between the ionic and the bonded radii for the more shared bonded interactions is ascribed to the progressive increase in the polarization and contraction of the electron density of the oxide anion by the bonded interactions with a concomitant decrease in the radius of the anion, a factor that was largely neglected in the compilation of the ionic radii for fluoride, oxide, sulfide, and nitride crystals. The close agreement of the bonded radii and procrystal bonded

  4. Galaxy Structure: Core Radii, and Central Mass Deficits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, A. W.; Trujillo, I.; Erwin, P.

    2004-05-01

    We investigate the nuclear and global structure of elliptical galaxies, and the apparent disparity between the Nuker and Sérsic light-profile models. We show that the so-called ``power-law" galaxies in fact have Sérsic r1/n profiles over their entire observed radial range. Consequently, only three (Sérsic-profile) parameters are required to simultaneously describe both the inner (HST-resolved) and outer profiles of low-luminosity (M > -20.5 B-mag) elliptical galaxies. We also find that ``core galaxies" have Sérsic profiles with a (partially evacuated) single power-law core. We have developed a modified (5-parameter) Sérsic profile with a power-law core to model the complete radial extent of luminous galaxies with cores. In addition to quantifying the global stellar distribution in these systems, we have derived new estimates of their core radii and other central properties. Comparison of the central stellar deficits with the galaxies' black hole masses suggests that the number of (dissipationless) major mergers that have produced luminous elliptical galaxies is around 1-2, rather than 8-10, which agrees with theory and implies that the galactic merger history of the Universe is roughly an order of magnitude less violent than previous observational analyses had suggested. Support for proposal number HST-AR-09927.01-A was provided by NASA through a grant from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  5. THE OBSERVATIONAL AND THEORETICAL TIDAL RADII OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IN M87

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Jeremy J.; Sills, Alison; Harris, William E.

    2012-02-10

    Globular clusters have linear sizes (tidal radii) which theory tells us are determined by their masses and by the gravitational potential of their host galaxy. To explore the relationship between observed and expected radii, we utilize the globular cluster population of the Virgo giant M87. Unusually deep, high signal-to-noise images of M87 are used to measure the effective and limiting radii of approximately 2000 globular clusters. To compare with these observations, we simulate a globular cluster population that has the same characteristics as the observed M87 cluster population. Placing these simulated clusters in the well-studied tidal field of M87, the orbit of each cluster is solved and the theoretical tidal radius of each cluster is determined. We compare the predicted relationship between cluster size and projected galactocentric distance to observations. We find that for an isotropic distribution of cluster velocities, theoretical tidal radii are approximately equal to observed limiting radii for R{sub gc} < 10 kpc. However, the isotropic simulation predicts a steep increase in cluster size at larger radii, which is not observed in large galaxies beyond the Milky Way. To minimize the discrepancy between theory and observations, we explore the effects of orbital anisotropy on cluster sizes, and suggest a possible orbital anisotropy profile for M87 which yields a better match between theory and observations. Finally, we suggest future studies which will establish a stronger link between theoretical tidal radii and observed radii.

  6. Masses, Radii, and Cloud Properties of the HR 8799 Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark S.; Saumon, Didier; Cushing, Michael; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Freedman, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The near-infrared colors of the planets directly imaged around the A star HR 8799 are much redder than most field brown dwarfs of the same effective temperature. Previous theoretical studies of these objects have compared the photometric and limited spectral data of the planets to the predictions of various atmosphere and evolution models and concluded that the atmospheres of planets b, c, and d are unusually cloudy or have unusual cloud properties. Most studies have also found that the inferred radii of some or all of the planets disagree with expectations of standard giant planet evolution models. Here we compare the available data to the predictions of our own set of atmospheric and evolution models that have been extensively tested against field L and T dwarfs, including the reddest L dwarfs. Unlike almost all previous studies we specify mutually self-consistent choices for effective temperature, gravity, cloud properties, and planetary radius. This procedure yields plausible and self-consistent values for the masses, effective temperatures, and cloud properties of all three planets. We find that the cloud properties of the HR 8799 planets are in fact not unusual but rather follow previously recognized trends including a gravity dependence on the temperature of the L to T spectral transition, some reasons for which we discuss. We find that the inferred mass of planet b is highly sensitive to the H and K band spectrum. Solutions for planets c and particularly d are less certain but are consistent with the generally accepted constraints on the age of the primary star and orbital dynamics. We also confirm that as for L and T dwarfs and solar system giant planets, non-equilibrium chemistry driven by atmospheric mixing is also important for these objects. Given the preponderance of data suggesting that the L to T spectral type transition is gravity dependent, we present a new evolution calculation that predicts cooling tracks on the near-infrared color

  7. Accurate Empirical Radii and Masses of Planets and Their Host Stars with Gaia Parallaxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stassun, Keivan G.; Collins, Karen A.; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2017-03-01

    We present empirical measurements of the radii of 116 stars that host transiting planets. These radii are determined using only direct observables—the bolometric flux at Earth, the effective temperature, and the parallax provided by the Gaia first data release—and thus are virtually model independent, with extinction being the only free parameter. We also determine each star’s mass using our newly determined radius and the stellar density, a virtually model independent quantity itself from previously published transit analyses. These stellar radii and masses are in turn used to redetermine the transiting-planet radii and masses, again using only direct observables. The median uncertainties on the stellar radii and masses are 8% and 30%, respectively, and the resulting uncertainties on the planet radii and masses are 9% and 22%, respectively. These accuracies are generally larger than previously published model-dependent precisions of 5% and 6% on the planet radii and masses, respectively, but the newly determined values are purely empirical. We additionally report radii for 242 stars hosting radial-velocity (non-transiting) planets, with a median achieved accuracy of ≈2%. Using our empirical stellar masses we verify that the majority of putative “retired A stars” in the sample are indeed more massive than ∼1.2 {M}ȯ . Most importantly, the bolometric fluxes and angular radii reported here for a total of 498 planet host stars—with median accuracies of 1.7% and 1.8%, respectively—serve as a fundamental data set to permit the re-determination of transiting-planet radii and masses with the Gaia second data release to ≈3% and ≈5% accuracy, better than currently published precisions, and determined in an entirely empirical fashion.

  8. Radii broadening due to molecular collision in focused ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komuro, Masanori

    1988-01-01

    Point exposures of poly(methyl methacrylate) resist are carried out with focused ion beams of Si++ and Au++ from a liquid AuSi ion source in order to obtain a current density distribution in the probe. All the distributions are composed of a main Gaussian distribution and a long tail dependent on r-3.3 (r means radial distance). The magnitude of this tail increases with the increase in ambient pressure of the ion-drifting space. When the probe is steered at the corner of deflection field, two types of clear ghost patterns appear: (1) circular patterns and (2) lines trailing from the main spot toward the deflection center. It is revealed that they are produced by exposures to ions or energetic neutrals generated with charge transfer collision of the primary ions with residual gas molecules. It is shown that the long tail in the current density distribution is also due to scattering with the residual gas molecules.

  9. Radii, shapes, and topography of the satellites of Uranus from limb coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P. C.

    1988-01-01

    The present use of limb coordinates to ascertain radii, shape and local topographic characteristics for the five large Uranian satellites directly measured satellite ellipsoidal shapes, determining radii with subpixel accuracy. While Umbriel, Titania, and Oberon are spherical, Miranda and Ariel are noted to be ellipsoids whose equatorial bulges agree with previously determined mean densities. Miranda's topography exhibits substantial deformation of cratered terrain and the younger coronae, as well as uplift and complex faulting at coronae margins.

  10. Near-global survey of effective droplet radii in liquid water clouds using ISCCP data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Qingyan; Rossow, William B.; Lacis, Andrew B.

    1994-01-01

    A global survey of cloud particle size variations can provide crucial constraints on how cloud processes determine cloud liquid water contents and their variation with temperature, and further, may indicate the magnitude of aerosol effects on clouds. A method, based on a complete radiative transfer model for Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR)-measured radiances, is described for retrieving cloud particle radii in liquid water clouds from satellite data currently available from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project. Results of sensitivity tests and validation studies provide error estimates. AVHRR data from NOAA-9 and NOAA-10 have been analyzed for January, April, July and October in 1987 and 1988. The results of this first survey reveal systematic continental and maritime differences and hemispheric contrasts that are indicative of the effects of associated aerosol concentration differences: cloud droplet radii in continental water clouds are about 2-3 micrometers smaller than in marine clouds, and droplet radii are about 1 micrometer smaller in marine clouds of the Northern Hemisphere than in the Southern Hemisphere. The height dependencies of cloud droplet radii in continental and marine clouds are also consistent with differences in the vertical profiles of aerosol concentration. Significant seasonal and diurnal variations of effective droplet radii are also observed, particularly at lower latitudes. Variations of the relationship between cloud optical thickness and droplet radii may indicate variations in cloud microphysical regimes.

  11. Fluorescent atom coincidence spectroscopy of extremely neutron-deficient barium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, S. A.; Evans, D. E.; Griffith, J. A. R.; Eastham, D. A.; Groves, J.; Smith, J. R. H.; Tolfree, D. W. L.; Warner, D. D.; Billowes, J.; Grant, I. S.; Walker, P. M.

    1988-09-01

    Fluorescent atom coincidence spectroscopy (FACS) has been used to measure the nuclear mean square radii and moments of the extremely neutron-deficient isotopes 120-124Ba. At N=65 an abrupt change in nuclear mean square charge radii is observed which can be understood in terms of the occupation of the spin-orbit partner g7/25/2[413] neutron and g9/29/2[404] proton orbitals and the consequent enhancement of the n-p interaction.

  12. Radiation of charge bunches revolving around a metamaterial sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torabi, Mahmoud; Shokri, Babak

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the interaction of a relativistic uniformly rotating charge with a metamaterial sphere in the microwave range. The charge revolves around the sphere at the equatorial plane. The root mean square of the radiation field for different types of metamaterial spheres is presented and its dependence on some usual parameters is considered. They demonstrate that the radiation field is concentrated near the surface and shifts towards the centre by increasing charge energy for conventional and double-negative metamaterials. The stopping and deflection forces acting on the charge are also calculated. Finally, we generalize these results to a line charge bunch. This study has potential application in the area of high-power radiation sources and accelerators.

  13. The strongest gravitational lenses. III. The order statistics of the largest Einstein radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waizmann, J.-C.; Redlich, M.; Meneghetti, M.; Bartelmann, M.

    2014-05-01

    Context. The Einstein radius of a gravitational lens is a key characteristic. It encodes information about decisive quantities such as halo mass, concentration, triaxiality, and orientation with respect to the observer. Therefore, the largest Einstein radii can potentially be utilised to test the predictions of the ΛCDM model. Aims: Hitherto, studies have focussed on the single largest observed Einstein radius. We extend those studies by employing order statistics to formulate exclusion criteria based on the n largest Einstein radii and apply these criteria to the strong lensing analysis of 12 MACS clusters at z> 0.5. Methods: We obtain the order statistics of Einstein radii by a Monte Carlo approach, based on the semi-analytic modelling of the halo population on the past lightcone. After sampling the order statistics, we fit a general extreme value distribution to the first-order distribution, which allows us to derive analytic relations for the order statistics of the Einstein radii. Results: We find that the Einstein radii of the 12 MACS clusters are not in conflict with the ΛCDM expectations. Our exclusion criteria indicate that, in order to exhibit tension with the concordance model, one would need to observe approximately twenty Einstein radii with θeff ≳ 30″, ten with θeff ≳ 35″, five with θeff ≳ 42″, or one with θeff ≳ 74″ in the redshift range 0.5 ≤ z ≤ 1.0 on the full sky (assuming a source redshift of zs = 2). Furthermore, we find that, with increasing order, the haloes with the largest Einstein radii are on average less aligned along the line-of-sight and less triaxial. In general, the cumulative distribution functions steepen for higher orders, giving them better constraining power. Conclusions: A framework that allows the individual and joint order distributions of the n-largest Einstein radii to be derived is presented. From a statistical point of view, we do not see any evidence of an Einstein ring problem even for the

  14. Charged massive scalar field configurations supported by a spherically symmetric charged reflecting shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hod, Shahar

    2016-12-01

    The physical properties of bound-state charged massive scalar field configurations linearly coupled to a spherically symmetric charged reflecting shell are studied analytically. To that end, we solve the Klein-Gordon wave equation for a static scalar field of proper mass μ, charge coupling constant q, and spherical harmonic index l in the background of a charged shell of radius R and electric charge Q. It is proved that the dimensionless inequality μR <√{(qQ) 2 -(l + 1 / 2) 2 } provides an upper bound on the regime of existence of the composed charged-spherical-shell-charged-massive-scalar-field configurations. Interestingly, we explicitly show that the discrete spectrum of shell radii {Rn(μ,qQ,l)}n = 0 n = ∞ which can support the static bound-state charged massive scalar field configurations can be determined analytically. We confirm our analytical results by numerical computations.

  15. Fast Moving Average Recursive Least Mean Square Fit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    R£FERENCE ONLY NAVAL UNDERWATER-SYSTEMS CENTER NEW LONOON LABORATORY NEW LONDON, CONNECTICUT 06320 Technical Memorandum TM 841143 II 1~11~ Ill... New London,CT,06320 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER TM 841143 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Material...release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES NUWC2015 14. ABSTRACT A new approach is developed to reduce the computational complexity of

  16. Mean-square error due to gradiometer field measuring devices.

    PubMed

    Hatsell, C P

    1991-06-01

    Gradiometers use spatial common mode magnetic field rejection to reduce interference from distant sources. They also introduce distortion that can be severe, rendering experimental data difficult to interpret. Attempts to recover the measured magnetic field from the gradiometer output will be plagued by the nonexistence of a spatial function for deconvolution (except for first-order gradiometers), and by the high-pass nature of the spatial transform that emphasizes high spatial frequency noise. Goals of a design for a facility for measuring biomagnetic fields should be an effective shielded room and a field detector employing a first-order gradiometer.

  17. Radii of neutron drops probed via the neutron skin thickness of nuclei

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, P. W.; Gandolfi, S.

    2016-10-10

    Multineutron systems are crucial to understanding the physics of neutron-rich nuclei and neutron stars. Neutron drops, neutrons confined in an external field, are investigated systematically in both nonrelativistic and relativistic density functional theories and with ab initio calculations. Here, we demonstrate a new strong linear correlation, which is universal in the realm of mean-field models, between the rms radii of neutron drops and the neutron skin thickness of 208 Pb and 48 Ca , i.e., the difference between the neutron and proton rms radii of a nucleus. This correlation can be used to deduce the radii of neutron drops frommore » the measured neutron skin thickness in a model-independent way, and the radii obtained for neutron drops can provide a useful constraint for realistic three-neutron forces, due to its high quality. Furthermore, we present a new correlation between the slope L of the symmetry energy and the radii of neutron drops, and provide the first validation of such a correlation by using density-functional models and ab initio calculations. These newly established correlations, together with more precise measurements of the neutron skin thicknesses of 208 Pb and 48 Ca and/or accurate determinations of L , will have an enduring impact on the understanding of multineutron interactions, neutron-rich nuclei, neutron stars, etc.« less

  18. Radii of neutron drops probed via the neutron skin thickness of nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, P. W.; Gandolfi, S.

    2016-10-10

    Multineutron systems are crucial to understanding the physics of neutron-rich nuclei and neutron stars. Neutron drops, neutrons confined in an external field, are investigated systematically in both nonrelativistic and relativistic density functional theories and with ab initio calculations. Here, we demonstrate a new strong linear correlation, which is universal in the realm of mean-field models, between the rms radii of neutron drops and the neutron skin thickness of 208 Pb and 48 Ca , i.e., the difference between the neutron and proton rms radii of a nucleus. This correlation can be used to deduce the radii of neutron drops from the measured neutron skin thickness in a model-independent way, and the radii obtained for neutron drops can provide a useful constraint for realistic three-neutron forces, due to its high quality. Furthermore, we present a new correlation between the slope L of the symmetry energy and the radii of neutron drops, and provide the first validation of such a correlation by using density-functional models and ab initio calculations. These newly established correlations, together with more precise measurements of the neutron skin thicknesses of 208 Pb and 48 Ca and/or accurate determinations of L , will have an enduring impact on the understanding of multineutron interactions, neutron-rich nuclei, neutron stars, etc.

  19. A new determination of radii and limb parameters for Pluto and Charon from mutual event lightcurves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Eliot F.; Binzel, Richard P.

    1994-01-01

    Over the past several years Pluto-Charon mutual events have yielded progressively more accurate estimates of Charon's orbital elements and the radii of Pluto and Charon (e.g., Buie, Tholen, and Horne, 1992). Analysis of the 1988 stellar occultation by Pluto indicates a radius for Pluto that is about 4%, or 50 km, larger than the mutual event radius of 1151 km. One possible explanation for the discrepancy is that the mutual event modeling treats Pluto and Charon as uniformly bright disks. If they are limb-darkened, the mutual event fits could underestimate their radii. In this paper we use an independent mutual event data set (Young and Binzel, 1992) to fit for Pluto and Charon's radii in a manner independent of either object's limb profile or albedo distribution. Our least-squares solution indicates that Pluto's radius is 1164 +/- 22.9 km and Charon's radius is 621 +/- 20.6 km.

  20. Gray and multigroup radiation transport through 3D binary stochastic media with different sphere radii distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Gordon L.

    2017-03-01

    Gray and multigroup radiation is transported through 3D media consisting of spheres randomly placed in a uniform background. Comparisons are made between using constant radii spheres and three different distributions of sphere radii. Because of the computational cost of 3D calculations, only the lowest angle order, n=1, is tested. If the mean chord length is held constant, using different radii distributions makes little difference. This is true for both gray and multigroup solutions. 3D transport solutions are compared to 2D and 1D solutions with the same mean chord lengths. 2D disk and 3D sphere media give solutions that are nearly identical while 1D slab solutions are fundamentally different.

  1. Energy losses in thermally cycled optical fibers constrained in small bend radii

    SciTech Connect

    Guild, Eric; Morelli, Gregg

    2012-09-23

    High energy laser pulses were fired into a 365μm diameter fiber optic cable constrained in small radii of curvature bends, resulting in a catastrophic failure. Q-switched laser pulses from a flashlamp pumped, Nd:YAG laser were injected into the cables, and the spatial intensity profile at the exit face of the fiber was observed using an infrared camera. The transmission of the radiation through the tight radii resulted in an asymmetric intensity profile with one half of the fiber core having a higher peak-to-average energy distribution. Prior to testing, the cables were thermally conditioned while constrained in the small radii of curvature bends. Single-bend, double-bend, and U-shaped eometries were tested to characterize various cable routing scenarios.

  2. Gray and multigroup radiation transport through 3D binary stochastic media with different sphere radii distributions

    DOE PAGES

    Olson, Gordon Lee

    2016-12-06

    Here, gray and multigroup radiation is transported through 3D media consisting of spheres randomly placed in a uniform background. Comparisons are made between using constant radii spheres and three different distributions of sphere radii. Because of the computational cost of 3D calculations, only the lowest angle order, n=1, is tested. If the mean chord length is held constant, using different radii distributions makes little difference. This is true for both gray and multigroup solutions. 3D transport solutions are compared to 2D and 1D solutions with the same mean chord lengths. 2D disk and 3D sphere media give solutions that aremore » nearly identical while 1D slab solutions are fundamentally different.« less

  3. Gray and multigroup radiation transport through 3D binary stochastic media with different sphere radii distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Gordon Lee

    2016-12-06

    Here, gray and multigroup radiation is transported through 3D media consisting of spheres randomly placed in a uniform background. Comparisons are made between using constant radii spheres and three different distributions of sphere radii. Because of the computational cost of 3D calculations, only the lowest angle order, n=1, is tested. If the mean chord length is held constant, using different radii distributions makes little difference. This is true for both gray and multigroup solutions. 3D transport solutions are compared to 2D and 1D solutions with the same mean chord lengths. 2D disk and 3D sphere media give solutions that are nearly identical while 1D slab solutions are fundamentally different.

  4. EFFECT OF UNCERTAINTIES IN STELLAR MODEL PARAMETERS ON ESTIMATED MASSES AND RADII OF SINGLE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Sarbani; Verner, Graham A.; Chaplin, William J.; Elsworth, Yvonne E-mail: gav@bison.ph.bham.ac.uk E-mail: y.p.elsworth@bham.ac.uk

    2012-02-10

    Accurate and precise values of radii and masses of stars are needed to correctly estimate properties of extrasolar planets. We examine the effect of uncertainties in stellar model parameters on estimates of the masses, radii, and average densities of solar-type stars. We find that in the absence of seismic data on solar-like oscillations, stellar masses can be determined to a greater accuracy than either stellar radii or densities; but to get reasonably accurate results the effective temperature, log g, and metallicity must be measured to high precision. When seismic data are available, stellar density is the most well-determined property, followed by radius, with mass the least well-determined property. Uncertainties in stellar convection, quantified in terms of uncertainties in the value of the mixing length parameter, cause the most significant errors in the estimates of stellar properties.

  5. Series-coupled double-ring resonators with asymmetric radii for use in channelizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xiaowen; Zhu, Dan; Zhao, Yongjiu; Pan, Shilong

    2014-10-01

    A series-coupled double-ring resonator with asymmetric radii is analyzed to achieve a filter response with a large free spectral range (FSR), a narrow passband of tens of MHz and a small shape factor simultaneously for use in microwave photonic channelizer. By introducing difference to the two radii, based on the vernier effect, the FSR of the resonator filter can be extended while maintaining the narrow passband and the small shape factor. A filter response with a FSR of 29.444 GHz, a 3-dB bandwidth of 96 MHz and a shape factor of 3.17 is realized by numerical analysis.

  6. On the Radii of Brown Dwarfs Measured with AKARI Near-infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorahana, S.; Yamamura, I.; Murakami, H.

    2013-04-01

    We derive the radii of 16 brown dwarfs observed by AKARI using their parallaxes and the ratios of observed to model fluxes. We find that the brown dwarf radius ranges between 0.64-1.13 RJ with an average radius of 0.83 RJ . We find a trend in the relation between radii and T eff; the radius is at a minimum at T eff ~ 1600 K, which corresponds to the spectral types of mid- to late-L. The result is interpreted by a combination of radius-mass and radius-age relations that are theoretically expected for brown dwarfs older than 108 yr.

  7. Charge-changing cross sections of Ne30, Na32,33 with a proton target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, A.; Moriguchi, T.; Ohtsubo, T.; Aoi, N.; Fang, D. Q.; Fukuda, N.; Fukuda, M.; Geissel, H.; Hachiuma, I.; Inabe, N.; Ishibashi, Y.; Ishimoto, S.; Ito, Y.; Izumikawa, T.; Kameda, D.; Kubo, T.; Kuboki, T.; Kusaka, K.; Lantz, M.; Ma, Y. G.; Mihara, M.; Miyashita, Y.; Momota, S.; Nagae, D.; Namihira, K.; Nishimura, D.; Ooishi, H.; Ohkuma, Y.; Ohnishi, T.; Ohtake, M.; Ogawa, K.; Shimbara, Y.; Suda, T.; Sumikama, T.; Suzuki, H.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, T.; Takechi, M.; Takeda, H.; Tanaka, K.; Watanabe, R.; Winkler, M.; Yamaguchi, T.; Yanagisawa, Y.; Yasuda, Y.; Yoshinaga, K.; Yoshida, A.; Yoshida, K.

    2014-04-01

    The total charge-changing, charge pick-up, and partial charge-changing cross sections of very neutron-rich nuclei (Ne30, Na32,33) with a proton target have been measured at ˜240A MeV for the first time. We introduced the phenomenological correction factor in Glauber-model calculations for the total charge-changing cross sections with the proton target, and applied it to deduce the proton radii of these nuclei. For Ne30 and Na32, the neutron skin thicknesses of the nuclei were deduced by comparing the proton radii with the matter radii deduced from the interaction cross-section measurements. A significant thick neutron-skin has been observed for the nuclei. We also found that the charge pick-up cross sections are much larger than those in the systematics of stable nuclei.

  8. Responses of articular and epiphyseal cartilage zones of developing avian radii to estrone treatment and a 2-G environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negulesco, J. A.; Kossler, T.

    1978-01-01

    Histological measurements of radii from chickens exposed to estrone and hypergravity are reported. Female chicks at two weeks post-hatch were maintained for two weeks at earth gravity or 2 G with daily injections of 0.2 or 0.4 mg estrone. Animals were sacrificed after the last injection, and the radii were processed by described histological techniques. The results suggest that proximal and distal epiphyses of developing radii show different morphological responses to estrone and hypergravity.

  9. Fitted Hanbury-Brown-Twiss radii versus space-time variances in flow-dominated models

    SciTech Connect

    Frodermann, Evan; Heinz, Ulrich; Lisa, Michael Annan

    2006-04-15

    The inability of otherwise successful dynamical models to reproduce the Hanbury-Brown-Twiss (HBT) radii extracted from two-particle correlations measured at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is known as the RHIC HBT Puzzle. Most comparisons between models and experiment exploit the fact that for Gaussian sources the HBT radii agree with certain combinations of the space-time widths of the source that can be directly computed from the emission function without having to evaluate, at significant expense, the two-particle correlation function. We here study the validity of this approach for realistic emission function models, some of which exhibit significant deviations from simple Gaussian behavior. By Fourier transforming the emission function, we compute the two-particle correlation function, and fit it with a Gaussian to partially mimic the procedure used for measured correlation functions. We describe a novel algorithm to perform this Gaussian fit analytically. We find that for realistic hydrodynamic models the HBT radii extracted from this procedure agree better with the data than the values previously extracted from the space-time widths of the emission function. Although serious discrepancies between the calculated and the measured HBT radii remain, we show that a more apples-to-apples comparison of models with data can play an important role in any eventually successful theoretical description of RHIC HBT data.

  10. Determination of mechanical properties of excised dog radii from lateral vibration experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, G. A.; Anliker, M.; Young, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental data which can be used as a guideline in developing a mathematical model for lateral vibrations of whole bone are reported. The study used wet and dry dog radii mounted in a cantilever configuration. Data are also given on the mechanical, geometric, and viscoelastic properties of bones.

  11. Investigation of Possible Electromagnetic Disturbances caused by Spacecraft-Plasma Interactions at 4 Radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okada, M.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Goldstein, G. E.; Matsumoto, H.; Brinca, A. L.; Kellogg, P. J.

    1995-01-01

    The proposed Small Solar Probe mission features a close approach to the sun with a perihelion of 4 radii. Carbon molecules emitted from the spacecraft's heat shield will become ionized by electron impact and photoionization. The newly created ions and electrons may generate electromagnetic and electrostatic plasma waves which are possible sources of interference with in-situ plasma measurements.

  12. The magnetic field of the equatorial magnetotail from 10 to 40 earth radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    A statistical study of IMP 6, 7, and 8 magnetotail magnetic field measurements near the equatorial plane reveals new information about various aspects of magnetospheric structure. More magnetic flux crosses the equatorial plane on the dawn and dusk flanks of the tail than near midnight, but no evidence is found for a dependence on the interplanetary magnetic field sector polarity. Field magnitudes within 3 earth radii of the equatorial plane near dawn are more than twice as large as those near dusk for Xsm = -20 to -10 earth radii. The frequency of occurrence of southward fields is greatest near midnight, and such fields are seen almost twice as often for Xsm = -20 to -10 earth radii as for Xsm beyond -20 earth radii. This latter result supports the idea that the midnight region of the tail between 10 and 20 is a special location where neutral lines are particularly apt to form. Such a neutral line will approach nearest the earth in the midnight and premidnight region, where substorms are thought to have their onset.

  13. Fitted Hanbury-Brown Twiss radii versus space-time variances in flow-dominated models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frodermann, Evan; Heinz, Ulrich; Lisa, Michael Annan

    2006-04-01

    The inability of otherwise successful dynamical models to reproduce the Hanbury-Brown Twiss (HBT) radii extracted from two-particle correlations measured at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is known as the RHIC HBT Puzzle. Most comparisons between models and experiment exploit the fact that for Gaussian sources the HBT radii agree with certain combinations of the space-time widths of the source that can be directly computed from the emission function without having to evaluate, at significant expense, the two-particle correlation function. We here study the validity of this approach for realistic emission function models, some of which exhibit significant deviations from simple Gaussian behavior. By Fourier transforming the emission function, we compute the two-particle correlation function, and fit it with a Gaussian to partially mimic the procedure used for measured correlation functions. We describe a novel algorithm to perform this Gaussian fit analytically. We find that for realistic hydrodynamic models the HBT radii extracted from this procedure agree better with the data than the values previously extracted from the space-time widths of the emission function. Although serious discrepancies between the calculated and the measured HBT radii remain, we show that a more apples-to-apples comparison of models with data can play an important role in any eventually successful theoretical description of RHIC HBT data.

  14. The stellar accretion origin of stellar population gradients in massive galaxies at large radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschmann, Michaela; Naab, Thorsten; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Davé, Romeel; Oser, Ludwig; Karabal, Emin

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the evolution of stellar population gradients from z = 2 to 0 in massive galaxies at large radii (r > 2Reff) using 10 cosmological zoom simulations of haloes with 6 × 1012 M⊙ < Mhalo < 2 × 1013 M⊙. The simulations follow metal cooling and enrichment from SNII, SNIa and asymptotic giant branch winds. We explore the differential impact of an empirical model for galactic winds that reproduces the mass-metallicity relation and its evolution with redshift. At larger radii the galaxies, for both models, become more dominated by stars accreted from satellite galaxies in major and minor mergers. In the wind model, fewer stars are accreted, but they are significantly more metal-poor resulting in steep global metallicity (<∇Zstars> = -0.35 dex dex-1) and colour (e.g. <∇g - r> = -0.13 dex dex-1) gradients in agreement with observations. In contrast, colour and metallicity gradients of the models without winds are inconsistent with observations. Age gradients are in general mildly positive at z = 0 (<∇Agestars> = 0.04 dex dex-1) with significant differences between the models at higher redshift. We demonstrate that for the wind model, stellar accretion is steepening existing in situ metallicity gradients by about 0.2 dex by the present day and helps to match observed gradients of massive early-type galaxies at large radii. Colour and metallicity gradients are significantly steeper for systems which have accreted stars in minor mergers, while galaxies with major mergers have relatively flat gradients, confirming previous results. The effect of stellar migration of in situ formed stars to large radii is discussed. This study highlights the importance of stellar accretion for stellar population properties of massive galaxies at large radii, which can provide important constraints for formation models.

  15. THE DEPENDENCE OF BROWN DWARF RADII ON ATMOSPHERIC METALLICITY AND CLOUDS: THEORY AND COMPARISON WITH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, Adam; Nampaisarn, Thane; Heng, Kevin E-mail: tnampais@astro.princeton.edu

    2011-07-20

    Employing realistic and consistent atmosphere boundary conditions, we have generated evolutionary models for brown dwarfs and very low mass stars (VLMs) for different atmospheric metallicities ([Fe/H]), with and without clouds. We find that the spread in radius at a given mass and age can be as large as {approx}10% to {approx}25%, with higher-metallicity, higher-cloud-thickness atmospheres resulting quite naturally in larger radii. For each 0.1 dex increase in [Fe/H], radii increase by {approx}1% to {approx}2.5%, depending upon the age and mass. We also find that, while for smaller masses and older ages brown dwarf radii decrease with increasing helium fraction (Y, as expected), for more massive brown dwarfs and a wide range of ages they increase with helium fraction. The increase in radius in going from Y = 0.25 to Y = 0.28 can be as large as {approx}0.025 R{sub J} ({approx}2.5%). Furthermore, we find that for VLMs an increase in atmospheric metallicity from 0.0 to 0.5 dex, increases radii by {approx}4%, and from -0.5 to 0.5 dex by {approx}10%. Therefore, we suggest that opacity due to higher metallicity might naturally account for the apparent radius anomalies in some eclipsing VLM systems. Ten to twenty-five percent variations in radius exceed errors stemming from uncertainties in the equation of state alone. This serves to emphasize that transit and eclipse measurements of brown dwarf radii constrain numerous effects collectively, importantly including the atmosphere and condensate cloud models, and not just the equation of state. At all times, one is testing a multi-parameter theory, and not a universal radius-mass relation.

  16. Absolute masses and radii determination in multiplanetary systems without stellar models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almenara, J. M.; Díaz, R. F.; Mardling, R.; Barros, S. C. C.; Damiani, C.; Bruno, G.; Bonfils, X.; Deleuil, M.

    2015-11-01

    The masses and radii of extrasolar planets are key observables for understanding their interior, formation and evolution. While transit photometry and Doppler spectroscopy are used to measure the radii and masses respectively of planets relative to those of their host star, estimates for the true values of these quantities rely on theoretical models of the host star which are known to suffer from systematic differences with observations. When a system is composed of more than two bodies, extra information is contained in the transit photometry and radial velocity data. Velocity information (finite speed-of-light, Doppler) is needed to break the Newtonian MR-3 degeneracy. We performed a photodynamical modelling of the two-planet transiting system Kepler-117 using all photometric and spectroscopic data available. We demonstrate how absolute masses and radii of single-star planetary systems can be obtained without resorting to stellar models. Limited by the precision of available radial velocities (38 m s-1), we achieve accuracies of 20 per cent in the radii and 70 per cent in the masses, while simulated 1 m s-1 precision radial velocities lower these to 1 per cent for the radii and 2 per cent for the masses. Since transiting multiplanet systems are common, this technique can be used to measure precisely the mass and radius of a large sample of stars and planets. We anticipate these measurements will become common when the TESS and PLATO mission provide high-precision light curves of a large sample of bright stars. These determinations will improve our knowledge about stars and planets, and provide strong constraints on theoretical models.

  17. Charge-changing cross-section measurements of C-1612 at around 45 A MeV and development of a Glauber model for incident energies 10 A -2100 A MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, D. T.; Ong, H. J.; Nguyen, T. T.; Tanihata, I.; Aoi, N.; Ayyad, Y.; Chan, P. Y.; Fukuda, M.; Hashimoto, T.; Hoang, T. H.; Ideguchi, E.; Inoue, A.; Kawabata, T.; Khiem, L. H.; Lin, W. P.; Matsuta, K.; Mihara, M.; Momota, S.; Nagae, D.; Nguyen, N. D.; Nishimura, D.; Ozawa, A.; Ren, P. P.; Sakaguchi, H.; Tanaka, J.; Takechi, M.; Terashima, S.; Wada, R.; Yamamoto, T.; RCNP-E372 Collaboration

    2016-12-01

    We have measured for the first time the charge-changing cross sections (σCC) of C-1612 on a 12C target at energies below 100 A MeV. To analyze these low-energy data, we have developed a finite-range Glauber model with a global parameter set within the optical-limit approximation which is applicable to reaction cross section (σR) and σCC measurements at incident energies from 10 A to 2100 A MeV. Adopting the proton-density distribution of 12C known from the electron-scattering data, as well as the bare total nucleon-nucleon cross sections and the real-to-imaginary-part ratios of the forward proton-proton elastic scattering amplitude available in the literatures, we determine the energy-dependent slope parameter βp n of the proton-neutron elastic differential cross section so as to reproduce the existing σR and interaction cross-section data for 12C+12C over a wide range of incident energies. The Glauber model thus formulated is applied to calculate the σR's of 12C on a 9Be and 27Al targets at various incident energies. Our calculations show excellent agreement with the experimental data. Applying our model to the σR and σCC for the so-called neutron-skin 16C nucleus, we reconfirm the importance of measurements at incident energies below 100 A MeV. The proton root-mean-square radii of C-1612 are extracted using the measured σCC's and the existing σR data. The results for C-1412 are consistent with the values from the electron scatterings, demonstrating the feasibility, usefulness of the σCC measurement, and the present Glauber model.

  18. Nuclear magnetization distribution radii determined by hyperfine transitions in the 1s level of H-like ions 185Re74+ and 187Re74+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo López-Urrutia, J. R.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Widmann, K.; Birkett, B. B.; Mårtensson-Pendrill, A.-M.; Gustavsson, M. G. H.

    1998-02-01

    The F=3 to F=2 hyperfine transitions in the 1s ground state of the two isotopes 185Re74+ and 187Re74+ were measured to be (4560.5+/-3) Å and (4516.9+/-3) Å, respectively, using emission spectroscopy in an electron beam ion trap. After applying appropriate corrections for the nuclear charge distribution and QED effects, a Bohr-Weisskopf effect of ɛ=2.23(9)% and 2.30(9)% are found for 185Re and 187Re, respectively. This value is almost twice that of a previous theoretical estimate, and indicates a distribution of the nuclear magnetization far more extended than that of the nuclear charge. A radius of the magnetization distribution of 1/2=7.57(32) fm and 1/2=7.69(32) fm for 185Re and 187Re, respectively, is inferred from the data. These radii are larger than the nuclear charge distribution radius [1/2=5.39(1) fm] for both isotopes by factors 1.40(6) and 1.43(6), respectively. We find that the Bohr-Weisskopf effect in H-like ions is a sensitive probe of nuclear magnetization distribution, especially for cases where the charge distribution and magnetic moments are accurately known.

  19. ON THE RADII OF BROWN DWARFS MEASURED WITH AKARI NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Sorahana, S.; Yamamura, I.; Murakami, H.

    2013-04-10

    We derive the radii of 16 brown dwarfs observed by AKARI using their parallaxes and the ratios of observed to model fluxes. We find that the brown dwarf radius ranges between 0.64-1.13 R{sub J} with an average radius of 0.83 R{sub J} . We find a trend in the relation between radii and T{sub eff}; the radius is at a minimum at T{sub eff} {approx} 1600 K, which corresponds to the spectral types of mid- to late-L. The result is interpreted by a combination of radius-mass and radius-age relations that are theoretically expected for brown dwarfs older than 10{sup 8} yr.

  20. Determination of radii of satellites and asteroids from radiometry and photometry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D.

    1973-01-01

    Visual photometry, which measures reflected solar radiation, can be combined with infrared radiometry, which measures absorbed and reradiated solar energy, to determine the albedo and hence the radius of small solar system objects. Equations and graphical solutions for radius and albedo are presented for cases where the object is at opposition, in equilibrium with the insolation, and has unit values for phase integral and infrared emissivities. Each of these assumptions is then discussed, and expressions are given for the dependence of the derived parameters on the assumptions. The Galilean satellites, whose radii are well known, provide a calibration of this technique. Applications are then discussed to Saturn's satellites Iapetus and Rhea and to asteroids (1) Ceres, (4) Vesta, and (324) Bamberga. It is shown that the technique is not subject to major systematic errors and that it is possible to derive radii, particularly for dark objects, with uncertainties of less than 10%.

  1. Counter-streaming electrons at the geomagnetic equator near 9 earth radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klumpar, D. M.; Quinn, J. M.; Shelley, E. G.

    1988-01-01

    AMPTE/CEE observations are used to study short-lived, highly anisotropic electron distributions in the region of the equatorial magnetosphere bewtween 6.6 earth radii and the CCE apogee at 8.8 earth radii. Intense bursts of highly collimated counterstreaming electrons were observed at keV energies with durations of a few tens of seconds to a few minutes near the geomagnetic equator on L-shells that intersect the high-latitude ionosphere in the region normally associated with the auroral zone. It is found that the counterstreaming electrons at energies below the peak energy are accompanied by simultaneous deep depressions of the locally mirroring fluxes. It is suggested that these equatorial electrons may result from the release of auroral electrons trapped beneath the auroral accelerating potentials at lower altitudes along the same magnetic flux tubes.

  2. Masses And Radii Of Neutron Stars Measured From Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guver, Tolga; Ozel, F.

    2011-09-01

    Low mass X-ray binaries that show thermonuclear bursts are ideal targets for constraining the equation of state of neutron star matter. The analysis of the time resolved, high count rate X-ray spectra allow a measurement of the Eddington limits and the apparent radii of neutron stars. Combined with an independent distance estimate, these spectroscopic quantities lead to the measurement of neutron star masses and radii. I will discuss the results of the application of this method to a number of X-ray binaries including EXO 1745-248, 4U 1820-30, 4U 1608-52,KS 1731-260, and SAX J1748.9-2021. I will also present the results from a comprehensive analysis of the entire RXTE archive of X-ray burst observations, which allows for a better quantification of the systematic uncertainties in these measurements.

  3. Interferometric determination of the topographies of absolute sphere radii using the sphere interferometer of PTB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartl, Guido; Krystek, Michael; Nicolaus, Arnold; Giardini, Walter

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents a method to reconstruct the absolute shape of a sphere—i.e. a topography of radii—using the sphere interferometer of PTB in combination with a stitching approach. The method allows for the reconstruction of absolute radii instead of the relative shape deviations which result from conventional sphericity measurements. The sphere interferometer was developed for the volume determination of spherical material measures—in particular the spheres of the Avogadro project—by precise diameter measurements with an uncertainty of 1 nm or less. In the scope of the present work a procedure has been implemented that extends the applicability of the interferometer to fields where not the volume or diameter but the direction-dependent radii are of interest. The results of the reconstruction were compared quantitatively to the independent results of sphericity measurements from CSIRO.

  4. Electrical Charging of the Clouds of Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, William J.; Whitten, R. C.; Bakes, E. L. O.

    2003-01-01

    We have used recent data on graphitic cloud particles in the atmosphere or Titan to compute the electrical charging of the particles (radii ranging from 0.01 microns to 0.26 microns). The charging on the nightside was rather similar to that obtained earlier (Borucki et al, Icarus, 72, 604-622, 1987) except that charge distributions on the particles are now computed and recently obtained cloud particle sizes and density distributions were employed. The negative charge on particles of 0.26 microns peaked at 9 at 150 km altitude. The computations were repeated for the dayside with the addition of photoelectron emission by the particles as a result of the absorption of solar UV radiation. Particles (except the very smallest) now became positively charged with particles of radius 0.26 microns being charged up to +47. Next, very small particles (radii approximately 3 x 10^-4 microns) of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were introduced and treated as sources of negative ions since they could be either neutral or carry one negative charge. Moreover, they are mobile so that they had to be treated like molecular size negative ions although much more massive. They had the effect of substantially reducing the electron densities in the altitude range 190 to 310 km to values less than the negative PAH densities and increasing the peak electron charge on the larger particles. Particles of radius 0.26 microns bore peak charges of plus or minus 47 at altitudes of approximately 250 km. The simulated effect of PAHs on the nightside proved to be much less pronounced; at the peak negative PAH density, it was less than the electron density. The physics governing these results will be discussed.

  5. Determining the nuclear equation of state from neutron-star masses and radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindblom, Lee

    1992-01-01

    A method is developed for determining the nuclear equation of state directly from a knowledge of the masses and radii of neutron stars. This analysis assumes only that equilibrium neutron-star matter has the stress-energy tensor of an isotropic fluid with a barotropic equation of state, and that general relativity describes a neutron star's internal gravitational field. We present numerical examples which illustrate how well this method will determine the equation of state when the appropriate observational data become available.

  6. Planetary Radii Across Five Orders of Magnitude in Mass and Stellar Insolation: Application to Transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortney, Jonathan J.; Barnes, J. W.; Marley, M. S.

