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Sample records for measured diffraction efficiency

  1. Measurement system for diffraction efficiency of convex gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Chen, Xin-hua; Zhou, Jian-kang; Zhao, Zhi-cheng; Liu, Quan; Luo, Chao; Wang, Xiao-feng; Tang, Min-xue; Shen, Wei-min

    2017-08-01

    A measurement system for diffraction efficiency of convex gratings is designed. The measurement system mainly includes four components as a light source, a front system, a dispersing system that contains a convex grating, and a detector. Based on the definition and measuring principle of diffraction efficiency, the optical scheme of the measurement system is analyzed and the design result is given. Then, in order to validate the feasibility of the designed system, the measurement system is set up and the diffraction efficiency of a convex grating with the aperture of 35 mm, the curvature-radius of 72mm, the blazed angle of 6.4°, the grating period of 2.5μm and the working waveband of 400nm-900nm is tested. Based on GUM (Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement), the uncertainties in the measuring results are evaluated. The measured diffraction efficiency data are compared to the theoretical ones, which are calculated based on the grating groove parameters got by an atomic force microscope and Rigorous Couple Wave Analysis, and the reliability of the measurement system is illustrated. Finally, the measurement performance of the system is analyzed and tested. The results show that, the testing accuracy, the testing stability and the testing repeatability are 2.5%, 0.085% and 3.5% , respectively.

  2. Spectral diffraction efficiency characterization of broadband diffractive optical elements.

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Junoh; Cruz-Cabrera, Alvaro Augusto; Tanbakuchi, Anthony

    Diffractive optical elements, with their thin profile and unique dispersion properties, have been studied and utilized in a number of optical systems, often yielding smaller and lighter systems. Despite the interest in and study of diffractive elements, the application has been limited to narrow spectral bands. This is due to the etch depths, which are optimized for optical path differences of only a single wavelength, consequently leading to rapid decline in efficiency as the working wavelength shifts away from the design wavelength. Various broadband diffractive design methodologies have recently been developed that improve spectral diffraction efficiency and expand the workingmore » bandwidth of diffractive elements. We have developed diffraction efficiency models and utilized the models to design, fabricate, and test two such extended bandwidth diffractive designs.« less

  3. EUV efficiency of a 6000-grooves per mm diffraction grating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Mark; Bowyer, Stuart; Edelstein, Jerry; Harada, Tatsuo; Kita, Toshiaki

    1990-01-01

    In order to explore whether grooves ruled mechanically at a density of 6000 per mm can perform well at EUV wavelengths, a sample grating is measured with this density in an EUV calibration facility. Measurements are presented of the planar uniform line-space diffraction grating's efficiency and large-angle scattering.

  4. Diffraction efficiency calculations of polarization diffraction gratings with surface relief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarova, D.; Sharlandjiev, P.; Berberova, N.; Blagoeva, B.; Stoykova, E.; Nedelchev, L.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the optical response of a stack of two diffraction gratings of equal one-dimensional periodicity. The first one is a surface-relief grating structure; the second, a volume polarization grating. This model is based on our experimental results from polarization holographic recordings in azopolymer films. We used films of commercially available azopolymer (poly[1-[4-(3-carboxy-4-hydroxyphenylazo) benzenesulfonamido]-1,2-ethanediyl, sodium salt]), shortly denoted as PAZO. During the recording process, a polarization grating in the volume of the material and a relief grating on the film surface are formed simultaneously. In order to evaluate numerically the optical response of this “hybrid” diffraction structure, we used the rigorous coupled-wave approach (RCWA). It yields stable numerical solutions of Maxwell’s vector equations using the algebraic eigenvalue method.

  5. Diffraction encoded position measuring apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Tansey, Richard J.

    1991-01-01

    When a lightwave passes through a transmission grating, diffracted beams appear at the output or opposite side of the grating that are effectively Doppler shifted in frequency (phase) whereby a detector system can compare the phase of the zero order and higher order beams to obtain an indication of position. Multiple passes through the grating increase resolution for a given wavelength of a laser signal. The resolution can be improved further by using a smaller wavelength laser to generate the grating itself. Since the grating must only have a pitch sufficient to produce diffracted orders, inexpensive, ultraviolet wavelength lasers can be utilized and still obtain high resolution detection.

  6. Diffraction encoded position measuring apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Tansey, R.J.

    1991-09-24

    When a lightwave passes through a transmission grating, diffracted beams appear at the output or opposite side of the grating that are effectively Doppler shifted in frequency (phase) whereby a detector system can compare the phase of the zero order and higher order beams to obtain an indication of position. Multiple passes through the grating increase resolution for a given wavelength of a laser signal. The resolution can be improved further by using a smaller wavelength laser to generate the grating itself. Since the grating must only have a pitch sufficient to produce diffracted orders, inexpensive, ultraviolet wavelength lasers can be utilized and still obtain high resolution detection. 3 figures.

  7. Neutron diffraction measurements on a reference metallic sample with a high-efficiency GEM side-on 10B-based thermal neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietropaolo, A.; Claps, G.; Fedrigo, A.; Grazzi, F.; Höglund, C.; Murtas, F.; Scherillo, A.; Schmidt, S.; Schooneveld, E. M.

    2018-03-01

    The upgraded version of the GEM side-on thermal neutron detector was successfully tested in a neutron diffraction experiment on a reference sample using the INES diffractometer at the ISIS spallation neutron source, UK. The performance of the new 10B4C-based detector is compared to that of a standard 3He tube, operating at the instrument as a part of the detectors assembly. The results show that the upgraded detector has a better resolution and an efficiency of the same order of magnitude of a 3He-based detector.

  8. Miniaturized diffraction based interferometric distance measurement sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byungki

    In this thesis, new metrology hardware is designed, fabricated, and tested to provide improvements over current MEMS metrology. The metrology system is a micromachined scanning interferometer (muSI) having a sub-nm resolution in a compact design. The proposed microinterferometer forms a phase sensitive diffraction grating with interferomeric sensitivity, while adding the capability of better lateral resolution by focusing the laser to a smaller spot size. A detailed diffraction model of the microinterferometer was developed to simulate the device performance and to suggest the location of photo detectors for integrated optoelectronics. A particular device is fabricated on a fused silica substrate using aluminum to form the deformable diffraction grating fingers and AZ P4620 photo resist (PR) for the microlens. The details of the fabrication processes are presented. The structure also enables optoelectronics to be integrated so that the interferometer with photo detectors can fit in an area that is 1 mm x 1 mm. The scanning results using a fixed grating muSI demonstrated that it could measure vibration profile as well as static vertical (less than a half wave length) and lateral dimension of MEMS. The muSI, which is integrated with photo diodes, demonstrated its operation by scanning a cMUT. The PID control has been tested and resulted in improvement in scanned images. The integrated muSI demonstrated that the deformable grating could be used to tune the measurement keep the interferometer in quadrature for highest sensitivity.

  9. Stratified Diffractive Optic Approach for Creating High Efficiency Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Diana M.; Nordin, Gregory P.

    1998-01-01

    Gratings with high efficiency in a single diffracted order can be realized with both volume holographic and diffractive optical elements. However, each method has limitations that restrict the applications in which they can be used. For example, high efficiency volume holographic gratings require an appropriate combination of thickness and permittivity modulation throughout the bulk of the material. Possible combinations of those two characteristics are limited by properties of currently available materials, thus restricting the range of applications for volume holographic gratings. Efficiency of a diffractive optic grating is dependent on its approximation of an ideal analog profile using discrete features. The size of constituent features and, consequently, the number that can be used within a required grating period restricts the applications in which diffractive optic gratings can be used. These limitations imply that there are applications which cannot be addressed by either technology. In this paper we propose to address a number of applications in this category with a new method of creating high efficiency gratings which we call stratified diffractive optic gratings. In this approach diffractive optic techniques are used to create an optical structure that emulates volume grating behavior. To illustrate the stratified diffractive optic grating concept we consider a specific application, a scanner for a space-based coherent wind lidar, with requirements that would be difficult to meet by either volume holographic or diffractive optic methods. The lidar instrument design specifies a transmissive scanner element with the input beam normally incident and the exiting beam deflected at a fixed angle from the optical axis. The element will be rotated about the optical axis to produce a conical scan pattern. The wavelength of the incident beam is 2.06 microns and the required deflection angle is 30 degrees, implying a grating period of approximately 4 microns

  10. High diffraction efficiency of three-layer diffractive optics designed for wide temperature range and large incident angle.

    PubMed

    Mao, Shan; Cui, Qingfeng; Piao, Mingxu; Zhao, Lidong

    2016-05-01

    A mathematical model of diffraction efficiency and polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency affected by environment temperature change and incident angle for three-layer diffractive optics with different dispersion materials is put forward, and its effects are analyzed. Taking optical materials N-FK5 and N-SF1 as the substrates of multilayer diffractive optics, the effect on diffraction efficiency and polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency with intermediate materials POLYCARB is analyzed with environment temperature change as well as incident angle. Therefore, three-layer diffractive optics can be applied in more wide environmental temperature ranges and larger incident angles for refractive-diffractive hybrid optical systems, which can obtain better image quality. Analysis results can be used to guide the hybrid imaging optical system design for optical engineers.

  11. An Efficient Image Recovery Algorithm for Diffraction Tomography Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Michael Y.

    1993-01-01

    A diffraction tomography system has potential application in ultrasonic medical imaging area. It is capable of achieving imagery with the ultimate resolution of one quarter the wavelength by collecting ultrasonic backscattering data from a circular array of sensors and reconstructing the object reflectivity using a digital image recovery algorithm performed by a computer. One advantage of such a system is that is allows a relatively lower frequency wave to penetrate more deeply into the object and still achieve imagery with a reasonable resolution. An efficient image recovery algorithm for the diffraction tomography system was originally developed for processing a wide beam spaceborne SAR data...

  12. Improved Resolution Optical Time Stretch Imaging Based on High Efficiency In-Fiber Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoqing; Yan, Zhijun; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Chao

    2018-01-12

    Most overlooked challenges in ultrafast optical time stretch imaging (OTSI) are sacrificed spatial resolution and higher optical loss. These challenges are originated from optical diffraction devices used in OTSI, which encode image into spectra of ultrashort optical pulses. Conventional free-space diffraction gratings, as widely used in existing OTSI systems, suffer from several inherent drawbacks: limited diffraction efficiency in a non-Littrow configuration due to inherent zeroth-order reflection, high coupling loss between free-space gratings and optical fibers, bulky footprint, and more importantly, sacrificed imaging resolution due to non-full-aperture illumination for individual wavelengths. Here we report resolution-improved and diffraction-efficient OTSI using in-fiber diffraction for the first time to our knowledge. The key to overcome the existing challenges is a 45° tilted fiber grating (TFG), which serves as a compact in-fiber diffraction device offering improved diffraction efficiency (up to 97%), inherent compatibility with optical fibers, and improved imaging resolution owning to almost full-aperture illumination for all illumination wavelengths. 50 million frames per second imaging of fast moving object at 46 m/s with improved imaging resolution has been demonstrated. This conceptually new in-fiber diffraction design opens the way towards cost-effective, compact and high-resolution OTSI systems for image-based high-throughput detection and measurement.

  13. Measuring Spray Droplet Size from Agricultural Nozzles Using Laser Diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Bradley K.; Hoffmann, W. Clint

    2016-01-01

    When making an application of any crop protection material such as an herbicide or pesticide, the applicator uses a variety of skills and information to make an application so that the material reaches the target site (i.e., plant). Information critical in this process is the droplet size that a particular spray nozzle, spray pressure, and spray solution combination generates, as droplet size greatly influences product efficacy and how the spray moves through the environment. Researchers and product manufacturers commonly use laser diffraction equipment to measure the spray droplet size in laboratory wind tunnels. The work presented here describes methods used in making spray droplet size measurements with laser diffraction equipment for both ground and aerial application scenarios that can be used to ensure inter- and intra-laboratory precision while minimizing sampling bias associated with laser diffraction systems. Maintaining critical measurement distances and concurrent airflow throughout the testing process is key to this precision. Real time data quality analysis is also critical to preventing excess variation in the data or extraneous inclusion of erroneous data. Some limitations of this method include atypical spray nozzles, spray solutions or application conditions that result in spray streams that do not fully atomize within the measurement distances discussed. Successful adaption of this method can provide a highly efficient method for evaluation of the performance of agrochemical spray application nozzles under a variety of operational settings. Also discussed are potential experimental design considerations that can be included to enhance functionality of the data collected. PMID:27684589

  14. Photoreceiver efficiency measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehr, C. G.

    1975-01-01

    The efficiency and other related parameters of Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's four laser receivers were measured at the observing stations by oscilloscope photography. If the efficiency is defined as the number of photoelectrons generated by the photomultiplier tube divided by the number of photons entering the aperture of the receiver, its measured value is about 1% for the laser wavelength of 694 nm. This value is consistent with the efficiency computed from the specified characteristics of the photoreceiver's optical components.

  15. Measuring Slit Width and Separation in a Diffraction Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gan, K. K.; Law, A. T.

    2009-01-01

    We present a procedure for measuring slit width and separation in single- and double-slit diffraction experiments. Intensity spectra of diffracted laser light are measured with an optical sensor (PIN diode). Slit widths and separations are extracted by fitting to the measured spectra. We present a simple fitting procedure to account for the…

  16. Diffraction efficiency of plasmonic gratings fabricated by electron beam lithography using a silver halide film

    SciTech Connect

    Sudheer,, E-mail: sudheer@rrcat.gov.in, E-mail: sudheer.rrcat@gmail.com; Tiwari, P.; Srivastava, Himanshu

    2016-07-28

    The silver nanoparticle surface relief gratings of ∼10 μm period are fabricated using electron beam lithography on the silver halide film substrate. Morphological characterization of the gratings shows that the period, the shape, and the relief depth in the gratings are mainly dependent on the number of lines per frame, the spot size, and the accelerating voltage of electron beam raster in the SEM. Optical absorption of the silver nanoparticle gratings provides a broad localized surface plasmon resonance peak in the visible region, whereas the intensity of the peaks depends on the number density of silver nanoparticles in the gratings. Themore » maximum efficiency of ∼7.2% for first order diffraction is observed for the grating fabricated at 15 keV. The efficiency is peaking at 560 nm with ∼380 nm bandwidth. The measured profiles of the diffraction efficiency for the gratings are found in close agreement with the Raman-Nath diffraction theory. This technique provides a simple and efficient method for the fabrication of plasmonic nanoparticle grating structures with high diffraction efficiency having broad wavelength tuning.« less

  17. Centrifugal Contactor Efficiency Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mincher, Bruce Jay; Tillotson, Richard Dean; Grimes, Travis Shane

    2017-01-01

    The contactor efficiency of a 2-cm acrylic centrifugal contactor, fabricated by ANL using 3D printer technology was measured by comparing a contactor test run to 5-min batch contacts. The aqueous phase was ~ 3 ppm depleted uranium in 3 M HNO3, and the organic phase was 1 M DAAP/dodecane. Sampling during the contactor run showed that equilibrium was achieved within < 3 minutes. The contactor efficiency at equilibrium was 95% to 100 %, depending on flowrate.

  18. Changes in diffraction efficiency of gratings with high fructose corn syrup by aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejias-Brizuela, Nildia Y.; Olivares-Pérez, Arturo

    2017-03-01

    High fructose corn syrup was used for preparation of holographic gratings photosensitized with potassium bichromated, for to analyze the behavior of diffraction efficiency to first order. The behavior of diffraction efficiency to first order was analyzed at time intervals different: 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours, because to the recorded gratings showed instability 24 hours after of record. For this reason, we decided to study in the time the evolution of diffraction efficiency parameter for to determine the maximum modulation of material holographic (HFCS-bichromated). The study realized showed that after of 72 hours, the photosensitized material reaches its maximum modulation, with a diffraction efficiency to first order of 4 percent.

  19. Efficient modeling of Bragg coherent x-ray nanobeam diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Hruszkewycz, S. O.; Holt, M. V.; Allain, M.; ...

    2015-07-02

    X-ray Bragg diffraction experiments that utilize tightly focused coherent beams produce complicated Bragg diffraction patterns that depend on scattering geometry, characteristics of the sample, and properties of the x-ray focusing optic. In this paper, we use a Fourier-transform-based method of modeling the 2D intensity distribution of a Bragg peak and apply it to the case of thin films illuminated with a Fresnel zone plate in three different Bragg scattering geometries. Finally, the calculations agree well with experimental coherent diffraction patterns, demonstrating that nanodiffraction patterns can be modeled at nonsymmetric Bragg conditions with this approach—a capability critical for advancing nanofocused x-raymore » diffraction microscopy.« less

  20. Diffraction efficiency of radially-profiled off-plane reflection gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Drew M.; Tutt, James H.; DeRoo, Casey T.; Marlowe, Hannah; Peterson, Thomas J.; McEntaffer, Randall L.; Menz, Benedikt; Burwitz, Vadim; Hartner, Gisela; Laubis, Christian; Scholze, Frank

    2015-09-01

    Future X-ray missions will require gratings with high throughput and high spectral resolution. Blazed off-plane reflection gratings are capable of meeting these demands. A blazed grating profile optimizes grating efficiency, providing higher throughput to one side of zero-order on the arc of diffraction. This paper presents efficiency measurements made in the 0.3 - 1.5 keV energy band at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) BESSY II facility for three holographically-ruled gratings, two of which are blazed. Each blazed grating was tested in both the Littrow configuration and anti-Littrow configuration in order to test the alignment sensitivity of these gratings with regard to throughput. This paper outlines the procedure of the grating experiment performed at BESSY II and discuss the resulting efficiency measurements across various energies. Experimental results are generally consistent with theory and demonstrate that the blaze does increase throughput to one side of zero-order. However, the total efficiency of the non-blazed, sinusoidal grating is greater than that of the blazed gratings, which suggests that the method of manufacturing these blazed profiles fails to produce facets with the desired level of precision. Finally, evidence of a successful blaze implementation from first diffraction results of prototype blazed gratings produce via a new fabrication technique at the University of Iowa are presented.

  1. Optical diffraction for measurements of nano-mechanical bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermans, Rodolfo I.; Dueck, Benjamin; Ndieyira, Joseph Wafula; McKendry, Rachel A.; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2016-06-01

    We explore and exploit diffraction effects that have been previously neglected when modelling optical measurement techniques for the bending of micro-mechanical transducers such as cantilevers for atomic force microscopy. The illumination of a cantilever edge causes an asymmetric diffraction pattern at the photo-detector affecting the calibration of the measured signal in the popular optical beam deflection technique (OBDT). The conditions that avoid such detection artefacts conflict with the use of smaller cantilevers. Embracing diffraction patterns as data yields a potent detection technique that decouples tilt and curvature and simultaneously relaxes the requirements on the illumination alignment and detector position through a measurable which is invariant to translation and rotation. We show analytical results, numerical simulations and physiologically relevant experimental data demonstrating the utility of the diffraction patterns. We offer experimental design guidelines and quantify possible sources of systematic error in OBDT. We demonstrate a new nanometre resolution detection method that can replace OBDT, where diffraction effects from finite sized or patterned cantilevers are exploited. Such effects are readily generalized to cantilever arrays, and allow transmission detection of mechanical curvature, enabling instrumentation with simpler geometry. We highlight the comparative advantages over OBDT by detecting molecular activity of antibiotic Vancomycin.

  2. Lattice strain measurements on sandstones under load using neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frischbutter, A.; Neov, D.; Scheffzük, Ch.; Vrána, M.; Walther, K.

    2000-11-01

    Neutron diffraction methods (both time-of-flight- and angle-dispersive diffraction) are applied to intracrystalline strain measurements on geological samples undergoing uniaxial increasing compressional load. The experiments were carried out on Cretaceous sandstones from the Elbezone (East Germany), consisting of >95% quartz which are bedded but without crystallographic preferred orientation of quartz. From the stress-strain relation the Young's modulus for our quartz sample was determined to be (72.2±2.9) GPa using results of the neutron time-of-flight method. The influence of different kinds of bedding in sandstones (laminated and convolute bedding) could be determined. We observed differences of factor 2 (convolute bedding) and 3 (laminated bedding) for the elastic stiffness, determined with angle dispersive neutron diffraction (crystallographic strain) and with strain gauges (mechanical strain). The data indicate which geological conditions may influence the stress-strain behaviour of geological materials. The influence of bedding on the stress-strain behaviour of a laminated bedded sandstone was indicated by direct residual stress measurements using neutron time-of-flight diffraction. The measurements were carried out six days after unloading the sample. Residual strain was measured for three positions from the centre to the periphery and within two radial directions of the cylinder. We observed that residual strain changes from extension to compression in a different manner for two perpendicular directions of the bedding plane.

  3. Phase sensitive diffraction sensor for high sensitivity refractive index measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumawat, Nityanand; Varma, Manoj; Kumar, Sunil

    2018-02-01

    In this study a diffraction based sensor has been developed for bio molecular sensing applications and performing assays in real time. A diffraction grating fabricated on a glass substrate produced diffraction patterns both in transmission and reflection when illuminated by a laser diode. We used zeroth order I(0,0) as reference and first order I(0,1) as signal channel and conducted ratiometric measurements that reduced noise by more than 50 times. The ratiometric approach resulted in a very simple instrumentation with very high sensitivity. In the past, we have shown refractive index measurements both for bulk and surface adsorption using the diffractive self-referencing approach. In the current work we extend the same concept to higher diffraction orders. We have considered order I(0,1) and I(1,1) and performed ratiometric measurements I(0,1)/I(1,1) to eliminate the common mode fluctuations. Since orders I(0,1) and I(1,1) behaved opposite to each other, the resulting ratio signal amplitude increased more than twice compared to our previous results. As a proof of concept we used different salt concentrations in DI water. Increased signal amplitude and improved fluid injection system resulted in more than 4 times improvement in detection limit, giving limit of detection 1.3×10-7 refractive index unit (RIU) compared to our previous results. The improved refractive index sensitivity will help significantly for high sensitivity label free bio sensing application in a very cost-effective and simple experimental set-up.

  4. Improved Diffraction Efficiency of Polarization-Sensitive Azobenzene-Containing Copolymers in an Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidenko, N. A.; Davidenko, I. I.; Mokrinskaya, E. V.; Pavlov, V. A.; Studzinsky, S. L.; Tarasenko, V. V.; Tonkopieva, L. S.; Chuprina, N. G.

    2018-03-01

    Recording media for polarization holography based on new azobenzene-containing monomers with octylmethacrylate are created. Their electrophysical and information properties are investigated. Improvement of the diffraction efficiency of holograms in these media in an external electric field formed by charging the free surface of the polymer film in a corona discharge is demonstrated. The diffraction efficiency is improved more in the copolymer, in which the azobenzene fragments possess larger dipole moments.

  5. Cross talk and diffraction efficiency in angular multiplexed memories using improved polypeptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramenah, Harry K.; Bertrand, Paul; Soubari, E. H.; Meyrueis, Patrick

    1996-12-01

    We studied energy coupling between gratings and angularly multiplexed 20 gratings with a uniform diffraction efficiency within 25 micrometer layer thickness of dichromated gelatin. The dependence of diffraction efficiency on beam ratio is given. We recorded a matrix form memory of nxmxp elements, where n and m are the rows and columns and p the number of multiplexes. For indication only, n equals m equals 10, p equals 20, the surface area of the matrix is 1 cm2. Color diffractive images and digital data are illustrated as well as video, cartography and medical applications.

  6. Diffraction measurements using the LHC Beam Loss Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalliokoski, Matti

    2017-03-01

    The Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system of the Large Hadron Collider protects the machine from beam induced damage by measuring the absorbed dose rates of beam losses, and by triggering beam dump if the rates increase above the allowed threshold limits. Although the detection time scales are optimized for multi-turn losses, information on fast losses can be recovered from the loss data. In this paper, methods in using the BLM system in diffraction studies are discussed.

  7. Diffraction Efficiency of Thin Film Holographic Beam Steering Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titus, Charles M.; Pouch, John; Nguyen, Hung; Miranda, Felix; Bos, Philip J.

    2003-01-01

    Dynamic holography has been demonstrated as a method for correcting aberrations in space deployable optics, and can also be used to achieve high-resolution beam steering in the same environment. In this paper, we consider some of the factors affecting the efficiency of these devices. Specifically, the effect on the efficiency of a highly collimated beam from the number of discrete phase steps per period is considered for a blazed thin film beam steering grating. The effect of the number of discrete phase steps per period on steering resolution is also considered. We also present some result of Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) calculations of light propagating through liquid crystal "blazed" gratings. Liquid crystal gratings are shown to spatially modulate both the phase and amplitude of the propagating light.

  8. Alternate Multilayer Gratings with Enhanced Diffraction Efficiency in the 500-5000 eV Energy Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polack, François; Lagarde, Bruno; Idir, Mourad; Cloup, Audrey Liard; Jourdain, Erick; Roulliay, Marc; Delmotte, Franck; Gautier, Julien; Ravet-Krill, Marie-Françoise

    2007-01-01

    An alternate multilayer (AML) grating is a 2 dimensional diffraction structure formed on an optical surface, having a 0.5 duty cycle in the in-plane and in the in-depth direction. It can be made by covering a shallow depth laminar grating with a multilayer stack. We show here that their 2D structure confer AML gratings a high angular and energetic selectivity and therefore enhanced diffraction properties, when used in grazing incidence. In the tender X-ray range (500eV - 5000 eV) they behave much like blazed gratings. Over 15% efficiency has been measured on a 1200 lines/mm Mo/Si AML grating in the 1.2 - 1.5 keV energy range. Computer simulations show that selected multilayer materials such as Cr/C should allow diffraction efficiency over 50% at photon energies over 3 keV.

  9. Evaluation of domain randomness in periodically poled lithium niobate by diffraction noise measurement.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Prashant Povel; Choi, Hee Joo; Kim, Byoung Joo; Cha, Myoungsik

    2013-12-16

    Random duty-cycle errors (RDE) in ferroelectric quasi-phase-matching (QPM) devices not only affect the frequency conversion efficiency, but also generate non-phase-matched parasitic noise that can be detrimental to some applications. We demonstrate an accurate but simple method for measuring the RDE in periodically poled lithium niobate. Due to the equivalence between the undepleted harmonic generation spectrum and the diffraction pattern from the QPM grating, we employed linear diffraction measurement which is much simpler than tunable harmonic generation experiments [J. S. Pelc, et al., Opt. Lett.36, 864-866 (2011)]. As a result, we could relate the RDE for the QPM device to the relative noise intensity between the diffraction orders.

  10. Effect of recording condition on the diffraction efficiency of magnetic hologram with magnetic garnet films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yuichi; Takagi, Hiroyuki; Lim, Pang Boey; Inoue, Mitsuteru

    2014-09-01

    A holographic memory has been attracting attention as recording media with high recording density and high data transfer rate. We have studied the magnetic garnets as a rewritable and long life media for magnetic holography. However, since the signal intensity of reconstructed image was relatively low, the effects of recording conditions on the diffraction efficiency of magnetic hologram were investigated with experiments and the numerical simulation using COMSOL multi-physics. The diffraction efficiency tends to decrease as increasing the spatial frequency, and the use of short pulse laser with the pulse width of 50 ps was found to be effective to achieve high diffraction efficiency. This suggests that the formation of clear magnetic fringe similar to interference pattern can be obtained by the use of short pulse laser since undesirable heat diffusion during radiation does not occur. On the other hand, the diffraction efficiency increased as increasing the film thickness up to 3.1 μm but was saturated in the garnet film thicker than 3.1 μm in the case of spatial frequency of 1500 line pair/mm. The numerical simulation showed that the effective depth of magnetic fringe was limited about 1.8 μm irrespective of the garnet film thickness because the fringes were connected by thermal diffusion near the surface of the film, and the effective depth is limited due to this connection of the magnetic fringe. Avoiding this fringe connection, much higher diffraction efficiency will be achieved.

  11. Spatially resolved scatter measurement of diffractive micromirror arrays.

    PubMed

    Sicker, Cornelius; Heber, Jörg; Berndt, Dirk

    2016-06-01

    Spatial light modulators (SLMs) support flexible system concepts in modern optics and especially phase-only SLMs such as micromirror arrays (MMAs) appear attractive for many applications. In order to achieve a precise phase modulation, which is crucial for optical performance, careful characterization and calibration of SLM devices is required. We examine an intensity-based measurement concept, which promises distinct advantages by means of a spatially resolved scatter measurement that is combined with the MMA's diffractive principle. Measurements yield quantitative results, which are consistent with measurements of micromirror roughness components, by white-light interferometry. They reveal relative scatter as low as 10-4, which corresponds to contrast ratios up to 10,000. The potential of the technique to resolve phase changes in the subnanometer range is experimentally demonstrated.

  12. High-resolution neutron-diffraction measurements to 8 kbar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, C. L.; Fortes, A. D.; Ridley, C. J.; Wood, I. G.; Dobson, D. P.; Funnell, N. P.; Gibbs, A. S.; Goodway, C. M.; Sadykov, R.; Knight, K. S.

    2017-10-01

    We describe the capability to measure high-resolution neutron powder diffraction data to a pressure of at least 8 kbar. We have used the HRPD instrument at the ISIS neutron source and a piston-cylinder design of pressure cell machined from a null-scattering titanium zirconium alloy. Data were collected under hydrostatic conditions from an elpasolite perovskite La?NiMnO?; by virtue of a thinner cell wall on the incident-beam side of the cell, it was possible to obtain data in the instrument's highest resolution back-scattering detector banks up to a maximum pressure of 8.5 kbar.

  13. Diffraction grating transmission efficiencies for XUV and soft X rays. [for HEAO-B extrasolar astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnopper, H. W.; Van Speybroeck, L. P.; Delvaille, J. P.; Epstein, A.; Kaellne, E.; Bachrach, R. Z.; Dijkstra, J.; Lantward, L.

    1977-01-01

    The manufacture and properties of a grating intended for extrasolar X-ray studies are described. The manufacturing process uses a split laser beam exposing an interference pattern on the photoresist-coated glass plated with a nickel parting layer. The grating, supporting structure, and mounting frame are electrodeposited on the nickel parting layer, and the final product is lifted from the glass substrate by selective etching of the nickel. A model was derived which relates the number of counts received in a given order m as a function of photon wavenumber. A 4-deg beam line was used to measure the efficiencies of gold transmission gratings for diffraction of X-rays in the range of 45 to 275 eV. The experimental results are in good agreement with model calculations.

  14. Effect of substrate material selection on polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency for multilayer diffractive optics in oblique incident situation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Cui, Qingfeng; Piao, Mingxu

    2018-05-01

    The effect of substrate material selection for multilayer diffractive optical elements (MLDOEs) on polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency (PIDE) is studied in the oblique incident situation. A mathematical model of substrate material selection is proposed to obtain the high PIDE with large incident angle. The extended expression of the microstructure heights with consideration of incident angle is deduced to calculate the PIDE difference Δ η bar(λ) for different substrate material combinations. The smaller value of Δ η bar(λ) indicates the more optimal substrate material combination in a wide incident angle range. Based on the deduced mathematical model, different MLDOEs are analyzed in visible and infrared wavebands. The results show that the three-layer DOEs can be applied in larger incident angle situation than the double-layer DOEs in visible waveband. When the two substrate materials are the same, polycarbonate (PC) is more reasonable than poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) as the middle filling optical material for the three-layer DOEs. In the infrared waveband, the PIDE decreases in the LWIR are obviously smaller than that in the MWIR for the same substrate material combination, and the PIDE cannot be calculated when the incident angle larger than critical angle. The analysis results can be used to guide the hybrid optical system design with MLDOEs.

  15. Measurement of erythrocyte deformability by two laser diffraction methods.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Zhao, H; Zhuang, F Y; Stoltz, J F

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the deformability of red blood cells (RBC) by two laser diffraction methods: the Laser-assisted Optical Rotational Cell Analyser (LORCA, Mechatronics, Amsterdam, Netherlands) and a Shear Stress Diffractometer (RHEODYN SSD, Myrenne, Roetgen, Germany). Experiments were carried out on 46 healthy human subjects. The elongation index EI of normal and hardened RBCs (obtained by heating blood at 49 degrees C or by incubating RBCs in solutions of diamide) was measured. The results showed that the standard deviations of the experimental data for normal RBCs were relatively small, especially at high shear stresses (more than 3.0 Pa), but higher than those reported before. Some correlations between the results given by the two instruments were also found. It should be noted that for hardened RBCs, the standard deviations of the measurements were important compared with the mean values in the two instruments.

  16. Optimisation of a low cost SLM for diffraction efficiency and ghost order suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, R.; D'Ambrosio, V.; Rubino, E.; Jedrkiewicz, O.; di Trapani, P.; Padgett, M. J.

    2011-11-01

    Spatial Light Modulators (SLMs) are a powerful tool in many optics laboratories, but due to the technology required for their fabrication, they are usually very expensive. Recently some inexpensive devices have been produced, however their phase shift range is less than 2π, leading to a loss of diffraction efficiency for the SLM. We show how to improve the first order diffraction efficiency of such an SLM by adjusting the blazing function, and obtain a 1.5 times increase in first order diffracted power. Even a perfect SLM with 2π phase throw can produce undesired effects in some situations; for example in holographic optical tweezers it is common to find unwanted "ghost spots" near to the array of first-order spots. Modulating the amplitude, by spatially modulating the blazing function, allows us to suppress the ghost spots. This increases the contrast between desired and unwanted spots by more than an order of magnitude.

  17. Three-Dimensional Displacement Measurement Using Diffractive Optic Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, John A.; Cole, Helen J.; Shepherd, Robert L.; Ashley Paul R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper introduces a powerful new optical method which utilizes diffractive optic interferometry (DOI) to measure both in-plane and out-of-plane displacement with variable sensitivity using the same optical system. Sensitivity is varied by utilizing various combinations of the different wavefronts produced by a conjugate pair of binary Optical elements; a transmission grating is used to produce several illumination beams while a reflective grating replicated on the surface of a specimen, provides the reference for the undeformed state. A derivation of the equations which govern the method is included along with a discussion Of the experimental tests conducted to verify the theory. Overall, the results are excellent, with experimental data agreeing to within a few percent of the theoretical predictions.

  18. Ultrashort electron bunch length measurement with diffraction radiation deflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Dao; Huang, Wen-Hui

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel method to measure electron bunch length with a diffraction radiation (DR) deflector which is composed of a DR radiator and three beam position monitors (BPMs). When an electron beam passes through a metallic aperture which is tilted by 45 degrees with respect to its trajectory, backward DR that propagates perpendicular to the beam’s trajectory is generated which adds a transverse deflection to the beam as a result of momentum conservation. The deflection is found to be largely dependent on the bunch length and could be easily observed with a downstream BPM. Detailed investigations show that this method has wide applicability, high temporal resolution, and great simplicity.

  19. Highly efficient acousto-optic diffraction in Sn2P2S6 crystals.

    PubMed

    Martynyuk-Lototska, I Yu; Mys, O G; Grabar, A A; Stoika, I M; Vysochanskii, Yu M; Vlokh, R O

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the acousto-optic (AO) diffraction in Sn2P2S6 crystals and found that they manifest high values of an AO figure of merit. The above crystals may therefore be used as highly efficient materials in different AO applications.

  20. Correlating Atom Probe Crystallographic Measurements with Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction Data.

    PubMed

    Breen, Andrew J; Babinsky, Katharina; Day, Alec C; Eder, K; Oakman, Connor J; Trimby, Patrick W; Primig, Sophie; Cairney, Julie M; Ringer, Simon P

    2017-04-01

    Correlative microscopy approaches offer synergistic solutions to many research problems. One such combination, that has been studied in limited detail, is the use of atom probe tomography (APT) and transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) on the same tip specimen. By combining these two powerful microscopy techniques, the microstructure of important engineering alloys can be studied in greater detail. For the first time, the accuracy of crystallographic measurements made using APT will be independently verified using TKD. Experimental data from two atom probe tips, one a nanocrystalline Al-0.5Ag alloy specimen collected on a straight flight-path atom probe and the other a high purity Mo specimen collected on a reflectron-fitted instrument, will be compared. We find that the average minimum misorientation angle, calculated from calibrated atom probe reconstructions with two different pole combinations, deviate 0.7° and 1.4°, respectively, from the TKD results. The type of atom probe and experimental conditions appear to have some impact on this accuracy and the reconstruction and measurement procedures are likely to contribute further to degradation in angular resolution. The challenges and implications of this correlative approach will also be discussed.

  1. Beam Size Measurement by Optical Diffraction Radiation and Laser System for Compton Polarimeter (in Chinese)

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chuyu

    2012-12-31

    Beam diagnostics is an essential constituent of any accelerator, so that it is named as "organs of sense" or "eyes of the accelerator." Beam diagnostics is a rich field. A great variety of physical effects or physical principles are made use of in this field. Some devices are based on electro-magnetic influence by moving charges, such as faraday cups, beam transformers, pick-ups; Some are related to Coulomb interaction of charged particles with matter, such as scintillators, viewing screens, ionization chambers; Nuclear or elementary particle physics interactions happen in some other devices, like beam loss monitors, polarimeters, luminosity monitors; Some measuremore » photons emitted by moving charges, such as transition radiation, synchrotron radiation monitors and diffraction radiation-which is the topic of the first part of this thesis; Also, some make use of interaction of particles with photons, such as laser wire and Compton polarimeters-which is the second part of my thesis. Diagnostics let us perceive what properties a beam has and how it behaves in a machine, give us guideline for commissioning, controlling the machine and indispensable parameters vital to physics experiments. In the next two decades, the research highlight will be colliders (TESLA, CLIC, JLC) and fourth-generation light sources (TESLA FEL, LCLS, Spring 8 FEL) based on linear accelerator. These machines require a new generation of accelerator with smaller beam, better stability and greater efficiency. Compared with those existing linear accelerators, the performance of next generation linear accelerator will be doubled in all aspects, such as 10 times smaller horizontal beam size, more than 10 times smaller vertical beam size and a few or more times higher peak power. Furthermore, some special positions in the accelerator have even more stringent requirements, such as the interaction point of colliders and wigglor of free electron lasers. Higher performance of these accelerators

  2. Efficiency Measurement of VANDLE Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, William; Matei, C.; Cizewski, J. A.; O'Malley, P. D.; Spassova, I.; Bardayan, D.; Blackmon, J. C.; Brune, C.; Massey, T.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Madurga, M.; Sarazin, F.; Raiola, F.

    2010-02-01

    The Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE) is a new array of plastic scintillator bars being developed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The modular design enables optimization of different configurations for particular experiments, such as (d,n) and beta-delayed neutron-decay experiments, with rare ion beams. Two prototype modules were moved to the Edwards Accelerator Laboratory at Ohio University to measure their efficiency using a calibrated ^27Al(d,n) reaction as a neutron source. Results show that one bar with a cross section of 3x3 cm^2 is over 25% efficient to neutrons around 1 MeV with sensitivity down to 100 keV neutrons. Other design features such as wrapping and coupling will be presented, as well as results from resolution tests. )

  3. High Quantum Efficiency Nanopillar Photodiodes Overcoming the Diffraction Limit of Light.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wook-Jae; Senanayake, Pradeep; Farrell, Alan C; Lin, Andrew; Hung, Chung-Hong; Huffaker, Diana L

    2016-01-13

    InAs1-xSbx nanowires have recently attracted interest for infrared sensing applications due to the small bandgap and high thermal conductivity. However, previous reports on nanowire-based infrared sensors required low operating temperatures in order to mitigate the high dark current and have shown poor sensitivities resulting from reduced light coupling efficiency beyond the diffraction limit. Here, InAsSb nanopillar photodiodes with high quantum efficiency are achieved by partially coating the nanopillar with metal that excites localized surface plasmon resonances, leading to quantum efficiencies of ∼29% at 2390 nm. These high quantum efficiency nanopillar photodiodes, with 180 nm diameters and 1000 nm heights, allow operation at temperatures as high as 220 K and exhibit a detection wavelength up to 3000 nm, well beyond the diffraction limit. The InAsSb nanopillars are grown on low cost GaAs (111)B substrates using an InAs buffer layer, making our device architecture a promising path toward low-cost infrared focal plane arrays with high operating temperature.

  4. Diffraction Efficiency Testing of Sinusoidal and Blazed Off-Plane Reflection Gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutt, James H.; McEntaffer, Randall L.; Marlowe, Hannah; Miles, Drew M.; Peterson, Thomas J.; Deroo, Casey T.; Scholze, Frank; Laubis, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Reflection gratings in the off-plane mount have the potential to enhance the performance of future high resolution soft X-ray spectrometers. Diffraction efficiency can be optimized through the use of blazed grating facets, achieving high-throughput on one side of zero-order. This paper presents the results from a comparison between a grating with a sinusoidally grooved profile and two gratings that have been blazed. The results show that the blaze does increase throughput to one side of zero-order; however, the total throughput of the sinusoidal gratings is greater than the blazed gratings, suggesting the method of manufacturing the blazed gratings does not produce precise facets. The blazed gratings were also tested in their Littrow and anti-Littrow configurations to quantify diffraction efficiency sensitivity to rotations about the grating normal. Only a small difference in the energy at which efficiency is maximized between the Littrow and anti-Littrow configurations is seen with a small shift in peak efficiency towards higher energies in the anti-Littrow case. This is due to a decrease in the effective blaze angle in the anti-Littrow mounting. This is supported by PCGrate-SX V6.1 modeling carried out for each blazed grating which predicts similar response trends in the Littrow and anti-Littrow orientations.

  5. Experiment evaluation of speckle suppression efficiency of 2D quasi-spiral M-sequence-based diffractive optical element.

    PubMed

    Lapchuk, A; Pashkevich, G A; Prygun, O V; Yurlov, V; Borodin, Y; Kryuchyn, A; Korchovyi, A A; Shylo, S

    2015-10-01

    The quasi-spiral 2D diffractive optical element (DOE) based on M-sequence of length N=15 is designed and manufactured. The speckle suppression efficiency by the DOE rotation is measured. The speckle suppression coefficients of 10.5, 6, and 4 are obtained for green, violet, and red laser beams, respectively. The results of numerical simulation and experimental data show that the quasi-spiral binary DOE structure can be as effective in speckle reduction as a periodic 2D DOE structure. The numerical simulation and experimental results show that the speckle suppression efficiency of the 2D DOE structure decreases approximately twice at the boundaries of the visible range. It is shown that a replacement of this structure with the bilateral 1D DOE allows obtaining the maximum speckle suppression efficiency in the entire visible range of light.

  6. Detecting measurement outliers: remeasure efficiently

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullrich, Albrecht

    2010-09-01

    Shrinking structures, advanced optical proximity correction (OPC) and complex measurement strategies continually challenge critical dimension (CD) metrology tools and recipe creation processes. One important quality ensuring task is the control of measurement outlier behavior. Outliers could trigger false positive alarm for specification violations impacting cycle time or potentially yield. Constant high level of outliers not only deteriorates cycle time but also puts unnecessary stress on tool operators leading eventually to human errors. At tool level the sources of outliers are natural variations (e.g. beam current etc.), drifts, contrast conditions, focus determination or pattern recognition issues, etc. Some of these can result from suboptimal or even wrong recipe settings, like focus position or measurement box size. Such outliers, created by an automatic recipe creation process faced with more complicated structures, would manifest itself rather as systematic variation of measurements than the one caused by 'pure' tool variation. I analyzed several statistical methods to detect outliers. These range from classical outlier tests for extrema, robust metrics like interquartile range (IQR) to methods evaluating the distribution of different populations of measurement sites, like the Cochran test. The latter suits especially the detection of systematic effects. The next level of outlier detection entwines additional information about the mask and the manufacturing process with the measurement results. The methods were reviewed for measured variations assumed to be normally distributed with zero mean but also for the presence of a statistically significant spatial process signature. I arrive at the conclusion that intelligent outlier detection can influence the efficiency and cycle time of CD metrology greatly. In combination with process information like target, typical platform variation and signature, one can tailor the detection to the needs of the photomask

  7. Copper Doped Methylene Blue Sensitized Poly(vinyl alcohol)-Acrylamide Films for Stable Diffraction Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Beena Mary; Joseph, Rani; Sreekumar, K.; Sudha Kartha, C.

    2006-11-01

    Copper doped methylene blue sensitized poly(vinyl alcohol) (MBPVA)-acrylamide films were fabricated to improve the storage life of recorded gratings. The films were fabricated using gravity settling method and the copper chloride concentration was optimized as 3.18× 10-3 mol/l for a dye concentration of 6.2× 10-4 mol/l. The gratings recorded on the optimized film constitution could be stored for months with stable diffraction efficiency (24%) without any chemical or thermal fixing techniques. The resolution of the material is found to be unaffected with the addition of copper chloride.

  8. Switchable electro-optic diffractive lens with high efficiency for ophthalmic applications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guoqiang; Mathine, David L.; Valley, Pouria; Äyräs, Pekka; Haddock, Joshua N.; Giridhar, M. S.; Williby, Gregory; Schwiegerling, Jim; Meredith, Gerald R.; Kippelen, Bernard; Honkanen, Seppo; Peyghambarian, Nasser

    2006-01-01

    Presbyopia is an age-related loss of accommodation of the human eye that manifests itself as inability to shift focus from distant to near objects. Assuming no refractive error, presbyopes have clear vision of distant objects; they require reading glasses for viewing near objects. Area-divided bifocal lenses are one example of a treatment for this problem. However, the field of view is limited in such eyeglasses, requiring the user to gaze down to accomplish near-vision tasks and in some cases causing dizziness and discomfort. Here, we report on previously undescribed switchable, flat, liquid-crystal diffractive lenses that can adaptively change their focusing power. The operation of these spectacle lenses is based on electrical control of the refractive index of a 5-μm-thick layer of nematic liquid crystal using a circular array of photolithographically defined transparent electrodes. It operates with high transmission, low voltage (<2 Vrms), fast response (<1 sec), diffraction efficiency > 90%, small aberrations, and a power-failure-safe configuration. These results represent significant advance in state-of-the-art liquid-crystal diffractive lenses for vision care and other applications. They have the potential of revolutionizing the field of presbyopia correction when combined with automatic adjustable focusing power. PMID:16597675

  9. Diffractive intermediate layer enables broadband light trapping for high efficiency ultrathin c-Si tandem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guijun; Ho, Jacob Y. L.; Li, He; Kwok, Hoi-Sing

    2014-06-01

    Light management through the intermediate reflector in the tandem cell configuration is of great practical importance for achieving high stable efficiency and also low cost production. So far, however, the intermediate reflectors employed currently are mainly focused on the light absorption enhancement of the top cell. Here, we present a diffractive intermediate layer that allows for light trapping over a broadband wavelength for the ultrathin c-Si tandem solar cell. Compared with the standard intermediate reflector, this nanoscale architectural intermediate layer results in a 35% and 21% remarkable enhancement of the light absorption in the top (400-800 nm) and bottom (800-1100 nm) cells simultaneously, and ultrathin c-Si tandem cells with impressive conversion efficiency of 13.3% are made on the glass substrate.

  10. Diffraction efficiency study of holographic gratings in dichromated poly(vinyl alcohol) NiCl II•6H IIO doped

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontanilla-Urdaneta, R. C.; Hernández-Garay, M. P.; Olivares-Pérez, A.; Páez-Trujillo, G.; Fuentes-Tapia, I.

    2008-02-01

    Experimental results to the saturation and diffraction efficiency from holographic gratings are presented in this investigation. The experiments were carried out during real time holographic gratings formation. Dichromated poly(vinyl alcohol) was doped with nickel(II) chloride hexahydrate and it is used like optical material. The influence of the hologram parameters to get the maximum diffraction efficiency is studied at room conditions. This study contributes to get more information about the behavior of this material for holographic gratings recording.

  11. Diffraction efficiency of unbleached phase and amplitude holograms as a function of volume fraction of metallic silver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madrigal, R. F.; Blaya, L. Carretero S.; Ulibarrena, M.; Beléndez, A.; Fimia, A.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present the theoretical and experimental study of diffraction efficiency of unbleached holograms, showing that the volume fraction of metallic silver inside the gelatin after development ( q) is the main parameter in the behavior of the holographic grating properties. Using this fact, and the obtained relationship between pH and q, we have found values of diffraction efficiencies near 30% with a developing time of 3 min without bleaching step.

  12. Challenges in measuring feed efficiency

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The term feed efficiency is vague, and is defined differently by people. Historically, feed efficiency has been defined as the feed:gain (F:G) ratio or the inverse (G:F). Indexes have been developed to rank animals for feed efficiency. These indexes include residual feed intake (RFI) and residual...

  13. The first X-ray diffraction measurements on Mars.

    PubMed

    Bish, David; Blake, David; Vaniman, David; Sarrazin, Philippe; Bristow, Thomas; Achilles, Cherie; Dera, Przemyslaw; Chipera, Steve; Crisp, Joy; Downs, R T; Farmer, Jack; Gailhanou, Marc; Ming, Doug; Morookian, John Michael; Morris, Richard; Morrison, Shaunna; Rampe, Elizabeth; Treiman, Allan; Yen, Albert

    2014-11-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory landed in Gale crater on Mars in August 2012, and the Curiosity rover then began field studies on its drive toward Mount Sharp, a central peak made of ancient sediments. CheMin is one of ten instruments on or inside the rover, all designed to provide detailed information on the rocks, soils and atmosphere in this region. CheMin is a miniaturized X-ray diffraction/X-ray fluorescence (XRD/XRF) instrument that uses transmission geometry with an energy-discriminating CCD detector. CheMin uses onboard standards for XRD and XRF calibration, and beryl:quartz mixtures constitute the primary XRD standards. Four samples have been analysed by CheMin, namely a soil sample, two samples drilled from mudstones and a sample drilled from a sandstone. Rietveld and full-pattern analysis of the XRD data reveal a complex mineralogy, with contributions from parent igneous rocks, amorphous components and several minerals relating to aqueous alteration. In particular, the mudstone samples all contain one or more phyllosilicates consistent with alteration in liquid water. In addition to quantitative mineralogy, Rietveld refinements also provide unit-cell parameters for the major phases, which can be used to infer the chemical compositions of individual minerals and, by difference, the composition of the amorphous component.

  14. Efficient photonic reformatting of celestial light for diffraction-limited spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLachlan, D. G.; Harris, R. J.; Gris-Sánchez, I.; Morris, T. J.; Choudhury, D.; Gendron, E.; Basden, A. G.; Spaleniak, I.; Arriola, A.; Birks, T. A.; Allington-Smith, J. R.; Thomson, R. R.

    2017-02-01

    The spectral resolution of a dispersive astronomical spectrograph is limited by the trade-off between throughput and the width of the entrance slit. Photonic guided wave transitions have been proposed as a route to bypass this trade-off, by enabling the efficient reformatting of incoherent seeing-limited light collected by the telescope into a linear array of single modes: a pseudo-slit which is highly multimode in one axis but diffraction-limited in the dispersion axis of the spectrograph. It is anticipated that the size of a single-object spectrograph fed with light in this manner would be essentially independent of the telescope aperture size. A further anticipated benefit is that such spectrographs would be free of `modal noise', a phenomenon that occurs in high-resolution multimode fibre-fed spectrographs due to the coherent nature of the telescope point spread function (PSF). We seek to address these aspects by integrating a multicore fibre photonic lantern with an ultrafast laser inscribed three-dimensional waveguide interconnect to spatially reformat the modes within the PSF into a diffraction-limited pseudo-slit. Using the CANARY adaptive optics (AO) demonstrator on the William Herschel Telescope, and 1530 ± 80 nm stellar light, the device exhibits a transmission of 47-53 per cent depending upon the mode of AO correction applied. We also show the advantage of using AO to couple light into such a device by sampling only the core of the CANARY PSF. This result underscores the possibility that a fully optimized guided-wave device can be used with AO to provide efficient spectroscopy at high spectral resolution.

  15. Direct Measurement of Polarization-Induced Fields in GaN/AlN by Nano-Beam Electron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Daniel; Müller-Caspary, Knut; Schowalter, Marco; Grieb, Tim; Mehrtens, Thorsten; Rosenauer, Andreas; Ben, Teresa; García, Rafael; Redondo-Cubero, Andrés; Lorenz, Katharina; Daudin, Bruno; Morales, Francisco M.

    2016-06-01

    The built-in piezoelectric fields in group III-nitrides can act as road blocks on the way to maximizing the efficiency of opto-electronic devices. In order to overcome this limitation, a proper characterization of these fields is necessary. In this work nano-beam electron diffraction in scanning transmission electron microscopy mode has been used to simultaneously measure the strain state and the induced piezoelectric fields in a GaN/AlN multiple quantum well system.

  16. Measurement of Droplet Sizes by the Diffraction Ring Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1948-07-27

    for measuring the droplet size distribution in sprays ob- tained by pressure injection of a liquid through an orifice «roby air- stream atomization...Diameter vs Injection Pressure 10 6. Distribution Curves for Spray Sample of Water Injected into Air Stream .... 11 Page ii Page Hi i^ujJa-je jii...tion in sprays obtained by pressure injection of a liquid through an orifice or by air- stream atomization. Perhaps the most widely used method

  17. Adaptability of laser diffraction measurement technique in soil physics methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barna, Gyöngyi; Szabó, József; Rajkai, Kálmán; Bakacsi, Zsófia; Koós, Sándor; László, Péter; Hauk, Gabriella; Makó, András

    2016-04-01

    There are intentions all around the world to harmonize soils' particle size distribution (PSD) data by the laser diffractometer measurements (LDM) to that of the sedimentation techniques (pipette or hydrometer methods). Unfortunately, up to the applied methodology (e. g. type of pre-treatments, kind of dispersant etc.), PSDs of the sedimentation methods (due to different standards) are dissimilar and could be hardly harmonized with each other, as well. A need was arisen therefore to build up a database, containing PSD values measured by the pipette method according to the Hungarian standard (MSZ-08. 0205: 1978) and the LDM according to a widespread and widely used procedure. In our current publication the first results of statistical analysis of the new and growing PSD database are presented: 204 soil samples measured with pipette method and LDM (Malvern Mastersizer 2000, HydroG dispersion unit) were compared. Applying usual size limits at the LDM, clay fraction was highly under- and silt fraction was overestimated compared to the pipette method. Subsequently soil texture classes determined from the LDM measurements significantly differ from results of the pipette method. According to previous surveys and relating to each other the two dataset to optimizing, the clay/silt boundary at LDM was changed. Comparing the results of PSDs by pipette method to that of the LDM, in case of clay and silt fractions the modified size limits gave higher similarities. Extension of upper size limit of clay fraction from 0.002 to 0.0066 mm, and so change the lower size limit of silt fractions causes more easy comparability of pipette method and LDM. Higher correlations were found between clay content and water vapor adsorption, specific surface area in case of modified limit, as well. Texture classes were also found less dissimilar. The difference between the results of the two kind of PSD measurement methods could be further reduced knowing other routinely analyzed soil parameters

  18. LN2 spray droplet size measurement via ensemble diffraction technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saiyed, N. H.; Jurns, J.; Chato, David J.

    1991-01-01

    The size of subcooled liquified nitrogen droplets are measured with a 5 mW He-Ne laser as a function of pressure difference (delta P) across flat spray and full cone pressure atomizing nozzles. For delta P's of 3 to 30 psid, the spray sauter mean diameter (SMD) ranged between 250 to 50 microns. The pressure range tested is representative of those expected during cryogenic fluid transfer operations in space. The droplet sizes from the flat spray nozzles were greater than those from the full cone nozzle. A power function of the form, SMD varies as delta P(exp a), describes the spray SMD as a function of the delta P very well. The values of a were -0.36 for the flat spray and -0.87 for the full cone. The reduced dependence of the flat spray SMD on the delta P was probably because of: (1) the absence of a swirler that generates turbulence within the nozzle to enhance atomization, and (2) a possible increase in shearing stress resulting from the delayed atomization due to the absence of turbulence. The nitrogen quality, up to 1.5 percent is based on isenthalpic expansion, did not have a distinct and measurable effect on the spray SMD. Both bimodal and monomodal droplet size population distributions were measured. In the bimodal distribution, the frequency of the first mode was much greater than the frequency of the second mode. Also, the frequency of the second mode was low enough such that a monomodal approximation probably would give reasonable results.

  19. Measuring Shock Stage of ltokawa Regolith Grains by Electron Back-Scattered Diffraction and Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael; Mikouchi, Takashi; Hagiya, Kenji; Ohsumi, Kazumasa; Martinez, James; Hagiya, Kenji; Sitzman, Scott; Terada, Yasuko; Yagi, Naoto; Komatsu, Mutsumi; hide

    2017-01-01

    We have been analyzing Itokawa samples in order to definitively establish the degree of shock experienced by the regolith of asteroid Itokawa, and to devise a bridge between shock determinations by standard light optical petrography, crystal structures as determined by electron and X-ray diffraction techniques. We are making measurements of olivine crystal structures and using these to elucidate critical regolith impact processes. We use electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) and synchrotron X-ray diffraction (SXRD). We are comparing the Itokawa samples to L and LL chondrite meteorites chosen to span the shock scale experienced by Itokawa, specifically Chainpur (LL3.4, Shock Stage 1), Semarkona (LL3.00, S2), Kilabo (LL6, S3), NWA100 (L6, S4) and Chelyabinsk (LL5, S4). In SXRD we measure the line broadening of olivine reflections as a measure of shock stage. In this presentation we concentrate on the EBSD work. We employed JSC's Supra 55 variable pressure FEG-SEM and Bruker EBSD system. We are not seeking actual strain values, but rather indirect strain-related measurements such as extent of intra-grain lattice rotation, and determining whether shock state "standards" (meteorite samples of accepted shock state, and appropriate small grain size) show strain measurements that may be statistically differentiated, using a sampling of particles (number and size range) typical of asteroid regoliths. Using our system we determined that a column pressure of 9 Pa and no C-coating on the sample was optimal. We varied camera exposure time and gain to optimize mapping performance, concluding that 320x240 pattern pixilation, frame averaging of 3, 15 kV, and low extractor voltage yielded an acceptable balance of hit rate (>90%), speed (11 fps) and map quality using an exposure time of 30 ms (gain 650). We found that there was no strong effect of step size on Grain Orientation Spread (GOS) and Grain Reference Orientation Deviation angle (GROD-a) distribution; there was some

  20. Predicted and measured transmission and diffraction by a metallic mesh coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halman, Jennifer I.; Ramsey, Keith A.; Thomas, Michael; Griffin, Andrew

    2009-05-01

    Metallic mesh coatings are used on visible and infrared windows and domes to provide shielding from electromagnetic interference (EMI) and as heaters to de-fog or de-ice windows or domes. The periodic metallic mesh structures that provide the EMI shielding and/or resistive electrical paths for the heating elements create a diffraction pattern when optical or infrared beams are incident on the coated windows. Over the years several different mesh geometries have been used to try to reduce the effects of diffraction. We have fabricated several different mesh patterns on small coupons of BK-7 and measured the transmitted power and the diffraction patterns of each one using a CW 1064 nm laser. In this paper we will present some predictions and measurements of the diffraction patterns of several different mesh patterns.

  1. Diffraction efficiency growth of nano-scale holographic recording produced in a corona discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodurov, I.; Yovcheva, T.; Vlaeva, I.; Viraneva, A.; Todorov, R.; Spassov, G.; Sainov, S.

    2012-12-01

    The nano-scale holographic gratings ware recorded in 29 nm and 56 nm thick As2S3 films. The chalcogenide layers were deposited on a transparent chromium electrode with thickness 10 nm, produced on a glass substrate. Both chromium and chalcogenide films were deposited in one vacuum cycle by e-beam and thermal evaporation, respectively. The diode 532 nm diode laser was used as a light source in the present holographic experiments. The total internal reflection arrangement (Stetson-Nassenstein) was used in holographic recordings. The reference beam was totally reflected from the air-As2S3 boundary surface by an input glass prism. The object beam was normally incident on the recording medium. The corona charging was performed by a needle fixed at the distance of 1 cm from the holographic recording medium by applying a - 5 kV voltage. The diffraction efficiency increased from 9 to 30 times when the corona discharge was applied during the holographic recording, in comparison to the uncharged recording. The possible reason of the observed effect is discussed on the basis of the Franz-Keldysh effect and Moss rule.

