Science.gov

Sample records for measurement-based quantum computing

  1. Acausal measurement-based quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2014-07-01

    In measurement-based quantum computing, there is a natural "causal cone" among qubits of the resource state, since the measurement angle on a qubit has to depend on previous measurement results in order to correct the effect of by-product operators. If we respect the no-signaling principle, by-product operators cannot be avoided. Here we study the possibility of acausal measurement-based quantum computing by using the process matrix framework [Oreshkov, Costa, and Brukner, Nat. Commun. 3, 1092 (2012), 10.1038/ncomms2076]. We construct a resource process matrix for acausal measurement-based quantum computing restricting local operations to projective measurements. The resource process matrix is an analog of the resource state of the standard causal measurement-based quantum computing. We find that if we restrict local operations to projective measurements the resource process matrix is (up to a normalization factor and trivial ancilla qubits) equivalent to the decorated graph state created from the graph state of the corresponding causal measurement-based quantum computing. We also show that it is possible to consider a causal game whose causal inequality is violated by acausal measurement-based quantum computing.

  2. Blind topological measurement-based quantum computation.

    PubMed

    Morimae, Tomoyuki; Fujii, Keisuke

    2012-01-01

    Blind quantum computation is a novel secure quantum-computing protocol that enables Alice, who does not have sufficient quantum technology at her disposal, to delegate her quantum computation to Bob, who has a fully fledged quantum computer, in such a way that Bob cannot learn anything about Alice's input, output and algorithm. A recent proof-of-principle experiment demonstrating blind quantum computation in an optical system has raised new challenges regarding the scalability of blind quantum computation in realistic noisy conditions. Here we show that fault-tolerant blind quantum computation is possible in a topologically protected manner using the Raussendorf-Harrington-Goyal scheme. The error threshold of our scheme is 4.3 × 10(-3), which is comparable to that (7.5 × 10(-3)) of non-blind topological quantum computation. As the error per gate of the order 10(-3) was already achieved in some experimental systems, our result implies that secure cloud quantum computation is within reach.

  3. Measurement-Based and Universal Blind Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadbent, Anne; Fitzsimons, Joseph; Kashefi, Elham

    Measurement-based quantum computation (MBQC) is a novel approach to quantum computation where the notion of measurement is the main driving force of computation. This is in contrast with the more traditional circuit model which is based on unitary operation. We review here the mathematical model underlying MBQC and the first quantum cryptographic protocol designed using the unique features of MBQC.

  4. Hybrid architecture for encoded measurement-based quantum computation

    PubMed Central

    Zwerger, M.; Briegel, H. J.; Dür, W.

    2014-01-01

    We present a hybrid scheme for quantum computation that combines the modular structure of elementary building blocks used in the circuit model with the advantages of a measurement-based approach to quantum computation. We show how to construct optimal resource states of minimal size to implement elementary building blocks for encoded quantum computation in a measurement-based way, including states for error correction and encoded gates. The performance of the scheme is determined by the quality of the resource states, where within the considered error model a threshold of the order of 10% local noise per particle for fault-tolerant quantum computation and quantum communication. PMID:24946906

  5. Verifiable fault tolerance in measurement-based quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Keisuke; Hayashi, Masahito

    2017-09-01

    Quantum systems, in general, cannot be simulated efficiently by a classical computer, and hence are useful for solving certain mathematical problems and simulating quantum many-body systems. This also implies, unfortunately, that verification of the output of the quantum systems is not so trivial, since predicting the output is exponentially hard. As another problem, the quantum system is very delicate for noise and thus needs an error correction. Here, we propose a framework for verification of the output of fault-tolerant quantum computation in a measurement-based model. In contrast to existing analyses on fault tolerance, we do not assume any noise model on the resource state, but an arbitrary resource state is tested by using only single-qubit measurements to verify whether or not the output of measurement-based quantum computation on it is correct. Verifiability is equipped by a constant time repetition of the original measurement-based quantum computation in appropriate measurement bases. Since full characterization of quantum noise is exponentially hard for large-scale quantum computing systems, our framework provides an efficient way to practically verify the experimental quantum error correction.

  6. Direct approach to Gaussian measurement based quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrini, G.; Roslund, J.; Arzani, F.; Fabre, C.; Treps, N.

    2016-12-01

    In this work we introduce an original scheme for measurement based quantum computation in continuous variables. Our approach does not necessarily rely on the use of ancillary cluster states to achieve its aim, but rather on the detection of a resource state in a suitable mode basis followed by digital postprocessing, and involves an optimization of the adjustable experimental parameters. After introducing the general method, we present some examples of application to simple specific computations.

  7. Closed timelike curves in measurement-based quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Dias da Silva, Raphael; Galvao, Ernesto F.; Kashefi, Elham

    2011-01-15

    Many results have been recently obtained regarding the power of hypothetical closed timelike curves (CTCs) in quantum computation. Here we show that the one-way model of measurement-based quantum computation encompasses in a natural way the CTC model proposed by Bennett, Schumacher, and Svetlichny. We identify a class of CTCs in this model that can be simulated deterministically and point to a fundamental limitation of Deutsch's CTC model which leads to predictions conflicting with those of the one-way model.

  8. HiFi-MBQC High Fidelitiy Measurement-Based Quantum Computing using Superconducting Detectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-04

    computer. We exploit the conceptual framework of measurement - based quantum computation that enables a client to delegate a computation to a quantum...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2016-0006 HiFi-MBQC High Fidelitiy Measurement - Based Quantum Computing using Superconducting Detectors Philip Walther UNIVERSITT...HiFi-MBQC High Fidelitiy Measurement - Based Quantum Computing using Superconducting Detectors 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8655-11-1-3004 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  9. Fault-tolerant measurement-based quantum computing with continuous-variable cluster states.

    PubMed

    Menicucci, Nicolas C

    2014-03-28

    A long-standing open question about Gaussian continuous-variable cluster states is whether they enable fault-tolerant measurement-based quantum computation. The answer is yes. Initial squeezing in the cluster above a threshold value of 20.5 dB ensures that errors from finite squeezing acting on encoded qubits are below the fault-tolerance threshold of known qubit-based error-correcting codes. By concatenating with one of these codes and using ancilla-based error correction, fault-tolerant measurement-based quantum computation of theoretically indefinite length is possible with finitely squeezed cluster states.

  10. Hierarchy of universal entanglement in 2D measurement-based quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jacob; Miyake, Akimasa

    2016-11-01

    Measurement-based quantum computation (MQC) is a paradigm for studying quantum computation using many-body entanglement and single-qubit measurements. Although MQC has inspired wide-ranging discoveries throughout quantum information, our understanding of the general principles underlying MQC seems to be biased by its historical reliance upon the archetypal 2D cluster state. Here we utilise recent advances in the subject of symmetry-protected topological order (SPTO) to introduce a novel MQC resource state, whose physical and computational behaviour differs fundamentally from that of the cluster state. We show that, in sharp contrast to the cluster state, our state enables universal quantum computation using only measurements of single-qubit Pauli X, Y, and Z operators. This novel computational feature is related to the 'genuine' 2D SPTO possessed by our state, and which is absent in the cluster state. Our concrete connection between the latent computational complexity of many-body systems and macroscopic quantum orders may find applications in quantum many-body simulation for benchmarking classically intractable complexity.

  11. Programming Non-Trivial Algorithms in the Measurement Based Quantum Computation Model

    SciTech Connect

    Alsing, Paul; Fanto, Michael; Lott, Capt. Gordon; Tison, Christoper C.

    2014-01-01

    We provide a set of prescriptions for implementing a quantum circuit model algorithm as measurement based quantum computing (MBQC) algorithm1, 2 via a large cluster state. As means of illustration we draw upon our numerical modeling experience to describe a large graph state capable of searching a logical 8 element list (a non-trivial version of Grover's algorithm3 with feedforward). We develop several prescriptions based on analytic evaluation of cluster states and graph state equations which can be generalized into any circuit model operations. Such a resulting cluster state will be able to carry out the desired operation with appropriate measurements and feed forward error correction. We also discuss the physical implementation and the analysis of the principal 3-qubit entangling gate (Toffoli) required for a non-trivial feedforward realization of an 8-element Grover search algorithm.

  12. Universal measurement-based quantum computation in two-dimensional symmetry-protected topological phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tzu-Chieh; Huang, Ching-Yu

    2017-09-01

    Recent progress in the characterization of gapped quantum phases has also triggered the search for a universal resource for quantum computation in symmetric gapped phases. Prior works in one dimension suggest that it is a feature more common than previously thought, in that nontrivial one-dimensional symmetry-protected topological (SPT) phases provide quantum computational power characterized by the algebraic structure defining these phases. Progress in two and higher dimensions so far has been limited to special fixed points. Here we provide two families of two-dimensional Z2 symmetric wave functions such that there exists a finite region of the parameter in the SPT phases that supports universal quantum computation. The quantum computational power appears to lose its universality at the boundary between the SPT and the symmetry-breaking phases.

  13. Measurement-based quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwerger, M.; Briegel, H. J.; Dür, W.

    2016-03-01

    We review and discuss the potential of using measurement-based elements in quantum communication schemes, where certain tasks are realized with the help of entangled resource states that are processed by measurements. We consider long-range quantum communication based on the transmission of encoded quantum states, where encoding, decoding and syndrome readout are implemented using small-scale resource states. We also discuss entanglement-based schemes and consider measurement-based quantum repeaters. An important element in these schemes is entanglement purification, which can also be implemented in a measurement-based way. We analyze the influence of noise and imperfections in these schemes and show that measurement-based implementation allows for very large error thresholds of the order of 10 % noise per qubit and more. We show how to obtain optimal resource states for different tasks and discuss first experimental realizations of measurement-based quantum error correction using trapped ions and photons.

  14. Translating non-trivial algorithms from the circuit model to the measurement-based quantum computing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. Matthew; Alsing, P. M.; Lott, G. E.; Fanto, M. L.

    2015-11-01

    We provide a set of prescriptions for implementing a circuit model algorithm as measurement-based quantum computing algorithm via a large discrete cluster state constructed sequentially, from qubits implemented as single photons. We describe a large optical discrete graph state capable of searching logical 4 and 8 element lists as an example. To do so we have developed several prescriptions based on analytic evaluation of the evolution of discrete cluster states and graph state equations. We describe the cluster state as a sequence of repeated entanglement and measurement steps using a small number of single photons for each step. These prescriptions can be generalized to implement any logical circuit model operation with appropriate single-photon measurements and feed forward error corrections. Such a cluster state is not guaranteed to be optimal (i.e. minimum number of photons, measurements, run time).

  15. Translating non-trivial algorithms from the circuit model to the measurement-based quantum computing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. Matthew; Alsing, P. M.; Lott, G. E.; Fanto, M. L.

    2015-06-01

    We provide a set of prescriptions for implementing a circuit model algorithm as measurement-based quantum computing algorithm via a large discrete cluster state constructed sequentially, from qubits implemented as single photons. We describe a large optical discrete graph state capable of searching logical 4 and 8 element lists as an example. To do so we have developed several prescriptions based on analytic evaluation of the evolution of discrete cluster states and graph state equations. We describe the cluster state as a sequence of repeated entanglement and measurement steps using a small number of single photons for each step. These prescriptions can be generalized to implement any logical circuit model operation with appropriate single-photon measurements and feed forward error corrections. Such a cluster state is not guaranteed to be optimal (i.e. minimum number of photons, measurements, run time).

  16. Quantum computing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu-Shen; Long, Gui-Lu; Bai, Feng-Shan; Feng, Song-Lin; Zheng, Hou-Zhi

    2001-01-01

    Quantum computing is a quickly growing research field. This article introduces the basic concepts of quantum computing, recent developments in quantum searching, and decoherence in a possible quantum dot realization. PMID:11562459

  17. Scalable optical quantum computer

    SciTech Connect

    Manykin, E A; Mel'nichenko, E V

    2014-12-31

    A way of designing a scalable optical quantum computer based on the photon echo effect is proposed. Individual rare earth ions Pr{sup 3+}, regularly located in the lattice of the orthosilicate (Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}) crystal, are suggested to be used as optical qubits. Operations with qubits are performed using coherent and incoherent laser pulses. The operation protocol includes both the method of measurement-based quantum computations and the technique of optical computations. Modern hybrid photon echo protocols, which provide a sufficient quantum efficiency when reading recorded states, are considered as most promising for quantum computations and communications. (quantum computer)

  18. Blind Quantum Signature with Blind Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Shi, Ronghua; Guo, Ying

    2017-04-01

    Blind quantum computation allows a client without quantum abilities to interact with a quantum server to perform a unconditional secure computing protocol, while protecting client's privacy. Motivated by confidentiality of blind quantum computation, a blind quantum signature scheme is designed with laconic structure. Different from the traditional signature schemes, the signing and verifying operations are performed through measurement-based quantum computation. Inputs of blind quantum computation are securely controlled with multi-qubit entangled states. The unique signature of the transmitted message is generated by the signer without leaking information in imperfect channels. Whereas, the receiver can verify the validity of the signature using the quantum matching algorithm. The security is guaranteed by entanglement of quantum system for blind quantum computation. It provides a potential practical application for e-commerce in the cloud computing and first-generation quantum computation.

  19. Blind Quantum Signature with Blind Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Shi, Ronghua; Guo, Ying

    2016-12-01

    Blind quantum computation allows a client without quantum abilities to interact with a quantum server to perform a unconditional secure computing protocol, while protecting client's privacy. Motivated by confidentiality of blind quantum computation, a blind quantum signature scheme is designed with laconic structure. Different from the traditional signature schemes, the signing and verifying operations are performed through measurement-based quantum computation. Inputs of blind quantum computation are securely controlled with multi-qubit entangled states. The unique signature of the transmitted message is generated by the signer without leaking information in imperfect channels. Whereas, the receiver can verify the validity of the signature using the quantum matching algorithm. The security is guaranteed by entanglement of quantum system for blind quantum computation. It provides a potential practical application for e-commerce in the cloud computing and first-generation quantum computation.

  20. Scalable optical quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manykin, E. A.; Mel'nichenko, E. V.

    2014-12-01

    A way of designing a scalable optical quantum computer based on the photon echo effect is proposed. Individual rare earth ions Pr3+, regularly located in the lattice of the orthosilicate (Y2SiO5) crystal, are suggested to be used as optical qubits. Operations with qubits are performed using coherent and incoherent laser pulses. The operation protocol includes both the method of measurement-based quantum computations and the technique of optical computations. Modern hybrid photon echo protocols, which provide a sufficient quantum efficiency when reading recorded states, are considered as most promising for quantum computations and communications.

  1. Quantum computers.

    PubMed

    Ladd, T D; Jelezko, F; Laflamme, R; Nakamura, Y; Monroe, C; O'Brien, J L

    2010-03-04

    Over the past several decades, quantum information science has emerged to seek answers to the question: can we gain some advantage by storing, transmitting and processing information encoded in systems that exhibit unique quantum properties? Today it is understood that the answer is yes, and many research groups around the world are working towards the highly ambitious technological goal of building a quantum computer, which would dramatically improve computational power for particular tasks. A number of physical systems, spanning much of modern physics, are being developed for quantum computation. However, it remains unclear which technology, if any, will ultimately prove successful. Here we describe the latest developments for each of the leading approaches and explain the major challenges for the future.

  2. Quantum Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-04-01

    information representation and processing technology, although faster than the wheels and gears of the Charles Babbage computation machine, is still in...the same computational complexity class as the Babbage machine, with bits of information represented by entities which obey classical (non-quantum...nuclear double resonances Charles M Bowden and Jonathan P. Dowling Weapons Sciences Directorate, AMSMI-RD-WS-ST Missile Research, Development, and

  3. Demonstration of blind quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Barz, Stefanie; Kashefi, Elham; Broadbent, Anne; Fitzsimons, Joseph F; Zeilinger, Anton; Walther, Philip

    2012-01-20

    Quantum computers, besides offering substantial computational speedups, are also expected to preserve the privacy of a computation. We present an experimental demonstration of blind quantum computing in which the input, computation, and output all remain unknown to the computer. We exploit the conceptual framework of measurement-based quantum computation that enables a client to delegate a computation to a quantum server. Various blind delegated computations, including one- and two-qubit gates and the Deutsch and Grover quantum algorithms, are demonstrated. The client only needs to be able to prepare and transmit individual photonic qubits. Our demonstration is crucial for unconditionally secure quantum cloud computing and might become a key ingredient for real-life applications, especially when considering the challenges of making powerful quantum computers widely available.

  4. Quantum Computers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-04

    empty valence-band states ) into a localized poten- tial with discrete energy levels, which is analagous to an electron bound to an atomic nucleus...seminal work, the ideas for implementing quantum computing have diversified, and the DiVincenzo criteria as originally stated are difficult to apply to...many emerging concepts. Here, we rephrase DiVincenzo’s original considerations into three more general criteria; these are stated with the assumption

  5. Quantum computation for quantum chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2010-03-01

    Numerically exact simulation of quantum systems on classical computers is in general, an intractable computational problem. Computational chemists have made progress in the development of approximate methods to tackle complex chemical problems. The downside of these approximate methods is that their failure for certain important cases such as long-range charge transfer states in the case of traditional density functional theory. In 1982, Richard Feynman suggested that a quantum device should be able to simulate quantum systems (in our case, molecules) exactly using quantum computers in a tractable fashion. Our group has been working in the development of quantum chemistry algorithms for quantum devices. In this talk, I will describe how quantum computers can be employed to carry out numerically exact quantum chemistry and chemical reaction dynamics calculations, as well as molecular properties. Finally, I will describe our recent experimental quantum computation of the energy of the hydrogen molecule using an optical quantum computer.

  6. Continuous-Variable Blind Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2012-12-01

    Blind quantum computation is a secure delegated quantum computing protocol where Alice, who does not have sufficient quantum technology at her disposal, delegates her computation to Bob, who has a fully fledged quantum computer, in such a way that Bob cannot learn anything about Alice’s input, output, and algorithm. Protocols of blind quantum computation have been proposed for several qudit measurement-based computation models, such as the graph state model, the Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki model, and the Raussendorf-Harrington-Goyal topological model. Here, we consider blind quantum computation for the continuous-variable measurement-based model. We show that blind quantum computation is possible for the infinite squeezing case. We also show that the finite squeezing causes no additional problem in the blind setup apart from the one inherent to the continuous-variable measurement-based quantum computation.

  7. Quantum walk computation

    SciTech Connect

    Kendon, Viv

    2014-12-04

    Quantum versions of random walks have diverse applications that are motivating experimental implementations as well as theoretical studies. Recent results showing quantum walks are “universal for quantum computation” relate to algorithms, to be run on quantum computers. We consider whether an experimental implementation of a quantum walk could provide useful computation before we have a universal quantum computer.

  8. Ancilla-driven universal blind quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sueki, Takahiro; Koshiba, Takeshi; Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2013-06-01

    Blind quantum computation is a new quantum secure protocol, which enables Alice who does not have enough quantum technology to delegate her computation to Bob who has a fully fledged quantum power without revealing her input, output, and algorithm. So far, blind quantum computation has been considered only for the circuit model and the measurement-based model. Here we consider the possibility and the limitation of blind quantum computation in the ancilla-driven model, which is a hybrid of the circuit and the measurement-based models.

  9. Quantum Computer Games: Quantum Minesweeper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2010-01-01

    The computer game of quantum minesweeper is introduced as a quantum extension of the well-known classical minesweeper. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. Quantum minesweeper demonstrates the effects of superposition, entanglement and their non-local characteristics. While in the classical…

  10. Quantum Computer Games: Quantum Minesweeper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2010-01-01

    The computer game of quantum minesweeper is introduced as a quantum extension of the well-known classical minesweeper. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. Quantum minesweeper demonstrates the effects of superposition, entanglement and their non-local characteristics. While in the classical…

  11. Quantum computational supremacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrow, Aram W.; Montanaro, Ashley

    2017-09-01

    The field of quantum algorithms aims to find ways to speed up the solution of computational problems by using a quantum computer. A key milestone in this field will be when a universal quantum computer performs a computational task that is beyond the capability of any classical computer, an event known as quantum supremacy. This would be easier to achieve experimentally than full-scale quantum computing, but involves new theoretical challenges. Here we present the leading proposals to achieve quantum supremacy, and discuss how we can reliably compare the power of a classical computer to the power of a quantum computer.

  12. Quantum robots and quantum computers

    SciTech Connect

    Benioff, P.

    1998-07-01

    Validation of a presumably universal theory, such as quantum mechanics, requires a quantum mechanical description of systems that carry out theoretical calculations and systems that carry out experiments. The description of quantum computers is under active development. No description of systems to carry out experiments has been given. A small step in this direction is taken here by giving a description of quantum robots as mobile systems with on board quantum computers that interact with different environments. Some properties of these systems are discussed. A specific model based on the literature descriptions of quantum Turing machines is presented.

  13. Efficient Universal Blind Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannetti, Vittorio; Maccone, Lorenzo; Morimae, Tomoyuki; Rudolph, Terry G.

    2013-12-01

    We give a cheat sensitive protocol for blind universal quantum computation that is efficient in terms of computational and communication resources: it allows one party to perform an arbitrary computation on a second party’s quantum computer without revealing either which computation is performed, or its input and output. The first party’s computational capabilities can be extremely limited: she must only be able to create and measure single-qubit superposition states. The second party is not required to use measurement-based quantum computation. The protocol requires the (optimal) exchange of O(Jlog⁡2(N)) single-qubit states, where J is the computational depth and N is the number of qubits needed for the computation.

  14. Efficient universal blind quantum computation.

    PubMed

    Giovannetti, Vittorio; Maccone, Lorenzo; Morimae, Tomoyuki; Rudolph, Terry G

    2013-12-06

    We give a cheat sensitive protocol for blind universal quantum computation that is efficient in terms of computational and communication resources: it allows one party to perform an arbitrary computation on a second party's quantum computer without revealing either which computation is performed, or its input and output. The first party's computational capabilities can be extremely limited: she must only be able to create and measure single-qubit superposition states. The second party is not required to use measurement-based quantum computation. The protocol requires the (optimal) exchange of O(Jlog2(N)) single-qubit states, where J is the computational depth and N is the number of qubits needed for the computation.

  15. Optimal Blind Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantri, Atul; Pérez-Delgado, Carlos A.; Fitzsimons, Joseph F.

    2013-12-01

    Blind quantum computation allows a client with limited quantum capabilities to interact with a remote quantum computer to perform an arbitrary quantum computation, while keeping the description of that computation hidden from the remote quantum computer. While a number of protocols have been proposed in recent years, little is currently understood about the resources necessary to accomplish the task. Here, we present general techniques for upper and lower bounding the quantum communication necessary to perform blind quantum computation, and use these techniques to establish concrete bounds for common choices of the client’s quantum capabilities. Our results show that the universal blind quantum computation protocol of Broadbent, Fitzsimons, and Kashefi, comes within a factor of (8)/(3) of optimal when the client is restricted to preparing single qubits. However, we describe a generalization of this protocol which requires exponentially less quantum communication when the client has a more sophisticated device.

  16. Quantum computing and probability.

    PubMed

    Ferry, David K

    2009-11-25

    Over the past two decades, quantum computing has become a popular and promising approach to trying to solve computationally difficult problems. Missing in many descriptions of quantum computing is just how probability enters into the process. Here, we discuss some simple examples of how uncertainty and probability enter, and how this and the ideas of quantum computing challenge our interpretations of quantum mechanics. It is found that this uncertainty can lead to intrinsic decoherence, and this raises challenges for error correction.

  17. Measurement-based noiseless linear amplification for quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzanowski, Helen M.; Walk, Nathan; Assad, Syed M.; Janousek, Jiri; Hosseini, Sara; Ralph, Timothy C.; Symul, Thomas; Lam, Ping Koy

    2014-04-01

    Entanglement distillation is an indispensable ingredient in extended quantum communication networks. Distillation protocols are necessarily non-deterministic and require advanced experimental techniques such as noiseless amplification. Recently, it was shown that the benefits of noiseless amplification could be extracted by performing a post-selective filtering of the measurement record to improve the performance of quantum key distribution. We apply this protocol to entanglement degraded by transmission loss of up to the equivalent of 100 km of optical fibre. We measure an effective entangled resource stronger than that achievable by even a maximally entangled resource passively transmitted through the same channel. We also provide a proof-of-principle demonstration of secret key extraction from an otherwise insecure regime. The measurement-based noiseless linear amplifier offers two advantages over its physical counterpart: ease of implementation and near-optimal probability of success. It should provide an effective and versatile tool for a broad class of entanglement-based quantum communication protocols.

  18. Quantum analogue computing.

    PubMed

    Kendon, Vivien M; Nemoto, Kae; Munro, William J

    2010-08-13

    We briefly review what a quantum computer is, what it promises to do for us and why it is so hard to build one. Among the first applications anticipated to bear fruit is the quantum simulation of quantum systems. While most quantum computation is an extension of classical digital computation, quantum simulation differs fundamentally in how the data are encoded in the quantum computer. To perform a quantum simulation, the Hilbert space of the system to be simulated is mapped directly onto the Hilbert space of the (logical) qubits in the quantum computer. This type of direct correspondence is how data are encoded in a classical analogue computer. There is no binary encoding, and increasing precision becomes exponentially costly: an extra bit of precision doubles the size of the computer. This has important consequences for both the precision and error-correction requirements of quantum simulation, and significant open questions remain about its practicality. It also means that the quantum version of analogue computers, continuous-variable quantum computers, becomes an equally efficient architecture for quantum simulation. Lessons from past use of classical analogue computers can help us to build better quantum simulators in future.

  19. Quantum computer games: quantum minesweeper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2010-07-01

    The computer game of quantum minesweeper is introduced as a quantum extension of the well-known classical minesweeper. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. Quantum minesweeper demonstrates the effects of superposition, entanglement and their non-local characteristics. While in the classical minesweeper the goal of the game is to discover all the mines laid out on a board without triggering them, in the quantum version there are several classical boards in superposition. The goal is to know the exact quantum state, i.e. the precise layout of all the mines in all the superposed classical boards. The player can perform three types of measurement: a classical measurement that probabilistically collapses the superposition; a quantum interaction-free measurement that can detect a mine without triggering it; and an entanglement measurement that provides non-local information. The application of the concepts taught by quantum minesweeper to one-way quantum computing are also presented.

  20. Derandomizing Quantum Circuits with Measurement-Based Unitary Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Peter S.; Markham, Damian

    2016-05-01

    Entangled multipartite states are resources for universal quantum computation, but they can also give rise to ensembles of unitary transformations, a topic usually studied in the context of random quantum circuits. Using several graph state techniques, we show that these resources can "derandomize" circuit results by sampling the same kinds of ensembles quantum mechanically, analogously to a quantum random number generator. Furthermore, we find simple examples that give rise to new ensembles whose statistical moments exactly match those of the uniformly random distribution over all unitaries up to order t , while foregoing adaptive feedforward entirely. Such ensembles—known as t designs—often cannot be distinguished from the "truly" random ensemble, and so they find use in many applications that require this implied notion of pseudorandomness.

  1. Quantum information and computation

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C.H.

    1995-10-01

    A new quantum theory of communication and computation is emerging, in which the stuff transmitted or processed is not classical information, but arbitrary superpositions of quantum states. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  2. Quantum computing classical physics.

    PubMed

    Meyer, David A

    2002-03-15

    In the past decade, quantum algorithms have been found which outperform the best classical solutions known for certain classical problems as well as the best classical methods known for simulation of certain quantum systems. This suggests that they may also speed up the simulation of some classical systems. I describe one class of discrete quantum algorithms which do so--quantum lattice-gas automata--and show how to implement them efficiently on standard quantum computers.

  3. Quantum computing with incoherent resources and quantum jumps.

    PubMed

    Santos, M F; Cunha, M Terra; Chaves, R; Carvalho, A R R

    2012-04-27

    Spontaneous emission and the inelastic scattering of photons are two natural processes usually associated with decoherence and the reduction in the capacity to process quantum information. Here we show that, when suitably detected, these photons are sufficient to build all the fundamental blocks needed to perform quantum computation in the emitting qubits while protecting them from deleterious dissipative effects. We exemplify this by showing how to efficiently prepare graph states for the implementation of measurement-based quantum computation.

  4. Quantum Computing since Democritus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaronson, Scott

    2013-03-01

    1. Atoms and the void; 2. Sets; 3. Gödel, Turing, and friends; 4. Minds and machines; 5. Paleocomplexity; 6. P, NP, and friends; 7. Randomness; 8. Crypto; 9. Quantum; 10. Quantum computing; 11. Penrose; 12. Decoherence and hidden variables; 13. Proofs; 14. How big are quantum states?; 15. Skepticism of quantum computing; 16. Learning; 17. Interactive proofs and more; 18. Fun with the Anthropic Principle; 19. Free will; 20. Time travel; 21. Cosmology and complexity; 22. Ask me anything.

  5. Adiabatic topological quantum computing

    DOE PAGES

    Cesare, Chris; Landahl, Andrew J.; Bacon, Dave; ...

    2015-07-31

    Topological quantum computing promises error-resistant quantum computation without active error correction. However, there is a worry that during the process of executing quantum gates by braiding anyons around each other, extra anyonic excitations will be created that will disorder the encoded quantum information. Here, we explore this question in detail by studying adiabatic code deformations on Hamiltonians based on topological codes, notably Kitaev’s surface codes and the more recently discovered color codes. We develop protocols that enable universal quantum computing by adiabatic evolution in a way that keeps the energy gap of the system constant with respect to the computationmore » size and introduces only simple local Hamiltonian interactions. This allows one to perform holonomic quantum computing with these topological quantum computing systems. The tools we develop allow one to go beyond numerical simulations and understand these processes analytically.« less

  6. Dissipative quantum computing with open quantum walks

    SciTech Connect

    Sinayskiy, Ilya; Petruccione, Francesco

    2014-12-04

    An open quantum walk approach to the implementation of a dissipative quantum computing scheme is presented. The formalism is demonstrated for the example of an open quantum walk implementation of a 3 qubit quantum circuit consisting of 10 gates.

  7. Quantum Jarzynski equality of measurement-based work extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morikuni, Yohei; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Hatano, Naomichi

    2017-03-01

    Many studies of quantum-size heat engines assume that the dynamics of an internal system is unitary and that the extracted work is equal to the energy loss of the internal system. Both assumptions, however, should be under scrutiny. In the present paper, we analyze quantum-scale heat engines, employing the measurement-based formulation of the work extraction recently introduced by Hayashi and Tajima [M. Hayashi and H. Tajima, arXiv:1504.06150]. We first demonstrate the inappropriateness of the unitary time evolution of the internal system (namely, the first assumption above) using a simple two-level system; we show that the variance of the energy transferred to an external system diverges when the dynamics of the internal system is approximated to a unitary time evolution. Second, we derive the quantum Jarzynski equality based on the formulation of Hayashi and Tajima as a relation for the work measured by an external macroscopic apparatus. The right-hand side of the equality reduces to unity for "natural" cyclic processes but fluctuates wildly for noncyclic ones, exceeding unity often. This fluctuation should be detectable in experiments and provide evidence for the present formulation.

  8. The Rabi Quantum Computer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-04-01

    example that other students learn to make quantum computers does not quite meet the RQC specification, consider useful in many fields . I also want to...UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP010869 TITLE: The Rabi Quantum Computer DISTRIBUTION: Approved for...comprise the compilation report: ADP010865 thru ADP010894 UNCLASSIFIED 5-1 The Rabi Quantum Computer Rudolph A. Krutar Advanced Information Technology’ U.S

  9. Measurement-based quantum communication with resource states generated by entanglement purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallnöfer, J.; Dür, W.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate measurement-based quantum communication with noisy resource states that are generated by entanglement purification. We consider the transmission of encoded information via noisy quantum channels using a measurement-based implementation of encoding, error correction, and decoding. We show that such an approach offers advantages over direct transmission, gate-based error correction, and measurement-based schemes with direct generation of resource states. We analyze the noise structure of resource states generated by entanglement purification and show that a local error model, i.e., noise acting independently on all qubits of the resource state, is a good approximation in general, and provides an exact description for Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states. The latter are resources for a measurement-based implementation of error-correction codes for bit-flip or phase-flip errors. This provides an approach to link the recently found very high thresholds for fault-tolerant measurement-based quantum information processing based on local error models for resource states with error thresholds for gate-based computational models.

  10. Measurement-based noiseless linear amplification for quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzanowski, H. M.; Walk, N.; Haw, J. Y.; Thearle, O.; Assad, S. M.; Janousek, J.; Hosseini, S.; Ralph, T. C.; Symul, T.; Lam, P. K.

    2014-11-01

    Entanglement distillation is an indispensable ingredient in extended quantum communication networks. Distillation protocols are necessarily non-deterministic and require non-trivial experimental techniques such as noiseless amplification. We show that noiseless amplification could be achieved by performing a post-selective filtering of measurement outcomes. We termed this protocol measurement-based noiseless linear amplification (MBNLA). We apply this protocol to entanglement that suffers transmission loss of up to the equivalent of 100km of optical fibre and show that it is capable of distilling entanglement to a level stronger than that achievable by transmitting a maximally entangled state through the same channel. We also provide a proof-of-principle demonstration of secret key extraction from an otherwise insecure regime via MBNLA. Compared to its physical counterpart, MBNLA not only is easier in term of implementation, but also allows one to achieve near optimal probability of success.

  11. Quantum Computational Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawachi, Akinori; Koshiba, Takeshi

    As computational approaches to classical cryptography have succeeded in the establishment of the foundation of the network security, computational approaches even to quantum cryptography are promising, since quantum computational cryptography could offer richer applications than the quantum key distribution. Our project focused especially on the quantum one-wayness and quantum public-key cryptosystems. The one-wayness of functions (or permutations) is one of the most important notions in computational cryptography. First, we give an algorithmic characterization of quantum one-way permutations. In other words, we show a necessary and sufficient condition for quantum one-way permutations in terms of reflection operators. Second, we introduce a problem of distinguishing between two quantum states as a new underlying problem that is harder to solve than the graph automorphism problem. The new problem is a natural generalization of the distinguishability problem between two probability distributions, which are commonly used in computational cryptography. We show that the problem has several cryptographic properties and they enable us to construct a quantum publickey cryptosystem, which is likely to withstand any attack of a quantum adversary.

  12. Quantum Analog Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1998-01-01

    Quantum analog computing is based upon similarity between mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics and phenomena to be computed. It exploits a dynamical convergence of several competing phenomena to an attractor which can represent an externum of a function, an image, a solution to a system of ODE, or a stochastic process.

  13. Quantum Analog Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1998-01-01

    Quantum analog computing is based upon similarity between mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics and phenomena to be computed. It exploits a dynamical convergence of several competing phenomena to an attractor which can represent an externum of a function, an image, a solution to a system of ODE, or a stochastic process.

  14. Quantum Information, Computation and Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Jonathan A.; Jaksch, Dieter

    2012-07-01

    Part I. Quantum Information: 1. Quantum bits and quantum gates; 2. An atom in a laser field; 3. Spins in magnetic fields; 4. Photon techniques; 5. Two qubits and beyond; 6. Measurement and entanglement; Part II. Quantum Computation: 7. Principles of quantum computing; 8. Elementary quantum algorithms; 9. More advanced quantum algorithms; 10. Trapped atoms and ions; 11. Nuclear magnetic resonance; 12. Large scale quantum computers; Part III. Quantum Communication: 13. Basics of information theory; 14. Quantum information; 15. Quantum communication; 16. Testing EPR; 17. Quantum cryptography; Appendixes; References; Index.

  15. Quantum computing with trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

  16. Quantum steady computation

    SciTech Connect

    Castagnoli, G. )

    1991-08-10

    This paper reports that current conceptions of quantum mechanical computers inherit from conventional digital machines two apparently interacting features, machine imperfection and temporal development of the computational process. On account of machine imperfection, the process would become ideally reversible only in the limiting case of zero speed. Therefore the process is irreversible in practice and cannot be considered to be a fundamental quantum one. By giving up classical features and using a linear, reversible and non-sequential representation of the computational process - not realizable in classical machines - the process can be identified with the mathematical form of a quantum steady state. This form of steady quantum computation would seem to have an important bearing on the notion of cognition.

  17. Quantum computing: towards reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabesinger, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    The concept of computers that harness the laws of quantum mechanics has transformed our thinking about how information can be processed. Now the environment exists to make prototype devices a reality.