    2006-09-01

    The forthcoming CoRoT and Kepler space missions promise to detect hundreds of transiting planets in the next several years. CoRoT may be able to detect planets as small at 2 Earth radii (13000 km) and Kepler as small as 1 Mercury radius (2500 km). Planetary systems for which radial velocity measurements can be made will allow for a determination of planetary mass, and hence, bulk density. However, obtaining radial velocities will often take years, and many planets will have no direct mass determination. Here we compute mass-radius relations for planets from 0.01 M_Earth to 10 M_Jupiter. We use high pressure equations of state for iron, rock, ice, helium, and hydrogen and make as few assumptions as necessary regarding composition to compute planetary radii over a significant phase space. For the hydrogen/helium-rich planets, we compute self-consistent model atmospheres at distances from 0.02 to 10 AU from the Sun, to correctly include the effects of stellar insolation on the contraction of planets with masses from 1 M_Neptune to 10 M_Jupiter. For all compositions we provide analytic fits to the derived mass-radius relations, which should allow for fast and useful mass estimates when only planetary radii are known. JJF is funded by a Spitzer Fellowship from NASA.

  7. Physical properties of a polar coronal hole from 2 to 5 solar radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munro, R. H.; Jackson, B. V.

    1977-01-01

    Observations with a white-light coronagraph aboard Skylab are used to determine the boundaries of a coronal hole in the northern polar region and the three-dimensional density structure within the hole between heights of 2 and 5 solar radii. The boundary of the hole is found to be essentially axisymmetric about the polar axis, nearly radial from 3 to 6 solar radii, and located near 25 deg latitude at these heights. The radiances arising from the hole are interpreted as resulting from an axisymmetric density distribution whose logarithmic radial gradient is independent of position within the hole and whose magnitude increases with angular distance away from the hole's axis. The velocity distribution within the hole is obtained from the continuity equation by assuming that the particle flux flowing outward in the hole is similar to that measured for high-speed solar-wind streams at 1 AU, and it is shown that the transition from subsonic to supersonic flow occurs between 2.2 and 3 solar radii.

  8. The Radii and Oblateness of Pluto and Charon: Preliminary Results from the 2015 New Horizons Flyby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisse, Carey M.; Nimmo, Francis; McKinnon, William B.; Umurhan, Orkan M.; Buie, Marc W.; Lauer, Tod R.; Roberts, James H.; Stern, S. Alan; Weaver, Hal A.; Young, Leslie A.; Ennico-Smith, Kimberly; Olkin, Cathy B.

    2015-11-01

    We present preliminary results for the radii and oblateness of Pluto and Charon. Accurate determinations of the mean radii of Pluto and Charon are important for establishing their densities and bulk composition. A fossil bulge, if present, would place constraints on the thermal and orbital evolution of these bodies [1,2]. The New Horizons LORRI imaging system [3] has provided global images of Pluto and Charon, with best resolutions of 3.8 and 2.3 km/pix, respectively. Three separate approaches have been used to determine mean radii and oblateness from the images, two using a threshold DN value [4,5] and one using a maximum gradient method. These approaches were validated using synthetic images having a range of photometric functions. Tradeoffs between the limb center location and the derived shape in individual images can be reduced by combining limb pixel locations obtained from different imaged rotational phases.This work was supported by NASA's New Horizons project.[1] Robuchon & Nimmo, Icarus 216, 426, 2011. [2] McKinnon & Singer, DPS 46, abs. no. 419.07, 2014. [3] Cheng et al., SSR 140, 189, 2008. [4] Dermott & Thomas, Icarus 73, 25, 1988. [5] Thomason & Nimmo, LPSC 46, abs. no. 1462, 2015.

  9. Larger Planet Radii Inferred from Stellar "Flicker" Brightness Variations of Bright Planet-host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastien, Fabienne A.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Pepper, Joshua

    2014-06-01

    Most extrasolar planets have been detected by their influence on their parent star, typically either gravitationally (the Doppler method) or by the small dip in brightness as the planet blocks a portion of the star (the transit method). Therefore, the accuracy with which we know the masses and radii of extrasolar planets depends directly on how well we know those of the stars, the latter usually determined from the measured stellar surface gravity, log g. Recent work has demonstrated that the short-timescale brightness variations ("flicker") of stars can be used to measure log g to a high accuracy of ~0.1-0.2 dex. Here, we use flicker measurements of 289 bright (Kepmag < 13) candidate planet-hosting stars with T eff = 4500-6650 K to re-assess the stellar parameters and determine the resulting impact on derived planet properties. This re-assessment reveals that for the brightest planet-host stars, Malmquist bias contaminates the stellar sample with evolved stars: nearly 50% of the bright planet-host stars are subgiants. As a result, the stellar radii, and hence the radii of the planets orbiting these stars, are on average 20%-30% larger than previous measurements had suggested.

  10. LARGER PLANET RADII INFERRED FROM STELLAR ''FLICKER'' BRIGHTNESS VARIATIONS OF BRIGHT PLANET-HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Bastien, Fabienne A.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Pepper, Joshua

    2014-06-10

    Most extrasolar planets have been detected by their influence on their parent star, typically either gravitationally (the Doppler method) or by the small dip in brightness as the planet blocks a portion of the star (the transit method). Therefore, the accuracy with which we know the masses and radii of extrasolar planets depends directly on how well we know those of the stars, the latter usually determined from the measured stellar surface gravity, log g. Recent work has demonstrated that the short-timescale brightness variations ({sup f}licker{sup )} of stars can be used to measure log g to a high accuracy of ∼0.1-0.2 dex. Here, we use flicker measurements of 289 bright (Kepmag < 13) candidate planet-hosting stars with T {sub eff} = 4500-6650 K to re-assess the stellar parameters and determine the resulting impact on derived planet properties. This re-assessment reveals that for the brightest planet-host stars, Malmquist bias contaminates the stellar sample with evolved stars: nearly 50% of the bright planet-host stars are subgiants. As a result, the stellar radii, and hence the radii of the planets orbiting these stars, are on average 20%-30% larger than previous measurements had suggested.

  11. STATISTICS OF MEASURING NEUTRON STAR RADII: ASSESSING A FREQUENTIST AND A BAYESIAN APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Özel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2015-09-10

    Measuring neutron star radii with spectroscopic and timing techniques relies on the combination of multiple observables to break the degeneracies between the mass and radius introduced by general relativistic effects. Here, we explore a previously used frequentist and a newly proposed Bayesian framework to obtain the most likely value and the uncertainty in such a measurement. We find that for the expected range of masses and radii and for realistic measurement errors, the frequentist approach suffers from biases that are larger than the accuracy in the radius measurement required to distinguish between the different equations of state. In contrast, in the Bayesian framework, the inferred uncertainties are larger, but the most likely values do not suffer from such biases. We also investigate ways of quantifying the degree of consistency between different spectroscopic measurements from a single source. We show that a careful assessment of the systematic uncertainties in the measurements eliminates the need for introducing ad hoc biases, which lead to artificially large inferred radii.

  12. What shapes stellar metallicity gradients of massive galaxies at large radii?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschmann, Michaela

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the differential impact of physical mechanisms, mergers and internal energetic phenomena, on the evolution of stellar metallicity gradients in massive, present-day galaxies employing sets of high-resolution, cosmological zoom simulations. We demonstrate that negative metallicity gradients at large radii (>2Reff) originate from the accretion of metal-poor stellar systems. At larger radii, galaxies become typically more dominated by stars accreted from satellite galaxies in major and minor mergers. However, only strong galactic, stellar-driven winds can sufficiently reduce the metallicity content of the accreted stars to realistically steepen the outer metallicity gradients in agreement with observations. In contrast, the gradients of the models without winds are inconsistent with observations. Moreover, we discuss the impact of additional AGN feedback. This analysis greatly highlights the importance of both energetic processes and merger events for stellar population properties of massive galaxies at large radii. Our results are expected to significantly contribute to the interpretation of current and up-coming IFU surveys (e.g. MaNGA, CALIFA).

  13. Which processes shape stellar population gradients of massive galaxies at large radii?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschmann, Michaela

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the differential impact of physical mechanisms, mergers (stellar accretion) and internal energetic phenomena, on the evolution of stellar population gradients in massive, present-day galaxies employing a set of high-resolution, cosmological zoom simulations. We demonstrate that negative metallicity and color gradients at large radii (>2Reff) originate from the accretion of metal-poor stellar systems. At larger radii, galaxies become typically more dominated by stars accreted from satellite galaxies in major and minor mergers. However, only strong galactic winds can sufficiently reduce the metallicity content of the accreted stars to realistically steepen the outer metallicity and colour gradients in agreement with present-day observations. In contrast, the gradients of the models without winds are inconsistent with observations (too flat). In the wind model, colour and metallicity gradients are significantly steeper for systems which have accreted stars in minor mergers, while galaxies with major mergers have relatively flat gradients, confirming previous results. This analysis greatly highlights the importance of both energetic processes and merger events for stellar population properties of massive galaxies at large radii. Our results are expected to significantly contribute to the interpretation of current and up-coming IFU surveys (like MaNGA and Califa), which in turn can help to better constrain still uncertain models for energetic processes in simulations.

  14. RADII OF RAPIDLY ROTATING STARS, WITH APPLICATION TO TRANSITING-PLANET HOSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Timothy M.

    2010-01-20

    The currently favored method for estimating radii and other parameters of transiting-planet host stars is to match theoretical models to observations of the stellar mean density rho{sub *}, the effective temperature T{sub eff}, and the composition parameter [Z]. This explicitly model-dependent approach is based on readily available observations, and results in small formal errors. Its performance will be central to the reliability of results from ground-based transit surveys such as TrES, HAT, and SuperWASP, as well as to the space-borne missions MOST, CoRoT, and Kepler. Here, I use two calibration samples of stars (eclipsing binaries (EBs) and stars for which asteroseismic analyses are available) having well-determined masses and radii to estimate the accuracy and systematic errors inherent in the rho{sub *} method. When matching to the Yonsei-Yale stellar evolution models, I find the most important systematic error results from selection bias favoring rapidly rotating (hence probably magnetically active) stars among the EB sample. If unaccounted for, this bias leads to a mass-dependent underestimate of stellar radii by as much as 4% for stars of 0.4 M{sub sun}, decreasing to zero for masses above about 1.4 M{sub sun}. Relative errors in estimated stellar masses are three times larger than those in radii. The asteroseismic sample suggests (albeit with significant uncertainty) that systematic errors are small for slowly rotating, inactive stars. Systematic errors arising from failings of the Yonsei-Yale models of inactive stars probably exist, but are difficult to assess because of the small number of well-characterized comparison stars having low mass and slow rotation. Poor information about [Z] is an important source of random error, and may be a minor source of systematic error as well. With suitable corrections for rotation, it is likely that systematic errors in the rho{sub *} method can be comparable to or smaller than the random errors, yielding radii that

  15. Internal Charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.

    2014-01-01

    (1) High energy (>100keV) electrons penetrate spacecraft walls and accumulate in dielectrics or isolated conductors; (2) Threat environment is energetic electrons with sufficient flux to charge circuit boards, cable insulation, and ungrounded metal faster than charge can dissipate; (3) Accumulating charge density generates electric fields in excess of material breakdown strenght resulting in electrostatic discharge; and (4) System impact is material damage, discharge currents inside of spacecraft Faraday cage on or near critical circuitry, and RF noise.

  16. Effect of ionic radii on the Curie temperature in Ba1-x-ySrxCayTiO3 compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berenov, A.; Le Goupil, F.; Alford, N.

    2016-06-01

    A series of Ba1-x-ySrxCayTiO3 compounds were prepared with varying average ionic radii and cation disorder on A-site. All samples showed typical ferroelectric behavior. A simple empirical equation correlated Curie temperature, TC, with the values of ionic radii of A-site cations. This correlation was related to the distortion of TiO6 octahedra observed during neutron diffraction studies. The equation was used for the selection of compounds with predetermined values of TC. The effects of A-site ionic radii on the temperatures of phase transitions in Ba1-x-ySrxCayTiO3 were discussed.

  17. Effect of ionic radii on the Curie temperature in Ba1-x-ySrxCayTiO3 compounds.

    PubMed

    Berenov, A; Le Goupil, F; Alford, N

    2016-06-21

    A series of Ba1-x-ySrxCayTiO3 compounds were prepared with varying average ionic radii and cation disorder on A-site. All samples showed typical ferroelectric behavior. A simple empirical equation correlated Curie temperature, TC, with the values of ionic radii of A-site cations. This correlation was related to the distortion of TiO6 octahedra observed during neutron diffraction studies. The equation was used for the selection of compounds with predetermined values of TC. The effects of A-site ionic radii on the temperatures of phase transitions in Ba1-x-ySrxCayTiO3 were discussed.

  18. Charging machine

    DOEpatents

    Medlin, John B.

    1976-05-25

    A charging machine for loading fuel slugs into the process tubes of a nuclear reactor includes a tubular housing connected to the process tube, a charging trough connected to the other end of the tubular housing, a device for loading the charging trough with a group of fuel slugs, means for equalizing the coolant pressure in the charging trough with the pressure in the process tubes, means for pushing the group of fuel slugs into the process tube and a latch and a seal engaging the last object in the group of fuel slugs to prevent the fuel slugs from being ejected from the process tube when the pusher is removed and to prevent pressure liquid from entering the charging machine.

  19. Possible octupole deformation in Cs and Ba nuclei from their differential radii

    SciTech Connect

    Sheline, R.K.; Jain, A.K.; Jain, K.

    1988-12-01

    The odd-even staggering of the differential radii of Fr and Ra and the Cs and Ba nuclei is compared. This staggering is inverted in the region of known octupole deformation in the Fr and Ra nuclei. The normal staggering is eliminated in the Cs nuclei and attenuated in the Ba nuclei for neutron numbers 85--88. This fact is used to suggest the possible existence of octupole deformation and its neutron number range in the Cs and Ba nuclear ground states.

  20. Understanding the Rapidity Dependence of the Elliptic Flow and the HBT Radii at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Csanad, M.; Loerstad, B.

    2006-04-11

    The pseudo-rapidity dependence of the elliptic flow at various excitation energies measured by the PHOBOS Collaboration in Au+Au collisions at RHIC is one of the surprising results that has not been explained before in terms of hydrodynamical models. Here we show that these data are in agreement with theoretical predictions and satisfy the universal scaling relation predicted by the Buda-Lund hydrodynamical model, based on exact solutions of perfect fluid hydrodynamics. We also show a theoretical prediction on the rapidity and transverse momentum scaling of the HBT radii measured in heavy ion collisions, based on the Buda-Lund model.

  1. Disk radii and grain sizes in Herschel-resolved debris disks

    SciTech Connect

    Pawellek, Nicole; Krivov, Alexander V.; Marshall, Jonathan P.; Montesinos, Benjamin; Ábrahám, Péter; Moór, Attila; Bryden, Geoffrey; Eiroa, Carlos

    2014-09-01

    The radii of debris disks and the sizes of their dust grains are important tracers of the planetesimal formation mechanisms and physical processes operating in these systems. Here we use a representative sample of 34 debris disks resolved in various Herschel Space Observatory (Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA) programs to constrain the disk radii and the size distribution of their dust. While we modeled disks with both warm and cold components, and identified warm inner disks around about two-thirds of the stars, we focus our analysis only on the cold outer disks, i.e., Kuiper-belt analogs. We derive the disk radii from the resolved images and find a large dispersion for host stars of any spectral class, but no significant trend with the stellar luminosity. This argues against ice lines as a dominant player in setting the debris disk sizes, since the ice line location varies with the luminosity of the central star. Fixing the disk radii to those inferred from the resolved images, we model the spectral energy distribution to determine the dust temperature and the grain size distribution for each target. While the dust temperature systematically increases toward earlier spectral types, the ratio of the dust temperature to the blackbody temperature at the disk radius decreases with the stellar luminosity. This is explained by a clear trend of typical sizes increasing toward more luminous stars. The typical grain sizes are compared to the radiation pressure blowout limit s {sub blow} that is proportional to the stellar luminosity-to-mass ratio and thus also increases toward earlier spectral classes. The grain sizes in the disks of G- to A-stars are inferred to be several times s {sub blow} at all stellar luminosities, in agreement with collisional models of debris disks. The sizes, measured in the units of s {sub blow}, appear to decrease

  2. Plastic set of smooth large radii of curvature thermal conductance specimens at light loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinzie, D. J., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Thermal contact conductance test data at high vacuum were obtained from two Armco iron specimens having smooth, large radii of curvature, convex, one-half wave length surfaces. The data are compared with calculations based on two macroscopic elastic deformation theories and an empirical expression. Major disagreement with the theories and fair agreement with the empirical expression resulted. Plastic deformation of all the contacting surfaces was verified from surface analyzer statistics. These results indicate that the theoretical assumption of macroscopic elastic deformation is inadequate for accurate prediction of heat transfer with light loads for Armco iron specimens similar to those used in this investigation.

  3. The quantization of the radii of coordination spheres cubic crystals and cluster systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, G.; Emelyanov, S.; Ignatenko, N.; Ignatenko, G.

    2016-02-01

    The article deals with the creation of an algorithm for calculating the radii of coordination spheres and coordination numbers cubic crystal structure and cluster systems in liquids. Solution has important theoretical value since it allows us to calculate the amount of coordination in the interparticle interaction potentials, to predict the processes of growth of the crystal structures and processes of self-organization of particles in the cluster system. One option accounting geometrical and quantum factors is the use of the Fibonacci series to construct a consistent number of focal areas for cubic crystals and cluster formation in the liquid.

  4. Centrality and Transverse Momentum Dependence of HBT Radii in Au+Au Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweid, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    The expansion dynamics of relativistic heavy ion collisions is influenced by the transport properties of the created medium, as well as the path of the reaction trajectory in the (T ,μB)-plane. Such an influence can manifest as quantifiable changes in the magnitude of the space-time extent of the emission source, characterized by the so-called HBT radii Rout, Rside and Rlong. We will present and discuss recent HBT measurements which extend the upper momentum range of measurements that have been made in the STAR detector for Au+Au collisions at several collision centralities and beam energies.

  5. The magnetic field of the equatorial magnetotail - AMPTE/CCE observations at R less than 8.8 earth radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.; Acuna, M. H.; Zanetti, L. J.; Potemra, T. A.

    1987-01-01

    The MPTE/CCE magnetic field experiment has been used to obtain a quantitative evaluation of the frequency and extent of magnetic field distortion in the near-tail region at less than 8.8 earth radii. The variation of this distortion with Kp, radial distance, longitude, and near-equatorial latitude is reported. It has been found that taillike distortions from the dipole field direction may reach 80 deg near the MPTE/CE apogee of 8.8 earth radii. The Bz field component in dipole coordinates was always positive within 0.5 earth radii of the equatorial current sheet, indicating the neutral lines were never seen inside of 8.8 earth radii. Fields were most taillike near midnight and during times of high Kp. At 8.5 earth radii the equatorial field magnitude depressions were roughly half the dipole field strength of 51 nT. These depressions are larger at lesser distances, reaching -40 nT at 3.4 earth radii for Kp of 2- or less and -80 nT and Kp of 3+ and greater.

  6. Extracting temperature and transverse flow by fitting transverse mass spectra and HBT radii together

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ronghua; Qian, Jing; Chen, Jianyi; Wu, Qingxin; Huo, Lei

    2017-03-01

    Single particle transverse mass spectra and HBT radii of identical pion and identical kaon are analyzed with a blast-wave parametrization under the assumptions of local thermal equilibrium and transverse expansion. Under the assumptions, temperature parameter T and transverse expansion rapidity ρ are sensitive to the shapes of transverse mass mT spectrum and HBT radius Rs(KT). Negative and positive correlations between T and ρ are observed by fitting mT spectrum and HBT radius Rs(KT), respectively. For a Monte Carlo simulation using the blast-wave function, T and ρ are extracted by fitting mT spectra and HBT radii together utilizing a combined optimization function χ2. With this method, T and ρ of the Monte Carlo sources can be extracted. Using this method for A Multi-Phase Transport (AMPT) model at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) energy, the differences of T and ρ between pion and kaon are observed obviously, and the tendencies of T and ρ versus collision energy sNN are similar with the results extracted directly from the AMPT model.

  7. Radii and Shape of Pluto and Charon: Preliminary Results from New Horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, F.; Lisse, C. M.; Umurhan, O. M.; McKinnon, W. B.; Buie, M. W.; Lauer, T.; Beyer, R. A.; Moore, J. M.; Stern, A.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Olkin, C.; Ennico Smith, K.; Young, L. A.; Bierson, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate determinations of the mean radii of Pluto and Charon are important for establishing their densities and thus bulk composition. A fossil bulge, if present, would place constraints on the thermal and orbital evolution of these bodies [1,2]. The New Horizons LORRI imaging system [3] has provided global images of Pluto and Charon, with best resolutions of 3.8 and 2.3 km/pix, respectively. Three separate approaches have been used to determine mean radii and shape from the images, two using a threshold DN value [4,5] and one using a maximum gradient method. These approaches were validated using synthetic images having a range of photometric functions. Tradeoffs between the limb center location and the derived shape in individual images can be reduced by combining limb picks from different images. Preliminary results for both Pluto and Charon will be presented. [1] Robuchon & Nimmo, Icarus 216, 426, 2011. [2] McKinnon & Singer, DPS 46, abs. no. 419.07, 2014. [3] Cheng et al., SSR 140, 189, 2008. [4] Dermott & Thomas, Icarus 73, 25, 1988. [5] Thomason & Nimmo, LPSC 46, abs. no. 1462, 2015.

  8. Absolute densities, masses, and radii of the WASP-47 system determined dynamically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almenara, J. M.; Díaz, R. F.; Bonfils, X.; Udry, S.

    2016-10-01

    We present a self-consistent modelling of the available light curve and radial velocity data of WASP-47 that takes into account the gravitational interactions between all known bodies in the system. The joint analysis of light curve and radial velocity data in a multi-planetary system allows deriving absolute densities, radii, and masses without the use of theoretical stellar models. For WASP-47 the precision is limited by the reduced dynamical information that is due to the short time span of the K2 light curve. We achieve a precision of around 22% for the radii of the star and the transiting planets, between 40% and 60% for their masses, and between 1.5% and 38% for their densities. All values agree with previously reported measurements. When theoretical stellar models are included, the system parameters are determined with a precision that exceeds that achieved by previous studies, thanks to the self-consistent modelling of light curve and radial velocity data.

  9. THE INFLUENCE OF ORBITAL ECCENTRICITY ON TIDAL RADII OF STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Jeremy J.; Harris, William E.; Sills, Alison; Hurley, Jarrod R.

    2013-02-20

    We have performed N-body simulations of star clusters orbiting in a spherically symmetric smooth galactic potential. The model clusters cover a range of initial half-mass radii and orbital eccentricities in order to test the historical assumption that the tidal radius of a cluster is imposed at perigalacticon. The traditional assumption for globular clusters is that since the internal relaxation time is larger than its orbital period, the cluster is tidally stripped at perigalacticon. Instead, our simulations show that a cluster with an eccentric orbit does not need to fully relax in order to expand. After a perigalactic pass, a cluster recaptures previously unbound stars, and the tidal shock at perigalacticon has the effect of energizing inner region stars to larger orbits. Therefore, instead of the limiting radius being imposed at perigalacticon, it more nearly traces the instantaneous tidal radius of the cluster at any point in the orbit. We present a numerical correction factor to theoretical tidal radii calculated at perigalacticon which takes into consideration both the orbital eccentricity and current orbital phase of the cluster.

  10. Charged snowball in nonpolar liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikina, I.; Shikin, V.; Varlamov, A.

    2007-09-01

    The problem of correct definition of the charge carrier effective mass in superfluid helium is revised. It is demonstrated that the effective mass M of such a quasiparticle can be introduced without use of Atkins' idea concerning the solidification of liquid He in the close vicinity of an ion. The two-liquid scenario of the "snowball" mass formation is investigated. The normal fluid contribution to the total snowball effective mass, the physical causes of its singularity, and a way to do the corresponding regularization procedure are discussed. Within the two-liquid model, two different effective snowball radii exist: Rid for superfluid flow component and Rn for the normal one, Rn>Rid is demonstrated. Agreement of the theory with the available experimental data is found.

  11. Coronal activity below 2 solar radii - 1980 February 15-17

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, R. R.; Poland, A. I.

    1981-01-01

    Coronal observations concerning the area between the solar surface and 2.0 solar radii can now be conducted by making use of a new ground-based K-coronameter and a prominence monitor on Mauna Loa in Hawaii. Observations made by the K-coronameter on three consecutive days surrounding the eclipse of 1980 February 16 show that the solar corona was very active during this time. Definite changes occurred between each day's observations. During one period of K-coronameter observations (1980 February 15) a coronal transient was observed to move through the coronameter's field of view. A description is presented of the general changes which occurred in the corona during this period, taking into account the coronal transient observed by the prominence monitor and K-coronameter. The most important aspects of these new observations pertain to the relationship between the H alpha prominence and the surrounding coronal material.

  12. Probing the 2-D Kinematic Structure of Early-Type Galaxies Out to 3 Effective Radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Robert N.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean P.; Strader, Jay; Spolaor, Max; Trevor Mendel, J.; Spitler, Lee

    2010-06-01

    We detail an innovative new technique for measuring the 2-D velocity moments (rotation velocity, velocity dispersion and Gauss-Hermite coefficients h3 and h4) using spectra from Keck DEIMOS multi-object spectroscopic observations. The data are used to reconstruct 2-D rotation velocity maps. Here we present data for one of five early-type galaxies whose kinematics we have measured out to ~3 effective radii (see [1]). From these data 2D kinematic maps are constructed. We show such analyses can provide significant insights into the global kinematic structure of galaxies, and, in some cases, challenge the accepted morphological classification. Our results are of particular importance to studies which attempt to classify galaxies by their kinematic structure within one effective radius, such as the recent definition of fast- and slow- rotator classes by the SAURON project.

  13. Retrievals and Comparisons of Various MODIS-Spectrum Inferred Water Cloud Droplet Effective Radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu-Lung, Chang; Minnis, Patrick; Lin, Bin; Sunny, Sun-Mack; Khaiyer, Mandana M.

    2007-01-01

    Cloud droplet effective radius retrievals from different Aqua MODIS nearinfrared channels (2.1- micrometer, 3.7- micrometer, and 1.6- micrometer) show considerable differences even among most confident QC pixels. Both Collection 004 and Collection 005 MOD06 show smaller mean effective radii at 3.7- micrometer wavelength than at 2.1- micrometer and 1.6- micrometer wavelengths. Differences in effective radius retrievals between Collection 004 and Collection 005 may be affected by cloud top height/temperature differences, which mainly occur for optically thin clouds. Changes in cloud top height and temperature for thin clouds have different impacts on the effective radius retrievals from 2.1- micrometer, 3.7- micrometer, and 1.6- micrometer channels. Independent retrievals (this study) show, on average, more consistency in the three effective radius retrievals. This study is for Aqua MODIS only.

  14. On the diamagnetic effect of the plasma sheet near 60 earth radii.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, C.-I.; Mihalov, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    The two-dimensional (YZ plane) spatial distribution of magnetic field magnitudes in the geomagnetic tail at the lunar distance is given in both the solar magnetospheric and the neutral-sheet coordinate systems by using three years of data from the Ames magnetometer on Explorer 35. The effect of changes in geomagnetic activity is also presented. In the magnetotail near 60 earth radii, a broad region in which the magnetic field intensity is relatively weak in comparison with that in the other region of the tail is located adjacent to the solar magnetospheric equatorial plane and the calculated neutral sheet. This depression of the field due to the diamagnetic effect of the plasma sheet is more evident during times of minimum geomagnetic activity.-

  15. Approximating proto-stellar structure without a computer (The proto-sun at 50 earth radii)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doorish, John F.

    1991-09-01

    An analytical method that facilitates the description of main-sequence stellar structure is applied to protostars to model the core in formation. The model is based on Motz dimensionless variables which permit the stellar interior equations to be converted into a linearly approximate form. Equations for the mass, pressure, and temperature gradients of the protosun's hydrostatic core at 50 earth radii are given, and an approximation is presented for a one-solar-mass protostar that is contracting down to the main sequence. Comparisons are made between the analytical values and values from observations and computer models, and IR data confirm some analytically derived protostellar characteristics. It is concluded that the core of a protostar is composed of a spherical ball of gas in hydrostatic equilibrium where accretion very gradually becomes a factor.

  16. High Precision, Directly Determined Radii and Effective Temperatures for Giant Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Belle, Gerard

    Mission Statement. The radius and temperature scale of giant stars across the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram from red giant branch stars to horizontal branch stars is understood well enough to enable an accurate prediction of temperature and size for a given star to no better than ~2.5% and ~20%, respectively, based upon photometry. The primary reason for this is the lack of empirically determined radii and temperatures across the giant branches. One of the long-running strengths of optical interferometry has been the empirical determination of fundamental stellar parameters. Through direct measurements of effective temperature and linear radius, methods such as photometric colors that indirectly predict such values can be calibrated. A substantial body of data on this topic collected for giant stars remains unpublished and stands to benefit from the advances in ancillary data sources and computational techniques of the last dozen years. Previous efforts in this regard have been limited by data sample breadth and depth. The Experiment. We will use multi-technique and multi-wavelength data available in NASA's Archives to directly measure angular sizes and bolometric fluxes for giant stars, establishing the radius-temperature scale across the giant branches. Interferometric data from NASA's Palomar Testbed Interferometer (PTI) Archive in conjunction with recent advances in calibration techniques will allow us to directly establish fundamental parameters of temperature and radius for 425 giant stars at unprecedented levels of accuracy. The majority of these objects was observed repeatedly over the 11-year run of this well- understood instrument, allowing for exquisite control of observational systematics. Optical, near-infrared and mid-infrared data from NASA Archives, including 2MASS, COBE, MSX, and WISE will constrain the bolometric fluxes; the recent reanalysis of the Hipparcos data will provide unparalleled distances to each of the 425 giant stars in the sample. We

  17. A finite element stress analysis of spur gears including fillet radii and rim thickness effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S. H.; Huston, R. L.; Coy, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    Spur gear stress analysis results are presented for a variety of loading conditions, support conditions, fillet radii, and rim thickness. These results are obtained using the SAP IV finite-element code. The maximum stresses, occurring at the root surface, substantially increase with decreasing rim thickness for partially supported rims (that is, with loose-fitting hubs). For fully supported rims (that is, with tight-fitting hubs), the root surface stresses slightly decrease with decreasing rim thickness. The fillet radius is found to have a significant effect upon the maximum stresses at the root surface. These stresses increase with increasing fillet radius. The fillet radius has little effect upon the internal root section stresses.

  18. Neutron star radii, universal relations, and the role of prior distributions

    DOE PAGES

    Steiner, Andrew W.; Lattimer, James M.; Brown, Edward F.

    2016-02-02

    We investigate constraints on neutron star structure arising from the assumptions that neutron stars have crusts, that recent calculations of pure neutron matter limit the equation of state of neutron star matter near the nuclear saturation density, that the high-density equation of state is limited by causality and the largest high-accuracy neutron star mass measurement, and that general relativity is the correct theory of gravity. We explore the role of prior assumptions by considering two classes of equation of state models. In a first, the intermediate- and high-density behavior of the equation of state is parameterized by piecewise polytropes. Inmore » the second class, the high-density behavior of the equation of state is parameterized by piecewise continuous line segments. The smallest density at which high-density matter appears is varied in order to allow for strong phase transitions above the nuclear saturation density. We critically examine correlations among the pressure of matter, radii, maximum masses, the binding energy, the moment of inertia, and the tidal deformability, paying special attention to the sensitivity of these correlations to prior assumptions about the equation of state. It is possible to constrain the radii of 1.4 solar mass neutron stars to be larger than 10 km, even without consideration of additional astrophysical observations, for example, those from photospheric radius expansion bursts or quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries. We are able to improve the accuracy of known correlations between the moment of inertia and compactness as well as the binding energy and compactness. Furthermore, we also demonstrate the existence of a correlation between the neutron star binding energy and the moment of inertia.« less

  19. THE MASS-RADIUS RELATION FOR 65 EXOPLANETS SMALLER THAN 4 EARTH RADII

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Lauren M.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.

    2014-03-01

    We study the masses and radii of 65 exoplanets smaller than 4 R {sub ⊕} with orbital periods shorter than 100 days. We calculate the weighted mean densities of planets in bins of 0.5 R {sub ⊕} and identify a density maximum of 7.6  g cm{sup –3} at 1.4 R {sub ⊕}. On average, planets with radii up to R {sub P} = 1.5 R {sub ⊕} increase in density with increasing radius. Above 1.5 R {sub ⊕}, the average planet density rapidly decreases with increasing radius, indicating that these planets have a large fraction of volatiles by volume overlying a rocky core. Including the solar system terrestrial planets with the exoplanets below 1.5 R {sub ⊕}, we find ρ{sub P} = 2.43 + 3.39(R {sub P}/R {sub ⊕}) g cm{sup –3} for R {sub P} < 1.5 R {sub ⊕}, which is consistent with rocky compositions. For 1.5 ≤ R {sub P}/R {sub ⊕} < 4, we find M {sub P}/M {sub ⊕} = 2.69(R {sub P}/R {sub ⊕}){sup 0.93}. The rms of planet masses to the fit between 1.5 and 4 R {sub ⊕} is 4.3 M {sub ⊕} with reduced χ{sup 2} = 6.2. The large scatter indicates a diversity in planet composition at a given radius. The compositional diversity can be due to planets of a given volume (as determined by their large H/He envelopes) containing rocky cores of different masses or compositions.

  20. Neutron star radii, universal relations, and the role of prior distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Andrew W.; Lattimer, James M.; Brown, Edward F.

    2016-02-02

    We investigate constraints on neutron star structure arising from the assumptions that neutron stars have crusts, that recent calculations of pure neutron matter limit the equation of state of neutron star matter near the nuclear saturation density, that the high-density equation of state is limited by causality and the largest high-accuracy neutron star mass measurement, and that general relativity is the correct theory of gravity. We explore the role of prior assumptions by considering two classes of equation of state models. In a first, the intermediate- and high-density behavior of the equation of state is parameterized by piecewise polytropes. In the second class, the high-density behavior of the equation of state is parameterized by piecewise continuous line segments. The smallest density at which high-density matter appears is varied in order to allow for strong phase transitions above the nuclear saturation density. We critically examine correlations among the pressure of matter, radii, maximum masses, the binding energy, the moment of inertia, and the tidal deformability, paying special attention to the sensitivity of these correlations to prior assumptions about the equation of state. It is possible to constrain the radii of 1.4 solar mass neutron stars to be larger than 10 km, even without consideration of additional astrophysical observations, for example, those from photospheric radius expansion bursts or quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries. We are able to improve the accuracy of known correlations between the moment of inertia and compactness as well as the binding energy and compactness. Furthermore, we also demonstrate the existence of a correlation between the neutron star binding energy and the moment of inertia.

  1. Fossil hominin radii from the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene site (Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain).

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Laura; Carretero, José Miguel; García-González, Rebeca; Lorenzo, Carlos; Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Quam, Rolf; Martínez, Ignacio; Gracia-Téllez, Ana; Arsuaga, Juan Luis

    2016-01-01

    Complete radii in the fossil record preceding recent humans and Neandertals are very scarce. Here we introduce the radial remains recovered from the Sima de los Huesos (SH) site in the Sierra de Atapuerca between 1976 and 2011 and which have been dated in excess of 430 ky (thousands of years) ago. The sample comprises 89 specimens, 49 of which are attributed to adults representing a minimum of seven individuals. All elements are described anatomically and metrically, and compared with other fossil hominins and recent humans in order to examine the phylogenetic polarity of certain radial features. Radial remains from SH have some traits that differentiate them from those of recent humans and make them more similar to Neandertals, including strongly curved shafts, anteroposterior expanded radial heads and both absolutely and relatively long necks. In contrast, the SH sample differs from Neandertals in showing a high overall gracility as well as a high frequency (80%) of an anteriorly oriented radial tuberosity. Thus, like the cranial and dental remains from the SH site, characteristic Neandertal radial morphology is not present fully in the SH radii. We also analyzed the cross-sectional properties of the SH radial sample at two different levels: mid-shaft and at the midpoint of the neck length. When standardized by shaft length, no difference in the mid-shaft cross-sectional properties were found between the SH hominins, Neandertals and recent humans. Nevertheless, due to their long neck length, the SH hominins show a higher lever efficiency than either Neandertals or recent humans. Functionally, the SH radial morphology is consistent with more efficient pronation-supination and flexion-extension movements. The particular trait composition in the SH sample and Neandertals resembles more closely morphology evident in recent human males.

  2. Measuring the masses, radii and orbital eccentricities of sub-Neptunes with transit timing variations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Lissauer, Jack J.; Rowe, Jason; Fabrycky, Daniel C.

    2014-05-01

    Outside our solar system, there is a small sample of planets with known masses and radii, mostly hot jupiters whose radii are known from transit depths, and whose masses are determined from radial velocity spectroscopy (RV). In the absence of mass determinations via RV observations, transit timing variations (TTVs) offer a chance to probe perturbations between planets that pass close to one another or are near resonance, and hence dynamical fits to observed transit times can measure planetary masses and orbital parameters. Such modeling can probe planetary masses at longer orbital periods than RV targets, although not without some challenges. For example, in modeling pairwise planetary perturbations near first order mean motion resonances, a degeneracy between eccentricity and mass exists that limits the accuracy of mass determinations. Nevertheless, in several compact multiplanet systems, fitting complex TTV signals can break the degeneracy, permitting useful mass constraints, and precise measures of small but non-zero eccentricity.The precision in measuring the radius of a transiting planet rests on the uncertainty in the stellar radius, which is typically ~10% for targets with spectral follow-up. With dynamical fits, however, solutions for the orbital parameters including the eccentricity vectors can, alongside the transit light curves, tightly constrain the stellar density and radius. Alongside spectroscopic data, our dynamical fits to TTVs reduced the stellar and hence planetary radius uncertainties at Kepler-11 and Kepler-79 to just 2%, permitting useful planetary density determinations. In the case of Kepler-79, planetary bulk densities are remarkably low given the planetary masses. Indeed, several multiplanet systems characterized by TTV show much lower planetary densities than typical RV determinations in the same mass range. While this reflects the detection biases of both techniques, it also represents a growing sample of characterized systems of

  3. Measuring the Masses and Radii of Sub-Neptunes with Transit Timing Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Lissauer, J. J.; Rowe, J. F.; Fabrycky, D.

    2013-10-01

    The bounty of sub-Neptunes discovered by Kepler enables us to study a regime in planetary size and mass that is absent from the Solar System. This regime includes a transition from rocky planets to those with substantial amounts of volatiles-- in either ice mantles or deep atmospheres. Characterizing these worlds by their bulk densities can probe this transition, and this requires mass and radius determinations. Outside our solar system, there is a small sample of planets with known masses and radii, mostly hot jupiters whose radii are known from transit depths, and whose masses are determined from radial velocity spectroscopy (RV). In the absence of mass determinations via RV observations, transit timing variations (TTVs) offer a chance to probe perturbations between planets that pass close to one another or are near resonance, and hence dynamical fits to observed transit times can measure planetary masses and orbital parameters. Such modelling can probe planetary masses at longer orbital periods than RV targets, although not without some challenges. For example, in modeling pairwise planetary perturbations, a degeneracy between eccentricity and mass exists that limits the accuracy of mass determinations. Nevertheless, in several compact multiplanet systems, fitting complex TTV signals can break the degeneracy, permitting useful mass determinations. The precision in measuring the radius of a transiting planet rests on the uncertainty in the stellar radius, which is typically ~10% for targets with spectral follow-up. With dynamical fits, however, solutions for the orbital parameters including the eccentricity vectors can, alongside the transit lightcurves, tightly constrain the stellar density and radius. Revisiting the six-planet system of Kepler-11, our dynamical fits to TTVs, alongside spectroscopic data on the host star, reduced the stellar and hence planetary radius uncertainties to just 2%, permitting useful planetary density determinations. In the case of

  4. Evidence for short-range-ordered charge stripes far above the charge-ordering transition in La1.67Sr0.33NiO4.

    PubMed

    Abeykoon, A M Milinda; Božin, Emil S; Yin, Wei-Guo; Gu, Genda; Hill, John P; Tranquada, John M; Billinge, Simon J L

    2013-08-30

    The temperature evolution of structural effects associated with charge order (CO) and spin order in La1.67Sr0.33NiO4 has been investigated using neutron powder diffraction. We report an anomalous shrinking of the c/a lattice parameter ratio that correlates with T(CO). The sign of this change can be explained by the change in interlayer Coulomb energy between the static-stripe-ordered state and the fluctuating-stripe-ordered state or the charge-disordered state. In addition, we identify a contribution to the mean-square displacements of Ni and in-plane O atoms whose width correlates quite well with the size of the pseudogap extracted from the reported optical conductivity, with a non-Debye-like component that persists below and well above T(CO). We infer that dynamic charge-stripe correlations survive to T∼2T(CO).

  5. Evidence for Short-Range-Ordered Charge Stripes Far above the Charge-Ordering Transition in La1.67Sr0.33NiO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeykoon, A. M. Milinda; Božin, Emil S.; Yin, Wei-Guo; Gu, Genda; Hill, John P.; Tranquada, John M.; Billinge, Simon J. L.

    2013-08-01

    The temperature evolution of structural effects associated with charge order (CO) and spin order in La1.67Sr0.33NiO4 has been investigated using neutron powder diffraction. We report an anomalous shrinking of the c/a lattice parameter ratio that correlates with TCO. The sign of this change can be explained by the change in interlayer Coulomb energy between the static-stripe-ordered state and the fluctuating-stripe-ordered state or the charge-disordered state. In addition, we identify a contribution to the mean-square displacements of Ni and in-plane O atoms whose width correlates quite well with the size of the pseudogap extracted from the reported optical conductivity, with a non-Debye-like component that persists below and well above TCO. We infer that dynamic charge-stripe correlations survive to T˜2TCO.

  6. Self-organization and oscillation of negatively charged dust particles in a 2-dimensional dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Y. L.; Huang, F.; Chen, Z. Y.; Liu, Y. H.; Yu, M. Y.

    2016-02-01

    Negatively charged dust particles immersed in 2-dimensional dusty plasma system are investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The effects of the confinement potential and attraction interaction potential on dust particle self-organization are studied in detail and two typical dust particle distributions are obtained when the system reaches equilibrium. The average radial velocity (ARV), average radial force (ARF) and radial mean square displacement are employed to analyze the dust particles' dynamics. Both ARVs and ARFs exhibit oscillation behaviors when the simulation system reaches equilibrium state. The relationships between the oscillation and confinement potential and attraction potential are studied in this paper. The simulation results are qualitatively similar to experimental results.

  7. Effect of ionic radii on the Curie temperature in Ba1-x-ySrxCayTiO3 compounds

    PubMed Central

    Berenov, A.; Le Goupil, F.; Alford, N.

