Science.gov

Sample records for measured electron density

  1. Absolute Measurement of Electron Cloud Density

    SciTech Connect

    Covo, M K; Molvik, A W; Cohen, R H; Friedman, A; Seidl, P A; Logan, G; Bieniosek, F; Baca, D; Vay, J; Orlando, E; Vujic, J L

    2007-06-21

    Beam interaction with background gas and walls produces ubiquitous clouds of stray electrons that frequently limit the performance of particle accelerator and storage rings. Counterintuitively we obtained the electron cloud accumulation by measuring the expelled ions that are originated from the beam-background gas interaction, rather than by measuring electrons that reach the walls. The kinetic ion energy measured with a retarding field analyzer (RFA) maps the depressed beam space-charge potential and provides the dynamic electron cloud density. Clearing electrode current measurements give the static electron cloud background that complements and corroborates with the RFA measurements, providing an absolute measurement of electron cloud density during a 5 {micro}s duration beam pulse in a drift region of the magnetic transport section of the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at LBNL.

  2. Electron density measurements in highly electronegative plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafalskyi, D.; Lafleur, T.; Aanesland, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we present experimental measurements of the electron density in very electronegative ‘ion–ion’ Ar–SF6 plasmas where previous investigations using Langmuir probes have observed electronegativities of up to 5000. The electron density is measured using a short matched dipole probe technique that provides a tolerance better than  ±2 · 1013 m‑3. The results demonstrate that the electron density in the low pressure plasma source (which contains a magnetic filter) can be reduced to around 2.7 · 1013 m‑3 with a corresponding plasma electronegativity of about 4000; close to that from fluid simulation predictions. The highest electronegativity, and lowest electron density, is achieved with a pure SF6 plasma, while adding only 6% SF6 to Ar allows the electronegativity to be increased from 0 to a few hundred with a corresponding decrease in the electron density by more than a thousand. The impedance probe based on a short matched dipole appears to be a practical diagnostic that can be used for independent measurements of the electron density in very electronegative plasmas, and opens up the possibility to further investigate and optimize electronegative plasma sources.

  3. Electron density measurements in highly electronegative plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafalskyi, D.; Lafleur, T.; Aanesland, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we present experimental measurements of the electron density in very electronegative ‘ion-ion’ Ar-SF6 plasmas where previous investigations using Langmuir probes have observed electronegativities of up to 5000. The electron density is measured using a short matched dipole probe technique that provides a tolerance better than  ±2 · 1013 m-3. The results demonstrate that the electron density in the low pressure plasma source (which contains a magnetic filter) can be reduced to around 2.7 · 1013 m-3 with a corresponding plasma electronegativity of about 4000; close to that from fluid simulation predictions. The highest electronegativity, and lowest electron density, is achieved with a pure SF6 plasma, while adding only 6% SF6 to Ar allows the electronegativity to be increased from 0 to a few hundred with a corresponding decrease in the electron density by more than a thousand. The impedance probe based on a short matched dipole appears to be a practical diagnostic that can be used for independent measurements of the electron density in very electronegative plasmas, and opens up the possibility to further investigate and optimize electronegative plasma sources.

  4. Electron density measurements for plasma adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neiswander, Brian W.

    Over the past 40 years, there has been growing interest in both laser communications and directed energy weapons that operate from moving aircraft. As a laser beam propagates from an aircraft in flight, it passes through boundary layers, turbulence, and shear layers in the near-region of the aircraft. These fluid instabilities cause strong density gradients which adversely affect the transmission of laser energy to a target. Adaptive optics provides corrective measures for this problem but current technology cannot respond quickly enough to be useful for high speed flight conditions. This research investigated the use of plasma as a medium for adaptive optics for aero-optics applications. When a laser beam passes through plasma, its phase is shifted proportionally to the electron density and gas heating within the plasma. As a result, plasma can be utilized as a dynamically controllable optical medium. Experiments were carried out using a cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge plasma chamber which generated a sub-atmospheric pressure, low-temperature plasma. An electrostatic model of this design was developed and revealed an important design constraint relating to the geometry of the chamber. Optical diagnostic techniques were used to characterize the plasma discharge. Single-wavelength interferometric experiments were performed and demonstrated up to 1.5 microns of optical path difference (OPD) in a 633 nm laser beam. Dual-wavelength interferometry was used to obtain time-resolved profiles of the plasma electron density and gas heating inside the plasma chamber. Furthermore, a new multi-wavelength infrared diagnostic technique was developed and proof-of-concept simulations were conducted to demonstrate the system's capabilities.

  5. Metastable atom probe for measuring electron beam density profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockhart, J. M.; Zorn, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Metastable atom probe was developed for measuring current density in electron beam as function of two arbitrary coordinates, with spatial resolution better than 0.5 mm. Probe shows effects of space charge, magnetic fields, and other factors which influence electron current density, but operates with such low beam densities that introduced perturbation is very small.

  6. Estimation of topside electron density profile using on-orbit measured GPS and electron density data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.

    2015-12-01

    The topside ionophere have lacks of information about plasma, but it is important for human beings and scientific applicaiton. We establish an estimation method for electron density profile using Langmuir Probe and GPS data of CHAMP satellite and have comparision the method results with other satellites measurements. In order to develop the model, hydrostatic mapping function, vertical scale height, and vertical TEC(Total Electron Contents) are used for calculations. The electron density and GPS data with hydrostatic mapping function give the vertical TEC and after some algebra using exponential model of density profile give the vertical scale height of ionosphere. The scale height have about 10^2~10^3 km order of magnitude so it can be used exponential model again since the altitude of CHAMP. Therefore, apply the scale height to exponoential model we can get the topside electron density profile. The result of the density profile model can be compared with other satellite data as STSAT-1, ROCSAT, DMSP which is measured the electron density in similar Local Time, Latitude, Longitude but above the CHAMP. This comparison shows the method is accecptable and it can be applied to other reseach for topside ionosphere.

  7. Measurement of electron density using reactance cutoff probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, K. H.; You, S. J.; Kim, D. W.; Na, B. K.; Seo, B. H.; Kim, J. H.; Seong, D. J.; Chang, H. Y.

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes a new measurement method of electron density using the reactance spectrum of the plasma in the cutoff probe system instead of the transmission spectrum. The highly accurate reactance spectrum of the plasma-cutoff probe system, as expected from previous circuit simulations [Kim et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 99, 131502 (2011)], was measured using the full two-port error correction and automatic port extension methods of the network analyzer. The electron density can be obtained from the analysis of the measured reactance spectrum, based on circuit modeling. According to the circuit simulation results, the reactance cutoff probe can measure the electron density more precisely than the previous cutoff probe at low densities or at higher pressure. The obtained results for the electron density are presented and discussed for a wide range of experimental conditions, and this method is compared with previous methods (a cutoff probe using the transmission spectrum and a single Langmuir probe).

  8. Rocket measurements of electron density irregularities during MAC/SINE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulwick, J. C.

    1989-01-01

    Four Super Arcas rockets were launched at the Andoya Rocket Range, Norway, as part of the MAC/SINE campaign to measure electron density irregularities with high spatial resolution in the cold summer polar mesosphere. They were launched as part of two salvos: the turbulent/gravity wave salvo (3 rockets) and the EISCAT/SOUSY radar salvo (one rocket). In both salvos meteorological rockets, measuring temperature and winds, were also launched and the SOUSY radar, located near the launch site, measured mesospheric turbulence. Electron density irregularities and strong gradients were measured by the rocket probes in the region of most intense backscatter observed by the radar. The electron density profiles (8 to 4 on ascent and 4 on descent) show very different characteristics in the peak scattering region and show marked spatial and temporal variability. These data are intercompared and discussed.

  9. Measuring ionospheric electron density using the plasma frequency probe

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, M.D.; Baker, K.D. )

    1992-02-01

    During the past decade, the plasma frequency probe (PFP) has evolved into an accurate, proven method of measuring electron density in the ionosphere above about 90 km. The instrument uses an electrically short antenna mounted on a sounding rocket that is immersed in the plasma and notes the frequency where the antenna impedance is large and nonreactive. This frequency is closely related to the plasma frequency, which is a direct function of free electron concentration. The probe uses phase-locked loop technology to follow a changing electron density. Several sections of the plasma frequency probe circuitry are unique, especially the voltage-controlled oscillator that uses both an electronically tuned capacitor and inductor to give the wide tuning range needed for electron density measurements. The results from two recent sounding rocket flights (Thunderstorm II and CRIT II) under vastly different plasma conditions demonstrate the capabilities of the PFP and show the importance of in situ electron density measurements of understanding plasma processes. 9 refs.

  10. Electron Density Measurement of Argon Containing Plasmas by Saturation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, S.; Wang, H.; Tomioka, S.; Sasaki, K.

    2014-10-01

    Langmuir probes are widely used for electron density measurements in plasmas. However, the use of a conventional probe should be avoided in a plasma which needs high purity because of the possibility of contamination. Optical measurements are suitable for these plasmas. In this work, we applied saturation spectroscopy to the electron density measurement. The peak height of the saturation spectrum is affected by the relaxation frequency of the related energy levels. In the case of the metastable levels of argon, the electron impact quenching rate, which is proportional to the electron density, is the dominant factor. In our experiments, an inductively coupled plasma source and a tunable cw diode laser were used. The frequency of the laser was scanned over the Doppler width of the 4 s[3/ 2 ] 2 o - 4 p[ 3 / 2 ] 2 (763.51 nm) transition. The experimental saturation spectrum was composed of a sharp Lorentzian peak and a broad base component, which was caused by velocity changing collisions. We deduced a new relationship between the saturation parameter and the measured saturated absorption spectrum with considering velocity changing collisions. We confirmed a linear relationship, which was expected theoretically, between the inverse of the saturation parameter and the electron density. Part of this work is supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 24540529.

  11. Rocket radio measurement of electron density in the nighttime ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilchrist, B. E.; Smith, L. G.

    1979-01-01

    One experimental technique based on the Faraday rotation effect of radio waves is presented for measuring electron density in the nighttime ionosphere at midlatitudes. High frequency linearly-polarized radio signals were transmitted to a linearly-polarized receiving system located in a spinning rocket moving through the ionosphere. Faraday rotation was observed in the reference plane of the rocket as a change in frequency of the detected receiver output. The frequency change was measured and the information was used to obtain electron density data. System performance was evaluated and some sources of error were identified. The data obtained was useful in calibrating a Langmuir probe experiment for electron density values of 100/cu cm and greater. Data from two rocket flights are presented to illustrate the experiment.

  12. Electron temperature and density measurements of laser induced germanium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeel, Hira; Arshad, Saboohi; Haq, S. U.; Nadeem, Ali

    2016-05-01

    The germanium plasma produced by the fundamental harmonics (1064 nm) of Nd:YAG laser in single and double pulse configurations have been studied spectroscopically. The plasma is characterized by measuring the electron temperature using the Boltzmann plot method for neutral and ionized species and electron number density as a function of laser irradiance, ambient pressure, and distance from the target surface. It is observed that the plasma parameters have an increasing trend with laser irradiance (9-33 GW/cm2) and with ambient pressure (8-250 mbar). However, a decreasing trend is observed along the plume length up to 4.5 mm. The electron temperature and electron number density are also determined using a double pulse configuration, and their behavior at fixed energy ratio and different interpulse delays is discussed.

  13. Absolute electron density measurements in the equatorial ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, K. D.; Howlett, L. C.; Rao, N. B.; Ulwick, J. C.; Labelle, J.

    1985-01-01

    Accurate measurement of the electron density profile and its variations is crucial to further progress in understanding the physics of the disturbed equatorial ionosphere. To accomplish this, a plasma frequency probe was included in the payload complement of two rockets flown during the Condor rocket campaign conducted from Peru in March 1983. This paper presents density profiles of the disturbed equatorial ionosphere from a night-time flight in which spread-F conditions were present and from a day-time flight during strong electrojet conditions. Results from both flights are in excellent agreement with simultaneous radar data in that the regions of highly disturbed plasma coincide with the radar signatures. The spread-F rocket penetrated a topside depletion during both the upleg and downleg. The electrojet measurements showed a profile peaking at 1.3 x 10 to the 5th per cu cm at 106 km, with large scale fluctuations having amplitudes of roughly 10 percent seen only in the upward gradient in electron density. This is in agreement with plasma instability theory. It is further shown that simultaneous measurements by fixed-bias Langmuir probes, when normalized at a single point to the altitude profile of electron density, are inadequate to correctly parameterize the observed enhancements and depletions.

  14. Interferometric measurement of the electron density in a pseudospark switch

    SciTech Connect

    Goertler, A.; Schwandner, A.; Frank, K.; Christiansen, J.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.

    1995-12-31

    In the recent years pseudospark switches have been developed for several applications. The pseudospark is a low pressure gas discharge usable as a closing switch. For medium power sealed-off devices are available for tests. In the high current regime only devices connected to a vacuum system are in use. The pseudospark transforms from a special hollow cathode discharge to a metal vapor arc like discharge type when the current exceeds 35 kA. Fast shutter photographs of the discharge prove the appearance of filaments at currents exceeding 40 kA corresponding to a dip in the forward voltage drop and a rise of the erosion rate of about one order of magnitude (4 to 40 {micro}g/C) for molybdenum electrodes. The knowledge of the electron density distribution provides more information about these phenomena. The discharge is no more radial symmetric to the central apertures at these high currents. A contraction to a small area on the plane electrode surface takes place. Therefore a tomographic setup is necessary to measure the electron density distribution with interferometry. The interferograms are digitized and the electron density distribution is evaluated by a computer program. As a result the 3-dimensional electron density distribution of the total discharge volume for the time interval given by the exposure time of the laser beams is calculated.

  15. Plasma actuator electron density measurement using microwave perturbation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirhosseini, Farid; Colpitts, Bruce

    2014-07-01

    A cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge plasma under five different pressures is generated in an evacuated glass tube. This plasma volume is located at the center of a rectangular copper waveguide cavity, where the electric field is maximum for the first mode and the magnetic field is very close to zero. The microwave perturbation method is used to measure electron density and plasma frequency for these five pressures. Simulations by a commercial microwave simulator are comparable to the experimental results.

  16. Plasma actuator electron density measurement using microwave perturbation method

    SciTech Connect

    Mirhosseini, Farid; Colpitts, Bruce

    2014-07-21

    A cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge plasma under five different pressures is generated in an evacuated glass tube. This plasma volume is located at the center of a rectangular copper waveguide cavity, where the electric field is maximum for the first mode and the magnetic field is very close to zero. The microwave perturbation method is used to measure electron density and plasma frequency for these five pressures. Simulations by a commercial microwave simulator are comparable to the experimental results.

  17. Cutoff probe using Fourier analysis for electron density measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Byung-Keun; You, Kwang-Ho; Kim, Dae-Woong; Chang, Hong-Young; You, Shin-Jae; Kim, Jung-Hyung

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a new method for cutoff probe using a nanosecond impulse generator and an oscilloscope, instead of a network analyzer. The nanosecond impulse generator supplies a radiating signal of broadband frequency spectrum simultaneously without frequency sweeping, while frequency sweeping method is used by a network analyzer in a previous method. The transmission spectrum (S21) was obtained through a Fourier analysis of the transmitted impulse signal detected by the oscilloscope and was used to measure the electron density. The results showed that the transmission frequency spectrum and the electron density obtained with a new method are very close to those obtained with a previous method using a network analyzer. And also, only 15 ns long signal was necessary for spectrum reconstruction. These results were also compared to the Langmuir probe's measurements with satisfactory results. This method is expected to provide not only fast measurement of absolute electron density, but also function in other diagnostic situations where a network analyzer would be used (a hairpin probe and an impedance probe) by replacing the network analyzer with a nanosecond impulse generator and an oscilloscope.

  18. Cutoff probe using Fourier analysis for electron density measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Na, Byung-Keun; You, Kwang-Ho; Kim, Dae-Woong; Chang, Hong-Young; You, Shin-Jae; Kim, Jung-Hyung

    2012-01-15

    This paper proposes a new method for cutoff probe using a nanosecond impulse generator and an oscilloscope, instead of a network analyzer. The nanosecond impulse generator supplies a radiating signal of broadband frequency spectrum simultaneously without frequency sweeping, while frequency sweeping method is used by a network analyzer in a previous method. The transmission spectrum (S21) was obtained through a Fourier analysis of the transmitted impulse signal detected by the oscilloscope and was used to measure the electron density. The results showed that the transmission frequency spectrum and the electron density obtained with a new method are very close to those obtained with a previous method using a network analyzer. And also, only 15 ns long signal was necessary for spectrum reconstruction. These results were also compared to the Langmuir probe's measurements with satisfactory results. This method is expected to provide not only fast measurement of absolute electron density, but also function in other diagnostic situations where a network analyzer would be used (a hairpin probe and an impedance probe) by replacing the network analyzer with a nanosecond impulse generator and an oscilloscope.

  19. Electron density and gas density measurements in a millimeter-wave discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaub, S. C.; Hummelt, J. S.; Guss, W. C.; Shapiro, M. A.; Temkin, R. J.

    2016-08-01

    Electron density and neutral gas density have been measured in a non-equilibrium air breakdown plasma using optical emission spectroscopy and two-dimensional laser interferometry, respectively. A plasma was created with a focused high frequency microwave beam in air. Experiments were run with 110 GHz and 124.5 GHz microwaves at powers up to 1.2 MW. Microwave pulses were 3 μs long at 110 GHz and 2.2 μs long at 124.5 GHz. Electron density was measured over a pressure range of 25 to 700 Torr as the input microwave power was varied. Electron density was found to be close to the critical density, where the collisional plasma frequency is equal to the microwave frequency, over the pressure range studied and to vary weakly with input power. Neutral gas density was measured over a pressure range from 150 to 750 Torr at power levels high above the threshold for initiating breakdown. The two-dimensional structure of the neutral gas density was resolved. Intense, localized heating was found to occur hundreds of nanoseconds after visible plasma formed. This heating led to neutral gas density reductions of greater than 80% where peak plasma densities occurred. Spatial structure and temporal dynamics of gas heating at atmospheric pressure were found to agree well with published numerical simulations.

  20. A Microwave FMCW Reflectometer for Electron Density Measurements on LTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peebles, W. A.; Kubota, S.; Nguyen, X. V.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.

    2013-10-01

    An FMCW (frequency-modulated continuous-wave) reflectometer is being installed on the Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX) for electron density profile and fluctuation measurements. The system has two channels covering 13.5-33 GHz for (O-mode) electron density measurements in the range of 0 . 2 - 1 . 3 ×1013 cm-3 . The diagnostic can operate at ultrafast full-band sweep intervals (Δt >= 4 μ s), which allows the system to function as both a profile and fluctuation monitor. The reflectometer utilizes a mid-plane port on LTX and views the plasma through a 4.8 '' gap between the upper and lower in-vessel shells. A pair of bi-static conical horns are attached to the ends of 18 '' long circular waveguide sections and mounted on a rotatable flange. This sub-assembly is attached to a jacking stage such that the horns can be positioned arbitrarily close to the plasma edge, or retracted outside the main chamber. A rotary joint allows the polarization of the launch and receive waves to be independently selected. Further details of the design and capabilities of the diagnostic, along with preliminary data, will be presented at the meeting. Supported by U.S. DoE Grants DE-FG02-99ER54527 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  1. Rocket-borne measurements of electron temperature and density with the Electron Retarding Potential Analyzer instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, I. J.; Widholm, M.; Lessard, M. R.; Riley, P.; Heavisides, J.; Moen, J. I.; Clausen, L. B. N.; Bekkeng, T. A.

    2016-07-01

    Determining electron temperature in the ionosphere is a fundamentally important measurement for space science. Obtaining measurements of electron temperatures at high altitudes (>700 km) is difficult because of limitations on ground-based radar and classic spacecraft instrumentation. In light of these limitations, the rocket-borne Electron Retarding Potential Analyzer (ERPA) was developed to allow for accurate in situ measurement of ionospheric electron temperature with a simple and low-resource instrument. The compact ERPA, a traditional retarding potential analyzer with multiple baffle collimators, allows for a straightforward calculation of electron temperature. Since its first mission in 2004, it has amassed significant flight heritage and obtained data used in multiple studies investigating a myriad of phenomena related to magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. In addition to highlighting the scientific contributions of the ERPA instrument, this paper outlines its theory and operation, the methodology used to obtain electron temperature measurements, and a comparative study suggesting that the ERPA can also provide electron density measurements.

  2. Electron density dependence of impedance probe plasma potential measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, D. N.; Blackwell, D. D.; Amatucci, W. E.

    2015-08-01

    In earlier works, we used spheres of various sizes as impedance probes in demonstrating a method of determining plasma potential, φp, when the probe radius is much larger than the Debye length, λD. The basis of the method in those works [Walker et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 032108 (2006); ibid. 15, 123506 (2008); ibid. 17, 113503 (2010)] relies on applying a small amplitude signal of fixed frequency to a probe in a plasma and, through network analyzer-based measurements, determining the complex reflection coefficient, Γ, for varying probe bias, Vb. The frequency range of the applied signal is restricted to avoid sheath resonant effects and ion contributions such that ωpi ≪ ω ≪ ωpe, where ωpi is the ion plasma frequency and ωpe is the electron plasma frequency. For a given frequency and applied bias, both Re(Zac) and Im(Zac) are available from Γ. When Re(Zac) is plotted versus Vb, a minimum predicted by theory occurs at φp [Walker et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 113503 (2010)]. In addition, Im(Zac) appears at, or very near, a maximum at φp. As ne decreases and the sheath expands, the minimum becomes harder to discern. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that when using network analyzer-based measurements, Γ itself and Im(Zac) and their derivatives are useful as accompanying indicators to Re(Zac) in these difficult cases. We note the difficulties encountered by the most commonly used plasma diagnostic, the Langmuir probe. Spherical probe data is mainly used in this work, although we present limited data for a cylinder and a disk. To demonstrate the effect of lowered density as a function of probe geometry, we compare the cylinder and disk using only the indicator Re(Zac).

  3. Time-resolved electron density and electron temperature measurements in nanosecond pulse discharges in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roettgen, A.; Shkurenkov, I.; Simeni Simeni, M.; Petrishchev, V.; Adamovich, I. V.; Lempert, W. R.

    2016-10-01

     ≈  4.25 eV, attained after the surface ionization wave reaches the grounded electrode. The sensitivity of the present diagnostics is too low to measure electron density in the plasma during surface ionization wave propagation (estimated to be below n e  ≈  1013 cm-3). After peaking during the primary current pulse, the electron density decays due to dissociative recombination. Electron temperature decreases rapidly over ~150 ns after the primary current pulse rise, to T e  ≈  0.5 eV, followed by a much more gradual electron cooling between the primary and the secondary discharge pulses, due to superelastic collisions providing moderate electron heating in the afterglow.

  4. Electron density dependence of impedance probe plasma potential measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D. N.; Blackwell, D. D.; Amatucci, W. E.

    2015-08-15

    In earlier works, we used spheres of various sizes as impedance probes in demonstrating a method of determining plasma potential, φ{sub p}, when the probe radius is much larger than the Debye length, λ{sub D}. The basis of the method in those works [Walker et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 032108 (2006); ibid. 15, 123506 (2008); ibid. 17, 113503 (2010)] relies on applying a small amplitude signal of fixed frequency to a probe in a plasma and, through network analyzer-based measurements, determining the complex reflection coefficient, Γ, for varying probe bias, V{sub b}. The frequency range of the applied signal is restricted to avoid sheath resonant effects and ion contributions such that ω{sub pi} ≪ ω ≪ ω{sub pe}, where ω{sub pi} is the ion plasma frequency and ω{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency. For a given frequency and applied bias, both Re(Z{sub ac}) and Im(Z{sub ac}) are available from Γ. When Re(Z{sub ac}) is plotted versus V{sub b}, a minimum predicted by theory occurs at φ{sub p} [Walker et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 113503 (2010)]. In addition, Im(Z{sub ac}) appears at, or very near, a maximum at φ{sub p}. As n{sub e} decreases and the sheath expands, the minimum becomes harder to discern. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that when using network analyzer-based measurements, Γ itself and Im(Z{sub ac}) and their derivatives are useful as accompanying indicators to Re(Z{sub ac}) in these difficult cases. We note the difficulties encountered by the most commonly used plasma diagnostic, the Langmuir probe. Spherical probe data is mainly used in this work, although we present limited data for a cylinder and a disk. To demonstrate the effect of lowered density as a function of probe geometry, we compare the cylinder and disk using only the indicator Re(Z{sub ac})

  5. Electron density and electron temperature measurement in a bi-Maxwellian electron distribution using a derivative method of Langmuir probes

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Ikjin; Chung, ChinWook; Youn Moon, Se

    2013-08-15

    In plasma diagnostics with a single Langmuir probe, the electron temperature T{sub e} is usually obtained from the slope of the logarithm of the electron current or from the electron energy probability functions of current (I)-voltage (V) curve. Recently, Chen [F. F. Chen, Phys. Plasmas 8, 3029 (2001)] suggested a derivative analysis method to obtain T{sub e} by the ratio between the probe current and the derivative of the probe current at a plasma potential where the ion current becomes zero. Based on this method, electron temperatures and electron densities were measured and compared with those from the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) measurement in Maxwellian and bi-Maxwellian electron distribution conditions. In a bi-Maxwellian electron distribution, we found the electron temperature T{sub e} obtained from the method is always lower than the effective temperatures T{sub eff} derived from EEDFs. The theoretical analysis for this is presented.

  6. Electron density and electron temperature measurement in a bi-Maxwellian electron distribution using a derivative method of Langmuir probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ikjin; Chung, ChinWook; Youn Moon, Se

    2013-08-01

    In plasma diagnostics with a single Langmuir probe, the electron temperature Te is usually obtained from the slope of the logarithm of the electron current or from the electron energy probability functions of current (I)-voltage (V) curve. Recently, Chen [F. F. Chen, Phys. Plasmas 8, 3029 (2001)] suggested a derivative analysis method to obtain Te by the ratio between the probe current and the derivative of the probe current at a plasma potential where the ion current becomes zero. Based on this method, electron temperatures and electron densities were measured and compared with those from the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) measurement in Maxwellian and bi-Maxwellian electron distribution conditions. In a bi-Maxwellian electron distribution, we found the electron temperature Te obtained from the method is always lower than the effective temperatures Teff derived from EEDFs. The theoretical analysis for this is presented.

  7. Absolute measurement of electron-cloud density in a positively charged particle beam.

    PubMed

    Kireeff Covo, Michel; Molvik, Arthur W; Friedman, Alex; Vay, Jean-Luc; Seidl, Peter A; Logan, Grant; Baca, David; Vujic, Jasmina L

    2006-08-01

    Clouds of stray electrons are ubiquitous in particle accelerators and frequently limit the performance of storage rings. Earlier measurements of electron energy distribution and flux to the walls provided only a relative electron-cloud density. We have measured electron accumulation using ions expelled by the beam. The ion energy distribution maps the depressed beam potential and gives the dynamic cloud density. Clearing electrode current reveals the static background cloud density, allowing the first absolute measurement of the time-dependent electron-cloud density during the beam pulse.

  8. Measurement of the electron density in a microwave plasma torch at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Qing; Zhang Guixin; Wang Liming; Wang Xinxin; Wang Shumin; Chen Yan

    2009-11-16

    The electron density in a microwave plasma torch at atmospheric pressure was measured with a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The electron density is on the order of 10{sup 17}/cm{sup 3}, one order higher than that deduced from the Stark broadening of spectral lines, and increases with the increase in the microwave power. The spatial distribution of the electron density was obtained. The highest electron density locates at the symmetrical axis of the plasma torch and decreases radially. It was found that the electron density fluctuates within a range of 0.3 with the time under the same experimental conditions.

  9. Electron density measurement of cesium seeded negative ion source by surface wave probe

    SciTech Connect

    Kisaki, M.; Tsumori, K.; Nakano, H.; Ikeda, K.; Osakabe, M.; Nagaoka, K.; Shibuya, M.; Sato, M.; Sekiguchi, H.; Komada, S.; Kondo, T.; Hayashi, H.; Asano, E.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.

    2012-02-15

    Electron density measurements of a large-scaled negative ion source were carried out with a surface wave probe. By comparison of the electron densities determined with the surface wave probe and a Langmuir probe, it was confirmed that the surface wave probe is highly available for diagnostic of the electron density in H{sup -} ion sources. In addition, it was found that the ratio of the electron density to the H{sup -} ion density dramatically decreases with increase of a bias voltage and the H{sup -} ions become dominant negative particles at the bias voltage of more than 6 V.

  10. Electron density measurement of inductively coupled plasmas by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS)

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, Ayumi; Kurose, Tomoko; Kitano, Katsuhisa; Hamaguchi, Satoshi; Reymond, Vivien; Kitahara, Hideaki; Takano, Keisuke; Hangyo, Masanori; Tani, Masahiko

    2011-10-01

    The electron densities of argon inductively coupled plasmas were measured by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). At a low pressure, the electron densities were also measured with a Langmuir-type double probe and the validity of THz-TDS electron-density measurement in a plasma has been corroborated. As the input radio-frequency (RF) power increases, the plasma density and gas temperature increase, which makes the probe measurement less reliable or even impossible, due to the large heat load to the probe surface. On the contrary, the THz-TDS measurement is unaffected by the gas temperature and becomes more reliable due to the higher electron density at higher input power for plasma generation.

  11. Wavefront-sensor-based electron density measurements for laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Plateau, Guillaume; Matlis, Nicholas; Geddes, Cameron; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; van Mourik, Reinier; Leemans, Wim

    2010-02-20

    Characterization of the electron density in laser produced plasmas is presented using direct wavefront analysis of a probe laser beam. The performance of a laser-driven plasma-wakefield accelerator depends on the plasma wavelength, hence on the electron density. Density measurements using a conventional folded-wave interferometer and using a commercial wavefront sensor are compared for different regimes of the laser-plasma accelerator. It is shown that direct wavefront measurements agree with interferometric measurements and, because of the robustness of the compact commercial device, have greater phase sensitivity, straightforward analysis, improving shot-to-shot plasma-density diagnostics.

  12. Electron density estimations derived from spacecraft potential measurements on Cluster in tenuous plasma regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, A.; Lybekk, B.; André, M.; Eriksson, A.; Masson, A.; Mozer, F. S.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; DéCréAu, P. M. E.; Dandouras, I.; Sauvaud, J.-A.; Fazakerley, A.; Taylor, M.; Paschmann, G.; Svenes, K. R.; Torkar, K.; Whipple, E.

    2008-07-01

    Spacecraft potential measurements by the EFW electric field experiment on the Cluster satellites can be used to obtain plasma density estimates in regions barely accessible to other type of plasma experiments. Direct calibrations of the plasma density as a function of the measured potential difference between the spacecraft and the probes can be carried out in the solar wind, the magnetosheath, and the plasmashere by the use of CIS ion density and WHISPER electron density measurements. The spacecraft photoelectron characteristic (photoelectrons escaping to the plasma in current balance with collected ambient electrons) can be calculated from knowledge of the electron current to the spacecraft based on plasma density and electron temperature data from the above mentioned experiments and can be extended to more positive spacecraft potentials by CIS ion and the PEACE electron experiments in the plasma sheet. This characteristic enables determination of the electron density as a function of spacecraft potential over the polar caps and in the lobes of the magnetosphere, regions where other experiments on Cluster have intrinsic limitations. Data from 2001 to 2006 reveal that the photoelectron characteristics of the Cluster spacecraft as well as the electric field probes vary with the solar cycle and solar activity. The consequences for plasma density measurements are addressed. Typical examples are presented to demonstrate the use of this technique in a polar cap/lobe plasma.

  13. Electron Density Measurements in UV-Preionized XeCl and CO2 Laser Gas Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Shigeyuki; Sato, Saburo; Goto, Tatsumi

    1989-11-01

    A Langmuir probe technique has been used to measure electron densities and temperatures in UV-preionized XeCl excimer and CO2 laser gas mixtures in a laser tube. For this experiment, only pin electrodes (preionization sparks) were operated with no discharge between the main electrodes. The measured electron densities were about 108 cm-3 in both the excimer and CO2 laser gases, compared with 1010 cm-3 in pure He gas. The electron density was found to increase due to the proximity of the main electrodes. The coefficients of absorption for excimer and CO2 laser gas were obtained from the characteristics of the electron densities vs the distance from the UV source. Based on the absorption coefficient for XeCl, 0.9 cm-1 atm-1, we propose pin-electrode arrangements for spatially uniform preionization.

  14. Density measurement of thin layers by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS).

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jürgen; Ramm, Jürgen; Gemming, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    A method to measure the density of thin layers is presented which utilizes electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) techniques within a transmission electron microscope. The method is based on the acquisition of energy filtered images in the low loss region as well as of an element distribution map using core loss edges. After correction of multiple inelastic scattering effects, the intensity of the element distribution map is proportional to density and thickness. The dependence of the intensities of images with low energy loss electrons on the density is different from that. This difference allows the calculation of the relative density pixel by pixel and to determine lateral density gradients or fluctuations in thin films without relying on a constant specimen thickness. The method is demonstrated at thin carbon layers produced with density gradients.

  15. Automated determination of electron density from electric field measurements on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelavskaya, Irina; Kurth, William; Spasojevic, Maria; Shprits, Yuri

    2016-07-01

    We present the Neural-network-based Upper-hybrid Resonance Determination (NURD) algorithm for automatic inference of the electron number density from plasma wave measurements made onboard NASA's Van Allen Probes mission. A feedforward neural network is developed to determine the upper hybrid resonance frequency, f_{uhr}, from electric field measurements, which is then used to calculate the electron number density. In previous missions, the plasma resonance bands were manually identified, and there have been few attempts to do robust, routine automated detections. We describe the design and implementation of the algorithm and perform an initial analysis of the resulting electron number density distribution obtained by applying NURD to 2.5 years of data collected with the EMFISIS instrumentation suite of the Van Allen Probes mission. Densities obtained by NURD are compared to those obtained by another recently developed automated technique and also to an existing empirical plasmasphere and trough density model.

  16. Automated Determination of Electron Density from Electric Field Measurements on the Van Allen Probes Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelavskaya, Irina; Spasojevic, Maria; Shprits, Yuri; Kurth, William

    2016-04-01

    We present the Neural-network-based Upper-hybrid Resonance Determination (NURD) algorithm for automatic inference of the electron number density from plasma wave measurement made onboard NASA's Van Allen Probes mission. A feedforward neural network is developed to determine the upper hybrid resonance frequency, fuhr, from electric field measurements, which is then used to calculate the electron number density. In previous missions, the plasma resonance bands were manually identified, and there have been few attempts to do robust, routine automated detection. We describe the design and implementation of the algorithm and perform initial analysis of the resulting electron number density distribution obtained by applying NURD to 2.5 years of data collected with the EMFISIS instrumentation suite of the Van Allen Probes mission. Densities obtained by NURD are compared to those obtained by another recently developed automated technique and also to an existing empirical plasmasphere and trough density model.

  17. Automated determination of electron density from electric field measurements on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelavskaya, I. S.; Spasojevic, M.; Shprits, Y. Y.; Kurth, W. S.

    2016-05-01

    We present the Neural-network-based Upper hybrid Resonance Determination (NURD) algorithm for automatic inference of the electron number density from plasma wave measurements made on board NASA's Van Allen Probes mission. A feedforward neural network is developed to determine the upper hybrid resonance frequency, fuhr, from electric field measurements, which is then used to calculate the electron number density. In previous missions, the plasma resonance bands were manually identified, and there have been few attempts to do robust, routine automated detections. We describe the design and implementation of the algorithm and perform an initial analysis of the resulting electron number density distribution obtained by applying NURD to 2.5 years of data collected with the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) instrumentation suite of the Van Allen Probes mission. Densities obtained by NURD are compared to those obtained by another recently developed automated technique and also to an existing empirical plasmasphere and trough density model.

  18. Development and application of diagnostic instrumentation for measurement of electron density and conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, L.E.

    1990-05-01

    The purpose of this contract was to assemble and demonstrate in the laboratory a Faraday rotation system for measurement of electron density and conductivity, with the intent to produce a system suitable for diagnostic support of the development of pulsed, space-based magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power systems. Two system configurations were tested: (1) a rotating polarizer and (2) a beam splitting polarizer. Due to the short path length plasma produced in the laboratory flame, the long wavelength 496 {mu}m methyl fluoride laser line was used and only the more sensitive rotating polarizer configuration was used for the demonstration experiments. Electron number densities from 2 {times} 10{sup 19} to 9 {times} 10{sup 19} were measured with good agreement to statistical equilibrium (Saha) calculations using emission absorption-measured flame temperatures and neutral seed atom number seed atom nuclear densities. The electron collision frequencies were measured by transmission measurements. Combining these two measurements gave measured electron conductivities of between 4 and 12 mohs/m. These results compared reasonably well with those found with an electron collision frequency model combined with chemical equilibrium calculations and the emission absorption measurements. Ellipticity measurements of electron collision frequency were not possible due to the short path length of the laboratory plasma. 46 refs., 25 figs., 9 tabs.

  19. Electron density measurements in a pulse-repetitive microwave discharge in air

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolic, M.; Popovic, S.; Vuskovic, L.; Herring, G. C.; Exton, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    We have developed a technique for absolute measurements of electron density in pulse-repetitive microwave discharges in air. The technique is based on the time-resolved absolute intensity of a nitrogen spectral band belonging to the Second Positive System, the kinetic model and the detailed particle balance of the N{sub 2}C{sup 3}{Pi}{sub u} ({nu} = 0) state. This new approach bridges the gap between two existing electron density measurement methods (Langmuir probe and Stark broadening). The electron density is obtained from the time-dependent rate equation for the population of N{sub 2}C{sup 3}{Pi}{sub u} ({nu} = 0) using recorded waveforms of the absolute C{sup 3}{Pi}{sub u}{yields}B{sup 3}{Pi}{sub g} (0-0) band intensity, the forward and reflected microwave power density. Measured electron density waveforms using numerical and approximated analytical methods are presented for the case of pulse repetitive planar surface microwave discharge at the aperture of a horn antenna covered with alumina ceramic plate. The discharge was generated in air at 11.8 Torr with a X-band microwave generator using 3.5 {mu}s microwave pulses at peak power of 210 kW. In this case, we were able to time resolve the electron density within a single 3.5 {mu}s pulse. We obtained (9.0 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} for the peak and (5.0 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} for the pulse-average electron density. The technique presents a convenient, non-intrusive diagnostic method for local, time-defined measurements of electron density in short duration discharges near atmospheric pressures.

  20. Electron density measurements in an atmospheric pressure air plasma by means of infrared heterodyne interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leipold, Frank; Stark, Robert H.; El-Habachi, Ahmed; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2000-09-01

    An infrared heterodyne interferometer has been used to measure the spatial distribution of the electron density in direct current, atmospheric pressure discharges in air. Spatial resolution of the electron density in the high-pressure glow discharge with characteristic dimensions on the order of 100 µm required the use of a CO2 laser at a wavelength of 10.6 µm. For this wavelength and electron densities greater than 1011 cm-3 the index of refraction of the atmospheric air plasma is mainly determined by heavy particles rather than electrons. The electron contribution to the refractive index was separated from that of the heavy particles by taking the different relaxation times of the two particle species into account. With the discharge operated in a repetitive pulsed mode, the initial rapid change of the refractive index was assumed to be due to the increase in electron density, whereas the following slower rise is due to the decrease in gas density caused by gas heating. By reducing the time between pulses, direct current conditions were approached, and the electron density as well as the gas density, and gas temperature, respectively, were obtained through extrapolation. A computation inversion method was used to determine the radial distribution of the plasma parameters in the cylindrical discharge. For a direct-current filamentary discharge in air, at a current of 10 mA, the electron density was found to be 1013 cm-3 in the centre, decreasing to half of this value at a radial distance of 0.21 mm. Gaussian temperature profiles with σ = 1.1 mm and maximum values of 1000-2000 K in the centre were also obtained with, however, larger error margins than for electron densities.

  1. Automated Determination of Electron Density from Electric Field Measurements on the Van Allen Probes Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelavskaya, I. S.; Spasojevic, M.; Shprits, Y.

    2015-12-01

    In this study we present an algorithm for automatic inference of the electron number density from plasma wave measurement made onboard NASA's Van Allen Probes mission. It accomplishes this by using feedforward neural networks to automatically infer the upper hybrid resonance frequency, 𝑓𝑢h𝑟, from plasma wave measurement, which is then used to determine the electron number density. In previous missions, the plasma resonance bands were manually identified, and there have been few attempts to do robust, routine automated detection (Kurth et al. [JGR, 2014]). We describe the design and implementation of the algorithm, as well as the resulting electron number density distribution. Resulting densities are compared with the densities obtained by Kurth et al. [JGR, 2014] and also to the empirical plasmasphere and trough density model of Sheeley et al. [JGR, 2001]. The analysis of the conditions, under which densities obtained by the proposed method differ significantly from the model of Sheeley et al. [JGR, 2001], is presented. Finally, we discuss the dependence of the electron number density on magnetic activity (Kp) and magnetic local time.

  2. Solar wind electron temperature and density measurements on the Solar Orbiter with thermal noise spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimovic, M.; Issautier, K.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Perche, C.; Moncuquet, M.; Zouganelis, I.; Bale, S. D.; Vilmer, N.; Bougeret, J.-L.

    The measurement of the solar wind electron temperature in the unexplored region between 1 and 45 Rs is of prime importance for understanding the solar wind acceleration. Solar Orbiter's location, combined with the fact that the spacecraft will nearly co-rotate with the sun on some portions of its orbit, will furnish observations placing constraints on solar wind models. We discuss the implementation of the plasma thermal noise analysis for the Solar Orbiter, in order to get accurate measurements of the total electron density and electron temperature and to correct the spacecraft charging effects which affect the electron analyzers.

  3. Solar wind electron temperature and density measurements for the Solar Orbiter using the thermal noise spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimovic, M.; Issautier, K.; Moncuquet, M.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Zouganelis, I.; Bale, S. D.; Vilmer, N.; Bougeret, J.-L.

    The measurement of the solar wind electron temperature radial profile in the unexplored region between 1 and 45 R_s is of prime importance for understanding the solar wind acceleration. Solar Orbiter's location, combined with its ability to observe the corona in co-rotation, will furnish strong observational constraints on solar wind models. We discuss the implementation of the plasma thermal noise analysis for the Solar Orbiter, in order (i) to get accurate measurements of the total electron density and core electron temperature and (ii) to allow direct determination of the spacecraft charging effects which affect the electron analyzers.

  4. Simultaneous measurement of core electron temperature and density fluctuations during electron cyclotron heating on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    White, A. E.; Schmitz, L.; Peebles, W. A.; Rhodes, T. L.; Carter, T. A.; McKee, G. R.; Shafer, M. W.; Staebler, G. M.; Burrell, K. H.; DeBoo, J. C.; Prater, R.

    2010-02-15

    New measurements show that long-wavelength (k{sub t}hetarho{sub s}<0.5) electron temperature fluctuations can play an important role in determining electron thermal transport in low-confinement mode (L-mode) tokamak plasmas. In neutral beam-heated L-mode tokamak plasmas, electron thermal transport and the amplitude of long-wavelength electron temperature fluctuations both increase in cases where local electron cyclotron heating (ECH) is used to modify the plasma profiles. In contrast, the amplitude of simultaneously measured long-wavelength density fluctuations does not significantly increase. Linear stability analysis indicates that the ratio of the trapped electron mode (TEM) to ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode growth rates increases in the cases with ECH. The increased importance of the TEM drive relative to the ITG mode drive in the cases with ECH may be associated with the increases in electron thermal transport and electron temperature fluctuations.

  5. Measurements of the Electron Cloud Density in the PEP-II Low Energy Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.; De Santis, S.; Sonnad, K.; Caspers, F.; Kroyer, T.; Krasnykh, A.; Pivi, M.; /SLAC

    2012-04-10

    Clouds of low energy electrons in the vacuum beam pipes of accelerators of positively charged particle beams present a serious limitation for operation of these machines at high currents. Because of the size of these accelerators, it is difficult to probe the low energy electron clouds over substantial lengths of the beam pipe. We have developed a novel technique to directly measure the electron cloud density via the phase shift induced in a TE wave that is independently excited and transmitted over a section of the accelerator. We infer the absolute phase shift with relatively high accuracy from the phase modulation of the transmission due to the modulation of the electron cloud density from a gap in the positively charged beam. We have used this technique for the first time to measure the average electron cloud density over a 50 m straight section in the positron ring of the PEP-II collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We have also measured the variation of the density by using low field solenoid magnets to control the electrons.

  6. Measuring the Density of a Molecular Cluster Injector via Visible Emission from an Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, D. P.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R. M.; Stotler, D. P.

    2010-06-28

    A method to measure the density distribution of a dense hydrogen gas jet is pre- sented. A Mach 5.5 nozzle is cooled to 80K to form a flow capable of molecular cluster formation. A 250V, 10mA electron beam collides with the jet and produces Hα emission that is viewed by a fast camera. The high density of the jet, several 1016cm-3, results in substantial electron depletion, which attenuates the Hα emission. The attenuated emission measurement, combined with a simplified electron-molecule collision model, allows us to determine the molecular density profile via a simple iterative calculation.

  7. Raman calibration of the HT-7 yttrium aluminum garnet Thomson scattering for electron density measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Zang Qing; Zhao Junyu; Gao Xiang; Shi Lingwei; Zhang Tao; Xi Xiaoqi; Yang Li; Hu Qingsheng; Sajjad, S.

    2007-11-15

    A multipulse neodym doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser Thomson scattering system calibrated by the anti-Stokes rotational Raman scattering from nitrogen gas had been developed in the HT-7 superconducting Tokmak. By virtue of this system, measured electron density results of the plasma were obtained. The results showed good repeatability and its total uncertainty was estimated to be {+-}18%.

  8. Electron density and temperature measurement by continuum radiation emitted from weakly ionized atmospheric pressure plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sanghoo; Choe, Wonho; Youn Moon, Se; Park, Jaeyoung

    2014-02-24

    The electron-atom neutral bremsstrahlung continuum radiation emitted from weakly ionized plasmas is investigated for electron density and temperature diagnostics. The continuum spectrum in 450–1000 nm emitted from the argon atmospheric pressure plasma is found to be in excellent agreement with the neutral bremsstrahlung formula with the electron-atom momentum transfer cross-section given by Popović. In 280–450 nm, however, a large discrepancy between the measured and the neutral bremsstrahlung emissivities is observed. We find that without accounting for the radiative H{sub 2} dissociation continuum, the temperature, and density measurements would be largely wrong, so that it should be taken into account for accurate measurement.

  9. Microwave Transmission Measurements of the Electron Cloud density In the Positron Ring of PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, Mauro T.F.; Krasnykh, Anatoly K.; Byrd, John; De Santis, Stefano; Sonnaad, Kiran G.; Caspers, Fritz; Kroyer, Tom

    2008-06-18

    Clouds of electrons in the vacuum chambers of accelerators of positively charged particle beams present a serious limitation for operation of these machines at high currents. Because of the size of these accelerators, it is difficult to probe the low energy electrons clouds over substantial lengths of the beam pipe. We applied a novel technique to directly measure the electron cloud density via the phase shift induced in a TE wave which is independently excited and transmitted over a straight section of the accelerator. The modulation in the wave transmission which appears to increase in depth when the clearing solenoids are switched off, seem to be directly correlated to the electron cloud density in the section. Furthermore, we expect a larger phase shift of a wave transmitted through magnetic dipole field regionsif the transmitted wave couples with the gyration motion of the electrons. We have used this technique to measure the average electron cloud density (ECD) specifically for the first time in magnetic field regions of a new 4-dipole chicane in the positron ring of the PEP-II collider at SLAC. In this paper we present and discuss the measurements taken in the Low Energy Ring (LER) between 2006 and 2008.

  10. Microwave Transmission Measurements of the Electron Cloud Density In The Positron Ring of PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M.T.F.; Krasnykh, A.K; Byrd, J.; Santis, S.De; Sonnad, K.G.; Caspers, F.; Kroyer, T.; /CERN

    2008-07-03

    Clouds of electrons in the vacuum chambers of accelerators of positively charged particle beams present a serious limitation for operation of these machines at high currents. Because of the size of these accelerators, it is difficult to probe the low energy electron clouds over substantial lengths of the beam pipe. We applied a novel technique to directly measure the electron cloud density via the phase shift induced in a TE wave which is independently excited and transmitted over a straight section of the accelerator. The modulation in the wave transmission which appear to increase in depth when the clearing solenoids are switched off, seem to be directly correlated to the electron cloud density in the section. Furthermore, we expect a larger phase shift of a wave transmitted through magnetic dipole field regions if the transmitted wave couples with the gyration motion of the electrons. We have used this technique to measure the average electron cloud density (ECD) specifically for the first time in magnetic field regions of a new 4-dipole chicane in the positron ring of the PEP-II collider at SLAC. In this paper we present and discuss the measurements taken in the Low Energy Ring (LER) between 2006 and 2008.

  11. Radial Electron Temperature and Density Measurements Using Thomson Scattering System in GAMMA 10/PDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, M.; Ohta, K.; Wang, X.; Chikatsu, M.; Kohagura, J.; Shima, Y.; Sakamoto, M.; Imai, T.; Nakashima, Y.; Yasuhara, R.; Yamada, I.; Funaba, H.; Minami, T.

    2015-11-01

    A Thomson scattering (TS) system in GAMMA 10/PDX has been developed for the measurement of radial profiles of electron temperature and density in a single plasma and laser shot. The TS system has a large solid angle optical collection system and high-sensitivity signal detection system. The TS signals are obtained using four-channel high-speed digital oscilloscopes controlled by a Windows PC. We designed the acquisition program for six oscilloscopes to obtain 10-Hz TS signals in a single plasma shot, following which the time-dependent electron temperatures and densities can be determined. Moreover, in order to obtain larger TS signal intensity in the edge region, we added a second collection mirror. The radial electron temperatures and densities at six radial positions in GAMMA 10/PDX were successfully obtained.

  12. 2D electron density profile measurement in tokamak by laser-accelerated ion-beam probea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. H.; Yang, X. Y.; Lin, C.; Wang, L.; Xu, M.; Wang, X. G.; Xiao, C. J.

    2014-11-01

    A new concept of Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic has been proposed, of which the key is to replace the electrostatic accelerator of traditional HIBP by a laser-driven ion accelerator. Due to the large energy spread of ions, the laser-accelerated HIBP can measure the two-dimensional (2D) electron density profile of tokamak plasma. In a preliminary simulation, a 2D density profile was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of about 2 cm, and with the error below 15% in the core region. Diagnostics of 2D density fluctuation is also discussed.

  13. 2D electron density profile measurement in tokamak by laser-accelerated ion-beam probe.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y H; Yang, X Y; Lin, C; Wang, L; Xu, M; Wang, X G; Xiao, C J

    2014-11-01

    A new concept of Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic has been proposed, of which the key is to replace the electrostatic accelerator of traditional HIBP by a laser-driven ion accelerator. Due to the large energy spread of ions, the laser-accelerated HIBP can measure the two-dimensional (2D) electron density profile of tokamak plasma. In a preliminary simulation, a 2D density profile was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of about 2 cm, and with the error below 15% in the core region. Diagnostics of 2D density fluctuation is also discussed.

  14. 2D electron density profile measurement in tokamak by laser-accelerated ion-beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y. H.; Yang, X. Y.; Lin, C. E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, X. G.; Xiao, C. J. E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, L.; Xu, M.

    2014-11-15

    A new concept of Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic has been proposed, of which the key is to replace the electrostatic accelerator of traditional HIBP by a laser-driven ion accelerator. Due to the large energy spread of ions, the laser-accelerated HIBP can measure the two-dimensional (2D) electron density profile of tokamak plasma. In a preliminary simulation, a 2D density profile was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of about 2 cm, and with the error below 15% in the core region. Diagnostics of 2D density fluctuation is also discussed.

  15. Measurement of electron density transients in pulsed RF discharges using a frequency boxcar hairpin probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, David; Coumou, David; Shannon, Steven

    2015-11-01

    Time resolved electron density measurements in pulsed RF discharges are shown using a hairpin resonance probe using low cost electronics, on par with normal Langmuir probe boxcar mode operation. Time resolution of 10 microseconds has been demonstrated. A signal generator produces the applied microwave frequency; the reflected waveform is passed through a directional coupler and filtered to remove the RF component. The signal is heterodyned with a frequency mixer and rectified to produce a DC signal read by an oscilloscope. At certain points during the pulse, the plasma density is such that the applied frequency is the same as the resonance frequency of the probe/plasma system, creating reflected signal dips. The applied microwave frequency is shifted in small increments in a frequency boxcar routine to determine the density as a function of time. A dc sheath correction is applied for the grounded probe, producing low cost, high fidelity, and highly reproducible electron density measurements. The measurements are made in both inductively and capacitively coupled systems, the latter driven by multiple frequencies where a subset of these frequencies are pulsed. Measurements are compared to previous published results, time resolved OES, and in-line measurement of plasma impedance. This work is supported by the NSF DOE partnership on plasma science, the NSF GOALI program, and MKS Instruments.

  16. Real-time electron density measurements from Cotton-Mouton effect in JET machine

    SciTech Connect

    Brombin, M.; Boboc, A.; Zabeo, L.

    2008-10-15

    Real-time density profile measurements are essential for advanced fusion tokamak operation and interferometry is a proven method for this task. Nevertheless, as a consequence of edge localized modes, pellet injections, fast density increases, or disruptions, the interferometer is subject to fringe jumps, which produce loss of the signal preventing reliable use of the measured density in a real-time feedback controller. An alternative method to measure the density is polarimetry based on the Cotton-Mouton effect, which is proportional to the line-integrated electron density. A new analysis approach has been implemented and tested to verify the reliability of the Cotton-Mouton measurements for a wide range of plasma parameters and to compare the density evaluated from polarimetry with that from interferometry. The density measurements based on polarimetry are going to be integrated in the real-time control system of JET since the difference with the interferometry is within one fringe for more than 90% of the cases.

  17. Measurements of the Electron Cloud Density in the PEP-II Low Energy Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, John; De Santis, Stefano; Sonnad, Kiran; Caspers, Fritz; Kroyer, Tom; Krasnykh, Anatoly; Pivi, Mauro

    2008-06-01

    Clouds of low energy electronsin the vacuum beam pipes of accelerators of positively charged particle beams present a serious limitation for operation of these machines at high currents. Because of the size of these accelerators, it is difficult to probe the low energyelectron clouds over substantial lengths of the beam pipe. We have developed a novel technique to directly measure the electron cloud density via the phase shift induced in a TE wave that is independently excited and transmitted over a section of the accelerator. We infer the absolute phase shift with relatively high accuracy from the phase modulation of the transmission due to the modulation of the electron cloud density from a gap in the positively charged beam. We have used this technique for the first time to measure the average electron cloud density over a 50 m straight section in the positron ring of the PEP-II collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We have also measured the variation of the density by using low field solenoid magnets to control the electrons.

  18. Validation of ISS Floating Potential Measurement Unit Electron Densities and Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffey, Victoria N.; Minow, Joseph I.; Parker, Linda N.; Bui, Them; Wright, Kenneth, Jr.; Koontz, Steven L.; Schneider, T.; Vaughn, J.; Craven, P.

    2007-01-01

    Validation of the Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU) electron density and temperature measurements is an important step in the process of evaluating International Space Station spacecraft charging issues .including vehicle arcing and hazards to crew during extravehicular activities. The highest potentials observed on Space Station are due to the combined VxB effects on a large spacecraft and the collection of ionospheric electron and ion currents by the 160 V US solar array modules. Ionospheric electron environments are needed for input to the ISS spacecraft charging models used to predict the severity and frequency of occurrence of ISS charging hazards. Validation of these charging models requires comparing their predictions with measured FPMU values. Of course, the FPMU measurements themselves must also be validated independently for use in manned flight safety work. This presentation compares electron density and temperatures derived from the FPMU Langmuir probes and Plasma Impedance Probe against the independent density and temperature measurements from ultraviolet imagers, ground based incoherent scatter radar, and ionosonde sites.

  19. Design and measurement considerations of hairpin resonator probes for determining electron number density in collisional plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sands, Brian L.; Siefert, Nicholas S.; Ganguly, Biswa N.

    2007-11-01

    The hairpin resonator probe has been developed in recent years into a sophisticated diagnostic technique capable of measuring spatially resolved electron number densities in sub-Torr discharges. In this paper, we extend the use of this technique to discharges at pressures greater than 1 Torr. In this regime, the effects of electron-neutral collisions become significant and a suitable correction is applied in conjunction with the sheath correction. We also describe elements of hairpin design and coupling that need to be more carefully controlled in order to maximize the range of electron densities that can be detected at higher pressures. Finally, we discuss limitations to the transmission-line model used routinely to interpret hairpin data as they apply to measurements in a nonuniform plasma.

  20. Nighttime E-region Electron Density Profiles Measured During the EQUIS II Campaign at Kwajalein Atoll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, D. E.; Pfaff, R. F.; Fourre, R.; Kudeki, E.; Steigies, C. T.; Chau, K.; Sarango, M.

    2005-05-01

    The EQUIS II nighttime E-region rocket and radar measurements were made in order to improve our understanding of the electrodynamics associated with density gradients, neutral wind shear, and enhanced electric fields that develop post-sunset in the near-equatorial region. Four rocket experiments were launched on two separate nights in September, 2004 from Kwajalein Atoll (9.4° N, 167.5° E), while simultaneous E-region radar observations were made with the ALTAIR radar. The focus of this presentation are the electron density profiles measured by two instrumented rockets as they passed through the unstable region on the upleg and downleg. Each rocket used two Langmuir probes and an impedance probe of a new design to measure both the absolute electron density and small-scale density fluctuations with spatial scales on the order of one meter. The impedance probe returned measurements from 7 kHz to 4 MHz, using a new design that excited the plasma using a pseudo-white-noise generator, allowing for an altitude resolution of approximately 40 meters. These impedance curves allow determination of the electron density from the identification of the upper hybrid frequency. In addition, evidence is presented that the impedance probe observed the lower-frequency "series" resonance which is dependent on the electron temperature. Data from the Langmuir probes, a beacon experiment, and the impedance probe are compared and the resulting density profiles are examined to estimate their contribution to the observed electric field irregularities via the gradient-drift and other instabilities.

  1. Measurement of Electron Densities in a Pulsed Atmospheric Pressure Air Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leipold, Frank; Stark, Robert H.; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2000-10-01

    Microhollow cathode discharges have been shown to serve as plasma cathodes for atmospheric pressure air discharges [1]. The high pressure discharges are operated dc at currents from 10 mA up to 30 mA and at average electric fields of 1.25 kV/cm. The electron density in the dc discharge was measured by an interferometrique technique [2]. For a dc filamentary air discharge with a current of 10 mA, the radial electron density distribution was found to be parabolic with a total width of 660 μ m and an electron density of ne = 10^13 cm-3 in the center of the discharge. The diagnostic technique has now also been applied to pulsed discharges. It was found that the method provides electron densities measurements for discharges with durations as low as 5 μ s. The spatial distribution of the index of refraction in the pulsed discharge was obtained by shifting the discharge volume through the laser beam and by using an inversion method to obtain the radial index profile. For the electron density with a assumed parabolic profile, the maximum value was measured as 1.17*10^14 cm-3. (10 mA atmospheric pressure air discharge. The temperature profile was found to be gaussian with a half width of 1.3 mm. Acknowledgement This work was funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research in Cooperation with the DDR&E Air Plasma Ramparts MURI Program. References [1] Robert H. Stark and Karl H. Schoenbach, Appl. Phys. Lett. 74, 3770 (1999) [2] Frank Leipold, Robert H. Stark, and Karl H. Schoenbach, to appear in J. Phys. D., Appl. Phys.

  2. Rocket Measurement of a Daytime Electron Density Profile up to 620 Kilometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, J. E.; Bauer, S. J.

    1961-01-01

    On April 27, 1961 at 1502 EST a four-stage research rocket was fired from Wallops Island, Virginia, to measure the ionospheric electron density distribution by means of Seddon's CW propagation technique. This experimental technique is based upon the dispersive Doppler effect measured at two harmonically related frequencies, in this case f = 12.267 Mc and 6f = 73.6 Mc. The electron density profile measured above the peak of the F2 region is representative of a diffusive-equilibrium distribution in an isothermal ionosphere having a temperature of 1640 deg +/- 90 deg K. This result, when compared with satellite and other data, indicates that the upper ionosphere is in thermodynamic equilibrium.

  3. Measurement of electron density with the phase-resolved cut-off probe method

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, J. H.; Kim, D. W.; Na, B. K.; You, S. J.; Kim, J. H.; Shin, Y. H.

    2011-07-15

    The phase resolved cut-off probe method, a precise measurement method for the electron density, was recently proposed [J. H. Kwon et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 96, 081502 (2010)]. This paper presents the measurements of electron density using the method under various experimental conditions (different pressures, powers, chamber volumes, and discharge sources). The result shows that the method is not only in good agreement with the previous method using wave transmittance under various experimental conditions but it is also able to find the cut-off point clearly even under difficult conditions such as high pressure ({approx} 1 Torr), high discharge power, and small plasma volume. The details of the experimental setup, the operating mechanism of the probe method, and the data processing procedure (algorithm) are also addressed. Furthermore, the reliability of the measurement method is investigated by using an electromagnetic field simulation with cold plasma model (CST-Drude model, Computer Simulation Technology).

  4. Curling probe measurement of electron density in pulse-modulated plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Anil; Nakamura, Keiji; Sugai, Hideo; Sakakibara, Wataru; Matsuoka, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-13

    The electron density n{sub e} of stationary plasma can be easily obtained on the basis of the resonance frequency f of a curling probe (CP) measured by a network analyzer (NWA). However, in pulsed plasma with discharge period T, the n{sub e} and f values periodically change with time. This study extends the conventional CP technique to a time-resolved measurement of the pulse-modulated electron density. The condition necessary for the measurement is revealed to be synchronization of NWA with the pulse modulation, which is expressed as (n − 1)T/T{sub SWP} = integer (1, 2, …) for a number n of data point and sweep time T{sub SWP}.