  18. Verifiable Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashefi, Elham

    Over the next five to ten years we will see a state of flux as quantum devices become part of the mainstream computing landscape. However adopting and applying such a highly variable and novel technology is both costly and risky as this quantum approach has an acute verification and validation problem: On the one hand, since classical computations cannot scale up to the computational power of quantum mechanics, verifying the correctness of a quantum-mediated computation is challenging; on the other hand, the underlying quantum structure resists classical certification analysis. Our grand aim is to settle these key milestones to make the translation from theory to practice possible. Currently the most efficient ways to verify a quantum computation is to employ cryptographic methods. I will present the current state of the art of various existing protocols where generally there exists a trade-off between the practicality of the scheme versus their generality, trust assumptions and security level. EK gratefully acknowledges funding through EPSRC Grants EP/N003829/1 and EP/M013243/1.

  19. Quantum entanglement, quantum communication and the limits of quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambainis, Andris

    Quantum entanglement is a term describing the quantum correlations between different parts of a quantum system. Quantum information theory has developed sophisticated techniques to quantify and study quantum entanglement. In this thesis, we show how to apply those techniques to problems in quantum algorithms, complexity theory, communication and cryptography. The main results are: (1) quantum communication protocols that are exponentially more efficient that conventional (classical) communication protocols, (2) unconditionally secure quantum protocols for cryptographic problems, (3) a new "quantum adversary" method for proving lower bounds on quantum algorithms, (4) a study of "one clean qubit computation", a model related to the experimental implementation of quantum computers using NMR (nucleo-magnetic resonance) technology.

  20. Computational quantum-classical boundary of noisy commuting quantum circuits

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Keisuke; Tamate, Shuhei

    2016-01-01

    It is often said that the transition from quantum to classical worlds is caused by decoherence originated from an interaction between a system of interest and its surrounding environment. Here we establish a computational quantum-classical boundary from the viewpoint of classical simulatability of a quantum system under decoherence. Specifically, we consider commuting quantum circuits being subject to decoherence. Or equivalently, we can regard them as measurement-based quantum computation on decohered weighted graph states. To show intractability of classical simulation in the quantum side, we utilize the postselection argument and crucially strengthen it by taking noise effect into account. Classical simulatability in the classical side is also shown constructively by using both separable criteria in a projected-entangled-pair-state picture and the Gottesman-Knill theorem for mixed state Clifford circuits. We found that when each qubit is subject to a single-qubit complete-positive-trace-preserving noise, the computational quantum-classical boundary is sharply given by the noise rate required for the distillability of a magic state. The obtained quantum-classical boundary of noisy quantum dynamics reveals a complexity landscape of controlled quantum systems. This paves a way to an experimentally feasible verification of quantum mechanics in a high complexity limit beyond classically simulatable region. PMID:27189039

  1. Computational quantum-classical boundary of noisy commuting quantum circuits.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Keisuke; Tamate, Shuhei

    2016-05-18

    It is often said that the transition from quantum to classical worlds is caused by decoherence originated from an interaction between a system of interest and its surrounding environment. Here we establish a computational quantum-classical boundary from the viewpoint of classical simulatability of a quantum system under decoherence. Specifically, we consider commuting quantum circuits being subject to decoherence. Or equivalently, we can regard them as measurement-based quantum computation on decohered weighted graph states. To show intractability of classical simulation in the quantum side, we utilize the postselection argument and crucially strengthen it by taking noise effect into account. Classical simulatability in the classical side is also shown constructively by using both separable criteria in a projected-entangled-pair-state picture and the Gottesman-Knill theorem for mixed state Clifford circuits. We found that when each qubit is subject to a single-qubit complete-positive-trace-preserving noise, the computational quantum-classical boundary is sharply given by the noise rate required for the distillability of a magic state. The obtained quantum-classical boundary of noisy quantum dynamics reveals a complexity landscape of controlled quantum systems. This paves a way to an experimentally feasible verification of quantum mechanics in a high complexity limit beyond classically simulatable region.

  2. Computational quantum-classical boundary of noisy commuting quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Keisuke; Tamate, Shuhei

    2016-05-01

    It is often said that the transition from quantum to classical worlds is caused by decoherence originated from an interaction between a system of interest and its surrounding environment. Here we establish a computational quantum-classical boundary from the viewpoint of classical simulatability of a quantum system under decoherence. Specifically, we consider commuting quantum circuits being subject to decoherence. Or equivalently, we can regard them as measurement-based quantum computation on decohered weighted graph states. To show intractability of classical simulation in the quantum side, we utilize the postselection argument and crucially strengthen it by taking noise effect into account. Classical simulatability in the classical side is also shown constructively by using both separable criteria in a projected-entangled-pair-state picture and the Gottesman-Knill theorem for mixed state Clifford circuits. We found that when each qubit is subject to a single-qubit complete-positive-trace-preserving noise, the computational quantum-classical boundary is sharply given by the noise rate required for the distillability of a magic state. The obtained quantum-classical boundary of noisy quantum dynamics reveals a complexity landscape of controlled quantum systems. This paves a way to an experimentally feasible verification of quantum mechanics in a high complexity limit beyond classically simulatable region.

  3. REVIEWS OF TOPICAL PROBLEMS: Quantum computers and quantum computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiev, Kamil'A.

    2005-01-01

    This review outlines the principles of operation of quantum computers and their elements. The theory of ideal computers that do not interact with the environment and are immune to quantum decohering processes is presented. Decohering processes in quantum computers are investigated. The review considers methods for correcting quantum computing errors arising from the decoherence of the state of the quantum computer, as well as possible methods for the suppression of the decohering processes. A brief enumeration of proposed quantum computer realizations concludes the review.

  4. Quantum Computational Geodesics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    equation, a well-known nonlinear differential matrix equation, and L and iF (L) are Lax pairs (30–32). Some solutions to the geodesic equation...D2J j Dt2 +Rjikl ∂xi ∂t ∂xl ∂t Jk + Cj = 0, (91) the so-called “lifted Jacobi equation” (1). Nielsen and Dowling used the lifted Jacobi equation...quantum circuits (1, 28, 2). 27 6. References 1. Dowling , M. R.; Nielsen, M. A. The Geometry of Quantum Computation. Quantum Information and

  5. Optical quantum computing.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Jeremy L

    2007-12-07

    In 2001, all-optical quantum computing became feasible with the discovery that scalable quantum computing is possible using only single-photon sources, linear optical elements, and single-photon detectors. Although it was in principle scalable, the massive resource overhead made the scheme practically daunting. However, several simplifications were followed by proof-of-principle demonstrations, and recent approaches based on cluster states or error encoding have dramatically reduced this worrying resource overhead, making an all-optical architecture a serious contender for the ultimate goal of a large-scale quantum computer. Key challenges will be the realization of high-efficiency sources of indistinguishable single photons, low-loss, scalable optical circuits, high-efficiency single-photon detectors, and low-loss interfacing of these components.

  6. Computational quantum chemistry website

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-22

    This report contains the contents of a web page related to research on the development of quantum chemistry methods for computational thermochemistry and the application of quantum chemistry methods to problems in material chemistry and chemical sciences. Research programs highlighted include: Gaussian-2 theory; Density functional theory; Molecular sieve materials; Diamond thin-film growth from buckyball precursors; Electronic structure calculations on lithium polymer electrolytes; Long-distance electronic coupling in donor/acceptor molecules; and Computational studies of NOx reactions in radioactive waste storage.

  7. Abstract quantum computing machines and quantum computational logics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiara, Maria Luisa Dalla; Giuntini, Roberto; Sergioli, Giuseppe; Leporini, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    Classical and quantum parallelism are deeply different, although it is sometimes claimed that quantum Turing machines are nothing but special examples of classical probabilistic machines. We introduce the concepts of deterministic state machine, classical probabilistic state machine and quantum state machine. On this basis, we discuss the question: To what extent can quantum state machines be simulated by classical probabilistic state machines? Each state machine is devoted to a single task determined by its program. Real computers, however, behave differently, being able to solve different kinds of problems. This capacity can be modeled, in the quantum case, by the mathematical notion of abstract quantum computing machine, whose different programs determine different quantum state machines. The computations of abstract quantum computing machines can be linguistically described by the formulas of a particular form of quantum logic, termed quantum computational logic.

  8. Five Measurement Bases Determine Pure Quantum States on Any Dimension.

    PubMed

    Goyeneche, D; Cañas, G; Etcheverry, S; Gómez, E S; Xavier, G B; Lima, G; Delgado, A

    2015-08-28

    A long-standing problem in quantum mechanics is the minimum number of observables required for the characterization of unknown pure quantum states. The solution to this problem is especially important for the developing field of high-dimensional quantum information processing. In this work we demonstrate that any pure d-dimensional state is unambiguously reconstructed by measuring five observables, that is, via projective measurements onto the states of five orthonormal bases. Thus, in our method the total number of different measurement outcomes (5d) scales linearly with d. The state reconstruction is robust against experimental errors and requires simple postprocessing, regardless of d. We experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of our scheme through the reconstruction of eight-dimensional quantum states, encoded in the momentum of single photons.

  9. Undergraduate computational physics projects on quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candela, D.

    2015-08-01

    Computational projects on quantum computing suitable for students in a junior-level quantum mechanics course are described. In these projects students write their own programs to simulate quantum computers. Knowledge is assumed of introductory quantum mechanics through the properties of spin 1/2. Initial, more easily programmed projects treat the basics of quantum computation, quantum gates, and Grover's quantum search algorithm. These are followed by more advanced projects to increase the number of qubits and implement Shor's quantum factoring algorithm. The projects can be run on a typical laptop or desktop computer, using most programming languages. Supplementing resources available elsewhere, the projects are presented here in a self-contained format especially suitable for a short computational module for physics students.

  10. Measurement-based formulation of quantum heat engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Masahito; Tajima, Hiroyasu

    2017-03-01

    There exist two formulations for quantum heat engines that model energy transfer between two microscopic systems. One is the semiclassical scenario and the other is the full quantum scenario. The former is formulated as unitary evolution for the internal system and is adopted by the statistical mechanics community. In the latter, the whole process is formulated as unitary and is adopted by the quantum information community. This paper proposes a model for quantum heat engines that transfer energy from a collection of microscopic systems to a macroscopic system like a fuel cell. In such a situation, the amount of extracted work is visible for a human. For this purpose, we formulate a quantum heat engine as the measurement process whose measurement outcome is the amount of extracted work. Under this model, we derive a suitable energy-conservation law and propose a more concrete submodel. Then we derive a trade-off relation between the measurability of the amount of work extraction and the coherence of the internal system, which limits the applicability of the semiclassical scenario to a heat engine transferring energy from a collection of microscopic systems to a macroscopic system.

  11. Measurements-based Moving Target Detection in Quantum Video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Fei; Iliyasu, Abdullah M.; Khan, Asif R.; Yang, Huamin

    2016-04-01

    A method to detect a moving target in multi-channel quantum video is proposed based on multiple measurements on the video strip. The proposed method is capable of detecting the location of the moving target in each frame of the quantum video thereby ensuring that the motion trail of the object is easily and efficiently retrieved. Three experiments, i.e. moving target detection (MTD) of a pixel, MTD of an object in complex shape, and MTD of a pixel whose color is conterminous with that of its background, are implemented to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposal. This study presents a modest attempt to focus on the moving target detection and its applications in quantum video.

  12. Quantum computers: Definition and implementations

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Delgado, Carlos A.; Kok, Pieter

    2011-01-15

    The DiVincenzo criteria for implementing a quantum computer have been seminal in focusing both experimental and theoretical research in quantum-information processing. These criteria were formulated specifically for the circuit model of quantum computing. However, several new models for quantum computing (paradigms) have been proposed that do not seem to fit the criteria well. Therefore, the question is what are the general criteria for implementing quantum computers. To this end, a formal operational definition of a quantum computer is introduced. It is then shown that, according to this definition, a device is a quantum computer if it obeys the following criteria: Any quantum computer must consist of a quantum memory, with an additional structure that (1) facilitates a controlled quantum evolution of the quantum memory; (2) includes a method for information theoretic cooling of the memory; and (3) provides a readout mechanism for subsets of the quantum memory. The criteria are met when the device is scalable and operates fault tolerantly. We discuss various existing quantum computing paradigms and how they fit within this framework. Finally, we present a decision tree for selecting an avenue toward building a quantum computer. This is intended to help experimentalists determine the most natural paradigm given a particular physical implementation.

  13. Quantum computers: Definition and implementations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Delgado, Carlos A.; Kok, Pieter

    2011-01-01

    The DiVincenzo criteria for implementing a quantum computer have been seminal in focusing both experimental and theoretical research in quantum-information processing. These criteria were formulated specifically for the circuit model of quantum computing. However, several new models for quantum computing (paradigms) have been proposed that do not seem to fit the criteria well. Therefore, the question is what are the general criteria for implementing quantum computers. To this end, a formal operational definition of a quantum computer is introduced. It is then shown that, according to this definition, a device is a quantum computer if it obeys the following criteria: Any quantum computer must consist of a quantum memory, with an additional structure that (1) facilitates a controlled quantum evolution of the quantum memory; (2) includes a method for information theoretic cooling of the memory; and (3) provides a readout mechanism for subsets of the quantum memory. The criteria are met when the device is scalable and operates fault tolerantly. We discuss various existing quantum computing paradigms and how they fit within this framework. Finally, we present a decision tree for selecting an avenue toward building a quantum computer. This is intended to help experimentalists determine the most natural paradigm given a particular physical implementation.

  14. A Parallel Quantum Computer Simulator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    The unique principles of quantum mechanics may one day enable computers to perform operations that would be impossible on a classical computer...Although no one knows whether it will be possible to build a large-scale, functional, and stable quantum computer, researchers can study quantum- mechanical

  15. Layered Architecture for Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, N. Cody; Van Meter, Rodney; Fowler, Austin G.; McMahon, Peter L.; Kim, Jungsang; Ladd, Thaddeus D.; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2012-07-01

    We develop a layered quantum-computer architecture, which is a systematic framework for tackling the individual challenges of developing a quantum computer while constructing a cohesive device design. We discuss many of the prominent techniques for implementing circuit-model quantum computing and introduce several new methods, with an emphasis on employing surface-code quantum error correction. In doing so, we propose a new quantum-computer architecture based on optical control of quantum dots. The time scales of physical-hardware operations and logical, error-corrected quantum gates differ by several orders of magnitude. By dividing functionality into layers, we can design and analyze subsystems independently, demonstrating the value of our layered architectural approach. Using this concrete hardware platform, we provide resource analysis for executing fault-tolerant quantum algorithms for integer factoring and quantum simulation, finding that the quantum-dot architecture we study could solve such problems on the time scale of days.

  16. Quantum Computation Toward Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zizzi, P. A.

    2001-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to enlighten the emerging relevance of Quantum Information Theory in the field of Quantum Gravity. As it was suggested by J. A. Wheeler, information theory must play a relevant role in understanding the foundations of Quantum Mechanics (the "It from bit" proposal). Here we suggest that quantum information must play a relevant role in Quantum Gravity (the "It from qubit" proposal). The conjecture is that Quantum Gravity, the theory which will reconcile Quantum Mechanics with General Relativity, can be formulated in terms of quantum bits of information (qubits) stored in space at the Planck scale. This conjecture is based on the following arguments: a) The holographic principle, b) The loop quantum gravity approach and spin networks, c) Quantum geometry and black hole entropy. From the above arguments, as they stand in the literature, it follows that the edges of spin networks pierce the black hole horizon and excite curvature degrees of freedom on the surface. These excitations are micro-states of Chern-Simons theory and account of the black hole entropy which turns out to be a quarter of the area of the horizon, (in units of Planck area), in accordance with the holographic principle. Moreover, the states which dominate the counting correspond to punctures of spin j = 1/2 and one can in fact visualize each micro-state as a bit of information. The obvious generalization of this result is to consider open spin networks with edges labeled by the spin -1/ 2 representation of SU(2) in a superposed state of spin "on" and spin "down." The micro-state corresponding to such a puncture will be a pixel of area which is "on" and "off" at the same time, and it will encode a qubit of information. This picture, when applied to quantum cosmology, describes an early inflationary universe which is a discrete version of the de Sitter universe.

  17. Quantum Walk Schemes for Universal Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, Michael S.

    Random walks are a powerful tool for the efficient implementation of algorithms in classical computation. Their quantum-mechanical analogues, called quantum walks, hold similar promise. Quantum walks provide a model of quantum computation that has recently been shown to be equivalent in power to the standard circuit model. As in the classical case, quantum walks take place on graphs and can undergo discrete or continuous evolution, though quantum evolution is unitary and therefore deterministic until a measurement is made. This thesis considers the usefulness of continuous-time quantum walks to quantum computation from the perspectives of both their fundamental power under various formulations, and their applicability in practical experiments. In one extant scheme, logical gates are effected by scattering processes. The results of an exhaustive search for single-qubit operations in this model are presented. It is shown that the number of distinct operations increases exponentially with the number of vertices in the scattering graph. A catalogue of all graphs on up to nine vertices that implement single-qubit unitaries at a specific set of momenta is included in an appendix. I develop a novel scheme for universal quantum computation called the discontinuous quantum walk, in which a continuous-time quantum walker takes discrete steps of evolution via perfect quantum state transfer through small 'widget' graphs. The discontinuous quantum-walk scheme requires an exponentially sized graph, as do prior discrete and continuous schemes. To eliminate the inefficient vertex resource requirement, a computation scheme based on multiple discontinuous walkers is presented. In this model, n interacting walkers inhabiting a graph with 2n vertices can implement an arbitrary quantum computation on an input of length n, an exponential savings over previous universal quantum walk schemes. This is the first quantum walk scheme that allows for the application of quantum error correction

  18. Measurement-based teleportation along quantum spin chains.

    PubMed

    Barjaktarevic, J P; McKenzie, R H; Links, J; Milburn, G J

    2005-12-02

    We examine the teleportation of an unknown spin-1/2 quantum state along a quantum spin chain with an even number of sites. Our protocol, using a sequence of Bell measurements, may be viewed as an iterated version of the 2-qubit protocol of C. H. Bennett et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 1895 (1993)]. A decomposition of the Hilbert space of the spin chain into 4 vector spaces, called Bell subspaces, is given. It is established that any state from a Bell subspace may be used as a channel to perform unit fidelity teleportation. The space of all spin-0 many-body states, which includes the ground states of many known antiferromagnetic systems, belongs to a common Bell subspace. A channel-dependent teleportation parameter [symbol: see text] is introduced, and a bound on the teleportation fidelity is given in terms of [symbol: see text].

  19. Quantum computing of semiclassical formulas.

    PubMed

    Georgeot, B; Giraud, O

    2008-04-01

    We show that semiclassical formulas such as the Gutzwiller trace formula can be implemented on a quantum computer more efficiently than on a classical device. We give explicit quantum algorithms which yield quantum observables from classical trajectories, and which alternatively test the semiclassical approximation by computing classical actions from quantum evolution. The gain over classical computation is in general quadratic, and can be larger in some specific cases.

  20. Non-Markovianity Measure Based on Brukner–Zeilinger Invariant Information for Unital Quantum Dynamical Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhi; Zhu, Lie-Qiang; Li, Li

    2017-03-01

    A non-Markovianity measure based on Brukner–Zeilinger invariant information to characterize non-Markovian effect of open systems undergoing unital dynamical maps is proposed. The method takes advantage of non-increasing property of the Brukner–Zeilinger invariant information under completely positive and trace-preserving unital maps. The simplicity of computing the Brukner–Zeilinger invariant information is the advantage of the proposed measure because of mainly depending on the purity of quantum state. The measure effectively captures the characteristics of non-Markovianity of unital dynamical maps. As some concrete application, we consider two typical non-Markovian noise channels, i.e., the phase damping channel and the random unitary channel to show the sensitivity of the proposed measure. By investigation, we find that the conditions of detecting the non-Markovianity for the phase damping channel are consistent with the results of existing measures for non-Markovianity, i.e., information flow, divisibility and quantum mutual information. However, for the random unitary channel non-Markovian conditions are same to that of the information flow, but is different from that of the divisibility and quantum mutual information. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 61505053, the Natural Science Foundation of Hunan Province under Grant No. 2015JJ3092, the Research Foundation of Education Bureau of Hunan Province, China under Grant No. 16B177, the School Foundation from the Hunan University of Arts and Science under Grant No. 14ZD01

  1. Quantum Computing for Quantum Chemistry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    random walks as the decoherence became strong. Recent experiments on photosynthetic light -harvesting complexes observed long-lived excitonic coherences...by the light -harvesting complex. In Environment-assisted quantum walks in energy transfer of photosynthetic complexes, J. Chem. Phys. 129 (2008...a decohered quantum walk. Motivated by the experiments on the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) light -harvesting complex of green sulfur bacteria, we

  2. Quantum computing on encrypted data.

    PubMed

    Fisher, K A G; Broadbent, A; Shalm, L K; Yan, Z; Lavoie, J; Prevedel, R; Jennewein, T; Resch, K J

    2014-01-01

    The ability to perform computations on encrypted data is a powerful tool for protecting privacy. Recently, protocols to achieve this on classical computing systems have been found. Here, we present an efficient solution to the quantum analogue of this problem that enables arbitrary quantum computations to be carried out on encrypted quantum data. We prove that an untrusted server can implement a universal set of quantum gates on encrypted quantum bits (qubits) without learning any information about the inputs, while the client, knowing the decryption key, can easily decrypt the results of the computation. We experimentally demonstrate, using single photons and linear optics, the encryption and decryption scheme on a set of gates sufficient for arbitrary quantum computations. As our protocol requires few extra resources compared with other schemes it can be easily incorporated into the design of future quantum servers. These results will play a key role in enabling the development of secure distributed quantum systems.

  3. Quantum computing on encrypted data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, K. A. G.; Broadbent, A.; Shalm, L. K.; Yan, Z.; Lavoie, J.; Prevedel, R.; Jennewein, T.; Resch, K. J.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to perform computations on encrypted data is a powerful tool for protecting privacy. Recently, protocols to achieve this on classical computing systems have been found. Here, we present an efficient solution to the quantum analogue of this problem that enables arbitrary quantum computations to be carried out on encrypted quantum data. We prove that an untrusted server can implement a universal set of quantum gates on encrypted quantum bits (qubits) without learning any information about the inputs, while the client, knowing the decryption key, can easily decrypt the results of the computation. We experimentally demonstrate, using single photons and linear optics, the encryption and decryption scheme on a set of gates sufficient for arbitrary quantum computations. As our protocol requires few extra resources compared with other schemes it can be easily incorporated into the design of future quantum servers. These results will play a key role in enabling the development of secure distributed quantum systems.

  4. Quantum Computing's Classical Problem, Classical Computing's Quantum Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Meter, Rodney

    2014-08-01

    Tasked with the challenge to build better and better computers, quantum computing and classical computing face the same conundrum: the success of classical computing systems. Small quantum computing systems have been demonstrated, and intermediate-scale systems are on the horizon, capable of calculating numeric results or simulating physical systems far beyond what humans can do by hand. However, to be commercially viable, they must surpass what our wildly successful, highly advanced classical computers can already do. At the same time, those classical computers continue to advance, but those advances are now constrained by thermodynamics, and will soon be limited by the discrete nature of atomic matter and ultimately quantum effects. Technological advances benefit both quantum and classical machinery, altering the competitive landscape. Can we build quantum computing systems that out-compute classical systems capable of some logic gates per month? This article will discuss the interplay in these competing and cooperating technological trends.

  5. Fluxon-controlled quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Toshiyuki; Matsuo, Shigemasa; Hatakenaka, Noriyuki

    2016-11-01

    We propose a fluxon-controlled quantum computer incorporated with three-qubit quantum error correction using special gate operations, i.e. joint-phase and SWAP gate operations, inherent in capacitively coupled superconducting flux qubits. The proposed quantum computer acts exactly like a knitting machine at home.

  6. Quantum computing with defects.

    PubMed

    Weber, J R; Koehl, W F; Varley, J B; Janotti, A; Buckley, B B; Van de Walle, C G; Awschalom, D D

    2010-05-11

    Identifying and designing physical systems for use as qubits, the basic units of quantum information, are critical steps in the development of a quantum computer. Among the possibilities in the solid state, a defect in diamond known as the nitrogen-vacancy (NV(-1)) center stands out for its robustness--its quantum state can be initialized, manipulated, and measured with high fidelity at room temperature. Here we describe how to systematically identify other deep center defects with similar quantum-mechanical properties. We present a list of physical criteria that these centers and their hosts should meet and explain how these requirements can be used in conjunction with electronic structure theory to intelligently sort through candidate defect systems. To illustrate these points in detail, we compare electronic structure calculations of the NV(-1) center in diamond with those of several deep centers in 4H silicon carbide (SiC). We then discuss the proposed criteria for similar defects in other tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors.

  7. Quantum computing with defects

    PubMed Central

    Weber, J. R.; Koehl, W. F.; Varley, J. B.; Janotti, A.; Buckley, B. B.; Van de Walle, C. G.; Awschalom, D. D.

    2010-01-01

    Identifying and designing physical systems for use as qubits, the basic units of quantum information, are critical steps in the development of a quantum computer. Among the possibilities in the solid state, a defect in diamond known as the nitrogen-vacancy (NV-1) center stands out for its robustness—its quantum state can be initialized, manipulated, and measured with high fidelity at room temperature. Here we describe how to systematically identify other deep center defects with similar quantum-mechanical properties. We present a list of physical criteria that these centers and their hosts should meet and explain how these requirements can be used in conjunction with electronic structure theory to intelligently sort through candidate defect systems. To illustrate these points in detail, we compare electronic structure calculations of the NV-1 center in diamond with those of several deep centers in 4H silicon carbide (SiC). We then discuss the proposed criteria for similar defects in other tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors. PMID:20404195

  8. Vibrational coherent quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Paternostro, M.; Kim, M.S.; Knight, P.L.

    2005-02-01

    A long-lived coherent state and nonlinear interaction have been experimentally demonstrated for the vibrational mode of a trapped ion. We propose an implementation of quantum computation using coherent states of the vibrational modes of trapped ions. Differently from earlier experiments, we consider a far-off resonance for the interaction between external fields and the ion in a bidimensional trap. By appropriate choices of the detunings between the external fields, the adiabatic elimination of the ionic excited level from the Hamiltonian of the system allows for beam splitting between orthogonal vibrational modes, production of coherent states, and nonlinear interactions of various kinds. In particular, this model enables the generation of the four coherent Bell states. Furthermore, all the necessary operations for quantum computation, such as preparation of qubits and one-qubit and controlled two-qubit operations, are possible. The detection of the state of a vibrational mode in a Bell state is made possible by the combination of resonant and off-resonant interactions between the ion and some external fields. We show that our read-out scheme provides highly efficient discrimination between all the four Bell states. We extend this to a quantum register composed of many individually trapped ions. In this case, operations on two remote qubits are possible through a cavity mode. We emphasize that our remote-qubit operation scheme does not require a high-quality factor resonator: the cavity field acts as a catalyst for the gate operation.

  9. Quantum computing: Efficient fault tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottesman, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    Dealing with errors in a quantum computer typically requires complex programming and many additional quantum bits. A technique for controlling errors has been proposed that alleviates both of these problems.

  10. Open Quantum Walks and Dissipative Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petruccione, Francesco

    2012-02-01

    Open Quantum Walks (OQWs) have been recently introduced as quantum Markov chains on graphs [S. Attal, F. Petruccione, C. Sabot, and I. Sinayskiy, E-print: http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00581553/fr/]. The formulation of the OQWs is exclusively based upon the non-unitary dynamics induced by the environment. It will be shown that OQWs are a very useful tool for the formulation of dissipative quantum computing and quantum state preparation. In particular, it will be shown how to implement single qubit gates and the CNOT gate as OQWs on fully connected graphs. Also, OQWS make possible the dissipative quantum state preparation of arbitrary single qubit states and of all two-qubit Bell states. Finally, it will be shown how to reformulate efficiently a discrete time version of dissipative quantum computing in the language of OQWs.

  11. Duality quantum computer and the efficient quantum simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shijie; Long, Guilu; Tsinghua National LaboratoryInformation Science; Technology Collaboration; Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter Collaboration

    Duality quantum computer is a new kind of quantum computer which is able to perform an arbitrary sum of unitaries, and therefore a general quantum operator. This gives more computational power than a normal quantum computer. All linear bounded operators can be realized in a duality quantum computer, and unitary operators are just the extreme points of the set of generalized quantum gates. Duality quantum computer can provide flexibility and clear physical picture in designing quantum algorithms, serving as a useful bridge between quantum and classical algorithms. In this report, we will firstly briefly review the theory of duality quantum computer. Then we will introduce the application of duality quantum computer in Hamiltonian simulation. We will show that duality quantum computer can simulate quantum systems more efficiently than ordinary quantum computer by providing descriptions of the recent efficient quantum simulation algorithms.

  12. Quantum Computing and Second Quantization

    DOE PAGES

    Makaruk, Hanna Ewa

    2017-02-10

    Quantum computers are by their nature many particle quantum systems. Both the many-particle arrangement and being quantum are necessary for the existence of the entangled states, which are responsible for the parallelism of the quantum computers. Second quantization is a very important approximate method of describing such systems. This lecture will present the general idea of the second quantization, and discuss shortly some of the most important formulations of second quantization.

  13. Interfacing external quantum devices to a universal quantum computer.

    PubMed

    Lagana, Antonio A; Lohe, Max A; von Smekal, Lorenz

    2011-01-01

    We present a scheme to use external quantum devices using the universal quantum computer previously constructed. We thereby show how the universal quantum computer can utilize networked quantum information resources to carry out local computations. Such information may come from specialized quantum devices or even from remote universal quantum computers. We show how to accomplish this by devising universal quantum computer programs that implement well known oracle based quantum algorithms, namely the Deutsch, Deutsch-Jozsa, and the Grover algorithms using external black-box quantum oracle devices. In the process, we demonstrate a method to map existing quantum algorithms onto the universal quantum computer.

  14. Flow Ambiguity: A Path Towards Classically Driven Blind Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantri, Atul; Demarie, Tommaso F.; Menicucci, Nicolas C.; Fitzsimons, Joseph F.

    2017-07-01

    Blind quantum computation protocols allow a user to delegate a computation to a remote quantum computer in such a way that the privacy of their computation is preserved, even from the device implementing the computation. To date, such protocols are only known for settings involving at least two quantum devices: either a user with some quantum capabilities and a remote quantum server or two or more entangled but noncommunicating servers. In this work, we take the first step towards the construction of a blind quantum computing protocol with a completely classical client and single quantum server. Specifically, we show how a classical client can exploit the ambiguity in the flow of information in measurement-based quantum computing to construct a protocol for hiding critical aspects of a computation delegated to a remote quantum computer. This ambiguity arises due to the fact that, for a fixed graph, there exist multiple choices of the input and output vertex sets that result in deterministic measurement patterns consistent with the same fixed total ordering of vertices. This allows a classical user, computing only measurement angles, to drive a measurement-based computation performed on a remote device while hiding critical aspects of the computation.

  15. Measurement-based quantum lattice gas model of fluid dynamics in 2+1 dimensions.

    PubMed

    Micci, Michael M; Yepez, Jeffrey

    2015-09-01

    Presented are quantum simulation results using a measurement-based quantum lattice gas algorithm for Navier-Stokes fluid dynamics in 2+1 dimensions. Numerical prediction of the kinematic viscosity was measured by the decay rate of an initial sinusoidal flow profile. Due to local quantum entanglement in the quantum lattice gas, the minimum kinematic viscosity in the measurement-based quantum lattice gas is lower than achievable in a classical lattice gas. The numerically predicted viscosities precisely match the theoretical predictions obtained with a mean field approximation. Uniform flow profile with double shear layers, on a 16K×8K lattice, leads to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, breaking up the shear layer into pairs of counter-rotating vortices that eventually merge via vortex fusion and dissipate because of the nonzero shear viscosity.

  16. Towards quantum chemistry on a quantum computer.

    PubMed

    Lanyon, B P; Whitfield, J D; Gillett, G G; Goggin, M E; Almeida, M P; Kassal, I; Biamonte, J D; Mohseni, M; Powell, B J; Barbieri, M; Aspuru-Guzik, A; White, A G

    2010-02-01

    Exact first-principles calculations of molecular properties are currently intractable because their computational cost grows exponentially with both the number of atoms and basis set size. A solution is to move to a radically different model of computing by building a quantum computer, which is a device that uses quantum systems themselves to store and process data. Here we report the application of the latest photonic quantum computer technology to calculate properties of the smallest molecular system: the hydrogen molecule in a minimal basis. We calculate the complete energy spectrum to 20 bits of precision and discuss how the technique can be expanded to solve large-scale chemical problems that lie beyond the reach of modern supercomputers. These results represent an early practical step toward a powerful tool with a broad range of quantum-chemical applications.

  17. Short Introduction to Quantum Computation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    below. A second type of computing, introduced by Richard Feynman [3, 4], has been termed quantum computing where two-level quantum objects, such as spin...Cellular-automata supercomputers for fluid-dynamics modeling. Physical Review Let- ters, 56(16):1694–1696, 1986. [3] Richard P. Feynman . Simulating...physics with computers. International Journal of Theoretical Physics, 21(6/7):467–488, 1982. [4] Richard P. Feynman . Quantum mechanical com- puters

  18. Ancilla-driven universal quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Janet; Browne, Dan E.; Oi, Daniel K. L.; Kashefi, Elham; Andersson, Erika

    2010-08-15

    We introduce a model of quantum computation intermediate between the gate-based and measurement-based models. A quantum register is manipulated remotely with the help of a single ancilla that ''drives'' the evolution of the register. The fully controlled ancilla qubit is coupled to the computational register only via a fixed unitary two-qubit interaction and then measured in suitable bases, driving both single- and two-qubit operations on the register. Arbitrary single-qubit operations directly on register qubits are not needed. We characterize all interactions E that induce a unitary, stepwise deterministic measurement back-action on the register sufficient to implement any quantum channel. Our scheme offers experimental advantages for computation, state preparation, and generalized measurements, since no tunable control of the register is required.

  19. Towards Quantum Computing With Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pysher, Matthew

    This thesis presents experimental progress towards the realization of an optical quantum computer. Quantum computers replace the bits used in classical computing with quantum systems and promise an exponential speedup over their classical counterparts for certain tasks such as integer factoring and the simulation of quantum systems. A recently proposed quantum computing protocol known as one-way quantum computing has paved the way for the use of light in a functional quantum computer. One-way quantum computing calls for the generation of a large (consisting of many subsystems) entangled state known as a cluster state to serve as a quantum register. Entangled states are comprised of subsystems linked in such a way that the state cannot be separated into individual components. A recent proposal has shown that is possible to make arbitrarily large cluster states by linking the resonant frequency modes of a single optical parametric oscillator (OPO). In this thesis, we present two major steps towards the creation of such a cluster state. Namely, we successfully design and test the exotic nonlinear crystal needed in this proposal and use a slight variation on this proposal to simultaneously create over 15 four-mode cluster states in a single OPO. We also explore the possibility of scaling down the physical size of an optical quantum computer by generating squeezed states of light in a compact optical waveguide. Additionally, we investigate photon-number-resolving measurements on continuous quantum light sources, which will be necessary to obtain the desired speedups for a quantum computer over a classical computer.

  20. Quantum Nash Equilibria and Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellman, Philip Vos; Post, Jonathan Vos

    In 2004, At the Fifth International Conference on Complex Systems, we drew attention to some remarkable findings by researchers at the Santa Fe Institute (Sato, Farmer and Akiyama, 2001) about hitherto unsuspected complexity in the Nash Equilibrium. As we progressed from these findings about heteroclinic Hamiltonians and chaotic transients hidden within the learning patterns of the simple rock-paper-scissors game to some related findings on the theory of quantum computing, one of the arguments we put forward was just as in the late 1990's a number of new Nash equilibria were discovered in simple bi-matrix games (Shubik and Quint, 1996; Von Stengel, 1997, 2000; and McLennan and Park, 1999) we would begin to see new Nash equilibria discovered as the result of quantum computation. While actual quantum computers remain rather primitive (Toibman, 2004), and the theory of quantum computation seems to be advancing perhaps a bit more slowly than originally expected, there have, nonetheless, been a number of advances in computation and some more radical advances in an allied field, quantum game theory (Huberman and Hogg, 2004) which are quite significant. In the course of this paper we will review a few of these discoveries and illustrate some of the characteristics of these new "Quantum Nash Equilibria". The full text of this research can be found at http://necsi.org/events/iccs6/viewpaper.php?id-234

  1. Simulating chemistry using quantum computers.

    PubMed

    Kassal, Ivan; Whitfield, James D; Perdomo-Ortiz, Alejandro; Yung, Man-Hong; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2011-01-01

    The difficulty of simulating quantum systems, well known to quantum chemists, prompted the idea of quantum computation. One can avoid the steep scaling associated with the exact simulation of increasingly large quantum systems on conventional computers, by mapping the quantum system to another, more controllable one. In this review, we discuss to what extent the ideas in quantum computation, now a well-established field, have been applied to chemical problems. We describe algorithms that achieve significant advantages for the electronic-structure problem, the simulation of chemical dynamics, protein folding, and other tasks. Although theory is still ahead of experiment, we outline recent advances that have led to the first chemical calculations on small quantum information processors.