    2016-01-01

    A series of Ba1-x-ySrxCayTiO3 compounds were prepared with varying average ionic radii and cation disorder on A-site. All samples showed typical ferroelectric behavior. A simple empirical equation correlated Curie temperature, TC, with the values of ionic radii of A-site cations. This correlation was related to the distortion of TiO6 octahedra observed during neutron diffraction studies. The equation was used for the selection of compounds with predetermined values of TC. The effects of A-site ionic radii on the temperatures of phase transitions in Ba1-x-ySrxCayTiO3 were discussed. PMID:27324841

  8. Systematic study of charged-pion and kaon femtoscopy in Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.

    2015-09-23

    We present a systematic study of charged pion and kaon interferometry in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV. The kaon mean source radii are found to be larger than pion radii in the outward and longitudinal directions for the same transverse mass; this difference increases for more central collisions. The azimuthal-angle dependence of the radii was measured with respect to the second-order event plane and similar oscillations of the source radii were found for pions and kaons. Hydrodynamic models qualitatively describe the similar oscillations of the mean source radii for pions and kaons, but they do not fully describe the transverse-massmore » dependence of the oscillations.« less

  9. Systematic study of charged-pion and kaon femtoscopy in Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.

    2015-09-23

    We present a systematic study of charged pion and kaon interferometry in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV. The kaon mean source radii are found to be larger than pion radii in the outward and longitudinal directions for the same transverse mass; this difference increases for more central collisions. The azimuthal-angle dependence of the radii was measured with respect to the second-order event plane and similar oscillations of the source radii were found for pions and kaons. Hydrodynamic models qualitatively describe the similar oscillations of the mean source radii for pions and kaons, but they do not fully describe the transverse-mass dependence of the oscillations.

  10. Determination of ion track radii in amorphous matrices via formation of nano-clusters by ion-beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Buljan, M.; Karlusic, M.; Bogdanovic-Radovic, I.; Jaksic, M.; Radic, N.; Salamon, K.; Bernstorff, S.

    2012-09-03

    We report on a method for the determination of ion track radii, formed in amorphous materials by ion-beam irradiation. The method is based on the addition to an amorphous matrix of a small amount of foreign atoms, which easily diffuse and form clusters when the temperature is sufficiently increased. The irradiation causes clustering of these atoms, and the final separations of the formed clusters are dependent on the parameters of the ion-beam. Comparison of the separations between the clusters that are formed by ions with different properties in the same type of material enables the determination of ion-track radii.

  11. Determination of ion track radii in amorphous matrices via formation of nano-clusters by ion-beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buljan, M.; Karlušić, M.; Bogdanović-Radović, I.; Jakšić, M.; Salamon, K.; Bernstorff, S.; Radić, N.

    2012-09-01

    We report on a method for the determination of ion track radii, formed in amorphous materials by ion-beam irradiation. The method is based on the addition to an amorphous matrix of a small amount of foreign atoms, which easily diffuse and form clusters when the temperature is sufficiently increased. The irradiation causes clustering of these atoms, and the final separations of the formed clusters are dependent on the parameters of the ion-beam. Comparison of the separations between the clusters that are formed by ions with different properties in the same type of material enables the determination of ion-track radii.

  12. Determination of time zero from a charged particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Green, Jesse Andrew [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-03-15

    A method, system and computer program is used to determine a linear track having a good fit to a most likely or expected path of charged particle passing through a charged particle detector having a plurality of drift cells. Hit signals from the charged particle detector are associated with a particular charged particle track. An initial estimate of time zero is made from these hit signals and linear tracks are then fit to drift radii for each particular time-zero estimate. The linear track having the best fit is then searched and selected and errors in fit and tracking parameters computed. The use of large and expensive fast detectors needed to time zero in the charged particle detectors can be avoided by adopting this method and system.

  13. Robust scoring functions for protein-ligand interactions with quantum chemical charge models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jui-Chih; Lin, Jung-Hsin; Chen, Chung-Ming; Perryman, Alex L; Olson, Arthur J

    2011-10-24

    Ordinary least-squares (OLS) regression has been used widely for constructing the scoring functions for protein-ligand interactions. However, OLS is very sensitive to the existence of outliers, and models constructed using it are easily affected by the outliers or even the choice of the data set. On the other hand, determination of atomic charges is regarded as of central importance, because the electrostatic interaction is known to be a key contributing factor for biomolecular association. In the development of the AutoDock4 scoring function, only OLS was conducted, and the simple Gasteiger method was adopted. It is therefore of considerable interest to see whether more rigorous charge models could improve the statistical performance of the AutoDock4 scoring function. In this study, we have employed two well-established quantum chemical approaches, namely the restrained electrostatic potential (RESP) and the Austin-model 1-bond charge correction (AM1-BCC) methods, to obtain atomic partial charges, and we have compared how different charge models affect the performance of AutoDock4 scoring functions. In combination with robust regression analysis and outlier exclusion, our new protein-ligand free energy regression model with AM1-BCC charges for ligands and Amber99SB charges for proteins achieve lowest root-mean-squared error of 1.637 kcal/mol for the training set of 147 complexes and 2.176 kcal/mol for the external test set of 1427 complexes. The assessment for binding pose prediction with the 100 external decoy sets indicates very high success rate of 87% with the criteria of predicted root-mean-squared deviation of less than 2 Å. The success rates and statistical performance of our robust scoring functions are only weakly class-dependent (hydrophobic, hydrophilic, or mixed).

  14. Two-qubit separability probabilities as joint functions of the Bloch radii of the qubit subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Paul B.

    2016-11-01

    We detect a certain pattern of behavior of separability probabilities p(rA,rB) for two-qubit systems endowed with Hilbert-Schmidt (HS), and more generally, random induced measures, where rA and rB are the Bloch radii (0≤rA,rB≤1) of the qubit reduced states (A,B). We observe a relative repulsion of radii effect, that is p(rA,rA)

  15. Radii, masses, and ages of 18 bright stars using interferometry and new estimations of exoplanetary parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligi, R.; Creevey, O.; Mourard, D.; Crida, A.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Nardetto, N.; Perraut, K.; Schultheis, M.; Tallon-Bosc, I.; ten Brummelaar, T.

    2016-02-01

    Context. Accurate stellar parameters are needed in numerous domains of astrophysics. The position of stars on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram is an important indication of their structure and evolution, and it helps improve stellar models. Furthermore, the age and mass of stars hosting planets are required elements for studying exoplanetary systems. Aims: We aim at determining accurate parameters of a set of 18 bright exoplanet host and potential host stars from interferometric measurements, photometry, and stellar models. Methods: Using the VEGA/CHARA interferometer operating in the visible domain, we measured the angular diameters of 18 stars, ten of which host exoplanets. We combined them with their distances to estimate their radii. We used photometry to derive their bolometric flux and, then, their effective temperature and luminosity to place them on the H-R diagram. We then used the PARSEC models to derive their best fit ages and masses, with error bars derived from Monte Carlo calculations. Results: Our interferometric measurements lead to an average of 1.9% uncertainty on angular diameters and 3% on stellar radii. There is good agreement between measured and indirect estimations of angular diameters (either from SED fitting or from surface brightness relations) for main sequence (MS) stars, but not as good for more evolved stars. For each star, we provide a likelihood map in the mass-age plane; typically, two distinct sets of solutions appear (an old and a young age). The errors on the ages and masses that we provide account for the metallicity uncertainties, which are often neglected by other works. From measurements of its radius and density, we also provide the mass of 55 Cnc independently of models. From the stellar masses, we provide new estimates of semi-major axes and minimum masses of exoplanets with reliable uncertainties. We also derive the radius, density, and mass of 55 Cnc e, a super-Earth that transits its stellar host. Our exoplanetary

  16. Charged rotating black holes on a 3-brane

    SciTech Connect

    Aliev, A.N.; Guemruekcueoglu, A.E.

    2005-05-15

    We study exact stationary and axisymmetric solutions describing charged rotating black holes localized on a 3-brane in the Randall-Sundrum braneworld. The charges of the black holes are considered to be of two types, the first being an induced tidal charge that appears as an imprint of nonlocal gravitational effects from the bulk space and the second is a usual electric charge arising due to a Maxwell field trapped on the brane. We assume a special ansatz for the metric on the brane taking it to be of the Kerr-Schild form and show that the Kerr-Newman solution of ordinary general relativity in which the electric charge is superseded by a tidal charge satisfies a closed system of the effective gravitational field equations on the brane. It turns out that the negative tidal charge may provide a mechanism for spinning up the black hole so that its rotation parameter exceeds its mass. This is not allowed in the framework of general relativity. We also find a new solution that represents a rotating black hole on the brane carrying both charges. We show that for a rapid enough rotation the combined influence of the rotational dynamics and the local bulk effects of the 'squared' energy-momentum tensor on the brane distort the horizon structure of the black hole in such a way that it can be thought of as composed of nonuniformly rotating null circles with growing radii from the equatorial plane to the poles. We finally study the geodesic motion of test particles in the equatorial plane of a rotating black hole with tidal charge. We show that the effects of negative tidal charge tend to increase the horizon radius, as well as the radii of the limiting photon orbit, the innermost bound and the innermost stable circular orbits for both direct and retrograde motions of the particles.

  17. Tracing the stellar halo of an early type galaxy out to 25 effective radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rejkuba, Marina

    2016-08-01

    We have used ACS and WFC3 cameras on board HST to resolve stars in the halo of NGC 5128 out to 140 kpc (25 effective radii, R eff) along the major axis and 70 kpc (13 R eff) along the minor axis. This dataset provides an unprecedented radial coverage of stellar halo properties in any galaxy. Color-magnitude diagrams clearly reveal the presence of the red giant branch stars belonging to the halo of NGC 5128 even in the most distant fields. The V-I colors of the red giants enable us to measure the metallicity distribution in each field and so map the metallicity gradient over the sampled area. The stellar metallicity follows a shallow gradient and even out at 140 kpc (25 R eff) its median value does not go below [M/H]~-1 dex. We observe significant field-to-field metallicity and stellar density variations. The star counts are higher along the major axis when compared to minor axis field located 90 kpc from the galaxy centre, indicating flattening in the outer halo. These observational results provide new important constraints for the assembly history of the halo and the formation of this gE galaxy.

  18. DNA stretching on the wall surfaces in curved microchannels with different radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Shou-Shing; Wu, Fong-He; Tsai, Ming-Ju

    2014-08-01

    DNA molecule conformation dynamics and stretching were made on semi-circular surfaces with different radii (500 to 5,000 μm) in microchannels measuring 200 μm × 200 μm in cross section. Five different buffer solutions - 1× Tris-acetate-EDTA (TAE), 1× Tris-borate-EDTA (TBE), 1× Tris-EDTA (TE), 1× Tris-phosphate-EDTA (TPE), and 1× Tris-buffered saline (TBS) solutions - were used with a variety of viscosity such as 40, 60, and 80 cP, with resultant 10-4 ≤ Re ≤ 10-3 and the corresponding 5 ≤ Wi ≤ 12. The test fluids were seeded with JOJO-1 tracer particles for flow visualization and driven through the test channels via a piezoelectric (PZT) micropump. Micro particle image velocimetry (μPIV) measuring technique was applied for the centered-plane velocity distribution measurements. It is found that the radius effect on the stretch ratio of DNA dependence is significant. The stretch ratio becomes larger as the radius becomes small due to the larger centrifugal force. Consequently, the maximum stretch was found at the center of the channel with a radius of 500 μm.

  19. Alfvenic Turbulence from the Sun to 65 Solar Radii: Numerical predictions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, J. C.; Chandran, B. D. G.

    2015-12-01

    The upcoming NASA Solar Probe Plus (SPP) mission will fly to within 9 solar radii from the solar surface, about 7 times closer to the Sun than any previous spacecraft has ever reached. This historic mission will gather unprecedented remote-sensing data and the first in-situ measurements of the plasma in the solar atmosphere, which will revolutionize our knowledge and understanding of turbulence and other processes that heat the solar corona and accelerate the solar wind. This close to the Sun the background solar-wind properties are highly inhomogeneous. As a result, outward-propagating Alfven waves (AWs) arising from the random motions of the photospheric magnetic-field footpoints undergo strong non-WKB reflections and trigger a vigorous turbulent cascade. In this talk I will discuss recent progress in the understanding of reflection-driven Alfven turbulence in this scenario by means of high-resolution numerical simulations, with the goal of predicting the detailed nature of the velocity and magnetic field fluctuations that the SPP mission will measure. In particular, I will place special emphasis on relating the simulations to relevant physical mechanisms that might govern the radial evolution of the turbulence spectra of outward/inward-propagating fluctuations and discuss the conditions that lead to universal power-laws.

  20. Interferometric observation of the F-corona radial velocities fields between 3 and 7 solar radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcheglov, P. V.; Shestakova, L. I.; Aimanov, A. K.

    During the July 31, 1981 solar eclipse, F-corona interferograms near Mg I 5184 A were obtained using a Fabry-Perot etalon with an FWHM of 0.5 A (corresponding to 30 km/sec) and an image tube. Radial velocities V(r) of the interplanetary dust (ID) were measured in different directions. Both prograde and retrograde motions of ID in the ecliptic region is discovered. Most of velocity values do not exceed 50 km/sec. A negative velocity component appears after averaging all V(r) for all directions. Its average increases to -20 km/sec toward the sun. Some ejections are observed. The strongest (+130 km/sec) is located at the north ecliptic pole at a distance of 6 to 7 solar radii. From the lack of unshifted Fraunhofer lines in the scattered sky light, it is concluded that the sky brigntness continuous component is predominant and its source is K-corona scattered light in the earth's atmosphere.

  1. Flow in Thin Streamer Boundaries, Streamer Stalks, and Plumes Between 2 and 10 Solar Radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Nerney, S.

    2005-01-01

    Slow solar wind is believed to arise in the legs or near the cusp of streamers, inside the brightness boundary. In an earlier study, we used an analytic model of flow in this layer to analyze the effect of the magnetic field on the geometry of the flow. That study successfully described those conditions that can lead to a decrease of the flow speed with increasing height near the cusp of the closed magnetic helmet inside the streamer. We have generalized that model to describe outflow in an arbitrarily thin layer inside the brightness boundary. The flow geometry now can also be constructive or divergent above the cusp and we show solutions of this type. A diverging streamer or ray above 2-3 solar radii is shown to indicate the plasma beta is greater than unity inside the streamer and less than unity outside. The same argument can be used to discover the height above which the plasma beta in plumes, inside coronal holes, is greater than unity.

  2. Structure of the magnetic field at altitudes of 1-1.15 solar radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtemov, Z. S.; Stepanyan, N. N.; Fainshtein, V. G.; Rudenko, G. V.

    2016-09-01

    An analysis of the characteristics of unipolar structures detected at latitudes from -40° to +40°, longitudes of 0°-360°, and altitudes of 1-1.15 solar radii during the period from May 1996 (the 23rd solar minimum) to October 2000 (the 23rd solar maximum) has been carried out. Synoptic maps of the solar radial magnetic field calculated in a potential approximation are used. The boundaries between unipolar structures with opposite magnetic polarities ("+/-" and "-/+" polarities) form chains extending along meridians at all the considered latitudes and altitudes. Depending on the latitude, the single-peaked distributions of the number of structures found at the lowest altitudes are replaced by double-peaked distributions at higher altitudes. The time variations of the total number of structures are non-monotonic. The growth in the number of unipolar structures begins before the growth in the Wolf number. This indicates that new unipolar structures already appear together with flocculi, preceding the formation of sunspots. It is found that structures with positive field have larger mean sizes that do structures with negative field. The polar field in the northern hemisphere penetrates to middle latitudes of the southern hemisphere. The existence of sets of structures with typical sizes is shown. The sizes of the smallest structures vary little with latitude, but increase slightly with altitude.

  3. Quantifying mass segregation and new core radii for 54 Milky Way globular clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsbury, Ryan; Heyl, Jeremy; Richer, Harvey E-mail: heyl@phas.ubc.ca

    2013-11-20

    We present core radii for 54 Milky Way globular clusters determined by fitting King-Michie models to cumulative projected star count distributions. We find that fitting star counts rather than surface brightness profiles produces results that differ significantly due to the presence of mass segregation. The sample in each cluster is further broken down into various mass groups, each of which is fit independently, allowing us to determine how the concentration of each cluster varies with mass. The majority of the clusters in our sample show general agreement with the standard picture that more massive stars will be more centrally concentrated. We find that core radius versus stellar mass can be fit with a two-parameter power law. The slope of this power law is a value that describes the amount of mass segregation present in the cluster, and is measured independently of our distance from the cluster. This value correlates strongly with the core relaxation time and physical size of each cluster. Supplementary figures are also included showing the best fits and likelihood contours of fit parameters for all 54 clusters.

  4. Acceleration of protons at 32 Jovian radii in the outer magnetosphere of jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schardt, A. W.; Mcdonald, F. B.; Trainor, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    During the inbound pass of Pioneer 10, a rapid ten-fold increase of the 0.2 to MeV proton flux was observed at 32 Jovian radii (R sub J). The total event lasted for 30 minutes and was made up of a number of superimposed individual events. At the time, the spacecraft was in the outer magnetosphere about 7 R sub J below the magnetic equator. Before and after the event, the proton flux was characteristic of the low flux level normally encountered between crossings of the magnetic equator. Flux changes at different energies were coherent within 1 minute; a time comparable to the time resolution of the data. The angular distributions were highly anisotropic with protons streaming towards Jupiter. A field-aligned dumbbell distribution was observed initially, and a pancake distribution just before the flux decayed to its pre-event value. The alpha particle flux changed as rapidly as the proton flux but peaked at different times. The energetic electron flux behaved differently; it increased gradually throughout the period.

  5. Molecular single-bond covalent radii for elements 1-118.

    PubMed

    Pyykkö, Pekka; Atsumi, Michiko

    2009-01-01

    A self-consistent system of additive covalent radii, R(AB)=r(A) + r(B), is set up for the entire periodic table, Groups 1-18, Z=1-118. The primary bond lengths, R, are taken from experimental or theoretical data corresponding to chosen group valencies. All r(E) values are obtained from the same fit. Both E-E, E-H, and E-CH(3) data are incorporated for most elements, E. Many E-E' data inside the same group are included. For the late main groups, the system is close to that of Pauling. For other elements it is close to the methyl-based one of Suresh and Koga [J. Phys. Chem. A 2001, 105, 5940] and its predecessors. For the diatomic alkalis MM' and halides XX', separate fits give a very high accuracy. These primary data are then absorbed with the rest. The most notable exclusion are the transition-metal halides and chalcogenides which are regarded as partial multiple bonds. Other anomalies include H(2) and F(2). The standard deviation for the 410 included data points is 2.8 pm.

  6. Charge Separation in Semicrystalline Polymeric Semiconductors by Photoexcitation: Is the Mechanism Intrinsic or Extrinsic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paquin, Francis; Latini, Gianluca; Sakowicz, Maciej; Karsenti, Paul-Ludovic; Wang, Linjun; Beljonne, David; Stingelin, Natalie; Silva, Carlos

    2011-05-01

    We probe charge photogeneration and subsequent recombination dynamics in neat regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) films over six decades in time by means of time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy. Exciton dissociation at 10 K occurs extrinsically at interfaces between molecularly ordered and disordered domains. Polaron pairs thus produced recombine by tunneling with distributed rates governed by the distribution of electron-hole radii. Quantum-chemical calculations suggest that hot-exciton dissociation at such interfaces results from a high charge-transfer character.

  7. Research on the drag reduction performance induced by the counterflowing jet for waverider with variable blunt radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shi-bin; Wang, Zhen-guo; Barakos, George N.; Huang, Wei; Steijl, Rene

    2016-10-01

    Waverider will endure the huge aero-heating in the hypersonic flow, thus, it need be blunt for the leading edge. However, the aerodynamic performance will decrease for the blunt waverider because of the drag hoik. How to improve the aerodynamic performance and reduce the drag and aero-heating is very important. The variable blunt radii method will improve the aerodynamic performance, however, the huge aero-heating and bow shock wave at the head is still serious. In the current study, opposing jet is used in the waverider with variable blunt radii to improve its performance. The three-dimensional coupled implicit Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes(RANS) equation and the two equation SST k-ω turbulence model have been utilized to obtain the flow field properties. The numerical method has been validated against the available experimental data in the open literature. The obtained results show that the L/D will drop 7-8% when R changes from 2 to 8. The lift coefficient will increase, and the drag coefficient almost keeps the same when the variable blunt radii method is adopted, and the L/D will increase. The variable blunt radii method is very useful to improve the whole characteristics of blunt waverider and the L/D can improve 3%. The combination of the variable blunt radii method and opposing jet is a novel way to improve the whole performance of blunt waverider, and L/D can improve 4-5%. The aperture as a novel way of opposing jet is suitable for blunt waverider and also useful to improve the aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic characteristics of waverider in the hypersonic flow. There is the optimal P0in/P0 that can make the detached shock wave reattach the lower surface again so that the blunt waverider can get the better aerodynamic performance.

  8. Electrical Charging of Aerosols and Conductivity of Titan's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, W. J.; Whitten, R. C.; Tripathi, S. N.; Bakes, E. L. O.; Barth, E.

    2004-01-01

    We have used recent data on graphitic cloud particles in the atmosphere of Titan to compute the electrical charging of the particles (radii ranging from 0.01 microns to 0.26 microns). The charging on the nightside was rather similar to that obtained earlier except that charge distributions on the particles are now computed and recently obtained cloud particle sizes and density distributions were employed. The negative charge on particles of 0.26 microns peaked at 9 at 150 km altitude. The computations were repeated for the dayside with the addition of photoelectron emission by the particles as a result of the absorption of solar UV radiation. Particles (except the very smallest) now became positively charged with particles of radius 0.26 microns being charged up to +47. Next, very small particles (radii approx. 3 x 10 (sup -4) microns) of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were introduced and treated as sources of negative ions since they could be either neutral or carry one negative charge. Moreover, they are mobile so that they had to be treated like molecular size negative ions although much more massive. They had the effect of substantially reducing the electron densities in the altitude range 190 to 310 km to values less than the negative PAH densities and increasing the peak electron charge on the larger particles. Particles of radius 0.26 microns bore peak charges of approx. +47 at altitudes of approx. 250 km. The simulated effect of PAHs on the nightside proved to be much less pronounced; at the peak negative PAH density, it was less than the electron density. The physics governing these results will be discussed.

  9. THE INNERMOST COLLIMATION STRUCTURE OF THE M87 JET DOWN TO ∼10 SCHWARZSCHILD RADII

    SciTech Connect

    Hada, Kazuhiro; Giroletti, Marcello; Giovannini, Gabriele; Kino, Motoki; Doi, Akihiro; Nagai, Hiroshi; Honma, Mareki; Hagiwara, Yoshiaki; Kawaguchi, Noriyuki

    2013-09-20

    We investigated the detailed inner jet structure of M87 using Very Long Baseline Array data at 2, 5, 8.4, 15, 23.8, 43, and 86 GHz, especially focusing on the multi-frequency properties of the radio core at the jet base. First, we measured the size of the core region transverse to the jet axis, defined as W{sub c}, at each frequency ν, and found a relation between W{sub c} and ν: W{sub c}(ν)∝ν{sup –0.71±0.05}. Then, by combining W{sub c}(ν) and the frequency dependence of the core position r{sub c}(ν), which was obtained in our previous study, we constructed a collimation profile of the innermost jet W{sub c}(r) down to ∼10 Schwarzschild radii (R{sub s}) from the central black hole. We found that W{sub c}(r) smoothly connects with the width profile of the outer edge-brightened, parabolic jet and then follows a similar radial dependence down to several tens of R{sub s}. Closer to the black hole, the measured radial profile suggests a possible change in the jet collimation shape from the outer parabolic one, where the jet shape tends to become more radially oriented. This result could be related to a magnetic collimation process or/and interactions with surrounding materials at the jet base. The present results shed light on the importance of higher-sensitivity/resolution imaging studies of M87 at 86, 43, and 22 GHz; these studies should be examined more rigorously.

  10. Stochastic charging of dust grains in planetary rings: Diffusion rates and their effects on Lorentz resonances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaffer, L.; Burns, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    Dust grains in planetary rings acquire stochastically fluctuating electric charges as they orbit through any corotating magnetospheric plasma. Here we investigate the nature of this stochastic charging and calculate its effect on the Lorentz resonance (LR). First we model grain charging as a Markov process, where the transition probabilities are identified as the ensemble-averaged charging fluxes due to plasma pickup and photoemission. We determine the distribution function P(t;N), giving the probability that a grain has N excess charges at time t. The autocorrelation function tau(sub q) for the strochastic charge process can be approximated by a Fokker-Planck treatment of the evolution equations for P(t; N). We calculate the mean square response to the stochastic fluctuations in the Lorentz force. We find that transport in phase space is very small compared to the resonant increase in amplitudes due to the mean charge, over the timescale that the oscillator is resonantly pumped up. Therefore the stochastic charge variations cannot break the resonant interaction; locally, the Lorentz resonance is a robust mechanism for the shaping of etheral dust ring systems. Slightly stronger bounds on plasma parameters are required when we consider the longer transit times between Lorentz resonances.

  11. Transportable charge in a periodic alternating gradient system

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.P.; Fessenden, T.J.; Laslett, L.J.

    1985-05-01

    A simple set of formulas is derived which relate emittance, line charge density, matched maximum and average envelope radii, occupancy factors, and the (space charge) depressed and vacuum values of tune. This formulation is an improvement on the smooth limit approximation; deviations from exact (numerically determined) relations are on the order of +-2%, while the smooth limit values are in error by up to +-30%. This transport formalism is used to determine the limits of transportable line charge density in an electrostatic quadrupole array, with specific application to the low energy portion of the High Temperature Experiment of Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research. The line charge density limit is found to be essentially proportional to the voltage on the pole faces and the fraction of occupied aperture area. A finite injection energy (greater than or equal to 2 MeV) is required to realize this limit, independent of particle mass.

  12. Modeling Electrical Structure of the Artificial Charged Aerosol Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydenko, S.; Iudin, D.; Klimashov, V.; Kostinskiy, A. J.; Syssoev, V.

    2014-12-01

    The electric structure of the unipolar charged aerosol cloud is considered. The cloud of the volume about 30 cubic meters is generated in the open atmosphere by the original aeroelectrical facility consisting of the source of the aquated ions and the high-voltage discharger. Representing the charge density distribution as a superposition of regular and irregular parts, a model of the electrical structure of the cloud is developed. The regular part is calculated under the stationary current approximation taking into account the source current structure, the shape of the cloud, and results of the multi-point measurements of the electric field and conductivity in the vicinity of the cloud. The irregular part describes random spatiotemporal fluctuations of the charge density which are assumed to be proportional to the aerosol number density. It is shown that a quasi-electrostatic field of the charged aerosol is characterized by significant spatial fluctuations showing the scale invariance. The mean-square fluctuations of the voltage between different parts of the cloud are proportional to the square root of its linear dimensions and may reach significant values even in the absence of the regular field. The basic parameters of the fluctuating spatial structure of the electric field inside the charged aerosol cloud are estimated. It is shown that the charge density fluctuations could lead to a significant (up to 2,5 times) local enhancement of the electric field as compared to the field of the regular part of the charge density. The above effect could serve as one of the important mechanisms of the spark initiation.

  13. CHARGE Association.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Semanti; Chakraborty, Jayanta

    2012-12-01

    We present here a case of 17-year-old boy from Kolkata presenting with obesity, bilateral gynecomastia, mental retardation, and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. The patient weighed 70 kg and was of 153 cm height. Facial asymmetry (unilateral facial palsy), gynecomastia, decreased pubic and axillary hair, small penis, decreased right testicular volume, non-palpable left testis, and right-sided congenital inguinal hernia was present. The patient also had disc coloboma, convergent squint, microcornea, microphthalmia, pseudohypertelorism, low set ears, short neck, and choanalatresia. He had h/o VSD repaired with patch. Laboratory examination revealed haemoglobin 9.9 mg/dl, urea 24 mg/dl, creatinine 0.68 mg/dl. IGF1 77.80 ng/ml (decreased for age), GH <0.05 ng/ml, testosterone 0.25 ng/ml, FSH-0.95 μIU/ml, LH 0.60 ΅IU/ml. ACTH, 8:00 A.M cortisol, FT3, FT4, TSH, estradiol, DHEA-S, lipid profile, and LFT was within normal limits. Prolactin was elevated at 38.50 ng/ml. The patient's karyotype was 46XY. Echocardiography revealed ventricularseptal defect closed with patch, grade 1 aortic regurgitation, and ejection fraction 67%. Ultrasound testis showed small right testis within scrotal sac and undescended left testis within left inguinal canal. CT scan paranasal sinuses revealed choanalatresia and deviation of nasal septum to the right. Sonomammography revealed bilateral proliferation of fibroglandular elements predominantly in subareoalar region of breasts. MRI of brain and pituitary region revealed markedly atrophic pituitary gland parenchyma with preserved infundibulum and hypothalamus and widened suprasellar cistern. The CHARGE association is an increasingly recognized non-random pattern of congenital anomalies comprising of coloboma, heart defect, choanal atresia, retarded growth and development, genital hypoplasia, ear abnormalities, and/or deafness.[1] These anomalies have a higher probability of occurring together. In this report, we have described a boy with CHARGE

  14. Nuclear Shape And Size Properties For Rare-earth Neutron-rich Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Benhamouda, N.; Oudih, M. R.; Allal, N. H.; Fellah, M.

    2009-01-28

    Two-neutron separation energies, quadrupole moments and mean square charge radii, are evaluated for even-even Osmium isotopes with 78{<=}N{<=}114. The calculations are performed in the framework of a microscopic model including the pairing correlations rigorously by means of the FSBCS (Fixed-Sharp-BCS) method.

  15. Hydrodynamic Radii of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins Determined from Experimental Polyproline II Propensities.

    PubMed

    Tomasso, Maria E; Tarver, Micheal J; Devarajan, Deepa; Whitten, Steven T

    2016-01-01

    The properties of disordered proteins are thought to depend on intrinsic conformational propensities for polyproline II (PPII) structure. While intrinsic PPII propensities have been measured for the common biological amino acids in short peptides, the ability of these experimentally determined propensities to quantitatively reproduce structural behavior in intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) has not been established. Presented here are results from molecular simulations of disordered proteins showing that the hydrodynamic radius (Rh) can be predicted from experimental PPII propensities with good agreement, even when charge-based considerations are omitted. The simulations demonstrate that Rh and chain propensity for PPII structure are linked via a simple power-law scaling relationship, which was tested using the experimental Rh of 22 IDPs covering a wide range of peptide lengths, net charge, and sequence composition. Charge effects on Rh were found to be generally weak when compared to PPII effects on Rh. Results from this study indicate that the hydrodynamic dimensions of IDPs are evidence of considerable sequence-dependent backbone propensities for PPII structure that qualitatively, if not quantitatively, match conformational propensities measured in peptides.

  16. Measurements of Lunar Dust Charging Properties by Electron Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, Mian M.; Tankosic, Dragana; Craven, Paul D.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; LeClair, Andre; Spann, James F.; Norwood, Joseph K.

    2009-01-01

    Dust grains in the lunar environment are believed to be electrostatically charged predominantly by photoelectric emissions resulting from solar UV radiation on the dayside, and on the nightside by interaction with electrons in the solar wind plasma. In the high vacuum environment on the lunar surface with virtually no atmosphere, the positive and negative charge states of micron/submicron dust grains lead to some unusual physical and dynamical dust phenomena. Knowledge of the electrostatic charging properties of dust grains in the lunar environment is required for addressing their hazardous effect on the humans and mechanical systems. It is well recognized that the charging properties of individual small micron size dust grains are substantially different from the measurements on bulk materials. In this paper we present the results of measurements on charging of individual Apollo 11 and Apollo 17 dust grains by exposing them to mono-energetic electron beams in the 10-100 eV energy range. The charging/discharging rates of positively and negatively charged particles of approx. 0.1 to 5 micron radii are discussed in terms of the sticking efficiencies and secondary electron yields. The secondary electron emission process is found to be a complex and effective charging/discharging mechanism for incident electron energies as low as 10-25 eV, with a strong dependence on particle size. Implications of the laboratory measurements on the nature of dust grain charging in the lunar environment are discussed.

  17. Neutron star radii and crusts: Uncertainties and unified equations of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortin, M.; Providência, C.; Raduta, Ad. R.; Gulminelli, F.; Zdunik, J. L.; Haensel, P.; Bejger, M.

    2016-09-01

    The uncertainties in neutron star radii and crust properties due to our limited knowledge of the equation of state are quantitatively analyzed. We first demonstrate the importance of a unified microscopic description for the different baryonic densities of the star. If the pressure functional is obtained matching a crust and a core equation of state based on models with different properties at nuclear matter saturation, the uncertainties can be as large as ˜30 % for the crust thickness and 4% for the radius. Necessary conditions for causal and thermodynamically consistent matchings between the core and the crust are formulated and their consequences examined. A large set of unified equations of state for purely nucleonic matter is obtained based on twenty-four Skyrme interactions and nine relativistic mean-field nuclear parametrizations. In addition, for relativistic models fifteen equations of state including a transition to hyperonic matter at high density are presented. All these equations of state have in common the property of describing a 2 M⊙ star and of being causal within stable neutron stars. Spans of ˜3 and ˜4 km are obtained for the radius of, respectively, 1.0 M⊙ and 2.0 M⊙ stars. Applying a set of nine further constraints from experiment and ab initio calculations the uncertainty is reduced to ˜1 and 2 km, respectively. These residual uncertainties reflect lack of constraints at large densities and insufficient information on the density dependence of the equation of state near the nuclear matter saturation point. The most important parameter to be constrained is shown to be the symmetry energy slope L . Indeed, this parameter exhibits a linear correlation with the stellar radius, which is particularly clear for small mass stars around 1.0 M⊙ . The other equation-of-state parameters do not show clear correlations with the radius, within the present uncertainties. Potential constraints on L , the neutron star radius, and the equation of

  18. Kinematics of the jet in M 87 on scales of 100-1000 Schwarzschild radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, F.; Lobanov, A. P.; Walker, R. C.; Hardee, P. E.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) imaging of radio emission from extragalactic jets provides a unique probe of physical mechanisms governing the launching, acceleration, and collimation of relativistic outflows. Aims: VLBI imaging of the jet in the nearby active galaxy M 87 enables morphological and kinematic studies to be done on linear scales down to 100 Schwarzschild radii (Rs). Methods: The two-dimensional structure and kinematics of the jet in M 87 (NGC 4486) have been studied by applying the wavelet-based image segmentation and evaluation (WISE) method to 11 images obtained from multi-epoch Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations made in January-August 2007 at 43 GHz (λ = 7 mm). Results: The WISE analysis recovers a detailed two-dimensional velocity field in the jet in M 87 at sub-parsec scales. The observed evolution of the flow velocity with distance from the jet base can be explained in the framework of MHD jet acceleration and Poynting flux conversion. A linear acceleration regime is observed up to zobs 2 mas. The acceleration is reduced at larger scales, which is consistent with saturation of Poynting flux conversion. Stacked cross correlation analysis of the images reveals a pronounced stratification of the flow. The flow consists of a slow, mildly relativistic layer (moving at β 0.5c), associated either with instability pattern speed or an outer wind, and a fast, accelerating stream line (with β 0.92, corresponding to a bulk Lorentz factor γ 2.5). A systematic difference of the apparent speeds in the northern and southern limbs of the jet is detected, providing evidence for jet rotation. The angular velocity of the magnetic field line associated with this rotation suggests that the jet in M 87 is launched in the inner part of the disk, at a distance r0 5Rs from the central engine. Conclusions: The combined results of the analysis imply that MHD acceleration and conversion of Poynting flux to kinetic energy play the dominant

  19. An improved algorithm for inferring neutron star masses and radii using NICER waveform data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Frederick K.; Miller, M. Coleman

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a new, faster Bayesian analysis algorithm that enables us to use energy-resolved waveforms of X-ray burst oscillations, like those that will be obtained using NICER, to estimate quickly the masses and radii of rapidly rotating, oblate neutron stars and determine the uncertainties in these estimates. We use the oblate-Schwarzschild (OS) approximation, which Cadeau et al. (2007) showed provides a very accurate description of the waveforms produced by hot spots on rapidly rotating, oblate neutron stars. We show that the angular radius of the hot spot and a phase-independent but otherwise arbitrary background must be included as part of the fit; to do otherwise is observationally incorrect and leads to misleadingly tight constraints on the mass and radius. A simple, single-hot-spot waveform model with 30 energy channels has 38 parameters. If the waveform data is informative, i.e., if they tightly constrain the mass M and the equatorial radius R of the star, the high-probability regions of the full parameter space are small. A grid search of this space would therefore require a prohibitive number of waveform computations. Here we describe a different procedure that is much more efficient. This new procedure (1) generates waveforms by interpolating in a table of pre-computed waveforms and (2) computes bounding ellipsoids that encompass points in the waveform parameter space that have interestingly high likelihoods. Using these bounding ellipsoids typically reduces the volume of the Monte Carlo integration by a factor ~ 30. The net result of these improvements is that whereas the analysis procedure used in Lo et al. (2013) took 50-150 clock hours on a 150-core cluster and did not search the (M,R) volume of interest, the new analysis procedure takes 50-150 clock hours on a 5-core desktop computer to perform a completely blind search of the full volume, despite the additional complexity of the OS waveform model used in the new algorithm.

  20. Energetic Charged Particles in Saturn's Magnetosphere: Voyager 2 Results.

    PubMed

    Vogt, R E; Chenette, D L; Cummings, A C; Garrard, T L; Stone, E C; Schardt, A W; Trainor, J H; Lal, N; McDonald, F B

    1982-01-29

    Results from the cosmic-ray system on Voyager 2 in Saturn's magnetosphere are presented. During the inbound pass through the outer magnetosphere, the >/= 0.43-million-electron-volt proton flux was more intense, and both the proton and electron fluxes were more variable, than previously observed. These changes are attributed to the influence on the magnetosphere of variations in the solar wind conditions. Outbound, beyond 18 Saturn radii, impulsive bursts of 0.14- to > 1.0- million-electron-volt electrons were observed. In the inner magnetosphere, the charged particle absorption signatures of Mimas, Enceladus, and Tethys are used to constrain the possible tilt and offset of Saturn's internal magnetic dipole. At approximately 3 Saturn radii, a transient decrease was observed in the electron flux which was not due to Mimas. Characteristics of this decrease suggest the existence of additional material, perhaps another satellite, in the orbit of Mimas.

  1. On neutron stars in f(R) theories: Small radii, large masses and large energy emitted in a merger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio Resco, Miguel; de la Cruz-Dombriz, Álvaro; Llanes Estrada, Felipe J.; Zapatero Castrillo, Víctor

    2016-09-01

    In the context of f(R) gravity theories, we show that the apparent mass of a neutron star as seen from an observer at infinity is numerically calculable but requires careful matching, first at the star's edge, between interior and exterior solutions, none of them being totally Schwarzschild-like but presenting instead small oscillations of the curvature scalar R; and second at large radii, where the Newtonian potential is used to identify the mass of the neutron star. We find that for the same equation of state, this mass definition is always larger than its general relativistic counterpart. We exemplify this with quadratic R2 and Hu-Sawicki-like modifications of the standard General Relativity action. Therefore, the finding of two-solar mass neutron stars basically imposes no constraint on stable f(R) theories. However, star radii are in general smaller than in General Relativity, which can give an observational handle on such classes of models at the astrophysical level. Both larger masses and smaller matter radii are due to much of the apparent effective energy residing in the outer metric for scalar-tensor theories. Finally, because the f(R) neutron star masses can be much larger than General Relativity counterparts, the total energy available for radiating gravitational waves could be of order several solar masses, and thus a merger of these stars constitutes an interesting wave source.

  2. Strong correlations of neutron star radii with the slopes of nuclear matter incompressibility and symmetry energy at saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, N.; Agrawal, B. K.; Fortin, M.; Pais, H.; Providência, C.; Raduta, Ad. R.; Sulaksono, A.

    2016-11-01

    We examine the correlations of neutron star radii with the nuclear matter incompressibility, symmetry energy, and their slopes, which are the key parameters of the equation of state (EoS) of asymmetric nuclear matter. The neutron star radii and the EoS parameters are evaluated using a representative set of 24 Skyrme-type effective forces and 18 relativistic mean field models, and two microscopic calculations, all describing 2 M⊙ neutron stars. Unified EoSs for the inner-crust-core region have been built for all the phenomenological models, both relativistic and nonrelativistic. Our investigation shows the existence of a strong correlation of the neutron star radii with the linear combination of the slopes of the nuclear matter incompressibility and the symmetry energy coefficients at the saturation density. Such correlations are found to be almost independent of the neutron star mass in the range 0.6 -1.8 M⊙ . This correlation can be linked to the empirical relation existing between the star radius and the pressure at a nucleonic density between one and two times saturation density, and the dependence of the pressure on the nuclear matter incompressibility, its slope, and the symmetry energy slope. The slopes of the nuclear matter incompressibility and the symmetry energy coefficients as estimated from the finite nuclei data yield the radius of a 1.4 M⊙ neutron star in the range 11.09 -12.86 km.

  3. Uniform spatial distribution of collagen fibril radii within tendon implies local activation of pC-collagen at individual fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutenberg, Andrew D.; Brown, Aidan I.; Kreplak, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    Collagen fibril cross-sectional radii show no systematic variation between the interior and the periphery of fibril bundles, indicating an effectively constant rate of collagen incorporation into fibrils throughout the bundle. Such spatially homogeneous incorporation constrains the extracellular diffusion of collagen precursors from sources at the bundle boundary to sinks at the growing fibrils. With a coarse-grained diffusion equation we determine stringent bounds, using parameters extracted from published experimental measurements of tendon development. From the lack of new fibril formation after birth, we further require that the concentration of diffusing precursors stays below the critical concentration for fibril nucleation. We find that the combination of the diffusive bound, which requires larger concentrations to ensure homogeneous fibril radii, and lack of nucleation, which requires lower concentrations, is only marginally consistent with fully processed collagen using conservative bounds. More realistic bounds may leave no consistent concentrations. Therefore, we propose that unprocessed pC-collagen diffuses from the bundle periphery followed by local C-proteinase activity and subsequent collagen incorporation at each fibril. We suggest that C-proteinase is localized within bundles, at fibril surfaces, during radial fibrillar growth. The much greater critical concentration of pC-collagen, as compared to fully processed collagen, then provides broad consistency between homogeneous fibril radii and the lack of fibril nucleation during fibril growth.

  4. Intrinsic α helix propensities compact hydrodynamic radii in intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    English, Lance R; Tilton, Erin C; Ricard, Benjamin J; Whitten, Steven T

    2017-02-01

    Proteins that lack tertiary stability under normal conditions, known as intrinsically disordered, exhibit a wide range of biological activities. Molecular descriptions for the biology of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) consequently rely on disordered structural models, which in turn require experiments that assess the origins to structural features observed. For example, while hydrodynamic size is mostly insensitive to sequence composition in chemically denatured proteins, IDPs show strong sequence-specific effects in the hydrodynamic radius (Rh ) when measured under normal conditions. To investigate sequence-modulation of IDP Rh , disordered ensembles generated by a hard sphere collision model modified with a structure-based parameterization of the solution energetics were used to parse the contributions of net charge, main chain dihedral angle bias, and excluded volume on hydrodynamic size. Ensembles for polypeptides 10-35 residues in length were then used to establish power-law scaling relationships for comparison to experimental Rh from 26 IDPs. Results showed the expected outcomes of increased hydrodynamic size from increases in excluded volume and net charge, and compaction from chain-solvent interactions. Chain bias representing intrinsic preferences for α helix and polyproline II (PPII ), however, modulated Rh with intricate dependence on the simulated propensities. PPII propensities at levels expected in IDPs correlated with heightened Rh sensitivity to even weak α helix propensities, indicating bias for common (φ, ψ) are important determinants of hydrodynamic size. Moreover, data show that IDP Rh can be predicted from sequence with good accuracy from a small set of physicochemical properties, namely intrinsic conformational propensities and net charge. Proteins 2017; 85:296-311. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Atomic charge transfer-counter polarization effects determine infrared CH intensities of hydrocarbons: a quantum theory of atoms in molecules model.