  2. Micro-beam Laue alignment of multi-reflection Bragg coherent diffraction imaging measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Hofmann, Felix; Phillips, Nicholas W.; Harder, Ross J.; ...

    2017-08-08

    Multi-reflection Bragg coherent diffraction imaging has the potential to allow three-dimensional (3D) resolved measurements of the full lattice strain tensor in specific micro-crystals. Until now such measurements were hampered by the need for laborious, time-intensive alignment procedures. Here, in this paper, a different approach is demonstrated, using micro-beam Laue X-ray diffraction to first determine the lattice orientation of the micro-crystal. This information is then used to rapidly align coherent diffraction measurements of three or more reflections from the crystal. Based on these, 3D strain and stress fields in the crystal are successfully determined. This approach is demonstrated on a focusedmore » ion beam milled micro-crystal from which six reflections could be measured. Since information from more than three independent reflections is available, the reliability of the phases retrieved from the coherent diffraction data can be assessed. Lastly, our results show that rapid, reliable 3D coherent diffraction measurements of the full lattice strain tensor in specific micro-crystals are now feasible and can be successfully carried out even in heavily distorted samples.« less

  3. Micro-beam Laue alignment of multi-reflection Bragg coherent diffraction imaging measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, Felix; Phillips, Nicholas W.; Harder, Ross J.

    Multi-reflection Bragg coherent diffraction imaging has the potential to allow three-dimensional (3D) resolved measurements of the full lattice strain tensor in specific micro-crystals. Until now such measurements were hampered by the need for laborious, time-intensive alignment procedures. Here, in this paper, a different approach is demonstrated, using micro-beam Laue X-ray diffraction to first determine the lattice orientation of the micro-crystal. This information is then used to rapidly align coherent diffraction measurements of three or more reflections from the crystal. Based on these, 3D strain and stress fields in the crystal are successfully determined. This approach is demonstrated on a focusedmore » ion beam milled micro-crystal from which six reflections could be measured. Since information from more than three independent reflections is available, the reliability of the phases retrieved from the coherent diffraction data can be assessed. Lastly, our results show that rapid, reliable 3D coherent diffraction measurements of the full lattice strain tensor in specific micro-crystals are now feasible and can be successfully carried out even in heavily distorted samples.« less

  4. Micro-beam Laue alignment of multi-reflection Bragg coherent diffraction imaging measurements.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Felix; Phillips, Nicholas W; Harder, Ross J; Liu, Wenjun; Clark, Jesse N; Robinson, Ian K; Abbey, Brian

    2017-09-01

    Multi-reflection Bragg coherent diffraction imaging has the potential to allow three-dimensional (3D) resolved measurements of the full lattice strain tensor in specific micro-crystals. Until now such measurements were hampered by the need for laborious, time-intensive alignment procedures. Here a different approach is demonstrated, using micro-beam Laue X-ray diffraction to first determine the lattice orientation of the micro-crystal. This information is then used to rapidly align coherent diffraction measurements of three or more reflections from the crystal. Based on these, 3D strain and stress fields in the crystal are successfully determined. This approach is demonstrated on a focused ion beam milled micro-crystal from which six reflections could be measured. Since information from more than three independent reflections is available, the reliability of the phases retrieved from the coherent diffraction data can be assessed. Our results show that rapid, reliable 3D coherent diffraction measurements of the full lattice strain tensor in specific micro-crystals are now feasible and can be successfully carried out even in heavily distorted samples.

  5. Micro-beam Laue Alignment of Multi-Reflection Bragg Coherent Diffraction Imaging Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Felix; Phillips, Nicholas W.; Harder, Ross J.; Liu, Wenjun; Clark, Jesse N.; Robinson, Ian K.; Abbey, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Multi-reflection Bragg coherent diffraction imaging has the potential to allow 3D resolved measurements of the full lattice strain tensor in specific micro-crystals. Until now such measurements were hampered by the need for laborious, time-intensive alignment procedures. Here we demonstrate a different approach, using micro-beam Laue X-ray diffraction to first determine the lattice orientation of the micro-crystal. This information is then used to rapidly align coherent diffraction measurements of three or more reflections from the crystal. Based on these, 3D strain and stress fields in the crystal are successfully determined. This approach is demonstrated on a focussed ion beam milled micro-crystal from which six reflections could be measured. Since information from more than three independent reflections is available, the reliability of the phases retrieved from the coherent diffraction data can be assessed. Our results show that rapid, reliable 3D coherent diffraction measurements of the full lattice strain tensor in specific micro-crystals are now feasible and can be successfully carried out even in heavily distorted samples. PMID:28862628

  6. Grey signal processing and data reconstruction in the non-diffracting beam triangulation measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hao; Wang, Zhongyu; Fu, Jihua

    2008-12-01

    The non-diffracting beam triangulation measurement system possesses the advantages of longer measurement range, higher theoretical measurement accuracy and higher resolution over the traditional laser triangulation measurement system. Unfortunately the measurement accuracy of the system is greatly degraded due to the speckle noise, the CCD photoelectric noise and the background light noise in practical applications. Hence, some effective signal processing methods must be applied to improve the measurement accuracy. In this paper a novel effective method for removing the noises in the non-diffracting beam triangulation measurement system is proposed. In the method the grey system theory is used to process and reconstruct the measurement signal. Through implementing the grey dynamic filtering based on the dynamic GM(1,1), the noises can be effectively removed from the primary measurement data and the measurement accuracy of the system can be improved as a result.

  7. Liquid-Crystal Point-Diffraction Interferometer for Wave-Front Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, Carolyn R.; Creath, Katherine

    1996-01-01

    A new instrument, the liquid-crystal point-diffraction interferometer (LCPDI), is developed for the measurement of phase objects. This instrument maintains the compact, robust design of Linnik's point-diffraction interferometer and adds to it a phase-stepping capability for quantitative interferogram analysis. The result is a compact, simple to align, environmentally insensitive interferometer capable of accurately measuring optical wave fronts with very high data density and with automated data reduction. We describe the theory and design of the LCPDI. A focus shift was measured with the LCPDI, and the results are compared with theoretical results,

  8. Measuring Transmission Efficiencies Of Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Santosh K.

    1989-01-01

    Coincidence counts yield absolute efficiencies. System measures mass-dependent transmission efficiencies of mass spectrometers, using coincidence-counting techniques reminiscent of those used for many years in calibration of detectors for subatomic particles. Coincidences between detected ions and electrons producing them counted during operation of mass spectrometer. Under certain assumptions regarding inelastic scattering of electrons, electron/ion-coincidence count is direct measure of transmission efficiency of spectrometer. When fully developed, system compact, portable, and used routinely to calibrate mass spectrometers.

  9. Radiated microwave power transmission system efficiency measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, R. M.; Brown, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    The measured and calculated results from determining the operating efficiencies of a laboratory version of a system for transporting electric power from one point to another via a wireless free space radiated microwave beam are reported. The system's overall end-to-end efficiency as well as intermediated conversion efficiencies were measured. The maximum achieved end-to-end dc-to-ac system efficiency was 54.18% with a probable error of + or - 0.94%. The dc-to-RF conversion efficiency was measured to be 68.87% + or - 1.0% and the RF-to-dc conversion efficiency was 78.67 + or - 1.1%. Under these conditions a dc power of 495.62 + or - 3.57 W was received with a free space transmitter antenna receiver antenna separation of 170.2 cm (67 in).

  10. A measurement of electron-wall interactions using transmission diffraction from nanofabricated gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barwick, Brett; Gronniger, Glen; Yuan, Lu; Liou, Sy-Hwang; Batelaan, Herman

    2006-10-01

    Electron diffraction from metal coated freestanding nanofabricated gratings is presented, with a quantitative path integral analysis of the electron-grating interactions. Electron diffraction out to the 20th order was observed indicating the high quality of our nanofabricated gratings. The electron beam is collimated to its diffraction limit with ion-milled material slits. Our path integral analysis is first tested against single slit electron diffraction, and then further expanded with the same theoretical approach to describe grating diffraction. Rotation of the grating with respect to the incident electron beam varies the effective distance between the electron and grating bars. This allows the measurement of the image charge potential between the electron and the grating bars. Image charge potentials that were about 15% of the value for that of a pure electron-metal wall interaction were found. We varied the electron energy from 50to900eV. The interaction time is of the order of typical metal image charge response times and in principle allows the investigation of image charge formation. In addition to the image charge interaction there is a dephasing process reducing the transverse coherence length of the electron wave. The dephasing process causes broadening of the diffraction peaks and is consistent with a model that ascribes the dephasing process to microscopic contact potentials. Surface structures with length scales of about 200nm observed with a scanning tunneling microscope, and dephasing interaction strength typical of contact potentials of 0.35eV support this claim. Such a dephasing model motivated the investigation of different metallic coatings, in particular Ni, Ti, Al, and different thickness Au-Pd coatings. Improved quality of diffraction patterns was found for Ni. This coating made electron diffraction possible at energies as low as 50eV. This energy was limited by our electron gun design. These results are particularly relevant for the use of

  11. Subreflector extension for improved efficiencies in Cassegrain antennas - GTD/PO analysis. [Geometrical Theory of Diffraction/Physical Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahmat-Samii, Yahya

    1986-01-01

    Both offset and symmetric Cassegrain reflector antennas are used in satellite and ground communication systems. It is known that the subreflector diffraction can degrade the performance of these reflectors. A geometrical theory of diffraction/physical optics analysis technique is used to investigate the effects of the extended subreflector, beyond its optical rim, on the reflector efficiency and far-field patterns. Representative numerical results are shown for an offset Cassegrain reflector antenna with different feed illumination tapers and subreflector extensions. It is observed that for subreflector extensions as small as one wavelength, noticeable improvements in the overall efficiencies can be expected. Useful design data are generated for the efficiency curves and far-field patterns.

  12. Measurement of Neutrino-Induced Coherent Pion Production and the Diffractive Background in MINERvA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Alicia; Minerva Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Neutrino-induced coherent charged pion production is a unique neutrino-nucleus scattering process in which a muon and pion are produced while the nucleus is left in its ground state. The MINERvA experiment has made a model-independent differential cross section measurement of this process on carbon by selecting events with a muon and a pion, no evidence of nuclear break-up, and small momentum transfer to the nucleus | t | . A similar process which is a background to the measurement on carbon is diffractive pion production off the free protons in MINERvA's scintillator. This process is not modeled in the neutrino event generator GENIE. At low | t | these events have a similar final state to the aforementioned process. A study to quantify this diffractive event contribution to the background is done by emulating these diffractive events by reweighting all other GENIE-generated background events to the predicted | t | distribution of diffractive events, and then scaling to the diffractive cross section.

  13. Receiver calibration and the nonlinearity parameter measurement of thick solid samples with diffraction and attenuation corrections.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyunjo; Barnard, Daniel; Cho, Sungjong; Zhang, Shuzeng; Li, Xiongbing

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents analytical and experimental techniques for accurate determination of the nonlinearity parameter (β) in thick solid samples. When piezoelectric transducers are used for β measurements, the receiver calibration is required to determine the transfer function from which the absolute displacement can be calculated. The measured fundamental and second harmonic displacement amplitudes should be modified to account for beam diffraction and material absorption. All these issues are addressed in this study and the proposed technique is validated through the β measurements of thick solid samples. A simplified self-reciprocity calibration procedure for a broadband receiver is described. The diffraction and attenuation corrections for the fundamental and second harmonics are explicitly derived. Aluminum alloy samples in five different thicknesses (4, 6, 8, 10, 12cm) are prepared and β measurements are made using the finite amplitude, through-transmission method. The effects of diffraction and attenuation corrections on β measurements are systematically investigated. When diffraction and attenuation corrections are all properly made, the variation of β between different thickness samples is found to be less than 3.2%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. First measurement of the deep-inelastic structure of proton diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, T.; Aid, S.; Andreev, V.; Andrieu, B.; Appuhn, R.-D.; Arpagaus, M.; Babaev, A.; Baehr, J.; Bán, J.; Ban, Y.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Barth, M.; Bassler, U.; Beck, H. P.; Behrend, H.-J.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Bernardi, G.; Bernet, R.; Bertrand-Coremans, G.; Besançon, M.; Beyer, R.; Biddulph, P.; Bispham, P.; Bizot, J. C.; Blobel, V.; Borras, K.; Botterweck, F.; Boudry, V.; Braemer, A.; Brasse, F.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Brune, C.; Buchholz, R.; Büngener, L.; Bürger, J.; Büsser, F. W.; Buniatian, A.; Burke, S.; Burton, M.; Buschhorn, G.; Campbell, A. J.; Carli, T.; Charles, F.; Clarke, D.; Clegg, A. B.; Clerbaux, B.; Colombo, M.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormack, C.; Coughlan, J. A.; Courau, A.; Coutures, Ch.; Cozzika, G.; Criegee, L.; Cussans, D. G.; Cvach, J.; Dagoret, S.; Dainton, J. B.; Dau, W. D.; Daum, K.; David, M.; Deffur, E.; Delcourt, B.; Del Buono, L.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E. A.; Di Nezza, P.; Dollfus, C.; Dowell, J. D.; Dreis, H. B.; Droutskoi, A.; Duboc, J.; Düllmann, D.; Dünger, O.; Duhm, H.; Ebert, J.; Ebert, T. R.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Eichenberger, S.; Eichler, R.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Eichenberger, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellison, R. J.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Evrard, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feeken, D.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrarotto, F.; Flamm, K.; Fleischer, M.; Flieser, M.; Flügge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Forbush, M.; Formánek, J.; Foster, J. M.; Franke, G.; Fretwurst, E.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Gamerdinger, K.; Garvey, J.; Gayler, J.; Gebauer, M.; Gellrich, A.; Genzel, H.; Gerhards, R.; Goerlach, U.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goldner, D.; Gonzalez-Pineiro, B.; Gorelov, I.; Goritchev, P.; Grab, C.; Grässler, H.; Grässler, R.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Gruber, A.; Gruber, C.; Haack, J.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Hamon, O.; Hampel, M.; Hanlon, E. M.; Hapke, M.; Haynes, W. J.; Heatherington, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Herynek, I.; Hess, M. F.; Hildesheim, W.; Hill, P.; Hiller, K. H.; Hilton, C. D.; Hladký, J.; Hoeger, K. C.; Höppner, M.; Horisberger, R.; Hudgson, V. L.; Huet, Ph.; Hütte, M.; Hufnagel, H.; Ibbotson, M.; Itterbeck, H.; Jabiol, M.-A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacobsson, C.; Jaffre, M.; Janoth, J.; Jansen, T.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, D. P.; Johnson, L.; Jung, H.; Kalmus, P. I. P.; Kant, D.; Kaschowitz, R.; Kasselmann, P.; Kathage, U.; Katzy, J.; Kaufmann, H. H.; Kazarian, S.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kermiche, S.; Keuker, C.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Knies, G.; Ko, W.; Köhler, T.; Köhne, J. H.; Kolanoski, H.; Kole, F.; Kolva, S. D.; Korbel, V.; Korn, M.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S. K.; Krämerkämper, T.; Krasny, M. W.; Krehbiel, H.; Krücker, D.; Krüger, U.; Krüner-Marquis, U.; Kubenka, J. P.; Küster, H.; Kuhlen, M.; Kurča, T.; Kurzhöfer, J.; Kuznik, B.; Lacour, D.; Lamarche, F.; Lander, R.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Lanius, P.; Laporte, J.-F.; Lebedev, A.; Leverenz, C.; Levonian, S.; Ley, Ch.; Lindner, A.; Lindström, G.; Link, J.; Linsel, F.; Lipinski, J.; List, B.; Lobo, G.; Loch, P.; Lohmander, H.; Lomas, J.; Lopez, G. C.; Lubimov, V.; Lüke, D.; Magnussen, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mani, S.; Maraček, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martens, J.; Martin, R.; Martyn, H.-U.; Martyniak, J.; Masson, S.; Mavroidis, T.; Maxfield, S. J.; McMahon, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Mercer, D.; Merz, T.; Meyer, C. A.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Moreau, F.; Morris, J. V.; Mroczko, E.; Müller, G.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Newton, D.; Neyret, D.; Nguyen, H. K.; Nicholls, T. C.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Niedzballa, Ch.; Nisius, R.; Nowak, G.; Noyes, G. W.; Nyberg-Werther, M.; Oakden, M.; Oberlack, H.; Obrock, U.; Olsson, J. E.; Ozerov, D.; Panaro, E.; Panitch, A.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peppel, E.; Perez, E.; Phillips, J. P.; Pichler, Ch.; Pitzl, D.; Pope, G.; Prell, S.; Prosi, R.; Rabbertz, K.; Rädel, G.; Raupach, F.; Reimer, P.; Reinshagen, S.; Ribarics, P.; Rick, H.; Riech, V.; Riedlberger, J.; Riess, S.; Rietz, M.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. M.; Robmann, P.; Roloff, H. E.; Roosen, R.; Rosenbauer, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rouse, F.; Royon, C.; Rüter, K.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Rylko, R.; Sahlmann, N.; Sanchez, E.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Schacht, P.; Schiek, S.; Schleper, P.; von Schlippe, W.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, G.; Schöning, A.; Schröder, V.; Schuhmann, E.; Schwab, B.; Schwind, A.; Sefkow, F.; Seidel, M.; Sell, R.; Semenov, A.; Shekelyan, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shooshtari, H.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Siegmon, G.; Siewert, U.; Sirois, Y.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Smirnov, P.; Smith, J. R.; Solochenko, V.; Soloviev, Y.; Spiekermann, J.; Spitzer, H.; Starosta, R.; Steenbock, M.; Steffen, P.; Steinberg, R.; Stella, B.; Stephens, K.; Stier, J.; Stiewe, J.; Stösslein, U.; Stolze, K.; Strachota, J.; Straumann, U.; Struczinski, W.; Sutton, J. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Taylor, R. E.; Tchernyshov, V.; Thiebaux, C.; Thompson, G.; Truöl, P.; Turnau, J.; Tutas, J.; Uelkes, P.; Usik, A.; Valkár, S.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Esch, P.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vartapetian, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Verrecchia, P.; Villet, G.; Wacker, K.; Wagener, A.; Wagener, M.; Walker, I. W.; Walther, A.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Wegner, A.; Wellisch, H. P.; West, L. R.; Willard, S.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.-G.; Wittek, C.; Wright, A. E.; Wünsch, E.; Wulff, N.; Yiou, T. P.; Žáček, J.; Zarbock, D.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zimmer, M.; Zimmermann, W.; Zomer, F.; Zuber, K.; H1 Collaboration

    1995-02-01

    A measurement is presented, using data taken with the H1 detector at HERA, of the contribution of diffractive interactions to deep-inelastic electron-proton ( ep) scattering in the kinematic range 8.5 < Q2 < 50GeV 2, 2.4 × 10 -4 < Bjorken- x < 0.0133, and 3.7 × 10 -4 < χp < 0.043. The diffractive contribution to the proton structure function F2( x, Q2) is evaluated as a function of the appropriate deep-inelastic scattering variables χp, Q2, β (= {χ}/{χ p}) using a class of deep-inelastic ep scattering events with no hadronic energy flow in an interval of pseudo-rapidity adjacent to the proton beam direction. the dependence of this contribution on χp is measured to be χp- n with n = 1.19 ± 0.06 (stat.) ± 0.07 (syst.) independent of β and Q2, which is consistent with both a diffractive interpretation and a factorisable ep diffractive cross section. A first measurement of the deep-inelastic structure of the pomeron in the form of the Q2 and β dependences of a factorised structure function is presented. For all measured β, this structure function is observed to be consistent with scale invariance.

  15. Time-resolved measurements with streaked diffraction patterns from electrons generated in laser plasma wakefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhaohan; Nees, John; Hou, Bixue; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alec; Beaurepaire, Benoît; Malka, Victor; Faure, Jérôme

    2013-10-01

    Femtosecond bunches of electrons with relativistic to ultra-relativistic energies can be robustly produced in laser plasma wakefield accelerators (LWFA). Scaling the electron energy down to sub-relativistic and MeV level using a millijoule laser system will make such electron source a promising candidate for ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) applications due to the intrinsic short bunch duration and perfect synchronization with the optical pump. Recent results of electron diffraction from a single crystal gold foil, using LWFA electrons driven by 8-mJ, 35-fs laser pulses at 500 Hz, will be presented. The accelerated electrons were collimated with a solenoid magnetic lens. By applying a small-angle tilt to the magnetic lens, the diffraction pattern can be streaked such that the temporal evolution is separated spatially on the detector screen after propagation. The observable time window and achievable temporal resolution are studied in pump-probe measurements of photo-induced heating on the gold foil.

  16. Enhancement of diffraction efficiency and storage life of poly(vinyl chloride)-based optical recording medium with incorporation of an electron donor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Beena Mary; Ushamani, M.; Sreekumar, K.; Joseph, Rani; Sudha Kartha, C.

    2007-01-01

    The diffraction efficiency, sensitivity, and storage life of methylene blue-sensitized poly(vinyl chloride) film was improved by the addition of an electron donor in the matrix. The addition of pyridine enhanced the diffraction efficiency by two times, and storage life of the gratings was increased to 2-3 days.

  17. Measuring the x-ray resolving power of bent potassium acid phthalate diffraction crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, M. J., E-mail: haughmj@nv.doe.gov; Jacoby, K. D.; Wu, M.

    2014-11-15

    This report presents the results from measuring the X-ray resolving power of a curved potassium acid phthalate (KAP(001)) spectrometer crystal using two independent methods. It is part of a continuing effort to measure the fundamental diffraction properties of bent crystals that are used to study various characteristics of high temperature plasmas. Bent crystals like KAP(001) do not usually have the same diffraction properties as corresponding flat crystals. Models that do exist to calculate the effect of bending the crystal on the diffraction properties have simplifying assumptions and their accuracy limits have not been adequately determined. The type of crystals thatmore » we measured is being used in a spectrometer on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The first technique for measuring the crystal resolving power measures the X-ray spectral line width of the characteristic lines from several metal anodes. The second method uses a diode X-ray source and a double crystal diffractometer arrangement to measure the reflectivity curve of the KAP(001) crystal. The width of that curve is inversely proportional to the crystal resolving power. The measurement results are analyzed and discussed.« less

  18. Measuring the X-ray Resolving Power of Bent Potassium Acid Phthalate Diffraction Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, M. J.; Wu, M.; Jacoby, K. D.

    2014-11-01

    This report presents the results from measuring the X-ray resolving power of a curved potassium acid phthalate (KAP(001)) spectrometer crystal using two independent methods. It is part of a continuing effort to measure the fundamental diffraction properties of bent crystals that are used to study various characteristics of high temperature plasmas. Bent crystals like KAP(001) do not usually have the same diffraction properties as corresponding flat crystals. Models that do exist to calculate the effect of bending the crystal on the diffraction properties have simplifying assumptions and their accuracy limits have not been adequately determined. The type of crystals thatmore » we measured is being used in a spectrometer on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The first technique for measuring the crystal resolving power measures the X-ray spectral line width of the characteristic lines from several metal anodes. The second method uses a diode X-ray source and a dual goniometer arrangement to measure the reflectivity curve of the KAP(001) crystal. The width of that curve is inversely proportional to the crystal resolving power. The measurement results are analyzed and discussed.« less

  19. Measuring the x-ray resolving power of bent potassium acid phthalate diffraction crystalsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haugh, M. J.; Wu, M.; Jacoby, K. D.; Loisel, G. P.

    2014-11-01

    This report presents the results from measuring the X-ray resolving power of a curved potassium acid phthalate (KAP(001)) spectrometer crystal using two independent methods. It is part of a continuing effort to measure the fundamental diffraction properties of bent crystals that are used to study various characteristics of high temperature plasmas. Bent crystals like KAP(001) do not usually have the same diffraction properties as corresponding flat crystals. Models that do exist to calculate the effect of bending the crystal on the diffraction properties have simplifying assumptions and their accuracy limits have not been adequately determined. The type of crystals that we measured is being used in a spectrometer on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The first technique for measuring the crystal resolving power measures the X-ray spectral line width of the characteristic lines from several metal anodes. The second method uses a diode X-ray source and a double crystal diffractometer arrangement to measure the reflectivity curve of the KAP(001) crystal. The width of that curve is inversely proportional to the crystal resolving power. The measurement results are analyzed and discussed.

  20. Design of high-efficiency diffractive optical elements towards ultrafast mid-infrared time-stretched imaging and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hongbo; Ren, Delun; Wang, Chao; Mao, Chensheng; Yang, Lei

    2018-02-01

    Ultrafast time stretch imaging offers unprecedented imaging speed and enables new discoveries in scientific research and engineering. One challenge in exploiting time stretch imaging in mid-infrared is the lack of high-quality diffractive optical elements (DOEs), which encode the image information into mid-infrared optical spectrum. This work reports the design and optimization of mid-infrared DOE with high diffraction-efficiency, broad bandwidth and large field of view. Using various typical materials with their refractive indices ranging from 1.32 to 4.06 in ? mid-infrared band, diffraction efficiencies of single-layer and double-layer DOEs have been studied in different wavelength bands with different field of views. More importantly, by replacing the air gap of double-layer DOE with carefully selected optical materials, one optimized ? triple-layer DOE, with efficiency higher than 95% in the whole ? mid-infrared window and field of view greater than ?, is designed and analyzed. This new DOE device holds great potential in ultrafast mid-infrared time stretch imaging and spectroscopy.

  1. Measurement of the diffractive structure function in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Mikunas, D.; Musgrave, B.; Repond, J.; Stanek, R.; Talaga, R. L.; Zhang, H.; Ayad, R.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, P.; Cara Romeo, G.; Castellini, G.; Chiarini, M.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; Gialas, I.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Laurenti, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Nemoz, C.; Palmonari, F.; Polini, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Timellini, R.; Zamora Garcia, Y.; Zichichi, A.; Bargende, A.; Crittenden, J.; Desch, K.; Diekmann, B.; Doeker, T.; Eckert, M.; Feld, L.; Frey, A.; Geerts, M.; Geitz, G.; Grothe, M.; Hartmann, H.; Heinloth, H.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H.-P.; Katz, U. F.; Mari, S. M.; Mass, A.; Mengel, S.; Mollen, J.; Paul, E.; Rembser, Ch.; Schramm, D.; Stamm, J.; Wedemeyer, R.; Campbell-Robson, S.; Cassidy, A.; Dyce, N.; Foster, B.; George, S.; Gilmore, R.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Llewellyn, T. J.; Morgado, C. J. S.; Norman, D. J. P.; O'Mara, J. A.; Tapper, R. J.; Wilson, S. S.; Yoshida, R.; Rau, R. R.; Arneodo, M.; Capua, M.; Garfagnini, A.; Iannotti, L.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Bernstein, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cartiglia, N.; Parsons, J. A.; Ritz, S.; Sciulli, F.; Straub, P. B.; Wai, L.; Yang, S.; Zhu, Q.; Borzemski, P.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Zachara, M.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bednarek, B.; Jeleń, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowalski, T.; Rulikowska-Zarębska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Zając, J.; Kotański, A.; Przybycień, M.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Behrens, U.; Beier, H.; Bienlein, J. K.; Coldewey, C.; Deppe, O.; Desler, K.; Drews, G.; Flasiński, M.; Gilkinson, D. J.; Glasman, C.; Göttlicher, P.; Große-Knetter, J.; Gutjahr, B.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hasell, D.; Heßling, H.; Iga, Y.; Joos, P.; Kasemann, M.; Klanner, R.; Koch, W.; Köpke, L.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Labs, J.; Ladage, A.; Löhr, B.; Löwe, M.; Lüke, D.; Mainusch, J.; Mańczak, O.; Monteiro, T.; Ng, J. S. T.; Nickel, S.; Notz, D.; Ohrenberg, K.; Roco, M.; Rohde, M.; Roldán, J.; Schneekloth, U.; Schulz, W.; Selonke, F.; Stiliaris, E.; Surrow, B.; Voß, T.; Westphal, D.; Wolf, G.; Youngman, C.; Zhou, J. F.; Grabosch, H. J.; Kharchilava, A.; Leich, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Meyer, A.; Schlenstedt, S.; Wulff, N.; Barbagli, G.; Pelfer, P.; Anzivino, G.; Maccarrone, G.; de Pasquale, S.; Votano, L.; Bamberger, A.; Eisenhardt, S.; Freidhof, A.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Schroeder, J.; Trefzger, T.; Brook, N. H.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Fleck, J. I.; Saxon, D. H.; Utley, M. L.; Wilson, A. S.; Dannemann, A.; Holm, U.; Horstmann, D.; Neumann, T.; Sinkus, R.; Wick, K.; Badura, E.; Burow, B. D.; Hagge, L.; Lohrmann, E.; Milewski, J.; Nakahata, M.; Pavel, N.; Poelz, G.; Schott, W.; Zetsche, F.; Bacon, T. C.; Butterworth, I.; Gallo, E.; Harris, V. L.; Hung, B. Y. H.; Long, K. R.; Miller, D. B.; Morawitz, P. P. O.; Prinias, A.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Whitfield, A. F.; Mallik, U.; McCliment, E.; Wang, M. Z.; Wang, S. M.; Wu, J. T.; Zhang, Y.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; An, S. H.; Hong, S. M.; Nam, S. W.; Park, S. K.; Suh, M. H.; Yon, S. H.; Imlay, R.; Kartik, S.; Kim, H.-J.; McNeil, R. R.; Metcalf, W.; Nadendla, V. K.; Barreiro, F.; Cases, G.; Fernandez, J. P.; Graciani, R.; Hernández, J. M.; Hervás, L.; Labarga, L.; Martinez, M.; Del Peso, J.; Puga, J.; Terron, J.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Smith, G. R.; Corriveau, F.; Hanna, D. S.; Hartmann, J.; Hung, L. W.; Lim, J. N.; Matthews, C. G.; Patel, P. M.; Sinclair, L. E.; Stairs, D. G.; St. Laurent, M.; Ullmann, R.; Zacek, G.; Bashkirov, V.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Stifutkin, A.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Ermolov, P. F.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Kobrin, V. D.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Savin, A. A.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Solomin, A. N.; Zotov, N. P.; Botje, M.; Chlebana, F.; Dake, A.; Engelen, J.; de Kamps, M.; Kooijman, P.; Kruse, A.; Tiecke, H.; Verkerke, W.; Vreeswijk, M.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; van Woudenberg, R.; Acosta, D.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Honscheid, K.; Li, C.; Ling, T. Y.; McLean, K. W.; Murray, W. N.; Park, I. H.; Romanowski, T. A.; Seidlein, R.; Bailey, D. S.; Byrne, A.; Cashmore, R. J.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Harnew, N.; Lancaster, M.; Lindemann, L.; McFall, J. D.; Nath, C.; Noyes, V. A.; Quadt, A.; Tickner, J. R.; Uijterwaal, H.; Walczak, R.; Waters, D. S.; Wilson, F. F.; Yip, T.; Abbiendi, G.; Bertolin, A.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Dal Corso, F.; de Giorgi, M.; Dosselli, U.; Limentani, S.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Bulmahn, J.; Butterworth, J. M.; Feild, R. G.; Oh, B. Y.; Whitmore, J. J.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Tassi, E.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Prytz, K.; Shah, T. P.; Short, T. L.; Barberis, E.; Dubbs, T.; Heusch, C.; van Hook, M.; Hubbard, B.; Lockman, W.; Rahn, J. T.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Seiden, A.; Biltzinger, J.; Seifert, R. J.; Schwarzer, O.; Walenta, A. H.; Zech, G.; Abramowicz, H.; Briskin, G.; Dagan, S.; Levy, A.; Hasegawa, T.; Hazumi, M.; Ishii, T.; Kuze, M.; Mine, S.; Nagasawa, Y.; Nakao, M.; Suzuki, I.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Chiba, M.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Homma, K.; Kitamura, S.; Nakamitsu, Y.; Yamauchi, K.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Lamberti, L.; Maselli, S.; Peroni, C.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Dardo, M.; Bailey, D. C.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Benard, F.; Brkic, M.; Crombie, M. B.; Gingrich, D. M.; Hartner, G. F.; Joo, K. K.; Levman, G. M.; Martin, J. F.; Orr, R. S.; Sampson, C. R.; Teuscher, R. J.; Catterall, C. D.; Jones, T. W.; Kaziewicz, P. B.; Lane, J. B.; Saunders, R. L.; Shulman, J.; Blankenship, K.; Lu, B.; Mo, L. W.; Bogusz, W.; Charchula, K.; Ciborowski, J.; Gajewski, J.; Grzelak, G.; Kasprzak, M.; Krzyżanowski, M.; Muchorowski, K.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Wróblewski, A. K.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Eisenberg, Y.; Karshon, U.; Revel, D.; Zer-Zion, D.; Ali, I.; Badgett, W. F.; Behrens, B.; Dasu, S.; Fordham, C.; Foudas, C.; Goussiou, A.; Loveless, R. J.; Reeder, D. D.; Silverstein, S.; Smith, W. H.; Vaiciulis, A.; Wodarczyk, M.; Tsurugai, T.; Bhadra, S.; Cardy, M. L.; Fagerstroem, C.-P.; Frisken, W. R.; Furutani, K. M.; Khakzad, M.; Schmidke, W. B.

    1995-12-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the inclusive properties of diffractive deep inelastic scattering events produced in ep interactions at HERA. The events are characterised by a rapidity gap between the outgoing proton system and the remaining hadronic system. Inclusive distributions are presented and compared with Monte Carlo models for diffractive processes. The data are consistent with models where the pomeron structure function has a hard and a soft contribution. The diffractive structure function is measured as a function of x ℙ, the momentum fraction lost by the proton, of β, the momentum fraction of the struck quark with respect to x ℙ, and of Q 2 in the range 6.3·10-4< x ℙ <10-2, 0.1<β<0.8 and 8< Q 2<100 GeV2. The dependence is consistent with the form x ℙ where a=1.30±0.08(stat) {-0.14/+0.08} (sys) in all bins of β and Q 2. In the measured Q 2 range, the diffractive structure function approximately scales with Q 2 at fixed β. In an Ingelman-Schlein type model, where commonly used pomeron flux factor normalisations are assumed, it is found that the quarks within the pomeron do not saturate the momentum sum rule.

  2. Diffracted wavefront measurement of a volume phase holographic grating at cryogenic temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Blanche, Pierre-Alexandre; Habraken, Serge; Lemaire, Philippe

    2006-09-20

    Flatness of the wavefront diffracted by grating can be mandatory for some applications. At ambient temperature, the wavefront diffracted by a volume phase holographic grating (VPHG) is well mastered by the manufacturing process and can be corrected or shaped by post polishing. However, to be used in cooled infrared spectrometers, VPHGs have to stand and work properly at low temperatures.We present the measurement of the wavefront diffracted by atypical VPHG at various temperatures down to 150 K and at several thermal inhomogeneity amplitudes. The particular grating observed was produced using a dichromated gelatine technique and encapsulated between two glass blanks.more » Diffracted wavefront measurements show that the wavefront is extremely stable according to the temperature as long as the latter is homogeneous over the grating stack volume. Increasing the thermal inhomogeneity increases the wavefront error that pinpoints the importance of the final instrument thermal design. This concludes the dichromated gelatine VPHG technology, used more and more in visible spectrometers, can be applied as it is to cooled IR spectrometers.« less

  3. Nondestructive X-ray diffraction measurement of warpage in silicon dies embedded in integrated circuit packages.

    PubMed

    Tanner, B K; Danilewsky, A N; Vijayaraghavan, R K; Cowley, A; McNally, P J

    2017-04-01

    Transmission X-ray diffraction imaging in both monochromatic and white beam section mode has been used to measure quantitatively the displacement and warpage stress in encapsulated silicon devices. The displacement dependence with position on the die was found to agree well with that predicted from a simple model of warpage stress. For uQFN microcontrollers, glued only at the corners, the measured misorientation contours are consistent with those predicted using finite element analysis. The absolute displacement, measured along a line through the die centre, was comparable to that reported independently by high-resolution X-ray diffraction and optical interferometry of similar samples. It is demonstrated that the precision is greater than the spread of values found in randomly selected batches of commercial devices, making the techniques viable for industrial inspection purposes.

  4. Analysis and Correction of Diffraction Effect on the B/A Measurement at High Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dong; Gong, Xiu-Fen; Liu, Xiao-Zhou; Kushibiki, Jun-ichi; Nishino, Hideo

    2004-01-01

    A numerical method is developed to analyse and to correct the diffraction effect in the measurement of acoustic nonlinearity parameter B/A at high frequencies. By using the KZK nonlinear equation and the superposition approach of Gaussian beams, an analytical model is derived to describe the second harmonic generation through multi-layer medium SiO2/liquid specimen/SiO2. Frequency dependence of the nonlinear characterization curve for water in 110-155 MHz is numerically and experimentally investigated. With the measured dip position and the new model, values of B/A for water are evaluated. The results show that the present method can effectively correct the diffraction effect in the measurement.

  5. Acoustic pressure measurement of pulsed ultrasound using acousto-optic diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Lecheng; Chen, Shili; Xue, Bin; Wu, Hanzhong; Zhang, Kai; Yang, Xiaoxia; Zeng, Zhoumo

    2018-01-01

    Compared with continuous ultrasound wave, pulsed ultrasound has been widely used in ultrasound imaging. The aim of this work is to show the applicability of acousto-optic diffraction on pulsed ultrasound transducer. In this paper, acoustic pressure of two ultrasound transducers is measured based on Raman-Nath diffraction. The frequencies of transducers are 5MHz and 10MHz. The pulse-echo method and simulation data are used to evaluate the results. The results show that the proposed method is capable to measure the absolute sound pressure. We get a sectional view of acoustic pressure using a displacement platform as an auxiliary. Compared with the traditional sound pressure measurement methods, the proposed method is non-invasive with high sensitivity and spatial resolution.

  6. In situ high-pressure measurement of crystal solubility by using neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ji; Hu, Qiwei; Fang, Leiming; He, Duanwei; Chen, Xiping; Xie, Lei; Chen, Bo; Li, Xin; Ni, Xiaolin; Fan, Cong; Liang, Akun

    2018-05-01

    Crystal solubility is one of the most important thermo-physical properties and plays a key role in industrial applications, fundamental science, and geoscientific research. However, high-pressure in situ measurements of crystal solubility remain very challenging. Here, we present a method involving high-pressure neutron diffraction for making high-precision in situ measurements of crystal solubility as a function of pressure over a wide range of pressures. For these experiments, we designed a piston-cylinder cell with a large chamber volume for high-pressure neutron diffraction. The solution pressures are continuously monitored in situ based on the equation of state of the sample crystal. The solubility at a high pressure can be obtained by applying a Rietveld quantitative multiphase analysis. To evaluate the proposed method, we measured the high-pressure solubility of NaCl in water up to 610 MPa. At a low pressure, the results are consistent with the previous results measured ex situ. At a higher pressure, more reliable data could be provided by using an in situ high-pressure neutron diffraction method.

  7. Measure Guideline: High Efficiency Natural Gas Furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, L.; Rose, W.

    2012-10-01

    This Measure Guideline covers installation of high-efficiency gas furnaces. Topics covered include when to install a high-efficiency gas furnace as a retrofit measure, how to identify and address risks, and the steps to be used in the selection and installation process. The guideline is written for Building America practitioners and HVAC contractors and installers. It includes a compilation of information provided by manufacturers, researchers, and the Department of Energy as well as recent research results from the Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit (PARR) Building America team.

  8. Measure Guideline. High Efficiency Natural Gas Furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, L.; Rose, W.

    2012-10-01

    This measure guideline covers installation of high-efficiency gas furnaces, including: when to install a high-efficiency gas furnace as a retrofit measure; how to identify and address risks; and the steps to be used in the selection and installation process. The guideline is written for Building America practitioners and HVAC contractors and installers. It includes a compilation of information provided by manufacturers, researchers, and the Department of Energy as well as recent research results from the Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit (PARR) Building America team.

  9. Numerical and neutron diffraction measurement of residual stress distribution in dissimilar weld

    DOE PAGES

    Eisazadeh, Hamid; Bunn, Jeffrey R.; Aidun, Daryush K.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a model considering an asymmetric power heat distribution, temperature-dependent material properties, strain hardening and phase transformation was developed to predict temperature field and residual stress distribution in GTA dissimilar weld between austenitic stainless steel (304) and low carbon steel (1018). The effect of martensite formation on longitudinal and transverse residual stress distributions were investigated using both FE model and neutron diffraction measurement. The results indicate that martensitic phase has a significant influence on both residual stress components, i.e., transverse and longitudinal, and it not only can change the distribution shape of residual stress near the weld centermore » line but, also, can alter the peak value of the residual stresses. The calculated temperature and weld zone profile were in agreement with the experimental results. Favorable general agreement was also found between the calculated residual stress distribution and residual stress measurements by the neutron diffraction method.« less

  10. Numerical and neutron diffraction measurement of residual stress distribution in dissimilar weld

    SciTech Connect

    Eisazadeh, Hamid; Bunn, Jeffrey R.; Aidun, Daryush K.

    In this study, a model considering an asymmetric power heat distribution, temperature-dependent material properties, strain hardening and phase transformation was developed to predict temperature field and residual stress distribution in GTA dissimilar weld between austenitic stainless steel (304) and low carbon steel (1018). The effect of martensite formation on longitudinal and transverse residual stress distributions were investigated using both FE model and neutron diffraction measurement. The results indicate that martensitic phase has a significant influence on both residual stress components, i.e., transverse and longitudinal, and it not only can change the distribution shape of residual stress near the weld centermore » line but, also, can alter the peak value of the residual stresses. The calculated temperature and weld zone profile were in agreement with the experimental results. Favorable general agreement was also found between the calculated residual stress distribution and residual stress measurements by the neutron diffraction method.« less

  11. Transient diffraction grating measurements of molecular diffusion in the undergraduate laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiegel, Daniel R.; Tuli, Santona

    2011-07-01

    Diffusion is a central process in many biological, chemical, and physical systems. We describe an experiment that employs the interference of laser beams to allow the measurement of molecular diffusion on submillimeter length scales. The interference fringes of two intersecting pump beams within a dye solution create a sinusoidal distribution of long-lived molecular excited states. A third probe beam is incident at a wavelength at which the indices of refraction of the ground and excited states are different, so the probe beam diffracts from the spatially periodic excited-state pattern. After the pump beams are switched off, the excited-state periodicity washes out as the system diffuses back to equilibrium. The molecular diffusion constant is obtained from the rate constant of the exponential decay of the diffracted beam. It is also possible to measure the excited-state lifetime.

  12. Numerical comparison of grid pattern diffraction effects through measurement and modeling with OptiScan software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Ian B.; Densmore, Victor; Bora, Vaibhav; Pieratt, Matthew W.; Hibbard, Douglas L.; Milster, Tom D.

    2011-06-01

    Coatings of various metalized patterns are used for heating and electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding applications. Previous work has focused on macro differences between different types of grids, and has shown good correlation between measurements and analyses of grid diffraction. To advance this work, we have utilized the University of Arizona's OptiScan software, which has been optimized for this application by using the Babinet Principle. When operating on an appropriate computer system, this algorithm produces results hundreds of times faster than standard Fourier-based methods, and allows realistic cases to be modeled for the first time. By using previously published derivations by Exotic Electro-Optics, we compare diffraction performance of repeating and randomized grid patterns with equivalent sheet resistance using numerical performance metrics. Grid patterns of each type are printed on optical substrates and measured energy is compared against modeled energy.

  13. Measuring h /mCs and the Fine Structure Constant with Bragg Diffraction and Bloch Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Richard

    2016-05-01

    We have demonstrated a new scheme for atom interferometry based on large-momentum-transfer Bragg beam splitters and Bloch oscillations. In this new scheme, we have achieved a resolution of δα / α =0.25ppb in the fine structure constant measurement, which gives up to 4.4 million radians of phase difference between freely evolving matter waves. We suppress many systematic effects, e.g., Zeeman shifts and effects from Earth's gravity and vibrations, use Bloch oscillations to increase the signal and reduce the diffraction phase, simulate multi-atom Bragg diffraction to understand sub-ppb systematic effects, and implement spatial filtering to further suppress systematic effects. We present our recent progress toward a measurement of the fine structure constant, which will provide a stringent test of the standard model of particle physics.

  14. Residual-stress measurement in socket welded joints by neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, M.; Ishiwata, M.; Minakawa, N.

    1994-12-31

    Neutron diffraction measurements of lattice strains provide spatial maps of residual stress near welds in ferritic steel socket joints. The highest tensile stresses in the welds are found in axial, radial and hoop direction at the weld root. However, the highest tensile stress in the axial direction is about 110MPa. Balancing compressive stresses are found near the surface of the socket weld fusion zone. Heat treatment at 600 C for 2 hours is sufficient to relieve residual stress in socket welds.

  15. Measurement of the refractive index by using a rectangular cell with a fs-laser engraved diffraction grating inner wall.

    PubMed

    Durán-Ramírez, Víctor M; Martínez-Ríos, Alejandro; Guerrero-Viramontes, J Ascención; Muñoz-Maciel, Jesús; Peña-Lecona, Francisco G; Selvas-Aguilar, Romeo; Anzueto-Sánchez, Gilberto

    2014-12-01

    A very simple method to obtain the refractive index of liquids by using a rectangular glass cell and a diffraction grating engraved by fs laser ablation on the inner face of one of the walls of the cell is presented. When a laser beam impinges normally on the diffraction grating, the diffraction orders are deviated when they pass through the cell filled with the liquid to be measured. By measuring the deviation of the diffraction orders, we can determine the refractive index of the liquid.

  16. In situ x-ray diffraction measurements of the capillary fountain jet produced via ultrasonic atomization.

    PubMed

    Yano, Yohko F; Douguchi, Junya; Kumagai, Atsushi; Iijima, Takao; Tomida, Yukinobu; Miyamoto, Toshiaki; Matsuura, Kazuo

    2006-11-07

    In situ x-ray diffraction measurements were carried out for investigating the liquid structure in the ultrasonic fountain jet to consider the mechanism of the "ultrasonic ethanol separation" reported by Sato et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 2382 (2001)]. For pure liquids (water and ethanol), it was found that the high frequency ultrasound does not affect the liquid structure microscopically. For the 20 mol % ethanol-water mixture, the estimated ethanol mole fraction in the ultrasonic fountain jet by using the position of the main maximum in the x-ray diffraction profile coincided with that in the reservoir. This result suggests that the ethanol separation is not caused by any distorted liquid structure under the ultrasound irradiation and occurs when or after the generation of the liquid droplet mist.

  17. Neutron diffraction measurements and modeling of residual strains in metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saigal, A.; Leisk, G. G.; Hubbard, C. R.; Misture, S. T.; Wang, X. L.

    1996-01-01

    Neutron diffraction measurements at room temperature are used to characterize the residual strains in tungsten fiber-reinforced copper matrix, tungsten fiber-reinforced Kanthal matrix, and diamond particulate-reinforced copper matrix composites. Results of finite element modeling are compared with the neutron diffraction data. In tungsten/Kanthal composites, the fibers are in compression, the matrix is in tension, and the thermal residual strains are a strong function of the volume fraction of fibers. In copper matrix composites, the matrix is in tension and the stresses are independent of the volume fraction of tungsten fibers or diamond particles and the assumed stress free temperature because of the low yield strength of the matrix phase.

  18. BX90: A new diamond anvil cell design for X-ray diffraction and optical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantor, I.; Prakapenka, V.; Kantor, A.; Dera, P.; Kurnosov, A.; Sinogeikin, S.; Dubrovinskaia, N.; Dubrovinsky, L.

    2012-12-01

    We present a new design of a universal diamond anvil cell, suitable for different kinds of experimental studies under high pressures. Main features of the cell are an ultimate 90-degrees symmetrical axial opening and high stability, making the presented cell design suitable for a whole range of techniques from optical absorption to single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies, also in combination with external resistive or double-side laser heating. Three examples of the cell applications are provided: a Brillouin scattering of neon, single-crystal X-ray diffraction of α-Cr2O3, and resistivity measurements on the (Mg0.60Fe0.40)(Si0.63Al0.37)O3 silicate perovskite.

  19. In situ x-ray diffraction measurements of the capillary fountain jet produced via ultrasonic atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Yohko F.; Douguchi, Junya; Kumagai, Atsushi; Iijima, Takao; Tomida, Yukinobu; Miyamoto, Toshiaki; Matsuura, Kazuo

    2006-11-01

    In situ x-ray diffraction measurements were carried out for investigating the liquid structure in the ultrasonic fountain jet to consider the mechanism of the "ultrasonic ethanol separation" reported by Sato et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 2382 (2001)]. For pure liquids (water and ethanol), it was found that the high frequency ultrasound does not affect the liquid structure microscopically. For the 20mol% ethanol-water mixture, the estimated ethanol mole fraction in the ultrasonic fountain jet by using the position of the main maximum in the x-ray diffraction profile coincided with that in the reservoir. This result suggests that the ethanol separation is not caused by any distorted liquid structure under the ultrasound irradiation and occurs when or after the generation of the liquid droplet mist.

  20. Measuring In-Plane Displacements with Variable Sensitivity Using Diffractive Optic Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Robert L.; Gilbert, John A.; Cole, Helen J.; Ashley, Paul R.

    1998-01-01

    This paper introduces a method called diffractive optic interferometry (DOI) which allows in-plane displacement components to be measured with variable sensitivity. DOI relies on binary optical elements fabricated as phase-type Dammann gratings which produce multiple diffraction orders of nearly equal intensity. Sensitivity is varied by combining the different wavefronts produced by a conjugate pair of these binary optical elements; a transmission element is used to produce several illumination beams while a reflective element, replicated on the surface of a specimen, provides the reference for the undeformed state. The steps taken to design and fabricate these binary optical elements are described. The specimen grating is characterized, and tested on a disk subjected to diametrical compression. Overall, the results are excellent, with experimental data agreeing to within a few percent of the theoretical predictions.

  1. Structural phase transition in d-benzil characterised by capacitance measurements and neutron powder diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goossens, D. J.; Wu, Xiaodong; Prior, M.

    2005-12-01

    The ferroelectric phase transition in deuterated benzil, C 14H 10O 2, has been studied using capacitance measurements and neutron powder diffraction. Hydrogenous benzil shows a phase transition at 83.5 K from a high temperature P3 121 phase to a cell-doubled P2 1 phase. The phase transition in d-benzil occurs at 88.1 K, a small isotope effect. Neutron powder diffraction was consistent with a low temperature phase of space group P2 1. Upon deuteration the transition remained first-order and the dynamics of the phenyl ring dominated the behaviour. The isotope effect can be attributed to the difference in mass and moment of inertia between C 6H 5 and C 6D 5.

  2. Measurement of heat and moisture exchanger efficiency.

    PubMed

    Chandler, M

    2013-09-01

    Deciding between a passive heat and moisture exchanger or active humidification depends upon the level of humidification that either will deliver. Published international standards dictate that active humidifiers should deliver a minimum humidity of 33 mg.l(-1); however, no such requirement exists, for heat and moisture exchangers. Anaesthetists instead have to rely on information provided by manufacturers, which may not allow comparison of different devices and their clinical effectiveness. I suggest that measurement of humidification efficiency, being the percentage moisture returned and determined by measuring the temperature of the respired gases, should be mandated, and report a modification of the standard method that will allow this to be easily measured. In this study, different types of heat and moisture exchangers for adults, children and patients with a tracheostomy were tested. Adult and paediatric models lost between 6.5 mg.l(-1) and 8.5 mg.l(-1) moisture (corresponding to an efficiency of around 80%); however, the models designed for patients with a tracheostomy lost between 16 mg.l(-1) and 18 mg.l(-1) (60% efficiency). I propose that all heat and moisture exchangers should be tested in this manner and percentage efficiency reported to allow an informed choice between different types and models. © 2013 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  3. Comparison of dissimilarity measures for cluster analysis of X-ray diffraction data from combinatorial libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Yuma; Kusne, A. Gilad; Takeuchi, Ichiro

    2017-12-01

    Machine learning techniques have proven invaluable to manage the ever growing volume of materials research data produced as developments continue in high-throughput materials simulation, fabrication, and characterization. In particular, machine learning techniques have been demonstrated for their utility in rapidly and automatically identifying potential composition-phase maps from structural data characterization of composition spread libraries, enabling rapid materials fabrication-structure-property analysis and functional materials discovery. A key issue in development of an automated phase-diagram determination method is the choice of dissimilarity measure, or kernel function. The desired measure reduces the impact of confounding structural data issues on analysis performance. The issues include peak height changes and peak shifting due to lattice constant change as a function of composition. In this work, we investigate the choice of dissimilarity measure in X-ray diffraction-based structure analysis and the choice of measure's performance impact on automatic composition-phase map determination. Nine dissimilarity measures are investigated for their impact in analyzing X-ray diffraction patterns for a Fe-Co-Ni ternary alloy composition spread. The cosine, Pearson correlation coefficient, and Jensen-Shannon divergence measures are shown to provide the best performance in the presence of peak height change and peak shifting (due to lattice constant change) when the magnitude of peak shifting is unknown. With prior knowledge of the maximum peak shifting, dynamic time warping in a normalized constrained mode provides the best performance. This work also serves to demonstrate a strategy for rapid analysis of a large number of X-ray diffraction patterns in general beyond data from combinatorial libraries.

  4. Multifrequency measurements of core-diffracted P waves (Pdiff) for global waveform tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Kasra; Sigloch, Karin

    2015-10-01

    The lower third of the mantle is sampled extensively by body waves that diffract around the earth's core (Pdiff and Sdiff phases), which could deliver highly resolved tomographic images of this poorly understood region. But core-diffracted waves-especially Pdiff waves-are not often used in tomography because they are difficult to model adequately. Our aim is to make core-diffracted body waves usable for global waveform tomography, across their entire frequency range. Here we present the data processing part of this effort. A method is demonstrated that routinely calculates finite-frequency traveltimes of Pdiff waves by cross-correlating large quantities of waveform data with synthetic seismograms, in frequency passbands ranging from 30.0 to 2.7 s dominant period. Green's functions for 1857 earthquakes, typically comprising thousands of seismograms, are calculated by theoretically exact wave propagation through a spherically symmetric earth model, up to 1 Hz dominant period. Out of 418 226 candidates, 165 651 (39.6 per cent) source-receiver pairs yielded at least one successful passband measurement of a Pdiff traveltime anomaly, for a total of 479 559 traveltimes in the eight passbands considered. Measurements of teleseismic P waves yielded 448 178 usable source-receiver paths from 613 057 candidates (73.1 per cent success rate), for a total of 2 306 755 usable teleseismic dT in eight passbands. Observed and predicted characteristics of Pdiff traveltimes are discussed and compared to teleseismic P for this very large data set. Pdiff measurements are noise-limited due to severe wave attenuation with epicentral distance and frequency. Measurement success drops from 40-60 per cent at 80° distance, to 5-10 per cent at 140°. Frequency has a 2-3 times stronger influence on measurement success for Pdiff than for P. The fewest usable dT measurements are obtained in the microseismic noise band, whereas the fewest usable teleseismic P measurements occur at the highest

  5. On the measurement of austenite in supermartensitic stainless steel by X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Tolchard, Julian Richard, E-mail: tolchard@material.ntnu.no; Sømme, Astri; Solberg, Jan Ketil

    2015-01-15

    Sections of a 13Cr supermartensitic stainless steel were investigated to determine the optimum sample preparation for measurement of the austenite content by X-ray diffraction. The surface of several samples was mechanically ground or polished using media of grit sizes in the range 1–120 μm. The strained surface layer was afterwards removed stepwise by electropolishing, and the austenite content measured at each step. It was found that any level of mechanical grinding or polishing results in a reduction of the measured austenite fraction relative to the true bulk value, and that coarser grinding media impart greater damage and greater reduction inmore » the measured austenite content. The results thus highlight the importance of the electropolishing step in preparation of such samples, but suggest that the American Society for Testing and Materials standard E975-03 substantially overestimates the amount of material which needs to be removed to recover the true “bulk” content. - Highlights: • Quantitative Rietveld analysis of austenite/martensite ratio in supermartensitic stainless steels • Critical evaluation of sample preparation for residual austenite measurements by X-ray diffraction • Highlighting of the importance of electropolishing as a final preparation step.« less

  6. Measurement of 3D refractive index distribution by optical diffraction tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Weining; Wang, Dayong; Wang, Yunxin; Zhao, Jie; Rong, Lu; Yuan, Yuanyuan

    2018-01-01

    Optical Diffraction Tomography (ODT), as a novel 3D imaging technique, can obtain a 3D refractive index (RI) distribution to reveal the important optical properties of transparent samples. According to the theory of ODT, an optical diffraction tomography setup is built based on the Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The propagation direction of object beam is controlled by a 2D translation stage, and 121 holograms based on different illumination angles are recorded by a Charge-coupled Device (CCD). In order to prove the validity and accuracy of the ODT, the 3D RI profile of microsphere with a known RI is firstly measured. An iterative constraint algorithm is employed to improve the imaging accuracy effectively. The 3D morphology and average RI of the microsphere are consistent with that of the actual situation, and the RI error is less than 0.0033. Then, an optical element fabricated by laser with a non-uniform RI is taken as the sample. Its 3D RI profile is obtained by the optical diffraction tomography system.

  7. Quantitative measurements of magnetic vortices using position resolved diffraction in Lorentz STEM

    SciTech Connect

    Zaluzec, N. J.