  2. Algorithms on ensemble quantum computers.

    PubMed

    Boykin, P Oscar; Mor, Tal; Roychowdhury, Vwani; Vatan, Farrokh

    2010-06-01

    In ensemble (or bulk) quantum computation, all computations are performed on an ensemble of computers rather than on a single computer. Measurements of qubits in an individual computer cannot be performed; instead, only expectation values (over the complete ensemble of computers) can be measured. As a result of this limitation on the model of computation, many algorithms cannot be processed directly on such computers, and must be modified, as the common strategy of delaying the measurements usually does not resolve this ensemble-measurement problem. Here we present several new strategies for resolving this problem. Based on these strategies we provide new versions of some of the most important quantum algorithms, versions that are suitable for implementing on ensemble quantum computers, e.g., on liquid NMR quantum computers. These algorithms are Shor's factorization algorithm, Grover's search algorithm (with several marked items), and an algorithm for quantum fault-tolerant computation. The first two algorithms are simply modified using a randomizing and a sorting strategies. For the last algorithm, we develop a classical-quantum hybrid strategy for removing measurements. We use it to present a novel quantum fault-tolerant scheme. More explicitly, we present schemes for fault-tolerant measurement-free implementation of Toffoli and σ(z)(¼) as these operations cannot be implemented "bitwise", and their standard fault-tolerant implementations require measurement.

  3. Models of optical quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krovi, Hari

    2017-03-01

    I review some work on models of quantum computing, optical implementations of these models, as well as the associated computational power. In particular, we discuss the circuit model and cluster state implementations using quantum optics with various encodings such as dual rail encoding, Gottesman-Kitaev-Preskill encoding, and coherent state encoding. Then we discuss intermediate models of optical computing such as boson sampling and its variants. Finally, we review some recent work in optical implementations of adiabatic quantum computing and analog optical computing. We also provide a brief description of the relevant aspects from complexity theory needed to understand the results surveyed.

  4. Quantum Computing: Solving Complex Problems

    ScienceCinema

    DiVincenzo, David [IBM Watson Research Center

    2016-07-12

    One of the motivating ideas of quantum computation was that there could be a new kind of machine that would solve hard problems in quantum mechanics. There has been significant progress towards the experimental realization of these machines (which I will review), but there are still many questions about how such a machine could solve computational problems of interest in quantum physics. New categorizations of the complexity of computational problems have now been invented to describe quantum simulation. The bad news is that some of these problems are believed to be intractable even on a quantum computer, falling into a quantum analog of the NP class. The good news is that there are many other new classifications of tractability that may apply to several situations of physical interest.

  5. Molecular Magnets for Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Takayoshi

    2009-06-01

    We review recent progress in molecular magnets especially in the viewpoint of the application for quantum computing. After a brief introduction to single-molecule magnets (SMMs), a method for qubit manipulation by using non-equidistant spin sublevels of a SMM will be introduced. A weakly-coupled dimer of two SMMs is also a candidate for quantum computing, which shows no quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM) at zero field. In the AF ring Cr7Ni system, the large tunnel splitting is a great advantage to reduce decoherence during manipulation, which can be a possible candidate to realize quantum computer devices in future.

  6. Quasicrystals and Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, Alexander A.

    1997-03-01

    In Quantum (Q) Computing qubits form Q-superpositions for macroscopic times. One scheme for ultra-fast (Q) computing can be based on quasicrystals. Ultrafast processing in Q-coherent structures (and the very existence of durable Q-superpositions) may be 'consequence' of presence of entire manifold of integer arithmetic (A0, aleph-naught of Georg Cantor) at any 4-point of space-time, furthermore, at any point of any multidimensional phase space of (any) N-particle Q-system. The latter, apart from quasicrystals, can include dispersed and/or diluted systems (Berezin, 1994). In such systems such alleged centrepieces of Q-Computing as ability for fast factorization of long integers can be processed by sheer virtue of the fact that entire infinite pattern of prime numbers is instantaneously available as 'free lunch' at any instant/point. Infinitely rich pattern of A0 (including pattern of primes and almost primes) acts as 'independent' physical effect which directly generates Q-dynamics (and physical world) 'out of nothing'. Thus Q-nonlocality can be ultimately based on instantaneous interconnectedness through ever- the-same structure of A0 ('Platonic field' of integers).

  7. Quantum Photonics Beyond Conventional Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-10

    computational task making it a key application of quantum technology for chemistry , biology and material science. In contrast to a digital simulation on a...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2015-0045 Quantum Photonics Beyond Conventional Computing Jeremy OBrien THE UNIVERSITY OF BRISTOL 07/10/2015 Final Report...2015 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From – To) 15 Mar 2012 – 15 Mar 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Quantum Photonics Beyond Conventional

  8. Geometric methods in quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun

    Recent advances in the physical sciences and engineering have created great hopes for new computational paradigms and substrates. One such new approach is the quantum computer, which holds the promise of enhanced computational power. Analogous to the way a classical computer is built from electrical circuits containing wires and logic gates, a quantum computer is built from quantum circuits containing quantum wires and elementary quantum gates to transport and manipulate quantum information. Therefore, design of quantum gates and quantum circuits is a prerequisite for any real application of quantum computation. In this dissertation we apply geometric control methods from differential geometry and Lie group representation theory to analyze the properties of quantum gates and to design optimal quantum circuits. Using the Cartan decomposition and the Weyl group, we show that the geometric structure of nonlocal two-qubit gates is a 3-Torus. After further reducing the symmetry, the geometric representation of nonlocal gates is seen to be conveniently visualized as a tetrahedron. Each point in this tetrahedron except on the base corresponds to a different equivalent class of nonlocal gates. This geometric representation is one of the cornerstones for the discussion on quantum computation in this dissertation. We investigate the properties of those two-qubit operations that can generate maximal entanglement. It is an astonishing finding that if we randomly choose a two-qubit operation, the probability that we obtain a perfect entangler is exactly one half. We prove that given a two-body interaction Hamiltonian, it is always possible to explicitly construct a quantum circuit for exact simulation of any arbitrary nonlocal two-qubit gate by turning on the two-body interaction for at most three times, together with at most four local gates. We also provide an analytic approach to construct a universal quantum circuit from any entangling gate supplemented with local gates

  9. Quantum Computing and High Performance Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    any hardware device. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Quantum Computing, FPGA, Quantum Computer Simulator, Paralelize 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 19a. NAME OF...Case Figure 2 repeatedly references a specific unitary operator—the CNot gate. The definition of the CNot, and any other gate elements that may...standard gate definition , we can reduce the general problem to the specific problem of simulating a gate in standard position, producing the

  10. Toward a superconducting quantum computer

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Jaw-Shen

    2010-01-01

    Intensive research on the construction of superconducting quantum computers has produced numerous important achievements. The quantum bit (qubit), based on the Josephson junction, is at the heart of this research. This macroscopic system has the ability to control quantum coherence. This article reviews the current state of quantum computing as well as its history, and discusses its future. Although progress has been rapid, the field remains beset with unsolved issues, and there are still many new research opportunities open to physicists and engineers. PMID:20431256

  11. Quantum Information and Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accardi, L.; Ohya, Masanori; Watanabe, N.

    2006-03-01

    Preface -- Coherent quantum control of [symbol]-atoms through the stochastic limit / L. Accardi, S. V. Kozyrev and A. N. Pechen -- Recent advances in quantum white noise calculus / L. Accardi and A. Boukas -- Control of quantum states by decoherence / L. Accardi and K. Imafuku -- Logical operations realized on the Ising chain of N qubits / M. Asano, N. Tateda and C. Ishii -- Joint extension of states of fermion subsystems / H. Araki -- Quantum filtering and optimal feedback control of a Gaussian quantum free particle / S. C. Edwards and V. P. Belavkin -- On existence of quantum zeno dynamics / P. Exner and T. Ichinose -- Invariant subspaces and control of decoherence / P. Facchi, V. L. Lepore and S. Pascazio -- Clauser-Horner inequality for electron counting statistics in multiterminal mesoscopic conductors / L. Faoro, F. Taddei and R. Fazio -- Fidelity of quantum teleportation model using beam splittings / K.-H. Fichtner, T. Miyadera and M. Ohya -- Quantum logical gates realized by beam splittings / W. Freudenberg ... [et al.] -- Information divergence for quantum channels / S. J. Hammersley and V. P. Belavkin -- On the uniqueness theorem in quantum information geometry / H. Hasegawa -- Noncanonical representations of a multi-dimensional Brownian motion / Y. Hibino -- Some of future directions of white noise theory / T. Hida -- Information, innovation and elemental random field / T. Hida -- Generalized quantum turing machine and its application to the SAT chaos algorithm / S. Iriyama, M. Ohya and I. Volovich -- A Stroboscopic approach to quantum tomography / A. Jamiolkowski -- Positive maps and separable states in matrix algebras / A. Kossakowski -- Simulating open quantum systems with trapped ions / S. Maniscalco -- A purification scheme and entanglement distillations / H. Nakazato, M. Unoki and K. Yuasa -- Generalized sectors and adjunctions to control micro-macro transitions / I. Ojima -- Saturation of an entropy bound and quantum Markov states / D. Petz -- An

  12. Insecurity of quantum secure computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    1997-08-01

    It had been widely claimed that quantum mechanics can protect private information during public decision in, for example, the so-called two-party secure computation. If this were the case, quantum smart-cards, storing confidential information accessible only to a proper reader, could prevent fake teller machines from learning the PIN (personal identification number) from the customers' input. Although such optimism has been challenged by the recent surprising discovery of the insecurity of the so-called quantum bit commitment, the security of quantum two-party computation itself remains unaddressed. Here I answer this question directly by showing that all one-sided two-party computations (which allow only one of the two parties to learn the result) are necessarily insecure. As corollaries to my results, quantum one-way oblivious password identification and the so-called quantum one-out-of-two oblivious transfer are impossible. I also construct a class of functions that cannot be computed securely in any two-sided two-party computation. Nevertheless, quantum cryptography remains useful in key distribution and can still provide partial security in ``quantum money'' proposed by Wiesner.

  13. Appearance and Disappearance of Quantum Correlations in Measurement-Based Feedback Control of a Mechanical Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhir, V.; Wilson, D. J.; Schilling, R.; Schütz, H.; Fedorov, S. A.; Ghadimi, A. H.; Nunnenkamp, A.; Kippenberg, T. J.

    2017-01-01

    Quantum correlations between imprecision and backaction are a hallmark of continuous linear measurements. Here, we study how measurement-based feedback can be used to improve the visibility of quantum correlations due to the interaction of a laser field with a nanomechanical oscillator. Backaction imparted by the meter laser, due to radiation-pressure quantum fluctuations, gives rise to correlations between its phase and amplitude quadratures. These quantum correlations are observed in the experiment both as squeezing of the meter field fluctuations below the vacuum level in a homodyne measurement and as sideband asymmetry in a heterodyne measurement, demonstrating the common origin of both phenomena. We show that quantum feedback, i.e., feedback that suppresses measurement backaction, can be used to increase the visibility of the sideband asymmetry ratio. In contrast, by operating the feedback loop in the regime of noise squashing, where the in-loop photocurrent variance is reduced below the vacuum level, the visibility of the sideband asymmetry is reduced. This is due to backaction arising from vacuum noise in the homodyne detector. These experiments demonstrate the possibility, as well as the fundamental limits, of measurement-based feedback as a tool to manipulate quantum correlations.

  14. Cryptography, quantum computation and trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Richard J.

    1998-03-01

    The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

  15. Universal blind quantum computation for hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, He-Liang; Bao, Wan-Su; Li, Tan; Li, Feng-Guang; Fu, Xiang-Qun; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, Hai-Long; Wang, Xiang

    2017-08-01

    As progress on the development of building quantum computer continues to advance, first-generation practical quantum computers will be available for ordinary users in the cloud style similar to IBM's Quantum Experience nowadays. Clients can remotely access the quantum servers using some simple devices. In such a situation, it is of prime importance to keep the security of the client's information. Blind quantum computation protocols enable a client with limited quantum technology to delegate her quantum computation to a quantum server without leaking any privacy. To date, blind quantum computation has been considered only for an individual quantum system. However, practical universal quantum computer is likely to be a hybrid system. Here, we take the first step to construct a framework of blind quantum computation for the hybrid system, which provides a more feasible way for scalable blind quantum computation.

  16. Quantum Estimation, meet Computational Statistics; Computational Statistics, meet Quantum Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrie, Chris; Granade, Chris; Combes, Joshua

    2013-03-01

    Quantum estimation, that is, post processing data to obtain classical descriptions of quantum states and processes, is an intractable problem--scaling exponentially with the number of interacting systems. Thankfully there is an entire field, Computational Statistics, devoted to designing algorithms to estimate probabilities for seemingly intractable problems. So, why not look to the most advanced machine learning algorithms for quantum estimation tasks? We did. I'll describe how we adapted and combined machine learning methodologies to obtain an online learning algorithm designed to estimate quantum states and processes.

  17. Adiabatic graph-state quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonio, B.; Markham, D.; Anders, J.

    2014-11-01

    Measurement-based quantum computation (MBQC) and holonomic quantum computation (HQC) are two very different computational methods. The computation in MBQC is driven by adaptive measurements executed in a particular order on a large entangled state. In contrast in HQC the system starts in the ground subspace of a Hamiltonian which is slowly changed such that a transformation occurs within the subspace. Following the approach of Bacon and Flammia, we show that any MBQC on a graph state with generalized flow (gflow) can be converted into an adiabatically driven holonomic computation, which we call adiabatic graph-state quantum computation (AGQC). We then investigate how properties of AGQC relate to the properties of MBQC, such as computational depth. We identify a trade-off that can be made between the number of adiabatic steps in AGQC and the norm of \\dot{H} as well as the degree of H, in analogy to the trade-off between the number of measurements and classical post-processing seen in MBQC. Finally the effects of performing AGQC with orderings that differ from standard MBQC are investigated.

  18. Quantum computation using geometric algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzke, Douglas James

    This dissertation reports that arbitrary Boolean logic equations and operators can be represented in geometric algebra as linear equations composed entirely of orthonormal vectors using only addition and multiplication Geometric algebra is a topologically based algebraic system that naturally incorporates the inner and anticommutative outer products into a real valued geometric product, yet does not rely on complex numbers or matrices. A series of custom tools was designed and built to simplify geometric algebra expressions into a standard sum of products form, and automate the anticommutative geometric product and operations. Using this infrastructure, quantum bits (qubits), quantum registers and EPR-bits (ebits) are expressed symmetrically as geometric algebra expressions. Many known quantum computing gates, measurement operators, and especially the Bell/magic operators are also expressed as geometric products. These results demonstrate that geometric algebra can naturally and faithfully represent the central concepts, objects, and operators necessary for quantum computing, and can facilitate the design and construction of quantum computing tools.

  19. Experimental quantum computing without entanglement.

    PubMed

    Lanyon, B P; Barbieri, M; Almeida, M P; White, A G

    2008-11-14

    Deterministic quantum computation with one pure qubit (DQC1) is an efficient model of computation that uses highly mixed states. Unlike pure-state models, its power is not derived from the generation of a large amount of entanglement. Instead it has been proposed that other nonclassical correlations are responsible for the computational speedup, and that these can be captured by the quantum discord. In this Letter we implement DQC1 in an all-optical architecture, and experimentally observe the generated correlations. We find no entanglement, but large amounts of quantum discord-except in three cases where an efficient classical simulation is always possible. Our results show that even fully separable, highly mixed, states can contain intrinsically quantum mechanical correlations and that these could offer a valuable resource for quantum information technologies.

  20. Computational Power of Quantum Machines, Quantum Grammars and Feasible Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, E. V.

    This paper studies the computational power of quantum computers to explore as to whether they can recognize properties which are in nondeterministic polynomial-time class (NP) and beyond. To study the computational power, we use the Feynman's path integral (FPI) formulation of quantum mechanics. From a computational point of view the Feynman's path integral computes a quantum dynamical analogue of the k-ary relation computed by an Alternating Turing machine (ATM) using AND-OR Parallelism. Hence, if we can find a suitable mapping function between an instance of a mathematical problem and the corresponding interference problem, using suitable potential functions for which FPI can be integrated exactly, the computational power of a quantum computer can be bounded to that of an alternating Turing machine that can solve problems in NP (e.g, factorization problem) and in polynomial space. Unfortunately, FPI is exactly integrable only for a few problems (e.g., the harmonic oscillator) involving quadratic potentials; otherwise, they may be only approximately computable or noncomputable. This means we cannot in general solve all quantum dynamical problems exactly except for those special cases of quadratic potentials, e.g., harmonic oscillator. Since there is a one to one correspondence between the quantum mechanical problems that can be analytically solved and the path integrals that can be exactly evaluated, we can say that the noncomputability of FPI implies quantum unsolvability. This is the analogue of classical unsolvability. The Feynman's path graph can be considered as a semantic parse graph for the quantum mechanical sentence. It provides a semantic valuation function of the terminal sentence based on probability amplitudes to disambiguate a given quantum description and obtain an interpretation in a linear time. In Feynman's path integral, the kernels are partially ordered over time (different alternate paths acting concurrently at the same time) and multiplied

  1. PERTURBATION APPROACH FOR QUANTUM COMPUTATION

    SciTech Connect

    G. P. BERMAN; D. I. KAMENEV; V. I. TSIFRINOVICH

    2001-04-01

    We discuss how to simulate errors in the implementation of simple quantum logic operations in a nuclear spin quantum computer with many qubits, using radio-frequency pulses. We verify our perturbation approach using the exact solutions for relatively small (L = 10) number of qubits.

  2. Qudit quantum computation on matrix product states with global symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong-Sheng; Stephen, David T.; Raussendorf, Robert

    2017-03-01

    Resource states that contain nontrivial symmetry-protected topological order are identified for universal single-qudit measurement-based quantum computation. Our resource states fall into two classes: one as the qudit generalizations of the one-dimensional qubit cluster state, and the other as the higher-symmetry generalizations of the spin-1 Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki (AKLT) state, namely, with unitary, orthogonal, or symplectic symmetry. The symmetry in cluster states protects information propagation (identity gate), while the higher symmetry in AKLT-type states enables nontrivial gate computation. This work demonstrates a close connection between measurement-based quantum computation and symmetry-protected topological order.

  3. Quantum chromodynamics with advanced computing

    SciTech Connect

    Kronfeld, Andreas S.; /Fermilab

    2008-07-01

    We survey results in lattice quantum chromodynamics from groups in the USQCD Collaboration. The main focus is on physics, but many aspects of the discussion are aimed at an audience of computational physicists.

  4. Contextuality as a Resource for Models of Quantum Computation with Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermejo-Vega, Juan; Delfosse, Nicolas; Browne, Dan E.; Okay, Cihan; Raussendorf, Robert

    2017-09-01

    A central question in quantum computation is to identify the resources that are responsible for quantum speed-up. Quantum contextuality has been recently shown to be a resource for quantum computation with magic states for odd-prime dimensional qudits and two-dimensional systems with real wave functions. The phenomenon of state-independent contextuality poses a priori an obstruction to characterizing the case of regular qubits, the fundamental building block of quantum computation. Here, we establish contextuality of magic states as a necessary resource for a large class of quantum computation schemes on qubits. We illustrate our result with a concrete scheme related to measurement-based quantum computation.

  5. Gate sequence for continuous variable one-way quantum computation

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiaolong; Hao, Shuhong; Deng, Xiaowei; Ma, Lingyu; Wang, Meihong; Jia, Xiaojun; Xie, Changde; Peng, Kunchi

    2013-01-01

    Measurement-based one-way quantum computation using cluster states as resources provides an efficient model to perform computation and information processing of quantum codes. Arbitrary Gaussian quantum computation can be implemented sufficiently by long single-mode and two-mode gate sequences. However, continuous variable gate sequences have not been realized so far due to an absence of cluster states larger than four submodes. Here we present the first continuous variable gate sequence consisting of a single-mode squeezing gate and a two-mode controlled-phase gate based on a six-mode cluster state. The quantum property of this gate sequence is confirmed by the fidelities and the quantum entanglement of two output modes, which depend on both the squeezing and controlled-phase gates. The experiment demonstrates the feasibility of implementing Gaussian quantum computation by means of accessible gate sequences.

  6. Delegating private quantum computations12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadbent, Anne

    2015-09-01

    We give a protocol for the delegation of quantum computation on encrypted data. More specifically, we show that in a client-server scenario, where the client holds the encryption key for an encrypted quantum register held by the server, it is possible for the server to perform a universal set of quantum gates on the quantum data. All Clifford group gates are non-interactive, while the remaining non-Clifford group gate that we implement (the p/8 gate) requires the client to prepare and send a single random auxiliary qubit (chosen among four possibilities), and exchange classical communication. This construction improves on previous work, which requires either multiple auxiliary qubits or two-way quantum communication. Using a reduction to an entanglement-based protocol, we show privacy against any adversarial server according to a simulation-based security definition.

  7. Quantum computing measurement and intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezziane, Zoheir

    One of the grand challenges in the nanoscopic computing era is guarantees of robustness. Robust computing system design is confronted with quantum physical, probabilistic, and even biological phenomena, and guaranteeing high-reliability is much more difficult than ever before. Scaling devices down to the level of single electron operation will bring forth new challenges due to probabilistic effects and uncertainty in guaranteeing "zero-one" based computing. Minuscule devices imply billions of devices on a single chip, which may help mitigate the challenge of uncertainty by replication and redundancy. However, such device densities will create a design and validation nightmare with the sheer scale. The questions that confront computer engineers regarding the current status of nanocomputing material and the reliability of systems built from such minuscule devices are difficult to articulate and answer. This article illustrates and discusses two types of quantum algorithms as follows: (1) a simple quantum algorithm and (2) a quantum search algorithm. This article also presents a review of recent advances in quantum computing and intelligence and presents major achievements and obstacles for researchers in the near future.

  8. A Short Survey on Quantum Computers

    SciTech Connect

    Kanamori, Yoshito; Yoo, Seong-Moo; Pan, W. D.; Sheldon, Frederick T

    2006-01-01

    Quantum computing is an emerging technology. The clock frequency of current computer processor systems may reach about 40 GHz within the next 10 years. By then, one atom may represent one bit. Electrons under such conditions are no longer described by classical physics and a new model of the computer may be necessary by then. The quantum computer is one proposal that may have merit in dealing with the problems associated with the fact that certain important computationally intense problems present that current (classical) computers cannot solve because they require too much processing time. For example, Shor's algorithm performs factoring a large integer in polynomial time while classical factoring algorithms can do it in exponential time. In this paper we briefly survey the current status of quantum computers, quantum computer systems, and quantum simulators. Keywords Classical computers, quantum computers, quantum computer systems, quantum simulators, Shor's algorithm.

  9. Cluster State Quantum Computation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-01

    means of a novel three dimensional architecture that utilizes spatial multiplexing . We have studied the CNOT gate, as an archetypical quantum linear...spontaneous parametric down conversion (SPDC). This is a process where laser pump photons are converted into ‘signal’ and ‘idler’ entangled pairs in...level or the number of photons that can be entangled in given applications. Photon yield is related to laser power, which cannot be increased beyond

  10. Cluster State Quantum Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    against the main Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited. 3 error source of photon loss was discussed. With non-unit efficiencies ηS and...entangled photons that greatly increase process efficiency , without increasing laser power, in a regime where high detection quantum efficiency is...their joint spectral function (Figure 5b). Removing this requirement typically increases the useable count rate and overall efficiency

  11. Photonic quantum computing (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Jeremy L.

    2017-05-01

    Of the various approaches to quantum computing, photons are appealing for their low-noise properties and ease of manipulation at the single photon level; while the challenge of entangling interactions between photons can be met via measurement induced non-linearities. However, the real excitement with this architecture is the promise of ultimate manufacturability: All of the components--inc. sources, detectors, filters, switches, delay lines--have been implemented on chip, and increasingly sophisticated integration of these components is being achieved. We will discuss the opportunities and challenges of a fully integrated photonic quantum computer.

  12. Ancilla-driven quantum computation for qudits and continuous variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Timothy; Giulian, Melissa; Korolkova, Natalia; Andersson, Erika; Kendon, Viv

    2017-05-01

    Although qubits are the leading candidate for the basic elements in a quantum computer, there are also a range of reasons to consider using higher-dimensional qudits or quantum continuous variables (QCVs). In this paper, we use a general "quantum variable" formalism to propose a method of quantum computation in which ancillas are used to mediate gates on a well-isolated "quantum memory" register and which may be applied to the setting of qubits, qudits (for d >2 ), or QCVs. More specifically, we present a model in which universal quantum computation may be implemented on a register using only repeated applications of a single fixed two-body ancilla-register interaction gate, ancillas prepared in a single state, and local measurements of these ancillas. In order to maintain determinism in the computation, adaptive measurements via a classical feed forward of measurement outcomes are used, with the method similar to that in measurement-based quantum computation (MBQC). We show that our model has the same hybrid quantum-classical processing advantages as MBQC, including the power to implement any Clifford circuit in essentially one layer of quantum computation. In some physical settings, high-quality measurements of the ancillas may be highly challenging or not possible, and hence we also present a globally unitary model which replaces the need for measurements of the ancillas with the requirement for ancillas to be prepared in states from a fixed orthonormal basis. Finally, we discuss settings in which these models may be of practical interest.

  13. Atomic physics: A milestone in quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Stephen D.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum computers require many quantum bits to perform complex calculations, but devices with more than a few bits are difficult to program. A device based on five atomic quantum bits shows a way forward. See Letter p.63

  14. Nanophotonic quantum computer based on atomic quantum transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Andrianov, S N; Moiseev, S A

    2015-10-31

    We propose a scheme of a quantum computer based on nanophotonic elements: two buses in the form of nanowaveguide resonators, two nanosized units of multiatom multiqubit quantum memory and a set of nanoprocessors in the form of photonic quantum transistors, each containing a pair of nanowaveguide ring resonators coupled via a quantum dot. The operation modes of nanoprocessor photonic quantum transistors are theoretically studied and the execution of main logical operations by means of them is demonstrated. We also discuss the prospects of the proposed nanophotonic quantum computer for operating in high-speed optical fibre networks. (quantum computations)

  15. Weak measurement-based state estimation of Gaussian states of one-variable quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Debmalya; Arvind

    2017-04-01

    We present a scheme to estimate Gaussian states of one-dimensional continuous variable systems, based on weak (unsharp) quantum measurements. The estimation of a Gaussian state requires us to find position (q), momentum (p) and their second order moments. We measure q weakly and follow it up with a projective measurement of p on half of the ensemble, and on the other half we measure p weakly followed by a projective measurement of q. In each case we use the state twice before discarding it. We compare our results with projective measurements and demonstrate that under certain conditions such weak measurement-based estimation schemes, where recycling of the states is possible, can outperform projective measurement-based state estimation schemes. We establish beyond statistical fluctuations that our method works better for small ensemble sizes.

  16. Quantum Computation: Entangling with the Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Commercial applications of quantum computation have become viable due to the rapid progress of the field in the recent years. Efficient quantum algorithms are discovered to cope with the most challenging real-world problems that are too hard for classical computers. Manufactured quantum hardware has reached unprecedented precision and controllability, enabling fault-tolerant quantum computation. Here, I give a brief introduction on what principles in quantum mechanics promise its unparalleled computational power. I will discuss several important quantum algorithms that achieve exponential or polynomial speedup over any classical algorithm. Building a quantum computer is a daunting task, and I will talk about the criteria and various implementations of quantum computers. I conclude the talk with near-future commercial applications of a quantum computer.

  17. ASCR Workshop on Quantum Computing for Science

    SciTech Connect

    Aspuru-Guzik, Alan; Van Dam, Wim; Farhi, Edward; Gaitan, Frank; Humble, Travis; Jordan, Stephen; Landahl, Andrew J; Love, Peter; Lucas, Robert; Preskill, John; Muller, Richard P.; Svore, Krysta; Wiebe, Nathan; Williams, Carl

    2015-06-01

    This report details the findings of the DOE ASCR Workshop on Quantum Computing for Science that was organized to assess the viability of quantum computing technologies to meet the computational requirements of the DOE’s science and energy mission, and to identify the potential impact of quantum technologies. The workshop was held on February 17-18, 2015, in Bethesda, MD, to solicit input from members of the quantum computing community. The workshop considered models of quantum computation and programming environments, physical science applications relevant to DOE's science mission as well as quantum simulation, and applied mathematics topics including potential quantum algorithms for linear algebra, graph theory, and machine learning. This report summarizes these perspectives into an outlook on the opportunities for quantum computing to impact problems relevant to the DOE’s mission as well as the additional research required to bring quantum computing to the point where it can have such impact.

  18. Course 10: Basic Concepts in Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekert, A.; Hayden, P. M.; Inamori, H.

    Contents 1 Qubits, gates and networks 2 Quantum arithmetic and function evaluations 3 Algorithms and their complexity 4 From interferometers to computers 5 The first quantum algorithms 6 Quantum search 7 Optimal phase estimation 8 Periodicity and quantum factoring 9 Cryptography 10 Conditional quantum dynamics 11 Decoherence and recoherence 12 Concluding remarks

  19. An Early Quantum Computing Proposal

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Stephen Russell; Alexander, Francis Joseph; Barros, Kipton Marcos; Daniels, Marcus G.; Gattiker, James R.; Hamada, Michael Scott; Howse, James Walter; Loncaric, Josip; Pakin, Scott D.; Somma, Rolando Diego; Vernon, Louis James

    2016-04-04

    The D-Wave 2X is the third generation of quantum processing created by D-Wave. NASA (with Google and USRA) and Lockheed Martin (with USC), both own D-Wave systems. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) purchased a D-Wave 2X in November 2015. The D-Wave 2X processor contains (nominally) 1152 quantum bits (or qubits) and is designed to specifically perform quantum annealing, which is a well-known method for finding a global minimum of an optimization problem. This methodology is based on direct execution of a quantum evolution in experimental quantum hardware. While this can be a powerful method for solving particular kinds of problems, it also means that the D-Wave 2X processor is not a general computing processor and cannot be programmed to perform a wide variety of tasks. It is a highly specialized processor, well beyond what NNSA currently thinks of as an “advanced architecture.”A D-Wave is best described as a quantum optimizer. That is, it uses quantum superposition to find the lowest energy state of a system by repeated doses of power and settling stages. The D-Wave produces multiple solutions to any suitably formulated problem, one of which is the lowest energy state solution (global minimum). Mapping problems onto the D-Wave requires defining an objective function to be minimized and then encoding that function in the Hamiltonian of the D-Wave system. The quantum annealing method is then used to find the lowest energy configuration of the Hamiltonian using the current D-Wave Two, two-level, quantum processor. This is not always an easy thing to do, and the D-Wave Two has significant limitations that restrict problem sizes that can be run and algorithmic choices that can be made. Furthermore, as more people are exploring this technology, it has become clear that it is very difficult to come up with general approaches to optimization that can both utilize the D-Wave and that can do better than highly developed algorithms on conventional computers for

  20. Computational quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grobe, Rainer

    2006-05-01

    I will give an overview on recent attempts to solve the time-dependent Dirac equation for the electron-positron field operator. These numerical solutions permit a first temporally and spatially resolved insight into the mechanisms of how an electron-positron pair can be created from vacuum in a very strong force field. This approach has helped to illuminate a wide range of controversial questions. Some of these questions arise for complicated physical situations such as how an electron scatters off a supercritical potential barrier (Klein paradox). This requires the application of quantum field theory to study the combined effect of the pair-production due to the supercriticality of the potential together with the scattering at the barrier involving the Pauli-principle. Other phenomena include Schr"odinger's Zitterbewegung and the localization problem for a relativistic particle. This work has been supported by the NSF and Research Corporation. P. Krekora, K. Cooley, Q. Su and R. Grobe, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 070403 (2005). P. Krekora, Q. Su and R. Grobe, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 043004 (2004). P. Krekora, Q. Su and R. Grobe, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 040406 (2004).

  1. Measurement-based local quantum filters and their ability to transform quantum entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Debmalya; Sengupta, Ritabrata; Arvind

    2017-06-01

    We introduce local filters as a means to detect the entanglement of bound entangled states which do not yield to detection by witnesses based on positive maps which are not completely positive. We demonstrate how such non-detectable bound entangled states can be locally filtered into detectable bound entangled states. Specifically, we show that a bound entangled state in the orthogonal complement of the unextendible product bases (UPB), can be locally filtered into another bound entangled state that is detectable by the Choi map. We reinterpret these filters as local measurements on locally extended Hilbert spaces. We give explicit constructions of a measurement-based implementation of these filters for 2 ⊗ 2 and 3 ⊗ 3 systems. This provides us with a physical mechanism to implement such local filters.

  2. Experimental demonstration of blind quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barz, Stefanie; Kashefi, Elham; Broadbent, Anne; Fitzsimons, Joe; Zeilinger, Anton; Walther, Philip

    2012-02-01

    Quantum computers are among the most promising applications of quantum-enhanced technologies. Quantum effects such as superposition and entanglement enable computational speed-ups that are unattainable using classical computers. The challenges in realising quantum computers suggest that in the near future, only a few facilities worldwide will be capable of operating such devices. In order to exploit these computers, users would seemingly have to give up their privacy. It was recently shown that this is not the case and that, via the universal blind quantum computation protocol, quantum mechanics provides a way to guarantee that the user's data remain private. Here, we demonstrate the first experimental version of this protocol using polarisation-entangled photonic qubits. We demonstrate various blind one- and two-qubit gate operations as well as blind versions of the Deutsch's and Grover's algorithms. When the technology to build quantum computers becomes available, this will become an important privacy-preserving feature of quantum information processing.

  3. Measurement based controlled not gate for topological qubits in a Majorana fermion and quantum-dot hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Zheng-Yuan

    2013-04-01

    We propose a scheme to implement controlled not gate for topological qubits in a quantum-dot and Majorana fermion hybrid system. Quantum information is encoded on pairs of Majorana fermions, which live on the the interface between topologically trivial and nontrivial sections of a quantum nanowire deposited on an s-wave superconductor. A measurement based two-qubit controlled not gate is produced with the help of parity measurements assisted by the quantum-dot and followed by prescribed single-qubit gates. The parity measurement, on the quantum-dot and a topological qubit, is achieved by the Aharonov-Casher effect.

  4. Geometry of quantum computation with qutrits.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Yu, Zu-Huan; Fei, Shao-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Determining the quantum circuit complexity of a unitary operation is an important problem in quantum computation. By using the mathematical techniques of Riemannian geometry, we investigate the efficient quantum circuits in quantum computation with n qutrits. We show that the optimal quantum circuits are essentially equivalent to the shortest path between two points in a certain curved geometry of SU(3(n)). As an example, three-qutrit systems are investigated in detail.

  5. Unconditionally verifiable blind quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzsimons, Joseph F.; Kashefi, Elham

    2017-07-01

    Blind quantum computing (BQC) allows a client to have a server carry out a quantum computation for them such that the client's input, output, and computation remain private. A desirable property for any BQC protocol is verification, whereby the client can verify with high probability whether the server has followed the instructions of the protocol or if there has been some deviation resulting in a corrupted output state. A verifiable BQC protocol can be viewed as an interactive proof system leading to consequences for complexity theory. We previously proposed [A. Broadbent, J. Fitzsimons, and E. Kashefi, in Proceedings of the 50th Annual Symposium on Foundations of Computer Science, Atlanta, 2009 (IEEE, Piscataway, 2009), p. 517] a universal and unconditionally secure BQC scheme where the client only needs to be able to prepare single qubits in separable states randomly chosen from a finite set and send them to the server, who has the balance of the required quantum computational resources. In this paper we extend that protocol with additional functionality allowing blind computational basis measurements, which we use to construct another verifiable BQC protocol based on a different class of resource states. We rigorously prove that the probability of failing to detect an incorrect output is exponentially small in a security parameter, while resource overhead remains polynomial in this parameter. This resource state allows entangling gates to be performed between arbitrary pairs of logical qubits with only constant overhead. This is a significant improvement on the original scheme, which required that all computations to be performed must first be put into a nearest-neighbor form, incurring linear overhead in the number of qubits. Such an improvement has important consequences for efficiency and fault-tolerance thresholds.