    PubMed

    Silva, Arnaldo F; Richter, Wagner E; Meneses, Helen G C; Bruns, Roy E

    2014-11-14

    Atomic charge transfer-counter polarization effects determine most of the infrared fundamental CH intensities of simple hydrocarbons, methane, ethylene, ethane, propyne, cyclopropane and allene. The quantum theory of atoms in molecules/charge-charge flux-dipole flux model predicted the values of 30 CH intensities ranging from 0 to 123 km mol(-1) with a root mean square (rms) error of only 4.2 km mol(-1) without including a specific equilibrium atomic charge term. Sums of the contributions from terms involving charge flux and/or dipole flux averaged 20.3 km mol(-1), about ten times larger than the average charge contribution of 2.0 km mol(-1). The only notable exceptions are the CH stretching and bending intensities of acetylene and two of the propyne vibrations for hydrogens bound to sp hybridized carbon atoms. Calculations were carried out at four quantum levels, MP2/6-311++G(3d,3p), MP2/cc-pVTZ, QCISD/6-311++G(3d,3p) and QCISD/cc-pVTZ. The results calculated at the QCISD level are the most accurate among the four with root mean square errors of 4.7 and 5.0 km mol(-1) for the 6-311++G(3d,3p) and cc-pVTZ basis sets. These values are close to the estimated aggregate experimental error of the hydrocarbon intensities, 4.0 km mol(-1). The atomic charge transfer-counter polarization effect is much larger than the charge effect for the results of all four quantum levels. Charge transfer-counter polarization effects are expected to also be important in vibrations of more polar molecules for which equilibrium charge contributions can be large.

  6. Workplace Charging. Charging Up University Campuses

    SciTech Connect

    Giles, Carrie; Ryder, Carrie; Lommele, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    This case study features the experiences of university partners in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Workplace Charging Challenge with the installation and management of plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) charging stations.

  7. Charge form factors of two-neutron halo nuclei in halo EFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, P.; Hammer, H.-W.; Platter, L.

    2013-09-01

    We set up a formalism to calculate the charge form factors of two-neutron halo nuclei with S -wave neutron-core interactions in the framework of the halo effective field theory. The method is applied to some known and suspected halo nuclei. In particular, we calculate the form factors and charge radii relative to the core to leading order in the halo EFT and compare to experiments where they are available. Moreover, we investigate the general dependence of the charge radius on the core mass and the one- and two-neutron separation energies.

  8. Quick spacecraft charging primer

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Brian Arthur

    2014-03-12

    This is a presentation in PDF format which is a quick spacecraft charging primer, meant to be used for program training. It goes into detail about charging physics, RBSP examples, and how to identify charging.

  9. [Experimental study of poly-DL-lactic acid membrane guided bone regeneration in rabbit radii bone defects].

    PubMed

    Duan, Hong; Fan, Yubo; Dou, Jun; Pei, Fuxing

    2004-10-01

    This study was conducted to observe bone regeneration guided by poly-DL-latic acid (PDLLA) membrane in rabbit radii bone defects and to explore the mechanism of the membrane guided bone regeneration (MGBR). The animal models of bony and periosteous defects were established in both radii of 40 adult New Zealand white rabbits. The left defect as the experimental side was bridged with PDLLA membrane tube, the right side as the controlled side was untreated. The specimens were collected at 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks postoperatively. General observation, X-ray, histological observation and biomechanical examination were applied to the repair of the models of MGBR in both groups. Two weeks after operation, with much new bony callus formed outside the tube at both fragments, the membrane tube covered with connective tissues was filled with haematoma and fibrous callus. Twelve weeks after operation, the PDLLA membrane became white and its tube shape was still maintained. However, new bone callus outside the tube almost completely disappeared, and inside the tubes all radii bone defects were successfully repaired with bony union. On the controlled sides, bone defects were filled with connective tissues 2 weeks postoperatively. And 12 weeks after operation, the typical nonunion that had been formed after bone marrow canals were sealed with cortical bone. On the experimental side, the strength of the newly formed bone at the 12th week was higher than that at the 8th week (P<0.05), whereas the biomechanical examination could not be done on the controlled side. Therefore, these findings suggested that the bone regeneration could be successfully guided by PDLLA membrane, and this MGBR technique might be generally used in the treatment of bone defects and nonunion.

  10. Ionization potentials, electron affinities, resonance excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and ionic radii of element Uus (Z = 117) and astatine.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zhiwei; Li, Jiguang; Dong, Chenzhong

    2010-12-30

    Multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) method was employed to calculate the first five ionization potentials, electron affinities, resonance excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and radii for the element Uus and its homologue At. Main valence correlation effects were taken into account. The Breit interaction and QED effects were also estimated. The uncertainties of calculated IPs, EAs, and IR for Uus and At were reduced through an extrapolation procedure. The good consistency with available experimental and other theoretical values demonstrates the validity of the present results. These theoretical data therefore can be used to predict some unknown physicochemical properties of element Uus, Astatine, and their compounds.

  11. Geophysical disturbance environment during the NASA/MPE barium release at 5 earth radii on September 21, 1971.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, T. N.; Stanley, G. M.; Boyd, J. S.

    1973-01-01

    The geophysical disturbance environment was quiet during the NASA/MPE barium release at 5 earth radii on September 21, 1971. At the time of the release, the magnetosphere was in the late recovery phase of a principal magnetic storm, the provisional Dst value was -13 gammas, and the local horizontal disturbance at Great Whale River was near zero. Riometer and other observations indicated low-level widespread precipitation of high-energy electrons at Great Whale River before, during, and after the release. Cloudy sky at this station prevented optical observation of aurora. No magnetic or ionospheric effects attributable to the barium release were detected at Great Whale River.

  12. Modulation of folding energy landscape by charge-charge interactions: linking experiments with computational modeling.

    PubMed

    Tzul, Franco O; Schweiker, Katrina L; Makhatadze, George I

    2015-01-20

    The kinetics of folding-unfolding of a structurally diverse set of four proteins optimized for thermodynamic stability by rational redesign of surface charge-charge interactions is characterized experimentally. The folding rates are faster for designed variants compared with their wild-type proteins, whereas the unfolding rates are largely unaffected. A simple structure-based computational model, which incorporates the Debye-Hückel formalism for the electrostatics, was used and found to qualitatively recapitulate the experimental results. Analysis of the energy landscapes of the designed versus wild-type proteins indicates the differences in refolding rates may be correlated with the degree of frustration of their respective energy landscapes. Our simulations indicate that naturally occurring wild-type proteins have frustrated folding landscapes due to the surface electrostatics. Optimization of the surface electrostatics seems to remove some of that frustration, leading to enhanced formation of native-like contacts in the transition-state ensembles (TSE) and providing a less frustrated energy landscape between the unfolded and TS ensembles. Macroscopically, this results in faster folding rates. Furthermore, analyses of pairwise distances and radii of gyration suggest that the less frustrated energy landscapes for optimized variants are a result of more compact unfolded and TS ensembles. These findings from our modeling demonstrates that this simple model may be used to: (i) gain a detailed understanding of charge-charge interactions and their effects on modulating the energy landscape of protein folding and (ii) qualitatively predict the kinetic behavior of protein surface electrostatic interactions.

  13. A simple rotational pendulum method to measure the radii of gyration or mass moments of inertia of a rotor and other assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Andriulli, J.B.

    1997-01-01

    In mechanical dynamic problems, it is often necessary to know the radii of gyration or equivalent mass moments of inertia of components and assemblies. Using the rotational pendulum technique described, one can easily measure the radii of gyration about the polar and diametric axes of any rigid rotor without requiring a special fixture. The principals employed are also applicable to more complicated assemblies such as aircraft, boats, and cars, where the radius of gyration and vehicle maneuverability are of interest. This description focuses on rotors. The relative values of polar and diametric radii of gyration characterize some dynamic behavior and stability of spinning rotors. When the ratio of polar to diametric radii of gyration approaches unity, the spinning rotor may exhibit undesirable dynamic behavior. Consequently, prior to high-speed spin testing the rotor or otherwise operating the assembly, it is desirable to have a simple and inexpensive procedure to directly measure the radii of gyration of existing hardware. These data permit the technician to estimate the rotor dynamic behavior or identify potential problems prior to committing to operation. If sufficient part information is available, such as dimensions, geometry and material density, one can calculate the radii of gyration. For complicated parts, this can be time consuming. Often the technician does not have access to the rotor`s dimensional details to make the calculations. Hence, an inexpensive empirical technique such as the one described is valuable.

  14. Constructing a statistical atlas of the radii of the optic nerve and cerebrospinal fluid sheath in young healthy adults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrigan, Robert L.; Plassard, Andrew J.; Mawn, Louise A.; Galloway, Robert L.; Smith, Seth A.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-03-01

    Optic neuritis is a sudden inflammation of the optic nerve (ON) and is marked by pain on eye movement, and visual symptoms such as a decrease in visual acuity, color vision, contrast and visual field defects. The ON is closely linked with multiple sclerosis (MS) and patients have a 50% chance of developing MS within 15 years. Recent advances in multi-atlas segmentation methods have omitted volumetric assessment. In the past, measuring the size of the ON has been done by hand. We utilize a new method of automatically segmenting the ON to measure the radii of both the ON and surrounding cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sheath to develop a normative distribution of healthy young adults. We examine this distribution for any trends and find that ON and CSF sheath radii do not vary between 20-35 years of age and between sexes. We evaluate how six patients suffering from optic neuropathy compare to this distribution of controls. We find that of these six patients, five of them qualitatively differ from the normative distribution which suggests this technique could be used in the future to distinguish between optic neuritis patients and healthy controls

  15. A new FFT-based algorithm to compute Born radii in the generalized Born theory of biomolecule solvation

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Wei Xu Zhenli; Baumketner, Andrij

    2008-12-20

    In this paper, a new method for calculating effective atomic radii within the generalized Born (GB) model of implicit solvation is proposed, for use in computer simulations of biomolecules. First, a new formulation for the GB radii is developed, in which smooth kernels are used to eliminate the divergence in volume integrals intrinsic in the model. Next, the fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithm is applied to integrate smoothed functions, taking advantage of the rapid spectral decay provided by the smoothing. The total cost of the proposed algorithm scales as O(N{sup 3}logN+M) where M is the number of atoms comprised in a molecule and N is the number of FFT grid points in one dimension, which depends only on the geometry of the molecule and the spectral decay of the smooth kernel but not on M. To validate our algorithm, numerical tests are performed for three solute models: one spherical object for which exact solutions exist and two protein molecules of differing size. The tests show that our algorithm is able to reach the accuracy of other existing GB implementations, while offering much lower computational cost.

  16. A new FFT-based algorithm to compute Born radii in the generalized Born theory of biomolecule solvation.

    PubMed

    Cai, Wei; Xu, Zhenli; Baumketner, Andrij

    2008-12-20

    In this paper, a new method for calculating effective atomic radii within the generalized Born (GB) model of implicit solvation is proposed, for use in computer simulations of bio-molecules. First, a new formulation for the GB radii is developed, in which smooth kernels are used to eliminate the divergence in volume integrals intrinsic in the model. Next, the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) algorithm is applied to integrate smoothed functions, taking advantage of the rapid spectral decay provided by the smoothing. The total cost of the proposed algorithm scales as O(N(3)logN + M) where M is the number of atoms comprised in a molecule, and N is the number of FFT grid points in one dimension, which depends only on the geometry of the molecule and the spectral decay of the smooth kernel but not on M. To validate our algorithm, numerical tests are performed for three solute models: one spherical object for which exact solutions exist and two protein molecules of differing size. The tests show that our algorithm is able to reach the accuracy of other existing GB implementations, while offering much lower computational cost.

  17. The direct cooling tail method for X-ray burst analysis to constrain neutron star masses and radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleimanov, Valery F.; Poutanen, Juri; Nättilä, Joonas; Kajava, Jari J. E.; Revnivtsev, Mikhail G.; Werner, Klaus

    2017-04-01

    Determining neutron star (NS) radii and masses can help to understand the properties of matter at supra-nuclear densities. Thermal emission during thermonuclear X-ray bursts from NSs in low-mass X-ray binaries provides a unique opportunity to study NS parameters, because of the high fluxes, large luminosity variations and the related changes in the spectral properties. The standard cooling tail method uses hot NS atmosphere models to convert the observed spectral evolution during cooling stages of X-ray bursts to the Eddington flux FEdd and the stellar angular size Ω. These are then translated to the constraints on the NS mass M and radius R. Here we present the improved, direct cooling tail method that generalizes the standard approach. First, we adjust the cooling tail method to account for the bolometric correction to the flux. Then, we fit the observed dependence of the blackbody normalization on flux with a theoretical model directly on the M-R plane by interpolating theoretical dependences to a given gravity, hence ensuring only weakly informative priors for M and R instead of FEdd and Ω. The direct cooling method is demonstrated using a photospheric radius expansion burst from SAX J1810.8-2609, which has happened when the system was in the hard state. Comparing to the standard cooling tail method, the confidence regions are shifted by 1σ towards larger radii, giving R = 11.5-13.0 km at M = 1.3-1.8 M⊙ for this NS.

  18. Lattice summations for spread out particles: Applications to neutral and charged systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyes, D. M.; Brańka, A. C.

    2013-01-01

    This work is concerned with the lattice energy of periodic assemblies of mass and charge distributions of the form, exp (-αp2), where α is an adjustable positive variable and {p} is the vector from the lattice site or average position. The energy of interaction between two distributions is the density-weighted integral of the interactions between the volume elements of each distribution. Reciprocal space lattice summation formulas derived for particles represented by gaussian smeared-out density distributions are applied to the gaussian potential and a bounded version of the soft-sphere potential for a range of exponents. Two types of spatial broadening are considered, continuous or physical broadening (PB) and broadening resulting from the time average of point particle positions, so-called "time" broadening (TB). For neutral mass distributions a reciprocal space lattice summation formula is derived which is applied to the bounded soft-sphere potential. For the charged systems, the methodology described in Heyes [J. Chem. Phys. 74, 1924 (1981), 10.1063/1.441285] is used, which for the PB case gives the Ewald-like formulas derived by Gingrich and Wilson [Chem. Phys. Lett. 500, 178 (2010), 10.1016/j.cplett.2010.10.010] using a different method. Another expression for the lattice energy of the spread out charge distributions is derived which is cast entirely in terms of a summation over the reciprocal lattice vectors, without the arbitrary charge spreading function used in the Ewald method. The effects of charge spreading on a generalized definition of the Madelung constant (M) for a selection of crystal lattices are shown to be insignificant for route mean square displacements up to values typical of melting of an ionic crystal. When the length scale of the charge distribution becomes comparable to or greater than the mean inter particle spacing, however, the effects of charge broadening on the lattice energy are shown to be significant. In the PB case, M → 0

  19. Singularity free charged anisotropic solutions of Einstein-Maxwell field equations in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, K. N.; Pant, N.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present generalization of anisotropic analogue of charged Heintzmann's solution of the general relativistic field equations in curvature coordinates. These exact solutions are stable and well behaved in all respect for a wide range of anisotropy parameter and charge parameter. We have found that these new solutions are suitable for the modeling of super dense stars like neutron stars and quark stars because they yield a wide range of masses and radii with simple mathematical expressions. By tuning different values of the few parameters, we can model various neutron stars and quark stars which are compatible with the experimentally observed values of masses and radii. Therefore, we have synchronized our solution with the observed values of some of the compact stars XTE J1739 - 217, EXO 0748 - 676, PSR J1614 - 2230, PSR J0348 + 0432 and PSR B0943 + 10.

  20. Evidence for Short-Range-Ordered Charge Stripes Far above the Charge-Ordering Transition in La1.67Sr0.33NiO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeykoon, A. M. Milinda; Bozin, Emil S.; Yin, Wei-Guo; Gu, Genda; Hill, John P.; Tranquada, John M.; Billinge, Simon J. L.

    2015-03-01

    The temperature evolution of structural modulation associated with charge and spin order in La1.67Sr0.33NiO4 has been investigated using neutron powder diffraction. For the first time we report an anomalous shrinking of the c/a lattice parameter ratio that correlates with TCO at the temperature where long-range stacking order of charge stripes disappears. The sign of this change can be explained by the change in interlayer Coulomb energy between the static-stripe-ordered state and the fluctuating-stripe-ordered state or the charge-disordered state. In addition, we identify a contribution to the mean-square displacements of Ni and in-plane O atoms whose width correlates quite well with the size of the pseudogap extracted from the reported optical conductivity, with a non-Debye-like component that persists below and well above TCO. Local structural parameters in the atomic pair distribution function (PDF) well-agree with this result. We infer that dynamic charge-stripe correlations survive to T ~ 2TCO. This work was supported by the DOE Grant, DE- AC02-98CH10886.

  1. The polydisperse cell model: Nonlinear screening and charge renormalization in colloidal mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Aldemar; Téllez, Gabriel; van Roij, René

    2008-04-01

    We propose a model for the calculation of renormalized charges and osmotic properties of mixtures of highly charged colloidal particles. The model is a generalization of the cell model and the notion of charge renormalization as introduced by Alexander et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 80, 5776 (1984)]. The total solution is partitioned into as many different cells as components in the mixture. The radii of these cells are determined self-consistently for a given set of parameters from the solution of the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation with appropriate boundary conditions. This generalizes Alexanders's model where the (unique) Wigner-Seitz cell radius is solely fixed by the colloid packing fraction. We illustrate the technique by considering a binary mixture of the colloids with the same sign of charge. The present model can be used to calculate thermodynamic properties of highly charged colloidal mixtures at the level of linear theories, while taking the effect of nonlinear screening into account.

  2. Synchrotron radiation from the winds of O supergiants - Tb = 10 to the 7. 6th K at 60 stellar radii

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, R.B.; Titus, M.A. )

    1990-08-01

    Results are presented on VLBI measurements of the nonthermal radio components around two O supergiant stars: Cyg OB2 No. 9 and HD 167971. The measurements were used to characterize the brightness temperature of the emission and to measure the size of compact 5-10 mJy components in these stars, reported by Bieging et al. (1989). The sizes found for the 5-10 mJy components are consistent with the free-free wind radii, indicating that the compact companions are not the sources of nonthermal radiation. Results suggest that there is a small fractional population (10 to the -4th to 10 to the -7th) of ultrarelativistic electrons (Teff of about 10 to the 11th K) coexisting with the stellar wind, which emit optically thin synchrotron radiation. This is in agreement with the synchrotron model of White (1985). 21 refs.

  3. Characteristics of Jovian trapped electrons and protons for the region within 20 Jupiter radii and their interaction with Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, J. A.; Hamilton, D. C.; Mckibben, R. B.; Mogro-Campero, A.; Pyle, K. R.; Tuzzolino, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    A brief summary is given of Pioneer 10 observations of trapped particles in the inner-core region (within 20 Jupiter radii) of the Jovian magnetosphere. The three sensor systems used to study trapped radiation in this region are described. Intensity profiles are plotted as a function of magnetic-shell parameter (L) for electrons with energies of at least 3 MeV, protons with energies of at least 35 MeV, and protons with energies between 0.5 and 1.8 MeV. The effect of trapped-particle absorption by Io is clearly seen in the intensity profiles of all the observed particle species, and evidence is presented for preferential absorption of small-pitch-angle particles by Io. Conclusive evidence is given for the fact that Jupiter's trapped radiation is maintained by the inward diffusion of particles across L shells.

  4. Comparison of Radii Sets, Entropy, QM Methods, and Sampling on MM-PBSA, MM-GBSA, and QM/MM-GBSA Ligand Binding Energies of F. tularensis Enoyl-ACP Reductase (FabI)

    PubMed Central

    Su, Pin-Chih; Tsai, Cheng-Chieh; Mehboob, Shahila; Hevener, Kirk E.; Johnson, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    To validate a method for predicting the binding affinities of FabI inhibitors, three implicit solvent methods, MM-PBSA, MM-GBSA and QM/MM GBSA were carefully compared using sixteen benzimidazole inhibitors in complex with F. tularensis FabI. The data suggests that the prediction results are sensitive to radii sets, GB methods, QM Hamiltonians, sampling protocols, and simulation length, if only one simulation trajectory is used for each ligand. In this case, QM/MM-GBSA using 6 ns MD simulation trajectories together with GBneck2, PM3, and the mbondi2 radii set, generate the closest agreement with experimental values (r2= 0.88). However, if the three implicit solvent methods are averaged from six 1 ns MD simulations for each ligand (called “multiple independent sampling”), the prediction results are relatively insensitive to all the tested parameters. Moreover, MM/GBSA together with GBHCT and mbondi, using 600 frames extracted evenly from six 0.25 ns MD simulations, can also provide accurate prediction to experimental values (r2 = 0.84). Therefore, the multiple independent sampling method can be more efficient than a single, long simulation method. Since future scaffold expansions may significantly change the benzimidazole's physiochemical properties (charges, etc.) and possibly binding modes, which may affect the sensitivities of various parameters, the relatively insensitive “multiple independent sampling method” may avoid the need of an entirely new validation study. Moreover, due to large fluctuating entropy values, (QM/)MM-P(G)BSA were limited to inhibitors’ relative affinity prediction, but not the absolute affinity. The developed protocol will support an ongoing benzimidazole lead optimization program. PMID:26216222

  5. Simulation of global sulfate distribution and the influence on effective cloud drop radii with a coupled photochemistry sulfur cycle model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelofs, Geert-J. A. N.; Lelieveld, Jos; Ganzeveld, Laurens

    1998-07-01

    A sulfur cycle model is coupled to a global chemistry-climate model. The simulated surface sulfate concentrations are generally within a factor of 2 of observed concentrations, and display a realistic seasonality for most background locations. However, the model tends to underestimate sulfate and overestimate surface SO2 at relatively polluted locations. A possible explanation for this is that additional oxidation reactions not considered in the model, may be important. Calculated tropospheric sulfate column abundances exceed those of previous studies, which is predominantly associated with a less efficient nucleation scavenging in wet convective updrafts. Through the simultaneous calculation of the sulfur cycle and tropospheric photochemistry, simulated H2O2 and SO2 concentrations are strongly linked, especially in polluted areas. The coupled model simulates a stronger oxidant limitation and, consequently, a smaller contribution to sulfate formation by H2O2 oxidation of SO2 when compared to sulfur cycle models that use monthly averaged oxidant distributions as input. In the polluted NH, the differences in calculated sulfate columns are largest in winter and relatively small in summer. Therefore, the coupling between the sulfur cycle and the oxidant chemistry is expected to have a minor impact on the calculation of the indirect and direct radiative forcing by sulfate. An empirical relation between sulfate concentration and cloud drop number concentration, derived from cloud measurements at Grean Dun Fell (UK), is applied to the simulated cloud and sulfate fields to derive distributions of effective could drop radii. Additionally, a relation between wind speed and cloud drop number concentration is applied over marine regions to account for the effect of seasalt aerosol on cloud formation when sulfate concentrations are relatively low. Calculated droplet radii are systematically underestimated by about 10 20% in the NH compared to satellite derived values, but they

  6. Spacial and Frequency Domain Calculation of Terrain Roughness Metric Root-Mean-Square (RMS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    Armaments Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) Detroit Arsenal ATTN: RDTA-SIE-SE/MS157 6501 East 11 Mile Road Warren , Michigan...RDECOM/TARDEC 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER ATTN: RDTA-SIE-SE/MS157 6501 E 11 MILE RD WARREN , MI 48397-5000 26042...8217g’); % account for filter beg and end plot(tt1(121:end-120),fdet,’b’); % account for filter beg and end 10 Figure 6 – Zoomed Terrain Profile

  7. Mean square value of noise equivalent magnetic induction for magnetic microsensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panait, Cornel; Tamaş, Razvan; Căruntu, George

    2010-11-01

    The noise-signal at the output of a Hall magnetic sensor can be interpreted as a results of an equivalent magnetic induction, acting on a noiseless Hall device. In the paperwork is defined this characteristic for two Hall devices realised in the bipolar and the MOS integrated circuits technology. The influence of geometry and material properties on these essential parameters in the characterisation of magnetic sensors performances, can be emphasised by simulating a few Hall devices structures.

  8. The mean-square error optimal linear discriminant function and its application to incomplete data vectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, H. F.

    1979-01-01

    In many pattern recognition problems, data vectors are classified although one or more of the data vector elements are missing. This problem occurs in remote sensing when the ground is obscured by clouds. Optimal linear discrimination procedures for classifying imcomplete data vectors are discussed.

  9. Adaptive Beamforming with the Transform Domain LMS (Least Mean-Square).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-01

    r --- ". - i,-early corstrained adaptive beamformring to cne cf corstraired multiple -efererne noise carcelling . Applying the TRLMS aigcrth to...Canceller. 2. 1. 1 The Generalized Sidelcbe Carceller Figure 2.2 shows the Generalized Sidelcbe Canceller Broadband Beamfor-mer (GSC), first analyzed by...nalsisanddaignef ’- [13] ~. Widrow et aL., "Adacptve noise carcelling : prlrn±ies ard acpiicatiors," Proc. IEEE, vol. 63, no. .2, pp. 5,2421715, December 10975

  10. Plasma fluctuations in a Kaufman thruster. [root mean square magnitude, spectra and cross correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, J. S.; Terdan, F. F.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of the RMS magnitude, spectra and cross-correlations for the fluctuations in the beam, discharge and neutralizer keeper currents are presented for a 30-cm diameter dished grid ion thrustor for a range of magnetic baffle currents and up to 2.0 amperes beam current. The ratio of RMS to mean ion beam current varied from 0.04 to 0.23. The spectra of the amplitudes of the beam and discharge current fluctuations were taken up to 9 MHz and show that the predominant amplitudes occur at frequencies of 10 kHz or below. The fall-off with increasing frequency is rapid. Frequencies above 100 kHz the spectral levels are 45 kb or more below the maximum peak amplitudes. The cross-correlations revealed the ion beam fluctuations to have large radial and axial scales which implied that the beam fluctuates as a whole or 'in-phase.' The cross-correlations of the beam and neutralizer keeper current fluctuations indicated the neutralizer contributions to the beam fluctuations to be small, but not negligible. The mode of operation of the thrustor (values of beam and magnetic baffle currents) was significant in determining the RMS magnitude and spectral shape of the beam fluctuations. The major oscillations were not found to be directly dependent on the power conditioner inverter frequencies.

  11. Examining the Reliability of Interval Level Data Using Root Mean Square Differences and Concordance Correlation Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barchard, Kimberly A.

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces new statistics for evaluating score consistency. Psychologists usually use correlations to measure the degree of linear relationship between 2 sets of scores, ignoring differences in means and standard deviations. In medicine, biology, chemistry, and physics, a more stringent criterion is often used: the extent to which…

  12. Range Profile Specific Optimal Waveforms for Minimum Mean Square Error Estimation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    requires as input the result of a single dwell. This is because of the effect of changing a fil- ter can be observed by simply processing the radar return...only be observed by transmitting another dwell. We have posited a joint measurement and adaptation process that assumes range cell specific waveforms...The observation resulting from using waveform s(l) is assumed to be given by ỹ(l) = AT (l)s(l) + ṽ(l) (1) where ṽ(l) is the measurement noise and A

  13. Computation of LMS (Least-Mean-Square) and Matched Digital Filters for Optical Clutter Suppression.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-31

    35, art. 48; ref. 36, secs. 35,36). Ay(dv/dy) Av, = Vv, = -v 1 + v, Av2(d 2v/dV2 ) 12v 1 V 2v3 = 62V, = v - 2v, + v3 Av 3(d 3v/dv3) .1v, V 3v4 = -v 1...required, and reduced correlation between the added and original samples may offset the greater accu - racy of the higher-order formulae. In addition, the... 12v , - 39v, + 56v, - 39v, - 12v , v.). )Cl I-C 16)6 6 Ay 5 (d 5v/dy5) M P65v 5 - -LA7v 5 W -- (vj - 9v, + 26v3 - 29v, + 29v - 26v, + 9v, - v.), 3 6 -~~y

  14. Computer Assisted Improvement of the Estimation Mean Squared Error with Application to Back Propagation Neural Networks.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    function. Key Words and Phrases: Parametric estimation , exponential families, nonlinear models, nonlinear least squares, neural networks, Monte Carlo simulation, computer intensive statistical methods.

  15. Analysis of charged aerosols in the mesosphere during the MASS/ECOMA rocket campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knappmiller, Scott Robert

    In the polar summer mesosphere ice particles grow sufficiently large to scatter sunlight, giving rise to visible cloud displays called Noctilucent Clouds (NLC). In August of 2007, two sounding rockets were launched from the Andoya Rocket Range, Norway carrying the newly developed MASS instrument (Mesospheric Aerosol Sampling Spectrometer) to study NLC. The instrument detects charged aerosols in four different mass ranges on four pairs of biased collector plates, one set for positive particles and one set for negative particles. The first sounding rocket was launched into a Polar Mesospheric Summer echo (PMSE) and into a NLC on 3 August. The solar zenith angle was 93 degrees and NLC were seen in the previous hour at 83 km by the ALOMAR RMR lidar. NLC were also detected at the same altitude by rocket-borne photometer measurements. The data from the MASS instrument shows a negatively charged population with radii >3 nm in the 83--89 km altitude range, which is collocated with PMSE detected by the ALWIN radar. Smaller particles, 1--2 nm in radius with both positive and negative polarity were detected between 86--88 km. Positively charged particles <1 nm in radius were detected at the same altitude. This is the first time the charge number densities of positive and negative NLC particles have been measured simultaneously. A charging model is developed to investigate the coexistence of positively and negatively charged aerosols in the NLC environment as measured by the MASS instrument. Natanson's rate equations are used for the attachment of free electrons and ions and the model includes charging by photo-electron emission and photo-detachment. Although the MASS flight occurred during twilight conditions, the solar UV flux was still sufficient to affect the charge state of the aerosols. The calculations are done assuming three types of particles with different photo-electron charging properties: (1) Icy NLC particles, (2) Hematite particles of meteoric origin as

  16. Brownian motion of a charged test particle in vacuum between two conducting plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hongwei; Chen, Jun

    2004-12-01

    The Brownian motion of a charged test particle caused by quantum electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations between two perfectly conducting plates is examined and the mean squared fluctuations in the velocity and position of the test particle are calculated. Our results show that the Brownian motion in the direction normal to the plates is reinforced in comparison to that in the single plate case. The effective temperature associated with this normal Brownian motion could be three times as large as that in the single plate case. However, the negative dispersions for the velocity and position in the longitudinal directions, which could be interpreted as reducing the quantum uncertainties of the particle, acquire positive corrections due to the presence of the second plate, and are thus weakened.

  17. Charge Exchange with Highly Charged Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, Jeremy; Ferri, Kevin; Schmitt, Jaclyn; Hanson, Joshua; Marler, Joan

    2016-05-01

    A detailed study of the physics of highly charged ions (HCIs) is critical for a deep understanding of observed phenomena resulting from interactions of HCIs with neutral atoms in astrophysical and fusion environments. Specifically the charge transfer rates and spectroscopy of the subsequent decay fluorescence are of great interest to these communities. Results from a laboratory based investigation of these rates will be presented. The experiment takes advantage of an energy and charge state selected beam of HCIs from the recently on-line Clemson University EBIT (CUEBIT). Progress towards an experimental apparatus for retrapping HCIs towards precision spectroscopy of HCIs will also be presented.

  18. The charged black-hole bomb: A lower bound on the charge-to-mass ratio of the explosive scalar field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hod, Shahar

    2016-04-01

    The well-known superradiant amplification mechanism allows a charged scalar field of proper mass μ and electric charge q to extract the Coulomb energy of a charged Reissner-Nordström black hole. The rate of energy extraction can grow exponentially in time if the system is placed inside a reflecting cavity which prevents the charged scalar field from escaping to infinity. This composed black-hole-charged-scalar-field-mirror system is known as the charged black-hole bomb. Previous numerical studies of this composed physical system have shown that, in the linearized regime, the inequality q / μ > 1 provides a necessary condition for the development of the superradiant instability. In the present paper we use analytical techniques to study the instability properties of the charged black-hole bomb in the regime of linearized scalar fields. In particular, we prove that the lower bound q/μ>√{rm/r--1/rm /r+-1 } provides a necessary condition for the development of the superradiant instability in this composed physical system (here r± are the horizon radii of the charged Reissner-Nordström black hole and rm is the radius of the confining mirror). This analytically derived lower bound on the superradiant instability regime of the composed black-hole-charged-scalar-field-mirror system is shown to agree with direct numerical computations of the instability spectrum.

  19. Spacecraft Charging Technology, 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The third Spacecraft Charging Technology Conference proceedings contain 66 papers on the geosynchronous plasma environment, spacecraft modeling, charged particle environment interactions with spacecraft, spacecraft materials characterization, and satellite design and testing. The proceedings is a compilation of the state of the art of spacecraft charging and environmental interaction phenomena.

  20. Particle charge spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuerstenau, Stephen D. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An airflow through a tube is used to guide a charged particle through the tube. A detector may be used to detect charge passing through the tube on the particle. The movement of the particle through the tube may be used to both detect its charge and size.

  1. Charge exchange system

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Oscar A.

    1978-01-01

    An improved charge exchange system for substantially reducing pumping requirements of excess gas in a controlled thermonuclear reactor high energy neutral beam injector. The charge exchange system utilizes a jet-type blanket which acts simultaneously as the charge exchange medium and as a shield for reflecting excess gas.

  2. Nanoparticle gel electrophoresis: bare charged spheres in polyelectrolyte hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Hill, Reghan J

    2013-03-15

    Nanoparticle gel electrophoresis has recently emerged as an attractive means of separating and characterizing nanoparticles. Consequently, a theory that accounts for electroosmotic flow in the gel, and coupling of the nanoparticle and hydrogel electrostatics and hydrodynamics, is required, particularly for gels in which the mesh size is comparable to or smaller than the particle radii. Here, we present an electrokinetic model for charged, spherical colloidal particles undergoing electrophoresis in charged (polyelectrolyte) hydrogels: the gel-electrophoresis analogue of Henry's theory for electrophoresis in Newtonian electrolytes. We compare numerically exact solutions of the model with several independent asymptotic approximations, identifying regions in the parameter space where these approximations are accurate or break down. As previously assumed in the literature, Henry's formula, modified by the addition of a constant electroosmotic flow mobility, is accurate only for nanoparticles that are small compared to the hydrogel mesh size. We derived an exact analytical solution of the full model by judiciously modifying the theory of Allison et al. for uncharged gels, drawing on the superposition methodology of Doane et al. to account for hydrogel charge. This furnishes accurate and economical mobility predictions for the entire parameter space. The present model suggests that nanoparticle size separations (with diameters ≲40 nm) are optimal at low ionic strength, with a gel mesh size that is selected according to the particle charging mechanism. For weakly charged particles, optimal size separation is achieved when the Brinkman screening length is matched to the mean particle size.

  3. Space-charge limits of ion sensitive probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, D.; LaBombard, B.; Ochoukov, R.; Sullivan, R.; Whyte, D.

    2013-12-01

    Ion sensitive probes (ISPs) are used to measure ion temperature and plasma potential in magnetized plasmas. Their operation relies on the difference in electron and ion Larmor radii to preferentially collect the ion species on a recessed electrode. Because of their simple two-electrode construction and optimal geometry for heat flux handling they are an attractive probe to use in the high heat flux boundary of magnetic confinement fusion experiments. However, the integrity of its measurements is rarely, if ever, checked under such conditions. Recent measurements with an ISP in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak have shown that its ion current is space-charge limited and thus its current-voltage (I-V) response does not contain information on the ion temperature. We numerically solve a 1D Vlasov-Poisson model of ion collection to determine how much bias is needed to overcome space-charge effects and regain the classic I-V characteristic with an exponential decay. Prompted by the observations of space charge in C-Mod, we have performed a survey of ISP measurements reported in the literature. Evidence of space-charge limited current collection is found on many probes, with few authors noting its presence. Some probes are able to apparently exceed the classic 1D space-charge limit because electrons can E × B drift into the probe volume, partially reducing the net ion charge; it is argued that this does not, however, change the basic problem that space charge compromises the measurement of ion temperature. Guidance is given for design of ISPs to minimize the effects of space charge.

  4. Predicting pK(a) values of substituted phenols from atomic charges: comparison of different quantum mechanical methods and charge distribution schemes.

    PubMed

    Svobodová Vareková, Radka; Geidl, Stanislav; Ionescu, Crina-Maria; Skrehota, Ondrej; Kudera, Michal; Sehnal, David; Bouchal, Tomás; Abagyan, Ruben; Huber, Heinrich J; Koca, Jaroslav

    2011-08-22

    The acid dissociation (ionization) constant pK(a) is one of the fundamental properties of organic molecules. We have evaluated different computational strategies and models to predict the pK(a) values of substituted phenols using partial atomic charges. Partial atomic charges for 124 phenol molecules were calculated using 83 approaches containing seven theory levels (MP2, HF, B3LYP, BLYP, BP86, AM1, and PM3), three basis sets (6-31G*, 6-311G, STO-3G), and five population analyses (MPA, NPA, Hirshfeld, MK, and Löwdin). The correlations between pK(a) and various atomic charge descriptors were examined, and the best descriptors were selected for preparing the quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models. One QSPR model was created for each of the 83 approaches to charge calculation, and then the accuracy of all these models was analyzed and compared. The pK(a)s predicted by most of the models correlate strongly with experimental pK(a) values. For example, more than 25% of the models have correlation coefficients (R²) greater than 0.95 and root-mean-square errors smaller than 0.49. All seven examined theory levels are applicable for pK(a) prediction from charges. The best results were obtained for the MP2 and HF level of theory. The most suitable basis set was found to be 6-31G*. The 6-311G basis set provided slightly weaker correlations, and unexpectedly also, the STO-3G basis set is applicable for the QSPR modeling of pK(a). The Mulliken, natural, and Löwdin population analyses provide accurate models for all tested theory levels and basis sets. The results provided by the Hirshfeld population analysis were also acceptable, but the QSPR models based on MK charges show only weak correlations.

  5. Mean ionic charge of silicon in He-3-rich solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Luhn, A.; Klecker, B.; Hovestadt, D.; Moebius, E.

    1987-06-01

    The charge state of Si in solar flares with enhanced He-3 is investigated on the basis of measurements obtained at a sunward distance of about 230 earth radii by the ultralow-energy Z, E, and Q sensor of ISEE 3 during 1978-1979. The data are presented in tables and graphs and characterized. The charge is found to have a mean of about 14 and a 99-percent-confidence-level lower bound of 11.7, as compared to 11.0 + or - 0.3 for normal flare events. Also presented are corrections to the mean Fe charges reported by Klecker et al. (1984). Both mean charge states indicate a source temperature of about 10 million K and appear to be incompatible with the mechanism proposed by Fisk (1978) to explain He-3 enrichment. 35 references.

  6. Scalable Graphene-Based Membranes for Ionic Sieving with Ultrahigh Charge Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seunghyun; Constans, Charlotte; Surmani Martins, Marcos Vinicius; Seow, Yong Chin; Guevara Carrió, Juan Alfredo; Garaj, Slaven

    2017-02-08

    Nanostructured graphene-oxide (GO) laminate membranes, exhibiting ultrahigh water flux, are excellent candidates for next generation nanofiltration and desalination membranes, provided the ionic rejection could be further increased without compromising the water flux. Using microscopic drift-diffusion experiments, we demonstrated the ultrahigh charge selectivity for GO membranes, with more than order of magnitude difference in the permeabilities of cationic and anionic species of equivalent hydration radii. Measuring diffusion of a wide range of ions of different size and charge, we were able to clearly disentangle different physical mechanisms contributing to the ionic sieving in GO membranes: electrostatic repulsion between ions and charged chemical groups; and the compression of the ionic hydration shell within the membrane's nanochannels, following the activated behavior. The charge-selectivity allows us to rationally design membranes with increased ionic rejection and opens up the field of ion exchange and electrodialysis to the GO membranes.

  7. Detailed heat transfer coefficient measurements and thermal analysis at engine conditions of a pedestal with fillet radii

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Ireland, P.T.; Jones, T.V.

    1995-04-01

    Short pin-fin and pin-fin arrays are frequently used in turbine blade internal cooling systems to enhance cooling and stiffen the structure. The present work has shown that a knowledge of the detailed heat transfer coefficient distribution is required to predict the cooling effect of such devices accurately. The heat flow process has been numerically modeled at typical engine conditions with the detailed heat transfer distribution measured by the transient heat transfer method being used as the thermal boundary conditions. The heat transfer coefficient over the surface of a pedestal with fillet radii has been measured using thermochromic liquid crystals and the transient heat transfer method. The tests were performed at engine representative Reynolds numbers for a geometry typical of those used in turbine blade cooling systems. The heat conduction process that occurs in the engine was subsequently modeled numerically with a finite element discretization of the solid pedestal. The measured heat transfer coefficients were used to derive the exact boundary conditions applicable to the engine. The temperature field within the pedestal, calculated using the correct heat transfer coefficient distribution, is compared to that calculated using an area-averaged heat transfer coefficient. Metal temperature differences of 90 K are predicted across the blade wall.

  8. Magnetospheric ions and electrons in the distant magnetosheath at about 50 and 180 earth radii - ISEE-3 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholer, M.; Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.; Zwickl, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    Energetic particle data were obtained in the dawn magnetosheath at about 50 earth radii (ER), analyzed, and compared with data taken at 180 ER. Both data sets were acquired during the ISEE-3 geotail mission. The results of analyses of the 16 sec time profiles of 32 and 130 keV protons, 75-115 keV electrons, and some of the 30-36 keV proton angular distributions (PAD) are presented. No temporal dispersions were detected in the particle bursts, implying instead a spatial dispersion. The particles filled flux tubes of 6 ER, with the energetic electrons being beamed along magnetic field lines. PADs displayed anisotropy symmetric relative to the magnetic field. The electrons were not detected at 180 ER. The phenomena are modeled as flux tubes connected to the magnetotail magnetic field in the near-earth magnetopause. The particles leak out along connected field lines. Lion roars scatter the electrons, which escape into interplanetary space. Ions, however, may carry their intensity out to 200 ER, a factor which awaits verification by further data.

  9. Tidal radii and destruction rates of globular clusters in the Milky Way due to bulge-bar and disk shocking

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, Edmundo; Pichardo, Bárbara; Velázquez, Héctor

    2014-10-01

    We calculate orbits, tidal radii, and bulge-bar and disk shocking destruction rates for 63 globular clusters in our Galaxy. Orbits are integrated in both an axisymmetric and a nonaxisymmetric Galactic potential that includes a bar and a three-dimensional model for the spiral arms. With the use of a Monte Carlo scheme, we consider in our simulations observational uncertainties in the kinematical data of the clusters. In the analysis of destruction rates due to the bulge-bar, we consider the rigorous treatment of using the real Galactic cluster orbit instead of the usual linear trajectory employed in previous studies. We compare results in both treatments. We find that the theoretical tidal radius computed in the nonaxisymmetric Galactic potential compares better with the observed tidal radius than that obtained in the axisymmetric potential. In both Galactic potentials, bulge-shocking destruction rates computed with a linear trajectory of a cluster at its perigalacticons give a good approximation of the result obtained with the real trajectory of the cluster. Bulge-shocking destruction rates for clusters with perigalacticons in the inner Galactic region are smaller in the nonaxisymmetric potential than those in the axisymmetric potential. For the majority of clusters with high orbital eccentricities (e > 0.5), their total bulge+disk destruction rates are smaller in the nonaxisymmetric potential.