    2002-03-05

    A number of electron column techniques have been developed over the last forty years to permit visualization of magnetic fields in specimens. These include: Fresnel imaging, Differential Phase Contrast, Electron Holography and Lorentz STEM. In this work we have extended the LSTEM methodology using Position Resolved Diffraction (PRD) to quantitatively measure the in-plane electromagnetic fields of thin film materials. The experimental work reported herein has been carried out using the ANL AAEM HB603Z 300 kV FEG instrument 5. In this instrument, the electron optical column was operated in a zero field mode, at the specimen, where the objective lens ismore » turned off and the probe forming lens functions were reallocated to the C1, C2, and C3 lenses. Post specimen lenses (P1, P2, P3, P4) were used to magnify the transmitted electrons to a YAG screen, which was then optically transferred to a Hamamatsu ORCA ER CCD array. This CCD was interfaced to an EmiSpec Data Acquisition System and the data was subsequently transferred to an external computer system for detailed quantitative analysis. In Position Resolved Diffraction mode, we digitally step a focused electron probe across the region of interest of the specimen while at the same time recording the complete diffraction pattern at each point in the scan.« less

  8. Measurement of inelastic, single- and double-diffraction cross sections in proton-proton collisions at the LHC with ALICE.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B; Adam, J; Adamová, D; Adare, A M; Aggarwal, M M; Aglieri Rinella, G; Agocs, A G; Agostinelli, A; Aguilar Salazar, S; Ahammed, Z; Ahmad Masoodi, A; Ahmad, N; Ahn, S A; Ahn, S U; Akindinov, A; Aleksandrov, D; Alessandro, B; Alfaro Molina, R; Alici, A; Alkin, A; Almaráz Aviña, E; Alme, J; Alt, T; Altini, V; Altinpinar, S; Altsybeev, I; Andrei, C; Andronic, A; Anguelov, V; Anielski, J; Anson, C; Antičić, T; Antinori, F; Antonioli, P; Aphecetche, L; Appelshäuser, H; Arbor, N; Arcelli, S; Arend, A; Armesto, N; Arnaldi, R; Aronsson, T; Arsene, I C; Arslandok, M; Asryan, A; Augustinus, A; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Äystö, J; Azmi, M D; Bach, M; Badalà, A; Baek, Y W; Bailhache, R; Bala, R; Baldini Ferroli, R; Baldisseri, A; Baldit, A; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F; Bán, J; Baral, R C; Barbera, R; Barile, F; Barnaföldi, G G; Barnby, L S; Barret, V; Bartke, J; Basile, M; Bastid, N; Basu, S; Bathen, B; Batigne, G; Batyunya, B; Baumann, C; Bearden, I G; Beck, H; Behera, N K; Belikov, I; Bellini, F; Bellwied, R; Belmont-Moreno, E; Bencedi, G; Beole, S; Berceanu, I; Bercuci, A; Berdnikov, Y; Berenyi, D; Bergognon, A A E; Berzano, D; Betev, L; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhom, J; Bianchi, N; Bianchi, L; Bianchin, C; Bielčík, J; Bielčíková, J; Bilandzic, A; Bjelogrlic, S; Blanco, F; Blanco, F; Blau, D; Blume, C; Boccioli, M; Bock, N; Böttger, S; Bogdanov, A; Bøggild, H; Bogolyubsky, M; Boldizsár, L; Bombara, M; Book, J; Borel, H; Borissov, A; Bose, S; Bossú, F; Botje, M; Botta, E; Boyer, B; Braidot, E; Braun-Munzinger, P; Bregant, M; Breitner, T; Browning, T A; Broz, M; Brun, R; Bruna, E; Bruno, G E; Budnikov, D; Buesching, H; Bufalino, S; Busch, O; Buthelezi, Z; Caballero Orduna, D; Caffarri, D; Cai, X; Caines, H; Calvo Villar, E; Camerini, P; Canoa Roman, V; Cara Romeo, G; Carena, F; Carena, W; Carlin Filho, N; Carminati, F; Casanova Díaz, A; Castillo Castellanos, J; Castillo Hernandez, J F; Casula, E A R; Catanescu, V; Cavicchioli, C; Ceballos Sanchez, C; Cepila, J; Cerello, P; Chang, B; Chapeland, S; Charvet, J L; Chattopadhyay, S; Chattopadhyay, S; Chawla, I; Cherney, M; Cheshkov, C; Cheynis, B; Chibante Barroso, V; Chinellato, D D; Chochula, P; Chojnacki, M; Choudhury, S; Christakoglou, P; Christensen, C H; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, S U; Cicalo, C; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Cleymans, J; Coccetti, F; Colamaria, F; Colella, D; Conesa Balbastre, G; Conesa Del Valle, Z; Constantin, P; Contin, G; Contreras, J G; Cormier, T M; Corrales Morales, Y; Cortese, P; Cortés Maldonado, I; Cosentino, M R; Costa, F; Cotallo, M E; Crescio, E; Crochet, P; Cruz Alaniz, E; Cuautle, E; Cunqueiro, L; Dainese, A; Dalsgaard, H H; Danu, A; Das, D; Das, K; Das, I; Dash, S; Dash, A; De, S; de Barros, G O V; De Caro, A; de Cataldo, G; de Cuveland, J; De Falco, A; De Gruttola, D; Delagrange, H; Deloff, A; Demanov, V; De Marco, N; Dénes, E; De Pasquale, S; Deppman, A; D Erasmo, G; de Rooij, R; Diaz Corchero, M A; Di Bari, D; Dietel, T; Di Giglio, C; Di Liberto, S; Di Mauro, A; Di Nezza, P; Divià, R; Djuvsland, Ø; Dobrin, A; Dobrowolski, T; Domínguez, I; Dönigus, B; Dordic, O; Driga, O; Dubey, A K; Dubla, A; Ducroux, L; Dupieux, P; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Dutta Majumdar, A K; Elia, D; Emschermann, D; Engel, H; Erazmus, B; Erdal, H A; Espagnon, B; Estienne, M; Esumi, S; Evans, D; Eyyubova, G; Fabris, D; Faivre, J; Falchieri, D; Fantoni, A; Fasel, M; Fearick, R; Fedunov, A; Fehlker, D; Feldkamp, L; Felea, D; Fenton-Olsen, B; Feofilov, G; Fernández Téllez, A; Ferretti, A; Ferretti, R; Festanti, A; Figiel, J; Figueredo, M A S; Filchagin, S; Finogeev, D; Fionda, F M; Fiore, E M; Floris, M; Foertsch, S; Foka, P; Fokin, S; Fragiacomo, E; Francescon, A; Frankenfeld, U; Fuchs, U; Furget, C; Fusco Girard, M; Gaardhøje, J J; Gagliardi, M; Gago, A; Gallio, M; Gangadharan, D R; Ganoti, P; Garabatos, C; Garcia-Solis, E; Garishvili, I; Gerhard, J; Germain, M; Geuna, C; Gheata, M; Gheata, A; Ghidini, B; Ghosh, P; Gianotti, P; Girard, M R; Giubellino, P; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Glässel, P; Gomez, R; Ferreiro, E G; González-Trueba, L H; González-Zamora, P; Gorbunov, S; Goswami, A; Gotovac, S; Grabski, V; Graczykowski, L K; Grajcarek, R; Grelli, A; Grigoras, C; Grigoras, A; Grigoriev, V; Grigoryan, S; Grigoryan, A; Grinyov, B; Grion, N; Gros, P; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J F; Grossiord, J-Y; Grosso, R; Guber, F; Guernane, R; Guerra Gutierrez, C; Guerzoni, B; Guilbaud, M; Gulbrandsen, K; Gunji, T; Gupta, A; Gupta, R; Gutbrod, H; Haaland, Ø; Hadjidakis, C; Haiduc, M; Hamagaki, H; Hamar, G; Han, B H; Hanratty, L D; Hansen, A; Harmanová-Tóthová, Z; Harris, J W; Hartig, M; Hasegan, D; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hayrapetyan, A; Heckel, S T; Heide, M; Helstrup, H; Herghelegiu, A; Herrera Corral, G; Herrmann, N; Hess, B A; Hetland, K F; Hicks, B; Hille, P T; Hippolyte, B; Horaguchi, T; Hori, Y; Hristov, P; Hřivnáčová, I; Huang, M; Humanic, T J; Hwang, D S; Ichou, R; Ilkaev, R; Ilkiv, I; Inaba, M; Incani, E; Innocenti, P G; Innocenti, G M; Ippolitov, M; Irfan, M; Ivan, C; Ivanov, A; Ivanov, M; Ivanov, V; Ivanytskyi, O; Jachołkowski, A; Jacobs, P M; Jang, H J; Janik, R; Janik, M A; Jayarathna, P H S Y; Jena, S; Jha, D M; Jimenez Bustamante, R T; Jirden, L; Jones, P G; Jung, H; Jusko, A; Kaidalov, A B; Kakoyan, V; Kalcher, S; Kaliňák, P; Kalliokoski, T; Kalweit, A; Kang, J H; Kaplin, V; Karasu Uysal, A; Karavichev, O; Karavicheva, T; Karpechev, E; Kazantsev, A; Kebschull, U; Keidel, R; Khan, P; Khan, S A; Khan, M M; Khanzadeev, A; Kharlov, Y; Kileng, B; Kim, S; Kim, B; Kim, T; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, J H; Kim, J S; Kim, M; Kim, M; Kirsch, S; Kisel, I; Kiselev, S; Kisiel, A; Klay, J L; Klein, J; Klein-Bösing, C; Kliemant, M; Kluge, A; Knichel, M L; Knospe, A G; Koch, K; Köhler, M K; Kollegger, T; Kolojvari, A; Kondratiev, V; Kondratyeva, N; Konevskikh, A; Korneev, A; Kour, R; Kowalski, M; Kox, S; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G; Kral, J; Králik, I; Kramer, F; Kraus, I; Krawutschke, T; Krelina, M; Kretz, M; Krivda, M; Krizek, F; Krus, M; Kryshen, E; Krzewicki, M; Kucheriaev, Y; Kugathasan, T; Kuhn, C; Kuijer, P G; Kulakov, I; Kumar, J; Kurashvili, P; Kurepin, A B; Kurepin, A; Kuryakin, A; Kushpil, V; Kushpil, S; Kvaerno, H; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Lakomov, I; Langoy, R; La Pointe, S L; Lara, C; Lardeux, A; La Rocca, P; Lea, R; Le Bornec, Y; Lechman, M; Lee, S C; Lee, G R; Lee, K S; Lefèvre, F; Lehnert, J; Lenhardt, M; Lenti, V; León, H; Leoncino, M; León Monzón, I; León Vargas, H; Lévai, P; Lien, J; Lietava, R; Lindal, S; Lindenstruth, V; Lippmann, C; Lisa, M A; Liu, L; Loggins, V R; Loginov, V; Lohn, S; Lohner, D; Loizides, C; Loo, K K; Lopez, X; López Torres, E; Løvhøiden, G; Lu, X-G; Luettig, P; Lunardon, M; Luo, J; Luparello, G; Luquin, L; Luzzi, C; Ma, K; Ma, R; Madagodahettige-Don, D M; Maevskaya, A; Mager, M; Mahapatra, D P; Maire, A; Malaev, M; Maldonado Cervantes, I; Malinina, L; Mal'Kevich, M V D; Malzacher, P; Mamonov, A; Mangotra, L; Manko, V; Manso, F; Manzari, V; Mao, Y; Marchisone, M; Mareš, J; Margagliotti, G V; Margotti, A; Marín, A; Marin Tobon, C A; Markert, C; Marquard, M; Martashvili, I; Martinengo, P; Martínez, M I; Martínez Davalos, A; Martínez García, G; Martynov, Y; Mas, A; Masciocchi, S; Masera, M; Masoni, A; Massacrier, L; Mastroserio, A; Matthews, Z L; Matyja, A; Mayer, C; Mazer, J; Mazzoni, M A; Meddi, F; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Mercado Pérez, J; Meres, M; Miake, Y; Milano, L; Milosevic, J; Mischke, A; Mishra, A N; Miśkowiec, D; Mitu, C; Mlynarz, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Montaño Zetina, L; Monteno, M; Montes, E; Moon, T; Morando, M; Moreira De Godoy, D A; Moretto, S; Morsch, A; Muccifora, V; Mudnic, E; Muhuri, S; Mukherjee, M; Müller, H; Munhoz, M G; Musa, L; Musso, A; Nandi, B K; Nania, R; Nappi, E; Nattrass, C; Naumov, N P; Navin, S; Nayak, T K; Nazarenko, S; Nazarov, G; Nedosekin, A; Nicassio, M; Niculescu, M; Nielsen, B S; Niida, T; Nikolaev, S; Nikolic, V; Nikulin, S; Nikulin, V; Nilsen, B S; Nilsson, M S; Noferini, F; Nomokonov, P; Nooren, G; Novitzky, N; Nyanin, A; Nyatha, A; Nygaard, C; Nystrand, J; Ochirov, A; Oeschler, H; Oh, S; Oh, S K; Oleniacz, J; Oppedisano, C; Ortiz Velasquez, A; Ortona, G; Oskarsson, A; Ostrowski, P; Otwinowski, J; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pachmayer, Y; Pachr, M; Padilla, F; Pagano, P; Paić, G; Painke, F; Pajares, C; Pal, S K; Palaha, A; Palmeri, A; Papikyan, V; Pappalardo, G S; Park, W J; Passfeld, A; Pastirčák, B; Patalakha, D I; Paticchio, V; Pavlinov, A; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Pereira Da Costa, H; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E; Peresunko, D; Pérez Lara, C E; Perez Lezama, E; Perini, D; Perrino, D; Peryt, W; Pesci, A; Peskov, V; Pestov, Y; Petráček, V; Petran, M; Petris, M; Petrov, P; Petrovici, M; Petta, C; Piano, S; Piccotti, A; Pikna, M; Pillot, P; Pinazza, O; Pinsky, L; Pitz, N; Piyarathna, D B; Planinic, M; Płoskoń, M; Pluta, J; Pocheptsov, T; Pochybova, S; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Poghosyan, M G; Polák, K; Polichtchouk, B; Pop, A; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S; Pospíšil, V; Potukuchi, B; Prasad, S K; Preghenella, R; Prino, F; Pruneau, C A; Pshenichnov, I; Puchagin, S; Puddu, G; Pulvirenti, A; Punin, V; Putiš, M; Putschke, J; Quercigh, E; Qvigstad, H; Rachevski, A; Rademakers, A; Räihä, T S; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ramello, L; Ramírez Reyes, A; Raniwala, S; Raniwala, R; Räsänen, S S; Rascanu, B T; Rathee, D; Read, K F; Real, J S; Redlich, K; Reichelt, P; Reicher, M; Renfordt, R; Reolon, A R; Reshetin, A; Rettig, F; Revol, J-P; Reygers, K; Riccati, L; Ricci, R A; Richert, T; Richter, M; Riedler, P; Riegler, W; Riggi, F; Rodrigues Fernandes Rabacal, B; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M; Rodriguez Manso, A; Røed, K; Rohr, D; Röhrich, D; Romita, R; Ronchetti, F; Rosnet, P; Rossegger, S; Rossi, A; Roy, P; Roy, C; Rubio Montero, A J; Rui, R; Russo, R; Ryabinkin, E; Rybicki, A; Sadovsky, S; Šafařík, K; Sahoo, R; Sahu, P K; Saini, J; Sakaguchi, H; Sakai, S; Sakata, D; Salgado, C A; Salzwedel, J; Sambyal, S; Samsonov, V; Sanchez Castro, X; Šándor, L; Sandoval, A; Sano, M; Sano, S; Santo, R; Santoro, R; Sarkamo, J; Scapparone, E; Scarlassara, F; Scharenberg, R P; Schiaua, C; Schicker, R; Schmidt, C; Schmidt, H R; Schreiner, S; Schuchmann, S; Schukraft, J; Schutz, Y; Schwarz, K; Schweda, K; Scioli, G; Scomparin, E; Scott, R; Segato, G; Selyuzhenkov, I; Senyukov, S; Seo, J; Serci, S; Serradilla, E; Sevcenco, A; Shabetai, A; Shabratova, G; Shahoyan, R; Sharma, N; Sharma, S; Rohni, S; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shtejer, K; Sibiriak, Y; Siciliano, M; Sicking, E; Siddhanta, S; Siemiarczuk, T; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Simatovic, G; Simonetti, G; Singaraju, R; Singh, R; Singha, S; Singhal, V; Sinha, B C; Sinha, T; Sitar, B; Sitta, M; Skaali, T B; Skjerdal, K; Smakal, R; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R J M; Søgaard, C; Soltz, R; Son, H; Song, M; Song, J; Soos, C; Soramel, F; Sputowska, I; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M; Srivastava, B K; Stachel, J; Stan, I; Stan, I; Stefanek, G; Steinpreis, M; Stenlund, E; Steyn, G; Stiller, J H; Stocco, D; Stolpovskiy, M; Strabykin, K; Strmen, P; Suaide, A A P; Subieta Vásquez, M A; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sukhorukov, M; Sultanov, R; Šumbera, M; Susa, T; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarka, I; Szczepankiewicz, A; Szostak, A; Szymański, M; Takahashi, J; Tapia Takaki, J D; Tauro, A; Tejeda Muñoz, G; Telesca, A; Terrevoli, C; Thäder, J; Thomas, D; Tieulent, R; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Toia, A; Torii, H; Toscano, L; Trubnikov, V; Truesdale, D; Trzaska, W H; Tsuji, T; Tumkin, A; Turrisi, R; Tveter, T S; Ulery, J; Ullaland, K; Ulrich, J; Uras, A; Urbán, J; Urciuoli, G M; Usai, G L; Vajzer, M; Vala, M; Valencia Palomo, L; Vallero, S; Vande Vyvre, P; van Leeuwen, M; Vannucci, L; Vargas, A; Varma, R; Vasileiou, M; Vasiliev, A; Vechernin, V; Veldhoen, M; Venaruzzo, M; Vercellin, E; Vergara, S; Vernet, R; Verweij, M; Vickovic, L; Viesti, G; Vikhlyantsev, O; Vilakazi, Z; Villalobos Baillie, O; Vinogradov, Y; Vinogradov, A; Vinogradov, L; Virgili, T; Viyogi, Y P; Vodopyanov, A; Voloshin, S; Voloshin, K; Volpe, G; von Haller, B; Vranic, D; Øvrebekk, G; Vrláková, J; Vulpescu, B; Vyushin, A; Wagner, V; Wagner, B; Wan, R; Wang, M; Wang, D; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Watanabe, K; Weber, M; Wessels, J P; Westerhoff, U; Wiechula, J; Wikne, J; Wilde, M; Wilk, A; Wilk, G; Williams, M C S; Windelband, B; Xaplanteris Karampatsos, L; Yaldo, C G; Yamaguchi, Y; Yang, H; Yang, S; Yasnopolskiy, S; Yi, J; Yin, Z; Yoo, I-K; Yoon, J; Yu, W; Yuan, X; Yushmanov, I; Zaccolo, V; Zach, C; Zampolli, C; Zaporozhets, S; Zarochentsev, A; Závada, P; Zaviyalov, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zelnicek, P; Zgura, I S; Zhalov, M; Zhang, X; Zhang, H; Zhou, D; Zhou, Y; Zhou, F; Zhu, J; Zhu, J; Zhu, X; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, A; Zinovjev, G; Zoccarato, Y; Zynovyev, M; Zyzak, M

    Measurements of cross sections of inelastic and diffractive processes in proton-proton collisions at LHC energies were carried out with the ALICE detector. The fractions of diffractive processes in inelastic collisions were determined from a study of gaps in charged particle pseudorapidity distributions: for single diffraction (diffractive mass M X <200 GeV/ c 2 ) [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text], respectively at centre-of-mass energies [Formula: see text]; for double diffraction (for a pseudorapidity gap Δ η >3) σ DD / σ INEL =0.11±0.03,0.12±0.05, and [Formula: see text], respectively at [Formula: see text]. To measure the inelastic cross section, beam properties were determined with van der Meer scans, and, using a simulation of diffraction adjusted to data, the following values were obtained: [Formula: see text] mb at [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] at [Formula: see text]. The single- and double-diffractive cross sections were calculated combining relative rates of diffraction with inelastic cross sections. The results are compared to previous measurements at proton-antiproton and proton-proton colliders at lower energies, to measurements by other experiments at the LHC, and to theoretical models.

  9. High-Efficiency, Near-Diffraction Limited, Dielectric Metasurface Lenses Based on Crystalline Titanium Dioxide at Visible Wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yaoyao; Liu, Hongzhan; Wang, Faqiang; Meng, Hongyun; Guo, Jianping; Li, Jinfeng; Wei, Zhongchao

    2018-04-28

    Metasurfaces are planar optical elements that hold promise for overcoming the limitations of refractive and conventional diffractive optics. Previous metasurfaces have been limited to transparency windows at infrared wavelengths because of significant optical absorption and loss at visible wavelengths. Here we report a polarization-insensitive, high-contrast transmissive metasurface composed of crystalline titanium dioxide pillars in the form of metalens at the wavelength of 633 nm. The focal spots are as small as 0.54 λ d , which is very close to the optical diffraction limit of 0.5 λ d . The simulation focusing efficiency is up to 88.5%. A rigorous method for metalens design, the phase realization mechanism and the trade-off between high efficiency and small spot size (or large numerical aperture) are discussed. Besides, the metalenses can work well with an imaging point source up to ±15° off axis. The proposed design is relatively systematic and can be applied to various applications such as visible imaging, ranging and sensing systems.

  10. High efficiency diffraction grating technologies LPDL 900 and LPDL 1100 in telecommunications applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milner, Darrin; Didona, Kevin; Bannon, David

    2005-04-01

    With the introduction of wavelength division multiplexing and dense wavelength division multiplexing, equipment manufactures have sought to reduce design tradeoffs and costs while maintaining or increasing their product performance. With the need to reduce if not eliminate optical losses and create the all light path from source to destination, equipment manufactures are addressing the concerns of component manufactures to provide increased performance to support configurable designs for 100, 50, and eventually 12.5GHz. One of the most reliable, robust, and high performance devices is the low polarization dependent loss (LPDL) diffraction grating used to disperse wavelengths for channel blocking, add/drop functionality and real time light path reconfigurations. The networks today have a variety of factors which contribute to the optical loss budget and impact system design cost, facility requirements, maintenance or replacement costs. These factors include first and second order polarization mode dispersion (PMD), polarization dependent loss (PDL), wavelength dependent losses, and chromatic dispersion (CD). Network designers and equipment manufactures have to consider each component capability and its impact to the systems bit error rate (BER). In order to gain an understanding of the advantages of components with low polarization dependency, we will summarize the effects that interplay with these types of components.

  11. Fabrication and testing of a newly designed slit system for depth-resolved X-ray diffraction measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Sinsheimer, John; Bouet, Nathalie; Ghose, Sanjit; ...

    2016-10-06

    A new system of slits called `spiderweb slits' have been developed for depth-resolved powder or polycrystalline X-ray diffraction measurements. The slits act on diffracted X-rays to select a particular gauge volume of sample, while absorbing diffracted X-rays from outside of this volume. Although the slit geometry is to some extent similar to that of previously developed conical slits or spiral slits, this new design has advantages over the previous ones in use for complex heterogeneous materials and in situ and operando diffraction measurements. For example, the slits can measure a majority of any diffraction cone for any polycrystalline material, overmore » a continuous range of diffraction angles, and work for X-ray energies of tens to hundreds of kiloelectronvolts. In addition, the design is generated and optimized using ray-tracing simulations, and fabricated through laser micromachining. The first prototype was successfully tested at the X17A beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source, and shows similar performance to simulations, demonstrating gauge volume selection for standard powders, for all diffraction peaks over angles of 2–10°. A similar, but improved, design will be implemented at the X-ray Powder Diffraction beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source II.« less

  12. Investigation of the effect of phase nonuniformities and the microwave field distribution on the electronic efficiency of a diffraction-radiation generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimov, P. P.; Tsvyk, A. I.; Shestopalov, V. P.

    1985-10-01

    The effect of local phase nonuniformities of the diffraction gratings and the field distribution of the open cavity on the electronic efficiency of a diffraction-radiation generator (DRG) is analyzed numerically on the basis of a self-consistent system of nonlinear stationary equations for the DRG. It is shown that the interaction power and efficiency of a DRG can be increased by the use of an open cavity with a nonuniform diffraction grating and a complex form of microwave field distribution over the interaction space.

  13. Diffraction-based overlay measurement on dedicated mark using rigorous modeling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hailiang; Wang, Fan; Zhang, Qingyun; Chen, Yonghui; Zhou, Chang

    2012-03-01

    Diffraction Based Overlay (DBO) is widely evaluated by numerous authors, results show DBO can provide better performance than Imaging Based Overlay (IBO). However, DBO has its own problems. As well known, Modeling based DBO (mDBO) faces challenges of low measurement sensitivity and crosstalk between various structure parameters, which may result in poor accuracy and precision. Meanwhile, main obstacle encountered by empirical DBO (eDBO) is that a few pads must be employed to gain sufficient information on overlay-induced diffraction signature variations, which consumes more wafer space and costs more measuring time. Also, eDBO may suffer from mark profile asymmetry caused by processes. In this paper, we propose an alternative DBO technology that employs a dedicated overlay mark and takes a rigorous modeling approach. This technology needs only two or three pads for each direction, which is economic and time saving. While overlay measurement error induced by mark profile asymmetry being reduced, this technology is expected to be as accurate and precise as scatterometry technologies.

  14. X-Ray diffraction and resonance shear measurement of nano-confined ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Kazuhito; Mizukami, Masashi; Nakano, Shinya; Ohta, Noboru; Yagi, Naoto; Kurihara, Kazue

    2018-05-23

    X-ray diffraction measurement at the SPring-8 synchrotron was employed to investigate the structures of two types of imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([C4mim][NTF2]) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([C4mim][BF4]), confined between silica surfaces by varying the surface separation distances of ca. 500 nm (bulk liquid), ca. 10 nm, and ca. 2 nm (hard wall thickness). The obtained diffraction profiles and intensities were discussed by considering the structures and properties of the nano-confined ILs between the silica surfaces investigated by resonance shear measurement (RSM) and molecular dynamics simulation (MD) in our previous reports. [C4mim][NTf2] showed two diffraction peaks at q = 8.8 nm-1 (spacing d = 0.71 nm) and at q = 14.0 nm-1 (spacing d = 0.45 nm) at the greatest distance (D = ca. 500 nm), which were assigned to the interval between the same ions (anion-anion or cation-cation) within the polar network of [C4mim][NTf2] and the interval between the neighboring anion-cation, respectively. The positions of these two peaks remained the same at D = ca. 10 nm and at the hard wall (D = ca. 2 nm) and their intensity factor increased, indicating that both the cation and anion existed in the same layer. This result was consistent with the checkerboard structure of [C4mim][NTf2] on the silica surface computer simulated in our previous studies. On the other hand, [C4mim][BF4] showed a peak at q = 15.4 nm-1 (spacing d = 0.41 nm) corresponding to the anion-cation interval at the greatest distance (D = ca. 500 nm). This peak became broader and weaker at D = ca. 12 nm and at D = ca. 2 nm.

  15. Light field measurement based on the single-lens coherent diffraction imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Cheng; Tan, Jiubin; Liu, Zhengjun

    2018-01-01

    Plenoptic camera and holography are popular light field measurement techniques. However, the low resolution or the complex apparatus hinders their widespread application. In this paper, we put forward a new light field measurement scheme. The lens is introduced into coherent diffraction imaging to operate an optical transform, extended fractional Fourier transform. Combined with the multi-image phase retrieval algorithm, the scheme is proved to hold several advantages. It gets rid of the support requirement and is much easier to implement while keeping a high resolution by making full use of the detector plane. Also, it is verified that our scheme has a superiority over the direct lens focusing imaging in amplitude measurement accuracy and phase retrieval ability.

  16. Efficient 41Ca measurements for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vockenhuber, C.; Schulze-König, T.; Synal, H.-A.; Aeberli, I.; Zimmermann, M. B.

    2015-10-01

    We present the performance of 41Ca measurements using low-energy Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at the 500 kV facility TANDY at ETH Zurich. We optimized the measurement procedure for biomedical applications where reliability and high sample throughput is required. The main challenge for AMS measurements of 41Ca is the interfering stable isobar 41K. We use a simplified sample preparation procedure to produce calcium fluoride (CaF2) and extract calcium tri-fluoride ions (CaF3-) ions to suppress the stable isobar 41K. Although 41K is not completely suppressed we reach 41Ca/40Ca background level in the 10-12 range which is adequate for biomedical studies. With helium as a stripper gas we can use charge state 2+ at high transmission (∼50%). The new measurement procedure with the approximately 10 × improved efficiency and the higher accuracy due to 41K correction allowed us to measure more than 600 samples for a large biomedical study within only a few weeks of measurement time.

  17. Evolution in boron-based GEM detectors for diffraction measurements: from planar to 3D converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albani, Giorgia; Perelli Cippo, Enrico; Croci, Gabriele; Muraro, Andrea; Schooneveld, Erik; Scherillo, Antonella; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Kanaki, Kalliopi; Höglund, Carina; Hultman, Lars; Birch, Jens; Claps, Gerardo; Murtas, Fabrizio; Rebai, Marica; Tardocchi, Marco; Gorini, Giuseppe

    2016-11-01

    The so-called ‘3He-crisis’ has motivated the neutron detector community to undertake an intense R&D programme in order to develop technologies alternative to standard 3He tubes and suitable for neutron detection systems in future spallation sources such as the European spallation source (ESS). Boron-based GEM (gas electron multiplier) detectors are a promising ‘3He-free’ technology for thermal neutron detection in neutron scattering experiments. In this paper the evolution of boron-based GEM detectors from planar to 3D converters with an application in diffraction measurements is presented. The use of 3D converters coupled with GEMs allows for an optimization of the detector performances. Three different detectors were used for diffraction measurements on the INES instrument at the ISIS spallation source. The performances of the GEM-detectors are compared with those of conventional 3He tubes installed on the INES instrument. The conceptual detector with the 3D converter used in this paper reached a count rate per unit area of about 25% relative to the currently installed 3He tube. Its timing resolution is similar and the signal-to-background ratio (S/B) is 2 times lower.

  18. Outdoor measurements of a photovoltaic system using diffractive spectrum-splitting and concentration

    DOE PAGES

    Mohammad, N.; Schulz, M.; Wang, P.; ...

    2016-09-16

    In a single-bandgap absorber, photons having energy less than the bandgap are not absorbed, while those having energy larger than the bandgap lose the excess energy via thermalization. We present outdoor measurements of a photovoltaic system that overcomes these losses via spectrum splitting and concentration using a planar diffractive optic. The system was comprised of the diffractive optic coupled with GaInP and CIGS solar cells. The optic provides a geometric concentration of 3X for each solar cell. It is easily fabricated by single-step grayscale lithography and it is ultra-thin with a maximum thickness of only 2.5μm. Electrical measurements under directmore » sunlight demonstrated an increase of ~25% in total output power compared to the reference case without spectrum splitting and concentration. Since different bandgaps are in the same plane, the proposed photovoltaic system successfully circumvents the lattice-matching and current-matching issues in conventional tandem multi-junction solar cells. As a result, this system is also tolerant to solar spectrum variation and fill-factor degradation of constitutive solar cells.« less

  19. Outdoor measurements of a photovoltaic system using diffractive spectrum-splitting and concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammad, N.; Schulz, M.; Wang, P.

    In a single-bandgap absorber, photons having energy less than the bandgap are not absorbed, while those having energy larger than the bandgap lose the excess energy via thermalization. We present outdoor measurements of a photovoltaic system that overcomes these losses via spectrum splitting and concentration using a planar diffractive optic. The system was comprised of the diffractive optic coupled with GaInP and CIGS solar cells. The optic provides a geometric concentration of 3X for each solar cell. It is easily fabricated by single-step grayscale lithography and it is ultra-thin with a maximum thickness of only 2.5μm. Electrical measurements under directmore » sunlight demonstrated an increase of ~25% in total output power compared to the reference case without spectrum splitting and concentration. Since different bandgaps are in the same plane, the proposed photovoltaic system successfully circumvents the lattice-matching and current-matching issues in conventional tandem multi-junction solar cells. As a result, this system is also tolerant to solar spectrum variation and fill-factor degradation of constitutive solar cells.« less

  20. Measurements of Auger Electron Diffraction Using a 180° Deflection Toroidal Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraki, Susumu; Ishii, Hideshi; Nihei, Yoshimasa; Owari, Masanori

    A 180° deflection toroidal analyzer is a novel electron spectrometer, which allows the simultaneous registration of the wide range of polar angles in a given azimuth of the sample. Therefore, measurements of photo- and Auger electron intensities over π steradians can be performed rapidly by azimuthal rotation of the sample. Using this analyzer, two-dimensional patterns of electron-beam-excited O KVV and Mg KVV Auger electron diffraction (AED) from a MgO(001) surface were measured in short acquisition times. The AED patterns obtained were compared with theoretical ones calculated by the multiple-scattering scheme. The agreement between experimental and theoretical data was good for both O KVV and Mg KVV transitions.

  1. Measuring the fine structure constant with Bragg diffraction and Bloch oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Richard; Yu, Chenghui; Zhong, Weicheng; Estey, Brian; Müller, Holger

    2017-04-01

    We have demonstrated a new scheme for atom interferometry based on large-momentum-transfer Bragg beam splitters and Bloch oscillations. In this new scheme, we have achieved a resolution of δÎ+/-/Î+/-=0.25ppb in the fine structure constant measurement, which gives over 10 million radians of phase difference between freely evolving matter waves. We have suppressed many systematic effects known in most atom interferometers with Raman beam splitters such as light shift, Zeeman effect shift as well as vibration. We have also simulated multi-atom Bragg diffraction to understand sub-ppb systematic effects, and implemented spatial filtering to further suppress systematic effects. We present our recent progress toward a measurement of the fine structure constant, which will provide a stringent test of the standard model of particle physics.

  2. Fabrication and testing of a newly designed slit system for depth-resolved X-ray diffraction measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Sinsheimer, John; Bouet, Nathalie; Ghose, Sanjit

    2016-10-06

    A new system of slits called `spiderweb slits' have been developed for depth-resolved powder or polycrystalline X-ray diffraction measurements. The slits act on diffracted X-rays to select a particular gauge volume of sample, while absorbing diffracted X-rays from outside of this volume. Although the slit geometry is to some extent similar to that of previously developed conical slits or spiral slits, this new design has advantages over the previous ones in use for complex heterogeneous materials andin situandoperandodiffraction measurements. For example, the slits can measure a majority of any diffraction cone for any polycrystalline material, over a continuous range ofmore » diffraction angles, and work for X-ray energies of tens to hundreds of kiloelectronvolts. The design is generated and optimized using ray-tracing simulations, and fabricated through laser micromachining. The first prototype was successfully tested at the X17A beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source, and shows similar performance to simulations, demonstrating gauge volume selection for standard powders, for all diffraction peaks over angles of 2–10°. A similar, but improved, design will be implemented at the X-ray Powder Diffraction beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source II.« less

  3. Energy resolution of the CdTe-XPAD detector: calibration and potential for Laue diffraction measurements on protein crystals.

    PubMed

    Medjoubi, Kadda; Thompson, Andrew; Bérar, Jean-François; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Delpierre, Pierre; Da Silva, Paulo; Dinkespiler, Bernard; Fourme, Roger; Gourhant, Patrick; Guimaraes, Beatriz; Hustache, Stéphanie; Idir, Mourad; Itié, Jean-Paul; Legrand, Pierre; Menneglier, Claude; Mercere, Pascal; Picca, Frederic; Samama, Jean-Pierre

    2012-05-01

    The XPAD3S-CdTe, a CdTe photon-counting pixel array detector, has been used to measure the energy and the intensity of the white-beam diffraction from a lysozyme crystal. A method was developed to calibrate the detector in terms of energy, allowing incident photon energy measurement to high resolution (approximately 140 eV), opening up new possibilities in energy-resolved X-ray diffraction. In order to demonstrate this, Laue diffraction experiments were performed on the bending-magnet beamline METROLOGIE at Synchrotron SOLEIL. The X-ray energy spectra of diffracted spots were deduced from the indexed Laue patterns collected with an imaging-plate detector and then measured with both the XPAD3S-CdTe and the XPAD3S-Si, a silicon photon-counting pixel array detector. The predicted and measured energy of selected diffraction spots are in good agreement, demonstrating the reliability of the calibration method. These results open up the way to direct unit-cell parameter determination and the measurement of high-quality Laue data even at low resolution. Based on the success of these measurements, potential applications in X-ray diffraction opened up by this type of technology are discussed.

  4. Neutron diffraction measurements and micromechanical modelling of temperature-dependent variations in TATB lattice parameters

    DOE PAGES

    Yeager, John D.; Luscher, Darby J.; Vogel, Sven C.; ...

    2016-02-02

    Triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) is a highly anisotropic molecular crystal used in several plastic-bonded explosive (PBX) formulations. TATB-based explosives exhibit irreversible volume expansion (“ratchet growth”) when thermally cycled. A theoretical understanding of the relationship between anisotropy of the crystal, crystal orientation distribution (texture) of polycrystalline aggregates, and the intergranular interactions leading to this irreversible growth is necessary to accurately develop physics-based predictive models for TATB-based PBXs under various thermal environments. In this work, TATB lattice parameters were measured using neutron diffraction during thermal cycling of loose powder and a pressed pellet. The measured lattice parameters help clarify conflicting reports in the literaturemore » as these new results are more consistent with one set of previous results than another. The lattice parameters of pressed TATB were also measured as a function of temperature, showing some differences from the powder. This data is used along with anisotropic single-crystal stiffness moduli reported in the literature to model the nominal stresses associated with intergranular constraints during thermal expansion. The texture of both specimens were characterized and the pressed pellet exhibits preferential orientation of (001) poles along the pressing direction, whereas no preferred orientation was found for the loose powder. Lastly, thermal strains for single-crystal TATB computed from lattice parameter data for the powder is input to a self-consistent micromechanical model, which predicts the lattice parameters of the constrained TATB crystals within the pellet. The agreement of these model results with the diffraction data obtained from the pellet is discussed along with future directions of research.« less

  5. Apparatus and method for measuring single cell and sub-cellular photosynthetic efficiency

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Ryan Wesley; Singh, Seema; Wu, Huawen

    2013-07-09

    Devices for measuring single cell changes in photosynthetic efficiency in algal aquaculture are disclosed that include a combination of modulated LED trans-illumination of different intensities with synchronized through objective laser illumination and confocal detection. Synchronization and intensity modulation of a dual illumination scheme were provided using a custom microcontroller for a laser beam block and constant current LED driver. Therefore, single whole cell photosynthetic efficiency, and subcellular (diffraction limited) photosynthetic efficiency measurement modes are permitted. Wide field rapid light scanning actinic illumination is provided for both by an intensity modulated 470 nm LED. For the whole cell photosynthetic efficiency measurement, the same LED provides saturating pulses for generating photosynthetic induction curves. For the subcellular photosynthetic efficiency measurement, a switched through objective 488 nm laser provides saturating pulses for generating photosynthetic induction curves. A second near IR LED is employed to generate dark adapted states in the system under study.

  6. Residual stress measurements via neutron diffraction of additive manufactured stainless steel 17-4 PH.

    PubMed

    Masoomi, Mohammad; Shamsaei, Nima; Winholtz, Robert A; Milner, Justin L; Gnäupel-Herold, Thomas; Elwany, Alaa; Mahmoudi, Mohamad; Thompson, Scott M

    2017-08-01

    Neutron diffraction was employed to measure internal residual stresses at various locations along stainless steel (SS) 17-4 PH specimens additively manufactured via laser-powder bed fusion (L-PBF). Of these specimens, two were rods (diameter=8 mm, length=80 mm) built vertically upward and one a parallelepiped (8×80×9 mm 3 ) built with its longest edge parallel to ground. One rod and the parallelepiped were left in their as-built condition, while the other rod was heat treated. Data presented provide insight into the microstructural characteristics of typical L-PBF SS 17-4 PH specimens and their dependence on build orientation and post-processing procedures such as heat treatment. Data have been deposited in the Data in Brief Dataverse repository (doi:10.7910/DVN/T41S3V).

  7. Type I and type II residual stress in iron meteorites determined by neutron diffraction measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caporali, Stefano; Pratesi, Giovanni; Kabra, Saurabh; Grazzi, Francesco

    2018-04-01

    In this work we present a preliminary investigation by means of neutron diffraction experiment to determine the residual stress state in three different iron meteorites (Chinga, Sikhote Alin and Nantan). Because of the very peculiar microstructural characteristic of this class of samples, all the systematic effects related to the measuring procedure - such as crystallite size and composition - were taken into account and a clear differentiation in the statistical distribution of residual stress in coarse and fine grained meteorites were highlighted. Moreover, the residual stress state was statistically analysed in three orthogonal directions finding evidence of the existence of both type I and type II residual stress components. Finally, the application of von Mises approach allowed to determine the distribution of type II stress.

  8. An Improved X-ray Diffraction Method For Cellulose Crystallinity Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Xiaohui; Bowden, Mark E.; Brown, Elvie E.

    2015-06-01

    We show in this work a modified X-ray diffraction method to determine cellulose crystallinity index (CrI). Nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) dervided from bleached wood pulp was used as a model substrate. Rietveld refinement was applied with consideration of March-Dollase preferred orientation at the (001) plane. In contrast to most previous methods, three distinct amorphous peaks identified from new model samples which are used to calculate CrI. A 2 theta range from 10° to 75° was found to be more suitable to determine CrI and crystallite structural parameters such as d-spacing and crystallite size. This method enables a more reliable measurement ofmore » CrI of cellulose and may be applicable to other types of cellulose polymorphs.« less

  9. Faster diffraction-based overlay measurements with smaller targets using 3D gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Kritsun, Oleg; Liu, Yongdong; Dasari, Prasad; Volkman, Catherine; Hu, Jiangtao

    2012-03-01

    Diffraction-based overlay (DBO) technologies have been developed to address the overlay metrology challenges for 22nm technology node and beyond. Most DBO technologies require specially designed targets that consist of multiple measurement pads, which consume too much space and increase measurement time. The traditional empirical approach (eDBO) using normal incidence spectroscopic reflectometry (NISR) relies on linear response of the reflectance with respect to overlay displacement within a small range. It offers convenience of quick recipe setup since there is no need to establish a model. However it requires three or four pads per direction (x or y) which adds burden to throughput and target size. Recent advances in modeling capability and computation power enabled mDBO, which allows overlay measurement with reduced number of pads, thus reducing measurement time and DBO target space. In this paper we evaluate the performance of single pad mDBO measurements using two 3D targets that have different grating shapes: squares in boxes and L-shapes in boxes. Good overlay sensitivities are observed for both targets. The correlation to programmed shifts and image-based overlay (IBO) is excellent. Despite the difference in shapes, the mDBO results are comparable for square and L-shape targets. The impact of process variations on overlay measurements is studied using a focus and exposure matrix (FEM) wafer. Although the FEM wafer has larger process variations, the correlation of mDBO results with IBO measurements is as good as the normal process wafer. We demonstrate the feasibility of single pad DBO measurements with faster throughput and smaller target size, which is particularly important in high volume manufacturing environment.

  10. Effects of Temperature and Humidity on Laser Diffraction Measurements to Jet Nebulizer and Comparison with NGI.

    PubMed

    Song, Xinghan; Hu, Junhua; Zhan, Shuyao; Zhang, Rui; Tan, Wen

    2016-04-01

    Laser diffraction (LD) and next generation impactor (NGI) are commonly used for the evaluation of inhaled drug formulations. In this study, the effect of temperature and humidity on the assessment of the nebulizer particle size distribution (PSD) by LD was investigated, and the consistency between NGI and LD measurements was evaluated. There was an increase in particle size with higher temperature or lower humidity. The particle population with a diameter less than 1 μm was significant at a temperature of 5°C or at relative humidity >90%; however, the same particle population became undetectable when temperature increased to 39°C or at relative humidity of 30-45%. The results of the NGI and LD measurements of aerosol generated from three types of jet nebulizers were compared. A poor correlation between the NGI and LD measurements was observed for PARI LC (2.2 μm) (R (2) = 0.893) and PARI LC (2.9 μm) (R (2) = 0.878), while a relatively good correlation (R (2) = 0.977) was observed for the largest particle size nebulizer (PARI TIA (8.6 μm)). We conclude that the ambient environment and the nebulizer have significant impacts on the performance and consistency between these instruments. These factors should be controlled in the evaluation of inhaled aerosol drug formulations when these instruments are used individually or in combination.

  11. Three-dimensional displacement measurement of image point by point-diffraction interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiao; Chen, Lingfeng; Meng, Xiaojie; Yu, Lei

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a method for measuring the three-dimensional (3-D) displacement of an image point based on point-diffraction interferometry. An object Point-light-source (PLS) interferes with a fixed PLS and its interferograms are captured by an exit pupil. When the image point of the object PLS is slightly shifted to a new position, the wavefront of the image PLS changes. And its interferograms also change. Processing these figures (captured before and after the movement), the wavefront difference of the image PLS can be obtained and it contains the information of three-dimensional (3-D) displacement of the image PLS. However, the information of its three-dimensional (3-D) displacement cannot be calculated until the distance between the image PLS and the exit pupil is calibrated. Therefore, we use a plane-parallel-plate with a known refractive index and thickness to determine this distance, which is based on the Snell's law for small angle of incidence. Thus, since the distance between the exit pupil and the image PLS is a known quantity, the 3-D displacement of the image PLS can be simultaneously calculated through two interference measurements. Preliminary experimental results indicate that its relative error is below 0.3%. With the ability to accurately locate an image point (whatever it is real or virtual), a fiber point-light-source can act as the reticle by itself in optical measurement.

  12. Measurement of fundamental illite particle thicknesses by X-ray diffraction using PVP-10 intercalation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberl, D.D.; Nüesch, R.; Šucha, Vladimír; Tsipursky, S.

    1998-01-01

    The thicknesses of fundamental illite particles that compose mixed-layer illite-smectite (I-S) crystals can be measured by X-ray diffraction (XRD) peak broadening techniques (Bertaut-Warren-Averbach [BWA] method and integral peak-width method) if the effects of swelling and XRD background noise are eliminated from XRD patterns of the clays. Swelling is eliminated by intercalating Na-saturated I-S with polyvinylpyrrolidone having a molecular weight of 10,000 (PVP-10). Background is minimized by using polished metallic silicon wafers cut perpendicular to (100) as a substrate for XRD specimens, and by using a single-crystal monochromator. XRD measurements of PVP-intercalated diagenetic, hydrothermal and low-grade metamorphic I-S indicate that there are at least 2 types of crystallite thickness distribution shapes for illite fundamental particles, lognormal and asymptotic; that measurements of mean fundamental illite particle thicknesses made by various techniques (Bertant-Warren-Averbach, integral peak width, fixed cation content, and transmission electron microscopy [TEM]) give comparable results; and that strain (small differences in layer thicknesses) generally has a Gaussian distribution in the log-normal-type illites, but is often absent in the asymptotic-type illites.

  13. Seismic anisotropy of the crust: electron-backscatter diffraction measurements from the Basin and Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdman, Monica E.; Hacker, Bradley R.; Zandt, George; Seward, Gareth

    2013-11-01

    Crystal preferred orientations were measured in a suite of rocks from three locations in the Basin and Range using electron-backscatter diffraction. Anisotropic velocities were calculated for all rocks using single-crystal stiffnesses, the Christoffel equation and Voigt-Reuss-Hill averaging. Anisotropic velocities were calculated for all three crustal sections using these values combined with rock proportions as exposed in the field. One suite of rocks previously measured in the laboratory was used as a benchmark to evaluate the accuracy of the calculated velocities. Differences in the seismic anisotropy of the Funeral Mountains, Ruby Mountains and East Humboldt Range sections arise because of differences in mineralogy and strain, with the calc-silicate dominated Ruby Mountains section having higher P-wave speeds and VP/VS ratios because of the reduced quartz content. In all cases, the velocities show either transverse isotropy or nearly so, with a unique slow axis normal to the foliation. Velocity anisotropy can thus be used to infer the flow plane, but not the flow direction in typical crustal rocks. Areas with a subhorizontal foliation have minimal shear wave splitting for vertically propagating waves and are thus good places to measure mantle anisotropy using SKS-splitting.

  14. Measuring efficiency among US federal hospitals.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jeffrey P; Meyer, Sean

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates the efficiency of federal hospitals, specifically those hospitals administered by the US Department of Veterans Affairs and the US Department of Defense. Hospital executives, health care policymakers, taxpayers, and federal hospital beneficiaries benefit from studies that improve hospital efficiency. This study uses data envelopment analysis to evaluate a panel of 165 federal hospitals in 2007 and 157 of the same hospitals again in 2011. Results indicate that overall efficiency in federal hospitals improved from 81% in 2007 to 86% in 2011. The number of federal hospitals operating on the efficiency frontier decreased slightly from 25 in 2007 to 21 in 2011. The higher efficiency score clearly documents that federal hospitals are becoming more efficient in the management of resources. From a policy perspective, this study highlights the economic importance of encouraging increased efficiency throughout the health care industry. This research examines benchmarking strategies to improve the efficiency of hospital services to federal beneficiaries. Through the use of strategies such as integrated information systems, consolidation of services, transaction-cost economics, and focusing on preventative health care, these organizations have been able to provide quality service while maintaining fiscal responsibility. In addition, the research documented the characteristics of those federal hospitals that were found to be on the Efficiency Frontier. These hospitals serve as benchmarks for less efficient federal hospitals as they develop strategies for improvement.

  15. X-Ray Diffraction and Fluorescence Measurements for In Situ Planetary Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansford, G.; Hill, K. S.; Talboys, D.; Vernon, D.; Ambrosi, R.; Bridges, J.; Hutchinson, I.; Marinangeli, L.

    2011-12-01

    The ESA/NASA ExoMars mission, due for launch in 2018, has a combined X-ray fluorescence/diffraction instrument, Mars-XRD, as part of the onboard analytical laboratory. The results of some XRF (X-ray fluorescence) and XRD (X-ray diffraction) tests using a laboratory chamber with representative performance are reported. A range of standard geological reference materials and analogues were used in these tests. The XRD instruments are core components of the forthcoming NASA Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) and ESA/NASA ExoMars missions and will provide the first demonstrations of the capabilities of combined XRD/XRF instrumentation in situ on an extraterrestrial planetary surface. The University of Leicester team is part of the Italy-UK collaboration that is responsible for building the ExoMars X-ray diffraction instrument, Mars-XRD [1,2]. Mars-XRD incorporates an Fe-55 radioisotope source and three fixed-position charge-coupled devices (CCDs) to simultaneously acquire an X-ray fluorescence spectrum and a diffraction pattern providing a measurement of both elemental and mineralogical composition. The CCDs cover an angular range of 2θ = 6° to 73° enabling the analysis of a wide range of geologically important minerals including phyllosilicates, feldspars, oxides, carbonates and evaporites. The identification of hydrous minerals may help identify past Martian hydrothermal systems capable of preserving traces of life. Here we present some initial findings from XRF and XRD tests carried out at the University of Leicester using an Fe-55 source and X-ray sensitive CCD. The XRF/XRD test system consists of a single CCD on a motorised arm, an Fe-55 X-ray source, a collimator and a sample table which approximately replicate the reflection geometry of the Mars-XRD instrument. It was used to test geological reference standard materials and Martian analogues. This work was funded by the Science and Technology Facilities Council, UK. References [1] Marinangeli, L., Hutchinson, I

  16. Determination of grain boundary mobility during recrystallization by statistical evaluation of electron backscatter diffraction measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, I., E-mail: basu@imm.rwth-aachen.de; Chen, M.; Loeck, M.

    One of the key aspects influencing microstructural design pathways in metallic systems is grain boundary motion. The present work introduces a method by means of which direct measurement of grain boundary mobility vs. misorientation dependence is made possible. The technique utilizes datasets acquired by means of serial electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements. The experimental EBSD measurements are collectively analyzed, whereby datasets were used to obtain grain boundary mobility and grain aspect ratio with respect to grain boundary misorientation. The proposed method is further validated using cellular automata (CA) simulations. Single crystal aluminium was cold rolled and scratched in order tomore » nucleate random orientations. Subsequent annealing at 300 °C resulted in grains growing, in the direction normal to the scratch, into a single deformed orientation. Growth selection was observed, wherein the boundaries with misorientations close to Σ7 CSL orientation relationship (38° 〈111〉) migrated considerably faster. The obtained boundary mobility distribution exhibited a non-monotonic behavior with a maximum corresponding to misorientation of 38° ± 2° about 〈111〉 axes ± 4°, which was 10–100 times higher than the mobility values of random high angle boundaries. Correlation with the grain aspect ratio values indicated a strong growth anisotropy displayed by the fast growing grains. The observations have been discussed in terms of the influence of grain boundary character on grain boundary motion during recrystallization. - Highlights: • Statistical microstructure method to measure grain boundary mobility during recrystallization • Method implementation independent of material or crystal structure • Mobility of the Σ7 boundaries in 5N Al was calculated as 4.7 × 10{sup –8} m{sup 4}/J ⋅ s. • Pronounced growth selection in the recrystallizing nuclei in Al • Boundary mobility values during recrystallization 2–3 orders

  17. Novel design and sensitivity analysis of displacement measurement system utilizing knife edge diffraction for nanopositioning stages.

    PubMed

    Lee, ChaBum; Lee, Sun-Kyu; Tarbutton, Joshua A

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a novel design and sensitivity analysis of a knife edge-based optical displacement sensor that can be embedded with nanopositioning stages. The measurement system consists of a laser, two knife edge locations, two photodetectors, and axillary optics components in a simple configuration. The knife edge is installed on the stage parallel to its moving direction and two separated laser beams are incident on knife edges. While the stage is in motion, the direct transverse and diffracted light at each knife edge is superposed producing interference at the detector. The interference is measured with two photodetectors in a differential amplification configuration. The performance of the proposed sensor was mathematically modeled, and the effect of the optical and mechanical parameters, wavelength, beam diameter, distances from laser to knife edge to photodetector, and knife edge topography, on sensor outputs was investigated to obtain a novel analytical method to predict linearity and sensitivity. From the model, all parameters except for the beam diameter have a significant influence on measurement range and sensitivity of the proposed sensing system. To validate the model, two types of knife edges with different edge topography were used for the experiment. By utilizing a shorter wavelength, smaller sensor distance and higher edge quality increased measurement sensitivity can be obtained. The model was experimentally validated and the results showed a good agreement with the theoretically estimated results. This sensor is expected to be easily implemented into nanopositioning stage applications at a low cost and mathematical model introduced here can be used for design and performance estimation of the knife edge-based sensor as a tool.

  18. Molybdenum cell for x-ray diffraction measurements of fluid alkali metals at high temperatures and high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Kazuhiro; Tamura, Kozaburo; Katoh, Masahiro; Inui, Masanori

    2004-03-01

    We have developed a sample cell for x-ray diffraction measurements of fluid alkali metals at high temperatures and high pressures. All parts of the cell are made of molybdenum which is resistant to the chemical corrosion of alkali metals. Single crystalline molybdenum disks electrolytically thinned down to 40 μm were used as the walls of the cell through which x rays pass. The crystal orientation of the disks was controlled in order to reduce the background from the cell. All parts of the cell were assembled and brazed together using a high-temperature Ru-Mo alloy. Energy dispersive x-ray diffraction measurements have been successfully carried out for fluid rubidium up to 1973 K and 16.2 MPa. The obtained S(Q) demonstrates the applicability of the molybdenum cell to x-ray diffraction measurements of fluid alkali metals at high temperatures and high pressures.

  19. Optical diffraction properties of multimicrogratings

    DOE PAGES

    Rothenbach, Christian A.; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Gupta, Mool C.

    2015-02-27

    This paper shows the results of optical diffraction properties of multimicrograting structures fabricated by e-beam lithography. Multimicrograting consist of arrays of hexagonally shaped cells containing periodic one-dimensional (1D) grating lines in different orientations and arrayed to form large area patterns. We analyzed the optical diffraction properties of multimicrogratings by studying the individual effects of the several periodic elements of multimicrogratings. The observed optical diffraction pattern is shown to be the combined effect of the periodic and non-periodic elements that define the multimicrogratings and the interaction between different elements. We measured the total transverse electric (TE) diffraction efficiency of multimicrogratings andmore » found it to be 32.1%, which is closely related to the diffraction efficiency of 1D periodic grating lines of the same characteristics, measured to be 33.7%. Beam profiles of the optical diffraction patterns from multimicrogratings are captured with a CCD sensor technique. Interference fringes were observed under certain conditions formed by multimicrograting beams interfering with each other. Finally, these diffraction structures may find applications in sensing, nanometrology, and optical interconnects.« less

  20. DynAMITe: a prototype large area CMOS APS for breast cancer diagnosis using x-ray diffraction measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinidis, A.; Anaxagoras, T.; Esposito, M.; Allinson, N.; Speller, R.

    2012-03-01

    X-ray diffraction studies are used to identify specific materials. Several laboratory-based x-ray diffraction studies were made for breast cancer diagnosis. Ideally a large area, low noise, linear and wide dynamic range digital x-ray detector is required to perform x-ray diffraction measurements. Recently, digital detectors based on Complementary Metal-Oxide- Semiconductor (CMOS) Active Pixel Sensor (APS) technology have been used in x-ray diffraction studies. Two APS detectors, namely Vanilla and Large Area Sensor (LAS), were developed by the Multidimensional Integrated Intelligent Imaging (MI-3) consortium to cover a range of scientific applications including x-ray diffraction. The MI-3 Plus consortium developed a novel large area APS, named as Dynamically Adjustable Medical Imaging Technology (DynAMITe), to combine the key characteristics of Vanilla and LAS with a number of extra features. The active area (12.8 × 13.1 cm2) of DynaMITe offers the ability of angle dispersive x-ray diffraction (ADXRD). The current study demonstrates the feasibility of using DynaMITe for breast cancer diagnosis by identifying six breast-equivalent plastics. Further work will be done to optimize the system in order to perform ADXRD for identification of suspicious areas of breast tissue following a conventional mammogram taken with the same sensor.

  1. Expected values and variances of Bragg peak intensities measured in a nanocrystalline powder diffraction experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Öztürk, Hande; Noyan, I. Cevdet

    2017-08-24

    A rigorous study of sampling and intensity statistics applicable for a powder diffraction experiment as a function of crystallite size is presented. Our analysis yields approximate equations for the expected value, variance and standard deviations for both the number of diffracting grains and the corresponding diffracted intensity for a given Bragg peak. The classical formalism published in 1948 by Alexander, Klug & Kummer [J. Appl. Phys.(1948),19, 742–753] appears as a special case, limited to large crystallite sizes, here. It is observed that both the Lorentz probability expression and the statistics equations used in the classical formalism are inapplicable for nanocrystallinemore » powder samples.« less

  2. Expected values and variances of Bragg peak intensities measured in a nanocrystalline powder diffraction experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Öztürk, Hande; Noyan, I. Cevdet

    A rigorous study of sampling and intensity statistics applicable for a powder diffraction experiment as a function of crystallite size is presented. Our analysis yields approximate equations for the expected value, variance and standard deviations for both the number of diffracting grains and the corresponding diffracted intensity for a given Bragg peak. The classical formalism published in 1948 by Alexander, Klug & Kummer [J. Appl. Phys.(1948),19, 742–753] appears as a special case, limited to large crystallite sizes, here. It is observed that both the Lorentz probability expression and the statistics equations used in the classical formalism are inapplicable for nanocrystallinemore » powder samples.« less

  3. In situ X-ray diffraction measurement of shock-wave-driven twinning and lattice dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrenberg, C. E.; McGonegle, D.; Bolme, C.; Higginbotham, A.; Lazicki, A.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B. A.; Rudd, R. E.; Sliwa, M.; Suggit, M.; Swift, D.; Tavella, F.; Zepeda-Ruiz, L.; Wark, J. S.

    2017-10-01

    Pressure-driven shock waves in solid materials can cause extreme damage and deformation. Understanding this deformation and the associated defects that are created in the material is crucial in the study of a wide range of phenomena, including planetary formation and asteroid impact sites, the formation of interstellar dust clouds, ballistic penetrators, spacecraft shielding and ductility in high-performance ceramics. At the lattice level, the basic mechanisms of plastic deformation are twinning (whereby crystallites with a mirror-image lattice form) and slip (whereby lattice dislocations are generated and move), but determining which of these mechanisms is active during deformation is challenging. Experiments that characterized lattice defects have typically examined the microstructure of samples after deformation, and so are complicated by post-shock annealing and reverberations. In addition, measurements have been limited to relatively modest pressures (less than 100 gigapascals). In situ X-ray diffraction experiments can provide insights into the dynamic behaviour of materials, but have only recently been applied to plasticity during shock compression and have yet to provide detailed insight into competing deformation mechanisms. Here we present X-ray diffraction experiments with femtosecond resolution that capture in situ, lattice-level information on the microstructural processes that drive shock-wave-driven deformation. To demonstrate this method we shock-compress the body-centred-cubic material tantalum—an important material for high-energy-density physics owing to its high shock impedance and high X-ray opacity. Tantalum is also a material for which previous shock compression simulations and experiments have provided conflicting information about the dominant deformation mechanism. Our experiments reveal twinning and related lattice rotation occurring on the timescale of tens of picoseconds. In addition, despite the common association between twinning

  4. In situ X-ray diffraction measurement of shock-wave-driven twinning and lattice dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wehrenberg, C. E.; McGonegle, D.; Bolme, C.

    We report that pressure-driven shock waves in solid materials can cause extreme damage and deformation. Understanding this deformation and the associated defects that are created in the material is crucial in the study of a wide range of phenomena, including planetary formation and asteroid impact sites, the formation of interstellar dust clouds, ballistic penetrators, spacecraft shielding and ductility in high-performance ceramics. At the lattice level, the basic mechanisms of plastic deformation are twinning (whereby crystallites with a mirror-image lattice form) and slip (whereby lattice dislocations are generated and move), but determining which of these mechanisms is active during deformation ismore » challenging. Experiments that characterized lattice defects have typically examined the microstructure of samples after deformation, and so are complicated by post-shock annealing and reverberations. In addition, measurements have been limited to relatively modest pressures (less than 100 gigapascals). In situ X-ray diffraction experiments can provide insights into the dynamic behaviour of materials, but have only recently been applied to plasticity during shock compression and have yet to provide detailed insight into competing deformation mechanisms. Here we present X-ray diffraction experiments with femtosecond resolution that capture in situ, lattice-level information on the microstructural processes that drive shock-wave-driven deformation. To demonstrate this method we shock-compress the body-centred-cubic material tantalum—an important material for high-energy-density physics owing to its high shock impedance and high X-ray opacity. Tantalum is also a material for which previous shock compression simulations and experiments have provided conflicting information about the dominant deformation mechanism. Our experiments reveal twinning and related lattice rotation occurring on the timescale of tens of picoseconds. In addition, despite the common

  5. In situ X-ray diffraction measurement of shock-wave-driven twinning and lattice dynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Wehrenberg, C. E.; McGonegle, D.; Bolme, C.; ...