  5. Electron density profiles obtained from CHAMP GPS radio occultation measurements: Initial results from GFZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arras, Christina; Schmidt, Torsten; Lee, Woo-Kyoung; Wickert, Jens; Heise, Stefan; Beyerle, Georg; Rothacher, Markus; Jakowski, Norbert

    GPS radio occultation signals received by Low Earth Orbit satellites provide global information about vertical distribution of lower atmospheric parameters (e.g., temperature and water vapour) and electron density in the ionosphere. Since its launch in July 2000 the German geoscience satellite CHAMP has collected about 400,000 occultation measurements. These data form a first and unique long-term dataset of ionospheric profiles, but also of other geophysical variables as temperature, pressure and water vapour in the lower atmosphere. We present initial results of the ionospheric occultation data analyses at GFZ. Vertical electron density profiles from CHAMP are derived using a recently developed software package. To obtain electron densities from calibrated TEC (Total Electron Content) data the so-called onion peeling method is used. The application of this technique allows for the derivation of the electron density profile iteratively starting from the top altitude. The derived profiles are compared with corresponding data processed by UCAR (University Corporation of Atmospheric Research) and DLR Neustrelitz, but also with independent PLP (Planar Langmuir Probe) measurements from CHAMP. These investigations are complemented by case studies comparing the profiles with ground based ionosonde measurements. The high vertical resolution of the derived ionospheric profiles reveals thin vertical ionospheric structures such as sporadic E layers. We investigate the occurrence distribution of these layers in more detail. Sporadic E appears predominantly during summer in the lower ionosphere and has a considerable effect on the propagation of the GPS radio occultation signals. This feature is used to derive information on the altitude and on the intensity of these irregularities.

  6. Floating probe for electron temperature and ion density measurement applicable to processing plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Min-Hyong; Jang, Sung-Ho; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2007-02-01

    A floating-type probe and its driving circuit using the nonlinear characteristics of the probe sheath was developed and the electron temperature and the plasma density which is found from the ion part of the probe characteristic (ion density) were measured in inductively coupled plasmas. The floating-type probe was compared with a single Langmuir probe and it turned out that the floating-type probe agrees closely with the single probe at various rf powers and pressures. The ion density and electron temperature by the floating-type probe were measured with a film on the probe tip coated in CF{sub 4} plasma. It is found that the ion density and electron temperature by the floating-type probe were almost the same regardless of the coating on the probe tip while a single Langmuir probe does not work. Because the floating-type probe is hardly affected by the deposition on the probe tip, it is expected to be applied to plasma diagnostics for plasma processing such as deposition or etching.

  7. Electron density profile measurements from hydrogen line intensity ratio method in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, YooSung; Shi, Yue-Jiang; Yang, Jeong-hun; Kim, SeongCheol; Kim, Young-Gi; Dang, Jeong-Jeung; Yang, Seongmoo; Jo, Jungmin; Oh, Soo-Ghee; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y. S.

    2016-11-01

    Electron density profiles of versatile experiment spherical torus plasmas are measured by using a hydrogen line intensity ratio method. A fast-frame visible camera with appropriate bandpass filters is used to detect images of Balmer line intensities. The unique optical system makes it possible to take images of Hα and Hβ radiation simultaneously, with only one camera. The frame rate is 1000 fps and the spatial resolution of the system is about 0.5 cm. One-dimensional local emissivity profiles have been obtained from the toroidal line of sight with viewing dumps. An initial result for the electron density profile is presented and is in reasonable agreement with values measured by a triple Langmuir probe.

  8. Diagnostics principle of microwave cut-off probe for measuring absolute electron density

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, Hyun-Su

    2014-08-15

    A generalized diagnostics principle of microwave cut-off probe is presented with a full analytical solution. In previous studies on the microwave cut-off measurement of weakly ionized plasmas, the cut-off frequency ω{sub c} of a given electron density is assumed to be equal to the plasma frequency ω{sub p} and is predicted using electromagnetic simulation or electric circuit model analysis. However, for specific plasma conditions such as highly collisional plasma and a very narrow probe tip gap, it has been found that ω{sub c} and ω{sub p} are not equal. To resolve this problem, a generalized diagnostics principle is proposed by analytically solving the microwave cut-off condition Re[ε{sub r,eff}(ω = ω{sub c})] = 0. In addition, characteristics of the microwave cut-off condition are theoretically tested for correct measurement of the absolute electron density.

  9. Development of far infrared attenuation to measure electron densities in cw pin discharge lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babcock, R. V.

    1977-01-01

    A two beam attenuation technique was devised to measure electron densities 10 to the 9th power to 10 to the 11th power cm/3 resolved to 1 cm, in a near atmospheric COFFEE laser discharge, using 496 micrometer and 1,220 micrometer radiations from CH3F, optically pumped by a CO2 laser. A far infrared generator was developed which was suitable except for a periodic intensity variation in FIR output deriving from frequency variation of the pump radiation.

  10. Infrared reflection spectra in contactless nondestructive measurements of the electron density and mobility in indium phosphide

    SciTech Connect

    Il'in, M.A.; Karasev, P.Yu.; Denisova, N.A.; Rezvov, A.V.; Tyurina, S.V.

    1988-07-01

    On the basis of numerical calculations and experimental studies we analyze the possibilities of measuring the electrophysical parameters of indium phosphide by means of infrared reflection spectra at wavelengths ranging from 5 to 200 /mu/m. We demonstrate that contactless nondestructive measurements of the electron density in the range 10/sup 16/-10/sup 20/ cm/sup /minus/3/ can be made with a relative error not exceeding 15%, and of mobility with a relative error not exceeding 25%. A nomogram method is presented for rapid conversion of data form infrared reflection spectra into the parameters being measured.

  11. Measurements of electron density irregularities in the ionosphere of Jupiter by Pioneer 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, R.; Yang, F.-C.

    1976-01-01

    It is demonstrated that when the frequency spectrum of log amplitude fluctuations is used, the radio-occultation experiment is a powerful tool for detecting, identifying, and studying ionospheric irregularities. Analysis of Pioneer 10 radio-occultation measurements reveals that the Jovian ionosphere possesses electron-density irregularities which are very similar to those found in the earth's ionosphere. This is the first time such irregularities have been found in a planetary ionosphere other than that of the earth. The Pioneer 10 results indicate that the spatial wave-number spectrum of the electron-density irregularities is close to the Kolmogorov spectrum and that the outer scale size is greater than the Fresnel size (6.15 km). This type of spectrum suggests that the irregularities are probably produced by the turbulent dissipation of irregularities larger than the outer scale size.

  12. Electron Density of Active Region Outflows Measured by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, N.; Yokoyama, T.

    2015-06-01

    In order to better understand the nature of active region outflows, the electron density was measured by using a density-sensitive line pair, Fe xiv 264.78 Å/274.20 Å. Because coronal line profiles of the outflow region are composed of a major component with a Doppler shift of ≤slant 10 km {{s}-1} and a minor component (enhanced blue wing, EBW) blueshifted by up to 100 km {{s}-1}, we extracted EBW from the line profiles through double-Gaussian fitting. We tried applying the simultaneous fitting to those two Fe xiv lines with several physical restrictions. Electron density for both components ({{n}Major} and {{n}EBW}, respectively) was calculated by referring to the theoretical intensity ratio as a function of electron density as per the CHIANTI database. We studied six locations in the outflow regions around NOAA AR10978. The average electron density was {{n}Major}={{10}9.16+/- 0.16} c{{m}-3} and {{n}EBW}={{10}8.74+/- 0.29} c{{m}-3}. The magnitude relationship between {{n}Major} and {{n}EBW} was the opposite in the eastern and western outflow regions. The column depth was also calculated for each component, which leads to the result that the outflows possess only a small fraction (∼0.1) in the eastern region, whereas they dominate over the major component in the line profiles by a factor of five in the western region. When taking into account the extended coronal structures, the western region can be thought to represent the mass leakage. In contrast, we suggest a possibility that the eastern region actually contributes to mass supply to coronal loops.

  13. Reproducibility of the cutoff probe for the measurement of electron density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D. W.; You, S. J.; Kwon, J. H.; You, K. H.; Seo, B. H.; Kim, J. H.; Yoon, J.-S.; Oh, W. Y.

    2016-06-01

    Since a plasma processing control based on plasma diagnostics attracted considerable attention in industry, the reproducibility of the diagnostics using in this application has become a great interest. Because the cutoff probe is one of the potential candidates for this application, knowing the reproducibility of the cutoff probe measurement becomes quit important in the cutoff probe application research. To test the reproducibility of the cutoff probe measurement, in this paper, a comparative study among the different cutoff probe measurements was performed. The comparative study revealed remarkable result: the cutoff probe has a great reproducibility for the electron density measurement, i.e., there are little differences among measurements by different probes made by different experimenters. The discussion including the reason for the result was addressed via this paper by using a basic measurement principle of cutoff probe and a comparative experiment with Langmuir probe.

  14. Computational characterization of cutoff probe system for the measurement of electron density

    SciTech Connect

    Na, Byung-Keun; Kim, Dae-Woong; Kwon, Jun-Hyuk; Chang, Hong-Young; Kim, Jung-Hyung; You, Shin-Jae

    2012-05-15

    The wave cutoff probe, a precise measurement method for measuring the electron density, was recently proposed. To characterize the cutoff probe system, in this paper, the microwave simulations of a cutoff probe system were performed at various configurations of the cutoff probe system. The influence of the cutoff probe spectrum stemming from numerous parametric elements such as the probe tip length, probe tip distance, probe tip plane orientation, chamber volume/geometry, and coaxial cable length is presented and discussed. This article is expected to provide qualitative and quantitative insight into cutoff probe systems and its optimization process.

  15. Electron Density Measurements on LTX Using Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, S.; Nguyen, X. V.; Peebles, W. A.; Boyle, D. P.; Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; Majeski, R.; Merino, E.; Schmitt, J. C.

    2015-11-01

    The dynamic evolution of the electron density profile is tracked using microwave and millimeter-wave diagnostics on LTX. The 296 GHz (λ =1 mm) interferometer provides a radial line density measurement at the midplane, while an FMCW (frequency-modulated continuous-wave) reflectometer (13.5 -33 GHz, or O-mode 0 . 2 - 1 . 3 ×1013 cm-3) provides density profile measurements for the low-field side. Data taken during FY2015 will be compared with measurements from Thomson scattering and estimates of the plasma position from LRDFIT. Measurements of density fluctuations due to low-frequency (<100 kHz) MHD instabilities will also be shown. Future plans include the installation of a correlation reflectomter (Ka-band, 27-40 GHz) with dual tuneable sources and a frequency bandwidth of up to 5 MHz. This system will utilize the same antennas as the profile reflectometer to provide radial and/or toroidal/poloidal correlations. Further diagnostic details will be presented at the meeting. Supported by U.S. DoE Grants DE-FG02-99ER54527 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  16. Matched dipole probe for precise electron density measurements in magnetized and non-magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafalskyi, Dmytro; Aanesland, Ane

    2015-09-01

    We present a plasma diagnostics method based on impedance measurements of a short matched dipole placed in the plasma. This allows measuring the local electron density in the range from 1012-1015 m-3 with a magnetic field of at least 0-50 mT. The magnetic field strength is not directly influencing the data analysis and requires only that the dipole probe is oriented perpendicularly to the magnetic field. As a result, the magnetic field can be non-homogeneous or even non-defined within the probe length without any effect on the final tolerance of the measurements. The method can be applied to plasmas of relatively small dimensions (< 10 cm) and doesn't require any special boundary conditions. The high sensitivity of the impedance measurements is achieved by using a miniature matching system installed close to the probe tip, which also allows to suppress sheath resonance effects. We experimentally show here that the tolerance of the electron density measurements reaches values lower than 1%, both with and without the magnetic field. The method is successfully validated by both analytical modeling and experimental comparison with Langmuir probes. The validation experiments are conducted in a low pressure (1 mTorr) Ar discharge sustained in a 10 cm size plasma chamber with and without a transversal magnetic field of about 20 mT. This work was supported by a Marie Curie International Incoming Fellowships within FP7 (NEPTUNE PIIF-GA-2012-326054).

  17. Plasma Core Electron Density and Temperature Measurements Using CVI Line Emissions in TCABR Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    do Nascimento, F.; Machida, M.; Severo, J. H. F.; Sanada, E.; Ronchi, G.

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we present results of electron temperature ( T e ) and density ( n e ) measurements obtained in Tokamak Chauffage Alfvén Brésilien (TCABR) tokamak using visible spectroscopy from CVI line emissions which occurs mainly near the center of the plasma column. The presented method is based on a well-known relationship between the particle flux ( Γ ion) and the photon flux ( ø ion) emitted by an ion species combined with ionizations per photon atomic data provided by the atomic data and analysis structure (ADAS) database. In the experiment, we measured the photon fluxes of three different CVI spectral line emissions, 4685.2, 5290.5, and 6200.6 Å (one line per shot). Using this method it was possible to find out the temporal evolution of T e and n e in the plasma. The results achieved are in good agreement with T e and n e measurements made using other diagnostic tools.

  18. Two-dimensional-spatial distribution measurement of electron temperature and plasma density in low temperature plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Cheol; Jang, Sung-Ho; Oh, Se-Jin; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2013-05-15

    A real-time measurement method for two-dimensional (2D) spatial distribution of the electron temperature and plasma density was developed. The method is based on the floating harmonic method and the real time measurement is achieved with little plasma perturbation. 2D arrays of the sensors on a 300 mm diameter wafer-shaped printed circuit board with a high speed multiplexer circuit were used. Experiments were performed in an inductive discharge under various external conditions, such as powers, gas pressures, and different gas mixing ratios. The results are consistent with theoretical prediction. Our method can measure the 2D spatial distribution of plasma parameters on a wafer-level in real-time. This method can be applied to plasma diagnostics to improve the plasma uniformity of plasma reactors for plasma processing.

  19. Measurement of solar wind electron density and temperature in the shocked region of Venus and the density and temperature of photoelectrons within the ionosphere of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, William C.; Jones, Douglas E.; Peterson, Bryan G.; Knadler, Charles E.

    2016-08-01

    Presented herein are measurements of the solar wind electron number density and temperature near and within the bow shock of Venus. The measurements were made by the Pioneer Venus mission Orbiter Retarding Potential Analyzer operating in its suprathermal electron mode. The measurements are essentially point measurements. The spacecraft travels approximately 0.8 km during the 0.1 s time interval required to record a single I-V curve. The dual measurement of a density and temperature is obtained from one sweep by least squares fitting a mathematical Maxwellian expression to the I-V curve. The distance between successive measurements is approximately 100 km. In many orbits, when the spacecraft is crossing or traveling within the bow shock, the derived densities and temperatures (high density, high temperature (HDHT)) are large, densities of the order of 100 cm-3 and temperatures of the order of several hundred eV. We interpret these HDHT measurements as measurements in regions where the large, directed kinetic energy of the solar wind ions is being degraded into randomized, more thermal-like energy distributions of the electrons and ions through wave-particle interactions. The HDHT values define the electron energy distribution in the limited energy interval 0 to 50 eV. We assume that the underlying electron flux distributions are flat topped like those measured in the Earth's bow shock. We also report densities and temperatures of EUV produced photoelectron energy distributions measured within the ionosphere.

  20. Measurements of plasma bremsstrahlung and plasma energy density produced by electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noland, Jonathan David

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this dissertation was to gain an understanding on the relative importance of microwave power, neutral pressure, and magnetic field configuration on the behavior of the hot electrons within an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) plasma. This was carried out through measurement of plasma bremsstrahlung with both NaI(Tl) (hv > 30 keV) and CdTe (2 keV < hv < 70 keV) x-ray detectors, and through measurement of the plasma energy density with a diamagnetic loop placed around the plasma chamber. We also examined the anisotropy in x-ray power by simultaneously measuring the x-ray spectra in two orthogonal directions: radially and axially, using NaI(Tl) detectors. We have seen that for a 6.4 GHz ECRIS, both the x-ray power produced by confined electrons and the plasma energy density behave logarithmically with microwave power. The x-ray flux created by electrons lost from the plasma, however, does not saturate. Thus, the small increase in plasma density that occurred at high microwave powers (> 150 W on a 6.4 GHz ECRIS) was accompanied by a large increase in total x-ray power. We suggest that the saturation of x-ray power and plasma energy density was due to rf-induced pitch-angle scattering of the electrons. X-ray power and plasma energy density were also shown to saturate with neutral pressure, and to increase nearly linearly as the gradient of the magnetic field in the resonance zone was decreased. All of these findings were in agreement with the theoretical models describing ECRIS plasmas. We have discussed the use of a diamagnetic loop as a means of exploring various plasma time scales on a relative basis. Specifically, we focused much of our attention on studying how changing ion source parameters, such as microwave power and neutral pressure, would effect the rise and decay of the integrated diamagnetic signal, which can be related to plasma energy density. We showed that increasing microwave power lowers the e-fold times at both the leading

  1. Thomson-scattering measurements of electron temperature and density in a plasma channel created by a relativistic electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, G.R.; Parke Davis, H.; Brandenburg, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    The electron density (n/sub e/) and temperature (T/sub e/) of the plasma channel created by the propagation of a relativistic electron beam in air have been measured by a ruby laser Thomson scattering diagnostic. The measurements were made at the MIMI electron beam accelerator (1.6 MV, 21 kA, 70 ns) at various times during the plasma channel development, with 25 ns temporal resolution and 2 mm radial resolution. For example, in 5 Torr air, at the time of maximum electron beam current, the results are n/sub e/ = 1.86 x 10/sup 15/ cm/sup -3/ (+- 12%), T/sub e/ = 4.24 eV (+- 20%). These results, as well as those with other timing, are in good agreement with the theoretical results of the Air Propagation Code: n/sub e/ = 1.65 x 10/sup 15/ cm/sup -3/, T/sub e/ = 2.59 eV. Signal-to-noise is very good (10:1), limited by x-ray fluorescence of the fiber optics at the spectrometer. In fielding the diagnostic on higher energy accelerators, however, the dominant noise is expected to be the background light from the plasma and hot gas, or the fluorescence of the collecting optics. Improvements to the diagnostic and an ongoing experiment in 80 Torr of air, 4 MV, 50 kA to address these issues is presented.

  2. Impedance probe with phase and gain detection for absolute electron density measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigies, C. T.; Pfaff, R. F.

    2003-04-01

    A new impedance probe to accurately measure plasma density using a variety of phase detection schemes has been designed for use on a sounding rocket. The instrument uses a Direct Digital Synthesis (DDS) chip to generate a frequency sweep of 256 discrete frequencies between 100 kHz and 5 MHz of a duration of 1 ms each, which generally covers the expected range of plasma frequencies. The voltage and current transmitted by a short dipole antenna, as well as the voltage received by a second receiving dipole antenna spaced 1 m away, are sampled in snippets with a 14-bit A/D converter at 8 MHz and telemetered to the ground. This mode of the instrument uses most of the 8 Mbits telemetry which is available for the impedance probe. A second, low-telemetry mode measures phase and gain between transmitted voltage and transmitted current, as well as between transmitted voltage and received voltage. For this measurement, two different circuits are provided. A phase/gain meter IC determines phase and gain between two signals. In addition, a second DDS synthesizes a frequency a few kHz below the sweep frequency. This signal is mixed with the transmitted voltage and current, as well as the received voltage. The mixed signals are sampled at a lower rate and sent to the ground. Comparing the signals with the mixed signal of the transmitted voltage allows the determination of phase and gain of both the transmitted current and the received voltage. As this is carried out as a function of frequency, the parallel resonance at the upper hybrid frequency will be discerned, from which the plasma density may be easily calculated. The instrument will be flown on a NASA sounding rocket from Poker Flat, Alaska in February, 2003. Data showing the performance of the instrument will be presented. The absolute electron density measurements made by this instrument will be used to cross calibrate with simultaneous Langmuir probe measurements.

  3. Gas temperature and electron density profiles in an argon dc microdischarge measured by optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belostotskiy, Sergey G.; Ouk, Tola; Donnelly, Vincent M.; Economou, Demetre J.; Sadeghi, Nader

    2010-03-01

    Optical emisssion spectroscopy was employed to study a high pressure (100 s of Torr), slot-type (600 μm interelectrode gap), argon dc microdischarge, with added traces of nitrogen. Spatially resolved gas temperature profiles were obtained by analyzing rovibrational bands of the N2 first positive system. The gas temperature peaked near the cathode and increased with current. The contribution of Stark broadening to the hydrogen Hβ emission lineshape was used to extract the electron density. The axial distribution of electron density as well as visual observation revealed that the microdischarge positive column was highly constricted. The electron density near the sheath edge increased with both pressure and current.

  4. Supersonic helium beam diagnostic for fluctuation measurements of electron temperature and density at the Tokamak TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Kruezi, U.; Stoschus, H.; Schweer, B.; Sergienko, G.; Samm, U.

    2012-06-15

    A supersonic helium beam diagnostic, based on the line-ratio technique for high resolution electron density and temperature measurements in the plasma edge (r/a > 0.9) was designed, built, and optimised at TEXTOR (Torus Experiment for Technology Oriented Research). The supersonic injection system, based on the Campargue skimmer-nozzle concept, was developed and optimised in order to provide both a high neutral helium beam density of n{sub 0}= 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} m{sup -3} and a low beam divergence of {+-}1 Degree-Sign simultaneously, achieving a poloidal resolution of {Delta}{sub poloidal}= 9 mm. The setup utilises a newly developed dead volume free piezo valve for operation in a high magnetic field environment of up to 2 T with a maximum repetition rate of 80 Hz. Gas injections are realised for a duration of 120 ms at a repetition rate of 2 Hz (duty cycle 1/3). In combination with a high sensitivity detection system, consisting of three 32 multi-channel photomultipliers (PMTs), measurements of edge electron temperature and density with a radial resolution of {Delta}{sub radial}= 2 mm and a maximum temporal resolution of {Delta}t Asymptotically-Equal-To 2 {mu}s (470 kHz) are possible for the first time. The diagnostic setup at TEXTOR is presented. The newly developed injection system and its theoretical bases are discussed. The applicability of the stationary collisional-radiative model as basis of the line-ratio technique is shown. Finally, an example of a fluctuation analysis demonstrating the unique high temporal and spatial resolution capabilities of this new diagnostic is presented.

  5. Electron density profile measurements at a self-focusing ion beam with high current density and low energy extracted through concave electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Y. Nakamiya, A.; Sakakita, H.; Hirano, Y.; Kiyama, S.; Koguchi, H.

    2014-02-15

    The self-focusing phenomenon has been observed in a high current density and low energy ion beam. In order to study the mechanism of this phenomenon, a special designed double probe to measure the electron density and temperature is installed into the chamber where the high current density ion beam is injected. Electron density profile is successfully measured without the influence of the ion beam components. Estimated electron temperature and density are ∼0.9 eV and ∼8 × 10{sup 8} cm{sup −3} at the center of ion beam cross section, respectively. It was found that a large amount of electrons are spontaneously accumulated in the ion beam line in the case of self-forcing state.

  6. Measurements of mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and electron density of some amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kore, Prashant S.; Pawar, Pravina P.

    2014-05-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients of some amino acids, such as DL-aspartic acid-LR(C4H7NO4), L-glutamine (C4H10N2O3), creatine monohydrate LR(C4H9N3O2H2O), creatinine hydrochloride (C4H7N3O·HCl) L-asparagine monohydrate(C4H9N3O2H2O), L-methionine LR(C5H11NO2S), were measured at 122, 356, 511, 662, 1170, 1275 and 1330 keV photon energies using a well-collimated narrow beam good geometry set-up. The gamma-rays were detected using NaI (Tl) scintillation detection system with a resolution of 0.101785 at 662 keV. The attenuation coefficient data were then used to obtain the effective atomic numbers (Zeff), and effective electron densities (Neff) of amino acids. It was observed that the effective atomic number (Zeff) and effective electron densities (Neff) initially decrease and tend to be almost constant as a function of gamma-ray energy. Zeff and Neff experimental values showed good agreement with the theoretical values with less than 1% error for amino acids.

  7. Ionospheric electron number densities from CUTLASS dual-frequency velocity measurements using artificial backscatter over EISCAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarno-Smith, Lois K.; Kosch, Michael J.; Yeoman, Timothy; Rietveld, Michael; Nel, Amore'; Liemohn, Michael W.

    2016-08-01

    Using quasi-simultaneous line-of-sight velocity measurements at multiple frequencies from the Hankasalmi Cooperative UK Twin Auroral Sounding System (CUTLASS) on the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN), we calculate electron number densities using a derivation outlined in Gillies et al. (2010, 2012). Backscatter targets were generated using the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) ionospheric modification facility at Tromsø, Norway. We use two methods on two case studies. The first approach is to use the dual-frequency capability on CUTLASS and compare line-of-sight velocities between frequencies with a MHz or greater difference. The other method used the kHz frequency shifts automatically made by the SuperDARN radar during routine operations. Using ray tracing to obtain the approximate altitude of the backscatter, we demonstrate that for both methods, SuperDARN significantly overestimates Ne compared to those obtained from the EISCAT incoherent scatter radar over the same time period. The discrepancy between the Ne measurements of both radars may be largely due to SuperDARN sensitivity to backscatter produced by localized density irregularities which obscure the background levels.

  8. Electron density and temperature measurements in a magnetized expanding hydrogen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyte-González, R.; Palomares, J. M.; Schram, D. C.; Engeln, R.

    2016-08-01

    We report measurements of electron densities, ne, and temperatures, Te, in a magnetized expanding hydrogen plasma performed using Thomson scattering. The effects of applying an axial magnetic field and changing the background pressure in the plasma vessel on ne and Te along the expansion axis are reported. Magnetic field strengths (B field) up to 170 mT were applied, which are one order of magnitude larger than previously reported. The main effect of the applied B field is the plasma confinement, which leads to higher ne. At B fields larger than 88 mT the electron density along the expansion axis does not depend strongly on the magnetic field strength. However, Te is susceptible to the B field and reaches at 170 mT a maximum of 2.5 eV at a distance of 1.5 cm from the exit of the cascaded arc. To determine also the effect of the arc current through the arc, measurements were performed with arc currents of 45, 60, and 75 A at background pressures of 9.7 and 88.3 Pa. At constant magnetic field ne decreases from the exit of the arc along the expansion axis when the arc current is decreased. At 88.3 Pa ne shows a higher value close to the exit of the arc, but a faster decay along the expansion axis with respect to the 9.7 Pa case. Te is overall higher at lower pressure reaching a maximum of 3.2 eV at the lower arc current of 45 A. The results of this study complement our understanding and the characterization of expanding hydrogen plasmas.

  9. Electron density and temperature measurements in a magnetized expanding hydrogen plasma.

    PubMed

    Leyte-González, R; Palomares, J M; Schram, D C; Engeln, R

    2016-08-01

    We report measurements of electron densities, n_{e}, and temperatures, T_{e}, in a magnetized expanding hydrogen plasma performed using Thomson scattering. The effects of applying an axial magnetic field and changing the background pressure in the plasma vessel on n_{e} and T_{e} along the expansion axis are reported. Magnetic field strengths (B field) up to 170 mT were applied, which are one order of magnitude larger than previously reported. The main effect of the applied B field is the plasma confinement, which leads to higher n_{e}. At B fields larger than 88 mT the electron density along the expansion axis does not depend strongly on the magnetic field strength. However, T_{e} is susceptible to the B field and reaches at 170 mT a maximum of 2.5 eV at a distance of 1.5 cm from the exit of the cascaded arc. To determine also the effect of the arc current through the arc, measurements were performed with arc currents of 45, 60, and 75 A at background pressures of 9.7 and 88.3 Pa. At constant magnetic field n_{e} decreases from the exit of the arc along the expansion axis when the arc current is decreased. At 88.3 Pa n_{e} shows a higher value close to the exit of the arc, but a faster decay along the expansion axis with respect to the 9.7 Pa case. T_{e} is overall higher at lower pressure reaching a maximum of 3.2 eV at the lower arc current of 45 A. The results of this study complement our understanding and the characterization of expanding hydrogen plasmas. PMID:27627401

  10. Measurement of Temporally and Spatially Resolved Electron Density in the Filament of a Pulsed Spark Discharge in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Zhiwen; Wen, Xiaoqiong; Ren, Chunsheng; Qiu, Yuliang

    2016-08-01

    The temporally and spatially resolved optical emission spectrum of Hα of a pulsed spark discharge in water was experimentally measured. The temporally and spatially resolved electron densities, along the radial direction of the spark filament, for a pulsed spark discharge in water with a conductivity of 100 μS/cm were investigated. The electron density in the spark filament was found to be in the 1018/cm3 order of magnitude. The highest electron density was measured at the primary stage of the spark filament, and it decreased with time. The radial distribution of electron density increased from the center to the edge of the spark filament. supported in part by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11275040 and 51437002)

  11. Local Measurement of Electron Density and Temperature in High Temperature Laser Plasma Using the Ion-Acoustic Dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, D H; Davis, P; Ross, S; Meezan, N; Divol, L; Price, D; Glenzer, S H; Rousseaux, C

    2005-09-20

    The dispersion of ion-acoustic fluctuations has been measured using a novel technique that employs multiple color Thomson-scattering diagnostics to measure the frequency spectrum for two separate thermal ion-acoustic fluctuations with significantly different wave vectors. The plasma fluctuations are shown to become dispersive with increasing electron temperature. We demonstrate that this technique allows a time resolved local measurement of electron density and temperature in inertial confinement fusion plasmas.

  12. Visualization of electronic density

    DOE PAGES

    Grosso, Bastien; Cooper, Valentino R.; Pine, Polina; Hashibon, Adham; Yaish, Yuval; Adler, Joan

    2015-04-22

    An atom’s volume depends on its electronic density. Although this density can only be evaluated exactly for hydrogen-like atoms, there are many excellent numerical algorithms and packages to calculate it for other materials. 3D visualization of charge density is challenging, especially when several molecular/atomic levels are intertwined in space. We explore several approaches to 3D charge density visualization, including the extension of an anaglyphic stereo visualization application based on the AViz package to larger structures such as nanotubes. We will describe motivations and potential applications of these tools for answering interesting questions about nanotube properties.

  13. Stark broadening measurement of the electron density in an atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet with double-power electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Qian Muyang; Ren Chunsheng; Wang Dezhen; Zhang Jialiang; Wei Guodong

    2010-03-15

    Characteristics of a double-power electrode dielectric barrier discharge of an argon plasma jet generated at the atmospheric pressure are investigated in this paper. Time-averaged optical emission spectroscopy is used to measure the plasma parameters, of which the excitation electron temperature is determined by the Boltzmann's plot method whereas the gas temperature is estimated using a fiber thermometer. Furthermore, the Stark broadening of the hydrogen Balmer H{sub {beta}} line is applied to measure the electron density, and the simultaneous presence of comparable Doppler, van der Waals, and instrumental broadenings is discussed. Besides, properties of the jet discharge are also studied by electrical diagnosis. It has been found that the electron densities in this argon plasma jet are on the order of 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}, and the excitation temperature, gas temperature, and electron density increase with the applied voltage. On the other hand, these parameters are inversely proportional to the argon gas flow rate.

  14. Theoretical and experimental study of the microwave cut-off probe for electron density measurements in low-temperature plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Li Bin; Li Hong; Wang Huihui; Xie Jinlin; Liu Wandong

    2011-10-01

    The microwave cut-off probe for the electron density measurement in low-temperature plasmas is described in this article. It is based on the wave cutoff in an unmagnetized plasma. The measurement principle is analyzed theoretically using a model of plasma slab. Because of the high-pass characteristic of plasma, the waves above the cut-off frequency can penetrate the plasma slab, whereas the lower frequency waves are reflected from the cut-off layer. Therefore, an obvious critical point can be observed in the wave transmission spectrum. The abscissa of the critical point indicates the cut-off frequency, which is directly related to the maximum electron density between transmitting/receiving antennas of the cut-off probe. The measured electron densities are in agreement with the data obtained by the Langmuir probe. Experimental results show that the microwave cut-off probe can be used to diagnose the plasmas with a wide range of parameters.

  15. Measurement of a density profile of a hot-electron plasma in RT-1 with three-chord interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, H.; Yano, Y.; Yoshida, Z.; Nishiura, M.; Morikawa, J.; Kawazura, Y.; Nogami, T.; Yamasaki, M.

    2015-02-15

    The electron density profile of a plasma in a magnetospheric dipole field configuration was measured with a multi-chord interferometry including a relativistic correction. In order to improve the accuracy of density reconstruction, a 75 GHz interferometer was installed at a vertical chord of the Ring Trap 1 (RT-1) device in addition to previously installed ones at tangential and another vertical chords. The density profile was calculated by using the data of three-chord interferometry including relativistic effects for a plasma consisting of hot and cold electrons generated by electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH). The results clearly showed the effects of density peaking and magnetic mirror trapping in a strongly inhomogeneous dipole magnetic field.

  16. Assessment of plasma impedance probe for measuring electron density and collision frequency in a plasma with spatial and temporal gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Mark A.; King, Lyon B.

    2014-05-01

    Numerical simulations and experimental measurements were combined to determine the ability of a plasma impedance probe (PIP) to measure plasma density and electron collision frequency in a plasma containing spatial gradients as well as time-varying oscillations in the plasma density. A PIP is sensitive to collision frequency through the width of the parallel resonance in the Re[Z]-vs.-frequency characteristic, while also being sensitive to electron density through the zero-crossing of the Im[Z]-vs.-frequency characteristic at parallel resonance. Simulations of the probe characteristic in a linear plasma gradient indicated that the broadening of Re[Z] due to the spatial gradient obscured the broadening due to electron collision frequency, preventing a quantitative measurement of the absolute collision frequency for gradients considered in this study. Simulation results also showed that the PIP is sensitive to relative changes in electron collision frequency in a spatial density gradient, but a second broadening effect due to time-varying oscillations made collision frequency measurements impossible. The time-varying oscillations had the effect of causing multiple zero-crossings in Im[Z] at parallel resonance. Results of experiments and simulations indicated that the lowest-frequency zero-crossing represented the lowest plasma density in the oscillations and the highest-frequency zero-crossing represented the highest plasma density in the oscillations, thus the PIP probe was found to be an effective tool to measure both the average plasma density as well as the maximum and minimum densities due to temporal oscillations.

  17. Assessment of plasma impedance probe for measuring electron density and collision frequency in a plasma with spatial and temporal gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, Mark A. King, Lyon B.

    2014-05-15

    Numerical simulations and experimental measurements were combined to determine the ability of a plasma impedance probe (PIP) to measure plasma density and electron collision frequency in a plasma containing spatial gradients as well as time-varying oscillations in the plasma density. A PIP is sensitive to collision frequency through the width of the parallel resonance in the Re[Z]-vs.-frequency characteristic, while also being sensitive to electron density through the zero-crossing of the Im[Z]-vs.-frequency characteristic at parallel resonance. Simulations of the probe characteristic in a linear plasma gradient indicated that the broadening of Re[Z] due to the spatial gradient obscured the broadening due to electron collision frequency, preventing a quantitative measurement of the absolute collision frequency for gradients considered in this study. Simulation results also showed that the PIP is sensitive to relative changes in electron collision frequency in a spatial density gradient, but a second broadening effect due to time-varying oscillations made collision frequency measurements impossible. The time-varying oscillations had the effect of causing multiple zero-crossings in Im[Z] at parallel resonance. Results of experiments and simulations indicated that the lowest-frequency zero-crossing represented the lowest plasma density in the oscillations and the highest-frequency zero-crossing represented the highest plasma density in the oscillations, thus the PIP probe was found to be an effective tool to measure both the average plasma density as well as the maximum and minimum densities due to temporal oscillations.

  18. Measurement of Field Aligned Electron and Ion Densities and Ducts from the Whistler and Z Mode Radio Sounding from IMAGE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonwalkar, V. S.; Hazra, S.; Mayank, K.; Reddy, A.; Liu, Y.; Carpenter, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    We present recent results from the application of whistler mode (WM) and Z mode (ZM) radio sounding experiments from the IMAGE satellite to the magnetospheric plasma diagnostics. A recently developed WM radio sounding method [Sonwalkar et al., JGR, 116, A11210, doi:10.1029/2011JA016759, 2011] was applied to 200 cases of WM echoes observed within the plasmasphere to measure field aligned electron density (Ne) and ion densities (NH+, NHe+, NO+) for L~1.6 -4, altitude <5000 km, Kp ~1-7, and F10.7 ~ 72-110 (low solar activity). The measured plasma parameters are in general consistent with the past space borne (e.g. CHAMP, DMSP, Alouette, ISIS, AE) and ground (e.g. ionosonde) measurements, but show significant differences from those predicted by IRI-2012 and GCPM models. We believe our measurements will lead to an improved model of electron and ion densities at <5000 km within the plasmasphere. The WM radio sounding method was applied to a case study of the variation of plasma parameters at L~2 during the development of a major storm, from quiet conditions and subsequent recovery, followed by a moderate and minor storm. Our study showed that relative to the preceding quiet time: (1) There was depletion in electron density, H+, He+ and enhancement in O+ ions leading to increase in O+-H+ transition height; (2) The recovery period of electrons and individual ions was different; (3) A similar trend in the variation of electron density, H+, O+ was observed after the moderate storm and the minor storm but He+ was not affected. Following a ray tracing technique originally developed for whistler mode sounding, we analyzed the fast nonducted and ducted Z mode echoes to obtain field aligned electron density and duct parameters (duct width and enhancement) from the measured dispersion of Z mode echoes. With the help of two case studies, we illustrate that fast Z mode echoes provide measurement of electron density at altitudes <10,000 km and duct width and enhancement within an

  19. An evaluation of International Reference Ionosphere electron density in the polar cap and cusp using EISCAT Svalbard radar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merete Bjoland, Lindis; Belyey, Vasyl; Løvhaug, Unni Pia; La Hoz, Cesar

    2016-09-01

    Incoherent scatter radar measurements are an important source for studies of ionospheric plasma parameters. In this paper the EISCAT Svalbard radar (ESR) long-term database is used to evaluate the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) model. The ESR started operations in 1996, and the accumulated database up to 2012 thus covers 16 years, giving an overview of the ionosphere in the polar cap and cusp during more than one solar cycle. Data from ESR can be used to obtain information about primary plasma parameters: electron density, electron and ion temperature, and line-of-sight plasma velocity from an altitude of about 50 and up to 1600 km. Monthly averages of electron density and temperature and ion temperature and composition are also provided by the IRI model from an altitude of 50 to 2000 km. We have compared electron density data obtained from the ESR with the predicted electron density from the IRI-2016 model. Our results show that the IRI model in general fits the ESR data well around the F2 peak height. However, the model seems to underestimate the electron density at lower altitudes, particularly during winter months. During solar minimum the model is also less accurate at higher altitudes. The purpose of this study is to validate the IRI model at polar latitudes.

  20. Measurement of electron density in complex plasmas of the PK-3 plus apparatus on the International Space Station

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kazuo; Hayashi, Yasuaki; Adachi, Satoshi

    2011-07-01

    Dust particles in discharge are often levitated in a sheath region rather than in bulk plasma under gravitational conditions (on Earth). Gravity compresses dust clouds, and the gravitational force restricts the motion of the dust particles. Microgravity gives the plasmas, including dust particles, so-called complex (dusty) plasmas, where dust particles are embedded in a completely charge-neutral region of the bulk plasma. The dust cloud, as an uncompressed strongly-coupled Coulomb system, corresponds to an atomic model with physical phenomena, e.g., crystallization, phase transition, and so on. Since the phenomena are tightly connected to plasma states expressed by plasma parameters, it is significant to estimate the plasma parameters, such as electron density and temperature. The present work shows the electron density measured by the frequency shift probe in the apparatus for microgravity experiments currently boarding on the International Space Station (PK-3 plus). The frequency shift probe measurement gave electron density in the order of 10{sup 8} cm{sup -3} as a typical value in the apparatus, and demonstrated the detection of electrons in plasmas with dust particles. The spatial distribution profile of the electron density obtained in this measurement presents an aspect for the void formation of dust clouds under microgravity.

  1. Electron density measurement in gas discharge plasmas by optical and acoustic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagioni, A.; Anania, M. P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F.; Mostacci, A.; Pompili, R.; Shpakov, V.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F.; Zigler, A.

    2016-08-01

    Plasma density represents a very important parameter for both laser wakefield and plasma wakefield acceleration, which use a gas-filled capillary plasma source. Several techniques can be used to measure the plasma density within a capillary discharge, which are mainly based on optical diagnostic methods, as for example the well-known spectroscopic method using the Stark broadening effect. In this work, we introduce a preliminary study on an alternative way to detect the plasma density, based on the shock waves produced by gas discharge in a capillary. Firstly, the measurements of the acoustic spectral content relative to the laser-induced plasmas by a solid target allowed us to understand the main properties of the acoustic waves produced during this kind of plasma generation; afterwards, we have extended such acoustic technique to the capillary plasma source in order to calibrate it by comparison with the stark broadening method.

  2. Measurements of core electron temperature and density fluctuations in DIII-D and comparison to nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    White, A. E.; Schmitz, L.; Peebles, W. A.; Carter, T. A.; Doyle, E. J.; Rhodes, T. L.; Wang, G.; McKee, G. R.; Shafer, M. W.; Holland, C.; Tynan, G. R.; Austin, M. E.; Burrell, K. H.; Candy, J.; DeBoo, J. C.; Prater, R.; Staebler, G. M.; Waltz, R. E.; Makowski, M. A.

    2008-05-15

    For the first time, profiles (0.3<{rho}<0.9) of electron temperature and density fluctuations in a tokamak have been measured simultaneously and the results compared to nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. Electron temperature and density fluctuations measured in neutral beam-heated, sawtooth-free low confinement mode (L-mode) plasmas in DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] are found to be similar in frequency and normalized amplitude, with amplitude increasing with radius. The measured radial profile of two fluctuation fields allows for a new and rigorous comparison with gyrokinetic results. Nonlinear gyrokinetic flux-tube simulations predict that electron temperature and density fluctuations have similar normalized amplitudes in L-mode. At {rho}=0.5, simulation results match experimental heat diffusivities and density fluctuation amplitude, but overestimate electron temperature fluctuation amplitude and particle diffusivity. In contrast, simulations at {rho}=0.75 do not match either the experimentally derived transport properties or the measured fluctuation levels.

  3. Assimilating Electron Density Profiles Measured by the Real Time Global Ionospheric Radio Observatory - GIRO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinisch, B. W.; Galkin, I. A.

    2009-04-01

    Operational applications of ionospheric models, whether they are first principles or data-driven models, rely on the accuracy of the models during quiet and disturbed conditions. Of course models can correctly describe ionospheric weather only if they assimilate measured ionospheric characteristics and electron density profiles (EDPs). For the "assimilating model" to make correct predictions, the measurements in turn must be accurate and reliable. Ionosondes provide the most accurate vertical EDPs at the site locations but do not cover all parts of the globe. Ionogram-derived EDPs have become the ground truth reference for ionospheric specification, presenting the unrivaled accuracy of the data on continuous demand for validation of alternative ionospheric techniques, including radio occultation, ultraviolet, and tomography. In recent years the digisonde network of ionosondes has grown to eighty stations and is expected to expand to more than 100 stations in the next couple of years. The new Digisonde-4D is running the Automatic Real Time Ionogram Scaler with True height inversion, ARTIST-5. The ARTIST-5 autoscaling program now calculates the EDPs together with density uncertainty limits at each height, making the data products suitable for ingestion in assimilative ionospheric models. In order to specify uncertainty at each height, two boundary profiles, inner and outer, are determined. The inner and outer boundaries reflect the uncertainties of the critical frequencies of each layer, the internal uncertainty of the starting height of the profile, and the uncertainties of the E valley model representation. The actual uncertainties are calculated from a cumulative difference characteristic representing a mismatch between automatically and manually scaled parameters (i.e., foF2, foF1) for the same ionogram. The cumulative differences are determined from statistical analysis of a large amount of ionograms for a specific station. The characteristics of interest are

  4. Measurement of electron temperature and ion density using the self-bias effect in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Kwang-Tae; Oh, Se-Jin; Choi, Ik-Jin; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2010-06-15

    For novel plasma diagnostics, the rf floating probe was revisited. For inducing the self-bias effect, ac bias voltage (approxkilohertz) was applied through a dc blocking capacitor between a probe and a signal generator. The dc self-bias potential was changed not only with ac bias voltages but also with electron temperatures, and therefore, the electron temperature was derived from the variations in the self-bias potential with and without ac bias voltage. The harmonic component of the probe contains information about the ion flux, and using a fast Fourier transform analysis of the probe current, the ion density was derived from the first harmonic current of the probe. The experimental results were compared with a single Langmuir probe. The electron temperature and the ion density were in good agreement with those from the Langmuir probe. Because the amplitude of the ac bias voltage is very low (<3 V), local ionizations affected by a high bias-voltage can be neglected.

  5. Estimation of D-region Electron Density using Tweeks Measurements at Nainital and Allahabad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, P.; Maurya, A. K.; Singh, Rajesh; Veenadhari, B.; Singh, A. K.

    2010-10-01

    Lightning generated radio atmospheric that propagates over long distances via multiple reflections through the boundaries of the Earth-ionosphere waveguide (EIWG), shows sharp dispersion near the cut-off frequency ˜1.8 kHz of the EIWG. These dispersed atmospherics at lower frequency end are called as `tweek' radio atmospherics. In order to estimate D-region electron densities at the ionospheric reflection heights we have utilized the dispersive property of tweeks observed at low latitude Indian stations Nainital (Geomag. Lat., 20.29° N) and Allahabad (Geomag. Lat., 16.05° N). Direction finding technique has also been applied to determine the source locations of causative lightning discharge of tweeks. In this perspective, the geographic locations is determined by the intersection of two circles that are drawn by taking the travelled / propagation distance by tweek atmospherics from source location to Allahabad (ALD) and Nainital (NTL) stations. These results are in good agreement with World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) data. The average D-region electron density along the propagation path varied in the range ˜20-35 el/cc at ionospheric reflection heights of 70-90 km. The tweek method has unique advantage of monitoring lower boundary of the D-region over an area of several thousand of km surrounding to the receiving stations.

  6. MIRI: A multichannel far-infrared laser interferometer for electron density measurements on TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, D.K.; Park, H.K.; Johnson, L.C.; Anderson, H.M.; Chouinard, R.; Foote, V.S.; Ma, C.H.; Clifton, B.J.

    1987-07-01

    A ten-channel far-infrared laser interferometer which is routinely used to measure the spatial and temporal behavior of the electron density profile on the TFTR tokamak is described and representative results are presented. This system has been designed for remote operation in the very hostile environment of a fusion reactor. The possible expansion of the system to include polarimetric measurements is briefly outlined. 13 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Middle atmosphere measurements of small-scale electron density irregularities and ion properties during the MAC/Epsilon campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blood, S. P.; Mitchell, J. D.; Croskey, C. L.

    1989-01-01

    Rocket payloads designed to measure small scale electron density irregularities and ion properties in the middle atmosphere were flown with each of the three main salvos of the MAC/Epsilon campaign conducted at the Andoya Rocket Range, Norway, during October to November 1987. Fixed bias, hemispheric nose tip probes measured small scale electron density irregularities, indicative of neutral air turbulence, during the rocket's ascent; and subsequently, parachute-borne Gerdien condensers measured the region's polar electrical conductivity, ion mobility and density. One rocket was launched during daylight (October 15, 1052:20 UT), and the other two launches occurred at night (October 21, 2134 UT: November 12, 0021:40 UT) under moderately disturbed conditions which enhanced the detection and measurement of turbulence structures. A preliminary analysis of the real time data displays indicates the presence of small scale electron density irregularities in the altitude range of 60 to 90 km. Ongoing data reduction will determine turbulence parameters and also the region's electrical properties below 90 km.

  8. Measurements of electron density and temperature in a miniature microwave discharge ion thruster using laser Thomson scattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, N.; Tomita, K.; Yamasaki, N.; Tsuru, T.; Ezaki, T.; Kotani, Y.; Uchino, K.; Nakashima, H.

    2010-08-01

    In order to improve the thrust performance of a miniature microwave discharge ion thruster, the relationship between electron number density/temperature and operational conditions, mass flow rate, incident microwave power and magnetic field strength were measured by means of laser Thomson scattering. A photon counting method and a triple grating spectrometer were used against a small Thomson scattering signal and a strong stray laser light. Electron number density increased with incident microwave power and was saturated at critical incident microwave power; it was about 1.2 × 1018 m-3 at incident microwave power >8 W. In addition, electron number density increased with mass flow rate and became saturated; it was about 1.7 × 1018 m-3 at mass flow rate > 0.04 mg s-1. The electron number density gradually increased with an increase in the number of magnets, i.e. magnetic field strength. There was a sudden jump at thirteen magnets, although the thruster failed to ignite at fourteen magnets. This is because there is an optimum distance between the antenna and the electron cyclotron resonance layer. These results suggest that future improvement in thrust efficiency in miniature microwave discharge ion thrusters may come from the fine adjustment of the magnetic field configuration inside the discharge chamber.

  9. Upgraded millimeter-wave interferometer for measuring the electron density during the beam extraction in the negative ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokuzawa, T.; Kisaki, M.; Nagaoka, K.; Tsumori, K.; Ito, Y.; Ikeda, K.; Nakano, H.; Osakabe, M.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.

    2016-11-01

    The upgraded millimeter-wave interferometer with the frequency of 70 GHz is installed on a large-scaled negative ion source. Measurable line-averaged electron density is from 2 × 1015 to 3 × 1018 m-3 in front of the plasma grid. Several improvements such as the change to shorter wavelength probing with low noise, the installation of special ordered horn antenna, the signal modulation for a high accuracy digital phase detection, the insertion of insulator, and so on, are carried out for the measurement during the beam extraction by applying high voltage. The line-averaged electron density is successfully measured and it is found that it increases linearly with the arc power and drops suddenly at the beam extraction.

  10. Electron temperature and density measurement of tungsten inert gas arcs with Ar-He shielding gas mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühn-Kauffeldt, M.; Marques, J.-L.; Forster, G.; Schein, J.

    2013-10-01

    The diagnostics of atmospheric welding plasma is a well-established technology. In most cases the measurements are limited to processes using pure shielding gas. However in many applications shielding gas is a mixture of various components including metal vapor in gas metal arc welding (GMAW). Shielding gas mixtures are intentionally used for tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding in order to improve the welding performance. For example adding Helium to Argon shielding gas allows the weld geometry and porosity to be influenced. Yet thermal plasmas produced with gas mixtures or metal vapor still require further experimental investigation. In this work coherent Thomson scattering is used to measure electron temperature and density in these plasmas, since this technique allows independent measurements of electron and ion temperature. Here thermal plasmas generated by a TIG process with 50% Argon and 50% Helium shielding gas mixture have been investigated. Electron temperature and density measured by coherent Thomson scattering have been compared to the results of spectroscopic measurements of the plasma density using Stark broadening of the 696.5 nm Argon spectral line. Further investigations of MIG processes using Thomson scattering technique are planned.

  11. Simulations of Electron-Cloud Current Density Measurements in Dipoles, Drifts, and Wigglers at CesrTA

    SciTech Connect

    Calvey, J.; Crittenden, J. A.; Dugan, G.; Greenwald, S.; Kreinick, D.; Livezey, J. A.; Palmer, M. A.; Rubin, D.; Fukuma, H.; Jain, P.; Kanazawa, K.; Suetsugu, Y.; Celata, C. M.; Furman, M.; Penn, G.; Venturini, M.; Pivi, M.T.F.; Harkay, K.C.; Wang, L.

    2009-05-01

    A core component of the Cesr-TA research program at Cornell is to fully understand the electron cloud effect through the use of simulation programs that have been developed to predict the growth of the cloud and its interaction with the beam. As a local probe of the electron cloud, several segmented retarding field analyzers (RFAs) have been installed in CesrTA in dipole, drift and wiggler regions. Using these RFAs, the energy spectrum of the time-average electron cloud current density striking the walls has been measured for a variety of bunch train patterns, with different bunch currents, beam energies, emittances, and bunch lengths, and for both positron and electron beams. This paper will compare these measurements with the predictions of simulation programs.

  12. Simulations of Electron-Cloud Current Density Measurements in Dipoles, Drifts And Wigglers at CesrTA

    SciTech Connect

    Calvey, J.; Crittenden, J. A.; Dugan, G.; Greenwald, S.; Livezey, J. A.; Palmer, M. A.; Rubin, D.; Harkay, K. C.; Jain, P.; Kanazawa, K.; Suetsugu, Y.; Celata, C. M.; Furman, M.; Pivi, M. T. F.; Wang, L.; Kreinick, D.; Penn, G.; Venturini, M.

    2009-05-04

    A core component of the CesrTA research program at Cornell is to fully understand the electron cloud effect through the use of simulation programs that have been developed to predict the growth of the cloud and its interaction with the beam. As a local probe of the electron cloud, several segmented retarding field analyzers (RFAs) have been installed in CesrTA in dipole, drift and wiggler regions. Using these RFAs, the energy spectrum of the time-average electron cloud current density striking the walls has been measured for a variety of bunch train patterns, with different bunch currents, beam energies, emittances, and bunch lengths, and for both positron and electron beams. This paper will compare these measurements with the predictions of simulation programs.

  13. Active measurement of the thermal electron density and temperature on the Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter of the BepiColombo mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trotignon, J. G.; Béghin, C.; Lagoutte, D.; Michau, J. L.; Matsumoto, H.; Kojima, H.; Hashimoto, K.; Kasaba, Y.; Blomberg, L. G.; Lebreton, J. P.; Masson, A.; Hamelin, M.; Pottelette, R.

    2006-01-01

    The thermal component of Mercury's electron population has never been measured. One scientific objective of the Plasma Wave Investigation consortium, PWI, is to determine the influence of the thermal plasma upon the formation and dynamics of the planetary magnetosphere, as a function of solar activity. The Active Measurement of Mercury's Plasma experiment, AM 2P, has been proposed as part of PWI, to monitor the density and temperature of the thermal electron population, during the whole mission of the Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter of BepiColombo. These two physical parameters will be deduced from the measurements of the self- and mutual-impedances of the MEFISTO (Mercury Electric Field In Situ TOol) double-sphere antenna, in a frequency range comprising the expected plasma frequency. The in situ measurement of the antenna impedance is also essential for calibrating the electric antenna which measures the natural waves; it will allow, in particular, the effective length of the antenna to be calculated as a function of frequency and plasma conditions. The purpose of this paper is to define the scientific objectives of AM 2P, to explain the principle of the measurement, to describe the electronic device, and to show the ability of AM 2P to make reliable and accurate measurements of the thermal plasma density and temperature in the Hermean magnetosphere, as well as in the solar wind at heliocentric distances of 0.31-0.47 AU. The potential performance of this instrument has been evaluated using both an analytical approach and numerical simulations.

  14. Electronic heterodyne moire deflectometry: A method for transient and three dimensional density fields measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stricker, Josef

    1987-01-01

    Effects of diffraction and nonlinear photographic emulsion characteristics on the performance of deferred electronic heterodyne moire deflectometry are investigated. The deferred deflectometry is used for measurements of nonsteady phase objects where it is difficult to complete the analysis of the field in real time. The sensitivity, accuracy and resolution of the system are calculated and it is shown that they are weakly affected by diffraction and by nonlinear recording. The feactures of the system are significantly improved compared with the conventional deferred intensity moire technique, and are comparable with the online heterodyne moire. The system was evaluated experimentally by deferred measurements of the refractive index gradients of a weak phase object consisting of a large KD*P crystal. This was done by photographing the phase object through a Ronchi grating and analyzing the tranparency with the electronic heterodyne readout system. The results are compared with the measurements performed on the same phase object with online heterodyne moire deflectometry and with heterodyne holographic interferometry methods. Some practical considerations for system improvement are discussed.

  15. Identification of errors in the electron density measurements of a tangential interferometer/polarimeter system during a tokamak discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Arakawa, H.; Kawano, Y.; Itami, K.

    2012-10-15

    A new method for the comparative verification of electron density measurements obtained with a tangential interferometer and a polarimeter during a discharge is proposed. The possible errors associated with the interferometer and polarimeter are classified by the time required for their identification. Based on the characteristics of the errors, the fringe shift error of the interferometer and the low-frequency noise of the polarimeter were identified and corrected for the JT-60U tangential interferometer/polarimeter system.

  16. Interstellar Electron Density Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Hendrick Clark

    This study concerns the investigation of the form of the wavenumber spectrum of the Galactic electron density fluctuations through an examination of the scattering of the radio pulses emitted by pulsars as they propagate through the diffuse ionized interstellar gas. A widely used model for the electron density spectrum is based on the simple power-law: Pne(q)∝ q-β, where β = 11/3 is usually assumed, corresponding to Kolmogorov's turbulence spectrum. The simple Kolmogorov model provides satisfactory agreement for observations along many lines of sight; however, major inconsistencies remain. The inconsistencies suggest that an increase in the ratio of the power between the high (10-8[ m]-1≤ q<=10-7[ m]-1) and low (10-13[ m]-1≤ q<=10-12[ m]-1) wavenumbers is needed. This enhancement in the ratio can in turn be achieved by either including an inner scale, corresponding to a dissipation scale for the turbulent cascade, in the Kolmogorov spectrum or by considering steeper spectra. Spectra with spectral exponents β > 4 have been in general rejected based on observations of pulsar refractive scintillations. The special case of β = 4 has been given little attention and is analyzed in detail. Physically, this 'β = 4' model corresponds to the random distribution, both in location and orientation, of discrete objects with relatively sharp boundaries across the line of sight. An outer scale is included in the model to account for the average size of such objects. We compare the predictions of the inner-scale and β = 4 models both with published observations and observations we made as part of this investigation. We conclude that the form of the wavenumber spectrum is dependent on the line of sight. We propose a composite spectrum featuring a uniform background turbulence in presence of randomly distributed discrete objects, as modeled by the β = model.

  17. Kinetic Temperature and Electron Density Measurement in an Inductively Coupled Plasma Torch using Degenerate Four-Wave Mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schafer, Julia; Lyons, Wendy; Tong, WIlliam G.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2008-01-01

    Laser wave mixing is presented as an effective technique for spatially resolved kinetic temperature measurements in an atmospheric-pressure radio-frequency inductively-coupled plasma. Measurements are performed in a 1 kW, 27 MHz RF plasma using a continuous-wave, tunable 811.5-nm diode laser to excite the 4s(sup 3)P2 approaches 4p(sup 3)D3 argon transition. Kinetic temperature measurements are made at five radial steps from the center of the torch and at four different torch heights. The kinetic temperature is determined by measuring simultaneously the line shape of the sub-Doppler backward phase-conjugate degenerate four-wave mixing and the Doppler-broadened forward-scattering degenerate four-wave mixing. The temperature measurements result in a range of 3,500 to 14,000 K+/-150 K. Electron densities measured range from 6.1 (+/-0.3) x 10(exp 15)/cu cm to 10.1 (+/-0.3) x 10(exp 15)/cu cm. The experimental spectra are analyzed using a perturbative treatment of the backward phase-conjugate and forward-geometry wave-mixing theory. Stark width is determined from the collisional broadening measured in the phase-conjugate geometry. Electron density measurements are made based on the Stark width. The kinetic temperature of the plasma was found to be more than halved by adding deionized water through the nebulizer.

  18. Active measurements of the thermal electron density and temperature from the Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter of the BepiColombo mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trotignon, J. G.; Beghin, C.; Matsumoto, H.; Kojima, H.; Hashimoto, K.; Blomberg, L.; Lebreton, J. P.; Masson, A.; Hamelin, M.; Pottelette, R.

    The thermal component of the Mercury's electron population remains to be investigated. It is one of the scientific objectives of the Plasma Wave Investigation, PWI, consortium to determine its influence on the formation and dynamics of the planetary magnetosphere as a function of the solar activity. The Active Measurement of Mercury's Plasma, AM2P, experiment has therefore been proposed as part of the PWI to measure the density and temperature of the thermal electron population all along the Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter of the BepiColombo mission. These two aeronomical parameters shall be deduced from the measurements of the self- and mutual-impedances of the MEFISTO (Mercury Electric Field In Situ TOol) double-sphere antenna in a frequency range comprising the expected plasma frequency. The purpose of the current presentation is: 1) to set the AM2P scientific objectives, 2) to give the principle of measurements, 3) to describe the electronics device, and 4) to show the ability of the AM2P to make reliable and accurate measurements of the thermal plasma density and temperature in the Hermean magnetosphere, as well as in the solar wind at 0.31-0.47 AU from the Sun. The latter point has been established from analytical and numerical simulations.

  19. Multichannel microwave interferometer with an antenna switching system for electron density measurement in a laboratory plasma experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamori, Eiichirou; Lin, Yu-Hsiang; Mase, Atsushi; Nishida, Yasushi; Cheng, C. Z.

    2014-02-15

    This study presents a simple and powerful technique for multichannel measurements of the density profile in laboratory plasmas by microwave interferometry. This technique uses electromechanical microwave switches to temporally switch the connection between multiple receiver antennas and one phase-detection circuit. Using this method, the phase information detected at different positions is rearranged into a time series that can be acquired from a minimum number of data acquisition channels (e.g., two channels in the case of quadrature detection). Our successfully developed multichannel microwave interferometer that uses the antenna switching method was applied to measure the radial electron density profiles in a magnetized plasma experiment. The advantage of the proposed method is its compactness and scalability to multidimensional measurement systems at low cost.

  20. Experimental measurement of spatially resolved electron density in a filament of a pulsed positive streamer discharge in water

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Xiao Qiong; Niu, Zhi Wen; Ren, Chun-Sheng; Hou, Bo

    2015-06-29

    By combining a high-speed frame camera with a monochromator, the spatially resolved optical emission spectrum of hydrogen α line in a single filament of a pulsed positive streamer discharge in water has been experimentally measured. The spatially resolved electron densities in a single filament of a pulsed positive streamer discharge in water with a conductivity of 200 μS/cm were investigated. During the experiment, the average energy per pulse of discharge was 90.6 ± 13.6 mJ. The results show that the electron density in the streamer filament is 10{sup 17–18}/cm{sup 3}, and present a decreasing tendency along the axial direction of the streamer filament with increasing distance from the tip of the anode.

  1. Understanding the dramatic role of anomalous dispersion on the measurement of electron densities in plasmas using interferometers

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, J; Johnson, W R; Iglesias, C A; Scofield, J H

    2005-07-20

    For decades the electron density of plasmas has been measured using optical interferometers. With the availability of good X-ray laser sources in the last decade interferometers have been extended into the wavelength range 14-47 nm, which has enabled researchers to probe even higher density plasmas. The data analysis assumes the index of refraction is due only to the free electrons, which makes the index less than one. Recent interferometer experiments in Al plasmas observed plasmas with index of refraction greater than one at 14 nm and brought into question the validity of the usual formula for calculating the index. In this paper we show how the anomalous dispersion from bound electrons can dominate the free electron contribution to the index of refraction in many plasmas and make the index greater than one or enhance the contribution to the index such that one would greatly overestimate the density of the plasma using interferometers. Using a new average-atom code we calculate the index of refraction in many plasmas at different temperatures for photon energies from 0 to 100 eV and compare against calculations done with OPAL. We also present examples of other plasmas that may have index of refraction greater than one at X-ray laser energies. During the next decade X-ray free electron lasers and other X-ray sources will be available to probe a wider variety of plasmas at higher densities and shorter wavelengths so understanding the index of refraction in plasmas will be even more essential.