  10. Standing on the Shoulders of Dwarfs: the Kepler Asteroseismic LEGACY Sample. II.Radii, Masses, and Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva Aguirre, Víctor; Lund, Mikkel N.; Antia, H. M.; Ball, Warrick H.; Basu, Sarbani; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Lebreton, Yveline; Reese, Daniel R.; Verma, Kuldeep; Casagrande, Luca; Justesen, Anders B.; Mosumgaard, Jakob R.; Chaplin, William J.; Bedding, Timothy R.; Davies, Guy R.; Handberg, Rasmus; Houdek, Günter; Huber, Daniel; Kjeldsen, Hans; Latham, David W.; White, Timothy R.; Coelho, Hugo R.; Miglio, Andrea; Rendle, Ben

    2017-02-01

    We use asteroseismic data from the Kepler satellite to determine fundamental stellar properties of the 66 main-sequence targets observed for at least one full year by the mission. We distributed tens of individual oscillation frequencies extracted from the time series of each star among seven modeling teams who applied different methods to determine radii, masses, and ages for all stars in the sample. Comparisons among the different results reveal a good level of agreement in all stellar properties, which is remarkable considering the variety of codes, input physics, and analysis methods employed by the different teams. Average uncertainties are of the order of ∼2% in radius, ∼4% in mass, and ∼10% in age, making this the best-characterized sample of main-sequence stars available to date. Our predicted initial abundances and mixing-length parameters are checked against inferences from chemical enrichment laws ΔY/ΔZ and predictions from 3D atmospheric simulations. We test the accuracy of the determined stellar properties by comparing them to the Sun, angular diameter measurements, Gaia parallaxes, and binary evolution, finding excellent agreement in all cases and further confirming the robustness of asteroseismically determined physical parameters of stars when individual frequencies of oscillation are available. Baptised as the Kepler dwarfs LEGACY sample, these stars are the solar-like oscillators with the best asteroseismic properties available for at least another decade. All data used in this analysis and the resulting stellar parameters are made publicly available for the community.

  11. Unusually sharp dependence of water exchange rate versus lanthanide ionic radii for a series of tetraamide complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shanrong; Wu, Kuangcong; Sherry, A Dean

    2002-04-24

    The tetraamide ligand, DOTA-tetra(glycine ethyl ester), forms complexes with the lanthanide(III) cations that exist in solution predominantly as the square antiprism structure with single, slowly exchanging inner-sphere water molecule. Variable-temperature 1H and 17O NMR studies revealed that the bound water lifetimes in these complexes were sharply dependent upon the ionic radius of Ln3+ cation. A novel lanthanide-induced shift technique was used to unmask the bound water 17O resonance of SmL3+ and YL3+ complexes from the bulk water resonance. The bound water lifetime (tauM298) was approximately 800 mus in the EuL3+ complex but became much shorter (several microseconds) for Ln3+ cations with larger and smaller ionic radii. This demonstrates that water exchange is exquisitely fine-tuned in this macrocyclic tetraamide system and that a variety of Ln3+ complexes meet with the exchange requirement, Deltaomega*tauM >/= 1, necessary for an efficient MT agent.

  12. QTAIM charge-charge flux-dipole flux interpretation of electronegativity and potential models of the fluorochloromethane mean dipole moment derivatives.

    PubMed

    Silva, Arnaldo F; da Silva, João V; Haiduke, R L A; Bruns, Roy E

    2011-11-17

    Infrared fundamental vibrational intensities and quantum theory atoms in molecules (QTAIM) charge-charge flux-dipole flux (CCFDF) contributions to the polar tensors of the fluorochloromethanes have been calculated at the QCISD/cc-pVTZ level. A root-mean-square error of 20.0 km mol(-1) has been found compared to an experimental error estimate of 14.4 and 21.1 km mol(-1) for MP2/6-311++G(3d,3p) results. The errors in the QCISD polar tensor elements and mean dipole moment derivatives are 0.059 e when compared with the experimental values. Both theoretical levels provide results showing that the dynamical charge and dipole fluxes provide significant contributions to the mean dipole moment derivatives and tend to be of opposite signs canceling one another. Although the experimental mean dipole moment derivative values suggest that all the fluorochloromethane molecules have electronic structures consistent with a simple electronegativity model with transferable atomic charges for their terminal atoms, the QTAIM/CCFDF models confirm this only for the fluoromethanes. Whereas the fluorine atom does not suffer a saturation effect in its capacity to drain electronic charge from carbon atoms that are attached to other fluorine and chlorine atoms, the zero flux electronic charge of the chlorine atom depends on the number and kind of the other substituent atoms. Both the QTAIM carbon charges (r = 0.990) and mean dipole moment derivatives (r = 0.996) are found to obey Siegbahn's potential model for carbon 1s electron ionization energies at the QCISD/cc-pVTZ level. The latter is a consequence of the carbon mean derivatives obeying the electronegativity model and not necessarily to their similarities with atomic charges. Atomic dipole contributions to the neighboring atom electrostatic potentials of the fluorochloromethanes are found to be of comparable size to the atomic charge contributions and increase the accuracy of Siegbahn's model for the QTAIM charge model results

  13. The charging processes of dust particles and the effects of Lorentz scattering in the circum-solar dust band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A. S.; Isobe, Syuzo

    1992-03-01

    An analysis is presented of the charging processes for the dust particles in the circumsolar dust band at 4 solar radii, as well as the effects of the interactions between these charged particles and the magnetized ambient solar wind plasma on the evolution of their orbits. It is concluded that due to the higher values of the potential on the dust particle and the ambient solar wind magnetic field, the Lorentz force affects a much wider size range of particles in the near-solar regions. Since the magnitude of the Lorentz force is much higher and its characteristic time to affect the particle's orbit is much lower than those for the Poynting-Robertson drag force, the Lorentz force is a major perturbing force for dust particles in the circumsolar dust band at 4 solar radii.

  14. Charge Islands Through Tunneling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Daryl C.

    2002-01-01

    It has been recently reported that the electrical charge in a semiconductive carbon nanotube is not evenly distributed, but rather it is divided into charge "islands." This paper links the aforementioned phenomenon to tunneling and provides further insight into the higher rate of tunneling processes, which makes tunneling devices attractive. This paper also provides a basis for calculating the charge profile over the length of the tube so that nanoscale devices' conductive properties may be fully exploited.

  15. Charging of interplanetary grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baragiola, R. A.; Johnson, R. E.; Newcomb, John L.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this program is to quantify, by laboratory experiments, the charging of ices and other insulators subject to irradiation with electrons, ions and ultraviolet photons and to model special conditions based on the data. The system and conditions to be studied are those relevant for charging of dust in magnetospheric plasmas. The measurements are supplemented by computer simulations of charging or grains under a variety of conditions. Our work for this period involved experiments on water ice, improved models of charging of ice grains for Saturn's E-ring, and the construction of apparatus for electron impact studies and measurements of electron energy distributions.

  16. Lunar dust charging by photoelectric emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Tankosic, D.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; LeClair, A.; West, E. A.

    2007-05-01

    The lunar surface is covered with a thick layer of sub-micron/micron size dust grains formed by meteoritic impact over billions of years. The fine dust grains are levitated and transported on the lunar surface, as indicated by the transient dust clouds observed over the lunar horizon during the Apollo 17 mission. Theoretical models suggest that the dust grains on the lunar surface are charged by the solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation as well as the solar wind. Even without any physical activity, the dust grains are levitated by electrostatic fields and transported away from the surface in the near vacuum environment of the Moon. The current dust charging and levitation models, however, do not fully explain the observed phenomena. Since the abundance of dust on the Moon's surface with its observed adhesive characteristics has the potential of severe impact on human habitat and operations and lifetime of a variety of equipment, it is necessary to investigate the charging properties and the lunar dust phenomena in order to develop appropriate mitigating strategies. Photoelectric emission induced by the solar UV radiation with photon energies higher than the work function (WF) of the grain materials is recognized to be the dominant process for charging of the lunar dust, and requires measurements of the photoelectric yields to determine the charging and equilibrium potentials of individual dust grains. In this paper, we present the first laboratory measurements of the photoelectric efficiencies and yields of individual sub-micron/micron size dust grains selected from sample returns of Apollo 17 and Luna-24 missions as well as similar size dust grains from the JSC-1 simulants. The measurements were made on a laboratory facility based on an electrodynamic balance that permits a variety of experiments to be conducted on individual sub-micron/micron size dust grains in simulated space environments. The photoelectric emission measurements indicate grain size dependence with

  17. Lunar Dust Charging by Photoelectric Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Tankosic, D.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; LeClair, A.; West, E. A.

    2007-01-01

    The lunar surface is covered with a thick layer of sub-micron/micron size dust grains formed by meteoritic impact over billions of years. The fine dust grains are levitated and transported on the lunar surface, as indicated by the transient dust clouds observed over the lunar horizon during the Apollo 17 mission. Theoretical models suggest that the dust grains on the lunar surface are charged by the solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation as well as the solar wind. Even without any physical activity, the dust grains are levitated by electrostatic fields and transported away from the surface in the near vacuum environment of the Moon. The current dust charging and levitation models, however, do not fully explain the observed phenomena. Since the abundance of dust on the Moon's surface with its observed adhesive characteristics has the potential of severe impact on human habitat and operations and lifetime of a variety of equipment, it is necessary to investigate the charging properties and the lunar dust phenomena in order to develop appropriate mitigating strategies. Photoelectric emission induced by the solar UV radiation with photon energies higher than the work function (WF) of the grain materials is recognized to be the dominant process for charging of the lunar dust, and requires measurements of the photoelectric yields to determine the charging and equilibrium potentials of individual dust grains. In this paper, we present the first laboratory measurements of the photoelectric efficiencies and yields of individual sub-micron/micron size dust grains selected from sample returns of Apollo 17 and Luna-24 missions as well as similar size dust grains from the JSC-1 simulants. The measurements were made on a laboratory facility based on an electrodynamic balance that permits a variety of experiments to be conducted on individual sub-micron/micron size dust grains in simulated space environments. The photoelectric emission measurements indicate grain size dependence with

  18. Lunar Dust Charging by Photoelectric Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Tankosic, D.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; LeClair, A.; West, E. A.

    2007-01-01

    The lunar surface is covered with a thick layer of sub-micron/micron size dust grains formed by meteoritic impact over billions of years. The fine dust grains are levitated and transported on the lunar surface, as indicated by the transient dust clouds observed over the lunar horizon during the Apollo 17 mission. Theoretical models suggest that the dust grains on the lunar surface are charged by the solar UV radiation as well as the solar wind. Even without any physical activity, the dust grains are levitated by electrostatic fields and transported away from the surface in the near vacuum environment of the Moon. The current dust charging and levitation models, however, do not fully explain the observed phenomena. Since the abundance of dust on the Moon s surface with its observed adhesive characteristics has the potential of severe impact on human habitat and operations and lifetime of a variety of equipment, it is necessary to investigate the charging properties and the lunar dust phenomena in order to develop appropriate mitigating strategies. Photoelectric emission induced by the solar UV radiation with photon energies higher than the work function of the grain materials is recognized to be the dominant process for charging of the lunar dust, and requires measurements of the photoelectric yields to determine the charging and equilibrium potentials of individual dust grains. In this paper, we present the first laboratory measurements of the photoelectric efficiencies and yields of individual sub-micron/micron size dust grains selected from sample returns of Apollo 17, and Luna 24 missions, as well as similar size dust grains from the JSC-1 simulants. The measurements were made on a laboratory facility based on an electrodynamic balance that permits a variety of experiments to be conducted on individual sub-micron/micron size dust grains in simulated space environments. The photoelectric emission measurements indicate grain size dependence with the yield

  19. Charge and matter form factors of two-neutron halo nuclei in halo effective field theory at next-to-leading order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanasse, Jared

    2017-02-01

    By using halo effective field theory (EFT), an expansion in Rcore/Rhalo , where Rcore is the radius of the core and Rhalo the radius of the halo nucleus, the charge and neutron form factors of the two-neutron halo nuclei 11Li, 14Be, and 22C are calculated to next-to-leading order (NLO) by treating them as an effective three-body system. From the form factors, the point-charge and point-matter radii, inter-neutron distances, and neutron opening angles are extracted. Agreement is found with existing experimental extractions. Results are given for the point-charge and point-matter radii for arbitrary neutron core scattering effective range ρc n, which can be used for predictions once ρc n is measured. Estimates for ρc n are also used to make NLO predictions. Finally, the point-charge radii of this work are compared with other halo-EFT predictions, and setting the core mass equal to the neutron mass the point-charge radius is found to agree with an analytical prediction in the unitary limit.

  20. Beam Extraction from Laser Driven Multi-Charged Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, O A; Logan, B G

    2001-03-19

    A newly proposed type of multicharged ion source offers the possibility of an economically advantageous high-charge-state fusion driver. Multiphoton absorption in an intense uniform laser focus can give multiple charge states of high purity, simplifying or eliminating the need for charge-state separation downstream. Very large currents (hundreds of amperes) can be extracted from this type of source. Several arrangements are possible. For example, the laser plasma could be tailored for storage in a magnetic bucket, with beam extracted from the bucket. A different approach, described in this report, is direct beam extraction from the expanding laser plasma. They discuss extraction and focusing for the particular case of a 4.1-MV beam of Xe{sup 16+} ions. The maximum duration of the beam pulse is limited by the total charge in the plasma, while the practical pulse length is determined by the range of plasma radii over which good beam optics can be achieved. The extraction electrode contains a solenoid for beam focusing. The design studies were carried out first with an envelope code and then with a self-consistent particle code. Results from the initial model showed that hundreds of amperes could be extracted, but that most of this current missed the solenoid entrance or was intercepted by the wall and that only a few amperes were able to pass through. They conclude with an improved design which increases the surviving beam to more than 70 amperes.

  1. Spatial distribution of osteocyte lacunae in equine radii and third metacarpals: considerations for cellular communication, microdamage detection and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Skedros, John G; Grunander, Todd R; Hamrick, Mark W

    2005-01-01

    Osteocytes, which are embedded in bone matrix, are the most abundant cells in bone. Despite the ideal location of osteocytes to sense the local environment and influence bone remodeling, their functions, and the relative importance of these functions, remain controversial. In this study, we tested several hypotheses that address the possibilities that population densities of osteocyte lacunae (Ot.Lc.N/B.Ar) correlate with strain-, remodeling- or metabolism-related aspects of the local biomechanical environments of mid-third diaphyseal equine radii and third metacarpals from skeletally mature animals. Ot.Lc.N/B.Ar data, quantified in multiple cortical locations, were analyzed for possible correlations with (1) structural and material characteristics (e.g., cortical thickness, percent ash, secondary osteon population density, mean osteon cross-sectional area, and predominant collagen fiber orientation), (2) strain characteristics, including prevalent/predominant strain magnitude and mode (tension, compression, shear), (3) hypothesized strain-mode-related microdamage characteristics, which might be perceived by osteocyte 'operational' networks, and (4) variations in remodeling dynamics and/or metabolism (i.e. presumably higher in endocortical regions than in other transcortical locations). Results showed relatively uniform Ot.Lc.N/B.Ar between regions with highly non-uniform strain and strain-related environments and markedly heterogeneous structural and material organization. These results suggest that population densities of these cells are poorly correlated with mechanobiological characteristics, including local variations in metabolic rate and strain magnitude/mode. Although osteocytes hypothetically evolved both as strain sensors and fatigue damage sensors able to direct the removal of damage as needed, the mechanisms that govern the distribution of these cells remain unclear. The results of this study provide little or no evidence that the number of osteocyte

  2. The NuSTAR spectrum of Mrk 335: extreme relativistic effects within two gravitational radii of the event horizon?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, M. L.; Wilkins, D. R.; Fabian, A. C.; Grupe, D.; Dauser, T.; Matt, G.; Harrison, F. A.; Brenneman, L.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Gallo, L. C.; Hailey, C. J.; Kara, E.; Komossa, S.; Marinucci, A.; Miller, J. M.; Risaliti, G.; Stern, D.; Walton, D. J.; Zhang, W. W.

    2014-09-01

    We present 3-50 keV NuSTAR observations of the active galactic nuclei Mrk 335 in a very low flux state. The spectrum is dominated by very strong features at the energies of the iron line at 5-7 keV and Compton hump from 10-30 keV. The source is variable during the observation, with the variability concentrated at low energies, which suggesting either a relativistic reflection or a variable absorption scenario. In this work, we focus on the reflection interpretation, making use of new relativistic reflection models that self consistently calculate the reflection fraction, relativistic blurring and angle-dependent reflection spectrum for different coronal heights to model the spectra. We find that the spectra can be well fitted with relativistic reflection, and that the lowest flux state spectrum is described by reflection alone, suggesting the effects of extreme light-bending occurring within ˜2 gravitational radii (RG) of the event horizon. The reflection fraction decreases sharply with increasing flux, consistent with a point source moving up to above 10 RG as the source brightens. We constrain the spin parameter to greater than 0.9 at the 3σ confidence level. By adding a spin-dependent upper limit on the reflection fraction to our models, we demonstrate that this can be a powerful way of constraining the spin parameter, particularly in reflection dominated states. We also calculate a detailed emissivity profile for the iron line, and find that it closely matches theoretical predictions for a compact source within a few RG of the black hole.

  3. Beware Capital Charge Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Stauffer, Hoff

    2006-04-15

    The capital charge rate has a material effect in cost comparisons. Care should be taken to calculate it correctly and use it properly. The most common mistake is to use a nominal, rather than real, capital charge rate. To make matters worse, the common short-cut formula does not work well. (author)

  4. Nondissipative optimum charge regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, R.; Vitebsky, J. N.

    1970-01-01

    Optimum charge regulator provides constant level charge/discharge control of storage batteries. Basic power transfer and control is performed by solar panel coupled to battery through power switching circuit. Optimum controller senses battery current and modifies duty cycle of switching circuit to maximize current available to battery.

  5. Rain Drop Charge Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Sreekanth T.

    begin{center} Large Large Rain Drop Charge Sensor Sreekanth T S*, Suby Symon*, G. Mohan Kumar (1) , S. Murali Das (2) *Atmospheric Sciences Division, Centre for Earth Science Studies, Thiruvananthapuram 695011 (1) D-330, Swathi Nagar, West Fort, Thiruvananthapuram 695023 (2) Kavyam, Manacaud, Thiruvananthapuram 695009 begin{center} ABSTRACT To study the inter-relations with precipitation electricity and precipitation microphysical parameters a rain drop charge sensor was designed and developed at CESS Electronics & Instrumentation Laboratory. Simultaneous measurement of electric charge and fall speed of rain drops could be done using this charge sensor. A cylindrical metal tube (sensor tube) of 30 cm length is placed inside another thick metal cover opened at top and bottom for electromagnetic shielding. Mouth of the sensor tube is exposed and bottom part is covered with metal net in the shielding cover. The instrument is designed in such a way that rain drops can pass only through unhindered inside the sensor tube. When electrically charged rain drops pass through the sensor tube, it is charged to the same magnitude of drop charge but with opposite polarity. The sensor tube is electrically connected the inverted input of a current to voltage converter operational amplifier using op-amp AD549. Since the sensor is electrically connected to the virtual ground of the op-amp, the charge flows to the ground and the generated current is converted to amplified voltage. This output voltage is recorded using a high frequency (1kHz) voltage recorder. From the recorded pulse, charge magnitude, polarity and fall speed of rain drop are calculated. From the fall speed drop diameter also can be calculated. The prototype is now under test running at CESS campus. As the magnitude of charge in rain drops is an indication of accumulated charge in clouds in lightning, this instrument has potential application in the field of risk and disaster management. By knowing the charge

  6. Charged topological entanglement entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Shunji; Wen, Xueda; Hung, Ling-Yan; Ryu, Shinsei

    2016-05-01

    A charged entanglement entropy is a new measure which probes quantum entanglement between different charge sectors. We study symmetry-protected topological (SPT) phases in (2+1)-dimensional space-time by using this charged entanglement entropy. SPT phases are short-range entangled states without topological order and hence cannot be detected by the topological entanglement entropy. We demonstrate that the universal part of the charged entanglement entropy is nonzero for nontrivial SPT phases and therefore it is a useful measure to detect short-range entangled topological phases. We also discuss that the classification of SPT phases based on the charged topological entanglement entropy is related to that of the braiding statistics of quasiparticles.

  7. Highly efficient and inverted tandem organic light-emitting devices using a MoO3/Al/MoO3 charge generation layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ya-Ze; Lee, Chih-Chien; Li, Yan-De; Yeh, Tzu-Hung; Chang, Po-Chien; Biring, Sajal; Huang, Kuan-Chieh; Su, Chia-Hung; Liu, Shun-Wei

    2017-03-01

    We present bottom-emission, inverted, tandem phosphorescent organic light-emitting devices (PHOLEDs) using a multilayer charge generation layer (CGL) of MoO3/Al/MoO3 (MAM), which exhibits a maximum external quantum efficiency of 40% and current efficiency of 120 cd/A. In this inverted tandem structure, the feature of MAM shows a high optical transmittance (approximately 90%) in visible light, an efficient charge generation property, and a relatively smooth morphology (root mean square of ∼0.336 nm) providing an efficient CGL to connect the bottom and top display units. In addition, the device structure of ITO/LiF/TAPC/MAM/BPhen:CS2CO3/BPhen/LiF/Al was proposed to capacitance characterization, and the results demonstrated that using the ultrathin Al of ∼2 nm in a MAM structure exhibited a more efficient CGL for high performance inverted tandem PHOLEDs.

  8. Isotope shift and hyperfine structure measurements in titanium I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luc, P.; Vetter, R.; Bauche-Arnoult, C.; Bauche, J.

    1994-09-01

    High accuracy measurements of hyperfine structure due to47Ti and49Ti in the 3 d 2 4 s 2 a 3 F 2-3 d 2 4 s4 p z 5 D 1 absorption line at σ=18482.772 cm-1 have been performed by use of a Doppler-free experiment, where a beam of titanium atoms is crossed by a CW single mode tunable dye laser. They have allowed for the determination of isotope shifts between46Ti,47Ti,48Ti,49Ti and50Ti. By use of accurate values of mean square nuclear charge radii for the even isotopes, it has been possible to separate mass shifts from field shifts and to determine accurate values for the mean square nuclear charge radii of47Ti and49Ti. The field shift presents a marked odd-even staggering.

  9. Stability of Charged Grains in Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jontof-Hutter, D.; Hamilton, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    magnetic dipole approximation can be defended. In addition to locating stability boundaries, we seek the orbital frequencies of charged dust grains. Our solution for vertical motions completes the epicyclic model for grains that experience small epicycles, in which the azimuthal, radial and vertical orbital frequencies for all distances and for all charge-to-mass ratios are predictable to a high degree of accuracy. Finally, we expand our numerical runs to include the effects of Saturn's full magnetic field, which closely resembles a dipole with a slight vertical offset, just 0.04 Saturn radii to the north. This has little effect on regions of radial instability for positive grains. By contrast, vertical motions are dramatically affected by this modest change in the magnetic field configuration. The offset breaks the north-south symmetry of the idealized problem and moves the location of the vertical equilibrium from the equatorial plane to a position that depends on both the charge-to-mass ratio and the launch distance. At Saturn, we find that regions of vertical instability expand significantly, and that grains subject to this instability collide with Saturn exclusively in the southern hemisphere. Stable vertical oscillations for electromagnetically-dominated grains switch to northern latitudes beyond synchronous orbit, and are centered on the magnetic equator only in the distant limit.

  10. Charged Proca stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landea, Ignacio Salazar; García, Federico

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we study gauged solutions associated with a massive vector field representing a spin-1 condensate, namely, the Proca field. We focus on regular spherically symmetric solutions which we construct either using a self-interaction potential or general relativity in order to glue the solutions together. We start generating nongravitating solutions—so-called Proca Q -balls and charged Proca Q -balls. Then we turn on backreaction on the metric, allowing gravity to hold together the Proca condensate, to study the so-called Proca stars, charged Proca stars, Proca Q -stars, and charged Proca Q -stars.

  11. A COMPARISON BETWEEN THE HALF-LIGHT RADII, LUMINOSITIES, AND UBV COLORS OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IN M31 AND THE GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Bergh, Sidney

    2010-10-15

    The Milky Way system and the Andromeda galaxy experienced radically different evolutionary histories. Nevertheless, it is found that these two galaxies ended up with globular cluster systems in which individual clusters have indistinguishable distributions of half-light radii. Furthermore, globulars in both M31 and the Galaxy are found to have radii that are independent of their luminosities. In this respect, globular clusters differ drastically from early-type galaxies in which half-light radius and luminosity are tightly correlated. Metal-rich globular clusters in M31 occupy a slightly larger volume than do those in the Galaxy. The specific globular cluster frequency in the Andromeda galaxy is found to be significantly higher than it is in the Milky Way system. The present discussion is based on the 107 Galactic globular clusters, and 200 putative globulars in M31, for which UBV photometry was available.

  12. A revised set of values of single-bond radii derived from the observed interatomic distances in metals by correction for bond number and resonance energy

    PubMed Central

    Pauling, Linus; Kamb, Barclay

    1986-01-01

    An earlier discussion [Pauling, L. (1947) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 69, 542] of observed bond lengths in elemental metals with correction for bond number and resonance energy led to a set of single-bond metallic radii with values usually somewhat less than the corresponding values obtained from molecules and complex ions. A theory of resonating covalent bonds has now been developed that permits calculation of the number of resonance structures per atom and of the effective resonance energy per bond. With this refined method of correcting the observed bond lengths for the effect of resonance energy, a new set of single-bond covalent radii, in better agreement with values from molecules and complex ions, has been constructed. PMID:16593698

  13. LOCAL GROUP DWARF ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES. II. STELLAR KINEMATICS TO LARGE RADII IN NGC 147 AND NGC 185

    SciTech Connect

    Geha, M.; Van der Marel, R. P.; Kalirai, J.; Guhathakurta, P.; Kirby, E. N.

    2010-03-01

    We present kinematic and metallicity profiles for the M 31 dwarf elliptical (dE) satellite galaxies NGC 147 and NGC 185. The profiles represent the most extensive spectroscopic radial coverage for any dE galaxy, extending to a projected distance of 8 half-light radii (8r{sub eff} {approx} 14'). We achieve this coverage via Keck/DEIMOS multislit spectroscopic observations of 520 and 442 member red giant branch stars in NGC 147 and NGC 185, respectively. In contrast to previous studies, we find that both dEs have significant internal rotation. We measure a maximum rotational velocity of 17 +- 2 km s{sup -1} for NGC 147 and 15 +- 5 km s{sup -1} for NGC 185. While both rotation profiles suggest a flattening in the outer regions, there is no indication that we have reached the radius of maximum rotation velocity. The velocity dispersions decrease gently with radius with average dispersions of 16 +- 1 km s{sup -1} and 24 +- 1 km s{sup -1} for NGC 147 and NGC 185, respectively. The average metallicities for NGC 147 and NGC 185 are [Fe/H] = -1.1 +- 0.1 and [Fe/H] = -1.3 +- 0.1, respectively; both dEs have internal metallicity dispersions of 0.5 dex, but show no evidence for a radial metallicity gradient. We construct two-{integral} axisymmetric dynamical models and find that the observed kinematical profiles cannot be explained without modest amounts of non-baryonic dark matter. We measure central mass-to-light ratios of M/L{sub V} = 4.2 +- 0.6 and M/L{sub V} = 4.6 +- 0.6 for NGC 147 and NGC 185, respectively. Both dE galaxies are consistent with being primarily flattened by their rotational motions, although some anisotropic velocity dispersion is needed to fully explain their observed shapes. The velocity profiles of all three Local Group dEs (NGC 147, NGC 185, and NGC 205) suggest that rotation is more prevalent in the dE galaxy class than previously assumed, but often manifests only at several times the effective radius. Since all dEs outside the Local Group have been

  14. The radii and limb darkenings of α Centauri A and B . Interferometric measurements with VLTI/PIONIER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kervella, P.; Bigot, L.; Gallenne, A.; Thévenin, F.

    2017-01-01

    The photospheric radius is one of the fundamental parameters governing the radiative equilibrium of a star. We report new observations of the nearest solar-type stars α Centauri A (G2V) and B (K1V) with the VLTI/PIONIER optical interferometer. The combination of four configurations of the VLTI enable us to measure simultaneously the limb darkened angular diameter θLD and the limb darkening parameters of the two solar-type stars in the near-infrared H band (λ = 1.65 μm). We obtain photospheric angular diameters of θLD(A) = 8.502 ± 0.038 mas (0.43%) and θLD(B) = 5.999 ± 0.025 mas (0.42%), through the adjustment of a power law limb darkening model. We find H band power law exponents of α(A) = 0.1404 ± 0.0050 (3.6%) and α(B) = 0.1545 ± 0.0044 (2.8%), which closely bracket the observed solar value (α⊙ = 0.15027). Combined with the parallax π = 747.17 ± 0.61 mas previously determined, we derive linear radii of RA = 1.2234 ± 0.0053 R⊙ (0.43%) and RB = 0.8632 ± 0.0037 R⊙ (0.43%). The power law exponents that we derive for the two stars indicate a significantly weaker limb darkening than predicted by both 1D and 3D stellar atmosphere models. As this discrepancy is also observed on the near-infrared limb darkening profile of the Sun, an improvement of the calibration of stellar atmosphere models is clearly needed. The reported PIONIER visibility measurements of α Cen A and B provide a robust basis to validate the future evolutions of these models. The calibrated visibility data are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/597/A137

  15. Charged Particle Flux Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, D. A.; Stocks, C. D.

    1983-01-01

    Improved version of Faraday cup increases accuracy of measurements of flux density of charged particles incident along axis through collection aperture. Geometry of cone-and-sensing cup combination assures most particles are trapped.

  16. Benchmark Airport Charges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Wit, A.; Cohn, N.

    1999-01-01

    The Netherlands Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) commissioned Hague Consulting Group (HCG) to complete a benchmark study of airport charges at twenty eight airports in Europe and around the world, based on 1996 charges. This study followed previous DGCA research on the topic but included more airports in much more detail. The main purpose of this new benchmark study was to provide insight into the levels and types of airport charges worldwide and into recent changes in airport charge policy and structure. This paper describes the 1996 analysis. It is intended that this work be repeated every year in order to follow developing trends and provide the most up-to-date information possible.

  17. CHARACTERIZING THE COOL KEPLER OBJECTS OF INTERESTS. NEW EFFECTIVE TEMPERATURES, METALLICITIES, MASSES, AND RADII OF LOW-MASS KEPLER PLANET-CANDIDATE HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Muirhead, Philip S.; Hamren, Katherine; Schlawin, Everett; Lloyd, James P.; Rojas-Ayala, Barbara; Covey, Kevin R.

    2012-05-10

    We report stellar parameters for late-K and M-type planet-candidate host stars announced by the Kepler Mission. We obtained medium-resolution, K-band spectra of 84 cool (T{sub eff} {approx}< 4400 K) Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) from Borucki et al. We identified one object as a giant (KOI 977); for the remaining dwarfs, we measured effective temperatures (T{sub eff}) and metallicities [M/H] using the K-band spectral indices of Rojas-Ayala et al. We determine the masses (M{sub *}) and radii (R{sub *}) of the cool KOIs by interpolation onto the Dartmouth evolutionary isochrones. The resultant stellar radii are significantly less than the values reported in the Kepler Input Catalog and, by construction, correlate better with T{sub eff}. Applying the published KOI transit parameters to our stellar radius measurements, we report new physical radii for the planet candidates. Recalculating the equilibrium temperatures of the planet-candidates assuming Earth's albedo and re-radiation fraction, we find that three of the planet-candidates are terrestrial sized with orbital semimajor axes that lie within the habitable zones of their host stars (KOI 463.01, KOI 812.03, and KOI 854.01). The stellar parameters presented in this Letter serve as a resource for prioritization of future follow-up efforts to validate and characterize the cool KOI planet candidates.

  18. Electrically charged targets

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Ronald K.; Hunt, Angus L.

    1984-01-01

    Electrically chargeable laser targets and method for forming such charged targets in order to improve their guidance along a predetermined desired trajectory. This is accomplished by the incorporation of a small amount of an additive to the target material which will increase the electrical conductivity thereof, and thereby enhance the charge placed upon the target material for guidance thereof by electrostatic or magnetic steering mechanisms, without adversely affecting the target when illuminated by laser energy.

  19. Particle-Charge Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuerstenau, Stephen; Wilson, Gregory R.

    2008-01-01

    An instrument for rapidly measuring the electric charges and sizes (from approximately 1 to approximately 100 micrometers) of airborne particles is undergoing development. Conceived for monitoring atmospheric dust particles on Mars, instruments like this one could also be used on Earth to monitor natural and artificial aerosols in diverse indoor and outdoor settings for example, volcanic regions, clean rooms, powder-processing machinery, and spray-coating facilities. The instrument incorporates a commercially available, low-noise, ultrasensitive charge-sensing preamplifier circuit. The input terminal of this circuit--the gate of a field-effect transistor--is connected to a Faraday-cage cylindrical electrode. The charged particles of interest are suspended in air or other suitable gas that is made to flow along the axis of the cylindrical electrode without touching the electrode. The flow can be channeled and generated by any of several alternative means; in the prototype of this instrument, the gas is drawn along a glass capillary tube (see upper part of figure) coaxial with the electrode. The size of a particle affects its rate of acceleration in the flow and thus affects the timing and shape of the corresponding signal peak generated by the charge-sensing amplifier. The charge affects the magnitude (and thus also the shape) of the signal peak. Thus, the signal peak (see figure) conveys information on both the size and electric charge of a sensed particle. In experiments thus far, the instrument has been found to be capable of measuring individual aerosol particle charges of magnitude greater than 350 e (where e is the fundamental unit of electric charge) with a precision of +/- 150 e. The instrument can sample particles at a rate as high as several thousand per second.

  20. Communication: Modeling charge-sign asymmetric solvation free energies with nonlinear boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bardhan, Jaydeep P.; Knepley, Matthew G.

    2014-10-07

    We show that charge-sign-dependent asymmetric hydration can be modeled accurately using linear Poisson theory after replacing the standard electric-displacement boundary condition with a simple nonlinear boundary condition. Using a single multiplicative scaling factor to determine atomic radii from molecular dynamics Lennard-Jones parameters, the new model accurately reproduces MD free-energy calculations of hydration asymmetries for: (i) monatomic ions, (ii) titratable amino acids in both their protonated and unprotonated states, and (iii) the Mobley “bracelet” and “rod” test problems [D. L. Mobley, A. E. Barber II, C. J. Fennell, and K. A. Dill, “Charge asymmetries in hydration of polar solutes,” J. Phys. Chem. B 112, 2405–2414 (2008)]. Remarkably, the model also justifies the use of linear response expressions for charging free energies. Our boundary-element method implementation demonstrates the ease with which other continuum-electrostatic solvers can be extended to include asymmetry.

  1. Communication: Modeling charge-sign asymmetric solvation free energies with nonlinear boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardhan, Jaydeep P.; Knepley, Matthew G.

    2014-10-01

    We show that charge-sign-dependent asymmetric hydration can be modeled accurately using linear Poisson theory after replacing the standard electric-displacement boundary condition with a simple nonlinear boundary condition. Using a single multiplicative scaling factor to determine atomic radii from molecular dynamics Lennard-Jones parameters, the new model accurately reproduces MD free-energy calculations of hydration asymmetries for: (i) monatomic ions, (ii) titratable amino acids in both their protonated and unprotonated states, and (iii) the Mobley "bracelet" and "rod" test problems [D. L. Mobley, A. E. Barber II, C. J. Fennell, and K. A. Dill, "Charge asymmetries in hydration of polar solutes," J. Phys. Chem. B 112, 2405-2414 (2008)]. Remarkably, the model also justifies the use of linear response expressions for charging free energies. Our boundary-element method implementation demonstrates the ease with which other continuum-electrostatic solvers can be extended to include asymmetry.

  2. Deuteron charge radius and Rydberg constant from spectroscopy data in atomic deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Randolf; Nez, François; Udem, Thomas; Antognini, Aldo; Beyer, Axel; Fleurbaey, Hélène; Grinin, Alexey; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Julien, Lucile; Kottmann, Franz; Krauth, Julian J.; Maisenbacher, Lothar; Matveev, Arthur; Biraben, François

    2017-04-01

    We give a pedagogical description of the method to extract the charge radii and Rydberg constant from laser spectroscopy in regular hydrogen (H) and deuterium (D) atoms, that is part of the CODATA least-squares adjustment (LSA) of the fundamental physical constants. We give a deuteron charge radius {{r}\\text{d}} from D spectroscopy alone of 2.1415(45) fm. This value is independent of the measurements that lead to the proton charge radius, and five times more accurate than the value found in the CODATA Adjustment 10. The improvement is due to the use of a value for the 1S\\to 2S transition in atomic deuterium which can be inferred from published data or found in a PhD thesis.

  3. A family of solutions with radiation reaction and retarded interactions for two charges in classical electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, R.; Villarroel, D.

    2002-10-01

    A family of solutions of the Lorentz-Dirac equation is constructed. It consists in the motion of two charges e1 and e2 of masses m1 and m2 in two coplanar and concentric circles of radii a and b. The charges rotate with constant angular velocity, and have an angular separation ψ. The radiation reaction forces and the retarded interactions between the charges are taken into account. The external electromagnetic field that allows the motion consists of a tangential time-independent electric field that takes a fixed value on each orbit, and a homogeneous time-independent magnetic field perpendicular to the plane of the motion. For all the solutions energy conservation is rigorously demonstrated by evaluating the energy radiated, with independence of the equation of motion, through the calculation of the instantaneous energy flux across a sphere of an infinitely large radius.

  4. Improvement in Thermostability of an Achaetomium sp. Strain Xz8 Endopolygalacturonase via the Optimization of Charge-Charge Interactions.

    PubMed

    Tu, Tao; Luo, Huiying; Meng, Kun; Cheng, Yanli; Ma, Rui; Shi, Pengjun; Huang, Huoqing; Bai, Yingguo; Wang, Yaru; Zhang, Lujia; Yao, Bin

    2015-10-01

    Improving enzyme thermostability is of importance for widening the spectrum of application of enzymes. In this study, a structure-based rational design approach was used to improve the thermostability of a highly active, wide-pH-range-adaptable, and stable endopolygalacturonase (PG8fn) from Achaetomium sp. strain Xz8 via the optimization of charge-charge interactions. By using the enzyme thermal stability system (ETSS), two residues--D244 and D299--were inferred to be crucial contributors to thermostability. Single (D244A and D299R) and double (D244A/D299R) mutants were then generated and compared with the wild type. All mutants showed improved thermal properties, in the order D244A < D299R < D244A/D299R. In comparison with PG8fn, D244A/D299R showed the most pronounced shifts in temperature of maximum enzymatic activity (Tmax), temperature at which 50% of the maximal activity of an enzyme is retained (T50), and melting temperature (Tm), of about 10, 17, and 10.2°C upward, respectively, with the half-life (t1/2) extended by 8.4 h at 50°C and 45 min at 55°C. Another distinguishing characteristic of the D244A/D299R mutant was its catalytic activity, which was comparable to that of the wild type (23,000 ± 130 U/mg versus 28,000 ± 293 U/mg); on the other hand, it showed more residual activity (8,400 ± 83 U/mg versus 1,400 ± 57 U/mg) after the feed pelleting process (80°C and 30 min). Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies indicated that mutations at sites D244 and D299 lowered the overall root mean square deviation (RMSD) and consequently increased the protein rigidity. This study reveals the importance of charge-charge interactions in protein conformation and provides a viable strategy for enhancing protein stability.

  5. Improvement in Thermostability of an Achaetomium sp. Strain Xz8 Endopolygalacturonase via the Optimization of Charge-Charge Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Tao; Luo, Huiying; Meng, Kun; Cheng, Yanli; Ma, Rui; Shi, Pengjun; Huang, Huoqing; Bai, Yingguo; Wang, Yaru

    2015-01-01

    Improving enzyme thermostability is of importance for widening the spectrum of application of enzymes. In this study, a structure-based rational design approach was used to improve the thermostability of a highly active, wide-pH-range-adaptable, and stable endopolygalacturonase (PG8fn) from Achaetomium sp. strain Xz8 via the optimization of charge-charge interactions. By using the enzyme thermal stability system (ETSS), two residues—D244 and D299—were inferred to be crucial contributors to thermostability. Single (D244A and D299R) and double (D244A/D299R) mutants were then generated and compared with the wild type. All mutants showed improved thermal properties, in the order D244A < D299R < D244A/D299R. In comparison with PG8fn, D244A/D299R showed the most pronounced shifts in temperature of maximum enzymatic activity (Tmax), temperature at which 50% of the maximal activity of an enzyme is retained (T50), and melting temperature (Tm), of about 10, 17, and 10.2°C upward, respectively, with the half-life (t1/2) extended by 8.4 h at 50°C and 45 min at 55°C. Another distinguishing characteristic of the D244A/D299R mutant was its catalytic activity, which was comparable to that of the wild type (23,000 ± 130 U/mg versus 28,000 ± 293 U/mg); on the other hand, it showed more residual activity (8,400 ± 83 U/mg versus 1,400 ± 57 U/mg) after the feed pelleting process (80°C and 30 min). Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies indicated that mutations at sites D244 and D299 lowered the overall root mean square deviation (RMSD) and consequently increased the protein rigidity. This study reveals the importance of charge-charge interactions in protein conformation and provides a viable strategy for enhancing protein stability. PMID:26209675

  6. An Examination of Proton Charge Radius Extractions from e–p Scattering Data

    SciTech Connect

    Arrington, John

    2015-09-15

    A detailed examination of issues associated with proton radius extractions from elastic electron–proton scattering experiments is presented. Sources of systematic uncertainty and model dependence in the extractions are discussed, with an emphasis on how these may impact the proton charge and magnetic radii. A comparison of recent Mainz data to previous world data is presented, highlighting the difference in treatment of systematic uncertainties as well as tension between different data sets. We find several issues that suggest that larger uncertainties than previously quoted may be appropriate, but do not find any corrections which would resolve the proton radius puzzle.