    2017-10-25

    We report that pressure-driven shock waves in solid materials can cause extreme damage and deformation. Understanding this deformation and the associated defects that are created in the material is crucial in the study of a wide range of phenomena, including planetary formation and asteroid impact sites, the formation of interstellar dust clouds, ballistic penetrators, spacecraft shielding and ductility in high-performance ceramics. At the lattice level, the basic mechanisms of plastic deformation are twinning (whereby crystallites with a mirror-image lattice form) and slip (whereby lattice dislocations are generated and move), but determining which of these mechanisms is active during deformation ismore » challenging. Experiments that characterized lattice defects have typically examined the microstructure of samples after deformation, and so are complicated by post-shock annealing and reverberations. In addition, measurements have been limited to relatively modest pressures (less than 100 gigapascals). In situ X-ray diffraction experiments can provide insights into the dynamic behaviour of materials, but have only recently been applied to plasticity during shock compression and have yet to provide detailed insight into competing deformation mechanisms. Here we present X-ray diffraction experiments with femtosecond resolution that capture in situ, lattice-level information on the microstructural processes that drive shock-wave-driven deformation. To demonstrate this method we shock-compress the body-centred-cubic material tantalum—an important material for high-energy-density physics owing to its high shock impedance and high X-ray opacity. Tantalum is also a material for which previous shock compression simulations and experiments have provided conflicting information about the dominant deformation mechanism. Our experiments reveal twinning and related lattice rotation occurring on the timescale of tens of picoseconds. In addition, despite the common

  6. Measuring Charter School Efficiency: An Early Appraisal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Dick M., II; Noller, Scott L.

    2010-01-01

    In an era of increased accountability and challenging times for public finance, charter schools built on decentralization, grassroots accountability, and market forces may provide, in the spirit of "educational laboratories," lessons for increasing student achievement more efficiently through diverse and innovative management,…

  7. Sound Velocity and Diffraction Intensity Measurements Based on Raman-Nath Theory of the Interaction of Light and Ultrasound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neeson, John F.; Austin, Stephen

    1975-01-01

    Describes a method for the measurement of the velocity of sound in various liquids based on the Raman-Nath theory of light-sound interaction. Utilizes an analog computer program to calculate the intensity of light scattered into various diffraction orders. (CP)

  8. Ensemble Diffraction Measurements of Spray Combustion in a Novel Vitiated Coflow Turbulent Jet Flame Burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabra, R.; Hamano, Y.; Chen, J. Y.; Dibble, R. W.; Acosta, F.; Holve, D.

    2000-01-01

    methanol spray in a vitiated coflow. As a proof of concept, an ensemble light diffraction (ELD) optical instrument was used to conduct preliminary measurements of droplet size distribution and liquid volume fraction.

  9. Measurement method for roll angular displacement with a high resolution by using diffraction gratings and a heterodyne interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Shanzhi, E-mail: shanzhit@gmail.com; School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049; Wang, Zhao

    The roll angle measurement is difficult to be achieved directly using a typical commercial interferometer due to its low sensitivity in axial direction, where the axial direction is orthogonal to the plane of the roll angular displacement. A roll angle measurement method combined diffraction gratings with a laser heterodyne interferometer is discussed in this paper. The diffraction grating placed in the plane of a roll angular displacement and the interferometer arranged in the plane's orthogonal direction, constitute the measurement pattern for the roll angle with high resolution. The roll angular displacement, considered as the linear, can be tested precisely whenmore » the corresponding angle is very small. Using the proposed method, the angle roll measurement obtains the high resolution of 0.002{sup ″}. Experiment has proved its feasibility and practicability.« less

  10. Measuring the Shock Stage of Asteroid Regolith Grains by Electron Back-Scattered Diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael; Martinez, James; Sitzman, Scott; Mikouchi, Takashi; Hagiya, Kenji; Ohsumi, Kazumasa; Terada, Yasuko; Yagi, Naoto; Komatsu, Mutsumi; Ozawa, Hikaru; hide

    2018-01-01

    We have been analyzing Itokawa samples in order to definitively establish the degree of shock experienced by the regolith of asteroid Itokawa, and to devise a bridge between shock determinations by standard light optical petrography, crystal structures as determined by electron and X-ray diffraction. These techniques would then be available for samples returned from other asteroid regoliths.

  11. A systematic review of health care efficiency measures.

    PubMed

    Hussey, Peter S; de Vries, Han; Romley, John; Wang, Margaret C; Chen, Susan S; Shekelle, Paul G; McGlynn, Elizabeth A

    2009-06-01

    To review and characterize existing health care efficiency measures in order to facilitate a common understanding about the adequacy of these methods. Review of the MedLine and EconLit databases for articles published from 1990 to 2008, as well as search of the "gray" literature for additional measures developed by private organizations. We performed a systematic review for existing efficiency measures. We classified the efficiency measures by perspective, outputs, inputs, methods used, and reporting of scientific soundness. We identified 265 measures in the peer-reviewed literature and eight measures in the gray literature, with little overlap between the two sets of measures. Almost all of the measures did not explicitly consider the quality of care. Thus, if quality varies substantially across groups, which is likely in some cases, the measures reflect only the costs of care, not efficiency. Evidence on the measures' scientific soundness was mostly lacking: evidence on reliability or validity was reported for six measures (2.3 percent) and sensitivity analyses were reported for 67 measures (25.3 percent). Efficiency measures have been subjected to few rigorous evaluations of reliability and validity, and methods of accounting for quality of care in efficiency measurement are not well developed at this time. Use of these measures without greater understanding of these issues is likely to engender resistance from providers and could lead to unintended consequences.

  12. Cost-Efficient Phase Noise Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perić, Ana; Bjelica, Milan

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, an automated system for oscillator phase noise measurement is described. The system is primarily intended for use in academic institutions, such as smaller university or research laboratories, as it deploys standard spectrum analyzer and free software. A method to compensate the effect of instrument intrinsic noise is proposed. Through series of experimental tests, good performances of our system are verified and compliance to theoretical expectations is demonstrated.

  13. Dynamic microscale temperature gradient in a gold nanorod solution measured by diffraction-limited nanothermometry

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chengmingyue; Gan, Xiaosong; Li, Xiangping

    2015-09-21

    We quantify the dynamic microscale temperature gradient in a gold nanorod solution using quantum-dot-based microscopic fluorescence nanothermometry. By incorporating CdSe quantum dots into the solution as a nanothermometer, precise temperature mapping with diffraction-limited spatial resolution and sub-degree temperature resolution is achieved. The acquired data on heat generation and dissipation show an excellent agreement with theoretical simulations. This work reveals an effective approach for noninvasive temperature regulation with localized nanoheaters in microfluidic environment.

  14. Measurement and Interpretation of Diffuse Scattering in X-Ray Diffraction for Macromolecular Crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Michael E.

    X-ray diffraction from macromolecular crystals includes both sharply peaked Bragg reflections and diffuse intensity between the peaks. The information in Bragg scattering reflects the mean electron density in the unit cells of the crystal. The diffuse scattering arises from correlations in the variations of electron density that may occur from one unit cell to another, and therefore contains information about collective motions in proteins.

  15. Real-time x-ray diffraction measurements of shocked polycrystalline tin and aluminum.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Dane V; Macy, Don; Stevens, Gerald

    2008-11-01

    A new, fast, single-pulse x-ray diffraction (XRD) diagnostic for determining phase transitions in shocked polycrystalline materials has been developed. The diagnostic consists of a 37-stage Marx bank high-voltage pulse generator coupled to a needle-and-washer electron beam diode via coaxial cable, producing line and bremsstrahlung x-ray emission in a 35 ns pulse. The characteristic K(alpha) lines from the selected anodes of silver and molybdenum are used to produce the diffraction patterns, with thin foil filters employed to remove the characteristic K(beta) line emission. The x-ray beam passes through a pinhole collimator and is incident on the sample with an approximately 3 x 6 mm(2) spot and 1 degrees full width half maximum angular divergence in a Bragg-reflecting geometry. For the experiments described in this report, the angle between the incident beam and the sample surface was 8.5 degrees . A Debye-Scherrer diffraction image was produced on a phosphor located 76 mm from the polycrystalline sample surface. The phosphor image was coupled to a charge-coupled device camera through a coherent fiber-optic bundle. Dynamic single-pulse XRD experiments were conducted with thin foil samples of tin, shock loaded with a 1 mm vitreous carbon back window. Detasheet high explosive with a 2-mm-thick aluminum buffer was used to shock the sample. Analysis of the dynamic shock-loaded tin XRD images revealed a phase transformation of the tin beta phase into an amorphous or liquid state. Identical experiments with shock-loaded aluminum indicated compression of the face-centered-cubic aluminum lattice with no phase transformation.

  16. Direct Measurement of the Topological Charge in Elliptical Beams Using Diffraction by a Triangular Aperture.

    PubMed

    Melo, Leandro A; Jesus-Silva, Alcenísio J; Chávez-Cerda, Sabino; Ribeiro, Paulo H Souto; Soares, Willamys C

    2018-04-23

    We introduce a simple method to characterize the topological charge associated with the orbital angular momentum of a m-order elliptic light beam. This method consists in the observation of the far field pattern of the beam carrying orbital angular momentum, diffracted from a triangular aperture. We show numerically and experimentally, for Mathieu, Ince-Gaussian, and vortex Hermite-Gaussian beams, that only isosceles triangular apertures allow us to determine in a precise and direct way, the magnitude m of the order and the number and sign of unitary topological charges of isolated vortices inside the core of these beams.

  17. Diffraction grating strain gauge method: error analysis and its application for the residual stress measurement in thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yuanjie; Fan, Bozhao; He, Wei; Dai, Xianglu; Guo, Baoqiao; Xie, Huimin

    2018-03-01

    Diffraction grating strain gauge (DGSG) is an optical strain measurement method. Based on this method, a six-spot diffraction grating strain gauge (S-DGSG) system has been developed with the advantages of high and adjustable sensitivity, compact structure, and non-contact measurement. In this study, this system is applied for the residual stress measurement in thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) combining the hole-drilling method. During the experiment, the specimen’s location is supposed to be reset accurately before and after the hole-drilling, however, it is found that the rigid body displacements from the resetting process could seriously influence the measurement accuracy. In order to understand and eliminate the effects from the rigid body displacements, such as the three-dimensional (3D) rotations and the out-of-plane displacement of the grating, the measurement error of this system is systematically analyzed, and an optimized method is proposed. Moreover, a numerical experiment and a verified tensile test are conducted, and the results verify the applicability of this optimized method successfully. Finally, combining this optimized method, a residual stress measurement experiment is conducted, and the results show that this method can be applied to measure the residual stress in TBCs.

  18. Path length dependent neutron diffraction peak shifts observed during residual strain measurements in U–8 wt% Mo castings

    DOE PAGES

    Steiner, M. A.; Bunn, J. R.; Einhorn, J. R.; ...

    2017-05-16

    This study reports an angular diffraction peak shift that scales linearly with the neutron beam path length traveled through a diffracting sample. This shift was observed in the context of mapping the residual stress state of a large U–8 wt% Mo casting, as well as during complementary measurements on a smaller casting of the same material. If uncorrected, this peak shift implies a non-physical level of residual stress. A hypothesis for the origin of this shift is presented, based upon non-ideal focusing of the neutron monochromator in combination with changes to the wavelength distribution reaching the detector due to factorsmore » such as attenuation. The magnitude of the shift is observed to vary linearly with the width of the diffraction peak reaching the detector. Consideration of this shift will be important for strain measurements requiring long path lengths through samples with significant attenuation. This effect can probably be reduced by selecting smaller voxel slit widths.« less

  19. An in situ thermo-mechanical rig for lattice strain measurement during creep using neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. Q.; Kabra, S.; Zhang, S. Y.; Truman, C. E.; Smith, D. J.

    2018-05-01

    A long-term high-temperature testing stress rig has been designed and fabricated for performing in situ neutron diffraction tests at the ENGIN-X beamline, ISIS facility in the UK. It is capable of subjecting metals to high temperatures up to 800 °C and uniaxial loading under different boundary conditions including constant load, constant strain, and elastic follow-up, each with minimum of external control. Samples are held horizontally between grips and connected to a rigid rig frame, a soft aluminium bar, and a stepper motor with forces up to 20 kN. A new three zone split electrical resistance furnace which generates a stable and uniform heat atmosphere over 200 mm length was used to heat the samples. An 8 mm diameter port at 45° to the centre of the furnace was made in order to allow the neutron beam through the furnace to illuminate the sample. The entire instrument is mounted on the positioner at ENGIN-X and has the potential ability to operate continuously while being moved in and out of the neutron diffraction beam. The performance of the rig has been demonstrated by tracking the evolution of lattice strains in type 316H stainless steel under elastic follow-up control at 550 °C.

  20. An in situ thermo-mechanical rig for lattice strain measurement during creep using neutron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y Q; Kabra, S; Zhang, S Y; Truman, C E; Smith, D J

    2018-05-01

    A long-term high-temperature testing stress rig has been designed and fabricated for performing in situ neutron diffraction tests at the ENGIN-X beamline, ISIS facility in the UK. It is capable of subjecting metals to high temperatures up to 800 °C and uniaxial loading under different boundary conditions including constant load, constant strain, and elastic follow-up, each with minimum of external control. Samples are held horizontally between grips and connected to a rigid rig frame, a soft aluminium bar, and a stepper motor with forces up to 20 kN. A new three zone split electrical resistance furnace which generates a stable and uniform heat atmosphere over 200 mm length was used to heat the samples. An 8 mm diameter port at 45° to the centre of the furnace was made in order to allow the neutron beam through the furnace to illuminate the sample. The entire instrument is mounted on the positioner at ENGIN-X and has the potential ability to operate continuously while being moved in and out of the neutron diffraction beam. The performance of the rig has been demonstrated by tracking the evolution of lattice strains in type 316H stainless steel under elastic follow-up control at 550 °C.

  1. Neutron-diffraction measurement of residual stresses in Al-Cu cold-cut welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiori, F.; Marcantoni, M.

    Usually, when it is necessary to join different materials with a large difference in their melting points, welding should be avoided. To overcome this problem we designed and built a device to obtain cold-cut welding, which is able to strongly decrease oxidation problems of the surfaces to be welded. Thanks to this device it is possible to achieve good joining between different pairs of materials (Al-Ti, Cu-Al, Cu-Al alloys) without reaching the material melting point. The mechanical and microstructural characterisation of the joining and the validation of its quality were obtained using several experimental methods. In particular, in this work neutron-diffraction experiments for the evaluation of residual stresses in Cu-Al junctions are described, carried out at the G5.2 diffractometer of LLB, Saclay. Neutron-diffraction results are presented and related to other experimental tests such as microstructural characterisation (through optical and scanning electron microscopy) and mechanical characterisation (tensile-strength tests) of the welded interface.

  2. Measuring of temperatures of phase objects using a point-diffraction interferometer plate made with the thermocavitation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, Juan C.; Berriel-Valdos, L. R.; Aguilar, J. Felix; Mejia-Romero, S.

    An optical system formed by four point-diffraction interferometers is used for measuring the refractive index distribution of a phase object. The phase of the object is assumed enough smooth to be computed in terms of the Radon Transform and it is processed with a tomographic iterative algorithm. Then, the associated refractive index distribution is calculated. To recovery the phase from the inteferograms we use the Kreis method, which is useful for interferograms having only few fringes. As an application of our technique, the temperature distribution of a candle flame is retrieved, this was made with the aid of the Gladstone-Dale equation. We also describe the process of manufacturing the point-diffraction interferometer (PDI) plates. These were made by means of the thermocavitation process. The obtained three dimensional distribution of temperature is presented.

  3. Simultaneous multiscale measurements on dynamic deformation of a magnesium alloy with synchrotron x-ray imaging and diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, L.; Sun, T.; Fezzaa, K.

    Dynamic split Hopkinson pressure bar experiments with in situ synchrotron x-ray imaging and diffraction are conducted on a rolled magnesium alloy at high strain rates of ~5500 s-1. High speed multiscale measurements including stress–strain curves (macroscale), strain fields (mesoscale), and diffraction patterns (microscale) are obtained simultaneously, revealing strong anisotropy in deformation across different length scales. {1012} extension twinning induces homogenized strain fields and gives rise to rapid increase in strain hardening rate, while dislocation motion leads to inhomogeneous deformation and a decrease in strain hardening rate. During the early stage of plastic deformation, twinning is dominant in dynamic compression, whilemore » dislocation motion prevails in quasi-static loading, manifesting a strain-rate dependence of deformation.« less

  4. Multiscale measurements on temperature-dependent deformation of a textured magnesium alloy with synchrotron x-ray imaging and diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, L.; Bie, B. X.; Li, Q. H.

    2017-06-01

    In situ synchrotron x-ray imaging and diffraction are used to investigate deformation of a rolled magnesium alloy under uniaxial compression at room and elevated temperatures along two different directions. The loading axis (LA) is either perpendicular or parallel to the normal direction, and these two cases are referred to as LA⊥ and LAk loading, respectively. Multiscale measurements including stressestrain curves (macroscale), strain fields (mesoscale), and diffraction patterns (microscale) are obtained simultaneously. Due to initial texture, f1012g extension twinning is predominant in the LA⊥ loading, while dislocation motion prevails in the LAk loading. With increasing temperature, fewer f1012g extension twins aremore » activated in the LA⊥ samples, giving rise to reduced strain homogenization, while pyramidal slip becomes readily activated, leading to more homogeneous deformation for the LAk loading. The difference in the strain hardening rates is attributed to that in strain field homogenization for these two loading directions« less

  5. Measuring energy efficiency in economics: Shadow value approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khademvatani, Asgar

    For decades, academic scholars and policy makers have commonly applied a simple average measure, energy intensity, for studying energy efficiency. In contrast, we introduce a distinctive marginal measure called energy shadow value (SV) for modeling energy efficiency drawn on economic theory. This thesis demonstrates energy SV advantages, conceptually and empirically, over the average measure recognizing marginal technical energy efficiency and unveiling allocative energy efficiency (energy SV to energy price). Using a dual profit function, the study illustrates how treating energy as quasi-fixed factor called quasi-fixed approach offers modeling advantages and is appropriate in developing an explicit model for energy efficiency. We address fallacies and misleading results using average measure and demonstrate energy SV advantage in inter- and intra-country energy efficiency comparison. Energy efficiency dynamics and determination of efficient allocation of energy use are shown through factors impacting energy SV: capital, technology, and environmental obligations. To validate the energy SV, we applied a dual restricted cost model using KLEM dataset for the 35 US sectors stretching from 1958 to 2000 and selected a sample of the four sectors. Following the empirical results, predicted wedges between energy price and the SV growth indicate a misallocation of energy use in stone, clay and glass (SCG) and communications (Com) sectors with more evidence in the SCG compared to the Com sector, showing overshoot in energy use relative to optimal paths and cost increases from sub-optimal energy use. The results show that energy productivity is a measure of technical efficiency and is void of information on the economic efficiency of energy use. Decomposing energy SV reveals that energy, capital and technology played key roles in energy SV increases helping to consider and analyze policy implications of energy efficiency improvement. Applying the marginal measure, we also

  6. Multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Michael D.; Britten, Jerald A.; Nguyen, Hoang T.; Boyd, Robert; Shore, Bruce W.

    1999-01-01

    The design and fabrication of dielectric grating structures with high diffraction efficiency used in reflection or transmission is described. By forming a multilayer structure of alternating index dielectric materials and placing a grating structure on top of the multilayer, a diffraction grating of adjustable efficiency, and variable optical bandwidth can be obtained. Diffraction efficiency into the first order in reflection varying between 1 and 98 percent has been achieved by controlling the design of the multilayer and the depth, shape, and material comprising the grooves of the grating structure. Methods for fabricating these gratings without the use of ion etching techniques are described.

  7. Multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings

    DOEpatents

    Perry, M.D.; Britten, J.A.; Nguyen, H.T.; Boyd, R.; Shore, B.W.

    1999-05-25

    The design and fabrication of dielectric grating structures with high diffraction efficiency used in reflection or transmission is described. By forming a multilayer structure of alternating index dielectric materials and placing a grating structure on top of the multilayer, a diffraction grating of adjustable efficiency, and variable optical bandwidth can be obtained. Diffraction efficiency into the first order in reflection varying between 1 and 98 percent has been achieved by controlling the design of the multilayer and the depth, shape, and material comprising the grooves of the grating structure. Methods for fabricating these gratings without the use of ion etching techniques are described. 7 figs.

  8. Method for Measurement of Multi-Degrees-of-Freedom Motion Parameters Based on Polydimethylsiloxane Cross-Coupling Diffraction Gratings.

    PubMed

    Duan, Junping; Zhu, Qiang; Qian, Kun; Guo, Hao; Zhang, Binzhen

    2017-08-30

    This work presents a multi-degrees-of-freedom motion parameter measurement method based on the use of cross-coupling diffraction gratings that were prepared on the two sides of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate using oxygen plasma processing technology. The laser beam that travels pass the cross-coupling optical grating would be diffracted into a two-dimensional spot array. The displacement and the gap size of the spot-array were functions of the movement of the laser source, as explained by the Fraunhofer diffraction effect. A 480 × 640 pixel charge-coupled device (CCD) was used to acquire images of the two-dimensional spot-array in real time. A proposed algorithm was then used to obtain the motion parameters. Using this method and the CCD described above, the resolutions of the displacement and the deflection angle were 0.18 μm and 0.0075 rad, respectively. Additionally, a CCD with a higher pixel count could improve the resolutions of the displacement and the deflection angle to sub-nanometer and micro-radian scales, respectively. Finally, the dynamic positions of hovering rotorcraft have been tracked and checked using the proposed method, which can be used to correct the craft's position and provide a method for aircraft stabilization in the sky.

  9. Method for Measurement of Multi-Degrees-of-Freedom Motion Parameters Based on Polydimethylsiloxane Cross-Coupling Diffraction Gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Junping; Zhu, Qiang; Qian, Kun; Guo, Hao; Zhang, Binzhen

    2017-08-01

    This work presents a multi-degrees-of-freedom motion parameter measurement method based on the use of cross-coupling diffraction gratings that were prepared on the two sides of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate using oxygen plasma processing technology. The laser beam that travels pass the cross-coupling optical grating would be diffracted into a two-dimensional spot array. The displacement and the gap size of the spot-array were functions of the movement of the laser source, as explained by the Fraunhofer diffraction effect. A 480 × 640 pixel charge-coupled device (CCD) was used to acquire images of the two-dimensional spot-array in real time. A proposed algorithm was then used to obtain the motion parameters. Using this method and the CCD described above, the resolutions of the displacement and the deflection angle were 0.18 μm and 0.0075 rad, respectively. Additionally, a CCD with a higher pixel count could improve the resolutions of the displacement and the deflection angle to sub-nanometer and micro-radian scales, respectively. Finally, the dynamic positions of hovering rotorcraft have been tracked and checked using the proposed method, which can be used to correct the craft's position and provide a method for aircraft stabilization in the sky.

  10. OBSERVATIONS OF BINARY STARS WITH THE DIFFERENTIAL SPECKLE SURVEY INSTRUMENT. III. MEASURES BELOW THE DIFFRACTION LIMIT OF THE WIYN TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Horch, Elliott P.; Van Altena, William F.; Howell, Steve B.

    2011-06-15

    In this paper, we study the ability of CCD- and electron-multiplying-CCD-based speckle imaging to obtain reliable astrometry and photometry of binary stars below the diffraction limit of the WIYN 3.5 m Telescope. We present a total of 120 measures of binary stars, 75 of which are below the diffraction limit. The measures are divided into two groups that have different measurement accuracy and precision. The first group is composed of standard speckle observations, that is, a sequence of speckle images taken in a single filter, while the second group consists of paired observations where the two observations are taken onmore » the same observing run and in different filters. The more recent paired observations were taken simultaneously with the Differential Speckle Survey Instrument, which is a two-channel speckle imaging system. In comparing our results to the ephemeris positions of binaries with known orbits, we find that paired observations provide the opportunity to identify cases of systematic error in separation below the diffraction limit and after removing these from consideration, we obtain a linear measurement uncertainty of 3-4 mas. However, if observations are unpaired or if two observations taken in the same filter are paired, it becomes harder to identify cases of systematic error, presumably because the largest source of this error is residual atmospheric dispersion, which is color dependent. When observations are unpaired, we find that it is unwise to report separations below approximately 20 mas, as these are most susceptible to this effect. Using the final results obtained, we are able to update two older orbits in the literature and present preliminary orbits for three systems that were discovered by Hipparcos.« less

  11. Measuring the labeling efficiency of pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhensen; Zhang, Xingxing; Yuan, Chun; Zhao, Xihai; van Osch, Matthias J P

    2017-05-01

    Optimization and validation of a sequence for measuring the labeling efficiency of pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) perfusion MRI. The proposed sequence consists of a labeling module and a single slice Look-Locker echo planar imaging readout. A model-based algorithm was used to calculate labeling efficiency from the signal acquired from the main brain-feeding arteries. Stability of the labeling efficiency measurement was evaluated with regard to the use of cardiac triggering, flow compensation and vein signal suppression. Accuracy of the measurement was assessed by comparing the measured labeling efficiency to mean brain pCASL signal intensity over a wide range of flip angles as applied in the pCASL labeling. Simulations show that the proposed algorithm can effectively calculate labeling efficiency when correcting for T1 relaxation of the blood spins. Use of cardiac triggering and vein signal suppression improved stability of the labeling efficiency measurement, while flow compensation resulted in little improvement. The measured labeling efficiency was found to be linearly (R = 0.973; P < 0.001) related to brain pCASL signal intensity over a wide range of pCASL flip angles. The optimized labeling efficiency sequence provides robust artery-specific labeling efficiency measurement within a short acquisition time (∼30 s), thereby enabling improved accuracy of pCASL CBF quantification. Magn Reson Med 77:1841-1852, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Magn Reson Med 77:1841-1852, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  12. Optical diffraction tomography using a digital micromirror device for stable measurements of 4D refractive index tomography of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seungwoo; Kim, Kyoohyun; Kim, Taeho; Yoon, Jonghee; Hong, Kihyun; Park, Jinah; Park, YongKeun

    2016-03-01

    Optical diffraction tomography (ODT) is an interferometric microscopy technique capable of measuring 3-D refractive index (RI) distribution of transparent samples. Multiple 2-D holograms of a sample illuminated with various angles are measured, from which 3-D RI map of the sample is reconstructed via the diffraction theory. ODT has been proved as a powerful tool for the study of biological cells, due to its non-invasiveness, label-free and quantitative imaging capability. Recently, our group has demonstrated that a digital micromirror device (DMD) can be exploited for fast and precise control of illumination beams for ODT. In this work, we systematically study the precision and stability of the ODT system equipped with a DMD and present measurements of 3-D and 4-D RI maps of various types of live cells including human red blood cells, white blood cells, hepatocytes, and HeLa cells. Furthermore, we also demonstrate the effective visualization of 3-D RI maps of live cells utilizing the measured information about the values and gradient of RI tomograms.

  13. Measurement of residual stress fields in FHPP welding: a comparison between DSPI combined with hole-drilling and neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viotti, Matias R.; Albertazzi, Armando; Staron, Peter; Pisa, Marcelo

    2013-04-01

    This paper shows a portable device to measure mainly residual stress fields outside the optical bench. This system combines the traditional hole drilling technique with Digital Speckle Pattern Interferometry. The novel feature of this device is the high degree of compaction since only one base supports simultaneously the measurement module and the hole-drilling device. The portable device allows the measurement of non-uniform residual stresses in accordance with the ASTM standard. In oil and gas offshore industries, alternative welding procedures among them, the friction hydro pillar processing (FHPP) is highlighted and nowadays is an important maintenance tool since it has the capability to produce structure repairs without risk of explosions. In this process a hole is drilled and filled with a consumable rod of the same material. The rod, which could be cylindrical or conical, is rotated and pressed against the hole, leading to frictional heating. In order to assess features about the residual stress distribution generated by the weld into the rod as well as into the base material around the rod, welded samples were evaluated by neutron diffraction and by the hole drilling technique having a comparison between them. For the hole drilling technique some layers were removed by using electrical discharge machining (EDM) after diffraction measurements in order to assess the bulk stress distribution. Results have shown a good agreement between techniques.

  14. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction measurements of reciprocal space structure of 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Y; Guo, F-W; Lu, T-M; Wang, G-C

    2016-12-02

    Knowledge on the symmetry and perfection of a 2D material deposited or transferred to a surface is very important and valuable. We demonstrate a method to map the reciprocal space structure of 2D materials using reflection high energy diffraction (RHEED). RHEED from a 2D material gives rise to 'streaks' patterns. It is shown that from these streaks patterns at different azimuthal rotation angles that the reciprocal space intensity distribution can be constructed as a function of momentum transfer parallel to the surface. To illustrate the principle, we experimentally constructed the reciprocal space structure of a commercial graphene/SiO 2 /Si sample in which the graphene layer was transferred to the SiO 2 /Si substrate after it was deposited on a Cu foil by chemical vapor deposition. The result reveals a 12-fold symmetry of the graphene layer which is a result of two dominant orientation domains with 30° rotation relative to each other. We show that the graphene can serve as a template to grow other materials such as a SnS film that follows the symmetry of graphene.

  15. Holographic assembly of semiconductor CdSe quantum dots in polymer for volume Bragg grating structures with diffraction efficiency near 100%

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiangming; Tomita, Yasuo; Oshima, Juro; Chikama, Katsumi; Matsubara, Koutatsu; Nakashima, Takuya; Kawai, Tsuyoshi

    2009-12-01

    We report on the fabrication of centimeter-size transmission Bragg gratings in semiconductor CdSe quantum dots dispersed 50 μm thick photopolymer films. This was done by holographic assembly of CdSe quantum dots in a photopolymerizable monomer blend. Periodic patterning of CdSe quantum dots in polymer was confirmed by a fluorescence microscope and confocal Raman imaging. The diffraction efficiency from the grating of 1 μm spacing was near 100% in the green with 0.34 vol % CdSe quantum dots, giving the refractive index modulation as large as 5.1×10-3.

  16. Semiconductor Quantum Electron Wave Transport, Diffraction, and Interference: Analysis, Device, and Measurement.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Gregory Newell

    Semiconductor device dimensions are rapidly approaching a fundamental limit where drift-diffusion equations and the depletion approximation are no longer valid. In this regime, quantum effects can dominate device response. To increase further device density and speed, new devices must be designed that use these phenomena to positive advantage. In addition, quantum effects provide opportunities for a new class of devices which can perform functions previously unattainable with "conventional" semiconductor devices. This thesis has described research in the analysis of electron wave effects in semiconductors and the development of methods for the design, fabrication, and characterization of quantum devices based on these effects. First, an exact set of quantitative analogies are presented which allow the use of well understood optical design and analysis tools for the development of electron wave semiconductor devices. Motivated by these analogies, methods are presented for modeling electron wave grating diffraction using both an exact rigorous coupled-wave analysis and approximate analyses which are useful for grating design. Example electron wave grating switch and multiplexer designs are presented. In analogy to thin-film optics, the design and analysis of electron wave Fabry-Perot interference filters are also discussed. An innovative technique has been developed for testing these (and other) electron wave structures using Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy (BEEM). This technique uses a liquid-helium temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) to perform spectroscopy of the electron transmittance as a function of electron energy. Experimental results show that BEEM can resolve even weak quantum effects, such as the reflectivity of a single interface between materials. Finally, methods are discussed for incorporating asymmetric electron wave Fabry-Perot filters into optoelectronic devices. Theoretical and experimental results show that such structures could

  17. Application of the phase shifting diffraction interferometer for measuring convex mirrors and negative lenses

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.; Campbell, Eugene W.

    2004-03-09

    To measure a convex mirror, a reference beam and a measurement beam are both provided through a single optical fiber. A positive auxiliary lens is placed in the system to give a converging wavefront onto the convex mirror under test. A measurement is taken that includes the aberrations of the convex mirror as well as the errors due to two transmissions through the positive auxiliary lens. A second, measurement provides the information to eliminate this error. A negative lens can also be measured in a similar way. Again, there are two measurement set-ups. A reference beam is provided from a first optical fiber and a measurement beam is provided from a second optical fiber. A positive auxiliary lens is placed in the system to provide a converging wavefront from the reference beam onto the negative lens under test. The measurement beam is combined with the reference wavefront and is analyzed by standard methods. This measurement includes the aberrations of the negative lens, as well as the errors due to a single transmission through the positive auxiliary lens. A second measurement provides the information to eliminate this error.

  18. Application Of The Phase Shifting Diffraction Interferometer For Measuring Convex Mirrors And Negative Lenses

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.; Campbell, Eugene W.

    2005-06-21

    To measure a convex mirror, a reference beam and a measurement beam are both provided through a single optical fiber. A positive auxiliary lens is placed in the system to give a converging wavefront onto the convex mirror under test. A measurement is taken that includes the aberrations of the convex mirror as well as the errors due to two transmissions through the positive auxiliary lens. A second measurement provides the information to eliminate this error. A negative lens can also be measured in a similar way. Again, there are two measurement set-ups. A reference beam is provided from a first optical fiber and a measurement beam is provided from a second optical fiber. A positive auxiliary lens is placed in the system to provide a converging wavefront from the reference beam onto the negative lens under test. The measurement beam is combined with the reference wavefront and is analyzed by standard methods. This measurement includes the aberrations of the negative lens, as well as the errors due to a single transmission through the positive auxiliary lens. A second measurement provides the information to eliminate this error.

  19. Diffraction grating-based sensing optofluidic device for measuring the refractive index of liquids.

    PubMed

    Calixto, Sergio; Bruce, Neil C; Rosete-Aguilar, Martha

    2016-01-11

    We describe a simple and versatile optical sensing device for measuring refractive index of liquids. The sensor consists of a sinusoidal relief grating in a glass cell. Device calibration is done by pouring in the cell different liquids of known refractive indices. Each time a liquid is poured first order intensity is measured. The fabrication process and testing of the prototype device is described. An application in the measurement of temperature is also presented.

  20. Efficiency measurement and the operationalization of hospital production.

    PubMed

    Magnussen, J

    1996-04-01

    To discuss the usefulness of efficiency measures as instruments of monitoring and resource allocation by analyzing their invariance to changes in the operationalization of hospital production. Norwegian hospitals over the three-year period 1989-1991. Efficiency is measured using Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA). The distribution of efficiency and the ranking of hospitals is compared across models using various distribution-free tests. Input and output data are collected by the Norwegian Central Bureau of Statistics. The distribution of efficiency is found to be unaffected by changes in the specification of hospital output. Both the ranking of hospitals and the scale properties of the technology, however, are found to depend on the choice of output specification. Extreme care should be taken before resource allocation is based on DEA-type efficiency measures alone. Both the identification of efficient and inefficient hospitals and the cardinal measure of inefficiency will depend on the specification of output. Since the scale properties of the technology also vary with the specification of output, the search for an optimal hospital size may be futile.

  1. Efficiency measurement and the operationalization of hospital production.

    PubMed Central

    Magnussen, J

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. To discuss the usefulness of efficiency measures as instruments of monitoring and resource allocation by analyzing their invariance to changes in the operationalization of hospital production. STUDY SETTING. Norwegian hospitals over the three-year period 1989-1991. STUDY DESIGN. Efficiency is measured using Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA). The distribution of efficiency and the ranking of hospitals is compared across models using various distribution-free tests. DATA COLLECTION. Input and output data are collected by the Norwegian Central Bureau of Statistics. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. The distribution of efficiency is found to be unaffected by changes in the specification of hospital output. Both the ranking of hospitals and the scale properties of the technology, however, are found to depend on the choice of output specification. CONCLUSION. Extreme care should be taken before resource allocation is based on DEA-type efficiency measures alone. Both the identification of efficient and inefficient hospitals and the cardinal measure of inefficiency will depend on the specification of output. Since the scale properties of the technology also vary with the specification of output, the search for an optimal hospital size may be futile. PMID:8617607

  2. Feed conversion efficiency in aquaculture: do we measure it correctly?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, Jillian P.; Mailloux, Nicholas A.; Love, David C.; Milli, Michael C.; Cao, Ling

    2018-02-01

    Globally, demand for food animal products is rising. At the same time, we face mounting, related pressures including limited natural resources, negative environmental externalities, climate disruption, and population growth. Governments and other stakeholders are seeking strategies to boost food production efficiency and food system resiliency, and aquaculture (farmed seafood) is commonly viewed as having a major role in improving global food security based on longstanding measures of animal production efficiency. The most widely used measurement is called the ‘feed conversion ratio’ (FCR), which is the weight of feed administered over the lifetime of an animal divided by weight gained. By this measure, fed aquaculture and chickens are similarly efficient at converting feed into animal biomass, and both are more efficient compared to pigs and cattle. FCR does not account for differences in feed content, edible portion of an animal, or nutritional quality of the final product. Given these limitations, we searched the literature for alternative efficiency measures and identified ‘nutrient retention’, which can be used to compare protein and calories in feed (inputs) and edible portions of animals (outputs). Protein and calorie retention have not been calculated for most aquaculture species. Focusing on commercial production, we collected data on feed composition, feed conversion ratios, edible portions (i.e. yield), and nutritional content of edible flesh for nine aquatic and three terrestrial farmed animal species. We estimate that 19% of protein and 10% of calories in feed for aquatic species are ultimately made available in the human food supply, with significant variation between species. Comparing all terrestrial and aquatic animals in the study, chickens are most efficient using these measures, followed by Atlantic salmon. Despite lower FCRs in aquaculture, protein and calorie retention for aquaculture production is comparable to livestock production

  3. Multidimensional motion measurement of a bimorph-type piezoelectric actuator using a diffraction grating target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong-Ahn; Bae, Eui Won; Kim, Soo Hyun; Kwak, Yoon Keun

    2001-09-01

    Precision actuators, such as pick-up actuators for HDDs or CD-ROMs, mostly show multidimensional motion. So, to evaluate them more completely, multidimensional measurement is required. Through structural variation and optimization of the design index, the performance of a measurement system can be improved to satisfy the requirement of this application, and so the resolution of each axis is higher than 0.1 μm for translation and 0.5 arcsec for rotation. Using this measurement system, the multidimensional motion and frequency transfer functions of a bimorph-type piezoelectric actuator are obtained.

  4. Compact and efficient blue laser sheet for measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yan; Wang, Yu; Wu, Bin; Wang, Yanwei; Yan, Boxia

    2017-10-01

    Compact and efficient blue laser sheet has important applications in the field of measurement, with laser diode end pumped Nd:YAG directly and LBO intracavity frequency doubling, a compact and efficient CW 473nm blue laser sheet composed of dual path liner blue laser is realized. At an incident pump power of 12.4W, up to 1.4W output power of the compound blue laser is achieved, the optical-to-optical conversion efficiency is as high as 11.3%.

  5. Tagging Efficiency for Nuclear Physics Measurements at MAX-lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Nevin; Elofson, David; Lewis, Codie; O'Brien, Erin; Buggelli, Kelsey; O'Connor, Kyle; O'Rielly, Grant; Maxtagg Team

    2014-09-01

    A careful study of the tagging efficiency during measurements of near threshold pion photoproduction and high energy Compton scattering has been performed. These experiments are being done at the MAX-lab tagged photon Facility during the June 2014 run period. The determination of the final results from these experiments depends on knowledge of the incident photon flux. The tagging efficiency is a critical part of the photon flux calculation. In addition to daily measurements of the tagging efficiency, a beam monitor was used during the production data runs to monitor the relative tagging efficiency. Two trigger types were used in the daily measurements; one was a logical OR from the tagger array and the other was from the Pb-glass photon detector. Investigations were made to explore the effect of the different trigger conditions and the differences between single and multi hit TDCs on the tagging efficiency. In addition the time evolution and overall uncertainty in the tagging efficiency for each tagger channel was determined. The results will be discussed.

  6. Measuring Efficiency of Secondary Healthcare Providers in Slovenia

    PubMed Central

    Blatnik, Patricia; Bojnec, Štefan; Tušak, Matej

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The chief aim of this study was to analyze secondary healthcare providers' efficiency, focusing on the efficiency analysis of Slovene general hospitals. We intended to present a complete picture of technical, allocative, and cost or economic efficiency of general hospitals. Methods We researched the aspects of efficiency with two econometric methods. First, we calculated the necessary quotients of efficiency with the stochastic frontier analyze (SFA), which are realized by econometric evaluation of stochastic frontier functions; then, with the data envelopment analyze (DEA), we calculated the necessary quotients that are based on the linear programming method. Results Results on measures of efficiency showed that the two chosen methods produced two different conclusions. The SFA method concluded Celje General Hospital is the most efficient general hospital, whereas the DEA method concluded Brežice General Hospital was the hospital to be declared as the most efficient hospital. Conclusion Our results are a useful tool that can aid managers, payers, and designers of healthcare policy to better understand how general hospitals operate. The participants can accordingly decide with less difficulty on any further business operations of general hospitals, having the best practices of general hospitals at their disposal. PMID:28730180

  7. Quantum efficiency measurements of eROSITA pnCCDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebermayer, Stefanie; Andritschke, Robert; Elbs, Johannes; Meidinger, Norbert; Strüder, Lothar; Hartmann, Robert; Gottwald, Alexander; Krumrey, Michael; Scholze, Frank

    2010-07-01

    For the eROSITA X-ray telescope, which is planned to be launched in 2012, detectors were developed and fabricated at the MPI Semiconductor Laboratory. The fully depleted, back-illuminated pnCCDs have an ultrathin pn-junction to improve the low-energy X-ray response function and quantum efficiency. The device thickness of 450 μm is fully sensitive to X-ray photons yielding high quantum efficiency of more than 90% at photon energies of 10 keV. An on-chip filter is deposited on top of the entrance window to suppress visible and UV light which would interfere with the X-ray observations. The pnCCD type developed for the eROSITA telescope was characterized in terms of quantum efficiency and spectral response function. The described measurements were performed in 2009 at the synchrotron radiation sources BESSY II and MLS as cooperation between the MPI Semiconductor Laboratory and the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). Quantum efficiency measurements over a wide range of photon energies from 3 eV to 11 keV as well as spectral response measurements are presented. For X-ray energies from 3 keV to 10 keV the quantum efficiency of the CCD including on-chip filter is shown to be above 90% with an attenuation of visible light of more than five orders of magnitude. A detector response model is described and compared to the measurements.

  8. Measurement of diffraction dissociation cross sections in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 7 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-07-06

    Measurements of diffractive dissociation cross sections in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV are presented in kinematic regions defined by the masses M X and M Y of the two final-state hadronic systems separated by the largest rapidity gap in the event. The differential cross sections are measured as a function of ξ X = M2 X /s in the region -5.5 < log 10ξ X < -2.5, for log 10M Y < 0.5, dominated by single dissociation (SD), and 0.5 < log10M Y < 1.1, dominated by double dissociation (DD), where M X and M Y are given in GeV.more » The inclusive pp cross section is also measured as a function of the width of the central pseudorapidity gap Δη for Δη > 3, log 10 M X > 1.1, and log 10M Y > 1.1, a region dominated by DD. The cross sections integrated over these regions are found to be, respectively, 2.99 ± 0.02(stat) +0.32 -0.29(syst) mb, 1.18 ± 0.02(stat) ± 0.13(syst) mb, and 0.58 ± 0.01(stat) +0.13 -0.11(syst) mb, and are used to extract extrapolated total SD and DD cross sections. In addition, the inclusive differential cross section, dσ/dΔη F, for events with a pseudorapidity gap adjacent to the edge of the detector, is measured over Δη F = 8.4 units of pseudorapidity. The results are compared to those of other experiments and to theoretical predictions and found compatible with slowly rising diffractive cross sections as a function of center-of-mass energy.« less

  9. Measurement of diffractive dissociation cross sections in p p collisions at √{s }=7 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Dildick, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Dos Reis Martins, T.; Mora Herrera, C.; Pol, M. E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Tao, J.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Bontenackels, M.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Hindrichs, O.; Klein, K.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Weber, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Heister, A.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behr, J.; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Bergholz, M.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Horton, D.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Krücker, D.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Novgorodova, O.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Roland, B.; Ron, E.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Saxena, P.; Schmidt, R.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Vargas Trevino, A. D. R.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lange, J.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Ott, J.; Peiffer, T.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Poehlsen, T.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Frensch, F.; Giffels, M.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, Th.; Nürnberg, A.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Ratnikov, F.; Röcker, S.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Stiliaris, E.; Aslanoglou, X.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Swain, S. K.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mittal, M.; Nishu, N.; Singh, J. B.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, V.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Modak, A.; Mukherjee, S.; Roy, D.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Dutta, D.; Kailas, S.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Barbone, L.; Calabria, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Singh, G.; Venditti, R.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Ferretti, R.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Martelli, A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Di Guida, S.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Branca, A.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Galanti, M.; Gasparini, F.; Giubilato, P.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Montecassiano, F.; Passaseo, M.; Pazzini, J.; Pegoraro, M.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Triossi, A.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Romeo, F.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Moon, C. S.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Vernieri, C.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D'imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Grassi, M.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Soffi, L.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Casasso, S.; Costa, M.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Ortona, G.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Schizzi, A.; Umer, T.; Zanetti, A.; Chang, S.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. J.; Lee, S.; Oh, Y. D.; Park, H.; Sakharov, A.; Son, D. C.; Kim, T. J.; Kim, J. Y.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K. S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Choi, M.; Kim, J. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Ryu, M. S.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Seo, H.; Yu, I.; Juodagalvis, A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Reucroft, S.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khalid, S.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Shah, M. A.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Wolszczak, W.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nguyen, F.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Karjavin, V.; Konoplyanikov, V.; Korenkov, V.; Kozlov, G.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Mitsyn, V. V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Smirnov, V.; Tikhonenko, E.; Zarubin, A.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, An.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Spiridonov, A.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Khein, L.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Lukina, O.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Ekmedzic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Brun, H.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Graziano, A.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benaglia, A.; Bendavid, J.; Benhabib, L.; Benitez, J. F.; Bernet, C.; Bianchi, G.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Bondu, O.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Colafranceschi, S.; D'Alfonso, M.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; David, A.; De Guio, F.; De Roeck, A.; De Visscher, S.; Di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dorney, B.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Eugster, J.; Franzoni, G.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Hansen, M.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Marrouche, J.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Musella, P.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Perrozzi, L.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Plagge, M.; Racz, A.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Wollny, H.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marini, A. C.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Mohr, N.; Nägeli, C.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Quittnat, M.; Rebane, L.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Amsler, C.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Millan Mejias, B.; Ngadiuba, J.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Taroni, S.; Verzetti, M.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Kao, K. Y.; Lei, Y. J.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Majumder, D.; Petrakou, E.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wilken, R.; Asavapibhop, B.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Akin, I. V.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Gamsizkan, H.; Karapinar, G.; Ocalan, K.; Sekmen, S.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Isildak, B.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Cankocak, K.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Williams, T.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Womersley, W. J.; Worm, S. D.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Burton, D.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Cutajar, M.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Kenzie, M.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Mathias, B.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Tapper, A.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Martin, W.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Kasmi, A.; Liu, H.; Scarborough, T.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Lawson, P.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Berry, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Christopher, G.; Cutts, D.; Demiragli, Z.; Dhingra, N.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Swanson, J.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Miceli, T.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Searle, M.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Rakness, G.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Nguyen, H.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Shrinivas, A.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wimpenny, S.; Andrews, W.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Evans, D.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Sudano, E.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Barge, D.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Danielson, T.; Dishaw, A.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Mccoll, N.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Rogan, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Timciuc, V.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Skinnari, L.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Kaadze, K.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Kwan, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitbeck, A.; Whitmore, J.; Yang, F.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carver, M.; Cheng, T.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Rinkevicius, A.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Bazterra, V. E.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Kurt, P.; Moon, D. H.; O'Brien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Duru, F.; Haytmyradov, M.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Rahmat, R.; Sen, S.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Swartz, M.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Kenny, R. P.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Sekaric, J.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Wood, J. S.; Barfuss, A. F.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Saini, L. K.; Shrestha, S.; Skhirtladze, N.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Marionneau, M.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Bauer, G.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Di Matteo, L.; Dutta, V.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Klute, M.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malik, S.; Meier, F.; Snow, G. R.; Zvada, M.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Haley, J.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Smith, G.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hebda, P.; Hunt, A.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Gutay, L.; Hu, Z.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Maroussov, V.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Kaplan, S.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Kunori, S.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Levine, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Verwilligen, P.; Vuosalo, C.; Woods, N.; CMS Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    Measurements of diffractive dissociation cross sections in p p collisions at √{s }=7 TeV are presented in kinematic regions defined by the masses MX and MY of the two final-state hadronic systems separated by the largest rapidity gap in the event. Differential cross sections are measured as a function of ξX=MX2/s in the region -5.5 measured as a function of the width of the central pseudorapidity gap Δ η for Δ η >3 , log10MX>1.1 , and log10MY>1.1 , a region dominated by DD. The cross sections integrated over these regions are found to be, respectively, 2.99 ±0.02 (stat)-0.29+0.32(syst) mb , 1.18 ±0.02 (stat) ±0.13 (syst) mb , and 0.58 ±0.01 (stat)-0.11+0.13(syst) mb , and are used to extract extrapolated total SD and DD cross sections. In addition, the inclusive differential cross section, d σ /d Δ ηF , for events with a pseudorapidity gap adjacent to the edge of the detector, is measured over Δ ηF=8.4 units of pseudorapidity. The results are compared to those of other experiments and to theoretical predictions and found compatible with slowly rising diffractive cross sections as a function of center-of-mass energy.

  10. The dynamics of soil aggregate breakdown in water in response to landuse as measured with laser diffraction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyedele, D. J.; Pini, R.; Sparvoli, E.; Scatena, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Mastersizer 2000G (Malvern Instruments) Diffraction Instrument was used to assess and quantify the breakdown of soil aggregates and compute wet aggregate stability indices. The study was aimed at evolving a novel rapid method of determining soil aggregate stability. Bulk surface (0-15 cm) soil samples were collected under 5 different land uses in the Teaching and Resrach Farm of Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria. About 0.5g of the soils aggregates (0.5 -1 mm diameter) were evaluated in the laser diffractometer with the stirrer operated at 500 rpm and the pump at 1800 rpm. The different size aggregates and particles of sand silt and clay were quantified periodically. Water stable aggregates greater than 250 µm (WSA>250), water stable aggregates less than 250 µm (WSA<250), water dispersible clay index (WDI), and mean volume diameter (MVD) among others were computed from the laser diffraction data. The values were compared with the classical Yoder wet sieving technique. The WSA>250 was significantly higher on the soils under Forest (FR), Cacao (CC), Teak (TK) and Oil Palm (OP) plantations, while it was significantly lowest under no-tillage (NT) and continuous cultivation (CT). The pasture (PD) was not significantly different from either the cultivated and the non-cultivated soils. Conversely, the WSA<250 and water dispersible clay index was highest in the cultivated soils (CT and NT) and lowest in the non-cultivated soils (FR, TK, CC and OP) while the PD was in-between. The MVD also followed a similar trend as the WSA>250. The wet sieving water stable aggregates index (WSI>250) was significantly correlated with WSA>250 (r = 0.75), MVD (r = 0.75), WDI (r = -0.68) and WSA<250 (r = - 0.73). All the laser diffraction measured aggregation indices were significantly correlated with the organic matter contents of the soils. Thus the laser diffraction promises a rapid and comprehensive method of evaluation of soil aggregate stability.

  11. Infrared measurements of a scramjet exhaust. [to determine combustion efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, R. A.; Slack, M. W.

    1980-01-01

    Diagnostic 2 - 5 mm infrared spectra of a hydrogen burning scramjet exhaust were measured with an interferometer spectrometer. Exhaust gas temperatures and water vapor partial pressures were determined from the observed intensity and spectral profile of the H2O 2.7 mm infrared emission band. Overall engine combustion efficiencies were derived by combining these measurements with the known engine operating conditions. Efficiencies fall (70 - 50 percent) as fuel equivalence ratios rise (0.4 - 1.0). Data analysis techniques and sensitivity studies are also presented.

  12. Measuring twinning and slip in shock-compressed Ta from in-situ x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrenberg, Christopher; McGonegle, David; Sliwa, Marcin; Suggit, Matt; Wark, Justin; Lee, Hae Ja; Nagler, Bob; Tavella, Franz; Remington, Bruce; Rudd, Rob; Lazicki, Amy; Park, Hye-Sook; Swift, Damian; Zepeda-Ruiz, Louis; Higginbotham, Andrew; Bolme, Cindy

    2017-06-01

    A fundamental understanding of high-pressure and high-strain-rate deformation rests on grasping the underlying microstructural processes, such as twinning and dislocation generation and transport (slip), yet simulations and ex-post-facto recovery experiments provide conflicting answers to these basic issues. Here, we report direct, in-situ observation of twinning and slip in shock compressed Ta using in-situ x-ray diffraction. A series of shock experiments were performed on the Matter in Extreme Conditions end station at LCLS. Direct laser ablation was used to drive a shock, ranging in pressure from 10-300 GPa, into a Ta sample with an initial (110) fiber texture. The subsequent changes in texture were observed in-situ by examining the azimuthal distribution of the diffraction intensity and found to match twinning and lattice rotation. Measurements of the twin fraction and lattice rotation were used to calculate the equivalent plastic strain from twinning and slip. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. CO 2 Sorption to Subsingle Hydration Layer Montmorillonite Clay Studied by Excess Sorption and Neutron Diffraction Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Rother, Gernot; Ilton, Eugene S.; Wallacher, Dirk

    2013-01-02

    Geologic storage of CO 2 requires that the caprock sealing the storage rock is highly impermeable to CO 2. Swelling clays, which are important components of caprocks, may interact with CO 2 leading to volume change and potentially impacting the seal quality. The interactions of supercritical (sc) CO 2 with Na saturated montmorillonite clay containing a subsingle layer of water in the interlayer region have been studied by sorption and neutron diffraction techniques. The excess sorption isotherms show maxima at bulk CO2 densities of ≈0.15 g/cm 3, followed by an approximately linear decrease of excess sorption to zero and negativemore » values with increasing CO 2 bulk density. Neutron diffraction experiments on the same clay sample measured interlayer spacing and composition. The results show that limited amounts of CO 2 are sorbed into the interlayer region, leading to depression of the interlayer peak intensity and an increase of the d(001) spacing by ca. 0.5 Å. The density of CO 2 in the clay pores is relatively stable over a wide range of CO 2 pressures at a given temperature, indicating the formation of a clay-CO 2 phase. Finally, at the excess sorption maximum, increasing CO 2 sorption with decreasing temperature is observed while the high-pressure sorption properties exhibit weak temperature dependence.« less

  14. Nanocalorimeter platform for in situ specific heat measurements and x-ray diffraction at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Willa, K.; Diao, Z.; Campanini, D.

    Recent advances in electronics and nanofabrication have enabled membrane-based nanocalorimetry for measurements of the specific heat of microgram-sized samples. We have integrated a nanocalorimeter platform into a 4.5 T split-pair vertical-field magnet to allow for the simultaneous measurement of the specific heat and x-ray scattering in magnetic fields and at temperatures as low as 4 K. This multi-modal approach empowers researchers to directly correlate scattering experiments with insights from thermodynamic properties including structural, electronic, orbital, and magnetic phase transitions. The use of a nanocalorimeter sample platform enables numerous technical advantages: precise measurement and control of the sample temperature, quantification ofmore » beam heating effects, fast and precise positioning of the sample in the x-ray beam, and fast acquisition of x-ray scans over a wide temperature range without the need for time-consuming re-centering and re-alignment. Furthermore, on an YBa2Cu3O7-delta crystal and a copper foil, we demonstrate a novel approach to x-ray absorption spectroscopy by monitoring the change in sample temperature as a function of incident photon energy. Finally, we illustrate the new insights that can be gained from in situ structural and thermodynamic measurements by investigating the superheated state occurring at the first-order magneto-elastic phase transition of Fe2P, a material that is of interest for magnetocaloric applications.« less

  15. Internal Stress Distribution Measurement of TIG Welded SUS304 Samples Using Neutron Diffraction Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muslih, M. Refai; Sumirat, I.; Sairun; Purwanta

    2008-03-01

    The distribution of residual stress of SUS304 samples that were undergone TIG welding process with four different electric currents has been measured. The welding has been done in the middle part of the samples that was previously grooved by milling machine. Before they were welded the samples were annealed at 650 degree Celsius for one hour. The annealing process was done to eliminate residual stress generated by grooving process so that the residual stress within the samples was merely produced from welding process. The calculation of distribution of residual stress was carried out by measuring the strains within crystal planes of Fe(220) SUS304. Strain, Young modulus, and Poisson ratio of Fe(220) SUS304 were measured using DN1-M neutron diffractometer. Young modulus and Poisson ratio of Fe(220) SUS304 sample were measured in-situ. The result of calculations showed that distribution of residual stress of SUS304 in the vicinity of welded area is influenced both by treatments given at the samples-making process and by the electric current used during welding process.

  16. Nanocalorimeter platform for in situ specific heat measurements and x-ray diffraction at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willa, K.; Diao, Z.; Campanini, D.; Welp, U.; Divan, R.; Hudl, M.; Islam, Z.; Kwok, W.-K.; Rydh, A.

    2017-12-01

    Recent advances in electronics and nanofabrication have enabled membrane-based nanocalorimetry for measurements of the specific heat of microgram-sized samples. We have integrated a nanocalorimeter platform into a 4.5 T split-pair vertical-field magnet to allow for the simultaneous measurement of the specific heat and x-ray scattering in magnetic fields and at temperatures as low as 4 K. This multi-modal approach empowers researchers to directly correlate scattering experiments with insights from thermodynamic properties including structural, electronic, orbital, and magnetic phase transitions. The use of a nanocalorimeter sample platform enables numerous technical advantages: precise measurement and control of the sample temperature, quantification of beam heating effects, fast and precise positioning of the sample in the x-ray beam, and fast acquisition of x-ray scans over a wide temperature range without the need for time-consuming re-centering and re-alignment. Furthermore, on an YBa2Cu3O7-δ crystal and a copper foil, we demonstrate a novel approach to x-ray absorption spectroscopy by monitoring the change in sample temperature as a function of incident photon energy. Finally, we illustrate the new insights that can be gained from in situ structural and thermodynamic measurements by investigating the superheated state occurring at the first-order magneto-elastic phase transition of Fe2P, a material that is of interest for magnetocaloric applications.

  17. Phononic crystal diffraction gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseyenko, Rayisa P.; Herbison, Sarah; Declercq, Nico F.; Laude, Vincent

    2012-02-01

    When a phononic crystal is interrogated by an external source of acoustic waves, there is necessarily a phenomenon of diffraction occurring on the external enclosing surfaces. Indeed, these external surfaces are periodic and the resulting acoustic diffraction grating has a periodicity that depends on the orientation of the phononic crystal. This work presents a combined experimental and theoretical study on the diffraction of bulk ultrasonic waves on the external surfaces of a 2D phononic crystal that consists of a triangular lattice of steel rods in a water matrix. The results of transmission experiments are compared with theoretical band structures obtained with the finite-element method. Angular spectrograms (showing frequency as a function of angle) determined from diffraction experiments are then compared with finite-element simulations of diffraction occurring on the surfaces of the crystal. The experimental results show that the diffraction that occurs on its external surfaces is highly frequency-dependent and has a definite relation with the Bloch modes of the phononic crystal. In particular, a strong influence of the presence of bandgaps and deaf bands on the diffraction efficiency is found. This observation opens perspectives for the design of efficient phononic crystal diffraction gratings.

  18. Efficient Measurement of Multiparticle Entanglement with Embedding Quantum Simulator.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Cheng; Wu, Dian; Su, Zu-En; Cai, Xin-Dong; Wang, Xi-Lin; Yang, Tao; Li, Li; Liu, Nai-Le; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-02-19

    The quantum measurement of entanglement is a demanding task in the field of quantum information. Here, we report the direct and scalable measurement of multiparticle entanglement with embedding photonic quantum simulators. In this embedding framework [R. Di Candia et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 240502 (2013)], the N-qubit entanglement, which does not associate with a physical observable directly, can be efficiently measured with only two (for even N) and six (for odd N) local measurement settings. Our experiment uses multiphoton quantum simulators to mimic dynamical concurrence and three-tangle entangled systems and to track their entanglement evolutions.