  6. Quantum chemistry simulation on quantum computers: theories and experiments.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dawei; Xu, Boruo; Xu, Nanyang; Li, Zhaokai; Chen, Hongwei; Peng, Xinhua; Xu, Ruixue; Du, Jiangfeng

    2012-07-14

    It has been claimed that quantum computers can mimic quantum systems efficiently in the polynomial scale. Traditionally, those simulations are carried out numerically on classical computers, which are inevitably confronted with the exponential growth of required resources, with the increasing size of quantum systems. Quantum computers avoid this problem, and thus provide a possible solution for large quantum systems. In this paper, we first discuss the ideas of quantum simulation, the background of quantum simulators, their categories, and the development in both theories and experiments. We then present a brief introduction to quantum chemistry evaluated via classical computers followed by typical procedures of quantum simulation towards quantum chemistry. Reviewed are not only theoretical proposals but also proof-of-principle experimental implementations, via a small quantum computer, which include the evaluation of the static molecular eigenenergy and the simulation of chemical reaction dynamics. Although the experimental development is still behind the theory, we give prospects and suggestions for future experiments. We anticipate that in the near future quantum simulation will become a powerful tool for quantum chemistry over classical computations.

  7. Optically simulated universal quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francisco, D.; Ledesma, S.

    2008-04-01

    Recently, classical optics based systems to emulate quantum information processing have been proposed. The analogy is based on the possibility of encoding a quantum state of a system with a 2N-dimensional Hilbert space as an image in the input of an optical system. The probability amplitude of each state of a certain basis is associated with the complex amplitude of the electromagnetic field in a given slice of the laser wavefront. Temporal evolution is represented as the change of the complex amplitude of the field when the wavefront pass through a certain optical arrangement. Different modules that represent universal gates for quantum computation have been implemented. For instance, unitary operations acting on the qbits space (or U(2) gates) are represented by means of two phase plates, two spherical lenses and a phase grating in a typical image processing set up. In this work, we present CNOT gates which are emulated by means of a cube prism that splits a pair of adjacent rays incoming from the input image. As an example of application, we present an optical module that can be used to simulate the quantum teleportation process. We also show experimental results that illustrate the validity of the analogy. Although the experimental results obtained are promising and show the capability of the system for simulate the real quantum process, we must take into account that any classical simulation of quantum phenomena, has as fundamental limitation the impossibility of representing non local entanglement. In this classical context, quantum teleportation has only an illustrative interpretation.

  8. Brain Neurons as Quantum Computers:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bershadskii, A.; Dremencov, E.; Bershadskii, J.; Yadid, G.

    The question: whether quantum coherent states can sustain decoherence, heating and dissipation over time scales comparable to the dynamical timescales of brain neurons, has been actively discussed in the last years. A positive answer on this question is crucial, in particular, for consideration of brain neurons as quantum computers. This discussion was mainly based on theoretical arguments. In the present paper nonlinear statistical properties of the Ventral Tegmental Area (VTA) of genetically depressive limbic brain are studied in vivo on the Flinders Sensitive Line of rats (FSL). VTA plays a key role in the generation of pleasure and in the development of psychological drug addiction. We found that the FSL VTA (dopaminergic) neuron signals exhibit multifractal properties for interspike frequencies on the scales where healthy VTA dopaminergic neurons exhibit bursting activity. For high moments the observed multifractal (generalized dimensions) spectrum coincides with the generalized dimensions spectrum calculated for a spectral measure of a quantum system (so-called kicked Harper model, actively used as a model of quantum chaos). This observation can be considered as a first experimental (in vivo) indication in the favor of the quantum (at least partially) nature of brain neurons activity.

  9. Exploiting Locality in Quantum Computation for Quantum Chemistry.

    PubMed

    McClean, Jarrod R; Babbush, Ryan; Love, Peter J; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-12-18

    Accurate prediction of chemical and material properties from first-principles quantum chemistry is a challenging task on traditional computers. Recent developments in quantum computation offer a route toward highly accurate solutions with polynomial cost; however, this solution still carries a large overhead. In this Perspective, we aim to bring together known results about the locality of physical interactions from quantum chemistry with ideas from quantum computation. We show that the utilization of spatial locality combined with the Bravyi-Kitaev transformation offers an improvement in the scaling of known quantum algorithms for quantum chemistry and provides numerical examples to help illustrate this point. We combine these developments to improve the outlook for the future of quantum chemistry on quantum computers.

  10. Multibit gates for quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Sørensen, A; Mølmer, K

    2001-04-23

    We present a general technique to implement products of many qubit operators communicating via a joint harmonic oscillator degree of freedom in a quantum computer. By conditional displacements and rotations we can implement Hamiltonians which are trigonometric functions of qubit operators. With such operators we can effectively implement higher order gates such as Toffoli gates and C(n)-NOT gates, and we show that the entire Grover search algorithm can be implemented in a direct way.

  11. Holonomic Quantum Computation in Subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreshkov, Ognyan

    2009-08-01

    We introduce a generalized method of holonomic quantum computation (HQC) based on encoding in subsystems. As an application, we propose a scheme for applying holonomic gates to unencoded qubits by the use of a noisy ancillary qubit. This scheme does not require initialization in a subspace since all dynamical effects factor out as a transformation on the ancilla. We use this approach to show how fault-tolerant HQC can be realized via 2-local Hamiltonians with perturbative gadgets.

  12. Quantum Computing in a Piece of Glass

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    key distribution. Recently a practical method has been demonstrated to produce such MUB states using computer-generated holography with a single...scalability, crosstalk) of this technology. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Linear Optical Quantum Computing, Volume Holography , Quantum Gates 16. SECURITY...Computing, Volume Holography , Quantum Gates 1. PHOTONIC QUANTUM ALGORITHMS WITHIN A VOLUME HOLOGRAM It is the objective of this manuscript to argue that

  13. Quantum Computing and the Onset of Quantum Chaotic Motion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    for Nuclear Theory Program on "Chaos and Interactions: from Nuclei to Quantum Dots’", University of Washington, Seattle, USA, 17 July, 2002. I...to Quantum Dots’", University of Washington, Seattle, USA, 17 July, 2002. G. Casati “Quantum computers and quantum chaos” Institute for Nuclear...Theory Program on "Chaos and Interactions: from Nuclei to Quantum Dots’", University of Washington, Seattle, USA, 17 July, 2002. 2. Scientific

  14. Toward a superconducting quantum computer. Harnessing macroscopic quantum coherence.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jaw-Shen

    2010-01-01

    Intensive research on the construction of superconducting quantum computers has produced numerous important achievements. The quantum bit (qubit), based on the Josephson junction, is at the heart of this research. This macroscopic system has the ability to control quantum coherence. This article reviews the current state of quantum computing as well as its history, and discusses its future. Although progress has been rapid, the field remains beset with unsolved issues, and there are still many new research opportunities open to physicists and engineers.

  15. Universal quantum computation using the discrete-time quantum walk

    SciTech Connect

    Lovett, Neil B.; Cooper, Sally; Everitt, Matthew; Trevers, Matthew; Kendon, Viv

    2010-04-15

    A proof that continuous-time quantum walks are universal for quantum computation, using unweighted graphs of low degree, has recently been presented by A. M. Childs [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 180501 (2009)]. We present a version based instead on the discrete-time quantum walk. We show that the discrete-time quantum walk is able to implement the same universal gate set and thus both discrete and continuous-time quantum walks are computational primitives. Additionally, we give a set of components on which the discrete-time quantum walk provides perfect state transfer.

  16. Efficient simulation of open quantum system in duality quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shi-Jie; Long, Gui-Lu

    2016-11-01

    Practical quantum systems are open systems due to interactions with their environment. Understanding the evolution of open systems dynamics is important for quantum noise processes , designing quantum error correcting codes, and performing simulations of open quantum systems. Here we proposed an efficient quantum algorithm for simulating the evolution of an open quantum system on a duality quantum computer. In contrast to unitary evolution in a usual quantum computer, the evolution operator in a duality quantum computer is a linear combination of unitary operators. In this duality algorithm, the time evolution of open quantum system is realized by using Kraus operators which is naturally realized in duality quantum computing. Compared to the Lloyd's quantum algorithm [Science.273, 1073(1996)] , the dependence on the dimension of the open quantum system in our algorithm is decreased. Moreover, our algorithm uses a truncated Taylor series of the evolution operators, exponentially improving the performance on the precision compared with existing quantum simulation algorithms with unitary evolution operations.

  17. Elucidating reaction mechanisms on quantum computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiher, Markus; Wiebe, Nathan; Svore, Krysta M.; Wecker, Dave; Troyer, Matthias

    2017-07-01

    With rapid recent advances in quantum technology, we are close to the threshold of quantum devices whose computational powers can exceed those of classical supercomputers. Here, we show that a quantum computer can be used to elucidate reaction mechanisms in complex chemical systems, using the open problem of biological nitrogen fixation in nitrogenase as an example. We discuss how quantum computers can augment classical computer simulations used to probe these reaction mechanisms, to significantly increase their accuracy and enable hitherto intractable simulations. Our resource estimates show that, even when taking into account the substantial overhead of quantum error correction, and the need to compile into discrete gate sets, the necessary computations can be performed in reasonable time on small quantum computers. Our results demonstrate that quantum computers will be able to tackle important problems in chemistry without requiring exorbitant resources.

  18. Elucidating reaction mechanisms on quantum computers.

    PubMed

    Reiher, Markus; Wiebe, Nathan; Svore, Krysta M; Wecker, Dave; Troyer, Matthias

    2017-07-18

    With rapid recent advances in quantum technology, we are close to the threshold of quantum devices whose computational powers can exceed those of classical supercomputers. Here, we show that a quantum computer can be used to elucidate reaction mechanisms in complex chemical systems, using the open problem of biological nitrogen fixation in nitrogenase as an example. We discuss how quantum computers can augment classical computer simulations used to probe these reaction mechanisms, to significantly increase their accuracy and enable hitherto intractable simulations. Our resource estimates show that, even when taking into account the substantial overhead of quantum error correction, and the need to compile into discrete gate sets, the necessary computations can be performed in reasonable time on small quantum computers. Our results demonstrate that quantum computers will be able to tackle important problems in chemistry without requiring exorbitant resources.

  19. Computational multiqubit tunnelling in programmable quantum annealers

    PubMed Central

    Boixo, Sergio; Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Shabani, Alireza; Isakov, Sergei V.; Dykman, Mark; Denchev, Vasil S.; Amin, Mohammad H.; Smirnov, Anatoly Yu; Mohseni, Masoud; Neven, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Quantum tunnelling is a phenomenon in which a quantum state traverses energy barriers higher than the energy of the state itself. Quantum tunnelling has been hypothesized as an advantageous physical resource for optimization in quantum annealing. However, computational multiqubit tunnelling has not yet been observed, and a theory of co-tunnelling under high- and low-frequency noises is lacking. Here we show that 8-qubit tunnelling plays a computational role in a currently available programmable quantum annealer. We devise a probe for tunnelling, a computational primitive where classical paths are trapped in a false minimum. In support of the design of quantum annealers we develop a nonperturbative theory of open quantum dynamics under realistic noise characteristics. This theory accurately predicts the rate of many-body dissipative quantum tunnelling subject to the polaron effect. Furthermore, we experimentally demonstrate that quantum tunnelling outperforms thermal hopping along classical paths for problems with up to 200 qubits containing the computational primitive. PMID:26739797

  20. Experimental one-way quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Walther, P; Resch, K J; Rudolph, T; Schenck, E; Weinfurter, H; Vedral, V; Aspelmeyer, M; Zeilinger, A

    2005-03-10

    Standard quantum computation is based on sequences of unitary quantum logic gates that process qubits. The one-way quantum computer proposed by Raussendorf and Briegel is entirely different. It has changed our understanding of the requirements for quantum computation and more generally how we think about quantum physics. This new model requires qubits to be initialized in a highly entangled cluster state. From this point, the quantum computation proceeds by a sequence of single-qubit measurements with classical feedforward of their outcomes. Because of the essential role of measurement, a one-way quantum computer is irreversible. In the one-way quantum computer, the order and choices of measurements determine the algorithm computed. We have experimentally realized four-qubit cluster states encoded into the polarization state of four photons. We characterize the quantum state fully by implementing experimental four-qubit quantum state tomography. Using this cluster state, we demonstrate the feasibility of one-way quantum computing through a universal set of one- and two-qubit operations. Finally, our implementation of Grover's search algorithm demonstrates that one-way quantum computation is ideally suited for such tasks.

  1. The Quantum Human Computer (QHC) Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmani-Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali

    2008-01-01

    This article attempts to suggest the existence of a human computer called Quantum Human Computer (QHC) on the basis of an analogy between human beings and computers. To date, there are two types of computers: Binary and Quantum. The former operates on the basis of binary logic where an object is said to exist in either of the two states of 1 and…

  2. The Quantum Human Computer (QHC) Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmani-Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali

    2008-01-01

    This article attempts to suggest the existence of a human computer called Quantum Human Computer (QHC) on the basis of an analogy between human beings and computers. To date, there are two types of computers: Binary and Quantum. The former operates on the basis of binary logic where an object is said to exist in either of the two states of 1 and…

  3. Quantum computing in molecular magnets.

    PubMed

    Leuenberger, M N; Loss, D

    2001-04-12

    Shor and Grover demonstrated that a quantum computer can outperform any classical computer in factoring numbers and in searching a database by exploiting the parallelism of quantum mechanics. Whereas Shor's algorithm requires both superposition and entanglement of a many-particle system, the superposition of single-particle quantum states is sufficient for Grover's algorithm. Recently, the latter has been successfully implemented using Rydberg atoms. Here we propose an implementation of Grover's algorithm that uses molecular magnets, which are solid-state systems with a large spin; their spin eigenstates make them natural candidates for single-particle systems. We show theoretically that molecular magnets can be used to build dense and efficient memory devices based on the Grover algorithm. In particular, one single crystal can serve as a storage unit of a dynamic random access memory device. Fast electron spin resonance pulses can be used to decode and read out stored numbers of up to 105, with access times as short as 10-10 seconds. We show that our proposal should be feasible using the molecular magnets Fe8 and Mn12.

  4. Energy-efficient quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikonen, Joni; Salmilehto, Juha; Möttönen, Mikko

    2017-04-01

    In the near future, one of the major challenges in the realization of large-scale quantum computers operating at low temperatures is the management of harmful heat loads owing to thermal conduction of cabling and dissipation at cryogenic components. This naturally raises the question that what are the fundamental limitations of energy consumption in scalable quantum computing. In this work, we derive the greatest lower bound for the gate error induced by a single application of a bosonic drive mode of given energy. Previously, such an error type has been considered to be inversely proportional to the total driving power, but we show that this limitation can be circumvented by introducing a qubit driving scheme which reuses and corrects drive pulses. Specifically, our method serves to reduce the average energy consumption per gate operation without increasing the average gate error. Thus our work shows that precise, scalable control of quantum systems can, in principle, be implemented without the introduction of excessive heat or decoherence.

  5. Quantum computing: In the 'death zone'?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dam, Wim

    2007-04-01

    An event advertised as the first demonstration of a commercial quantum computer raises the question of how far one can go with a 'do not care' attitude towards imperfections, without losing the quantum advantage.

  6. Non-unitary probabilistic quantum computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gingrich, Robert M.; Williams, Colin P.

    2004-01-01

    We present a method for designing quantum circuits that perform non-unitary quantum computations on n-qubit states probabilistically, and give analytic expressions for the success probability and fidelity.

  7. Non-unitary probabilistic quantum computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gingrich, Robert M.; Williams, Colin P.

    2004-01-01

    We present a method for designing quantum circuits that perform non-unitary quantum computations on n-qubit states probabilistically, and give analytic expressions for the success probability and fidelity.

  8. Model dynamics for quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabakin, Frank

    2017-08-01

    A model master equation suitable for quantum computing dynamics is presented. In an ideal quantum computer (QC), a system of qubits evolves in time unitarily and, by virtue of their entanglement, interfere quantum mechanically to solve otherwise intractable problems. In the real situation, a QC is subject to decoherence and attenuation effects due to interaction with an environment and with possible short-term random disturbances and gate deficiencies. The stability of a QC under such attacks is a key issue for the development of realistic devices. We assume that the influence of the environment can be incorporated by a master equation that includes unitary evolution with gates, supplemented by a Lindblad term. Lindblad operators of various types are explored; namely, steady, pulsed, gate friction, and measurement operators. In the master equation, we use the Lindblad term to describe short time intrusions by random Lindblad pulses. The phenomenological master equation is then extended to include a nonlinear Beretta term that describes the evolution of a closed system with increasing entropy. An external Bath environment is stipulated by a fixed temperature in two different ways. Here we explore the case of a simple one-qubit system in preparation for generalization to multi-qubit, qutrit and hybrid qubit-qutrit systems. This model master equation can be used to test the stability of memory and the efficacy of quantum gates. The properties of such hybrid master equations are explored, with emphasis on the role of thermal equilibrium and entropy constraints. Several significant properties of time-dependent qubit evolution are revealed by this simple study.

  9. Embracing the quantum limit in silicon computing.

    PubMed

    Morton, John J L; McCamey, Dane R; Eriksson, Mark A; Lyon, Stephen A

    2011-11-16

    Quantum computers hold the promise of massive performance enhancements across a range of applications, from cryptography and databases to revolutionary scientific simulation tools. Such computers would make use of the same quantum mechanical phenomena that pose limitations on the continued shrinking of conventional information processing devices. Many of the key requirements for quantum computing differ markedly from those of conventional computers. However, silicon, which plays a central part in conventional information processing, has many properties that make it a superb platform around which to build a quantum computer.

  10. Contextuality supplies the 'magic' for quantum computation.

    PubMed

    Howard, Mark; Wallman, Joel; Veitch, Victor; Emerson, Joseph

    2014-06-19

    Quantum computers promise dramatic advantages over their classical counterparts, but the source of the power in quantum computing has remained elusive. Here we prove a remarkable equivalence between the onset of contextuality and the possibility of universal quantum computation via 'magic state' distillation, which is the leading model for experimentally realizing a fault-tolerant quantum computer. This is a conceptually satisfying link, because contextuality, which precludes a simple 'hidden variable' model of quantum mechanics, provides one of the fundamental characterizations of uniquely quantum phenomena. Furthermore, this connection suggests a unifying paradigm for the resources of quantum information: the non-locality of quantum theory is a particular kind of contextuality, and non-locality is already known to be a critical resource for achieving advantages with quantum communication. In addition to clarifying these fundamental issues, this work advances the resource framework for quantum computation, which has a number of practical applications, such as characterizing the efficiency and trade-offs between distinct theoretical and experimental schemes for achieving robust quantum computation, and putting bounds on the overhead cost for the classical simulation of quantum algorithms.

  11. Quantum computation speedup limits from quantum metrological precision bounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demkowicz-Dobrzański, Rafał; Markiewicz, Marcin

    2015-06-01

    We propose a scheme for translating metrological precision bounds into lower bounds on query complexity of quantum search algorithms. Within the scheme the link between quadratic performance enhancement in idealized quantum metrological and quantum computing schemes becomes clear. More importantly, we utilize results from the field of quantum metrology on a generic loss of quadratic quantum precision enhancement in the presence of decoherence to infer an analogous generic loss of quadratic speedup in oracle based quantum computing. While most of our reasoning is rigorous, at one of the final steps, we need to make use of an unproven technical conjecture. We hope that we will be able to amend this deficiency in the near future, but we are convinced that even without the conjecture proven our results provide a deep insight into the relationship between quantum algorithms and quantum metrology protocols.

  12. Adaptive quantum computation in changing environments using projective simulation

    PubMed Central

    Tiersch, M.; Ganahl, E. J.; Briegel, H. J.

    2015-01-01

    Quantum information processing devices need to be robust and stable against external noise and internal imperfections to ensure correct operation. In a setting of measurement-based quantum computation, we explore how an intelligent agent endowed with a projective simulator can act as controller to adapt measurement directions to an external stray field of unknown magnitude in a fixed direction. We assess the agent’s learning behavior in static and time-varying fields and explore composition strategies in the projective simulator to improve the agent’s performance. We demonstrate the applicability by correcting for stray fields in a measurement-based algorithm for Grover’s search. Thereby, we lay out a path for adaptive controllers based on intelligent agents for quantum information tasks. PMID:26260263

  13. Adaptive quantum computation in changing environments using projective simulation.

    PubMed

    Tiersch, M; Ganahl, E J; Briegel, H J

    2015-08-11

    Quantum information processing devices need to be robust and stable against external noise and internal imperfections to ensure correct operation. In a setting of measurement-based quantum computation, we explore how an intelligent agent endowed with a projective simulator can act as controller to adapt measurement directions to an external stray field of unknown magnitude in a fixed direction. We assess the agent's learning behavior in static and time-varying fields and explore composition strategies in the projective simulator to improve the agent's performance. We demonstrate the applicability by correcting for stray fields in a measurement-based algorithm for Grover's search. Thereby, we lay out a path for adaptive controllers based on intelligent agents for quantum information tasks.

  14. Adaptive quantum computation in changing environments using projective simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiersch, M.; Ganahl, E. J.; Briegel, H. J.

    2015-08-01

    Quantum information processing devices need to be robust and stable against external noise and internal imperfections to ensure correct operation. In a setting of measurement-based quantum computation, we explore how an intelligent agent endowed with a projective simulator can act as controller to adapt measurement directions to an external stray field of unknown magnitude in a fixed direction. We assess the agent’s learning behavior in static and time-varying fields and explore composition strategies in the projective simulator to improve the agent’s performance. We demonstrate the applicability by correcting for stray fields in a measurement-based algorithm for Grover’s search. Thereby, we lay out a path for adaptive controllers based on intelligent agents for quantum information tasks.

  15. Mini-maximizing two qubit quantum computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Faisal Shah; Phoenix, Simon J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Two qubit quantum computations are viewed as two player, strictly competitive games and a game-theoretic measure of optimality of these computations is developed. To this end, the geometry of Hilbert space of quantum computations is used to establish the equivalence of game-theoretic solution concepts of Nash equilibrium and mini-max outcomes in games of this type, and quantum mechanisms are designed for realizing these mini-max outcomes.

  16. Quantum computing. Defining and detecting quantum speedup.

    PubMed

    Rønnow, Troels F; Wang, Zhihui; Job, Joshua; Boixo, Sergio; Isakov, Sergei V; Wecker, David; Martinis, John M; Lidar, Daniel A; Troyer, Matthias

    2014-07-25

    The development of small-scale quantum devices raises the question of how to fairly assess and detect quantum speedup. Here, we show how to define and measure quantum speedup and how to avoid pitfalls that might mask or fake such a speedup. We illustrate our discussion with data from tests run on a D-Wave Two device with up to 503 qubits. By using random spin glass instances as a benchmark, we found no evidence of quantum speedup when the entire data set is considered and obtained inconclusive results when comparing subsets of instances on an instance-by-instance basis. Our results do not rule out the possibility of speedup for other classes of problems and illustrate the subtle nature of the quantum speedup question.

  17. Prospects for quantum computation with trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.; James, D.F.V.

    1997-12-31

    Over the past decade information theory has been generalized to allow binary data to be represented by two-state quantum mechanical systems. (A single two-level system has come to be known as a qubit in this context.) The additional freedom introduced into information physics with quantum systems has opened up a variety of capabilities that go well beyond those of conventional information. For example, quantum cryptography allows two parties to generate a secret key even in the presence of eavesdropping. But perhaps the most remarkable capabilities have been predicted in the field of quantum computation. Here, a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, and an overview of the in trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos are presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are discussed.

  18. Some Thoughts Regarding Practical Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoshal, Debabrata; Gomez, Richard; Lanzagorta, Marco; Uhlmann, Jeffrey

    2006-03-01

    Quantum computing has become an important area of research in computer science because of its potential to provide more efficient algorithmic solutions to certain problems than are possible with classical computing. The ability of performing parallel operations over an exponentially large computational space has proved to be the main advantage of the quantum computing model. In this regard, we are particularly interested in the potential applications of quantum computers to enhance real software systems of interest to the defense, industrial, scientific and financial communities. However, while much has been written in popular and scientific literature about the benefits of the quantum computational model, several of the problems associated to the practical implementation of real-life complex software systems in quantum computers are often ignored. In this presentation we will argue that practical quantum computation is not as straightforward as commonly advertised, even if the technological problems associated to the manufacturing and engineering of large-scale quantum registers were solved overnight. We will discuss some of the frequently overlooked difficulties that plague quantum computing in the areas of memories, I/O, addressing schemes, compilers, oracles, approximate information copying, logical debugging, error correction and fault-tolerant computing protocols.

  19. Disciplines, models, and computers: the path to computational quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lenhard, Johannes

    2014-12-01

    Many disciplines and scientific fields have undergone a computational turn in the past several decades. This paper analyzes this sort of turn by investigating the case of computational quantum chemistry. The main claim is that the transformation from quantum to computational quantum chemistry involved changes in three dimensions. First, on the side of instrumentation, small computers and a networked infrastructure took over the lead from centralized mainframe architecture. Second, a new conception of computational modeling became feasible and assumed a crucial role. And third, the field of computa- tional quantum chemistry became organized in a market-like fashion and this market is much bigger than the number of quantum theory experts. These claims will be substantiated by an investigation of the so-called density functional theory (DFT), the arguably pivotal theory in the turn to computational quantum chemistry around 1990.

  20. The Heisenberg representation of quantum computers

    SciTech Connect

    Gottesman, D.

    1998-06-24

    Since Shor`s discovery of an algorithm to factor numbers on a quantum computer in polynomial time, quantum computation has become a subject of immense interest. Unfortunately, one of the key features of quantum computers--the difficulty of describing them on classical computers--also makes it difficult to describe and understand precisely what can be done with them. A formalism describing the evolution of operators rather than states has proven extremely fruitful in understanding an important class of quantum operations. States used in error correction and certain communication protocols can be described by their stabilizer, a group of tensor products of Pauli matrices. Even this simple group structure is sufficient to allow a rich range of quantum effects, although it falls short of the full power of quantum computation.

  1. Resonant transition-based quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chen-Fu; Hsieh, Chang-Yu

    2017-05-01

    In this article we assess a novel quantum computation paradigm based on the resonant transition (RT) phenomenon commonly associated with atomic and molecular systems. We thoroughly analyze the intimate connections between the RT-based quantum computation and the well-established adiabatic quantum computation (AQC). Both quantum computing frameworks encode solutions to computational problems in the spectral properties of a Hamiltonian and rely on the quantum dynamics to obtain the desired output state. We discuss how one can adapt any adiabatic quantum algorithm to a corresponding RT version and the two approaches are limited by different aspects of Hamiltonians' spectra. The RT approach provides a compelling alternative to the AQC under various circumstances. To better illustrate the usefulness of the novel framework, we analyze the time complexity of an algorithm for 3-SAT problems and discuss straightforward methods to fine tune its efficiency.

  2. Quantum computing with realistically noisy devices.

    PubMed

    Knill, E

    2005-03-03

    In theory, quantum computers offer a means of solving problems that would be intractable on conventional computers. Assuming that a quantum computer could be constructed, it would in practice be required to function with noisy devices called 'gates'. These gates cause decoherence of the fragile quantum states that are central to the computer's operation. The goal of so-called 'fault-tolerant quantum computing' is therefore to compute accurately even when the error probability per gate (EPG) is high. Here we report a simple architecture for fault-tolerant quantum computing, providing evidence that accurate quantum computing is possible for EPGs as high as three per cent. Such EPGs have been experimentally demonstrated, but to avoid excessive resource overheads required by the necessary architecture, lower EPGs are needed. Assuming the availability of quantum resources comparable to the digital resources available in today's computers, we show that non-trivial quantum computations at EPGs of as high as one per cent could be implemented.

  3. Multilayer microwave integrated quantum circuits for scalable quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecht, Teresa; Pfaff, Wolfgang; Wang, Chen; Chu, Yiwen; Frunzio, Luigi; Devoret, Michel H.; Schoelkopf, Robert J.

    2016-02-01

    As experimental quantum information processing (QIP) rapidly advances, an emerging challenge is to design a scalable architecture that combines various quantum elements into a complex device without compromising their performance. In particular, superconducting quantum circuits have successfully demonstrated many of the requirements for quantum computing, including coherence levels that approach the thresholds for scaling. However, it remains challenging to couple a large number of circuit components through controllable channels while suppressing any other interactions. We propose a hardware platform intended to address these challenges, which combines the advantages of integrated circuit fabrication and the long coherence times achievable in three-dimensional circuit quantum electrodynamics. This multilayer microwave integrated quantum circuit platform provides a path towards the realisation of increasingly complex superconducting devices in pursuit of a scalable quantum computer.

  4. Quantum Computer Games: Schrodinger Cat and Hounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2012-01-01

    The quantum computer game "Schrodinger cat and hounds" is the quantum extension of the well-known classical game fox and hounds. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. "Schrodinger cat and hounds" demonstrates the effects of superposition, destructive and constructive interference, measurements and…

  5. Quantum Computer Games: Schrodinger Cat and Hounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2012-01-01

    The quantum computer game "Schrodinger cat and hounds" is the quantum extension of the well-known classical game fox and hounds. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. "Schrodinger cat and hounds" demonstrates the effects of superposition, destructive and constructive interference, measurements and…

  6. Nonlinear optics quantum computing with circuit QED.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Prabin; Hafezi, Mohammad; Taylor, J M

    2013-02-08

    One approach to quantum information processing is to use photons as quantum bits and rely on linear optical elements for most operations. However, some optical nonlinearity is necessary to enable universal quantum computing. Here, we suggest a circuit-QED approach to nonlinear optics quantum computing in the microwave regime, including a deterministic two-photon phase gate. Our specific example uses a hybrid quantum system comprising a LC resonator coupled to a superconducting flux qubit to implement a nonlinear coupling. Compared to the self-Kerr nonlinearity, we find that our approach has improved tolerance to noise in the qubit while maintaining fast operation.

  7. Quantum and classical dynamics in adiabatic computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, P. J. D.; Äńurić, T.; Vinci, W.; Warburton, P. A.; Green, A. G.

    2014-10-01

    Adiabatic transport provides a powerful way to manipulate quantum states. By preparing a system in a readily initialized state and then slowly changing its Hamiltonian, one may achieve quantum states that would otherwise be inaccessible. Moreover, a judicious choice of final Hamiltonian whose ground state encodes the solution to a problem allows adiabatic transport to be used for universal quantum computation. However, the dephasing effects of the environment limit the quantum correlations that an open system can support and degrade the power of such adiabatic computation. We quantify this effect by allowing the system to evolve over a restricted set of quantum states, providing a link between physically inspired classical optimization algorithms and quantum adiabatic optimization. This perspective allows us to develop benchmarks to bound the quantum correlations harnessed by an adiabatic computation. We apply these to the D-Wave Vesuvius machine with revealing—though inconclusive—results.

  8. Mathematical Aspects of Quantum Computing 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahara, Mikio; Rahimi, Robabeh; SaiToh, Akira

    2008-04-01

    Quantum computing: an overview / M. Nakahara -- Braid group and topological quantum computing / T. Ootsuka, K. Sakuma -- An introduction to entanglement theory / D. J. H. Markham -- Holonomic quantum computing and its optimization / S. Tanimura -- Playing games in quantum mechanical settings: features of quantum games / S. K. Özdemir, J. Shimamura, N. Imoto -- Quantum error-correcting codes / M. Hagiwara -- Poster summaries. Controled teleportation of an arbitrary unknown two-qubit entangled state / V. Ebrahimi, R. Rahimi, M. Nakahara. Notes on the Dür-Cirac classification / Y. Ota, M. Yoshida, I. Ohba. Bang-bang control of entanglement in Spin-Bus-Boson model / R. Rahimi, A. SaiToh, M. Nakahara. Numerical computation of time-dependent multipartite nonclassical correlation / A. SaiToh ... [et al.]. On classical no-cloning theorem under Liouville dynamics and distances / T. Yamano, O. Iguchi.

  9. Parallel Environment for Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabakin, Frank; Diaz, Bruno Julia

    2009-03-01

    To facilitate numerical study of noise and decoherence in QC algorithms,and of the efficacy of error correction schemes, we have developed a Fortran 90 quantum computer simulator with parallel processing capabilities. It permits rapid evaluation of quantum algorithms for a large number of qubits and for various ``noise'' scenarios. State vectors are distributed over many processors, to employ a large number of qubits. Parallel processing is implemented by the Message-Passing Interface protocol. A description of how to spread the wave function components over many processors, along with how to efficiently describe the action of general one- and two-qubit operators on these state vectors will be delineated.Grover's search and Shor's factoring algorithms with noise will be discussed as examples. A major feature of this work is that concurrent versions of the algorithms can be evaluated with each version subject to diverse noise effects, corresponding to solving a stochastic Schrodinger equation. The density matrix for the ensemble of such noise cases is constructed using parallel distribution methods to evaluate its associated entropy. Applications of this powerful tool is made to delineate the stability and correction of QC processes using Hamiltonian based dynamics.

  10. Composite nonadiabatic holonomic quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, G. F.; Zhao, P. Z.; Xing, T. H.; Sjöqvist, Erik; Tong, D. M.

    2017-03-01

    Nonadiabatic holonomic quantum computation has a robust feature in suppressing control errors because of its holonomic feature. However, this kind of robust feature is challenged since the usual way of realizing nonadiabatic holonomic gates introduces errors due to systematic errors in the control parameters. To resolve this problem, we here propose a composite scheme to realize nonadiabatic holonomic gates. Our scheme can suppress systematic errors while preserving holonomic robustness. It is particularly useful when the evolution period is shorter than the coherence time. We further show that our composite scheme can be protected by decoherence-free subspaces. In this case, the strengthened robust feature of our composite gates and the coherence stabilization virtue of decoherence-free subspaces are combined.

  11. Quantum error correction and fault-tolerant quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Ching-Yi

    Quantum computers need to be protected by quantum error-correcting codes against decoherence. One of the most interesting and useful classes of quantum codes is the class of quantum stabilizer codes. Entanglement-assisted (EA) quantum codes are a class of stabilizer codes that make use of preshared entanglement between the sender and the receiver. We provide several code constructions for entanglement-assisted quantum codes. The MacWilliams identity for quantum codes leads to linear programming bounds on the minimum distance. We find new constraints on the simplified stabilizer group and the logical group, which help improve the linear programming bounds on entanglement-assisted quantum codes. The results also can be applied to standard stabilizer codes. In the real world, quantum gates are faulty. To implement quantum computation fault-tolerantly, quantum codes with certain properties are needed. We first analyze Knill's postselection scheme in a two-dimensional architecture. The error performance of this scheme is better than other known concatenated codes. Then we propose several methods to protect syndrome extraction against measurement errors.

  12. Verifiable Measurement-Only Blind Quantum Computing with Stabilizer Testing.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masahito; Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2015-11-27

    We introduce a simple protocol for verifiable measurement-only blind quantum computing. Alice, a client, can perform only single-qubit measurements, whereas Bob, a server, can generate and store entangled many-qubit states. Bob generates copies of a graph state, which is a universal resource state for measurement-based quantum computing, and sends Alice each qubit of them one by one. Alice adaptively measures each qubit according to her program. If Bob is honest, he generates the correct graph state, and, therefore, Alice can obtain the correct computation result. Regarding the security, whatever Bob does, Bob cannot get any information about Alice's computation because of the no-signaling principle. Furthermore, malicious Bob does not necessarily send the copies of the correct graph state, but Alice can check the correctness of Bob's state by directly verifying the stabilizers of some copies.

  13. Verifiable Measurement-Only Blind Quantum Computing with Stabilizer Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Masahito; Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2015-11-01

    We introduce a simple protocol for verifiable measurement-only blind quantum computing. Alice, a client, can perform only single-qubit measurements, whereas Bob, a server, can generate and store entangled many-qubit states. Bob generates copies of a graph state, which is a universal resource state for measurement-based quantum computing, and sends Alice each qubit of them one by one. Alice adaptively measures each qubit according to her program. If Bob is honest, he generates the correct graph state, and, therefore, Alice can obtain the correct computation result. Regarding the security, whatever Bob does, Bob cannot get any information about Alice's computation because of the no-signaling principle. Furthermore, malicious Bob does not necessarily send the copies of the correct graph state, but Alice can check the correctness of Bob's state by directly verifying the stabilizers of some copies.