  2. The ionospheric electron density of Titan as measured by RPWS/LP during TA-T100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edberg, N. J. T.; Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Andrews, D. J.; Shebanits, O.; Vigren, E.; Ågren, K.; Wahlund, J. E.; Holmberg, M. K. G.; Opgenoorth, H. J.; Jackman, C. M.; Roussous, E.; Garnier, P.; Cravens, T. E.; Badman, S. V.; Modolo, R.; Bertucci, C.; Dougherty, M.

    2014-04-01

    We present measurements from the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science/Langmuir probe (RPWS/LP) instrument of the electron density in the ionosphere of Titan from the first 101 close flybys (TA-T100). The electron density has been shown to vary significantly from one flyby to the next, as well as on longer time scales, and we discern some of the reasons for this variability. Firstly, following the rise to the current solar maximum we show how the ionospheric peak density, normalized to a common solar zenith angle, Nnorm varies with the ~11-year solar cycle (Figure 1). Nnorm correlates well with the solar energy flux Fe and we find that Nnorm ∝ Fe k, with k = 0.54 ± 0.18, which is close to the theoretical value of 0.5 [1]. Secondly, we present a case study from the T85 flyby when Titan was located in the magnetosheath of Saturn as opposed to the magnetosphere. Concurrently, the highest ever electron densities in the ionosphere of Titan were measured (Npeak = 4310 cm-3). We show that this could be caused by increased particle impact ionization during a CME impact on the Saturn system [2]. Thirdly, we also present results that indicate that the ionospheric density in the topside ionosphere (altitude range 1200-2400 km) are generally significantly increased, roughly by a factor of 2, when Titan is located in the post-midnight sector of Saturn, i.e. at Saturn local time 00 - 03 h, compared to other local time sectors. We suggest that this increase could be caused by additional particle impact ionization from reconnection events in the Saturn tail.

  3. ISS FPP Ionospheric Electron Density and Temperature Measurements: Results, Comparison with the IRI-90 Model, and Implications for ISS Charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, D. C.; Hillard, G. B.; Morton, T. L.; Personen, R.

    2003-01-01

    We give measurement results of electron temperature and electron density from the Floating Potential Probe (FPP) on the International Space Station (ISS), and relate them to the electron current collection of the ISS solar arrays and the degree of charging of ISS when its Plasma Contacting Units (PCUs) are not operating. We show that on days of high solar activity index Kp, high levels of ISS charging are significantly more probable than on days of low solar activity, due to some abnormally low morning electron temperatures. Although the FPP electron temperatures measured are almost always higher than predicted by the International Reference Ionosphere 90 model (IRI-90), it is shown that the CHAMP satellite Langmuir Probe (PLP) also shows low dawn electron temperatures on the same day as those found by FPP. It is further shown that similar high levels of predicted charging, accompanied by vxB charging on the ISS structure, could exceed the -40 V specification on ISS charging, and could be dangerous to ISS astronauts if the PCUs fail to operate.

  4. Multichannel Microwave Interferometer for Simultaneous Measurement of Electron Density and its Fluctuation on HL-2A Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Peiwan; Shi, Zhongbing; Chen, Wei; Zhong, Wulyu; Yang, Zengchen; Jiang, Min; Zhang, Boyu; Li, Yonggao; Yu, Liming; Liu, Zetian; Ding, Xuantong

    2016-07-01

    A multichannel microwave interferometer system has been developed on the HL-2A tokomak. Its working frequency is well designed to avoid the fringe jump effect. Taking the structure of HL-2A into account, its antennas are installed in the horizontal direction, i.e. one launcher in high field side (HFS) and four receivers in low field side (LFS). The fan-shaped measurement area covers those regions where the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) instabilities are active. The heterodyne technique contributes to its high temporal resolution (1 μs). It is possible for the multichannel system to realize simultaneous measurements of density and its fluctuation. The quadrature phase detection based on the zero-crossing method is introduced to density measurement. With this system, reliable line-averaged densities and density profiles are obtained. The location of the saturated internal kink mode can be figured out from the mode showing different intensities on four channels, and the result agrees well with that measured by electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI). supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB104002, 2013GB107002, 2014GB107001) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11475058, 11475057, 11261140326, 11405049)

  5. Comparison of the Ionospheric Electron Density Profiles Obtained by COSMIC Radio Occultation with Ground-based Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharenkova, I.; Shagimuratov, I.; Krankowski, A.

    2009-04-01

    The Radio Occultation technique using GPS signals has been proven to be a promising technique to retrieve accurate profiles of the ionospheric electron density with high vertical resolution on a global scale. Formosat-3/COSMIC (Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate) is a joint scientific mission between Taiwan and the U.S.A. The mission placed six small micro-satellites into six different orbits at 700~800 kilometer above the earth surface. Each microsatellite has a GPS Occultation Experiment payload to operate the ionospheric radio occultation (RO). With the ability of performing both rising and setting occultation, Formosat-3/COSMIC has been producing about 2000 profiles of the ionospheric electron density per day - much more than ever before. In the given paper we used the ionograms recorded by European ionosonde stations for the cases of winter and summer solstices and time of quiet and geomagnetically disturbed days in March 2008 and compare these ground measured data with the GPS COSMIC radio occultation ionospheric profiles. This result is important to validate the reliability of the COSMIC ionospheric observations using the radio occultation technique. The comparison of RO data with measurements provided by European ionosondes (Pruhonice, Iuliusruh, Ebre, Rome) indicates that usually COSMIC RO profiles are in a good agreement with ionosonde's profiles both in the F2 layer peak electron density (NmF2) and the bottom side part of the profiles. The coincidence of profiles is better in the cases when projection of the ray path of tangent points is closer to the ionosonde location. But it is necessary to mention that practically for all analyzed cases there are observed the understated values of electron density in the topside part of the ionosonde's profiles in compare with RO profiles. As the topside ionosonde profile is obtained by fitting a model to the peak electron density value, the COSMIC radio occultation measurements

  6. Edge electron density profiles and fluctuations measured by two-dimensional beam emission spectroscopy in the KSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Y. U. Wi, H. M.; Zoletnik, S.; Lampert, M.; Kovácsik, Ákos

    2014-11-15

    Beam emission spectroscopy (BES) system in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) has recently been upgraded. The background intensity was reduced from 30% to 2% by suppressing the stray lights. This allows acquisition of the relative electron density profiles on the plasma edge without background subtraction from the beam power modulation signals. The KSTAR BES system has its spatial resolution of 1 cm, the temporal resolution of 2 MHz, and a total 32 channel (8 radial × 4 poloidal) avalanche photo diode array. Most measurements were done on the plasma edge, r/a ∼ 0.9, with 8 cm radial measurement width that covers the pedestal range. High speed density profile measurements reveal temporal behaviors of fast transient events, such as the precursors of edge localized modes and the transitions between confinement modes. Low background level also allows analysis of the edge density fluctuation patterns with reduced background fluctuations. Propagation of the density structures can be investigated by comparing the phase delays between the spatially distributed channels.

  7. Inductively-coupled plasmas in pure O2: measurements of densities of O atoms, electrons and vibrationally excited Omolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucher, Mickaël; Carbone, Emile; Booth, Jean-Paul; Chabert, Pascal; LPP-Plasmas froids Team

    2014-10-01

    Inductively-coupled plasmas containing O2 (pure or mixtures) are widely used in materials processing. Various simulations have been developed but experimental validation is still sparse. We present here a comprehensive data set for O2 plasmas over a wide range of pressure and RF power to address this need. The plasma is excited with a 4-turn planar coil through a dielectric window at 13.56 MHz in an anodized aluminium reactor. The electron density was measured with a microwave resonator hairpin probe. It increases continuously with RF power, but with pressure it passes through a broad maximum around 40 mTorr. Ground-state O atom densities were determined using Two-Photon Absorption Laser-Induced Fluorescence combined with absolute calibration using Xe TALIF. The atom density increases with gas pressure, but with RF power it first increases but progressively saturates tot about 20% of the initial (no plasma) gas density. A novel high-sensitivity ultra-broad-band absorption spectroscopy setup allowed O2 molecules to be detected in high vibrational states (up to v = 18) via the Schumann-Runge bands. Molecular Ovibrational temperatures up to 12,000 K were observed, whereas the rotational temperature did not exceed 500 K. This indicates that electron-impact pumping of vibrational levels is important, whereas V-T transfer is slow. These processes must be included to accurately model the O2 plasma system.

  8. Direct measurement of electron density and temperature distributions in a micro-discharge plasma for a plasma display panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Yasuyuki; Matsuoka, Akira; Uchino, Kiichiro; Muraoka, Katsunori

    2002-01-01

    Spatial distributions of electron density (ne) and electron temperature (Te) of a micro-discharge plasma for an alternating current plasma display panel cell were directly measured using the laser Thomson scattering method. The use of a triple-grating spectrometer was very successful in suppressing the strong stray laser light and allowed us to perform measurements at 0.1 mm above the surface of the electrode substrate. Values of ne and Te were (0.2-3)×1019m-3 and (1.6-3.4) eV, respectively, depending on the time from the beginning of the pulsed discharge and the observation position. The structure of the micro-discharge is discussed in terms of the obtained distributions of ne and Te.

  9. Compact and high-particle-flux thermal-lithium-beam probe system for measurement of two-dimensional electron density profile.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Y; Manabe, T; Kajita, S; Ohno, N; Takagi, M; Tsuchiya, H; Morisaki, T

    2014-09-01

    A compact and high-particle-flux thermal-lithium-beam source for two-dimensional measurement of electron density profiles has been developed. The thermal-lithium-beam oven is heated by a carbon heater. In this system, the maximum particle flux of the thermal lithium beam was ~4 × 10(19) m(-2) s(-1) when the temperature of the thermal-lithium-beam oven was 900 K. The electron density profile was evaluated in the small tokamak device HYBTOK-II. The electron density profile was reconstructed using the thermal-lithium-beam probe data and this profile was consistent with the electron density profile measured with a Langmuir electrostatic probe. We confirm that the developed thermal-lithium-beam probe can be used to measure the two-dimensional electron density profile with high time and spatial resolutions.

  10. Compact and high-particle-flux thermal-lithium-beam probe system for measurement of two-dimensional electron density profile

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Y. Manabe, T.; Ohno, N.; Takagi, M.; Kajita, S.; Tsuchiya, H.; Morisaki, T.

    2014-09-15

    A compact and high-particle-flux thermal-lithium-beam source for two-dimensional measurement of electron density profiles has been developed. The thermal-lithium-beam oven is heated by a carbon heater. In this system, the maximum particle flux of the thermal lithium beam was ∼4 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −2} s{sup −1} when the temperature of the thermal-lithium-beam oven was 900 K. The electron density profile was evaluated in the small tokamak device HYBTOK-II. The electron density profile was reconstructed using the thermal-lithium-beam probe data and this profile was consistent with the electron density profile measured with a Langmuir electrostatic probe. We confirm that the developed thermal-lithium-beam probe can be used to measure the two-dimensional electron density profile with high time and spatial resolutions.

  11. Comparisons of the NRL SAMI3 Physics-Based Ionospheric Model with Global Ionosonde and GPS Electron Density Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siefring, C. L.; Tondwalkar, A.; McDonald, S. E.; Huba, J. D.; Krall, J.; Emmert, J. T.; Drob, D. P.; Lean, J.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory is conducting an interdisciplinary physics-based Space Weather model development and validation program called the Integrated Sun-Earth System for the Operational Environment (ISES-OE). In contrast to other geospace integration efforts, a key aspect of ISES is determining the extent to which current models capture the climate of the ionosphere and thermosphere. Until now, complementary long-term simulations using physics-based ionosphere models have not been performed. As part of this program, numerous runs of the physics-based SAMI3 model have been made and compared to global measurements of electron density. The data sets includes: 1) Ionosonde NmF2 and hmF2 measurements, 2) GPS Total Electron Content (TEC) measurements and others. This presentation compares electron density data with SAMI3 and other models during much of Solar Cycle 23 and the ascending phase of Cycle 24. Previous work has concentrated on the Whole Heliospheric Interval (WHI) from February 19 - April 19, 2008 [Lean et al., 2014]. This solar minimum period with extremely low solar activity was used to test the validity of the SAMI3 simulations of the base-state ionosphere. Several modifications to SAMI3 were incorporated including updates to the Solar EUV fluxes, the NRL MSIS neutral atmospheric model parameterization at Solar Minimum and compensating for variations in the Sun-to-Earth distance. Data and model comparisons during times of higher solar activity will be presented with an emphasis on understanding the effects of coupling of the neutral atmosphere, neutral winds and driving electric fields on our ability to model the measured global electron density data. We examine responses to solar EUV radiation and geomagnetic activity, and semiannual and annual oscillations that all induce geospace variability. Lean, J. L., S. E. McDonald, J. D. Huba, J. T. Emmert, D. P. Drob, and C. L. Siefring (2014), Geospace variability during the 2008-2009 Whole Heliosphere

  12. Comparison of topside electron density measured by Radio Occultation (RO) of FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC satellites and Digisondes on a global scale with IRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Tanmay; Haralambous, Haris

    2016-07-01

    This paper represents a comparison of the topside electron density of the F2-layer measured by FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC satellites in terms of GPS radio occultation technique and digisondes as manually scaled ionograms being provided by DIDBase (Digital Ionogram Database) with IRI. This study encompasses data from more than 40 locations for an extended period from January 2007 to December 2015. It utilises a subset of around 1000 very well matched (in terms of bottomside) FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC - Digisonde electron density profile pairs to compare the corresponding topside electron density profiles with IRI. The selection criteria for the electron density profile pairs, apart from coincidence of COSMIC and Digisonde electron density in the bottomside, is a collocation distance of less than 2.5o in terms of latitude and longtitude and 15 min maximum time difference in measuring NmF2 with the two techniques.

  13. Measurement of electron density in atmospheric pressure small-scale plasmas using CO2-laser heterodyne interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Joon-Young; Takano, Nobuhiko; Urabe, Keiichiro; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2009-08-01

    CO2-laser heterodyne interferometry was applied to measure electron density ne in three different types of high pressure (including atmospheric pressure) small-scale plasma sources: a short hollow cathode (HC) discharge tube, a pulsed dc plasma jet and a micro-HC plasma jet. The interfering contribution of the gas density reduction due to Joule heating of the measured phase shift was separated from the electron component based on these different temporal dependences. The typical values of ne measured in the short HC discharge tube with helium gas were on the order of 1013 cm-3 at a discharge current that varied from 25 to 225 mA and the pressure from a few tens to hundreds of Torr; the values measured in argon gas were further increased by a factor of five to six. For the dc He plasma jet ejected into open air, the radial profile of ne on the order of 1014 cm-3 presented a hollowed distribution based on the tubular cathode structure. The micro-HC structure allowed us to evaluate ne in both the parallel and the perpendicular directions with respect to the plasma jet axis, and the derived values of ne from both directions were consistent. Thus, we verified that this diagnostic technique can be applied to measure ne in various sub-millimeter scale plasmas operated at atmospheric pressure in pulsed operation modes with a sensitivity of about 1013 cm-3 (at an optical length of 1 mm) and a spatial resolution better than 100 µm.

  14. Measurement of Electron Density near Plasma Grid of Large-scaled Negative Ion Source by Means of Millimeter-Wave Interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaoka, K.; Tokuzawa, T.; Tsumori, K.; Nakano, H.; Ito, Y.; Osakabe, M.; Ikeda, K.; Kisaki, M.; Shibuya, M.; Sato, M.; Komada, S.; Kondo, T.; Hayashi, H.; Asano, E.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.

    2011-09-26

    A millimeter-wave interferometer with the frequency of 39 GHz ({lambda} 7.7 mm) was newly installed to a large-scaled negative ion source. The measurable line-integrated electron density (n{sub e}l) is from 2x10{sup 16} to 7x10{sup 18} m{sup -2}, where n{sub e} and l represent an electron density and the plasma length along the millimeter-wave path, respectively. Our interest in this study is behavior of negative ions and reduction of electron density in the beam extraction region near the plasma grid. The first results show the possibility of the electron density measurement by the millimeter-wave interferometer in this region. The line-averaged electron density increases proportional to the arc power under the condition without cesium seeding. The significant decrease of the electron density and significant increase of the negative ion density were observed just after the cesium seeding. The electron density measured with the interferometer agrees well with that observed with a Langmuir probe. The very high negative ion ratio of n{sub H-}/(n{sub e}+n{sub H-}) = 0.85 was achieved within 400 min. after the cesium seeding.

  15. Measurement of electron temperature and density in the DIII-D neutral beam ion source arc chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Kellman, D.H.; Busath, J.; Hong, R.

    1993-10-01

    A swept-bias Langmuir probe diagnostic was employed with the DIII-D neutral beam ion source in an effort to study the effects of filament temperature, arc power, and backstreaming energetic electrons on the electron temperature and density of the arc discharge inside the ion source arc chamber. The arc chamber contains six Langmuir probes biased with a negative dc voltage. These probes provide a feedback signal for regulation of the arc power supply, and give a relative indication of plasma uniformity within the arc chamber. For this study, one probe was reconnected to a voltage-sweeping power supply, and probe current versus voltage characteristics were generated. These characteristics provided the information necessary to calculate electron temperature and density. With arc discharge only, the results demonstrated that an filament temperature increases, so does electron density. Electron temperature decreases at a faster rate, however, as required to maintain constant ion maturation current (regulated by the arc power supply). The results also demonstrated that increasing arc power (through control of the arc power supply) results in higher electron temperature and density. Experiments were also performed with probe voltage sweeps during beam extraction, at various accelerator voltage levels and at different delay times after beam turn-on with a fixed acceleration voltage. These results indicated an increase in electron temperature and density as acceleration voltage is increased. However, nearly identical trends result when arc discharges are produced at the same parameter settings as during these beams, but without beam extraction. This indicates minimal influence of backstreaming energetic electrons on electron temperature and density in the arc chamber. Temperature and density also remain fairly constant over time during a long beam pulse.

  16. Hi line measurements of pulsars towards the Galactic Centre and the electron density in the inner Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Simon; Koribalski, Bärbel; Weisberg, Joel M.; Wilson, Warwick

    2001-04-01

    We have measured 21-cm absorption and emission spectra in the direction of a further seven southern pulsars with the Parkes telescope to derive their kinematic distances and to study the interstellar medium. For the first time we have successfully obtained Hi absorption measurements for PSRs J1602-5100, J1740-3015 and J1745-3040. We have also significantly improved the sensitivity and resolution on PSRs J1600-5044, J1752-2806 and J1825-0935, the spectra of which have previously been measured, and have corrected an error in the published distance to PSR J1824-1945. Since the Frail & Weisberg summary of pulsar distances in 1990, a further 23 pulsars now have measured Hi distances, mainly through the efforts of the current group. We discuss the Taylor & Cordes electron density model in light of these new measurements and find that, although the model towards the Galactic Centre appears good, the line of sight through the Carina spiral arm is poorly fitted by the model.

  17. Influence of the dielectric surrounding of plasma on the electron density measurement by microwave interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrasch, M.; Ehlbeck, J.; Weltmann, K.-D.

    2014-07-01

    Using a vector network analyzer a frequency resolved microwave interferometer is built up in the range of 42.5-50 GHz. Due to the frequency resolved measurement technique it is possible to investigate the influence of the surrounding dielectric material on the transmission. The experiments are performed on a fluorescent lamp, which is enclosed by a glass tube. Furthermore, a dielectric resonator is built up by two plane silica windows, placed perpendicular to the beam. It was found that the influence can be described by a one-dimensional model using equivalent circuits, which is in very good agreement with experimental results. In addition, the common technique of rotating the windows to reduce their influence is investigated.

  18. Measurements of the cross-phase angle between density and electron temperature fluctuations and comparison with gyrokinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    White, A. E.; Peebles, W. A.; Rhodes, T. L.; Schmitz, L.; Carter, T. A.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Doyle, E. J.; Zeng, L.; Holland, C. H.; Wang, G.; McKee, G. R.; Staebler, G. M.; Waltz, R. E.; DeBoo, J. C.; Petty, C. C.; Burrell, K. H.

    2010-05-15

    This paper presents new measurements of the cross-phase angle, alpha{sub n{sub eT{sub e}}}, between long-wavelength (k{sub t}hetarho{sub s}<0.5) density, n-tilde{sub e}, and electron temperature, T-tilde{sub e}, fluctuations in the core of DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] tokamak plasmas. The coherency and cross-phase angle between n-tilde{sub e} and T-tilde{sub e} are measured using coupled reflectometer and correlation electron cyclotron emission diagnostics that view the same plasma volume. In addition to the experimental results, two sets of local, nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence simulations that are performed with the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] are described. One set, called the pre-experiment simulations, was performed prior to the experiment in order to predict a change in alpha{sub n{sub eT{sub e}}} given experimentally realizable increases in the electron temperature, T{sub e}. In the experiment the cross-phase angle was measured at three radial locations (rho=0.55, 0.65, and 0.75) in both a 'Base' case and a 'High T{sub e}' case. The measured cross-phase angle is in good qualitative agreement with the pre-experiment simulations, which predicted that n-tilde{sub e} and T-tilde{sub e} would be out of phase. The pre-experiment simulations also predicted a decrease in cross-phase angle as T{sub e} is increased. Experimentally, this trend is observed at the inner two radial locations only. The second set of simulations, the postexperiment simulations, is carried out using local parameters taken from measured experimental profiles as input to GYRO. These postexperiment simulation results are in good quantitative agreement with the measured cross-phase angle, despite disagreements with transport fluxes. Directions for future modeling and experimental work are discussed.

  19. Measurement of Electron Temperature and Plasma Density via Thomson Scattering and Electric Probe in Low Temperature Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Hyun-Jong; Chung, Kyu-Sun; Lho, Taihyeop

    2011-10-01

    Laser Thomson scattering system has been developed for the measurements of electron temperature and plasma density in low temperature plasma by means of the Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with 2nd Harmonics (250 mJ at 532 nm, repetition rate of 20 Hz), triple grating spectrometer and ICCD camera. The triple grating spectrometer is composed of 3 grating (1800 gr/mm and 100 x 100 mm dimensions), 6 achromatic doublet lens (f=400 mm and 100 mm diameter) for reducing the abbreviation effect, two slits (entrance and exitance), opto- mechanical instruments, etc. The alignment and calibration of TGS system were performed by a diode laser and diffraction optics, Ne lamp (wavelength) and metal halide lamp (intensity), respectively. The LTS measurements were done wide ranges of 1 measurements.

  20. Optical emission spectroscopy for simultaneous measurement of plasma electron density and temperature in a low-pressure microwave induced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Konjevic, N.; Jovicevic, S.; Ivkovic, M.

    2009-10-15

    The simple optical emission spectroscopy technique for diagnostics of low pressure microwave induced plasma (MIP) in hydrogen or in MIP seeded with hydrogen is described and tested. This technique uses the Boltzmann plot of relative line intensities along Balmer spectral series in conjunction with the criterion for partial local thermodynamic equilibrium for low electron density (N{sub e}) plasma diagnostics. The proposed technique is tested in a low pressure MIP discharge for simultaneous determination of electron density N{sub e} (10{sup 17}-10{sup 18} m{sup -3}) and temperature T{sub e}.

  1. Marshall N. Rosenbluth Outstanding Doctoral Thesis Award Talk: Simultaneous Measurement of Electron Temperature and Density Fluctuations in the Core of DIII-D Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, A. E.

    2009-11-01

    Multi-field fluctuation measurements provide opportunities for rigorous comparison between experiment and nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence simulations. A unique set of diagnostics on DIII-D allows for simultaneous study of local, long-wavelength (0 < kθρs< 0.5) electron temperature and density fluctuations in the core plasma (0.4 < ρ< 0.8). Previous experiments in L-mode indicate that normalized electron temperature fluctuation levels (40 < f < 400,kHz) increase with radius from ˜0.4% at ρ= 0.5 to ˜2% at ρ=0.8, similar to simultaneously measured density fluctuations. Electron cyclotron heating (ECH) is used to increase Te, which increases electron temperature fluctuation levels and electron heat transport in the experiments. In contrast, long wavelength density fluctuation levels change very little. The different responses are consistent with increased TEM drive relative to ITG-mode drive. A new capability at DIII-D is the measurement of phase angle between electron temperature and density fluctuations using coupled correlation electron cyclotron emission radiometer and reflectometer diagnostics. Linear and nonlinear GYRO runs have been used to design validation experiments that focus on measurements of the phase angle. GYRO shows that if Te and ∇Te increase 50% in a beam-heated L-mode plasma (ρ=0.5), then the phase angle between electron temperature and density fluctuations decreases 30%-50% and electron temperature fluctuation levels increase a factor of two more than density fluctuations. Comparisons between these predictions and experimental results will be presented.

  2. A method to measure the electron temperature and density of a laser-produced plasma by Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, H.; Hur, M. S.; Lee, J. M.; Suk, H.; Cho, M. H.; Namkung, W.

    2008-08-18

    A method is proposed to investigate the electron temperature and density of a laser-produced plasma simultaneously, using the temperature dependence difference of the Raman forward scattering (RFS) and backward scattering (RBS). Density and temperature dependence of spectra from the RBS and the RFS in a laser produced plasma were investigated by one-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in the nonrelativistic regime. This technique has a great advantage as a simple diagnostic of plasma characteristics in the sense that it can be performed only with the pump laser, without any additional probe laser.

  3. Design of a dispersion interferometer combined with a polarimeter to increase the electron density measurement reliability on ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, T.; Sirinelli, A.; Watts, C.; Shigin, P.; Vayakis, G.; Walsh, M.

    2016-11-01

    A dispersion interferometer is a reliable density measurement system and is being designed as a complementary density diagnostic on ITER. The dispersion interferometer is inherently insensitive to mechanical vibrations, and a combined polarimeter with the same line of sight can correct fringe jump errors. A proof of the principle of the CO2 laser dispersion interferometer combined with the PEM polarimeter was recently conducted, where the phase shift and the polarization angle were successfully measured simultaneously. Standard deviations of the line-average density and the polarization angle measurements over 1 s are 9 × 1016 m-2 and 0.19°, respectively, with a time constant of 100 μs. Drifts of the zero point, which determine the resolution in steady-state operation, correspond to 0.25% and 1% of the phase shift and the Faraday rotation angle expected on ITER.

  4. Initial measurements of plasma current and electron density profiles using a polarimeter/interferometer (POINT) for long pulse operation in EAST (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. Q.; Qian, J. P.; Jie, Y. X.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Zou, Z. Y.; Li, W. M.; Lian, H.; Wang, S. X.; Yang, Y.; Zeng, L.; Lan, T.; Yao, Y.; Hu, L. Q.; Zhang, X. D.; Wan, B. N.

    2016-11-01

    A double-pass, radially viewing, far-infrared laser-based POlarimeter-INTerferometer (POINT) system utilizing the three-wave technique has been implemented for diagnosing the plasma current and electron density profiles in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). POINT has been operated routinely during the most recent experimental campaign and provides continuous 11 chord line-integrated Faraday effect and density measurement throughout the entire plasma discharge for all heating schemes and all plasma conditions (including ITER relevant scenario development). Reliability of both the polarimetric and interferometric measurements is demonstrated in 25 s plasmas with H-mode and 102 s long-pulse discharges. Current density, safety factor (q), and electron density profiles are reconstructed using equilibrium fitting code (EFIT) with POINT constraints for the plasma core.

  5. A new method to measure electron density and effective atomic number using dual-energy CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos Garcia, Luis Isaac; Pérez Azorin, José Fernando; Almansa, Julio F.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to present a new method to extract the electron density ({ρ\\text{e}} ) and the effective atomic number (Z eff) from dual-energy CT images, based on a Karhunen-Loeve expansion (KLE) of the atomic cross section per electron. This method was used to calibrate a Siemens Definition CT using the CIRS phantom. The predicted electron density and effective atomic number using 80 kVp and 140 kVp were compared with a calibration phantom and an independent set of samples. The mean absolute deviations between the theoretical and calculated values for all the samples were 1.7 %  ±  0.1 % for {ρ\\text{e}} and 4.1 %  ±  0.3 % for Z eff. Finally, these results were compared with other stoichiometric method. The application of the KLE to represent the atomic cross section per electron is a promising method for calculating {ρ\\text{e}} and Z eff using dual-energy CT images.

  6. A new method to measure electron density and effective atomic number using dual-energy CT images.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Luis Isaac Ramos; Azorin, José Fernando Pérez; Almansa, Julio F

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to present a new method to extract the electron density ([Formula: see text]) and the effective atomic number (Z eff) from dual-energy CT images, based on a Karhunen-Loeve expansion (KLE) of the atomic cross section per electron. This method was used to calibrate a Siemens Definition CT using the CIRS phantom. The predicted electron density and effective atomic number using 80 kVp and 140 kVp were compared with a calibration phantom and an independent set of samples. The mean absolute deviations between the theoretical and calculated values for all the samples were 1.7 %  ±  0.1 % for [Formula: see text] and 4.1 %  ±  0.3 % for Z eff. Finally, these results were compared with other stoichiometric method. The application of the KLE to represent the atomic cross section per electron is a promising method for calculating [Formula: see text] and Z eff using dual-energy CT images.

  7. A new method to measure electron density and effective atomic number using dual-energy CT images.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Luis Isaac Ramos; Azorin, José Fernando Pérez; Almansa, Julio F

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to present a new method to extract the electron density ([Formula: see text]) and the effective atomic number (Z eff) from dual-energy CT images, based on a Karhunen-Loeve expansion (KLE) of the atomic cross section per electron. This method was used to calibrate a Siemens Definition CT using the CIRS phantom. The predicted electron density and effective atomic number using 80 kVp and 140 kVp were compared with a calibration phantom and an independent set of samples. The mean absolute deviations between the theoretical and calculated values for all the samples were 1.7 %  ±  0.1 % for [Formula: see text] and 4.1 %  ±  0.3 % for Z eff. Finally, these results were compared with other stoichiometric method. The application of the KLE to represent the atomic cross section per electron is a promising method for calculating [Formula: see text] and Z eff using dual-energy CT images. PMID:26649484

  8. Comparison of the measured and modeled electron densities and temperatures in the ionosphere and plasmasphere during the period 25-29 June 1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, A. V.; Abe, T.; Oyama, K.-I.

    2001-04-01

    We present a comparison of the electron density and temperature behavior measured in the ionosphere by the Millstone Hill incoherent-scatter radar during the period 25-29 June 1990, and in the plasmasphere within the Millstone Hill magnetic field flux tube by the instruments on board of the EXOS-D satellite in the Northern Hemisphere between 02:07:56 UT and 02:11:08 UT on 28 June 1990 with numerical model calculations from a time-dependent mathematical model of the Earth's ionosphere and plasmasphere. We have evaluated the value of the nighttime additional heating rate that should be added to the normal photoelectron heating in the electron energy equation in the plasmasphere region above 5000 km along the magnetic field line to explain the high electron temperature measured by the instruments on board of the EXOS-D satellite. The additional heating brings the measured and modeled electron temperatures into agreement with the plasmasphere and into very large disagreement with the ionosphere if the classical electron heat flux along magnetic field line is used in the model. The approach of Pavlov et al. (Annales Geophysicae 18 (2000) 1257-1272) based on an effective electron thermal conductivity coefficient along the magnetic field line, is used to explain the measured electron temperature in the ionosphere and plasmasphere. This approach leads to a heat flux which is less than that given by the classical Spitzer-Harm theory. The evaluated additional heating of electrons in the plasmasphere and the decrease of the thermal conductivity in the topside ionosphere and the greater part of the plasmasphere allow the model to accurately reproduce the electron temperatures observed by the instruments on board of the EXOS-D satellite in the plasmasphere and the Millstone Hill incoherent-scatter radar in the ionosphere. The resulting effect of vibrationally excited N2 and O2 on NmF2 is the decrease of the calculated daytime NmF2 up to a factor of 2. The modeled electron

  9. Time-resolved electron temperature and electron density measurements in a nanosecond pulse filament discharge in H2-He and O2-He mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roettgen, A.; Shkurenkov, I.; Simeni Simeni, M.; Adamovich, I. V.; Lempert, W. R.

    2016-10-01

    Time evolution of electron density and electron temperature in a nanosecond pulse, diffuse filament electric discharge in H2-He and O2-He mixtures at a pressure of 100 Torr is studied by Thomson/pure rotational Raman scattering and kinetic modeling. The discharge is sustained between two spherical electrodes separated by a 1 cm gap and powered by high voltage pulses ~150 ns duration. Discharge energy coupled to the plasma filament 2-3 mm in diameter is 4-5 mJ/pulse, with specific energy loading of up to ~0.3 eV/molecule. At all experimental conditions, a rapid initial rise of electron temperature and electron density during the discharge pulse is observed, followed by the decay in the afterglow, over ~100 ns-1 µs. Electron density in the afterglow decays more rapidly as H2 or O2 fraction in the mixture is increased. In He/H2 mixtures, this is likely due to more rapid recombination of electrons in collisions with \\text{H}2+ and \\text{H}3+ ions, compared to recombination with \\text{He}2+ ions. In O2/He mixtures, electron density decay in the afterglow is affected by recombination with \\text{O}2+ and \\text{O}4+ ions, while the effect of three-body attachment is relatively minor. Peak electron number densities and electron temperatures are n e  =  (1.7-3.1) · 1014 cm-3 and T e  =  2.9-5.5 eV, depending on gas mixture composition. Electron temperature in the afterglow decays to approximately T e  ≈  0.3 eV, considerably higher compared to the gas temperature of T  =  300-380 K, inferred from O2 pure rotational Raman scattering spectra, due to superelastic collisions. The experimental results in helium and O2-He mixtures are compared with kinetic modeling predictions, showing good agreement.

  10. Model-independent measurement of the charge density distribution along an Fe atom probe needle using off-axis electron holography without mean inner potential effects

    SciTech Connect

    Migunov, V. Dunin-Borkowski, R. E.; London, A.; Farle, M.

    2015-04-07

    The one-dimensional charge density distribution along an electrically biased Fe atom probe needle is measured using a model-independent approach based on off-axis electron holography in the transmission electron microscope. Both the mean inner potential and the magnetic contribution to the phase shift are subtracted by taking differences between electron-optical phase images recorded with different voltages applied to the needle. The measured one-dimensional charge density distribution along the needle is compared with a similar result obtained using model-based fitting of the phase shift surrounding the needle. On the assumption of cylindrical symmetry, it is then used to infer the three-dimensional electric field and electrostatic potential around the needle with ∼10 nm spatial resolution, without needing to consider either the influence of the perturbed reference wave or the extension of the projected potential outside the field of view of the electron hologram. The present study illustrates how a model-independent approach can be used to measure local variations in charge density in a material using electron holography in the presence of additional contributions to the phase, such as those arising from changes in mean inner potential and specimen thickness.

  11. Comparison of the measured and modeled electron densities and temperatures in the ionosphere and plasmasphere during 14-16 May 1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, A. V.; Pavlova, N. M.

    2004-01-01

    The electron density and temperature in the ionosphere and plasmasphere measured by the Millstone Hill incoherent-scatter radar and the instruments on board of the EXOS-D satellite are compared with calculations from a time-dependent mathematical model of the Earth's ionosphere and plasmasphere during 14-16 May 1991. Use of [O]/[N2] correction factors with the NRLMSISE-00 model of the neutral atmosphere was found to bring the modeled and measured F-region main peak electron densities into agreement. It was found that the nighttime additional heating rate should be added to the normal photoelectron heating in the electron energy equation, in the nighttime plasmasphere region, in order for the model to reproduce the observed high plasmaspheric electron temperature within the Millstone Hill magnetic field flux tube in the Northern Hemisphere. The additional heating brings the measured and modeled electron temperatures into agreement in the plasmasphere and into a very large disagreement in the ionosphere, if the classical electron heat flux along magnetic field lines is used. An approach of Pavlov et al. (2000, 2001) based on a new effective electron thermal conductivity coefficient along the magnetic field line and the evaluated additional heating of electrons in the plasmasphere is used to explain the observed electron temperature in the ionosphere and plasmasphere. This approach leads to a heat flux which is less than that given by the classical theory. The effects of the additional plasmaspheric heating of electrons on the electron temperature and density are small at the F-region altitudes if the modified electron heat flux is used. We found that the resulting effect of vibrationally excited N2 and O2 on NmF2 is the decrease of the calculated NmF2 by up to a factor of about 2.7 by day and up to a factor of about 2.5 by night. The modeled electron temperature is very sensitive to the electron density, and this decrease in electron density results in an increase of

  12. Use of multiwavelength emission from hollow cathode lamp for measurement of state resolved atom density of metal vapor produced by electron beam evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Majumder, A.; Dikshit, B.; Bhatia, M. S.; Mago, V. K.

    2008-09-15

    State resolved atom population of metal vapor having low-lying metastable states departs from equilibrium value. It needs to be experimentally investigated. This paper reports the use of hollow cathode lamp based atomic absorption spectroscopy technique to measure online the state resolved atom density (ground and metastable) of metal vapor in an atomic beam produced by a high power electron gun. In particular, the advantage of availability of multiwavelength emission in hollow cathode lamp is used to determine the atom density in different states. Here, several transitions pertaining to a given state have also been invoked to obtain the mean value of atom density thereby providing an opportunity for in situ averaging. It is observed that at higher source temperatures the atoms from metastable state relax to the ground state. This is ascribed to competing processes of atom-atom and electron-atom collisions. The formation of collision induced virtual source is inferred from measurement of atom density distribution profile along the width of the atomic beam. The total line-of-sight average atom density measured by absorption technique using hollow cathode lamp is compared to that measured by atomic vapor deposition method. The presence of collisions is further supported by determination of beaming exponent by numerically fitting the data.

  13. Large-Scale Structure of the Solar Wind: Electron Density, Temperature and Kappa Deduced From ULYSSES Radio Measurements by Quasi-Thermal Noise Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zouganelis, I.; Maksimovic, M.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Issautier, K.; Moncuquet, M.

    2006-12-01

    We will revisit and discuss the electron density and temperature derived from the electrostatic noise measurement made with the URAP-RAR dipole electric antenna on Ulysses, as this probe flew by pole-to-pole during the minimum solar activity (1994-95). The electron parameters are obtained by fitting a model of the voltage power spectrum to the voltage measured at the terminals of an electric antenna. This method is generically known as quasi thermal noise spectroscopy. In the present work, the model of spectrum is depending on only 3 parameters and computed by assuming that the electron velocity distribution is a generalized Lorentzian or kappa distribution. The 3 fitted parameters are thus the electron density, temperature and kappa value of the distribution, and we will discuss their variations with heliocentric distance, latitude and temporal solar activity. We will also compare these new results to those obtained by our team from the same data set but assuming instead a classical core + halo distribution for the electron velocity, that is a sum of two Maxwellian distributions. With this latter method, the only temperature that could be determined with enough precision was the core temperature, while our new processing provides the total temperature of the solar wind electrons. We will finally focus on the total temperature gradient with distance we find when using such a kappa distribution.

  14. Large-Scale Structure of the Solar Wind: Electron Density, Temperature and Kappa Deduced from ULYSSES Radio Measurements by Quasi-Thermal Noise Spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moncuquet, M.; Issautier, K.; Zouganelis, I.

    2004-05-01

    We will revisit and discuss the electron density and temperature derived from the electrostatic noise measurement made with the URAP-RAR dipole electric antenna on Ulysses, as this probe flew by pole-to-pole during the minimum solar activity (1994-95). The electron parameters are obtained by fitting a model of the voltage power spectrum to the voltage measured at the terminals of an electric antenna. This method is generically known as ``quasi thermal noise spectroscopy''. In the present work, the model of spectrum is depending on only 3 parameters and computed by assuming that the electron velocity distribution is a generalized Lorentzian or ``kappa'' distribution. The 3 fitted parameters are thus the electron density, temperature and kappa value of the distribution, and we will discuss their variations with heliocentric distance, latitude and temporal solar activity. We will also compare these new results to those obtained by our team from the same data set but assuming instead a classical ''core + halo'' distribution for the electron velocity, that is a sum of two Maxwellian distributions. With this later method, the only temperature that could be determined with enough precision was the core temperature, while our new processing provides the total temperature of the solar wind electrons. We will finally focus on the total temperature gradient with distance we find when using such a kappa distribution.

  15. Departures from local thermodynamic equilibrium in cutting arc plasmas derived from electron and gas density measurements using a two-wavelength quantitative Schlieren technique

    SciTech Connect

    Prevosto, L.; Mancinelli, B.; Artana, G.; Kelly, H.

    2011-03-15

    A two-wavelength quantitative Schlieren technique that allows inferring the electron and gas densities of axisymmetric arc plasmas without imposing any assumption regarding statistical equilibrium models is reported. This technique was applied to the study of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) departures within the core of a 30 A high-energy density cutting arc. In order to derive the electron and heavy particle temperatures from the inferred density profiles, a generalized two-temperature Saha equation together with the plasma equation of state and the quasineutrality condition were employed. Factors such as arc fluctuations that influence the accuracy of the measurements and the validity of the assumptions used to derive the plasma species temperature were considered. Significant deviations from chemical equilibrium as well as kinetic equilibrium were found at elevated electron temperatures and gas densities toward the arc core edge. An electron temperature profile nearly constant through the arc core with a value of about 14000-15000 K, well decoupled from the heavy particle temperature of about 1500 K at the arc core edge, was inferred.

  16. Derivation of electron densities from differential potential measurements upstream and downstream of the bow shock and in the magnetosphere of Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, A.; Nairn, C.; Grard, R. ); Schwingenschuh, K. )

    1991-07-01

    A new technique is developed where the potential difference between a conductive spacecraft at floating potential and an electric field probe, negatively biased in relation to the spacecraft, with a current of 50 nA, is used to determine electron densities in the range 1-70 cm{sup {minus}3}. The density can be obtained with an acceptable accuracy without any knowledge of the electron energy, provided the latter does not exceed 100 eV. This technique has been applied to the Phobos 2 spacecraft data to determine characteristic densities in the solar wind near Mars, in the foot of the bow shock, in the planetosheath, and at the top of the ionosphere. In the latter region, measurements have also been made using a Langmuir probe on board the spacecraft. A magnetic barrier, with a low plasma density, is observed between the planetosheath and the top of the ionosphere. Pronounced electron density increases are observed on the flanks and in the tail, some correlated and some anticorrelated with variations in the magnetic field strength.

  17. Measurements of electron density and temperature profiles in plasma produced by Nike KrF laser for laser plasma instability research.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jaechul; Weaver, J L; Karasik, M; Chan, L Y

    2015-08-01

    A grid image refractometer (GIR) has been implemented at the Nike krypton fluoride laser facility of the Naval Research Laboratory. This instrument simultaneously measures propagation angles and transmissions of UV probe rays (λ = 263 nm, Δt = 10 ps) refracted through plasma. We report results of the first Nike-GIR measurement on a CH plasma produced by the Nike laser pulse (∼1 ns FWHM) with the intensity of 1.1 × 10(15) W/cm(2). The measured angles and transmissions were processed to construct spatial profiles of electron density (ne) and temperature (Te) in the underdense coronal region of the plasma. Using an inversion algorithm developed for the strongly refracted rays, the deployed GIR system probed electron densities up to 4 × 10(21) cm(-3) with the density scale length of 120 μm along the plasma symmetry axis. The resulting n(e) and T(e) profiles are verified to be self-consistent with the measured quantities of the refracted probe light. PMID:26329186

  18. Electron Density and Two-Channel Neutron Emission Measurements in Steady-State Spherical Inertial-Electrostatically Confined Plasmas, with Review of the 1-D Kinetic Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, Chris C.; Hrbud, Ivana

    2004-01-01

    Electron density measurements have been made in steady-state plasmas in a spherical inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) discharge using microwave interferometry. Plasma cores interior to two cathodes, having diameters of 15 and 23 cm, respectively, were probed over a transverse range of 10 cm with a spatial resolution of about 1.4 cm for buffer gas pressures from 0.2 to 6 Pa in argon and deuterium. The transverse profiles are generally flat, in some cases with eccentric symmetric minima, and give mean densities of from approx. = 0.4 to 7x 10(exp 10)/cu cm, the density generally increasing with the neutral gas pressure. Numerical solutions of the 1-D Poisson equation for EC plasmas are reviewed and energy distribution functions are identified which give flat transverse profiles. These functions are used with the plasma approximation to obtain solutions which also give densities consistent with the measurements, and a double potential well solution is obtained which has minima qualitatively similar to those observed. Explicit consideration is given to the compatibility of the solutions interior and exterior to the cathode, and to grid transparency. Deuterium fusion neutron emission rates were also measured and found to be isotropic, to within the measurement error, over two simultaneous directions. Anisotropy was observed in residual emissions during operation with non-fusing hydrogen-1. The deuterium rates are consistent with predictions from the model.

  19. Pulsed HF radiowave absorption measurements at 2.1 MHZ. over Delhi under quiet and solar flare conditions and related electron density height profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandra Swamy, A. C.

    EXTENDED ABSTRACT Pulsed HF radiowave absorption measurements at 2.1 MHZ. over Delhi under quiet and solar flare conditions and related electron density height profiles A.C.Balachandra swmay & Late C.S.G.K. Setty Absorption of radio waves in the ionosphere is of great practical importance for radio communication and navigation systems. The first attempt to measure the absolute magnitude of the radiowave absorption were made by appletion and Ratcliffe (1930) using the frequency change method for medium frequency waves reflected from the E-region. They concluded from their experiment that the main part of the attenuation occurred below the reflection level and named the absorption region, D-region of the ionosphere. One of the basic properties of the ionosphere is the absorption of high Frequency Radiowaves. HF radiowave absorption results mainly from collisions between electrons (which are set into forced oscillations by the electric field of the wave) and neutral air particles, the RF energy abstracted from the wave being converted into thermal energy. The radiowave absorption in the ionosphere depends on electron density and collision frequency. The most important absorbing regions are the D-region and the lower E-region (50-100 Km.) The regular diurnal variation of the electron density in this height range is caused mainly by the changes in the depth of penetration of solar XUV radiations with solar zenith angle under quiet solar conditions. In 1937 Dellinger J.H.identified fade outs in high frequency radio circuits as due to abnormal ionospheric absorption associated with solar flares. The onset of the fade out was usually rapid and the duration was typically tens of minutes like that of the visible flare, because of the sudden onset, the immediate effects of solar flares are known collectively as sudden Ionospheric Disturbances (STD). The phenomenon discovered by Dellinger is usually called a short Wave Fadeout(SWF). Since the SWF is due to abnormal absorption

  20. Electron (charge) density studies of cellulose models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introductory material first describes electron density approaches and demonstrates visualization of electron lone pairs and bonding as concentrations of electron density. Then it focuses on the application of Bader’s Quantum Theory of Atoms-in-Molecules (AIM) to cellulose models. The purpose of the ...

  1. Electron density distributions in the high-latitude magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Persoon, Ann M.

    1988-01-01

    Electron density profiles were constructed to study the plasma density depletions in the nightside auroral zone and the density variations with increasing altitude in the polar cap, using electric field spectrum measurements from the plasma wave instrument on DE-1. Sharply defined regions of depleted plasma densities were commonly observed on nightside auroral field lines, in which electron densities were strongly depleted in relation to the adjacent plasmaspheric and polar densities, forming a low-density cavity at about 70 deg invariant latitude. A correlation was found between low auroral plasma densities, upflowing ion distributions, and an energetic precipitating electron population, indicating that electron density depletions in the nightside auroral zone are directly associated with auroral acceleration processes.

  2. Electron measurement in PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    Akiba, Y.

    1995-07-15

    Electron Measurement in PHENIX detector at RHIC is discussed. The yield and S/N ratio at vector meson peaks ({phi}, {omega}, {rho}{sup o}, and J/{psi}) are evaluated. The electrons from open charm decay, and its consequence to the di-electron measurements is discussed.

  3. Teaching Chemistry with Electron Density Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shusterman, Gwendolyn P.; Shusterman, Alan J.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a method for teaching electronic structure and its relevance to chemical phenomena that relies on computer-generated three-dimensional models of electron density distributions. Discusses the quantum mechanical background needed and presents ways of using models of electronic ground states to teach electronic structure, bonding concepts,…

  4. Measuring the magnetic-field-dependent chemical potential of a low-density three-dimensional electron gas in n -GaAs and extracting its magnetic susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy Choudhury, Aditya N.; Venkataraman, V.

    2016-01-01

    We report the magnetic-field-dependent shift of the electron chemical potential in bulk, n -type GaAs at room temperature. A transient voltage of ˜100 μ V was measured across a Au-Al2O3 -GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitor in a pulsed magnetic field of ˜6 T . Several spurious voltages larger than the signal that had plagued earlier researchers performing similar experiments were carefully eliminated. The itinerant magnetic susceptibility of GaAs is extracted from the experimentally measured data for four different doping densities, including one as low as 5 ×1015cm-3 . Though the susceptibility in GaAs is dominated by Landau-Peierls diamagnetism, the experimental technique demonstrated can be a powerful tool for extracting the total free carrier magnetization of any electron system. The method is also virtually independent of the carrier concentration and is expected to work better in the nondegenerate limit. Such experiments had been successfully performed in two-dimensional electron gases at cryogenic temperatures. However, an unambiguous report on having observed this effect in any three-dimensional electron gas has been lacking. We highlight the 50 year old literature of various trials and discuss the key details of our experiment that were essential for its success. The technique can be used to unambiguously yield only the itinerant part of the magnetic susceptibility of complex materials such as magnetic semiconductors and hexaborides, and thus shed light on the origin of ferromagnetism in such systems.

  5. Determination of Jupiter's electron density profile from plasma wave observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Scarf, F. L.; Kurth, W. S.; Shaw, R. R.; Poynter, R. L.

    1981-09-01

    The electron density measurements obtained in the Jovian magnetosphere from the plasma wave instruments on the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft are summarized. Three basic techniques for determining the electron density are discussed. They are (1) local measurements from the low-frequency cutoff of continuum radiation, (2) local measurements from the frequency of upper hybrid resonance emissions, and (3) integral measurements from the dispersion of whistlers. The limitations and advantages of each technique are reviewed.

  6. Ionospheric E-region electron density and neutral atmosphere variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stick, T. L.

    1976-01-01

    Electron density deviations from a basic variation with the solar zenith angle were investigated. A model study was conducted in which the effects of changes in neutral and relative densities of atomic and molecular oxygen on calculated electron densities were compared with incoherent scatter measurements in the height range 100-117 km at Arecibo, Puerto Rico. The feasibility of determining tides in the neutral atmosphere from electron density profiles was studied. It was determined that variations in phase between the density and temperature variation and the comparable magnitudes of their components make it appear improbable that the useful information on tidal modes can be obtained in this way.

  7. A direct measurement of the forward shock speed in supernova remnant ``0519‑69.0'': Constraints on the age, ambient density and electron-ion temperature equilibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovey, Luke; Hughes, John P.; Eriksen, Kristoffer; Pandya, Viraj

    2016-06-01

    The supernova remnant 0519-69.0 is the second youngest Ia remnant in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The typing of the remnant rests primarily on ejecta abundances inferred from X-ray spectra and the Balmer-dominated nature of its forward shock. Using two narrow-band Hα imaging with the Hubble Space Telescope separated by ~1 year we are able to measure the global shock velocity of the remnant to be 2780 km/s. Using the global shock speed with the measured size of the remnant as constraints we employ one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations to constrain the age and ambient medium density of the remnant. We also report on the degree of electron-to-ion temperature ratios for select portions of the rim for which we have spectroscopic measurements using the Robert Stobie Spectrograph on the Southern African Large Telescope.

  8. Energy resolved actinometry for simultaneous measurement of atomic oxygen densities and local mean electron energies in radio-frequency driven plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Greb, Arthur Niemi, Kari; O'Connell, Deborah; Gans, Timo

    2014-12-08

    A diagnostic method for the simultaneous determination of atomic oxygen densities and mean electron energies is demonstrated for an atmospheric pressure radio-frequency plasma jet. The proposed method is based on phase resolved optical emission measurements of the direct and dissociative electron-impact excitation dynamics of three distinct emission lines, namely, Ar 750.4 nm, O 777.4 nm, and O 844.6 nm. The energy dependence of these lines serves as basis for analysis by taking into account two line ratios. In this frame, the method is highly adaptable with regard to pressure and gas composition. Results are benchmarked against independent numerical simulations and two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence experiments.

  9. Electron density studies of methyl cellobioside

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experimental X-ray diffraction crystallography determines the variations in electron density that result from the periodic array of atoms in a crystal. Normally, the positions and type of atom are determined from the electron density based on an approximation that the atoms are spherical. However, t...

  10. The mapping of electronic energy distributions using experimental electron density.

    PubMed

    Tsirelson, Vladimir G

    2002-08-01

    It is demonstrated that the approximate kinetic energy density calculated using the second-order gradient expansion with parameters of the multipole model fitted to experimental structure factors reproduces the main features of this quantity in a molecular or crystal position space. The use of the local virial theorem provides an appropriate derivation of approximate potential energy density and electronic energy density from the experimental (model) electron density and its derivatives. Consideration of these functions is not restricted by the critical points in the electron density and provides a comprehensive characterization of bonding in molecules and crystals.

  11. The mapping of electronic energy distributions using experimental electron density.

    PubMed

    Tsirelson, Vladimir G

    2002-08-01

    It is demonstrated that the approximate kinetic energy density calculated using the second-order gradient expansion with parameters of the multipole model fitted to experimental structure factors reproduces the main features of this quantity in a molecular or crystal position space. The use of the local virial theorem provides an appropriate derivation of approximate potential energy density and electronic energy density from the experimental (model) electron density and its derivatives. Consideration of these functions is not restricted by the critical points in the electron density and provides a comprehensive characterization of bonding in molecules and crystals. PMID:12149553

  12. Electron density in the equatorial topside

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilitza, D.

    1985-01-01

    Ionospheric electron content studies have revealed severe discrepancies between Faraday measurements and model predictions at low latitudes. In this investigation, satellite data of AE-C and Aeros and incoherent scatter data from Jicamarca, Peru and Arecibo, Puerto Rico are used to examine the latitudinal and diurnal extent of this disagreement. It is found that in the modified dip range -30 deg to +30 deg the present IRI relative layer shape underestimates the thickness of the topside electron density during both, day and night. The Bent model which was used as a source for the IRI description performs somewhat better in this critical dip range, though it does not reach the observed values. Also it does not show the observed diurnal variation. A correction to the IRI formula is proposed that guarantees better agreement with the satellite and incoherent scatter data.

  13. Electron density measurements of atmospheric-pressure non-thermal N{sub 2} plasma jet by Stark broadening and irradiance intensity methods

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Dezhi; Shen, Jie; Lan, Yan; Xie, Hongbing; Shu, Xingsheng; Meng, Yuedong; Li, Jiangang; Cheng, Cheng E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk; Chu, Paul K. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk

    2014-05-15

    An atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma jet excited by high frequency alternating current using nitrogen is developed and the electron density in the active region of this plasma jet is investigated by two different methods using optical emission spectroscopy, Stark broadening, and irradiance intensity method. The irradiance intensity method shows that the average electron density is about 10{sup 20}/m{sup 3} which is slightly smaller than that by the Stark broadening method. However, the trend of the change in the electron density with input power obtained by these two methods is consistent.

  14. Measurements of line-averaged electron density of pulsed plasmas using a He-Ne laser interferometer in a magnetized coaxial plasma gun device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, D.; Sakuma, I.; Kitagawa, Y.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2012-10-01

    In next step of fusion devices such as ITER, lifetime of plasma-facing materials (PFMs) is strongly affected by transient heat and particle loads during type I edge localized modes (ELMs) and disruption. To clarify damage characteristics of the PFMs, transient heat and particle loads have been simulated by using a plasma gun device. We have performed simulation experiments by using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) device at University of Hyogo. The line-averaged electron density measured by a He-Ne interferometer is 2x10^21 m-3 in a drift tube. The plasma velocity measured by a time of flight technique and ion Doppler spectrometer was 70 km/s, corresponding to the ion energy of 100 eV for helium. Thus, the ion flux density is 1.4x10^26 m-2s-1. On the other hand, the MCPG is connected to a target chamber for material irradiation experiments. It is important to measure plasma parameters in front of target materials in the target chamber. In particular, a vapor cloud layer in front of the target material produced by the pulsed plasma irradiation has to be characterized in order to understand surface damage of PFMs under ELM-like plasma bombardment. In the conference, preliminary results of application of the He-Ne laser interferometer for the above experiment will be shown.

  15. Measuring liquid density using Archimedes' principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Stephen W.

    2006-09-01

    A simple technique is described for measuring absolute and relative liquid density based on Archimedes' principle. The technique involves placing a container of the liquid under test on an electronic balance and suspending a probe (e.g. a glass marble) attached to a length of line beneath the surface of the liquid. If the volume of the probe is known, the density of liquid is given by the difference between the balance reading before and after immersion of the probe divided by the volume of the probe. A test showed that the density of water at room temperature could be measured to an accuracy and precision of 0.01 ± 0.1%. The probe technique was also used to measure the relative density of milk, Coca-Cola, fruit juice, olive oil and vinegar.

  16. Density Measurements of Be Shells

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, R C

    2005-02-15

    The purpose of this memo is to lay out the uncertainties associated with the measurement of density of Be ablators by the weigh and volume method. I am counting on the readers to point out any faulty assumptions about the techniques or uncertainties associated with them. Based on the analysis presented below we should expect that 30 {micro}m thick shells will have an uncertainty in the measured density of about 2% of the value, coming more or less equally from the mass and volume measurement. The uncertainty is roughly inversely proportional to the coating thickness, thus a 60 {micro}m walled shell would result in a 1% uncertainty in the density.

  17. Variation of the topside ionosphere during the last solar minimum period studied with multisatellite measurements of electron density and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Kwangsun; Kwak, Youngsil; Kim, Yong Ha; Park, Jaeheung; Lee, Junchan; Min, Kyoungwook

    2016-07-01

    Using the ionospheric measurements of CHAMP, DEMETER, and DMSP F15, the seasonal and spatial variations of the topside ionosphere during the last solar minimum period were investigated and compared with ionospheric models. In all the satellite measurements, equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) shows clearly longitudinal asymmetry with wave number -3 or -4 patterns. Anomalous increases of Ne in the nighttime surpassing daytime Ne, known as the Weddell Sea anomaly (WSA) or midlatitude summer nighttime anomaly (MSNA), were also observed in the global Ne distribution with differences in detailed geometry of the geomagnetic field according to the altitude. In the nighttime ionosphere, the reduced Te in the equatorial region at the DMSP altitude, identified as the equatorial plasma temperature anomaly (EPTA), was ascribed to the leftover of the prereversal enhancement of the upward plasma drift. Though the EIA, WSA, MSNA, and EPTA are all associated with the upward plasma movement, the difference in the thermal evolution is ascribable to the geometry of drift in which the plasma moves across the geomagnetic field line for the EIA and the EPTA, while along the field line for the WSA and the MSNA.

  18. Analysis of the interaction of an electron beam with a solar cell. III - The effect of spacial variations of the number density of recombination centers on SEM measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Roos, O.

    1979-01-01

    By means of an exactly soluble model the short circuit current generated by a scanning electron microscope in a P-N junction has been determined in cases where the trap density is inhomogeneous. The diffusion length for minority carriers becomes then dependent on the spacial coordinates. It is shown that in this case the dependence of the Isc on characteristic parameters as cell thickness, distance of the beam excitation spot from ohmic contacts, etc., becomes very intricate. This fact precludes the determination of the local diffusion length in the usual manner. Although the model is somewhat simplified in order to make it amenable to exact solutions, it is nevertheless realistic enough to lead to the conclusion that SEM measurements of bulk transport parameters in inhomogeneous semiconductor material are impractical since they may lead to serious errors in the interpretation of the data by customary means.

  19. Electron density depletions in the nightside auroral zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Persoon, A. M.; Gurnett, D. A.; Peterson, W. K.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Burch, J. L.; Green, J. L.

    1988-01-01

    Dynamics Explorer 1 measurements are used to investigate regions of low electron density in the nightside auroral zone. Sharply defined regions of low electron density are found in auroral zone crossings from the predusk hours until the early morning hours at all radial distances up to at least 4.6 earth radii. Densities in the auroral cavity are shown to fall to values below 0.3/cu cm. Within the auroral cavity, electron-density-profile variations of a factor of 2 or more on spatial scales of tens of kilometers are found, and the electron plasma frequency to electron cyclotron frequency ratios are 0.02-0.4. The results suggest associations between the density depletions in the nightside auroral zone and auroral acceleration processes.

  20. Theoretical study of lithium ionic conductors by electronic stress tensor density and electronic kinetic energy density.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Hiroo; Fujii, Yosuke; Ichikawa, Kazuhide; Watanabe, Taku; Aihara, Yuichi; Tachibana, Akitomo

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the electronic structure of lithium ionic conductors, Li3PO4 and Li3PS4, using the electronic stress tensor density and kinetic energy density with special focus on the ionic bonds among them. We find that, as long as we examine the pattern of the eigenvalues of the electronic stress tensor density, we cannot distinguish between the ionic bonds and bonds among metalloid atoms. We then show that they can be distinguished by looking at the morphology of the electronic interface, the zero surface of the electronic kinetic energy density. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Evaluating electronic measurement equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.K. )

    1990-12-01

    Changes in a utility's rate structure created an urgent need to develop electronic devices to measure transportation gas. The author describes how the company's measurement and test development staff selected proper devices and provided guidelines in quality control, calibration procedure, field maintenance and personnel training.

  2. Large eigenvalue of the cumulant part of the two-electron reduced density matrix as a measure of off-diagonal long-range order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeber, Alexandra; Mazziotti, David A.

    2015-11-01

    Off-diagonal long-range order (ODLRO) in the two-electron reduced density matrix (2-RDM) has long been recognized as a mathematical characteristic of conventional superconductors. The large eigenvalue of the 2-RDM has been shown to be a useful measure of this long-range order. The 2-RDM can be represented as the sum of a connected (cumulant) piece and an unconnected piece. In this work, we show that the cumulant 2-RDM also has a large eigenvalue in the limit of ODLRO. The largest eigenvalue of the cumulant 2-RDM, we prove, is bounded from above by N . In the limit of extreme pairing, such as Cooper pairing, the largest eigenvalue and the trace of the cumulant 2-RDM approach their extreme values of N and -N , respectively. While the trace of the cumulant 2-RDM, which is computable from only a knowledge of the 1-RDM, can reflect ODLRO, it alone does not appear to be a sufficient criterion. The large eigenvalue of the cumulant 2-RDM, we show, implies the large eigenvalue of the 2-RDM and, hence, is a natural measure of ODLRO that vanishes in the mean-field limit.