  19. Efficiency measurement of health care organizations: What models are used?

    PubMed Central

    Jaafaripooyan, Ebrahim; Emamgholipour, Sara; Raei, Behzad

    2017-01-01

    Background: Literature abounds with various techniques for efficiency measurement of health care organizations (HCOs), which should be used cautiously and appropriately. The present study aimed at discovering the rules regulating the interplay among the number of inputs, outputs, and decision- making units (DMUs) and identifying all methods used for the measurement of Iranian HCOs and critically appraising all DEA studies on Iranian HCOs in their application of such rules. Methods: The present study employed a systematic search of all studies related to efficiency measurement of Iranian HCOs. A search was conducted in different databases such as PubMed and Scopus between 2001 and 2015 to identify the studies related to the measurement in health care. The retrieved studies passed through a multi-stage (title, abstract, body) filtering process. Data extraction table for each study was completed and included method, number of inputs and outputs, DMUs, and their efficiency score. Results: Various methods were found for efficiency measurement. Overall, 122 studies were retrieved, of which 73 had exclusively employed DEA technique for measuring the efficiency of HCOs in Iran, and 23 with hybrid models (including DEA). Only 6 studies had explicitly used the rules of thumb. Conclusion: The number of inputs, outputs, and DMUs should be cautiously selected in DEA like techniques, as their proportionality can directly affect the discriminatory power of the technique. The given literature seemed to be, to a large extent, unsuccessful in attending to such proportionality. This study collected a list of key rules (of thumb) on the interplay of inputs, outputs, and DMUs, which could be considered by most researchers keen to apply DEA technique.

  20. A novel pendulum test for measuring roller chain efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wragge-Morley, R.; Yon, J.; Lock, R.; Alexander, B.; Burgess, S.

    2018-07-01

    This paper describes a novel pendulum decay test for determining the transmission efficiency of chain drives. The test involves releasing a pendulum with an initial potential energy and measuring its decaying oscillations: under controlled conditions the decay reveals the losses in the transmission to a high degree of accuracy. The main advantage over motorised rigs is that there are significantly fewer sources of friction and inertia and hence measurement error. The pendulum rigs have an accuracy around 0.6% for the measurement of the coefficient of friction, giving an accuracy of transmission efficiency measurement around 0.012%. A theoretical model of chain friction combined with the equations of motion enables the coefficient of friction to be determined from the decay rate of pendulum velocity. The pendulum rigs operate at relatively low speeds. However, they allow an accurate determination of the coefficient of friction to estimate transmission efficiency at higher speeds. The pendulum rig revealed a previously undetected rocking behaviour in the chain links at very small articulation angles. In this regime, the link interfaces were observed to roll against one another rather than slide. This observation indicates that a very high-efficiency transmission can be achieved if the articulation angle is very low.

  1. Efficiency Measurement Using a Motor-Dynamo Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Pun-hon; Wong, Siu-ling; Mak, Se-yuen

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we describe a simple method which can be used to measure the efficiency of a low power dc motor, a motor-converted dynamo and a coupled motor-dynamo module as a function of the speed of rotation. The result can also be used to verify Faraday's law of electromagnetic induction. (Contains 1 table and 8 figures.)

  2. Measuring Information Technology Performance: Operational Efficiency and Operational Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Annette G.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation provides a practical approach for measuring operational efficiency and operational effectiveness for IT organizations introducing the ITIL process framework. The intent of the study was to assist Chief Information Officers (CIOs) in explaining the impact of introducing the Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL)…

  3. Wavefront measurements of phase plates combining a point-diffraction interferometer and a Hartmann-Shack sensor.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Juan M; Acosta, Eva; Schwarz, Christina; Artal, Pablo

    2010-01-20

    A dual setup composed of a point diffraction interferometer (PDI) and a Hartmann-Shack (HS) wavefront sensor was built to compare the estimates of wavefront aberrations provided by the two different and complementary techniques when applied to different phase plates. Results show that under the same experimental and fitting conditions both techniques provide similar information concerning the wavefront aberration map. When taking into account all Zernike terms up to 6th order, the maximum difference in root-mean-square wavefront error was 0.08 microm, and this reduced up to 0.03 microm when excluding lower-order terms. The effects of the pupil size and the order of the Zernike expansion used to reconstruct the wavefront were evaluated. The combination of the two techniques can accurately measure complicated phase profiles, combining the robustness of the HS and the higher resolution and dynamic range of the PDI.

  4. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction and electrical resistance measurements of structural phase transitions in zirconium

    DOE PAGES

    Velisavljevic, N.; Sinogeikin, S.; Saavedra, R.; ...

    2014-05-07

    Here, we have designed a portable pressure controller module to tune compression rates and maximum pressures attainable in a standard gas-membrane diamond anvil cell (DAC). During preliminary experiments, performed on zirconium (Zr) metal sample, pressure jumps of up to 80 GPa were systematically obtained in less than 0.2s (resulting in compression rate of few GPa/s up to more than 400 GPa/s). In-situ x-ray diffraction and electrical resistance measurements were performed simultaneously during this rapid pressure increase to provide the first time resolved data on α → ω → β structural evolution in Zr at high pressures. Direct control of compressionmore » rates and peak pressures, which can be held for prolonged time, allows for investigation of structural evolution and kinetics of structural phase transitions of materials under previously unexplored compression rate-pressure conditions that bridge traditional static and shock/dynamic experimental platforms.« less

  5. A possibility of parallel and anti-parallel diffraction measurements on neu- tron diffractometer employing bent perfect crystal monochromator at the monochromatic focusing condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yong Nam; Kim, Shin Ae; Kim, Sung Kyu; Kim, Sung Baek; Lee, Chang-Hee; Mikula, Pavel

    2004-07-01

    In a conventional diffractometer having single monochromator, only one position, parallel position, is used for the diffraction experiment (i.e. detection) because the resolution property of the other one, anti-parallel position, is very poor. However, a bent perfect crystal (BPC) monochromator at monochromatic focusing condition can provide a quite flat and equal resolution property at both parallel and anti-parallel positions and thus one can have a chance to use both sides for the diffraction experiment. From the data of the FWHM and the Delta d/d measured on three diffraction geometries (symmetric, asymmetric compression and asymmetric expansion), we can conclude that the simultaneous diffraction measurement in both parallel and anti-parallel positions can be achieved.

  6. Measurements of Long-range Electronic Correlations During Femtosecond Diffraction Experiments Performed on Nanocrystals of Buckminsterfullerene

    DOE PAGES

    Ryan, Rebecca A.; Williams, Sophie; Martin, Andrew V.; ...

    2017-08-22

    The precise details of the interaction of intense X-ray pulses with matter are a topic of intense interest to researchers attempting to interpret the results of femtosecond X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) experiments. An increasing number of experimental observations have shown that although nuclear motion can be negligible, given a short enough incident pulse duration, electronic motion cannot be ignored. The current and widely accepted models assume that although electrons undergo dynamics driven by interaction with the pulse, their motion could largely be considered 'random'. This would then allow the supposedly incoherent contribution from the electronic motion to be treatedmore » as a continuous background signal and thus ignored. The original aim of our experiment was to precisely measure the change in intensity of individual Bragg peaks, due to X-ray induced electronic damage in a model system, crystalline C 60. Contrary to this expectation, we observed that at the highest X-ray intensities, the electron dynamics in C 60 were in fact highly correlated, and over sufficiently long distances that the positions of the Bragg reflections are significantly altered. Our paper describes in detail the methods and protocols used for these experiments, which were conducted both at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and the Australian Synchrotron (AS) as well as the crystallographic approaches used to analyse the data.« less

  7. Measurements of Long-range Electronic Correlations During Femtosecond Diffraction Experiments Performed on Nanocrystals of Buckminsterfullerene

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Rebecca A.; Williams, Sophie; Martin, Andrew V.; Dilanian, Ruben A.; Darmanin, Connie; Putkunz, Corey T.; Wood, David; Streltsov, Victor A.; Jones, Michael W.M.; Gaffney, Naylyn; Hofmann, Felix; Williams, Garth J.; Boutet, Sebastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M. Marvin; Curwood, Evan K.; Balaur, Eugeniu; Peele, Andrew G.; Nugent, Keith A.; Quiney, Harry M.; Abbey, Brian

    2017-01-01

    The precise details of the interaction of intense X-ray pulses with matter are a topic of intense interest to researchers attempting to interpret the results of femtosecond X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) experiments. An increasing number of experimental observations have shown that although nuclear motion can be negligible, given a short enough incident pulse duration, electronic motion cannot be ignored. The current and widely accepted models assume that although electrons undergo dynamics driven by interaction with the pulse, their motion could largely be considered 'random'. This would then allow the supposedly incoherent contribution from the electronic motion to be treated as a continuous background signal and thus ignored. The original aim of our experiment was to precisely measure the change in intensity of individual Bragg peaks, due to X-ray induced electronic damage in a model system, crystalline C60. Contrary to this expectation, we observed that at the highest X-ray intensities, the electron dynamics in C60 were in fact highly correlated, and over sufficiently long distances that the positions of the Bragg reflections are significantly altered. This paper describes in detail the methods and protocols used for these experiments, which were conducted both at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and the Australian Synchrotron (AS) as well as the crystallographic approaches used to analyse the data. PMID:28872125

  8. Measurements of Long-range Electronic Correlations During Femtosecond Diffraction Experiments Performed on Nanocrystals of Buckminsterfullerene

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Rebecca A.; Williams, Sophie; Martin, Andrew V.

    The precise details of the interaction of intense X-ray pulses with matter are a topic of intense interest to researchers attempting to interpret the results of femtosecond X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) experiments. An increasing number of experimental observations have shown that although nuclear motion can be negligible, given a short enough incident pulse duration, electronic motion cannot be ignored. The current and widely accepted models assume that although electrons undergo dynamics driven by interaction with the pulse, their motion could largely be considered 'random'. This would then allow the supposedly incoherent contribution from the electronic motion to be treatedmore » as a continuous background signal and thus ignored. The original aim of our experiment was to precisely measure the change in intensity of individual Bragg peaks, due to X-ray induced electronic damage in a model system, crystalline C 60. Contrary to this expectation, we observed that at the highest X-ray intensities, the electron dynamics in C 60 were in fact highly correlated, and over sufficiently long distances that the positions of the Bragg reflections are significantly altered. Our paper describes in detail the methods and protocols used for these experiments, which were conducted both at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and the Australian Synchrotron (AS) as well as the crystallographic approaches used to analyse the data.« less

  9. On-the-fly data assessment for high-throughput x-ray diffraction measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Fang; Pandolfi, Ronald; Van Campen, Douglas

    Investment in brighter sources and larger and faster detectors has accelerated the speed of data acquisition at national user facilities. The accelerated data acquisition offers many opportunities for the discovery of new materials, but it also presents a daunting challenge. The rate of data acquisition far exceeds the current speed of data quality assessment, resulting in less than optimal data and data coverage, which in extreme cases forces recollection of data. Herein, we show how this challenge can be addressed through the development of an approach that makes routine data assessment automatic and instantaneous. By extracting and visualizing customized attributesmore » in real time, data quality and coverage, as well as other scientifically relevant information contained in large data sets, is highlighted. Deployment of such an approach not only improves the quality of data but also helps optimize the usage of expensive characterization resources by prioritizing measurements of the highest scientific impact. We anticipate our approach will become a starting point for a sophisticated decision-tree that optimizes data quality and maximizes scientific content in real time through automation. Finally, with these efforts to integrate more automation in data collection and analysis, we can truly take advantage of the accelerating speed of data acquisition.« less

  10. On-the-fly data assessment for high-throughput x-ray diffraction measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Ren, Fang; Pandolfi, Ronald; Van Campen, Douglas; ...

    2017-05-02

    Investment in brighter sources and larger and faster detectors has accelerated the speed of data acquisition at national user facilities. The accelerated data acquisition offers many opportunities for the discovery of new materials, but it also presents a daunting challenge. The rate of data acquisition far exceeds the current speed of data quality assessment, resulting in less than optimal data and data coverage, which in extreme cases forces recollection of data. Herein, we show how this challenge can be addressed through the development of an approach that makes routine data assessment automatic and instantaneous. By extracting and visualizing customized attributesmore » in real time, data quality and coverage, as well as other scientifically relevant information contained in large data sets, is highlighted. Deployment of such an approach not only improves the quality of data but also helps optimize the usage of expensive characterization resources by prioritizing measurements of the highest scientific impact. We anticipate our approach will become a starting point for a sophisticated decision-tree that optimizes data quality and maximizes scientific content in real time through automation. Finally, with these efforts to integrate more automation in data collection and analysis, we can truly take advantage of the accelerating speed of data acquisition.« less

  11. X-ray diffraction measurement of cosolvent accessible volume in rhombohedral insulin crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Soares, Alexei S.; Caspar, Donald L. D.

    We report x-ray crystallographic measurement of the number of solvent electrons in the unit cell of a protein crystal equilibrated with aqueous solutions of different densities provides information about preferential hydration in the crystalline state. Room temperature and cryo-cooled rhombohedral insulin crystals were equilibrated with 1.2 M trehalose to study the effect of lowered water activity. The native and trehalose soaked crystals were isomorphous and had similar structures. Including all the low resolution data, the amplitudes of the structure factors were put on an absolute scale (in units of electrons per asymmetric unit) by constraining the integrated number of electronsmore » inside the envelope of the calculated protein density map to equal the number deduced from the atomic model. This procedure defines the value of F(0 0 0), the amplitude at the origin of the Fourier transform, which is equal to the total number of electrons in the asymmetric unit (i.e. protein plus solvent). Comparison of the F(0 0 0) values for three isomorphous pairs of room temperature insulin crystals, three with trehalose and three without trehalose, indicates that 75 ± 12 electrons per asymmetric unit were added to the crystal solvent when soaked in 1.2 M trehalose. If all the water in the crystal were available as solvent for the trehalose, 304 electrons would have been added. Thus, the co-solvent accessible volume is one quarter of the total water in the crystal. Finally, determination of the total number of electrons in a protein crystal is an essential first step for mapping the average density distribution of the disordered solvent.« less

  12. X-ray diffraction measurement of cosolvent accessible volume in rhombohedral insulin crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Soares, Alexei S.; Caspar, Donald L. D.

    2017-08-31

    We report x-ray crystallographic measurement of the number of solvent electrons in the unit cell of a protein crystal equilibrated with aqueous solutions of different densities provides information about preferential hydration in the crystalline state. Room temperature and cryo-cooled rhombohedral insulin crystals were equilibrated with 1.2 M trehalose to study the effect of lowered water activity. The native and trehalose soaked crystals were isomorphous and had similar structures. Including all the low resolution data, the amplitudes of the structure factors were put on an absolute scale (in units of electrons per asymmetric unit) by constraining the integrated number of electronsmore » inside the envelope of the calculated protein density map to equal the number deduced from the atomic model. This procedure defines the value of F(0 0 0), the amplitude at the origin of the Fourier transform, which is equal to the total number of electrons in the asymmetric unit (i.e. protein plus solvent). Comparison of the F(0 0 0) values for three isomorphous pairs of room temperature insulin crystals, three with trehalose and three without trehalose, indicates that 75 ± 12 electrons per asymmetric unit were added to the crystal solvent when soaked in 1.2 M trehalose. If all the water in the crystal were available as solvent for the trehalose, 304 electrons would have been added. Thus, the co-solvent accessible volume is one quarter of the total water in the crystal. Finally, determination of the total number of electrons in a protein crystal is an essential first step for mapping the average density distribution of the disordered solvent.« less

  13. Observables of QCD diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mieskolainen, Mikael; Orava, Risto

    2017-03-01

    A new combinatorial vector space measurement model is introduced for soft QCD diffraction. The model independent mathematical construction resolves experimental complications; the theoretical framework of the approach includes the Good-Walker view of diffraction, Regge phenomenology together with AGK cutting rules and random fluctuations.

  14. Measurements of electron detection efficiencies in solid state detectors.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lupton, J. E.; Stone, E. C.

    1972-01-01

    Detailed laboratory measurement of the electron response of solid state detectors as a function of incident electron energy, detector depletion depth, and energy-loss discriminator threshold. These response functions were determined by exposing totally depleted silicon surface barrier detectors with depletion depths between 50 and 1000 microns to the beam from a magnetic beta-ray spectrometer. The data were extended to 5000 microns depletion depth using the results of previously published Monte Carlo electron calculations. When the electron counting efficiency of a given detector is plotted as a function of energy-loss threshold for various incident energies, the efficiency curves are bounded by a smooth envelope which represents the upper limit to the detection efficiency. These upper limit curves, which scale in a simple way, make it possible to easily estimate the electron sensitivity of solid-state detector systems.

  15. Measurements of charge state breeding efficiency at BNL test EBIS

    SciTech Connect

    Kondrashev, S.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.N.

    Charge breeding of singly charged ions is required to efficiently accelerate rare isotope ion beams for nuclear and astrophysics experiments, and to enhance the accuracy of low-energy Penning trap-assisted spectroscopy. An efficient charge breeder for the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) to the ANL Tandem Linear Accelerator System (ATLAS) facility is being developed using the BNL Test Electron Beam Ion Source (Test EBIS) as a prototype. Parameters of the CARIBU EBIS charge breeder are similar to those of the BNL Test EBIS except the electron beam current will be adjustable in the range from 1 to 2 {angstrom}. Themore » electron beam current density in the CARIBU EBIS trap will be significantly higher than in existing operational charge state breeders based on the EBIS concept. The charge state breeding efficiency is expected to be about 25% for the isotope ions extracted from the CARIBU. For the success of our EBIS project, it is essential to demonstrate high breeding efficiency at the BNL Test EBIS tuned to the regime close to the parameters of the CARIBU EBIS at ANL. The breeding efficiency optimization and measurements have been successfully carried out using a Cs{sup +} surface ionization ion source for externally pulsed injection into the BNL Test EBIS. A Cs{sup +} ion beam with a total number of ions of 5 x 10{sup 8} and optimized pulse length of 70 {mu}s has been injected into the Test EBIS and charge-bred for 5.3 ms for two different electron beam currents 1 and 1.5 {angstrom}. In these experiments we have achieved 70% injection/extraction efficiency and breeding efficiency into the most abundant charge state 17%.« less

  16. A two-stage DEA approach for environmental efficiency measurement.

    PubMed

    Song, Malin; Wang, Shuhong; Liu, Wei

    2014-05-01

    The slacks-based measure (SBM) model based on the constant returns to scale has achieved some good results in addressing the undesirable outputs, such as waste water and water gas, in measuring environmental efficiency. However, the traditional SBM model cannot deal with the scenario in which desirable outputs are constant. Based on the axiomatic theory of productivity, this paper carries out a systematic research on the SBM model considering undesirable outputs, and further expands the SBM model from the perspective of network analysis. The new model can not only perform efficiency evaluation considering undesirable outputs, but also calculate desirable and undesirable outputs separately. The latter advantage successfully solves the "dependence" problem of outputs, that is, we can not increase the desirable outputs without producing any undesirable outputs. The following illustration shows that the efficiency values obtained by two-stage approach are smaller than those obtained by the traditional SBM model. Our approach provides a more profound analysis on how to improve environmental efficiency of the decision making units.

  17. Measurement and simulation of thermoelectric efficiency for single leg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiaokai; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Ohta, Michihiro; Nishiate, Hirotaka

    2015-04-01

    Thermoelectric efficiency measurements were carried out on n-type bismuth telluride legs with the hot-side temperature at 100 and 150 °C. The electric power and heat flow were measured individually. Water coolant was utilized to maintain the cold-side temperature and to measure heat flow out of the cold side. Leg length and vacuum pressure were studied in terms of temperature difference across the leg, open-circuit voltage, internal resistance, and heat flow. Finite-element simulation on thermoelectric generation was performed in COMSOL Multiphysics, by inputting two-side temperatures and thermoelectric material properties. The open-circuit voltage and resistance were in good agreement between the measurement and simulation. Much larger heat flows were found in measurements, since they were comprised of conductive, convective, and radiative contributions. Parasitic heat flow was measured in the absence of bismuth telluride leg, and the conductive heat flow was then available. Finally, the maximum thermoelectric efficiency was derived in accordance with the electric power and the conductive heat flow.

  18. Measuring technical efficiency of output quality in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Junoy, J P

    1997-01-01

    Presents some examples of the implications derived from imposing the objective of maximizing social welfare, subject to limited resources, on ethical care patients management in respect of quality performance of health services. Conventional knowledge of health economics points out that critically ill patients are responsible for increased use of technological resources and that they receive a high proportion of health care resources. Attempts to answer, from the point of view of microeconomics, the question: how do we measure comparative efficiency in the management of intensive care units? Analyses this question through data from an international empirical study using micro-economic measures of productive efficiency in public services (data envelopment analysis). Results show a 28.8 per cent level of technical inefficiency processing data from 25 intensive care units in the USA.

  19. Two essays on efficiency in the electric power industry: Measurement of technical and allocative efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, John Corby

    The electric power industry market structure has changed over the last twenty years since the passage of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA). These changes include the entry by unregulated generator plants and, more recently, the deregulation of entry and price in the retail generation market. Such changes have introduced and expanded competitive forces on the incumbent electric power plants. Proponents of this deregulation argued that the enhanced competition would lead to a more efficient allocation of resources. Previous studies of power plant technical and allocative efficiency have failed to measure technical and allocative efficiency at the plant level. In contrast, this study uses panel data on 35 power plants over 59 years to estimate technical and allocative efficiency of each plant. By using a flexible functional form, which is not constrained by the assumption that regulation is constant over the 59 years sampled, the estimation procedure accounts for changes in both state and national regulatory/energy policies that may have occurred over the sample period. The empirical evidence presented shows that most of the power plants examined have operated more efficiently since the passage of PURPA and the resultant increase of competitive forces. Chapter 2 extends the model used in Chapter 1 and clarifies some issues in the efficiency literature by addressing the case where homogeneity does not hold. A more general model is developed for estimating both input and output inefficiency simultaneously. This approach reveals more information about firm inefficiency than the single estimation approach that has previously been used in the literature. Using the more general model, estimates are provided on the type of inefficiency that occurs as well as the cost of inefficiency by type of inefficiency. In previous studies, the ranking of firms by inefficiency has been difficult because of the cardinal and ordinal differences between different types of

  20. Measuring mixing efficiency in experiments of strongly stratified turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augier, P.; Campagne, A.; Valran, T.; Calpe Linares, M.; Mohanan, A. V.; Micard, D.; Viboud, S.; Segalini, A.; Mordant, N.; Sommeria, J.; Lindborg, E.

    2017-12-01

    Oceanic and atmospheric models need better parameterization of the mixing efficiency. Therefore, we need to measure this quantity for flows representative of geophysical flows, both in terms of types of flows (with vortices and/or waves) and of dynamical regimes. In order to reach sufficiently large Reynolds number for strongly stratified flows, experiments for which salt is used to produce the stratification have to be carried out in a large rotating platform of at least 10-meter diameter.We present new experiments done in summer 2017 to study experimentally strongly stratified turbulence and mixing efficiency in the Coriolis platform. The flow is forced by a slow periodic movement of an array of large vertical or horizontal cylinders. The velocity field is measured by 3D-2C scanned horizontal particles image velocimetry (PIV) and 2D vertical PIV. Six density-temperature probes are used to measure vertical and horizontal profiles and signals at fixed positions.We will show how we rely heavily on open-science methods for this study. Our new results on the mixing efficiency will be presented and discussed in terms of mixing parameterization.

  1. Measurement of UO2 surface oxidation using grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction: Implications for nuclear forensics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracy, Cameron L.; Chen, Chien-Hung; Park, Sulgiye; Davisson, M. Lee; Ewing, Rodney C.

    2018-04-01

    Nuclear forensics involves determination of the origin and history of interdicted nuclear materials based on the detection of signatures associated with their production and trafficking. The surface oxidation undergone by UO2 when exposed to air is a potential signature of its atmospheric exposure during handling and transport. To assess the sensitivity of this oxidation to atmospheric parameters, surface sensitive grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXRD) measurements were performed on UO2 samples exposed to air of varying relative humidity (34%, 56%, and 95% RH) and temperature (room temperature, 50 °C, and 100 °C). Near-surface unit cell contraction was observed following exposure, indicating oxidation of the surface and accompanying reduction of the uranium cation ionic radii. The extent of unit cell contraction provides a measure of the extent of oxidation, allowing for comparison of the effects of various exposure conditions. No clear influence of relative humidity on the extent of oxidation was observed, with samples exhibiting similar degrees of unit cell contraction at all relative humidities investigated. In contrast, the thickness of the oxidized layers increased substantially with increasing temperature, such that differences on the order of 10 °C yielded readily observable crystallographic signatures of the exposure conditions.

  2. Amorphous and liquid samples structure and density measurements at high pressure - high temperature using diffraction and imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guignot, N.; King, A.; Clark, A. N.; Perrillat, J. P.; Boulard, E.; Morard, G.; Deslandes, J. P.; Itié, J. P.; Ritter, X.; Sanchez-Valle, C.

    2016-12-01

    Determination of the density and structure of liquids such as iron alloys, silicates and carbonates is a key to understand deep Earth structure and dynamics. X-ray diffraction provided by large synchrotron facilities gives excellent results as long as the signal scattered from the sample can be isolated from its environment. Different techniques already exist; we present here the implementation and the first results given by the combined angle- and energy-dispersive structural analysis and refinement (CAESAR) technique introduced by Wang et al. in 2004, that has never been used in this context. It has several advantages in the study of liquids: 1/ the standard energy-dispersive technique (EDX), fast and compatible with large multi-anvil presses frames, is used for fast analysis free of signal pollution from the sample environment 2/ some limitations of the EDX technique (homogeneity of the sample, low resolution) are irrelevant in the case of liquid signals, others (wrong intensities, escape peaks artifacts, background subtraction) are solved by the CAESAR technique 3/ high Q data (up to 15 A-1 and more) can be obtained in a few hours (usually less than 2). We present here the facilities available on the PSICHE beamline (SOLEIL synchrotron, France) and a few results obtained using a Paris-Edinburgh (PE) press and a 1200 tons load capacity multi-anvil press with a (100) DIA compression module. X-ray microtomography, used in conjunction with a PE press featuring rotating anvils (RotoPEc, Philippe et al., 2013) is also very effective, by simply measuring the 3D volume of glass or liquid spheres at HPHT, thus providing density. This can be done in conjunction with the CAESAR technique and we illustrate this point. Finally, absorption profiles can be obtained via imaging techniques, providing another independent way to measure the density of these materials. References Y. Wang et al., A new technique for angle-dispersive powder diffraction using an energy

  3. Comparison of measured efficiencies of nine turbine designs with efficiencies predicted by two empirical methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, Robert E; Cavicchi, Richard H

    1951-01-01

    Empirical methods of Ainley and Kochendorfer and Nettles were used to predict performances of nine turbine designs. Measured and predicted performances were compared. Appropriate values of blade-loss parameter were determined for the method of Kochendorfer and Nettles. The measured design-point efficiencies were lower than predicted by as much as 0.09 (Ainley and 0.07 (Kochendorfer and Nettles). For the method of Kochendorfer and Nettles, appropriate values of blade-loss parameter ranged from 0.63 to 0.87 and the off-design performance was accurately predicted.

  4. Compact Efficient Lidar Receiver for Measuring Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gili, Christopher; De Young, Russell

    2006-01-01

    A small, light weight, and efficient aerosol lidar receiver was constructed and tested. Weight and space savings were realized by using rigid optic tubes and mounting cubes to package the steering optics and detectors in a compact assembly. The receiver had a 1064nm channel using an APD detector. The 532nm channel was split (90/10) into an analog channel (90%) and a photon counting channel (10%). The efficiency of the 1064nm channel with optical filter was 44.0%. The efficiency of the analog 532nm channel was 61.4% with the optical filter, and the efficiency of the 532nm photon counting channel was 7.6% with the optical filter. The results of the atmospheric tests show that the detectors were able to consistently return accurate results. The lidar receiver was able to detect distinct cloud layers, and the lidar returns also agreed across the different detectors. The use of a light weight fiber-coupled telescope reduced weight and allowed great latitude in detector assembly positioning due to the flexibility enabled by the use of fiber optics. The receiver is now ready to be deployed for aircraft or ground based aerosol lidar measurements.

  5. Angle-resolved diffraction grating biosensor based on porous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Changwu; Li, Peng; Jia, Zhenhong, E-mail: jzhh@xju.edu.cn

    2016-03-07

    In this study, an optical biosensor based on a porous silicon composite structure was fabricated using a simple method. This structure consists of a thin, porous silicon surface diffraction grating and a one-dimensional porous silicon photonic crystal. An angle-resolved diffraction efficiency spectrum was obtained by measuring the diffraction efficiency at a range of incident angles. The angle-resolved diffraction efficiency of the 2nd and 3rd orders was studied experimentally and theoretically. The device was sensitive to the change of refractive index in the presence of a biomolecule indicated by the shift of the diffraction efficiency spectrum. The sensitivity of this sensormore » was investigated through use of an 8 base pair antifreeze protein DNA hybridization. The shifts of the angle-resolved diffraction efficiency spectrum showed a relationship with the change of the refractive index, and the detection limit of the biosensor reached 41.7 nM. This optical device is highly sensitive, inexpensive, and simple to fabricate. Using shifts in diffraction efficiency spectrum to detect biological molecules has not yet been explored, so this study establishes a foundation for future work.« less

  6. Efficiency and concentration ratio measurements of fluorescent solar concentrators using a xenon measurement system.

    PubMed

    Heidler, K

    1981-03-01

    An indoor test stand for fluorescent planar concentrator-collectors (FPC) with a 1.6-kW xenon light source, irradiating a rectangular triangle (active area 400 cm(2)) with 82 mW cm(-2), and a typical homogeneity of +/-10% is described in detail. Conditions and definitions for the efficiency measurements are discussed, taking intensity and reflection effects into account. As an illustration FPC efficiency and concentration ratios are reported (best optical efficiency was 7.5% for a single-plate one-dye FPC), the influence of thickness variation is discussed, and an enhancement in solar cell efficiency is demonstrated.

  7. A sound and efficient measure of joint congruence.

    PubMed

    Conconi, Michele; Castelli, Vincenzo Parenti

    2014-09-01

    In the medical world, the term "congruence" is used to describe by visual inspection how the articular surfaces mate each other, evaluating the joint capability to distribute an applied load from a purely geometrical perspective. Congruence is commonly employed for assessing articular physiology and for the comparison between normal and pathological states. A measure of it would thus represent a valuable clinical tool. Several approaches for the quantification of joint congruence have been proposed in the biomechanical literature, differing on how the articular contact is modeled. This makes it difficult to compare different measures. In particular, in previous articles a congruence measure has been presented which proved to be efficient and suitable for the clinical practice, but it was still empirically defined. This article aims at providing a sound theoretical support to this congruence measure by means of the Winkler elastic foundation contact model which, with respect to others, has the advantage to hold also for highly conforming surfaces as most of the human articulations are. First, the geometrical relation between the applied load and the resulting peak of pressure is analytically derived from the elastic foundation contact model, providing a theoretically sound approach to the definition of a congruence measure. Then, the capability of congruence measure to capture the same geometrical relation is shown. Finally, the reliability of congruence measure is discussed. © IMechE 2014.

  8. Resource-Efficient Measurement-Device-Independent Entanglement Witness

    DOE PAGES

    Verbanis, E.; Martin, A.; Rosset, D.; ...

    2016-05-09

    Imperfections in experimental measurement schemes can lead to falsely identifying, or over estimating, entanglement in a quantum system. A recent solution to this is to define schemes that are robust to measurement imperfections—measurement-device-independent entanglement witness (MDI-EW). This approach can be adapted to witness all entangled qubit states for a wide range of physical systems and does not depend on detection efficiencies or classical communication between devices. In this paper, we extend the theory to remove the necessity of prior knowledge about the two-qubit states to be witnessed. Moreover, we tested this model via a novel experimental implementation for MDI-EW thatmore » significantly reduces the experimental complexity. Finally, by applying it to a bipartite Werner state, we demonstrate the robustness of this approach against noise by witnessing entanglement down to an entangled state fraction close to 0.4.« less

  9. Measurement of Sn and In Solidification Undercooling and Lattice Expansion Using In Situ X-Ray Diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Elmer, John W.; Specht, Eliot D.

    2010-12-15

    The solidification behavior of two low-melting-point metals, Sn and In, on three substrates has been examined using in situ x-ray diffraction. Undercoolings of up to 56.1°C were observed for Sn solidified on graphite, which is a non-wetting substrate, while lower undercoolings were observed for Sn on Au/Ni/Cu (17.3°C) and on Cu (10.5°C). Indium behaved quite differently, showing undercoolings of less than 4°C on all three substrates. The lattice expansion/contraction behavior of Sn, In, and intermetallic compounds (IMCs) that formed during the reaction of Sn with Au/Ni/Cu surfaces were also measured during heating and cooling. Results showed anisotropic and nonlinear expansionmore » of both Sn and In, with a contraction, rather than expansion, of the basal planes of In during heating. The principal IMC that formed between Sn and the Au/Ni/Cu surface was characterized as Cu 6Sn 5, having an average expansion coefficient of 13.6 × 10 ₋6/°C, which is less than that of Sn or Cu.« less

  10. Measuring efficiency of international crude oil markets: A multifractality approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niere, H. M.

    2015-01-01

    The three major international crude oil markets are treated as complex systems and their multifractal properties are explored. The study covers daily prices of Brent crude, OPEC reference basket and West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude from January 2, 2003 to January 2, 2014. A multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MFDFA) is employed to extract the generalized Hurst exponents in each of the time series. The generalized Hurst exponent is used to measure the degree of multifractality which in turn is used to quantify the efficiency of the three international crude oil markets. To identify whether the source of multifractality is long-range correlations or broad fat-tail distributions, shuffled data and surrogated data corresponding to each of the time series are generated. Shuffled data are obtained by randomizing the order of the price returns data. This will destroy any long-range correlation of the time series. Surrogated data is produced using the Fourier-Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (F-DFA). This is done by randomizing the phases of the price returns data in Fourier space. This will normalize the distribution of the time series. The study found that for the three crude oil markets, there is a strong dependence of the generalized Hurst exponents with respect to the order of fluctuations. This shows that the daily price time series of the markets under study have signs of multifractality. Using the degree of multifractality as a measure of efficiency, the results show that WTI is the most efficient while OPEC is the least efficient market. This implies that OPEC has the highest likelihood to be manipulated among the three markets. This reflects the fact that Brent and WTI is a very competitive market hence, it has a higher level of complexity compared against OPEC, which has a large monopoly power. Comparing with shuffled data and surrogated data, the findings suggest that for all the three crude oil markets, the multifractality is mainly due to long

  11. Measuring hospital efficiency--comparing four European countries.

    PubMed

    Mateus, Céu; Joaquim, Inês; Nunes, Carla

    2015-02-01

    Performing international comparisons on efficiency usually has two main drawbacks: the lack of comparability of data from different countries and the appropriateness and adequacy of data selected for efficiency measurement. With inpatient discharges for four countries, some of the problems of data comparability usually found in international comparisons were mitigated. The objectives are to assess and compare hospital efficiency levels within and between countries, using stochastic frontier analysis with both cross-sectional and panel data. Data from English (2005-2008), Portuguese (2002-2009), Spanish (2003-2009) and Slovenian (2005-2009) hospital discharges and characteristics are used. Weighted hospital discharges were considered as outputs while the number of employees, physicians, nurses and beds were selected as inputs of the production function. Stochastic frontier analysis using both cross-sectional and panel data were performed, as well as ordinary least squares (OLS) analysis. The adequacy of the data was assessed with Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Breusch-Pagan/Cook-Weisberg tests. Data available results were redundant to perform efficiency measurements using stochastic frontier analysis with cross-sectional data. The likelihood ratio test reveals that in cross-sectional data stochastic frontier analysis (SFA) is not statistically different from OLS in Portuguese data, while SFA and OLS estimates are statistically different for Spanish, Slovenian and English data. In the panel data, the inefficiency term is statistically different from 0 in the four countries in analysis, though for Portugal it is still close to 0. Panel data are preferred over cross-section analysis because results are more robust. For all countries except Slovenia, beds and employees are relevant inputs for the production process. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  12. Energy Efficiency Measures to Incorporate into Remodeling Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Liaukus, C.

    2014-12-01

    Energy improvements in a home are often approached as one concerted effort, beginning with a simple walk-through assessment or more in-depth energy audit and followed by the installation of recommended energy measures. While this approach allows for systems thinking to guide the efforts, comprehensive energy improvements of this nature are undertaken by a relatively small number of the households in our nation compared to more piecemeal remodeling efforts. Even when programs like the Weatherization Assistance Program and Home Performance with ENERGY STAR are considered, homes that have had a comprehensive energy makeover still represent a small fraction of the 111.1more » million households. In this report, the U.S Department of Energy Building America Retrofit Alliance research team looks at the improvement of a home's energy performance in an opportunistic way: it examines what can be done to incorporate energy efficiency measures into general remodeling work and home repair projects. This allows for the possibility for people who would not normally pursue energy efficiency but will remodel their kitchen or re-side their home to improve their home's performance at the same time. There are challenges to this approach, not the least of which being that the work will take place over time in potentially many separate projects. The opportunity to improve a home's energy efficiency at one time expands or contracts with the scope of the remodel. As such, guidance on how to do each piece thoughtfully and with consideration for potential future projects, is critical.« less

  13. Using Reflectance Measurements to Determine Ecosystem Light Use Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huemmrich, K. F.; Middleton, E. M.; Hall, F. G.; Knox, R. G.; Walter-Shea, E.; Verma, S. B.

    2006-05-01

    Understanding the dynamics of the global carbon cycle requires an accurate determination of the spatial and temporal distribution of photosynthetic CO2 uptake by terrestrial vegetation. Remote sensing observations may provide the spatially extensive observations required for this type of analysis. A light use efficiency model is one approach to modeling carbon fluxes driven by remotely sensed inputs. Photosynthetic down-regulation has been associated with changes in the apparent spectral reflectance of leaves and these responses may permit the estimation of ecosystem photosynthetic light use efficiency (LUE). At a prairie site in Oklahoma, CO2 flux measurements from an eddy covariance system along with biophysical data were collected through 1998 and 1999. During the growing seasons hyperspectral reflectance measurements were collected in nearby plots at multiple times in a day at approximately monthly intervals. LUE is calculated as the ratio of carbon uptake by the ecosystem and the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) absorbed by green leaves. The LUE values are compared with reflectance indexes examining how relationships vary over hours, months, and years. For this system a number of different reflectance indexes have been found to correlate with LUE; including the Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI) and the Structure Independent Pigment Index (SIPI); as well as spectral first derivatives at 460, 550, and 615nm; and second derivatives at 510 and 620nm. This methodology provides a nondestructive, repeatable, direct comparison between ecosystem carbon fluxes and spectral reflectance at scales relevant to remote sensing.

  14. Energy Efficiency Measures to Incorporate into Remodeling Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Liaukus, C.

    2014-12-01

    Energy improvements in a home are often approached as one concerted effort, beginning with a simple walk-through assessment or more in-depth energy audit and followed by the installation of recommended energy measures. While this approach allows for systems thinking to guide the efforts, comprehensive energy improvements of this nature are undertaken by a relatively small number of U.S. households compared to piecemeal remodeling efforts. In this report, the U.S Department of Energy Building America Retrofit Alliance research team examines the improvement of a home’s energy performance in an opportunistic way by examining what can be done to incorporate energy efficiencymore » measures into general remodeling work and home repair projects. This allows for energy efficiency upgrades to occur at the same time as remodeling proejcts. There are challenges to this approach, not the least of which being that the work will take place over time in potentially many separate projects. The opportunity to improve a home’s energy efficiency at one time expands or contracts with the scope of the remodel. As such, guidance on how to do each piece thoughtfully and with consideration for potential future projects, is critical.« less

  15. Diffracted diffraction radiation and its application to beam diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goponov, Yu. A.; Shatokhin, R. A.; Sumitani, K.; Syshchenko, V. V.; Takabayashi, Y.; Vnukov, I. E.

    2018-03-01

    We present theoretical considerations for diffracted diffraction radiation and also propose an application of this process to diagnosing ultra-relativistic electron (positron) beams for the first time. Diffraction radiation is produced when relativistic particles move near a target. If the target is a crystal or X-ray mirror, diffraction radiation in the X-ray region is expected to be diffracted at the Bragg angle and therefore be detectable. We present a scheme for applying this process to measurements of the beam angular spread, and consider how to conduct a proof-of-principle experiment for the proposed method.

  16. Measuring Charge Collection Efficiency in Diamond Vertex Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josey, Brian; Seidel, Sally; Hoeferkamp, Martin

    2011-10-01

    As currently used at the Large Hadron Collider, vertex detectors are composed primarily of silicon sensors that image particle tracks by detecting the creation of electron-hole pairs caused by the excitation of the silicon atoms. We are investigating replacing these silicon detectors with detectors made out of diamond. Diamond is advantageous due to its radiation hardness. We are measuring the charge collection efficiency of diamond as a function of fluence. We are building a characterization station. Diamond samples will be placed into the characterization station and exposed to a strontium-90 beta source, before and after I irradiate them with 800 MeV protons at LANL. The radiation from the Sr-90 source will create electron-hole pairs. These will be read out by applying an electric field across the sample. The system is triggered by a scintillator-photomultiplier tube assembly. The goal of this measurement is to record collected charge as a function of bias voltage. The diamond charge collection data will be compared to silicon and predictions about detector operation at the LHC will be made.

  17. Data Envelopment Analysis: Measurement of Educational Efficiency in Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Lacy

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the efficiency of Texas public school districts through Data Envelopment Analysis. The Data Envelopment Analysis estimation method calculated and assigned efficiency scores to each of the 931 school districts considered in the study. The efficiency scores were utilized in two phases. First, the school…

  18. A reference pelton turbine - design and efficiency measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solemslie, Bjørn W.; Dahlhaug, Ole G.

    2014-03-01

    The Pelton turbine has been subject to a varying degree of research interest since the debut of the technology over a century ago. Despite its age there are gaps in the knowledge concerning the flow mechanisms effecting the flow through the turbine. A Pelton turbine has been designed at the Waterpower Laboratory at NTNU. This has been done in connection to a Ph.D. project focusing on the flow in Pelton turbine buckets. The design of the turbine has been conducted using in-house knowledge in addition to some comments from a turbine producer. To describe the geometry multiple Bezier curves were used and the design strategy aimed to give a smooth and continuous gradient along the main flow directions in the bucket. The turbine has been designed for the operational conditions of the Pelton test rig installed at the Waterpower Laboratory which is a horizontal single jet test rig with a jet diameter(ds) of 35 mm. The diameter(D) of the runner was set to 513 mm and the width(W) of a bucket 114 mm, leading to a D/W ratio of 4.5. Manufacturing of the turbine has been carried out in aluminium and the turbine has undergone efficiency testing and visual inspection during operation at a head of 70 m. The turbine did not performed as expected and the maximum efficiency was found to be 77.75%. The low efficiency is mainly caused by a large amount of water leaving the bucket through the lip and hence transferring close to zero of its energy to the shaft. The reason for the large lip loss is discussed and two possible causes are found; the jet is located too close to the lip, and the inner surface of the bucket does not lead the water away from the lip. The turbine geometry and all data from both measurements and simulations will be available upon request in an effort to increase the amount of available data concerning Pelton turbines.

  19. Comparison of dislocation content measured with transmission electron microscopy and micro-Laue diffraction based streak analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, C.; Balachandran, S.; Eisenlohr, P.; ...

    2017-10-04

    The subsurface dislocation content in a Ti-5Al-2.5Sn (wt%) uniaxial tension sample deformed at ambient temperature was characterized by peak streak analysis of micro-Laue diffraction patterns collected non-destructively by differential aperture X-raymicroscopy, and with focused ion beam transmission electron microscopy of material in the same volume. This comparison reveals that micro-Laue diffraction streak analysis based on an edge dislocation assumption can accurately identify the dominant dislocation slip system history (Burgers vector and plane observed by TEM), despite the fact that dislocations have predominantly screw character. As a result, other dislocations identified by TEM were not convincingly discernible from the peak streakmore » analysis.« less

  20. Electron and lattice dynamics of transition metal thin films observed by ultrafast electron diffraction and transient optical measurements.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, A; Shimojima, T; Nakano, M; Iwasa, Y; Ishizaka, K

    2016-11-01

    We report the ultrafast dynamics of electrons and lattice in transition metal thin films (Au, Cu, and Mo) investigated by a combination of ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) and pump-probe optical methods. For a single-crystalline Au thin film, we observe the suppression of the diffraction intensity occuring in 10 ps, which direcly reflects the lattice thermalization via the electron-phonon interaction. By using the two-temperature model, the electron-phonon coupling constant ( g ) and the electron and lattice temperatures ( T e , T l ) are evaluated from UED, with which we simulate the transient optical transmittance. The simulation well agrees with the experimentally obtained transmittance data, except for the slight deviations at the initial photoexcitation and the relaxed quasi-equilibrium state. We also present the results similarly obtained for polycrystalline Au, Cu, and Mo thin films and demonstrate the electron and lattice dynamics occurring in metals with different electron-phonon coupling strengths.

  1. Comparison of dislocation content measured with transmission electron microscopy and micro-Laue diffraction based streak analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, C.; Balachandran, S.; Eisenlohr, P.

    The subsurface dislocation content in a Ti-5Al-2.5Sn (wt%) uniaxial tension sample deformed at ambient temperature was characterized by peak streak analysis of micro-Laue diffraction patterns collected non-destructively by differential aperture X-raymicroscopy, and with focused ion beam transmission electron microscopy of material in the same volume. This comparison reveals that micro-Laue diffraction streak analysis based on an edge dislocation assumption can accurately identify the dominant dislocation slip system history (Burgers vector and plane observed by TEM), despite the fact that dislocations have predominantly screw character. As a result, other dislocations identified by TEM were not convincingly discernible from the peak streakmore » analysis.« less

  2. Diffraction-Based Optical Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sperno, Stevan M. (Inventor); Fuhr, Peter L. (Inventor); Schipper, John F. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Method and system for controllably redirecting a light beam, having a central wavelength lambda, from a first light-receiving site to a second light-receiving site. A diffraction grating is attached to or part of a piezoelectric substrate, which is connected to one or two controllable voltage difference sources. When a substrate voltage difference is changed and the diffraction grating length in each of one or two directions is thereby changed, at least one of the diffraction angle, the diffraction order and the central wavelength is controllably changed. A diffracted light beam component, having a given wavelength, diffraction angle and diffraction order, that is initially received at a first light receiving site (e.g., a detector or optical fiber) is thereby controllably shifted or altered and can be received at a second light receiving site. A polynomially stepped, chirped grating is used in one embodiment. In another embodiment, an incident light beam, having at least one of first and second wavelengths, lambda1 and lambda2, is received and diffracted at a first diffraction grating to provide a first diffracted beam. The first diffracted beam is received and diffracted at a second diffraction grating to produce a second diffracted beam. The second diffracted beam is received at a light-sensitive transducer, having at least first and second spaced apart light detector elements that are positioned so that, when the incident light beam has wavelength lambda1 or lambda2 (lambda1 not equal to lambda2), the second diffracted beam is received at the first element or at the second element, respectively; change in a selected physical parameter at the second grating can also be sensed or measured. A sequence of spaced apart light detector elements can be positioned along a linear or curvilinear segment with equal or unequal spacing.

  3. Rapid identification of areas of interest in thin film materials libraries by combining electrical, optical, X-ray diffraction, and mechanical high-throughput measurements: a case study for the system Ni-Al.

    PubMed

    Thienhaus, S; Naujoks, D; Pfetzing-Micklich, J; König, D; Ludwig, A

    2014-12-08

    The efficient identification of compositional areas of interest in thin film materials systems fabricated by combinatorial deposition methods is essential in combinatorial materials science. We use a combination of compositional screening by EDX together with high-throughput measurements of electrical and optical properties of thin film libraries to determine efficiently the areas of interest in a materials system. Areas of interest are compositions which show distinctive properties. The crystallinity of the thus determined areas is identified by X-ray diffraction. Additionally, by using automated nanoindentation across the materials library, mechanical data of the thin films can be obtained which complements the identification of areas of interest. The feasibility of this approach is demonstrated by using a Ni-Al thin film library as a reference system. The obtained results promise that this approach can be used for the case of ternary and higher order systems.

  4. A method for the monitoring of metal recrystallization based on the in-situ measurement of the elastic energy release using neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Christien, F., E-mail: frederic.christien@univ-nantes.fr; Le Gall, R.; Telling, M. T. F.

    2015-05-15

    A method is proposed for the monitoring of metal recrystallization using neutron diffraction that is based on the measurement of stored energy. Experiments were performed using deformed metal specimens heated in-situ while mounted at the sample position of the High Resolution Powder Diffractometer, HRPD (ISIS Facility), UK. Monitoring the breadth of the resulting Bragg lines during heating not only allows the time-dependence (or temperature-dependence) of the stored energy to be determined but also the recrystallized fraction. The analysis method presented here was developed using pure nickel (Ni270) specimens with different deformation levels from 0.29 to 0.94. In situ temperature rampingmore » as well as isothermal annealing was undertaken. The method developed in this work allows accurate and quantitative monitoring of the recrystallization process. The results from neutron diffraction are satisfactorily compared to data obtained from calorimetry and hardness measurements.« less

  5. A method for the monitoring of metal recrystallization based on the in-situ measurement of the elastic energy release using neutron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Christien, F; Telling, M T F; Knight, K S; Le Gall, R

    2015-05-01

    A method is proposed for the monitoring of metal recrystallization using neutron diffraction that is based on the measurement of stored energy. Experiments were performed using deformed metal specimens heated in-situ while mounted at the sample position of the High Resolution Powder Diffractometer, HRPD (ISIS Facility), UK. Monitoring the breadth of the resulting Bragg lines during heating not only allows the time-dependence (or temperature-dependence) of the stored energy to be determined but also the recrystallized fraction. The analysis method presented here was developed using pure nickel (Ni270) specimens with different deformation levels from 0.29 to 0.94. In situ temperature ramping as well as isothermal annealing was undertaken. The method developed in this work allows accurate and quantitative monitoring of the recrystallization process. The results from neutron diffraction are satisfactorily compared to data obtained from calorimetry and hardness measurements.

  6. Efficient iris texture analysis method based on Gabor ordinal measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajouri, Imen; Aydi, Walid; Ghorbel, Ahmed; Masmoudi, Nouri

    2017-07-01

    With the remarkably increasing interest directed to the security dimension, the iris recognition process is considered to stand as one of the most versatile technique critically useful for the biometric identification and authentication process. This is mainly due to every individual's unique iris texture. A modestly conceived efficient approach relevant to the feature extraction process is proposed. In the first place, iris zigzag "collarette" is extracted from the rest of the image by means of the circular Hough transform, as it includes the most significant regions lying in the iris texture. In the second place, the linear Hough transform is used for the eyelids' detection purpose while the median filter is applied for the eyelashes' removal. Then, a special technique combining the richness of Gabor features and the compactness of ordinal measures is implemented for the feature extraction process, so that a discriminative feature representation for every individual can be achieved. Subsequently, the modified Hamming distance is used for the matching process. Indeed, the advanced procedure turns out to be reliable, as compared to some of the state-of-the-art approaches, with a recognition rate of 99.98%, 98.12%, and 95.02% on CASIAV1.0, CASIAV3.0, and IIT Delhi V1 iris databases, respectively.

  7. 10 CFR 431.16 - Test procedures for the measurement of energy efficiency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Test procedures for the measurement of energy efficiency. 431.16 Section 431.16 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR... Methods of Determining Efficiency § 431.16 Test procedures for the measurement of energy efficiency. For...

  8. 10 CFR 431.16 - Test procedures for the measurement of energy efficiency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Test procedures for the measurement of energy efficiency. 431.16 Section 431.16 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR... Methods of Determining Efficiency § 431.16 Test procedures for the measurement of energy efficiency. For...

  9. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER ASPECTS OF QUANTUM ELECTRONICS Measurement of angular parameters of divergent optical radiation by light diffraction on sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, V. M.; Averin, S. V.; Shkerdin, G. N.

    2010-12-01

    A method is proposed to measure the scattering angle of optical radiation, the method employing two Bragg diffraction processes in which divergent optical radiation propagates close to the optical axis of a uniaxial crystal, while the acoustic wave — orthogonally to this axis. The method does not require additional angular tuning of the acousto-optic cell. We suggest using a mask to measure the light divergence that is larger than the angle of Bragg scattering. The method can be used to measure the size of the polished glass plate inhomogeneities.

  10. Measuring the operational efficiency of individual theme park attractions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Changhee; Kim, Soowook

    2016-01-01

    This study assesses the operation efficiency of theme park attractions using the data envelopment analysis, utilizing actual data on 15 attractions at Samsung Everland located in Yongin-si, Republic of Korea. In particular, this study identifies crowding and waiting time as one of the main causes of visitor's satisfaction, and analyzes the efficiency of individual attractions in terms of waiting time. The installation area, installation cost, and annual repair cost are set as input factors and the number of annual users and customer satisfaction as output factors. The results show that the roller coaster-type attractions were less efficient than other types of attractions while rotating-type attractions were relatively more efficient. However, an importance performance analysis on individual attraction's efficiency and satisfaction showed that operational efficiency should not be the sole consideration in attraction installation. In addition, the projection points for input factors for efficient use of attractions and the appropriate reference set for benchmarking are provided as guideline for attraction efficiency management.

  11. A tool to measure nurse efficiency and value.

    PubMed

    Landry, M T; Landry, H T; Hebert, W

    2001-07-01

    Home care nurses who have multiple roles can increase their value by validating their contributions and work efficiency. This article presents a method for tracking nurse efficiency for those who are paid on an hourly basis, and provides a mechanism to document their contributions to the home care agency.

  12. Erosion Control of Scour during Construction. Report 5. Experimental Measurements of Refraction and Diffraction Downcoast of an Oblique Breakwater.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    such as a jetty or shore-connected breakwater. The theory of water wave diffraction can be explained by Huygens’ principle . Each point of an ad...a slowly varying bottom, an asymptotic theory has been developed by Liu and Mei (1976) that accounts for the combined effects ot refraction and... Fundment i" rs t Second Third Fo :rth ,ri,- ATa rronlc Ha rmon i c Ha rme qic Gage s.__ ’ sc 0.33 sec 0.25 sec 0.20 sec 1* 0.n+ 6. .0 (-163) 0.12(-9) 0.01

  13. High-throughput powder diffraction measurement system consisting of multiple MYTHEN detectors at beamline BL02B2 of SPring-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, S.; Takemoto, M.; Osaka, K.; Nishibori, E.; Moriyoshi, C.; Kubota, Y.; Kuroiwa, Y.; Sugimoto, K.

    2017-08-01

    In this study, we developed a user-friendly automatic powder diffraction measurement system for Debye-Scherrer geometry using a capillary sample at beamline BL02B2 of SPring-8. The measurement system consists of six one-dimensional solid-state (MYTHEN) detectors, a compact auto-sampler, wide-range temperature control systems, and a gas handling system. This system enables to do the automatic measurement of temperature dependence of the diffraction patterns for multiple samples. We introduced two measurement modes in the MYTHEN system and developed new attachments for the sample environment such as a gas handling system. The measurement modes and the attachments can offer in situ and/or time-resolved measurements in an extended temperature range between 25 K and 1473 K and various gas atmospheres and pressures. The results of the commissioning and performance measurements using reference materials (NIST CeO2 674b and Si 640c), V2O3 and Ti2O3, and a nanoporous coordination polymer are presented.

  14. Efficiency measures and output specification : the case of European railways

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2000-12-01

    This study analyzes the sensitivity of the efficiency indicators of a sample of European railway companies to different alternatives in output specification. The results vary according to the specification selected. Investigating the causes of these ...

  15. Performance measures to assess resiliency and efficiency of transit systems.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-03-01

    Transit agencies are interested in assessing the short-, mid-, and long-term performance of their infrastructure with the : objective of enhancing resiliency and efficiency. This report addresses three distinct aspects of New Jerseys Transit Syste...

  16. Correlation of rheological characteristics of lubricants with transmission efficiency measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, B. O.; Hamrock, B. J.; Hoeglund, E.

    1985-01-01

    The power efficiency of a helicopter transmission has been analyzed for 11 lubricants by looking at the Newtonian and non-Newtonian properties of the lubricants. A non-Newtonian property of the lubricants was the limiting shear strength proportionality constant. The tests were performed on a high-pressure, short-time shear strength analyzer. A power efficiency formula that was obtained by analyzing the Newtonian and non-Newtonian properties of the lubricants is presented in detail.

  17. Non destructive neutron diffraction measurements of cavities, inhomogeneities, and residual strain in bronzes of Ghiberti's relief from the Gates of Paradise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Festa, G.; Senesi, R.; Alessandroni, M.; Andreani, C.; Vitali, G.; Porcinai, S.; Giusti, A. M.; Materna, T.; Paradowska, A. M.

    2011-03-01

    Quantitative neutron studies of cultural heritage objects provide access to microscopic, mesoscopic, and macroscopic structures in a nondestructive manner. In this paper we present a neutron diffraction investigation of a Ghiberti Renaissance gilded bronze relief devoted to the measurement of cavities and inhomogeneities in the bulk of the sample, along with the bulk phase composition and residual strain distribution. The quantitative measurements allowed the determination of the re-melting parts extension, as well as improving current knowledge about the manufacturing process. The study provides significant and unique information to conservators and restorators about the history of the relief.

  18. Correlation of x-ray diffraction and Mössbauer effect measurements with magnetic properties of heat-treated Cu80Co15Fe5 ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, V. G.; Rubinstein, M.; Das, B. N.; Koon, N. C.

    1994-05-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Mössbauer Effect (ME) measurements were performed on heat-treated Cu80Co15Fe5 melt-spun ribbons in an attempt to understand the trends in magnetic properties with heat treatment. ME measurements indicate that the majority of Fe atoms (86%) occupy sites in ferromagnetic FCC CoFe clusters after the initial quench. A heat treatment at 900 °C acts to complete the chemical separation of Fe from the Cu matrix. The presence of Co in the Cu matrix, even after high temperature anneals, provides a paramagnetic component that prohibits saturation even at high fields.

  19. Fabrication and efficiency measurement of a Mo/C/Si/C three material system multilayer Laue lens

    DOE PAGES

    Kubec, Adam; Maser, J.; Formanek, P.; ...

    2017-03-17

    In this letter we report on the manufacturing of a multilayer Laue lens (MLL) consisting of a multilayer stack with three materials: molybdenum and silicon as absorber and spacer layer, respectively, and carbon as transition layers. The design has four layers per period: Mo/C/Si/C. It yields 6000 zones, and provides an aperture of 50 μm. This allows the MLL structure to accept a large portion of the coherent part of the beam and achieving a small spot size. The MLL deposition was made by magnetron sputtering at the Fraunhofer IWS, the sectioning was done by laser cutting and subsequent focusedmore » ion beam milling to a thickness that provides a good efficiency for a photon energy of 12 keV. The diffraction efficiency as a function of the tilting angle has been measured at beamline 1-BM of the Advanced Photon Source. An efficiency of almost 40% has been achieved. This shows that the material system performs well compared to MLLs made of two-materials and that it is in an excellent agreement with the numerically calculated efficiency for a comparable molybdenum/silicon bilayer system lens. Here, we conclude that the three material system offers high efficiencies and is advantageous for stress reduction in MLLs.« less

  20. Fabrication and efficiency measurement of a Mo/C/Si/C three material system multilayer Laue lens

    SciTech Connect

    Kubec, Adam; Maser, J.; Formanek, P.