  14. Experimental demonstration of deterministic one-way quantum computation on a NMR quantum computer

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Chenyong; Zhu Jing; Peng Xinhua; Chong Bo; Zhou Xianyi; Du Jiangfeng

    2010-01-15

    One-way quantum computing is an important and novel approach to quantum computation. By exploiting the existing particle-particle interactions, we report an experimental realization of the complete process of deterministic one-way quantum Deutsch-Josza algorithm in NMR, including graph state preparation, single-qubit measurements, and feed-forward corrections. The findings in our experiment may shed light on the future scalable one-way quantum computation.

  15. The case for biological quantum computer elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, Wolfgang; Pizzi, Rita

    2009-05-01

    An extension to vonNeumann's analysis of quantum theory suggests self-measurement is a fundamental process of Nature. By mapping the quantum computer to the brain architecture we will argue that the cognitive experience results from a measurement of a quantum memory maintained by biological entities. The insight provided by this mapping suggests quantum effects are not restricted to small atomic and nuclear phenomena but are an integral part of our own cognitive experience and further that the architecture of a quantum computer system parallels that of a conscious brain. We will then review the suggestions for biological quantum elements in basic neural structures and address the de-coherence objection by arguing for a self- measurement event model of Nature. We will argue that to first order approximation the universe is composed of isolated self-measurement events which guaranties coherence. Controlled de-coherence is treated as the input/output interactions between quantum elements of a quantum computer and the quantum memory maintained by biological entities cognizant of the quantum calculation results. Lastly we will present stem-cell based neuron experiments conducted by one of us with the aim of demonstrating the occurrence of quantum effects in living neural networks and discuss future research projects intended to reach this objective.

  16. Performing quantum computing experiments in the cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devitt, Simon J.

    2016-09-01

    Quantum computing technology has reached a second renaissance in the past five years. Increased interest from both the private and public sector combined with extraordinary theoretical and experimental progress has solidified this technology as a major advancement in the 21st century. As anticipated my many, some of the first realizations of quantum computing technology has occured over the cloud, with users logging onto dedicated hardware over the classical internet. Recently, IBM has released the Quantum Experience, which allows users to access a five-qubit quantum processor. In this paper we take advantage of this online availability of actual quantum hardware and present four quantum information experiments. We utilize the IBM chip to realize protocols in quantum error correction, quantum arithmetic, quantum graph theory, and fault-tolerant quantum computation by accessing the device remotely through the cloud. While the results are subject to significant noise, the correct results are returned from the chip. This demonstrates the power of experimental groups opening up their technology to a wider audience and will hopefully allow for the next stage of development in quantum information technology.

  17. Universal quantum computation with little entanglement.

    PubMed

    Van den Nest, Maarten

    2013-02-08

    We show that universal quantum computation can be achieved in the standard pure-state circuit model while the entanglement entropy of every bipartition is small in each step of the computation. The entanglement entropy required for large-scale quantum computation even tends to zero. Moreover we show that the same conclusion applies to many entanglement measures commonly used in the literature. This includes e.g., the geometric measure, localizable entanglement, multipartite concurrence, squashed entanglement, witness-based measures, and more generally any entanglement measure which is continuous in a certain natural sense. These results demonstrate that many entanglement measures are unsuitable tools to assess the power of quantum computers.

  18. Numerical characteristics of quantum computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyavskiy, A.; Khamitov, K.; Teplov, A.; Voevodin, V.; Voevodin, Vl.

    2016-12-01

    The simulation of quantum circuits is significantly important for the implementation of quantum information technologies. The main difficulty of such modeling is the exponential growth of dimensionality, thus the usage of modern high-performance parallel computations is relevant. As it is well known, arbitrary quantum computation in circuit model can be done by only single- and two-qubit gates, and we analyze the computational structure and properties of the simulation of such gates. We investigate the fact that the unique properties of quantum nature lead to the computational properties of the considered algorithms: the quantum parallelism make the simulation of quantum gates highly parallel, and on the other hand, quantum entanglement leads to the problem of computational locality during simulation. We use the methodology of the AlgoWiki project (algowiki-project.org) to analyze the algorithm. This methodology consists of theoretical (sequential and parallel complexity, macro structure, and visual informational graph) and experimental (locality and memory access, scalability and more specific dynamic characteristics) parts. Experimental part was made by using the petascale Lomonosov supercomputer (Moscow State University, Russia). We show that the simulation of quantum gates is a good base for the research and testing of the development methods for data intense parallel software, and considered methodology of the analysis can be successfully used for the improvement of the algorithms in quantum information science.

  19. Quantum Computation Using Optically Coupled Quantum Dot Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pradhan, Prabhakar; Anantram, M. P.; Wang, K. L.; Roychowhury, V. P.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A solid state model for quantum computation has potential advantages in terms of the ease of fabrication, characterization, and integration. The fundamental requirements for a quantum computer involve the realization of basic processing units (qubits), and a scheme for controlled switching and coupling among the qubits, which enables one to perform controlled operations on qubits. We propose a model for quantum computation based on optically coupled quantum dot arrays, which is computationally similar to the atomic model proposed by Cirac and Zoller. In this model, individual qubits are comprised of two coupled quantum dots, and an array of these basic units is placed in an optical cavity. Switching among the states of the individual units is done by controlled laser pulses via near field interaction using the NSOM technology. Controlled rotations involving two or more qubits are performed via common cavity mode photon. We have calculated critical times, including the spontaneous emission and switching times, and show that they are comparable to the best times projected for other proposed models of quantum computation. We have also shown the feasibility of accessing individual quantum dots using the NSOM technology by calculating the photon density at the tip, and estimating the power necessary to perform the basic controlled operations. We are currently in the process of estimating the decoherence times for this system; however, we have formulated initial arguments which seem to indicate that the decoherence times will be comparable, if not longer, than many other proposed models.

  20. Quantum Computation Using Optically Coupled Quantum Dot Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pradhan, Prabhakar; Anantram, M. P.; Wang, K. L.; Roychowhury, V. P.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A solid state model for quantum computation has potential advantages in terms of the ease of fabrication, characterization, and integration. The fundamental requirements for a quantum computer involve the realization of basic processing units (qubits), and a scheme for controlled switching and coupling among the qubits, which enables one to perform controlled operations on qubits. We propose a model for quantum computation based on optically coupled quantum dot arrays, which is computationally similar to the atomic model proposed by Cirac and Zoller. In this model, individual qubits are comprised of two coupled quantum dots, and an array of these basic units is placed in an optical cavity. Switching among the states of the individual units is done by controlled laser pulses via near field interaction using the NSOM technology. Controlled rotations involving two or more qubits are performed via common cavity mode photon. We have calculated critical times, including the spontaneous emission and switching times, and show that they are comparable to the best times projected for other proposed models of quantum computation. We have also shown the feasibility of accessing individual quantum dots using the NSOM technology by calculating the photon density at the tip, and estimating the power necessary to perform the basic controlled operations. We are currently in the process of estimating the decoherence times for this system; however, we have formulated initial arguments which seem to indicate that the decoherence times will be comparable, if not longer, than many other proposed models.

  1. Universal quantum computation with weakly integral anyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Shawn X.; Hong, Seung-Moon; Wang, Zhenghan

    2015-08-01

    Harnessing non-abelian statistics of anyons to perform quantum computational tasks is getting closer to reality. While the existence of universal anyons by braiding alone such as the Fibonacci anyon is theoretically a possibility, accessible anyons with current technology all belong to a class that is called weakly integral—anyons whose squared quantum dimensions are integers. We analyze the computational power of the first non-abelian anyon system with only integral quantum dimensions—, the quantum double of . Since all anyons in have finite images of braid group representations, they cannot be universal for quantum computation by braiding alone. Based on our knowledge of the images of the braid group representations, we set up three qutrit computational models. Supplementing braidings with some measurements and ancillary states, we find a universal gate set for each model.

  2. Numerical computation for teaching quantum statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Tyson; Swendsen, Robert H.

    2013-11-01

    The study of ideal quantum gases reveals surprising quantum effects that can be observed in macroscopic systems. The properties of bosons are particularly unusual because a macroscopic number of particles can occupy a single quantum state. We describe a computational approach that supplements the usual analytic derivations applicable in the thermodynamic limit. The approach involves directly summing over the quantum states for finite systems and avoids the need for doing difficult integrals. The results display the unusual behavior of quantum gases even for relatively small systems.

  3. Video Encryption and Decryption on Quantum Computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Fei; Iliyasu, Abdullah M.; Venegas-Andraca, Salvador E.; Yang, Huamin

    2015-08-01

    A method for video encryption and decryption on quantum computers is proposed based on color information transformations on each frame encoding the content of the encoding the content of the video. The proposed method provides a flexible operation to encrypt quantum video by means of the quantum measurement in order to enhance the security of the video. To validate the proposed approach, a tetris tile-matching puzzle game video is utilized in the experimental simulations. The results obtained suggest that the proposed method enhances the security and speed of quantum video encryption and decryption, both properties required for secure transmission and sharing of video content in quantum communication.

  4. Hyper-parallel photonic quantum computation with coupled quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Bao-Cang; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that a parallel quantum computer is more powerful than a classical one. So far, there are some important works about the construction of universal quantum logic gates, the key elements in quantum computation. However, they are focused on operating on one degree of freedom (DOF) of quantum systems. Here, we investigate the possibility of achieving scalable hyper-parallel quantum computation based on two DOFs of photon systems. We construct a deterministic hyper-controlled-not (hyper-CNOT) gate operating on both the spatial-mode and the polarization DOFs of a two-photon system simultaneously, by exploiting the giant optical circular birefringence induced by quantum-dot spins in double-sided optical microcavities as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). This hyper-CNOT gate is implemented by manipulating the four qubits in the two DOFs of a two-photon system without auxiliary spatial modes or polarization modes. It reduces the operation time and the resources consumed in quantum information processing, and it is more robust against the photonic dissipation noise, compared with the integration of several cascaded CNOT gates in one DOF. PMID:24721781

  5. One-way quantum computation with circuit quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Chunwang; Han Yang; Chen Pingxing; Li Chengzu; Zhong Xiaojun

    2010-03-15

    In this Brief Report, we propose a potential scheme to implement one-way quantum computation with circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED). Large cluster states of charge qubits can be generated in just one step with a superconducting transmission line resonator (TLR) playing the role of a dispersive coupler. A single-qubit measurement in the arbitrary basis can be implemented using a single electron transistor with the help of one-qubit gates. By examining the main decoherence sources, we show that circuit QED is a promising architecture for one-way quantum computation.

  6. Conceptual aspects of geometric quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöqvist, Erik; Azimi Mousolou, Vahid; Canali, Carlo M.

    2016-10-01

    Geometric quantum computation is the idea that geometric phases can be used to implement quantum gates, i.e., the basic elements of the Boolean network that forms a quantum computer. Although originally thought to be limited to adiabatic evolution, controlled by slowly changing parameters, this form of quantum computation can as well be realized at high speed by using nonadiabatic schemes. Recent advances in quantum gate technology have allowed for experimental demonstrations of different types of geometric gates in adiabatic and nonadiabatic evolution. Here, we address some conceptual issues that arise in the realizations of geometric gates. We examine the appearance of dynamical phases in quantum evolution and point out that not all dynamical phases need to be compensated for in geometric quantum computation. We delineate the relation between Abelian and non-Abelian geometric gates and find an explicit physical example where the two types of gates coincide. We identify differences and similarities between adiabatic and nonadiabatic realizations of quantum computation based on non-Abelian geometric phases.

  7. Scalable quantum information processing and the optical topological quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devitt, S.

    2010-02-01

    Optical quantum computation has represented one of the most successful testbed systems for quantum information processing. Along with ion-traps and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), experimentalists have demonstrated control of qubits, multi-gubit gates and small quantum algorithms. However, photonic based qubits suffer from a problematic lack of a large scale architecture for fault-tolerant computation which could conceivably be built in the near future. While optical systems are, in some regards, ideal for quantum computing due to their high mobility and low susceptibility to environmental decoherence, these same properties make the construction of compact, chip based architectures difficult. Here we discuss many of the important issues related to scalable fault-tolerant quantum computation and introduce a feasible architecture design for an optics based computer. We combine the recent development of topological cluster state computation with the photonic module, simple chip based devices which can be utilized to deterministically entangle photons. The integration of this operational unit with one of the most exciting computational models solves many of the existing problems with other optics based architectures and leads to a feasible large scale design which can continuously generate a 3D cluster state with a photonic module resource cost linear in the cross sectional size of the cluster.

  8. Materials Frontiers to Empower Quantum Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Antoinette Jane; Sarrao, John Louis; Richardson, Christopher

    2015-06-11

    This is an exciting time at the nexus of quantum computing and materials research. The materials frontiers described in this report represent a significant advance in electronic materials and our understanding of the interactions between the local material and a manufactured quantum state. Simultaneously, directed efforts to solve materials issues related to quantum computing provide an opportunity to control and probe the fundamental arrangement of matter that will impact all electronic materials. An opportunity exists to extend our understanding of materials functionality from electronic-grade to quantum-grade by achieving a predictive understanding of noise and decoherence in qubits and their origins in materials defects and environmental coupling. Realizing this vision systematically and predictively will be transformative for quantum computing and will represent a qualitative step forward in materials prediction and control.

  9. Ramsey numbers and adiabatic quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Gaitan, Frank; Clark, Lane

    2012-01-06

    The graph-theoretic Ramsey numbers are notoriously difficult to calculate. In fact, for the two-color Ramsey numbers R(m,n) with m, n≥3, only nine are currently known. We present a quantum algorithm for the computation of the Ramsey numbers R(m,n). We show how the computation of R(m,n) can be mapped to a combinatorial optimization problem whose solution can be found using adiabatic quantum evolution. We numerically simulate this adiabatic quantum algorithm and show that it correctly determines the Ramsey numbers R(3,3) and R(2,s) for 5≤s≤7. We then discuss the algorithm's experimental implementation, and close by showing that Ramsey number computation belongs to the quantum complexity class quantum Merlin Arthur.

  10. Image segmentation on a quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caraiman, Simona; Manta, Vasile I.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we address the field of quantum information processing and analyze the prospects of applying quantum computation concepts to image processing tasks. Specifically, we discuss the development of a quantum version for the image segmentation operation. This is an important technique that comes up in many image processing applications. We consider the threshold-based segmentation and show that a quantum circuit to achieve this operation can be built using a quantum oracle that implements the thresholding function. We discuss the circuit implementation of the oracle operator and provide examples of segmenting synthetic and real images. The main advantage of the quantum version for image segmentation over the classical approach is its speedup and is provided by the special properties of quantum information processing: superposition of states and inherent parallelism.

  11. Superadiabatic Controlled Evolutions and Universal Quantum Computation

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Alan C.; Sarandy, Marcelo S.

    2015-01-01

    Adiabatic state engineering is a powerful technique in quantum information and quantum control. However, its performance is limited by the adiabatic theorem of quantum mechanics. In this scenario, shortcuts to adiabaticity, such as provided by the superadiabatic theory, constitute a valuable tool to speed up the adiabatic quantum behavior. Here, we propose a superadiabatic route to implement universal quantum computation. Our method is based on the realization of piecewise controlled superadiabatic evolutions. Remarkably, they can be obtained by simple time-independent counter-diabatic Hamiltonians. In particular, we discuss the implementation of fast rotation gates and arbitrary n-qubit controlled gates, which can be used to design different sets of universal quantum gates. Concerning the energy cost of the superadiabatic implementation, we show that it is dictated by the quantum speed limit, providing an upper bound for the corresponding adiabatic counterparts. PMID:26511064

  12. Superadiabatic Controlled Evolutions and Universal Quantum Computation.

    PubMed

    Santos, Alan C; Sarandy, Marcelo S

    2015-10-29

    Adiabatic state engineering is a powerful technique in quantum information and quantum control. However, its performance is limited by the adiabatic theorem of quantum mechanics. In this scenario, shortcuts to adiabaticity, such as provided by the superadiabatic theory, constitute a valuable tool to speed up the adiabatic quantum behavior. Here, we propose a superadiabatic route to implement universal quantum computation. Our method is based on the realization of piecewise controlled superadiabatic evolutions. Remarkably, they can be obtained by simple time-independent counter-diabatic Hamiltonians. In particular, we discuss the implementation of fast rotation gates and arbitrary n-qubit controlled gates, which can be used to design different sets of universal quantum gates. Concerning the energy cost of the superadiabatic implementation, we show that it is dictated by the quantum speed limit, providing an upper bound for the corresponding adiabatic counterparts.

  13. Reducing computational complexity of quantum correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanda, Titas; Das, Tamoghna; Sadhukhan, Debasis; Pal, Amit Kumar; SenDe, Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal

    2015-12-01

    We address the issue of reducing the resource required to compute information-theoretic quantum correlation measures such as quantum discord and quantum work deficit in two qubits and higher-dimensional systems. We show that determination of the quantum correlation measure is possible even if we utilize a restricted set of local measurements. We find that the determination allows us to obtain a closed form of quantum discord and quantum work deficit for several classes of states, with a low error. We show that the computational error caused by the constraint over the complete set of local measurements reduces fast with an increase in the size of the restricted set, implying usefulness of constrained optimization, especially with the increase of dimensions. We perform quantitative analysis to investigate how the error scales with the system size, taking into account a set of plausible constructions of the constrained set. Carrying out a comparative study, we show that the resource required to optimize quantum work deficit is usually higher than that required for quantum discord. We also demonstrate that minimization of quantum discord and quantum work deficit is easier in the case of two-qubit mixed states of fixed ranks and with positive partial transpose in comparison to the corresponding states having nonpositive partial transpose. Applying the methodology to quantum spin models, we show that the constrained optimization can be used with advantage in analyzing such systems in quantum information-theoretic language. For bound entangled states, we show that the error is significantly low when the measurements correspond to the spin observables along the three Cartesian coordinates, and thereby we obtain expressions of quantum discord and quantum work deficit for these bound entangled states.

  14. Experimental comparison of two quantum computing architectures

    PubMed Central

    Linke, Norbert M.; Maslov, Dmitri; Roetteler, Martin; Debnath, Shantanu; Figgatt, Caroline; Landsman, Kevin A.; Wright, Kenneth; Monroe, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    We run a selection of algorithms on two state-of-the-art 5-qubit quantum computers that are based on different technology platforms. One is a publicly accessible superconducting transmon device (www.research.ibm.com/ibm-q) with limited connectivity, and the other is a fully connected trapped-ion system. Even though the two systems have different native quantum interactions, both can be programed in a way that is blind to the underlying hardware, thus allowing a comparison of identical quantum algorithms between different physical systems. We show that quantum algorithms and circuits that use more connectivity clearly benefit from a better-connected system of qubits. Although the quantum systems here are not yet large enough to eclipse classical computers, this experiment exposes critical factors of scaling quantum computers, such as qubit connectivity and gate expressivity. In addition, the results suggest that codesigning particular quantum applications with the hardware itself will be paramount in successfully using quantum computers in the future. PMID:28325879

  15. Is the Brain a Quantum Computer?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litt, Abninder; Eliasmith, Chris; Kroon, Frederick W.; Weinstein, Steven; Thagard, Paul

    2006-01-01

    We argue that computation via quantum mechanical processes is irrelevant to explaining how brains produce thought, contrary to the ongoing speculations of many theorists. First, quantum effects do not have the temporal properties required for neural information processing. Second, there are substantial physical obstacles to any organic…

  16. Is the Brain a Quantum Computer?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litt, Abninder; Eliasmith, Chris; Kroon, Frederick W.; Weinstein, Steven; Thagard, Paul

    2006-01-01

    We argue that computation via quantum mechanical processes is irrelevant to explaining how brains produce thought, contrary to the ongoing speculations of many theorists. First, quantum effects do not have the temporal properties required for neural information processing. Second, there are substantial physical obstacles to any organic…

  17. Experimental comparison of two quantum computing architectures.

    PubMed

    Linke, Norbert M; Maslov, Dmitri; Roetteler, Martin; Debnath, Shantanu; Figgatt, Caroline; Landsman, Kevin A; Wright, Kenneth; Monroe, Christopher

    2017-03-28

    We run a selection of algorithms on two state-of-the-art 5-qubit quantum computers that are based on different technology platforms. One is a publicly accessible superconducting transmon device (www. ibm.com/ibm-q) with limited connectivity, and the other is a fully connected trapped-ion system. Even though the two systems have different native quantum interactions, both can be programed in a way that is blind to the underlying hardware, thus allowing a comparison of identical quantum algorithms between different physical systems. We show that quantum algorithms and circuits that use more connectivity clearly benefit from a better-connected system of qubits. Although the quantum systems here are not yet large enough to eclipse classical computers, this experiment exposes critical factors of scaling quantum computers, such as qubit connectivity and gate expressivity. In addition, the results suggest that codesigning particular quantum applications with the hardware itself will be paramount in successfully using quantum computers in the future.

  18. Directional coupling for quantum computing and communication.

    PubMed

    Nikolopoulos, Georgios M

    2008-11-14

    We introduce the concept of directional coupling, i.e., the selective transfer of a state between adjacent quantum wires, in the context of quantum computing and communication. Our analysis rests upon a mathematical analogy between a dual-channel directional coupler and a composite spin system.

  19. Decoherence and a simple quantum computer

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, I.L.; Yamamoto, Y.; Laflamme, R.

    1995-10-01

    The authors analyze the effect of decoherence on the operation of part of a simple quantum computer. The results indicate that quantum bit coding techniques may be used to mitigate the effects of two sources of decoherence - amplitude damping and phase randomization.

  20. Algorithms Bridging Quantum Computation and Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClean, Jarrod Ryan

    The design of new materials and chemicals derived entirely from computation has long been a goal of computational chemistry, and the governing equation whose solution would permit this dream is known. Unfortunately, the exact solution to this equation has been far too expensive and clever approximations fail in critical situations. Quantum computers offer a novel solution to this problem. In this work, we develop not only new algorithms to use quantum computers to study hard problems in chemistry, but also explore how such algorithms can help us to better understand and improve our traditional approaches. In particular, we first introduce a new method, the variational quantum eigensolver, which is designed to maximally utilize the quantum resources available in a device to solve chemical problems. We apply this method in a real quantum photonic device in the lab to study the dissociation of the helium hydride (HeH+) molecule. We also enhance this methodology with architecture specific optimizations on ion trap computers and show how linear-scaling techniques from traditional quantum chemistry can be used to improve the outlook of similar algorithms on quantum computers. We then show how studying quantum algorithms such as these can be used to understand and enhance the development of classical algorithms. In particular we use a tool from adiabatic quantum computation, Feynman's Clock, to develop a new discrete time variational principle and further establish a connection between real-time quantum dynamics and ground state eigenvalue problems. We use these tools to develop two novel parallel-in-time quantum algorithms that outperform competitive algorithms as well as offer new insights into the connection between the fermion sign problem of ground states and the dynamical sign problem of quantum dynamics. Finally we use insights gained in the study of quantum circuits to explore a general notion of sparsity in many-body quantum systems. In particular we use

  1. Optimised resource construction for verifiable quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashefi, Elham; Wallden, Petros

    2017-04-01

    Recent developments have brought the possibility of achieving scalable quantum networks and quantum devices closer. From the computational point of view these emerging technologies become relevant when they are no longer classically simulatable. Hence a pressing challenge is the construction of practical methods to verify the correctness of the outcome produced by universal or non-universal quantum devices. A promising approach that has been extensively explored is the scheme of verification via encryption through blind quantum computation. We present here a new construction that simplifies the required resources for any such verifiable protocol. We obtain an overhead that is linear in the size of the input (computation), while the security parameter remains independent of the size of the computation and can be made exponentially small (with a small extra cost). Furthermore our construction is generic and could be applied to any universal or non-universal scheme with a given underlying graph.

  2. Quantum computing Hyper Terahertz Facility opens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Chadha, Kulvinder

    2016-01-01

    A new facility has opened at the University of Surrey to use terahertz radiation for quantum computing. The Hyper Terahertz Facility (HTF) is a joint collaboration between the University of Surrey and the National Physical Laboratory (NPL).

  3. Iterated Gate Teleportation and Blind Quantum Computation.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Delgado, Carlos A; Fitzsimons, Joseph F

    2015-06-05

    Blind quantum computation allows a user to delegate a computation to an untrusted server while keeping the computation hidden. A number of recent works have sought to establish bounds on the communication requirements necessary to implement blind computation, and a bound based on the no-programming theorem of Nielsen and Chuang has emerged as a natural limiting factor. Here we show that this constraint only holds in limited scenarios, and show how to overcome it using a novel method of iterated gate teleportations. This technique enables drastic reductions in the communication required for distributed quantum protocols, extending beyond the blind computation setting. Applied to blind quantum computation, this technique offers significant efficiency improvements, and in some scenarios offers an exponential reduction in communication requirements.

  4. Iterated Gate Teleportation and Blind Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Delgado, Carlos A.; Fitzsimons, Joseph F.

    2015-06-01

    Blind quantum computation allows a user to delegate a computation to an untrusted server while keeping the computation hidden. A number of recent works have sought to establish bounds on the communication requirements necessary to implement blind computation, and a bound based on the no-programming theorem of Nielsen and Chuang has emerged as a natural limiting factor. Here we show that this constraint only holds in limited scenarios, and show how to overcome it using a novel method of iterated gate teleportations. This technique enables drastic reductions in the communication required for distributed quantum protocols, extending beyond the blind computation setting. Applied to blind quantum computation, this technique offers significant efficiency improvements, and in some scenarios offers an exponential reduction in communication requirements.

  5. Delayed Commutation in Quantum Computer Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Escartín, Juan Carlos; Chamorro-Posada, Pedro

    2006-09-01

    In the same way that classical computer networks connect and enhance the capabilities of classical computers, quantum networks can combine the advantages of quantum information and communication. We propose a nonclassical network element, a delayed commutation switch, that can solve the problem of switching time in packet switching networks. With the help of some local ancillary qubits and superdense codes, we can route a qubit packet after part of it has left the network node.

  6. Quantum Computer Circuit Analysis and Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    is a first order nonlinear differential matrix equation of the Lax type. This report gives derivations of the Levi-Civita connection, Riemann...computational paths in the )2( nSU manifold. It is a nonlinear first-order differential matrix equation of the same form as the Lax equation for...I. L. Quantum Information and Computation; Cambridge University Press, 2000. 2. Dowling , M. R.; Nielsen, M. A. The Geometry of Quantum

  7. Braid group representation on quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Aziz, Ryan Kasyfil; Muchtadi-Alamsyah, Intan

    2015-09-30

    There are many studies about topological representation of quantum computation recently. One of diagram representation of quantum computation is by using ZX-Calculus. In this paper we will make a diagrammatical scheme of Dense Coding. We also proved that ZX-Calculus diagram of maximally entangle state satisfies Yang-Baxter Equation and therefore, we can construct a Braid Group representation of set of maximally entangle state.

  8. Private quantum computation: an introduction to blind quantum computing and related protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzsimons, Joseph F.

    2017-06-01

    Quantum technologies hold the promise of not only faster algorithmic processing of data, via quantum computation, but also of more secure communications, in the form of quantum cryptography. In recent years, a number of protocols have emerged which seek to marry these concepts for the purpose of securing computation rather than communication. These protocols address the task of securely delegating quantum computation to an untrusted device while maintaining the privacy, and in some instances the integrity, of the computation. We present a review of the progress to date in this emerging area.

  9. EDITORIAL: Quantum Computing and the Feynman Festival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Howard E.; Kim, Young S.; Man'ko, Margarita A.

    2003-12-01

    The Feynman Festival is a new interdisciplinary conference developed for studying Richard Feynman and his physics. The first meeting of this new conference series was held at the University of Maryland on 23--28 August 2002 (http://www.physics.umd.edu/robot/feynman.html) and the second meeting is scheduled for August 2004 at the same venue. According to Feynman, the different aspects of nature are different aspects of the same thing. Therefore, the ultimate purpose of the conference is to find Feynman's same thing from all different theories. For this reason, the first meeting of the Festival did not begin with a fixed formula, but composed its scientific programme based on responses from the entire physics community. The conference drew the most enthusiastic response from the community of quantum computing, the field initiated by Feynman. Encouraged by the response, we decided to edit a special issue of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics on quantum computing in connection with the first Feynman Festival. The authorship is not restricted to the participants of the Feynman Festival, and all interested parties were encouraged to submit their papers on this subject. Needless to say, all the papers were peer reviewed according to the well-established standards of the journal. The subject of quantum computing is not restricted to building and operating computers. It requires a deeper understanding of how quantum mechanics works in materials as well as in our minds. Indeed, it covers the basic foundations of quantum mechanics, measurement theory, information theory, quantum optics, atomic physics and condensed matter physics. It may be necessary to develop new mathematical tools to accommodate the language that nature speaks. It is gratifying to note that this special issue contains papers covering all these aspects of quantum computing. As Feynman noted, we could be discussing these diversified issues to study one problem. In our case, this `one

  10. Superadiabatic holonomic quantum computation in cavity QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bao-Jie; Huang, Zhen-Hua; Xue, Zheng-Yuan; Zhang, Xin-Ding

    2017-06-01

    Adiabatic quantum control is a powerful tool for quantum engineering and a key component in some quantum computation models, where accurate control over the timing of the involved pulses is not needed. However, the adiabatic condition requires that the process be very slow and thus limits its application in quantum computation, where quantum gates are preferred to be fast due to the limited coherent times of the quantum systems. Here, we propose a feasible scheme to implement universal holonomic quantum computation based on non-Abelian geometric phases with superadiabatic quantum control, where the adiabatic manipulation is sped up while retaining its robustness against errors in the timing control. Consolidating the advantages of both strategies, our proposal is thus both robust and fast. The cavity QED system is adopted as a typical example to illustrate the merits where the proposed scheme can be realized in a tripod configuration by appropriately controlling the pulse shapes and their relative strength. To demonstrate the distinct performance of our proposal, we also compare our scheme with the conventional adiabatic strategy.

  11. Quantum computing in a piece of glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Warner A.; Alsing, Paul M.; Kreymerman, Grigoriy; McDonald, Jonathan R.; Tison, Christopher

    2011-05-01

    Quantum gates and simple quantum algorithms can be designed utilizing the diffraction phenomena of a photon within a multiplexed holographic element. The quantum eigenstates we use are the photon's linear momentum (LM) as measured by the number of waves of tilt across the aperture. Two properties of quantum computing within the circuit model make this approach attractive. First, any conditional measurement can be commuted in time with any unitary quantum gate - the timeless nature of quantum computing. Second, photon entanglement can be encoded as a superposition state of a single photon in a higher-dimensional state space afforded by LM. Our theoretical and numerical results indicate that OptiGrate's photo-thermal refractive (PTR) glass is an enabling technology. We will review our previous design of a quantum projection operator and give credence to this approach on a representative quantum gate grounded on coupled-mode theory and numerical simulations, all with parameters consistent with PTR glass. We discuss the strengths (high efficiencies, robustness to environment) and limitations (scalability, crosstalk) of this technology. While not scalable, the utility and robustness of such optical elements for broader quantum information processing applications can be substantial.

  12. Waveguide-QED-based photonic quantum computation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Huaixiu; Gauthier, Daniel J; Baranger, Harold U

    2013-08-30

    We propose a new scheme for quantum computation using flying qubits--propagating photons in a one-dimensional waveguide interacting with matter qubits. Photon-photon interactions are mediated by the coupling to a four-level system, based on which photon-photon π-phase gates (CONTROLLED-NOT) can be implemented for universal quantum computation. We show that high gate fidelity is possible, given recent dramatic experimental progress in superconducting circuits and photonic-crystal waveguides. The proposed system can be an important building block for future on-chip quantum networks.

  13. Cat-qubits for quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirrahimi, Mazyar

    2016-08-01

    The development of quantum Josephson circuits has created a strong expectation for reliable processing of quantum information. While this progress has already led to various proof-of-principle experiments on small-scale quantum systems, a major scaling step is required towards many-qubit protocols. Fault-tolerant computation with protected logical qubits usually comes at the expense of a significant overhead in the hardware. Each of the involved physical qubits still needs to satisfy the best achieved properties (coherence times, coupling strengths and tunability). Here, and in the aim of addressing alternative approaches to deal with these obstacles, I overview a series of recent theoretical proposals, and the experimental developments following these proposals, to enable a hardware-efficient paradigm for quantum memory protection and universal quantum computation. xml:lang="fr"

  14. Quantum Fourier transform in computational basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, S. S.; Loke, T.; Izaac, J. A.; Wang, J. B.

    2017-03-01

    The quantum Fourier transform, with exponential speed-up compared to the classical fast Fourier transform, has played an important role in quantum computation as a vital part of many quantum algorithms (most prominently, Shor's factoring algorithm). However, situations arise where it is not sufficient to encode the Fourier coefficients within the quantum amplitudes, for example in the implementation of control operations that depend on Fourier coefficients. In this paper, we detail a new quantum scheme to encode Fourier coefficients in the computational basis, with fidelity 1 - δ and digit accuracy ɛ for each Fourier coefficient. Its time complexity depends polynomially on log (N), where N is the problem size, and linearly on 1/δ and 1/ɛ . We also discuss an application of potential practical importance, namely the simulation of circulant Hamiltonians.

  15. Simulating physical phenomena with a quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Gerardo

    2003-03-01

    In a keynote speech at MIT in 1981 Richard Feynman raised some provocative questions in connection to the exact simulation of physical systems using a special device named a ``quantum computer'' (QC). At the time it was known that deterministic simulations of quantum phenomena in classical computers required a number of resources that scaled exponentially with the number of degrees of freedom, and also that the probabilistic simulation of certain quantum problems were limited by the so-called sign or phase problem, a problem believed to be of exponential complexity. Such a QC was intended to mimick physical processes exactly the same as Nature. Certainly, remarks coming from such an influential figure generated widespread interest in these ideas, and today after 21 years there are still some open questions. What kind of physical phenomena can be simulated with a QC?, How?, and What are its limitations? Addressing and attempting to answer these questions is what this talk is about. Definitively, the goal of physics simulation using controllable quantum systems (``physics imitation'') is to exploit quantum laws to advantage, and thus accomplish efficient imitation. Fundamental is the connection between a quantum computational model and a physical system by transformations of operator algebras. This concept is a necessary one because in Quantum Mechanics each physical system is naturally associated with a language of operators and thus can be considered as a possible model of quantum computation. The remarkable result is that an arbitrary physical system is naturally simulatable by another physical system (or QC) whenever a ``dictionary'' between the two operator algebras exists. I will explain these concepts and address some of Feynman's concerns regarding the simulation of fermionic systems. Finally, I will illustrate the main ideas by imitating simple physical phenomena borrowed from condensed matter physics using quantum algorithms, and present experimental

  16. Robust dynamical decoupling for quantum computing and quantum memory.

    PubMed

    Souza, Alexandre M; Alvarez, Gonzalo A; Suter, Dieter

    2011-06-17

    Dynamical decoupling (DD) is a popular technique for protecting qubits from the environment. However, unless special care is taken, experimental errors in the control pulses used in this technique can destroy the quantum information instead of preserving it. Here, we investigate techniques for making DD sequences robust against different types of experimental errors while retaining good decoupling efficiency in a fluctuating environment. We present experimental data from solid-state nuclear spin qubits and introduce a new DD sequence that is suitable for quantum computing and quantum memory.

  17. Irreconcilable difference between quantum walks and adiabatic quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Thomas G.; Meyer, David A.

    2016-06-01

    Continuous-time quantum walks and adiabatic quantum evolution are two general techniques for quantum computing, both of which are described by Hamiltonians that govern their evolutions by Schrödinger's equation. In the former, the Hamiltonian is fixed, while in the latter, the Hamiltonian varies with time. As a result, their formulations of Grover's algorithm evolve differently through Hilbert space. We show that this difference is fundamental; they cannot be made to evolve along each other's path without introducing structure more powerful than the standard oracle for unstructured search. For an adiabatic quantum evolution to evolve like the quantum walk search algorithm, it must interpolate between three fixed Hamiltonians, one of which is complex and introduces structure that is stronger than the oracle for unstructured search. Conversely, for a quantum walk to evolve along the path of the adiabatic search algorithm, it must be a chiral quantum walk on a weighted, directed star graph with structure that is also stronger than the oracle for unstructured search. Thus, the two techniques, although similar in being described by Hamiltonians that govern their evolution, compute by fundamentally irreconcilable means.