  3. Electron Densities Near Io from Galileo Plasma Wave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Persoon, A. M.; Kurth, W. S.; Roux, A.; Bolton, S. J.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of electron densities obtained near Io from the Galileo plasma wave instrument during the first four flybys of Io. These flybys were Io, which was a downstream wake pass that occurred on December 7, 1995; I24, which was an upstream pass that occurred on October 11, 1999; I25, which was a south polar pass that occurred on November 26, 1999; and I27, which was an upstream pass that occurred on February 22, 2000. Two methods were used to measure the electron density. The first was based on the frequency of upper hybrid resonance emissions, and the second was based on the low-frequency cutoff of electromagnetic radiation at the electron plasma frequency. For three of the flybys, Io, I25, and I27, large density enhancements were observed near the closest approach to Io. The peak electron densities ranged from 2.1 to 6.8 x 10(exp 4) per cubic centimeters. These densities are consistent with previous radio occultation measurements of Io's ionosphere. No density enhancement was observed during the I24 flyby, most likely because the spacecraft trajectory passed too far upstream to penetrate Io's ionosphere. During two of the flybys, I25 and I27, abrupt step-like changes were observed at the outer boundaries of the region of enhanced electron density. Comparisons with magnetic field models and energetic particle measurements show that the abrupt density steps occur as the spacecraft penetrated the boundary of the Io flux tube, with the region of high plasma density on the inside of the flux tube. Most likely the enhanced electron density within the Io flux tube is associated with magnetic field lines that are frozen to Io by the high conductivity of Io's atmosphere, thereby enhancing the escape of plasma along the magnetic field lines that pass through Io's ionosphere.

  4. Multipoint Plasma Density Measurements from Cluster Wave and Particle Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persoon, A.; Gurnett, D.; Pickett, J.; Canu, P.; Décréau, P.; Laakso, H.; Pedersen, A.; Andre, M.; Parks, G.; Wilber, M.; Reme, H.; Goldstein, M.; Fazakerly, A.

    2001-12-01

    Measurements from instruments onboard the Cluster spacecraft are used to study regions of diminished plasma density inside and poleward of the nightside auroral zone. The plasma density is derived from the digitization of the electron plasma frequency cutoff of the whistler mode auroral hiss, using the electric field spectrum measurements from the Wideband Plasma Wave Instrument (WBD). Two nightside auroral zone crossings, on May 8 and July 21, 2001, each with simultaneous measurements from two Cluster spacecraft, have been selected for this study. Both of these intervals contain multiple low density structures and provide an opportunity to make multi-instrument comparisons of the WBD electric spectrum measurements with the electron plasma frequency measurements of the WHISPER experiment and the spacecraft potential measurements of the Electric Fields and Waves (EFW) experiment. Since the satellite potential measurements are very sensitive to variations in the electron density, EFW spacecraft potential and density measurements will complement the WBD density measurements in the low density regions. Density variations will also be compared to the observed ion fluxes, using the ion distribution functions of the Cluster Ion Spectrometry (CIS) instruments and the low energy electron fluxes, using the electron velocity and energy distributions of the Electron and Current Experiment (PEACE).

  5. Stabilization of electron-scale turbulence by electron density gradient in national spherical torus experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Ruiz, J.; Ren, Y.; Guttenfelder, W.; White, A. E.; Kaye, S. M.; Leblanc, B. P.; Mazzucato, E.; Lee, K. C.; Domier, C. W.; Smith, D. R.; Yuh, H.

    2015-12-01

    Theory and experiments have shown that electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence on the electron gyro-scale, kρe ≲ 1, can be responsible for anomalous electron thermal transport in NSTX. Electron scale (high-k) turbulence is diagnosed in NSTX with a high-k microwave scattering system [D. R. Smith et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 123501 (2008)]. Here we report on stabilization effects of the electron density gradient on electron-scale density fluctuations in a set of neutral beam injection heated H-mode plasmas. We found that the absence of high-k density fluctuations from measurements is correlated with large equilibrium density gradient, which is shown to be consistent with linear stabilization of ETG modes due to the density gradient using the analytical ETG linear threshold in F. Jenko et al. [Phys. Plasmas 8, 4096 (2001)] and linear gyrokinetic simulations with GS2 [M. Kotschenreuther et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 88, 128 (1995)]. We also found that the observed power of electron-scale turbulence (when it exists) is anti-correlated with the equilibrium density gradient, suggesting density gradient as a nonlinear stabilizing mechanism. Higher density gradients give rise to lower values of the plasma frame frequency, calculated based on the Doppler shift of the measured density fluctuations. Linear gyrokinetic simulations show that higher values of the electron density gradient reduce the value of the real frequency, in agreement with experimental observation. Nonlinear electron-scale gyrokinetic simulations show that high electron density gradient reduces electron heat flux and stiffness, and increases the ETG nonlinear threshold, consistent with experimental observations.

  6. Stabilization of electron-scale turbulence by electron density gradient in national spherical torus experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz Ruiz, J.; White, A. E.; Ren, Y.; Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Leblanc, B. P.; Mazzucato, E.; Lee, K. C.; Domier, C. W.; Smith, D. R.; Yuh, H.

    2015-12-15

    Theory and experiments have shown that electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence on the electron gyro-scale, k{sub ⊥}ρ{sub e} ≲ 1, can be responsible for anomalous electron thermal transport in NSTX. Electron scale (high-k) turbulence is diagnosed in NSTX with a high-k microwave scattering system [D. R. Smith et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 123501 (2008)]. Here we report on stabilization effects of the electron density gradient on electron-scale density fluctuations in a set of neutral beam injection heated H-mode plasmas. We found that the absence of high-k density fluctuations from measurements is correlated with large equilibrium density gradient, which is shown to be consistent with linear stabilization of ETG modes due to the density gradient using the analytical ETG linear threshold in F. Jenko et al. [Phys. Plasmas 8, 4096 (2001)] and linear gyrokinetic simulations with GS2 [M. Kotschenreuther et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 88, 128 (1995)]. We also found that the observed power of electron-scale turbulence (when it exists) is anti-correlated with the equilibrium density gradient, suggesting density gradient as a nonlinear stabilizing mechanism. Higher density gradients give rise to lower values of the plasma frame frequency, calculated based on the Doppler shift of the measured density fluctuations. Linear gyrokinetic simulations show that higher values of the electron density gradient reduce the value of the real frequency, in agreement with experimental observation. Nonlinear electron-scale gyrokinetic simulations show that high electron density gradient reduces electron heat flux and stiffness, and increases the ETG nonlinear threshold, consistent with experimental observations.

  7. Teaching Chemistry with Electron Density Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shusterman, Gwendolyn P.; Shusterman, Alan J.

    1997-07-01

    Linus Pauling once said that a topic must satisfy two criteria before it can be taught to students. First, students must be able to assimilate the topic within a reasonable amount of time. Second, the topic must be relevant to the educational needs and interests of the students. Unfortunately, the standard general chemistry textbook presentation of "electronic structure theory", set as it is in the language of molecular orbitals, has a difficult time satisfying either criterion. Many of the quantum mechanical aspects of molecular orbitals are too difficult for most beginning students to appreciate, much less master, and the few applications that are presented in the typical textbook are too limited in scope to excite much student interest. This article describes a powerful new method for teaching students about electronic structure and its relevance to chemical phenomena. This method, which we have developed and used for several years in general chemistry (G.P.S.) and organic chemistry (A.J.S.) courses, relies on computer-generated three-dimensional models of electron density distributions, and largely satisfies Pauling's two criteria. Students find electron density models easy to understand and use, and because these models are easily applied to a broad range of topics, they successfully convey to students the importance of electronic structure. In addition, when students finally learn about orbital concepts they are better prepared because they already have a well-developed three-dimensional picture of electronic structure to fall back on. We note in this regard that the types of models we use have found widespread, rigorous application in chemical research (1, 2), so students who understand and use electron density models do not need to "unlearn" anything before progressing to more advanced theories.

  8. Electronic measurement correction devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mahns, R.R.

    1984-04-01

    The electronics semi-conductor revolution has touched every industry and home in the nation. The gas industry is no exception. Sophisticated gas measurement instrumentation has been with us for several decades now, but only in the last 10 years or so has it really begun to boom. First marketed were the flow computers dedicated to orifice meter measurement; but with steadily decreasing manufacturing costs, electronic instrumentation is now moving into the area of base volume, pressure and temperature correction previously handled almost solely by mechanical integrating instruments. This paper takes a brief look at some of the features of the newcomers on the market and how they stack up against the old standby mechanical base volume/pressure/temperature correctors.

  9. Laser Induced Tunnel Ionization and Electron Density Evolution in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Pawan K.; Brussaard, G. J. H.; Wiel, M. J. v. d.; Tripathi, V. K.

    2005-08-01

    An indigenously built Ti:sapphire laser system delivering 50 mJ, 100 fs pulses at a repetition rate of 10 Hz, is employed to tunnel ionize air at 1 atm pressure and form a plasma channel. The laser is line focused using a cylindrical lens to a spot size of 20 μm× 1 mm. A folded wave interferometry is used to deduce the radial electron density profile by measuring the phase shift and employing Abel inversion. The maximum value of chord-integrated electron density and radial electron density are estimated to be approximately equal to 3.0× 1016 cm-2 and 4.0× 1018 cm-3 respectively with density scale length of 20 μm. These results have been theoretically interpreted by developing a unified formalism of tunnel ionization. The experimental results are in reasonable agreement with the theory.

  10. Evidence of Electron Density Enhancements at Enceladus' Apoapsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persoon, A. M.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Groene, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Enceladus' plumes are the dominant source of plasma in Saturn's magnetosphere. Icy particles and water vapor are vented into the inner magnetosphere through fissures in Enceladus' southern polar region. These fissures are subjected to tidal stresses that vary as Enceladus moves in a slightly eccentric orbit around Saturn. Plume activity is greatest when tidal stress is minimal. This occurs when Enceladus is farthest away from Saturn in its orbit (the Enceladus apoapsis). This study will show temporal variations in the electron density distribution that correlate with the position of Enceladus in its orbit around Saturn, with strong density enhancements in the vicinity of Enceladus when the moon is near apoapsis. Equatorial electron density measurements derived from the upper hybrid resonance frequency from the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) experiment are used to illustrate these electron density enhancements.

  11. The Uppsala Electron-Density Server.

    PubMed

    Kleywegt, Gerard J; Harris, Mark R; Zou, Jin Yu; Taylor, Thomas C; Wählby, Anders; Jones, T Alwyn

    2004-12-01

    The Uppsala Electron Density Server (EDS; http://eds.bmc.uu.se/) is a web-based facility that provides access to electron-density maps and statistics concerning the fit of crystal structures and their maps. Maps are available for approximately 87% of the crystallographic Protein Data Bank (PDB) entries for which structure factors have been deposited and for which straightforward map calculations succeed in reproducing the published R value to within five percentage points. Here, an account is provided of the methods that are used to generate the information contained in the server. Some of the problems that are encountered in the map-generation process as well as some spin-offs of the project are also discussed.

  12. Electron Density Profiles of the Topside Ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Xue-Qin; Reinsch, Bodo W.; Bilitza, Dieter; Benson, Robert F.

    2002-01-01

    The existing uncertainties about the electron density profiles in the topside ionosphere, i.e., in the height region from h,F2 to - 2000 km, require the search for new data sources. The ISIS and Alouette topside sounder satellites from the sixties to the eighties recorded millions of ionograms but most were not analyzed in terms of electron density profiles. In recent years an effort started to digitize the analog recordings to prepare the ionograms for computerized analysis. As of November 2001 about 350000 ionograms have been digitized from the original 7-track analog tapes. These data are available in binary and CDF format from the anonymous ftp site of the National Space Science Data Center. A search site and browse capabilities on CDAWeb assist the scientific usage of these data. All information and access links can be found at http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/space/isis/isis- status.htm1. This paper describes the ISIS data restoration effort and shows how the digital ionograms are automatically processed into electron density profiles from satellite orbit altitude (1400 km for ISIS-2) down to the F peak. Because of the large volume of data an automated processing algorithm is imperative. The TOPside Ionogram Scaler with True height algorithm TOPIST software developed for this task is successfully scaling - 70% of the ionograms. An <> is available to manually scale the more difficult ionograms. The automated processing of the digitized ISIS ionograms is now underway, producing a much-needed database of topside electron density profiles for ionospheric modeling covering more than one solar cycle.

  13. Localized electron heating and density peaking in downstream helicon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Soumen; Barada, K. K.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Ghosh, J.; Bora, D.

    2015-06-01

    Localized electron temperature and density peaking at different axial locations in the downstream helicon plasma have been observed in a linear helicon device with both geometrical and magnetic expansion. The discharge is produced with an m=+1 right helical antenna powered by a RF source operating at 13.56 MHz. Axial wave field measurement shows the presence of damped helicon waves with standing wave character folded into it even at low densities (˜ {{10}16} m-3 ). The measured helicon wavelength is just about twice the antenna length and the phase velocity ≤ft({{v}p}\\right) is almost the speed required for electron impact ionization. These experimental observations strongly advocate the Landau damping heating and density production by the helicon waves, particularly in low density plasma such as ours. The electron temperature maximizes at 35-45 cm away from the antenna center in our experiments indicating a local source of heating at those locations. Different mechanisms responsible for this additional heating at a particular spatial location have been discussed for their possible roles. Further downstream from the location of the maximum electron temperature, a density peak located 55-65 cm away from the antenna is observed. This downstream density peaking can be explained through pressure balance in the system.

  14. Neutral wind estimation from 4-D ionospheric electron density images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta-Barua, S.; Bust, G. S.; Crowley, G.; Curtis, N.

    2009-06-01

    We develop a new inversion algorithm for Estimating Model Parameters from Ionospheric Reverse Engineering (EMPIRE). The EMPIRE method uses four-dimensional images of global electron density to estimate the field-aligned neutral wind ionospheric driver when direct measurement is not available. We begin with a model of the electron continuity equation that includes production and loss rate estimates, as well as E × B drift, gravity, and diffusion effects. We use ion, electron, and neutral species temperatures and neutral densities from the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIMEGCM-ASPEN) for estimating the magnitude of these effects. We then model the neutral wind as a power series at a given longitude for a range of latitudes and altitudes. As a test of our algorithm, we have input TIMEGCM electron densities to our algorithm. The model of the neutral wind is computed at hourly intervals and validated by comparing to the “true” TIMEGCM neutral wind fields. We show results for a storm day: 10 November 2004. The agreement between the winds derived from EMPIRE versus the TIMEGCM “true” winds appears to be time-dependent for the day under consideration. This may indicate that the diurnal variation in certain driving processes impacts the accuracy of our neutral wind model. Despite the potential temporal and spatial limits on accuracy, estimating neutral wind speed from measured electron density fields via our algorithm shows great promise as a complement to the more sparse radar and satellite measurements.

  15. Analysis of the IMAGE RPI electron density data and CHAMP plasmasphere electron density reconstructions with focus on plasmasphere modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerzen, T.; Feltens, J.; Jakowski, N.; Galkin, I.; Reinisch, B.; Zandbergen, R.

    2016-09-01

    The electron density of the topside ionosphere and the plasmasphere contributes essentially to the overall Total Electron Content (TEC) budget affecting Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) signals. The plasmasphere can cause half or even more of the GNSS range error budget due to ionospheric propagation errors. This paper presents a comparative study of different plasmasphere and topside ionosphere data aiming at establishing an appropriate database for plasmasphere modelling. We analyze electron density profiles along the geomagnetic field lines derived from the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) satellite/Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) records of remote plasma sounding with radio waves. We compare these RPI profiles with 2D reconstructions of the topside ionosphere and plasmasphere electron density derived from GNSS based TEC measurements onboard the Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) satellite. Most of the coincidences between IMAGE profiles and CHAMP reconstructions are detected in the region with L-shell between 2 and 5. In general the CHAMP reconstructed electron densities are below the IMAGE profile densities, with median of the CHAMP minus IMAGE residuals around -588 cm-3. Additionally, a comparison is made with electron densities derived from passive radio wave RPI measurements onboard the IMAGE satellite. Over the available 2001-2005 period of IMAGE measurements, the considered combined data from the active and passive RPI operations cover the region within a latitude range of ±60°N, all longitudes, and an L-shell ranging from 1.2 to 15. In the coincidence regions (mainly 2 ⩽ L ⩽ 4), we check the agreement between available active and passive RPI data. The comparison shows that the measurements are well correlated, with a median residual of ∼52 cm-3. The RMS and STD values of the relative residuals are around 22% and 21% respectively. In summary, the results encourage the application of IMAGE RPI data for

  16. Density measurements using coherence imaging spectroscopy based on Stark broadeninga)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lischtschenko, O.; Bystrov, K.; De Temmerman, G.; Howard, J.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; König, R.

    2010-10-01

    A coherence imaging camera has been set up at Pilot-PSI. The system is to be used for imaging the plasma density through the Stark effect broadening of the Hγ line. Local density values are then obtained by the Abel inversion of the measured interferometric fringe contrast. This report will present the instrument setup and proof-of-principle demonstration. The inverted spatial electron density profiles obtained near the cascaded arc source of Pilot-PSI in discharges with axial magnetic field of B=0.4 T are compared with an independent measurement of electron density by Thomson scattering and good agreement is found.

  17. Ionospheric electron density profile estimation using commercial AM broadcast signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, De; Ma, Hong; Cheng, Li; Li, Yang; Zhang, Yufeng; Chen, Wenjun

    2015-08-01

    A new method for estimating the bottom electron density profile by using commercial AM broadcast signals as non-cooperative signals is presented in this paper. Without requiring any dedicated transmitters, the required input data are the measured elevation angles of signals transmitted from the known locations of broadcast stations. The input data are inverted for the QPS model parameters depicting the electron density profile of the signal's reflection area by using a probabilistic inversion technique. This method has been validated on synthesized data and used with the real data provided by an HF direction-finding system situated near the city of Wuhan. The estimated parameters obtained by the proposed method have been compared with vertical ionosonde data and have been used to locate the Shijiazhuang broadcast station. The simulation and experimental results indicate that the proposed ionospheric sounding method is feasible for obtaining useful electron density profiles.

  18. Electron Density Calibration for Radiotherapy Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera-Martinez, F.; Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.; Martinez-Davalos, A.; Ruiz-Trejo, C.; Celis-Lopez, M. A.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Garcia-Garduno, A.

    2006-09-08

    Computed tomography (CT) images are used as basic input data for most modern radiosurgery treatment planning systems (TPS). CT data not only provide anatomic information to delineate target volumes, but also allow the introduction of corrections for tissue inhomogeneities into dose calculations during the treatment planning procedure. These corrections involve the determination of a relationship between tissue electron density ({rho}e) and their corresponding Hounsfield Units (HU). In this work, an elemental analysis of different commercial tissue equivalent materials using Scanning Electron Microscopy was carried out to characterize their chemical composition. The tissue equivalent materials were chosen to ensure a large range of {rho}e to be included in the CT scanner calibration. A phantom was designed and constructed with these materials to simulate the size of a human head.

  19. Electron density and plasma dynamics of a colliding plasma experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiechula, J.; Schönlein, A.; Iberler, M.; Hock, C.; Manegold, T.; Bohlender, B.; Jacoby, J.

    2016-07-01

    We present experimental results of two head-on colliding plasma sheaths accelerated by pulsed-power-driven coaxial plasma accelerators. The measurements have been performed in a small vacuum chamber with a neutral-gas prefill of ArH2 at gas pressures between 17 Pa and 400 Pa and load voltages between 4 kV and 9 kV. As the plasma sheaths collide, the electron density is significantly increased. The electron density reaches maximum values of ≈8 ṡ 1015 cm-3 for a single accelerated plasma and a maximum value of ≈2.6 ṡ 1016 cm-3 for the plasma collision. Overall a raise of the plasma density by a factor of 1.3 to 3.8 has been achieved. A scaling behavior has been derived from the values of the electron density which shows a disproportionately high increase of the electron density of the collisional case for higher applied voltages in comparison to a single accelerated plasma. Sequences of the plasma collision have been taken, using a fast framing camera to study the plasma dynamics. These sequences indicate a maximum collision velocity of 34 km/s.

  20. Implementation of a multichannel soft x-ray diagnostic for electron temperature measurements in TJ-II high-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Baiao, D.; Varandas, C.; Molinero, A.; Chercoles, J.

    2012-10-15

    Based on the multi-foil technique, a multichannel soft x-ray diagnostic for electron temperature measurements has been recently implemented in the TJ-II stellarator. The diagnostic system is composed by four photodiodes arrays with beryllium filters of different thickness. An in-vacuum amplifier board is coupled to each array, aiming at preventing induced noise currents. The Thomson scattering and the vacuum ultraviolet survey diagnostics are used for assessing plasma profiles and composition, being the analysis carried out with the radiation code IONEQ. The electron temperature is determined through the different signal-pair ratios with temporal and spatial resolution. The design and preliminary results from the diagnostic are presented.

  1. Silicon surface barrier detectors used for liquid hydrogen density measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, D. T.; Milam, J. K.; Winslett, H. B.

    1968-01-01

    Multichannel system employing a radioisotope radiation source, strontium-90, radiation detector, and a silicon surface barrier detector, measures the local density of liquid hydrogen at various levels in a storage tank. The instrument contains electronic equipment for collecting the density information, and a data handling system for processing this information.

  2. Density-dependent electron transport and precise modeling of GaN high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajaj, Sanyam; Shoron, Omor F.; Park, Pil Sung; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Akyol, Fatih; Hung, Ting-Hsiang; Reza, Shahed; Chumbes, Eduardo M.; Khurgin, Jacob; Rajan, Siddharth

    2015-10-01

    We report on the direct measurement of two-dimensional sheet charge density dependence of electron transport in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Pulsed IV measurements established increasing electron velocities with decreasing sheet charge densities, resulting in saturation velocity of 1.9 × 107 cm/s at a low sheet charge density of 7.8 × 1011 cm-2. An optical phonon emission-based electron velocity model for GaN is also presented. It accommodates stimulated longitudinal optical (LO) phonon emission which clamps the electron velocity with strong electron-phonon interaction and long LO phonon lifetime in GaN. A comparison with the measured density-dependent saturation velocity shows that it captures the dependence rather well. Finally, the experimental result is applied in TCAD-based device simulator to predict DC and small signal characteristics of a reported GaN HEMT. Good agreement between the simulated and reported experimental results validated the measurement presented in this report and established accurate modeling of GaN HEMTs.

  3. Density-dependent electron transport and precise modeling of GaN high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Bajaj, Sanyam Shoron, Omor F.; Park, Pil Sung; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Akyol, Fatih; Hung, Ting-Hsiang; Reza, Shahed; Chumbes, Eduardo M.; Khurgin, Jacob; Rajan, Siddharth

    2015-10-12

    We report on the direct measurement of two-dimensional sheet charge density dependence of electron transport in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Pulsed IV measurements established increasing electron velocities with decreasing sheet charge densities, resulting in saturation velocity of 1.9 × 10{sup 7 }cm/s at a low sheet charge density of 7.8 × 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −2}. An optical phonon emission-based electron velocity model for GaN is also presented. It accommodates stimulated longitudinal optical (LO) phonon emission which clamps the electron velocity with strong electron-phonon interaction and long LO phonon lifetime in GaN. A comparison with the measured density-dependent saturation velocity shows that it captures the dependence rather well. Finally, the experimental result is applied in TCAD-based device simulator to predict DC and small signal characteristics of a reported GaN HEMT. Good agreement between the simulated and reported experimental results validated the measurement presented in this report and established accurate modeling of GaN HEMTs.

  4. Superthermal electron distribution measurements from polarized electron cyclotron emission

    SciTech Connect

    Luce, T.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Fisch, N.J.

    1988-06-01

    Measurements of the superthermal electron distribution can be made by observing the polarized electron cyclotron emission. The emission is viewed along a constant magnetic field surface. This simplifies the resonance condition and gives a direct correlation between emission frequency and kinetic energy of the emitting electron. A transformation technique is formulated which determines the anisotropy of the distribution and number density of superthermals at each energy measured. The steady-state distribution during lower hybrid current drive and examples of the superthermal dynamics as the runaway conditions is varied are presented for discharges in the PLT tokamak. 15 refs., 8 figs.

  5. Total electron content and F-region electron density distribution near the magnetic equator in India

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rastogi, R. G.; Sethia, G.; Chandra, H.; Deshpande, M. R.; Davies, K.; Murthy, B. S.

    1979-01-01

    Total electron content derived from the group delay measurements of ATS-6 radio beacons received at Ootacamund (India) are compared with the electron-density vs height distributions derived from the ionosonde data of the nearby station Kodaikanal. The daily variation of equivalent vertical total electron content does not show the midday bite out which is so prominently present in the corresponding daily variation of the maximum F-region electron density. The topside electron content continues to increase from sunrise to a maximum value around 1500 LT, while the bottomside electron content reaches a maximum value around 0500 LT. Daily variations of these as well as other parameters, e.g. the vertical slab thickness, the bottomside semi-thickness, the height of the F2 peak have been also studied for a geomagnetically quiet and a disturbed day.

  6. Wireless sensor node for surface seawater density measurements.

    PubMed

    Baronti, Federico; Fantechi, Gabriele; Roncella, Roberto; Saletti, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    An electronic meter to measure surface seawater density is presented. It is based on the measurement of the difference in displacements of a surface level probe and a weighted float, which according to Archimedes' law depends on the density of the water. The displacements are simultaneously measured using a high-accuracy magnetostrictive sensor, to which a custom electronic board provides a wireless connection and power supply so that it can become part of a wireless sensor network. The electronics are designed so that different kinds of wireless networks can be used, by simply changing the wireless module and the relevant firmware of the microcontroller. Lastly, laboratory and at-sea tests are presented and discussed in order to highlight the functionality and the performance of a prototype of the wireless density meter node in a Bluetooth radio network. The experimental results show a good agreement of the values of the calculated density compared to reference hydrometer readings.

  7. Wireless Sensor Node for Surface Seawater Density Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Baronti, Federico; Fantechi, Gabriele; Roncella, Roberto; Saletti, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    An electronic meter to measure surface seawater density is presented. It is based on the measurement of the difference in displacements of a surface level probe and a weighted float, which according to Archimedes’ law depends on the density of the water. The displacements are simultaneously measured using a high-accuracy magnetostrictive sensor, to which a custom electronic board provides a wireless connection and power supply so that it can become part of a wireless sensor network. The electronics are designed so that different kinds of wireless networks can be used, by simply changing the wireless module and the relevant firmware of the microcontroller. Lastly, laboratory and at-sea tests are presented and discussed in order to highlight the functionality and the performance of a prototype of the wireless density meter node in a Bluetooth radio network. The experimental results show a good agreement of the values of the calculated density compared to reference hydrometer readings. PMID:22736986

  8. Wireless sensor node for surface seawater density measurements.

    PubMed

    Baronti, Federico; Fantechi, Gabriele; Roncella, Roberto; Saletti, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    An electronic meter to measure surface seawater density is presented. It is based on the measurement of the difference in displacements of a surface level probe and a weighted float, which according to Archimedes' law depends on the density of the water. The displacements are simultaneously measured using a high-accuracy magnetostrictive sensor, to which a custom electronic board provides a wireless connection and power supply so that it can become part of a wireless sensor network. The electronics are designed so that different kinds of wireless networks can be used, by simply changing the wireless module and the relevant firmware of the microcontroller. Lastly, laboratory and at-sea tests are presented and discussed in order to highlight the functionality and the performance of a prototype of the wireless density meter node in a Bluetooth radio network. The experimental results show a good agreement of the values of the calculated density compared to reference hydrometer readings. PMID:22736986

  9. Exploring the temporally resolved electron density evolution in extreme ultra-violet induced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Horst, R. M.; Beckers, J.; Nijdam, S.; Kroesen, G. M. W.

    2014-07-01

    We measured the electron density in an extreme ultra-violet (EUV) induced plasma. This is achieved in a low-pressure argon plasma by using a method called microwave cavity resonance spectroscopy. The measured electron density just after the EUV pulse is 2.6 × 1016 m-3. This is in good agreement with a theoretical prediction from photo-ionization, which yields a density of 4.5 × 1016 m-3. After the EUV pulse the density slightly increases due to electron impact ionization. The plasma (i.e. electron density) decays in tens of microseconds.

  10. Modeling Ionosphere Environments: Creating an ISS Electron Density Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurgew, Danielle N.; Minow, Joseph I.

    2011-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) maintains an altitude typically between 300 km and 400 km in low Earth orbit (LEO) which itself is situated in the Earth's ionosphere. The ionosphere is a region of partially ionized gas (plasma) formed by the photoionization of neutral atoms and molecules in the upper atmosphere of Earth. It is important to understand what electron density the spacecraft is/will be operating in because the ionized gas along the ISS orbit interacts with the electrical power system resulting in charging of the vehicle. One instrument that is already operational onboard the ISS with a goal of monitoring electron density, electron temperature, and ISS floating potential is the Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU). Although this tool is a valuable addition to the ISS, there are limitations concerning the data collection periods. The FPMU uses the Ku band communication frequency to transmit data from orbit. Use of this band for FPMU data runs is often terminated due to necessary observation of higher priority Extravehicular Activities (EVAs) and other operations on ISS. Thus, large gaps are present in FPMU data. The purpose of this study is to solve the issue of missing environmental data by implementing a secondary electron density data source, derived from the COSMIC satellite constellation, to create a model of ISS orbital environments. Extrapolating data specific to ISS orbital altitudes, we model the ionospheric electron density along the ISS orbit track to supply a set of data when the FPMU is unavailable. This computer model also provides an additional new source of electron density data that is used to confirm FPMU is operating correctly and supplements the original environmental data taken by FPMU.

  11. Imaginary time density-density correlations for two-dimensional electron gases at high density

    SciTech Connect

    Motta, M.; Galli, D. E.; Moroni, S.; Vitali, E.

    2015-10-28

    We evaluate imaginary time density-density correlation functions for two-dimensional homogeneous electron gases of up to 42 particles in the continuum using the phaseless auxiliary field quantum Monte Carlo method. We use periodic boundary conditions and up to 300 plane waves as basis set elements. We show that such methodology, once equipped with suitable numerical stabilization techniques necessary to deal with exponentials, products, and inversions of large matrices, gives access to the calculation of imaginary time correlation functions for medium-sized systems. We discuss the numerical stabilization techniques and the computational complexity of the methodology and we present the limitations related to the size of the systems on a quantitative basis. We perform the inverse Laplace transform of the obtained density-density correlation functions, assessing the ability of the phaseless auxiliary field quantum Monte Carlo method to evaluate dynamical properties of medium-sized homogeneous fermion systems.

  12. Evidence for a continuous, power law, electron density irregularity spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronyn, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    The spectral form of the irregularities in electron density that cause interplanetary scintillation (IPS) of small angular diameter radio sources is discussed. The intensity scintillation technique always yields an irregularity scale size, which is of the order of the first Fresnel zone for the wavelength at which the observations are taken. This includes not only the radio wavelength measurements of the structure of the interplanetary medium, but also radio wavelength measurements of the irregularity structure of the ionosphere and interstellar medium, and optical wavelength measurements of the irregularity structure of the atmosphere.

  13. Electronic properties of solids excited with intermediate laser power densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirotti, Fausto; Tempo Beamline Team

    Intermediate laser power density up to about 100 GW/cm2 is below the surface damage threshold is currently used to induce modification in the physical properties on short time scales. The absorption of a short laser pulse induces non-equilibrium electronic distributions followed by lattice-mediated equilibrium taking place only in the picosecond range. The role of the hot electrons is particularly important in several domains as for example fast magnetization and demagnetization processes, laser induced phase transitions, charge density waves. Angular resolved photoelectron spectroscopy measuring directly energy and momentum of electrons is the most adapted tool to study the electronic excitations at short time scales during and after fast laser excitations. The main technical problem is the space charge created by the pumping laser pulse. I will present angular resolved multiphoton photoemission results obtained with 800 nm laser pulses showing how space charge electrons emitted during fast demagnetization processes can be measured. Unable enter Affiliation: CNRS-SOLEIL Synchrotron L'Orme des Merisiers , Saint Aubin 91192 Gif sur Yvette France.

  14. Time and space resolved measurement of the electron temperature, mass density and ionization state in the ablation plasma between two exploding Al wires

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, P. F.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.; Hansen, S. B.

    2012-05-15

    We have determined the properties of plasma around and between two exploding wires using high-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Plasma densities and temperatures ranging from Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 0.1g/cm{sup 3} and a few eV to less than 0.01 g/cm{sup 3} and 30 eV have been measured in experiments at Cornell University with two 40 {mu}m aluminum (Al) wires spaced 1 mm apart driven by {approx}150 kA peak current pulses with 100 ns rise time. The wire plasma was backlit by the 1.4-1.6 keV continuum radiation produced by a Mo wire X-pinch. The spectrometer employed two spherically bent quartz crystals to record the absorption and backlighter spectra simultaneously. The transition between the dense Al wire core and the coronal plasma is seen as a transition from cold K-edge absorption to Mg-, Na-, and finally Ne-like absorption at the boundary. In the plasma that accumulates between the wires, ionization states up to C-Like Al are observed. The spectrometer geometry and {approx}2{mu}m X-pinch source size provide 0.3 eV spectral resolution and 20 {mu}m spatial resolution enabling us to see 1s{yields} 2p satellite transitions as separate lines as well as O-, F-, and Ne-like 1s{yields} 3p transitions that have not been seen before. A step wedge was used to calibrate the transmission, enabling density to be measured within a factor of two and temperature to be measured within {+-}25%. A genetic algorithm was developed to fit synthetic spectra calculated using the collisional-radiative code SCRAM to the experimental spectra. In order to obtain agreement it was necessary to assume multiple plasma regions with variable thicknesses, thereby allowing the inferred plasma conditions to vary along the absorption path.

  15. Communication: Investigation of the electron momentum density distribution of nanodiamonds by electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Zhenbao; Yang, Bing; Lin, Yangming; Su, Dangsheng

    2015-12-07

    The electron momentum distribution of detonation nanodiamonds (DND) was investigated by recording electron energy-loss spectra at large momentum transfer in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), which is known as electron Compton scattering from solid (ECOSS). Compton profile of diamond film obtained by ECOSS was found in good agreement with prior photon experimental measurement and theoretical calculation that for bulk diamond. Compared to the diamond film, the valence Compton profile of DND was found to be narrower, which indicates a more delocalization of the ground-state charge density for the latter. Combining with other TEM characterizations such as high-resolution transmission electron spectroscopy, diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements, ECOSS was shown to be a great potential technique to study ground-state electronic properties of nanomaterials.

  16. Communication: Investigation of the electron momentum density distribution of nanodiamonds by electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhenbao; Yang, Bing; Lin, Yangming; Su, Dangsheng

    2015-12-01

    The electron momentum distribution of detonation nanodiamonds (DND) was investigated by recording electron energy-loss spectra at large momentum transfer in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), which is known as electron Compton scattering from solid (ECOSS). Compton profile of diamond film obtained by ECOSS was found in good agreement with prior photon experimental measurement and theoretical calculation that for bulk diamond. Compared to the diamond film, the valence Compton profile of DND was found to be narrower, which indicates a more delocalization of the ground-state charge density for the latter. Combining with other TEM characterizations such as high-resolution transmission electron spectroscopy, diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements, ECOSS was shown to be a great potential technique to study ground-state electronic properties of nanomaterials. PMID:26646862

  17. Electrons trapped in single crystals of sucrose: Induced spin densities

    SciTech Connect

    Box, H.C.; Budzinski, E.E.; Freund, H.G. )

    1990-07-01

    Electrons are trapped at intermolecular sites in single crystals of sucrose {ital X} irradiated at 4.2 K. The coupling tensors for the hyperfine couplings between the electron and surrounding protons have been deduced from electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) data. Electron spin densities at nearby hydroxy protons are positive, whereas spin densities at the more remote protons of carbon-bound hydrogen atoms are negative. The origin of these negative spin densities is discussed.

  18. Electrons trapped in single crystals of sucrose: Induced spin densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Box, Harold C.; Budzinski, Edwin E.; Freund, Harold G.

    1990-07-01

    Electrons are trapped at intermolecular sites in single crystals of sucrose X irradiated at 4.2 K. The coupling tensors for the hyperfine couplings between the electron and surrounding protons have been deduced from electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) data. Electron spin densities at nearby hydroxy protons are positive, whereas spin densities at the more remote protons of carbon-bound hydrogen atoms are negative. The origin of these negative spin densities is discussed.

  19. Weather Effects on the D-region Electron Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eccles, V.; Rice, D.; Sojka, J. J.; Hunsucker, R. D.; Raitt, W. J.

    2009-05-01

    Studies of D-region ionization are complicated by the low electron densities and the altitude range involved. The D-region bottom-side densities are less than 100 cm-3 and the D-region altitudes are inaccessible to most in-situ measurements. Available methods, such as sounding rockets and incoherent scatter radar, can provide detailed profiles for specific times and locations, but mesoscale characterization of D-region weather effects is difficult to obtain. Specifically the horizontal structuring of these densities and to which drivers they are most sensitive is unclear. The response of the D-region to solar inputs, background radiation sources, and wind transport from high latitudes needs to be better understood to improve both our understanding and modeling efforts. The Agile beacon monitor network measures signal strength from radio beacons from three important frequency ranges. The measurements in three frequency ranges, VLF (3-30kHz), LF (30-300 kHz), and HF (0.3-30 MHz), cooperatively help define the D region more precisely. The daytime D-region is perhaps best known for absorption of frequencies below 30 MHz. Measurements of radio signal absorption are useful in describing the D-region response to solar flares and the winter absorption anomaly. Description of the D- region bottom-side and nighttime D-region density requires a different methodology. VLF and LF propagation analysis is sensitive to densities in the 0.1 to 10 cm-3 range. Networks of receivers over these frequency ranges provide an approach for observing the horizontal spatial distribution of the lower D-region density. The D-region electron densities may be inferred by interpreting signal levels at VLF, LF, and HF using D-region models and propagation analysis. This paper describes how the model electron density profiles are modified to include weather effects. Variations are observed in day and night data even during the quietest solar conditions; some variations are consistent with

  20. Electron density power spectrum in the local interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.; Rickett, B. J.; Spangler, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    Interstellar scintillation (ISS), fluctuations in the amplitude and phase of radio waves caused by scattering in the interstellar medium, is important as a diagnostic of interstellar plasma turbulence. ISS is also of interest because it is noise for other radio astronomical observations. The unifying concern is the power spectrum of the interstellar electron density. Here we use ISS observations through the nearby (less than or approximately =1 kpc) (ISM) to estimate the spectrum. From measurements of angular broadening of pulsars and extragalactic sources, decorrelation bandwidth of pulsars, refractive steering of features in pulsar dynamic spectra, dispersion measured fluctuations of pulsars, and refractive scintillation index measurements, we construct a composite structure function that is approximately power law over 2 x 10(exp 6) m less than scale less than 10(exp 13) m. The data are consistent with the structure function having a logarithmic slope versus baseline less than 2; thus there is a meaningful connection between scales in the radiowave fluctuation field and the scales in the electron density field causing the scattering. The data give an upper limit to the inner scale, l(sub o) less than or approximately 10(exp 8) m and are consistent with much smaller values. We construct a composite electron density spectrum that is approximately power law over at least the approximately = 5 decade wavenumber range 10(exp -13)/m less than wavenumber less than 10(exp -8)/m and that may extend to higher wavenumbers. The average spectral index of electron density over this wavenumber range is approximately = 3.7, very close to the value expected for a Kolmogorov process. The outer scale size, L(sub o), must be greater than or approximately = 10(exp 13) m (determined from dispersion measure fluctuations). When the ISS data are combined with measurements of differential Faraday rotation angle, and gradients in the average electron density, constraints can be put on the

  1. Synopsis of D- and E-region electron densities during the energy budget campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedrich, M.; Baker, K. D.; Brekke, A.; Dickinson, P. H. G.; Dumbs, A.; Grandal, B.; Thrane, E. V.; Smith, L. G.; Torkar, K. M.

    1982-01-01

    Electron density profiles from ground-based and rocket-borne measurements conducted at three sites in northern Scandinavia under various degrees of geophysical disturbances are presented. These data are checked against an instantaneous picture of the ionospheric absorption obtained via the dense riometer network. A map of the riometer absorption and measured electron densities over Scandinavia is given.

  2. Measuring electron beam polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napolitano, J.

    1992-12-01

    A two-hour discussion session was held on electron beam polarimetry including representatives from Halls A, B, and C. Presentations included a description of an existing Mo/ller polarimeter at the MIT-Bates laboratory, plans for Mo/ller polarimeters in Halls A and B, and a Compton (i.e., ``laser backscatter'') polarimeter planned for Hall A. This paper is a summary of those discussions.

  3. Electron Density in Atmospheric Pressure Microwave Surface Wave Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasinski, M.; Zakrzewski, Z.; Mizeraczyk, J.

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, we present results of the spectroscopic measurements of the electron density in a microwave surface wave sustained discharges in Ar and Ne at atmospheric pressure. The discharge in the form of a plasma column was generated inside a quartz tube cooled with a dielectric liquid. The microwave power delivered to the discharge via rectangular waveguide was applied in the range of 200-1500 W. In all investigations presented in this paper, the gas flow rate was relatively low (0.5 l/min), so the plasma column was generated in the form of a single filament, and the lengths of the upstream and downstream plasma columns were almost the same. The electron density in the plasma columns was determined using the method based on the Stark broadening of Hβ spectral line, including plasma region inside the waveguide which was not investigated earlier.

  4. Electron Density in Atmospheric Pressure Microwave Surface Wave Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Jasinski, M.; Zakrzewski, Z.; Mizeraczyk, J.

    2008-03-19

    In this paper, we present results of the spectroscopic measurements of the electron density in a microwave surface wave sustained discharges in Ar and Ne at atmospheric pressure. The discharge in the form of a plasma column was generated inside a quartz tube cooled with a dielectric liquid. The microwave power delivered to the discharge via rectangular waveguide was applied in the range of 200-1500 W. In all investigations presented in this paper, the gas flow rate was relatively low (0.5 l/min), so the plasma column was generated in the form of a single filament, and the lengths of the upstream and downstream plasma columns were almost the same. The electron density in the plasma columns was determined using the method based on the Stark broadening of H{sub {beta}} spectral line, including plasma region inside the waveguide which was not investigated earlier.

  5. Deriving large electron temperatures and small electron densities with the Cassini Langmuir probe at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, Philippe; Wahlund, Jan-Erik; Holmberg, Mika; Lewis, Geraint; Schippers, Patricia; Rochel Grimald, Sandrine; Gurnett, Donald; Coates, Andrew; Dandouras, Iannis; Waite, Hunter

    2014-05-01

    The Langmuir Probes (LPs) are commonly used to investigate the cold plasma characteristics in planetary ionospheres/magnetospheres. The LPs performances are limited to low temperatures (i.e. below 5-10 eV at Saturn) and large densities (above several particles/cm3). A strong sensitivity of the Cassini LP measurements to energetic electrons (hundreds eV) may however be observed at Saturn in the L Shell range L=6-10 RS. These electrons impact the surface of the probe and generate a detectable current of secondary electrons. We investigate the influence of such electrons on the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics (for negative potentials), and manage to reproduce the observations with a reasonable precision through empirical and theoretical methods. Conversely, the modelling allows us to derive useful information about the energetic electrons from the LP observations : some information about their pitch angle anisotropy (if combined with the data from a single CAPS ELS anode), as well as an estimate of the electron temperature (in the range 100-300 eV) and of the electron density (above 0.1 particles/cm3). This enlarges the LP measurements capabilities when the influence of the energetic electrons is large (essentially near L=6-10 RS at Saturn). We finally show that a significant influence of the energetic electrons (larger than the contribution of thermal ions) is also expected in various plasma environments of the Solar System, such as at Jupiter (i.e near Ganymede, Europa, Callisto and Io), or even at Earth (in the plasmasheet, the magnetosheath or in plasma cavities). Large electron temperatures and small electron densities could potentially be derived in these environments, which may be of interest for Langmuir Probes in the Earth magnetosphere or onboard the future JUICE mission at Jupiter.

  6. Electron temperature and density probe for small aeronomy satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Oyama, K.-I.; Hsu, Y. W.; Jiang, G. S.; Chen, W. H.; Liu, W. T.; Cheng, C. Z.; Fang, H. K.

    2015-08-15

    A compact and low power consumption instrument for measuring the electron density and temperature in the ionosphere has been developed by modifying the previously developed Electron Temperature Probe (ETP). A circuit block which controls frequency of the sinusoidal signal is added to the ETP so that the instrument can measure both T{sub e} in low frequency mode and N{sub e} in high frequency mode from the floating potential shift of the electrode. The floating potential shift shows a minimum at the upper hybrid resonance frequency (f{sub UHR}). The instrument which is named “TeNeP” can be used for tiny satellites which do not have enough conductive surface area for conventional DC Langmuir probe measurements. The instrument also eliminates the serious problems associated with the contamination of satellite surface as well as the sensor electrode.

  7. Electron temperature and density probe for small aeronomy satellites.

    PubMed

    Oyama, K-I; Hsu, Y W; Jiang, G S; Chen, W H; Cheng, C Z; Fang, H K; Liu, W T

    2015-08-01

    A compact and low power consumption instrument for measuring the electron density and temperature in the ionosphere has been developed by modifying the previously developed Electron Temperature Probe (ETP). A circuit block which controls frequency of the sinusoidal signal is added to the ETP so that the instrument can measure both T(e) in low frequency mode and N(e) in high frequency mode from the floating potential shift of the electrode. The floating potential shift shows a minimum at the upper hybrid resonance frequency (f(UHR)). The instrument which is named "TeNeP" can be used for tiny satellites which do not have enough conductive surface area for conventional DC Langmuir probe measurements. The instrument also eliminates the serious problems associated with the contamination of satellite surface as well as the sensor electrode. PMID:26329217

  8. Electron temperature and density probe for small aeronomy satellites.

    PubMed

    Oyama, K-I; Hsu, Y W; Jiang, G S; Chen, W H; Cheng, C Z; Fang, H K; Liu, W T

    2015-08-01

    A compact and low power consumption instrument for measuring the electron density and temperature in the ionosphere has been developed by modifying the previously developed Electron Temperature Probe (ETP). A circuit block which controls frequency of the sinusoidal signal is added to the ETP so that the instrument can measure both T(e) in low frequency mode and N(e) in high frequency mode from the floating potential shift of the electrode. The floating potential shift shows a minimum at the upper hybrid resonance frequency (f(UHR)). The instrument which is named "TeNeP" can be used for tiny satellites which do not have enough conductive surface area for conventional DC Langmuir probe measurements. The instrument also eliminates the serious problems associated with the contamination of satellite surface as well as the sensor electrode.

  9. Electronic Flux Density beyond the Born-Oppenheimer Approximation.

    PubMed

    Schild, Axel; Agostini, Federica; Gross, E K U

    2016-05-19

    In the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, the electronic wave function is typically real-valued and hence the electronic flux density (current density) seems to vanish. This is unfortunate for chemistry, because it precludes the possibility to monitor the electronic motion associated with the nuclear motion during chemical rearrangements from a Born-Oppenheimer simulation of the process. We study an electronic flux density obtained from a correction to the electronic wave function. This correction is derived via nuclear velocity perturbation theory applied in the framework of the exact factorization of electrons and nuclei. To compute the correction, only the ground state potential energy surface and the electronic wave function are needed. For a model system, we demonstrate that this electronic flux density approximates the true one very well, for coherent tunneling dynamics as well as for over-the-barrier scattering, and already for mass ratios between electrons and nuclei that are much larger than the true mass ratios.

  10. Interferometer for the measurement of plasma density

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Abram R.

    1980-01-01

    An interferometer which combines the advantages of a coupled cavity interferometer requiring alignment of only one light beam, and a quadrature interferometer which has the ability to track multi-fringe phase excursions unambiguously. The device utilizes a Bragg cell for generating a signal which is electronically analyzed to unambiguously determine phase modulation which is proportional to the path integral of the plasma density.

  11. Spacetime Average Density (SAD) cosmological measures

    SciTech Connect

    Page, Don N.

    2014-11-01

    The measure problem of cosmology is how to obtain normalized probabilities of observations from the quantum state of the universe. This is particularly a problem when eternal inflation leads to a universe of unbounded size so that there are apparently infinitely many realizations or occurrences of observations of each of many different kinds or types, making the ratios ambiguous. There is also the danger of domination by Boltzmann Brains. Here two new Spacetime Average Density (SAD) measures are proposed, Maximal Average Density (MAD) and Biased Average Density (BAD), for getting a finite number of observation occurrences by using properties of the Spacetime Average Density (SAD) of observation occurrences to restrict to finite regions of spacetimes that have a preferred beginning or bounce hypersurface. These measures avoid Boltzmann brain domination and appear to give results consistent with other observations that are problematic for other widely used measures, such as the observation of a positive cosmological constant.

  12. Driving Plasmaspheric Electron Density Simulations During Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pascuale, S.; Kletzing, C.; Jordanova, V.; Goldstein, J.; Wygant, J. R.; Thaller, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    We test global convection electric field models driving plasmaspheric electron density simulations (RAM-CPL) during geomagnetic storms with in situ measurements provided by the Van Allen Probes (RBSP). RAM-CPL is the cold plasma component of the ring-current atmosphere interactions suite (RAM-SCB) and describes the evolution of plasma density in the magnetic equatorial plane near Earth. Geomagnetic events observed by the RBSP satellites in different magnetic local time (MLT) sectors enable a comparison of local asymmetries in the input electric field and output densities of these simulations. Using a fluid MHD approach, RAM-CPL reproduces core plasmaspheric densities (L<4) to less than 1 order of magnitude difference. Approximately 80% of plasmapause crossings, defined by a low-density threshold, are reproduced to within a mean radial difference of 0.6 L. RAM-CPL, in conjunction with a best-fit driver, can be used in other studies as an asset to predict density conditions in locations distant from RBSP orbits of interest.

  13. BOOK REVIEW: Practical Density Measurement and Hydrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S. V.

    2003-01-01

    Density determinations are very important not only for science and production but also in everyday life, since very often a product is sold by mass but the content of the package is measured by volume (or vice versa) so that the density is needed to convert the values. In production processes the density serves as a measure of mixing ratios and other properties. In science, the determination of Avogadro's constant using silicon single crystals and the potential replacement of the kilogram prototype boost density determination to an extremely low relative uncertainty of 10-7 or less. The book by S V Gupta explains in detail the foundations of any density measurement, namely the volume determination of solid artefacts in terms of the SI base unit of length and the density of water and mercury. Both the history and the actual state of science are reported. For practical density measurements, these chapters contain very useful formulae and tables. Water is treated in detail since it is most widely used as a standard not only for density determination but also to gravimetrically calibrate the capacity of volumetric glassware. Two thirds of the book are devoted to the practical density measurement of solids and liquids, mainly using classical instruments like pycnometers and hydrometers. Methods using free flotation of samples in a liquid without suspension are especially useful for small samples. Also, density determinations of powders and granular or porous samples are explained. Unfortunately, modern density meters of the oscillation type are dealt with in only a few pages. The book is clearly written and easy to understand. It contains a lot of evaluations of formulae that for practical measurements are represented in detailed tables. Methods and measurement procedures are described in detail, including also the calculation of uncertainty. Listings of the advantages and disadvantages of the different methods are very helpful. S V Gupta has written a book that will be

  14. Measuring Femtosecond Collisional Ionization Rates in Solid-Density Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinko, Sam; Ciricosta, Orlando; Hollebon, Patrick; Preston, Thomas; Wark, Justin; Burian, Tomas; Chalupsky, Jaromir; Vozda, Vojtech; Dakovski, Georgi; Minitti, Michael; Zastrau, Ulf

    2015-11-01

    The rate at which atoms and ions within a plasma are further ionized by collisions with free electrons is a fundamental parameter that dictates the dynamics of plasma systems at intermediate and high densities. While collisional ionization rates are well known experimentally in a few dilute systems, similar measurements for non-ideal plasmas at densities approaching or exceeding those of solids remain elusive. Here we illustrate a spectroscopic method capable of measuring rates of collisional ionization dynamics in solid-density plasmas by clocking them to Auger recombination processes. We have recently employed this technique on the LCLS X-ray free-electron laser at SLAC and will present the first experimental results for optically-thin, solid-density magnesium plasmas at peak temperatures exceeding 200 eV.

  15. Probing Electron Dynamics with the Laplacian of the Momentum Density

    SciTech Connect

    Sukumar, N.; MacDougall, Preston J.; Levit, M. Creon

    2012-09-24

    This chapter in the above-titled monograph presents topological analysis of the Laplacian of the electron momentum density in organic molecules. It relates topological features in this distribution to chemical and physical properties, particularly aromaticity and electron transport.

  16. Edge Stabilized Ribbon (ESR); Stress, Dislocation Density and Electronic Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachs, E. M.

    1984-01-01

    The edge stabilized ribbon (ESR) silicon ribbon was grown in widths of 1, 2.2 and 4.0 inches at speeds ranging from .6 to 7 in/min, which result in ribbon thicknesses of 5 to 400 microns. One of the primary problems remaining in ESR growth is that of thermally induced mechanical stresses. This problem is manifested as ribbon with a high degree of residual stress or as ribbon with buckled ribbon. Thermal stresses result in a high dislocation density in the grown material, resulting in compromised electronic performance. Improvements in ribbon flatness were accomplished by modification of the ribbon cooling profile. Ribbon flatness and other experimental observations of ESR ribbon are discussed. Laser scanner measurements show a good correlation between diffusion length and dislocation density which indicates that the high dislocation densities are the primary cause of the poor current performance of ESR materials. Dislocation densities were reduced and improved electronic performance resulted. Laser scanner data on new and old material are presented.

  17. Momentum-space properties from coordinate-space electron density

    SciTech Connect

    Harbola, Manoj K.; Zope, Rajendra R.; Kshirsagar, Anjali; Pathak, Rajeev K.

    2005-05-22

    Electron density and electron momentum density, while independently tractable experimentally, bear no direct connection without going through the many-electron wave function. However, invoking a variant of the constrained-search formulation of density-functional theory, we develop a general scheme (valid for arbitrary external potentials) yielding decent momentum-space properties, starting exclusively from the coordinate-space electron density. A numerical illustration of the scheme is provided for the closed-shell atomic systems He, Be, and Ne in their ground state and for 1s{sup 1} 2s{sup 1} singlet electronic excited state for helium by calculating the Compton profiles and the expectation values derived from given coordinate-space electron densities.

  18. Validation of DSMC results for chemically nonequilibrium air flows against measurements of the electron number density in RAM-C II flight experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Shevyrin, Alexander A.; Vashchenkov, Pavel V.; Bondar, Yevgeniy A.; Ivanov, Mikhail S.

    2014-12-09

    An ionized flow around the RAM C-II vehicle in the range of altitudes from 73 to 81 km is studied by the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method with three models of chemical reactions. It is demonstrated that vibration favoring in reactions of dissociation of neutral molecules affects significantly the predicted values of plasma density in the shock layer, and good agreement between the results of experiments and DSMC computations can be achieved in terms of the plasma density as a function of the flight altitude.

  19. Electronic and nuclear flux densities in the H2 molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, G.; Paulus, B.; Pérez-Torres, J. F.; Pohl, V.

    2014-05-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electronic and nuclear flux densities of a vibrating H2 molecule after an electronic excitation by a short femtosecond laser pulse. The final state, a coherent superposition of the electronic ground state X1Σg+ and the electronic excited state B1Σu+, evolves freely and permits the partition of the electronic flux density into two competing fluxes: the adiabatic and the transition flux density. The nature of the two fluxes allows us to identify two alternating dynamics of the electronic motion, occurring on the attosecond and the femtosecond time scales. In contradistinction to the adiabatic electronic flux density, the transition electronic flux density shows a dependence on the carrier-envelope phase of the laser field, encoding information of the interaction of the electrons with the electric field. Furthermore, the nuclear flux density displays multiple reversals, a quantum effect recently discovered by Manz et al. [J. Manz, J. F. Pérez-Torres, and Y. Yang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 153004 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.153004], calling for investigation of the electronic flux density.

  20. Instrument continuously measures density of flowing fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, R. B.; Macinko, J.; Miller, C. E.

    1967-01-01

    Electromechanical densitometer continuously measures the densities of either single-phase or two-phase flowing cryogenic fluids. Measurement is made on actual flow. The instrument operates on the principle that the mass of any vibrating system is a primary factor in determining the dynamic characteristics of the system.

  1. Dust density measurements in 3D dust clouds by tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melzer, Andre

    2014-10-01

    Dusty plasmas usually consist of (micron-sized) dust particles trapped in a gaseous discharge plasma. Volume-filling dust clouds can be generated in the laboratory by thermophoretic levitation of the particles against gravity or under the microgravity conditions of parabolic flights. In these discharges, the dust density is typically so high that together with the high charge on the particles, the dust charge density can compete with the ion and electron (charge) density indicating a regime of charge depletion. Here, we present a technique that allows to measure the spatially resolved 3D dust density in such dusty discharges. For that purpose, the dust cloud is transilluminated by a homogeneous light source and the transilluminated cloud is measured under different angles in a tomographic-like manner. This allows to reconstruct the full 3D dust density within the discharge volume and further to deduce the force balance for the dust component. Supported by DLR 50 WM 1138.

  2. A new method for determining the plasma electron density using optical frequency comb interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Arakawa, Hiroyuki Tojo, Hiroshi; Sasao, Hajime; Kawano, Yasunori; Itami, Kiyoshi

    2014-04-15

    A new method of plasma electron density measurement using interferometric phases (fractional fringes) of an optical frequency comb interferometer is proposed. Using the characteristics of the optical frequency comb laser, high density measurement can be achieved without fringe counting errors. Simulations show that the short wavelength and wide wavelength range of the laser source and low noise in interferometric phases measurements are effective to reduce ambiguity of measured density.

  3. Ligand identification using electron-density mapcorrelations

    SciTech Connect

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Adams, Paul D.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Cohn,Judith D.

    2006-12-01

    A procedure for the identification of ligands bound incrystal structuresof macromolecules is described. Two characteristics ofthe density corresponding to a ligand are used in the identificationprocedure. One is the correlation of the ligand density with each of aset of test ligands after optimization of the fit of that ligand to thedensity. The other is the correlation of a fingerprint of the densitywith the fingerprint of model density for each possible ligand. Thefingerprints consist of an ordered list of correlations of each the testligands with the density. The two characteristics are scored using aZ-score approach in which the correlations are normalized to the mean andstandard deviation of correlations found for a variety of mismatchedligand-density pairs, so that the Z scores are related to the probabilityof observing a particular value of the correlation by chance. Theprocedure was tested with a set of 200 of the most commonly found ligandsin the Protein Data Bank, collectively representing 57 percent of allligands in the Protein Data Bank. Using a combination of these twocharacteristics of ligand density, ranked lists of ligand identificationswere made for representative (F-o-F-c) exp(i phi(c)) difference densityfrom entries in the Protein Data Bank. In 48 percent of the 200 cases,the correct ligand was at the top of the ranked list of ligands. Thisapproach may be useful in identification of unknown ligands in newmacromolecular structures as well as in the identification of whichligands in a mixture have bound to a macromolecule.

  4. The Use of Ultrasound to Measure Dislocation Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barra, Felipe; Espinoza-González, Rodrigo; Fernández, Henry; Lund, Fernando; Maurel, Agnès; Pagneux, Vincent

    2015-08-01

    Dislocations are at the heart of the plastic behavior of materials yet they are very difficult to probe experimentally. Lack of a practical nonintrusive measuring tool for, say, dislocation density, seriously hampers modeling efforts, as there is little guidance from data in the form of quantitative measurements, as opposed to visualizations. Dislocation density can be measured using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). TEM can directly show the strain field around dislocations, which allows for the counting of the number of dislocations in a micrograph. This procedure is very laborious and local, since samples have to be very small and thin, and is difficult to apply when dislocation densities are high. XRD relies on the broadening of diffraction peaks induced by the loss of crystalline order induced by the dislocations. This broadening can be very small, and finding the dislocation density involves unknown parameters that have to be fitted with the data. Both methods, but especially TEM, are intrusive, in the sense that samples must be especially treated, mechanically and chemically. A nonintrusive method to measure dislocation density would be desirable. This paper reviews recent developments in the theoretical treatment of the interaction of an elastic wave with dislocations that have led to formulae that relate dislocation density to quantities that can be measured with samples of cm size. Experimental results that use resonant ultrasound spectroscopy supporting this assertion are reported, and the outlook for the development of a practical, nonintrusive, method to measure dislocation density is discussed.

  5. A study of electron density profiles in relation to ionization sources and ground-based radio wave absorption measurements, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnanalingam, S.; Kane, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    The D-region ion production functions are used to calculate the relationship between radio wave absorption and the flux level of X-rays in the 1-8A wavelength band. In order to bring this calculation into agreement with the empirically established relationship, it was found necessary to reduce by, a factor of about 5, the Meira nitric oxide densities below 90 km.

  6. A Modeling Study of the Ionospheric F Region Electron Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Burns, A. G.; Killeen, T. L.

    2002-12-01

    The high-resolution Thermosphere/Ionosphere Nested Grid (TING) model has been used to study the variability of ionospheric F region electron densities under various geophysical conditions. Important space weather phenomena such as the tongue of ionization and mid-latitude electron density trough, which are not well simulated in global models, can be readily studied using high spatial resolution nested grids. In this presentation we will discuss the effects of geomagnetic activity, solar cycle, seasonal and UT variations on the ionospheric F-region electron densities. It is found that geomagnetic activity can greatly enhance the polar cap tongue of ionization and nighttime auroral F region electron densities (blobs). Such enhancements in auroral electron densities have a strong effect not only locally, but also in the mid latitudes as a result of changes in the neutral circulation.

  7. High current density sheet-like electron beam generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow-Miller, Cora; Korevaar, Eric; Schuster, John

    Sheet electron beams are very desirable for coupling to the evanescent waves in small millimeter wave slow-wave circuits to achieve higher powers. In particular, they are critical for operation of the free-electron-laser-like Orotron. The program was a systematic effort to establish a solid technology base for such a sheet-like electron emitter system that will facilitate the detailed studies of beam propagation stability. Specifically, the effort involved the design and test of a novel electron gun using Lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) as the thermionic cathode material. Three sets of experiments were performed to measure beam propagation as a function of collector current, beam voltage, and heating power. The design demonstrated its reliability by delivering 386.5 hours of operation throughout the weeks of experimentation. In addition, the cathode survived two venting and pump down cycles without being poisoned or losing its emission characteristics. A current density of 10.7 A/sq cm. was measured while operating at 50 W of ohmic heating power. Preliminary results indicate that the nearby presence of a metal plate can stabilize the beam.