  7. Taming Highly Charged Radioisotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Usman; Eberhardt, Benjamin; Jang, Fuluni; Schultz, Brad; Simon, Vanessa; Delheij, Paul; Dilling, Jens; Gwinner, Gerald

    2012-10-01

    The precise and accurate mass of short-lived radioisotopes is a very important parameter in physics. Contribution to the improvement of nuclear models, metrological standard fixing and tests of the unitarity of the Caibbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix are a few examples where the mass value plays a major role. TRIUMF's ion trap for atomic and nuclear physics (TITAN) is a unique facility of three online ion traps that enables the mass measurement of short-lived isotopes with high precision (˜10-8). At present TITAN's electron beam ion trap (EBIT) increases the charge state to increase the precision, but there is no facility to significantly reduce the energy spread introduced by the charge breeding process. The precision of the measured mass of radioisotopes is linearly dependent on the charge state while the energy spread of the charged radioisotopes affects the precision adversely. To boost the precision level of mass measurement at TITAN without loosing too many ions, a cooler Penning trap (CPET) is being developed. CPET is designed to use either positively (proton) or negatively (electron) charged particles to reduce the energy spread via sympathetic cooling. Off-line setup of CPET is complete. Details of the working principles and updates are presented

  8. Nanoparticle coagulation in fractionally charged and charge fluctuating dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nunomura, Shota; Kondo, Michio; Shiratani, Masaharu; Koga, Kazunori; Watanabe, Yukio

    2008-08-15

    The kinetics of nanoparticle coagulation has been studied in fractionally charged and charge fluctuating dusty plasmas. The coagulation occurs when the mutual collision frequency among nanoparticles exceeds their charging and decharging/neutralization frequency. Interestingly, the coagulation is suppressed while a fraction (several percent) of nanoparticles are negatively charged in a plasma, in which stochastic charging plays an important role. A model is developed to predict a phase diagram of the coagulation and its suppression.

  9. Quick charge battery

    SciTech Connect

    Parise, R.J.

    1998-07-01

    Electric and hybrid electric vehicles (EVs and HEVs) will become a significant reality in the near future of the automotive industry. Both types of vehicles will need a means to store energy on board. For the present, the method of choice would be lead-acid batteries, with the HEV having auxiliary power supplied by a small internal combustion engine. One of the main drawbacks to lead-acid batteries is internal heat generation as a natural consequence of the charging process as well as resistance losses. This limits the re-charging rate to the battery pack for an EV which has a range of about 80 miles. A quick turnaround on recharge is needed but not yet possible. One of the limiting factors is the heat buildup. For the HEV the auxiliary power unit provides a continuous charge to the battery pack. Therefore heat generation in the lead-acid battery is a constant problem that must be addressed. Presented here is a battery that is capable of quick charging, the Quick Charge Battery with Thermal Management. This is an electrochemical battery, typically a lead-acid battery, without the inherent thermal management problems that have been present in the past. The battery can be used in an all-electric vehicle, a hybrid-electric vehicle or an internal combustion engine vehicle, as well as in other applications that utilize secondary batteries. This is not restricted to only lead-acid batteries. The concept and technology are flexible enough to use in any secondary battery application where thermal management of the battery must be addressed, especially during charging. Any battery with temperature constraints can benefit from this advancement in the state of the art of battery manufacturing. This can also include nickel-cadmium, metal-air, nickel hydroxide, zinc-chloride or any other type of battery whose performance is affected by the temperature control of the interior as well as the exterior of the battery.

  10. Holographic charge oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Mike; Donos, Aristomenis; Tong, David

    2015-04-01

    The Reissner-Nordström black hole provides the prototypical description of a holographic system at finite density. We study the response of this system to the presence of a local, charged impurity. Below a critical temperature, the induced charge density, which screens the impurity, exhibits oscillations. These oscillations can be traced to the singularities in the density-density correlation function moving in the complex momentum plane. At finite temperature, the oscillations are very similar to the Friedel oscillations seen in Fermi liquids. However, at zero temperature the oscillations in the black hole background remain exponentially damped, while Friedel oscillations relax to a power-law.

  11. Charged conformal Killing spinors

    SciTech Connect

    Lischewski, Andree

    2015-01-15

    We study the twistor equation on pseudo-Riemannian Spin{sup c}-manifolds whose solutions we call charged conformal Killing spinors (CCKSs). We derive several integrability conditions for the existence of CCKS and study their relations to spinor bilinears. A construction principle for Lorentzian manifolds admitting CCKS with nontrivial charge starting from CR-geometry is presented. We obtain a partial classification result in the Lorentzian case under the additional assumption that the associated Dirac current is normal conformal and complete the classification of manifolds admitting CCKS in all dimensions and signatures ≤5 which has recently been initiated in the study of supersymmetric field theories on curved space.

  12. Holographic charge density waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donos, Aristomenis; Gauntlett, Jerome P.

    2013-06-01

    We show that strongly coupled holographic matter at finite charge density can exhibit charge density wave phases which spontaneously break translation invariance while preserving time-reversal and parity invariance. We show that such phases are possible within Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory in general spacetime dimensions. We also discuss related spatially modulated phases when there is an additional coupling to a second vector field, possibly with nonzero mass. We discuss how these constructions, and others, should be associated with novel spatially modulated ground states.

  13. Charged Kaon interferometric probes of space-time evolution in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[S(NN)]=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Al-Jamel, A; Aoki, K; Aphecetche, L; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, Y; Bjorndal, M T; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Chai, J-S; Chernichenko, S; Chiba, J; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cleven, C R; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgo, T; Dahms, T; Das, K; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Drachenberg, J L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Dubey, A K; Durum, A; Dzhordzhadze, V; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Espagnon, B; Esumi, S; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Forestier, B; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fukao, Y; Fung, S-Y; Gadrat, S; Gastineau, F; Germain, M; Glenn, A; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Hadj Henni, A; Haggerty, J S; Hagiwara, M N; Hamagaki, H; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Harvey, M; Haslum, E; Hasuko, K; Hayano, R; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; He, X; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Holmes, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hur, M G; Ichihara, T; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kawagishi, T; Kazantsev, A V; Kelly, S; Khanzadeev, A; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, Y-S; Kinney, E; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Boesing, C; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Le Bornec, Y; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, M K; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Li, X H; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCain, M C; McGaughey, P L; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nakamura, T; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Norman, B E; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, H; Okada, K; Omiwade, O O; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Rykov, V L; Ryu, S S; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shohjoh, T; Shoji, K; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Skutnik, S; Smith, W C; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sullivan, J P; Sziklai, J; Tabaru, T; Takagi, S; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wagner, M; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; Wessels, J; White, S N; Willis, N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zaudtke, O; Zhang, C; Zimányi, J; Zolin, L

    2009-10-02

    Bose-Einstein correlations of charged kaons are used to probe Au+Au collisions at sqrt[S(NN)]=200 GeV and are compared to charged pion probes, which have a larger hadronic scattering cross section. Three-dimensional Gaussian source radii are extracted, along with a one-dimensional kaon emission source function. The centrality dependences of the three Gaussian radii are well described by a single linear function of N(part)1/3 with a zero intercept. Imaging analysis shows a deviation from a Gaussian tail at r greater than or approximately equal to 10 fm, although the bulk emission at lower radius is well described by a Gaussian. The presence of a non-Gaussian tail in the kaon source reaffirms that the particle emission region in a heavy-ion collision is extended, and that similar measurements with pions are not solely due to the decay of long-lived resonances.

  14. ION PRODUCING MECHANISM (CHARGE CUPS)

    DOEpatents

    Brobeck, W.W.

    1959-04-21

    The problems of confining a charge material in a calutron and uniformly distributing heat to the charge is described. The charge is held in a cup of thermally conductive material removably disposed within the charge chamber of the ion source block. A central thermally conducting stem is incorporated within the cup for conducting heat to the central portion of the charge contained within the cup.

  15. The radii of the nearby K5V and K7V stars 61 Cygni A & B. CHARA/FLUOR interferometry and CESAM2k modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kervella, P.; Mérand, A.; Pichon, B.; Thévenin, F.; Heiter, U.; Bigot, L.; ten Brummelaar, T. A.; McAlister, H. A.; Ridgway, S. T.; Turner, N.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Goldfinger, P. J.; Farrington, C.

    2008-09-01

    Context: The main sequence binary star 61 Cyg (K5V+K7V) is our nearest stellar neighbour in the northern hemisphere. This proximity makes it a particularly well suited system for very high accuracy interferometric radius measurements. Aims: Our goal is to constrain the poorly known evolutionary status and age of this bright binary star. Methods: We obtained high accuracy interferometric observations in the infrared K' band, using the CHARA/FLUOR instrument. We then computed evolutionary models of 61 Cyg A & B with the CESAM2k code. As model constraints, we used a combination of observational parameters from classical observation methods (photometry, spectroscopy) as well as our new interferometric radii. Results: The measured limb darkened disk angular diameters are θ_LD(A) = 1.775 ± 0.013 mas and θ_LD(B) = 1.581 ± 0.022 mas, respectively for 61 Cyg A and B. Considering the high accuracy parallaxes available, these values translate into photospheric radii of R(A) = 0.665 ± 0.005 R⊙ and R(B) = 0.595 ± 0.008 R⊙. The new radii constrain efficiently the physical parameters adopted for the modeling of both stars, allowing us to predict asteroseismic frequencies based on our best-fit models. Conclusions: The CESAM2k evolutionary models indicate an age around 6 Gyr and are compatible with small values of the mixing length parameter. The measurement of asteroseismic oscillation frequencies in 61 Cyg A & B would be of great value to improve the modeling of this important fiducial stellar system, in particular to better constrain the masses.

  16. On the Sizes of the North Atlantic Basin Tropical Cyclones Based on 34- and 64-kt Wind Radii Data, 2004-2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    At end of the 2012 hurricane season the National Hurricane Center retired the original HURDAT dataset and replaced it with the newer version HURDAT2, which reformatted the original data and included additional information, in particular, estimates of the 34-, 50, and 64-kt wind radii for the interval 2004-2013. During the brief 10-year interval, some 164 tropical cyclones are noted to have formed in the North Atlantic basin, with 77 becoming hurricanes. Hurricane Sandy (2012) stands out as being the largest individual storm that occurred in the North Atlantic basin during the 2004 -2013 timeframe, both in terms of its 34- and 64-kt wind radii and wind areas, having maximum 34- and 64-kt wind radii, maximum wind areas, and average wind areas each more than 2 standard deviations larger than the corresponding means. In terms of the largest yearly total 34-kt wind area (i.e., the sum of all individual storm 34-kt wind areas during the year), the year 2010 stands out as being the largest (about 423 × 10(exp 6) nmi(exp 2)), compared to the mean of about 174 × 10(exp 6) nmi(exp 2)), surpassing the year 2005 (353 x 10(exp 6) nmi(exp 2)) that had the largest number of individual storms (28). However, in terms of the largest yearly total 64-kt wind area, the year 2005 was the largest (about 9 × 10(exp 6) nmi(exp 2)), compared to the mean of about 3 × 106 nmi(exp 2)). Interesting is that the ratio of total 64-kt wind area to total 34-kt wind area has decreased over time, from 0.034 in 2004 to 0.008 in 2013.

  17. Who's in Charge Here?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphries, Jack W.

    1986-01-01

    Even though most decisions are made before they reach the superintendent's desk, and even though these are times of "litigious paranoia," the superintendent is still in charge of the public schools. Some of the responsibilities of the superintendent are outlined. (MLW)

  18. Charge separation distance for flexible donor-bridge-acceptor systems after electron-transfer quenching.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jinwei; Lukin, Leonid V; Braun, Charles L

    2008-08-21

    Photoinduced transient dipole experiments are used to measure the effective charge separation distance, which is equivalent to the photoinduced change in dipole moment divided by the electron charge of flexible electron-donor/acceptor systems, D-(CH2)n-A, where D is 4- N,N-dimethylaniline, A is 9-anthryl, and n = 3, 4. We find that the dipole moments increase strongly with solvent polarity. For the compound with n = 4 (DBA4), analysis of dipole signals indicates that the effective charge separation distances in toluene, 1,4-dioxane, ethyl acetate, tetrahydrofuran, dichloromethane, 1,2-dichloroethane, 2-methylpentanone-3, 3-pentanone, and benzonitrile are 2.2, 2.5, 4.5, 4.7, 5.5, 5.5, 4.8, and 6.3 A, respectively. These values can be understood as the root-mean-square charge separation distance in the solutions of different solvents. We assume that the folded contact configuration has a separation distance of 3.5 A, the extended, solvent-separated configuration has a separation distance of 8.0 A, and that they are the only two stable species after electron-transfer quenching. The formation efficiencies of contact radical ion pairs (CRIPs) and solvent-separated radical ion pairs (SSRIPs) are estimated in different solvents. The results indicate that a significant fraction of the ion pairs exist as solvent-separated ion pairs when the dielectric constant of the solvent is larger than 10. These results indicate that electron-transfer quenching can indeed happen at large separations in polar solvents. They also reveal that there is a barrier for ion pairs formed at large separations, hindering collapse to a contact separation of around 3.5 A.

  19. Space charge field in a FEL with axially symmetric electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, I.A.; Belyavskiy, E.D.

    1995-12-31

    Nonlinear two-dimensional theory of the space charge of an axially symmetric electron beam propagating in combined right-hand polarized wiggler and uniform axial guide fields in a presence of high-frequency electromagnetic wave is presented. The well-known TE{sub 01} mode in a cylindrical waveguide for the model of radiation fields and paraxial approximation for the wiggler field are used. Space charge field components are written in the Lagrange coordinates by the twice averaged Green`s functions of two equally charged infinitely thin discs. For that {open_quotes}compensating charges{close_quotes} method is applied in which an electron ring model is substituted by one with two different radii and signs discs. On this approach the initial Green`s functions peculiarities are eliminated and all calculations are considerably simplified. Coefficients of a twice averaged Green`s function expansion into a Fourier series are obtained by use of corresponding expansion coefficients of longitudinal Green`s functions of equal radii discs and identical rings known from the one-dimensional theory of super HF devices taking into account electron bunches periodicity. This approach permit the space charge field components for an arbitrary stratified stream to be expressed in a simple and strict enough form. The expressions obtained can be employed in a nonlinear two-dimensional FEL theory in order to investigate beam dynamical defocusing and electrons failing on the waveguide walls in the high gain regime. This is especially important for FEL operation in mm and submm.

  20. ISEE 3 observations during a plasma sheet encounter at 140 earth radii - Evidence for enhancement of reconnection at the distant neutral line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholer, M.; Terasawa, T.; Baker, D. N.; Zwickl, R. D.; Gloeckler, G.; Hovestadt, D.; Smith, E. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1986-01-01

    A plasma sheet encounter of the ISEE-3 spacecraft in the distant tail at 140 earth radii on March 20, 1983 is studied using magnetic field, energetic particle, and plasma electron data sets. The H-component magnetograms from auroral magnetometer stations, intensity-time profiles, high resolution magnetic field measurements, and electron and proton angular distributions are analyzed. The dynamics of the plasma sheet displayed by the strong tailward and earthward directed ion beams, large northward and southward magnetic fields excursions, and short tailward and earthward plasma flows are described.

  1. Optimization of BEV Charging Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei

    This paper presents different approaches to optimize fast charging and workplace charging strategy of battery electric vehicle (BEV) drivers. For the fast charging analysis, a rule-based model was built to simulate BEV charging behavior. Monte Carlo analysis was performed to explore to the potential range of congestion at fast charging stations which could be more than four hours at the most crowded stations. Genetic algorithm was performed to explore the theoretical minimum waiting time at fast charging stations, and it can decrease the waiting time at the most crowded stations to be shorter than one hour. A deterministic approach was proposed as a feasible suggestion that people should consider to take fast charging when the state of charge is approaching 40 miles. This suggestion is hoped to help to minimize potential congestion at fast charging stations. For the workplace charging analysis, scenario analysis was performed to simulate temporal distribution of charging demand under different workplace charging strategies. It was found that if BEV drivers charge as much as possible and as late as possible at workplace, it could increase the utility of solar-generated electricity while relieve grid stress of extra intensive electricity demand at night caused by charging electric vehicles at home.

  2. Gated charged-particle trap

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W. Henry

    1999-01-01

    The design and operation of a new type of charged-particle trap provides simultaneous measurements of mass, charge, and velocity of large electrospray ions. The trap consists of a detector tube mounted between two sets of center-bored trapping plates. Voltages applied to the trapping plates define symmetrically-opposing potential valleys which guide axially-injected ions to cycle back and forth through the charge-detection tube. A low noise charge-sensitive amplifier, connected to the tube, reproduces the image charge of individual ions as they pass through the detector tube. Ion mass is calculated from measurement of ion charge and velocity following each passage through the detector.

  3. Line10 Charge Injection Biases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggett, Sylvia

    2012-10-01

    Radiation damage on-orbit, in the form of charge traps, gradually reduces the charge transfer efficiency {CTE} of CCDs over time. In WFC3, one option for mitigating CTE losses is charge injection i.e. electronically inserting charge every Nth row. The benefit of this method is the significantly lower noise penalty, much less than the traditional Poissonian noise imparted by a pre- or post-flash of the same charge level. This program acquires the calibration data necessary to support science observations using charge injection.

  4. 23. 175 TON CAPACITY CHARGING LADLE ON THE CHARGING AISLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. 175 TON CAPACITY CHARGING LADLE ON THE CHARGING AISLE OF THE BOP SHOP LOOKING SOUTH. HISTORIAN FOR SCALE. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  5. Statistical radii associated with amino acids to determine the contact map: fixing the structure of a type I cohesin domain in the Clostridium thermocellum cellulosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chwastyk, Mateusz; Poma Bernaola, Adolfo; Cieplak, Marek

    2015-07-01

    We propose to improve and simplify protein refinement procedures through consideration of which pairs of amino acid residues should form native contacts. We first consider 11 330 proteins from the CATH database to determine statistical distributions of contacts associated with a given type of amino acid. The distributions are set across the distances between the α-C atoms that are in contact. Based on this data, we determine typical radii of effective spheres that can be placed on the α-C atoms in order to reconstruct the distribution of the contact lengths. This is done by checking for overlaps with enlarged van der Waals spheres associated with heavy atoms on other amino acids. The resulting contacts can be used to identify non-native contacts that may arise during the time evolution of structure-based models. Here, the radii are used to guide reconstruction of nine missing side chains in a type I cohesin domain with the Protein Data Bank code 1AOH. We first identify the likely missing contacts and then sculpt the corresponding side chains by standard refinement tools to achieve consistency with the expected contact map. One ambiguity in refinement is resolved by determining all-atom conformational energies.

  6. SYSTEMATIC UNCERTAINTIES IN THE SPECTROSCOPIC MEASUREMENTS OF NEUTRON-STAR MASSES AND RADII FROM THERMONUCLEAR X-RAY BURSTS. II. EDDINGTON LIMIT

    SciTech Connect

    Guever, Tolga; Oezel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2012-03-01

    Time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy of thermonuclear bursts observed from low-mass X-ray binaries offer a unique tool to measure neutron-star masses and radii. In this paper, we continue our systematic analysis of all the X-ray bursts observed with Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer from X-ray binaries. We determine the events that show clear evidence for photospheric radius expansion and measure the Eddington limits for these accreting neutron stars using the bolometric fluxes attained at the touchdown moments of each X-ray burst. We employ a Bayesian technique to investigate the degree to which the Eddington limit for each source remains constant between bursts. We find that for sources with a large number of radius expansion bursts, systematic uncertainties are at a 5%-10% level. Moreover, in six sources with only pairs of Eddington-limited bursts, the distribution of fluxes is consistent with a {approx}10% fractional dispersion. This indicates that the spectroscopic measurements of neutron-star masses and radii using thermonuclear X-ray bursts can reach the level of accuracy required to distinguish between different neutron-star equations of state, provided that uncertainties related to the overall flux calibration of X-ray detectors are of comparable magnitude.

  7. Freeze-out radii extracted from three-pion cumulants in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belmont, R.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Böhmer, F. V.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dørheim, S.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Esposito, M.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gumbo, M.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hippolyte, B.; Hladky, J.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Innocenti, G. M.; Ionita, C.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Jachołkowski, A.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kadyshevskiy, V.; Kalcher, S.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Khan, M. M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskikh, A.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kravčáková, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kučera, V.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Lea, R.; Lee, G. R.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; Leoncino, M.; León Monzón, I.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Luzzi, C.; Ma, R.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martashvili, I.; Martin, N. A.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Okatan, A.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Sahoo, P.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Palmeri, A.; Pant, D.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Pesci, A.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Pohjoisaho, E. H. O.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Rauf, A. W.; Razazi, V.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Reidt, F.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rivetti, A.; Rocco, E.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohni, S.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Sánchez Rodríguez, F. J.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seo, J.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, N.; Sharma, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Spacek, M.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Susa, T.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szabo, A.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tarantola Peloni, A.; Tarazona Martinez, A.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terrevoli, C.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Torii, H.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ulery, J.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Vannucci, L.; Van Der Maarel, J.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wagner, V.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, D.; Weber, M.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Xiang, C.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yang, S.; Yano, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaccolo, V.; Zach, C.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, F.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2014-12-01

    In high-energy collisions, the spatio-temporal size of the particle production region can be measured using the Bose-Einstein correlations of identical bosons at low relative momentum. The source radii are typically extracted using two-pion correlations, and characterize the system at the last stage of interaction, called kinetic freeze-out. In low-multiplicity collisions, unlike in high-multiplicity collisions, two-pion correlations are substantially altered by background correlations, e.g. mini-jets. Such correlations can be suppressed using three-pion cumulant correlations. We present the first measurements of the size of the system at freeze-out extracted from three-pion cumulant correlations in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC with ALICE. At similar multiplicity, the invariant radii extracted in p-Pb collisions are found to be 5-15% larger than those in pp, while those in Pb-Pb are 35-55% larger than those in p-Pb. Our measurements disfavor models which incorporate substantially stronger collective expansion in p-Pb as compared to pp collisions at similar multiplicity.

  8. Spectrometer for neutron and gamma-ray detection at the distances less than 100 solar radii from the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, S.; Panasyuk, M.; Ryumin, S.; Sobolevsky, N.; Ufimtsev, M.

    2001-08-01

    Solar neutrons with energies <5 MeV can't be detected in the near-Earth space due to the both its decay and decreasing of its fluxes with distance from the Sun. So solar neutron observations near the Sun compared with near-Earth ones allow studying acceleration of ions up to significantly smaller energies, what occurs considerably more often. Besides that near-Sun low energy neutron observations are important for search for non-flare ion acceleration on the Sun. For project InterHelioProbe we have proposed spectrometer of neutrons with energies 0.055 MeV. LiI(Eu) crystal 4*3 cm enriched in 6 Li , surrounded by a plastic scintillator 1-3 cm thick loaded with 10 B is used as a detector. Neutrons will undergo elastic scattering with the hydrogen in the plastic. A delayed coincidence within a window of 0.1 - 10 µs in either scintillator is a signature of a neutron, with the initial fast plastic signal pulse height being a direct measure of the incident neutron's energy. A fast charged particle will be vetoed as simultaneous signals in both scintillators. Gamma's with energies 0.03-10 MeV will be identified too as signals in LiI alone. Calculated effective area for normal neutron incidence is 0.3-5.6 cm2 . Estimated effective area for gamma detection is 3-12 cm2 . Mass of the instrument is <1.5 kg. Power of the detector is about 1.5 watt, needing telemetry - 40 b/s.

  9. Intelligent battery charging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, Hobert R., Jr.

    1991-09-01

    The present invention is a battery charging system that provides automatic voltage selection, short circuit protection, and delayed output to prevent arcing or pitting. A second embodiment of the invention provides a homing beacon which transmits a signal so that a battery powered mobile robot may home in on and contact the invention to charge its battery. The invention includes electric terminals isolated from one another. One terminal is grounded and the other has a voltage applied to it through a resistor connected to the output of a DC power supply. A voltage scaler is connected between the resistor and the hot terminal. An On/Off controller and a voltage mode selector sense the voltage provided at the output of the voltage scaler.

  10. Extremally charged line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzner, Jiří; Žofka, Martin

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the properties of a static, cylindrically symmetric Majumdar-Papapetrou-type solution of Einstein-Maxwell equations. We locate its singularities, establish its algebraic type, find its asymptotic properties and weak-field limit, study the structure of electrogeodesics, and determine the mass and charge of its sources. We provide an interpretation of the spacetime and discuss the parameter appearing in the metric.

  11. Interaction between heterogeneously charged surfaces: Surface patches and charge modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Yaakov, Dan; Andelman, David; Diamant, Haim

    2013-02-01

    When solid surfaces are immersed in aqueous solutions, some of their charges can dissociate and leave behind charged patches on the surface. Although the charges are distributed heterogeneously on the surface, most of the theoretical models treat them as homogeneous. For overall non-neutral surfaces, the assumption of surface charge homogeneity is rather reasonable since the leading terms of two such interacting surfaces depend on the nonzero average charge. However, for overall neutral surfaces the nature of the surface charge distribution is crucial in determining the intersurface interaction. In the present work we study the interaction between two charged surfaces across an aqueous solution for several charge distributions. The analysis is preformed within the framework of the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann theory. For periodic charge distributions the interaction is found to be repulsive at small separations, unless the two surface distributions are completely out-of-phase with respect to each other. For quenched random charge distributions we find that due to the presence of the ionic solution in between the surfaces, the intersurface repulsion dominates over the attraction in the linear regime of the Poisson-Boltzmann theory. The effect of quenched charge heterogeneity is found to be particularly substantial in the case of large charged domains.

  12. Distributed charging of electrical assets

    DOEpatents

    Ghosh, Soumyadip; Phan, Dung; Sharma, Mayank; Wu, Chai Wah; Xiong, Jinjun

    2016-02-16

    The present disclosure relates generally to the field of distributed charging of electrical assets. In various examples, distributed charging of electrical assets may be implemented in the form of systems, methods and/or algorithms.

  13. Wind Power Charged Aerosol Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, A.M.

    1980-07-01

    This describes experimental results on a Charged Aerosol Wind/Electric Power Generator, using Induction Electric Charging with a water jet issuing under water pressure from a small diameter (25-100 ..mu..m) orifice.

  14. Systematics of nucleon density distributions and neutron skin of nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seif, W. M.; Mansour, Hesham

    2015-10-01

    Proton and neutron density profiles of 760 nuclei in the mass region of A = 16-304 are analyzed using the Skyrme energy density for the parameter set SLy4. Simple formulae are obtained to fit the resulting radii and diffuseness data. These formulae are useful to estimate the values of the unmeasured radii and especially in extrapolating charge radii values for nuclei which are far from the valley of stability. Also, it provides an easy way to formulate the density profile for nuclear applications and to perform analytic calculations for bound and/or scattering problems. The obtained neutron and proton root-mean-square (rms) radii and the neutron skin thicknesses are in agreement with the available experimental data and previous Hartree-Fock (HF) calculations.

  15. Submerged AUV Charging Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.; Chao, Yi; Curtin, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) are becoming increasingly important for military surveillance and mine detection. Most AUVs are battery powered and have limited lifetimes of a few days to a few weeks. This greatly limits the distance that AUVs can travel underwater. Using a series of submerged AUV charging stations, AUVs could travel a limited distance to the next charging station, recharge its batteries, and continue to the next charging station, thus traveling great distances in a relatively short time, similar to the Old West “Pony Express.” One solution is to use temperature differences at various depths in the ocean to produce electricity, which is then stored in a submerged battery. It is preferred to have the upper buoy submerged a reasonable distance below the surface, so as not to be seen from above and not to be inadvertently destroyed by storms or ocean going vessels. In a previous invention, a phase change material (PCM) is melted (expanded) at warm temperatures, for example, 15 °C, and frozen (contracted) at cooler temperatures, for example, 8 °C. Tubes containing the PCM, which could be paraffin such as pentadecane, would be inserted into a container filled with hydraulic oil. When the PCM is melted (expanded), it pushes the oil out into a container that is pressurized to about 3,000 psi (approx equals 20.7 MPa). When a valve is opened, the high-pressure oil passes through a hydraulic motor, which turns a generator and charges a battery. The low-pressure oil is finally reabsorbed into the PCM canister when the PCM tubes are frozen (contracted). Some of the electricity produced could be used to control an external bladder or a motor to the tether line, such that depth cycling is continued for a very long period of time. Alternatively, after the electricity is generated by the hydraulic motor, the exiting low-pressure oil from the hydraulic motor could be vented directly to an external bladder on the AUV, such that filling of the bladder

  16. Modular Battery Charge Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Robert; Gonzalez, Marcelo

    2009-01-01

    A new approach to masterless, distributed, digital-charge control for batteries requiring charge control has been developed and implemented. This approach is required in battery chemistries that need cell-level charge control for safety and is characterized by the use of one controller per cell, resulting in redundant sensors for critical components, such as voltage, temperature, and current. The charge controllers in a given battery interact in a masterless fashion for the purpose of cell balancing, charge control, and state-of-charge estimation. This makes the battery system invariably fault-tolerant. The solution to the single-fault failure, due to the use of a single charge controller (CC), was solved by implementing one CC per cell and linking them via an isolated communication bus [e.g., controller area network (CAN)] in a masterless fashion so that the failure of one or more CCs will not impact the remaining functional CCs. Each micro-controller-based CC digitizes the cell voltage (V(sub cell)), two cell temperatures, and the voltage across the switch (V); the latter variable is used in conjunction with V(sub cell) to estimate the bypass current for a given bypass resistor. Furthermore, CC1 digitizes the battery current (I1) and battery voltage (V(sub batt) and CC5 digitizes a second battery current (I2). As a result, redundant readings are taken for temperature, battery current, and battery voltage through the summation of the individual cell voltages given that each CC knows the voltage of the other cells. For the purpose of cell balancing, each CC periodically and independently transmits its cell voltage and stores the received cell voltage of the other cells in an array. The position in the array depends on the identifier (ID) of the transmitting CC. After eight cell voltage receptions, the array is checked to see if one or more cells did not transmit. If one or more transmissions are missing, the missing cell(s) is (are) eliminated from cell

  17. Notch Charge-Coupled Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janesick, James

    1992-01-01

    Notch charge-coupled devices are imaging arrays of photodetectors designed to exhibit high charge-transfer efficiencies necessary for operation in ultra-large array, and less vulnerable to degradation by energetic protons, neutrons, and electrons. Main channel of horizontal register includes deep narrow inner channel (notch). Small packets of charge remain confined to notch. Larger packets spill into rest of channel; transferred in usual way. Degradation of charge-transfer efficiency by energetic particles reduced.

  18. Improving Charging-Breeding Simulations with Space-Charge Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilek, Ryan; Kwiatkowski, Ania; Steinbrügge, René

    2016-09-01

    Rare-isotope-beam facilities use Highly Charged Ions (HCI) for accelerators accelerating heavy ions and to improve measurement precision and resolving power of certain experiments. An Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) is able to create HCI through successive electron impact, charge breeding trapped ions into higher charge states. CBSIM was created to calculate successive charge breeding with an EBIT. It was augmented by transferring it into an object-oriented programming language, including additional elements, improving ion-ion collision factors, and exploring the overlap of the electron beam with the ions. The calculation is enhanced with the effects of residual background gas by computing the space charge due to charge breeding. The program assimilates background species, ionizes and charge breeds them alongside the element being studied, and allows them to interact with the desired species through charge exchange, giving fairer overview of realistic charge breeding. Calculations of charge breeding will be shown for realistic experimental conditions. We reexamined the implementation of ionization energies, cross sections, and ion-ion interactions when charge breeding.

  19. Charge dynamic characteristics in corona-charged polytetrafluoroethylene film electrets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang-Jin; Xiao, Hui-Ming; Zhu, Chun-Feng

    2004-08-01

    In this work, the charge dynamics characteristics of injection, transport and decay in porous and non-porous polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) film electrets were investigated by means of corona charging, isothermal and thermal stimulating surface-potential decay measurements. The results showed that the initial surface potential, whether positively or negatively charging, is much higher in non-porous PTFE than in porous PTFE. For porous film the value of initial surface potentials increases with increase of film thickness. Higher charging temperature can remarkably improve charge stability. The charge dynamics are correlated to materials microstructure according to their scanning electron micrographs. For non-porous PTFE films, polarizability change of C-F bonds is the main origin of electret charges; but for porous PTFE film a large number of bulk and interface type traps are expected because of the greater area of interface and higher crystallinity.

  20. Density functional description of size-dependent effects at nucleation on neutral and charged nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchekin, Alexander K.; Lebedeva, Tatiana S.

    2017-03-01

    A numerical study of size-dependent effects in the thermodynamics of a small droplet formed around a solid nanoparticle has been performed within the square-gradient density functional theory. The Lennard-Jones fluid with the Carnahan-Starling model for the hard-sphere contribution to intermolecular interaction in liquid and vapor phases and interfaces has been used for description of the condensate. The intermolecular forces between the solid core and condensate molecules have been taken into account with the help of the Lennard-Jones part of the total molecular potential of the core. The influence of the electric charge of the particle has been considered under assumption of the central Coulomb potential in the medium with dielectric permittivity depending on local condensate density. The condensate density profiles and equimolecular radii for equilibrium droplets at different values of the condensate chemical potential have been computed in the cases of an uncharged solid core with the molecular potential, a charged core without molecular potential, and a core with joint action of the Coulomb and molecular potentials. The appearance of stable equilibrium droplets even in the absence of the electric charge has been commented. As a next step, the capillary, disjoining pressure, and electrostatic contributions to the condensate chemical potential have been considered and compared with the predictions of classical thermodynamics in a wide range of values of the droplet and the particle equimolecular radii. With the help of the found dependence of the condensate chemical potential in droplet on the droplet size, the activation barrier for nucleation on uncharged and charged particles has been computed as a function of the vapor supersaturation. Finally, the work of droplet formation and the work of wetting the particle have been found as functions of the droplet size.

  1. Backside charging of the CCD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janesick, J.; Elliott, T.; Daud, T.; Mccarthy, J.; Blouke, M.

    1985-01-01

    Until recently, the usefulness of the charge coupled device (CCD) as an imaging sensor was thought to be restricted to within rather narrow boundaries of the visible and near IR spectrum. However, since the discovery of backside charging the full potential of CCD performance is now realized. Indeed, the technique of backside charging not only allows the CCD to be used directly in the UV, EUV, and soft X-ray regimes, it has opened up new opportunities in optimizing charge collection processes as well. The technique of backside charging is discussed, and its properties, use, and potential in the future as it applies to the CCD are described.

  2. Adsorption isotherms of charged nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Alexandre P; Bakhshandeh, Amin; Diehl, Alexandre; Levin, Yan

    2016-10-19

    We present theory and simulations which allow us to quantitatively calculate the amount of surface adsorption excess of charged nanoparticles onto a charged surface. The theory is very accurate for weakly charged nanoparticles and can be used at physiological concentrations of salt. We have also developed an efficient simulation algorithm which can be used for dilute suspensions of nanoparticles of any charge, even at very large salt concentrations. With the help of the new simulation method, we are able to efficiently calculate the adsorption isotherms of highly charged nanoparticles in suspensions containing multivalent ions, for which there are no accurate theoretical methods available.

  3. High resolution printing of charge

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, John; Park, Jang-Ung

    2015-06-16

    Provided are methods of printing a pattern of charge on a substrate surface, such as by electrohydrodynamic (e-jet) printing. The methods relate to providing a nozzle containing a printable fluid, providing a substrate having a substrate surface and generating from the nozzle an ejected printable fluid containing net charge. The ejected printable fluid containing net charge is directed to the substrate surface, wherein the net charge does not substantially degrade and the net charge retained on the substrate surface. Also provided are functional devices made by any of the disclosed methods.

  4. Charge sniffer for electrostatics demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinca, Mihai P.

    2011-02-01

    An electronic electroscope with a special design for demonstrations and experiments on static electricity is described. It operates as an electric charge sniffer by detecting slightly charged objects when they are brought to the front of its sensing electrode. The sniffer has the advantage of combining high directional sensitivity with a logarithmic bar display. It allows for the identification of electric charge polarity during charge separation by friction, peeling, electrostatic induction, batteries, or secondary coils of power transformers. Other experiments in electrostatics, such as observing the electric field of an oscillating dipole and the distance dependence of the electric field generated by simple charge configurations, are also described.

  5. Antiproton charge radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crivelli, P.; Cooke, D.; Heiss, M. W.

    2016-09-01

    The upcoming operation of the extra low energy antiprotons ring at CERN, the upgrade of the antiproton decelerator (AD), and the installation in the AD hall of an intense slow positron beam with an expected flux of 1 08 e+ /s will open the possibility for new experiments with antihydrogen (H ¯). Here we propose a scheme to measure the Lamb shift of H ¯. For four months of data taking, we anticipate an uncertainty of 100 ppm. This will provide a test of C P T and the first determination of the antiproton charge radius at the level of 10%.

  6. Effective electrophoretic mobilities and charges of anti-VEGF proteins determined by capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Li, S Kevin; Liddell, Mark R; Wen, He

    2011-06-01

    Macromolecules such as therapeutic proteins currently serve an important role in the treatment of eye diseases such as wet age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. Particularly, bevacizumab and ranibizumab have been shown to be effective in the treatment of these diseases. Iontophoresis can be employed to enhance ocular delivery of these macromolecules, but the lack of information on the properties of these macromolecules has hindered its development. The objectives of the present study were to determine the effective electrophoretic mobilities and charges of bevacizumab, ranibizumab, and model compound polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) using capillary zone electrophoresis. Salicylate, lidocaine, and bovine serum albumin (BSA), which have known electrophoretic mobilities in the literature, were also studied to validate the present technique. The hydrodynamic radii and diffusion coefficients of BSA, bevacizumab, ranibizumab, and PSS were measured by dynamic light scattering. The effective charges were calculated using the Einstein relation between diffusion coefficient and electrophoretic mobility and the Henry equation. The results show that bevacizumab and ranibizumab have low electrophoretic mobilities and are net negatively charged in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) of pH 7.4 and 0.16M ionic strength. PSS has high negative charge but the electrophoretic mobility in PBS is lower than that expected from the polymer structure. The present study demonstrated that capillary electrophoresis could be used to characterize the mobility and charge properties of drug candidates in the development of iontophoretic drug delivery.

  7. Effective Electrophoretic Mobilities and Charges of Anti-VEGF Proteins Determined by Capillary Zone Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Li, S. Kevin; Liddell, Mark R.; Wen, He

    2011-01-01

    Macromolecules such as therapeutic proteins currently serve an important role in the treatment of eye diseases such as wet age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. Particularly, bevacizumab and ranibizumab have been shown to be effective in the treatment of these diseases. Iontophoresis can be employed to enhance ocular delivery of these macromolecules, but the lack of information on the properties of these macromolecules has hindered its development. The objectives of the present study were to determine the effective electrophoretic mobilities and charges of bevacizumab, ranibizumab, and model compound polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) using capillary zone electrophoresis. Salicylate, lidocaine, and bovine serum albumin (BSA), which have known electrophoretic mobilities in the literature, were also studied to validate the present technique. The hydrodynamic radii and diffusion coefficients of BSA, bevacizumab, ranibizumab, and PSS were measured by dynamic light scattering. The effective charges were calculated using the Einstein relation between diffusion coefficient and electrophoretic mobility and the Henry equation. The results show that bevacizumab and ranibizumab have low electrophoretic mobilities and are net negatively charged in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) of pH 7.4 and 0.16 M ionic strength. PSS has high negative charge but the electrophoretic mobility in PBS is lower than that expected from the polymer structure. The present study demonstrated that capillary electrophoresis could be used to characterize the mobility and charge properties of drug candidates in the development of iontophoretic drug delivery. PMID:21269789

  8. Charge shielding in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shaojie; Stroth, Ulrich; Van Oost, Guido

    2010-11-15

    The shielding of a charge sheet in a magnetized plasma is investigated by taking account of the diamagnetic drift start-up current in addition to the polarization current. For a charge sheet with an infinitesimal width, the shielding is the same as the conventional Debye shielding if the charge sheet is perpendicular to the magnetic field; the shielding length is {radical}(2) times larger than the conventional one if the charge sheet is parallel to the magnetic field. When the scale length of the charge sheet is comparable or smaller than the ion Larmor radius, the electric field is significantly enhanced within the charge sheet, while far away from the charge sheet, the electric field is shielded to the usual 1/{epsilon}{sub r} level (where {epsilon}{sub r} is the diamagnetic coefficient of the magnetized plasma).

  9. THE TRANSIT LIGHT-CURVE PROJECT. XIV. CONFIRMATION OF ANOMALOUS RADII FOR THE EXOPLANETS TrES-4b, HAT-P-3b, AND WASP-12b

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Tucker; Ingemyr, Mikael; Winn, Joshua N.; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Holman, Matthew J.; Esquerdo, Gil; Everett, Mark

    2011-06-15

    We present transit photometry of three exoplanets, TrES-4b, HAT-P-3b, and WASP-12b, allowing for refined estimates of the systems' parameters. TrES-4b and WASP-12b were confirmed to be 'bloated' planets, with radii of 1.706 {+-} 0.056R{sub Jup} and 1.736 {+-} 0.092R{sub Jup}, respectively. These planets are too large to be explained with standard models of gas giant planets. In contrast, HAT-P-3b has a radius of 0.827 {+-} 0.055R{sub Jup}, smaller than a pure hydrogen-helium planet and indicative of a highly metal-enriched composition. Analyses of the transit timings revealed no significant departures from strict periodicity. For TrES-4, our relatively recent observations allow for improvement in the orbital ephemerides, which is useful for planning future observations.

  10. Kepler-62: a five-planet system with planets of 1.4 and 1.6 Earth radii in the habitable zone.

    PubMed

    Borucki, William J; Agol, Eric; Fressin, Francois; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Rowe, Jason; Isaacson, Howard; Fischer, Debra; Batalha, Natalie; Lissauer, Jack J; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Fabrycky, Daniel; Désert, Jean-Michel; Bryson, Stephen T; Barclay, Thomas; Bastien, Fabienne; Boss, Alan; Brugamyer, Erik; Buchhave, Lars A; Burke, Chris; Caldwell, Douglas A; Carter, Josh; Charbonneau, David; Crepp, Justin R; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Christiansen, Jessie L; Ciardi, David; Cochran, William D; DeVore, Edna; Doyle, Laurance; Dupree, Andrea K; Endl, Michael; Everett, Mark E; Ford, Eric B; Fortney, Jonathan; Gautier, Thomas N; Geary, John C; Gould, Alan; Haas, Michael; Henze, Christopher; Howard, Andrew W; Howell, Steve B; Huber, Daniel; Jenkins, Jon M; Kjeldsen, Hans; Kolbl, Rea; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery; Latham, David W; Lee, Brian L; Lopez, Eric; Mullally, Fergal; Orosz, Jerome A; Prsa, Andrej; Quintana, Elisa V; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Sasselov, Dimitar; Seader, Shawn; Shporer, Avi; Steffen, Jason H; Still, Martin; Tenenbaum, Peter; Thompson, Susan E; Torres, Guillermo; Twicken, Joseph D; Welsh, William F; Winn, Joshua N

    2013-05-03

    We present the detection of five planets--Kepler-62b, c, d, e, and f--of size 1.31, 0.54, 1.95, 1.61 and 1.41 Earth radii (R⊕), orbiting a K2V star at periods of 5.7, 12.4, 18.2, 122.4, and 267.3 days, respectively. The outermost planets, Kepler-62e and -62f, are super-Earth-size (1.25 R⊕ < planet radius ≤ 2.0 R⊕) planets in the habitable zone of their host star, respectively receiving 1.2 ± 0.2 times and 0.41 ± 0.05 times the solar flux at Earth's orbit. Theoretical models of Kepler-62e and -62f for a stellar age of ~7 billion years suggest that both planets could be solid, either with a rocky composition or composed of mostly solid water in their bulk.