  18. Universal quantum computation in a semiconductor quantum wire network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sau, Jay D.; Tewari, Sumanta; Das Sarma, S.

    2010-11-01

    Universal quantum computation (UQC) using Majorana fermions on a two-dimensional topological superconducting (TS) medium remains an outstanding open problem. This is because the quantum gate set that can be generated by braiding of the Majorana fermions does not include any two-qubit gate and also no single-qubit π/8 phase gate. In principle, it is possible to create these crucial extra gates using quantum interference of Majorana fermion currents. However, it is not clear if the motion of the various order parameter defects (vortices, domain walls, etc.), to which the Majorana fermions are bound in a TS medium, can be quantum coherent. We show that these obstacles can be overcome using a semiconductor quantum wire network in the vicinity of an s-wave superconductor, by constructing topologically protected two-qubit gates and any arbitrary single-qubit phase gate in a topologically unprotected manner, which can be error corrected using magic-state distillation. Thus our strategy, using a judicious combination of topologically protected and unprotected gate operations, realizes UQC on a quantum wire network with a remarkably high error threshold of 0.14 as compared to 10-3 to 10-4 in ordinary unprotected quantum computation.

  19. Simulating fermions on a quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, G.; Gubernatis, J. E.; Knill, E.; Laflamme, R.

    2002-07-01

    The real-time probabilistic simulation of quantum systems in classical computers is known to be limited by the so-called dynamical sign problem, a problem leading to exponential complexity. In 1981 Richard Feynman raised some provocative questions in connection to the "exact imitation" of such systems using a special device named a "quantum computer". Feynman hesitated about the possibility of imitating fermion systems using such a device. Here we address some of his concerns and, in particular, investigate the simulation of fermionic systems. We show how quantum computers avoid the sign problem in some cases by reducing the complexity from exponential to polynomial. Our demonstration is based upon the use of isomorphisms of algebras. We present specific quantum algorithms that illustrate the main points of our algebraic approach.

  20. Prospects for quantum computing: Extremely doubtful

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyakonov, M. I.

    2014-09-01

    The quantum computer is supposed to process information by applying unitary transformations to 2N complex amplitudes defining the state of N qubits. A useful machine needing N 103 or more, the number of continuous parameters describing the state of a quantum computer at any given moment is at least 21000 10300 which is much greater than the number of protons in the Universe. However, the theorists believe that the feasibility of large-scale quantum computing has been proved via the “threshold theorem”. Like for any theorem, the proof is based on a number of assumptions considered as axioms. However, in the physical world none of these assumptions can be fulfilled exactly. Any assumption can be only approached with some limited precision. So, the rather meaningless “error per qubit per gate” threshold must be supplemented by a list of the precisions with which all assumptions behind the threshold theorem should hold. Such a list still does not exist. The theory also seems to ignore the undesired free evolution of the quantum computer caused by the energy differences of quantum states entering any given superposition. Another important point is that the hypothetical quantum computer will be a system of 103 -106 qubits PLUS an extremely complex and monstrously sophisticated classical apparatus. This huge and strongly nonlinear system will generally exhibit instabilities and chaotic behavior.

  1. Universality of black hole quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvali, Gia; Gomez, Cesar; Lüst, Dieter; Omar, Yasser; Richter, Benedikt

    2017-01-01

    By analyzing the key properties of black holes from the point of view of quantum information, we derive a model-independent picture of black hole quantum computing. It has been noticed that this picture exhibits striking similarities with quantum critical condensates, allowing the use of a common language to describe quantum computing in both systems. We analyze such quantum computing by allowing coupling to external modes, under the condition that the external influence must be soft-enough in order not to offset the basic properties of the system. We derive model-independent bounds on some crucial time-scales, such as the times of gate operation, decoherence, maximal entanglement and total scrambling. We show that for black hole type quantum computers all these time-scales are of the order of the black hole half-life time. Furthermore, we construct explicitly a set of Hamiltonians that generates a universal set of quantum gates for the black hole type computer. We find that the gates work at maximal energy efficiency. Furthermore, we establish a fundamental bound on the complexity of quantum circuits encoded on these systems, and characterize the unitary operations that are implementable. It becomes apparent that the computational power is very limited due to the fact that the black hole life-time is of the same order of the gate operation time. As a consequence, it is impossible to retrieve its information, within the life-time of a black hole, by externally coupling to the black hole qubits. However, we show that, in principle, coupling to some of the internal degrees of freedom allows acquiring knowledge about the micro-state. Still, due to the trivial complexity of operations that can be performed, there is no time advantage over the collection of Hawking radiation and subsequent decoding.

  2. Compressed quantum computation using a remote five-qubit quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebenstreit, M.; Alsina, D.; Latorre, J. I.; Kraus, B.

    2017-05-01

    The notion of compressed quantum computation is employed to simulate the Ising interaction of a one-dimensional chain consisting of n qubits using the universal IBM cloud quantum computer running on log2(n ) qubits. The external field parameter that controls the quantum phase transition of this model translates into particular settings of the quantum gates that generate the circuit. We measure the magnetization, which displays the quantum phase transition, on a two-qubit system, which simulates a four-qubit Ising chain, and show its agreement with the theoretical prediction within a certain error. We also discuss the relevant point of how to assess errors when using a cloud quantum computer with a limited amount of runs. As a solution, we propose to use validating circuits, that is, to run independent controlled quantum circuits of similar complexity to the circuit of interest.

  3. Quantum Optical Implementations of Quantum Computing and Quantum Informatics Protocols

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-20

    REPORT NUMBER Institute for Quantum Studies and Department of Physics Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843- 4242 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING...September 30, 2007 Principal Investigators: Marlan 0. Scully and M. Subail Zubairy Institute for Quantum Studies and Department of Physics Texas A&M...Thus, N has a simple physical meaning: It is the ratio of the delay time of the buffer and the pulse duration and corresponds to the number of

  4. Efficient quantum circuits for one-way quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Tanamoto, Tetsufumi; Liu, Yu-Xi; Hu, Xuedong; Nori, Franco

    2009-03-13

    While Ising-type interactions are ideal for implementing controlled phase flip gates in one-way quantum computing, natural interactions between solid-state qubits are most often described by either the XY or the Heisenberg models. We show an efficient way of generating cluster states directly using either the imaginary SWAP (iSWAP) gate for the XY model, or the sqrt[SWAP] gate for the Heisenberg model. Our approach thus makes one-way quantum computing more feasible for solid-state devices.

  5. Centrality measure based on continuous-time quantum walks and experimental realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izaac, Josh A.; Zhan, Xiang; Bian, Zhihao; Wang, Kunkun; Li, Jian; Wang, Jingbo B.; Xue, Peng

    2017-03-01

    Network centrality has important implications well beyond its role in physical and information transport analysis; as such, various quantum-walk-based algorithms have been proposed for measuring network vertex centrality. In this work, we propose a continuous-time quantum walk algorithm for determining vertex centrality, and show that it generalizes to arbitrary graphs via a statistical analysis of randomly generated scale-free and Erdős-Rényi networks. As a proof of concept, the algorithm is detailed on a four-vertex star graph and physically implemented via linear optics, using spatial and polarization degrees of freedoms of single photons. This paper reports a successful physical demonstration of a quantum centrality algorithm.

  6. Qubus ancilla-driven quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Katherine Louise; De, Suvabrata; Kendon, Viv; Munro, Bill

    2014-12-04

    Hybrid matter-optical systems offer a robust, scalable path to quantum computation. Such systems have an ancilla which acts as a bus connecting the qubits. We demonstrate how using a continuous variable qubus as the ancilla provides savings in the total number of operations required when computing with many qubits.

  7. Extending matchgates into universal quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Brod, Daniel J.; Galvao, Ernesto F.

    2011-08-15

    Matchgates are a family of two-qubit gates associated with noninteracting fermions. They are classically simulatable if acting only on nearest neighbors but become universal for quantum computation if we relax this restriction or use swap gates [Jozsa and Miyake, Proc. R. Soc. A 464, 3089 (2008)]. We generalize this result by proving that any nonmatchgate parity-preserving unitary is capable of extending the computational power of matchgates into universal quantum computation. We identify the single local invariant of parity-preserving unitaries responsible for this, and discuss related results in the context of fermionic systems.

  8. Triple-server blind quantum computation using entanglement swapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qin; Chan, Wai Hong; Wu, Chunhui; Wen, Zhonghua

    2014-04-01

    Blind quantum computation allows a client who does not have enough quantum resources or technologies to achieve quantum computation on a remote quantum server such that the client's input, output, and algorithm remain unknown to the server. Up to now, single- and double-server blind quantum computation have been considered. In this work, we propose a triple-server blind computation protocol where the client can delegate quantum computation to three quantum servers by the use of entanglement swapping. Furthermore, the three quantum servers can communicate with each other and the client is almost classical since one does not require any quantum computational power, quantum memory, and the ability to prepare any quantum states and only needs to be capable of getting access to quantum channels.

  9. Quantum Heterogeneous Computing for Satellite Positioning Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, G.; Kumar, V.; Dulny, J., III

    2016-12-01

    Hard optimization problems occur in many fields of academic study and practical situations. We present results in which quantum heterogeneous computing is used to solve a real-world optimization problem: satellite positioning. Optimization problems like this can scale very rapidly with problem size, and become unsolvable with traditional brute-force methods. Typically, such problems have been approximately solved with heuristic approaches; however, these methods can take a long time to calculate and are not guaranteed to find optimal solutions. Quantum computing offers the possibility of producing significant speed-up and improved solution quality. There are now commercially available quantum annealing (QA) devices that are designed to solve difficult optimization problems. These devices have 1000+ quantum bits, but they have significant hardware size and connectivity limitations. We present a novel heterogeneous computing stack that combines QA and classical machine learning and allows the use of QA on problems larger than the quantum hardware could solve in isolation. We begin by analyzing the satellite positioning problem with a heuristic solver, the genetic algorithm. The classical computer's comparatively large available memory can explore the full problem space and converge to a solution relatively close to the true optimum. The QA device can then evolve directly to the optimal solution within this more limited space. Preliminary experiments, using the Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) algorithm to simulate QA hardware, have produced promising results. Working with problem instances with known global minima, we find a solution within 8% in a matter of seconds, and within 5% in a few minutes. Future studies include replacing QMC with commercially available quantum hardware and exploring more problem sets and model parameters. Our results have important implications for how heterogeneous quantum computing can be used to solve difficult optimization problems in any

  10. Quantum learning for a quantum lattice gas computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrman, Elizabeth; Steck, James

    2015-03-01

    Quantum lattice gas is the logical generalization of quantum cellular automata. In low energy the dynamics are well described by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation in the mean field limit, which is an effective nonlinear interaction model of a Bose-Einstein condensate. In previous work, we have shown in simulation that both spatial and temporal models of quantum learning computers can be used to ``design'' non-trivial quantum algorithms. The advantages of quantum learning over the usual practice of using quantum gate building blocks are, first, the rapidity with which the problem can be solved, without having to decompose the problem; second, the fact that our technique can be used readily even when the problem, or the operator, is not well understood; and, third, that because the interactions are a natural part of the physical system, connectivity is automatic. The advantage to quantum learning obviously grows with the size and the complexity of the problem. We develop and present our learning algorithm as applied to the mean field lattice gas equation, and present a few preliminary results.

  11. Quantum learning in a quantum lattice gas computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrman, Elizabeth; Steck, James

    2015-04-01

    Quantum lattice gas is the logical generalization of quantum cellular automata. At low energy the dynamics are well described by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation in the mean field limit, which is an effective nonlinear interaction model of a Bose-Einstein condensate. In previous work, we have shown in simulation that both spatial and temporal models of quantum learning computers can be used to ``design'' non-trivial quantum algorithms. The advantages of quantum learning over the usual practice of using quantum gate building blocks are, first, the rapidity with which the problem can be solved, without having to decompose the problem; second, the fact that our technique can be used readily even when the problem, or the operator, is not well understood; and, third, that because the interactions are a natural part of the physical system, connectivity is automatic. The advantage to quantum learning obviously grows with the size and the complexity of the problem. We develop and present our learning algorithm as applied to the mean field lattice gas equation, and present a few preliminary results.

  12. Semiconductor-inspired superconducting quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Yun-Pil

    Superconducting circuits offer tremendous design flexibility in the quantum regime culminating most recently in the demonstration of few qubit systems supposedly approaching the threshold for fault-tolerant quantum information processing. Competition in the solid-state comes from semiconductor qubits, where nature has bestowed some very useful properties which can be utilized for spin qubit based quantum computing. Here we present an architecture for superconducting quantum computing based on selective design principles deduced from spin-based systems. We propose an encoded qubit approach realizable with state-of-the-art tunable Josephson junction qubits. Our results show that this design philosophy holds promise, enables microwave-free control, and offers a pathway to future qubit designs with new capabilities such as with higher fidelity or, perhaps, operation at higher temperature. The approach is especially suited to qubits based on variable super-semi junctions.

  13. Nanoscale solid-state quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardavan, A.; Austwick, M.; Benjamin, S.C.; Briggs, G.A.D.; Dennis, T.J.S.; Ferguson, A.; Hasko, D.G.; Kanai, M.; Khlobystov, A.N.; Lovett, B.W.; Morley, G.W.; Oliver, R.A.; Pettifor, D.G.; Porfyrakis, K.; Reina, J.H.; Rice, J.H.; Smith, J.D.; Taylor, R.A.; Williams, D.A.; Adelmann, C.; Mariette, H.; Hamers, R.J.

    2003-07-01

    Most experts agree that it is too early to say how quantum computers will eventually be built, and several nanoscale solid-state schemes are being implemented in a range of materials. Nanofabricated quantum dots can be made in designer configurations, with established technology for controlling interactions and for reading out results. Epitaxial quantum dots can be grown in vertical arrays in semiconductors, and ultrafast optical techniques are available for controlling and measuring their excitations. Single-walled carbon nanotubes can be used for molecular self-assembly of endohedral fullerenes, which can embody quantum information in the electron spin. The challenges of individual addressing in such tiny structures could rapidly become intractable with increasing numbers of qubits, but these schemes are amenable to global addressing methods for computation.

  14. Information-theoretic temporal Bell inequality and quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Morikoshi, Fumiaki

    2006-05-15

    An information-theoretic temporal Bell inequality is formulated to contrast classical and quantum computations. Any classical algorithm satisfies the inequality, while quantum ones can violate it. Therefore, the violation of the inequality is an immediate consequence of the quantumness in the computation. Furthermore, this approach suggests a notion of temporal nonlocality in quantum computation.

  15. Plasmon Resonators for Quantum Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    quantum dot. For free atoms this strong coupling is achieved using high Q optical resonators, such as ultra-low-loss bulk Fabry - Perot cavities or...TR-07-0487 11. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 12a. DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE Unlimited UL 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) The

  16. Introduction to Quantum Information/Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    mωX + iP) sqrt(2mhω) BCS Theory – Named for John Bardeen , Leon Cooper, and Robert Schrieffer. According to theory, the...Theory and Reliable Communication, John Wiley & Sons 1998 2. M.A. Nielsen, I. L. Chuang, Quantum Computation and Quantum Information, Cambridge...France and by John Wiley & Sons. 6. H. Goldstein, Classical Mechanics, 1950 Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Inc. 7. L.S. Brown and G

  17. Entanglement and Quantum Computation: An Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, R.B.

    2000-06-27

    This report presents a selective compilation of basic facts from the fields of particle entanglement and quantum information processing prepared for those non-experts in these fields that may have interest in an area of physics showing counterintuitive, ''spooky'' (Einstein's words) behavior. In fact, quantum information processing could, in the near future, provide a new technology to sustain the benefits to the U.S. economy due to advanced computer technology.

  18. Computations in quantum mechanics made easy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korsch, H. J.; Rapedius, K.

    2016-09-01

    Convenient and simple numerical techniques for performing quantum computations based on matrix representations of Hilbert space operators are presented and illustrated by various examples. The applications include the calculations of spectral and dynamical properties for one-dimensional and two-dimensional single-particle systems as well as bosonic many-particle and open quantum systems. Due to their technical simplicity these methods are well suited as a tool for teaching quantum mechanics to undergraduates and graduates. Explicit implementations of the presented numerical methods in Matlab are given.

  19. Universal dephasing control during quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Goren; Kurizki, Gershon

    2007-10-15

    Dephasing is a ubiquitous phenomenon that leads to the loss of coherence in quantum systems and the corruption of quantum information. We present a universal dynamical control approach to combat dephasing during all stages of quantum computation, namely, storage and single- and two-qubit operators. We show that (a) tailoring multifrequency gate pulses to the dephasing dynamics can increase fidelity; (b) cross-dephasing, introduced by entanglement, can be eliminated by appropriate control fields; (c) counterintuitively and contrary to previous schemes, one can increase the gate duration, while simultaneously increasing the total gate fidelity.

  20. Efficient quantum computing of complex dynamics.

    PubMed

    Benenti, G; Casati, G; Montangero, S; Shepelyansky, D L

    2001-11-26

    We propose a quantum algorithm which uses the number of qubits in an optimal way and efficiently simulates a physical model with rich and complex dynamics described by the quantum sawtooth map. The numerical study of the effect of static imperfections in the quantum computer hardware shows that the main elements of the phase space structures are accurately reproduced up to a time scale which is polynomial in the number of qubits. The errors generated by these imperfections are more significant than the errors of random noise in gate operations.

  1. Neuromorphic quantum computation with energy dissipation

    SciTech Connect

    Kinjo, Mitsunaga; Sato, Shigeo; Nakamiya, Yuuki; Nakajima, Koji

    2005-11-15

    Real parallel computing with a quantum computer attracts vast interest due to its extreme high potential. We propose a neuromorphic quantum computation algorithm based on an adiabatic Hamiltonian evolution with energy dissipation. This algorithm can be applied to problems if a cost function can be expressed in a quadratic form. This requirement results from the fact that our Hamiltonian is designed by following a method similar to an artificial neural network (ANN). The state of an ANN is often trapped at local minima, and the network outputs an error. Since the state of a quantum system with the proposed algorithm is always in the ground state according to the adiabatic theorem, it is not necessary to be concerned that the quantum state is trapped at local minima. However, there is no guarantee that a quantum algorithm based on an adiabatic Hamiltonian evolution with degeneration or level crossing is successfully executed. We show successful numerical simulation results with the proposed algorithm by introducing energy dissipation to keep the quantum state staying in the ground state, and then we show an application to the n-queen problem, which is one of the combinatorial optimization problems.

  2. Can the human brain do quantum computing?

    PubMed

    Rocha, A F; Massad, E; Coutinho, F A B

    2004-01-01

    The electrical membrane properties have been the key issues in the understanding of the cerebral physiology for more than almost two centuries. But, molecular neurobiology has now discovered that biochemical transactions play an important role in neuronal computations. Quantum computing (QC) is becoming a reality both from the theoretical point of view as well as from practical applications. Quantum mechanics is the most accurate description at atomic level and it lies behind all chemistry that provides the basis for biology ... maybe the magic of entanglement is also crucial for life. The purpose of the present paper is to discuss the dendrite spine as a quantum computing device, taking into account what is known about the physiology of the glutamate receptors and the cascade of biochemical transactions triggered by the glutamate binding to these receptors.

  3. Universal two-body-Hamiltonian quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaj, Daniel

    2012-03-01

    We present a Hamiltonian quantum-computation scheme universal for quantum computation. Our Hamiltonian is a sum of a polynomial number (in the number of gates L in the quantum circuit) of constant-norm, time-independent, two-body interaction terms. Furthermore, each qubit in the system interacts only with a constant number of other qubits in a three-layer, geometrically local layout. The computer runs in three steps—it starts in a simple initial product state, evolves according to a time-independent Hamiltonian for time of order L2 (up to logarithmic factors), and finishes with a two-qubit measurement. Our model improves previous universal two-local-Hamiltonian constructions, as it avoids using perturbation gadgets and large energy-penalty terms in the Hamiltonian, which would result in a large required run time.

  4. Quantum computing without wavefunctions: time-dependent density functional theory for universal quantum computation.

    PubMed

    Tempel, David G; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2012-01-01

    We prove that the theorems of TDDFT can be extended to a class of qubit Hamiltonians that are universal for quantum computation. The theorems of TDDFT applied to universal Hamiltonians imply that single-qubit expectation values can be used as the basic variables in quantum computation and information theory, rather than wavefunctions. From a practical standpoint this opens the possibility of approximating observables of interest in quantum computations directly in terms of single-qubit quantities (i.e. as density functionals). Additionally, we also demonstrate that TDDFT provides an exact prescription for simulating universal Hamiltonians with other universal Hamiltonians that have different, and possibly easier-to-realize two-qubit interactions. This establishes the foundations of TDDFT for quantum computation and opens the possibility of developing density functionals for use in quantum algorithms.

  5. Quantum Computing Without Wavefunctions: Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory for Universal Quantum Computation

    PubMed Central

    Tempel, David G.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2012-01-01

    We prove that the theorems of TDDFT can be extended to a class of qubit Hamiltonians that are universal for quantum computation. The theorems of TDDFT applied to universal Hamiltonians imply that single-qubit expectation values can be used as the basic variables in quantum computation and information theory, rather than wavefunctions. From a practical standpoint this opens the possibility of approximating observables of interest in quantum computations directly in terms of single-qubit quantities (i.e. as density functionals). Additionally, we also demonstrate that TDDFT provides an exact prescription for simulating universal Hamiltonians with other universal Hamiltonians that have different, and possibly easier-to-realize two-qubit interactions. This establishes the foundations of TDDFT for quantum computation and opens the possibility of developing density functionals for use in quantum algorithms. PMID:22553483

  6. Superconducting Qubits for Quantum Computation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    based on the Aharonov - Casher effect for flux tunneling, and the extension of the concept of the quantum non-demolition measurements to the measurement...consists of a Bloch transistor included in the superconducting loop with finite inductance and uses the Aharonov - Casher effect to modulate the flux...tunneling amplitude. The Aharonov - Casher effect in a simple system of Josephson junctions is of considerable interest of its own, and we expect that the

  7. Mimicking time evolution within a quantum ground state: Ground-state quantum computation, cloning, and teleportation

    SciTech Connect

    Mizel, Ari

    2004-07-01

    Ground-state quantum computers mimic quantum-mechanical time evolution within the amplitudes of a time-independent quantum state. We explore the principles that constrain this mimicking. A no-cloning argument is found to impose strong restrictions. It is shown, however, that there is flexibility that can be exploited using quantum teleportation methods to improve ground-state quantum computer design.

  8. Towards universal quantum computation through relativistic motion

    PubMed Central

    Bruschi, David Edward; Sabín, Carlos; Kok, Pieter; Johansson, Göran; Delsing, Per; Fuentes, Ivette

    2016-01-01

    We show how to use relativistic motion to generate continuous variable Gaussian cluster states within cavity modes. Our results can be demonstrated experimentally using superconducting circuits where tuneable boundary conditions correspond to mirrors moving with velocities close to the speed of light. In particular, we propose the generation of a quadripartite square cluster state as a first example that can be readily implemented in the laboratory. Since cluster states are universal resources for universal one-way quantum computation, our results pave the way for relativistic quantum computation schemes. PMID:26860584

  9. Quantum game simulator, using the circuit model of quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachos, Panagiotis; Karafyllidis, Ioannis G.

    2009-10-01

    We present a general two-player quantum game simulator that can simulate any two-player quantum game described by a 2×2 payoff matrix (two strategy games).The user can determine the payoff matrices for both players, their strategies and the amount of entanglement between their initial strategies. The outputs of the simulator are the expected payoffs of each player as a function of the other player's strategy parameters and the amount of entanglement. The simulator also produces contour plots that divide the strategy spaces of the game in regions in which players can get larger payoffs if they choose to use a quantum strategy against any classical one. We also apply the simulator to two well-known quantum games, the Battle of Sexes and the Chicken game. Program summaryProgram title: Quantum Game Simulator (QGS) Catalogue identifier: AEED_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEED_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3416 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 583 553 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Matlab R2008a (C) Computer: Any computer that can sufficiently run Matlab R2008a Operating system: Any system that can sufficiently run Matlab R2008a Classification: 4.15 Nature of problem: Simulation of two player quantum games described by a payoff matrix. Solution method: The program calculates the matrices that comprise the Eisert setup for quantum games based on the quantum circuit model. There are 5 parameters that can be altered. We define 3 of them as constant. We play the quantum game for all possible values for the other 2 parameters and store the results in a matrix. Unusual features: The software provides an easy way of simulating any two-player quantum games. Running time: Approximately

  10. Random Numbers and Quantum Computers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCartney, Mark; Glass, David

    2002-01-01

    The topic of random numbers is investigated in such a way as to illustrate links between mathematics, physics and computer science. First, the generation of random numbers by a classical computer using the linear congruential generator and logistic map is considered. It is noted that these procedures yield only pseudo-random numbers since…

  11. Random Numbers and Quantum Computers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCartney, Mark; Glass, David

    2002-01-01

    The topic of random numbers is investigated in such a way as to illustrate links between mathematics, physics and computer science. First, the generation of random numbers by a classical computer using the linear congruential generator and logistic map is considered. It is noted that these procedures yield only pseudo-random numbers since…

  12. Universality of quantum computation with cluster states and (X, Y)-plane measurements.

    PubMed

    Mantri, Atul; Demarie, Tommaso F; Fitzsimons, Joseph F

    2017-02-20

    Measurement-based quantum computing (MBQC) is a model of quantum computation where quantum information is coherently processed by means of projective measurements on highly entangled states. Following the introduction of MBQC, cluster states have been studied extensively both from the theoretical and experimental point of view. Indeed, the study of MBQC was catalysed by the realisation that cluster states are universal for MBQC with (X, Y)-plane and Z measurements. Here we examine the question of whether the requirement for Z measurements can be dropped while maintaining universality. We answer this question in the affirmative by showing that universality is possible in this scenario.

  13. Universality of quantum computation with cluster states and (X, Y)-plane measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantri, Atul; Demarie, Tommaso F.; Fitzsimons, Joseph F.

    2017-02-01

    Measurement-based quantum computing (MBQC) is a model of quantum computation where quantum information is coherently processed by means of projective measurements on highly entangled states. Following the introduction of MBQC, cluster states have been studied extensively both from the theoretical and experimental point of view. Indeed, the study of MBQC was catalysed by the realisation that cluster states are universal for MBQC with (X, Y)-plane and Z measurements. Here we examine the question of whether the requirement for Z measurements can be dropped while maintaining universality. We answer this question in the affirmative by showing that universality is possible in this scenario.

  14. Universality of quantum computation with cluster states and (X, Y)-plane measurements

    PubMed Central

    Mantri, Atul; Demarie, Tommaso F.; Fitzsimons, Joseph F.

    2017-01-01

    Measurement-based quantum computing (MBQC) is a model of quantum computation where quantum information is coherently processed by means of projective measurements on highly entangled states. Following the introduction of MBQC, cluster states have been studied extensively both from the theoretical and experimental point of view. Indeed, the study of MBQC was catalysed by the realisation that cluster states are universal for MBQC with (X, Y)-plane and Z measurements. Here we examine the question of whether the requirement for Z measurements can be dropped while maintaining universality. We answer this question in the affirmative by showing that universality is possible in this scenario. PMID:28216652

  15. Ultrafast quantum nondemolition measurement based on diamond-shaped artificial atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küng, Bruno; Dumur, Etienne; Diniz, Igor; Feofanov, Alexey; Weissl, Thomas; Naud, Cécile; Guichard, Wiebke; Auffèves, Alexia; Buisson, Olivier

    2014-03-01

    We present a theoretical study of a quantum nondemolition readout scheme based on a superconducting artificial atom with two internal degrees of freedom. In comparison with the most widely employed readout scheme for superconducting qubits, the dispersive readout in a circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture, our approach promises a significantly stronger measurement signal. This should allow for a high-fidelity readout in a single shot. Our device consists of two transmons (i.e., small capacitively shunted Josephson junctions) coupled via a large inductance. The resulting circuit exhibits a symmetric and an antisymmetric oscillation which we use as a logical and ancilla qubit, respectively. The Josephson non-linearity leads to a cross-Kerr-like coupling of the two oscillations. This allows us to read out the logical qubit state by measuring the ancilla qubit frequency. To measure the ancilla qubit frequency, we couple it to a superconducting microwave resonator, allowing for a large amplitude and a fast response of the transmitted microwave signal. At the same time, the logical qubit remains weakly coupled and far detuned from the resonator, preventing qubit relaxation due to the Purcell effect.

  16. A surface code quantum computer in silicon

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Charles D.; Peretz, Eldad; Hile, Samuel J.; House, Matthew G.; Fuechsle, Martin; Rogge, Sven; Simmons, Michelle Y.; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.

    2015-01-01

    The exceptionally long quantum coherence times of phosphorus donor nuclear spin qubits in silicon, coupled with the proven scalability of silicon-based nano-electronics, make them attractive candidates for large-scale quantum computing. However, the high threshold of topological quantum error correction can only be captured in a two-dimensional array of qubits operating synchronously and in parallel—posing formidable fabrication and control challenges. We present an architecture that addresses these problems through a novel shared-control paradigm that is particularly suited to the natural uniformity of the phosphorus donor nuclear spin qubit states and electronic confinement. The architecture comprises a two-dimensional lattice of donor qubits sandwiched between two vertically separated control layers forming a mutually perpendicular crisscross gate array. Shared-control lines facilitate loading/unloading of single electrons to specific donors, thereby activating multiple qubits in parallel across the array on which the required operations for surface code quantum error correction are carried out by global spin control. The complexities of independent qubit control, wave function engineering, and ad hoc quantum interconnects are explicitly avoided. With many of the basic elements of fabrication and control based on demonstrated techniques and with simulated quantum operation below the surface code error threshold, the architecture represents a new pathway for large-scale quantum information processing in silicon and potentially in other qubit systems where uniformity can be exploited. PMID:26601310

  17. A surface code quantum computer in silicon.

    PubMed

    Hill, Charles D; Peretz, Eldad; Hile, Samuel J; House, Matthew G; Fuechsle, Martin; Rogge, Sven; Simmons, Michelle Y; Hollenberg, Lloyd C L

    2015-10-01

    The exceptionally long quantum coherence times of phosphorus donor nuclear spin qubits in silicon, coupled with the proven scalability of silicon-based nano-electronics, make them attractive candidates for large-scale quantum computing. However, the high threshold of topological quantum error correction can only be captured in a two-dimensional array of qubits operating synchronously and in parallel-posing formidable fabrication and control challenges. We present an architecture that addresses these problems through a novel shared-control paradigm that is particularly suited to the natural uniformity of the phosphorus donor nuclear spin qubit states and electronic confinement. The architecture comprises a two-dimensional lattice of donor qubits sandwiched between two vertically separated control layers forming a mutually perpendicular crisscross gate array. Shared-control lines facilitate loading/unloading of single electrons to specific donors, thereby activating multiple qubits in parallel across the array on which the required operations for surface code quantum error correction are carried out by global spin control. The complexities of independent qubit control, wave function engineering, and ad hoc quantum interconnects are explicitly avoided. With many of the basic elements of fabrication and control based on demonstrated techniques and with simulated quantum operation below the surface code error threshold, the architecture represents a new pathway for large-scale quantum information processing in silicon and potentially in other qubit systems where uniformity can be exploited.

  18. Hybrid quantum computing: semicloning for general database retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzagorta, Marco; Uhlmann, Jeffrey K.

    2005-05-01

    Quantum computing (QC) has become an important area of research in computer science because of its potential to provide more efficient algorithmic solutions to certain problems than are possible with classical computing (CC). In particular, QC is able to exploit the special properties of quantum superposition to achieve computational parallelism beyond what can be achieved with parallel CC computers. However, these special properties are not applicable for general computation. Therefore, we propose the use of "hybrid quantum computers" (HQCs) that combine both classical and quantum computing architectures in order to leverage the benefits of both. We demonstrate how an HQC can exploit quantum search to support general database operations more efficiently than is possible with CC. Our solution is based on new quantum results that are of independent significance to the field of quantum computing. More specifically, we demonstrate that the most restrictive implications of the quantum No-Cloning Theorem can be avoided through the use of semiclones.

  19. Experimental realization of Deutsch's algorithm in a one-way quantum computer.

    PubMed

    Tame, M S; Prevedel, R; Paternostro, M; Böhi, P; Kim, M S; Zeilinger, A

    2007-04-06

    We report the first experimental demonstration of an all-optical one-way implementation of Deutsch's quantum algorithm on a four-qubit cluster state. All the possible configurations of a balanced or constant function acting on a two-qubit register are realized within the measurement-based model for quantum computation. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with the theoretical model, therefore demonstrating the successful performance of the algorithm.

  20. Blind Quantum Computing with Weak Coherent Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunjko, Vedran; Kashefi, Elham; Leverrier, Anthony

    2012-05-01

    The universal blind quantum computation (UBQC) protocol [A. Broadbent, J. Fitzsimons, and E. Kashefi, in Proceedings of the 50th Annual IEEE Symposiumon Foundations of Computer Science (IEEE Computer Society, Los Alamitos, CA, USA, 2009), pp. 517-526.] allows a client to perform quantum computation on a remote server. In an ideal setting, perfect privacy is guaranteed if the client is capable of producing specific, randomly chosen single qubit states. While from a theoretical point of view, this may constitute the lowest possible quantum requirement, from a pragmatic point of view, generation of such states to be sent along long distances can never be achieved perfectly. We introduce the concept of ɛ blindness for UBQC, in analogy to the concept of ɛ security developed for other cryptographic protocols, allowing us to characterize the robustness and security properties of the protocol under possible imperfections. We also present a remote blind single qubit preparation protocol with weak coherent pulses for the client to prepare, in a delegated fashion, quantum states arbitrarily close to perfect random single qubit states. This allows us to efficiently achieve ɛ-blind UBQC for any ɛ>0, even if the channel between the client and the server is arbitrarily lossy.

  1. Simulations of Probabilities for Quantum Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1996-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that classical probabilities, and in particular, probabilistic Turing machine, can be simulated by combining chaos and non-LIpschitz dynamics, without utilization of any man-made devices (such as random number generators). Self-organizing properties of systems coupling simulated and calculated probabilities and their link to quantum computations are discussed.

  2. Blind quantum computing with weak coherent pulses.

    PubMed

    Dunjko, Vedran; Kashefi, Elham; Leverrier, Anthony

    2012-05-18

    The universal blind quantum computation (UBQC) protocol [A. Broadbent, J. Fitzsimons, and E. Kashefi, in Proceedings of the 50th Annual IEEE Symposiumon Foundations of Computer Science (IEEE Computer Society, Los Alamitos, CA, USA, 2009), pp. 517-526.] allows a client to perform quantum computation on a remote server. In an ideal setting, perfect privacy is guaranteed if the client is capable of producing specific, randomly chosen single qubit states. While from a theoretical point of view, this may constitute the lowest possible quantum requirement, from a pragmatic point of view, generation of such states to be sent along long distances can never be achieved perfectly. We introduce the concept of ϵ blindness for UBQC, in analogy to the concept of ϵ security developed for other cryptographic protocols, allowing us to characterize the robustness and security properties of the protocol under possible imperfections. We also present a remote blind single qubit preparation protocol with weak coherent pulses for the client to prepare, in a delegated fashion, quantum states arbitrarily close to perfect random single qubit states. This allows us to efficiently achieve ϵ-blind UBQC for any ϵ>0, even if the channel between the client and the server is arbitrarily lossy.

  3. Simulations of Probabilities for Quantum Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1996-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that classical probabilities, and in particular, probabilistic Turing machine, can be simulated by combining chaos and non-LIpschitz dynamics, without utilization of any man-made devices (such as random number generators). Self-organizing properties of systems coupling simulated and calculated probabilities and their link to quantum computations are discussed.

  4. The quantum computer game: citizen science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damgaard, Sidse; Mølmer, Klaus; Sherson, Jacob

    2013-05-01

    Progress in the field of quantum computation is hampered by daunting technical challenges. Here we present an alternative approach to solving these by enlisting the aid of computer players around the world. We have previously examined a quantum computation architecture involving ultracold atoms in optical lattices and strongly focused tweezers of light. In The Quantum Computer Game (see http://www.scienceathome.org/), we have encapsulated the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the problem in a graphical user interface allowing for easy user input. Players can then search the parameter space with real-time graphical feedback in a game context with a global high-score that rewards short gate times and robustness to experimental errors. The game which is still in a demo version has so far been tried by several hundred players. Extensions of the approach to other models such as Gross-Pitaevskii and Bose-Hubbard are currently under development. The game has also been incorporated into science education at high-school and university level as an alternative method for teaching quantum mechanics. Initial quantitative evaluation results are very positive. AU Ideas Center for Community Driven Research, CODER.