    In this letter we report on the manufacturing of a multilayer Laue lens (MLL) consisting of a multilayer stack with three materials: molybdenum and silicon as absorber and spacer layer, respectively, and carbon as transition layers. The design has four layers per period: Mo/C/Si/C. It yields 6000 zones, and provides an aperture of 50 μm. This allows the MLL structure to accept a large portion of the coherent part of the beam and achieving a small spot size. The MLL deposition was made by magnetron sputtering at the Fraunhofer IWS, the sectioning was done by laser cutting and subsequent focusedmore » ion beam milling to a thickness that provides a good efficiency for a photon energy of 12 keV. The diffraction efficiency as a function of the tilting angle has been measured at beamline 1-BM of the Advanced Photon Source. An efficiency of almost 40% has been achieved. This shows that the material system performs well compared to MLLs made of two-materials and that it is in an excellent agreement with the numerically calculated efficiency for a comparable molybdenum/silicon bilayer system lens. Here, we conclude that the three material system offers high efficiencies and is advantageous for stress reduction in MLLs.« less

  1. Strain distribution in an Si single crystal measured by interference fringes of X-ray mirage diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Jongsukswat, Sukswat; Fukamachi, Tomoe; Ju, Dongying; Negishi, Riichirou; Hirano, Keiichi; Kawamura, Takaaki

    2013-01-01

    In X-ray interference fringes accompanied by mirage diffraction, variations have been observed in the spacing and position of the fringes from a plane-parallel Si single crystal fixed at one end as a function of distance from the incident plane of the X-rays to the free crystal end. The variations can be explained by distortion of the sample crystal due to gravity. From the variations and positions of the fringes, the strain gradient of the crystal has been determined. The distribution of the observed strain agrees with that expected from rod theory except for residual strain. When the distortion is large, the observed strain distribution does not agree with that expected from rod theory. PMID:24068841

  2. Measuring grain boundary character distributions in Ni-base alloy 725 using high-energy diffraction microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Bagri, Akbar; Hanson, John P.; Lind, J. P.; ...

    2016-10-25

    We use high-energy X-ray diffraction microscopy (HEDM) to characterize the microstructure of Ni-base alloy 725. HEDM is a non-destructive technique capable of providing three-dimensional reconstructions of grain shapes and orientations in polycrystals. The present analysis yields the grain size distribution in alloy 725 as well as the grain boundary character distribution (GBCD) as a function of lattice misorientation and boundary plane normal orientation. We find that the GBCD of Ni-base alloy 725 is similar to that previously determined in pure Ni and other fcc-base metals. We find an elevated density of Σ9 and Σ3 grain boundaries. We also observe amore » preponderance of grain boundaries along low-index planes, with those along (1 1 1) planes being the most common, even after Σ3 twins have been excluded from the analysis.« less

  3. Measuring the efficiency of large pharmaceutical companies: an industry analysis.

    PubMed

    Gascón, Fernando; Lozano, Jesús; Ponte, Borja; de la Fuente, David

    2017-06-01

    This paper evaluates the relative efficiency of a sample of 37 large pharmaceutical laboratories in the period 2008-2013 using a data envelopment analysis (DEA) approach. We describe in detail the procedure followed to select and construct relevant inputs and outputs that characterize the production and innovation activity of these pharmaceutical firms. Models are estimated with financial information from Datastream, including R&D investment, and the number of new drugs authorized by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) considering the time effect. The relative performances of these firms-taking into consideration the strategic importance of R&D-suggest that the pharmaceutical industry is a highly competitive sector given that there are many laboratories at the efficient frontier and many inefficient laboratories close to this border. Additionally, we use data from S&P Capital IQ to analyze 2071 financial transactions announced by our sample of laboratories as an alternative way to gain access to new drugs, and we link these transactions with R&D investment and DEA efficiency. We find that efficient laboratories make on average more financial transactions, and the relative size of each transaction is larger. However, pharmaceutical companies that simultaneously are more efficient and invest more internally in R&D announce smaller transactions relative to total assets.

  4. Modeling focusing characteristics of low Fnumber diffractive optical elements with continuous relief fabricated by laser direct writing.

    PubMed

    Shan, Mingguang; Tan, Jiubin

    2007-12-10

    A theoretical model is established using Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction theory to describe the diffraction focusing characteristics of low F-number diffractive optical elements with continuous relief fabricated by laser direct writing, and continuous-relief diffractive optical elements with a design wavelength of 441.6nm and a F-number of F/4 are fabricated and measured to verify the validity of the diffraction focusing model. The measurements made indicate that the spot size is 1.75mum and the diffraction efficiency is 70.7% at the design wavelength, which coincide well with the theoretical results: a spot size of 1.66mum and a diffraction efficiency of 71.2%.

  5. Note: application of a pixel-array area detector to simultaneous single crystal X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements.

    PubMed

    Sun, Cheng-Jun; Zhang, Bangmin; Brewe, Dale L; Chen, Jing-Sheng; Chow, G M; Venkatesan, T; Heald, Steve M

    2014-04-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) are two main x-ray techniques in synchrotron radiation facilities. In this Note, we present an experimental setup capable of performing simultaneous XRD and XAS measurements by the application of a pixel-array area detector. For XRD, the momentum transfer in specular diffraction was measured by scanning the X-ray energy with fixed incoming and outgoing x-ray angles. By selecting a small fixed region of the detector to collect the XRD signal, the rest of the area was available for collecting the x-ray fluorescence for XAS measurements. The simultaneous measurement of XRD and X-ray absorption near edge structure for Pr0.67Sr0.33MnO3 film was demonstrated as a proof of principle for future time-resolved pump-probe measurements. A static sample makes it easy to maintain an accurate overlap of the X-ray spot and laser pump beam.

  6. Low Efficiency Control Measures for Jet Engine Test Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-01

    replacement cost was based upon filter cost data ob- tained from Mr. Roland Langlois, Owens - Corning Fiberglas Inc., Technical Cen- ter, Granville, Ohio. 3...Torgeson’s theory was used to calculate the collection efficiency of three commercial glass fiber filter media samples obtained from Owens - Corning Fiberglas

  7. 10 CFR 431.444 - Test procedures for the measurement of energy efficiency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Test procedures for the measurement of energy efficiency. 431.444 Section 431.444 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR... procedures for the measurement of energy efficiency. (a) Scope. Pursuant to section 346(b)(1) of EPCA, this...

  8. 10 CFR 431.444 - Test procedures for the measurement of energy efficiency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Test procedures for the measurement of energy efficiency. 431.444 Section 431.444 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR... procedures for the measurement of energy efficiency. (a) Scope. Pursuant to section 346(b)(1) of EPCA, this...

  9. Study of the physical properties of a mesogenic mixture showing induced smectic A(d) phase by refractive index, density and x-ray diffraction measurements.

    PubMed

    Roy, P D; Prasad, A; Das, M K

    2009-02-18

    The binary mixture of 4-n-pentyl phenyl 4-n'-hexyloxy benzoate (ME6O.5) and p-cyanophenyl trans-4-pentyl cyclohexane carboxylate (CPPCC) shows the presence of an induced smectic A(d) phase in a certain concentration range 0.03diffraction measurements are reported here. In general, the change in birefringence is continuous at the smectic A(d) to nematic phase transition for mixtures with x>0.33, whereas there is a discontinuity in these values for mixtures with x<0.33, consistent with the density and transition entropy measurements done on this system. The orientational order parameter, measured from x-ray diffraction studies, are somewhat smaller than those obtained from refractive index measurement in the induced smectic phase for all the mixtures. In the smectic phase, the OOP values initially increases with molar concentration up to x = 0.24 and then decreases showing a broad minima around x = 0.4. The variation of layer thickness in the induced smectic phase with composition has been explained by assuming the formation of homo- and heterodimers. We conclude that the possible packing of molecules in the induced smectic A(d) phase stabilizes the layers but increases the orientational free volume, consistent with the lower orientational order parameter.

  10. Generation of a Parabolic Trough Collector Efficiency Curve from Separate Measurements of Outdoor Optical Efficiency and Indoor Receiver Heat Loss

    SciTech Connect

    Kutscher, C.; Burkholder, F.; Stynes, J. K.

    2012-02-01

    The thermal efficiency of a parabolic trough collector is a function of both the fraction of direct normal radiation absorbed by the receiver (the optical efficiency) and the heat lost to the environment when the receiver is at operating temperature. The thermal efficiency can be determined by testing the collector under actual operating conditions or by separately measuring these two components. This paper describes how outdoor measurement of the optical efficiency is combined with laboratory measurements of receiver heat loss to obtain the thermal efficiency curve. This paper describes this approach and also makes the case that there are advantagesmore » to plotting collector efficiency versus the difference between the operating temperature and the ambient temperature at which the receiver heat loss was measured divided by radiation to a fractional power (on the order of 1/3 but obtained via data regression) - as opposed to the difference between operating and ambient temperatures divided by the radiation. The results are shown to be robust over wide ranges of ambient temperature, sky temperature, and wind speed.« less

  11. Compact silicon diffractive sensor: design, fabrication, and prototype.

    PubMed

    Maikisch, Jonathan S; Gaylord, Thomas K

    2012-07-01

    An in-plane constant-efficiency variable-diffraction-angle grating and an in-plane high-angular-selectivity grating are combined to enable a new compact silicon diffractive sensor. This sensor is fabricated in silicon-on-insulator and uses telecommunications wavelengths. A single sensor element has a micron-scale device size and uses intensity-based (as opposed to spectral-based) detection for increased integrability. In-plane diffraction gratings provide an intrinsic splitting mechanism to enable a two-dimensional sensor array. Detection of the relative values of diffracted and transmitted intensities is independent of attenuation and is thus robust. The sensor prototype measures refractive index changes of 10(-4). Simulations indicate that this sensor configuration may be capable of measuring refractive index changes three or four orders of magnitude smaller. The characteristics of this sensor type make it promising for lab-on-a-chip applications.

  12. A Progress Report on X-Ray Diffraction Measurements on New Low-Thermal Conductivity Thermoelectric Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-04-01

    as the only moving parts and no environmentally unfriendly gases . Thermoelectric generators can also improve fuel efficiency by using the heat lost...Facolta di Chimica Industriale di Bologna, 24[4] (1966) 113-132. 11 — i at £ 73 U « ■ 2-Theta (deg) Figure 1. Calibration plot for SRM1976

  13. 3D Experimental Measurement of Lattice Strain and Fracture Behavior of Sand Particles Using Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction and Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Cil, Mehmet B.; Alshibli, Khalid A.; Kenesei, Peter

    3D synchrotron X-ray diffraction (3DXRD) and synchrotron micro-computed tomography (SMT) techniques were used to measure and monitor the lattice strain evolution and fracture behavior of natural Ottawa sand particles subjected to 1D compression loading. The particle-averaged lattice strain within sand particles was measured using 3DXRD and then was used to calculate the corresponding lattice stress tensor. In addition, the evolution and mode of fracture of sand particles was investigated using high-resolution 3D SMT images. The results of diffraction data analyses revealed that the major principal component of the lattice strain or stress tensor increased in most of the particles asmore » the global applied compressive load increased until the onset of fracture. Particle fracture and subsequent rearrangements caused significant variation and fluctuations in measured lattice strain/stress values from one particle to another and from one load step to the next one. SMT image analysis at the particle-scale showed that cracks in fractured sand particles generally initiate and propagate along the plane that connects the two contact points. Fractured particles initially split into two or three major fragments followed by disintegration into multiple smaller fragments in some cases. In conclusion, microscale analysis of fractured particles showed that particle position, morphology, the number and location of contact points play a major role in the occurrence of particle fracture in confined comminution of the sand assembly.« less

  14. 3D Experimental Measurement of Lattice Strain and Fracture Behavior of Sand Particles Using Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction and Tomography

    DOE PAGES

    Cil, Mehmet B.; Alshibli, Khalid A.; Kenesei, Peter

    2017-05-27

    3D synchrotron X-ray diffraction (3DXRD) and synchrotron micro-computed tomography (SMT) techniques were used to measure and monitor the lattice strain evolution and fracture behavior of natural Ottawa sand particles subjected to 1D compression loading. The particle-averaged lattice strain within sand particles was measured using 3DXRD and then was used to calculate the corresponding lattice stress tensor. In addition, the evolution and mode of fracture of sand particles was investigated using high-resolution 3D SMT images. The results of diffraction data analyses revealed that the major principal component of the lattice strain or stress tensor increased in most of the particles asmore » the global applied compressive load increased until the onset of fracture. Particle fracture and subsequent rearrangements caused significant variation and fluctuations in measured lattice strain/stress values from one particle to another and from one load step to the next one. SMT image analysis at the particle-scale showed that cracks in fractured sand particles generally initiate and propagate along the plane that connects the two contact points. Fractured particles initially split into two or three major fragments followed by disintegration into multiple smaller fragments in some cases. In conclusion, microscale analysis of fractured particles showed that particle position, morphology, the number and location of contact points play a major role in the occurrence of particle fracture in confined comminution of the sand assembly.« less

  15. Chapter 20: Data Center IT Efficiency Measures Evaluation Protocol. The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Kurnik, Charles W; Huang, Robert; Masanet, Eric

    This chapter focuses on IT measures in the data center and examines the techniques and analysis methods used to verify savings that result from improving the efficiency of two specific pieces of IT equipment: servers and data storage.

  16. Efficient measurement of amylose content in cereal grains.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rapid and economical measurement of amylose content in barley is important for genetic study and breeding improvement of this trait. Seventeen genotypes with a wide range of amylose contents were used to compare the amylose measurement accuracy of the cost-effective iodine-potassium iodide (I:KI) me...

  17. Measurement of carbon capture efficiency and stored carbon leakage

    DOEpatents

    Keeling, Ralph F.; Dubey, Manvendra K.

    2013-01-29

    Data representative of a measured carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) concentration and of a measured oxygen (O.sub.2) concentration at a measurement location can be used to determine whether the measured carbon dioxide concentration at the measurement location is elevated relative to a baseline carbon dioxide concentration due to escape of carbon dioxide from a source associated with a carbon capture and storage process. Optionally, the data can be used to quantify a carbon dioxide concentration increase at the first location that is attributable to escape of carbon dioxide from the source and to calculate a rate of escape of carbon dioxide from the source by executing a model of gas-phase transport using at least the first carbon dioxide concentration increase. Related systems, methods, and articles of manufacture are also described.

  18. Consistent and efficient processing of ADCP streamflow measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, David S.; Constantinescu, George; Garcia, Marcelo H.; Hanes, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The use of Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCPs) from a moving boat is a commonly used method for measuring streamflow. Currently, the algorithms used to compute the average depth, compute edge discharge, identify invalid data, and estimate velocity and discharge for invalid data vary among manufacturers. These differences could result in different discharges being computed from identical data. Consistent computational algorithm, automated filtering, and quality assessment of ADCP streamflow measurements that are independent of the ADCP manufacturer are being developed in a software program that can process ADCP moving-boat discharge measurements independent of the ADCP used to collect the data.

  19. In operando X-ray diffraction strain measurement in Ni 3Sn 2 – Coated inverse opal nanoscaffold anodes for Li-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Glazer, Matthew P. B.; Wang, Junjie; Cho, Jiung

    Volume changes associated with the (de)lithiation of a nanostructured Ni 3Sn 2 coated nickel inverse opal scaffold anode create mismatch stresses and strains between the Ni 3Sn 2 anode material and its mechanically supporting Ni scaffold. By using in operando synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements, elastic strains in the Ni scaffold are determined during cyclic (dis)charging of the Ni 3Sn 2 anode. These strains are characterized using both the center position of the Ni diffraction peaks, to quantify the average strain, and the peak breadth, which describes the distribution of strain in the measured volume. Upon lithiation (half-cell discharging) or delithiationmore » (half-cell charging), compressive strains and peak breadth linearly increase or decrease, respectively, with charge. The evolution of the average strains and peak breadths suggests that some irreversible plastic deformation and/or delamination occurs during cycling, which can result in capacity fade in the anode. The strain behavior associated with cycling of the Ni 3Sn 2 anode is similar to that observed in recent studies on a Ni inverse-opal supported amorphous Si anode and demonstrates that the (de)lithiation-induced deformation and damage mechanisms are likely equivalent in both anodes, even though the magnitude of mismatch strain in the Ni 3Sn 2 is lower due to the lower (de)lithiation-induced contraction/expansion.« less

  20. In operando X-ray diffraction strain measurement in Ni3Sn2 - Coated inverse opal nanoscaffold anodes for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazer, Matthew P. B.; Wang, Junjie; Cho, Jiung; Almer, Jonathan D.; Okasinski, John S.; Braun, Paul V.; Dunand, David C.

    2017-11-01

    Volume changes associated with the (de)lithiation of a nanostructured Ni3Sn2 coated nickel inverse opal scaffold anode create mismatch stresses and strains between the Ni3Sn2 anode material and its mechanically supporting Ni scaffold. Using in operando synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements, elastic strains in the Ni scaffold are determined during cyclic (dis)charging of the Ni3Sn2 anode. These strains are characterized using both the center position of the Ni diffraction peaks, to quantify the average strain, and the peak breadth, which describes the distribution of strain in the measured volume. Upon lithiation (half-cell discharging) or delithiation (half-cell charging), compressive strains and peak breadth linearly increase or decrease, respectively, with charge. The evolution of the average strains and peak breadths suggests that some irreversible plastic deformation and/or delamination occurs during cycling, which can result in capacity fade in the anode. The strain behavior associated with cycling of the Ni3Sn2 anode is similar to that observed in recent studies on a Ni inverse-opal supported amorphous Si anode and demonstrates that the (de)lithiation-induced deformation and damage mechanisms are likely equivalent in both anodes, even though the magnitude of mismatch strain in the Ni3Sn2 is lower due to the lower (de)lithiation-induced contraction/expansion.

  1. In operando X-ray diffraction strain measurement in Ni 3Sn 2 – Coated inverse opal nanoscaffold anodes for Li-ion batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Glazer, Matthew P. B.; Wang, Junjie; Cho, Jiung; ...

    2017-11-01

    Volume changes associated with the (de)lithiation of a nanostructured Ni 3Sn 2 coated nickel inverse opal scaffold anode create mismatch stresses and strains between the Ni 3Sn 2 anode material and its mechanically supporting Ni scaffold. By using in operando synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements, elastic strains in the Ni scaffold are determined during cyclic (dis)charging of the Ni 3Sn 2 anode. These strains are characterized using both the center position of the Ni diffraction peaks, to quantify the average strain, and the peak breadth, which describes the distribution of strain in the measured volume. Upon lithiation (half-cell discharging) or delithiationmore » (half-cell charging), compressive strains and peak breadth linearly increase or decrease, respectively, with charge. The evolution of the average strains and peak breadths suggests that some irreversible plastic deformation and/or delamination occurs during cycling, which can result in capacity fade in the anode. The strain behavior associated with cycling of the Ni 3Sn 2 anode is similar to that observed in recent studies on a Ni inverse-opal supported amorphous Si anode and demonstrates that the (de)lithiation-induced deformation and damage mechanisms are likely equivalent in both anodes, even though the magnitude of mismatch strain in the Ni 3Sn 2 is lower due to the lower (de)lithiation-induced contraction/expansion.« less

  2. Characterization of CuCl quantum dots grown in NaCl single crystals via optical measurements, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyajima, Kensuke; Akatsu, Tatsuro; Itoh, Ken

    2018-05-01

    We evaluated the crystal size, shape, and alignment of the lattice planes of CuCl quantum dots (QDs) embedded in NaCl single crystals by optical measurements, X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We obtained, for the first time, an XRD pattern and TEM images for CuCl QDs in NaCl crystals. The XRD pattern showed that the lattice planes of the CuCl QDs were parallel to those of the NaCl crystals. In addition, the size of the QDs was estimated from the diffraction width. It was apparent from the TEM images that almost all CuCl QDs were polygonal, although some cubic QDs were present. The mean size and size distribution of the QDs were also obtained. The dot size obtained from optical measurements, XRD, and TEM image were almost consistent. Our new findings can help to reveal the growth mechanism of semiconductor QDs embedded in a crystallite matrix. In addition, this work will play an important role in progressing the study of optical phenomena originating from assembled semiconductor QDs.

  3. Diffractive variable beam splitter: optimal design.

    PubMed

    Borghi, R; Cincotti, G; Santarsiero, M

    2000-01-01

    The analytical expression of the phase profile of the optimum diffractive beam splitter with an arbitrary power ratio between the two output beams is derived. The phase function is obtained by an analytical optimization procedure such that the diffraction efficiency of the resulting optical element is the highest for an actual device. Comparisons are presented with the efficiency of a diffractive beam splitter specified by a sawtooth phase function and with the pertinent theoretical upper bound for this type of element.

  4. Triaxial Measurement Method for Analysis of Residual Stress after High Feed Milling by X-Ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čuma, Matúš; Török, Jozef; Telišková, Monika

    2016-12-01

    Surface integrity is a broad term which includes various quality factors affecting the functional properties of parts. Residual stress is one of these factors. Machining generates residual stresses in the surface and subsurface layers of the structural elements. X-ray diffractometry is a non-destructive method applicable for the measurement of residual stresses in surface and subsurface layers of components. The article is focused on the non-destructive progressive method of triaxial measurement of residual stress after machining the surface of sample by high feed milling technology. Significance of triaxial measuring is the capability of measuring in different angles so it is possible to acquire stress tensor containing normal and shear stress components acting in the spot of measuring, using a Cartesian coordinate system.

  5. Measurement of Mechanical Coherency Temperature and Solid Volume Fraction in Al-Zn Alloys Using In Situ X-ray Diffraction During Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drezet, Jean-Marie; Mireux, Bastien; Kurtuldu, Güven; Magdysyuk, Oxana; Drakopoulos, Michael

    2015-09-01

    During solidification of metallic alloys, coalescence leads to the formation of solid bridges between grains or grain clusters when both solid and liquid phases are percolated. As such, it represents a key transition with respect to the mechanical behavior of solidifying alloys and to the prediction of solidification cracking. Coalescence starts at the coherency point when the grains begin to touch each other, but are unable to sustain any tensile loads. It ends up at mechanical coherency when the solid phase is sufficiently coalesced to transmit macroscopic tensile strains and stresses. Temperature at mechanical coherency is a major input parameter in numerical modeling of solidification processes as it defines the point at which thermally induced deformations start to generate internal stresses in a casting. This temperature has been determined for Al-Zn alloys using in situ X-ray diffraction during casting in a dog-bone-shaped mold. This setup allows the sample to build up internal stress naturally as its contraction is prevented. The cooling on both extremities of the mold induces a hot spot at the middle of the sample which is irradiated by X-ray. Diffraction patterns were recorded every 0.5 seconds using a detector covering a 426 × 426 mm2 area. The change of diffraction angles allowed measuring the general decrease of the lattice parameter of the fcc aluminum phase. At high solid volume fraction, a succession of strain/stress build up and release is explained by the formation of hot tears. Mechanical coherency temperatures, 829 K to 866 K (556 °C to 593 °C), and solid volume fractions, ca. 98 pct, are shown to depend on solidification time for grain refined Al-6.2 wt pct Zn alloys.

  6. The Efficiency of Higher Education Institutions in England Revisited: Comparing Alternative Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnes, Geraint; Tone, Kaoru

    2017-01-01

    Data envelopment analysis (DEA) has often been used to evaluate efficiency in the context of higher education institutions. Yet there are numerous alternative non-parametric measures of efficiency available. This paper compares efficiency scores obtained for institutions of higher education in England, 2013-2014, using three different methods: the…

  7. Selected Private Higher Educational Institutions in Metro Manila: A DEA Efficiency Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Maria Corazon Gwendolyn N.; Cabana, Emilyn

    2009-01-01

    This paper measures the technical efficiency of 16 selected colleges and universities in Metro Manila, Philippines, using academic data for the SY 2001-2005. Using the data envelopment analysis (DEA), on average, schools posted 0.807 index score and need additional 19.3% efficiency growth to be efficient. Overall, there are top four efficient…

  8. High resolution neutron Larmor diffraction using superconducting magnetic Wollaston prisms

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Fankang; Feng, Hao; Thaler, Alexander N.; ...

    2017-04-13

    The neutron Larmor diffraction technique has been implemented using superconducting magnetic Wollaston prisms in both single-arm and double-arm configurations. Successful measurements of the coefficient of thermal expansion of a single-crystal copper sample demonstrates that the method works as expected. Our experiment involves a new method of tuning by varying the magnetic field configurations in the device and the tuning results agree well with previous measurements. The difference between single-arm and double-arm configurations has been investigated experimentally. Here, we conclude that this measurement benchmarks the applications of magnetic Wollaston prisms in Larmor diffraction and shows in principle that the setup canmore » be used for inelastic phonon line-width measurements. The achievable resolution for Larmor diffraction is comparable to that using Neutron Resonance Spin Echo (NRSE) coils. Furthermore, the use of superconducting materials in the prisms allows high neutron polarization and transmission efficiency to be achieved.« less

  9. The measurement of maintenance function efficiency through financial KPIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galar, D.; Parida, A.; Kumar, U.; Baglee, D.; Morant, A.

    2012-05-01

    The measurement of the performance in the maintenance function has produced large sets of indicators that due to their nature and disparity in criteria and objectives have been grouped in different subsets lately, emphasizing the set of financial indicators. The generation of these indicators demands data collection of high reliability that is only made possible through a model of costs adapted to the special casuistry of the maintenance function, characterized by the occultism of these costs.

  10. A highly efficient measure of mass segregation in star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olczak, C.; Spurzem, R.; Henning, Th.

    2011-08-01

    Context. Investigations of mass segregation are of vital interest for the understanding of the formation and dynamical evolution of stellar systems on a wide range of spatial scales. A consistent analysis requires a robust measure among different objects and well-defined comparison with theoretical expectations. Various methods have been used for this purpose but usually with limited significance, quantifiability, and application to both simulations and observations. Aims: We aim at developing a measure of mass segregation with as few parameters as possible, robustness against peculiar configurations, independence of mass determination, simple implementation, stable algorithm, and that is equally well adoptable for data from either simulations or observations. Methods: Our method is based on the minimum spanning tree (MST) that serves as a geometry-independent measure of concentration. Compared to previous such approaches we obtain a significant refinement by using the geometrical mean as an intermediate-pass. Results: The geometrical mean boosts the sensitivity compared to previous applications of the MST. It thus allows the detection of mass segregation with much higher confidence and for much lower degrees of mass segregation than other approaches. The method shows in particular very clear signatures even when applied to small subsets of the entire population. We confirm with high significance strong mass segregation of the five most massive stars in the Orion nebula cluster (ONC). Conclusions: Our method is the most sensitive general measure of mass segregation so far and provides robust results for both data from simulations and observations. As such it is ideally suited for tracking mass segregation in young star clusters and to investigate the long standing paradigm of primordial mass segregation by comparison of simulations and observations.

  11. The efficiency of aspheric intraocular lens according to biometric measurements.

    PubMed

    Whang, Woong-Joo; Piao, Junjie; Yoo, Young-Sik; Joo, Choun-Ki; Yoon, Geunyoung

    2017-01-01

    To analyze internal spherical aberration in pseudophakic eyes that underwent aspheric intraocular lens (IOL) implantation, and to investigate the relationships between biometric data and the effectiveness of aspheric IOL implantation. This retrospective study included 40 eyes of 40 patients who underwent implantation of an IOL having a negative spherical aberration of -0.20 μm (CT ASPHINA 509M; Carl Zeiss Meditec Inc., Germany). The IOLMaster (version 5.0; Carl Zeiss AG, Germany) was used for preoperative biometric measurements (axial length, anterior chamber depth, central corneal power) and the measurement of postoperative anterior chamber depth. The spherical aberrations were measured preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively using the iTrace (Tracey Technologies, Houston, TX, USA) at a pupil diameter of 5.0 mm. We investigated the relationships between preoperative biometric data and postoperative internal spherical aberration, and compared biometric measurements between 2 subgroups stratified according to internal spherical aberration (spherical aberration ≤ -0.06 μm vs. spherical aberration > -0.06 μm). The mean postoperative internal spherical aberration was -0.087 ± 0.063 μm. Preoperative axial length and residual total spherical aberration showed statistically significant correlations with internal spherical aberration (p = 0.041, 0.002). Preoperative axial length, postoperative anterior chamber depth, IOL power, and residual spherical aberration showed significant differences between the 2 subgroups stratified according to internal spherical aberration (p = 0.020, 0.029, 0.048, 0.041 respectively). The corrective effect of an aspheric IOL is influenced by preoperative axial length and postoperative anterior chamber depth. Not only the amount of negative spherical aberration on the IOL surface but also the preoperative axial length should be considered to optimize spherical aberration after aspheric IOL implantation.

  12. A synchrotron X-ray diffraction deconvolution method for the measurement of residual stress in thermal barrier coatings as a function of depth.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Jacques, S D M; Chen, Y; Daisenberger, D; Xiao, P; Markocsan, N; Nylen, P; Cernik, R J

    2016-12-01

    The average residual stress distribution as a function of depth in an air plasma-sprayed yttria stabilized zirconia top coat used in thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems was measured using synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction in reflection geometry on station I15 at Diamond Light Source, UK, employing a series of incidence angles. The stress values were calculated from data deconvoluted from diffraction patterns collected at increasing depths. The stress was found to be compressive through the thickness of the TBC and a fluctuation in the trend of the stress profile was indicated in some samples. Typically this fluctuation was observed to increase from the surface to the middle of the coating, decrease a little and then increase again towards the interface. The stress at the interface region was observed to be around 300 MPa, which agrees well with the reported values. The trend of the observed residual stress was found to be related to the crack distribution in the samples, in particular a large crack propagating from the middle of the coating. The method shows promise for the development of a nondestructive test for as-manufactured samples.

  13. Efficient Measurement of Quantum Gate Error by Interleaved Randomized Benchmarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magesan, Easwar; Gambetta, Jay M.; Johnson, B. R.; Ryan, Colm A.; Chow, Jerry M.; Merkel, Seth T.; da Silva, Marcus P.; Keefe, George A.; Rothwell, Mary B.; Ohki, Thomas A.; Ketchen, Mark B.; Steffen, M.

    2012-08-01

    We describe a scalable experimental protocol for estimating the average error of individual quantum computational gates. This protocol consists of interleaving random Clifford gates between the gate of interest and provides an estimate as well as theoretical bounds for the average error of the gate under test, so long as the average noise variation over all Clifford gates is small. This technique takes into account both state preparation and measurement errors and is scalable in the number of qubits. We apply this protocol to a superconducting qubit system and find a bounded average error of 0.003 [0,0.016] for the single-qubit gates Xπ/2 and Yπ/2. These bounded values provide better estimates of the average error than those extracted via quantum process tomography.

  14. Chained Bell Inequality Experiment with High-Efficiency Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, T. R.; Wan, Y.; Erickson, S.; Bierhorst, P.; Kienzler, D.; Glancy, S.; Knill, E.; Leibfried, D.; Wineland, D. J.

    2017-03-01

    We report correlation measurements on two 9Be+ ions that violate a chained Bell inequality obeyed by any local-realistic theory. The correlations can be modeled as derived from a mixture of a local-realistic probabilistic distribution and a distribution that violates the inequality. A statistical framework is formulated to quantify the local-realistic fraction allowable in the observed distribution without the fair-sampling or independent-and-identical-distributions assumptions. We exclude models of our experiment whose local-realistic fraction is above 0.327 at the 95% confidence level. This bound is significantly lower than 0.586, the minimum fraction derived from a perfect Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality experiment. Furthermore, our data provide a device-independent certification of the deterministically created Bell states.

  15. Data Envelopment Analysis and Its Application to the Measurement of Efficiency in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnes, Jill

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the possibility of measuring efficiency in the context of higher education. The paper begins by exploring the advantages and drawbacks of the various methods for measuring efficiency in the higher education context. The ease with which data envelopment analysis (DEA) can handle multiple inputs and multiple…

  16. Diffractive optical element-based glossmeter for the on-line measurement of normal reflectance on a printed porous coated paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksman, Antti; Kuivalainen, Kalle; Ta˚G, Carl-Mikael; Juuti, Mikko; Mattila, Rauno; Hietala, Eero; Gane, Patrick A. C.; Peiponen, Kai-Erik

    2011-04-01

    Gloss of a product, such as print gloss, is mainly inspected with conventional white light glossmeters both at laboratory or production facilities. However, problems occur in conventional gloss measurement when the inspected surface is vertically moved in the plane of incidence and reflection or when the measurement area is small or curved. For a partial solution to these problems, we have previously introduced diffractive optical element-based glossmeters (DOGs) for the gloss inspection in laboratories and off-line use. We present a new construction of DOG, termed μDOG 1D, for the one-dimensional on-line print gloss measurement, in the form of the reflectance determination normal to the surface. The function of the glossmeter is demonstrated by laboratory tests and on-line measurements at a heat-set web offset printing machine. It is shown that gloss (i.e., normal reflectance) and minute gloss variation of papers and prints can be measured at the printing line using the glossmeter. This glossmeter is expected to be useful in real-time monitoring of the gloss and surface-specific absorption not only in the printing industry but also in inspection of products in other industrial sectors, such as metal finishing, laminating, paper, and construction materials manufacturing.

  17. Anisotropic crystal deformation measurements determined using powder X-ray diffraction and a new in situ compression stage.

    PubMed

    Haware, Rahul V; Kim, Paul; Ruffino, Lauren; Nimi, Brian; Fadrowsky, Catherine; Doyle, Michael; Boerrigter, Stephan X M; Cuitino, Alberto; Morris, Ken

    2011-10-14

    This report addresses the development of experimental and computational estimations of the anisotropic elastic moduli (EM) of single crystals to aid in the a priori (i.e., starting with the crystal structure) prediction of the trend as a function of the direction of applied stress. Experimentally EM values in the normal direction to the X-, Y- and Z-planes of block shaped aspirin and acetaminophen crystals were determined using data generated by the newly designed compression stage housed in our powder X-ray diffractometer. Computational estimations of EM were made using the applicable modules in Material Studio 5.5. The measured EM values normal to the (100), (020) and (002) planes of aspirin, and (20-1), (020) and (001) planes of acetaminophen crystals by both methods succeeded in detected the anisotropic behavior. However, disparity in the relative values between measured EM values by different techniques was observed. This may be attributed to deformation sources other than lattice compression including inelastic processes such as local failure and plasticity as well as deformation at the crystal-probe interfaces due to crystal surface roughness (asperities). The trend of the ratio of the values from the respective methods showed reasonable agreement and promise for the technique. The present approach demonstrated the suitability of the compression stage to determine and predict anisotropic EM of subjected small molecular organic crystals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Time-dependent efficiency measurements of polymer solar cells with dye additives: unexpected initial increase of efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandaccari, Kyle J.; Chesmore, Grace E.; Bugaj, Mitchel; Valverde, Parisa Tajalli-Tehrani; Barber, Richard P.; McNelis, Brian J.

    2018-04-01

    We report the effects of the addition of two azo-dye additives on the time-dependent efficiency of polymer solar cells. Although the maximum efficiencies of devices containing different amounts of dye do not vary greatly over the selected concentration range, the time dependence results reveal a surprising initial increase in efficiency in some samples. We observe this effect to be correlated with a leakage current, although a specific mechanism is not yet identified. We also present the measured lifetimes of these solar cells, and find that variations in dye concentrations produce a small effect at most. Characterization of the bulk heterojunction layer (active layer) morphology using atomic-force microscope (AFM) imaging reveals reordering patterns which suggest that the primary effects of the dyes arise via structural, not absorptive, characteristics.

  19. Comparison of fluvial suspended-sediment concentrations and particle-size distributions measured with in-stream laser diffraction and in physical samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czuba, Jonathan A.; Straub, Timothy D.; Curran, Christopher A.; Landers, Mark N.; Domanski, Marian M.

    2015-01-01

    Laser-diffraction technology, recently adapted for in-stream measurement of fluvial suspended-sediment concentrations (SSCs) and particle-size distributions (PSDs), was tested with a streamlined (SL), isokinetic version of the Laser In-Situ Scattering and Transmissometry (LISST) for measuring volumetric SSCs and PSDs ranging from 1.8-415 µm in 32 log-spaced size classes. Measured SSCs and PSDs from the LISST-SL were compared to a suite of 22 datasets (262 samples in all) of concurrent suspended-sediment and streamflow measurements using a physical sampler and acoustic Doppler current profiler collected during 2010-12 at 16 U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations in Illinois and Washington (basin areas: 38 – 69,264 km2). An unrealistically low computed effective density (mass SSC / volumetric SSC) of 1.24 g/ml (95% confidence interval: 1.05-1.45 g/ml) provided the best-fit value (R2 = 0.95; RMSE = 143 mg/L) for converting volumetric SSC to mass SSC for over 2 orders of magnitude of SSC (12-2,170 mg/L; covering a substantial range of SSC that can be measured by the LISST-SL) despite being substantially lower than the sediment particle density of 2.67 g/ml (range: 2.56-2.87 g/ml, 23 samples). The PSDs measured by the LISST-SL were in good agreement with those derived from physical samples over the LISST-SL's measureable size range. Technical and operational limitations of the LISST-SL are provided to facilitate the collection of more accurate data in the future. Additionally, the spatial and temporal variability of SSC and PSD measured by the LISST-SL is briefly described to motivate its potential for advancing our understanding of suspended-sediment transport by rivers.

  20. Comparison of fluvial suspended-sediment concentrations and particle-size distributions measured with in-stream laser diffraction and in physical samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czuba, Jonathan A.; Straub, Timothy D.; Curran, Christopher A.; Landers, Mark N.; Domanski, Marian M.

    2015-01-01

    Laser-diffraction technology, recently adapted for in-stream measurement of fluvial suspended-sediment concentrations (SSCs) and particle-size distributions (PSDs), was tested with a streamlined (SL), isokinetic version of the Laser In Situ Scattering and Transmissometry (LISST) for measuring volumetric SSCs and PSDs ranging from 1.8 to 415 μm in 32 log-spaced size classes. Measured SSCs and PSDs from the LISST-SL were compared to a suite of 22 data sets (262 samples in all) of concurrent suspended-sediment and streamflow measurements using a physical sampler and acoustic Doppler current profiler collected during 2010-2012 at 16 U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations in Illinois and Washington (basin areas: 38-69,264 km2). An unrealistically low computed effective density (mass SSC/volumetric SSC) of 1.24 g/mL (95% confidence interval: 1.05-1.45 g/mL) provided the best-fit value (R2 = 0.95; RMSE = 143 mg/L) for converting volumetric SSC to mass SSC for over two orders of magnitude of SSC (12-2,170 mg/L; covering a substantial range of SSC that can be measured by the LISST-SL) despite being substantially lower than the sediment particle density of 2.67 g/mL (range: 2.56-2.87 g/mL, 23 samples). The PSDs measured by the LISST-SL were in good agreement with those derived from physical samples over the LISST-SL's measureable size range. Technical and operational limitations of the LISST-SL are provided to facilitate the collection of more accurate data in the future. Additionally, the spatial and temporal variability of SSC and PSD measured by the LISST-SL is briefly described to motivate its potential for advancing our understanding of suspended-sediment transport by rivers.

  1. Nd/sup 3 +/ fluorescence quantum-efficiency measurements with photoacoustics

    SciTech Connect

    Rosencwaig, A.; Hildum, E.A.

    1981-04-01

    We have investigated the use of photoacoustic techniques for obtaining absolute values of fluorescence quantum efficiencies in lightly doped Nd/sup 3 +/ laser materials. We have found that surface absorptions play an important role in gas-microphone measurements, and that thermal profiles are important in piezoelectric measurements. We have obtained fluorescence quantum efficiencies for Nd/sup 3 +/ in yttrium aluminum garnet, and in silicate and borate glasses that are in good agreement with lifetime measurements and Judd-Ofelt calculations.

  2. Calorimetric Measurement for Internal Conversion Efficiency of Photovoltaic Cells/Modules Based on Electrical Substitution Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Terubumi; Tatsuta, Muneaki; Abe, Yamato; Takesawa, Minato

    2018-02-01

    We have succeeded in the direct measurement for solar cell/module internal conversion efficiency based on a calorimetric method or electrical substitution method by which the absorbed radiant power is determined by replacing the heat absorbed in the cell/module with the electrical power. The technique is advantageous in that the reflectance and transmittance measurements, which are required in the conventional methods, are not necessary. Also, the internal quantum efficiency can be derived from conversion efficiencies by using the average photon energy. Agreements of the measured data with the values estimated from the nominal values support the validity of this technique.

  3. Generation of a Parabolic Trough Collector Efficiency Curve from Separate Measurements of Outdoor Optical Efficiency and Indoor Receiver Heat Loss: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kutscher, C.; Burkholder, F.; Stynes, K.

    2010-10-01

    The overall efficiency of a parabolic trough collector is a function of both the fraction of direct normal radiation absorbed by the receiver (the optical efficiency) and the heat lost to the environment when the receiver is at operating temperature. The overall efficiency can be determined by testing the collector under actual operating conditions or by separately measuring these two components. This paper describes how outdoor measurement of the optical efficiency is combined with laboratory measurements of receiver heat loss to obtain an overall efficiency curve. Further, it presents a new way to plot efficiency that is more robust overmore » a range of receiver operating temperatures.« less

  4. Transmission Efficiency Measurements and Correlations with Physical Characteristics of the Lubricant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coy, J. J.; Mitchell, A. M.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1984-01-01

    Data from helicopter transmission efficiency tests were compared to physical properties of the eleven lubricants used in those tests. The tests were conducted with the OH-58 helicopter main rotor transmission. Efficiencies ranged from 98.3 to 98.8 percent. The data was examined for correlation of physical properties with efficiency. There was a reasonable correlation of efficiency with absolute viscosity if the viscosity was first corrected for temperature and pressure in the lubricated contact. Between lubricants, efficiency did not correlate well with viscosity at atmospheric pressure. Between lubricants, efficiency did not correlate well with calculated lubricant film forming capacity. Bench type sliding friction and wear measurements could not be correlated to transmission efficiency and component wear.

  5. Optical diffraction by ordered 2D arrays of silica microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, A. A.; Shavdina, O.; Tishchenko, A. V.; Veillas, C.; Verrier, I.; Dellea, O.; Jourlin, Y.

    2017-03-01

    The article presents experimental and theoretical studies of angular dependent diffraction properties of 2D monolayer arrays of silica microspheres. High-quality large area defect-free monolayers of 1 μm diameter silica microspheres were deposited by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique under an accurate optical control. Measured angular dependencies of zeroth and one of the first order diffraction efficiencies produced by deposited samples were simulated by the rigorous Generalized Source Method taking into account particle size dispersion and lattice nonideality.

  6. Measuring the efficiencies of visiting nurse service agencies using data envelopment analysis.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Yuki; Nagata, Satoko; Taguchi, Atsuko; Naruse, Takashi; Kawaguchi, Hiroyuki; Murashima, Sachiyo

    2013-09-01

    This study develops a measure of the efficiency of visiting nurse (VN) agencies in Japan, examining the issues related to the measurement of efficiency, and identifying the characteristics that influence efficiency. We have employed a data envelopment analysis to measure the efficiency of 108 VN agencies, using the numbers of 5 types of staff as the input variables and the numbers of 3 types of visits as the output variables. The median efficiency scores of the VN agencies were found to be 0.80 and 1.00 according to the constant returns to scale (CRS) and variable returns to scale (VRS) models, respectively, and the median scale efficiency score was 0.95. This study supports using both the CRS and VRS models to measure the scale efficiency of VN service agencies. We also found that relatively efficient VN agencies filled at least 30 % of staff positions with experienced workers, and so concluded that this characteristic has a direct influence on the length of visits.

  7. Combined Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction and Digital Image Correlation Technique for Measurement of Austenite Transformation with Strain in TRIP-assisted Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Poling, Whitney A.; Savic, Vesna; Hector, Louis G.

    2016-04-05

    The strain-induced, diffusionless shear transformation of retained austenite to martensite during straining of transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) assisted steels increases strain hardening and delays necking and fracture leading to exceptional ductility and strength, which are attractive for automotive applications. A novel technique that provides the retained austenite volume fraction variation with strain in TRIP-assisted steels with improved precision is presented. Digital images of the gauge section of tensile specimens were first recorded up to selected plastic strains with a stereo digital image correlation (DIC) system. The austenite volume fraction was measured by synchrotron X-ray diffraction from small squares cut frommore » the gage section. Strain fields in the squares were then computed by localizing the strain measurement to the corresponding region of a given square during DIC post-processing of the images recorded during tensile testing. Results obtained for a QP980 steel are used to study the influence of initial volume fraction of austenite and the austenite transformation with strain on tensile mechanical behavior.« less

  8. Auto-rickshaw: an automated crystal structure determination platform as an efficient tool for the validation of an X-ray diffraction experiment.

    PubMed

    Panjikar, Santosh; Parthasarathy, Venkataraman; Lamzin, Victor S; Weiss, Manfred S; Tucker, Paul A

    2005-04-01

    The EMBL-Hamburg Automated Crystal Structure Determination Platform is a system that combines a number of existing macromolecular crystallographic computer programs and several decision-makers into a software pipeline for automated and efficient crystal structure determination. The pipeline can be invoked as soon as X-ray data from derivatized protein crystals have been collected and processed. It is controlled by a web-based graphical user interface for data and parameter input, and for monitoring the progress of structure determination. A large number of possible structure-solution paths are encoded in the system and the optimal path is selected by the decision-makers as the structure solution evolves. The processes have been optimized for speed so that the pipeline can be used effectively for validating the X-ray experiment at a synchrotron beamline.

  9. Energy Efficiency Under Alternative Carbon Policies. Incentives, Measurement, and Interregional Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, Daniel C.; Boyd, Erin

    2015-08-28

    In this report, we examine and compare how tradable mass-based polices and tradable rate-based policies create different incentives for energy efficiency investments. Through a generalized demonstration and set of examples, we show that as a result of the output subsidy they create, traditional rate-based policies, those that do not credit energy savings from efficiency measures, reduce the incentive for investment in energy efficiency measures relative to an optimally designed mass-based policy or equivalent carbon tax. We then show that this reduced incentive can be partially addressed by modifying the rate-based policy such that electricity savings from energy efficiency measures aremore » treated as a source of zero-carbon generation within the framework of the standard, or equivalently, by assigning avoided emissions credit to the electricity savings at the rate of the intensity target. These approaches result in an extension of the output subsidy to efficiency measures and eliminate the distortion between supply-side and demand-side options for GHG emissions reduction. However, these approaches do not address electricity price distortions resulting from the output subsidy that also impact the value of efficiency measures. Next, we assess alternative approaches for crediting energy efficiency savings within the framework of a rate-based policy. Finally, we identify a number of challenges that arise in implementing a rate-based policy with efficiency crediting, including the requirement to develop robust estimates of electricity savings in order to assess compliance, and the requirement to track the regionality of the generation impacts of efficiency measures to account for their interstate effects.« less

  10. Measuring and Benchmarking Technical Efficiency of Public Hospitals in Tianjin, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; Dong, Siping

    2015-01-01

    China has long been stuck in applying traditional data envelopment analysis (DEA) models to measure technical efficiency of public hospitals without bias correction of efficiency scores. In this article, we have introduced the Bootstrap-DEA approach from the international literature to analyze the technical efficiency of public hospitals in Tianjin (China) and tried to improve the application of this method for benchmarking and inter-organizational learning. It is found that the bias corrected efficiency scores of Bootstrap-DEA differ significantly from those of the traditional Banker, Charnes, and Cooper (BCC) model, which means that Chinese researchers need to update their DEA models for more scientific calculation of hospital efficiency scores. Our research has helped shorten the gap between China and the international world in relative efficiency measurement and improvement of hospitals. It is suggested that Bootstrap-DEA be widely applied into afterward research to measure relative efficiency and productivity of Chinese hospitals so as to better serve for efficiency improvement and related decision making. PMID:26396090

  11. Phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    1996-01-01

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of .lambda./1000 where .lambda. is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about .lambda./50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms.

  12. Phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, G.E.

    1996-08-29

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of {lambda}/1000 where {lambda} is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about {lambda}/50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms. 8 figs.

  13. Direct measurement of critical resolved shear stress of prismatic and basal slip in polycrystalline Ti using high energy X-ray diffraction microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Zheng, Z.; Phukan, H.

    Knowledge of the critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) values of different slip modes is important for accurately modeling plastic deformation of hexagonal materials. Here, we demonstrate that CRSS can be directly measured with an in-situ high energy X-ray diffraction microscopy (HEDM) experiment. A commercially pure Ti tensile specimen was deformed up to 2.6% strain. In-situ far-field HEDM experiments were carried out to track the evolution of crystallographic orientations, centers of masses, and stress states of 1153 grains in a material volume of 1.1mm×1mm×1mm. Predominant prismatic slip was identified in 18 grains, where the orientation change occurred primarily by rotation aroundmore » the c-axis during specimen deformation. By analyzing the resolved shear stress on individual slip systems, the estimated CRSS for prismatic slip is 96±18 MPa. Predominant basal slip was identified in 22 other grains, where the 2 orientation change occurred primarily by tilting the c-axis about an axis in the basal plane. The estimated CRSS for basal slip is 127±33 MPa. The ratio of CRSS basal/CRSS prismatic is in the range of 1.7-2.1. From indirect assessment, the CRSS for pyramidal < c+a > slip is likely greater than 240MPa. Lastly, grain size and free surface effects on the CRSS value in different grains are also examined.« less

  14. Neutron diffraction measurement of residual stresses, dislocation density and texture in Zr-bonded U-10Mo “mini” fuel foils and plates

    DOE PAGES

    Brown, Donald William; Okuniewski, Maria A.; Sisneros, Thomas A.; ...

    2016-12-01

    Here, Al clad U-10Mo fuel plates are being considered for conversion of several research reactors from high-enriched to low-enriched U fuel. Neutron diffraction measurements of the textures, residual phase stresses, and dislocation densities in the individual phases of the mini-foils throughout several processing steps and following hot-isostatic pressing to the Al cladding, have been completed. Recovery and recrystallization of the bare U-10Mo fuel foil, as indicated by the dislocation density and texture, are observed depending on the state of the material prior to annealing and the duration and temperature of the annealing process. In general, the cladding procedure significantly reducesmore » the dislocation density, but the final state of the clad plate, both texture and dislocation density, depends strongly on the final processing step of the fuel foil. In contrast, the residual stress state of the final plate is dominated by the thermal expansion mismatch of the constituent materials.« less

  15. Determination of 200 °C Isothermal Section of Al-Ag-Ga Phase Diagram by Microanalysis, X-ray Diffraction, Hardness and Electrical Conductivity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premović, Milena; Tomović, Milica; Minić, Duško; Manasijević, Dragan; Živković, Dragana; Ćosović, Vladan; Grković, Vladan; Đorđević, Aleksandar

    2017-04-01

    Ternary Al-Ag-Ga system at 200 °C was experimentally and thermodynamically assessed. Isothermal section was extrapolated using optimized thermodynamic parameters for constitutive binary systems. Microstructure and phase composition of the selected alloy samples were analyzed using light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy combined with energy-dispersive spectrometry and x-ray powder diffraction technique. The obtained experimental results were found to be in a close agreement with the predicted phase equilibria. Hardness and electrical conductivity of the alloy samples from four vertical sections Al-Ag80Ga20, Al-Ag60Ga40, Ag-Al80Ga20 and Ag-Al60Ga40 of the ternary Al-Ag-Ga system at 200 °C were experimentally determined using Brinell method and eddy current measurements. Additionally, hardness of the individual phases present in the microstructure of the studied alloy samples was determined using Vickers microhardness test. Based on experimentally obtained results, isolines of Brinell hardness and electrical conductivity were calculated for the alloys from isothermal section of the ternary Al-Ag-Ga system at 200 °C.

  16. Direct measurement of critical resolved shear stress of prismatic and basal slip in polycrystalline Ti using high energy X-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, L.; Zheng, Z.; Phukan, H.; ...

    2017-05-07

    Knowledge of the critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) values of different slip modes is important for accurately modeling plastic deformation of hexagonal materials. Here, we demonstrate that CRSS can be directly measured with an in-situ high energy X-ray diffraction microscopy (HEDM) experiment. A commercially pure Ti tensile specimen was deformed up to 2.6% strain. In-situ far-field HEDM experiments were carried out to track the evolution of crystallographic orientations, centers of masses, and stress states of 1153 grains in a material volume of 1.1mm×1mm×1mm. Predominant prismatic slip was identified in 18 grains, where the orientation change occurred primarily by rotation aroundmore » the c-axis during specimen deformation. By analyzing the resolved shear stress on individual slip systems, the estimated CRSS for prismatic slip is 96±18 MPa. Predominant basal slip was identified in 22 other grains, where the 2 orientation change occurred primarily by tilting the c-axis about an axis in the basal plane. The estimated CRSS for basal slip is 127±33 MPa. The ratio of CRSS basal/CRSS prismatic is in the range of 1.7-2.1. From indirect assessment, the CRSS for pyramidal < c+a > slip is likely greater than 240MPa. Lastly, grain size and free surface effects on the CRSS value in different grains are also examined.« less

  17. Neutron diffraction measurement of residual stresses, dislocation density and texture in Zr-bonded U-10Mo “mini” fuel foils and plates

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Donald William; Okuniewski, Maria A.; Sisneros, Thomas A.

    Here, Al clad U-10Mo fuel plates are being considered for conversion of several research reactors from high-enriched to low-enriched U fuel. Neutron diffraction measurements of the textures, residual phase stresses, and dislocation densities in the individual phases of the mini-foils throughout several processing steps and following hot-isostatic pressing to the Al cladding, have been completed. Recovery and recrystallization of the bare U-10Mo fuel foil, as indicated by the dislocation density and texture, are observed depending on the state of the material prior to annealing and the duration and temperature of the annealing process. In general, the cladding procedure significantly reducesmore » the dislocation density, but the final state of the clad plate, both texture and dislocation density, depends strongly on the final processing step of the fuel foil. In contrast, the residual stress state of the final plate is dominated by the thermal expansion mismatch of the constituent materials.« less

  18. Wireless Sensor for Measuring Pump Efficiency: Small Business Voucher Project with KCF Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Fugate, David L.; Liu, Xiaobing; Gehl, Anthony C.

    This document is to fulfill the final report requirements for the Small Business Voucher (SBV) CRADA project with ORNL and KCF Technologies (CRADA/NFE-16-06133). Pumping systems account for nearly 20% of the world’s electrical energy demand and range from 25-50% of the energy usage in many industrial and building power plants. The energy cost is the largest element in the total cost of owning a pump (~40%). In response to a recent DOE mandate for improved pump efficiency pump manufacturers are preparing for the changes that the impending regulations will bring, including design improvements. This mandate also establishes a need formore » new low cost pump efficiency measurement systems. The standard industry definition of pump efficiency is the mechanical water horsepower delivered divided by the electrical horsepower input to the motor. KCF Technologies has developed a new sensor measurement technique to estimate fluid pump efficiency using a thermodynamic approach. KCF Technologies applied for a SBV grant with ORNL as the research partner. KCF needed a research partner with the proper facilities to demonstrate the efficacy of its wireless sensor unit for measuring pump efficiency. The ORNL Building Technologies Research and Integration Center (BTRIC) test resources were used to test and demonstrate the successful measurement of pump efficiency with the KCF sensor technology. KCF is now working on next steps to commercialize this sensing technology.« less

  19. Compatibility of a Diffractive Pupil and Coronagraphic Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bendek, Eduardo; Belikov, Rusian; Pluzhnyk, Yevgeniy; Guyon, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Detection and characterization of exo-earths require direct-imaging techniques that can deliver contrast ratios of 10(exp 10) at 100 milliarc-seconds or smaller angular separation. At the same time, astrometric data is required to measure planet masses and can help detect planets and constrain their orbital parameters. To minimize costs, a single space mission can be designed using a high efficiency coronograph to perform direct imaging and a diffractive pupil to calibrate wide-field distortions to enable high precision astrometric measurements. This paper reports the testing of a diffractive pupil on the high-contrast test bed at the NASA Ames Research Center to assess the compatibility of using a diffractive pupil with coronographic imaging systems. No diffractive contamination was found within our detectability limit of 2x10(exp -7) contrast outside a region of 12lambda/D and 2.5x10(exp -6) within a region spanning from 2 to 12lambda/D. Morphology of the image features suggests that no contamination exists even beyond the detectability limit specified or at smaller working angles. In the case that diffractive contamination is found beyond these stated levels, active wavefront control would be able to mitigate its intensity to 10(exp -7) or better contrast.

  20. The structure of liquid water up to 360 MPa from x-ray diffraction measurements using a high Q-range and from molecular simulation

    DOE PAGES

    Skinner, L. B.; Galib, M.; Fulton, J. L.; ...

    2016-04-04

    In this study, x-ray diffraction measurements of liquid water are reported at pressures up to 360 MPa corresponding to a density of 0.0373 molecules per Å 3. The measurements were conducted at a spatial resolution corresponding to Q max = 16 Å -1. The method of data analysis and measurement in this study follows the earlier benchmark results reported for water under ambient conditions having a density of 0.0333 molecules per Å 3 and Q max = 20 Å -1 [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 074506 (2013)] and at 70°C having a density of 0.0327 molecules per Å 3 and Qmore » max = 20 Å -1 [J. Chem. Phys. 141, 214507 (2014)]. The structure of water is very different at these three different T and P state points and thus they provide the basis for evaluating the fidelity of molecular simulation. Measurements show that at 360 MPa, the 4 waters residing in the region between 2.3 and 3 Å are nearly unchanged: the peak position, shape, and coordination number are nearly identical to their values under ambient conditions. However, in the region above 3 Å, large structural changes occur with the collapse of the well-defined 2nd shell and shifting of higher shells to shorter distances. The measured structure is compared to simulated structure using intermolecular potentials described by both first-principles methods (revPBE-D3) and classical potentials (TIP4P/2005, MB-pol, and mW). The DFT-based, revPBE-D3, method and the many-body empirical potential model, MB-pol, provide the best overall representation of the ambient, high-temperature, and high-pressure data. Finally, the revPBE-D3, MB-pol, and the TIP4P/2005 models capture the densification mechanism, whereby the non-bonded 5th nearest neighbor molecule, which partially encroaches the 1st shell at ambient pressure, is pushed further into the local tetrahedral arrangement at higher pressures by the more distant molecules filling the void space in the network between the 1st and 2nd shells.« less

  1. The structure of liquid water up to 360 MPa from x-ray diffraction measurements using a high Q-range and from molecular simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, L. B.; Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York, New York 11794-2100; Galib, M.

    2016-04-07

    X-ray diffraction measurements of liquid water are reported at pressures up to 360 MPa corresponding to a density of 0.0373 molecules per Å{sup 3}. The measurements were conducted at a spatial resolution corresponding to Q{sub max} = 16 Å{sup −1}. The method of data analysis and measurement in this study follows the earlier benchmark results reported for water under ambient conditions having a density of 0.0333 molecules per Å{sup 3} and Q{sub max} = 20 Å{sup −1} [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 074506 (2013)] and at 70 °C having a density of 0.0327 molecules per Å{sup 3} and Q{sub max} = 20more » Å{sup −1} [J. Chem. Phys. 141, 214507 (2014)]. The structure of water is very different at these three different T and P state points and thus they provide the basis for evaluating the fidelity of molecular simulation. Measurements show that at 360 MPa, the 4 waters residing in the region between 2.3 and 3 Å are nearly unchanged: the peak position, shape, and coordination number are nearly identical to their values under ambient conditions. However, in the region above 3 Å, large structural changes occur with the collapse of the well-defined 2nd shell and shifting of higher shells to shorter distances. The measured structure is compared to simulated structure using intermolecular potentials described by both first-principles methods (revPBE-D3) and classical potentials (TIP4P/2005, MB-pol, and mW). The DFT-based, revPBE-D3, method and the many-body empirical potential model, MB-pol, provide the best overall representation of the ambient, high-temperature, and high-pressure data. The revPBE-D3, MB-pol, and the TIP4P/2005 models capture the densification mechanism, whereby the non-bonded 5th nearest neighbor molecule, which partially encroaches the 1st shell at ambient pressure, is pushed further into the local tetrahedral arrangement at higher pressures by the more distant molecules filling the void space in the network between the 1st and 2nd shells.« less

  2. Real-Time Measurement of Machine Efficiency during Inertia Friction Welding.

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, Daniel Joseph; Mahaffey, David; Senkov, Oleg

    Process efficiency is a crucial parameter for inertia friction welding (IFW) that is largely unknown at the present time. A new method has been developed to determine the transient profile of the IFW process efficiency by comparing the workpiece torque used to heat and deform the joint region to the total torque. Particularly, the former is measured by a torque load cell attached to the non-rotating workpiece while the latter is calculated from the deceleration rate of flywheel rotation. The experimentally-measured process efficiency for IFW of AISI 1018 steel rods is validated independently by the upset length estimated from anmore » analytical equation of heat balance and the flash profile calculated from a finite element based thermal stress model. The transient behaviors of torque and efficiency during IFW are discussed based on the energy loss to machine bearings and the bond formation at the joint interface.« less

  3. Measurement of X-ray emission efficiency for K-lines.

    PubMed

    Procop, M

    2004-08-01

    Results for the X-ray emission efficiency (counts per C per sr) of K-lines for selected elements (C, Al, Si, Ti, Cu, Ge) and for the first time also for compounds and alloys (SiC, GaP, AlCu, TiAlC) are presented. An energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) of known detection efficiency (counts per photon) has been used to record the spectra at a takeoff angle of 25 degrees determined by the geometry of the secondary electron microscope's specimen chamber. Overall uncertainty in measurement could be reduced to 5 to 10% in dependence on the line intensity and energy. Measured emission efficiencies have been compared with calculated efficiencies based on models applied in standardless analysis. The widespread XPP and PROZA models give somewhat too low emission efficiencies. The best agreement between measured and calculated efficiencies could be achieved by replacing in the modular PROZA96 model the original expression for the ionization cross section by the formula given by Casnati et al. (1982) A discrepancy remains for carbon, probably due to the high overvoltage ratio.