  11. Charged Galileon black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Babichev, Eugeny; Charmousis, Christos; Hassaine, Mokhtar E-mail: christos.charmousis@th.u-psud.fr

    2015-05-01

    We consider an Abelian gauge field coupled to a particular truncation of Horndeski theory. The Galileon field has translation symmetry and couples non minimally both to the metric and the gauge field. When the gauge-scalar coupling is zero the gauge field reduces to a standard Maxwell field. By taking into account the symmetries of the action, we construct charged black hole solutions. Allowing the scalar field to softly break symmetries of spacetime we construct black holes where the scalar field is regular on the black hole event horizon. Some of these solutions can be interpreted as the equivalent of Reissner-Nordstrom black holes of scalar tensor theories with a non trivial scalar field. A self tuning black hole solution found previously is extended to the presence of dyonic charge without affecting whatsoever the self tuning of a large positive cosmological constant. Finally, for a general shift invariant scalar tensor theory we demonstrate that the scalar field Ansatz and method we employ are mathematically compatible with the field equations. This opens up the possibility for novel searches of hairy black holes in a far more general setting of Horndeski theory.

  12. Charge disproportionation, everywhere!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, T.; Hiraki, K.; Moroto, S.; Tajima, N.; Takano, Y.; Kubo, Y.; Satsukawa, H.; Chiba, R.; Yamamoto, H. M.; Kato, R.; Naito, T.

    2005-12-01

    Charge disproportionation (CD) recently observed in many organic conductors is reviewed. CD is closely related to the charge ordering (CO) but is observed even when no long range CO is established. In a θ -phase BEDT-TTF salt, (BEDT-TTF){2}RbZn(SCN){4}, an extremely slow dynamics of CD has been observed above T_MI. A similar phenomenon is also observed in the Cs-analog, (BEDT-TTF){2}CsZn(SCN){4}. However, a spin-singlet ground state without CD is suggested in this salt at low temperatures. It is shown that α -(BETS){2}I{3} exhibits CD at low temperatures, as in α -(BET-TTF){2}I{3}. Recently, an abnormal line broadening has been observed in 13C-NMR of (TMTSF){2}FSO{3} under pressure as well as in 77Se-NMR of λ-(BETS){2}FeCl{4} in a high field. We expect that both are very likely caused by a large CD among the organic molecular sites. The current investigation is a part of a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Priority Areas of Molecular Conductors (No. 15073221) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan, and the “Japan-Korea Joint Research Project” from Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (03-01-8) and Korea Science and Engineering Foundation (F01-2003-000-20023-0).

  13. Charged pion production in $$\

    DOE PAGES

    Eberly, B.; et al.

    2015-11-23

    Charged pion production via charged-current νμ interactions on plastic scintillator (CH) is studied using the MINERvA detector exposed to the NuMI wideband neutrino beam at Fermilab. Events with hadronic invariant mass W < 1.4 GeV and W < 1.8 GeV are selected in separate analyses: the lower W cut isolates single pion production, which is expected to occur primarily through the Δ(1232) resonance, while results from the higher cut include the effects of higher resonances. Cross sections as functions of pion angle and kinetic energy are compared to predictions from theoretical calculations and generator-based models for neutrinos ranging in energymore » from 1.5–10 GeV. The data are best described by calculations which include significant contributions from pion intranuclear rescattering. As a result, these measurements constrain the primary interaction rate and the role of final state interactions in pion production, both of which need to be well understood by neutrino oscillation experiments.« less

  14. Charged pion production in $\

    SciTech Connect

    Eberly, B.; et al.

    2015-11-23

    Charged pion production via charged-current νμ interactions on plastic scintillator (CH) is studied using the MINERvA detector exposed to the NuMI wideband neutrino beam at Fermilab. Events with hadronic invariant mass W < 1.4 GeV and W < 1.8 GeV are selected in separate analyses: the lower W cut isolates single pion production, which is expected to occur primarily through the Δ(1232) resonance, while results from the higher cut include the effects of higher resonances. Cross sections as functions of pion angle and kinetic energy are compared to predictions from theoretical calculations and generator-based models for neutrinos ranging in energy from 1.5–10 GeV. The data are best described by calculations which include significant contributions from pion intranuclear rescattering. As a result, these measurements constrain the primary interaction rate and the role of final state interactions in pion production, both of which need to be well understood by neutrino oscillation experiments.

  15. Charged Dust Aggregate Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2015-11-01

    A proper understanding of the behavior of dust particle aggregates immersed in a complex plasma first requires a knowledge of the basic properties of the system. Among the most important of these are the net electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments on the dust aggregate as well as the manner in which the aggregate interacts with the local electrostatic fields. The formation of elongated, fractal-like aggregates levitating in the sheath electric field of a weakly ionized RF generated plasma discharge has recently been observed experimentally. The resulting data has shown that as aggregates approach one another, they can both accelerate and rotate. At equilibrium, aggregates are observed to levitate with regular spacing, rotating about their long axis aligned parallel to the sheath electric field. Since gas drag tends to slow any such rotation, energy must be constantly fed into the system in order to sustain it. A numerical model designed to analyze this motion provides both the electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments of the aggregate while including the forces due to thermophoresis, neutral gas drag, and the ion wakefield. This model will be used to investigate the ambient conditions leading to the observed interactions. This research is funded by NSF Grant 1414523.

  16. The SLUGGS Survey: stellar masses and effective radii of early-type galaxies from Spitzer Space Telescope 3.6 μm imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Duncan A.; Sinpetru, Luciana; Savorgnan, Giulia; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Usher, Christopher; Brodie, Jean

    2017-02-01

    Galaxy starlight at 3.6 μm is an excellent tracer of stellar mass. Here we use the latest 3.6 μm imaging from the Spitzer Space Telescope to measure the total stellar mass and effective radii in a homogeneous way for a sample of galaxies from the SAGES Legacy Unifying Globulars and GalaxieS (SLUGGS) survey. These galaxies are representative of nearby early-type galaxies in the stellar mass range of 10 < log M*/M⊙ < 11.7 and our methodology can be applied to other samples of early-type galaxies. We model each galaxy in 2D and estimate its total asymptotic magnitude from a 1D curve-of-growth. Magnitudes are converted into stellar masses using a 3.6 μm mass-to-light ratio from the latest stellar population models of Röck et al., assuming a Kroupa initial mass function. We apply a ratio based on each galaxy's mean mass-weighted stellar age within one effective radius (the mass-to-light ratio is insensitive to galaxy metallicity for the generally old stellar ages and high metallicities found in massive early-type galaxies). Our 3.6 μm stellar masses agree well with masses derived from 2.2 μm data. From the 1D surface brightness profile, we fit a single Sérsic law, excluding the very central regions. We measure the effective radius, Sérsic n parameter and effective surface brightness for each galaxy. We find that galaxy sizes derived from shallow optical imaging and the 2MASS survey tend to underestimate the true size of the largest, most massive galaxies in our sample. We adopt the 3.6 μm stellar masses and effective radii for the SLUGGS survey galaxies.

  17. THE STELLAR MASS STRUCTURE OF MASSIVE GALAXIES FROM z = 0 TO z = 2.5: SURFACE DENSITY PROFILES AND HALF-MASS RADII

    SciTech Connect

    Szomoru, Daniel; Franx, Marijn; Labbe, Ivo; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Trenti, Michele; Illingworth, Garth D.; Oesch, Pascal

    2013-02-15

    We present stellar mass surface density profiles of a mass-selected sample of 177 galaxies at 0.5 < z < 2.5, obtained using very deep Hubble Space Telescope optical and near-infrared data over the GOODS-South field, including recent CANDELS data. Accurate stellar mass surface density profiles have been measured for the first time for a complete sample of high-redshift galaxies more massive than 10{sup 10.7} M {sub Sun }. The key advantage of this study compared to previous work is that the surface brightness profiles are deconvolved for point-spread function smoothing, allowing accurate measurements of the structure of the galaxies. The surface brightness profiles account for contributions from complex galaxy structures such as rings and faint outer disks. Mass profiles are derived using radial rest-frame ug color profiles and a well-established empirical relation between these colors and the stellar mass-to-light ratio. We derive stellar half-mass radii from the mass profiles, and find that these are on average {approx}25% smaller than rest-frame g-band half-light radii. This average size difference of 25% is the same at all redshifts, and does not correlate with stellar mass, specific star formation rate, effective surface density, Sersic index, or galaxy size. Although on average the difference between half-mass size and half-light size is modest, for approximately 10% of massive galaxies this difference is more than a factor of two. These extreme galaxies are mostly extended, disk-like systems with large central bulges. These results are robust, but could be impacted if the central dust extinction becomes high. ALMA observations can be used to explore this possibility. These results provide added support for galaxy growth scenarios wherein massive galaxies at these epochs grow by accretion onto their outer regions.

  18. Ion-induced nucleation of dibutyl phthalate vapors on spherical and nonspherical singly and multiply charged polyethylene glycol ions.

    PubMed

    Nasibulin, Albert G; de la Mora, Juan Fernandez; Kauppinen, Esko I

    2008-02-14

    Dibutyl phthalate vapor nucleation induced by positive polyethylene glycol (PEG) ions with controlled sizes and charges was experimentally studied. The ions were produced by electrospray ionization, classified in a high-resolution differential mobility analyzer, and studied in a nano condensation nucleus counter of the mixing type. Ionic radii of PEG varied from 0.52 to 1.56 nm, including from singly to quadruply charged ions. Some of these ions are fully stretched chains, other are spherical, and others have intermediate forms, all of them having been previously characterized by mobility and mass spectrometry studies. Activation of PEG1080(+2) requires a supersaturation almost as high as that required for small singly charged ions and higher than for PEG1080(+). This anomaly is explained by the Coulombic stretching of the ion into a long chain, where the two charged centers appear to be relatively decoupled from each other. The critical supersaturation for singly charged spherical ions falls below Thomson's (capillary) theory and even below the already low values seen previously for tetraheptyl ammonium bromide clusters. Spherical PEG4120(+2) falls close to the Thomson curve. The trends observed for slightly nonspherical PEG4120(+3) and highly nonspherical (but not quite linear) PEG4120(+4) are intermediate between those of multiply charged spheres and small singly charged ions.

  19. Battery charging control methods, electric vehicle charging methods, battery charging apparatuses and rechargeable battery systems

    DOEpatents

    Tuffner, Francis K [Richland, WA; Kintner-Meyer, Michael C. W. [Richland, WA; Hammerstrom, Donald J [West Richland, WA; Pratt, Richard M [Richland, WA

    2012-05-22

    Battery charging control methods, electric vehicle charging methods, battery charging apparatuses and rechargeable battery systems. According to one aspect, a battery charging control method includes accessing information regarding a presence of at least one of a surplus and a deficiency of electrical energy upon an electrical power distribution system at a plurality of different moments in time, and using the information, controlling an adjustment of an amount of the electrical energy provided from the electrical power distribution system to a rechargeable battery to charge the rechargeable battery.

  20. Relativistic model of anisotropic charged fluid sphere in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, Neeraj; Pradhan, N.; Bansal, Rajeev K.

    2016-01-01

    In this present paper, we present a class of static, spherically symmetric charged anisotropic fluid models of super dense stars in isotropic coordinates by considering a particular type of metric potential, a specific choice of electric field intensity E and pressure anisotropy factor Δ which involve parameters K (charge) and α (anisotropy) respectively. The solutions so obtained are utilized to construct the models for super-dense stars like neutron stars and strange quark stars. Our solutions are well behaved within the following ranges of different constant parameters. In the absence of pressure anisotropy and charge present model reduces to the isotropic model Pant et al. (Astrophys. Space Sci. 330:353-359, 2010). Our solution is well behaved in all respects for all values of X lying in the range 0< X ≤ 0.18, α lying in the range 0 ≤ α ≤6.6, K lying in the range 0< K ≤ 6.6 and Schwarzschild compactness parameter "u" lying in the range 0< u ≤ 0.38. Since our solution is well behaved for a wide ranges of the parameters, we can model many different types of ultra-cold compact stars like quark stars and neutron stars. We have shown that corresponding to X=0.088, α=0.6 and K=4.3 for which u=0.2054 and by assuming surface density ρb = 4.6888 × 10^{14} g/cm3 the mass and radius are found to be 1.51 M_{\\varTheta} and 10.90 km respectively. Assuming surface density ρb = 2 × 10^{14} g/cm3 the mass and radius for a neutron star candidate are found to be 2.313 M_{\\varTheta} and 16.690 km respectively. Hence we obtain masses and radii that fall in the range of what is generally expected for quark stars and neutron stars.

  1. Langevin equation versus kinetic equation: Subdiffusive behavior of charged particles in a stochastic magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Balescu, R.; Wang, H. ); Misguich, J.H. )

    1994-12-01

    The running diffusion coefficient [ital D]([ital t]) is evaluated for a system of charged particles undergoing the effect of a fluctuating magnetic field and of their mutual collisions. The latter coefficient can be expressed either in terms of the mean square displacement (MSD) of a test particle, or in terms of a correlation between a fluctuating distribution function and the magnetic field fluctuation. In the first case a stochastic differential equation of Langevin type for the position of a test particle must be solved; the second problem requires the determination of the distribution function from a kinetic equation. Using suitable simplifications, both problems are amenable to exact analytic solution. The conclusion is that the equivalence of the two approaches is by no means automatically guaranteed. A new type of object, the hybrid kinetic equation'' is constructed: it automatically ensures the equivalence with the Langevin results. The same conclusion holds for the generalized Fokker--Planck equation. The (Bhatnagar--Gross--Krook) (BGK) model for the collisions yields a completely wrong result. A linear approximation to the hybrid kinetic equation yields an inexact behavior, but represents an acceptable approximation in the strongly collisional limit.

  2. Adsorption of silica colloids onto like-charged silica surfaces of different roughness

    DOE PAGES

    Dylla-Spears, R.; Wong, L.; Shen, N.; ...

    2017-01-17

    Particle adsorption was explored in a model optical polishing system, consisting of silica colloids and like-charged silica surfaces. The adsorption was monitored in situ under various suspension conditions, in the absence of surfactants or organic modifiers, using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). Changes in surface coverage with particle concentration, particle size, pH, ionic strength and ionic composition were quantified by QCM-D and further characterized ex situ by atomic force microscopy (AFM). A Monte Carlo model was used to describe the kinetics of particle deposition and provide insights on scaling with particle concentration. Transitions from near-zero adsorption tomore » measurable adsorption were compared with equilibrium predictions made using the Deraguin-Verwey-Landau-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. In addition, the impact of silica surface roughness on the propensity for particle adsorption was studied on various spatial scale lengths by intentionally roughening the QCM sensor surface using polishing methods. It was found that a change in silica surface roughness at the AFM scale from 1.3 nm root-mean-square (rms) to 2.7 nm rms resulted in an increase in silica particle adsorption of 3-fold for 50-nm diameter particles and 1.3-fold for 100-nm diameter particles—far exceeding adsorption observed by altering suspension conditions alone, potentially because roughness at the proper scale reduces the total separation distance between particle and surface.« less

  3. Large-eddy simulation of charged particle flows to model sandstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mustafa; Cheng, Wan; Samtaney, Ravi

    2016-11-01

    Intense electric fields and lightning have been observed in sandstorms. It is proposed to investigate the physical mechanisms essential for production and sustenance of large-scale electric fields in sandstorms. Our central hypothesis is that the turbulent transport of charged sand particles is a necessary condition to attain sustained large-scale electric fields in sandstorms. Our investigation relies on simulating turbulent two-phase (air and suspended sand particles) flows in which the flow of air is governed by the filtered Navier-Stokes equations with a subgrid-scale model in a Large-Eddy-Simulation setting, while dust particles are modeled using the Eulerian approach using a version of the Direct Quadrature Method of Moments. For the fluid phase, the LES of incompressible turbulent boundary layer employs stretched spiral vortex subgrid-scale model and a virtual wall model similar to the work of Cheng, Pullin & Samtaney. We will quantify the effects of different sand particle distributions, and turbulent intensities on the root-mean-square of the generated electric fields. Supported by KAUST OCRF under Award Number URF/1/1704-01-01. The supercomputer Shaheen at KAUST is used for all simulations.

  4. A Smart Filtering Method for Space-Charge Dominated Beam Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartz, Sean; Hess, Mark

    2007-11-01

    We present a ``smart'' filtering method that removes the small-wavelength noise in beam simulation programs which can occur due to numerical errors. This method utilizes Fourier transforms and a low-pass filtering scheme to remove noise from space-charge generated electric fields. In particular, for a uniform-density (beer can) beam distribution, we find the necessary amount of Fourier k-space for removing field errors while maintaining the electric field's maximum peak value and its full width at half maximum. The term ``smart'' refers to the method's applicability for general beam distributions which have equivalent root-mean-square sizes as the uniform-density case. We demonstrate the ability of the algorithm to filter the longitudinal and radial components of the electric field in both one dimension and two dimensions. This method has the potential to reduce computational run-time while maintaining a high level of accuracy, i.e. less than two percent field error.

  5. Charge Storage, Conductivity and Charge Profiles of Insulators as Related to Spacecraft Charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennison, J. R.; Swaminathan, Prasanna; Frederickson, A. R.

    2004-01-01

    Dissipation of charges built up near the surface of insulators due to space environment interaction is central to understanding spacecraft charging. Conductivity of insulating materials is key to determine how accumulated charge will distribute across the spacecraft and how rapidly charge imbalance will dissipate. To understand these processes requires knowledge of how charge is deposited within the insulator, the mechanisms for charge trapping and charge transport within the insulator, and how the profile of trapped charge affects the transport and emission of charges from insulators. One must consider generation of mobile electrons and holes, their trapping, thermal de-trapping, mobility and recombination. Conductivity is more appropriately measured for spacecraft charging applications as the "decay" of charge deposited on the surface of an insulator, rather than by flow of current across two electrodes around the sample. We have found that conductivity determined from charge storage decay methods is 102 to 104 smaller than values obtained from classical ASTM and IEC methods for a variety of thin film insulating samples. For typical spacecraft charging conditions, classical conductivity predicts decay times on the order of minutes to hours (less than typical orbit periods); however, the higher charge storage conductivities predict decay times on the order of weeks to months leading to accumulation of charge with subsequent orbits. We found experimental evidence that penetration profiles of radiation and light are exceedingly important, and that internal electric fields due to charge profiles and high-field conduction by trapped electrons must be considered for space applications. We have also studied whether the decay constants depend on incident voltage and flux or on internal charge distributions and electric fields; light-activated discharge of surface charge to distinguish among differing charge trapping centers; and radiation-induced conductivity. Our

  6. Understanding the Linkage between Charging Network Coverage and Charging Opportunity

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Changzheng; Lin, Zhenhong; Kontou, Eleftheria; Wu, Xing

    2016-01-01

    Using GPS-based travel survey data, this paper estimates the relationship between public charging network coverage and charging opportunity, defined as the probability of being able to access public charging for a driver at one of his/her stops or at one travel day. Understanding this relationship is of important interests to the electric vehicle industry and government in determining appropriate charging infrastructure deployment level and estimating the impact of public charging on market adoption of electric vehicles. The analysis finds that drivers trip destinations concentrate on a few popular places. If top 1% of most popular places are installed with public chargers, on average, drivers will be able to access public charging at 20% of all their stops and 1/3 of their travel days; If 20% of most popular places are installed with public chargers, drivers will be able to access public charging at 89% of all their stops and 94% of their travel days. These findings are encouraging, implying charging network can be efficiently designed by concentrating at a few popular places while still providing a high level of charging opportunity.

  7. XMM-Newton Observations of Solar Wind Charge Exchange Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, S. L.; Collier, M. R.; Kuntz, K. D.

    2004-01-01

    We present an XMM-Newton spectrum of diffuse X-ray emission from within the solar system. The spectrum is dominated by O VII and O VIII lines at 0.57 keV and 0.65 keV, O VIII (and possibly Fe XVII) lines at approximately 0.8 keV, Ne IX lines at approximately 0.92 keV, and Mg XI lines at approximately 1.35 keV. This spectrum is consistent with what is expected from charge exchange emission between the highly ionized solar wind and either interstellar neutrals in the heliosphere or material from Earth's exosphere. The emission is clearly seen as a low-energy ( E less than 1.5 keV) spectral enhancement in one of a series of observations of the Hubble Deep Field North. The X-ray enhancement is concurrent with an enhancement in the solar wind measured by the ACE satellite. The solar wind enhancement reaches a flux level an order of magnitude more intense than typical fluxes at 1 AU, and has ion ratios with significantly enhanced higher ionization states. Whereas observations of the solar wind plasma made at a single point reflect only local conditions which may only be representative of solar wind properties with spatial scales ranging from less than half of an Earth radii (approximately 10 s) to 100 Earth radii, X-ray observations of solar wind charge exchange are remote sensing measurements which may provide observations which are significantly more global in character. Besides being of interest in its own right for studies of the solar system, this emission can have significant consequences for observations of more cosmological objects. It can provide emission lines at zero redshift which are of particular interest (e.g., O VII and O VIII) in studies of diffuse thermal emission, and which can therefore act as contamination in objects which cover the entire detector field of view. We propose the use of solar wind monitoring data, such as from the ACE and Wind spacecraft, as a diagnostic to screen for such possibilities.

  8. Comparison of a new rapid convergent adaptive control algorithm to least mean square on an active noise control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshigoe, Shozo; Gordon, Alan; Teagle, Allen; Tsay, Ching-Hsu

    1995-04-01

    In this paper, an efficient rapid convergent control algorithm will be developed and will be compared with other adaptive control algorithms using an experimental active noise control system. Other control algorithms are Widrow's finite impulse response adaptive control algorithm, and a modified Godard's algorithm. Comparisons of the random noise attenuation capability, transient and convergence performance, and computational requirements of each algorithm will be made as the order of the controller and relevant convergence parameters are varied. The system used for these experiments is a test bed of noise suppression technology for expendable launch vehicles. It consists of a flexible plate backed by a rigid cavity. Piezoelectric actuators are mounted on the plate and polyvinylidene fluoride is used both for microphones and pressure sensors within the cavity. The plate is bombarded with an amplified random noise signal, and the control system is used to suppress the noise inside the cavity generated by the outside sound source.

  9. Exploiting root-mean-square time-frequency structure for multiple-image optical compression and encryption.

    PubMed

    Alfalou, A; Brosseau, C

    2010-06-01

    We report on an algorithm to compress and encrypt simultaneously multiple images (target images). This method, which is based upon a specific spectral multiplexing (fusion without overlapping) of the multiple images, aims to achieve a single encrypted image, at the output plane of our system, that contains all information needed to reconstruct the target images. For that purpose, we divide the Fourier plane of the image to transmit into two types of area, i.e., specific and common areas to each target image. A segmentation criterion taking into account the rms duration of each target image spectrum is proposed. This approach, which consists of merging the input target images together (in the Fourier plane) allows us to reduce the information to be stored and/or transmitted (compression) and induce noise on the output image (encryption). To achieve a good encryption level, a first key image (containing biometric information and providing the intellectual property of the target images) is used. A second encryption key is inserted in the Fourier plane to ensure a relevant phase distribution of the different merged spectra. We also discuss how the encoding information can be optimized by minimizing the number of bits required to encode each pixel.

  10. Fractional lattice charge transport

    PubMed Central

    Flach, Sergej; Khomeriki, Ramaz

    2017-01-01

    We consider the dynamics of noninteracting quantum particles on a square lattice in the presence of a magnetic flux α and a dc electric field E oriented along the lattice diagonal. In general, the adiabatic dynamics will be characterized by Bloch oscillations in the electrical field direction and dispersive ballistic transport in the perpendicular direction. For rational values of α and a corresponding discrete set of values of E(α) vanishing gaps in the spectrum induce a fractionalization of the charge in the perpendicular direction - while left movers are still performing dispersive ballistic transport, the complementary fraction of right movers is propagating in a dispersionless relativistic manner in the opposite direction. Generalizations and the possible probing of the effect with atomic Bose-Einstein condensates and photonic networks are discussed. Zak phase of respective band associated with gap closing regime has been computed and it is found converging to π/2 value. PMID:28102302

  11. Battery charging stations

    SciTech Connect

    Bergey, M.

    1997-12-01

    This paper discusses the concept of battery charging stations (BCSs), designed to service rural owners of battery power sources. Many such power sources now are transported to urban areas for recharging. A BCS provides the opportunity to locate these facilities closer to the user, is often powered by renewable sources, or hybrid systems, takes advantage of economies of scale, and has the potential to provide lower cost of service, better service, and better cost recovery than other rural electrification programs. Typical systems discussed can service 200 to 1200 people, and consist of stations powered by photovoltaics, wind/PV, wind/diesel, or diesel only. Examples of installed systems are presented, followed by cost figures, economic analysis, and typical system design and performance numbers.

  12. Explosive bulk charge

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Jacob Lee

    2015-04-21

    An explosive bulk charge, including: a first contact surface configured to be selectively disposed substantially adjacent to a structure or material; a second end surface configured to selectively receive a detonator; and a curvilinear side surface joining the first contact surface and the second end surface. The first contact surface, the second end surface, and the curvilinear side surface form a bi-truncated hemispherical structure. The first contact surface, the second end surface, and the curvilinear side surface are formed from an explosive material. Optionally, the first contact surface and the second end surface each have a substantially circular shape. Optionally, the first contact surface and the second end surface consist of planar structures that are aligned substantially parallel or slightly tilted with respect to one another. The curvilinear side surface has one of a smooth curved geometry, an elliptical geometry, and a parabolic geometry.

  13. Solar charged agriculture

    SciTech Connect

    Heckeroth, S.

    1999-07-01

    It is becoming obvious that the developed world's reliance on petroleum for transportation and agricultural production is not sustainable. Industrial agriculture currently uses an average of 200 gallons of diesel per acre (1,900 liters per hectare) per year. Sustainability requires a transition to the use of non-polluting renewable energy sources, as well as small scale farming techniques. This paper outlines the tremendous potential electric tractors offer in a variety of applications all over the world, including greenhouses and organic farms, toxic cleanup, bomb disposal and mine sweeping, as well as use as a mobile power source in remote areas and in emergency applications. An electric tractor can be charged from photovoltaic panels, either on the tractor in the form of a shade canopy or mounted on the roof of a building.

  14. High dynamic range charge measurements

    SciTech Connect

    De Geronimo, Gianluigi

    2012-09-04

    A charge amplifier for use in radiation sensing includes an amplifier, at least one switch, and at least one capacitor. The switch selectively couples the input of the switch to one of at least two voltages. The capacitor is electrically coupled in series between the input of the amplifier and the input of the switch. The capacitor is electrically coupled to the input of the amplifier without a switch coupled therebetween. A method of measuring charge in radiation sensing includes selectively diverting charge from an input of an amplifier to an input of at least one capacitor by selectively coupling an output of the at least one capacitor to one of at least two voltages. The input of the at least one capacitor is operatively coupled to the input of the amplifier without a switch coupled therebetween. The method also includes calculating a total charge based on a sum of the amplified charge and the diverted charge.

  15. 12 CFR 226.4 - Finance charge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Finance charge. 226.4 Section 226.4 Banks and... LENDING (REGULATION Z) General § 226.4 Finance charge. (a) Definition. The finance charge is the cost of...) Charges by third parties. The finance charge includes fees and amounts charged by someone other than...

  16. 12 CFR 226.4 - Finance charge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Finance charge. 226.4 Section 226.4 Banks and...) TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) General § 226.4 Finance charge. (a) Definition. The finance charge is... transaction. (1) Charges by third parties. The finance charge includes fees and amounts charged by...

  17. 12 CFR 226.4 - Finance charge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Finance charge. 226.4 Section 226.4 Banks and...) TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) General § 226.4 Finance charge. (a) Definition. The finance charge is... transaction. (1) Charges by third parties. The finance charge includes fees and amounts charged by...

  18. Charge contribution to patch-charged microparticle adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallabh, Chaitanya Krishna Prasad; Vahdat, Armin Saeedi; Cetinkaya, Cetin

    2014-11-01

    Microparticle adhesion influenced by electrostatic charge has been a significant research interest for over past three decades or so in a wide spectrum of areas of interest from manufacturing (electrophotography, powder technology, metallurgy, and semi-conductor manufacturing) to natural phenomena (desert sandstorms and northern lights (auroras)). However, over the years, as a result of the strong discrepancies between the experimental adhesion measurements data and theoretical predictions, some key issues regarding the contributors of adhesion forces in charged microparticles and the nature of surface charge distribution still remain unresolved. In the current work, a non-contact ultrasonic approach is presented and employed for understanding the nature of charge distribution on a single microparticle and determining the effect of electrostatic charge on its adhesion in a non-invasive manner. From the vibrational spectra of the charged particle response to the ultrasonic substrate oscillations under various electrostatic loading conditions, three distinct shifting patterns of vibrational (rocking) resonance frequencies are observed for each level of applied substrate surface voltage, implying an un-symmetric force field on the particle, thus depicting non-uniform non-symmetric surface charge distribution on its surface. Also, a simple mathematical model was presented and employed for predicting the equivalent bulk charge on a single microparticle (toner) from resonance frequency shifts. In summary, it is found that the charge levels reported here are consistent with the previously published data, and it is demonstrated that, in a non-invasive manner, non-uniform charge distribution on a single microparticle can be observed and its total charge can be predicted.

  19. Scientific charge-coupled devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janesick, James R.; Elliott, Tom; Collins, Stewart; Blouke, Morley M.; Freeman, Jack

    1987-01-01

    The charge-coupled device dominates an ever-increasing variety of scientific imaging and spectroscopy applications. Recent experience indicates, however, that the full potential of CCD performance lies well beyond that realized in devices currently available.Test data suggest that major improvements are feasible in spectral response, charge collection, charge transfer, and readout noise. These properties, their measurement in existing CCDs, and their potential for future improvement are discussed in this paper.

  20. Literature Review of Spacecraft Charging,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-20

    the charged dielectric surface ; what fraction of the satellite surface will discharge in one event; the nature of the discharge ( flashover ...Punchthrough Is the process by which a discharge is initiated from a layer of charge deposited near the surface of a thin dielectric, through the bulk of...punchthrough discharge. Flashover is defined here as the release of charge from the surface of a dielectric to a nearby conductor, which is usually

  1. Photoelectric Charging of Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sickafoose, A.; Colwell, J.; Horanyi, M.; Robertson, S.; Walch, B.

    1999-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have been performed on the photoelectric charging of dust particles which are either isolated or adjacent to a surface that is also a photoemitter. We find that zinc dust charges to a positive potential of a few volts when isolated in vacuum and that it charges to a negative potential of a few volts when passed by a photoemitting surface. The illumination is an arc lamp emitting wavelengths longer than 200 nm and the emitting surface is a zirconium foil.

  2. Criminal Charges in Corporate Scandals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Criminal Charges in Corporate Scandals Summary Since the collapse of Enron Corp . in late 2001, there has been a series of scandals involving major U .S...to the series of corporate scandals that began with Enron by passing the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 . That law created a new oversight body for...List of Tables Table 1. List of Charges, Indictments, and Guilty Pleas in Corporate Scandals Since Enron 2 Criminal Charges in Corporate Scandals

  3. Butterflies with rotation and charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Alan P.; Ross, Simon F.

    2016-11-01

    We explore the butterfly effect for black holes with rotation or charge. We perturb rotating BTZ and charged black holes in 2 + 1 dimensions by adding a small perturbation on one asymptotic region, described by a shock wave in the spacetime, and explore the effect of this shock wave on the length of geodesics through the wormhole and hence on correlation functions. We find the effect of the perturbation grows exponentially at a rate controlled by the temperature; dependence on the angular momentum or charge does not appear explicitly. We comment on issues affecting the extension to higher-dimensional charged black holes.

  4. Charge transferred in brush discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talarek, M.; Kacprzyk, R.

    2015-10-01

    Electrostatic discharges from surfaces of plastic materials can be a source of ignition, when appear in explosive atmospheres. Incendivity of electrostatic discharges can be estimated using the transferred charge test. In the case of brush discharges not all the energy stored at the tested sample is released and the effective surface charge density (or surface potential) crater is observed after the discharge. Simplified model, enabling calculation of a charge transferred during electrostatic brush discharge, was presented. Comparison of the results obtained from the simplified model and from direct measurements of transferred charge are presented in the paper.

  5. Low-charge-state linac

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, K.W.; Kim, J.W.

    1995-08-01

    A design is being developed for a low-charge-state linac suitable for injecting ATLAS with a low-charge-state, radioactive beam. Initial work indicates that the existing ATLAS interdigital superconducting accelerating structures, together with the superconducting quadrupole transverse focussing element discussed above, provides a basis for a high-performance low-charge-state linac. The initial 2 or 3 MV of such a linac could be based on a normally-conducting, low-frequency RFQ, possibly combined with 24-MHz superconducting interdigital structures. Beam dynamics studies of the whole low-charge-state post-accelerator section were carried out in early FY 1995.

  6. Experiments on Dust Grain Charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. N.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; Tankosic, D.; LeClair, A.; West, E. A.

    2004-01-01

    Dust particles in various astrophysical environments are charged by a variety of mechanisms generally involving collisional processes with other charged particles and photoelectric emission with UV radiation from nearby sources. The sign and the magnitude of the particle charge are determined by the competition between the charging processes by UV radiation and collisions with charged particles. Knowledge of the particle charges and equilibrium potentials is important for understanding of a number of physical processes. The charge of a dust grain is thus a fundamental parameter that influences the physics of dusty plasmas, processes in the interplanetary medium and interstellar medium, interstellar dust clouds, planetary rings, cometary and outer atmospheres of planets etc. In this paper we present some results of experiments on charging of dust grains carried out on a laboratory facility capable levitating micron size dust grains in an electrodynamic balance in simulated space environments. The charging/discharging experiments were carried out by exposing the dust grains to energetic electron beams and UV radiation. Photoelectric efficiencies and yields of micron size dust grains of SiO2, and lunar simulates obtained from NASA-JSC will be presented.

  7. Charge exchange molecular ion source

    DOEpatents

    Vella, Michael C.

    2003-06-03

    Ions, particularly molecular ions with multiple dopant nucleons per ion, are produced by charge exchange. An ion source contains a minimum of two regions separated by a physical barrier and utilizes charge exchange to enhance production of a desired ion species. The essential elements are a plasma chamber for production of ions of a first species, a physical separator, and a charge transfer chamber where ions of the first species from the plasma chamber undergo charge exchange or transfer with the reactant atom or molecules to produce ions of a second species. Molecular ions may be produced which are useful for ion implantation.

  8. Determining the best forecasting method to estimate unitary charges price indexes of PFI data in central region Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad Kamaruddin, Saadi Bin; Md Ghani, Nor Azura; Mohamed Ramli, Norazan

    2013-04-01

    The concept of Private Financial Initiative (PFI) has been implemented by many developed countries as an innovative way for the governments to improve future public service delivery and infrastructure procurement. However, the idea is just about to germinate in Malaysia and its success is still vague. The major phase that needs to be given main attention in this agenda is value for money whereby optimum efficiency and effectiveness of each expense is attained. Therefore, at the early stage of this study, estimating unitary charges or materials price indexes in each region in Malaysia was the key objective. This particular study aims to discover the best forecasting method to estimate unitary charges price indexes in construction industry by different regions in the central region of Peninsular Malaysia (Selangor, Federal Territory of Kuala Lumpur, Negeri Sembilan, and Melaka). The unitary charges indexes data used were from year 2002 to 2011 monthly data of different states in the central region Peninsular Malaysia, comprising price indexes of aggregate, sand, steel reinforcement, ready mix concrete, bricks and partition, roof material, floor and wall finishes, ceiling, plumbing materials, sanitary fittings, paint, glass, steel and metal sections, timber and plywood. At the end of the study, it was found that Backpropagation Neural Network with linear transfer function produced the most accurate and reliable results for estimating unitary charges price indexes in every states in central region Peninsular Malaysia based on the Root Mean Squared Errors, where the values for both estimation and evaluation sets were approximately zero and highly significant at p < 0.01. Therefore, artificial neural network is sufficient to forecast construction materials price indexes in Malaysia. The estimated price indexes of construction materials will contribute significantly to the value for money of PFI as well as towards Malaysian economical growth.

  9. Grain charging in protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilgner, M.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Recent work identified a growth barrier for dust coagulation that originates in the electric repulsion between colliding particles. Depending on its charge state, dust material may have the potential to control key processes towards planet formation such as magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and grain growth, which are coupled in a two-way process. Aims: We quantify the grain charging at different stages of disc evolution and differentiate between two very extreme cases: compact spherical grains and aggregates with fractal dimension Df = 2. Methods: Applying a simple chemical network that accounts for collisional charging of grains, we provide a semi-analytical solution. This allowed us to calculate the equilibrium population of grain charges and the ionisation fraction efficiently. The grain charging was evaluated for different dynamical environments ranging from static to non-stationary disc configurations. Results: The results show that the adsorption/desorption of neutral gas-phase heavy metals, such as magnesium, effects the charging state of grains. The greater the difference between the thermal velocities of the metal and the dominant molecular ion, the greater the change in the mean grain charge. Agglomerates have more negative excess charge on average than compact spherical particles of the same mass. The rise in the mean grain charge is proportional to N1/6 in the ion-dust limit. We find that grain charging in a non-stationary disc environment is expected to lead to similar results. Conclusions: The results indicate that the dust growth and settling in regions where the dust growth is limited by the so-called "electro-static barrier" do not prevent the dust material from remaining the dominant charge carrier.

  10. Insight into the structure and physics of M dwarf stars through determination of the rotation, metallicities, and radii of the nearby population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, Elisabeth R.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of M dwarfs, their fundamental properties--their sizes, compositions, and ages--are not well-constrained. Empirical determination of these properties is important for gaining insight into their stellar structure, magnetic field generation, and angular momentum evolution. Knowledge of the stellar parameters is also key to characterizing planetary systems. I used observations to empirically constrain the properties of nearby, mid-to-late M dwarfs targeted by the MEarth transiting planet survey. I obtained low-resolution (R=2000) NIR spectra of 450 M dwarfs using SpeX on IRTF. I measured their absolute radial velocities with an accuracy of 4 km/s by exploiting telluric lines to establish an absolute wavelength calibration, and developed techniques to estimate M dwarf metallicities from K-band spectral line equivalent widths (EWs) or 2MASS colors to 0.15 dex. Using stars with interferometric radii, I showed that H-band EWs can be used to infer K and M dwarf temperatures to 69K, and radii to 0.027Rsun. I applied these relations to planet-hosting stars from Kepler, showing that the typical planet is 15% larger than is inferred if adopting other stellar parameters. Using photometry from the MEarth-North Observatory, I measured rotation periods from 0.1 to 150 days for 350 M dwarfs. There is a prevalence of stable spot patterns, and no correlation between period and amplitude for fully-convective stars. Using galactic kinematics as a proxy for age, I demonstrated a smooth age-rotation relation. I found that rapid rotators (P<10 days) are <2 Gyr, and that the slowest are on average 5+-3 Gyr old. I will discuss the extension of this work to the southern hemisphere, which utilizes FIRE on Magellan and the MEarth-South Observatory. MEarth acknowledges funding from the NSF, the David and Lucile Packard Foundation and the John Templeton Foundation. ERN was supported by the NSF GRFP. This work includes observations obtained at the Infrared Telescope

  11. Charge coupled devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, J. W.; Hornbeck, L. J.; Stubbs, D. P.

    1977-01-01

    The results are presented of a program to design, fabricate, and test CCD arrays suitable for operation in an electron-bombarded mode. These intensified charge coupled devices have potential application to astronomy as photon-counting arrays. The objectives of this program were to deliver arrays of 250 lines of 400 pixels each and some associated electronics. Some arrays were delivered on tube-compatible headers and some were delivered after incorporation in vacuum tubes. Delivery of these devices required considerable improvements to be made in the processing associated with intensified operation. These improvements resulted in a high yield in the thinning process, reproducible results in the accumulation process, elimination of a dark current source in the accumulation process, solution of a number of header related problems, and the identification of a remaining major source of dark current. Two systematic failure modes were identified and protective measures established. The effects of tube processing on the arrays in the delivered ICCDs were determined and are reported along with the characterization data on the arrays.

  12. Estimation of droplet charge forming out of an electrified ligament in the presence of a uniform electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, H.; Castle, G. S. P.; Adamiak, K.; Fan, H. T.; Simmer, J.

    2015-10-01

    The charge on a liquid droplet is a critical parameter that needs to be determined to accurately predict the behaviour of the droplet in many electrostatic applications, for example, electrostatic painting and ink-jet printing. The charge depends on many factors, such as the liquid conductivity, droplet and ligament radii, ligament length, droplet shape, electric field intensity, space charge, the presence of adjacent ligaments and previously formed droplets. In this paper, a 2D axisymmetric model is presented which can be used to predict the electric charge on a conductive spherical droplet ejected from a single ligament directly supplied with high voltage. It was found that the droplet charging levels for the case of isolated electrified ligaments are as much as 60 times higher than that in the case of ligaments connected to a planar high voltage electrode. It is suggested that practical atomization systems lie somewhere between these two extremes and that a better model was achieved by developing a 3D approximation of a linear array of ligaments connected to an electrode having variable width. The effect on droplet charge and its radius was estimated for several cases of different boundary conditions.

  13. Dust Charge in Cryogenic Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, J.; Kojima, C.; Sekine, W.; Ishihara, O.

    2008-09-07

    Dust charges in a complex helium gas plasma, surrounded by cryogenic liquid, are studied experimentally. The charge is determined by frequency and equilibrium position of damped dust oscillation proposed by Tomme et al.(2000) and is found to decrease with ion temperature of the complex plasma.

  14. Battery-Charge-State Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vivian, H. C.

    1985-01-01

    Charge-state model for lead/acid batteries proposed as part of effort to make equivalent of fuel gage for battery-powered vehicles. Models based on equations that approximate observable characteristics of battery electrochemistry. Uses linear equations, easier to simulate on computer, and gives smooth transitions between charge, discharge, and recuperation.

  15. Charge transport in organic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Bässler, Heinz; Köhler, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Modern optoelectronic devices, such as light-emitting diodes, field-effect transistors and organic solar cells require well controlled motion of charges for their efficient operation. The understanding of the processes that determine charge transport is therefore of paramount importance for designing materials with improved structure-property relationships. Before discussing different regimes of charge transport in organic semiconductors, we present a brief introduction into the conceptual framework in which we interpret the relevant photophysical processes. That is, we compare a molecular picture of electronic excitations against the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger semiconductor band model. After a brief description of experimental techniques needed to measure charge mobilities, we then elaborate on the parameters controlling charge transport in technologically relevant materials. Thus, we consider the influences of electronic coupling between molecular units, disorder, polaronic effects and space charge. A particular focus is given to the recent progress made in understanding charge transport on short time scales and short length scales. The mechanism for charge injection is briefly addressed towards the end of this chapter.

  16. MODELING PARTICULATE CHARGING IN ESPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In electrostatic precipitators there is a strong interaction between the particulate space charge and the operating voltage and current of an electrical section. Calculating either the space charge or the operating point when the other is fixed is not difficult, but calculating b...