  8. Gutzwiller density functional theory for correlated electron systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, K. M.; Schmalian, J.; Wang, C. Z.

    2008-02-04

    We develop a density functional theory (DFT) and formalism for correlated electron systems by taking as reference an interacting electron system that has a ground state wave function which exactly obeys the Gutzwiller approximation for all one-particle operators. The solution of the many-electron problem is mapped onto the self-consistent solution of a set of single-particle Schroedinger equations, analogously to standard DFT-local density approximation calculations.

  9. Denoising surface renewal flux density measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapland, T.; Paw U, K.; Snyder, R. L.; McElrone, A.; Calderon Orellana, A.; Williams, L.

    2012-12-01

    When combined with net radiation and ground heat flux density measurements, surface renewal sensible heat flux density measurements can be used to obtain latent heat flux density, and therefore evapotranspiration, via the energy balance residual. Surface renewal is based on analyzing the energy and mass budget of air parcels that interact with plant canopies. The air parcels are manifested as ramp-like shapes in turbulent scalar time series data, and the amplitude and period of the ramps are used to calculate the flux densities. The root mean square error between calibrated surface renewal and eddy covariance is generally twice the root mean square error between two eddy covariance systems. In this presentation, we evaluate the efficacy of various methods for reducing the random error in surface renewal sensible heat flux density measurements. These methods include signal de-spiking, conventional low-pass filtering, wavelet-based filtering, ramp signal to noise thresholds, ramp period scaling, novel rearrangements of the Van Atta procedure (Arch Mech 29:161-171, 1977) for resolving the ramp amplitude and ramp period, sensor replication, and optimization of sensor placement.

  10. The Influence of Energetic Electrons on the Cassini Langmuir Probe at Saturn : Deriving Large Electron Temperatures and Small Electron Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, P.; Wahlund, J.; Holmberg, M.; Lewis, G.; Schippers, P.; Thomsen, M. F.; Rochel Grimald, S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Coates, A. J.; Dandouras, I. S.; Waite, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    The Langmuir probes (LPs) are commonly used to investigate the cold plasma characteristics in planetary ionospheres/magnetospheres. The LPs performances are limited to low temperatures (i.e. below 5-10 eV at Saturn) and large densities (above several particles/cm3). A strong sensitivity of the Cassini LP measurements to energetic electrons (hundreds eV) may however be observed at Saturn in the L Shell range L=6-10 RS. These electrons impact the surface of the probe and generate a detectable current of secondary electrons. We investigated the influence of such electrons on the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics (for negative potentials), showing that both the DC level and slope of the I-V curve are modified. The influence of energetic electrons may be interpreted in terms of the critical and anticritical temperatures concept that is important for spacecraft charging studies. Estimations of the maximum secondary yield value for the LP surface are obtained without using laboratory measurements. Empirical and theoretical methods were developed to reproduce the influence of the energetic electrons with a reasonable precision. Conversely, this modelling allows us to derive useful information about the energetic electrons from the LP observations : some information about their pitch angle anisotropy (if combined with the data from a single CAPS ELS anode), as well as an estimate of the electron temperature (in the range 100-300 eV) and of the electron density (above 0.1 particles/cm3). This enlarges the LP measurements capabilities when the influence of the energetic electrons is large (essentially near L=6-10 RS at Saturn). The understanding of this influence may be used for other missions using Langmuir probes, such as the future missions JUICE at Jupiter, BepiColombo at Mercury, or even the probes in the Earth magnetosphere.

  11. Modification of ionospheric electron density by dust suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Sweta; Mishra, Rashmi; Singh Sodha, Mahendra

    2016-05-01

    On the basis of a dynamic analysis the effectiveness of dust suspension for the reduction and enhancement of electron density in the E-layer of the ionosphere has been investigated in this paper. The analysis is based on the modelling of the E-layer as the Chapman α layer (validated earlier); the electron/ion production function, arrived at by Chapman and effective electron temperature-dependent electron-ion recombination coefficients in agreement with observations have been used. The balance of the charge on the particles and the number/energy balance of the constituents have been taken into account. The following is the physics of the change in electron density in the ionosphere by the suspension of dust. First, the dust provides a source (emission) and sink (accretion) of electrons. Second, the dust emits photoelectrons with energies much higher than those of ambient electrons, which enhances the electron temperature, leading to a reduced electron-ion recombination coefficient, and thus to a higher electron density. An interplay of these processes and the natural processes of electron production/annihilation determines the electron density and temperature in the dust suspension in the ionosphere. The numerical results, corresponding to suspension of dust of silicate (high work function) and Cs coated bronze (low work function) in the E-layer at 105 \\text{km} are presented and discussed.

  12. Measuring Air Density in the Introductory Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calza, G.; Gratton, L. M.; Lopez-Arias, T.; Oss, S.

    2010-01-01

    The measurement of the mass, or the density, of air can easily be done with very simple materials and offers many interesting phenomena for discussion--buoyancy and its effects being the most obvious but not the only one. Many interesting considerations can be done regarding the behavior of gases, the effect of the external conditions in the…

  13. Ionospheric Electron Density during Magnetically Active Times over Istanbul

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naz Erbaş, Bute; Kaymaz, Zerefsan; Ceren Moral, Aysegul; Emine Ceren Kalafatoglu Eyiguler, R. A..

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we analyze electron density variations over Istanbul using Dynasonde observations during the magnetically active times. In order to perform statistical analyses, we first determined magnetic storms and magnetospheric substorm intervals from October 2012 to October 2015 using Kyoto's magnetic index data. Corresponding ionospheric parameters, such as critical frequency of F2 region (foF2), maximum electron density height (hmF2), total electron density (TEC) etc. were retrieved from Dynasonde data base at Istanbul Technical University's Space Weather Laboratory. To understand the behavior of electron density during the magnetically active times, we remove the background quiet time variations first and then quantify the anomalies. In this presentation, we will report results from our preliminary analyses from the selected cases corresponding to the strong magnetic storms. Initial results show lower electron densities at noon times and higher electron densities in the late afternoon toward sunset times when compared to the electron densities of magnetically quiet times. We also compare the results with IRI and TIEGCM ionospheric models in order to understand the physical and dynamical causes of these variations. During the presentation we will also discuss the role of these changes during the magnetically active times on the GPS communications through ionosphere.

  14. Opto-Curling Probe for Simultaneous Monitoring of Optical Emission and Electron Density in Reactive Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Anil; Nakamura, Keiji; Sugai, Hideo

    2013-05-01

    An advanced robust probe called opto-curling probe (OCP) is presented, which enables the simultaneous monitoring of electron density and optical emission of reactive plasma. The electron density is obtained from the microwave resonance frequency of a small antenna set on the probe surface while the optical emission spectra are observed through an optical fiber tip located at the probe surface. The ratio of the measured optical emission intensity to the electron density readily provides the radical density without relying on actinometry. The usefulness of OCP was experimentally demonstrated in the oxygen plasma cleaning of a carbonized wall with endpoint detection.

  15. A study of electron density profiles in relation to ionization sources and ground-based radio wave absorption measurements, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnanalingam, S.; Kane, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    An extensive set of ground-based measurements of the diurnal variation of medium frequency radio wave adsorption and virtual height is analyzed in terms of current understanding of the D- and lower E-region ion production and loss process. When this is done a gross discrepancy arises, the source of which is not known.

  16. Surface Dependent Electron and Negative Ion Density in Inductively Coupled Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Blain, M.G.; Hamilton, T.W.; Hebner, G.A.; Jarecki, R.L.; Nichols, C.A.

    1999-01-18

    Electron and negative ion density have been measured in a modfied Applied Materials DPS metal etch chamber using gas mixtures of BCl{sub 3}, Cl{sub 2} and Ar. Measurements were performed for four dflerent substrate types to examine the influence of surface material on the bulk plasma properties; aluminurq alumina, photoresist and 50 percent patterned aluminum / photoresist. Electron densities in the Cl{sub 2} / BCl{sub 3} mixtures varied from 0.25 to 4 x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}. Photodetachment measurements of the negative ion density indicate that the negative ion density was smaller than the electron density and that the electron to negative ion density ratio varied between 1 and 6. The presence of photoresist had a dominant intluence on the electron and negative ion density compared to alumina and aluminum surfaces. In most cases, the electron density above wafers covered with photoresist was a factor of two lower while the negative ion density was a factor of two higher than the aluminum or alumina surfaces.

  17. Measurement of density and temperature in a hypersonic turbulent boundary layer using the electron beam fluorescence technique. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report, 1 Oct. 1969 - 1 Sep. 1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcronald, A. D.

    1975-01-01

    Mean density and temperature fluctuations were measured across the turbulent, cooled-wall boundary layer in a continuous hypersonic (Mach 9.4) wind tunnel in air, using the nitrogen fluorescence excited by a 50 kV electron beam. Data were taken at three values of the tunnel stagnation pressure, the corresponding free stream densities being equivalent to 1.2, 4.0, and 7.4 torr at room temperature, and the boundary layer thicknesses about 4.0, 4.5, and 6.0 inches. The mean temperature and density profiles were similar to those previously determined in the same facility by conventional probes (static and pitot pressure, total temperature). A static pressure variation of about 50% across the boundary layer was found, the shape of the variation changing somewhat for the three stagnation pressure levels. The quadrupole model for rotational temperature spectra gave closer agreement with the free stream isentropic level (approximately 44 K) than the dipole model.

  18. Cassini INMS measurements of Enceladus plume density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, M. E.; Teolis, B. D.; Hurley, D. M.; Magee, B. A.; Waite, J. H.; Brockwell, T. G.; Perryman, R. S.; McNutt, R. L.

    2015-09-01

    During six encounters between 2008 and 2013, the Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) made in situ measurements deep within the Enceladus plumes. Throughout each encounter, those measurements contained density variations that reflected the nature of the source, particularly of the high-velocity jets. Since the dominant constituent of the vapor, H2O, interacted with the walls of the INMS inlet, we track changes in the external vapor density by using more-volatile species that responded promptly to those changes. However, the most-abundant volatiles, at 28 u and 44 u, behaved differently from each other in the plume. At least a portion of their differences may be attributed to mass-dependent thermal velocity that affects Mach number in the high-velocity jets. Variations between volatiles place an emphasis on modeling as a means to construct overall plume density from the volatile densities and to investigate the velocity, gas temperature, and location of the jets. Ice grains, entering the INMS aperture add complexity and uncertainty to the physical interpretation of the data because the grains modified the INMS measurements. A comparison of data from the last three encounters, E14, E17, and E18, are consistent with the VIMS observation of variability in jet production and a slower, more diffuse gas flux from the four sulci or tiger stripes. We provide and describe the INMS data, its processing, and its uncertainty.

  19. Modification of ionospheric electron density by dust suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Sweta; Mishra, Rashmi; Singh Sodha, Mahendra

    2016-05-01

    On the basis of a dynamic analysis the effectiveness of dust suspension for the reduction and enhancement of electron density in the E-layer of the ionosphere has been investigated in this paper. The analysis is based on the modelling of the E-layer as the Chapman α layer (validated earlier); the electron/ion production function, arrived at by Chapman and effective electron temperature-dependent electron–ion recombination coefficients in agreement with observations have been used. The balance of the charge on the particles and the number/energy balance of the constituents have been taken into account. The following is the physics of the change in electron density in the ionosphere by the suspension of dust. First, the dust provides a source (emission) and sink (accretion) of electrons. Second, the dust emits photoelectrons with energies much higher than those of ambient electrons, which enhances the electron temperature, leading to a reduced electron–ion recombination coefficient, and thus to a higher electron density. An interplay of these processes and the natural processes of electron production/annihilation determines the electron density and temperature in the dust suspension in the ionosphere. The numerical results, corresponding to suspension of dust of silicate (high work function) and Cs coated bronze (low work function) in the E-layer at 105 \\text{km} are presented and discussed.

  20. Acoustic levitation methods for density measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Hsu, C. J.

    1986-01-01

    The capability of ultrasonic levitators operating in air to perform density measurements has been demonstrated. The remote determination of the density of ordinary liquids as well as low density solid metals can be carried out using levitated samples with size on the order of a few millimeters and at a frequency of 20 kHz. Two basic methods may be used. The first one is derived from a previously known technique developed for acoustic levitation in liquid media, and is based on the static equilibrium position of levitated samples in the earth's gravitational field. The second approach relies on the dynamic interaction between a levitated sample and the acoustic field. The first technique appears more accurate (1 percent uncertainty), but the latter method is directly applicable to a near gravity-free environment such as that found in space.

  1. Medical Electronics and Physiological Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochrane, T.

    1989-01-01

    Described are developments in medical electronics and physiological measurement. Discussed are electrocardiology, audiology, and urology as mature applications; applied potential tomography, magnetic stimulation of nerves, and laser Doppler flowmetry as new techniques; and optical sensors, ambulatory monitoring, and biosensors as future…

  2. Radiance Measurement for Low Density Mars Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.

    2012-01-01

    We report measurements of radiance behind a shock wave in Martian simulant (96% CO2, 4% N2) atmosphere at conditions relevant for aerodynamic decelerators. Shock waves are generated in the NASA Ames Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility at velocities from 6-8 km/s and freestream densities from 1.2-5.9 x 10(exp -4) kilograms per cubic meter (0.05-0.25 Torr, corresponding to 35-50 km altitude). Absolute radiance is measured as a function of wavelength and position in the shock. Radiance measurements extend from the vacuum ultraviolet to near infrared (120-1650 nm). As at higher density/velocity, radiation is dominate by CO 4th positive radiation in the vacuum ultraviolet, though CN contribution is also significant. At most low density conditions, the shock does not relax to equilibrium over several centimeters. A small number of measurements in the mid-infrared were performed to quantify radiation from the fundamental vibrational transition in CO, and this is found to be a minor contributor to the overall radiance at these speeds. Efforts to extend test time and reliability in the 60 cm (24) shock tube will be discussed in the full paper.

  3. New electronic measurement, control devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-04-01

    The electronic control device serves to measure the capacitance of the loss factor tg delta and the leakage current of tantalum and electrolytic capacitors. During the measurement of the leakage current, the capacitor can be polarized from an internal source with constant voltage regulated continuously from 0 to 100 V, or with a voltage of up to 500 V from an external source. The instrument has a system signalizing the loading state of the capacitor and a system for unloading it. The meter has two readout fields with LED display indicators: 3 and 5-digit for measuring the capacitance and the leakage current; 3-digit for measurement of tg delta and polarization intensity. The choice of the range for capacitance measurement can be done manually or from outside. The capacitance measurement is performed by the four-point technique in a serial replacement system. The meter with the corresponding interface block can operate in measurement systems according to IEC/ISP II standard.

  4. A new Langmuir probe concept for rapid sampling of space plasma electron density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, K. S.; Pedersen, A.; Moen, J. I.; Bekkeng, T. A.

    2010-08-01

    In this paper we describe a new Langmuir probe concept that was invented for the in situ investigation of HF radar backscatter irregularities, with the capability to measure absolute electron density at a resolution sufficient to resolve the finest conceivable structure in an ionospheric plasma. The instrument consists of two or more fixed-bias cylindrical Langmuir probes whose radius is small compared to the Debye length. With this configuration, it is possible to acquire absolute electron density measurements independent of electron temperature and rocket/satellite potential. The system was flown on the ICI-2 sounding rocket to investigate the plasma irregularities which cause HF backscatter. It had a sampling rate of more than 5 kHz and successfully measured structures down to the scale of one electron gyro radius. The system can easily be adapted for any ionospheric rocket or satellite, and provides high-quality measurements of electron density at any desired resolution.

  5. Two-color terahertz interferometer based on the frequency-splitted orthogonal polarization modes of the water vapor laser and designed for measuring the electron density profile in the L-2M stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Letunov, A. A.; Logvinenko, V. P.; Zav'yalov, V. V.

    2008-03-15

    An upgraded diagnostics for measuring the electron density profile in the L-2M stellarator is proposed. The existing diagnostics employs an interferometer based on an HCN laser with a mechanical frequency shifter and unmagnetized InSb detectors cooled with liquid helium. It is proposed to replace the HCN laser with a water vapor laser operating simultaneously at two wavelengths (220 and 118 {mu}m). Being equipped with an anisotropic exit mirror, the water vapor laser allows the generation of orthogonally polarized, frequency-splitted modes at each of these wavelengths with a frequency difference of several tens of kilohertzs. Such a scheme makes it possible to get rid of the mechanical frequency shifter. Moreover, simultaneous measurements at two wavelengths allow one to reliably separate the phase increments introduced by the plasma electron component and by variations in the lengths of the interferometer arms. To take full advantage of this scheme, specially developed cryogenic receivers consisting of Ge and InSb photodetectors placed one after another will be used. To increase the response of the system near {lambda} = 220 {mu}m, the InSb detector is placed in a Almost-Equal-To 0.55-T magnetic field.

  6. Density Profile Measurement in the TS-4 Merging Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashiya, Hitoshi; Ono, Yasushi; Katsurai, Makoto

    1999-11-01

    A CO2 laser interferometer system is being developed to measure density profiles of merging plasmas in new-built plasma merging device, TS-4 (university of Tokyo Spherical torus-4). The TS-4 merging device introduces a flux-core method to produce compact toroid whose major and minor radii are 0.50m, 0.42m, and its electron density will be ranging from 5× 10^19 to 5 × 10^20, respectively. Its main experimental subjects are to investigate (1) merging formation of field-reversed configuration (FRC), (2) ultra-high-beta spherical tokamak (ST) formation by use of FRC, (3) comparative study of ST, spheromak, FRC and reversed-field pinches (RFP) and (4) laboratory experiment of magnetic reconnection. The multi-cannel Michelson interferometer with heterodyne modulator has from 5 to 10 beam paths of 60W CO2 laser (10.6μm) to measure radial profile of electron density on the midplane. The electron density profile of merging toroids especially around the ``X-point'' will be studied in detail and its physical properties will be discussed.

  7. Extracting electron transfer coupling elements from constrained density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qin; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2006-10-01

    Constrained density functional theory (DFT) is a useful tool for studying electron transfer (ET) reactions. It can straightforwardly construct the charge-localized diabatic states and give a direct measure of the inner-sphere reorganization energy. In this work, a method is presented for calculating the electronic coupling matrix element (Hab) based on constrained DFT. This method completely avoids the use of ground-state DFT energies because they are known to irrationally predict fractional electron transfer in many cases. Instead it makes use of the constrained DFT energies and the Kohn-Sham wave functions for the diabatic states in a careful way. Test calculations on the Zn2+ and the benzene-Cl atom systems show that the new prescription yields reasonable agreement with the standard generalized Mulliken-Hush method. We then proceed to produce the diabatic and adiabatic potential energy curves along the reaction pathway for intervalence ET in the tetrathiafulvalene-diquinone (Q-TTF-Q) anion. While the unconstrained DFT curve has no reaction barrier and gives Hab≈17kcal /mol, which qualitatively disagrees with experimental results, the Hab calculated from constrained DFT is about 3kcal /mol and the generated ground state has a barrier height of 1.70kcal/mol, successfully predicting (Q-TTF-Q)- to be a class II mixed-valence compound.

  8. Electronics reliability and measurement technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    A summary is presented of the Electronics Reliability and Measurement Technology Workshop. The meeting examined the U.S. electronics industry with particular focus on reliability and state-of-the-art technology. A general consensus of the approximately 75 attendees was that "the U.S. electronics industries are facing a crisis that may threaten their existence". The workshop had specific objectives to discuss mechanisms to improve areas such as reliability, yield, and performance while reducing failure rates, delivery times, and cost. The findings of the workshop addressed various aspects of the industry from wafers to parts to assemblies. Key problem areas that were singled out for attention are identified, and action items necessary to accomplish their resolution are recommended.

  9. Measurement of electron clouds in large accelerators by microwave dispersion.

    PubMed

    De Santis, S; Byrd, J M; Caspers, F; Krasnykh, A; Kroyer, T; Pivi, M T F; Sonnad, K G

    2008-03-01

    Clouds of low energy electrons in the vacuum beam pipes of accelerators of positively charged particle beams present a serious limitation for operation at high currents. Furthermore, it is difficult to probe their density over substantial lengths of the beam pipe. We have developed a novel technique to directly measure the electron cloud density via the phase shift induced in a TE wave transmitted over a section of the accelerator and used it to measure the average electron cloud density over a 50 m section in the positron ring of the PEP-II collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

  10. Measuring Air Density in the Introductory Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzà, G.; Gratton, L. M.; López-Arias, T.; Oss, S.

    2010-03-01

    The measurement of the mass, or the density, of air can easily be done with very simple materials and offers many interesting phenomena for discussion—buoyancy and its effects being the most obvious but not the only one. Many interesting considerations can be done regarding the behavior of gases, the effect of the external conditions in the measurement, and the reason for the choice of the procedure, among others. One of the most widespread approaches makes use of rubber balloons. Such an approach can be misleading if attention is not paid to the effect of the buoyant force on the balloon, exerted by the surrounding air. Air is weightless in an environment full of it. While this fact can usually be neglected in daily, nontechnical weight measurements, it is not the case when we are interested in the weight of air itself. A sketch such as the one depicted in Fig. 1 is often presented in elementary science textbooks, as a demonstration that air has weight. A search of the Internet will reveal that this misleading approach is often presented as the simplest one for this kind of measurement at an elementary level and represents one among other common misconceptions that can be found in K-6 science textbooks as discussed, for instance, in Ref. 2. For a more detailed description of the flaws inherent to the measurement of air's weight with a rubber balloon, see Ref. 3. In this paper we will describe two procedures to measure the density of air: weighing a PET bottle and a vacuum rigid container. There are other interesting ways to estimate the weight of air; see, for instance, the experiment of Zhu and Se-yuen using carbon dioxide and Archimedes' principle.4 We emphasize the experimental implications and the physical reasons for the accuracy and conceptual correctness of each method. It is important not to undervalue the importance of both simplicity and reliability for any experimental measurement made in a didactic context.

  11. Conditional Density Estimation in Measurement Error Problems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Feng; Ye, Deping

    2015-01-01

    This paper is motivated by a wide range of background correction problems in gene array data analysis, where the raw gene expression intensities are measured with error. Estimating a conditional density function from the contaminated expression data is a key aspect of statistical inference and visualization in these studies. We propose re-weighted deconvolution kernel methods to estimate the conditional density function in an additive error model, when the error distribution is known as well as when it is unknown. Theoretical properties of the proposed estimators are investigated with respect to the mean absolute error from a "double asymptotic" view. Practical rules are developed for the selection of smoothing-parameters. Simulated examples and an application to an Illumina bead microarray study are presented to illustrate the viability of the methods. PMID:25284902

  12. Hydroxyl density measurements with resonant holographic interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Trolinger, J.D.; Hess, C.F.; Yip, B.; Battles, B.; Hanson, R.K. Stanford University, CA )

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes experimentation with a new type of flow diagnostics referred to as Resonant Holographic Interferometry Spectroscopy (RHIS). This technique combines the power of holography with the species selectivity of spectroscopy to provide three-dimensional images of the density profile of selected species in complex flows. The technique is particularly suitable to study mixing processes as well as to measure minor species in combustion processes. The method would allow the measurement of minor species in the presence of major species, as well as major species in a heterogeneous low pressure environment. Both experiments and modeling are being conducted to establish the feasibility of RHIS in measuring the hydroxyl concentrations in combustion processes. It is expected that in addition to the species concentration, the resonant holographic technique has the potential of providing temperature, pressure, and flow velocity. 28 refs.

  13. Interactive Database of Pulsar Flux Density Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koralewska, O.; Krzeszowski, K.; Kijak, J.; Lewandowski, W.

    2012-12-01

    The number of astronomical observations is steadily growing, giving rise to the need of cataloguing the obtained results. There are a lot of databases, created to store different types of data and serve a variety of purposes, e. g. databases providing basic data for astronomical objects (SIMBAD Astronomical Database), databases devoted to one type of astronomical object (ATNF Pulsar Database) or to a set of values of the specific parameter (Lorimer 1995 - database of flux density measurements for 280 pulsars on the frequencies up to 1606 MHz), etc. We found that creating an online database of pulsar flux measurements, provided with facilities for plotting diagrams and histograms, calculating mean values for a chosen set of data, filtering parameter values and adding new measurements by the registered users, could be useful in further studies on pulsar spectra.

  14. [Determination of electron density in atmospheric pressure radio frequency dielectric barrier discharges by Stark broadening].

    PubMed

    Li, Sen; Liu, Zhong-wei; Chen, Qiang; Liu, Fu-ping; Wang, Zheng-duo; Yang, Li-zhen

    2012-01-01

    The use of high frequency power to generate plasma at atmospheric pressure is a relatively new development. An apparatus of atmospheric pressure radio frequency dielectric barrier discharge was constructed. Plasma emission based measurement of electron density in discharge columns from Stark broadening Ar is discribed. The spacial profile of electron density was studied. In the middle of the discharge column, as the input power increases from 138 to 248 W, the electron density rises from 4.038 x 10(21) m(-3) to 4.75 x 10(21) m(-3). PMID:22497121

  15. Depth profile characterization technique for electron density in GaN films by infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamijoh, Takaaki; Ma, Bei; Morita, Ken; Ishitani, Yoshihiro

    2016-05-01

    Infrared reflectance spectroscopy is a noncontact measurement method for carrier density and mobility. In this article, the model determination procedure of layer-type nonuniform electron distribution is investigated, since the spectrum fitting hitherto has been conducted on the basis of a multilayer model defined in advance. A simplified case of a high-electron-density GaN layer embedded in a GaN matrix is mainly studied. The following procedure is found to be applicable. The first step is the determination of the high-density layer position in the vicinity of the surface, in the middle region, or in the vicinity of the interface. This is followed by the specification of the sheet electron density and the layer thickness of the high-density region. It is found that this procedure is also applicable to the characterization of two-dimensional electron gases in the vicinity of AlGaN/GaN heterointerfaces.

  16. Distribution of E/N and N/e/ in a cross-flow electric discharge laser. [electric field to neutral gas density and electron number density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunning, J. W., Jr.; Lancashire, R. B.; Manista, E. J.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements have been conducted of the effect of the convection of ions and electrons on the discharge characteristics in a large scale laser. The results are presented for one particular distribution of ballast resistance. Values of electric field, current density, input power density, ratio of electric field to neutral gas density (E/N), and electron number density were calculated on the basis of measurements of the discharge properties. In a number of graphs, the E/N ratio, current density, power density, and electron density are plotted as a function of row number (downstream position) with total discharge current and gas velocity as parameters. From the dependence of the current distribution on the total current, it appears that the electron production in the first two rows significantly affects the current flowing in the succeeding rows.

  17. Density-shear instability in electron magneto-hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, T. S. Hollerbach, R.; Lyutikov, M.

    2014-05-15

    We discuss a novel instability in inertia-less electron magneto-hydrodynamics (EMHD), which arises from a combination of electron velocity shear and electron density gradients. The unstable modes have a lengthscale longer than the transverse density scale, and a growth-rate of the order of the inverse Hall timescale. We suggest that this density-shear instability may be of importance in magnetic reconnection regions on scales smaller than the ion skin depth, and in neutron star crusts. We demonstrate that the so-called Hall drift instability, previously argued to be relevant in neutron star crusts, is a resistive tearing instability rather than an instability of the Hall term itself. We argue that the density-shear instability is of greater significance in neutron stars than the tearing instability, because it generally has a faster growth-rate and is less sensitive to geometry and boundary conditions. We prove that, for uniform electron density, EMHD is “at least as stable” as regular, incompressible MHD, in the sense that any field configuration that is stable in MHD is also stable in EMHD. We present a connection between the density-shear instability in EMHD and the magneto-buoyancy instability in anelastic MHD.

  18. Density-shear instability in electron magneto-hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, T. S.; Hollerbach, R.; Lyutikov, M.

    2014-05-01

    We discuss a novel instability in inertia-less electron magneto-hydrodynamics (EMHD), which arises from a combination of electron velocity shear and electron density gradients. The unstable modes have a lengthscale longer than the transverse density scale, and a growth-rate of the order of the inverse Hall timescale. We suggest that this density-shear instability may be of importance in magnetic reconnection regions on scales smaller than the ion skin depth, and in neutron star crusts. We demonstrate that the so-called Hall drift instability, previously argued to be relevant in neutron star crusts, is a resistive tearing instability rather than an instability of the Hall term itself. We argue that the density-shear instability is of greater significance in neutron stars than the tearing instability, because it generally has a faster growth-rate and is less sensitive to geometry and boundary conditions. We prove that, for uniform electron density, EMHD is "at least as stable" as regular, incompressible MHD, in the sense that any field configuration that is stable in MHD is also stable in EMHD. We present a connection between the density-shear instability in EMHD and the magneto-buoyancy instability in anelastic MHD.

  19. Density Measurement of Ethanol Blended Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, John

    Density measurements for petro-ethanol blended fuels of various mixture ratios were conducted at temperatures from 5°C to 40°C using an oscillatory densitometer at the National Measurement Institute, Australia (NMIA). The petrol and ethanol fuels used for the preparation of samples of ethanol blends were supplied directly from a local petroleum refinery. Results were within the lower end of 0.06% repeatability and 0.3% reproducibility of the ASTM D4052-2011 method. The volume correction factors (VCF) for petrol and ethanol obtained from the measurement results agreed to within 0.1% and 0.01% of the values calculated as per American Petroleum Institute Standard 2540 Chapter 11.1 and 11.3.3 respectively. Based on a simple volume-mixture model, an equation was derived to calculate the VCF for petrol-ethanol blends. The measured and calculated values of VCF were in agreement within 0.1%. This paper presents the measurement method, results and the development of an equation for calculation of VCF for petro-ethanol blends. Note from Publisher: This article contains the abstract only.

  20. Critical current density: Measurements vs. reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, A. V.; Golovchanskiy, I. A.; Fedoseev, S. A.

    2013-07-01

    Different experimental techniques are employed to evaluate the critical current density (Jc), namely transport current measurements and two different magnetisation measurements forming quasi-equilibrium and dynamic critical states. Our technique-dependent results for superconducting YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO) film and MgB2 bulk samples show an extremely high sensitivity of Jc and associated interpretations, such as irreversibility fields and Kramer plots, which lose meaning without a universal approach. We propose such approach for YBCO films based on their unique pinning features. This approach allows us to accurately recalculate the magnetic-field-dependent Jc obtained by any technique into the Jc behaviour, which would have been measured by any other method without performing the corresponding experiments. We also discovered low-frequency-dependent phenomena, governing flux dynamics, but contradicting the considered ones in the literature. The understanding of these phenomena, relevant to applications with moving superconductors, can clarify their dramatic impact on the electric-field criterion through flux diffusivity and corresponding measurements.

  1. Shock-wave-based density down ramp for electron injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunmei; Li, Ji; Sun, Jun; Luo, Xisheng

    2012-02-01

    We demonstrate a sharp density transition for electron injection in laser wakefield acceleration through numerical study. This density transition is generated by a detached shock wave induced by a cylinder inserted into a supersonic helium gas flow. In a Mach 1.5 flow, the scale length of the density transition Lgrad can approximately equal to plasma wavelength λp at the shock front, and can be further reduced with an increase of the flow Mach number. A density down ramp with Lgrad≥λp can reduce the phase velocity of the wakefield and lower the energy threshold for the electrons to be trapped. Moreover, the quality of the accelerated beam may be greatly improved by precisely controlling of Lgrad to be one λp. For an even sharper density down ramp with Lgrad≪λp, the oscillating electrons in the plasma wave will up shift their phase when crossing the ramp, therefore a fraction of the electrons are injected into the accelerating field. For this injection mechanism, there is no threshold requirement for the pump laser intensity to reach wave breaking, which is a big advantage as compared with other injection mechanisms.

  2. Features of Electron Density Distribution in Delafossite Cualo2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogoreltsev, A. I.; Schmidt, S. V.; Gavrilenko, A. N.; Shulgin, D. A.; Korzun, B. V.; Matukhin, V. L.

    2015-07-01

    We have used pulsed 63,65Cu nuclear quadrupole resonance at room temperature to study the semiconductor compound CuAlO2 with a delafossite crystal structure, and we have determined the quadrupole frequency νQ = 28.12 MHz and the asymmetry parameter η ~ 0, which we used to study the features of the electron density distribution in the vicinity of the quadrupolar nucleus. In order to take into account the influence of correlation effects on the electric field gradient, we carried out ab initio calculations within the density functional theory (DFT) approximation using a set of correlation functionals VWN1RPA, VWN5, PW91LDA, CPW91, and B3LYP1. We mapped the electron density distribution in the vicinity of the quadrupolar copper nucleus for the Cu7Al6o{14/- 1} cluster and we calculated the size of the LUMO-HOMO gap, Δ ~ 3.33 eV. We established the anisotropy of the spatial electron density distribution. Based on analysis of the electron density distribution obtained, we suggest that the bond in CuAlO2 is not purely covalent.

  3. Mobility of electrons in supercritical krypton: Role of density fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Masaru; Holroyd, Richard A.; Preses, Jack M.

    2007-07-01

    Excess electrons were generated in supercritical krypton by means of pulsed x-ray irradiation, and the electron transport phenomena were studied. Electron signals immediately after a 30ps pulse showed a distinctive feature characteristic of the presence of the Ramsauer-Townsend minimum in the momentum transfer cross section. The dependence of the drift velocity vD on field strength was found to be concave upward in the low field region and then to go through a maximum with increasing field strength, which is also typical of the presence of a minimum in the scattering cross section at an intermediate field strength. A minimum in the electron mobility was observed at about one-half the critical density. The acoustical phonon scattering model, which successfully explained the mobility change in this density region in supercritical xenon, was again found to account for the mobility in supercritical krypton.

  4. Statistical quality indicators for electron-density maps

    SciTech Connect

    Tickle, Ian J.

    2012-04-01

    A likelihood-based metric for scoring the local agreement of a structure model with the observed electron density is described. The commonly used validation metrics for the local agreement of a structure model with the observed electron density, namely the real-space R (RSR) and the real-space correlation coefficient (RSCC), are reviewed. It is argued that the primary goal of all validation techniques is to verify the accuracy of the model, since precision is an inherent property of the crystal and the data. It is demonstrated that the principal weakness of both of the above metrics is their inability to distinguish the accuracy of the model from its precision. Furthermore, neither of these metrics in their usual implementation indicate the statistical significance of the result. The statistical properties of electron-density maps are reviewed and an improved alternative likelihood-based metric is suggested. This leads naturally to a χ{sup 2} significance test of the difference density using the real-space difference density Z score (RSZD). This is a metric purely of the local model accuracy, as required for effective model validation and structure optimization by practising crystallographers prior to submission of a structure model to the PDB. A new real-space observed density Z score (RSZO) is also proposed; this is a metric purely of the model precision, as a substitute for other precision metrics such as the B factor.

  5. Accurate Measurement of Bone Density with QCT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleek, Tammy M.; Beaupre, Gary S.; Matsubara, Miki; Whalen, Robert T.; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the accuracy of bone density measurement with a new OCT technology. A phantom was fabricated using two materials, a water-equivalent compound and hydroxyapatite (HA), combined in precise proportions (QRM GrnbH, Germany). The phantom was designed to have the approximate physical size and range in bone density as a human calcaneus, with regions of 0, 50, 100, 200, 400, and 800 mg/cc HA. The phantom was scanned at 80, 120 and 140 KVp with a GE CT/i HiSpeed Advantage scanner. A ring of highly attenuating material (polyvinyl chloride or teflon) was slipped over the phantom to alter the image by introducing non-axi-symmetric beam hardening. Images were corrected with a new OCT technology using an estimate of the effective X-ray beam spectrum to eliminate beam hardening artifacts. The algorithm computes the volume fraction of HA and water-equivalent matrix in each voxel. We found excellent agreement between expected and computed HA volume fractions. Results were insensitive to beam hardening ring material, HA concentration, and scan voltage settings. Data from all 3 voltages with a best fit linear regression are displays.

  6. Spectral density measurements of gyro noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truncale, A.; Koenigsberg, W.; Harris, R.

    1972-01-01

    Power spectral density (PSD) was used to analyze the outputs of several gyros in the frequency range from 0.01 to 200 Hz. Data were accumulated on eight inertial quality instruments. The results are described in terms of input angle noise (arcsec 2/Hz) and are presented on log-log plots of PSD. These data show that the standard deviation of measurement noise was 0.01 arcsec or less for some gyros in the passband from 1 Hz down 10 0.01 Hz and probably down to 0.001 Hz for at least one gyro. For the passband between 1 and 100 Hz, uncertainties in the 0.01 and 0.05 arcsec region were observed.

  7. Electron density diagnostics in the 10-100 A interval for a solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. A.; Bruner, M. E.; Acton, L. W.; Mason, H. E.

    1986-01-01

    Electron density measurements from spectral-line diagnostics are reported for a solar flare on July 13, 1982, 1627 UT. The spectrogram, covering the 10-95 A interval, contained usable lines of helium-like ions C V, N VI, O VII, and Ne IX which are formed over the temperature interval 0.7-3.5 x 10 to the 6th K. In addition, spectral-line ratios of Si IX, Fe XIV, and Ca XV were compared with new theoretical estimates of their electron density sensitivity to obtain additional electron density diagnostics. An electron density of 3 x 10 to the 10th/cu cm was obtained. The comparison of these results from helium-like and other ions gives confidence in the utility of these tools for solar coronal analysis and will lead to a fuller understanding of the phenomena observed in this flare.

  8. Assessing the effect of electron density in photon dose calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Seco, J.; Evans, P. M.

    2006-02-15

    Photon dose calculation algorithms (such as the pencil beam and collapsed cone, CC) model the attenuation of a primary photon beam in media other than water, by using pathlength scaling based on the relative mass density of the media to water. In this study, we assess if differences in the electron density between the water and media, with different atomic composition, can influence the accuracy of conventional photon dose calculations algorithms. A comparison is performed between an electron-density scaling method and the standard mass-density scaling method for (i) tissues present in the human body (such as bone, muscle, etc.), and for (ii) water-equivalent plastics, used in radiotherapy dosimetry and quality assurance. We demonstrate that the important material property that should be taken into account by photon dose algorithms is the electron density, and not the mass density. The mass-density scaling method is shown to overestimate, relative to electron-density predictions, the primary photon fluence for tissues in the human body and water-equivalent plastics, where 6%-7% and 10% differences were observed respectively for bone and air. However, in the case of patients, differences are expected to be smaller due to the large complexity of a treatment plan and of the patient anatomy and atomic composition and of the smaller thickness of bone/air that incident photon beams of a treatment plan may have to traverse. Differences have also been observed for conventional dose algorithms, such as CC, where an overestimate of the lung dose occurs, when irradiating lung tumors. The incorrect lung dose can be attributed to the incorrect modeling of the photon beam attenuation through the rib cage (thickness of 2-3 cm in bone upstream of the lung tumor) and through the lung and the oversimplified modeling of electron transport in convolution algorithms. In the present study, the overestimation of the primary photon fluence, using the mass-density scaling method, was shown

  9. Probabilistic Fatigue Life Analysis of High Density Electronics Packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, N. R.; Kolawa, E. A.; Sutharshana, S.; Newlin, L. E.; Creager, M.

    1996-01-01

    The fatigue of thin film metal interconnections in high density electronics packaging subjected to thermal cycling has been evaluated using a probabilistic fracture mechanics methodology. This probabilistic methodology includes characterization of thin film stress using an experimentally calibrated finite element model and simulation of flaw growth in the thin films using a stochastic crack growth model.

  10. Extreme atmospheric electron densities created by extensive air showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutjes, Casper; Camporeale, Enrico; Ebert, Ute; Buitink, Stijn; Scholten, Olaf; Trinh, Gia

    2016-04-01

    A sufficient density of free electrons and strong electric fields are the basic requirements to start any electrical discharge. In the context of thunderstorm discharges it has become clear that in addition droplets and or ice particles are required to enhance the electric field to values above breakdown. In our recent study [1] we have shown that these three ingredients have to interplay to allow for lightning inception, triggered by an extensive air shower event. The extensive air showers are a very stochastic natural phenomenon, creating highly coherent bursts of extreme electron density in our atmosphere. Predicting these electron density bursts accurately one has to take the uncertainty of the input variables into account. To this end we use uncertainty quantification methods, like in [2], to post-process our detailed Monte Carlo extensive air shower simulations, done with the CORSIKA [3] software package, which provides an efficient and elegant way to determine the distribution of the atmospheric electron density enhancements. We will present the latest results. [1] Dubinova, A., Rutjes, C., Ebert, E., Buitink, S., Scholten, O., and Trinh, G. T. N. "Prediction of Lightning Inception by Large Ice Particles and Extensive Air Showers." PRL 115 015002 (2015) [2] G.J.A. Loeven, J.A.S. Witteveen, H. Bijl, Probabilistic collocation: an efficient nonintrusive approach for arbitrarily distributed parametric uncertainties, 45th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Reno, Nevada, 2007, AIAA-2007-317 [3] Heck, Dieter, et al. CORSIKA: A Monte Carlo code to simulate extensive air showers. No. FZKA-6019. 1998.

  11. Ligand electronic properties modulate tau filament binding site density

    PubMed Central

    Cisek, Katryna; Jensen, Jordan R.; Honson, Nicolette S.; Schafer, Kelsey N.; Cooper, Grace L.; Kuret, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Small molecules that bind tau-bearing neurofibrillary lesions are being sought for premortem diagnosis, staging, and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and other tauopathic neurodegenerative diseases. The utility of these agents will depend on both their binding affinity and binding site density (Bmax). Previously we identified polarizability as a descriptor of protein aggregate binding affinity. To examine its contribution to binding site density, we investigated the ability of two closely related benzothiazole derivatives ((E)-2-[[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]azo]-6-methoxybenzothiazole) and ((E)-2-[2-[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]ethenyl]-6-methoxybenzothiazole)) that differed in polarizability to displace probes of high (Thioflavin S) and low (radiolabeled (E,E)-1-iodo-2,5-bis(3-hydroxycarbonyl-4-methoxy)styrylbenzene; IMSB) density sites. Consistent with their site densities, Thioflavin S completely displaced radiolabeled IMSB, but IMSB was incapable of displacing Thioflavin S. Although both benzothiazoles displaced the low Bmax IMSB probe, only the highly polarizable analog displaced near saturating concentrations of the Thioflavin S probe. Quantum calculations showed that high polarizability reflected extensive pi-electron delocalization fostered by the presence of electron donating and accepting groups. These data suggest that electron delocalization promotes ligand binding at a subset of sites on tau aggregates that are present at high density, and that optimizing this aspect of ligand structure can yield tau-directed agents with superior diagnostic and therapeutic performance. PMID:23072817

  12. Density functionals not based on the electron gas: local-density approximation for a Luttinger liquid.

    PubMed

    Lima, N A; Silva, M F; Oliveira, L N; Capelle, K

    2003-04-11

    By shifting the reference system for the local-density approximation (LDA) from the electron gas to other model systems, one obtains a new class of density functionals, which by design account for the correlations present in the chosen reference system. This strategy is illustrated by constructing an explicit LDA for the one-dimensional Hubbard model. While the traditional ab initio LDA is based on a Fermi liquid (the three-dimensional interacting electron gas), this one is based on a Luttinger liquid. First applications to inhomogeneous Hubbard models, including one containing a localized impurity, are reported.

  13. Density functionals not based on the electron gas: local-density approximation for a Luttinger liquid.

    PubMed

    Lima, N A; Silva, M F; Oliveira, L N; Capelle, K

    2003-04-11

    By shifting the reference system for the local-density approximation (LDA) from the electron gas to other model systems, one obtains a new class of density functionals, which by design account for the correlations present in the chosen reference system. This strategy is illustrated by constructing an explicit LDA for the one-dimensional Hubbard model. While the traditional ab initio LDA is based on a Fermi liquid (the three-dimensional interacting electron gas), this one is based on a Luttinger liquid. First applications to inhomogeneous Hubbard models, including one containing a localized impurity, are reported. PMID:12731934

  14. Relations among several nuclear and electronic density functional reactivity indexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrent-Sucarrat, Miquel; Luis, Josep M.; Duran, Miquel; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro; Solà, Miquel

    2003-11-01

    An expansion of the energy functional in terms of the total number of electrons and the normal coordinates within the canonical ensemble is presented. A comparison of this expansion with the expansion of the energy in terms of the total number of electrons and the external potential leads to new relations among common density functional reactivity descriptors. The formulas obtained provide explicit links between important quantities related to the chemical reactivity of a system. In particular, the relation between the nuclear and the electronic Fukui functions is recovered. The connection between the derivatives of the electronic energy and the nuclear repulsion energy with respect to the external potential offers a proof for the "Quantum Chemical le Chatelier Principle." Finally, the nuclear linear response function is defined and the relation of this function with the electronic linear response function is given.

  15. Communication: Near-locality of exchange and correlation density functionals for 1- and 2-electron systems.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianwei; Perdew, John P; Yang, Zenghui; Peng, Haowei

    2016-05-21

    The uniform electron gas and the hydrogen atom play fundamental roles in condensed matter physics and quantum chemistry. The former has an infinite number of electrons uniformly distributed over the neutralizing positively charged background, and the latter only one electron bound to the proton. The uniform electron gas was used to derive the local spin density approximation to the exchange-correlation functional that undergirds the development of the Kohn-Sham density functional theory. We show here that the ground-state exchange-correlation energies of the hydrogen atom and many other 1- and 2-electron systems are modeled surprisingly well by a different local spin density approximation (LSDA0). LSDA0 is constructed to satisfy exact constraints but agrees surprisingly well with the exact results for a uniform two-electron density in a finite, curved three-dimensional space. We also apply LSDA0 to excited or noded 1-electron densities, where it works less well. Furthermore, we show that the localization of the exact exchange hole for a 1- or 2-electron ground state can be measured by the ratio of the exact exchange energy to its optimal lower bound. PMID:27208927

  16. Communication: Near-locality of exchange and correlation density functionals for 1- and 2-electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianwei; Perdew, John P.; Yang, Zenghui; Peng, Haowei

    2016-05-01

    The uniform electron gas and the hydrogen atom play fundamental roles in condensed matter physics and quantum chemistry. The former has an infinite number of electrons uniformly distributed over the neutralizing positively charged background, and the latter only one electron bound to the proton. The uniform electron gas was used to derive the local spin density approximation to the exchange-correlation functional that undergirds the development of the Kohn-Sham density functional theory. We show here that the ground-state exchange-correlation energies of the hydrogen atom and many other 1- and 2-electron systems are modeled surprisingly well by a different local spin density approximation (LSDA0). LSDA0 is constructed to satisfy exact constraints but agrees surprisingly well with the exact results for a uniform two-electron density in a finite, curved three-dimensional space. We also apply LSDA0 to excited or noded 1-electron densities, where it works less well. Furthermore, we show that the localization of the exact exchange hole for a 1- or 2-electron ground state can be measured by the ratio of the exact exchange energy to its optimal lower bound.

  17. Usefulness of bone density measurement in fallers.

    PubMed

    Blain, Hubert; Rolland, Yves; Beauchet, Olivier; Annweiler, Cedric; Benhamou, Claude-Laurent; Benetos, Athanase; Berrut, Gilles; Audran, Maurice; Bendavid, Sauveur; Bousson, Valérie; Briot, Karine; Brazier, Michel; Breuil, Véronique; Chapuis, Laure; Chapurlat, Roland; Cohen-Solal, Martine; Cortet, Bernard; Dargent, Patricia; Fardellone, Patrice; Feron, Jean-Marc; Gauvain, Jean-Bernard; Guggenbuhl, Pascal; Hanon, Olivier; Laroche, Michel; Kolta, Sami; Lespessailles, Eric; Letombe, Brigitte; Mallet, Eric; Marcelli, Christian; Orcel, Philippe; Puisieux, François; Seret, Patrick; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude; Sutter, Bruno; Trémollières, Florence; Weryha, Georges; Roux, Christian; Thomas, Thierry

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this systematic literature review is to discuss the latest French recommendation issued in 2012 that a fall within the past year should lead to bone mineral density (BMD) measurement using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). This recommendation rests on four facts. First, osteoporosis and fall risk are the two leading risk factors for nonvertebral fractures in postmenopausal women. Second, BMD measurement using DXA supplies significant information on the fracture risk independently from the fall risk. Thus, when a fall occurs, the fracture risk increases as BMD decreases. Third, osteoporosis drugs have been proven effective in preventing fractures only in populations with osteoporosis defined based on BMD criteria. Finally, the prevalence of osteoporosis is high in patients who fall and increases in the presence of markers for frailty (e.g., recurrent falls, sarcopenia [low muscle mass and strength], limited mobility, and weight loss), which are risk factors for both osteoporosis and falls. Nevertheless, life expectancy should be taken into account when assessing the appropriateness of DXA in fallers, as osteoporosis treatments require at least 12months to decrease the fracture risk. Another relevant factor is the availability of DXA, which may be limited due to geographic factors, patient dependency, or severe cognitive impairments, for instance. Studies are needed to better determine how the fall risk and frailty should be incorporated into the fracture risk evaluation based on BMD and the FRAX® tool. PMID:24703626

  18. Fast electronic resistance switching involving hidden charge density wave states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaskivskyi, I.; Mihailovic, I. A.; Brazovskii, S.; Gospodaric, J.; Mertelj, T.; Svetin, D.; Sutar, P.; Mihailovic, D.

    2016-05-01

    The functionality of computer memory elements is currently based on multi-stability, driven either by locally manipulating the density of electrons in transistors or by switching magnetic or ferroelectric order. Another possibility is switching between metallic and insulating phases by the motion of ions, but their speed is limited by slow nucleation and inhomogeneous percolative growth. Here we demonstrate fast resistance switching in a charge density wave system caused by pulsed current injection. As a charge pulse travels through the material, it converts a commensurately ordered polaronic Mott insulating state in 1T-TaS2 to a metastable electronic state with textured domain walls, accompanied with a conversion of polarons to band states, and concurrent rapid switching from an insulator to a metal. The large resistance change, high switching speed (30 ps) and ultralow energy per bit opens the way to new concepts in non-volatile memory devices manipulating all-electronic states.

  19. Fast electronic resistance switching involving hidden charge density wave states

    PubMed Central

    Vaskivskyi, I.; Mihailovic, I. A.; Brazovskii, S.; Gospodaric, J.; Mertelj, T.; Svetin, D.; Sutar, P.; Mihailovic, D.

    2016-01-01

    The functionality of computer memory elements is currently based on multi-stability, driven either by locally manipulating the density of electrons in transistors or by switching magnetic or ferroelectric order. Another possibility is switching between metallic and insulating phases by the motion of ions, but their speed is limited by slow nucleation and inhomogeneous percolative growth. Here we demonstrate fast resistance switching in a charge density wave system caused by pulsed current injection. As a charge pulse travels through the material, it converts a commensurately ordered polaronic Mott insulating state in 1T–TaS2 to a metastable electronic state with textured domain walls, accompanied with a conversion of polarons to band states, and concurrent rapid switching from an insulator to a metal. The large resistance change, high switching speed (30 ps) and ultralow energy per bit opens the way to new concepts in non-volatile memory devices manipulating all-electronic states. PMID:27181483

  20. Empirical models of the electron temperature and density in the nightside Venus ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brace, L. H.; Theis, R. F.; Niemann, H. B.; Mayr, H. G.; Hoegy, W. R.; Nagy, A. F.

    1979-01-01

    Empirical models of the electron temperature and density of the late afternoon and nightside Venus ionosphere based on the Pioneer Venus measurements are presented. They describe the ionosphere conditions near 18 deg latitude between 150 and 700 km altitude for solar zenith angles of 80 to 180 deg, with a 10-fold decrease beyond 90 deg and a gradual decrease between 120 and 180 deg. The nightside electron density profile, the ion transport process, and electron precipitation are discussed. The high nocturnal temperatures and the well defined nightside ionopause suggest that energetic processes occur across the top of the entire nightside ionosphere, maintaining elevated temperatures.

  1. Measurement of Density Inhomogeneity for Source Masses in Time-of-Swing Method of Measuring G

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lin-Xia; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Tu, Liang-Cheng; Luo, Jun

    2009-01-01

    A method with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is presented to measure the density inhomogeneity of the stainless steel (SS316) sphere prepared for measuring G using time-of-swing method. The experimental result shows that the relative density inhomogeneity of the sphere is better than 5.9 × 10-4 over the volume of 0.272 × 0.234 × 0.005 mm3. If we assume that the density inhomogeneity of the spheres used in our G measurement is the same as that of the sphere destroyed in testing, it will contribute to G value with an uncertainty of less than 0.034 ppm in our G measurement. Furthermore, the mass centre offset from the geometric centre of the sphere will be less than 4.3 × 10-4 μm due to this inhomogeneity.

  2. Collimated fast electron beam generation in critical density plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Iwawaki, T. Habara, H.; Morita, K.; Tanaka, K. A.; Baton, S.; Fuchs, J.; Chen, S.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Rousseaux, C.; Filippi, F.; Nazarov, W.

    2014-11-15

    Significantly collimated fast electron beam with a divergence angle 10° (FWHM) is observed when an ultra-intense laser pulse (I = 10{sup 14 }W/cm{sup 2}, 300 fs) irradiates a uniform critical density plasma. The uniform plasma is created through the ionization of an ultra-low density (5 mg/c.c.) plastic foam by X-ray burst from the interaction of intense laser (I = 10{sup 14 }W/cm{sup 2}, 600 ps) with a thin Cu foil. 2D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation well reproduces the collimated electron beam with a strong magnetic field in the region of the laser pulse propagation. To understand the physical mechanism of the collimation, we calculate energetic electron motion in the magnetic field obtained from the 2D PIC simulation. As the results, the strong magnetic field (300 MG) collimates electrons with energy over a few MeV. This collimation mechanism may attract attention in many applications such as electron acceleration, electron microscope and fast ignition of laser fusion.

  3. An x-ray backlit Talbot-Lau deflectometer for high-energy-density electron density diagnostics

    DOE PAGES

    Valdivia, M. P.; Stutman, D.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Mileham, C.; Begishev, I. A.; Bromage, J.; Regan, S. P.

    2016-02-10

    X-ray phase-contrast techniques can measure electron density gradients in high-energy-density plasmas through refraction induced phase shifts. An 8 keV Talbot-Lau interferometer consisting of free standing ultrathin gratings was deployed at an ultra-short, high-intensity laser system using K-shell emission from a 1-30 J, 8 ps laser pulse focused on thin Cu foil targets. Grating survival was demonstrated for 30 J, 8 ps laser pulses. The first x-ray deflectometry images obtained under laser backlighting showed up to 25% image contrast and thus enabled detection of electron areal density gradients with a maximum value of 8.1 ± 0.5 × 1023 cm₋3 in amore » low-Z millimeter sized sample. An electron density profile was obtained from refraction measurements with an error of <8%. We found the 50 ± 15 μm spatial resolution achieved across the full field of view was limited by the x-ray source-size, similar to conventional radiography.« less

  4. Validation of Ionosonde Electron Density Reconstruction Algorithms with IONOLAB-RAY in Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gok, Gokhan; Mosna, Zbysek; Arikan, Feza; Arikan, Orhan; Erdem, Esra

    2016-07-01

    Ionospheric observation is essentially accomplished by specialized radar systems called ionosondes. The time delay between the transmitted and received signals versus frequency is measured by the ionosondes and the received signals are processed to generate ionogram plots, which show the time delay or reflection height of signals with respect to transmitted frequency. The critical frequencies of ionospheric layers and virtual heights, that provide useful information about ionospheric structurecan be extracted from ionograms . Ionograms also indicate the amount of variability or disturbances in the ionosphere. With special inversion algorithms and tomographical methods, electron density profiles can also be estimated from the ionograms. Although structural pictures of ionosphere in the vertical direction can be observed from ionosonde measurements, some errors may arise due to inaccuracies that arise from signal propagation, modeling, data processing and tomographic reconstruction algorithms. Recently IONOLAB group (www.ionolab.org) developed a new algorithm for effective and accurate extraction of ionospheric parameters and reconstruction of electron density profile from ionograms. The electron density reconstruction algorithm applies advanced optimization techniques to calculate parameters of any existing analytical function which defines electron density with respect to height using ionogram measurement data. The process of reconstructing electron density with respect to height is known as the ionogram scaling or true height analysis. IONOLAB-RAY algorithm is a tool to investigate the propagation path and parameters of HF wave in the ionosphere. The algorithm models the wave propagation using ray representation under geometrical optics approximation. In the algorithm , the structural ionospheric characteristics arerepresented as realistically as possible including anisotropicity, inhomogenity and time dependence in 3-D voxel structure. The algorithm is also used

  5. Nearly degenerate electron distributions and superluminal radiation densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaschitz, Roman

    2010-02-01

    Polylogarithmic fugacity expansions of the partition function, the caloric and thermal equations of state, and the specific heat of fermionic power-law distributions are derived in the nearly degenerate low-temperature/high-density quantum regime. The spectral functions of an ultra-relativistic electron plasma are obtained by averaging the tachyonic radiation densities of inertial electrons with Fermi power-laws, whose entropy is shown to be extensive and stable. The averaged radiation densities are put to test by performing tachyonic cascade fits to the γ-ray spectrum of the TeV blazar Markarian 421 in a low and high emission state. Estimates of the thermal electron plasma in this active galactic nucleus are extracted from the spectral fits, such as temperature, number count, and internal energy. The tachyonic cascades reproduce the quiescent as well as a burst spectrum of the blazar obtained with imaging atmospheric Cherenkov detectors. Double-logarithmic plots of the differential tachyon flux exhibit intrinsic spectral curvature, caused by the Boltzmann factor of the electron gas.

  6. Coupled-channels quantum theory of electronic flux density in electronically adiabatic processes: fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Diestler, D J

    2012-03-22

    The Born-Oppenheimer (BO) description of electronically adiabatic molecular processes predicts a vanishing electronic flux density (j(e)), =1/2∫dR[Δ(b) (x;R) - Δ(a) (x;R)] even though the electrons certainly move in response to the movement of the nuclei. This article, the first of a pair, proposes a quantum-mechanical "coupled-channels" (CC) theory that allows the approximate extraction of j(e) from the electronically adiabatic BO wave function . The CC theory is detailed for H(2)(+), in which case j(e) can be resolved into components associated with two channels α (=a,b), each of which corresponds to the "collision" of an "internal" atom α (proton a or b plus electron) with the other nucleus β (proton b or a). The dynamical role of the electron, which accommodates itself instantaneously to the motion of the nuclei, is submerged in effective electronic probability (population) densities, Δ(α), associated with each channel (α). The Δ(α) densities are determined by the (time-independent) BO electronic energy eigenfunction, which depends parametrically on the configuration of the nuclei, the motion of which is governed by the usual BO nuclear Schrödinger equation. Intuitively appealing formal expressions for the electronic flux density are derived for H(2)(+).

  7. Assisted assignment of ligands corresponding to unknown electron density.

    SciTech Connect

    Binkowski, T. A.; Cuff, M.; Nocek, B.; Chang, C.; Joachimiak, A.; Biosciences Division

    2010-01-03

    A semi-automated computational procedure to assist in the identification of bound ligands from unknown electron density has been developed. The atomic surface surrounding the density blob is compared to a library of three-dimensional ligand binding surfaces extracted from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Ligands corresponding to surfaces which share physicochemical texture and geometric shape similarities are considered for assignment. The method is benchmarked against a set of well represented ligands from the PDB, in which we show that we can identify the correct ligand based on the corresponding binding surface. Finally, we apply the method during model building and refinement stages from structural genomics targets in which unknown density blobs were discovered. A semi-automated computational method is described which aims to assist crystallographers with assigning the identity of a ligand corresponding to unknown electron density. Using shape and physicochemical similarity assessments between the protein surface surrounding the density and a database of known ligand binding surfaces, a plausible list of candidate ligands are identified for consideration. The method is validated against highly observed ligands from the Protein Data Bank and results are shown from its use in a high-throughput structural genomics pipeline.

  8. Statistical quality indicators for electron-density maps.

    PubMed

    Tickle, Ian J

    2012-04-01

    The commonly used validation metrics for the local agreement of a structure model with the observed electron density, namely the real-space R (RSR) and the real-space correlation coefficient (RSCC), are reviewed. It is argued that the primary goal of all validation techniques is to verify the accuracy of the model, since precision is an inherent property of the crystal and the data. It is demonstrated that the principal weakness of both of the above metrics is their inability to distinguish the accuracy of the model from its precision. Furthermore, neither of these metrics in their usual implementation indicate the statistical significance of the result. The statistical properties of electron-density maps are reviewed and an improved alternative likelihood-based metric is suggested. This leads naturally to a χ(2) significance test of the difference density using the real-space difference density Z score (RSZD). This is a metric purely of the local model accuracy, as required for effective model validation and structure optimization by practising crystallographers prior to submission of a structure model to the PDB. A new real-space observed density Z score (RSZO) is also proposed; this is a metric purely of the model precision, as a substitute for other precision metrics such as the B factor.

  9. High-current density, high-brightness electron beams from large-area lanthanum hexaboride cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loschialpo, P.; Kapetanakos, C. A.

    1987-12-01

    Large (approx. 5 cm) diameter lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) cathodes operated at 10 kV have produced 1 to 5 micro electron pulses with current density between 10 and 20 A/sq cm. Normalized beam brightness, has been consistently measured. To obtain this high current density, the LaB6 cathodes have been heated to temperatures between approximately 1600 to 1800 C. Very uniform temperature profiles are obtained by applying a carefully tailored electron bombardment heating power distribution. These measurements have been made between pressure .000001 to .00001 Torr, i.e., under much less demanding vacuum conditions than that required by conventional dispenser type cathodes.

  10. 46 CFR 164.009-17 - Density measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Density measurement. 164.009-17 Section 164.009-17...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Noncombustible Materials for Merchant Vessels § 164.009-17 Density measurement. (a) The measurements described in this section are made to determine the density of a sample....

  11. 46 CFR 164.009-17 - Density measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Density measurement. 164.009-17 Section 164.009-17...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Noncombustible Materials for Merchant Vessels § 164.009-17 Density measurement. (a) The measurements described in this section are made to determine the density of a sample....

  12. 46 CFR 164.009-17 - Density measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Density measurement. 164.009-17 Section 164.009-17...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Noncombustible Materials for Merchant Vessels § 164.009-17 Density measurement. (a) The measurements described in this section are made to determine the density of a sample....

  13. 46 CFR 164.009-17 - Density measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Density measurement. 164.009-17 Section 164.009-17...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Noncombustible Materials for Merchant Vessels § 164.009-17 Density measurement. (a) The measurements described in this section are made to determine the density of a sample....