  4. Operational and environmental performance in China's thermal power industry: Taking an effectiveness measure as complement to an efficiency measure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Zhang, Jieming; Wei, Yi-Ming

    2017-05-01

    The trend toward a more fiercely competitive and strictly environmentally regulated electricity market in several countries, including China has led to efforts by both industry and government to develop advanced performance evaluation models that adapt to new evaluation requirements. Traditional operational and environmental efficiency measures do not fully consider the influence of market competition and environmental regulations and, thus, are not sufficient for the thermal power industry to evaluate its operational performance with respect to specific marketing goals (operational effectiveness) and its environmental performance with respect to specific emissions reduction targets (environmental effectiveness). As a complement to an operational efficiency measure, an operational effectiveness measure not only reflects the capacity of an electricity production system to increase its electricity generation through the improvement of operational efficiency, but it also reflects the system's capability to adjust its electricity generation activities to match electricity demand. In addition, as a complement to an environmental efficiency measure, an environmental effectiveness measure not only reflects the capacity of an electricity production system to decrease its pollutant emissions through the improvement of environmental efficiency, but it also reflects the system's capability to adjust its emissions abatement activities to fulfill environmental regulations. Furthermore, an environmental effectiveness measure helps the government regulator to verify the rationality of its emissions reduction targets assigned to the thermal power industry. Several newly developed effectiveness measurements based on data envelopment analysis (DEA) were utilized in this study to evaluate the operational and environmental performance of the thermal power industry in China during 2006-2013. Both efficiency and effectiveness were evaluated from the three perspectives of operational

  5. The Multidimensional Efficiency of Pension System: Definition and Measurement in Cross-Country Studies.

    PubMed

    Chybalski, Filip

    The existing literature on the efficiency of pension system, usually addresses the problem between the choice of different theoretical models, or concerns one or few empirical pension systems. In this paper quite different approach to the measurement of pension system efficiency is proposed. It is dedicated mainly to the cross-country studies of empirical pension systems, however it may be also employed to the analysis of a given pension system on the basis of time series. I identify four dimensions of pension system efficiency, referring to: GDP-distribution, adequacy of pension, influence on the labour market and administrative costs. Consequently, I propose four sets of static and one set of dynamic efficiency indicators. In the empirical part of the paper, I use Spearman's rank correlation coefficient and cluster analysis to verify the proposed method on statistical data covering 28 European countries in years 2007-2011. I prove that the method works and enables some comparisons as well as clustering of analyzed pension systems. The study delivers also some interesting empirical findings. The main goal of pension systems seems to become poverty alleviation, since the efficiency of ensuring protection against poverty, as well as the efficiency of reducing poverty, is very resistant to the efficiency of GDP-distribution. The opposite situation characterizes the efficiency of consumption smoothing-this is generally sensitive to the efficiency of GDP-distribution, and its dynamics are sensitive to the dynamics of GDP-distribution efficiency. The results of the study indicate the Norwegian and the Icelandic pension systems to be the most efficient in the analyzed group.

  6. Measure Guideline. Five Steps to Implement the Public Housing Authority Energy-Efficient Unit Turnover Checklist

    SciTech Connect

    Liaukus, Christine

    2015-07-09

    Five Steps to Implementing the PHA Energy Efficient Unit Turnover Package (ARIES, 2014) is a guide to prepare for the installation of energy efficient measures during a typical public housing authority unit turnover. While a PHA is cleaning, painting and readying a unit for a new resident, there is an opportunity to incorporate energy efficiency measures to further improve the unit's performance. The measures on the list are simple enough to be implemented by in-house maintenance personnel, inexpensive enough to be folded into operating expenses without needing capital budget, and fast enough to implement without substantially changing the number ofmore » days between occupancies, a critical factor for organizations where the demand for dwelling units far outweighs the supply. The following guide lays out a five step plan to implement the EE Unit Turnover Package in your PHA, from an initial Self-Assessment through to Package Implementation.« less

  7. Erosion of Pelton buckets and changes in turbine efficiency measured in the HPP Fieschertal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abgottspon, A.; Staubli, T.; Felix, D.

    2016-11-01

    Geometrical changes and material loss of Pelton turbine runners as well as changes in turbine efficiency were measured at HPP Fieschertal in Valais, Switzerland. The HPP is equipped with two horizontal axis Pelton units, with each 32 MW nominal power, 7.5 m3/s design discharge, 515 m head and two injectors. The injectors and the buckets are hard-coated. Hydro-abrasive erosion was quantified based on repeated measurements on two runner buckets using (i) 3d-scanning and (ii) a coating thickness gauge. Changes in efficiency were measured by applying the sliding needle procedure. In addition to these periodically performed measurements, efficiency was also continuously monitored. The highest erosion rate was measured during the first half of the sediment season 2012 including a major sediment transport event. Because the runner was not fully reconditioned at the beginning of this season, progressive damages occurred. After the event, a splitter width of 10 mm was measured, corresponding to 1.5 % of the inner bucket width. The cut-outs were eroded by up to 9 mm towards the axis. The efficiency reductions ranged from 1 % in the year with the major sediment transport event to insignificant differences in 2014, when the sediment load was small and only little hydro-abrasive erosion occurred.

  8. High-efficiency tomographic reconstruction of quantum states by quantum nondemolition measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J. S.; Centre for Quantum Technologies and Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 2, Singapore 117542; Wei, L. F.

    We propose a high-efficiency scheme to tomographically reconstruct an unknown quantum state by using a series of quantum nondemolition (QND) measurements. The proposed QND measurements of the qubits are implemented by probing the stationary transmissions through a driven dispersively coupled resonator. It is shown that only one kind of QND measurement is sufficient to determine all the diagonal elements of the density matrix of the detected quantum state. The remaining nondiagonal elements can be similarly determined by transferring them to the diagonal locations after a series of unitary operations. Compared with the tomographic reconstructions based on the usual destructive projectivemore » measurements (wherein one such measurement can determine only one diagonal element of the density matrix), the present reconstructive approach exhibits significantly high efficiency. Specifically, our generic proposal is demonstrated by the experimental circuit quantum electrodynamics systems with a few Josephson charge qubits.« less

  9. Statistical properties of proportional residual energy intake as a new measure of energetic efficiency.

    PubMed

    Zamani, Pouya

    2017-08-01

    Traditional ratio measures of efficiency, including feed conversion ratio (FCR), gross milk efficiency (GME), gross energy efficiency (GEE) and net energy efficiency (NEE) may have some statistical problems including high correlations with milk yield. Residual energy intake (REI) or residual feed intake (RFI) is another criterion, proposed to overcome the problems attributed to the traditional ratio criteria, but it does not account for production or intake levels. For example, the same REI value could be considerable for low producing and negligible for high producing cows. The aim of this study was to propose a new measure of efficiency to overcome the problems attributed to the previous criteria. A total of 1478 monthly records of 268 lactating Holstein cows were used for this study. In addition to FCR, GME, GEE, NEE and REI, a new criterion called proportional residual energy intake (PREI) was calculated as REI to net energy intake ratio and defined as proportion of net energy intake lost as REI. The PREI had an average of -0·02 and range of -0·36 to 0·27, meaning that the least efficient cow lost 0·27 of her net energy intake as REI, while the most efficient animal saved 0·36 of her net energy intake as less REI. Traditional ratio criteria (FCR, GME, GEE and NEE) had high correlations with milk and fat corrected milk yields (absolute values from 0·469 to 0·816), while the REI and PREI had low correlations (0·000 to 0·069) with milk production. The results showed that the traditional ratio criteria (FCR, GME, GEE and NEE) are highly influenced by production traits, while the REI and PREI are independent of production level. Moreover, the PREI adjusts the REI magnitude for intake level. It seems that the PREI could be considered as a worthwhile measure of efficiency for future studies.

  10. Non-spectroscopic composition measurements of SrTiO 3-La 0.7Sr 0.3MnO 3 multilayers using scanning convergent beam electron diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Ophus, Colin; Ercius, Peter; Huijben, Mark; ...

    2017-02-08

    The local atomic structure of a crystalline sample aligned along a zone axis can be probed with a focused electron probe, which produces a convergent beam electron diffraction pattern. The introduction of high speed direct electron detectors has allowed for experiments that can record a full diffraction pattern image at thousands of probe positions on a sample. By incoherently summing these patterns over crystalline unit cells, we demonstrate in this paper that in addition to crystal structure and thickness, we can also estimate the local composition of a perovskite superlattice sample. This is achieved by matching the summed patterns tomore » a library of simulated diffraction patterns. Finally, this technique allows for atomic-scale chemical measurements without requiring a spectrometer or hardware aberration correction.« less

  11. Thorough subcells diagnosis in a multi-junction solar cell via absolute electroluminescence-efficiency measurements

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shaoqiang; Zhu, Lin; Yoshita, Masahiro; Mochizuki, Toshimitsu; Kim, Changsu; Akiyama, Hidefumi; Imaizumi, Mitsuru; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2015-01-01

    World-wide studies on multi-junction (tandem) solar cells have led to record-breaking improvements in conversion efficiencies year after year. To obtain detailed and proper feedback for solar-cell design and fabrication, it is necessary to establish standard methods for diagnosing subcells in fabricated tandem devices. Here, we propose a potential standard method to quantify the detailed subcell properties of multi-junction solar cells based on absolute measurements of electroluminescence (EL) external quantum efficiency in addition to the conventional solar-cell external-quantum-efficiency measurements. We demonstrate that the absolute-EL-quantum-efficiency measurements provide I–V relations of individual subcells without the need for referencing measured I–V data, which is in stark contrast to previous works. Moreover, our measurements quantify the absolute rates of junction loss, non-radiative loss, radiative loss, and luminescence coupling in the subcells, which constitute the “balance sheets” of tandem solar cells. PMID:25592484

  12. A benchmarking method to measure dietary absorption efficiency of chemicals by fish.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ruiyang; Adolfsson-Erici, Margaretha; Åkerman, Gun; McLachlan, Michael S; MacLeod, Matthew

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the dietary absorption efficiency of chemicals in the gastrointestinal tract of fish is important from both a scientific and a regulatory point of view. However, reported fish absorption efficiencies for well-studied chemicals are highly variable. In the present study, the authors developed and exploited an internal chemical benchmarking method that has the potential to reduce uncertainty and variability and, thus, to improve the precision of measurements of fish absorption efficiency. The authors applied the benchmarking method to measure the gross absorption efficiency for 15 chemicals with a wide range of physicochemical properties and structures. They selected 2,2',5,6'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (PCB53) and decabromodiphenyl ethane as absorbable and nonabsorbable benchmarks, respectively. Quantities of chemicals determined in fish were benchmarked to the fraction of PCB53 recovered in fish, and quantities of chemicals determined in feces were benchmarked to the fraction of decabromodiphenyl ethane recovered in feces. The performance of the benchmarking procedure was evaluated based on the recovery of the test chemicals and precision of absorption efficiency from repeated tests. Benchmarking did not improve the precision of the measurements; after benchmarking, however, the median recovery for 15 chemicals was 106%, and variability of recoveries was reduced compared with before benchmarking, suggesting that benchmarking could account for incomplete extraction of chemical in fish and incomplete collection of feces from different tests. © 2013 SETAC.

  13. Efficiency measurement of the banking sector in the presence of non-performing loan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, Nurhayati; Ramli, Noor Asiah; Hussin, Siti Aida Sheikh

    2017-01-01

    Bank industry plays a vital role in a country's economic development. In the banking industry, the non-performing loans which are acknowledged as being undesirable outputs and usually ignored in most of the analysis should be taken into account since they are undesirable by-products of producing loans and may lead to the bank inefficiency. Modelling the efficiency measurement without undesirable outputs can provide misleading results and unfair assessment. The Directional Distance Function (DDF) approach which extended from the Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) framework is one of the enhancement efficiency approaches to handle a situation when there is a joint production of the desirable and undesirable outputs. The comparison of both results between the domestic and foreign banks shows that the DEA technical efficiency score for domestic banks is marginally higher than the Malaysian foreign banks. However, when incorporating the undesirable output, the DDF technical efficiency for foreign banks is slightly higher than domestic banks.

  14. Experimental feasibility of the airborne measurement of absolute oil fluorescence spectral conversion efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    Airborne lidar oil spill experiments carried out to determine the practicability of the AOFSCE (absolute oil fluorescence spectral conversion efficiency) computational model are described. The results reveal that the model is suitable over a considerable range of oil film thicknesses provided the fluorescence efficiency of the oil does not approach the minimum detection sensitivity limitations of the lidar system. Separate airborne lidar experiments to demonstrate measurement of the water column Raman conversion efficiency are also conducted to ascertain the ultimate feasibility of converting such relative oil fluorescence to absolute values. Whereas the AOFSCE model is seen as highly promising, further airborne water column Raman conversion efficiency experiments with improved temporal or depth-resolved waveform calibration and software deconvolution techniques are thought necessary for a final determination of suitability.

  15. Diffraction Gratings for High-Intensity Laser Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Britten, J

    The scattering of light into wavelength-dependent discrete directions (orders) by a device exhibiting a periodic modulation of a physical attribute on a spatial scale similar to the wavelength of light has been the subject of study for over 200 years. Such a device is called a diffraction grating. Practical applications of diffraction gratings, mainly for spectroscopy, have been around for over 100 years. The importance of diffraction gratings in spectroscopy for the measurement of myriad properties of matter can hardly be overestimated. Since the advent of coherent light sources (lasers) in the 1960's, applications of diffraction gratings in spectroscopy havemore » further exploded. Lasers have opened a vast application space for gratings, and apace, gratings have enabled entirely new classes of laser systems. Excellent reviews of the history, fundamental properties, applications and manufacturing techniques of diffraction gratings up to the time of their publication can be found in the books by Hutley (1) and more recently Loewen and Popov (2). The limited scope of this chapter can hardly do justice to such a comprehensive subject, so the focus here will be narrowly limited to characteristics required for gratings suitable for high-power laser applications, and methods to fabricate them. A particular area of emphasis will be on maximally-efficient large-aperture gratings for short-pulse laser generation.« less

  16. Compact and high-efficiency device for Raman scattering measurement using optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Tadashi

    2014-11-01

    We describe the design and development of a high-efficiency optical measurement device for operation within the small bore of a high-power magnet at low temperature. For the high-efficiency measurement of light emitted from this small region, we designed a compact confocal optics with lens focusing and tilting systems, and used a piezodriven translation stage that allows micron-scale focus control of the sample position. We designed a measurement device that uses 10 m-long optical fibers in order to avoid the influence of mechanical vibration and magnetic field leakage of high-power magnets, and we also describe a technique for minimizing the fluorescence signal of optical fibers. The operation of the device was confirmed by Raman scattering measurements of monolayer graphene on quartz glass with a high signal-to-noise ratio.

  17. How [NOT] to Measure a Solar Cell to Get the Highest Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, Keith

    The multibillion-dollar photovoltaic (PV) industry sells products by the watt; the calibration labs measure this parameter at the cell and module level with the lowest possible uncertainty of 1-2 percent. The methods and procedures to achieve a measured 50 percent efficiency on a thin-film solar cell are discussed. This talk will describe methods that ignore procedures that increase the uncertainty. Your questions will be answered concerning 'Everything you Always Wanted to Know about Efficiency Enhancements But Were Afraid to Ask.' The talk will cover a step-by-step procedure using examples found in literature or encountered in customer samples by the Nationalmore » Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) PV Performance Characterization Group on how to artificially enhance the efficiency. The procedures will describe methods that have been used to enhance the current voltage and fill factor.« less

  18. Measuring the efficiency of dental departments in medical centers: a nonparametric analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Wang, Su-Chen; Tsai, Chi-Cheng; Huang, Shun-Te; Hong, Yu-Jue

    2002-12-01

    Data envelopment analysis (DEA), a cross-sectional study design based on secondary data analysis, was used to evaluate the relative operational efficiency of 16 dental departments in medical centers in Taiwan in 1999. The results indicated that 68.7% of all dental departments in medical centers had poor performance in terms of overall efficiency and scale efficiency. All relatively efficient dental departments were in private medical centers. Half of these dental departments were unable to fully utilize available medical resources. 75.0% of public medical centers did not take full advantage of medical resources at their disposal. In the returns to scale, 56.3% of dental departments in medical centers exhibited increasing returns to scale, due to the insufficient scale influencing overall hospital operational efficiency. Public medical centers accounted for 77.8% of the institutions affected. The scale of dental departments in private medical centers was more appropriate than those in public medical centers. In the sensitivity analysis, the numbers of residents, interns, and published papers were used to assess teaching and research. Greater emphasis on teaching and research in medical centers has a large effect on the relative inefficiency of hospital operation. Dental departments in private medical centers had a higher mean overall efficiency score than those in public medical centers, and the overall efficiency of dental departments in non-university hospitals was greater than those in university hospitals. There was no information to evaluate the long-term efficiency of each dental department in all hospitals. A different combination of input and output variables, using common multipliers for efficiency value measurements in DEA, may help establish different pioneering dental departments in hospitals.

  19. Measurement of the photon identification efficiencies with the ATLAS detector using LHC Run-1 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Verzini, M. J. Alconada; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alstaty, M.; Gonzalez, B. Alvarez; Piqueras, D. Álvarez; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Coutinho, Y. Amaral; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Santos, S. P. Amor Dos; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Bella, L. Aperio; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. 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    2016-12-01

    The algorithms used by the ATLAS Collaboration to reconstruct and identify prompt photons are described. Measurements of the photon identification efficiencies are reported, using 4.9 fb^{-1} of pp collision data collected at the LHC at √{s} = 7 {TeV} and 20.3 fb^{-1} at √{s} = 8 {TeV}. The efficiencies are measured separately for converted and unconverted photons, in four different pseudorapidity regions, for transverse momenta between 10 {GeV} and 1.5 {TeV}. The results from the combination of three data-driven techniques are compared to the predictions from a simulation of the detector response, after correcting the electromagnetic shower momenta in the simulation for the average differences observed with respect to data. Data-to-simulation efficiency ratios used as correction factors in physics measurements are determined to account for the small residual efficiency differences. These factors are measured with uncertainties between 0.5% and 10% in 7 {TeV} data and between 0.5% and 5.6% in 8 {TeV} data, depending on the photon transverse momentum and pseudorapidity.

  20. Measurement of the photon identification efficiencies with the ATLAS detector using LHC Run-1 data.

    PubMed

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Zimine, N I; Zimmermann, C; Zimmermann, S; Zinonos, Z; Zinser, M; Ziolkowski, M; Živković, L; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Nedden, M Zur; Zurzolo, G; Zwalinski, L

    2016-01-01

    The algorithms used by the ATLAS Collaboration to reconstruct and identify prompt photons are described. Measurements of the photon identification efficiencies are reported, using 4.9 fb[Formula: see text] of pp collision data collected at the LHC at [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text] and 20.3 fb[Formula: see text] at [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text]. The efficiencies are measured separately for converted and unconverted photons, in four different pseudorapidity regions, for transverse momenta between 10 [Formula: see text] and 1.5 [Formula: see text]. The results from the combination of three data-driven techniques are compared to the predictions from a simulation of the detector response, after correcting the electromagnetic shower momenta in the simulation for the average differences observed with respect to data. Data-to-simulation efficiency ratios used as correction factors in physics measurements are determined to account for the small residual efficiency differences. These factors are measured with uncertainties between 0.5% and 10% in 7 [Formula: see text] data and between 0.5% and 5.6% in 8 [Formula: see text] data, depending on the photon transverse momentum and pseudorapidity.

  1. Tracking Our Success: How TAFE Institutes Measure Their Effectiveness and Efficiency--Case Studies. Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misko, Josie; Wynes, Sian Halliday

    2009-01-01

    This report is the support document to "Tracking Our Success: How TAFE Institutes Measure Their Effectiveness and Efficiency". It comprises reports on each of the nine technical and further education (TAFE) institutes that have taken part in the study. Information was collected via in-depth interviews with chief executive officers and…

  2. Measuring Search Efficiency in Complex Visual Search Tasks: Global and Local Clutter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Melissa R.; Lohrenz, Maura C.; Trafton, J. Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Set size and crowding affect search efficiency by limiting attention for recognition and attention against competition; however, these factors can be difficult to quantify in complex search tasks. The current experiments use a quantitative measure of the amount and variability of visual information (i.e., clutter) in highly complex stimuli (i.e.,…

  3. Measurement of the photon identification efficiencies with the ATLAS detector using LHC Run-1 data

    DOE PAGES

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; ...

    2016-12-03

    The algorithms used by the ATLAS Collaboration to reconstruct and identify prompt photons are described. Measurements of the photon identification efficiencies are reported, using 4.9 fb –1 of pp collision data collected at the LHC at √s = 7 TeV and 20.3 fb –1 at √s = 8 TeV. The efficiencies are measured separately for converted and unconverted photons, in four different pseudorapidity regions, for transverse momenta between 10 GeV and 1.5 TeV. The results from the combination of three data-driven techniques are compared to the predictions from a simulation of the detector response, after correcting the electromagnetic shower momentamore » in the simulation for the average differences observed with respect to data. Data-to-simulation efficiency ratios used as correction factors in physics measurements are determined to account for the small residual efficiency differences. These factors are measured with uncertainties between 0.5% and 10% in 7 TeV data and between 0.5% and 5.6% in 8 TeV data, depending on the photon transverse momentum and pseudorapidity.« less

  4. Genetic markers that influence feed efficiency phenotypes also affect cattle temperament as measured by flight speed

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The measure of flight speed for cattle has been shown to be a predictive indicator of temperament and has also been associated with feed efficiency phenotypes, thus, genetic markers associated with both traits may assist with the selection of animals with calmer disposition and economic value. Chrom...

  5. A Measurement of Charter School Efficiency in North Carolina Utilizing Modified Quadriform Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturdevant, Daniel C.

    2017-01-01

    Charter schools exist under the umbrella of public education, but are not subject to the same level of public oversight or accountability measures as traditional public schools in North Carolina and many other states (BiFulco and Ladd, 2006, Bettinger, 2004). There is a lack of easily accessible efficiency data on charter schools. The primary aim…

  6. Long-duration heat load measurement approach by novel apparatus design and highly efficient algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yanwei; Yi, Fajun; Meng, Songhe; Zhuo, Lijun; Pan, Weizhen

    2017-11-01

    Improving the surface heat load measurement technique for vehicles in aerodynamic heating environments is imperative, regarding aspects of both the apparatus design and identification efficiency. A simple novel apparatus is designed for heat load identification, taking into account the lessons learned from several aerodynamic heating measurement devices. An inverse finite difference scheme (invFDM) for the apparatus is studied to identify its surface heat flux from the interior temperature measurements with high efficiency. A weighted piecewise regression filter is also proposed for temperature measurement prefiltering. Preliminary verification of the invFDM scheme and the filter is accomplished via numerical simulation experiments. Three specific pieces of apparatus have been concretely designed and fabricated using different sensing materials. The aerodynamic heating process is simulated by an inductively coupled plasma wind tunnel facility. The identification of surface temperature and heat flux from the temperature measurements is performed by invFDM. The results validate the high efficiency, reliability and feasibility of heat load measurements with different heat flux levels utilizing the designed apparatus and proposed method.

  7. The structure of liquid water up to 360 MPa from x-ray diffraction measurements using a high Q-range and from molecular simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, L. B.; Galib, M.; Fulton, J. L.

    2016-04-07

    X-ray diffraction measurements of liquid water are reported at pressures up to 360 MPa corresponding to a density of 0.0373 molecules per Å3. The measurements were conducted at a spatial resolution corresponding to Qmax = 16 Å-1. The method of data analysis and measurement in this study follows the earlier benchmark results reported for water under ambient conditions having density of 0.0333 molecules per Å3 and Qmax = 20 Å-1 [J Chem Phys 138, 074506 (2013)]1 and at 70°C having density of 0.0327 molecules per Å3 and Qmax = 20 Å-1. [J Chem Phys 141, 214507 (2014)]2 The structure ofmore » water is very different at these three different T and P state points and thus they provide basis for evaluating the fidelity of molecular simulation. Measurements show that at 360 MPa, the 4 waters residing in the region between 2.3-3 Å are nearly unchanged: the peak position, shape and coordination number are nearly identical to their values under ambient conditions. However, in the region above 3 Å, large structural changes occur with the collapse of the well-defined 2nd shell and shifting of higher shells to shorter distances. The measured structure is compared to simulated structure using intermolecular potentials described by both first-principles methods (revPBE-D3) and classical potentials (TIP4P/2005 and mW). The DFT-based, revPBE-D3 provides the best overall representation of the ambient, high-temperature and high-pressure data while the TIP4P/2005 also captures the densification mechanism, whereby the non-bonded 5th nearest neighbor molecule, which encroaches the 1st shell at ambient pressure, is pushed further into the local tetrahedral arrangement at higher pressures by the more distant molecules filling the void space in the network between the 1st and 2nd shells. Acknowledgments: Thanks to Rick Spence and Doug Robinson for support with the beamline equipment at the Advanced Photon Source. The helpful comments of Valeria Molinero are acknowledged. This work

  8. Light distribution in diffractive multifocal optics and its optimization.

    PubMed

    Portney, Valdemar

    2011-11-01

    To expand a geometrical model of diffraction efficiency and its interpretation to the multifocal optic and to introduce formulas for analysis of far and near light distribution and their application to multifocal intraocular lenses (IOLs) and to diffraction efficiency optimization. Medical device consulting firm, Newport Coast, California, USA. Experimental study. Application of a geometrical model to the kinoform (single focus diffractive optical element) was expanded to a multifocal optic to produce analytical definitions of light split between far and near images and light loss to other diffraction orders. The geometrical model gave a simple interpretation of light split in a diffractive multifocal IOL. An analytical definition of light split between far, near, and light loss was introduced as curve fitting formulas. Several examples of application to common multifocal diffractive IOLs were developed; for example, to light-split change with wavelength. The analytical definition of diffraction efficiency may assist in optimization of multifocal diffractive optics that minimize light loss. Formulas for analysis of light split between different foci of multifocal diffractive IOLs are useful in interpreting diffraction efficiency dependence on physical characteristics, such as blaze heights of the diffractive grooves and wavelength of light, as well as for optimizing multifocal diffractive optics. Disclosure is found in the footnotes. Copyright © 2011 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Electron efficiency measurements with the ATLAS detector using 2012 LHC proton–proton collision data

    DOE PAGES

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; ...

    2017-03-27

    This paper describes the algorithms for the reconstruction and identification of electrons in the central region of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). These algorithms were used for all ATLAS results with electrons in the final state that are based on the 2012 pp collision data produced by the LHC at s = 8 TeV. The efficiency of these algorithms, together with the charge misidentification rate, is measured in data and evaluated in simulated samples using electrons from Z→ ee, Z→ eeγ and J/ ψ→ ee decays. For these efficiency measurements, the full recorded data set, corresponding tomore » an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb - 1 , is used. Based on a new reconstruction algorithm used in 2012, the electron reconstruction efficiency is 97% for electrons with E T = 15 GeV and 99% at E T = 50 GeV. Combining this with the efficiency of additional selection criteria to reject electrons from background processes or misidentified hadrons, the efficiency to reconstruct and identify electrons at the ATLAS experiment varies from 65 to 95%, depending on the transverse momentum of the electron and background rejection.« less

  10. [Hospital efficiency measured by bed space use in a secondary care hospital].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Martínez, Roberto; Martínez-Cruz, Rocío Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    In recognition that the availability of resources in the medical facility forms part of the factors that influence the quality of healthcare, it is of vital importance to measure their outcome. The aim of this study was determine the efficiency of the medical facility through the use of beds in a secondary level hospital. Through the Health Information Management System (HIMS), we examined statistical reports from July 2012 to June 2013 including variables such as expenses, patient days, occupancy rate, average length of stay by specialty and medical division, results were obtained for each strategic indicator, and these results were related assumptions proposing to assess hospital efficiency. Overall, we identified optimal efficiency of the medical facility without analysis of services, leads to deteriorating and low efficiency. The overall outcome of the five indicators applied overlooked saturation of services within the medical unit. However, the overall analysis shows the problem, noting the advantage of evaluating the same scenario from different perspectives. The include indicators measuring hospital efficiency resource based bed, allows considering deficiencies identified, so that decision making is strengthened the decision making health.

  11. Electron efficiency measurements with the ATLAS detector using 2012 LHC proton-proton collision data.

    PubMed

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Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scharf, V; Schegelsky, V A; Scheirich, D; Schernau, M; Schiavi, C; Schier, S; Schillo, C; Schioppa, M; Schlenker, S; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K R; Schmieden, K; Schmitt, C; Schmitt, S; Schmitz, S; Schneider, B; Schnoor, U; Schoeffel, L; Schoening, A; Schoenrock, B D; Schopf, E; Schott, M; Schouwenberg, J F P; Schovancova, J; Schramm, S; Schreyer, M; Schuh, N; Schulte, A; Schultens, M J; Schultz-Coulon, H-C; Schulz, H; Schumacher, M; Schumm, B A; Schune, Ph; Schwartzman, A; Schwarz, T A; Schweiger, H; Schwemling, Ph; Schwienhorst, R; Schwindling, J; Schwindt, T; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Scutti, F; Searcy, J; Seema, P; Seidel, S C; Seiden, A; Seifert, F; Seixas, J M; Sekhniaidze, G; Sekhon, K; Sekula, S J; Seliverstov, D M; Semprini-Cesari, N; Serfon, C; Serin, L; Serkin, L; Serre, T; Sessa, M; Seuster, R; Severini, H; Sfiligoj, T; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shabalina, E; Shaikh, N W; Shan, L Y; Shang, R; Shank, J T; Shapiro, M; Shatalov, P B; Shaw, K; Shaw, S M; Shcherbakova, A; Shehu, C Y; Sherwood, P; Shi, L; Shimizu, S; Shimmin, C O; Shimojima, M; Shirabe, S; Shiyakova, M; Shmeleva, A; Shoaleh Saadi, D; Shochet, M J; Shojaii, S; Shope, D R; Shrestha, S; Shulga, E; Shupe, M A; Sicho, P; Sickles, A M; Sidebo, P E; Sideras Haddad, E; Sidiropoulou, O; Sidorov, D; Sidoti, A; Siegert, F; Sijacki, Dj; Silva, J; Silverstein, S B; Simak, V; Simic, Lj; Simion, S; Simioni, E; Simmons, B; Simon, D; Simon, M; Sinervo, P; Sinev, N B; Sioli, M; Siragusa, G; Siral, I; Sivoklokov, S Yu; Sjölin, J; Skinner, M B; Skottowe, H P; Skubic, P; Slater, M; Slavicek, T; Slawinska, M; Sliwa, K; Slovak, R; Smakhtin, V; Smart, B H; Smestad, L; Smiesko, J; Smirnov, S Yu; Smirnov, Y; Smirnova, L N; Smirnova, O; Smith, J W; Smith, M N K; Smith, R W; Smizanska, M; Smolek, K; Snesarev, A A; Snyder, I M; Snyder, S; Sobie, R; Socher, F; Soffer, A; Soh, D A; Sokhrannyi, G; Solans Sanchez, C A; Solar, M; Soldatov, E Yu; Soldevila, U; Solodkov, A A; Soloshenko, A; Solovyanov, O V; Solovyev, V; Sommer, P; Son, H; Song, H Y; Sood, A; Sopczak, A; Sopko, V; Sorin, V; Sosa, D; Sotiropoulou, C L; Soualah, R; Soukharev, A M; South, D; Sowden, B C; Spagnolo, S; Spalla, M; Spangenberg, M; Spanò, F; Sperlich, D; Spettel, F; Spighi, R; Spigo, G; Spiller, L A; Spousta, M; Denis, R D St; Stabile, A; Stamen, R; Stamm, S; Stanecka, E; Stanek, R W; Stanescu, C; Stanescu-Bellu, M; Stanitzki, M M; Stapnes, S; Starchenko, E A; Stark, G H; Stark, J; Stark, S H; Staroba, P; Starovoitov, P; Stärz, S; Staszewski, R; Steinberg, P; Stelzer, B; Stelzer, H J; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stenzel, H; Stewart, G A; Stillings, J A; Stockton, M C; Stoebe, M; Stoicea, G; Stolte, P; Stonjek, S; Stradling, A R; Straessner, A; Stramaglia, M E; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strandlie, A; Strauss, M; Strizenec, P; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D M; Stroynowski, R; Strubig, A; Stucci, S A; Stugu, B; Styles, N A; Su, D; Su, J; Suchek, S; Sugaya, Y; Suk, M; Sulin, V V; Sultansoy, S; Sumida, T; Sun, S; Sun, X; Sundermann, J E; Suruliz, K; Suster, C J E; Sutton, M R; Suzuki, S; Svatos, M; Swiatlowski, M; Swift, S P; Sykora, I; Sykora, T; Ta, D; Tackmann, K; Taenzer, J; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Taiblum, N; Takai, H; Takashima, R; Takeshita, T; Takubo, Y; Talby, M; Talyshev, A A; Tanaka, J; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanaka, S; Tanioka, R; Tannenwald, B B; Tapia Araya, S; Tapprogge, S; Tarem, S; Tartarelli, G F; Tas, P; Tasevsky, M; Tashiro, T; Tassi, E; Tavares Delgado, A; Tayalati, Y; Taylor, A C; Taylor, G N; Taylor, P T E; Taylor, W; Teischinger, F A; Teixeira-Dias, P; Temming, K K; Temple, D; Ten Kate, H; Teng, P K; Teoh, J J; Tepel, F; Terada, S; Terashi, K; Terron, J; Terzo, S; Testa, M; Teuscher, R J; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T; Thomas, J P; Thomas-Wilsker, J; Thompson, P D; Thompson, A S; Thomsen, L A; Thomson, E; Tibbetts, M J; Ticse Torres, R E; Tikhomirov, V O; Tikhonov, Yu A; Timoshenko, S; Tiouchichine, E; Tipton, P; Tisserant, S; Todome, K; Todorov, T; Todorova-Nova, S; Tojo, J; Tokár, S; Tokushuku, K; Tolley, E; Tomlinson, L; Tomoto, M; Tompkins, L; Toms, K; Tong, B; Tornambe, P; Torrence, E; Torres, H; Torró Pastor, E; Toth, J; Touchard, F; Tovey, D R; Trefzger, T; Tricoli, A; Trigger, I M; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tripiana, M F; Trischuk, W; Trocmé, B; Trofymov, A; Troncon, C; Trottier-McDonald, M; Trovatelli, M; Truong, L; Trzebinski, M; Trzupek, A; Tseng, J C-L; Tsiareshka, P V; Tsipolitis, G; Tsirintanis, N; Tsiskaridze, S; Tsiskaridze, V; Tskhadadze, E G; Tsui, K M; Tsukerman, I I; Tsulaia, V; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Tu, Y; Tudorache, A; Tudorache, V; Tulbure, T T; Tuna, A N; Tupputi, S A; Turchikhin, S; Turgeman, D; Turk Cakir, I; Turra, R; Tuts, P M; Ucchielli, G; Ueda, I; Ughetto, M; Ukegawa, F; Unal, G; Undrus, A; Unel, G; Ungaro, F C; Unno, Y; Unverdorben, C; Urban, J; Urquijo, P; Urrejola, P; Usai, G; Usui, J; Vacavant, L; Vacek, V; Vachon, B; Valderanis, C; Valdes Santurio, E; Valencic, N; Valentinetti, S; Valero, A; Valery, L; Valkar, S; Valls Ferrer, J A; Van Den Wollenberg, W; Van Der Deijl, P C; van der Graaf, H; van Eldik, N; van Gemmeren, P; Van Nieuwkoop, J; van Vulpen, I; van Woerden, M C; Vanadia, M; Vandelli, W; Vanguri, R; Vaniachine, A; Vankov, P; Vardanyan, G; Vari, R; Varnes, E W; Varol, T; Varouchas, D; Vartapetian, A; Varvell, K E; Vasquez, J G; Vasquez, G A; Vazeille, F; Vazquez Schroeder, T; Veatch, J; Veeraraghavan, V; Veloce, L M; Veloso, F; Veneziano, S; Ventura, A; Venturi, M; Venturi, N; Venturini, A; Vercesi, V; Verducci, M; Verkerke, W; Vermeulen, J C; Vest, A; Vetterli, M C; Viazlo, O; Vichou, I; Vickey, T; Vickey Boeriu, O E; Viehhauser, G H A; Viel, S; Vigani, L; Villa, M; Villaplana Perez, M; Vilucchi, E; Vincter, M G; Vinogradov, V B; Vittori, C; Vivarelli, I; Vlachos, S; Vlasak, M; Vogel, M; Vokac, P; Volpi, G; Volpi, M; von der Schmitt, H; von Toerne, E; Vorobel, V; Vorobev, K; Vos, M; Voss, R; Vossebeld, J H; Vranjes, N; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M; Vrba, V; Vreeswijk, M; Vuillermet, R; Vukotic, I; Wagner, P; Wagner, W; Wahlberg, H; Wahrmund, S; Wakabayashi, J; Walder, J; Walker, R; Walkowiak, W; Wallangen, V; Wang, C; Wang, C; Wang, F; Wang, H; Wang, H; Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, K; Wang, R; Wang, S M; Wang, T; Wang, W; Wanotayaroj, C; Warburton, A; Ward, C P; Wardrope, D R; Washbrook, A; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, M F; Watts, G; Watts, S; Waugh, B M; Webb, S; Weber, M S; Weber, S W; Weber, S A; Webster, J S; Weidberg, A R; Weinert, B; Weingarten, J; Weiser, C; Weits, H; Wells, P S; Wenaus, T; Wengler, T; Wenig, S; Wermes, N; Werner, M D; Werner, P; Wessels, M; Wetter, J; Whalen, K; Whallon, N L; Wharton, A M; White, A; White, M J; White, R; Whiteson, D; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wiglesworth, C; Wiik-Fuchs, L A M; Wildauer, A; Wilk, F; Wilkens, H G; Williams, H H; Williams, S; Willis, C; Willocq, S; Wilson, J A; Wingerter-Seez, I; Winklmeier, F; Winston, O J; Winter, B T; Wittgen, M; Wolf, T M H; Wolff, R; Wolter, M W; Wolters, H; Worm, S D; Wosiek, B K; Wotschack, J; Woudstra, M J; Wozniak, K W; Wu, M; Wu, M; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Wu, Y; Wyatt, T R; Wynne, B M; Xella, S; Xi, Z; Xu, D; Xu, L; Yabsley, B; Yacoob, S; Yamaguchi, D; Yamaguchi, Y; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, S; Yamanaka, T; Yamauchi, K; Yamazaki, Y; Yan, Z; Yang, H; Yang, H; Yang, Y; Yang, Z; Yao, W-M; Yap, Y C; Yasu, Y; Yatsenko, E; Yau Wong, K H; Ye, J; Ye, S; Yeletskikh, I; Yildirim, E; Yorita, K; Yoshida, R; Yoshihara, K; Young, C; Young, C J S; Youssef, S; Yu, D R; Yu, J; Yu, J M; Yu, J; Yuan, L; Yuen, S P Y; Yusuff, I; Zabinski, B; Zacharis, G; Zaidan, R; Zaitsev, A M; Zakharchuk, N; Zalieckas, J; Zaman, A; Zambito, S; Zanello, L; Zanzi, D; Zeitnitz, C; Zeman, M; Zemla, A; Zeng, J C; Zeng, Q; Zenin, O; Ženiš, T; Zerwas, D; Zhang, D; Zhang, F; Zhang, G; Zhang, H; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, R; Zhang, R; Zhang, X; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhao, X; Zhao, Y; Zhao, Z; Zhemchugov, A; Zhong, J; Zhou, B; Zhou, C; Zhou, L; Zhou, L; Zhou, M; Zhou, M; Zhou, N; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, J; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zhukov, K; Zibell, A; Zieminska, D; Zimine, N I; Zimmermann, C; Zimmermann, S; Zinonos, Z; Zinser, M; Ziolkowski, M; Živković, L; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Zur Nedden, M; Zwalinski, L

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the algorithms for the reconstruction and identification of electrons in the central region of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). These algorithms were used for all ATLAS results with electrons in the final state that are based on the 2012 pp collision data produced by the LHC at [Formula: see text] = 8 [Formula: see text]. The efficiency of these algorithms, together with the charge misidentification rate, is measured in data and evaluated in simulated samples using electrons from [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] decays. For these efficiency measurements, the full recorded data set, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb[Formula: see text], is used. Based on a new reconstruction algorithm used in 2012, the electron reconstruction efficiency is 97% for electrons with [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text] and 99% at [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text]. Combining this with the efficiency of additional selection criteria to reject electrons from background processes or misidentified hadrons, the efficiency to reconstruct and identify electrons at the ATLAS experiment varies from 65 to 95%, depending on the transverse momentum of the electron and background rejection.

  12. Measuring the efficiency of zakat collection process using data envelopment analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamzah, Ahmad Aizuddin; Krishnan, Anath Rau

    2016-10-01

    It is really necessary for each zakat institution in the nation to timely measure and understand their efficiency in collecting zakat for the sake of continuous betterment. Pusat Zakat Sabah, Malaysia which has kicked off its operation in early of 2007, is not excused from this obligation as well. However, measuring the collection efficiency is not a very easy task as it usually incorporates the consideration of multiple inputs or/and outputs. This paper sequentially employed three data envelopment analysis models, namely Charnes-Cooper-Rhodes (CCR) primal model, CCR dual model, and slack based model to quantitatively evaluate the efficiency of zakat collection in Sabah across the year of 2007 up to 2015 by treating each year as a decision making unit. The three models were developed based on two inputs (i.e. number of zakat branches and number of staff) and one output (i.e. total collection). The causes for not achieving efficiency and the suggestions on how the efficiency in each year could have been improved were disclosed.

  13. A Novel Approach to Measuring Efficiency of Scientific Research Projects: Data Envelopment Analysis.

    PubMed

    Dilts, David M; Zell, Adrienne; Orwoll, Eric

    2015-10-01

    Measuring the efficiency of resource allocation for the conduct of scientific projects in medical research is difficult due to, among other factors, the heterogeneity of resources supplied (e.g., dollars or FTEs) and outcomes expected (e.g., grants, publications). While this is an issue in medical science, it has been approached successfully in other fields by using data envelopment analysis (DEA). DEA has a number of advantages over other techniques as it simultaneously uses multiple heterogeneous inputs and outputs to determine which projects are performing most efficiently, referred to as being at the efficiency frontier, when compared to others in the data set. This research uses DEA for the evaluation of supported translational science projects by the Oregon Clinical and Translational Research Institute (OCTRI), a NCATS Clinical & Translational Science Award (CTSA) recipient. These results suggest that the primary determinate of overall project efficiency at OCTRI is the amount of funding, with smaller amounts of funding providing more efficiency than larger funding amounts. These results, and the use of DEA, highlight both the success of using this technique in helping determine medical research efficiency and those factors to consider when distributing funds for new projects at CTSAs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A Novel Approach to Measuring Efficiency of Scientific Research Projects: Data Envelopment Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zell, Adrienne; Orwoll, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose Measuring the efficiency of resource allocation for the conduct of scientific projects in medical research is difficult due to, among other factors, the heterogeneity of resources supplied (e.g., dollars or FTEs) and outcomes expected (e.g., grants, publications). While this is an issue in medical science, it has been approached successfully in other fields by using data envelopment analysis (DEA). DEA has a number of advantages over other techniques as it simultaneously uses multiple heterogeneous inputs and outputs to determine which projects are performing most efficiently, referred to as being at the efficiency frontier, when compared to others in the data set. Method This research uses DEA for the evaluation of supported translational science projects by the Oregon Clinical and Translational Research Institute (OCTRI), a NCATS Clinical & Translational Science Award (CTSA) recipient. Results These results suggest that the primary determinate of overall project efficiency at OCTRI is the amount of funding, with smaller amounts of funding providing more efficiency than larger funding amounts. Conclusion These results, and the use of DEA, highlight both the success of using this technique in helping determine medical research efficiency and those factors to consider when distributing funds for new projects at CTSAs. PMID:26243147

  15. 10 CFR 431.96 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of small, large, and very large...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL... measurement of energy efficiency of small, large, and very large commercial package air conditioning and... section contains test procedures for measuring, pursuant to EPCA, the energy efficiency of any small...

  16. Pinhole diffraction filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodgate, B. E.

    1977-01-01

    Multistage diffraction filter consisting of coalined series of pinholes on parallel sheets can be used as nondegradable UV filter. Beam is attenuated as each pinhole diffracts radiation in controlled manner into divergent beam, and following pinhole accepts only small part of that beam.

  17. Anomalous Diffraction in Crystallographic Phase Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, Wayne A.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray diffraction patterns from crystals of biological macromolecules contain sufficient information to define atomic structures, but atomic positions are inextricable without having electron-density images. Diffraction measurements provide amplitudes, but the computation of electron density also requires phases for the diffracted waves. The resonance phenomenon known as anomalous scattering offers a powerful solution to this phase problem. Exploiting scattering resonances from diverse elements, the methods of multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD) now predominate for de novo determinations of atomic-level biological structures. This review describes the physical underpinnings of anomalous diffraction methods, the evolution of these methods to their current maturity, the elements, procedures and instrumentation used for effective implementation, and the realm of applications. PMID:24726017

  18. The relationship between different measures of feed efficiency and feeding behavior traits in Duroc pigs.

    PubMed

    Lu, D; Jiao, S; Tiezzi, F; Knauer, M; Huang, Y; Gray, K A; Maltecca, C

    2017-08-01

    Utilization of feed in livestock species consists of a wide range of biological processes, and therefore, its efficiency can be expressed in various ways, including direct measurement, such as daily feed intake, as well as indicator measures, such as feeding behavior. Measuring feed efficiency is important to the swine industry, and its accuracy can be enhanced by using automated feeding systems, which record feed intake and associated feeding behavior of individual animals. Each automated feeder space is often shared among several pigs and therefore raises concerns about social interactions among pen mates with regard to feeding behavior. The study herein used a data set of 14,901 Duroc boars with individual records on feed intake, feeding behavior, and other off-test traits. These traits were modeled with and without the random spatial effect of Pen_Room, a concatenation of room and pen, or random social interaction among pen mates. The nonheritable spatial effect of common Pen-Room was observed for traits directly measuring feed intake and accounted for up to 13% of the total phenotypic variance in the average daily feeding rate. The social interaction effect explained larger proportions of phenotypic variation in all the traits studied, with the highest being 59% for ADFI in the group of feeding behaviors, 73% for residual feed intake (RFI; RFI4 and RFI6) in the feed efficiency traits, and 69% for intramuscular fat percentage in the off-test traits. After accounting for the social interaction effect, residual BW gain and RFI and BW gain (RIG) were found to have the heritability of 0.38 and 0.18, respectively, and had strong genetic correlations with growth and off-test traits. Feeding behavior traits were found to be moderately heritable, ranging from 0.14 (ADFI) to 0.52 (average daily occupation time), and some of them were strongly correlated with feed efficiency measures; for example, there was a genetic correlation of 0.88 between ADFI and RFI6. Our work

  19. Multilayer diffraction at 104 keV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krieger, Allen S.; Blake, Richard L.; Siddons, D. P.

    1993-01-01

    We have measured the diffraction peak of a W:Si synthetic multilayer reflector at 104 keV using the High Energy Bonse-Hart Camera at the X-17B hard X-ray wiggler beam line of the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The characteristics of the diffraction peak are described and compared to theory.

  20. Monte Carlo simulations and measurements for efficiency determination of lead shielded plastic scintillator detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Zafar; Negoita, Florin; Tabbassum, Sana; Borcea, Ruxandra; Kisyov, Stanimir

    2017-12-01

    The plastic scintillators are used in different areas of science and technology. One of the use of these scintillator detectors is as beam loss monitors (BLM) for new generation of high intensity heavy ion in superconducting linear accelerators. Operated in pulse counting mode with rather high thresholds and shielded by few centimeters of lead in order to cope with radiofrequency noise and X-ray background emitted by accelerator cavities, they preserve high efficiency for high energy gamma ray and neutrons produced in the nuclear reactions of lost beam particles with accelerator components. Efficiency calculation and calibration of detectors is very important before their practical usage. In the present work, the efficiency of plastic scintillator detectors is simulated using FLUKA for different gamma and neutron sources like, 60Co, 137Cs and 238Pu-Be. The sources are placed at different positions around the detector. Calculated values are compared with the measured values and a reasonable agreement is observed.

  1. Measuring environmental efficiency of agricultural water use: a Luenberger environmental indicator.

    PubMed

    Azad, Md A S; Ancev, Tihomir

    2014-12-01

    Irrigated agriculture creates substantial environmental pressures by withdrawing large quantities of water, leaving rivers and wetlands empty and unable to support the valuable ecosystems that depend on the water resource. The key challenge facing society is that of balancing water extractions for agricultural production and other uses with provision of appropriate environmental flow to maintain healthy rivers and wetlands. Measuring tradeoffs between economic gain of water use in agriculture and its environmental pressures can contribute to constructing policy instruments for improved water resource management. The aim of this paper is to develop a modelling framework to measure these tradeoffs. Using a new approach - Luenberger environmental indicator - the study derives environmental efficiency scores for various types of irrigation enterprises across seventeen natural resource management regions within the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia. Findings show that there is a substantial variation in environmental performance of irrigation enterprises across the regions. Some enterprises were found to be relatively environmentally efficient in some regions, but they were not efficient in others. The environmental efficiency scores could be used as a guideline for formulating regional policy and strategy to achieve sustainable water use in the agricultural sector. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. An automated system to measure the quantum efficiency of CCDs for astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Coles, R.; Chiang, J.; Cinabro, D.

    We describe a system to measure the Quantum Efficiency in the wavelength range of 300 nm to 1100 nm of 40 × 40 mm n-channel CCD sensors for the construction of the 3.2 gigapixel LSST focal plane. The technique uses a series of instrument to create a very uniform flux of photons of controllable intensity in the wavelength range of interest across the face the sensor. This allows the absolute Quantum Efficiency to be measured with an accuracy in the 1% range. Finally, this system will be part of a production facility at Brookhaven National Lab for the basic componentmore » of the LSST camera.« less

  3. An automated system to measure the quantum efficiency of CCDs for astronomy

    DOE PAGES

    Coles, R.; Chiang, J.; Cinabro, D.; ...

    2017-04-18

    We describe a system to measure the Quantum Efficiency in the wavelength range of 300 nm to 1100 nm of 40 × 40 mm n-channel CCD sensors for the construction of the 3.2 gigapixel LSST focal plane. The technique uses a series of instrument to create a very uniform flux of photons of controllable intensity in the wavelength range of interest across the face the sensor. This allows the absolute Quantum Efficiency to be measured with an accuracy in the 1% range. Finally, this system will be part of a production facility at Brookhaven National Lab for the basic componentmore » of the LSST camera.« less

  4. Computer Generated Diffraction Patterns Of Rough Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakels, Jan H.

    1989-03-01

    It is generally accepted, that optical methods are the most promising for the in-process measurement of surface finish. These methods have the advantages of being non-contacting and fast data acquisition. In the Micro-Engineering Centre at the University of Warwick, an optical sensor has been devised which can measure the rms roughness, slope and wavelength of turned and precision ground surfaces. The operation of this device is based upon the Kirchhoff-Fresnel diffraction integral. Application of this theory to ideal turned surfaces is straightforward, and indeed the theoretically calculated diffraction patterns are in close agreement with patterns produced by an actual optical instrument. Since it is mathematically difficult to introduce real surface profiles into the diffraction integral, a computer program has been devised, which simulates the operation of the optical sensor. The program produces a diffraction pattern as a graphical output. Comparison between computer generated and actual diffraction patterns of the same surfaces show a high correlation.

  5. Color characterization of coatings with diffraction pigments.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, A; Bernad, B; Campos, J; Perales, E; Velázquez, J L; Martínez-Verdú, F M

    2016-10-01

    Coatings with diffraction pigments present high iridescence, which needs to be characterized in order to describe their appearance. The spectral bidirectional reflectance distribution functions (BRDFs) of six coatings with SpectraFlair diffraction pigments were measured using the robot-arm-based goniospectrophotometer GEFE, designed and developed at CSIC. Principal component analysis has been applied to study the coatings of BRDF data. From data evaluation and based on theoretical considerations, we propose a relevant geometric factor to study the spectral reflectance and color gamut variation of coatings with diffraction pigments. At fixed values of this geometric factor, the spectral BRDF component due to diffraction is almost constant. Commercially available portable goniospectrophotometers, extensively used in several industries (automotive and others), should be provided with more aspecular measurement angles to characterize the complex reflectance of goniochromatic coatings based on diffraction pigments, but they would not require either more than one irradiation angle or additional out-of-plane geometries.

  6. Diffraction effects in mechanically chopped laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambhir, Samridhi; Singh, Mandip

    2018-06-01

    A mechanical beam chopper consists of a rotating disc of regularly spaced wide slits which allow light to pass through them. A continuous light beam, after passing through the rotating disc, is switched-on and switched-off periodically, and a series of optical pulses are produced. The intensity of each pulse is expected to rise and fall smoothly with time. However, a careful study has revealed that the edges of mechanically chopped laser light pulses consist of periodic intensity undulations which can be detected with a photo detector. In this paper, it is shown that the intensity undulations in mechanically chopped laser pulses are produced by diffraction of light from the rotating disc, and a detailed explanation is given of the intensity undulations in mechanically chopped laser pulses. An experiment presented in this paper provides an efficient method to capture a one dimensional diffraction profile of light from a straight sharp-edge in the time domain. In addition, the experiment accurately measures wavelengths of three different laser beams from the undulations in mechanically chopped laser light pulses.

  7. Fraunhofer Diffraction and Polarization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortin, E.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an experiment for the intermediate undergraduate optics laboratory designed to illustrate simultaneously some aspects of the phenomena of diffraction; interference, coherence, apodization, the Fresnel-Arago law; as well as of the interrelations between these concepts. (HM)

  8. DIFFRACTION SYNCHRONIZATION OF LASERS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    semiconductor lasers while suppressing parasitic generation in the plane of the mirror. The diffraction coupling coefficient of open resonators is calculated, and the stability conditions of the synchronized system is determined.

  9. NOTE: Calculating diffraction patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rioux, Frank

    2003-05-01

    Following Marcella's approach to the double-slit experiment (Marcella T V 2002 Eur. J. Phys. 23 615-21), diffraction patterns for two-dimensional masks are calculated by Fourier transform of the Mask geometry into momentum space.

  10. Rice growing farmers efficiency measurement using a slack based interval DEA model with undesirable outputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Sahubar Ali Mohd. Nadhar; Ramli, Razamin; Baten, M. D. Azizul

    2017-11-01

    In recent years eco-efficiency which considers the effect of production process on environment in determining the efficiency of firms have gained traction and a lot of attention. Rice farming is one of such production processes which typically produces two types of outputs which are economic desirable as well as environmentally undesirable. In efficiency analysis, these undesirable outputs cannot be ignored and need to be included in the model to obtain the actual estimation of firm's efficiency. There are numerous approaches that have been used in data envelopment analysis (DEA) literature to account for undesirable outputs of which directional distance function (DDF) approach is the most widely used as it allows for simultaneous increase in desirable outputs and reduction of undesirable outputs. Additionally, slack based DDF DEA approaches considers the output shortfalls and input excess in determining efficiency. In situations when data uncertainty is present, the deterministic DEA model is not suitable to be used as the effects of uncertain data will not be considered. In this case, it has been found that interval data approach is suitable to account for data uncertainty as it is much simpler to model and need less information regarding the underlying data distribution and membership function. The proposed model uses an enhanced DEA model which is based on DDF approach and incorporates slack based measure to determine efficiency in the presence of undesirable factors and data uncertainty. Interval data approach was used to estimate the values of inputs, undesirable outputs and desirable outputs. Two separate slack based interval DEA models were constructed for optimistic and pessimistic scenarios. The developed model was used to determine rice farmers efficiency from Kepala Batas, Kedah. The obtained results were later compared to the results obtained using a deterministic DDF DEA model. The study found that 15 out of 30 farmers are efficient in all cases. It

  11. Reflective diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Lamartine, Bruce C.

    2003-06-24

    Reflective diffraction grating. A focused ion beam (FIB) micromilling apparatus is used to store color images in a durable medium by milling away portions of the surface of the medium to produce a reflective diffraction grating with blazed pits. The images are retrieved by exposing the surface of the grating to polychromatic light from a particular incident bearing and observing the light reflected by the surface from specified reception bearing.

  12. Semi-automated high-efficiency reflectivity chamber for vacuum UV measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiley, James; Fleming, Brian; Renninger, Nicholas; Egan, Arika

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents the design and theory of operation for a semi-automated reflectivity chamber for ultraviolet optimized optics. A graphical user interface designed in LabVIEW controls the stages, interfaces with the detector system, takes semi-autonomous measurements, and monitors the system in case of error. Samples and an optical photodiode sit on an optics plate mounted to a rotation stage in the middle of the vacuum chamber. The optics plate rotates the samples and diode between an incident and reflected position to measure the absolute reflectivity of the samples at wavelengths limited by the monochromator operational bandpass of 70 nm to 550 nm. A collimating parabolic mirror on a fine steering tip-tilt motor enables beam steering for detector peak-ups. This chamber is designed to take measurements rapidly and with minimal oversight, increasing lab efficiency for high cadence and high accuracy vacuum UV reflectivity measurements.

  13. Measured impacts of high efficiency domestic clothes washers in a community

    SciTech Connect

    Tomlinson, J.; Rizy, T.