  5. Quantum computation with Turaev-Viro codes

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, Robert; Kuperberg, Greg; Reichardt, Ben W.

    2010-12-15

    For a 3-manifold with triangulated boundary, the Turaev-Viro topological invariant can be interpreted as a quantum error-correcting code. The code has local stabilizers, identified by Levin and Wen, on a qudit lattice. Kitaev's toric code arises as a special case. The toric code corresponds to an abelian anyon model, and therefore requires out-of-code operations to obtain universal quantum computation. In contrast, for many categories, such as the Fibonacci category, the Turaev-Viro code realizes a non-abelian anyon model. A universal set of fault-tolerant operations can be implemented by deforming the code with local gates, in order to implement anyon braiding. We identify the anyons in the code space, and present schemes for initialization, computation and measurement. This provides a family of constructions for fault-tolerant quantum computation that are closely related to topological quantum computation, but for which the fault tolerance is implemented in software rather than coming from a physical medium.

  6. Quantum vertex model for reversible classical computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamon, C.; Mucciolo, E. R.; Ruckenstein, A. E.; Yang, Z.-C.

    2017-05-01

    Mappings of classical computation onto statistical mechanics models have led to remarkable successes in addressing some complex computational problems. However, such mappings display thermodynamic phase transitions that may prevent reaching solution even for easy problems known to be solvable in polynomial time. Here we map universal reversible classical computations onto a planar vertex model that exhibits no bulk classical thermodynamic phase transition, independent of the computational circuit. Within our approach the solution of the computation is encoded in the ground state of the vertex model and its complexity is reflected in the dynamics of the relaxation of the system to its ground state. We use thermal annealing with and without `learning' to explore typical computational problems. We also construct a mapping of the vertex model into the Chimera architecture of the D-Wave machine, initiating an approach to reversible classical computation based on state-of-the-art implementations of quantum annealing.

  7. Quantum vertex model for reversible classical computing.

    PubMed

    Chamon, C; Mucciolo, E R; Ruckenstein, A E; Yang, Z-C

    2017-05-12

    Mappings of classical computation onto statistical mechanics models have led to remarkable successes in addressing some complex computational problems. However, such mappings display thermodynamic phase transitions that may prevent reaching solution even for easy problems known to be solvable in polynomial time. Here we map universal reversible classical computations onto a planar vertex model that exhibits no bulk classical thermodynamic phase transition, independent of the computational circuit. Within our approach the solution of the computation is encoded in the ground state of the vertex model and its complexity is reflected in the dynamics of the relaxation of the system to its ground state. We use thermal annealing with and without 'learning' to explore typical computational problems. We also construct a mapping of the vertex model into the Chimera architecture of the D-Wave machine, initiating an approach to reversible classical computation based on state-of-the-art implementations of quantum annealing.

  8. Quantum vertex model for reversible classical computing

    PubMed Central

    Chamon, C.; Mucciolo, E. R.; Ruckenstein, A. E.; Yang, Z.-C.

    2017-01-01

    Mappings of classical computation onto statistical mechanics models have led to remarkable successes in addressing some complex computational problems. However, such mappings display thermodynamic phase transitions that may prevent reaching solution even for easy problems known to be solvable in polynomial time. Here we map universal reversible classical computations onto a planar vertex model that exhibits no bulk classical thermodynamic phase transition, independent of the computational circuit. Within our approach the solution of the computation is encoded in the ground state of the vertex model and its complexity is reflected in the dynamics of the relaxation of the system to its ground state. We use thermal annealing with and without ‘learning' to explore typical computational problems. We also construct a mapping of the vertex model into the Chimera architecture of the D-Wave machine, initiating an approach to reversible classical computation based on state-of-the-art implementations of quantum annealing. PMID:28497790

  9. Optically Driven Spin Based Quantum Dots for Quantum Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    system approach to quantum optics, Lecture Notes in Physics (Springer, Berlin, 1993). [5] H. M. Wiseman and G. J. Milburn, Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 548 (1993...Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department of Physics Harrison M. Randall Laboratory of Physics The University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI...48109 Phone: 734-764-4469 Email: dst@umich.edu Co-Principal Investigator: L.J. Sham Department of Physics The University of California – San

  10. Efficient quantum computing using coherent photon conversion.

    PubMed

    Langford, N K; Ramelow, S; Prevedel, R; Munro, W J; Milburn, G J; Zeilinger, A

    2011-10-12

    Single photons are excellent quantum information carriers: they were used in the earliest demonstrations of entanglement and in the production of the highest-quality entanglement reported so far. However, current schemes for preparing, processing and measuring them are inefficient. For example, down-conversion provides heralded, but randomly timed, single photons, and linear optics gates are inherently probabilistic. Here we introduce a deterministic process--coherent photon conversion (CPC)--that provides a new way to generate and process complex, multiquanta states for photonic quantum information applications. The technique uses classically pumped nonlinearities to induce coherent oscillations between orthogonal states of multiple quantum excitations. One example of CPC, based on a pumped four-wave-mixing interaction, is shown to yield a single, versatile process that provides a full set of photonic quantum processing tools. This set satisfies the DiVincenzo criteria for a scalable quantum computing architecture, including deterministic multiqubit entanglement gates (based on a novel form of photon-photon interaction), high-quality heralded single- and multiphoton states free from higher-order imperfections, and robust, high-efficiency detection. It can also be used to produce heralded multiphoton entanglement, create optically switchable quantum circuits and implement an improved form of down-conversion with reduced higher-order effects. Such tools are valuable building blocks for many quantum-enabled technologies. Finally, using photonic crystal fibres we experimentally demonstrate quantum correlations arising from a four-colour nonlinear process suitable for CPC and use these measurements to study the feasibility of reaching the deterministic regime with current technology. Our scheme, which is based on interacting bosonic fields, is not restricted to optical systems but could also be implemented in optomechanical, electromechanical and superconducting

  11. Scheme for Quantum Computing Immune to Decoherence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Colin; Vatan, Farrokh

    2008-01-01

    A constructive scheme has been devised to enable mapping of any quantum computation into a spintronic circuit in which the computation is encoded in a basis that is, in principle, immune to quantum decoherence. The scheme is implemented by an algorithm that utilizes multiple physical spins to encode each logical bit in such a way that collective errors affecting all the physical spins do not disturb the logical bit. The scheme is expected to be of use to experimenters working on spintronic implementations of quantum logic. Spintronic computing devices use quantum-mechanical spins (typically, electron spins) to encode logical bits. Bits thus encoded (denoted qubits) are potentially susceptible to errors caused by noise and decoherence. The traditional model of quantum computation is based partly on the assumption that each qubit is implemented by use of a single two-state quantum system, such as an electron or other spin-1.2 particle. It can be surprisingly difficult to achieve certain gate operations . most notably, those of arbitrary 1-qubit gates . in spintronic hardware according to this model. However, ironically, certain 2-qubit interactions (in particular, spin-spin exchange interactions) can be achieved relatively easily in spintronic hardware. Therefore, it would be fortunate if it were possible to implement any 1-qubit gate by use of a spin-spin exchange interaction. While such a direct representation is not possible, it is possible to achieve an arbitrary 1-qubit gate indirectly by means of a sequence of four spin-spin exchange interactions, which could be implemented by use of four exchange gates. Accordingly, the present scheme provides for mapping any 1-qubit gate in the logical basis into an equivalent sequence of at most four spin-spin exchange interactions in the physical (encoded) basis. The complexity of the mathematical derivation of the scheme from basic quantum principles precludes a description within this article; it must suffice to report

  12. Discrete Wigner functions and quantum computational speedup

    SciTech Connect

    Galvao, Ernesto F.

    2005-04-01

    Gibbons et al. [Phys. Rev. A 70, 062101 (2004)] have recently defined a class of discrete Wigner functions W to represent quantum states in a finite Hilbert space dimension d. I characterize the set C{sub d} of states having non-negative W simultaneously in all definitions of W in this class. For d{<=}5 I show C{sub d} is the convex hull of stabilizer states. This supports the conjecture that negativity of W is necessary for exponential speedup in pure-state quantum computation.

  13. Adiabatic cluster-state quantum computing

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, Dave; Flammia, Steven T.

    2010-09-15

    Models of quantum computation (QC) are important because they change the physical requirements for achieving universal QC. For example, one-way QC requires the preparation of an entangled ''cluster'' state, followed by adaptive measurement on this state, a set of requirements which is different from the standard quantum-circuit model. Here we introduce a model based on one-way QC but without measurements (except for the final readout), instead using adiabatic deformation of a Hamiltonian whose initial ground state is the cluster state. Our results could help increase the feasibility of adiabatic schemes by using tools from one-way QC.

  14. Deterministic quantum computation with one photonic qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hor-Meyll, M.; Tasca, D. S.; Walborn, S. P.; Ribeiro, P. H. Souto; Santos, M. M.; Duzzioni, E. I.

    2015-07-01

    We show that deterministic quantum computing with one qubit (DQC1) can be experimentally implemented with a spatial light modulator, using the polarization and the transverse spatial degrees of freedom of light. The scheme allows the computation of the trace of a high-dimension matrix, being limited by the resolution of the modulator panel and the technical imperfections. In order to illustrate the method, we compute the normalized trace of unitary matrices and implement the Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm. The largest matrix that can be manipulated with our setup is 1080 ×1920 , which is able to represent a system with approximately 21 qubits.

  15. Ion Trap Quantum Computers: Performance Limits and Experimental Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Richard

    1998-03-01

    In a quantum computer information would be represented by the quantum mechanical states of suitable atomic-scale systems. (A single bit of information represented by a two-level quantum system is known as a qubit.) This notion leads to the possibility of computing with quantum mechanical superpositions of numbers ("quantum parallelism"), which for certain problems would make Quantum/quantum.html>quantum computation very much more efficient than classical computation. The possibility of rapidly factoring the large integers used in public-key cryptography is an important example. (Public key cryptosystems derive their security from the difficuty of factoring, and similar problems, with conventional computers.) Quantum computational hardware development is in its infancy, but an experimental study of quantum computation with laser-cooled trapped calcium ions that is under way at Los Alamos will be described. One of the pricipal obstacles to practical quantum computation is the inevitable loss of quantum coherence of the complex quantum states involved. The results of a theoretical analysis showing that quantum factoring of small integers should be possible with trapped ions will be presented. The prospects for larger-scale computations will be discussed.

  16. Entanglement enhancement through multirail noise reduction for continuous-variable measurement-based quantum-information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yung-Chao; Wu, Shin-Tza

    2017-09-01

    We study theoretically the teleportation of a controlled-phase (cz) gate through measurement-based quantum-information processing for continuous-variable systems. We examine the degree of entanglement in the output modes of the teleported cz-gate for two classes of resource states: the canonical cluster states that are constructed via direct implementations of two-mode squeezing operations and the linear-optical version of cluster states which are built from linear-optical networks of beam splitters and phase shifters. In order to reduce the excess noise arising from finite-squeezed resource states, teleportation through resource states with different multirail designs will be considered and the enhancement of entanglement in the teleported cz gates will be analyzed. For multirail cluster with an arbitrary number of rails, we obtain analytical expressions for the entanglement in the output modes and analyze in detail the results for both classes of resource states. At the same time, we also show that for uniformly squeezed clusters the multirail noise reduction can be optimized when the excess noise is allocated uniformly to the rails. To facilitate the analysis, we develop a trick with manipulations of quadrature operators that can reveal rather efficiently the measurement sequence and corrective operations needed for the measurement-based gate teleportation, which will also be explained in detail.

  17. Ensemble quantum computing by NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cory, David G.; Fahmy, Amr F.; Havel, Timothy F.

    1997-01-01

    A quantum computer (QC) can operate in parallel on all its possible inputs at once, but the amount of information that can be extracted from the result is limited by the phenomenon of wave function collapse. We present a new computational model, which differs from a QC only in that the result of a measurement is the expectation value of the observable, rather than a random eigenvalue thereof. Such an expectation value QC can solve nondeterministic polynomial-time complete problems in polynomial time. This observation is significant precisely because the computational model can be realized, to a certain extent, by NMR spectroscopy on macroscopic ensembles of quantum spins, namely molecules in a test tube. This is made possible by identifying a manifold of statistical spin states, called pseudo-pure states, the mathematical description of which is isomorphic to that of an isolated spin system. The result is a novel NMR computer that can be programmed much like a QC, but in other respects more closely resembles a DNA computer. Most notably, when applied to intractable combinatorial problems, an NMR computer can use an amount of sample, rather than time, which grows exponentially with the size of the problem. Although NMR computers will be limited by current technology to exhaustive searches over only 15 to 20 bits, searches over as much as 50 bits are in principle possible, and more advanced algorithms could greatly extend the range of applicability of such machines. PMID:9050830

  18. Quantum computation: algorithms and implementation in quantum dot devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamble, John King

    In this thesis, we explore several aspects of both the software and hardware of quantum computation. First, we examine the computational power of multi-particle quantum random walks in terms of distinguishing mathematical graphs. We study both interacting and non-interacting multi-particle walks on strongly regular graphs, proving some limitations on distinguishing powers and presenting extensive numerical evidence indicative of interactions providing more distinguishing power. We then study the recently proposed adiabatic quantum algorithm for Google PageRank, and show that it exhibits power-law scaling for realistic WWW-like graphs. Turning to hardware, we next analyze the thermal physics of two nearby 2D electron gas (2DEG), and show that an analogue of the Coulomb drag effect exists for heat transfer. In some distance and temperature, this heat transfer is more significant than phonon dissipation channels. After that, we study the dephasing of two-electron states in a single silicon quantum dot. Specifically, we consider dephasing due to the electron-phonon coupling and charge noise, separately treating orbital and valley excitations. In an ideal system, dephasing due to charge noise is strongly suppressed due to a vanishing dipole moment. However, introduction of disorder or anharmonicity leads to large effective dipole moments, and hence possibly strong dephasing. Building on this work, we next consider more realistic systems, including structural disorder systems. We present experiment and theory, which demonstrate energy levels that vary with quantum dot translation, implying a structurally disordered system. Finally, we turn to the issues of valley mixing and valley-orbit hybridization, which occurs due to atomic-scale disorder at quantum well interfaces. We develop a new theoretical approach to study these effects, which we name the disorder-expansion technique. We demonstrate that this method successfully reproduces atomistic tight-binding techniques

  19. Quantum computing gates via optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atia, Yosi; Elias, Yuval; Mor, Tal; Weinstein, Yossi

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate the use of optimal control to design two entropy-manipulating quantum gates which are more complex than the corresponding, commonly used, gates, such as CNOT and Toffoli (CCNOT): A two-qubit gate called polarization exchange (PE) and a three-qubit gate called polarization compression (COMP) were designed using GRAPE, an optimal control algorithm. Both gates were designed for a three-spin system. Our design provided efficient and robust nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) radio frequency (RF) pulses for 13C2-trichloroethylene (TCE), our chosen three-spin system. We then experimentally applied these two quantum gates onto TCE at the NMR lab. Such design of these gates and others could be relevant for near-future applications of quantum computing devices.

  20. QDENSITY—A Mathematica quantum computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juliá-Díaz, Bruno; Burdis, Joseph M.; Tabakin, Frank

    2009-03-01

    This Mathematica 6.0 package is a simulation of a Quantum Computer. The program provides a modular, instructive approach for generating the basic elements that make up a quantum circuit. The main emphasis is on using the density matrix, although an approach using state vectors is also implemented in the package. The package commands are defined in Qdensity.m which contains the tools needed in quantum circuits, e.g., multiqubit kets, projectors, gates, etc. New version program summaryProgram title: QDENSITY 2.0 Catalogue identifier: ADXH_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADXH_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 26 055 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 227 540 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica 6.0 Operating system: Any which supports Mathematica; tested under Microsoft Windows XP, Macintosh OS X, and Linux FC4 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADXH_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 174 (2006) 914 Classification: 4.15 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Offers an alternative, more up to date, implementation Nature of problem: Analysis and design of quantum circuits, quantum algorithms and quantum clusters. Solution method: A Mathematica package is provided which contains commands to create and analyze quantum circuits. Several Mathematica notebooks containing relevant examples: Teleportation, Shor's Algorithm and Grover's search are explained in detail. A tutorial, Tutorial.nb is also enclosed. Reasons for new version: The package has been updated to make it fully compatible with Mathematica 6.0 Summary of revisions: The package has been updated to make it fully compatible with Mathematica 6.0 Running time: Most examples

  1. Scalable quantum computer architecture with coupled donor-quantum dot qubits

    DOEpatents

    Schenkel, Thomas; Lo, Cheuk Chi; Weis, Christoph; Lyon, Stephen; Tyryshkin, Alexei; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2014-08-26

    A quantum bit computing architecture includes a plurality of single spin memory donor atoms embedded in a semiconductor layer, a plurality of quantum dots arranged with the semiconductor layer and aligned with the donor atoms, wherein a first voltage applied across at least one pair of the aligned quantum dot and donor atom controls a donor-quantum dot coupling. A method of performing quantum computing in a scalable architecture quantum computing apparatus includes arranging a pattern of single spin memory donor atoms in a semiconductor layer, forming a plurality of quantum dots arranged with the semiconductor layer and aligned with the donor atoms, applying a first voltage across at least one aligned pair of a quantum dot and donor atom to control a donor-quantum dot coupling, and applying a second voltage between one or more quantum dots to control a Heisenberg exchange J coupling between quantum dots and to cause transport of a single spin polarized electron between quantum dots.

  2. Universal quantum gates for Single Cooper Pair Box based quantum computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Echternach, P.; Williams, C. P.; Dultz, S. C.; Braunstein, S.; Dowling, J. P.

    2000-01-01

    We describe a method for achieving arbitrary 1-qubit gates and controlled-NOT gates within the context of the Single Cooper Pair Box (SCB) approach to quantum computing. Such gates are sufficient to support universal quantum computation.

  3. Universal quantum gates for Single Cooper Pair Box based quantum computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Echternach, P.; Williams, C. P.; Dultz, S. C.; Braunstein, S.; Dowling, J. P.

    2000-01-01

    We describe a method for achieving arbitrary 1-qubit gates and controlled-NOT gates within the context of the Single Cooper Pair Box (SCB) approach to quantum computing. Such gates are sufficient to support universal quantum computation.

  4. Dual-code quantum computation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Byung-Soo

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we propose the dual-code quantum computation model—a fault-tolerant quantum computation scheme which alternates between two different quantum error-correction codes. Since the chosen two codes have different sets of transversal gates, we can implement a universal set of gates transversally, thereby reducing the overall cost. We use code teleportation to convert between quantum states in different codes. The overall cost is decreased if code teleportation requires fewer resources than the fault-tolerant implementation of the non-transversal gate in a specific code. To analyze the cost reduction, we investigate two cases with different base codes, namely the Steane and Bacon-Shor codes. For the Steane code, neither the proposed dual-code model nor another variation of it achieves any cost reduction since the conventional approach is simple. For the Bacon-Shor code, the three proposed variations of the dual-code model reduce the overall cost. However, as the encoding level increases, the cost reduction decreases and becomes negative. Therefore, the proposed dual-code model is advantageous only when the encoding level is low and the cost of the non-transversal gate is relatively high.

  5. Dual field theories of quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanchurin, Vitaly

    2016-06-01

    Given two quantum states of N q-bits we are interested to find the shortest quantum circuit consisting of only one- and two- q-bit gates that would transfer one state into another. We call it the quantum maze problem for the reasons described in the paper. We argue that in a large N limit the quantum maze problem is equivalent to the problem of finding a semiclassical trajectory of some lattice field theory (the dual theory) on an N +1 dimensional space-time with geometrically flat, but topologically compact spatial slices. The spatial fundamental domain is an N dimensional hyper-rhombohedron, and the temporal direction describes transitions from an arbitrary initial state to an arbitrary target state and so the initial and final dual field theory conditions are described by these two quantum computational states. We first consider a complex Klein-Gordon field theory and argue that it can only be used to study the shortest quantum circuits which do not involve generators composed of tensor products of multiple Pauli Z matrices. Since such situation is not generic we call it the Z-problem. On the dual field theory side the Z-problem corresponds to massless excitations of the phase (Goldstone modes) that we attempt to fix using Higgs mechanism. The simplest dual theory which does not suffer from the massless excitation (or from the Z-problem) is the Abelian-Higgs model which we argue can be used for finding the shortest quantum circuits. Since every trajectory of the field theory is mapped directly to a quantum circuit, the shortest quantum circuits are identified with semiclassical trajectories. We also discuss the complexity of an actual algorithm that uses a dual theory prospective for solving the quantum maze problem and compare it with a geometric approach. We argue that it might be possible to solve the problem in sub-exponential time in 2 N , but for that we must consider the Klein-Gordon theory on curved spatial geometry and/or more complicated (than N -torus

  6. Applications of computational quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temel, Burcin

    This original research dissertation is composed of a new numerical technique based on Chebyshev polynomials that is applied on scattering problems, a phenomenological kinetics study for CO oxidation on RuO2 surface, and an experimental study on methanol coupling with doped metal oxide catalysts. Minimum Error Method (MEM), a least-squares minimization method, provides an efficient and accurate alternative to solve systems of ordinary differential equations. Existing methods usually utilize matrix methods which are computationally costful. MEM, which is based on the Chebyshev polynomials as a basis set, uses the recursion relationships and fast Chebyshev transforms which scale as O(N). For large basis set calculations this provides an enormous computational efficiency in the calculations. Chebyshev polynomials are also able to represent non-periodic problems very accurately. We applied MEM on elastic and inelastic scattering problems: it is more efficient and accurate than traditionally used Kohn variational principle, and it also provides the wave function in the interaction region. Phenomenological kinetics (PK) is widely used in industry to predict the optimum conditions for a chemical reaction. PK neglects the fluctuations, assumes no lateral interactions, and considers an ideal mix of reactants. The rate equations are tested by fitting the rate constants to the results of the experiments. Unfortunately, there are numerous examples where a fitted mechanism was later shown to be erroneous. We have undertaken a thorough comparison between the phenomenological equations and the results of kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations performed on the same system. The PK equations are qualitatively consistent with the KMC results but are quantitatively erroneous as a result of interplays between the adsorption and desorption events. The experimental study on methanol coupling with doped metal oxide catalysts demonstrates the doped metal oxides as a new class of catalysts

  7. Nature computes: information processing in quantum dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Wiesner, Karoline

    2010-09-01

    Nature intrinsically computes. It has been suggested that the entire universe is a computer, in particular, a quantum computer. To corroborate this idea we require tools to quantify the information processing. Here we review a theoretical framework for quantifying information processing in a quantum dynamical system. So-called intrinsic quantum computation combines tools from dynamical systems theory, information theory, quantum mechanics, and computation theory. We will review how far the framework has been developed and what some of the main open questions are. On the basis of this framework we discuss upper and lower bounds for intrinsic information storage in a quantum dynamical system.

  8. Non-unitary probabilistic quantum computing circuit and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Colin P. (Inventor); Gingrich, Robert M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A quantum circuit performing quantum computation in a quantum computer. A chosen transformation of an initial n-qubit state is probabilistically obtained. The circuit comprises a unitary quantum operator obtained from a non-unitary quantum operator, operating on an n-qubit state and an ancilla state. When operation on the ancilla state provides a success condition, computation is stopped. When operation on the ancilla state provides a failure condition, computation is performed again on the ancilla state and the n-qubit state obtained in the previous computation, until a success condition is obtained.

  9. Quantum computation architecture using optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Weitenberg, Christof; Kuhr, Stefan; Moelmer, Klaus; Sherson, Jacob F.

    2011-09-15

    We present a complete architecture for scalable quantum computation with ultracold atoms in optical lattices using optical tweezers focused to the size of a lattice spacing. We discuss three different two-qubit gates based on local collisional interactions. The gates between arbitrary qubits require the transport of atoms to neighboring sites. We numerically optimize the nonadiabatic transport of the atoms through the lattice and the intensity ramps of the optical tweezer in order to maximize the gate fidelities. We find overall gate times of a few 100 {mu}s, while keeping the error probability due to vibrational excitations and spontaneous scattering below 10{sup -3}. The requirements on the positioning error and intensity noise of the optical tweezer and the magnetic field stability are analyzed and we show that atoms in optical lattices could meet the requirements for fault-tolerant scalable quantum computing.

  10. Hierarchy of Efficiently Computable and Faithful Lower Bounds to Quantum Discord.

    PubMed

    Piani, Marco

    2016-08-19

    Quantum discord expresses a fundamental nonclassicality of correlations that is more general than entanglement, but that, in its standard definition, is not easily evaluated. We derive a hierarchy of computationally efficient lower bounds to the standard quantum discord. Every nontrivial element of the hierarchy constitutes by itself a valid discordlike measure, based on a fundamental feature of quantum correlations: their lack of shareability. Our approach emphasizes how the difference between entanglement and discord depends on whether shareability is intended as a static property or as a dynamical process.

  11. Hard chaos, quantum billiards, and quantum dot computers

    SciTech Connect

    Mainieri, R.; Cvitanovic, P.; Hasslacher, B.

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Research was performed in analytic and computational techniques for dealing with hard chaos, especially the powerful tool of cycle expansions. This work has direct application to the understanding of electrons in nanodevices, such as junctions of quantum wires, or in arrays of dots or antidots. We developed a series of techniques for computing the properties of quantum systems with hard chaos, in particular the flow of electrons through nanodevices. These techniques are providing the insight and tools to design computers with nanoscale components. Recent efforts concentrated on understanding the effects of noise and orbit pruning in chaotic dynamical systems. We showed that most complicated chaotic systems (not just those equivalent to a finite shift) will develop branch points in their cycle expansion. Once the singularity is known to exist, it can be removed with a dramatic increase in the speed of convergence of quantities of physical interest.

  12. Universal quantum computation with metaplectic anyons

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Shawn X.; Wang, Zhenghan E-mail: zhenghwa@microsoft.com

    2015-03-15

    We show that braidings of the metaplectic anyons X{sub ϵ} in SO(3){sub 2} = SU(2){sub 4} with their total charge equal to the metaplectic mode Y supplemented with projective measurements of the total charge of two metaplectic anyons are universal for quantum computation. We conjecture that similar universal anyonic computing models can be constructed for all metaplectic anyon systems SO(p){sub 2} for any odd prime p ≥ 5. In order to prove universality, we find new conceptually appealing universal gate sets for qutrits and qupits.

  13. PREFACE: Quantum Information, Communication, Computation and Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benatti, F.; Fannes, M.; Floreanini, R.; Petritis, D.

    2007-07-01

    The application of quantum mechanics to information related fields such as communication, computation and cryptography is a fast growing line of research that has been witnessing an outburst of theoretical and experimental results, with possible practical applications. On the one hand, quantum cryptography with its impact on secrecy of transmission is having its first important actual implementations; on the other hand, the recent advances in quantum optics, ion trapping, BEC manipulation, spin and quantum dot technologies allow us to put to direct test a great deal of theoretical ideas and results. These achievements have stimulated a reborn interest in various aspects of quantum mechanics, creating a unique interplay between physics, both theoretical and experimental, mathematics, information theory and computer science. In view of all these developments, it appeared timely to organize a meeting where graduate students and young researchers could be exposed to the fundamentals of the theory, while senior experts could exchange their latest results. The activity was structured as a school followed by a workshop, and took place at The Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) and The International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) in Trieste, Italy, from 12-23 June 2006. The meeting was part of the activity of the Joint European Master Curriculum Development Programme in Quantum Information, Communication, Cryptography and Computation, involving the Universities of Cergy-Pontoise (France), Chania (Greece), Leuven (Belgium), Rennes1 (France) and Trieste (Italy). This special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical collects 22 contributions from well known experts who took part in the workshop. They summarize the present day status of the research in the manifold aspects of quantum information. The issue is opened by two review articles, the first by G Adesso and F Illuminati discussing entanglement in continuous variable

  14. Symmetrically private information retrieval based on blind quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhiwei; Yu, Jianping; Wang, Ping; Xu, Lingling

    2015-05-01

    Universal blind quantum computation (UBQC) is a new secure quantum computing protocol which allows a user Alice who does not have any sophisticated quantum technology to delegate her computing to a server Bob without leaking any privacy. Using the features of UBQC, we propose a protocol to achieve symmetrically private information retrieval, which allows a quantum limited Alice to query an item from Bob with a fully fledged quantum computer; meanwhile, the privacy of both parties is preserved. The security of our protocol is based on the assumption that malicious Alice has no quantum computer, which avoids the impossibility proof of Lo. For the honest Alice, she is almost classical and only requires minimal quantum resources to carry out the proposed protocol. Therefore, she does not need any expensive laboratory which can maintain the coherence of complicated quantum experimental setups.

  15. Software Systems for High-performance Quantum Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S; Britt, Keith A

    2016-01-01

    Quantum computing promises new opportunities for solving hard computational problems, but harnessing this novelty requires breakthrough concepts in the design, operation, and application of computing systems. We define some of the challenges facing the development of quantum computing systems as well as software-based approaches that can be used to overcome these challenges. Following a brief overview of the state of the art, we present models for the quantum programming and execution models, the development of architectures for hybrid high-performance computing systems, and the realization of software stacks for quantum networking. This leads to a discussion of the role that conventional computing plays in the quantum paradigm and how some of the current challenges for exascale computing overlap with those facing quantum computing.

  16. Quantum computation over the butterfly network

    SciTech Connect

    Soeda, Akihito; Kinjo, Yoshiyuki; Turner, Peter S.; Murao, Mio

    2011-07-15

    In order to investigate distributed quantum computation under restricted network resources, we introduce a quantum computation task over the butterfly network where both quantum and classical communications are limited. We consider deterministically performing a two-qubit global unitary operation on two unknown inputs given at different nodes, with outputs at two distinct nodes. By using a particular resource setting introduced by M. Hayashi [Phys. Rev. A 76, 040301(R) (2007)], which is capable of performing a swap operation by adding two maximally entangled qubits (ebits) between the two input nodes, we show that unitary operations can be performed without adding any entanglement resource, if and only if the unitary operations are locally unitary equivalent to controlled unitary operations. Our protocol is optimal in the sense that the unitary operations cannot be implemented if we relax the specifications of any of the channels. We also construct protocols for performing controlled traceless unitary operations with a 1-ebit resource and for performing global Clifford operations with a 2-ebit resource.

  17. Possible topological quantum computation via Khovanov homology: D-brane topological quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vélez, Mario; Ospina, Juan

    2009-05-01

    A model of a D-Brane Topological Quantum Computer (DBTQC) is presented and sustained. The model is based on four-dimensional TQFTs of the Donaldson-Witten and Seiber-Witten kinds. It is argued that the DBTQC is able to compute Khovanov homology for knots, links and graphs. The DBTQC physically incorporates the mathematical process of categorification according to which the invariant polynomials for knots, links and graphs such as Jones, HOMFLY, Tutte and Bollobás-Riordan polynomials can be computed as the Euler characteristics corresponding to special homology complexes associated with knots, links and graphs. The DBTQC is conjectured as a powerful universal quantum computer in the sense that the DBTQC computes Khovanov homology which is considered like powerful that the Jones polynomial.

  18. Semiquantum key distribution with secure delegated quantum computation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qin; Chan, Wai Hong; Zhang, Shengyu

    2016-01-01

    Semiquantum key distribution allows a quantum party to share a random key with a “classical” party who only can prepare and measure qubits in the computational basis or reorder some qubits when he has access to a quantum channel. In this work, we present a protocol where a secret key can be established between a quantum user and an almost classical user who only needs the quantum ability to access quantum channels, by securely delegating quantum computation to a quantum server. We show the proposed protocol is robust even when the delegated quantum server is a powerful adversary, and is experimentally feasible with current technology. As one party of our protocol is the most quantum-resource efficient, it can be more practical and significantly widen the applicability scope of quantum key distribution. PMID:26813384

  19. Semiquantum key distribution with secure delegated quantum computation.

    PubMed

    Li, Qin; Chan, Wai Hong; Zhang, Shengyu

    2016-01-27

    Semiquantum key distribution allows a quantum party to share a random key with a "classical" party who only can prepare and measure qubits in the computational basis or reorder some qubits when he has access to a quantum channel. In this work, we present a protocol where a secret key can be established between a quantum user and an almost classical user who only needs the quantum ability to access quantum channels, by securely delegating quantum computation to a quantum server. We show the proposed protocol is robust even when the delegated quantum server is a powerful adversary, and is experimentally feasible with current technology. As one party of our protocol is the most quantum-resource efficient, it can be more practical and significantly widen the applicability scope of quantum key distribution.

  20. Milestones Toward Majorana-Based Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasen, David; Hell, Michael; Mishmash, Ryan V.; Higginbotham, Andrew; Danon, Jeroen; Leijnse, Martin; Jespersen, Thomas S.; Folk, Joshua A.; Marcus, Charles M.; Flensberg, Karsten; Alicea, Jason

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a scheme for preparation, manipulation, and read out of Majorana zero modes in semiconducting wires with mesoscopic superconducting islands. Our approach synthesizes recent advances in materials growth with tools commonly used in quantum-dot experiments, including gate control of tunnel barriers and Coulomb effects, charge sensing, and charge pumping. We outline a sequence of milestones interpolating between zero-mode detection and quantum computing that includes (1) detection of fusion rules for non-Abelian anyons using either proximal charge sensors or pumped current, (2) validation of a prototype topological qubit, and (3) demonstration of non-Abelian statistics by braiding in a branched geometry. The first two milestones require only a single wire with two islands, and additionally enable sensitive measurements of the system's excitation gap, quasiparticle poisoning rates, residual Majorana zero-mode splittings, and topological-qubit coherence times. These pre-braiding experiments can be adapted to other manipulation and read out schemes as well.

  1. Holographic computations of the quantum information metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivella, Andrea

    2017-05-01

    In this paper we show how the quantum information metric can be computed holographically using a perturbative approach. In particular when the deformation of the conformal field theory state is induced by a scalar operator the corresponding bulk configuration reduces to a scalar field perturbatively probing the background. We study two concrete examples: a CFT ground state deformed by a primary operator and thermofield double state in d  =  2 deformed by a marginal operator. Finally, we generalize the bulk construction to the case of a multi dimensional parameter space and show that the quantum information metric coincides with the metric of the non-linear sigma model for the corresponding scalar fields.

  2. Minimal computational-space implementation of multiround quantum protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Bisio, Alessandro; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Perinotti, Paolo; Chiribella, Giulio

    2011-02-15

    A single-party strategy in a multiround quantum protocol can be implemented by sequential networks of quantum operations connected by internal memories. Here, we provide an efficient realization in terms of computational-space resources.

  3. Homomorphic encryption experiments on IBM's cloud quantum computing platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, He-Liang; Zhao, You-Wei; Li, Tan; Li, Feng-Guang; Du, Yu-Tao; Fu, Xiang-Qun; Zhang, Shuo; Wang, Xiang; Bao, Wan-Su

    2017-02-01

    Quantum computing has undergone rapid development in recent years. Owing to limitations on scalability, personal quantum computers still seem slightly unrealistic in the near future. The first practical quantum computer for ordinary users is likely to be on the cloud. However, the adoption of cloud computing is possible only if security is ensured. Homomorphic encryption is a cryptographic protocol that allows computation to be performed on encrypted data without decrypting them, so it is well suited to cloud computing. Here, we first applied homomorphic encryption on IBM's cloud quantum computer platform. In our experiments, we successfully implemented a quantum algorithm for linear equations while protecting our privacy. This demonstration opens a feasible path to the next stage of development of cloud quantum information technology.

  4. Measurement-only verifiable blind quantum computing with quantum input verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2016-10-01

    Verifiable blind quantum computing is a secure delegated quantum computing where a client with a limited quantum technology delegates her quantum computing to a server who has a universal quantum computer. The client's privacy is protected (blindness), and the correctness of the computation is verifiable by the client despite her limited quantum technology (verifiability). There are mainly two types of protocols for verifiable blind quantum computing: the protocol where the client has only to generate single-qubit states and the protocol where the client needs only the ability of single-qubit measurements. The latter is called the measurement-only verifiable blind quantum computing. If the input of the client's quantum computing is a quantum state, whose classical efficient description is not known to the client, there was no way for the measurement-only client to verify the correctness of the input. Here we introduce a protocol of measurement-only verifiable blind quantum computing where the correctness of the quantum input is also verifiable.