  17. Static Gas-Charging Plug

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Indoe, William

    2012-01-01

    A gas-charging plug can be easily analyzed for random vibration. The design features two steeped O-rings in a radial configuration at two different diameters, with a 0.050-in. (.1.3-mm) diameter through-hole between the two O-rings. In the charging state, the top O-ring is engaged and sealing. The bottom O-ring outer diameter is not squeezed, and allows air to flow by it into the tank. The inner diameter is stretched to plug the gland diameter, and is restrained by the O-ring groove. The charging port bushing provides mechanical stop to restrain the plug during gas charge removal. It also prevents the plug from becoming a projectile when removing gas charge from the accumulator. The plug can easily be verified after installation to ensure leakage requirements are met.

  18. EBIS charge breeder for CARIBU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrashev, S.; Barcikowski, A.; Dickerson, C.; Fischer, R.; Ostroumov, P. N.; Vondrasek, R.; Pikin, A.

    2014-02-01

    A high-efficiency charge breeder based on an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) is being developed by the ANL Physics Division to increase the intensity and improve the purity of accelerated radioactive ion beams. A wide variety of low-energy neutron-rich ion beams are produced by the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) for the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS). These beams will be charge-bred by an EBIS charge breeder to a charge-to-mass ratio (q/A) ≥ 1/7 and accelerated by ATLAS to energies of about 10 MeV/u. The assembly of the CARIBU EBIS charge breeder except the injection/extraction beam lines has been completed. This summer we started electron beam commissioning of the EBIS. The first results on electron beam extraction, transport from the electron gun to a high power electron collector are presented and discussed.

  19. State-of-charge coulometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlette, J. J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A coulometer for accurately measuring the state-of-charge of an open-cell battery utilizing an aqueous electrolyte, includes a current meter for measuring the battery/discharge current and a flow meter for measuring the rate at which the battery produces gas during charge and discharge. Coupled to the flow meter is gas analyzer which measures the oxygen fraction of the battery gas. The outputs of the current meter, flow meter, and gas analyzer are coupled to a programmed microcomputer which includes a CPU and program and data memories. The microcomputer calculates that fraction of charge and discharge current consumed in the generation of gas so that the actual state-of-charge can be determined. The state-of-charge is then shown on a visual display.

  20. Electrostatic charging of jumping droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miljkovic, Nenad; Preston, Daniel J.; Enright, Ryan; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2013-09-01

    With the broad interest in and development of superhydrophobic surfaces for self-cleaning, condensation heat transfer enhancement and anti-icing applications, more detailed insights on droplet interactions on these surfaces have emerged. Specifically, when two droplets coalesce, they can spontaneously jump away from a superhydrophobic surface due to the release of excess surface energy. Here we show that jumping droplets gain a net positive charge that causes them to repel each other mid-flight. We used electric fields to quantify the charge on the droplets and identified the mechanism for the charge accumulation, which is associated with the formation of the electric double layer at the droplet-surface interface. The observation of droplet charge accumulation provides insight into jumping droplet physics as well as processes involving charged liquid droplets. Furthermore, this work is a starting point for more advanced approaches for enhancing jumping droplet surface performance by using external electric fields to control droplet jumping.

  1. Electrostatic charging of jumping droplets.

    PubMed

    Miljkovic, Nenad; Preston, Daniel J; Enright, Ryan; Wang, Evelyn N

    2013-01-01

    With the broad interest in and development of superhydrophobic surfaces for self-cleaning, condensation heat transfer enhancement and anti-icing applications, more detailed insights on droplet interactions on these surfaces have emerged. Specifically, when two droplets coalesce, they can spontaneously jump away from a superhydrophobic surface due to the release of excess surface energy. Here we show that jumping droplets gain a net positive charge that causes them to repel each other mid-flight. We used electric fields to quantify the charge on the droplets and identified the mechanism for the charge accumulation, which is associated with the formation of the electric double layer at the droplet-surface interface. The observation of droplet charge accumulation provides insight into jumping droplet physics as well as processes involving charged liquid droplets. Furthermore, this work is a starting point for more advanced approaches for enhancing jumping droplet surface performance by using external electric fields to control droplet jumping.

  2. Collinear laser spectroscopy of radioisotopes of zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayer, H. L.; Billowes, J.; Campbell, P.; Dendooven, P.; Flanagan, K. T.; Forest, D. H.; Griffith, J. A. R.; Huikari, J.; Jokinen, A.; Moore, R.; Nieminen, A.; Tungate, G.; Zemlyanoi, S.; Äystö, J.

    2003-09-01

    Isotope shifts and hyperfine structures have been measured for radioisotopes of ionic zirconium using on-line laser spectroscopy at the IGISOL facility in Jyväskylä, where the installation of an ion beam cooler/buncher has significantly improved the experimental sensitivity. Measurements have been made on all the neutron-deficient isotopes from 87Zr to 90Zr, including the isomers 87m,89mZr, and the neutron-rich isotopes from 96Zr to 102Zr. The change in mean square charge radii between the isotopes and the nuclear moments of the odd isotopes have been extracted. The data show a sudden increase in the mean square charge radius at mass A = 100, consistent with an onset of nuclear deformation which has been observed in the gamma ray spectroscopy of isotope chains in this region of the nuclear chart.

  3. Capacitive charging system for high power battery charging

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    This document describes a project to design, build, demonstrate, and document a Level 3 capacitive charging system, and it will be based on the existing PEZIC prototype capacitive coupler. The capacitive coupler will be designed to transfer power at a maximum of 600 kW, and it will transfer power by electric fields. The power electronics will transfer power at 100 kW. The coupler will be designed to function with future increases in the power electronics output power and increases in the amp/hours capacity of sealed batteries. Battery charging algorithms will be programmed into the control electronics. The finished product will be a programmable battery charging system capable of transferring 100 kW via a capacitive coupler. The coupler will have a low power loss of less than 25 watts when transferring 240 kW (400 amps). This system will increase the energy efficiency of high power battery charging, and it will enhance mobility by reducing coupler failures. The system will be completely documented. An important deliverable of this project is information. The information will be distributed to the Army`s TACOM-TARDEC`s Advanced Concept Group, and it will be distributed to commercial organizations by the Society of Automotive Engineers. The information will be valuable for product research, development, and specification. The capacitive charging system produced in this project will be of commercial value for future electric vehicles. The coupler will be designed to rapid charge batteries that have a capacity of several thousand amp/hours at hundreds of volts. The charging system built here will rapid charge batteries with several hundred amp/hours capacity, depending on the charging voltage.

  4. Forming parts over small radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, S. K.; Hughes, D. J.; Pereira, M. P.; Rolfe, B. F.

    2016-08-01

    Stamping simulations usually make the plane stress simplifying assumption. However, this becomes less valid when material draws around features with radius to sheet thickness ratios less than 20. Pereira, Yan & Rolfe (Wear, Vol.265, p.1687 (2008)) predicted that out-of-plane stress equivalent to material yield can occur because a line contact forms briefly at the start of the draw process. The high transient stress can cause high rates of tool wear and may cause the ‘die impact line’ cosmetic defect. In this work, we present residual strain results of a channel section that was drawn over a small radius. Using the neutron source at the Institut Laue-Langevin, in-plane and out-of-plane strains were measured in the channel part to show some support for the conclusions of Pereira et. al.

  5. Aircraft battery state of charge and charge control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, S.; Charkey, A.

    1986-02-01

    This Interim Report describes work done in developing an aircraft battery state of charge and charge control system. The basis for this system developed by ERC is a nickel-oxygen (NiO2) Pilot cell (0.374 Ah). This pilot cell is cycled in tandem with a nickel-cadmium battery. The oxygen pressure of the pilot cell is utilized to determine and control the state of charge of the nickel-cadmium battery. The NiO2 pilot cell baseline performance was determined during this period. The effect of using different nickel electrodes (ERC, SAFT, MARATHON) was also performed.

  6. Syntheses, structures, and spectroscopic properties of plutonium and americium phosphites and the redetermination of the ionic radii of Pu(III) and Am(III).

    PubMed

    Cross, Justin N; Villa, Eric M; Wang, Shuao; Diwu, Juan; Polinski, Matthew J; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2012-08-06

    A series of isotypic rare earth phosphites (RE = Ce(III), Pr(III), Nd(III), Pu(III), or Am(III)) with the general formulas RE(2)(HPO(3))(3)(H(2)O) along with a Pu(IV) phosphite, Pu[(HPO(3))(2)(H(2)O)(2)], have been prepared hydrothermally via reactions of RECl(3) with phosphorous acid. The structure of RE(2)(HPO(3))(3)(H(2)O) features a face-sharing interaction of eight- and nine-coordinate rare earth polyhedra. By use of the crystallographic data from the isotypic series along with data from previously reported isotypic series, the ionic radii for higher coordinate Pu(III) and Am(III) were calculated. The (VIII)Pu(III) radius was calculated as 1.112 ± 0.004 Å, and the (IX)Pu(III) radius was calculated to be 1.165 ± 0.002 Å. The (VIII)Am(III) radius was calculated as 1.108 ± 0.004 Å, and the (IX)Am(III) radius was calculated as 1.162 ± 0.002 Å.

  7. Determination of the Mass Moments and Radii of Inertia of the Sections of a Tapered Wing and the Center-of-Gravity Line along the Wing Span

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savelyev, V. V.

    1943-01-01

    For computing the critical flutter velocity of a wing among the data required are the position of the line of centers of gravity of the wing sections along the span and the mass moments and radii of inertia of any section of the wing about the axis passing through the center of gravity of the section. A sufficiently detailed computation of these magnitudes even if the weights of all the wing elements are known, requires a great deal of time expenditure. Thus a rapid competent worker would require from 70 to 100 hours for the preceding computations for one wing only, while hundreds of hours would be required if all the weights were included. With the aid of the formulas derived in the present paper, the preceding work can be performed with a degree of accuracy sufficient for practical purposes in from one to two hours, the only required data being the geometric dimensions of the outer wing (tapered part), the position of its longerons, the total weight of the outer wing, and the approximate weight of the longerons, The entire material presented in this paper is applicable mainly to wings of longeron construction of the CAHI type and investigations are therefore being conducted by CAHI for the derivation of formulas for the determination of the preceding data for wings of other types.

  8. Simultaneous analysis of matter radii, transition probabilities, and excitation energies of Mg isotopes by angular-momentum-projected configuration-mixing calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Mitsuhiro; Watanabe, Shin; Tagami, Shingo; Matsumoto, Takuma; Shimizu, Yoshifumi R.; Yahiro, Masanobu

    2016-06-01

    We perform simultaneous analysis of (1) matter radii, (2) B (E 2 ;0+→2+) transition probabilities, and (3) excitation energies, E (2+) and E (4+) , for Mg-4024 by using the beyond-mean-field (BMF) framework with angular-momentum-projected configuration mixing with respect to the axially symmetric β2 deformation with infinitesimal cranking. The BMF calculations successfully reproduce all of the data for rm,B (E 2 ) , and E (2+) and E (4+) , indicating that it is quite useful for data analysis; particularly for low-lying states. We also discuss the absolute value of the deformation parameter β2 deduced from measured values of B (E 2 ) and rm. This framework makes it possible to investigate the effects of β2 deformation, the change in β2 due to restoration of rotational symmetry, β2 configuration mixing, and the inclusion of time-odd components by infinitesimal cranking. Under the assumption of axial deformation and parity conservation, we clarify which effect is important for each of the three measurements and propose the kinds of BMF calculations that are practical for each of the three kinds of observables.

  9. Sound scattering from rough bubbly ocean surface based on modified sea surface acoustic simulator and consideration of various incident angles and sub-surface bubbles' radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolghasi, Alireza; Ghadimi, Parviz; Chekab, Mohammad A. Feizi

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study is to improve the capabilities and precision of a recently introduced Sea Surface Acoustic Simulator (SSAS) developed based on optimization of the Helmholtz-Kirchhoff-Fresnel (HKF) method. The improved acoustic simulator, hereby known as the Modified SSAS (MSSAS), is capable of determining sound scattering from the sea surface and includes an extended Hall-Novarini model and optimized HKF method. The extended Hall-Novarini model is used for considering the effects of sub-surface bubbles over a wider range of radii of sub-surface bubbles compared to the previous SSAS version. Furthermore, MSSAS has the capability of making a three-dimensional simulation of scattered sound from the rough bubbly sea surface with less error than that of the Critical Sea Tests (CST) experiments. Also, it presents scattered pressure levels from the rough bubbly sea surface based on various incident angles of sound. Wind speed, frequency, incident angle, and pressure level of the sound source are considered as input data, and scattered pressure levels and scattering coefficients are provided. Finally, different parametric studies were conducted on wind speeds, frequencies, and incident angles to indicate that MSSAS is quite capable of simulating sound scattering from the rough bubbly sea surface, according to the scattering mechanisms determined by Ogden and Erskine. Therefore, it is concluded that MSSAS is valid for both scattering mechanisms and the transition region between them that are defined by Ogden and Erskine.

  10. A Chronology of Annual-Mean Effective Radii of Stratospheric Aerosols from Volcanic Eruptions During the Twentieth Century as Derived From Ground-based Spectral Extinction Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strothers, Richard B.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Stratospheric extinction can be derived from ground-based spectral photometric observations of the Sun and other stars (as well as from satellite and aircraft measurements, available since 1979), and is found to increase after large volcanic eruptions. This increased extinction shows a characteristic wavelength dependence that gives information about the chemical composition and the effective (or area weighted mean) radius of the particles responsible for it. Known to be tiny aerosols constituted of sulfuric acid in a water solution, the stratospheric particles at midlatitudes exhibit a remarkable uniformity of their column-averaged effective radii r(sub eff) in the first few months after the eruption. Considering the seven largest eruptions of the twentieth century, r(sub eff) at this phase of peak aerosol abundance is approx. 0.3 micrometers in all cases. A year later, r(sub eff) either has remained about the same size (almost certainly in the case of the Katmai eruption of 1912) or has increased to approx. 0.5 micrometers (definitely so for the Pinatubo eruption of 1991). The reasons for this divergence in aerosol growth are unknown.

  11. Simulation of a multi-spacecraft detected gradual SEP event by using a shock-and-particle model starting at 4 solar radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Gasen, Rosa; Jacobs, Carla; Aran, Angels; Sanahuja, Blai; Poedts, Stefaan

    Particle intensity-time profiles of a gradual SEP event observed by spacecraft located a different heliolongitudes close to the ecliptic plane, even being at a similar distance from the Sun, have shown different shapes. To model this variability we present the simulation of an event observed by the Helios 1 and 2 and IMP8/ISEE-3 spacecraft. We have developed under the Solar Energetic Particle Event Modeling (SEPEM) project a new shock-and-particle model that combines a 2D MHD code (in the ecliptic plane) and a particle transport code. With this model we can track the traveling shock from 4 solar radii. This allows us to determine the injection rate of shock accelerated particles from close to the Sun, where the bulk of high energy particles often are accelerated. We have simulated the shock propagation by fitting the time of shock arrivals and jumps in plasma observed at each of the spacecraft and we have reproduced the proton intensities measured by these vantage observers. We draw conclusions on the influence of the relative position of the observer (with respect to the leading direction of the traveling shock), on the injection rate of shock-accelerated particles, and on the particles transport conditions found for each spacecraft. We also discuss the forecasting capability of the relation between the injection rate of shock accelerated particles and the jump in speed across the shock front that we have found in SEP events previously modeled.

  12. Systematic Uncertainties in the Spectroscopic Measurements of Neutron-star Masses and Radii from Thermonuclear X-Ray Bursts. III. Absolute Flux Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güver, Tolga; Özel, Feryal; Marshall, Herman; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Guainazzi, Matteo; Díaz-Trigo, Maria

    2016-09-01

    Many techniques for measuring neutron star radii rely on absolute flux measurements in the X-rays. As a result, one of the fundamental uncertainties in these spectroscopic measurements arises from the absolute flux calibrations of the detectors being used. Using the stable X-ray burster, GS 1826-238, and its simultaneous observations by Chandra HETG/ACIS-S and RXTE/PCA as well as by XMM-Newton EPIC-pn and RXTE/PCA, we quantify the degree of uncertainty in the flux calibration by assessing the differences between the measured fluxes during bursts. We find that the RXTE/PCA and the Chandra gratings measurements agree with each other within their formal uncertainties, increasing our confidence in these flux measurements. In contrast, XMM-Newton EPIC-pn measures 14.0 ± 0.3% less flux than the RXTE/PCA. This is consistent with the previously reported discrepancy with the flux measurements of EPIC-pn, compared with EPIC MOS1, MOS2, and ACIS-S detectors. We also show that any intrinsic time-dependent systematic uncertainty that may exist in the calibration of the satellites has already been implicity taken into account in the neutron star radius measurements.

  13. Physicochemical studies on turnip-yellow-mosaic virus. Homogeneity, relative molecular masses, hydrodynamic radii and concentration-dependence of parameters in non-dissociating solvents.

    PubMed Central

    Harding, S E; Johnson, P

    1985-01-01

    Turnip-yellow-mosaic virus, with its stable, highly spherical and monodisperse character, was chosen as a suitable model substance with which to test hydrodynamic theories of transport. Sedimentation coefficients, diffusion coefficients (obtained through photon correlation spectroscopy) and viscosities were measured accurately as a function of concentration in well-defined and nearly neutral buffer systems. Ancillary information was also obtained from very-low-speed sedimentation-equilibrium experiments. The coefficients expressing the variation in sedimentation and diffusion coefficients with weight concentration were obtained, and by combination with other data it was possible to avoid assumptions concerning solvation and transform such regression coefficients into the form appropriate to volume fractions. Some measure of support for Batchelor's [(1972) J. Fluid Mech. 52, 245-268] calculations was thus obtained, but over most of the pH range the coefficients were significantly smaller than those calculated from his theory. It seems likely that electrostatic interactions are responsible for the discrepancies. Hydrodynamic radii (from diffusion coefficients) were in very fair agreement with those calculated from the thermodynamic excluded-volume term, but were higher than indicated by electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, a discrepancy ascribable to solvation. Images Fig. 1. PMID:4074323

  14. Size and Charge Dependence of Ion Transport in Human Nail Plate.

    PubMed

    Baswan, Sudhir M; Li, S Kevin; LaCount, Terri D; Kasting, Gerald B

    2016-03-01

    The electrical properties of human nail plate are poorly characterized yet are a key determinate of the potential to treat nail diseases, such as onychomycosis, using iontophoresis. To address this deficiency, molar conductivities of 17 electrolytes comprising 12 ionic species were determined in hydrated human nail plate in vitro. Cation transport numbers across the nail for 11 of these electrolytes were determined by the electromotive force method. Effective ionic mobilities and diffusivities at infinite dilution for all ionic species were determined by regression analysis. The ratios of diffusivities in nail to those in solution were found to correlate inversely with the hydrodynamic radii of the ions according to a power law relationship having an exponent of -1.75 ± 0.27, a substantially steeper size dependence than observed for similar experiments in skin. Effective diffusivities of cations in nail were 3-fold higher than those of comparably sized anions. These results reflect the strong size and charge selectivity of the nail plate for ionic conduction and diffusion. The analysis implies that efficient transungual iontophoretic delivery of ionized drugs having radii upward of 5 Å (molecular weight, ca. ≥ 340 Da) will require chemical or mechanical alteration of the nail plate.

  15. Size and Charge Dependence of Ion Transport in Human Nail Plate

    PubMed Central

    Baswan, Sudhir M.; Li, S. Kevin; LaCount, Terri D.; Kasting, Gerald B.

    2016-01-01

    The electrical properties of human nail plate are poorly characterized, yet are a key determinate of the potential to treat nail diseases such as onychomycosis using iontophoresis. In order to address this deficiency, molar conductivities of 17 electrolytes comprising 12 ionic species were determined in hydrated human nail plate in vitro. Cation transport numbers across the nail for 11 of these electrolytes were determined by the electromotive force method. Effective ionic mobilities and diffusivities at infinite dilution for all ionic species were determined by regression analysis. The ratios of diffusivities in nail to those in solution were found to correlate inversely with the hydrodynamic radii of the ions according to a power law relationship having an exponent of −1.75 ± 0.27, a substantially steeper size dependence than observed for similar experiments in skin. Effective diffusivities of cations in nail were three-fold higher than those of comparably sized anions. These results reflect the strong size and charge selectivity of the nail plate for ionic conduction and diffusion. The analysis implies that efficient transungual iontophoretic delivery of ionized drugs having radii upwards of 5 Å (approximately MW ≥ 340 Da) will require chemical or mechanical alteration of the nail plate. PMID:26886342

  16. Charged particle dynamics in the presence of non-Gaussian Lévy electrostatic fluctuations

    DOE PAGES

    Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego B.; Moradi, Sara; Anderson, Johan

    2016-09-01

    Full orbit dynamics of charged particles in a 3-dimensional helical magnetic field in the presence of -stable Levy electrostatic fluctuations and linear friction modeling collisional Coulomb drag is studied via Monte Carlo numerical simulations. The Levy fluctuations are introduced to model the effect of non-local transport due to fractional diffusion in velocity space resulting from intermittent electrostatic turbulence. The probability distribution functions of energy, particle displacements, and Larmor radii are computed and showed to exhibit a transition from exponential decay, in the case of Gaussian fluctuations, to power law decay in the case of Levy fluctuations. The absolute value ofmore » the power law decay exponents are linearly proportional to the Levy index. Furthermore, the observed anomalous non-Gaussian statistics of the particles' Larmor radii (resulting from outlier transport events) indicate that, when electrostatic turbulent fluctuations exhibit non-Gaussian Levy statistics, gyro-averaging and guiding centre approximations might face limitations and full particle orbit effects should be taken into account.« less

  17. When Charged Black Holes Merge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-08-01

    Most theoretical models assume that black holes arent charged. But a new study shows that mergers of charged black holes could explain a variety of astrophysical phenomena, from fast radio bursts to gamma-ray bursts.No HairThe black hole no hair theorem states that all black holes can be described by just three things: their mass, their spin, and their charge. Masses and spins have been observed and measured, but weve never measured the charge of a black hole and its widely believed that real black holes dont actually have any charge.That said, weve also never shown that black holes dont have charge, or set any upper limits on the charge that they might have. So lets suppose, for a moment, that its possible for a black hole to be charged. How might that affect what we know about the merger of two black holes? A recent theoretical study by Bing Zhang (University of Nevada, Las Vegas) examines this question.Intensity profile of a fast radio burst, a sudden burst of radio emission that lasts only a few milliseconds. [Swinburne Astronomy Productions]Driving TransientsZhangs work envisions a pair of black holes in a binary system. He argues that if just one of the black holes carries charge possibly retained by a rotating magnetosphere then it may be possible for the system to produce an electromagnetic signal that could accompany gravitational waves, such as a fast radio burst or a gamma-ray burst!In Zhangs model, the inspiral of the two black holes generates a global magnetic dipole thats perpendicular to the plane of the binarys orbit. The magnetic flux increases rapidly as the separation between the black holes decreases, generating an increasingly powerful magnetic wind. This wind, in turn, can give rise to a fast radio burst or a gamma-ray burst, depending on the value of the black holes charge.Artists illustration of a short gamma-ray burst, thought to be caused by the merger of two compact objects. [ESO/A. Roquette]Zhang calculates lower limits on the charge

  18. Theory of using magnetic deflections to combine charged particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Steckbeck, Mackenzie K.; Doyle, Barney Lee

    2014-09-01

    Several radiation effects projects in the Ion Beam Lab (IBL) have recently required two disparate charged particle beams to simultaneously strike a single sample through a single port of the target chamber. Because these beams have vastly different mass–energy products (MEP), the low-MEP beam requires a large angle of deflection toward the sample by a bending electromagnet. A second electromagnet located further upstream provides a means to compensate for the small angle deflection experienced by the high-MEP beam during its path through the bending magnet. This paper derives the equations used to select the magnetic fields required by these two magnets to achieve uniting both beams at the target sample. A simple result was obtained when the separation of the two magnets was equivalent to the distance from the bending magnet to the sample, and the equation is given by: Bs= 1/2(rc/rs) Bc, where Bs and Bc are the magnetic fields in the steering and bending magnet and rc/rs is the ratio of the radii of the bending magnet to that of the steering magnet. This result is not dependent upon the parameters of the high MEP beam, i.e. energy, mass, charge state. Therefore, once the field of the bending magnet is set for the low-MEP beam, and the field in the steering magnet is set as indicted in the equation, the trajectory path of any high-MEP beam will be directed into the sample.

  19. Charge-pump voltage converter

    DOEpatents

    Brainard, John P.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2009-11-03

    A charge-pump voltage converter for converting a low voltage provided by a low-voltage source to a higher voltage. Charge is inductively generated on a transfer rotor electrode during its transit past an inductor stator electrode and subsequently transferred by the rotating rotor to a collector stator electrode for storage or use. Repetition of the charge transfer process leads to a build-up of voltage on a charge-receiving device. Connection of multiple charge-pump voltage converters in series can generate higher voltages, and connection of multiple charge-pump voltage converters in parallel can generate higher currents. Microelectromechanical (MEMS) embodiments of this invention provide a small and compact high-voltage (several hundred V) voltage source starting with a few-V initial voltage source. The microscale size of many embodiments of this invention make it ideally suited for MEMS- and other micro-applications where integration of the voltage or charge source in a small package is highly desirable.

  20. Ionospheric Drivers of ISS Charging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minow, J. I.; Willis, E. M.

    2015-12-01

    Severe spacecraft surface charging in terrestrial environments typically results from exposure to energetic electrons at some 10's of keV within auroral environments at high latitudes in low Earth orbit or hot thermal plasma in geostationary orbit. Predicting surface charging of a vehicle in these environments depends on our ability to specify and forecast auroral acceleration events and geomagnetic storms. Measurements of ISS frame charging to date, in contrast, are dominated by US 160V solar array interactions with the ionospheric plasma environment with little evidence for strong charging during geomagnetic storms. Predicting ISS charging, therefore, requires an ability to specify and forecast components of ionospheric variability of importance to high voltage solar array interactions with the plasma environment. This presentation provides examples of the ionospheric conditions responsible for typical and extreme ISS charging and discusses current capabilities to forecast these events. Specific examples are given for ISS frame charging observed when the vehicle passes through low latitude dawn density depletions, high latitude plasma troughs, and plasma depletions associated with equatorial spread-f conditions.

  1. 12 CFR 1026.4 - Finance charge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Finance charge. 1026.4 Section 1026.4 Banks and... specifically excluded by paragraphs (c) through (e) of this section: (1) Interest, time price differential, and... law. (c) Charges excluded from the finance charge. The following charges are not finance charges:...

  2. Rewritable artificial magnetic charge ice

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y. -L.; Xiao, Z. -L.; Snezhko, A.; Xu, J.; Ocola, L. E.; Divan, R.; Pearson, J. E.; Crabtree, G. W.; Kwok, W. -K.

    2016-05-19

    Artificial ices enable the study of geometrical frustration by design and through direct observation. However, it has proven difficult to achieve tailored long-range ordering of their diverse configurations, limiting both fundamental and applied research directions. We designed an artificial spin structure that produces a magnetic charge ice with tunable long-range ordering of eight different configurations. We also developed a technique to precisely manipulate the local magnetic charge states and demonstrate write-read-erase multifunctionality at room temperature. This globally reconfigurable and locally writable magnetic charge ice could provide a setting for designing magnetic monopole defects, tailoring magnonics, and controlling the properties of other two-dimensional materials.

  3. Fog dispersion. [charged particle technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, L. S.; Frost, W.

    1980-01-01

    The concept of using the charged particle technique to disperse warm fog at airports is investigated and compared with other techniques. The charged particle technique shows potential for warm fog dispersal, but experimental verification of several significant parameters, such as particle mobility and charge density, is needed. Seeding and helicopter downwash techniques are also effective for warm fog disperals, but presently are not believed to be viable techniques for routine airport operations. Thermal systems are currently used at a few overseas airports; however, they are expensive and pose potential environmental problems.

  4. Charge transfer between fullerenes and highly charged noble gas ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narits, A. A.

    2008-07-01

    A semiclassical model for the description of charge-exchange processes in collisions between fullerenes and multiply charged ions is developed. It is based on the decay model combined with the impact-parameter representation for the heavy particles' relative motion. The charge-transfer process in our model is treated as a transition of the active electron over and under the quasistatic potential barrier formed by the electric fields of the target and projectile. Due to the high electron delocalization on the surface of fullerene we represent it as a perfectly conducting hard sphere, whose radius is determined by the dipole polarizability of C60. The energies of the active electrons are assumed to be equal to the corresponding ionization potentials including the Stark-shift effect. We have developed an efficient technique for the evaluation of the electron transmission coefficient through the asymmetric potential barrier. It is shown that our model provides a good agreement with the available experimental data on single-electron charge-exchange processes. Moreover, it allows us to get an adequate description of multi-electron transfer processes. The first theoretical results on charge exchange between the fullerene ions and highly charged ions have been obtained.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: CHARGE syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... lip ) with or without an opening in the roof of the mouth ( cleft palate ). Affected individuals frequently ... Central GeneReview: CHARGE Syndrome Hale CL, Niederriter AN, Green GE, Martin DM. Atypical phenotypes associated with pathogenic ...

  6. Organic Text Authors Charge Plagiarism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Reports on the recent controversy involving two organic chemistry textbooks. The charge of plagiarism and the court litigations are the object of interest in the chemical community since many prominant scientists are planned as witnesses. (SA)

  7. Electrical Charging of Volcanic Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M. R.; Wilson, L.; Lane, S. J.; Gilbert, J. S.; Mather, T. A.; Harrison, R. G.; Martin, R. S.

    2008-06-01

    Many explosive terrestrial volcanic eruptions are accompanied by lightning and other atmospheric electrical phenomena. The plumes produced generate large perturbations in the surface atmospheric electric potential gradient and high charge densities have been measured on falling volcanic ash particles. The complex nature of volcanic plumes (which contain gases, solid particles, and liquid drops) provides several possible charging mechanisms. For plumes rich in solid silicate particles, fractoemission (the ejection of ions and atomic particles during fracture events) is probably the dominant source of charge generation. In other plumes, such as those created when lava enters the sea, different mechanisms, such as boiling, may be important. Further charging mechanisms may also subsequently operate, downwind of the vent. Other solar system bodies also show evidence for volcanism, with activity ongoing on Io. Consequently, volcanic electrification under different planetary scenarios (on Venus, Mars, Io, Moon, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione and Triton) is also discussed.

  8. Electrical Charging of Volcanic Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M. R.; Wilson, L.; Lane, S. J.; Gilbert, J. S.; Mather, T. A.; Harrison, R. G.; Martin, R. S.

    Many explosive terrestrial volcanic eruptions are accompanied by lightning and other atmospheric electrical phenomena. The plumes produced generate large perturbations in the surface atmospheric electric potential gradient and high charge densities have been measured on falling volcanic ash particles. The complex nature of volcanic plumes (which contain gases, solid particles, and liquid drops) provides several possible charging mechanisms. For plumes rich in solid silicate particles, fractoemission (the ejection of ions and atomic particles during fracture events) is probably the dominant source of charge generation. In other plumes, such as those created when lava enters the sea, different mechanisms, such as boiling, may be important. Further charging mechanisms may also subsequently operate, downwind of the vent. Other solar system bodies also show evidence for volcanism, with activity ongoing on Io. Consequently, volcanic electrification under different planetary scenarios (on Venus, Mars, Io, Moon, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione and Triton) is also discussed.

  9. Electronegativity Equalization and Partial Charge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, R. T.

    1974-01-01

    This article elaborates the relationship between covalent radius, homonuclear bond energy, and electronegativity, and sets the background for bond energy calculation by discussing the nature of heteronuclear covalent bonding on the basis of electronegativity equalization and particle charge. (DT)

  10. Electrokinetic concentration of charged molecules

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Anup K.; Neyer, David W.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Garguilo, Michael G.

    2002-01-01

    A method for separating and concentrating charged species from uncharged or neutral species regardless of size differential. The method uses reversible electric field induced retention of charged species, that can include molecules and molecular aggregates such as dimers, polymers, multimers, colloids, micelles, and liposomes, in volumes and on surfaces of porous materials. The retained charged species are subsequently quantitatively removed from the porous material by a pressure driven flow that passes through the retention volume and is independent of direction thus, a multi-directional flow field is not required. Uncharged species pass through the system unimpeded thus effecting a complete separation of charged and uncharged species and making possible concentration factors greater than 1000-fold.

  11. Measurements of W Charge Asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Holzbauer, J. L.

    2015-10-06

    We discuss W boson and lepton charge asymmetry measurements from W decays in the electron channel, which were made using 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ of RunII data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The electron charge asymmetry is presented as a function of pseudo-rapidity out to |$\\eta$| $\\le$ 3.2, in five symmetric and asymmetric kinematic bins of electron transverse momentum and the missing transverse energy of the event. We also give the W charge asymmetry as a function of W boson rapidity. The asymmetries are compared with next-to-leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations. These charge asymmetry measurements will allow more accurate determinations of the proton parton distribution functions and are the most precise to date.

  12. Neutron and weak-charge distributions of the 48Ca nucleus

    DOE PAGES

    Hagen, Gaute; Forssen, Christian; Nazarewicz, Witold; ...

    2015-11-02

    What is the size of the atomic nucleus? This deceivably simple question is difficult to answer. Although the electric charge distributions in atomic nuclei were measured accurately already half a century ago, our knowledge of the distribution of neutrons is still deficient. In addition to constraining the size of atomic nuclei, the neutron distribution also impacts the number of nuclei that can exist and the size of neutron stars. We present an ab initio calculation of the neutron distribution of the neutron-rich nucleus 48Ca. We show that the neutron skin (difference between the radii of the neutron and proton distributions)more » is significantly smaller than previously thought. We also make predictions for the electric dipole polarizability and the weak form factor; both quantities that are at present targeted by precision measurements. Here, based on ab initio results for 48Ca, we provide a constraint on the size of a neutron star.« less

  13. Measuring momentum for charged particle tomography

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Christopher; Fraser, Andrew Mcleod; Schultz, Larry Joe; Borozdin, Konstantin N.; Klimenko, Alexei Vasilievich; Sossong, Michael James; Blanpied, Gary

    2010-11-23

    Methods, apparatus and systems for detecting charged particles and obtaining tomography of a volume by measuring charged particles including measuring the momentum of a charged particle passing through a charged particle detector. Sets of position sensitive detectors measure scattering of the charged particle. The position sensitive detectors having sufficient mass to cause the charged particle passing through the position sensitive detectors to scatter in the position sensitive detectors. A controller can be adapted and arranged to receive scattering measurements of the charged particle from the charged particle detector, determine at least one trajectory of the charged particle from the measured scattering; and determine at least one momentum measurement of the charged particle from the at least one trajectory. The charged particle can be a cosmic ray-produced charged particle, such as a cosmic ray-produced muon. The position sensitive detectors can be drift cells, such as gas-filled drift tubes.

  14. Metallic charge stripes in cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tranquada, J. M.

    2004-08-01

    Some recent evidence for the existence of dynamic, metallic stripes in the 214 family of cuprates is reviewed. The mechanism of stripe pinning is considered, and changes in the charge density within stripes between the pinned and dynamic phases is discussed. From a purely experimental perspective, dynamic charge stripes are fully compatible with nodal “quasiparticles” and other electronic properties common to all superconducting cuprates.

  15. Thermophoresis of charged colloidal particles.

    PubMed

    Fayolle, Sébastien; Bickel, Thomas; Würger, Alois

    2008-04-01

    Thermally induced particle flow in a charged colloidal suspension is studied in a fluid-mechanical approach. The force density acting on the charged boundary layer is derived in detail. From Stokes' equation with no-slip boundary conditions at the particle surface, we obtain the particle drift velocity and the thermophoretic transport coefficients. The results are discussed in view of previous work and available experimental data.

  16. Jet charge at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Krohn, David; Schwartz, Matthew D; Lin, Tongyan; Waalewijn, Wouter J

    2013-05-24

    Knowing the charge of the parton initiating a light-quark jet could be extremely useful both for testing aspects of the standard model and for characterizing potential beyond-the-standard-model signals. We show that despite the complications of hadronization and out-of-jet radiation such as pileup, a weighted sum of the charges of a jet's constituents can be used at the LHC to distinguish among jets with different charges. Potential applications include measuring electroweak quantum numbers of hadronically decaying resonances or supersymmetric particles, as well as standard model tests, such as jet charge in dijet events or in hadronically decaying W bosons in tt[over ¯] events. We develop a systematically improvable method to calculate moments of these charge distributions by combining multihadron fragmentation functions with perturbative jet functions and pertubative evolution equations. We show that the dependence on energy and jet size for the average and width of the jet charge can be calculated despite the large experimental uncertainty on fragmentation functions. These calculations can provide a validation tool for data independent of Monte Carlo fragmentation models.

  17. Aggregation of Heterogeneously Charged Colloids.

    PubMed

    Dempster, Joshua M; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2016-06-28

    Patchy colloids are attractive as programmable building blocks for metamaterials. Inverse patchy colloids, in which a charged surface is decorated with patches of the opposite charge, are additionally noteworthy as models for heterogeneously charged biological materials such as proteins. We study the phases and aggregation behavior of a single charged patch in an oppositely charged colloid with a single-site model. This single-patch inverse patchy colloid model shows a large number of phases when varying patch size. For large patch sizes we find ferroelectric crystals, while small patch sizes produce cross-linked gels. Intermediate values produce monodisperse clusters and unusual worm structures that preserve finite ratios of area to volume. The polarization observed at large patch sizes is robust under extreme disorder in patch size and shape. We examine phase-temperature dependence and coexistence curves and find that large patch sizes produce polarized liquids, in contrast to mean-field predictions. Finally, we introduce small numbers of unpatched charged colloids. These can either suppress or encourage aggregation depending on their concentration and the size of the patches on the patched colloids. These effects can be exploited to control aggregation and to measure effective patch size.

  18. Forcefield_PTM: Ab Initio Charge and AMBER Forcefield Parameters for Frequently Occurring Post-Translational Modifications.

    PubMed

    Khoury, George A; Thompson, Jeff P; Smadbeck, James; Kieslich, Chris A; Floudas, Christodoulos A

    2013-12-10

    In this work, we introduce Forcefield_PTM, a set of AMBER forcefield parameters consistent with ff03 for 32 common post-translational modifications. Partial charges were calculated through ab initio calculations and a two-stage RESP-fitting procedure in an ether-like implicit solvent environment. The charges were found to be generally consistent with others previously reported for phosphorylated amino acids, and trimethyllysine, using different parameterization methods. Pairs of modified and their corresponding unmodified structures were curated from the PDB for both single and multiple modifications. Background structural similarity was assessed in the context of secondary and tertiary structures from the global dataset. Next, the charges derived for Forcefield_PTM were tested on a macroscopic scale using unrestrained all-atom Langevin molecular dynamics simulations in AMBER for 34 (17 pairs of modified/unmodified) systems in implicit solvent. Assessment was performed in the context of secondary structure preservation, stability in energies, and correlations between the modified and unmodified structure trajectories on the aggregate. As an illustration of their utility, the parameters were used to compare the structural stability of the phosphorylated and dephosphorylated forms of OdhI. Microscopic comparisons between quantum and AMBER single point energies along key χ torsions on several PTMs were performed and corrections to improve their agreement in terms of mean squared errors and squared correlation coefficients were parameterized. This forcefield for post-translational modifications in condensed-phase simulations can be applied to a number of biologically relevant and timely applications including protein structure prediction, protein and peptide design, docking, and to study the effect of PTMs on folding and dynamics. We make the derived parameters and an associated interactive webtool capable of performing post-translational modifications on proteins

  19. The Gaia-ESO Survey: lithium depletion in the Gamma Velorum cluster and inflated radii in low-mass pre-main-sequence stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffries, R. D.; Jackson, R. J.; Franciosini, E.; Randich, S.; Barrado, D.; Frasca, A.; Klutsch, A.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Prisinzano, L.; Sacco, G. G.; Gilmore, G.; Vallenari, A.; Alfaro, E. J.; Koposov, S. E.; Pancino, E.; Bayo, A.; Casey, A. R.; Costado, M. T.; Damiani, F.; Hourihane, A.; Lewis, J.; Jofre, P.; Magrini, L.; Monaco, L.; Morbidelli, L.; Worley, C. C.; Zaggia, S.; Zwitter, T.

    2017-01-01

    We show that non-magnetic models for the evolution of pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars cannot simultaneously describe the colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) and the pattern of lithium depletion seen in the cluster of young, low-mass stars surrounding γ2 Velorum. The age of 7.5 ± 1 Myr inferred from the CMD is much younger than that implied by the strong Li depletion seen in the cluster M-dwarfs, and the Li depletion occurs at much redder colours than predicted. The epoch at which a star of a given mass depletes its Li and the surface temperature of that star are both dependent on its radius. We demonstrate that if the low-mass stars have radii ˜10 per cent larger at a given mass and age, then both the CMD and the Li-depletion pattern of the Gamma Velorum cluster are explained at a common age of ≃18-21 Myr. This radius inflation could be produced by some combination of magnetic suppression of convection and extensive cool starspots. Models that incorporate radius inflation suggest that PMS stars, similar to those in the Gamma Velorum cluster, in the range 0.2 < M/M⊙ < 0.7, are at least a factor of 2 older and ˜7 per cent cooler than previously thought and that their masses are much larger (by >30 per cent) than inferred from conventional, non-magnetic models in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Systematic changes of this size may be of great importance in understanding the evolution of young stars, disc lifetimes and the formation of planetary systems.

  20. Evidence for a Nuclear Radio Jet and its Structure down to lsim100 Schwarzschild Radii in the Center of the Sombrero Galaxy (M 104, NGC 4594)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hada, Kazuhiro; Doi, Akihiro; Nagai, Hiroshi; Inoue, Makoto; Honma, Mareki; Giroletti, Marcello; Giovannini, Gabriele

    2013-12-01

    The Sombrero galaxy (M 104, NGC 4594) is associated with one of the nearest low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We investigated the detailed radio structure of the Sombrero nucleus using high-resolution, quasi-simultaneous, multi-frequency, phase-referencing Very Long Baseline Array observations. We obtained high-quality images of this nucleus at seven frequencies, where those at 15, 24, and 43 GHz are the first clear very long baseline interferometry detections. At 43 GHz, the nuclear structure was imaged on a linear scale under 0.01 pc or 100 Schwarzschild radii, revealing a compact, high-brightness-temperature (gsim 3 × 109 K) radio core. We discovered the presence of the extended structure emanating from the core on two sides in the northwest and southeast directions. The nuclear radio spectra show a clear spatial gradient, which is similar to that seen in more luminous AGNs with powerful relativistic jets. Moreover, the size and position of the core tend to be frequency dependent. These findings provide evidence that the central engine of the Sombrero is powering radio jets and the jets are overwhelming the emission from the underlying radiatively inefficient accretion flow over the observed frequencies. Based on these radio characteristics, we constrained the following physical parameters for the M 104 jets: (1) the northern side is approaching, whereas the southern one is receding; (2) the jet viewing angle is relatively close to our line-of-sight (lsim 25°) and (3) the intrinsic jet velocity is highly sub-relativistic (lsim 0.2c). The derived pole-on nature of the M 104 jets is consistent with the previous argument that this nucleus contains a true type II AGN, i.e., the broad line region is actually absent or intrinsically weak if the plane of the circumnuclear torus is perpendicular to the jet axis.