  14. Magnetic field-aligned electrons escaping from plasma density minima in the cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, A.; Lybekk, B.; Haaland, S.; Svenes, K.; Dandouras, I.; Fazakerley, A. N.

    2012-04-01

    On Cluster the plasma density in very tenuous plasmas can be estimated based on spacecraft potential measurements. This has made it possible to detect plasma density minima of 0.01-0.1 cm-3 in the cusp poleward of the main precipitation of electrons and ions. Electron data from PEACE show that some of these minima have magnetic field-aligned outflow of electrons with energies of several hundred eV. Ion data from CIS will be used to look for possible related ion field-aligned flow. In this study the locations and the extents of plasma density minima, with electron outflow, will be determined for the northern and the southern cusp. Information about extent across the magnetic field can be obtained by using data from all four Cluster satellites, and electric field data can be used to detect plasma drift and wave activity. Possible connections to solar wind conditions and magnetosphere disturbance level will be presented

  15. Excess electrons in ice: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Somesh Kr; Inam, Fakharul; Scandolo, Sandro

    2014-02-21

    We present a density functional theory study of the localization of excess electrons in the bulk and on the surface of crystalline and amorphous water ice. We analyze the initial stages of electron solvation in crystalline and amorphous ice. In the case of crystalline ice we find that excess electrons favor surface states over bulk states, even when the latter are localized at defect sites. In contrast, in amorphous ice excess electrons find it equally favorable to localize in bulk and in surface states which we attribute to the preexisting precursor states in the disordered structure. In all cases excess electrons are found to occupy the vacuum regions of the molecular network. The electron localization in the bulk of amorphous ice is assisted by its distorted hydrogen bonding network as opposed to the crystalline phase. Although qualitative, our results provide a simple interpretation of the large differences observed in the dynamics and localization of excess electrons in crystalline and amorphous ice films on metals.

  16. Excitations and benchmark ensemble density functional theory for two electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Pribram-Jones, Aurora; Burke, Kieron; Yang, Zeng-hui; Ullrich, Carsten A.; Trail, John R.; Needs, Richard J.

    2014-05-14

    A new method for extracting ensemble Kohn-Sham potentials from accurate excited state densities is applied to a variety of two-electron systems, exploring the behavior of exact ensemble density functional theory. The issue of separating the Hartree energy and the choice of degenerate eigenstates is explored. A new approximation, spin eigenstate Hartree-exchange, is derived. Exact conditions that are proven include the signs of the correlation energy components and the asymptotic behavior of the potential for small weights of the excited states. Many energy components are given as a function of the weights for two electrons in a one-dimensional flat box, in a box with a large barrier to create charge transfer excitations, in a three-dimensional harmonic well (Hooke's atom), and for the He atom singlet-triplet ensemble, singlet-triplet-singlet ensemble, and triplet bi-ensemble.

  17. Electron inelastic mean free path theory and density functional theory resolving discrepancies for low-energy electrons in copper.

    PubMed

    Chantler, C T; Bourke, J D

    2014-02-01

    We develop the many-pole dielectric theory of UV plasmon interactions and electron energy losses, and couple our advances with recent developments of Kohn-Sham density functional theory to address observed discrepancies between high-precision measurements and tabulated data for electron inelastic mean free paths (IMFPs). Recent publications have demonstrated that a five standard error difference exists between longstanding theoretical calculations and measurements of electron IMFPs for elemental solids at energies below 120 eV, a critical region for analysis of electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and related technologies. Our implementation of improved optical loss spectra and a physical treatment of second-order excitation lifetimes resolves this problem in copper for the first time for energies in excess of 80 eV and substantially improves agreement for lower energy electrons.

  18. Temporal evolution of electron density and temperature in capillary discharge plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Seong Y.; Kang, Hoonsoo; Uhm, Han S.; Lee, In W.; Suk, Hyyong

    2010-05-15

    Time-resolved spectroscopic measurements of a capillary discharge plasma of helium gas were carried out to obtain detailed information about dynamics of the discharge plasma column, where the fast plasma dynamics is determined by the electron density and temperature. Our measurements show that the electron density of the capillary plasma column increases sharply after gas breakdown and reaches its peak of the order of 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} within less than 100 ns, and then it decreases as time goes by. The result indicates that a peak electron density of 2.3x10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} occurs about 65 ns after formation of the discharge current, which is ideal for laser wakefield acceleration experiments reported by Karsch et al. [New J. Phys. 9, 415 (2007)].

  19. New Data on the Topside Electron Density Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Xue-Qin; Reinisch, Bodo; Bilitza, Dieter; Benson, Robert F.

    2001-01-01

    The existing uncertainties about the electron density profiles in the topside ionosphere, i.e., in the height region from hmF2 to approx. 2000 km, require the search for new data sources. The ISIS and Alouette topside sounder satellites from the sixties to the eighties recorded millions of ionograms and most were not analyzed in terms of electron density profiles. In recent years an effort started to digitize the analog recordings to prepare the ionograms for computerized analysis. As of November 2001 about 350,000 ionograms have been digitized from the original 7-track analog tapes. These data are available in binary and CDF format from the anonymous ftp site of the National Space Science Data Center. A search site and browse capabilities on CDAWeb assist the scientific usage of these data. All information and access links can be found at http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/space/isis/isis-status.html. This paper describes the ISIS data restoration effort and shows how the digital ionograms are automatically processed into electron density profiles from satellite orbit altitude (1400 km for ISIS-2) down to the F peak. Because of the large volume of data an automated processing algorithm is imperative. The automatic topside ionogram scaler with true height algorithm TOPIST software developed for this task is successfully scaling approx.70 % of the ionograms. An 'editing process' is available to manually scale the more difficult ionograms. The automated processing of the digitized ISIS ionograms is now underway, producing a much-needed database of topside electron density profiles for ionospheric modeling covering more than one solar cycle. The ISIS data restoration efforts are supported through NASA's Applied Systems and Information Research Program.

  20. Surprising resistivity decrease in manganites with constant electronic density.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Gil, R; Ruiz-González, M L; Alonso, J M; Martínez, J L; Hernando, A; Vallet-Regí, M; González-Calbet, J M

    2013-12-01

    A decrease of eight orders of magnitude in the resistance of (La0.5Ca0.5)zMnO3 has been detected when the electronic density is kept constant while the calcium content is modified by introducing cationic vacancies. This effect is related to the disappearance of the charge ordering state and the emergence of an antiferromagnetic–ferromagnetic transition. Moreover, high values of the colossal magnetoresistance above room temperature are attained. PMID:24200948

  1. A real-space stochastic density matrix approach for density functional electronic structure.

    PubMed

    Beck, Thomas L

    2015-12-21

    The recent development of real-space grid methods has led to more efficient, accurate, and adaptable approaches for large-scale electrostatics and density functional electronic structure modeling. With the incorporation of multiscale techniques, linear-scaling real-space solvers are possible for density functional problems if localized orbitals are used to represent the Kohn-Sham energy functional. These methods still suffer from high computational and storage overheads, however, due to extensive matrix operations related to the underlying wave function grid representation. In this paper, an alternative stochastic method is outlined that aims to solve directly for the one-electron density matrix in real space. In order to illustrate aspects of the method, model calculations are performed for simple one-dimensional problems that display some features of the more general problem, such as spatial nodes in the density matrix. This orbital-free approach may prove helpful considering a future involving increasingly parallel computing architectures. Its primary advantage is the near-locality of the random walks, allowing for simultaneous updates of the density matrix in different regions of space partitioned across the processors. In addition, it allows for testing and enforcement of the particle number and idempotency constraints through stabilization of a Feynman-Kac functional integral as opposed to the extensive matrix operations in traditional approaches. PMID:25969148

  2. Electron density of local interstellar medium, based on the Voyager heliospheric-shock observations

    SciTech Connect

    Baranov, V.B.

    1986-10-01

    Some implications of a model for the solar wind-local-interstellar-medium (LISM) interaction, comprising a bow shock and a heliospheric shock with a contact interface in between, are compared against the Voyager probe data. A fit can be achieved if the LISM electron density is somewhat higher than indicated by pulsar dispersion measurements. The theory is compatible with the hydrogen densities inferred from Copernicus and from the scattering solar L-alpha radiation. 14 references.

  3. The calculation of free electron density in CASSANDRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattison, L. K.; Crowley, B. J. B.; Harris, J. W. O.; Upcraft, L. M.

    2010-01-01

    CASSANDRA is an AWE opacity code used to model plasmas in local thermal equilibrium: there is a desire to expand its use to calculating plasma equations of state. CASSANDRA's self-consistent field calculation ( SCF) uses the local density approximation for bounds states and has a free electron contribution based upon the Thomas-Fermi model [B.J.B. Crowley et al., J. Quant. Spectro. Radiat. Trans. 71, 257(2001)]. Whilst this is applicable for very high temperature or low density plasmas; in hot and dense matter the effect of ionization will lead to discontinuities in the effective ionisation, Z⋆. The electron contribution to hydrostatic pressure is associated with Z⋆, thus these discontinuities produce unphysical jumps in the resulting calculated material pressure. We describe a procedure to mitigate the effect by calculating the free electron wave functions within the generalized ion-cell model [B.J.B. Crowley et al., Phys. Rev. A 41, 2179(1990)], and thus explicitly calculate free-electron resonances.

  4. Kinetic and electron-electron energies for convex sums of ground state densities with degeneracies and fractional electron number

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, Mel E-mail: mlevy@tulane.edu; Anderson, James S. M.; Zadeh, Farnaz Heidar; Ayers, Paul W. E-mail: mlevy@tulane.edu

    2014-05-14

    Properties of exact density functionals provide useful constraints for the development of new approximate functionals. This paper focuses on convex sums of ground-level densities. It is observed that the electronic kinetic energy of a convex sum of degenerate ground-level densities is equal to the convex sum of the kinetic energies of the individual degenerate densities. (The same type of relationship holds also for the electron-electron repulsion energy.) This extends a known property of the Levy-Valone Ensemble Constrained-Search and the Lieb Legendre-Transform refomulations of the Hohenberg-Kohn functional to the individual components of the functional. Moreover, we observe that the kinetic and electron-repulsion results also apply to densities with fractional electron number (even if there are no degeneracies), and we close with an analogous point-wise property involving the external potential. Examples where different degenerate states have different kinetic energy and electron-nuclear attraction energy are given; consequently, individual components of the ground state electronic energy can change abruptly when the molecular geometry changes. These discontinuities are predicted to be ubiquitous at conical intersections, complicating the development of universally applicable density-functional approximations.

  5. Feedback control of plasma electron density and ion energy in an inductively coupled plasma etcher

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Chaung; Leou, K.-C.; Huang, H.-M.; Hsieh, C.-H.

    2009-01-15

    Here the authors report the development of a fuzzy logic based feedback control of the plasma electron density and ion energy for high density plasma etch process. The plasma electron density was measured using their recently developed transmission line microstrip microwave interferometer mounted on the chamber wall, and the rf voltage was measured by a commercial impedance meter connected to the wafer stage. The actuators were two 13.56 MHz rf power generators which provided the inductively coupled plasma power and bias power, respectively. The control system adopted the fuzzy logic control algorithm to reduce frequent actuator action resulting from measurement noise. The experimental results show that the first wafer effect can be eliminated using closed-loop control for both poly-Si and HfO{sub 2} etching. In particular, for the HfO2 etch, the controlled variables in this work were much more effective than the previous one where ion current was controlled, instead of the electron density. However, the pressure disturbance effect cannot be reduced using plasma electron density feedback.

  6. The absorption jump factor of effective atomic number and electronic density for some barium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polat, Recep; Yalçın, Zeynel; İçelli, Orhan

    2011-02-01

    Some photonic energy absorption parameters such as the mass attenuation coefficient μt, the molecular σM, atomic σA, the electronic cross-sections σE, the effective atomic number Zeff and the electron density NE have been calculated and measured. We have gained the terms jump factor of effective atomic number JZeff and jump factor of electronic density JNE to literature with the help of these fundamental parameters. Also, we want to obtain both XAFS effect and the applicability of mixture rule. The most interesting finding in this study is that the trend of the total molecular, atomic and electronic cross-sections is getting beyond the measure by the absorption edge and these cross-sections are affected in the region of absorption edge. The obtained results have been compared with some other theoretical values given earlier.

  7. A density-temperature description of the outer electron radiation belt during geomagnetic storms

    SciTech Connect

    Borovsky, Joseph E; Cayton, Thomas E; Denton, Michael H

    2009-01-01

    Electron flux measurements from 7 satellites in geosynchronous orbit from 1990-2007 are fit with relativistic bi-Maxwellians, yielding a number density n and temperature T description of the outer electron radiation belt. For 54.5 spacecraft years of measurements the median value ofn is 3.7x10-4 cm-3 and the median value ofT is 142 keY. General statistical properties of n, T, and the 1.1-1.5 MeV flux J are investigated, including local-time and solar-cycle dependencies. Using superposed-epoch analysis triggered on storm onset, the evolution of the outer electron radiation belt through high-speed-steam-driven storms is investigated. The number density decay during the calm before the storm is seen, relativistic-electron dropouts and recoveries from dropout are investigated, and the heating of the outer electron radiation belt during storms is examined. Using four different triggers (SSCs, southward-IMF CME sheaths, southward-IMF magnetic clouds, and minimum Dst), CME-driven storms are analyzed with superposed-epoch techniques. For CME-driven storms an absence of a density decay prior to storm onset is found, the compression of the outer electron radiation belt at time of SSC is analyzed, the number-density increase and temperature decrease during storm main phase is seen, and the increase in density and temperature during storm recovery phase is observed. Differences are found between the density-temperature and the flux descriptions, with more information for analysis being available in the density-temperature description.

  8. Exploring the electron density in plasma induced by EUV radiation: II. Numerical studies in argon and hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astakhov, D. I.; Goedheer, W. J.; Lee, C. J.; Ivanov, V. V.; Krivtsun, V. M.; Koshelev, K. N.; Lopaev, D. V.; van der Horst, R. M.; Beckers, J.; Osorio, E. A.; Bijkerk, F.

    2016-07-01

    We used numerical modeling to study the evolution of EUV-induced plasmas in argon and hydrogen. The results of simulations were compared to the electron densities measured by microwave cavity resonance spectroscopy. It was found that the measured electron densities can be used to derive the integral amount of plasma in the cavity. However, in some regimes, the impact of the setup geometry, EUV spectrum, and EUV induced secondary emission should be taken into account. The influence of these parameters on the generated plasma and the measured electron density is discussed.

  9. Equation satisfied by the energy-density functional for electron-electron mutual Coulomb repulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Joubert, Daniel P.

    2011-10-15

    It is shown that the electron-electron mutual Coulomb repulsion energy-density functional V{sub ee}{sup {gamma}}[{rho}] satisfies the equationV{sub ee}{sup {gamma}}[{rho}{sub N}{sup 1}]-V{sub ee}{sup {gamma}}[{rho}{sub N-1}{sup {gamma}}]={integral}d{sup 3}r({delta}V{sub ee}{sup {gamma}}[{rho}{sub N}{sup 1}]/{delta}{rho}{sub N}{sup 1}(r))[{rho}{sub N}{sup 1}(r)-{rho}{sub N-1}{sup {gamma}}(r)], where {rho}{sub N}{sup 1}(r) and {rho}{sub N-1}{sup {gamma}}(r) are N-electron and (N-1)-electron densities determined from the same adiabatic scaled external potential of the N-electron system at coupling strength {gamma}.

  10. Determining electron temperature and density in a hydrogen microwave plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.; Farhat, Samir; Gicquel, Alix; Hassouni, Khaled; Lefebvre, Michel

    1993-01-01

    A three-temperature thermo-chemical model is developed for analyzing the chemical composition and energy states of a hydrogen microwave plasma used for studying diamond deposition. The chemical and energy exchange rate coefficients are determined from cross section data, assuming Maxwellian velocity distributions for electrons. The model is reduced to a zero-dimensional problem to solve for the electron temperature and ion mole fraction, using measured vibrational and rotational temperatures. The calculations indicate that the electron temperature may be determined to within a few percent error even though the uncertainty in dissociation fraction is many times larger.

  11. Finding the density of objects without measuring mass and volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumba, Frackson; Tsige, Mesfin

    2007-05-01

    A simple method based on the moment of forces and Archimedes' principle is described for finding density without measuring the mass and volume of an object. The method involves balancing two unknown objects of masses M1 and M2 on each side of a pivot on a metre rule and measuring their corresponding moment arms. The object whose density is to be found is then immersed in a liquid of known density and the new moment of the arm of this object is measured. The density of the immersed object is then determined using only its measured moment arms and the density of the liquid.

  12. Advanced applications of reduced density matrices in electronic structure theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothman, Adam Eric

    This dissertation describes several applications of reduced density matrices (RDMs) in electronic structure theory. RDM methods are a valuable addition to the library of electronic structure theories because they reduce a many-electron problem to the space of just two electrons without approximation. New theoretical and computational avenues enabled by the two-electron RDM (2-RDM) have already shown substantial progress in calculating atomic and molecular energies and properties with an eye toward predictive chemistry. More than simply accurate calculations, RDM methods entail a paradigm shift in quantum chemistry. While one-electron approaches are conceptually easy to understand, the importance of the 2-RDM quantifies the centrality of a two-body framework. The 2-RDM facilitates a two-electron interpretation of quantum mechanics that will undoubtedly lead to a greater understanding of electron correlation. Two applications presented in the dissertation center around near-exact evaluation of the 2-RDM in chemical systems without the many-electron wave function, but approach the problem from different angles. The first applies variational 2-RDM theory to a model quantum dot; the second attempts non-variational determination of the 2-RDM in open-shell atomic and molecular systems using an extension of the anti-Hermitian contracted Schrodinger equation (ACSE). An example reaction is presented to demonstrate how energies computed with the 2-RDM can facilitate an understanding of chemical reactivity. A third application uses the one-electron RDM (1-RDM) as a tool for understanding molecular conductivity. In this case, the 1-RDM is valuable because it integrates out many extraneous degrees of freedom from metal baths, simplifying the electron transport problem but retaining enough information to predict the dependence of current on applied voltage. The results are competitive with other conductivity theories, including a dominant scattering-based understanding, but

  13. Density Measurement System for Weights of 1 kg to 20 kg Using Hydrostatic Weighing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yong Jae; Lee, Woo Gab; Abdurahman, Mohammed; Kim, Kwang Pyo

    This paper presents a density measurement system to determine density of weights from 1 kg to 20 kg using hydrostatic weighing. The system works based on Archimedes principle. The density of reference liquid is determined using this setup while determining the density of the test weight. Density sphere is used as standard density ball to determine density of the reference liquid. A new immersion pan is designed for dual purpose to carry the density sphere and the cylindrical test weight for weighing in liquid. Main parts of the setup are an electronic balance, a thermostat controlled liquid bath, reference weights designed for bottom weighing, dual purpose immersion pans and stepping motors to load and unload in weighing process. The results of density measurement will be evaluated as uncertainties for weights of 1 kg to 20 kg.

  14. Performance of a local electron density trigger to select extensive air showers at sea level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, T.; Madani, J.; Ashton, F.

    1985-01-01

    Time coincident voltage pulses in the two closely space (1.6m) plastic scintillators were recorded. Most of the recorded events are expeted to be due to electrons in cosmic ray showers whose core fall at some distance from the detectors. This result is confirmed from a measurement of the frequency distribution of the recorded density ratios of the two scintillators.

  15. Quasi-classical theory of electronic flux density in electronically adiabatic molecular processes.

    PubMed

    Diestler, D J

    2012-11-26

    The standard Born-Oppenheimer (BO) description of electronically adiabatic molecular processes predicts a vanishing electronic flux density (EFD). A previously proposed "coupled-channels" theory permits the extraction of the EFD from the BO wave function for one-electron diatomic systems, but attempts at generalization to many-electron polyatomic systems are frustrated by technical barriers. An alternative "quasi-classical" approach, which eliminates the explicit quantum dynamics of the electrons within a classical framework, yet retains the quantum character of the nuclear motion, appears capable of yielding EFDs for arbitrarily complex systems. Quasi-classical formulas for the EFD in simple systems agree with corresponding coupled-channels formulas. Results of the application of the new quasi-classical formula for the EFD to a model triatomic system indicate the potential of the quasi-classical scheme to elucidate the dynamical role of electrons in electronically adiabatic processes in more complex multiparticle systems.

  16. Measurement of the lunar neutron density profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolum, D. S.; Burnett, D. S.; Furst, M.; Weiss, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    Relatively small discrepancies between Apollo 17 lunar neutron probe experiment (LNPE) data and theoretical calculations by Lingenfelter, Canfield, and Hampel in the effect of Cd absorption on the neutron density, and in the relative Sm-149 to Gd-157 capture rates reported previously, imply that the true lunar Gd-157 capture rate is about one-half of that derived theoretically.

  17. Baseline Bone Mineral Density Measurements Key to Future Testing Intervals

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Research 2012 May 2012 (historical) Baseline Bone Mineral Density Measurements Key to Future Testing Intervals How often a woman should have bone mineral density (BMD) tests to track bone mass is ...

  18. Inference of equatorial field-line-integrated electron density values using whistlers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. N.; Kintner, P. M.; Kelley, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    The nighttime electron density integrated along a magnetic field line at very small L-values (about 1.06) is inferred by comparing whistler dispersions, measured from a sounding rocket, with model ionospheric calculations. At a local time of 0500 LT, the electron density in the F-layer valley was found to be about 1000 per cu cm. It is suggested that this technique can be applied to earlier times in the local evening to determine ionospheric conditions which benefit the growth of low-latitude plasma instabilities.

  19. Electron densities and alkali atoms in exoplanet atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Lavvas, P.; Koskinen, T.; Yelle, R. V.

    2014-11-20

    We describe a detailed study on the properties of alkali atoms in extrasolar giant planets, and specifically focus on their role in generating the atmospheric free electron densities, as well as their impact on the transit depth observations. We focus our study on the case of HD 209458b, and we show that photoionization produces a large electron density in the middle atmosphere that is about two orders of magnitude larger than the density anticipated from thermal ionization. Our purely photochemical calculations, though, result in a much larger transit depth for K than observed for this planet. This result does not change even if the roles of molecular chemistry and excited state chemistry are considered for the alkali atoms. In contrast, the model results for the case of exoplanet XO-2b are in good agreement with the available observations. Given these results we discuss other possible scenarios, such as changes in the elemental abundances, changes in the temperature profiles, and the possible presence of clouds, which could potentially explain the observed HD 209458b alkali properties. We find that most of these scenarios cannot explain the observations, with the exception of a heterogeneous source (i.e., clouds or aerosols) under specific conditions, but we also note the discrepancies among the available observations.

  20. Analysis of line integrated electron density using plasma position data on Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Y. U.; Chung, J.

    2010-10-15

    A 280 GHz single-channel horizontal millimeter-wave interferometer system has been installed for plasma electron density measurements on the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) device. This system has a triangular beam path that does not pass through the plasma axis due to geometrical constraints in the superconducting tokamak. The term line density on KSTAR has a different meaning from the line density of other tokamaks. To estimate the peak density and the mean density from the measured line density, information on the position of the plasma is needed. The information has been calculated from tangentially viewed visible images using the toroidal symmetry of the plasma. Interface definition language routines have been developed for this purpose. The calculated plasma position data correspond well to calculation results from magnetic analysis. With the position data and an estimated plasma profile, the peak density and the mean density have been obtained from the line density. From these results, changes of plasma density themselves can be separated from effects of the plasma movements, so they can give valuable information on the plasma status.

  1. The electron localization as the information content of the conditional pair density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbina, Andres S.; Torres, F. Javier; Rincon, Luis

    2016-06-01

    In the present work, the information gained by an electron for "knowing" about the position of another electron with the same spin is calculated using the Kullback-Leibler divergence (DKL) between the same-spin conditional pair probability density and the marginal probability. DKL is proposed as an electron localization measurement, based on the observation that regions of the space with high information gain can be associated with strong correlated localized electrons. Taking into consideration the scaling of DKL with the number of σ-spin electrons of a system (Nσ), the quantity χ = (Nσ - 1) DKLfcut is introduced as a general descriptor that allows the quantification of the electron localization in the space. fcut is defined such that it goes smoothly to zero for negligible densities. χ is computed for a selection of atomic and molecular systems in order to test its capability to determine the region in space where electrons are localized. As a general conclusion, χ is able to explain the electron structure of molecules on the basis of chemical grounds with a high degree of success and to produce a clear differentiation of the localization of electrons that can be traced to the fluctuation in the average number of electrons in these regions.

  2. The electron localization as the information content of the conditional pair density.

    PubMed

    Urbina, Andres S; Torres, F Javier; Rincon, Luis

    2016-06-28

    In the present work, the information gained by an electron for "knowing" about the position of another electron with the same spin is calculated using the Kullback-Leibler divergence (DKL) between the same-spin conditional pair probability density and the marginal probability. DKL is proposed as an electron localization measurement, based on the observation that regions of the space with high information gain can be associated with strong correlated localized electrons. Taking into consideration the scaling of DKL with the number of σ-spin electrons of a system (N(σ)), the quantity χ = (N(σ) - 1) DKLfcut is introduced as a general descriptor that allows the quantification of the electron localization in the space. fcut is defined such that it goes smoothly to zero for negligible densities. χ is computed for a selection of atomic and molecular systems in order to test its capability to determine the region in space where electrons are localized. As a general conclusion, χ is able to explain the electron structure of molecules on the basis of chemical grounds with a high degree of success and to produce a clear differentiation of the localization of electrons that can be traced to the fluctuation in the average number of electrons in these regions. PMID:27369494

  3. Density fitting for three-electron integrals in explicitly correlated electronic structure theory

    SciTech Connect

    Womack, James C.; Manby, Frederick R.

    2014-01-28

    The principal challenge in using explicitly correlated wavefunctions for molecules is the evaluation of nonfactorizable integrals over the coordinates of three or more electrons. Immense progress was made in tackling this problem through the introduction of a single-particle resolution of the identity. Decompositions of sufficient accuracy can be achieved, but only with large auxiliary basis sets. Density fitting is an alternative integral approximation scheme, which has proven to be very reliable for two-electron integrals. Here, we extend density fitting to the treatment of all three-electron integrals that appear at the MP2-F12/3*A level of theory. We demonstrate that the convergence of energies with respect to auxiliary basis size is much more rapid with density fitting than with the traditional resolution-of-the-identity approach.

  4. MEASUREMENTS OF RAPID DENSITY FLUCTUATIONS IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Malaspina, D. M.; Ergun, R. E.; Kellogg, P. J.; Bale, S. D.

    2010-03-01

    The power spectrum of density fluctuations in the solar wind is inferred by tracking small timescale changes in the electron plasma frequency during periods of strong Langmuir wave activity. STEREO electric field waveform data are used to produce time profiles of plasma density from which the density power spectrum is derived. The power spectra obtained by this method extend the observed frequency range by an order of magnitude while remaining consistent with previous results near a few Hertz. Density power spectral indices are found to be organized by the angle between the local magnetic field and the solar wind direction, indicating significant anisotropy in solar wind high-frequency density turbulence.

  5. Automated Processing of ISIS Topside Ionograms into Electron Density Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinisch, bodo W.; Huang, Xueqin; Bilitza, Dieter; Hills, H. Kent

    2004-01-01

    Modeling of the topside ionosphere has for the most part relied on just a few years of data from topside sounder satellites. The widely used Bent et al. (1972) model, for example, is based on only 50,000 Alouette 1 profiles. The International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) (Bilitza, 1990, 2001) uses an analytical description of the graphs and tables provided by Bent et al. (1972). The Alouette 1, 2 and ISIS 1, 2 topside sounder satellites of the sixties and seventies were ahead of their times in terms of the sheer volume of data obtained and in terms of the computer and software requirements for data analysis. As a result, only a small percentage of the collected topside ionograms was converted into electron density profiles. Recently, a NASA-funded data restoration project has undertaken and is continuing the process of digitizing the Alouette/ISIS ionograms from the analog 7-track tapes. Our project involves the automated processing of these digital ionograms into electron density profiles. The project accomplished a set of important goals that will have a major impact on understanding and modeling of the topside ionosphere: (1) The TOPside Ionogram Scaling and True height inversion (TOPIST) software was developed for the automated scaling and inversion of topside ionograms. (2) The TOPIST software was applied to the over 300,000 ISIS-2 topside ionograms that had been digitized in the fkamework of a separate AISRP project (PI: R.F. Benson). (3) The new TOPIST-produced database of global electron density profiles for the topside ionosphere were made publicly available through NASA s National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) ftp archive at . (4) Earlier Alouette 1,2 and ISIS 1, 2 data sets of electron density profiles from manual scaling of selected sets of ionograms were converted fiom a highly-compressed binary format into a user-friendly ASCII format and made publicly available through nssdcftp.gsfc.nasa.gov. The new database for the topside

  6. Reduced density matrix approach to calculation of electronic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braams, Bastiaan J.; Jiang, Shidong; Nayakkankuppam, Madhu; Overton, Michael L.; Percus, Jerome K.

    1998-11-01

    The possibility of using the one-body and two-body reduced density matrices, rather than the many-body wavefunction, as the fundamental object of study for electronic structure calculations was actively explored in the 1960's and 1970's [1]-[3], but interest has waned since. In this approach the calculation of ground-state properties is reduced to a linear optimization problem subject to the representability conditions for the density matrices, which are a mixture of linear equalities and bounds on eigenvalues. We will review this approach, present a new family of representability conditions, and discuss our experience in using present-day methods for semi-definite programming for this application. [1] A. J. Coleman: Structure of fermion density matrices. Rev. Mod. Phys. 35 (1963) 668--689. [2] Claude Garrod and Jerome K. Percus: Reduction of the N-particle variational problem. J. Math. Phys. 5 (1964) 1756--1776. [3] M. Rosina and C. Garrod: The variational calculation of reduced density matrices. J. Comput. Phys. 18 (1975) 300--310.

  7. Gamma densitometer for measuring Pu density in fuel tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.

    1982-01-01

    A fuel-gamma-densitometer (FGD) has been developed to examine nondestructively the uniformity of plutonium in aluminum-clad fuel tubes at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). The monitoring technique is ..gamma..-ray spectroscopy with a lead-collimated Ge(Li) detector. Plutonium density is correlated with the measured intensity of the 208 keV ..gamma..-ray from /sup 237/U (7d) of the /sup 241/Pu (15y) decay chain. The FGD measures the plutonium density within 0.125- or 0.25-inch-diameter areas of the 0.133- to 0.183-inch-thick tube walls. Each measurement yields a density ratio that relates the plutonium density of the measured area to the plutonium density in normal regions of the tube. The technique was used to appraise a series of fuel tubes to be irradated in an SRP reactor. High-density plutonium areas were initially identified by x-ray methods and then examined quantitatively with the FGD. The FGD reliably tested fuel tubes and yielded density ratios over a range of 0.0 to 2.5. FGD measurements examined (1) nonuniform plutonium densities or hot spots, (2) uniform high-density patches, and (3) plutonium density distribution in thin cladding regions. Measurements for tubes with known plutonium density agreed with predictions to within 2%. Attenuation measurements of the 208-keV ..gamma..-ray passage through the tube walls agreed to within 2 to 3% of calculated predictions. Collimator leakage measurements agreed with model calculations that predicted less than a 1.5% effect on plutonium density ratios. Finally, FGD measurements correlated well with x-ray transmission and fluoroscopic measurements. The data analysis for density ratios involved a small correction of about 10% for ..gamma..-shielding within the fuel tube. For hot spot examinations, limited information for this correction dictated a density ratio uncertainty of 3 to 5%.

  8. Dimmable electronic ballasts by variable power density modulation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borekci, Selim; Kesler, Selami

    2014-11-01

    Dimming can be accomplished commonly by switching frequency and pulse density modulation techniques and a variable inductor. In this study, a variable power density modulation (VPDM) control technique is proposed for dimming applications. A fluorescent lamp is operated in several states to meet the desired lamp power in a modulation period. The proposed technique has the same advantages of magnetic dimming topologies have. In addition, a unique and flexible control technique can be achieved. A prototype dimmable electronic ballast is built and experiments related to it have been conducted. As a result, a 36WT8 fluorescent lamp can be driven for a desired lamp power from several alternatives without modulating the switching frequency.

  9. Momentum distribution function of the electron gas at metallic densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Yasutami; Yasuhara, H.

    1991-10-01

    The momentum distribution function n(k) of the electron gas is calculated in the effective-potential-expansion method at metallic densities. The recently established self-consistency relation between n(k) and the correlation energy [Y. Takada and T. Kita, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 60, 25 (1991)] is employed to check the accuracy of our results. This check shows that the effective-potential-expansion method provides probably the exact and at least more accurate results of n(k) than all the other methods that have given n(k) thus far.

  10. HF produced ionospheric electron density irregularities diagnosed by UHF radio star scintillations

    SciTech Connect

    Alfred, F.

    1982-01-01

    HF-waves incident on an overdense (HF-frequency < penetration frequency) ionosphere are known to produce large scale electron density irregularities. It is predicted that similar irregularities are formed during underdense HF-modification. The propagation of UHF radio waves originating from radio stars will be affected by such irregularities in the ionosphere. The interest in a scintillation experiment is twofold. One may obtain information on the electron density irregularies and one may learn about the propagation of radio waves through such a perturbed medium. A thin screen (diffractive) theory is derived which allows to draw conclusons on the electron density irregularities from the intensity fluctuations measured on the ground if the phase perturbations are much less than one radian. Since radio stars suitable for scintillation measurements at UHF are very faint an antenna with a large collection area is required. The observations reported in this dissertation were performed with the 300m diameter spherical reflector of the Arecibo Observatory. Successful observations were performed at 430 MHz and at 1400 MHz. Intensity fluctuations at such high frequencies measured with a large antenna suffer severe filtering in the thin phase screen regime. The theory presented in this dissertation includes these filtering effects. Many observations agree with the predictions of that theory. Some observations indicate that refraction effects have to be included to explain the data. HF-induced electron density irregularities were only observed during overdense heating.

  11. Charge density waves in strongly correlated electron systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Wei; Choe, Jesse; Morosan, E

    2016-08-01

    Strong electron correlations are at the heart of many physical phenomena of current interest to the condensed matter community. Here we present a survey of the mechanisms underlying such correlations in charge density wave (CDW) systems, including the current theoretical understanding and experimental evidence for CDW transitions. The focus is on emergent phenomena that result as CDWs interact with other charge or spin states, such as magnetism and superconductivity. In addition to reviewing the CDW mechanisms in 1D, 2D, and 3D systems, we pay particular attention to the prevalence of this state in two particular classes of compounds, the high temperature superconductors (cuprates) and the layered transition metal dichalcogenides. The possibilities for quantum criticality resulting from the competition between magnetic fluctuations and electronic instabilities (CDW, unconventional superconductivity) are also discussed. PMID:27376547

  12. Charge density waves in strongly correlated electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih-Wei; Choe, Jesse; Morosan, E.

    2016-08-01

    Strong electron correlations are at the heart of many physical phenomena of current interest to the condensed matter community. Here we present a survey of the mechanisms underlying such correlations in charge density wave (CDW) systems, including the current theoretical understanding and experimental evidence for CDW transitions. The focus is on emergent phenomena that result as CDWs interact with other charge or spin states, such as magnetism and superconductivity. In addition to reviewing the CDW mechanisms in 1D, 2D, and 3D systems, we pay particular attention to the prevalence of this state in two particular classes of compounds, the high temperature superconductors (cuprates) and the layered transition metal dichalcogenides. The possibilities for quantum criticality resulting from the competition between magnetic fluctuations and electronic instabilities (CDW, unconventional superconductivity) are also discussed.

  13. Electron temperatures and densities in the Venus ionosphere - Pioneer Venus orbiter electron temperature probe results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brace, L. H.; Theis, R. F.; Krehbiel, J. P.; Nagy, A. F.; Donahue, T. M.; Mcelroy, M. B.; Pedersen, A.

    1979-01-01

    The Pioneer Venus orbiter electron temperature probe was used to obtain altitude profiles of electron temperature and density in the ionosphere of Venus. Elevated temperatures at times of low solar wind flux might indicate support for a certain model. According to this model, less than 5% of the solar wind energy is deposited at the ionopause and is conducted downward through an unmagnetized ionosphere to the region below 200 km where electron cooling to the neutral atmosphere proceeds rapidly. The patterns of electron temperatures and densities at higher solar wind fluxes are considered, the variability of the ionopause height in the late afternoon is noted, and the role of an induced magnetic barrier in the neighborhood of the ionopause is discussed.

  14. The effective density of randomly moving electrons and related characteristics of materials with degenerate electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palenskis, V.

    2014-04-01

    Interpretation of the conductivity of metals, of superconductors in the normal state and of semiconductors with highly degenerate electron gas remains a significant issue if consideration is based on the classical statistics. This study is addressed to the characterization of the effective density of randomly moving electrons and to the evaluation of carrier diffusion coefficient, mobility, and other parameters by generalization of the widely published experimental results. The generalized expressions have been derived for various kinetic parameters attributed to the non-degenerate and degenerate electron gas, by analyzing a random motion of the single type carriers in homogeneous materials. The values of the most important kinetic parameters for different metals are also systematized and discussed. It has been proved that Einstein's relation between the diffusion coefficient and the drift mobility of electrons is held for any level of degeneracy if the effective density of randomly moving carriers is properly taken into account.

  15. A new interferometry-based electron density fluctuation diagnostic on Alcator C-Moda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasten, C. P.; Irby, J. H.; Murray, R.; White, A. E.; Pace, D. C.

    2012-10-01

    The two-color interferometry diagnostic on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak has been upgraded to measure fluctuations in the electron density and density gradient for turbulence and transport studies. Diagnostic features and capabilities are described. In differential mode, fast phase demodulation electronics detect the relative phase change between ten adjacent, radially-separated (ΔR = 1.2 cm, adjustable), vertical-viewing chords, which allows for measurement of the line-integrated electron density gradient. The system can be configured to detect the absolute phase shift of each chord by comparison to a local oscillator, measuring the line-integrated density. Each chord is sensitive to density fluctuations with kR < 20.3 cm-1 and is digitized at up to 10 MS/s, resolving aspects of ion temperature gradient-driven modes and other long-wavelength turbulence. Data from C-Mod discharges is presented, including observations of the quasi-coherent mode in enhanced D-alpha H-mode plasmas and the weakly coherent mode in I-mode.

  16. Monte Carlo modeling of electron density in hypersonic rarefied gas flows

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Jin; Zhang, Yuhuai; Jiang, Jianzheng

    2014-12-09

    The electron density distribution around a vehicle employed in the RAM-C II flight test is calculated with the DSMC method. To resolve the mole fraction of electrons which is several orders lower than those of the primary species in the free stream, an algorithm named as trace species separation (TSS) is utilized. The TSS algorithm solves the primary and trace species separately, which is similar to the DSMC overlay techniques; however it generates new simulated molecules of trace species, such as ions and electrons in each cell, basing on the ionization and recombination rates directly, which differs from the DSMC overlay techniques based on probabilistic models. The electron density distributions computed by TSS agree well with the flight data measured in the RAM-C II test along a decent trajectory at three altitudes 81km, 76km, and 71km.

  17. Exploring the electron density in plasmas induced by extreme ultraviolet radiation in argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Horst, R. M.; Beckers, J.; Osorio, E. A.; Banine, V. Y.

    2015-07-01

    The new generation of lithography tools use high energy EUV radiation which ionizes the present background gas due to photoionization. To predict and understand the long term impact on the highly delicate mirrors, it is essential to characterize these kinds of EUV-induced plasmas. We measured the electron density evolution in argon gas during and just after irradiation by a short pulse of EUV light at 13.5 nm by applying microwave cavity resonance spectroscopy. Dependencies on EUV pulse energy and gas pressure have been explored over a range relevant for industrial applications. Our experimental results show that the maximum reached electron density depends linearly on pulse energy. A quadratic dependence caused by photoionization and subsequent electron impact ionization by free electrons is found from experiments where the gas pressure is varied. This is demonstrated by our theoretical estimates presented in this manuscript as well.

  18. Effective electron displacements: A tool for time-dependent density functional theory computational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Guido, Ciro A. Cortona, Pietro; Adamo, Carlo

    2014-03-14

    We extend our previous definition of the metric Δr for electronic excitations in the framework of the time-dependent density functional theory [C. A. Guido, P. Cortona, B. Mennucci, and C. Adamo, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 9, 3118 (2013)], by including a measure of the difference of electronic position variances in passing from occupied to virtual orbitals. This new definition, called Γ, permits applications in those situations where the Δr-index is not helpful: transitions in centrosymmetric systems and Rydberg excitations. The Γ-metric is then extended by using the Natural Transition Orbitals, thus providing an intuitive picture of how locally the electron density changes during the electronic transitions. Furthermore, the Γ values give insight about the functional performances in reproducing different type of transitions, and allow one to define a “confidence radius” for GGA and hybrid functionals.

  19. Monte Carlo modeling of electron density in hypersonic rarefied gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jin; Zhang, Yuhuai; Jiang, Jianzheng

    2014-12-01

    The electron density distribution around a vehicle employed in the RAM-C II flight test is calculated with the DSMC method. To resolve the mole fraction of electrons which is several orders lower than those of the primary species in the free stream, an algorithm named as trace species separation (TSS) is utilized. The TSS algorithm solves the primary and trace species separately, which is similar to the DSMC overlay techniques; however it generates new simulated molecules of trace species, such as ions and electrons in each cell, basing on the ionization and recombination rates directly, which differs from the DSMC overlay techniques based on probabilistic models. The electron density distributions computed by TSS agree well with the flight data measured in the RAM-C II test along a decent trajectory at three altitudes 81km, 76km, and 71km.

  20. Estimates of the Electron Density Profile on LTX Using FMCW Reflectometry and mm-Wave Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peebles, W. A.; Kubota, S.; Nguyen, X. V.; Holoman, T.; Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; Labrie, D.; Schmitt, J. C.; Majeski, R.

    2014-10-01

    An FMCW (frequency-modulated continuous-wave) reflectometer has been installed on the Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX) for electron density profile and fluctuation measurements. This diagnostic consists of two channels using bistatic antennas with a combined frequency coverage of 13.5 -33 GHz, which corresponds to electron density measurements in the range of 0 . 2 - 1 . 3 ×1013 cm-3 (in O-mode). Initial measurements will utilize O-mode polarization, which will require modeling of the plasma edge. Reflections from the center stack (delayometry above the peak cutoff frequency), as well as line density measurements from a 296 GHz interferometer (single-chord, radial midplane), will provide constraints for the profile reconstruction/estimate. Typical chord-averaged line densities on LTX range from 2 -6 ×1012 cm-3, which correspond to peak densities of 0 . 6 - 1 . 8 ×1013 cm-3 assuming a parabolic shape. If available, EFIT/LRDFIT results will provide additional constraints, as well as the possibility of utilizing data from measurements with X-mode or dual-mode (simultaneous O- and X-mode) polarization. Supported by U.S. DoE Grants DE-FG02-99ER54527 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  1. Imaging polychromator for density measurements of polystyrene pellet cloud on the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Sharov, I. A. Sergeev, V. Yu.; Miroshnikov, I. V.; Tamura, N.; Sudo, S.; Kuteev, B. V.

    2015-04-15

    Experimental data on spatial distributions of a pellet cloud electron density are necessary for the development of many applications of pellet injection, namely, plasma fuelling, discharge control, and plasma diagnostics. An improved approach of electron density measurements inside the cloud of a polystyrene pellet ablating in hot plasma of the large helical device is described. Density values of (1-30) × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} depending on the background plasma parameters and distance from the solid pellet were measured.

  2. Spatially resolved density and ionization measurements of shocked foams using x-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, M. J.; Keiter, P. A.; Montgomery, D. S.; Scott, H. A.; Biener, M. M.; Fein, J. R.; Fournier, K. B.; Gamboa, E. J.; Kemp, G. E.; Klein, S. R.; Kuranz, C. C.; LeFevre, H. J.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Wan, W. C.; Drake, R. P.

    2016-09-01

    We present experiments at the Trident laser facility demonstrating the use of x-ray fluorescence (XRF) to simultaneously measure density, ionization state populations, and electron temperature in shocked foams. An imaging x-ray spectrometer obtained spatially resolved measurements of Ti K-α emission. Density profiles were measured from K-α intensity. Ti ionization state distributions and electron temperatures were inferred by fitting K-α spectra to spectra from CRETIN simulations. This work shows that XRF provides a powerful tool to complement other diagnostics to make equation of state measurements of shocked materials containing a suitable tracer element.

  3. Plasma dynamics near critical density inferred from direct measurements of laser hole boring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Chao; Tochitsky, Sergei Ya.; Fiuza, Frederico; Pigeon, Jeremy J.; Joshi, Chan

    2016-06-01

    We have used multiframe picosecond optical interferometry to make direct measurements of the hole boring velocity, vHB, of the density cavity pushed forward by a train of C O2 laser pulses in a near critical density helium plasma. As the pulse train intensity rises, the increasing radiation pressure of each pulse pushes the density cavity forward and the plasma electrons are strongly heated. After the peak laser intensity, the plasma pressure exerted by the heated electrons strongly impedes the hole boring process and the vHB falls rapidly as the laser pulse intensity falls at the back of the laser pulse train. A heuristic theory is presented that allows the estimation of the plasma electron temperature from the measurements of the hole boring velocity. The measured values of vHB, and the estimated values of the heated electron temperature as a function of laser intensity are in reasonable agreement with those obtained from two-dimensional numerical simulations.

  4. Modelling the experimental electron density: only the synergy of various approaches can tackle the new challenges

    PubMed Central

    Macchi, Piero; Gillet, Jean-Michel; Taulelle, Francis; Campo, Javier; Claiser, Nicolas; Lecomte, Claude

    2015-01-01

    Electron density is a fundamental quantity that enables understanding of the chemical bonding in a molecule or in a solid and the chemical/physical property of a material. Because electrons have a charge and a spin, two kinds of electron densities are available. Moreover, because electron distribution can be described in momentum or in position space, charge and spin density have two definitions and they can be observed through Bragg (for the position space) or Compton (for the momentum space) diffraction experiments, using X-rays (charge density) or polarized neutrons (spin density). In recent years, we have witnessed many advances in this field, stimulated by the increased power of experimental techniques. However, an accurate modelling is still necessary to determine the desired functions from the acquired data. The improved accuracy of measurements and the possibility to combine information from different experimental techniques require even more flexibility of the models. In this short review, we analyse some of the most important topics that have emerged in the recent literature, especially the most thought-provoking at the recent IUCr general meeting in Montreal. PMID:26175903

  5. Dymalloy: A composite substrate for high power density electronic components

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, J.A.; Colella, N.J.; Makowiecki, D.; Davidson, H.L.

    1995-06-29

    High power density electronic components such as fast microprocessors and power semiconductors must operate below the maximum rated device junction temperature to ensure reliability. function temperatures are determined by the amount of heat generated and the thermal resistance from junction to the ambient thermal environment. Two of the Largest contributions to this thermal resistance are the die attach interface and the package base. A decrease in these resistances can allow increased component packing density in MCMs, reduction of heat sink volume in tightly packed systems, enable the use of higher performance circuit components, and improve reliability. The substrate for high power density devices is the primary thermal link between the junctions and the heat sink. Present high power multichip modules and single chip packages use substrate materials such as silicon nitride or copper tungsten that have thermal conductivity in the range of 200 W/mK. We have developed Dymalloy, a copper-diamond composite, that has a thermal conductivity of 420 W/mK and an adjustable coefficient of thermal expansion, nominally 5.5 ppm/C at 25 C, compatible with silicon and gallium arsenide. Because of the matched coefficient of thermal expansion it is possible to use low thermal resistance hard die attach methods. Dymalloy is a composite material made using micron size Type I diamond powder that has a published thermal conductivity of 600 to 1000 W/mK in a metal matrix that has a thermal conductivity of 350 W/mK. The region of chemical bonding between the matrix material and diamond is limited to approximately 1000 A to maintain a high effective thermal conductivity for the composite. The material may be fabricated in near net shapes. Besides having exceptional thermal properties, the mechanical properties of this material also make it an attractive candidate as an electronic component substrate material.

  6. Surface electron density models for accurate ab initio molecular dynamics with electronic friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novko, D.; Blanco-Rey, M.; Alducin, M.; Juaristi, J. I.

    2016-06-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics with electronic friction (AIMDEF) is a valuable methodology to study the interaction of atomic particles with metal surfaces. This method, in which the effect of low-energy electron-hole (e-h) pair excitations is treated within the local density friction approximation (LDFA) [Juaristi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 116102 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.100.116102], can provide an accurate description of both e-h pair and phonon excitations. In practice, its applicability becomes a complicated task in those situations of substantial surface atoms displacements because the LDFA requires the knowledge at each integration step of the bare surface electron density. In this work, we propose three different methods of calculating on-the-fly the electron density of the distorted surface and we discuss their suitability under typical surface distortions. The investigated methods are used in AIMDEF simulations for three illustrative adsorption cases, namely, dissociated H2 on Pd(100), N on Ag(111), and N2 on Fe(110). Our AIMDEF calculations performed with the three approaches highlight the importance of going beyond the frozen surface density to accurately describe the energy released into e-h pair excitations in case of large surface atom displacements.

  7. Exploring the electron density in plasma induced by EUV radiation: I. Experimental study in hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Horst, R. M.; Beckers, J.; Osorio, E. A.; Astakhov, D. I.; Goedheer, W. J.; Lee, C. J.; Ivanov, V. V.; Krivtsum, V. M.; Koshelev, K. N.; Lopaev, D. V.; Bijkerk, F.; Banine, V. Y.

    2016-04-01

    Plasmas induced by EUV radiation are unique since they are created without the need of any discharge. Moreover, it is essential to characterize these plasmas to understand and predict their long term impact on highly delicate optics in EUV lithography tools. In this paper we study plasmas induced by 13.5 nm EUV radiation in hydrogen gas. The electron density is measured temporally resolved using a non-invasive technique known as microwave cavity resonance spectroscopy. The influence of the EUV pulse energy and gas pressure on the temporal evolution of the electron density has been explored over a parameter range relevant for industry. Our experimental results show that the maximum electron density is in the order of 1014 m-3 and depends linearly on the EUV pulse energy. Furthermore, the maximum electron density depends quadratically on the pressure; the linear term is caused by photoionization and the quadratic term by subsequent electron impact ionization. The decay of the plasma is governed by ambipolar diffusion and, hence, becomes slower at elevated pressures. Similarities and differences of the same processes in argon are highlighted in this paper.

  8. Optical pressure/density measuring means

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    1995-05-09

    An apparatus and method for rapidly and accurately determining the pressure of a fluid medium in either a static or dynamic state. The pressure is determined by making a measurement of the velocity of a light beam that is directed through the fluid medium along a pathway that enables an integrated pressure measurement to be made along the pathway, rather than making such a measurement only at a single point in the medium. A HeNe laser is configured to emit a beam of two frequencies separated by about 2 MHz. One of these beam frequencies is directed through the fluid medium and is reflected back through the medium to a non-linear diode detector. The other beam frequency is passed directly to a diode detector without traversing said medium. The diode detector is operated to determine the frequency shift or beat frequency between the two beam frequencies. Any variation in the frequency of said reflected beam that is caused by a change in its velocity as it is passed through the fluid medium causes a change in the beat frequency. This beat frequency change is then converted to an output signal value corresponding to the pressure of the medium. The measurement instrument apparatus is remotely positioned relative to the medium being measured, thus the apparatus is immune from electro-magnetic interference and can operate in conditions of high radiation, corrosion and extraordinarily high temperature.

  9. Optical pressure/density measuring means

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1995-05-09

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for rapidly and accurately determining the pressure of a fluid medium in either a static or dynamic state. The pressure is determined by making a measurement of the velocity of a light beam that is directed through the fluid medium along a pathway that enables an integrated pressure measurement to be made along the pathway, rather than making such a measurement only at a single point in the medium. A HeNe laser is configured to emit a beam of two frequencies separated by about 2 MHz. One of these beam frequencies is directed through the fluid medium and is reflected back through the medium to a non-linear diode detector. The other beam frequency is passed directly to a diode detector without traversing said medium. The diode detector is operated to determine the frequency shift or beat frequency between the two beam frequencies. Any variation in the frequency of said reflected beam that is caused by a change in its velocity as it is passed through the fluid medium causes a change in the beat frequency. This beat frequency change is then converted to an output signal value corresponding to the pressure of the medium. The measurement instrument apparatus is remotely positioned relative to the medium being measured, thus the apparatus is immune from electro-magnetic interference and can operate in conditions of high radiation, corrosion and extraordinarily high temperature. 4 figs.

  10. The Electron Density Structure of Mars Magnetosphere by MAVEN/LPW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morooka, M.; Andersson, L.; Ergun, R. E.; Fowler, C. M.; Delory, G. T.; Weber, T. D.; Woodson, A. K.; Andrews, D. J.; Eriksson, A. I.; Mitchell, D. L.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Gruesbeck, J.; Halekas, J. S.; Edberg, N. J. T.; McFadden, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    The Langmuir probe (LP) is primarily designed to characterize the plasma by direct analysis of the collected plasma particle current in a dense and cold plasma regime. On the other hand in the tenuous plasma the floating potential of the spacecraft is anti-correlated with the flux of the ambient electrons, and therefore provides a qualitative and sensitive indication of variations in the ambient plasma. The advantage of this measurement is that the obtained density yields the overall ambient plasma density irrespective of the particle energy range and sensitive to low-density plasma. Langmuir Probe sensors onboard two spacecraft (Phobos-2 and Rosetta) have identified the plasma regions around Mars magnetosphere using the LP measured spacecraft potentials. However, the examples of such observation are few. A set of Langmuir Probe onboard MAVEN makes possible to monitor the spacecraft potentials around Martian magnetosphere statistically. In most of the cases MAVEN/LPW identifies sharp density jumps near the location previously reported as the magnetic pile-up boundary. We will show the electron density characteristics and its comparison to the characteristics of thermal electron/ion as well as the magnetic field activities and discuss their relation to the Solar wind conditions and Martian magnetic field.

  11. Measurements of uranium mass confined in high density plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeffler, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    An X-ray absorption method for measuring the amount of uranium confined in high density, rf-heated uranium plasmas is described. A comparison of measured absorption of 8 keV X-rays with absorption calculated using Beer Law indicated that the method could be used to measure uranium densities from 3 times 10 to the 16th power atoms/cu cm to 5 times 10 to the 18th power atoms/cu cm. Tests were conducted to measure the density of uranium in an rf-heated argon plasma with UF6 infection and with the power to maintain the discharge supplied by a 1.2 MW rf induction heater facility. The uranium density was measured as the flow rate through the test chamber was varied. A maximum uranium density of 3.85 times 10 to the 17th power atoms/cu cm was measured.

  12. Determination of the electrostatic potential and electron density of silicon using convergent-beam electron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Yoichiro; Tsuda, Kenji; Tanaka, Michiyoshi

    2008-09-01

    A structure-analysis method using convergent-beam electron diffraction (CBED) developed by Tsuda et al. [Tsuda & Tanaka (1999), Acta Cryst. A55, 939-954; Tsuda, Ogata, Takagi, Hashimoto & Tanaka (2002), Acta Cryst. A58, 514-525] has been applied to the determination of the electrostatic potential and electron density of crystalline silicon. CBED patterns recorded at nine different incidences are simultaneously used to improve the accuracy of the refinement. The Debye-Waller factor and low-order structure factors of silicon have been successfully refined only using CBED data. The electrostatic potential and electron-density distribution have been reconstructed from the refined parameters. The latter clearly shows the bonding electrons between the nearest neighbor atoms. The obtained results are compared with the results of other CBED and recent X-ray diffraction experiments. The influence of the number of refined low-order structure factors on the electron density is discussed. The effect of the reduction of experimental data points on the accuracy of the refined parameters is also examined.

  13. Experimental and numerical investigations of electron density in low-pressure dual-frequency capacitively coupled oxygen discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jia; Wen, De-Qi; Liu, Yong-Xin; Gao, Fei; Lu, Wen-Qi; Wang, You-Nian

    2013-11-15

    The electron density is measured in low-pressure dual-frequency (2/60 MHz) capacitively coupled oxygen discharges by utilizing a floating hairpin probe. The dependence of electron density at the discharge center on the high frequency (HF) power, low frequency (LF) power, and gas pressure are investigated in detail. A (1D) particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo method is developed to calculate the time-averaged electron density at the discharge center and the simulation results are compared with the experimental ones, and general agreements are achieved. With increasing HF power, the electron density linearly increases. The electron density exhibits different changes with the LF power at different HF powers. At low HF powers (e.g., 30 W in our experiment), the electron density increases with increasing LF power while the electron density decreases with increasing LF power at relatively high HF powers (e.g., 120 W in our experiment). With increasing gas pressure the electron density first increases rapidly to reach a maximum value and then decreases slowly due to the combined effect of the production process by the ionization and the loss processes including the surface and volume losses.

  14. Multiple Point Dynamic Gas Density Measurements Using Molecular Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard; Panda, Jayanta

    1999-01-01

    A nonintrusive technique for measuring dynamic gas density properties is described. Molecular Rayleigh scattering is used to measure the time-history of gas density simultaneously at eight spatial locations at a 50 kHz sampling rate. The data are analyzed using the Welch method of modified periodograms to reduce measurement uncertainty. Cross-correlations, power spectral density functions, cross-spectral density functions, and coherence functions may be obtained from the data. The technique is demonstrated using low speed co-flowing jets with a heated inner jet.

  15. Bayesian modeling of JET Li-BES for edge electron density profiles using Gaussian processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Sehyun; Svensson, Jakob; Brix, Mathias; Ghim, Young-Chul; JET Contributors Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    A Bayesian model for the JET lithium beam emission spectroscopy (Li-BES) system has been developed to infer edge electron density profiles. The 26 spatial channels measure emission profiles with ~15 ms temporal resolution and ~1 cm spatial resolution. The lithium I (2p-2s) line radiation in an emission spectrum is calculated using a multi-state model, which expresses collisions between the neutral lithium beam atoms and the plasma particles as a set of differential equations. The emission spectrum is described in the model including photon and electronic noise, spectral line shapes, interference filter curves, and relative calibrations. This spectral modeling gets rid of the need of separate background measurements for calculating the intensity of the line radiation. Gaussian processes are applied to model both emission spectrum and edge electron density profile, and the electron temperature to calculate all the rate coefficients is obtained from the JET high resolution Thomson scattering (HRTS) system. The posterior distributions of the edge electron density profile are explored via the numerical technique and the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) samplings. See the Appendix of F. Romanelli et al., Proceedings of the 25th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference 2014, Saint Petersburg, Russia.

  16. Method for measuring the density of lightweight materials

    DOEpatents

    Snow, Samuel G.; Giacomelli, Edward J.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to a nondestructive method for measuring the density of articles composed of elements having a low atomic number such as plastic and carbon composites. The measurement is accomplished by striking the article with a collimated beam of X radiation, simultaneously monitoring the radiation scattered and the radiation transmitted by the article, then relating the ratio of the radiation scattered to the radiation transmitted with the density of the article. The above method is insensitive to all variables except density.

  17. Development of High Power Electron Beam Measuring and Analyzing System for Microwave Vacuum Electron Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, C. J.; Wu, X. L.; Li, Q. S.; Li, C. S.

    The measurement and analysis of high power electron beam during its formation and transmission are the basic scientific problems and key techniques for the development of high performance microwave vacuum electron devices, which are widely used in the fields of military weapon, microwave system and scientific instruments. In this paper, the dynamic parameters measurement and analysis system being built in Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IECAS) recently are introduced. The instrument are designed to determine the cross-section, the current density, and the energy resolution of the high power electron beam during its formation and transmission process, which are available both for the electron gun and the electron optics system respectively. Then the three dimension trajectory images of the electron beam can be rebuilt and display with computer controlled data acquisition and processing system easily. Thus, much more complicated structures are considered and solved completely to achieve its detection and analysis, such as big chamber with 10-6 Pa high vacuum system, the controlled detector movement system in axis direction with distance of 600 mm inside the vacuum chamber, the electron beam energy analysis system with high resolution of 0.5%, and the electron beam cross-section and density detector using the YAG: Ce crystal and CCD imaging system et al. At present, the key parts of the instrument have been finished, the cross-section experiment of the electron beam have been performed successfully. Hereafter, the instrument will be used to measure and analyze the electron beam with the electron gun and electron optics system for the single beam and multiple beam klystron, gyrotron, sheet beam device, and traveling wave tube etc. thoroughly.

  18. Effect of fast drifting electrons on electron temperature measurement with a triple Langmuir probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Subir; Chowdhury, Satyajit; Palivela, Yaswanth; Pal, Rabindranath

    2015-08-01

    Triple Langmuir Probe (TLP) is a widely used diagnostics for instantaneous measurement of electron temperature and density in low temperature laboratory plasmas as well as in edge region of fusion plasma devices. Presence of a moderately energetic flowing electron component, constituting only a small fraction of the bulk electrons, is also a generally observed scenario in plasma devices, where plasmas are produced by electron impact ionization of neutrals. A theoretical analysis of its effect on interpretation of the TLP data for bulk electron temperature measurement is presented here assuming electron velocity distribution is not deviating substantially from a Maxwellian. The study predicts conventional expression from standard TLP theory to give overestimated value of bulk electron temperature. Correction factor is significant and largely depends on population density, temperature, and energy of the fast component. Experimental verification of theoretical results is obtained in the magnetized plasma linear experimental device of Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics where plasma is produced by an electron cyclotron resonance method and known to have a fast flowing electron component.

  19. Effect of fast drifting electrons on electron temperature measurement with a triple Langmuir probe

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Subir Chowdhury, Satyajit; Pal, Rabindranath

    2015-08-14

    Triple Langmuir Probe (TLP) is a widely used diagnostics for instantaneous measurement of electron temperature and density in low temperature laboratory plasmas as well as in edge region of fusion plasma devices. Presence of a moderately energetic flowing electron component, constituting only a small fraction of the bulk electrons, is also a generally observed scenario in plasma devices, where plasmas are produced by electron impact ionization of neutrals. A theoretical analysis of its effect on interpretation of the TLP data for bulk electron temperature measurement is presented here assuming electron velocity distribution is not deviating substantially from a Maxwellian. The study predicts conventional expression from standard TLP theory to give overestimated value of bulk electron temperature. Correction factor is significant and largely depends on population density, temperature, and energy of the fast component. Experimental verification of theoretical results is obtained in the magnetized plasma linear experimental device of Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics where plasma is produced by an electron cyclotron resonance method and known to have a fast flowing electron component.