    1998-07-01

    The US market for domestic clothes washers is currently dominated by conventional vertical-axis washers that typically require approximately 40 gallons of water for each wash load. Although the current market for high efficiency clothes washers that use much less water and energy is quite small, it is growing slowly as manufacturers make machines based on tumble action, horizontal-axis designs available and as information about the performance and benefits of such machines is developed and made available to consumers. To help build awareness of these benefits and to accelerate markets for high efficiency washers, the Department of Energy (DOE), under itsmore » ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} Program and in cooperation with a major manufacturers of high efficiency washers, conducted a field evaluation of high efficiency washers using Bern, Kansas as a test bed. Baseline washing machine performance data as well as consumer washing behavior were obtained from data collected on the existing machines of more than 100 participants in this instrumented study. Following a 2-month initial study period, all conventional machines were replaced by high efficiency, tumble-action washers, and the study continued for 3 months. Based on measured data from over 20,000 loads of laundry, the impact of the washer replacement on (1) individual customers` energy and water consumption, (2) customers` laundry habits and perceptions, and (3) the community`s water supply and waste water systems were determined. The study, its findings, and how information from the experiment was used to improve national awareness of high efficiency clothes washer benefits are described in this paper.« less

  14. 7Be and hydrological model for more efficient implementation of erosion control measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Barri, Bashar; Bode, Samuel; Blake, William; Ryken, Nick; Cornelis, Wim; Boeckx, Pascal

    2014-05-01

    Increased concern about the on-site and off-site impacts of soil erosion in agricultural and forested areas has endorsed interest in innovative methods to assess in an unbiased way spatial and temporal soil erosion rates and redistribution patterns. Hence, interest in precisely estimating the magnitude of the problem and therefore applying erosion control measures (ECM) more efficiently. The latest generation of physically-based hydrological models, which fully couple overland flow and subsurface flow in three dimensions, permit implementing ECM in small and large scales more effectively if coupled with a sediment transport algorithm. While many studies focused on integrating empirical or numerical models based on traditional erosion budget measurements into 3D hydrological models, few studies evaluated the efficiency of ECM on watershed scale and very little attention is given to the potentials of environmental Fallout Radio-Nuclides (FRNs) in such applications. The use of FRN tracer 7Be in soil erosion/deposition research proved to overcome many (if not all) of the problems associated with the conventional approaches providing reliable data for efficient land use management. This poster will underline the pros and cones of using conventional methods and 7Be tracers to evaluate the efficiency of coconuts dams installed as ECM in experimental field in Belgium. It will also outline the potentials of 7Be in providing valuable inputs for evolving the numerical sediment transport algorithm needed for the hydrological model on field scale leading to assess the possibility of using this short-lived tracer as a validation tool for the upgraded hydrological model on watershed scale in further steps. Keywords: FRN, erosion control measures, hydrological modes

  15. Time-dependent efficiency measurements of donor-acceptor, dye-sensitized polymer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandaccari, Kyle; Chesmore, Grace; Tajalli-Tehrani Valverde, Parisa; Bugaj, Mitchel; McNelis, Brian; Barber, Richard, Jr.

    The fullerene/polymer active layer pairing of PCBM/P3HT has become the model system within the field of polymer solar cell research. A large body of work concerned with reporting improved efficiencies for this system exists, but truly quantitative studies of device lifetime and long-term degradation tendencies are much rarer. Here, we report the effects of two donor-acceptor diazo dye sensitizers on efficiency and lifetime upon addition into the PCBM/P3HT active layer at varied concentrations. The electrical and efficiency measurements were supplemented by time-dependent UV-visible spectroscopy studies and morphology investigations via atomic-force microscopy (AFM). This pairing with spectroscopy offers an internal check on the data as the rate of change in absorbance of the active layer correlates almost exactly to the rate of power conversion efficiency decrease. Additionally, AFM imaging reveals different morphology patterns when dye concentrations and functionalities change. Such observations suggest that such small-molecule sensitizers exert yet undetermined effects on the organization of components within the active layer at the molecular level.

  16. Measuring efficiency of university-industry Ph.D. projects using best worst method.

    PubMed

    Salimi, Negin; Rezaei, Jafar

    A collaborative Ph.D. project, carried out by a doctoral candidate, is a type of collaboration between university and industry. Due to the importance of such projects, researchers have considered different ways to evaluate the success, with a focus on the outputs of these projects. However, what has been neglected is the other side of the coin-the inputs. The main aim of this study is to incorporate both the inputs and outputs of these projects into a more meaningful measure called efficiency. A ratio of the weighted sum of outputs over the weighted sum of inputs identifies the efficiency of a Ph.D. The weights of the inputs and outputs can be identified using a multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) method. Data on inputs and outputs are collected from 51 Ph.D. candidates who graduated from Eindhoven University of Technology. The weights are identified using a new MCDM method called Best Worst Method (BWM). Because there may be differences in the opinion of Ph.D. candidates and supervisors on weighing the inputs and outputs, data for BWM are collected from both groups. It is interesting to see that there are differences in the level of efficiency from the two perspectives, because of the weight differences. Moreover, a comparison between the efficiency scores of these projects and their success scores reveals differences that may have significant implications. A sensitivity analysis divulges the most contributing inputs and outputs.

  17. 10 CFR 431.324 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of metal halide ballasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... efficiency of metal halide ballasts. 431.324 Section 431.324 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Metal Halide Lamp Ballasts and Fixtures Test Procedures § 431.324 Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of metal...

  18. Effect of energy-efficient measures in building construction on indoor radon in Russia.

    PubMed

    Vasilyev, A; Yarmoshenko, I

    2017-04-28

    The effect of implementation of energy-efficient measures in building construction was studied. Analysis includes study of indoor radon in energy-efficient buildings in Ekaterinburg, Russia, and results of radiation measurements in 83 regions of Russia conducted within the regional programmes. The forecast distribution of radon concentration in Ekaterinburg was built with regard to the city development programme. With Ekaterinburg taken as representative case, forecast distribution of radon concentration in Russia in 2030 was built. In comparison with 2000, average radon concentration increases by a factor of 1.42 in 2030 year; percentage above the reference level 300 Bq/m3 increases by a factor of 4 in 2030 year. It is necessary to perceive such an increase with all seriousness and to prepare appropriate measures for optimization of protection against indoor radon. Despite the high uncertainty, reconstructed distribution of radon concentration can be applied for justification of measures to be incorporated in the radon mitigation strategy. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Design of quantum efficiency measurement system for variable doping GaAs photocathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang; Yang, Kai; Liu, HongLin; Chang, Benkang

    2008-03-01

    To achieve high quantum efficiency and good stability has been a main direction to develop GaAs photocathode recently. Through early research, we proved that variable doping structure is executable and practical, and has great potential. In order to optimize variable doping GaAs photocathode preparation techniques and study the variable doping theory deeply, a real-time quantum efficiency measurement system for GaAs Photocathode has been designed. The system uses FPGA (Field-programmable gate array) device, and high speed A/D converter to design a high signal noise ratio and high speed data acquisition card. ARM (Advanced RISC Machines) core processor s3c2410 and real-time embedded system are used to obtain and show measurement results. The measurement precision of photocurrent could reach 1nA, and measurement range of spectral response curve is within 400~1000nm. GaAs photocathode preparation process can be real-time monitored by using this system. This system could easily be added other functions to show the physic variation of photocathode during the preparation process more roundly in the future.

  20. Diffractive Optic Fluid Shear Stress Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D.; Scalf, J.; Forouhar, S.; Muller, R.; Taugwalder, F.; Gharib, M.; Fourguette, D.; Modarress, D.

    2000-01-01

    Light scattering off particles flowing through a two-slit interference pattern can be used to measure the shear stress of the fluid. We have designed and fabricated a miniature diffractive optic sensor based on this principle.

  1. Materials identification using a small-scale pixellated x-ray diffraction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Flynn, D.; Crews, C.; Drakos, I.; Christodoulou, C.; Wilson, M. D.; Veale, M. C.; Seller, P.; Speller, R. D.

    2016-05-01

    A transmission x-ray diffraction system has been developed using a pixellated, energy-resolving detector (HEXITEC) and a small-scale, mains operated x-ray source (Amptek Mini-X). HEXITEC enables diffraction to be measured without the requirement of incident spectrum filtration, or collimation of the scatter from the sample, preserving a large proportion of the useful signal compared with other diffraction techniques. Due to this efficiency, sufficient molecular information for material identification can be obtained within 5 s despite the relatively low x-ray source power. Diffraction data are presented from caffeine, hexamine, paracetamol, plastic explosives and narcotics. The capability to determine molecular information from aspirin tablets inside their packaging is demonstrated. Material selectivity and the potential for a sample classification model is shown with principal component analysis, through which each different material can be clearly resolved.

  2. Real time measurements of surface growth evolution in magnetron sputtered single crystal Mo/V superlattices using in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svedberg, E. B.; Birch, J.; Edvardsson, C. N. L.; Sundgren, J.-E.

    1999-07-01

    The use of video recording of reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) patterns for assessing the dynamic evolution of the surface morphology and crystallinity during growth was evaluated. As an example, Mo/V(001) superlattices with varying layer thickness (with periods Λ of 2.5 to 8.9 nm and a constant Mo:V ratio of 1:1) were examined. During the deposition, changes from two- to three-dimensional growth were observed in situ. From prior transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies, it is known that this transition is associated with a critical thickness and concurrent roughening of the V layer. Video recording and subsequent image and data processing allowed the surface morphology to be continuously followed during growth. Post-growth analyses of the recorded data provided the evolution of surface lattice parameters and short range [1-2 monolayer (ML)] surface roughnesses with a time resolution of 200-400 ms (0.02-0.04 nm thickness resolution). During growth of Mo, a smoothening effect could be observed while the growth of V evidently increased the surface roughness from 1 to 2 ML. Furthermore, the onset of coherency strain relaxation of the topmost growing layers was observed to occur at 2.0-2.5 nm layer thicknesses for both materials, which is in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions.

  3. Observation of Structure of Surfaces and Interfaces by Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction: Atomic-Scale Imaging and Time-Resolved Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakabayashi, Yusuke; Shirasawa, Tetsuroh; Voegeli, Wolfgang; Takahashi, Toshio

    2018-06-01

    The recent developments in synchrotron optics, X-ray detectors, and data analysis algorithms have enhanced the capability of the surface X-ray diffraction technique. This technique has been used to clarify the atomic arrangement around surfaces in a non-contact and nondestructive manner. An overview of surface X-ray diffraction, from the historical development to recent topics, is presented. In the early stage of this technique, surface reconstructions of simple semiconductors or metals were studied. Currently, the surface or interface structures of complicated functional materials are examined with sub-Å resolution. As examples, the surface structure determination of organic semiconductors and of a one-dimensional structure on silicon are presented. A new frontier is time-resolved interfacial structure analysis. A recent observation of the structure and dynamics of the electric double layer of ionic liquids, and an investigation of the structural evolution in the wettability transition on a TiO2 surface that utilizes a newly designed time-resolved surface diffractometer, are presented.

  4. A nearly on-axis spectroscopic system for simultaneously measuring UV-visible absorption and X-ray diffraction in the SPring-8 structural genomics beamline.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Miyuki; Kimura, Tetsunari; Nishida, Takuma; Tosha, Takehiko; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro; Yanagisawa, Sachiko; Ueno, Go; Murakami, Hironori; Ago, Hideo; Yamamoto, Masaki; Ogura, Takashi; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Kubo, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    UV-visible absorption spectroscopy is useful for probing the electronic and structural changes of protein active sites, and thus the on-line combination of X-ray diffraction and spectroscopic analysis is increasingly being applied. Herein, a novel absorption spectrometer was developed at SPring-8 BL26B2 with a nearly on-axis geometry between the X-ray and optical axes. A small prism mirror was placed near the X-ray beamstop to pass the light only 2° off the X-ray beam, enabling spectroscopic analysis of the X-ray-exposed volume of a crystal during X-ray diffraction data collection. The spectrometer was applied to NO reductase, a heme enzyme that catalyzes NO reduction to N2O. Radiation damage to the heme was monitored in real time during X-ray irradiation by evaluating the absorption spectral changes. Moreover, NO binding to the heme was probed via caged NO photolysis with UV light, demonstrating the extended capability of the spectrometer for intermediate analysis.

  5. Efficiency of prompt quarantine measures on a susceptible-infected-removed model in networks.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Takehisa; Nemoto, Koji

    2017-08-01

    This study focuses on investigating the manner in which a prompt quarantine measure suppresses epidemics in networks. A simple and ideal quarantine measure is considered in which an individual is detected with a probability immediately after it becomes infected and the detected one and its neighbors are promptly isolated. The efficiency of this quarantine in suppressing a susceptible-infected-removed (SIR) model is tested in random graphs and uncorrelated scale-free networks. Monte Carlo simulations are used to show that the prompt quarantine measure outperforms random and acquaintance preventive vaccination schemes in terms of reducing the number of infected individuals. The epidemic threshold for the SIR model is analytically derived under the quarantine measure, and the theoretical findings indicate that prompt executions of quarantines are highly effective in containing epidemics. Even if infected individuals are detected with a very low probability, the SIR model under a prompt quarantine measure has finite epidemic thresholds in fat-tailed scale-free networks in which an infected individual can always cause an outbreak of a finite relative size without any measure. The numerical simulations also demonstrate that the present quarantine measure is effective in suppressing epidemics in real networks.

  6. Efficiency of prompt quarantine measures on a susceptible-infected-removed model in networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Takehisa; Nemoto, Koji

    2017-08-01

    This study focuses on investigating the manner in which a prompt quarantine measure suppresses epidemics in networks. A simple and ideal quarantine measure is considered in which an individual is detected with a probability immediately after it becomes infected and the detected one and its neighbors are promptly isolated. The efficiency of this quarantine in suppressing a susceptible-infected-removed (SIR) model is tested in random graphs and uncorrelated scale-free networks. Monte Carlo simulations are used to show that the prompt quarantine measure outperforms random and acquaintance preventive vaccination schemes in terms of reducing the number of infected individuals. The epidemic threshold for the SIR model is analytically derived under the quarantine measure, and the theoretical findings indicate that prompt executions of quarantines are highly effective in containing epidemics. Even if infected individuals are detected with a very low probability, the SIR model under a prompt quarantine measure has finite epidemic thresholds in fat-tailed scale-free networks in which an infected individual can always cause an outbreak of a finite relative size without any measure. The numerical simulations also demonstrate that the present quarantine measure is effective in suppressing epidemics in real networks.

  7. Conversion of far ultraviolet to visible radiation: absolute measurements of the conversion efficiency of tetraphenyl butadiene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vest, Robert E.; Coplan, Michael A.; Clark, Charles W.

    Far ultraviolet (FUV) scintillation of noble gases is used in dark matter and neutrino research and in neutron detection. Upon collisional excitation, noble gas atoms recombine into excimer molecules that decay by FUV emission. Direct detection of FUV is difficult. Another approach is to convert it to visible light using a wavelength-shifting medium. One such medium, tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) can be vapor-deposited on substrates. Thus the quality of thin TPB films can be tightly controlled. We have measured the absolute efficiency of FUV-to-visible conversion by 1 μm-thick TPB films vs. FUV wavelengths between 130 and 300 nm, with 1 nm resolution. The energy efficiency of FUV to visible conversion varies between 1% and 5%. We make comparisons with other recent results. Work performed at the NIST SURF III Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility,.

  8. Indirect measurement of the thermal-acoustic efficiency spectrum of a long turbulent burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahan, J. R.; Jones, J. D.; Blevins, L. R.; Cline, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    A new method is described for deducing the thermal-acoustic efficiency spectrum (defined as the fraction of combustion heat release converted to acoustic energy at a given frequency) of a long turbulent burner from the sound spectrum measured in the far field. The method, which is based on a one-dimensional model of the unsteady flow in the burner, is applied to a tubular diffusion-flame hydrogen burner whose length is large compared to its diameter. The results for thermal powers ranging from 4.5 to 22.3 kW show that the thermal-acoustic efficiency is relatively insensitive to the burner power level, decreasing from a value of around 0.0001 at 150 Hz with a slope of about 20 dB per decade. Evidence is presented indicating that acoustic agitation of the flame below 500 Hz, especially in the neighborhood of the resonant frequencies of the burner, is a significant acoustic source.

  9. Discrimination of orbital angular momentum modes of the terahertz vortex beam using a diffractive mode transformer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changming; Wei, Xuli; Niu, Liting; Wang, Kejia; Yang, Zhengang; Liu, Jinsong

    2016-06-13

    We present an efficient method to discriminate orbital angular momentum (OAM) of the terahertz (THz) vortex beam using a diffractive mode transformer. The mode transformer performs a log-polar coordinate transformation of the input THz vortex beam, which consists of two 3D-printed diffractive elements. A following lens separates each transformed OAM mode to a different lateral position in its focal plane. This method enables a simultaneous measurement over multiple OAM modes of the THz vortex beam. We experimentally demonstrate the measurement of seven individual OAM modes and two multiplexed OAM modes, which is in good agreement with simulations.

  10. Efficiency and productivity measurement of rural township hospitals in China: a bootstrapping data envelopment analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Zhaohui; Cai, Miao; Tao, Hongbing; He, Zhifei; Lin, Xiaojun; Lin, Haifeng; Zuo, Yuling

    2016-01-01

    Objective Township hospitals (THs) are important components of the three-tier rural healthcare system of China. However, the efficiency and productivity of THs have been questioned since the healthcare reform was implemented in 2009. The objective of this study is to analyse the efficiency and productivity changes in THs before and after the reform process. Setting and participants A total of 48 sample THs were selected from the Xiaogan Prefecture in Hubei Province from 2008 to 2014. Outcome measures First, bootstrapping data envelopment analysis (DEA) was performed to estimate the technical efficiency (TE), pure technical efficiency (PTE) and scale efficiency (SE) of the sample THs during the period. Second, the bootstrapping Malmquist productivity index was used to calculate the productivity changes over time. Results The average TE, PTE and SE of the sample THs over the 7-year period were 0.5147, 0.6373 and 0.7080, respectively. The average TE and PTE increased from 2008 to 2012 but declined considerably after 2012. In general, the sample THs experienced a negative shift in productivity from 2008 to 2014. The negative change was 2.14%, which was attributed to a 23.89% decrease in technological changes (TC). The sample THs experienced a positive productivity shift from 2008 to 2012 but experienced deterioration from 2012 to 2014. Conclusions There was considerable space for TE improvement in the sample THs since the average TE was relatively low. From 2008 to 2014, the sample THs experienced a decrease in productivity, and the adverse alteration in TC should be emphasised. In the context of healthcare reform, the factors that influence TE and productivity of THs are complex. Results suggest that numerous quantitative and qualitative studies are necessary to explore the reasons for the changes in TE and productivity. PMID:27836870

  11. Atmospheric particulate mercury in the megacity Beijing: Efficiency of mitigation measures and assessment of health effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleicher, N. J.; Schäfer, J.; Chen, Y.; Blanc, G.; Chen, Y.; Chai, F.; Cen, K.; Norra, S.

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric particulate mercury (HgP) was studied before, during, and after the Olympic Summer Games in Beijing, China, in August 2008 in order to investigate the efficiency of the emission control measures implemented by the Chinese Government. These source control measures comprised traffic reductions, increase in public transportation, planting of vegetation, establishment of parks, building freeze at construction sites, cleaner production techniques for industries and industry closures in Beijing and also in the surrounding areas. Strictest measures including the ;odd-even ban; to halve the vehicle volume were enforced from the 20th of July to the 20th of September 2008. The Olympic period provided the unique opportunity to investigate the efficiency of these comprehensive actions implemented in order to reduce air pollution on a large scale. Therefore, the sampling period covered summer (August, September) and winter (December and January) samples over several years from December 2005 to September 2013. Average HgP concentrations in total suspended particulates (TSP) sampled in August 2008 were 81 ± 39 pg/m3 while TSP mass concentrations were 93 ± 49 μg/m3. This equals a reduction by about 63% for TSP mass and 65% for HgP, respectively, compared to the previous two years demonstrating the short-term success of the measures. However, after the Olympic Games, HgP concentrations increased again to pre-Olympic levels in August 2009 while values in August 2010 decreased again by 30%. Moreover, winter samples, which were 2- to 11-fold higher than corresponding August values, showed decreasing concentrations over the years indicating a long-term improvement of HgP pollution in Beijing. However, regarding adverse health effects, comparisons with soil guideline values and studies from other cities highlighted that HgP concentrations in TSP remained high in Beijing despite respective control measures. Consequently, future mitigation measures need to be tailored more

  12. Experimental method for testing diffraction properties of reflection waveguide holograms.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yi; Kang, Ming-Wu; Wang, Bao-Ping

    2014-07-01

    Waveguide holograms' diffraction properties include peak wavelength and diffraction efficiency, which play an important role in determining their display performance. Based on the record and reconstruction theory of reflection waveguide holograms, a novel experimental method for testing diffraction properties is introduced and analyzed in this paper, which uses a plano-convex lens optically contacted to the surface of the substrate plate of the waveguide hologram, so that the diffracted light beam can be easily detected. Then an experiment is implemented. The designed reconstruction wavelength of the test sample is 530 nm, and its diffraction efficiency is 100%. The experimental results are a peak wavelength of 527.7 nm and a diffraction efficiency of 94.1%. It is shown that the tested value corresponds well with the designed value.

  13. A "hydrokinematic" method of measuring the glide efficiency of a human swimmer.

    PubMed

    Naemi, Roozbeh; Sanders, Ross H

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and test a method of quantifying the glide efficiency, defined as the ability of the body to maintain its velocity over time and to minimize deceleration through a rectilinear glide. The glide efficiency should be determined in a way that accounts for both the inertial and resistive characteristics of the gliding body as well as the instantaneous velocity. A displacement function (parametric curve) was obtained from the equation of motion of the body during a horizontal rectilinear glide. The values of the parameters in the displacement curve that provide the best fit to the displacement-time data of a body during a rectilinear horizontal glide represent the glide factor and the initial velocity of the particular glide interval. The glide factor is a measure of glide efficiency and indicates the ability of the body to minimize deceleration at each corresponding velocity. The glide efficiency depends on the hydrodynamic characteristic of the body, which is influenced by the body's shape as well as by the body's size. To distinguish the effects of size and shape on the glide efficiency, a size-related glide constant and a shape-related glide coefficient were determined as separate entities. The glide factor is the product of these two parameters. The goodness of fit statistics indicated that the representative displacement function found for each glide interval closely represents the real displacement data of a body in a rectilinear horizontal glide. The accuracy of the method was indicated by a relative standard error of calculation of less than 2.5%. Also the method was able to distinguish between subjects in their glide efficiency. It was found that the glide factor increased with decreasing velocity. The glide coefficient also increased with decreasing Reynolds number. The method is sufficiently accurate to distinguish between individual swimmers in terms of their glide efficiency. The separation of glide factor to a size

  14. Chapter 4: Small Commercial and Residential Unitary and Split System HVAC Heating and Cooling Equipment-Efficiency Upgrade Evaluation Protocol. The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Kurnik, Charles W; Jacobson, David; Metoyer, Jarred

    The specific measure described here involves improving the overall efficiency in air-conditioning systems as a whole (compressor, evaporator, condenser, and supply fan). The efficiency rating is expressed as the energy efficiency ratio (EER), seasonal energy efficiency ratio (SEER), and integrated energy efficiency ratio (IEER). The higher the EER, SEER or IEER, the more efficient the unit is.

  15. Multipath analysis diffraction calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statham, Richard B.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes extensions of the Kirchhoff diffraction equation to higher edge terms and discusses their suitability to model diffraction multipath effects of a small satellite structure. When receiving signals, at a satellite, from the Global Positioning System (GPS), reflected signals from the satellite structure result in multipath errors in the determination of the satellite position. Multipath error can be caused by diffraction of the reflected signals and a method of calculating this diffraction is required when using a facet model of the satellite. Several aspects of the Kirchhoff equation are discussed and numerical examples, in the near and far fields, are shown. The vector form of the extended Kirchhoff equation, by adding the Larmor-Tedone and Kottler edge terms, is given as a mathematical model in an appendix. The Kirchhoff equation was investigated as being easily implemented and of good accuracy in the basic form, especially in phase determination. The basic Kirchhoff can be extended for higher accuracy if desired. A brief discussion of the method of moments and the geometric theory of diffraction is included, but seems to offer no clear advantage in implementation over the Kirchhoff for facet models.

  16. Measurement of efficiency in calculus removal with a frequency-doubled Alexandrite laser on pigs' jaws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilgrim, Christian G.; Rechmann, Peter; Goldin, Dan S.; Hennig, Thomas

    2000-03-01

    Periodontal therapy aims in a most sufficient cleaning of tooth surfaces from supra- and subgingival calculus. As a standard dental procedure teeth are treated with ultrasonic devices. The competence of the frequency doubled Alexandrite laser for a highly effective and selective removal of calculus has been repeatedly proved. Aim of the study presented here was to determine the efficiency at simulated clinical conditions of the frequency doubled Alexandrite laser (laboratory prototype, q-switched, fiber guided, wavelength 377 nm, pulse duration 1 microsecond, pulse repetition rate 70 Hz, water cooling) by quantifying it's calculus removing efficiency. The evaluated data were compared to those obtained with an ultrasonic calculus remover. In the first part of the study sample material consisted of 23 pigs' jaws. They were divided into two groups. The teeth of one group were cleaned on their buccal surfaces using an ultrasonic device (Sonosoft Lux, KaVo, Biberach, Germany; tip #9). Than hand-guided cleaning was performed until no further improvement in cleanness was visible. Cleaning time was measured. Photographic documentation was taken before and after the treatment. The teeth in the second group were cleaned engaging a frequency doubled Alexandrite laser. Treatment time was measured and photographs were taken in the same way. In the second part of the study 21 surfaces of human teeth set up in an artificial pocket model were treated with both systems again. Measurements followed the same protocol. The results strongly support the use of the frequency doubled Alexandrite laser for calculus removal.

  17. Improving energy efficiency via smart building energy management systems. A comparison with policy measures

    DOE PAGES

    Rocha, Paula; Siddiqui, Afzal; Stadler, Michael

    2014-12-09

    In this study, to foster the transition to more sustainable energy systems, policymakers have been approving measures to improve energy efficiency as well as promoting smart grids. In this setting, building managers are encouraged to adapt their energy operations to real-time market and weather conditions. Yet, most fail to do so as they rely on conventional building energy management systems (BEMS) that have static temperature set points for heating and cooling equipment. In this paper, we investigate how effective policy measures are at improving building-level energy efficiency compared to a smart BEMS with dynamic temperature set points. To this end,more » we present an integrated optimisation model mimicking the smart BEMS that combines decisions on heating and cooling systems operations with decisions on energy sourcing. Using data from an Austrian and a Spanish building, we find that the smart BEMS results in greater reduction in energy consumption than a conventional BEMS with policy measures.« less

  18. Measurement of fast neutron detection efficiency with 6Li and 7Li enriched CLYC scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mentana, A.; Camera, F.; Giaz, A.; Blasi, N.; Brambilla, S.; Ceruti, S.; Gini, L.; Groppi, F.; Manenti, S.; Million, B.; Riboldi, S.

    2016-10-01

    The CLYC (Cs2LiYC6:Ce) crystal belongs to the elpasolite scintillator family, discovered about 15 years ago. It is a very interesting material because of its good energy resolution and its capability to identify and measure gamma rays and fast/thermal neutrons. In the present work, the fast neutron detection efficiency for two different CLYC cylindrical samples has been measured. These two crystals, both with dimension (thickness x diameter) 1”×1”, were respectively enriched with more than 99% of 7Li (CLYC-7) and with ∼ 95% of 6Li (CLYC-6). The presence of the 6Li isotope makes the CLYC-6 ideal to detect thermal neutrons. In order to compare the two scintillators, only the detection efficiency for fast neutrons was considered, neglecting the energy region associated to thermal neutrons in both the crystals. The measurement was performed at the L.A.S.A. Laboratory of INFN and University of Milano (Italy), using a 241Am-Be source.

  19. 10 CFR 431.107 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial heat pump water...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial heat pump water heaters. [Reserved] 431.107 Section 431.107 Energy DEPARTMENT OF....107 Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial heat pump water heaters...

  20. 10 CFR 431.107 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial heat pump water...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial heat pump water heaters. [Reserved] 431.107 Section 431.107 Energy DEPARTMENT OF....107 Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial heat pump water heaters...

  1. 10 CFR 431.107 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial heat pump water...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial heat pump water heaters. [Reserved] 431.107 Section 431.107 Energy DEPARTMENT OF....107 Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial heat pump water heaters...

  2. Comparison of efficiency of distance measurement methodologies in mango (Mangifera indica) progenies based on physicochemical descriptors.

    PubMed

    Alves, E O S; Cerqueira-Silva, C B M; Souza, A M; Santos, C A F; Lima Neto, F P; Corrêa, R X

    2012-03-14

    We investigated seven distance measures in a set of observations of physicochemical variables of mango (Mangifera indica) submitted to multivariate analyses (distance, projection and grouping). To estimate the distance measurements, five mango progeny (total of 25 genotypes) were analyzed, using six fruit physicochemical descriptors (fruit weight, equatorial diameter, longitudinal diameter, total soluble solids in °Brix, total titratable acidity, and pH). The distance measurements were compared by the Spearman correlation test, projection in two-dimensional space and grouping efficiency. The Spearman correlation coefficients between the seven distance measurements were, except for the Mahalanobis' generalized distance (0.41 ≤ rs ≤ 0.63), high and significant (rs ≥ 0.91; P < 0.001). Regardless of the origin of the distance matrix, the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean grouping method proved to be the most adequate. The various distance measurements and grouping methods gave different values for distortion (-116.5 ≤ D ≤ 74.5), cophenetic correlation (0.26 ≤ rc ≤ 0.76) and stress (-1.9 ≤ S ≤ 58.9). Choice of distance measurement and analysis methods influence the.

  3. A compact and high efficiency GAGG well counter for radiocesium concentration measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Ogata, Yoshimune

    2014-07-01

    After the Fukushima nuclear disaster, social concern about radiocesium (137Cs and 134Cs) contamination in food increased. However, highly efficient instruments that can measure low level radioactivity are quite expensive and heavy. A compact, lightweight, and reliable radiation detector that can inexpensively monitor low level radiocesium is highly desired. We developed a compact and highly efficient radiocesium detector to detect ~32 keV X-rays from radiocesium instead of high energy gamma photons. A 1-mm thick GAGG scintillator was selected to effectively detect ~32 keV X-rays from 137Cs to reduce the influence of ambient radiation. Four sets of 25 mm×25 mm×1 mm GAGG plates, each of which was optically coupled to a triangular-shaped light guide, were optically coupled to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) to form a square-shaped well counter. Another GAGG plate was directly optically coupled to the PMT to form its bottom detector. The energy resolution of the GAGG well counter was 22.3% FWHM for 122 keV gamma rays and 32% FWHM for ~32 keV X-rays. The counting efficiency for the X-rays from radiocesium (mixture of 137Cs and 134Cs) was 4.5%. In measurements of the low level radiocesium mixture, a photo-peak of ~32 keV X-rays can clearly be distinguished from the background. The minimum detectable activity (MDA) was estimated to be ~100 Bq/kg for 1000 s measurement. The results show that our developed GAGG well counter is promising for the detection of radiocesium in food.

  4. Measurement of tritium with high efficiency by using liquid scintillation counter with plastic scintillator.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Etsuko; Ohyama, Ryu-ichiro; Yokota, Shigeaki; Nakajo, Toshiya; Yamada, Yuka; Kawano, Takao; Uda, Tatsuhiko; Watanabe, Yasuo

    2014-11-01

    The detection efficiencies of tritium samples by using liquid scintillation counter with hydrophilic plastic scintillator (PS) was approximately 48% when the sample of 20 μL was held between 2 PS sheets treated by plasma. The activity and count rates showed a good relationship between 400 Bq to 410 KBq mL(-1). The calculated detection limit of 2 min measurement by the PS was 13 Bq mL(-1) when a confidence was 95%. The plasma method for PS produces no radioactive waste. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Technical and economic assessment of design efficiency of information and measuring systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurov, V. M.; Eremin, E. N.; Baisagov, Ya Zh; Arkhipov, V. V.

    2018-01-01

    A thermodynamic approach to the analysis of information-measuring systems (IMS) is developed in the work. Expressions for efficiency of IMS are obtained. The connection between the amount of processor memory and the amount of incoming information and the accuracy of the IMS is obtained. It is shown that the probability of information loss in IMS decreases with the increase in the amount of information from the object. Using the analogy method, economic aspects of IMS design are considered. The innate ability of IMS and Moore’s law are considered. The proposed approach and the resulting formulas will be useful in the design of new IMS.

  6. Stochastic Order Redshift Technique (SORT): a simple, efficient and robust method to improve cosmological redshift measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejos, Nicolas; Rodríguez-Puebla, Aldo; Primack, Joel R.

    2018-01-01

    We present a simple, efficient and robust approach to improve cosmological redshift measurements. The method is based on the presence of a reference sample for which a precise redshift number distribution (dN/dz) can be obtained for different pencil-beam-like sub-volumes within the original survey. For each sub-volume we then impose that: (i) the redshift number distribution of the uncertain redshift measurements matches the reference dN/dz corrected by their selection functions and (ii) the rank order in redshift of the original ensemble of uncertain measurements is preserved. The latter step is motivated by the fact that random variables drawn from Gaussian probability density functions (PDFs) of different means and arbitrarily large standard deviations satisfy stochastic ordering. We then repeat this simple algorithm for multiple arbitrary pencil-beam-like overlapping sub-volumes; in this manner, each uncertain measurement has multiple (non-independent) 'recovered' redshifts which can be used to estimate a new redshift PDF. We refer to this method as the Stochastic Order Redshift Technique (SORT). We have used a state-of-the-art N-body simulation to test the performance of SORT under simple assumptions and found that it can improve the quality of cosmological redshifts in a robust and efficient manner. Particularly, SORT redshifts (zsort) are able to recover the distinctive features of the so-called 'cosmic web' and can provide unbiased measurement of the two-point correlation function on scales ≳4 h-1Mpc. Given its simplicity, we envision that a method like SORT can be incorporated into more sophisticated algorithms aimed to exploit the full potential of large extragalactic photometric surveys.

  7. Short and long term efficiencies of debris risk reduction measures: Application to a European LEO mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, T.; Kervarc, R.; Bertrand, S.; Carle, P.; Donath, T.; Destefanis, R.; Grassi, L.; Tiboldo, F.; Schäfer, F.; Kempf, S.; Gelhaus, J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent numerical studies indicate that the low Earth orbit (LEO) debris environment has reached a point such that even if no further space launches were conducted, the Earth satellite population would remain relatively constant for only the next 50 years or so. Beyond that, the debris population would begin to increase noticeably, due to the production of collisional debris (Liou and Johnson, 2008). Measures to be enforced play thus a major role to preserve an acceptable space mission risk and ensure sustainable space activities. The identification of such measures and the quantification of their efficiency over time for LEO missions is of prime concern in the decision-making process, as it has been investigated for the last few decades by the Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee (IADC). This paper addresses the final results of a generic methodology and the characteristics of a tool developed to assess the efficiency of the risk reduction measures identified for the Sentinel-1 (S1) mission. This work is performed as part of the 34-month P2-ROTECT project (Prediction, Protection & Reduction of OrbiTal Exposure to Collision Threats), funded by the European Union within the Seventh Framework Programme. Three ways of risk reduction have been investigated, both in short and long-term, namely: better satellite protection, better conjunction prediction, and cleaner environment. According to our assumptions, the S1 mission vulnerability evaluations in the long term (from 2093 to 2100) show that full compliance to the mitigation measures leads to a situation twice safer than that induced by an active debris removal of 5 objects per year in a MASTER2009 Business-As-Usual context. Because these measures have visible risk reduction effects in the long term, complementary measures with short response time are also studied. In the short term (from 2013 to 2020), a better prediction of the conjunctions is more efficient than protecting the satellite S1 itself. By

  8. Processing and error compensation of diffractive optical element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunlong; Wang, Zhibin; Zhang, Feng; Qin, Hui; Li, Junqi; Mai, Yuying

    2014-09-01

    Diffractive optical element (DOE) shows high diffraction efficiency and good dispersion performance, which makes the optical system becoming light-weight and more miniature. In this paper, the design, processing, testing, compensation of DOE are discussed, especially the analyzing of compensation technology which based on the analyzing the DOE measurement date from Taylor Hobson PGI 1250. In this method, the relationship between shadowing effect with diamond tool and processing accuracy are analyzed. According to verification processing on the Taylor Hobson NANOFORM 250 lathe, the results indicate that the PV reaches 0.539 micron, the surface roughness reaches 4nm, the step position error is smaller than λ /10 and the step height error is less than 0.23 micron after compensation processing one time.

  9. Measurement and decomposition of energy efficiency of Northeast China-based on super efficiency DEA model and Malmquist index.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaojun; Liu, Yan; Wei, Xiaoxue; Li, Yifan; Zheng, Mengchen; Li, Yudong; Cheng, Chaochao; Wu, Yumei; Liu, Zhaonan; Yu, Yuanbo

    2017-08-01

    Nowadays, environment problem has become the international hot issue. Experts and scholars pay more and more attention to the energy efficiency. Unlike most studies, which analyze the changes of TFEE in inter-provincial or regional cities, TFEE is calculated with the ratio of target energy value and actual energy input based on data in cities of prefecture levels, which would be more accurate. Many researches regard TFP as TFEE to do analysis from the provincial perspective. This paper is intended to calculate more reliably by super efficiency DEA, observe the changes of TFEE, and analyze its relation with TFP, and it proves that TFP is not equal to TFEE. Additionally, the internal influences of the TFEE are obtained via the Malmquist index decomposition. The external influences of the TFFE are analyzed afterward based on the Tobit models. Analysis results demonstrate that Heilongjiang has the highest TFEE followed by Jilin, and Liaoning has the lowest TFEE. Eventually, some policy suggestions are proposed for the influences of energy efficiency and study results.

  10. New Phases of YBaCuGeO Superconductors Identified from X-ray Diffraction and Infra-red Absorption Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abo-Arais, Ahmed; Dawoud, Mohamad Ahmad Taher

    2005-01-01

    X-ray powder diffraction patterns and infra-red absorption spectra have been evaluated and analysed for the Y1 Ba2 Cu3 O7-d - Gex compound samples prepared by the solid state reaction with x values ranging from 0.0 to 1.13. All samples show bulk superconductivity above liquid nitrogen temperature using the levitation test (Meissner effect). Samples with Ge content up to x = 0.2 have offset Tc between 83K and 92K while the sample with x = 1.13 shows semiconducting behavior above 100K. As a result of the solid state interaction between YBCO and Ge, new phases are observed and determined, mainly three phases are concluded from X-ray powder diffraction analysis: (i) Ba2GeO4 (ii) Y2BaCuO5 (iii) BaCO3. The unit cell parameters a, b and c of the orthorhombic superconducting phase are calculated for all the prepared samples. The anisotropy factor is evaluated and related to the new structural phases in YBCO-Ge composite system. The I-R absorption spectra for the samples with orthorhombic symmetry have been determined. The phonon modes between ~ 400 cm-1 and 630 cm-1 are attributed to the Cu - O octahedron and pyramid vibrations for the CuO2 -planes and CuO-chains, while the peaks in the range from ~ 700 cm-1 to ~ 860 cm-1 may be due to defects such as the new phase Ba2GeO4 and the green phase Y2BaCuO5. The obtained results are discussed according to the superconductor - semi-conductor composite model and with the phonon-mediated charge transfer between CuO2 -planes and CuO- chains through apex oxygen (BaO).

  11. Diffraction radiation generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestopalov, Viktor P.; Vertii, Aleksei A.; Ermak, Gennadii P.; Skrynnik, Boris K.; Khlopov, Grigorii I.; Tsvyk, Aleksei I.

    Research in the field of diffraction radiation generators (DRG) conducted at the Radio Physics and electronics Institute of the Ukranian Academy of Sciences over the past 25 years is reviewed. The effect of diffraction radiation is analyzed in detail, and various operating regimes of DRGs are discussed. The discussion then focuses on the principal requirements for the design of packaged DRGs and their principal parameters. Finally, applications of DRGs in various fields of science and technology are reviewed, including such applications as DRG spectroscopy, diagnostics of plasma, biological specimens, and vibration, and DRG radar systems.

  12. Improving health, safety and energy efficiency in New Zealand through measuring and applying basic housing standards.

    PubMed

    Gillespie-Bennett, Julie; Keall, Michael; Howden-Chapman, Philippa; Baker, Michael G

    2013-08-02

    Substandard housing is a problem in New Zealand. Historically there has been little recognition of the important aspects of housing quality that affect people's health and safety. In this viewpoint article we outline the importance of assessing these factors as an essential step to improving the health and safety of New Zealanders and household energy efficiency. A practical risk assessment tool adapted to New Zealand conditions, the Healthy Housing Index (HHI), measures the physical characteristics of houses that affect the health and safety of the occupants. This instrument is also the only tool that has been validated against health and safety outcomes and reported in the international peer-reviewed literature. The HHI provides a framework on which a housing warrant of fitness (WOF) can be based. The HHI inspection takes about one hour to conduct and is performed by a trained building inspector. To maximise the effectiveness of this housing quality assessment we envisage the output having two parts. The first would be a pass/fail WOF assessment showing whether or not the house meets basic health, safety and energy efficiency standards. The second component would rate each main assessment area (health, safety and energy efficiency), potentially on a five-point scale. This WOF system would establish a good minimum standard for rental accommodation as well encouraging improved housing performance over time. In this article we argue that the HHI is an important, validated, housing assessment tool that will improve housing quality, leading to better health of the occupants, reduced home injuries, and greater energy efficiency. If required, this tool could be extended to also cover resilience to natural hazards, broader aspects of sustainability, and the suitability of the dwelling for occupants with particular needs.

  13. Efficient method for computing the maximum-likelihood quantum state from measurements with additive Gaussian noise.

    PubMed

    Smolin, John A; Gambetta, Jay M; Smith, Graeme

    2012-02-17

    We provide an efficient method for computing the maximum-likelihood mixed quantum state (with density matrix ρ) given a set of measurement outcomes in a complete orthonormal operator basis subject to Gaussian noise. Our method works by first changing basis yielding a candidate density matrix μ which may have nonphysical (negative) eigenvalues, and then finding the nearest physical state under the 2-norm. Our algorithm takes at worst O(d(4)) for the basis change plus O(d(3)) for finding ρ where d is the dimension of the quantum state. In the special case where the measurement basis is strings of Pauli operators, the basis change takes only O(d(3)) as well. The workhorse of the algorithm is a new linear-time method for finding the closest probability distribution (in Euclidean distance) to a set of real numbers summing to one.

  14. An efficient algorithm for measurement of retinal vessel diameter from fundus images based on directional filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuchu; Niu, Yanmin

    2011-02-01

    Automatic measurement of vessels from fundus images is a crucial step for assessing vessel anomalies in ophthalmological community, where the change in retinal vessel diameters is believed to be indicative of the risk level of diabetic retinopathy. In this paper, a new retinal vessel diameter measurement method by combining vessel orientation estimation and filter response is proposed. Its interesting characteristics include: (1) different from the methods that only fit the vessel profiles, the proposed method extracts more stable and accurate vessel diameter by casting this problem as a maximal response problem of a variation of Gabor filter; (2) the proposed method can directly and efficiently estimate the vessel's orientation, which is usually captured by time-consuming multi-orientation fitting techniques in many existing methods. Experimental results shows that the proposed method both retains the computational simplicity and achieves stable and accurate estimation results.

  15. The Experimental Demonstration of High Efficiency Interaction-free Measurement for Quantum Counterfactual-like Communication.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Liu, Jinhong; Zhang, Junxiang; Zhu, Shiyao

    2017-09-07

    We present an interaction-free measurement with quantum Zeno effect and a high efficiency η = 74.6% ± 0.15%. As a proof-of-principle demonstration, this measurement can be used to implement a quantum counterfactual-like communication protocol. Instead of a single photon state, we use a coherent light as the input source and show that the output agrees with the proposed quantum counterfactual communication protocol according to Salih et al. Although the counterfactuality is not achieved due to the presence of a few photons in the public channel, we show that the signal light is nearly absent in the public channel, which exhibits a proof-of-principle quantum counterfactual-like property of communication.

  16. High-efficiency interaction-free measurement with an unbalanced Mach–Zehnder interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Liu; Jinhong, Liu; Junxiang, Zhang; Shiyao, Zhu

    2018-06-01

    The presence of an object can be detected without the absorption of photons in an interaction-free measurement (IFM) system based on the Zeno effect in chained Mach–Zehnder interferometers (MZIs). In this paper, we propose a scheme with an unbalanced MZI to perform the transmission of two frequency components of input light simultaneously. The two components are separated at two output ports of the MZI, achieving a high probability of asserting the absence of the object. The two final outputs of the MZI can also be extended to perform special information processing via IFM. As a result, this proposal contributes to the improvement of efficiency in interaction-free measurements with a very small number of interferometers for potential practical implementations of quantum information technology.

  17. Algorithm for measuring the internal quantum efficiency of individual injection lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Sommers, H.S. Jr.

    1978-05-01

    A new algorithm permits determination of the internal quantum efficiency eta/sub i/ of individual lasers. Above threshold, the current is partitioned into a ''coherent'' component driving the lasing modes and the ''noncoherent'' remainder. Below threshold the current is known to grow as exp(qV/n/sub 0/KT); the algorithm proposes that extrapolation of this equation into the lasing region measures the noncoherent remainder, enabling deduction of the coherent component and of its current derivative eta/sub i/. Measurements on five (AlGa)As double-heterojunction lasers cut from one wafer demonstrate the power of the new method. Comparison with band calculations of Stern shows that n/sub 0/more » originates in carrier degeneracy.« less

  18. Determination of light extinction efficiency of diesel soot from smoke opacity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapuerta, Magín; Martos, Francisco J.; Cárdenas, M. Dolores

    2005-10-01

    An experimental method for the indirect determination of the light extinction efficiency of the exhaust gas emitted by diesel engines is proposed in this paper, based on the simultaneous measurement of spot opacity and continuous opacity, together with the double modelling of the associated soot concentration. The first model simulates the projection of a differently sized soot particle population enclosed in an exhaust gas sample on the filter of a spot opacimeter. The second one simulates the light extinction caused by the soot particles flowing in the exhaust gas stream in an online continuous opacimeter, on the basis of the Beer-Lambert law. This method is an alternative to other theoretical or semi-empirical complex methods which have proved to be inadequate in the case of soot agglomerates. The application of this method to a set of experimental smoke measurements from a commercial light-duty DI diesel engine typical of vehicle road transportation permitted us to draw conclusions about the effect of different engine conditions on the mean light extinction efficiency of the soot particles flowing in the raw exhaust gas stream.

  19. Quantum efficiency measurement of the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) CCD detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, A.; Villasenor, J.; Thayer, C.; Kissel, S.; Ricker, G.; Seager, S.; Lyle, R.; Deline, A.; Morgan, E.; Sauerwein, T.; Vanderspek, R.

    2016-07-01

    Very precise on-ground characterization and calibration of TESS CCD detectors will significantly assist in the analysis of the science data from the mission. An accurate optical test bench with very high photometric stability has been developed to perform precise measurements of the absolute quantum efficiency. The setup consists of a vacuum dewar with a single MIT Lincoln Lab CCID-80 device mounted on a cold plate with the calibrated reference photodiode mounted next to the CCD. A very stable laser-driven light source is integrated with a closed-loop intensity stabilization unit to control variations of the light source down to a few parts-per-million when averaged over 60 s. Light from the stabilization unit enters a 20 inch integrating sphere. The output light from the sphere produces near-uniform illumination on the cold CCD and on the calibrated reference photodiode inside the dewar. The ratio of the CCD and photodiode signals provides the absolute quantum efficiency measurement. The design, key features, error analysis, and results from the test campaign are presented.

  20. DIFFRACTION FROM MODEL CRYSTALS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although calculating X-ray diffraction patterns from atomic coordinates of a crystal structure is a widely available capability, calculation from non-periodic arrays of atoms has not been widely applied to cellulose. Non-periodic arrays result from modeling studies that, even though started with at...

  1. Calculating cellulose diffraction patterns

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although powder diffraction of cellulose is a common experiment, the patterns are not widely understood. The theory is mathematical, there are numerous different crystal forms, and the conventions are not standardized. Experience with IR spectroscopy is not directly transferable. An awful error, tha...

  2. Chapter 1: Introduction. The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy-Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Michael; Haeri, Hossein; Reynolds, Arlis

    This chapter provides a set of model protocols for determining energy and demand savings that result from specific energy efficiency measures implemented through state and utility efficiency programs. The methods described here are approaches that are or are among the most commonly used and accepted in the energy efficiency industry for certain measures or programs. As such, they draw from the existing body of research and best practices for energy efficiency program evaluation, measurement, and verification (EM&V). These protocols were developed as part of the Uniform Methods Project (UMP), funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The principal objectivemore » for the project was to establish easy-to-follow protocols based on commonly accepted methods for a core set of widely deployed energy efficiency measures.« less

  3. Coherent x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitney, John Allen

    Conventional x-ray diffraction has historically been done under conditions such that the measured signal consists of an incoherent addition of scattering which is coherent only on a length scale determined by the properties of the beam. The result of the incoherent summation is a statistical averaging over the whole illuminated volume of the sample, which yields certain kinds of information with a high degree of precision and has been key to the success of x-ray diffraction in a variety of applications. Coherent x-ray scattering techniques, such as coherent x-ray diffraction (CXD) and x-ray intensity fluctuation spectroscopy (XIFS), attempt to reduce or eliminate any incoherent averaging so that specific, local structures couple to the measurement without being averaged out. In the case of XIFS, the result is analogous to dynamical light scattering, but with sensitivity to length scales less than 200 nm and time scales from 10-3 s to 103 s. When combined with phase retrieval, CXD represents an imaging technique with the penetration, in situ capabilities, and contrast mechanisms associated with x-rays and with a spatial resolution ultimately limited by the x-ray wavelength. In practice, however, the spatial resolution of CXD imaging is limited by exposure to about 100 A. This thesis describes CXD measurements of the binary alloy Cu3Au and the adaptation of phase retrieval methods for the reconstruction of real-space images of Cu3Au antiphase domains. The theoretical foundations of CXD are described in Chapter 1 as derived from the kinematical formulation for x-ray diffraction and from the temporal and spatial coherence of radiation. The antiphase domain structure of Cu 3Au is described, along with the associated reciprocal-space structure which is measured by CXD. CXD measurements place relatively stringent requirements on the coherence properties of the beam and on the detection mechanism of the experiment; these requirements and the means by which they have been

  4. An efficient technique for determining apparent temperature distributions from antenna temperature measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claassen, J. P.; Fung, A. K.

    1973-01-01

    A method by which the apparent microwave temperature characteristic of a flat scene is estimated from dual polarized measurements is derived and interpreted. Approximate linear relationships between antenna and apparent temperatures are established by weighting emission components in spherical bands under the assumption that the surface is isotropic. The weighting factors are formed by integrating the antenna pattern functions over these bands. The vector aspect of the formulation is retained to account for the difference between the definition of the antenna polarizations and the polarizations of the emitted fields. The method is largely applicable to the measurement of smooth temperature distributions by an antenna having good spatial resolution of the distributions and is considered efficient for inverting large volumes of measurements. Sample cases are presented and the implications of these cases on remote radiometer observations are discussed. It is shown that cross-coupling occurs between the polarizations of the emitted fields and the polarizations of the antenna. For this reason and because practical antennas have cross-polarized patterns associated with them, it is necessary to conduct measurements at both horizontal and vertical polarizations to realize the inversion. It is also made evident that thorough inversions require that the apparent temperatures be sampled at a sufficient number of points between nadir and zenith.

  5. A robust approach to measuring the detective quantum efficiency of radiographic detectors in a clinical setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Michael C.; Kim, H. K.; Henry, J. R.; Cunningham, I. A.

    2012-03-01

    The detective quantum efficiency (DQE) is widely accepted as a primary measure of x-ray detector performance in the scientific community. A standard method for measuring the DQE, based on IEC 62220-1, requires the system to have a linear response meaning that the detector output signals are proportional to the incident x-ray exposure. However, many systems have a non-linear response due to characteristics of the detector, or post processing of the detector signals, that cannot be disabled and may involve unknown algorithms considered proprietary by the manufacturer. For these reasons, the DQE has not been considered as a practical candidate for routine quality assurance testing in a clinical setting. In this article we described a method that can be used to measure the DQE of both linear and non-linear systems that employ only linear image processing algorithms. The method was validated on a Cesium Iodide based flat panel system that simultaneously stores a raw (linear) and processed (non-linear) image for each exposure. It was found that the resulting DQE was equivalent to a conventional standards-compliant DQE with measurement precision, and the gray-scale inversion and linear edge enhancement did not affect the DQE result. While not IEC 62220-1 compliant, it may be adequate for QA programs.

  6. A Cost-Effective Transparency-Based Digital Imaging for Efficient and Accurate Wound Area Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pei-Nan; Li, Hong; Wu, Mo-Li; Wang, Shou-Yu; Kong, Qing-You; Zhang, Zhen; Sun, Yuan; Liu, Jia; Lv, De-Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Wound measurement is an objective and direct way to trace the course of wound healing and to evaluate therapeutic efficacy. Nevertheless, the accuracy and efficiency of the current measurement methods need to be improved. Taking the advantages of reliability of transparency tracing and the accuracy of computer-aided digital imaging, a transparency-based digital imaging approach is established, by which data from 340 wound tracing were collected from 6 experimental groups (8 rats/group) at 8 experimental time points (Day 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 12, 14 and 16) and orderly archived onto a transparency model sheet. This sheet was scanned and its image was saved in JPG form. Since a set of standard area units from 1 mm2 to 1 cm2 was integrated into the sheet, the tracing areas in JPG image were measured directly, using the “Magnetic lasso tool” in Adobe Photoshop program. The pixel values/PVs of individual outlined regions were obtained and recorded in an average speed of 27 second/region. All PV data were saved in an excel form and their corresponding areas were calculated simultaneously by the formula of Y (PV of the outlined region)/X (PV of standard area unit) × Z (area of standard unit). It took a researcher less than 3 hours to finish area calculation of 340 regions. In contrast, over 3 hours were expended by three skillful researchers to accomplish the above work with traditional transparency-based method. Moreover, unlike the results obtained traditionally, little variation was found among the data calculated by different persons and the standard area units in different sizes and shapes. Given its accurate, reproductive and efficient properties, this transparency-based digital imaging approach would be of significant values in basic wound healing research and clinical practice. PMID:22666449

  7. Application of automated measurement and verification to utility energy efficiency program data

    SciTech Connect

    Granderson, Jessica; Touzani, Samir; Fernandes, Samuel

    Trustworthy savings calculations are critical to convincing regulators of both the cost-effectiveness of energy efficiency program investments and their ability to defer supply-side capital investments. Today’s methods for measurement and verification (M&V) of energy savings constitute a significant portion of the total costs of energy efficiency programs. They also require time-consuming data acquisition. A spectrum of savings calculation approaches is used, with some relying more heavily on measured data and others relying more heavily on estimated, modeled, or stipulated data. The increasing availability of “smart” meters and devices that report near-real time data, combined with new analytical approaches to quantifymore » savings, offers the potential to conduct M&V more quickly and at lower cost, with comparable or improved accuracy. Commercial energy management and information systems (EMIS) technologies are beginning to offer these ‘M&V 2.0’ capabilities, and program administrators want to understand how they might assist programs in quickly and accurately measuring energy savings. This paper presents the results of recent testing of the ability to use automation to streamline the M&V process. In this paper, we apply an automated whole-building M&V tool to historic data sets from energy efficiency programs to begin to explore the accuracy, cost, and time trade-offs between more traditional M&V, and these emerging streamlined methods that use high-resolution energy data and automated computational intelligence. For the data sets studied we evaluate the fraction of buildings that are well suited to automated baseline characterization, the uncertainty in gross savings that is due to M&V 2.0 tools’ model error, and indications of labor time savings, and how the automated savings results compare to prior, traditionally determined savings results. The results show that 70% of the buildings were well suited to the automated approach. In a majority of

  8. Application of automated measurement and verification to utility energy efficiency program data

    DOE PAGES

    Granderson, Jessica; Touzani, Samir; Fernandes, Samuel; ...

    2017-02-17

    Trustworthy savings calculations are critical to convincing regulators of both the cost-effectiveness of energy efficiency program investments and their ability to defer supply-side capital investments. Today’s methods for measurement and verification (M&V) of energy savings constitute a significant portion of the total costs of energy efficiency programs. They also require time-consuming data acquisition. A spectrum of savings calculation approaches is used, with some relying more heavily on measured data and others relying more heavily on estimated, modeled, or stipulated data. The increasing availability of “smart” meters and devices that report near-real time data, combined with new analytical approaches to quantifymore » savings, offers the potential to conduct M&V more quickly and at lower cost, with comparable or improved accuracy. Commercial energy management and information systems (EMIS) technologies are beginning to offer these ‘M&V 2.0’ capabilities, and program administrators want to understand how they might assist programs in quickly and accurately measuring energy savings. This paper presents the results of recent testing of the ability to use automation to streamline the M&V process. In this paper, we apply an automated whole-building M&V tool to historic data sets from energy efficiency programs to begin to explore the accuracy, cost, and time trade-offs between more traditional M&V, and these emerging streamlined methods that use high-resolution energy data and automated computational intelligence. For the data sets studied we evaluate the fraction of buildings that are well suited to automated baseline characterization, the uncertainty in gross savings that is due to M&V 2.0 tools’ model error, and indications of labor time savings, and how the automated savings results compare to prior, traditionally determined savings results. The results show that 70% of the buildings were well suited to the automated approach. In a majority of

  9. Tunable resonance-domain diffraction gratings based on electrostrictive polymers.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, Ramon; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi; Golub, Michael A

    2017-03-01

    Critical combination of high diffraction efficiency and large diffraction angles can be delivered by resonance-domain diffractive optics with high aspect ratio and wavelength-scale grating periods. To advance from static to electrically tunable resonance-domain diffraction grating, we resorted to its replication onto 2-5 μm thick P(VDF-TrFE-CFE) electrostrictive ter-polymer membranes. Electromechanical and optical computer simulations provided higher than 90% diffraction efficiency, a large continuous deflection range exceeding 20°, and capabilities for adiabatic spatial modulation of the grating period and slant. A prototype of the tunable resonance-domain diffraction grating was fabricated in a soft-stamp thermal nanoimprinting process, characterized, optically tested, and provided experimental feasibility proof for the tunable sub-micron-period gratings on electrostrictive polymers.

  10. Gaussian decomposition of high-resolution melt curve derivatives for measuring genome-editing efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Zaboikin, Michail; Freter, Carl

    2018-01-01

    We describe a method for measuring genome editing efficiency from in silico analysis of high-resolution melt curve data. The melt curve data derived from amplicons of genome-edited or unmodified target sites were processed to remove the background fluorescent signal emanating from free fluorophore and then corrected for temperature-dependent quenching of fluorescence of double-stranded DNA-bound fluorophore. Corrected data were normalized and numerically differentiated to obtain the first derivatives of the melt curves. These were then mathematically modeled as a sum or superposition of minimal number of Gaussian components. Using Gaussian parameters determined by modeling of melt curve derivatives of unedited samples, we were able to model melt curve derivatives from genetically altered target sites where the mutant population could be accommodated using an additional Gaussian component. From this, the proportion contributed by the mutant component in the target region amplicon could be accurately determined. Mutant component computations compared well with the mutant frequency determination from next generation sequencing data. The results were also consistent with our earlier studies that used difference curve areas from high-resolution melt curves for determining the efficiency of genome-editing reagents. The advantage of the described method is that it does not require calibration curves to estimate proportion of mutants in amplicons of genome-edited target sites. PMID:29300734

  11. Do different case-mix measures affect assessments of provider efficiency? Lessons from the Department of Veterans Affairs.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Amy K; Loveland, Susan A; Rakovski, Carter C; Christiansen, Cindy L; Berlowitz, Dan R

    2003-01-01

    Although case-mix adjustment is critical for provider profiling, little is known regarding whether different case-mix measures affect assessments of provider efficiency. We examine whether two case-mix measures, Adjusted Clinical Groups (ACGs) and Diagnostic Cost Groups (DCGs), result in different assessments of efficiency across service networks within the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). Three profiling indicators examine variation in resource use. Although results from the ACGs and DCGs generally agree on which networks have greater or lesser efficiency than average, assessments of individual network efficiency vary depending upon the case-mix measure used. This suggests that caution should be used so that providers are not misclassified based on reported efficiency.

  12. Efficient linear criterion for witnessing Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen nonlocality under many-setting local measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yu-Lin; Zhen, Yi-Zheng; Chen, Zeng-Bing; Liu, Nai-Le; Chen, Kai; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2017-01-01

    The striking and distinctive nonlocal features of quantum mechanics were discovered by Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen (EPR) beyond classical physics. At the core of the EPR argument, it was "steering" that Schrödinger proposed in 1935. Besides its fundamental significance, quantum steering opens up a novel application for quantum communication. Recent work has precisely characterized its properties; however, witnessing the EPR nonlocality remains a big challenge under arbitrary local measurements. Here we present an alternative linear criterion and complement existing results to efficiently testify steering for high-dimensional system in practice. By developing a novel and analytical method to tackle the maximization problem in deriving the bound of a steering criterion, we show how observed correlations can reveal powerfully the EPR nonlocality in an easily accessed manner. Althou