  20. Synchrotron powder diffraction of silicon: high-quality structure factors and electron density.

    PubMed

    Wahlberg, Nanna; Bindzus, Niels; Bjerg, Lasse; Becker, Jacob; Dippel, Ann Christin; Iversen, Bo Brummerstedt

    2016-01-01

    Crystalline silicon is an ideal compound to test the current state of experimental structure factors and corresponding electron densities. High-quality structure factors have been measured on crystalline silicon with synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction. They are in excellent agreement with benchmark Pendellösung data having comparable accuracy and precision, but acquired in far less time and to a much higher resolution (sin θ/λ < 1.7 Å(-1)). The extended data range permits an experimental modelling of not only the valence electron density but also the core deformation in silicon, establishing an increase of the core density upon bond formation in crystalline silicon. Furthermore, a physically sound procedure for evaluating the standard deviation of powder-derived structure factors has been applied. Sampling statistics inherently account for contributions from photon counts as well as the limited number of diffracting particles, where especially the latter are particularly difficult to handle. PMID:26697864

  1. Relative electron density distribution in a low nd helium dc discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Biswa N.; Scofield, James D.

    2016-09-01

    The axial and radial variations of the relative electron density distributions have been measured in an obstructed helium dc discharge by a laser collision induced fluorescence (LCIF) from 4 3D to 2 3P state at 447 nm. For this 1.75 Torr, 6.5 mm gap, 1.6 mA helium obstructed gas discharge, the on-axis LCIF intensity is mostly determined by the neutral atom collision. On the basis of this information, we have plotted the LCIF data to obtain a normalized electron density variation in the inter-electrode volume by plotting the ratio, I/-Io n -a x i s Io n -a x i s , where I is the radial variation of the LCIF intensity and Ion-axis is the on-axis LCIF intensity. The normalized LCIF data show an annular current density distribution in this obstructed discharge with the current peaking near the radial boundary of the electrodes.

  2. Electronic properties of graphene nanoribbons: A density functional investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sandeep Sharma, Hitesh

    2015-05-15

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed on graphene nano ribbons (GNRs) to investigate the electronic properties as a function of chirality, size and hydrogenation on the edges. The calculations were performed on GNRs with armchair and zigzag configurations with 28, 34, 36, 40, 50, 56, 62, 66 carbon atoms. The structural stability of AGNR and ZGNR increases with the size of nanoribbon where as hydrogenation of GNR tends to lowers their structural stability. All GNRs considered have shown semiconducting behavior with HOMO-LUMO gap decreasing with the increase in the GNR size. The hydrogenation of GNR decreases its HOMO-LUMO gap significantly. The results are in agreement with the available experimental and theoretical results.

  3. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited x-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, E.M.; Rosen, M.D.

    1984-11-29

    An operational x-ray laser is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition x-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The x-ray laser is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam illuminates a free-standing thin foil that may be associated with a substrate for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the x-ray laser gain medium. The x-ray laser may be driven by more than one optical laser beam. The x-ray laser has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  4. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited X-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Edward M.; Rosen, Mordecai D.

    1989-01-01

    An operational X-ray laser (30) is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition X-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The X-ray laser (30) is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam (32) illuminates a free-standing thin foil (34) that may be associated with a substrate (36) for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the X-ray laser gain medium. The X-ray laser (30) may be driven by more than one optical laser beam (32, 44). The X-ray laser (30) has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  5. Plasmaspheric Electron Densities and Plasmashere-Ionosphere Coupling Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenberger, Janos; Cherneva, Nina; Shevtsov, Boris; Sannikov, Dmitry; Ferencz, Csaba; Koronczay, David

    The Automatic Whistler Detector and Analyzer Network (AWDANet) is able to detect and analyze whistlers in quasi-realtime and can provide equatorial electron density data. The plasmaspheric electron densities and ionosphere-plasmasphere coupling fluxes are key parameters for plasmasphere models in Space Weather related investigations, particularly in modeling charged particle accelerations and losses in Radiation Belts. The global AWDANet [1] detects millions of whistlers in a year. The system has been recently completed with automatic analyzer capability in PLASMON (http://plasmon.elte.hu) project. It is based on a recently developed whistler inversion model [2], that opened the way for an automated process of whistler analysis, not only for single whistler events but for complex analysis of multiple-path propagation whistler groups [3]. In this paper we present the results of quasi-real-time runs processing whistlers from quiet and disturb periods from Karymshina station (Kamchatka, Russia). Refilling rates, that are not yet known in details are also presented for the various periods. 1.Lichtenberger, J., C. Ferencz, L. Bodnár, D. Hamar, and P. Steinbach (2008), Automatic whistler detector and analyzer system: Automatic whistler detector, J. Geophys. Res., 113, A12201, doi:10.1029/2008JA013467. 2. Lichtenberger, J. (2009), A new whistler inversion method, J. Geophys. Res., 114, A07222, doi:10.1029/2008JA013799. 3. Lichtenberger, J., C. Ferencz, D. Hamar, P. Steinbach, C. J. Rodger, M. A. Clilverd, and A. B. Collier (2010), Automatic Whistler Detector and Analyzer system: Implementation of the analyzer algorithm, J. Geophys. Res., 115, A12214, doi:10.1029/2010JA015931.

  6. Electronic density fluctuation associated to coherent plasmon excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervasoni, Juana; Segui, Silvina; Arista, Nestor

    2011-10-01

    In this work we analyze, in the frame of the coherent states, the fluctuation of the electronic collective modes associated with the wake potential generated by an external particle of charge Ze. This perturbation is described as coherent states of plasmons spatially localized in an average distance of the order of the velocity of the projectile divided by the plasmon frequency of the material. One of the most important features is that in all the cases, for different trajectories of the external particle, and for different structures of the material, the fluctuations are not negligible. In particular, we observe that due to the importance of the surface in nanostructured materials, the fluctuation of density is very sensitive to their geometry and composition, fact that must have taken into account for the nanodevices designs. In this work we analyze, in the frame of the coherent states, the fluctuation of the electronic collective modes associated with the wake potential generated by an external particle of charge Ze. This perturbation is described as coherent states of plasmons spatially localized in an average distance of the order of the velocity of the projectile divided by the plasmon frequency of the material. One of the most important features is that in all the cases, for different trajectories of the external particle, and for different structures of the material, the fluctuations are not negligible. In particular, we observe that due to the importance of the surface in nanostructured materials, the fluctuation of density is very sensitive to their geometry and composition, fact that must have taken into account for the nanodevices designs. Acknowledgements to CNEA and CONICET, Argentina.

  7. Electron density diagnostics for gaseous nebulae involving the O 4 intercombination lines near 1400 A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keenan, F. P.; Conlon, E. S.; Bowden, D. A.; Feibelman, W. A.; Pradhan, Anil K.

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical O IV electron density sensitive emission line ratios, determined using electron impact excitation rates calculated with the R-matrix code, are presented for R(sub 1) = I(1407.4 A)/I(1401.2 A), R(sub 2) = I(1404.8 A)/I(1401.2A), R(sub 3) = I(1399.8 A)/(1401.2 A), and R(sub 4) = I(1397.2 A)/I(1401.2 A). The observed values of R(sub 1)-R(sub 4), measured from high resolution spectra obtained with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite, lead to electron densities that are compatible, and which are also in good agreement with those deduced from line ratios in other species. This provides observational support for the accuracy of the atomic data adopted in the present calculations.

  8. Measuring the Plasma Density of a Ferroelectric Plasma Source in an Expanding Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    A. Dunaevsky; N.J. Fisch

    2003-10-02

    The initial density and electron temperature at the surface of a ferroelectric plasma source were deduced from floating probe measurements in an expanding plasma. The method exploits negative charging of the floating probe capacitance by fast flows before the expanding plasma reaches the probe. The temporal profiles of the plasma density can be obtained from the voltage traces of the discharge of the charged probe capacitance by the ion current from the expanding plasma. The temporal profiles of the plasma density, at two different distances from the surface of the ferroelectric plasma source, could be further fitted by using the density profiles for the expanding plasma. This gives the initial values of the plasma density and electron temperature at the surface. The method could be useful for any pulsed discharge, which is accompanied by considerable electromagnetic noise, if the initial plasma parameters might be deduced from measurements in expanding plasma.

  9. The behavior of the electron density and temperature at Millstone Hill during the equinox transition study September 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, P. G.; Torr, D. G.; Buonsanto, M. J.; Miller, K. L.

    1989-01-01

    The ionospheric electron density and temperature variations is simulated during the equinox transition study in September 1984 and the results are compared with measurements made at Millstone Hill. The agreement between the modeled and measured electron density and temperature for the quiet day (18 September) is very good but there are large differences on the day of the storm (19 September). On the storm day, the measured electron density decreases by a factor of 1.7 over the previous day, while the model density actually increases slightly. The model failure is attributed to an inadequate increase in the ratio of atomic oxygen to molecular neutral densities in the MSIS neutral atmosphere model, for this particular storm. A factor of 3 to 5 increase in the molecular to atomic oxygen density ratio at 300 km is needed to explain the observed decrease in electron density. The effect of vibrationally excited N sub 2 on the electron density were studied and found to be small.

  10. The behavior of the electron density and temperatue at Millstone Hill during the equinox transition study September 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, P. G.; Torr, D. G.; Buonsanto, M. J.; Miller, K. L.

    1989-01-01

    The ionospheric electron density and temperature variations is simulated during the equinox transition study in September 1984 and the results are compared with measurements made at Millstone Hill. The agreement between the modeled and measured electron density and temperature for the quiet day (18 September) is very good but there are large differences on the day of the storm (19 September). On the storm day, the measured electron density decreases by a factor of 1.7 over the previous day, while the model density actually increases slightly. The model failure is attributed to an inadequate increase in the ratio of atomic oxygen to molecular neutral densities in the MSIS neutral atmosphere model, for this particular storm. A factor of 3 to 5 increase in the molecular to atomic oxygen density ratio at 300 km is needed to explain the observed decrease in electron density. The effect of vibrationally excited N sub 2 on the electron density were studied and found to be small.

  11. Electron correlation in solids via density embedding theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bulik, Ireneusz W.; Chen, Weibing; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2014-08-07

    Density matrix embedding theory [G. Knizia and G. K.-L. Chan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 186404 (2012)] and density embedding theory [I. W. Bulik, G. E. Scuseria, and J. Dukelsky, Phys. Rev. B 89, 035140 (2014)] have recently been introduced for model lattice Hamiltonians and molecular systems. In the present work, the formalism is extended to the ab initio description of infinite systems. An appropriate definition of the impurity Hamiltonian for such systems is presented and demonstrated in cases of 1, 2, and 3 dimensions, using coupled cluster theory as the impurity solver. Additionally, we discuss the challenges related to disentanglement of fragment and bath states. The current approach yields results comparable to coupled cluster calculations of infinite systems even when using a single unit cell as the fragment. The theory is formulated in the basis of Wannier functions but it does not require separate localization of unoccupied bands. The embedding scheme presented here is a promising way of employing highly accurate electronic structure methods for extended systems at a fraction of their original computational cost.

  12. Relative electron density determination using a physics based parameterization of photon interactions in medical DECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Abbema, Joanne K.; van Goethem, Marc-Jan; Greuter, Marcel J. W.; van der Schaaf, Arjen; Brandenburg, Sytze; van der Graaf, Emiel R.

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy and particle therapy treatment planning require accurate knowledge of the electron density and elemental composition of the tissues in the beam path to predict the local dose deposition. We describe a method for the analysis of dual energy computed tomography (DECT) images that provides the electron densities and effective atomic numbers of tissues. The CT measurement process is modelled by system weighting functions, which apply an energy dependent weighting to the parameterization of the total cross section for photon interactions with matter. This detailed parameterization is based on the theoretical analysis of Jackson and Hawkes and deviates, at most, 0.3% from the tabulated NIST values for the elements H to Zn. To account for beam hardening in the object as present in the CT image we implemented an iterative process employing a local weighting function, derived from the method proposed by Heismann and Balda. With this method effective atomic numbers between 1 and 30 can be determined. The method has been experimentally validated on a commercially available tissue characterization phantom with 16 inserts made of tissue substitutes and aluminium that has been scanned on a dual source CT system with tube potentials of 100 kV and 140 kV using a clinical scan protocol. Relative electron densities of all tissue substitutes have been determined with accuracy better than 1%. The presented DECT analysis method thus provides high accuracy electron densities and effective atomic numbers for radiotherapy and especially particle therapy treatment planning.

  13. Relative electron density determination using a physics based parameterization of photon interactions in medical DECT.

    PubMed

    van Abbema, Joanne K; van Goethem, Marc-Jan; Greuter, Marcel J W; van der Schaaf, Arjen; Brandenburg, Sytze; van der Graaf, Emiel R

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy and particle therapy treatment planning require accurate knowledge of the electron density and elemental composition of the tissues in the beam path to predict the local dose deposition. We describe a method for the analysis of dual energy computed tomography (DECT) images that provides the electron densities and effective atomic numbers of tissues. The CT measurement process is modelled by system weighting functions, which apply an energy dependent weighting to the parameterization of the total cross section for photon interactions with matter. This detailed parameterization is based on the theoretical analysis of Jackson and Hawkes and deviates, at most, 0.3% from the tabulated NIST values for the elements H to Zn. To account for beam hardening in the object as present in the CT image we implemented an iterative process employing a local weighting function, derived from the method proposed by Heismann and Balda. With this method effective atomic numbers between 1 and 30 can be determined. The method has been experimentally validated on a commercially available tissue characterization phantom with 16 inserts made of tissue substitutes and aluminium that has been scanned on a dual source CT system with tube potentials of 100 kV and 140 kV using a clinical scan protocol. Relative electron densities of all tissue substitutes have been determined with accuracy better than 1%. The presented DECT analysis method thus provides high accuracy electron densities and effective atomic numbers for radiotherapy and especially particle therapy treatment planning. PMID:25905890

  14. Reduced density matrix hybrid approach: application to electronic energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Berkelbach, Timothy C; Markland, Thomas E; Reichman, David R

    2012-02-28

    Electronic energy transfer in the condensed phase, such as that occurring in photosynthetic complexes, frequently occurs in regimes where the energy scales of the system and environment are similar. This situation provides a challenge to theoretical investigation since most approaches are accurate only when a certain energetic parameter is small compared to others in the problem. Here we show that in these difficult regimes, the Ehrenfest approach provides a good starting point for a dynamical description of the energy transfer process due to its ability to accurately treat coupling to slow environmental modes. To further improve on the accuracy of the Ehrenfest approach, we use our reduced density matrix hybrid framework to treat the faster environmental modes quantum mechanically, at the level of a perturbative master equation. This combined approach is shown to provide an efficient and quantitative description of electronic energy transfer in a model dimer and the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex and is used to investigate the effect of environmental preparation on the resulting dynamics.

  15. Non-invasive fluid density and viscosity measurement

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2012-05-01

    The noninvasively measurement of the density and viscosity of static or flowing fluids in a section of pipe such that the pipe performs as the sensing apparatus, is described. Measurement of a suitable structural vibration resonance frequency of the pipe and the width of this resonance permits the density and viscosity to be determined, respectively. The viscosity may also be measured by monitoring the decay in time of a vibration resonance in the pipe.

  16. High-current density, high-brightness electron beams from large-area lanthanum hexaboride cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loschialpo, P.; Kapetanakos, C. A.

    1988-04-01

    Large diameter lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) cathodes operated at 10 kV have produced 1-5-microsec electron pulses with current density between 10 and 20 A/sq cm. Normalized beam brightness, approximately 300,000 A/sq cm sq rad has been consistently measured. To obtain this high-current density, the LaB6 cathodes have been heated to temperatures between about 1600 and 1800 C. Very uniform temperature profiles are obtained by applying a carefully tailored electron bombardment heating power distribution. These measurements have been made between pressure 10 to the -6th to -10 to the -5th Torr, i.e., under much less demanding vacuum conditions than that required by conventional dispenser-type cathodes.

  17. Comet P/Giacobini-Zinner electron and H2O(+) column densities from ICE and ground-based observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer-Vernet, N.; Steinberg, J. L.; Strauss, Michael A.; Spinrad, H.; Mccarthy, Patrick J.

    1987-01-01

    An H2O(+) spatial mission profile, extracted from an optical CCD spectrogram obtained during the ICE/Giacobini-Zinner encounter, is compared to the electron-density profile that was deduced from in situ measurements by the radio experiment aboard ICE. The electron column density along a line of sight has two components, one from the spherically symmetric coma, and the second from a thin plasma sheet, whenever it is along the line of sight. The deduced electron column-density profile agrees well with the observed H2O(+) emission profile. It is concluded that the electrons and the H2O(+) ions are distributed similarly 9600 km tailward from the cometary nucleus, that the ratio of number densities of H2O(+) ions to electrons is about 1/4 at this point, and that the width of the plasma sheet is about 16,000 km.

  18. First test of BNL electron beam ion source with high current density electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Pikin, Alexander Alessi, James G. Beebe, Edward N.; Shornikov, Andrey; Mertzig, Robert; Wenander, Fredrik; Scrivens, Richard

    2015-01-09

    A new electron gun with electrostatic compression has been installed at the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) Test Stand at BNL. This is a collaborative effort by BNL and CERN teams with a common goal to study an EBIS with electron beam current up to 10 A, current density up to 10,000 A/cm{sup 2} and energy more than 50 keV. Intensive and pure beams of heavy highly charged ions with mass-to-charge ratio < 4.5 are requested by many heavy ion research facilities including NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL and HIE-ISOLDE at CERN. With a multiampere electron gun, the EBIS should be capable of delivering highly charged ions for both RHIC facility applications at BNL and for ISOLDE experiments at CERN. Details of the electron gun simulations and design, and the Test EBIS electrostatic and magnetostatic structures with the new electron gun are presented. The experimental results of the electron beam transmission are given.

  19. Measurements of parallel electron velocity distributions using whistler wave absorption.

    PubMed

    Thuecks, D J; Skiff, F; Kletzing, C A

    2012-08-01

    We describe a diagnostic to measure the parallel electron velocity distribution in a magnetized plasma that is overdense (ω(pe) > ω(ce)). This technique utilizes resonant absorption of whistler waves by electrons with velocities parallel to a background magnetic field. The whistler waves were launched and received by a pair of dipole antennas immersed in a cylindrical discharge plasma at two positions along an axial background magnetic field. The whistler wave frequency was swept from somewhat below and up to the electron cyclotron frequency ω(ce). As the frequency was swept, the wave was resonantly absorbed by the part of the electron phase space density which was Doppler shifted into resonance according to the relation ω - k([parallel])v([parallel]) = ω(ce). The measured absorption is directly related to the reduced parallel electron distribution function integrated along the wave trajectory. The background theory and initial results from this diagnostic are presented here. Though this diagnostic is best suited to detect tail populations of the parallel electron distribution function, these first results show that this diagnostic is also rather successful in measuring the bulk plasma density and temperature both during the plasma discharge and into the afterglow.

  20. Measurements of parallel electron velocity distributions using whistler wave absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Thuecks, D. J.; Skiff, F.; Kletzing, C. A.

    2012-08-15

    We describe a diagnostic to measure the parallel electron velocity distribution in a magnetized plasma that is overdense ({omega}{sub pe} > {omega}{sub ce}). This technique utilizes resonant absorption of whistler waves by electrons with velocities parallel to a background magnetic field. The whistler waves were launched and received by a pair of dipole antennas immersed in a cylindrical discharge plasma at two positions along an axial background magnetic field. The whistler wave frequency was swept from somewhat below and up to the electron cyclotron frequency {omega}{sub ce}. As the frequency was swept, the wave was resonantly absorbed by the part of the electron phase space density which was Doppler shifted into resonance according to the relation {omega}-k{sub ||v||} = {omega}{sub ce}. The measured absorption is directly related to the reduced parallel electron distribution function integrated along the wave trajectory. The background theory and initial results from this diagnostic are presented here. Though this diagnostic is best suited to detect tail populations of the parallel electron distribution function, these first results show that this diagnostic is also rather successful in measuring the bulk plasma density and temperature both during the plasma discharge and into the afterglow.

  1. Paramagnetic ionic liquids for measurements of density using magnetic levitation.

    PubMed

    Bwambok, David K; Thuo, Martin M; Atkinson, Manza B J; Mirica, Katherine A; Shapiro, Nathan D; Whitesides, George M

    2013-09-01

    Paramagnetic ionic liquids (PILs) provide new capabilities to measurements of density using magnetic levitation (MagLev). In a typical measurement, a diamagnetic object of unknown density is placed in a container containing a PIL. The container is placed between two magnets (typically NdFeB, oriented with like poles facing). The density of the diamagnetic object can be determined by measuring its position in the magnetic field along the vertical axis (levitation height, h), either as an absolute value or relative to internal standards of known density. For density measurements by MagLev, PILs have three advantages over solutions of paramagnetic salts in aqueous or organic solutions: (i) negligible vapor pressures; (ii) low melting points; (iii) high thermal stabilities. In addition, the densities, magnetic susceptibilities, glass transition temperatures, thermal decomposition temperatures, viscosities, and hydrophobicities of PILs can be tuned over broad ranges by choosing the cation-anion pair. The low melting points and high thermal stabilities of PILs provide large liquidus windows for density measurements. This paper demonstrates applications and advantages of PILs in density-based analyses using MagLev.

  2. Paramagnetic ionic liquids for measurements of density using magnetic levitation.

    PubMed

    Bwambok, David K; Thuo, Martin M; Atkinson, Manza B J; Mirica, Katherine A; Shapiro, Nathan D; Whitesides, George M

    2013-09-01

    Paramagnetic ionic liquids (PILs) provide new capabilities to measurements of density using magnetic levitation (MagLev). In a typical measurement, a diamagnetic object of unknown density is placed in a container containing a PIL. The container is placed between two magnets (typically NdFeB, oriented with like poles facing). The density of the diamagnetic object can be determined by measuring its position in the magnetic field along the vertical axis (levitation height, h), either as an absolute value or relative to internal standards of known density. For density measurements by MagLev, PILs have three advantages over solutions of paramagnetic salts in aqueous or organic solutions: (i) negligible vapor pressures; (ii) low melting points; (iii) high thermal stabilities. In addition, the densities, magnetic susceptibilities, glass transition temperatures, thermal decomposition temperatures, viscosities, and hydrophobicities of PILs can be tuned over broad ranges by choosing the cation-anion pair. The low melting points and high thermal stabilities of PILs provide large liquidus windows for density measurements. This paper demonstrates applications and advantages of PILs in density-based analyses using MagLev. PMID:23972068

  3. Rocket observations of electron-density irregularities in the equatorial ionosphere below 200 km

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klaus, D. E.; Smith, L. G.

    1978-01-01

    Nike Apache rockets carring instrumentation to measure electron density and its fine structure in the equatorial ionosphere were launched from Chilca, Peru in May and June 1975. The fine structure experiment and the data reduction system are described. Results obtained from this system are presented and compared with those obtained by VHF radar and from other rocket studies. A description of the equatorial ionosphere and its features is also presented.

  4. Contemporary X-ray electron-density studies using synchrotron radiation

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, Mads R. V.; Hathwar, Venkatesha R.; Bindzus, Niels; Wahlberg, Nanna; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Overgaard, Jacob; Iversen, Bo B.

    2014-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation has many compelling advantages over conventional radiation sources in the measurement of accurate Bragg diffraction data. The variable photon energy and much higher flux may help to minimize critical systematic effects such as absorption, extinction and anomalous scattering. Based on a survey of selected published results from the last decade, the benefits of using synchrotron radiation in the determination of X-ray electron densities are discussed, and possible future directions of this field are examined. PMID:25295169

  5. Study on Momentum Density of Electrons and Fermi Surface in Niobium by Positron Annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Takeshi; Kondo, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Murakami, Yasukazu; Cho, Yang-Koo; Tanigawa, Shoichiro; Kawano, Takao; Bahng, Gun-Woong

    1990-12-01

    The three dimensional electron-positron momentum density in niobium has been reconstructed from measurements of two dimensional angular correlation of positron annihilation radiations (2D-ACAR) followed by the image reconstruction technique based on a direct Fourier transformation. We determined the position of the Fermi surface sheets; \\varGamma-centered hole octahedron, multiply connected jungle-gym arms and N-centered hole ellipsoids. The Fermi surface topology is in good agreement with the theory.

  6. Measuring Density Of Air By Ultraviolet Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, Robert L.

    1992-01-01

    Report presents theoretical and experimental studies directed toward development of optoelectronic instrument to measure density of air at altitudes from 50 to 90 km and possibly beyond. Instrument mounted in Space Shuttle orbiter and operated during reentry into atmosphere. Data gathered by instrument needed because density of upper atmosphere highly variable in space and time and this variability affects aerodynamic behavior and trajectory of reentering Shuttle. Variations in density also meteorologically significant.

  7. Rocket experiments for spectral estimation of electron density fine structure in the auroral and equatorial ionosphere and preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomei, B. A.; Smith, L. G.

    1986-01-01

    Sounding rockets equipped to monitor electron density and its fine structure were launched into the auroral and equatorial ionosphere in 1980 and 1983, respectively. The measurement electronics are based on the Langmuir probe and are described in detail. An approach to the spectral analysis of the density irregularities is addressed and a software algorithm implementing the approach is given. Preliminary results of the analysis are presented.

  8. Electron densities for 10 planetary nebulae derived from the semiforbidden C III lambda 1907/1909 ratio. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feibelman, W. A.; Boggess, A.; Mccracken, C. W.; Hobbs, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    Electron densities for IC 351, IC 2165, J900, IC 3568, NGC 6644, NGC 6891, IC 4997, NGC 7009, Hu 1-2, and IC 5217 are derived from high-dispersion semiforbidden C III spectrograms. For seven of these nebulae, the derived electron density is larger than the values derived from either surface brightness measurements or forbidden line ratios. Only one object, Hu 1-2, shows pronounced splitting of the semiforbidden C III emission lines due to a large expansion velocity.

  9. Upgrading electron temperature and electron density diagnostic diagrams of forbidden line emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proxauf, B.; Öttl, S.; Kimeswenger, S.

    2014-01-01

    Context. Diagnostic diagrams of forbidden lines have been a useful tool for observers for many decades now. They are used to obtain information on the basic physical properties of thin gaseous nebulae. Some diagnostic diagrams are in wavelength domains that were difficult to apply either due to missing wavelength coverage or the low resolution of older spectrographs. Furthermore, most of the diagrams were calculated using just the species involved as a single atom gas, although several are affected by well-known fluorescence mechanisms as well. Additionally, the atomic data have improved up to the present time. Aims: The aim of this work is to recalculate well-known, but also sparsely used, unnoted diagnostics diagrams. The new diagrams provide observers with modern, easy-to-use recipes for determining electron temperature and densities. Methods: The new diagnostic diagrams were calculated using large grids of parameter space in the photoionization code CLOUDY. For a given basic parameter (e.g., electron density or temperature), the solutions with cooling-heating-equilibrium were chosen to derive the diagnostic diagrams. Empirical numerical functions were fitted to provide formulas usable in, e.g., data reduction pipelines. Results: The resulting diagrams differ significantly from those used up to now and will improve thermodynamic calculations. To our knowledge, detailed, directly applicable fit formulas are given for the first time, leading to the calculation of electron temperature or density from the line ratios.

  10. Electron density estimation in cold magnetospheric plasmas with the Cluster Active Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, A.; Pedersen, A.; Taylor, M. G.; Escoubet, C. P.; Laakso, H. E.

    2009-12-01

    Electron density is a key physical quantity to characterize any plasma medium. Its measurement is thus essential to understand the various physical processes occurring in the environment of a magnetized planet. However, any magnetosphere of the solar system is far from being an homogeneous medium with a constant electron density and temperature. For instance, the Earth’s magnetosphere is composed of a variety of regions with densities and temperatures spanning over at least 6 decades of magnitude. For this reason, different types of scientific instruments are usually carried onboard a magnetospheric spacecraft to estimate in situ the electron density of the various plasma regions crossed by different means. In the case of the European Space Agency Cluster mission, five different instruments on each of its four identical spacecraft can be used to estimate it: two particle instruments, a DC electric field instrument, a relaxation sounder and a high-time resolution passive wave receiver. Each of these instruments has its pros and cons depending on the plasma conditions. The focus of this study is the accurate estimation of the electron density in cold plasma regions of the magnetosphere including the magnetotail lobes (Ne ≤ 0.01 e-/cc, Te ~ 100 eV) and the plasmasphere (Ne> 10 e-/cc, Te <10 eV). In these regions, particle instruments can be blind to low energy ions outflowing from the ionosphere or measuring only a portion of the energy range of the particles due to photoelectrons. This often results in an under estimation of the bulk density. Measurements from a relaxation sounder enables accurate estimation of the bulk electron density above a fraction of 1 e-/cc but requires careful calibration of the resonances and/or the cutoffs detected. On Cluster, active soundings enable to derive precise density estimates between 0.2 and 80 e-/cc every minute or two. Spacecraft-to-probe difference potential measurements from a double probe electric field experiment can be

  11. Evidence of water molecules--a statistical evaluation of water molecules based on electron density.

    PubMed

    Nittinger, Eva; Schneider, Nadine; Lange, Gudrun; Rarey, Matthias

    2015-04-27

    Water molecules play important roles in many biological processes, especially when mediating protein-ligand interactions. Dehydration and the hydrophobic effect are of central importance for estimating binding affinities. Due to the specific geometric characteristics of hydrogen bond functions of water molecules, meaning two acceptor and two donor functions in a tetrahedral arrangement, they have to be modeled accurately. Despite many attempts in the past years, accurate prediction of water molecules-structurally as well as energetically-remains a grand challenge. One reason is certainly the lack of experimental data, since energetic contributions of water molecules can only be measured indirectly. However, on the structural side, the electron density clearly shows the positions of stable water molecules. This information has the potential to improve models on water structure and energy in proteins and protein interfaces. On the basis of a high-resolution subset of the Protein Data Bank, we have conducted an extensive statistical analysis of 2.3 million water molecules, discriminating those water molecules that are well resolved and those without much evidence of electron density. In order to perform this classification, we introduce a new measurement of electron density around an individual atom enabling the automatic quantification of experimental support. On the basis of this measurement, we present an analysis of water molecules with a detailed profile of geometric and structural features. This data, which is freely available, can be applied to not only modeling and validation of new water models in structural biology but also in molecular design.

  12. Electron spin relaxation dynamics in GaN: influence of temperature, doping density, and crystal orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buß, J. H.; Rudolph, J.; Starosielec, S.; Schaefer, A.; Semond, F.; Hägele, D.

    2013-03-01

    We present a systematic study of electron spin relaxation in wurtzite GaN. Fast relaxation is caused by a Rashba effective magnetic field that linearly depends on the electron momentum k. The field prevents spin lifetimes to exceed 50 ps at room temperature and is the origin of an anisotropic spin relaxation tensor that we evidence by magnetic field dependent magneto-optical pump-probe measurements. In addition, the spin lifetime depends - as compared to GaAs - weaker on temperature and doping density. We give a fully analytical description of both effects based on D'yakonov-Perel' theory that describes our results quantitatively without any fitting parameter.

  13. Validation of COSMIC radio occultation electron density profiles by incoherent scatter radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, Iurii; Zakharenkova, Irina

    The COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3 is a joint US/Taiwan radio occultation mission consisting of six identical micro-satellites. Each microsatellite has a GPS Occultation Experiment payload to operate the ionospheric RO measurements. FS3/COSMIC data can make a positive impact on global ionosphere study providing essential information about height electron density distribu-tion. For correct using of the RO electron density profiles for geophysical analysis, modeling and other applications it is necessary to make validation of these data with electron density distributions obtained by another measurement techniques such as proven ground based facili-ties -ionosondes and IS radars. In fact as the ionosondes provide no direct information on the profile above the maximum electron density and the topside ionosonde profile is obtained by fitting a model to the peak electron density value, the COSMIC RO measurements can make an important contribution to the investigation of the topside part of the ionosphere. IS radars provide information about the whole electron density profile, so we can estimate the agreement of topside parts between two independent measurements. To validate the reliability of COS-MIC data we have used the ionospheric electron density profiles derived from IS radar located near Kharkiv, Ukraine (geographic coordinates: 49.6N, 36.3E, geomagnetic coordinates: 45.7N, 117.8E). The Kharkiv radar is a sole incoherent scatter facility on the middle latitudes of Eu-ropean region. The radar operates with 100-m zenith parabolic antenna at 158 MHz with peak transmitted power 2.0 MW. The Kharkiv IS radar is able to determine the heights-temporal distribution of ionosphere parameters in height range of 70-1500 km. At the ionosphere in-vestigation by incoherent scatter method there are directly measured the power spectrum (or autocorrelation function) of scattered signal. With using of rather complex procedure of the received signal processing it is possible to estimate the

  14. Matched dipole probe for magnetized low electron density laboratory plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Rafalskyi, Dmytro; Aanesland, Ane

    2015-07-15

    In this paper, a diagnostic method for magnetized and unmagnetized laboratory plasma is proposed, based on impedance measurements of a short matched dipole. The range of the measured electron densities is limited to low density plasmas (10{sup 12}–10{sup 15 }m{sup −3}), where other diagnostic methods have strong limitations on the magnetic field strength and topology, plasma dimensions, and boundary conditions. The method is designed for use in both large- and small-dimension plasma (<10 cm) without or with strong non-homogeneous magnetic field, which can be undefined within the probe size. The design of a matched dipole probe allows to suppress the sheath resonance effects and to reach high sensitivity at relatively small probe dimensions. Validation experiments are conducted in both magnetized (B ∼ 170 G) and unmagnetized (B = 0) low density (7 × 10{sup 12 }m{sup −3}–7 × 10{sup 13 }m{sup −3}) low pressure (1 mTorr) 10 cm scale plasmas. The experimentally measured data show very good agreement with an analytical theory both for a non-magnetized and a magnetized case. The electron density measured by the matched dipole and Langmuir probes in the range of 7 × 10{sup 12 }m{sup −3}–7 × 10{sup 13 }m{sup −3} show less than 30% difference. An experimentally measured tolerance/uncertainty of the dipole probe method is estimated to ±1% for plasma densities above 2 × 10{sup 13 }m{sup −3}. A spatial resolution is estimated from the experiments to be about 3d, where d is the dipole diameter. The diagnostic method is also validated by comparing the measured plasma impedance curves with results of analytical modelling.

  15. Matched dipole probe for magnetized low electron density laboratory plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafalskyi, Dmytro; Aanesland, Ane

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a diagnostic method for magnetized and unmagnetized laboratory plasma is proposed, based on impedance measurements of a short matched dipole. The range of the measured electron densities is limited to low density plasmas (1012-1015 m-3), where other diagnostic methods have strong limitations on the magnetic field strength and topology, plasma dimensions, and boundary conditions. The method is designed for use in both large- and small-dimension plasma (<10 cm) without or with strong non-homogeneous magnetic field, which can be undefined within the probe size. The design of a matched dipole probe allows to suppress the sheath resonance effects and to reach high sensitivity at relatively small probe dimensions. Validation experiments are conducted in both magnetized (B ˜ 170 G) and unmagnetized (B = 0) low density (7 × 1012 m-3-7 × 1013 m-3) low pressure (1 mTorr) 10 cm scale plasmas. The experimentally measured data show very good agreement with an analytical theory both for a non-magnetized and a magnetized case. The electron density measured by the matched dipole and Langmuir probes in the range of 7 × 1012 m-3-7 × 1013 m-3 show less than 30% difference. An experimentally measured tolerance/uncertainty of the dipole probe method is estimated to ±1% for plasma densities above 2 × 1013 m-3. A spatial resolution is estimated from the experiments to be about 3d, where d is the dipole diameter. The diagnostic method is also validated by comparing the measured plasma impedance curves with results of analytical modelling.

  16. Pauling bond strength, bond length and electron density distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Ross, Nancy L.; Cox, David F.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Iversen, Bo B.; Spackman, M. A.

    2014-01-18

    A power law regression equation, = 1.46(<ρ(rc)>/r)-0.19, connecting the average experimental bond lengths, , with the average accumulation of the electron density at the bond critical point, <ρ(rc)>, between bonded metal M and oxygen atoms, determined at ambient conditions for oxide crystals, where r is the row number of the M atom, is similar to the regression equation R(M-O) = 1.39(ρ(rc)/r)-0.21 determined for three perovskite crystals for pressures as high as 80 GPa. The two equations are also comparable with those, = 1.43(/r)-0.21, determined for a large number of oxide crystals at ambient conditions and = 1.39(/r)-0.22, determined for geometry optimized hydroxyacid molecules, that connect the bond lengths to the average Pauling electrostatic bond strength, , for the M-O bonded interactions. On the basis of the correspondence between the two sets of equations connecting ρ(rc) and the Pauling bond strength s with bond length, it appears that Pauling’s simple definition of bond strength closely mimics the accumulation of the electron density between bonded pairs of atoms. The similarity of the expressions for the crystals and molecules is compelling evidence that the M-O bonded interactions for the crystals and molecules 2 containing the same bonded interactions are comparable. Similar expressions, connecting bond lengths and bond strength, have also been found to hold for fluoride, nitride and sulfide molecules and crystals. The Brown-Shannon bond valence, σ, power law expression σ = [R1/(R(M-O)]N that has found wide use in crystal chemistry, is shown to be connected to a more universal expression determined for oxides and the perovskites, <ρ(rc)> = r[(1.41)/]4.76, demonstrating that the bond valence for a bonded interaction is likewise closely connected to the accumulation of the electron density between the bonded atoms. Unlike the Brown-Shannon expression, it is universal in that it holds for the M

  17. Photo-detachment signal analysis to accurately determine electronegativity, electron temperature, and charged species density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oudini, N.; Sirse, N.; Taccogna, F.; Ellingboe, A. R.; Bendib, A.

    2016-09-01

    Laser pulse induced photo-detachment combined with Langmuir probing has been introduced to diagnose plasma electronegativity. This technique uses a laser pulse to convert negative ions into electron-atom pairs and tracks the change of electron saturation current by a Langmuir probe. The existing model determines plasma electronegativity as the ratio of electron saturation current before and after detachment. However, this model depends on various assumptions and neglects the formation of a potential barrier between the laser channel and surrounding electronegative plasma. In this letter, we present a new analytical model to analyze photo-detachment signals in order to improve the accuracy of electronegativity measurements and extend this technique for measuring electron temperature and charged species density. This analytical model is supported by Particle-In-Cell simulation of electronegative plasma dynamics following laser photo-detachment. The analysis of the signal, detected on a simulated probe, shows that the present analytical model determines electronegativity, electron temperature, and plasma density with a relative error of ˜20%, ˜20%, and ˜50%, respectively, whereas the electronegativity obtained from a previous model is underestimated by an order of magnitude.

  18. Effect of electron density on cutoff frequency of III-N HFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matulionis, Arvydas; Morkoç, Hadis

    2014-03-01

    Advances in frequency performance of heterostructure field-effect transistors (HFETs) are discussed in terms of dissipative processes. The conditions for fastest dissipation coincide reasonably well with those for fastest operation and slowest device degradation. The correlation has its genesis in dissipation of the hot-phonon heat accumulated by non-equilibrium optical phonons launched by hot electrons. The hot-phonon heat causes defect formation and additional electron scattering in a different manner as compared with the effects due to conventional heat accumulated by acoustic phonons. The desirable ultrafast conversion of hot phonons into acoustic phonons is assisted by plasmons as demonstrated through measurement of hot-phonon lifetime. Signatures of plasmons have been also resolved in hot-electron transport, transistor frequency performance, phase noise, and device reliability. The plasmon-assisted ultrafast dissipation of hot-phonon heat explains the known necessity for application a stronger negative gate bias to a channel with higher as-grown electron density.

  19. Diagnosis of gas temperature, electron temperature, and electron density in helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Zhengshi; Zhang Guanjun; Shao Xianjun; Zhang Zenghui

    2012-07-15

    The optical emission spectra of helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) are captured with a three grating spectrometer. The grating primary spectrum covers the whole wavelength range from 200 nm to 900 nm, with the overlapped grating secondary spectrum appearing from 500 nm to 900 nm, which has a higher resolution than that of the grating primary spectrum. So the grating secondary spectrum of OH (A{sup 2}{Sigma} {sup +}({upsilon} Prime = 0) {yields} X{sup 2}{Pi}({upsilon} Double-Prime = 0)) is employed to calculate the gas temperature (T{sub g}) of helium APPJ. Moreover, the electron temperature (T{sub e}) is deduced from the Maxwellian electron energy distribution combining with T{sub g}, and the electron density (n{sub e}) is extracted from the plasma absorbed power. The results are helpful for understanding the physical property of APPJs.

  20. Air density measurement with a falling A4 sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oladyshkin, Ivan V.; Oladyshkina, Anastasia A.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a simple experiment on the air density measurement which does not require any special equipment: just an A4 sheet of paper, a stopwatch and a ruler. The discussed method uses the most basic air resistance model.

  1. Paper area density measurement from forward transmitted scattered light

    DOEpatents

    Koo, Jackson C.

    2001-01-01

    A method whereby the average paper fiber area density (weight per unit area) can be directly calculated from the intensity of transmitted, scattered light at two different wavelengths, one being a non-absorpted wavelength. Also, the method makes it possible to derive the water percentage per fiber area density from a two-wavelength measurement. In the optical measuring technique optical transmitted intensity, for example, at 2.1 microns cellulose absorption line is measured and compared with another scattered, optical transmitted intensity reference in the nearby spectrum region, such as 1.68 microns, where there is no absorption. From the ratio of these two intensities, one can calculate the scattering absorption coefficient at 2.1 microns. This absorption coefficient at this wavelength is, then, experimentally correlated to the paper fiber area density. The water percentage per fiber area density can be derived from this two-wavelength measurement approach.

  2. Ozone density measurements in the troposphere and stratosphere of Natal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirchhoff, V. W. J. H.; Motta, A. G.

    1983-01-01

    Ozone densitities were measured in the troposphere and stratosphere of Natal using ECC sondes launches on balloons. The data analyzed so far show tropospheric densities and total ozone contents larger than expected.

  3. Negative vacuum energy densities and the causal diamond measure

    SciTech Connect

    Salem, Michael P.

    2009-07-15

    Arguably a major success of the landscape picture is the prediction of a small, nonzero vacuum energy density. The details of this prediction depend in part on how the diverging spacetime volume of the multiverse is regulated, a question that remains unresolved. One proposal, the causal diamond measure, has demonstrated many phenomenological successes, including predicting a distribution of positive vacuum energy densities in good agreement with observation. In the string landscape, however, the vacuum energy density is expected to take positive and negative values. We find the causal diamond measure gives a poor fit to observation in such a landscape - in particular, 99.6% of observers in galaxies seemingly just like ours measure a vacuum energy density smaller than we do, most of them measuring it to be negative.

  4. Rapid density-measurement system with vibrating-tube densimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayukawa, Yohei; Hasumoto, Masaya; Watanabe, Koichi

    2003-09-01

    Concerning an increasing demand for environmentally friendly refrigerants including hydrocarbons, thermodynamic properties of such new refrigerants, especially densities, are essential information for refrigeration engineering. A rapid density-measurement system with vibrating-tube densimeter was developed in the present study with an aim to supply large numbers of high-quality PVT property data in a short period. The present system needs only a few minutes to obtain a single datum, and requires less than 20 cm3 sample fluid. PVT properties in the entire fluid-phase, vapor-pressures, saturated-liquid densities for pure fluid are available. Liquid densities, bubble-point pressures and saturated-liquid densities for mixture can be obtained. The measurement range is from 240 to 380 K for temperature and up to 7 MPa for pressure. By employing a new calibration function, density can be precisely obtained even at lower densities. The densimeter is calibrated with pure water and iso-octane which is one of the density-standard fluids, and then measurement uncertainty was evaluated to be 0.1 kg m-3 or 0.024% whichever greater in density, 0.26 kPa or 0.022% whichever greater in pressure and 3 mK for temperature, respectively. The performance of the present measurement system was examined by measuring thermodynamic properties for refrigerant R134a. The experimental results were compared with available equation of state and confirmed to agree with it within ±0.05% for liquid densities while ±0.5% in pressure for the gas phase.

  5. Electron Densities in Solar Flare Loops, Chromospheric Evaporation Upflows, and Acceleration Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benz, Arnold O.

    1996-01-01

    We compare electron densities measured at three different locations in solar flares: (1) in Soft X-Ray (SXR) loops, determined from SXR emission measures and loop diameters from Yohkoh Soft X-Ray Telescope maps (n(sub e, sup SXR) = (0.2-2.5) x 10(exp 11)/ cu cm); (2) in chromospheric evaporation upflows, inferred from plasma frequency cutoffs of decimetric radio bursts detected with the 0.1-3 GHz spectrometer Phoenix of ETH Zuerich (n(sub e, sup upflow) = (0.3-11) x 10(exp 10)/cu cm; and (3) in acceleration sites, inferred from the plasma frequency at the separatrix between upward-accelerated (type III bursts) and downward-accelerated (reverse-drift bursts) electron beams [n(sub e, sup acc) = (0.6-10) x 10(exp 9)/cu cm]. The comparison of these density measurements, obtained from 44 flare episodes (during 14 different flares), demonstrates the compatibility of flare plasma density diagnostics with SXR and radio methods. The density in the upflowing plasma is found to be somewhat lower than in the filled loops, having ratios in a range n(sub e, sup upflow)/n(sub e, sup SXR) = 0.02-1.3, and a factor of 3.6 higher behind the upflow front. The acceleration sites are found to have a much lower density than the SXR-bright flare loops, i.e., n(sub e, sup acc)/n(sub e, sup SXR) = 0.005- 0.13, and thus must be physically displaced from the SXR-bright flare loops. The scaling law between electron time-of-flight distances l' and loop half-lengths s, l'/s = 1.4 +/- 0.3, recently established by Aschwanden et al. suggests that the centroid of the acceleration region is located above the SXR-bright flare loop, as envisioned in cusp geometries (e.g., in magnetic reconnection models).

  6. Group-delay diagnostic for measuring vapor column density

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, J.K.; Presta, R.W.; Christensen, J.J.; Cooke, J.D.; Shaw, M.J.; Johnson, M.A.; Paisner, J.A. )

    1991-10-20

    We describe a technique for determining {ital Nfl} by measuring the group-velocity delay of a probe laser beam propagating through a vapor. This diagnostic has wide dynamic range, is simple to implement, and can be used as a high-bandwidth vapor rate monitor. In addition, it can be used to measure column density, {ital Nl}, number density, {ital N}, oscillator strengths, {ital f}, or absorption cross sections, collisional line broadening, and vapor group-velocity delay.

  7. Experimental and theoretical electron density distribution of alpha,alpha-trehalose dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Edwin D; Dowd, Michael K; Johnson, Glenn P; French, Alfred D

    2010-07-01

    alpha,alpha-Trehalose is of interest because of its cryoprotective and antidessicant properties, and because it possesses various technical anomalies such as (13)C NMR spectra that give misleading indications of intramolecular structural symmetry. It is a non-reducing disaccharide, with the glycosidic oxygen atom shared by the anomeric carbon atoms of the two glucose rings, and is therefore subject to a proposed 'overlapping'exo-anomeric effect. We report here a study of the electron density of trehalose with X-ray diffraction and quantum mechanics calculations, similar to a recent study of sucrose, also a non-reducing molecule. In particular we studied the electron density around the glycosidic linkage and the hydrogen bonding with both deformation density and Atoms in Molecules (AIM) analyses. A total of 129,952 single crystal X-ray intensity measurements were collected on alpha,alpha-trehalose dihydrate to a resolution of sintheta/lambda=1.18A(-1) at 100K and refined with an aspherical multipole model to a final agreement factor of R(1)=0.0160. Wavefunctions were calculated at three levels of theory. Redistribution of electron density due to anomeric effects was reduced in trehalose, compared to sucrose. Five new C-Hcdots, three dots, centeredO hydrogen bonds were confirmed with bond critical points and bond paths from AIM analyses, as were the previously proposed O-Hcdots, three dots, centeredO hydrogen bonds. PMID:20381017

  8. Ultrasonic Technique for Density Measurement of Liquids in Extreme Conditions.

    PubMed

    Kazys, Rymantas; Sliteris, Reimondas; Rekuviene, Regina; Zukauskas, Egidijus; Mazeika, Liudas

    2015-08-07

    An ultrasonic technique, invariant to temperature changes, for a density measurement of different liquids under in situ extreme conditions is presented. The influence of geometry and material parameters of the measurement system (transducer, waveguide, matching layer) on measurement accuracy and reliability is analyzed theoretically along with experimental results. The proposed method is based on measurement of the amplitude of the ultrasonic wave, reflected from the interface of the solid/liquid medium under investigation. In order to enhance sensitivity, the use of a quarter wavelength acoustic matching layer is proposed. Therefore, the sensitivity of the measurement system increases significantly. Density measurements quite often must be performed in extreme conditions at high temperature (up to 220 °C) and high pressure. In this case, metal waveguides between piezoelectric transducer and the measured liquid are used in order to protect the conventional transducer from the influence of high temperature and to avoid depolarization. The presented ultrasonic density measurement technique is suitable for density measurement in different materials, including liquids and polymer melts in extreme conditions. A new calibration algorithm was proposed. The metrological evaluation of the measurement method was performed. The expanded measurement uncertainty Uρ = 7.4 × 10(-3) g/cm(3) (1%).

  9. Ultrasonic Technique for Density Measurement of Liquids in Extreme Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kazys, Rymantas; Sliteris, Reimondas; Rekuviene, Regina; Zukauskas, Egidijus; Mazeika, Liudas

    2015-01-01

    An ultrasonic technique, invariant to temperature changes, for a density measurement of different liquids under in situ extreme conditions is presented. The influence of geometry and material parameters of the measurement system (transducer, waveguide, matching layer) on measurement accuracy and reliability is analyzed theoretically along with experimental results. The proposed method is based on measurement of the amplitude of the ultrasonic wave, reflected from the interface of the solid/liquid medium under investigation. In order to enhance sensitivity, the use of a quarter wavelength acoustic matching layer is proposed. Therefore, the sensitivity of the measurement system increases significantly. Density measurements quite often must be performed in extreme conditions at high temperature (up to 220 °C) and high pressure. In this case, metal waveguides between piezoelectric transducer and the measured liquid are used in order to protect the conventional transducer from the influence of high temperature and to avoid depolarization. The presented ultrasonic density measurement technique is suitable for density measurement in different materials, including liquids and polymer melts in extreme conditions. A new calibration algorithm was proposed. The metrological evaluation of the measurement method was performed. The expanded measurement uncertainty Uρ = 7.4 × 10−3 g/cm3 (1%). PMID:26262619

  10. Enhancement of Mammographic Density Measures in Breast Cancer Risk Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Cheddad, Abbas; Czene, Kamila; Shepherd, John A.; Li, Jingmei; Hall, Per; Humphreys, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Background Mammographic density is a strong risk factor for breast cancer. Methods We present a novel approach to enhance area density measures that takes advantage of the relative density of the pectoral muscle that appears in lateral mammographic views. We hypothesized that the grey scale of film mammograms is normalized to volume breast density but not pectoral density and thus pectoral density becomes an independent marker of volumetric density. Results From analysis of data from a Swedish case–control study (1,286 breast cancer cases and 1,391 control subjects, ages 50–75 years), we found that the mean intensity of the pectoral muscle (MIP) was highly associated with breast cancer risk [per SD: OR = 0.82; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.75–0.88; P = 6 × 10−7] after adjusting for a validated computer-assisted measure of percent density (PD), Cumulus. The area under curve (AUC) changed from 0.600 to 0.618 due to using PD with the pectoral muscle as reference instead of a standard area-based PD measure. We showed that MIP is associated with a genetic variant known to be associated with mammographic density and breast cancer risk, rs10995190, in a subset of women with genetic data. We further replicated the association between MIP and rs10995190 in an additional cohort of 2,655 breast cancer cases (combined P = 0.0002). Conclusions MIP is a marker of volumetric density that can be used to complement area PD in mammographic density studies and breast cancer risk assessment. Impact Inclusion of MIP in risk models should be considered for studies using area PD from analog films. PMID:24722754

  11. A comparison of electronic heterodyne moire deflectometry and electronic heterodyne holographic interferometry for flow measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, A. J.; Stricker, J.

    1985-01-01

    Electronic heterodyne moire deflectometry and electronic heterodyne holographic interferometry are compared as methods for the accurate measurement of refractive index and density change distributions of phase objects. Experimental results are presented to show that the two methods have comparable accuracy for measuring the first derivative of the interferometric fringe shift. The phase object for the measurements is a large crystal of KD*P, whose refractive index distribution can be changed accurately and repeatably for the comparison. Although the refractive index change causes only about one interferometric fringe shift over the entire crystal, the derivative shows considerable detail for the comparison. As electronic phase measurement methods, both methods are very accurate and are intrinsically compatible with computer controlled readout and data processing. Heterodyne moire is relatively inexpensive and has high variable sensitivity. Heterodyne holographic interferometry is better developed, and can be used with poor quality optical access to the experiment.

  12. Modeling of free electronic state density in hydrogenic plasmas based on nearest neighbor approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Nishikawa, Takeshi

    2014-07-15

    Most conventional atomic models in a plasma do not treat the effect of the plasma on the free-electron state density. Using a nearest neighbor approximation, the state densities in hydrogenic plasmas for both bound and free electrons were evaluated and the effect of the plasma on the atomic model (especially for the state density of the free electron) was studied. The model evaluates the electron-state densities using the potential distribution formed by the superposition of the Coulomb potentials of two ions. The potential from one ion perturbs the electronic state density on the other. Using this new model, one can evaluate the free-state density without making any ad-hoc assumptions. The resulting contours of the average ionization degree, given as a function of the plasma temperature and density, are shifted slightly to lower temperatures because of the effect of the increasing free-state density.

  13. Calculated ionization rates, ion densities, and airglow emission rates due to precipitating electrons in the nightside ionosphere of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haider, S. A.; Kim, J.; Nagy, A. F.; Keller, C. N.; Verigin, M. I.; Gringauz, K. I.; Shutte, N. M.; Szego, K.; Kiraly, P.

    1992-01-01

    The calculations presented in this paper clearly establish that the electron fluxes measured by the HARP instrument, carried on board Phobos 2, could cause significant electron impact ionization and excitation in the nightside atmosphere of Mars, if these electrons actually do precipitate. The calculated peak electron densities were found to be about a factor of 2 larger than the mean observed nightside densities, indicating that if a significant fraction of the measured electrons actually precipitate, they could be the dominant mechanism responsible for maintaining the nightside ionosphere. The calculated zenith column emission rates of the O I 5577-A and 6300-A and CO Cameron band emissions, due to electron impact and dissociative recombination mechanisms, were found to be significant.

  14. Imaging electron density and magnetic field distributions in the magnetosphere: A new technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, S.; Van Bavel, G. H.; Brown, A.

    2000-07-01

    The current collection of magnetospheric observations consists almost entirely of in situ measurements at isolated spacecraft positions. A novel remote sensing technique for simultaneously imaging the plasma density N and the magnetic field B is proposed. The imaged region of the magnetosphere can be several Earth radii in extent. Simultaneous measurements of both group delay and Faraday rotation of radio waves propagating through the magnetosphere yield both total electron content (TEC) and Faraday rotation angle, which is the integral of electron density weighted by some known function of the magnetic field and ray path. These data can then be inverted to obtain estimates of the three-dimensional spatial distribution of N and B. The geometry of the ray paths determines the number of components of B that can be resolved. Simple multisatellite simulations and common data processing techniques introduce this new application of tomography: Magnetospheric TEC measurements yield a map of N, which is then combined with Faraday rotation angle measurements to produce a two-component map of B in the plane of observation. The successful tomographic reconstructions provide a straightforward illustration of the practicality of using this technique to map the magnetospheric plasma density and magnetic field in two or three dimensions. Furthermore, simultaneous images of N and B are of great topical interest to geospace science because of their direct and immediate relevance to current questions regarding magnetospheric structure and dynamics.

  15. Device and method for electron beam heating of a high density plasma

    DOEpatents

    Thode, L.E.

    A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high density plasma in a small localized region are described. A relativistic electron beam generator produces a high voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10/sup 17/ to 10/sup 20/.

  16. Comparison of density fluctuation measurements between O-mode and X-mode reflectometry on Tore Supra

    SciTech Connect

    Gerbaud, T.; Clairet, F.; Sabot, R.; Sirinelli, A.; Heuraux, S.; Leclert, G.; Vermare, L.

    2006-10-15

    Reflectometry is a versatile diagnostic which allows both electronic density profile and density fluctuation measurements. Fast sweep heterodyne technique is particularly suitable for precise measurement of the phase of the reflected signal, which records the story of the wave propagation through the plasma up to the cutoff layer, including the density fluctuations. The present article exhibits a comparison of the density fluctuation radial profile measurements between fast sweep frequency technique, both using O-mode and X-mode polarizations, and fixed frequency technique. The correct agreement between all measurements of the relative values of the density fluctuation profiles reinforces the validity of the approximations used.

  17. Solar cycle variations of the Cluster spacecraft potential and its use for electron density estimations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lybekk, B.; Pedersen, A.; Haaland, S.; Svenes, K.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Masson, A.; Taylor, M. G. G. T.; Trotignon, J.-G.

    2012-01-01

    A sunlit conductive spacecraft, immersed in tenuous plasma, will attain a positive potential relative to the ambient plasma. This potential is primarily governed by solar irradiation, which causes escape of photoelectrons from the surface of the spacecraft, and the electrons in the ambient plasma providing the return current. In this paper we combine potential measurements from the Cluster satellites with measurements of extreme ultraviolet radiation from the TIMED satellite to establish a relation between solar radiation and spacecraft charging from solar maximum to solar minimum. We then use this relation to derive an improved method for determination of the current balance of the spacecraft. By calibration with other instruments we thereafter derive the plasma density. The results show that this method can provide information about plasma densities in the polar cap and magnetotail lobe regions where other measurements have limitations.

  18. DE/ISIS conjunction comparisons of high-latitude electron density features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoegy, Walter R.; Benson, Robert F.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison between the ISIS-1 and -2 topside sounder measurements of electron number density, N(e), with the in situ ion and N(e) measurements by the Langmuir probe aboard the Dynamics Explorer 2 (DE 2) during four high-latitude ISIS/DE magnetic field-aligned conjunctions. The ISIS-derived N(e) values, even at the greatest distance from the sounder, were found to agree with the Langmuir probe measurements to within about 30 percent over a density range of more than two decades on three of the four comparisons; the fourth comparison which included data with strong N(e) irregularities, showed a difference of 60 percent.

  19. Mars Global Surveyor Radio Science Electron Density Profiles: Interannual Variability and Implications for the Neutral Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bougher, S. W.; Engel, S.; Hinson, D. P.; Murphy, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Radio Science (RS) experiment employs an ultrastable oscillator aboard the spacecraft. The signal from the oscillator to Earth is refracted by the Martian ionosphere, allowing retrieval of electron density profiles versus radius and geopotential. The present analysis is carried out on five sets of occultation measurements: (1) four obtained near northern summer solstice (Ls = 74-116, near aphelion) at high northern latitudes (64.7-77.6N), and (2) one set of profiles approaching equinox conditions (Ls = 135- 146) at high southern latitudes (64.7-69.1S). Electron density profiles (95 to 200 km) are examined over a narrow range of solar zenith angles (76.5-86.9 degrees) for local true solar times of (1) 3-4 hours and (2) 12.1 hours. Variations spanning 1-Martian year are specifically examined in the Northern hemisphere.

  20. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATIONS OF ION CHARGE DISTRIBUTIONS, EFFECTIVE ELECTRON DENSITIES, AND ELECTRON-ION CLOUD OVERLAP IN ELECTRON BEAM ION TRAP PLASMA USING EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, G. Y.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J. R.; Baumann, T. M.; Epp, S. W.; Gonchar, A.; Mokler, P. H.; Simon, M. C.; Tawara, H.; Maeckel, V.; Ullrich, J.; Lapierre, A.; Yao, K.; Zou, Y.; Zhao, G. E-mail: crespojr@mpi-hd.mpg.de

    2009-09-10

    Spectra in the extreme ultraviolet range from 107 to 353 A emitted from Fe ions in various ionization stages have been observed at the Heidelberg electron beam ion trap (EBIT) with a flat-field grating spectrometer. A series of transition lines and their intensities have been analyzed and compared with collisional-radiative simulations. The present collisional-radiative model reproduces well the relative line intensities and facilitates line identification of ions produced in the EBIT. The polarization effect on the line intensities resulting from nonthermal unidirectional electron impact was explored and found to be significant (up to 24%) for a few transition lines. Based upon the observed line intensities, relative charge state distributions (CSD) of ions were determined, which peaked at Fe{sup 23+} tailing toward lower charge states. Another simulation on ion charge distributions including the ionization and electron capture processes generated CSDs which are in general agreement with the measurements. By observing intensity ratios of specific lines from levels collisionally populated directly from the ground state and those starting from the metastable levels of Fe XXI, Fe X and other ionic states, the effective electron densities were extracted and found to depend on the ionic charge. Furthermore, it was found that the overlap of the ion cloud with the electron beam estimated from the effective electron densities strongly depends on the charge state of the ion considered, i.e. under the same EBIT conditions, higher charge ions show less expansion in the radial direction.

  1. Regional time-density measurement of myocardial perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eusemann, Christian D.; Breen, Jerome F.; Robb, Richard A.

    2003-05-01

    The measurement of time-density relationships of the myocardium in studies of Magnetic Resonance perfusion data sets is a clinical technique used in assessing myocardial perfusion. Traditionally, to measure the time-density relationship a physician draws a region on the same 2-D image of the myocardium in sequential cardiac cycles. Throughout multiple cardiac cycles the density changes in this region are measured. A major limitation of this technique is change in anatomy relative to the selected region on the myocardium during consecutive cardiac cycles. This causes measurement errors, which are amplified if the traced region does not encompass the entire myocardial thickness, or includes a boundary exterior to the epicardial or endocardial surface. The technique described in this paper uses approximately the same myocardial region throughout the entire perfusion study, which insures inclusion of the entire endocardial to epicardial region and exclusion of exterior regions. Moreover, this region can be subdivided into smaller regions of interest. This can be accomplished by careful segmentation and reformatting of the data into polar coordinates. This allows sectioning both axially and transaxially through the myocardium permitting regional assessment of perfusion specific values such as maximum and/or the time to reach maximum density. These values can then be illustrated using density-mapped colors or time-density curves. This measurement and display technique may provide enhanced detection and evaluation of regional deficits in myocardial contractility and perfusion.

  2. Increasing positive ion number densities below the peak of ion-electron pair production in Titan's ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Vigren, E.; Galand, M.; Shebanits, O.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Geppert, W. D.; Lavvas, P.; Vuitton, V.

    2014-05-01

    We combine derived ion-electron pair formation rates with Cassini Radio Plasma Wave Science Langmuir Probe measurements of electron and positive ion number densities in Titan's sunlit ionosphere. We show that positive ion number densities in Titan's sunlit ionosphere can increase toward significantly lower altitudes than the peak of ion-electron pair formation despite that the effective ion-electron recombination coefficient increases. This is explained by the increased mixing ratios of negative ions, which are formed by electron attachment to neutrals. While such a process acts as a sink for free electrons, the positive ions become longer-lived as the rate coefficients for ion-anion neutralization reactions are smaller than those for ion-electron dissociative recombination reactions.

  3. Dayside electron density structures organised by the Martian crustal magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieval, C.; Wild, J. A.; Morgan, D. D.; Andrews, D. J.; Gurnett, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS) onboard Mars Express is able to detect remotely the Martian topside electron densities down to the main ionospheric peak. In the ionospheric mode it transmits a sequence of pulses in the frequency range 0.1 to 5.5 MHz and measures the delay of reception of the reflected signals returned by the ionospheric plasma layers below the spacecraft. Previous studies using MARSIS have investigated localized electron density structures in the dayside Martian ionosphere, located in areas of typically near-vertical or oblique orientation of the Martian crustal magnetic fields. These crustal fields are remnants of the now extinct global Martian dipole magnetic field, with the strongest fields in the Southern hemisphere reaching up to |B| > 200 nT at altitudes of 400 km. These density structures are often detected as apparent upwellings above the surrounding ideally horizontally stratified ionosphere. Previous studies searched the density structures at a fixed sounding frequency of 1.9 MHz (equivalent to a plasma density of 4.47·104 cm-3), which is a typical frequency at which they are detected. In addition, these studies did not account for the signal dispersion due to the propagation through the ionosphere, which causes larger time delays for receiving the radar echoes, and therefore an underestimation of the altitude of these structures. In the present work we propose to use a statistical dataset of such density structures detected on the dayside of Mars by MARSIS in areas of oblique crustal fields, to determine the interval of densities for which the structures are found to make apparent upwellings. Then we use the corresponding electron density profiles corrected for signal dispersion, to determine the real altitudes of the density structures, their vertical extent and their plasma scale heights compared to the surrounding ionosphere. These new informations give critical hints for uncovering their origins

  4. Systematic comparison between line integrated densities measured with interferometry and polarimetry at JET

    SciTech Connect

    Brombin, M.; Zilli, E.; Giudicotti, L.; Boboc, A.; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2009-06-15

    A systematic comparison between the line integrated electron density derived from interferometry and polarimetry at JET has been carried out. For the first time the reliability of the measurements of the Cotton-Mouton effect has been analyzed for a wide range of main plasma parameters and the possibility to evaluate the electron density directly from polarimetric data has been studied. The purpose of this work is to recover the interferometric data with the density derived from the measured Cotton-Mouton effect, when the fringe jump phenomena occur. The results show that the difference between the line integrated electron density from interferometry and polarimetry is with one fringe (1.143x10{sup 19} m{sup -2}) for more than 90% of the cases. It is possible to consider polarimetry as a satisfactory alternative method to interferometry to measure the electron density and it could be used to recover interferometric signal when a fringe jumps occurs, preventing difficulties for the real-time control of many experiments at the JET machine.

  5. Evaluation of four mammographic density measures on HRT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raundahl, Jakob; Loog, Marco; Pettersen, Paola; Nielsen, Mads

    2007-03-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the relation between mammographic density and breast cancer risk. These studies indicate that women with dense breasts have a four to six fold risk increase. There is currently no gold standard for automatic assessment of mammographic density. In previous work two different automated methods for measuring the effect of HRT w.r.t. changes in breast density have been presented. One is a percentage density based on an adaptive global threshold, and the other is an intensity invariant measure, which provides structural information orthogonal to intensity-based methods. In this article we investigate the ability to detect density changes induced by HRT for these measures and compare to a radiologist's BI-RADS rating and interactive threshold percentage density. In the experiments, two sets of mammograms of 80 patients from a double blind, placebo controlled HRT experiment are used. The p-values for the statistical significance of the separation of density means, for the HRT group and the placebo group at end of study, are 0.2, 0.1, 0.02 and 0.02 for the automatic threshold, BI-RADS, the stripyness and the interactive threshold respectively.

  6. Quasi-optical design for systems to diagnose the electron temperature and density fluctuations on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Qifo; Liu, Yong; Zhao, Hailin; Zhou, Tianfu; Ti, Ang; Hu, Liqun

    2016-11-01

    A system to simultaneously diagnose the electron temperature and density fluctuations is proposed for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak device. This system includes a common quasi-optical antenna, a correlation electron cyclotron emission (CECE) system that is used to measure the electron temperature fluctuations and a Doppler backscattering (DBS) system that is used to measure the electron density fluctuations. The frequency range of the proposed CECE system is 108-120 GHz, and this corresponds to a radial coverage of normalized radius ((R - R0)/a, R0 = 1850 mm, a = 450 mm) from 0.2 to 0.67 for the plasma operation with a toroidal magnetic field of 2.26 T. This paper focuses on the design of the quasi-optical antenna and aims at optimizing the poloidal resolution for different frequency bands. An optimum result gives the beam radius for the CECE system of 13-15 mm and this corresponds to a wave number range of kθ < 2.4 cm-1. The beam radius is 20-30 mm for V band (50-75 GHz) and 15-20 mm for W band (75-110 GHz).

  7. Spacecraft radio scattering observations of the power spectrum of electron density fluctuations in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, R.; Armstrong, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    Solar wind electron density power spectra in the solar equatorial region are inferred from observations of phase scintillations and spectral broadening made with the Viking, Helios, and Pioneer spacecraft. The heliocentric distance range covered is 2-215 solar radii and for some observations close to the sun the spectra extend to fluctuation frequencies as high as 100 Hz. For heliocentric distances of about 20 solar radii the equivalent spacecraft-measured one-dimensional density spectrum is well modeled by a single power law in the frequency range 0.0001-0.05 Hz. The flattening of the density spectrum within 20 solar radii is presumably associated with energy deposition in the near-sun region and acceleration of the solar wind.

  8. Electron transfer and ionic displacements at the origin of the 2D electron gas at the LAO/STO interface: direct measurements with atomic-column spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Cantoni, Claudia; Gazquez, Jaume; Miletto Granozio, Fabio; Oxley, Mark P; Varela, Maria; Lupini, Andrew R; Pennycook, Stephen J; Aruta, Carmela; di Uccio, Umberto Scotti; Perna, Paolo; Maccariello, Davide

    2012-08-01

    Using state-of-the-art, aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy with atomic-scale spatial resolution, experimental evidence for an intrinsic electronic reconstruction at the LAO/STO interface is shown. Simultaneous measurements of interfacial electron density and system polarization are crucial for establishing the highly debated origin of the 2D electron gas.

  9. Possible cause of enhancement of electron temperature in high electron density region in the dayside ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakinami, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Shigeto

    2016-07-01

    When neutral atmosphere is ionized by solar EUV, energetic electrons named photoelectrons are emitted. The photoelectrons are primary heat source of electrons in the ionosphere in the daytime. The heating rate of electron by photoelectron is proportion to 0.97 power of electron density (Ne) while the heated electron is cooled through the Column collision with ions, the rate of which rate is square of Ne. Therefore, electron temperature (Te) decreases and approach ion temperature (Ti) with increase of Ne. Ions are also cooled through the collision with neutral spices. Finally, these temperatures (Te, Ti and Tn) show very similar values in high Ne region. However, Te enhancement with increase of Ne is found in the satellite observation at 600 km in the daytime ionosphere [Kakinami et al., 2011]. Similar Ti variation is also found around the magnetic dip equator [Kakinami et al., 2014]. One possible cause of the enhancement of Te is enhacement of Tn with increase Ne because both Ne and Tn increase with increase of solar irradiance flux, F10.7 [Lei et al., 2007]. However, since such the enhancements of Te are seen in any F10.7, it is hard to explain the phenomenon. In this paper, we present correlation between Te (Ti) and Ne obtained by the Incoherent Scatter radar at Jicamarca. The similar correlation, namely positive correlation of Te (Ti) with Ne in high Ne region are found above 300 km. Using the observations and Tn and neutral density calculated with MSIS, the Column collision cooling with ions, and inelastic collision cooling with neutral spices for electron are shown. The heat conduction along the magnetic field line is also estimated by using IRI model. Using these information, we discuss possible cause of the enhancement of Te in the high Ne region. References Kakinami et al. (2011), J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1029/2011JA016905. Kakinami et al. (2014), J. Geophys. Res., 119, doi:10.1002/2014JA020302. Lei et al.(2007), J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1029/2006JA012041.

  10. Comparing two iteration algorithms of Broyden electron density mixing through an atomic electronic structure computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man-Hong, Zhang

    2016-05-01

    By performing the electronic structure computation of a Si atom, we compare two iteration algorithms of Broyden electron density mixing in the literature. One was proposed by Johnson and implemented in the well-known VASP code. The other was given by Eyert. We solve the Kohn-Sham equation by using a conventional outward/inward integration of the differential equation and then connect two parts of solutions at the classical turning points, which is different from the method of the matrix eigenvalue solution as used in the VASP code. Compared to Johnson’s algorithm, the one proposed by Eyert needs fewer total iteration numbers. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61176080).

  11. Finding the Density of Objects without Measuring Mass and Volume

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mumba, Frackson; Tsige, Mesfin

    2007-01-01

    A simple method based on the moment of forces and Archimedes' principle is described for finding density without measuring the mass and volume of an object. The method involves balancing two unknown objects of masses M[subscript 1] and M[subscript 2] on each side of a pivot on a metre rule and measuring their corresponding moment arms. The object…

  12. Radial gradients of phase space density in the inner electron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung-Chan; Shprits, Yuri

    2012-12-01

    While the outer radiation belt (3.5 < L < 8.0) is highly variable with respect to geomagnetic activity, the inner radiation belt (1.2 < L< 2.0) is relatively stable. Less attention has been paid to the inner electron belt in recent years. It has been generally accepted that the equilibrium structure of radiation belt electrons is explained by the slow inward radial diffusion from a source in the outer belt and losses by Coulomb collision and wave-particle interaction. In this study, we examine this well accepted theory using the radial profiles of the phase space density (PSD), inferred from in situ measurements made by three different satellites: S3-3, CRRES, and POLAR. Our results show that electron PSD in the inner electron belt has a clear prominent local peak and negative radial gradient in the outer portion of the inner zone, i.e., decreasing PSD with increasingL-value. A likely explanation for the peaks in PSD is acceleration due to energy diffusion produced by lightning-generated and anthropogenic whistlers. These results indicate that either additional local acceleration mechanism is responsible for the formation of the inner electron belt or inner electron belt is formed by sporadic injections of electrons into the inner zone. The currently well accepted model of slow diffusion and losses will be further examined by the upcoming Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission.

  13. New electron cyclotron emission diagnostic for measurement of temperature based upon the electron Bernstein wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efthimion, P. C.; Hosea, J. C.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Taylor, G.

    1999-01-01

    Most magnetically confined plasma devices cannot take advantage of standard electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics to measure temperature. They either operate at high density relative to their magnetic field (e.g., ωp≫Ωc in spherical tokamaks) or they do not have sufficient density and temperature to reach the blackbody condition (τ>2). The standard ECE technique measures the electromagnetic waves emanating from the plasma. Here we propose to measure electron Bernstein waves (EBW) to ascertain the local electron temperature in these plasmas. The optical thickness of EBW is extremely high because it is an electrostatic wave with a large ki. For example, the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) will have an optical thickness τ≈3000 and CDX-U will have τ≈300. One can reach the blackbody condition with a plasma density ≈1011cm-3 and Te≈1 eV. This makes it attractive to most plasma devices. The serious issue with using EBW is the wave accessibility for the emission measurement. Simple accessibility arguments indicate the wave may be accessible by either direct coupling or mode conversion through an extremely narrow layer (≈1-2 mm). EBW experiments on the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) will test the accessibility properties of the spherical tokamak configuration.

  14. New electron cyclotron emission diagnostic for measurement of temperature based upon the electron Bernstein wave

    SciTech Connect

    Efthimion, P.C.; Hosea, J.C.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Taylor, G.

    1999-01-01

    Most magnetically confined plasma devices cannot take advantage of standard electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics to measure temperature. They either operate at high density relative to their magnetic field (e.g., {omega}{sub p}{gt}{Omega}{sub c} in spherical tokamaks) or they do not have sufficient density and temperature to reach the blackbody condition ({tau}{gt}2). The standard ECE technique measures the electromagnetic waves emanating from the plasma. Here we propose to measure electron Bernstein waves (EBW) to ascertain the local electron temperature in these plasmas. The optical thickness of EBW is extremely high because it is an electrostatic wave with a large k{sub i}. For example, the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) will have an optical thickness {tau}{approx}3000 and CDX-U will have {tau}{approx}300. One can reach the blackbody condition with a plasma density {approx}10{sup 11}thinspcm{sup {minus}3} and T{sub e}{approx}1thinspeV. This makes it attractive to most plasma devices. The serious issue with using EBW is the wave accessibility for the emission measurement. Simple accessibility arguments indicate the wave may be accessible by either direct coupling or mode conversion through an extremely narrow layer ({approx}1{endash}2 mm). EBW experiments on the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) will test the accessibility properties of the spherical tokamak configuration. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Direct electronic measurement of Peltier cooling and heating in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vera-Marun, I. J.; van den Berg, J. J.; Dejene, F. K.; van Wees, B. J.

    2016-05-01

    Thermoelectric effects allow the generation of electrical power from waste heat and the electrical control of cooling and heating. Remarkably, these effects are also highly sensitive to the asymmetry in the density of states around the Fermi energy and can therefore be exploited as probes of distortions in the electronic structure at the nanoscale. Here we consider two-dimensional graphene as an excellent nanoscale carbon material for exploring the interaction between electronic and thermal transport phenomena, by presenting a direct and quantitative measurement of the Peltier component to electronic cooling and heating in graphene. Thanks to an architecture including nanoscale thermometers, we detected Peltier component modulation of up to 15 mK for currents of 20 μA at room temperature and observed a full reversal between Peltier cooling and heating for electron and hole regimes. This fundamental thermodynamic property is a complementary tool for the study of nanoscale thermoelectric transport in two-dimensional materials.

  16. Direct electronic measurement of Peltier cooling and heating in graphene.

    PubMed

    Vera-Marun, I J; van den Berg, J J; Dejene, F K; van Wees, B J

    2016-01-01

    Thermoelectric effects allow the generation of electrical power from waste heat and the electrical control of cooling and heating. Remarkably, these effects are also highly sensitive to the asymmetry in the density of states around the Fermi energy and can therefore be exploited as probes of distortions in the electronic structure at the nanoscale. Here we consider two-dimensional graphene as an excellent nanoscale carbon material for exploring the interaction between electronic and thermal transport phenomena, by presenting a direct and quantitative measurement of the Peltier component to electronic cooling and heating in graphene. Thanks to an architecture including nanoscale thermometers, we detected Peltier component modulation of up to 15 mK for currents of 20 μA at room temperature and observed a full reversal between Peltier cooling and heating for electron and hole regimes. This fundamental thermodynamic property is a complementary tool for the study of nanoscale thermoelectric transport in two-dimensional materials. PMID:27161186

  17. Direct electronic measurement of Peltier cooling and heating in graphene

    PubMed Central

    Vera-Marun, I. J.; van den Berg, J. J.; Dejene, F. K.; van Wees, B. J.

    2016-01-01

    Thermoelectric effects allow the generation of electrical power from waste heat and the electrical control of cooling and heating. Remarkably, these effects are also highly sensitive to the asymmetry in the density of states around the Fermi energy and can therefore be exploited as probes of distortions in the electronic structure at the nanoscale. Here we consider two-dimensional graphene as an excellent nanoscale carbon material for exploring the interaction between electronic and thermal transport phenomena, by presenting a direct and quantitative measurement of the Peltier component to electronic cooling and heating in graphene. Thanks to an architecture including nanoscale thermometers, we detected Peltier component modulation of up to 15 mK for currents of 20 μA at room temperature and observed a full reversal between Peltier cooling and heating for electron and hole regimes. This fundamental thermodynamic property is a complementary tool for the study of nanoscale thermoelectric transport in two-dimensional materials. PMID:27161186

  18. Density measurement in air with saturable absorbing seed gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baganoff, D.

    1982-01-01

    Approaches which have the potential to make density measurements in a compressible flow, where one or more laser beams are used as probes, were investigated. Saturation in sulfur hexafluoride iodine and a crossed beam technique where one beam acts as a saturating beam and the other is at low intensity and acts as a probe beam are considered. It is shown that a balance between an increase in fluorescence intensity with increasing pressure from line broadening and the normal decrease in intensity with increasing pressure from quenching can be used to develop a linear relation between fluorescence intensity and number density and lead to a new density measurement scheme. The method is used to obtain a density image of the cross section of an iodine seeded underexpanded supersonic jet of nitrogen, by illuminating the cross section by a sheet of laser light.

  19. Void alignment and density profile applied to measuring cosmological parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, De-Chang

    2015-12-01

    We study the orientation and density profiles of the cosmological voids with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS; Ahn et al.) 10 data. Using voids to test Alcock-Paczynski effect has been proposed and tested in both simulations and actual SDSS data. Previous observations imply that there exist an empirical stretching factor which plays an important role in the voids' orientation. Simulations indicate that this empirical stretching factor is caused by the void galaxies' peculiar velocities. Recently Hamaus et al. found that voids' density profiles are universal and their average velocities satisfy linear theory very well. In this paper, we first confirm that the stretching effect exists using independent analysis. We then apply the universal density profile to measure the cosmological parameters. We find that the void density profile can be a tool to measure the cosmological parameters.

  20. Talbot-Lau X-ray Deflectometer electron density diagnostic for laser and pulsed power high energy density plasma experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Valdivia, M. P.; Stutman, D.; Stoeckl, C.; Mileham, C.; Begishev, I.; Theobald, W.; Bromage, J.; Regan, S. P.; Klein, S. R.; Munoz-Cordoves, G.; et al

    2016-04-21

    Talbot-Lau X-ray Deflectometry has been developed as an electron density diagnostic for High Energy Density plasmas. The technique can deliver x-ray refraction, attenuation, elemental composition, and scatter information from a single Moiré image. An 8 keV Talbot-Lau interferometer was deployed using laser and x-pinch backlighters. Grating survival and electron density mapping was demonstrated for 25-29 J, 8-30 ps laser pulses using copper foil targets. Moire pattern formation and grating survival was also observed using a copper x-pinch driven at 400 kA, ~1 kA/ns. Lastly, these results demonstrate the potential of TXD as an electron density diagnostic for HED plasmas.

  1. A neural network based error correction method for radio occultation electron density retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Viet-Cuong; Juang, Jyh-Ching

    2015-12-01

    Abel inversion techniques have been widely employed to retrieve electron density profiles (EDPs) from radio occultation (RO) measurements, which are available by observing Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) satellites from low-earth-orbit (LEO) satellites. It is well known that the ordinary Abel inversion might introduce errors in the retrieval of EDPs when the spherical symmetry assumption is violated. The error, however, is case-dependent; therefore it is desirable to associate an error index or correction coefficient with respect to each retrieved EDP. Several error indices have been proposed but they only deal with electron density at the F2 peak and suffer from some drawbacks. In this paper we propose an artificial neural network (ANN) based error correction method for EDPs obtained by the ordinary Abel inversion. The ANN is first trained to learn the relationship between vertical total electron content (TEC) measurements and retrieval errors at the F2 peak, 220 km and 110 km altitudes; correction coefficients are then estimated to correct the retrieved EDPs at these three altitudes. Experiments using the NeQuick2 model and real FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC RO geometry show that the proposed method outperforms existing ones. Real incoherent scatter radar (ISR) measurements at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory and the global TEC map provided by the International GNSS Service (IGS) are also used to valid the proposed method.

  2. Direct Measurements of Pore Fluid Density by Vibrating Tube Densimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S; Rother, Gernot; Wesolowski, David J; Cole, David R; Wallacher, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    The densities of pore-confined fluids were measured for the first time by means of a vibrating tube method. Isotherms of total adsorption capacity were measured directly making the method complementary to the conventional gravimetric or volumetric/piezometric adsorption techniques, which yield the excess adsorption (the Gibbsian surface excess). A custom-made high-pressure, high-temperature vibrating tube densimeter (VTD) was used to measure the densities of subcritical and supercritical propane (between 35 C and 97 C) and supercritical carbon dioxide (between 32 C and 50 C) saturating hydrophobic silica aerogel (0.2 g/cm3, 90% porosity) synthesized inside Hastelloy U-tubes. Additionally, excess adsorption isotherms for supercritical CO2 and the same porous solid were measured gravimetrically using a precise magnetically-coupled microbalance. Pore fluid densities and total adsorption isotherms increased monotonically with increasing density of the bulk fluid, in contrast to excess adsorption isotherms, which reached a maximum at a subcritical density of the bulk fluid, and then decreased towards zero or negative values at supercritical densities. Compression of the confined fluid significantly beyond the density of the bulk liquid at the same temperature was observed at subcritical temperatures. The features of the isotherms of confined fluid density are interpreted to elucidate the observed behavior of excess adsorption. The maxima of excess adsorption were found to occur below the critical density of the bulk fluid at the conditions corresponding to the beginning of the plateau of total adsorption, marking the end of the transition of pore fluid to a denser, liquid-like pore phase. The results for propane and carbon dioxide showed similarity in the sense of the principle of corresponding states. No measurable effect of pore confinement on the liquid-vapor critical point was found. Quantitative agreement was obtained between excess adsorption isotherms determined

  3. 600-GHz Electronically Tunable Vector Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dengler, Robert; Maiwald, Frank; Siegel, Peter

    2007-01-01

    A compact, high-dynamic-range, electronically tunable vector measurement system that operates in the frequency range from approximately 560 to approximately 635 GHz has been developed as a prototype of vector measurement systems that would be suitable for use in nearly-real-time active submillimeter-wave imaging. As used here, 'vector measurement system" signifies an instrumentation system that applies a radio-frequency (RF) excitation to an object of interest and measures the resulting amplitude and phase response, relative to either the applied excitatory signal or another reference signal related in a known way to applied excitatory signal.

  4. Measuring soil particle density using the ultrasonic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennik, Kersti; Tõnutare, Tõnu; Krebstein, Kadri; Keller, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Particle density is a fundamental soil physical parameter that represents the density of the solid soil particles (mineral and organic) and is expressed as the ratio of the mass to the volume of the solid. Particle density serves as input value in many models, such as soil compression and bearing capacity models. Particle density is often estimated rather than measured. In Estonia particle density is typically estimated based on soil organic matter content by Kitse's (1978) and Reppo's (1968) formulas for mineral and peat soils. The standard method for measuring particle density is the pycnometer method in which entrapped air is removed by vacuum or by boiling the soil-water mixture. The ultrasonic technology is widely used in chromatography for degassing of solutions and is easy to use. This ultrasonic energy can also be used for sweeping out the gaseous phase from the soil-water mixture, however the appropriate treatment time is not yet specified. The purpose of this study was to test the usability of ultrasonic energy in particle density determination as well to test different treatment time steps with ultrasonic path. We sampled 15 typical Estonian mineral soils with different texture and organic content. Also 3 peat soils were analysed. Particle density was determined by the pycnometer method and with ultrasonic bath. Soil organic carbon (SOC) content was determined by the Tjurin method and the soil organic matter content (SOM) was calculated as SOM=1.724SOC. The particle density values determined with the pycnometer method were compared to values measured with the ultrasonic bath with different time steps, as well as to calculated values according to Kitse (1978) and Reppo (1968). The applicability of formulas by Kitse and Reppo were tested by comparing the estimated particle densities with measured particle densities. Based on the results of this study it can be concluded that ultrasonic method is applicable for particle density determination and the most

  5. Measure the local dark matter density with LAMOST spectroscopic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Xia, Qiran; Mao, Shude

    2016-08-01

    The local dark matter density plays the key role in the distribution of the dark matter halo near the Galactic disk. It will also answer whether a dark matter disk exists in the Milky Way. We measure the local dark matter density with LAMOST observed stars located at around the north Galactic pole. The selection effects of the observations are well considered and corrected. We find that the derived DM density, which is around 0.0159+0.0047 -0.0057 M ⊙ pc-3 providing a flat local rotation curve.

  6. Measurement of the lunar neutron density profile. [Apollo 17 flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolum, D. S.; Burnett, D. S.; Furst, M.; Weiss, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    An in situ measurement of the lunar neutron density from 20 to 400 g/sq cm depth between the lunar surface was made by the Apollo 17 Lunar Neutron Probe Experiment using particle tracks produced by the B10(n, alpha)Li7 reaction. Both the absolute magnitude and depth profile of the neutron density are in good agreement with past theoretical calculations. The effect of cadmium absorption on the neutron density and in the relative Sm149 to Gd157 capture rates obtained experimentally implies that the true lunar Gd157 capture rate is about one half of that calculated theoretically.

  7. Structural and electronic properties of small silver-sulfur clusters: A density functional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan-Fang; Li, Yang; Li, Ying; Tan, Jia-Jin; Li, Hui-Li

    2016-10-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed to systematically investigate the structural and electronic properties of neutral and anionic AgnSm (2≤n+m≤6) clusters. The results show that the ground-state structures of neutral clusters are different from those of anionic clusters. Theoretical electron detachment energies (both vertical and adiabatic) are compared with the experimental measurements to verify the ground states of silver-sulfur clusters obtained in the present study. For both neutral and anionic systems, the highest occupied-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy gaps exhibit an odd-even oscillation as a function of the cluster size. In addition, the natural population analysis reveals that the charges transfer from Ag atoms to S atoms in AgnSm clusters, and the extra electron of AgnSm- clusters is mainly localized on the 3p subshells of S atoms.

  8. Comet P/Giacobini-Zinner electron and H2O column densities from ICE and ground-based observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer-Vernet, N.; Strauss, Michael A.; Steinberg, J. L.; Spinrad, Hyron; Mccarthy, Patrick J.

    1986-01-01

    An H2O(+) emission profile extracted from an optical CCD spectrogram obtained during the ICE/Giacobini-Zinner encounter is compared to the electron density profile deduced from in-situ measurements by the ratio experiment aboard ICE. It is concluded that the electrons and the H2O(+) ions are distributed similarly 9600 km tailward from the cometary nucleus; that the ratio of number densities of H2O(+) ions to electrons is 1/4 at this point; and that the width of the plasma sheet is 16,000 km.

  9. User's Guide: An Enhanced Modified Faraday Cup for the Profiling of the Power Density Distribution in Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J W; Teruya, A T; Palmer, T A

    2002-06-01

    This handbook describes the assembly and operation of an enhanced Modified Faraday Cup (MFC) diagnostic device for measuring the power density distribution of high power electron beams used for welding. The most recent version of this diagnostic device, [1] Version 2.0, contains modifications to the hardware components of previous MFC designs.[2] These modifications allow for more complete capture of the electrons and better electrical grounding, thus improving the quality of the acquired data and enabling a more accurate computed tomographic (CT) reconstruction [3,4] of the power density distribution of the electron beam to be performed. [ 5-9

  10. High-Sensitivity Measurement of Density by Magnetic Levitation.

    PubMed

    Nemiroski, Alex; Kumar, A A; Soh, Siowling; Harburg, Daniel V; Yu, Hai-Dong; Whitesides, George M

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents methods that use Magnetic Levitation (MagLev) to measure very small differences in density of solid diamagnetic objects suspended in a paramagnetic medium. Previous work in this field has shown that, while it is a convenient method, standard MagLev (i.e., where the direction of magnetization and gravitational force are parallel) cannot resolve differences in density <10(-4) g/cm(3) for macroscopic objects (>mm) because (i) objects close in density prevent each other from reaching an equilibrium height due to hard contact and excluded volume, and (ii) using weaker magnets or reducing the magnetic susceptibility of the medium destabilizes the magnetic trap. The present work investigates the use of weak magnetic gradients parallel to the faces of the magnets as a means of increasing the sensitivity of MagLev without destabilization. Configuring the MagLev device in a rotated state (i.e., where the direction of magnetization and gravitational force are perpendicular) relative to the standard configuration enables simple measurements along the axes with the highest sensitivity to changes in density. Manipulating the distance of separation between the magnets or the lengths of the magnets (along the axis of measurement) enables the sensitivity to be tuned. These modifications enable an improvement in the resolution up to 100-fold over the standard configuration, and measurements with resolution down to 10(-6) g/cm(3). Three examples of characterizing the small differences in density among samples of materials having ostensibly indistinguishable densities-Nylon spheres, PMMA spheres, and drug spheres-demonstrate the applicability of rotated Maglev to measuring the density of small (0.1-1 mm) objects with high sensitivity. This capability will be useful in materials science, separations, and quality control of manufactured objects. PMID:26815205

  11. High-Sensitivity Measurement of Density by Magnetic Levitation.

    PubMed

    Nemiroski, Alex; Kumar, A A; Soh, Siowling; Harburg, Daniel V; Yu, Hai-Dong; Whitesides, George M

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents methods that use Magnetic Levitation (MagLev) to measure very small differences in density of solid diamagnetic objects suspended in a paramagnetic medium. Previous work in this field has shown that, while it is a convenient method, standard MagLev (i.e., where the direction of magnetization and gravitational force are parallel) cannot resolve differences in density <10(-4) g/cm(3) for macroscopic objects (>mm) because (i) objects close in density prevent each other from reaching an equilibrium height due to hard contact and excluded volume, and (ii) using weaker magnets or reducing the magnetic susceptibility of the medium destabilizes the magnetic trap. The present work investigates the use of weak magnetic gradients parallel to the faces of the magnets as a means of increasing the sensitivity of MagLev without destabilization. Configuring the MagLev device in a rotated state (i.e., where the direction of magnetization and gravitational force are perpendicular) relative to the standard configuration enables simple measurements along the axes with the highest sensitivity to changes in density. Manipulating the distance of separation between the magnets or the lengths of the magnets (along the axis of measurement) enables the sensitivity to be tuned. These modifications enable an improvement in the resolution up to 100-fold over the standard configuration, and measurements with resolution down to 10(-6) g/cm(3). Three examples of characterizing the small differences in density among samples of materials having ostensibly indistinguishable densities-Nylon spheres, PMMA spheres, and drug spheres-demonstrate the applicability of rotated Maglev to measuring the density of small (0.1-1 mm) objects with high sensitivity. This capability will be useful in materials science, separations, and quality control of manufactured objects.

  12. Electron momentum density, band structure, and structural properties of SrS

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, G.; Munjal, N.; Vyas, V.; Kumar, R.; Sharma, B. K.; Joshi, K. B.

    2013-10-15

    The electron momentum density, the electronic band structure, and the structural properties of SrS are presented in this paper. The isotropic Compton profile, anisotropies in the directional Compton profiles, the electronic band structure and density of states are calculated using the ab initio periodic linear combination of atomic orbitals method with the CRYSTAL06 code. Structural parameters of SrS-lattice constants and bulk moduli in the B1 and B2 phases-are computed together with the transition pressure. The computed parameters are well in agreement with earlier investigations. To compare the calculated isotropic Compton profile, measurement on polycrystalline SrS is performed using 5Ci-{sup 241}Am Compton spectrometer. Additionally, charge transfer is studied by means of the Compton profiles computed from the ionic model. The nature of bonding in the isovalent SrS and SrO compounds is compared on the basis of equal-valenceelectron-density profiles and the bonding in SrS is found to be more covalent than in SrO.

  13. Pathways of F region thermospheric mass density enhancement via soft electron precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; Varney, R. H.; Lotko, W.; Brambles, O. J.; Wang, W.; Lei, J.; Wiltberger, M.; Lyon, J. G.

    2015-07-01

    The efficiencies of pathways of thermospheric heating via soft electron precipitation in the dayside cusp region are investigated using the coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere model (CMIT). Event-based data-model comparisons show that the CMIT model is capable of reproducing the thermospheric mass density variations measured by the CHAMP satellite during both quite and active periods. During the 24 August 2005 storm event (Kp = 6-) while intense Joule heating rate occurs in the polar cusp region, including soft electron precipitation is important for accurately modeling the F region thermospheric mass density distribution near the cusp region. During the 27 July 2007 event (Kp = 2-) while little Joule heating rate occurs in the polar cusp region, the controlled CMIT simulations suggest that the direct pathway through the energy exchange between soft electrons and thermospheric neutrals is the dominant process during this event, which only has a small effect on the neutral temperature and mass density at 400 km altitude. Comparisons between the two case studies show that the indirect pathway via increasing the F region Joule heating rate is a dominant process during the 24 August 2005 storm event, which is much more efficient than the direct heating process.

  14. Faraday-effect polarimeter-interferometer system for current density measurement on EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H. Q.; Jie, Y. X. Zou, Z. Y.; Li, W. M.; Wang, Z. X.; Qian, J. P.; Yang, Y.; Zeng, L.; Wei, X. C.; Hu, L. Q.; Wan, B. N.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Lan, T.; Li, G. S.

    2014-11-15

    A multichannel far-infrared laser-based POlarimeter-INTerferometer (POINT) system utilizing the three-wave technique is under development for current density and electron density profile measurements in the EAST tokamak. Novel molybdenum retro-reflectors are mounted in the inside wall for the double-pass optical arrangement. A Digital Phase Detector with 250 kHz bandwidth, which will provide real-time Faraday rotation angle and density phase shift output, have been developed for use on the POINT system. Initial calibration indicates the electron line-integrated density resolution is less than 5 × 10{sup 16} m{sup −2} (∼2°), and the Faraday rotation angle rms phase noise is <0.1°.

  15. Variation of carrier concentration and interface trap density in 8MeV electron irradiated c-Si solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Sathyanarayana Rao, Asha; Krishnan, Sheeja; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Suresh, E. P.

    2014-04-24

    The capacitance and conductance measurements were carried out for c-Si solar cells, irradiated with 8 MeV electrons with doses ranging from 5kGy – 100kGy in order to investigate the anomalous degradation of the cells in the radiation harsh environments. Capacitance – Voltage measurements indicate that there is a slight reduction in the carrier concentration upon electron irradiation due to the creation of radiation induced defects. The conductance measurement results reveal that the interface state densities and the trap time constant increases with electron dose due to displacement damages in c-Si solar cells.

  16. Ligand identification using electron-density map correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Adams, Paul D.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Cohn, Judith D.

    2007-01-01

    An automated ligand-fitting procedure is applied to (F{sub o} − F{sub c})exp(iϕ{sub c}) difference density for 200 commonly found ligands from macromolecular structures in the Protein Data Bank to identify ligands from density maps. A procedure for the identification of ligands bound in crystal structures of macromolecules is described. Two characteristics of the density corresponding to a ligand are used in the identification procedure. One is the correlation of the ligand density with each of a set of test ligands after optimization of the fit of that ligand to the density. The other is the correlation of a fingerprint of the density with the fingerprint of model density for each possible ligand. The fingerprints consist of an ordered list of correlations of each the test ligands with the density. The two characteristics are scored using a Z-score approach in which the correlations are normalized to the mean and standard deviation of correlations found for a variety of mismatched ligand-density pairs, so that the Z scores are related to the probability of observing a particular value of the correlation by chance. The procedure was tested with a set of 200 of the most commonly found ligands in the Protein Data Bank, collectively representing 57% of all ligands in the Protein Data Bank. Using a combination of these two characteristics of ligand density, ranked lists of ligand identifications were made for representative (F{sub o} − F{sub c})exp(iϕ{sub c}) difference density from entries in the Protein Data Bank. In 48% of the 200 cases, the correct ligand was at the top of the ranked list of ligands. This approach may be useful in identification of unknown ligands in new macromolecular structures as well as in the identification of which ligands in a mixture have bound to a macromolecule.

  17. TRACTOGRAPHY DENSITY AND NETWORK MEASURES IN ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Gautam; Nir, Talia M; Toga, Arthur W; Thompson, Paul M

    2013-04-01

    Brain connectivity declines in Alzheimer's disease (AD), both functionally and structurally. Connectivity maps and networks derived from diffusion-based tractography offer new ways to track disease progression and to understand how AD affects the brain. Here we set out to identify (1) which fiber network measures show greatest differences between AD patients and controls, and (2) how these effects depend on the density of fibers extracted by the tractography algorithm. We computed brain networks from diffusion-weighted images (DWI) of the brain, in 110 subjects (28 normal elderly, 56 with early and 11 with late mild cognitive impairment, and 15 with AD). We derived connectivity matrices and network topology measures, for each subject, from whole-brain tractography and cortical parcellations. We used an ODF lookup table to speed up fiber extraction, and to exploit the full information in the orientation distribution function (ODF). This made it feasible to compute high density connectivity maps. We used accelerated tractography to compute a large number of fibers to understand what effect fiber density has on network measures and in distinguishing different disease groups in our data. We focused on global efficiency, transitivity, path length, mean degree, density, modularity, small world, and assortativity measures computed from weighted and binary undirected connectivity matrices. Of all these measures, the mean nodal degree best distinguished diagnostic groups. High-density fiber matrices were most helpful for picking up the more subtle clinical differences, e.g. between mild cognitively impaired (MCI) and normals, or for distinguishing subtypes of MCI (early versus late). Care is needed in clinical analyses of brain connectivity, as the density of extracted fibers may affect how well a network measure can pick up differences between patients and controls. PMID:25404994

  18. A phase contrast imaging-interferometer system for detection of multiscale electron density fluctuations on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, E. M.; Rost, J. C.; Porkolab, M.; Marinoni, A.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2016-11-01

    Heterodyne interferometry and phase contrast imaging (PCI) are robust, mature techniques for measuring low-k and high-k electron density fluctuations, respectively. This work describes the first-ever implementation of a combined PCI-interferometer. The combined system uses a single 10.6 μm probe beam, two interference schemes, and two detectors to measure electron density fluctuations at large spatiotemporal bandwidth (10 kHz measurement of ion- and electron-scale instabilities. Further, correlating our interferometer's measurements with those from DIII-D's pre-existing, toroidally separated interferometer allows core-localized, low-n MHD studies that may otherwise be inaccessible via external magnetic measurements. The combined diagnostic's small port requirements and minimal access restrictions make it well-suited to the harsh neutron environments and limited port space expected in next-step devices.

  19. Mammographic density measurements are not affected by mammography system

    PubMed Central

    Damases, Christine N.; Brennan, Patrick C.; McEntee, Mark F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Mammographic density (MD) is a significant risk factor for breast cancer and has been shown to reduce the sensitivity of mammography screening. Knowledge of a woman’s density can be used to predict her risk of developing breast cancer and personalize her imaging pathway. However, measurement of breast density has proven to be troublesome with wide variations in density recorded using radiologists’ visual Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS). Several automated methods for assessing breast density have been proposed, each with their own source of measurement error. The use of differing mammographic imaging systems further complicates MD measurement, especially for the same women imaged over time. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether having a mammogram on differing manufacturer’s equipment affects a woman’s MD measurement. Raw mammographic images were acquired on two mammography imaging systems (General Electric and Hologic) one year apart and processed using VolparaDensity™ to obtain the Volpara Density Grade (VDG) and average volumetric breast density percentage (AvBD%). Visual BIRADS scores were also obtained from 20 expert readers. BIRADS scores for both systems showed strong positive correlation (ρ=0.904; p<0.001), while the VDG (ρ=0.978; p<0.001) and AvBD% (ρ=0.973; p<0.001) showed stronger positive correlations. Substantial agreement was shown between the systems for BIRADS (κ=0.692; p<0.001), however, the systems demonstrated an almost perfect agreement for VDG (κ=0.933; p<0.001). PMID:26158085

  20. Electron thermalization ranges and free-ion yields in dielectric fluids: Effects of density and molecular shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, Norman; Freeman, Gordon R.

    1983-12-01

    Secondary-electron thermalization ranges bGP and free-ion yields GEfi have been measured in the coexistence vapor and liquid of spherelike (methane) and nonspherelike (ethane) molecules at densities 0.14<~ddc<~2.8, where dc is the density of the critical fluid. The density-normalized range bGPd at low d is 5.5×10-6 kg/m2 in both compounds. In the dense gas at ddc>~0.3, bGPd increases slightly; the effective cross section for epithermal electron scattering is lessened. The large density fluctuations at these conditions, which cause quasilocalization of thermal electrons, appear to affect epithermal electrons in an opposite fashion. At ddc>1.0, conduction-band formation lifts bGPd in liquid methane to ~4 times the value in liquid ethane. The density effect is in the same direction as, but less marked than, that for thermal electrons. At ddc=2.5, bGP in methane is 1.2 times larger than at ddc=1, but the mobility μ of thermal electrons is 15 times larger than at ddc=1. In ethane at ddc=2.5, bGP is 3.4 times and μ is 33 times smaller than at ddc=1. The degree of sphericity of the molecules greatly affects electron energy loss and localization interactions.

  1. Precision measurements of linear scattering density using muon tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åström, E.; Bonomi, G.; Calliari, I.; Calvini, P.; Checchia, P.; Donzella, A.; Faraci, E.; Forsberg, F.; Gonella, F.; Hu, X.; Klinger, J.; Sundqvist Ökvist, L.; Pagano, D.; Rigoni, A.; Ramous, E.; Urbani, M.; Vanini, S.; Zenoni, A.; Zumerle, G.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that muon tomography can be used to precisely measure the properties of various materials. The materials which have been considered have been extracted from an experimental blast furnace, including carbon (coke) and iron oxides, for which measurements of the linear scattering density relative to the mass density have been performed with an absolute precision of 10%. We report the procedures that are used in order to obtain such precision, and a discussion is presented to address the expected performance of the technique when applied to heavier materials. The results we obtain do not depend on the specific type of material considered and therefore they can be extended to any application.

  2. Lunar Surface Material - Spacecraft Measurements of Density and Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, L. D.

    1969-01-01

    The relation of the density of the lunar surface layer to depth is probably best determined from spacecraft measurements of the bearing capacity as a function of depth. A comparison of these values with laboratory measurements of the bearing capacity of low-cohesion particulate materials as a function of the percentage of solid indicates that the bulk density at the lunar surface is about 1.1 grams per cubic centimeter and that it increases nearly linearly to about 1.6 grams per cubic centimeter at a depth of 5 centimeters.

  3. Boundary location of Mars nightside ionospheric plasma in term of the electron density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morooka, Michiko W.; Andersson, Laila; Ergun, Bob; Fowler, Christopher; Woodson, Adam; Weber, Tristan; Delory, Greg; Andrews, David; Edberg, Niklas; Eriksson, Anders; Michell, David; Connerney, Jack; Gruesbeck, Jacob; Halekas, Jasper

    2015-11-01

    Photo-ionized Mars atmosphere is forming an ionosphere and shielding the solar wind with creating barriers of bow shock. Inside the bow shock ionospheric plasma interact with solar wind plasma and result different boundaries. A question is how far the ionospheric plasma can stand off the solar wind.On the dayside, in-situ data set from Mars magnetosphere missions often observed the sharp gradient of the thermal plasma flux and ion composition change as well as the drop off of the magnetic fluctuation simultaneously as a outer boundary of the ionospheric plasma and an obstacle to the solar wind. Several models have constructed the shape of the boundary based on the statistical observations [e.g., Trotignon et al., 2006; Edberg et al., 2008].On the nightside, plasma instrument onboard Phobos 2 observed the particles and magnetic field characteristics similar to the dayside. However, the number of data is still too few to understand the general location of boundaries. We will present the characteristics of the nightside magnetospheric boundary region in term of the electron density. MAVEN Langmuir probe measurement (LPW) can estimate the electron density using the spacecraft environment. As MAVEN pass from the bow shock and sheath region into the magnetosphere the electron density often show a sharp gradient (the density jumps two orders of magnitudes in a few seconds). Comparing this to the data from particle instrument, the sharp electron density gradient was often associated with the transition of the characteristic energy of ions.Several hundreds of boundaries crossing by MAVEN allow us to investigate the statistical view of the boundary. We searched for a large electron density gradient as an indicator of the plasma boundary to identify the location of the ionospheric/solar wind plasma boundary. The results show that the many of the nightside boundaries locates close to the tail region of Mars forming elliptical shape of boundary. We will provide the empirical

  4. 3D Distribution of the Coronal Electron Density and its Evolution with Solar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tongjiang; Reginald, Nelson Leslie; Davila, Joseph M.; St. Cyr, Orville Chris

    2016-05-01

    The variability of the solar white-light corona and its connection to the solar activity has been studied for more than a half century. It is widely accepted that the temporal variation of the total radiance of the K-corona follows the solar cycle pattern (e.g., correlated with sunspot number). However, the origin of this variation and its relationships with regard to coronal mass ejections and the solar wind are yet to be clearly understood. We know that the COR1-A and –B instruments onboard the STEREO spacecraft have continued to perform high-cadence (5 min) polarized brightness measurements from two different vantage points over a long period of time that encompasses the solar minimum of Solar Cycle 23 to the solar maximum of Solar Cycle 24. This extended period of polarized brightness measurements can now be used to reconstruct 3D electron density distributions of the corona between the heliocentric heights of 1.5-4.0 solar radii. In this study we have constructed the 3D coronal density models for 100 Carrington rotations (CRs) from 2007 to 2014 using the spherically symmetric inversion (SSI) method. The validity of these 3D density models is verified by comparing with similar 3D density models created by other means such as tomography, MHD modeling, and 2D density distributions inverted from the polarized brightness images from LASCO/C2 instrument onboard the SOHO spacecraft. When examining the causes for the temporal variation of the global electron content we find that its increase from the solar minimum to maximum depends on changes to both the total area and mean density of coronal streamers. We also find that the global and hemispheric electron contents show quasi-periodic variations with a period of 8-9 CRs during the ascending and maximum phases of Solar Cycle 24 through wavelet analysis. In addition, we also explore any obvious relationships between temporal variation of the global electron content with the photospheric magnetic flux, total mass of

  5. Optical density and velocity measurements in cryogenic gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, O. S.; Kunsch, J. P.; Rösgen, T.

    2005-07-01

    This paper presents the application of optical measurement techniques in dense-gas flows in a heavy-gas channel to determine planar two-component (2C) velocity profiles and two-dimensional (2D) temperature profiles. The experimental approach is rather new in this area, and represents progress compared with the traditional techniques based on thermocouple measurements. The dense-gas flows are generated by the evaporation of liquid nitrogen. The optical measurement of both the velocity and density profiles is accomplished by the implementation of particle image velocimetry (PIV) and background-oriented schlieren (BOS) systems. Supplemental thermocouple measurements are used as independent calibrations to derive temperatures from the density data measured with the BOS system. The results obtained with both systems are used to quantify the dilution behavior of the propagating cloud through a global entrainment parameter β. Its value agrees well with the results obtained by earlier studies.

  6. Electronic measurement poses challenges for technicians

    SciTech Connect

    Tajani, F.A. )

    1994-05-01

    In today's highly competitive natural gas transportation business, electronic gas measurement (EGM) information is more than important. It's essential. The measurement system consists of primary, secondary and tertiary devices. The primary device defines the basic meter used for gas measurement such as an orifice, turbine, rotary or diaphragm meter. The secondary device provides such data as static pressure, temperature and differential pressure. The tertiary device is an electronic computer, programmed to correctly calculate flow within specified limits, that received information from the primary and/or secondary devices. Calculation factor accuracy is dependent on two items: volume calculation accuracy; information accuracy. Volume calculations accuracy can only be as good as the data provided by pressure, temperature and differential pressure devices and time used in the calculation. In turn, the accuracy of these devices is as good as the device being calibrated.

  7. Temperature measurement systems in wearable electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, S.; Gołebiowski, J.

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the concept of temperature measurement system, adapted to wearable electronics applications. Temperature is one of the most commonly monitored factor in smart textiles, especially in sportswear, medical and rescue products. Depending on the application, measured temperature could be used as an initial value of alert, heating, lifesaving or analysis system. The concept of the temperature measurement multi-point system, which consists of flexible screen-printed resistive sensors, placed on the T-shirt connected with the central unit and the power supply is elaborated in the paper.

  8. Density measurements in water using background oriented schlieren technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Shi; Wang, Chuanxi; Eliasson, Veronica

    2012-11-01

    Undersea earthquakes, tsunamis and underwater explosions are examples of phenomena that cause compressible wave propagation in oceans leading to changes in density and pressure. Here, a direct impact method is used to generate a shock wave in a water-filled channel and the following changes in the density of the fluid is quantified using an extended background oriented schlieren technique. Background oriented schlieren technique relies on measuring variations in index of refraction in the fluid. A high-speed camera is used to capture multiple frames of the shock wave propagation. A code has been developed to quantify the change in index of refection, and map it to the change in density. Results of density changes due to shock wave propagation in converging water-filled channels will be presented. Supported by Office of Naval Research through a MURI Grant Number N00014-06-1-0730 (Dr. Y.D.S. Rajapakse, Program Manager).

  9. A microwave interferometer for small and tenuous plasma density measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Tudisco, O.; Falcetta, C.; De Angelis, R.; Florean, M.; Neri, C.; Mazzotta, C.; Pollastrone, F.; Rocchi, G.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Lucca Fabris, A.; Manente, M.; Ferri, F.; Tasinato, L.; Trezzolani, F.; Accatino, L.; Selmo, A.

    2013-03-15

    The non-intrusive density measurement of the thin plasma produced by a mini-helicon space thruster (HPH.com project) is a challenge, due to the broad density range (between 10{sup 16} m{sup -3} and 10{sup 19} m{sup -3}) and the small size of the plasma source (2 cm of diameter). A microwave interferometer has been developed for this purpose. Due to the small size of plasma, the probing beam wavelength must be small ({lambda}= 4 mm), thus a very high sensitivity interferometer is required in order to observe the lower density values. A low noise digital phase detector with a phase noise of 0.02 Degree-Sign has been used, corresponding to a density of 0.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} m{sup -3}.

  10. A microwave interferometer for small and tenuous plasma density measurements.

    PubMed

    Tudisco, O; Lucca Fabris, A; Falcetta, C; Accatino, L; De Angelis, R; Manente, M; Ferri, F; Florean, M; Neri, C; Mazzotta, C; Pavarin, D; Pollastrone, F; Rocchi, G; Selmo, A; Tasinato, L; Trezzolani, F; Tuccillo, A A

    2013-03-01

    The non-intrusive density measurement of the thin plasma produced by a mini-helicon space thruster (HPH.com project) is a challenge, due to the broad density range (between 10(16) m(-3) and 10(19) m(-3)) and the small size of the plasma source (2 cm of diameter). A microwave interferometer has been developed for this purpose. Due to the small size of plasma, the probing beam wavelength must be small (λ = 4 mm), thus a very high sensitivity interferometer is required in order to observe the lower density values. A low noise digital phase detector with a phase noise of 0.02° has been used, corresponding to a density of 0.5 × 10(16) m(-3).

  11. Direct measurements of pore fluid density by vibrating tube densimetry.

    PubMed

    Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw S; Rother, Gernot; Wesolowski, David J; Cole, David R; Wallacher, Dirk

    2012-03-20

    The densities of pore-confined fluids were measured for the first time by means of vibrating tube densimetry (VTD). A custom-built high-pressure, high-temperature vibrating tube densimeter was used to measure the densities of propane at subcritical and supercritical temperatures (between 35 and 97 °C) and carbon dioxide at supercritical temperatures (between 32 and 50 °C) saturating hydrophobic silica aerogel (0.2 g/cm(3), 90% porosity) synthesized inside Hastelloy U-tubes. Additionally, supercritical isotherms of excess adsorption for CO(2) and the same porous solid were measured gravimetrically using a precise magnetically coupled microbalance. Pore fluid densities and total adsorption isotherms increased monotonically with increasing density of the bulk fluid, in contrast to excess adsorption isotherms, which reached a maximum and then decreased toward zero or negative values above the critical density of the bulk fluid. The isotherms of confined fluid density and excess adsorption obtained by VTD contain additional information. For instance, the maxima of excess adsorption occur below the critical density of the bulk fluid at the beginning of the plateau region in the total adsorption, marking the end of the transition of pore fluid to a denser, liquidlike pore phase. Compression of the confined fluid significantly beyond the density of the bulk fluid at the same temperature was observed even at subcritical temperatures. The effect of pore confinement on the liquid-vapor critical temperature of propane was less than ~1.7 K. The results for propane and carbon dioxide showed similarity in the sense of the principle of corresponding states. Good quantitative agreement was obtained between excess adsorption isotherms determined from VTD total adsorption results and those measured gravimetrically at the same temperature, confirming the validity of the vibrating tube measurements. Thus, it is demonstrated that vibrating tube densimetry is a novel experimental

  12. Ligand identification using electron-density map correlations.

    PubMed

    Terwilliger, Thomas C; Adams, Paul D; Moriarty, Nigel W; Cohn, Judith D

    2007-01-01

    A procedure for the identification of ligands bound in crystal structures of macromolecules is described. Two characteristics of the density corresponding to a ligand are used in the identification procedure. One is the correlation of the ligand density with each of a set of test ligands after optimization of the fit of that ligand to the density. The other is the correlation of a fingerprint of the density with the fingerprint of model density for each possible ligand. The fingerprints consist of an ordered list of correlations of each the test ligands with the density. The two characteristics are scored using a Z-score approach in which the correlations are normalized to the mean and standard deviation of correlations found for a variety of mismatched ligand-density pairs, so that the Z scores are related to the probability of observing a particular value of the correlation by chance. The procedure was tested with a set of 200 of the most commonly found ligands in the Protein Data Bank, collectively representing 57% of all ligands in the Protein Data Bank. Using a combination of these two characteristics of ligand density, ranked lists of ligand identifications were made for representative (F(o) - F(c))exp(i(phi)c) difference density from entries in the Protein Data Bank. In 48% of the 200 cases, the correct ligand was at the top of the ranked list of ligands. This approach may be useful in identification of unknown ligands in new macromolecular structures as well as in the identification of which ligands in a mixture have bound to a macromolecule.

  13. Electron densities inferred from plasma wave spectra obtained by the Waves instrument on Van Allen Probes

    PubMed Central

    Kurth, W S; De Pascuale, S; Faden, J B; Kletzing, C A; Hospodarsky, G B; Thaller, S; Wygant, J R

    2015-01-01

    The twin Van Allen Probe spacecraft, launched in August 2012, carry identical scientific payloads. The Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science suite includes a plasma wave instrument (Waves) that measures three magnetic and three electric components of plasma waves in the frequency range of 10 Hz to 12 kHz using triaxial search coils and the Electric Fields and Waves triaxial electric field sensors. The Waves instrument also measures a single electric field component of waves in the frequency range of 10 to 500 kHz. A primary objective of the higher-frequency measurements is the determination of the electron density ne at the spacecraft, primarily inferred from the upper hybrid resonance frequency fuh. Considerable work has gone into developing a process and tools for identifying and digitizing the upper hybrid resonance frequency in order to infer the electron density as an essential parameter for interpreting not only the plasma wave data from the mission but also as input to various magnetospheric models. Good progress has been made in developing algorithms to identify fuh and create a data set of electron densities. However, it is often difficult to interpret the plasma wave spectra during active times to identify fuh and accurately determine ne. In some cases, there is no clear signature of the upper hybrid band, and the low-frequency cutoff of the continuum radiation is used. We describe the expected accuracy of ne and issues in the interpretation of the electrostatic wave spectrum. PMID:26167442

  14. Dusty plasma diagnostics methods for charge, electron temperature, and ion density

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Bin; Goree, J.; Fortov, V. E.; Lipaev, A. M.; Molotkov, V. I.; Petrov, O. F.; Morfill, G. E.; Thomas, H. M.; Ivlev, A. V.

    2010-05-15

    Diagnostic methods are developed to measure the microparticle charge Q and two plasma parameters, electron temperature T{sub e}, and ion density n{sub i}, in the main plasma region of a dusty plasma. Using video microscopy to track microparticles yields a resonance frequency, which along with a charging model allows an estimation of Q and T{sub e}. Only measurements of microparticle position and velocity are required, unlike other methods that use measurements of T{sub e} and plasma parameters as inputs. The resonance frequency measurement can also be used with an ion drag model to estimate n{sub i}. These methods are demonstrated using a single-layer dusty plasma suspension under microgravity conditions.

  15. Comparison of bone density measurement techniques: DXA and Archimedes' principle.

    PubMed

    Keenan, M J; Hegsted, M; Jones, K L; Delany, J P; Kime, J C; Melancon, L E; Tulley, R T; Hong, K D

    1997-11-01

    The standard method for determination of density (g/cm3) of bones from small animals has been the application of Archimedes' principle. A recent development has been software for the determination of "density" (g/cm2) of small animal bones with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). We compared Archimedes' principle and DXA (Hologic QDR-2000) in the measurement of the densities of whole and hollowed femurs of 5- to 6-month-old retired female breeder rats. In an attempt to ensure detectable treatment differences, rats were used from a low-vitamin D Holtzman and a supplemental-vitamin D Sprague-Dawley colony. Whole femur densities were higher for supplemental-vitamin D colony rats than for low vitamin D rats using both techniques (Archimedes' principle, p < 0.002; DXA, p < 0.005), and the densities from the two techniques were highly correlated (r = 0.82, p < 0.0001). Actual density values were higher for Archimedes' principle than for DXA. Other variables such as femur ash weight and calcium content were also highly correlated to densities with both techniques. Hollowed femur density values were higher than whole femur values with Archimedes' principle but lower with DXA. Colony effects for hollowed femur densities were diminished with Archimedes' principle (p < 0.03) and eliminated with DXA (p < 0.53). Investigation of whole bones is more biologically relevant, and both techniques were effective in detecting differences between whole femurs from low-vitamin D and supplemental-vitamin D colony rats.

  16. Comparison of bone density measurement techniques: DXA and Archimedes' principle.

    PubMed

    Keenan, M J; Hegsted, M; Jones, K L; Delany, J P; Kime, J C; Melancon, L E; Tulley, R T; Hong, K D

    1997-11-01

    The standard method for determination of density (g/cm3) of bones from small animals has been the application of Archimedes' principle. A recent development has been software for the determination of "density" (g/cm2) of small animal bones with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). We compared Archimedes' principle and DXA (Hologic QDR-2000) in the measurement of the densities of whole and hollowed femurs of 5- to 6-month-old retired female breeder rats. In an attempt to ensure detectable treatment differences, rats were used from a low-vitamin D Holtzman and a supplemental-vitamin D Sprague-Dawley colony. Whole femur densities were higher for supplemental-vitamin D colony rats than for low vitamin D rats using both techniques (Archimedes' principle, p < 0.002; DXA, p < 0.005), and the densities from the two techniques were highly correlated (r = 0.82, p < 0.0001). Actual density values were higher for Archimedes' principle than for DXA. Other variables such as femur ash weight and calcium content were also highly correlated to densities with both techniques. Hollowed femur density values were higher than whole femur values with Archimedes' principle but lower with DXA. Colony effects for hollowed femur densities were diminished with Archimedes' principle (p < 0.03) and eliminated with DXA (p < 0.53). Investigation of whole bones is more biologically relevant, and both techniques were effective in detecting differences between whole femurs from low-vitamin D and supplemental-vitamin D colony rats. PMID:9383695

  17. New diagnostics for density measurement on Frascati Tokamak upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudisco, O.; Canton, A.; Innocente, P.; Mazzotta, C.; Petrov, V. G.; Petrov, A. A.; Avino, F.; Rocchi, G.

    2013-08-01

    In FTU, density profile is measured with two new diagnostics: a CO2/CO scanning interferometer and a time-of-flight radar (denominated refractometer). The first, using two scanning beams, can provide a plasma density profile every 62.5 μs. Two lasers (CO2/CO) are employed for compensation of mechanical vibration of optical components. The scanning component is a small mirror (∅=5 mm) tilting at 8 kHz. The oscillation is cancelled out by a second reflection on this mirror. The time-of- flight refractometer is a two-frequency radar (51.5 GHz and 60.5 GHz) which measures the plasma refractive index from the delay time of an RF pulse that goes through the plasma and is reflected back by the metallic vacuum vessel. The line density and the profile peaking by both diagnostics are in good agreement.

  18. High-energy-density electron beam from interaction of two successive laser pulses with subcritical-density plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. W.; Yu, W.; Yu, M. Y.; Xu, H.; Ju, J. J.; Luan, S. X.; Murakami, M.; Zepf, M.; Rykovanov, S.

    2016-02-01

    It is shown by particle-in-cell simulations that a narrow electron beam with high energy and charge density can be generated in a subcritical-density plasma by two consecutive laser pulses. Although the first laser pulse dissipates rapidly, the second pulse can propagate for a long distance in the thin wake channel created by the first pulse and can further accelerate the preaccelerated electrons therein. Given that the second pulse also self-focuses, the resulting electron beam has a narrow waist and high charge and energy densities. Such beams are useful for enhancing the target-back space-charge field in target normal sheath acceleration of ions and bremsstrahlung sources, among others.

  19. Entanglement from density measurements: Analytical density functional for the entanglement of strongly correlated fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Franca, Vivian V.; D'Amico, Irene

    2011-04-15

    We derive an analytical density functional for the single-site entanglement of the one-dimensional homogeneous Hubbard model by means of an approximation to the linear entropy. We show that this very simple density functional reproduces quantitatively the exact results. We then use this functional as input for a local-density approximation to the single-site entanglement of inhomogeneous systems. We illustrate the power of this approach in a harmonically confined system, which could simulate recent experiments with ultracold atoms in optical lattices as well as in a superlattice and in an impurity system. The impressive quantitative agreement with numerical calculations--which includes reproducing subtle signatures of the particle density stages--shows that our density functional can provide entanglement calculations for actual experiments via density measurements. Next we use our functional to calculate the entanglement in disordered systems. We find that, in contrast with the expectation that disorder destroys the entanglement, there exist regimes for which the entanglement remains almost unaffected by the presence of disordered impurities.

  20. Quantitative electron density characterization of soft tissue substitute plastic materials using grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sarapata, A.; Chabior, M.; Zanette, I.; Pfeiffer, F.; Cozzini, C.; Sperl, J. I.; Bequé, D.; Langner, O.; Coman, J.; Ruiz-Yaniz, M.

    2014-10-15

    Many scientific research areas rely on accurate electron density characterization of various materials. For instance in X-ray optics and radiation therapy, there is a need for a fast and reliable technique to quantitatively characterize samples for electron density. We present how a precise measurement of electron density can be performed using an X-ray phase-contrast grating interferometer in a radiographic mode of a homogenous sample in a controlled geometry. A batch of various plastic materials was characterized quantitatively and compared with calculated results. We found that the measured electron densities closely match theoretical values. The technique yields comparable results between a monochromatic and a polychromatic X-ray source. Measured electron densities can be further used to design dedicated X-ray phase contrast phantoms and the additional information on small angle scattering should be taken into account in order to exclude unsuitable materials.