  5. One-way quantum computing in the optical frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Menicucci, Nicolas C; Flammia, Steven T; Pfister, Olivier

    2008-09-26

    One-way quantum computing allows any quantum algorithm to be implemented easily using just measurements. The difficult part is creating the universal resource, a cluster state, on which the measurements are made. We propose a scalable method that uses a single, multimode optical parametric oscillator (OPO). The method is very efficient and generates a continuous-variable cluster state, universal for quantum computation, with quantum information encoded in the quadratures of the optical frequency comb of the OPO.

  6. Computing with quantum knots: Marjorana modes, non-Abelian anyons, and topological quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Das Sarma, Sankar

    2012-10-03

    I will discuss the revolutionary new concept of topological quantum computation, which is fault-tolerant at the hardware level with no need, in principle, of any quantum error correction protocols. Errors simply do not occur since the physical qubits and the computation steps are protected against decoherence by non-local topological correlations in the underlying physical system. The key idea is non-Abelian statistics of the quasiparticles (called 'anyons' as opposed to fermions or bosons), where the space-time braiding of the anyons around each other, i.e. quantum 'knots', form topologically protected quantum gate operations. I will describe in detail the theoretical principles guiding the experimental search for the appropriate topological phases of matter where such non-Abelian anyons, which are low-dimensional solid state versions of the elusive and exotic Majorana fermions hypothesized seventy-five years ago, may exist. I will critically discuss the recent experimental claims of observing the Majorana modes in semiconductor nanowire structures following earlier theoretical proposals, outlining the future developments which would be necessary to eventually build a topological quantum computer.

  7. Decoherence in a scalable adiabatic quantum computer

    SciTech Connect

    Ashhab, S.; Johansson, J. R.; Nori, Franco

    2006-11-15

    We consider the effects of decoherence on Landau-Zener crossings encountered in a large-scale adiabatic-quantum-computing setup. We analyze the dependence of the success probability--i.e., the probability for the system to end up in its new ground state--on the noise amplitude and correlation time. We determine the optimal sweep rate that is required to maximize the success probability. We then discuss the scaling of decoherence effects with increasing system size. We find that those effects can be important for large systems, even if they are small for each of the small building blocks.

  8. Quantum computational complexity in the presence of closed timelike curves

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, Dave

    2004-09-01

    Quantum computation with quantum data that can traverse closed timelike curves represents a new physical model of computation. We argue that a model of quantum computation in the presence of closed timelike curves can be formulated which represents a valid quantification of resources given the ability to construct compact regions of closed timelike curves. The notion of self-consistent evolution for quantum computers whose components follow closed timelike curves, as pointed out by Deutsch [Phys. Rev. D 44, 3197 (1991)], implies that the evolution of the chronology respecting components which interact with the closed timelike curve components is nonlinear. We demonstrate that this nonlinearity can be used to efficiently solve computational problems which are generally thought to be intractable. In particular we demonstrate that a quantum computer which has access to closed timelike curve qubits can solve NP-complete problems with only a polynomial number of quantum gates.

  9. Verification for measurement-only blind quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2014-06-01

    Blind quantum computing is a new secure quantum computing protocol where a client who does not have any sophisticated quantum technology can delegate her quantum computing to a server without leaking any privacy. It is known that a client who has only a measurement device can perform blind quantum computing [T. Morimae and K. Fujii, Phys. Rev. A 87, 050301(R) (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevA.87.050301]. It has been an open problem whether the protocol can enjoy the verification, i.e., the ability of the client to check the correctness of the computing. In this paper, we propose a protocol of verification for the measurement-only blind quantum computing.

  10. Quantum computing accelerator I/O : LDRD 52750 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeppel, Richard Crabtree; Modine, Normand Arthur; Ganti, Anand; Pierson, Lyndon George; Tigges, Christopher P.

    2003-12-01

    In a superposition of quantum states, a bit can be in both the states '0' and '1' at the same time. This feature of the quantum bit or qubit has no parallel in classical systems. Currently, quantum computers consisting of 4 to 7 qubits in a 'quantum computing register' have been built. Innovative algorithms suited to quantum computing are now beginning to emerge, applicable to sorting and cryptanalysis, and other applications. A framework for overcoming slightly inaccurate quantum gate interactions and for causing quantum states to survive interactions with surrounding environment is emerging, called quantum error correction. Thus there is the potential for rapid advances in this field. Although quantum information processing can be applied to secure communication links (quantum cryptography) and to crack conventional cryptosystems, the first few computing applications will likely involve a 'quantum computing accelerator' similar to a 'floating point arithmetic accelerator' interfaced to a conventional Von Neumann computer architecture. This research is to develop a roadmap for applying Sandia's capabilities to the solution of some of the problems associated with maintaining quantum information, and with getting data into and out of such a 'quantum computing accelerator'. We propose to focus this work on 'quantum I/O technologies' by applying quantum optics on semiconductor nanostructures to leverage Sandia's expertise in semiconductor microelectronic/photonic fabrication techniques, as well as its expertise in information theory, processing, and algorithms. The work will be guided by understanding of practical requirements of computing and communication architectures. This effort will incorporate ongoing collaboration between 9000, 6000 and 1000 and between junior and senior personnel. Follow-on work to fabricate and evaluate appropriate experimental nano/microstructures will be proposed as a result of this work.

  11. Radio-frequency measurement in semiconductor quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, TianYi; Chen, MingBo; Cao, Gang; Li, HaiOu; Xiao, Ming; Guo, GuoPing

    2017-05-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots have attracted wide interest for the potential realization of quantum computation. To realize efficient quantum computation, fast manipulation and the corresponding readout are necessary. In the past few decades, considerable progress of quantum manipulation has been achieved experimentally. To meet the requirements of high-speed readout, radio-frequency (RF) measurement has been developed in recent years, such as RF-QPC (radio-frequency quantum point contact) and RF-DGS (radio-frequency dispersive gate sensor). Here we specifically demonstrate the principle of the radio-frequency reflectometry, then review the development and applications of RF measurement, which provides a feasible way to achieve high-bandwidth readout in quantum coherent control and also enriches the methods to study these artificial mesoscopic quantum systems. Finally, we prospect the future usage of radio-frequency reflectometry in scaling-up of the quantum computing models.

  12. Control aspects of quantum computing using pure and mixed states.

    PubMed

    Schulte-Herbrüggen, Thomas; Marx, Raimund; Fahmy, Amr; Kauffman, Louis; Lomonaco, Samuel; Khaneja, Navin; Glaser, Steffen J

    2012-10-13

    Steering quantum dynamics such that the target states solve classically hard problems is paramount to quantum simulation and computation. And beyond, quantum control is also essential to pave the way to quantum technologies. Here, important control techniques are reviewed and presented in a unified frame covering quantum computational gate synthesis and spectroscopic state transfer alike. We emphasize that it does not matter whether the quantum states of interest are pure or not. While pure states underly the design of quantum circuits, ensemble mixtures of quantum states can be exploited in a more recent class of algorithms: it is illustrated by characterizing the Jones polynomial in order to distinguish between different (classes of) knots. Further applications include Josephson elements, cavity grids, ion traps and nitrogen vacancy centres in scenarios of closed as well as open quantum systems.

  13. Control aspects of quantum computing using pure and mixed states

    PubMed Central

    Schulte-Herbrüggen, Thomas; Marx, Raimund; Fahmy, Amr; Kauffman, Louis; Lomonaco, Samuel; Khaneja, Navin; Glaser, Steffen J.

    2012-01-01

    Steering quantum dynamics such that the target states solve classically hard problems is paramount to quantum simulation and computation. And beyond, quantum control is also essential to pave the way to quantum technologies. Here, important control techniques are reviewed and presented in a unified frame covering quantum computational gate synthesis and spectroscopic state transfer alike. We emphasize that it does not matter whether the quantum states of interest are pure or not. While pure states underly the design of quantum circuits, ensemble mixtures of quantum states can be exploited in a more recent class of algorithms: it is illustrated by characterizing the Jones polynomial in order to distinguish between different (classes of) knots. Further applications include Josephson elements, cavity grids, ion traps and nitrogen vacancy centres in scenarios of closed as well as open quantum systems. PMID:22946034

  14. Experimental Implementation of Efficient Linear Optics Quantum Computation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Experimental Implementation of Efficient Linear Optics Quantum Computation Final Report G. J. Milburn, T. C. Ralph, and A. G. White University of...Queensland, Australia 1. Statement of Problem. One of the earliest proposals [1] for implementing quantum computation was based on encoding...containing few photons. In 2001 Knill, Laflamme and Milburn (KLM) found a way to circumvent this restriction and implement efficient quantum computation

  15. Modeling fluid dynamics on type II quantum computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoville, James; Weeks, David; Yepez, Jeffrey

    2006-03-01

    A quantum algorithm is presented for modeling the time evolution of density and flow fields governed by classical equations, such as the diffusion equation, the nonlinear Burgers equation, and the damped wave equation. The algorithm is intended to run on a type-II quantum computer, a parallel quantum computer consisting of a lattice of small type I quantum computers undergoing unitary evolution and interacting via information interchanges represented by an orthogonal matrices. Information is effectively transferred between adjacent quantum computers over classical communications channels because of controlled state demolition following local quantum mechanical qubit-qubit interactions within each quantum computer. The type-II quantum algorithm presented in this paper describes a methodology for generating quantum logic operations as a generalization of classical operations associated with finite-point group symmetries. The quantum mechanical evolution of multiple qubits within each node is described. Presented is a proof that the parallel quantum system obeys a finite-difference quantum Boltzman equation at the mesoscopic scale, leading in turn to various classical linear and nonlinear effective field theories at the macroscopic scale depending on the details of the local qubit-qubit interactions.

  16. Stability of Quantum Loops and Exchange Operations in the Construction of Quantum Computation Gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermúdez, D.; Delgado, F.

    2017-05-01

    Quantum information and quantum computation is a rapidly emergent field where quantum systems and their applications play a central role. In the gate version of quantum computation, the construction of universal quantum gates to manipulate quantum information is currently an intensive arena for quantum engineering. Specific properties of systems should be able to reproduce such idealized gates imitating the classically inspired computational gates. Recently, for magnetic systems driven by the bipartite Heisenberg-Ising model a universal set of gates has been realized, an alternative easy design for the Boykin set but using the Bell states as grammar. Exact control can be then used to construct specific prescriptions to achieve those gates. Physical parameters impose a challenge in the gate control. This work analyzes, based on the worst case quantum fidelity, the associated instability for the proposed set of gates. An strong performance is found in those gates for the most of quantum states involved.

  17. Computational Studies of Strongly Correlated Quantum Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hao

    The study of strongly correlated quantum many-body systems is an outstanding challenge. Highly accurate results are needed for the understanding of practical and fundamental problems in condensed-matter physics, high energy physics, material science, quantum chemistry and so on. Our familiar mean-field or perturbative methods tend to be ineffective. Numerical simulations provide a promising approach for studying such systems. The fundamental difficulty of numerical simulation is that the dimension of the Hilbert space needed to describe interacting systems increases exponentially with the system size. Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods are one of the best approaches to tackle the problem of enormous Hilbert space. They have been highly successful for boson systems and unfrustrated spin models. For systems with fermions, the exchange symmetry in general causes the infamous sign problem, making the statistical noise in the computed results grow exponentially with the system size. This hinders our understanding of interesting physics such as high-temperature superconductivity, metal-insulator phase transition. In this thesis, we present a variety of new developments in the auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo (AFQMC) methods, including the incorporation of symmetry in both the trial wave function and the projector, developing the constraint release method, using the force-bias to drastically improve the efficiency in Metropolis framework, identifying and solving the infinite variance problem, and sampling Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov wave function. With these developments, some of the most challenging many-electron problems are now under control. We obtain an exact numerical solution of two-dimensional strongly interacting Fermi atomic gas, determine the ground state properties of the 2D Fermi gas with Rashba spin-orbit coupling, provide benchmark results for the ground state of the two-dimensional Hubbard model, and establish that the Hubbard model has a stripe order in the

  18. Formalization and computation of quality measures based on electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Dentler, Kathrin; Numans, Mattijs E; ten Teije, Annette; Cornet, Ronald; de Keizer, Nicolette F

    2014-01-01

    Ambiguous definitions of quality measures in natural language impede their automated computability and also the reproducibility, validity, timeliness, traceability, comparability, and interpretability of computed results. Therefore, quality measures should be formalized before their release. We have previously developed and successfully applied a method for clinical indicator formalization (CLIF). The objective of our present study is to test whether CLIF is generalizable--that is, applicable to a large set of heterogeneous measures of different types and from various domains. We formalized the entire set of 159 Dutch quality measures for general practice, which contains structure, process, and outcome measures and covers seven domains. We relied on a web-based tool to facilitate the application of our method. Subsequently, we computed the measures on the basis of a large database of real patient data. Our CLIF method enabled us to fully formalize 100% of the measures. Owing to missing functionality, the accompanying tool could support full formalization of only 86% of the quality measures into Structured Query Language (SQL) queries. The remaining 14% of the measures required manual application of our CLIF method by directly translating the respective criteria into SQL. The results obtained by computing the measures show a strong correlation with results computed independently by two other parties. The CLIF method covers all quality measures after having been extended by an additional step. Our web tool requires further refinement for CLIF to be applied completely automatically. We therefore conclude that CLIF is sufficiently generalizable to be able to formalize the entire set of Dutch quality measures for general practice.

  19. Formalization and computation of quality measures based on electronic medical records

    PubMed Central

    Dentler, Kathrin; Numans, Mattijs E; ten Teije, Annette; Cornet, Ronald; de Keizer, Nicolette F

    2014-01-01

    Objective Ambiguous definitions of quality measures in natural language impede their automated computability and also the reproducibility, validity, timeliness, traceability, comparability, and interpretability of computed results. Therefore, quality measures should be formalized before their release. We have previously developed and successfully applied a method for clinical indicator formalization (CLIF). The objective of our present study is to test whether CLIF is generalizable—that is, applicable to a large set of heterogeneous measures of different types and from various domains. Materials and methods We formalized the entire set of 159 Dutch quality measures for general practice, which contains structure, process, and outcome measures and covers seven domains. We relied on a web-based tool to facilitate the application of our method. Subsequently, we computed the measures on the basis of a large database of real patient data. Results Our CLIF method enabled us to fully formalize 100% of the measures. Owing to missing functionality, the accompanying tool could support full formalization of only 86% of the quality measures into Structured Query Language (SQL) queries. The remaining 14% of the measures required manual application of our CLIF method by directly translating the respective criteria into SQL. The results obtained by computing the measures show a strong correlation with results computed independently by two other parties. Conclusions The CLIF method covers all quality measures after having been extended by an additional step. Our web tool requires further refinement for CLIF to be applied completely automatically. We therefore conclude that CLIF is sufficiently generalizable to be able to formalize the entire set of Dutch quality measures for general practice. PMID:24192317

  20. Multi-party Semi-quantum Key Agreement with Delegating Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen-Jie; Chen, Zhen-Yu; Ji, Sai; Wang, Hai-Bin; Zhang, Jun

    2017-10-01

    A multi-party semi-quantum key agreement (SQKA) protocol based on delegating quantum computation (DQC) model is proposed by taking Bell states as quantum resources. In the proposed protocol, the participants only need the ability of accessing quantum channel and preparing single photons {|0〉, |1〉, |+〉, |-〉}, while the complicated quantum operations, such as the unitary operations and Bell measurement, will be delegated to the remote quantum center. Compared with previous quantum key agreement protocols, this client-server model is more feasible in the early days of the emergence of quantum computers. In order to prevent the attacks from outside eavesdroppers, inner participants and quantum center, two single photon sequences are randomly inserted into Bell states: the first sequence is used to perform the quantum channel detection, while the second is applied to disorder the positions of message qubits, which guarantees the security of the protocol.

  1. Multi-party Semi-quantum Key Agreement with Delegating Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen-Jie; Chen, Zhen-Yu; Ji, Sai; Wang, Hai-Bin; Zhang, Jun

    2017-07-01

    A multi-party semi-quantum key agreement (SQKA) protocol based on delegating quantum computation (DQC) model is proposed by taking Bell states as quantum resources. In the proposed protocol, the participants only need the ability of accessing quantum channel and preparing single photons {|0〉, |1〉, |+〉, |-〉}, while the complicated quantum operations, such as the unitary operations and Bell measurement, will be delegated to the remote quantum center. Compared with previous quantum key agreement protocols, this client-server model is more feasible in the early days of the emergence of quantum computers. In order to prevent the attacks from outside eavesdroppers, inner participants and quantum center, two single photon sequences are randomly inserted into Bell states: the first sequence is used to perform the quantum channel detection, while the second is applied to disorder the positions of message qubits, which guarantees the security of the protocol.

  2. A quantum computer on the basis of an atomic quantum transistor with built-in quantum memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseev, S. A.; Andrianov, S. N.

    2016-12-01

    A quantum transistor based quantum computer where the multiqubit quantum memory is a component of the quantum transistor and, correspondingly, takes part in the performance of quantum logical operations is considered. Proceeding from the generalized Jaynes-Cummings model, equations for coefficients of the wave function of the quantum system under consideration have been obtained for different stages of its evolution in processes of performing logical operations. The solution of the system of equations allows one to establish requirements that are imposed on the parameters of the initial Hamiltonian and must be satisfied for the effective operation of the computer; it also demonstrates the possibility of a universal set of quantum operations. Thus, based on the proposed approach, the possibility of constructing a compact multiatomic ensemble based on quantum computer using a quantum transistor for the implementation of two-qubit gates has been demonstrated.

  3. Measurement-only topological quantum computation via anyonic interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bonderson, Parsa Freedman, Michael Nayak, Chetan

    2009-04-15

    We describe measurement-only topological quantum computation using both projective and interferometrical measurement of topological charge. We demonstrate how anyonic teleportation can be achieved using 'forced measurement' protocols for both types of measurement. Using this, it is shown how topological charge measurements can be used to generate the braiding transformations used in topological quantum computation, and hence that the physical transportation of computational anyons is unnecessary. We give a detailed discussion of the anyonics for implementation of topological quantum computation (particularly, using the measurement-only approach) in fractional quantum Hall systems.

  4. NMR quantum computation with optically polarized molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhulst, Anne; Yannoni, Constantino; Sherwood, Mark; Pomerantz, Drew; Vandersypen, Lieven; Chuang, Isaac

    2000-03-01

    Current methods for bulk NMR quantum computation rely on nuclear spin polarization present at high temperature equilibrium. This presents a challenging obstacle as the probability to find a spin in a specific state decreases exponentially in the number of spins used as qubits, causing a corresponding decrease in the signal to noise ratio of the desired NMR signal. One way to address this problem is to provide an artificial source of high polarization, such as optically pumped ^129Xe. For comparison, thermal equilibrium polarizations are only about 10-3% for ^1H in a typical NMR experiment at room temperature and in a 10 Tesla magnetic field, but with ^129Xe polarizations as high as 18% have been achieved [Happer et. al., Chem.Phys.Lett., 284, p.87-92, Feb 1998]. Using this technique, we prepare hyperpolarized liquid Xe and use it as a solvent for chloroform molecules (CHCl_3). Cross polarization (SPINOE) between ^129Xe and ^1H results in measured enhancements of the proton signal of over 300%, and evidence of transfer to ^13C. These results provide hope for the scalability of quantum computation.

  5. Algorithmic cooling and scalable NMR quantum computers

    PubMed Central

    Boykin, P. Oscar; Mor, Tal; Roychowdhury, Vwani; Vatan, Farrokh; Vrijen, Rutger

    2002-01-01

    We present here algorithmic cooling (via polarization heat bath)—a powerful method for obtaining a large number of highly polarized spins in liquid nuclear-spin systems at finite temperature. Given that spin-half states represent (quantum) bits, algorithmic cooling cleans dirty bits beyond the Shannon's bound on data compression, by using a set of rapidly thermal-relaxing bits. Such auxiliary bits could be implemented by using spins that rapidly get into thermal equilibrium with the environment, e.g., electron spins. Interestingly, the interaction with the environment, usually a most undesired interaction, is used here to our benefit, allowing a cooling mechanism. Cooling spins to a very low temperature without cooling the environment could lead to a breakthrough in NMR experiments, and our “spin-refrigerating” method suggests that this is possible. The scaling of NMR ensemble computers is currently one of the main obstacles to building larger-scale quantum computing devices, and our spin-refrigerating method suggests that this problem can be resolved. PMID:11904402

  6. Multiple network alignment on quantum computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daskin, Anmer; Grama, Ananth; Kais, Sabre

    2014-12-01

    Comparative analyses of graph-structured datasets underly diverse problems. Examples of these problems include identification of conserved functional components (biochemical interactions) across species, structural similarity of large biomolecules, and recurring patterns of interactions in social networks. A large class of such analyses methods quantify the topological similarity of nodes across networks. The resulting correspondence of nodes across networks, also called node alignment, can be used to identify invariant subgraphs across the input graphs. Given graphs as input, alignment algorithms use topological information to assign a similarity score to each -tuple of nodes, with elements (nodes) drawn from each of the input graphs. Nodes are considered similar if their neighbors are also similar. An alternate, equivalent view of these network alignment algorithms is to consider the Kronecker product of the input graphs and to identify high-ranked nodes in the Kronecker product graph. Conventional methods such as PageRank and HITS (Hypertext-Induced Topic Selection) can be used for this purpose. These methods typically require computation of the principal eigenvector of a suitably modified Kronecker product matrix of the input graphs. We adopt this alternate view of the problem to address the problem of multiple network alignment. Using the phase estimation algorithm, we show that the multiple network alignment problem can be efficiently solved on quantum computers. We characterize the accuracy and performance of our method and show that it can deliver exponential speedups over conventional (non-quantum) methods.

  7. Quantum computing with Josephson junction circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Huizhong

    This work concerns the study of Josephson junction circuits in the context of their usability for quantum computing. The zero-voltage state of a current-biased Josephson junction has a set of metastable quantum energy levels. If a junction is well isolated from its environment, it will be possible to use the two lowest states as a qubit in a quantum computer. I first examine the meaning of isolation theoretically. Using a master equation, I analyzed the effect of dissipation on escape rates and suggested a simple method, population depletion technique, to measure the relaxation time (T1). Using a stochastic Bloch equation to analyze the dependence of microwave resonance peak width on current noise, I found decoherence due to current noise depends on the noise spectrum. For high frequency noise with a cutoff frequency fc much larger than 1/T1, I found decoherence due to noise can be described by a dephasing rate that is proportional to the noise spectral density. However, for low frequency noise such that its cutoff frequency fc is much smaller than 1/T 1, decoherence due to noise depends on the total rms current noise. I then analyze and test a few qubit isolation schemes, including resistive isolation, inductor-capacitor (LC) isolation, half-wavelength resonant isolation and inductor-junction (LJ) isolation. I found the resistive isolation scheme has a severe heating problem. Macroscopic quantum tunneling and energy level quantization were observed in the LC isolated Nb/AlOx/Nb and AL/ALOx/Al junction qubits at 25 mK. Relaxation times of 4--12 ns and spectroscopic coherence times of 1--3 ns were obtained for these LC isolated qubits. I found the half-wavelength isolated junction qubit has a relaxation time of about 20 ns measured by the population-depletion techniques, but no energy levels were observed in this qubit. Experimental results suggest the LJ isolated qubit has a longer relaxation and coherence times than all my previously examined samples. Using a

  8. A measurement-based X-ray source model characterization for CT dosimetry computations.

    PubMed

    Sommerville, Mitchell; Poirier, Yannick; Tambasco, Mauro

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to show that the nominal peak tube voltage potential (kVp) and measured half-value layer (HVL) can be used to generate energy spectra and fluence profiles for characterizing a computed tomography (CT) X-ray source, and to validate the source model and an in-house kV X-ray dose computation algorithm (kVDoseCalc) for computing machine- and patient-specific CT dose. Spatial variation of the X-ray source spectra of a Philips Brilliance and a GE Optima Big Bore CT scanner were found by measuring the HVL along the direction of the internal bow-tie filter axes. Third-party software, Spektr, and the nominal kVp settings were used to generate the energy spectra. Beam fluence was calculated by dividing the integral product of the spectra and the in-air NIST mass-energy attenuation coefficients by in-air dose measurements along the filter axis. The authors found the optimal number of photons to seed in kVDoseCalc to achieve dose convergence. The Philips Brilliance beams were modeled for 90, 120, and 140 kVp tube settings. The GE Optima beams were modeled for 80, 100, 120, and 140 kVp tube settings. Relative doses measured using a Capintec Farmer-type ionization chamber (0.65 cc) placed in a cylindrical polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom and irradiated by the Philips Brilliance, were compared to those computed with kVDoseCalc. Relative doses in an anthropomorphic thorax phantom (E2E SBRT Phantom) irradiated by the GE Optima were measured using a (0.015 cc) PTW Freiburg ionization chamber and compared to computations from kVDoseCalc. The number of photons required to reduce the average statistical uncertainty in dose to <0.3% was 2×105. The average percent difference between calculation and measurement over all 12 PMMA phantom positions was found to be 1.44%, 1.47%, and 1.41% for 90, 120, and 140 kVp, respectively. The maximum percent difference between calculation and measurement for all energies, measurement positions, and phantoms was less

  9. A measurement-based X-ray source model characterization for CT dosimetry computations.

    PubMed

    Sommerville, Mitchell; Poirier, Yannick; Tambasco, Mauro

    2015-11-08

    The purpose of this study was to show that the nominal peak tube voltage potential (kVp) and measured half-value layer (HVL) can be used to generate energy spectra and fluence profiles for characterizing a computed tomography (CT) X-ray source, and to validate the source model and an in-house kV X-ray dose computation algorithm (kVDoseCalc) for computing machine- and patient-specific CT dose. Spatial variation of the X-ray source spectra of a Philips Brilliance and a GE Optima Big Bore CT scanner were found by measuring the HVL along the direction of the internal bow-tie filter axes. Third-party software, Spektr, and the nominal kVp settings were used to generate the energy spectra. Beam fluence was calculated by dividing the integral product of the spectra and the in-air NIST mass-energy attenuation coefficients by in-air dose measurements along the filter axis. The authors found the optimal number of photons to seed in kVDoseCalc to achieve dose convergence. The Philips Brilliance beams were modeled for 90, 120, and 140 kVp tube settings. The GE Optima beams were modeled for 80, 100, 120, and 140 kVp tube settings. Relative doses measured using a Capintec Farmer-type ionization chamber (0.65 cc) placed in a cylindrical polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom and irradiated by the Philips Brilliance, were compared to those computed with kVDoseCalc. Relative doses in an anthropomorphic thorax phantom (E2E SBRT Phantom) irradiated by the GE Optima were measured using a (0.015 cc) PTW Freiburg ionization chamber and compared to computations from kVDoseCalc. The number of photons required to reduce the average statistical uncertainty in dose to < 0.3% was 2 × 105. The average percent difference between calculation and measurement over all 12 PMMA phantom positions was found to be 1.44%, 1.47%, and 1.41% for 90, 120, and 140 kVp, respectively. The maximum percent difference between calculation and measurement for all energies, measurement positions, and phantoms was

  10. Fast quantum computation at arbitrarily low energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Stephen P.

    2017-03-01

    One version of the energy-time uncertainty principle states that the minimum time T⊥ for a quantum system to evolve from a given state to any orthogonal state is h /(4 Δ E ) , where Δ E is the energy uncertainty. A related bound called the Margolus-Levitin theorem states that T⊥≥h /(2 ) , where is the expectation value of energy and the ground energy is taken to be zero. Many subsequent works have interpreted T⊥ as defining a minimal time for an elementary computational operation and correspondingly a fundamental limit on clock speed determined by a system's energy. Here we present local time-independent Hamiltonians in which computational clock speed becomes arbitrarily large relative to and Δ E as the number of computational steps goes to infinity. We argue that energy considerations alone are not sufficient to obtain an upper bound on computational speed, and that additional physical assumptions such as limits to information density and information transmission speed are necessary to obtain such a bound.

  11. Computer Visualization of Many-Particle Quantum Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ozhigov, A. Y.

    2009-03-10

    In this paper I show the importance of computer visualization in researching of many-particle quantum dynamics. Such a visualization becomes an indispensable illustrative tool for understanding the behavior of dynamic swarm-based quantum systems. It is also an important component of the corresponding simulation framework, and can simplify the studies of underlying algorithms for multi-particle quantum systems.

  12. Preparing projected entangled pair states on a quantum computer.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Martin; Temme, Kristan; Verstraete, Frank

    2012-03-16

    We present a quantum algorithm to prepare injective projected entangled pair states (PEPS) on a quantum computer, a class of open tensor networks representing quantum states. The run time of our algorithm scales polynomially with the inverse of the minimum condition number of the PEPS projectors and, essentially, with the inverse of the spectral gap of the PEPS's parent Hamiltonian.

  13. A Telemetric system for electromagnetic measurements based on Internet technologies and cloud computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassoulas, E.; Vereses, A.; Agiakatsikas, D.; Koulouras, Gr.; Nomicos, C.

    2010-05-01

    A few years ago, real time communication, data collection and transmission from a field station measuring electromagnetic variations in the middle of nowhere, was a very expensive accomplishment. Nowadays, wireless communications and Internet access reach end users much easier and they are less expensive. WIFI, GPRS, 3G or Satellite Internet connections enable this to come true even at the most detached areas of our world where no cables can easily reach at a low cost. Except for the effective potential range, these communication technologies can also give high speed, constant and low cost Internet access. As the Internet access speeds grow, a new term is coming to the foreground. Cloud Computing. The terminology of Cloud Computing refers to a wide subset of Internet technologies usage that the clients: A)Do not need to store any valuable information in any physical infrastructure owned by themselves. B)Consume on-line resources from a third party provider, enabling them to focus on their productivity without having to worry about their data or any other possible local hardware failure. C)Collaborate and share between associates faster and easier, as they can access their work from anywhere, just with the existence of Internet access. This telemetric system, relies on Cloud Computing for the delivery of collected data from the field station to an on-line storage. Collaborators and scientists, can be synchronized with the on-line storage, make changes and synchronize vice versa. Local storage at the field station end, is only needed in the case of an Internet connection failure, so that the data can be stored until the Internet connection is regained. Local storage at the user's side is optional, however desirable thus giving the ability to work off-line and synchronize again the changes when one goes on-line.

  14. Topological quantum computation--from basic concepts to first experiments.

    PubMed

    Stern, Ady; Lindner, Netanel H

    2013-03-08

    Quantum computation requires controlled engineering of quantum states to perform tasks that go beyond those possible with classical computers. Topological quantum computation aims to achieve this goal by using non-Abelian quantum phases of matter. Such phases allow for quantum information to be stored and manipulated in a nonlocal manner, which protects it from imperfections in the implemented protocols and from interactions with the environment. Recently, substantial progress in this field has been made on both theoretical and experimental fronts. We review the basic concepts of non-Abelian phases and their topologically protected use in quantum information processing tasks. We discuss different possible realizations of these concepts in experimentally available solid-state systems, including systems hosting Majorana fermions, their recently proposed fractional counterparts, and non-Abelian quantum Hall states.

  15. Heterotic quantum and classical computing on convergence spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patten, D. R.; Jakel, D. W.; Irwin, R. J.; Blair, H. A.

    2015-05-01

    Category-theoretic characterizations of heterotic models of computation, introduced by Stepney et al., combine computational models such as classical/quantum, digital/analog, synchronous/asynchronous, etc. to obtain increased computational power. A highly informative classical/quantum heterotic model of computation is represented by Abramsky's simple sequential imperative quantum programming language which extends the classical simple imperative programming language to encompass quantum computation. The mathematical (denotational) semantics of this classical language serves as a basic foundation upon which formal verification methods can be developed. We present a more comprehensive heterotic classical/quantum model of computation based on heterotic dynamical systems on convergence spaces. Convergence spaces subsume topological spaces but admit finer structure from which, in prior work, we obtained differential calculi in the cartesian closed category of convergence spaces allowing us to define heterotic dynamical systems, given by coupled systems of first order differential equations whose variables are functions from the reals to convergence spaces.

  16. Parallel Photonic Quantum Computation Assisted by Quantum Dots in One-Side Optical Microcavities

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ming-Xing; Wang, Xiaojun

    2014-01-01

    Universal quantum logic gates are important elements for a quantum computer. In contrast to previous constructions on one degree of freedom (DOF) of quantum systems, we investigate the possibility of parallel quantum computations dependent on two DOFs of photon systems. We construct deterministic hyper-controlled-not (hyper-CNOT) gates operating on the spatial-mode and the polarization DOFs of two-photon or one-photon systems by exploring the giant optical circular birefringence induced by quantum-dot spins in one-sided optical microcavities. These hyper-CNOT gates show that the quantum states of two DOFs can be viewed as independent qubits without requiring auxiliary DOFs in theory. This result can reduce the quantum resources by half for quantum applications with large qubit systems, such as the quantum Shor algorithm. PMID:25030424

  17. Blueprint for a microwave trapped ion quantum computer

    PubMed Central

    Lekitsch, Bjoern; Weidt, Sebastian; Fowler, Austin G.; Mølmer, Klaus; Devitt, Simon J.; Wunderlich, Christof; Hensinger, Winfried K.

    2017-01-01

    The availability of a universal quantum computer may have a fundamental impact on a vast number of research fields and on society as a whole. An increasingly large scientific and industrial community is working toward the realization of such a device. An arbitrarily large quantum computer may best be constructed using a modular approach. We present a blueprint for a trapped ion–based scalable quantum computer module, making it possible to create a scalable quantum computer architecture based on long-wavelength radiation quantum gates. The modules control all operations as stand-alone units, are constructed using silicon microfabrication techniques, and are within reach of current technology. To perform the required quantum computations, the modules make use of long-wavelength radiation–based quantum gate technology. To scale this microwave quantum computer architecture to a large size, we present a fully scalable design that makes use of ion transport between different modules, thereby allowing arbitrarily many modules to be connected to construct a large-scale device. A high error–threshold surface error correction code can be implemented in the proposed architecture to execute fault-tolerant operations. With appropriate adjustments, the proposed modules are also suitable for alternative trapped ion quantum computer architectures, such as schemes using photonic interconnects. PMID:28164154

  18. Blueprint for a microwave trapped ion quantum computer.

    PubMed

    Lekitsch, Bjoern; Weidt, Sebastian; Fowler, Austin G; Mølmer, Klaus; Devitt, Simon J; Wunderlich, Christof; Hensinger, Winfried K

    2017-02-01

    The availability of a universal quantum computer may have a fundamental impact on a vast number of research fields and on society as a whole. An increasingly large scientific and industrial community is working toward the realization of such a device. An arbitrarily large quantum computer may best be constructed using a modular approach. We present a blueprint for a trapped ion-based scalable quantum computer module, making it possible to create a scalable quantum computer architecture based on long-wavelength radiation quantum gates. The modules control all operations as stand-alone units, are constructed using silicon microfabrication techniques, and are within reach of current technology. To perform the required quantum computations, the modules make use of long-wavelength radiation-based quantum gate technology. To scale this microwave quantum computer architecture to a large size, we present a fully scalable design that makes use of ion transport between different modules, thereby allowing arbitrarily many modules to be connected to construct a large-scale device. A high error-threshold surface error correction code can be implemented in the proposed architecture to execute fault-tolerant operations. With appropriate adjustments, the proposed modules are also suitable for alternative trapped ion quantum computer architectures, such as schemes using photonic interconnects.

  19. The computer-based model of quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevastianov, L. A.; Zorin, A. V.

    2017-07-01

    Quantum theory of measurements is an extremely important part of quantum mechanics. Currently perturbations by quantum measurements of observable quantities of atomic systems are rarely taken into account in computing algorithms and calculations. In the previous studies of the authors, constructive model of quantum measurements has been developed and implemented in the form of symbolic and numerical calculations for the hydrogen-like atoms. This work describes a generalization of these results to the alkali metal atoms.

  20. En Route to Solid State Spin Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehring, M.; Mende, J.; Scherer, W.

    We present routes to quantum information processing in solids. An introduction to electron and nuclear spins as quantum bits (qubits) is given and basic quantum algorithms are discussed. In particular we focus on the preparation of pseudo pure states and pseudo entangled states in solid systems of combined electron and nuclear spins. As an example we demonstrate the Deutsch algorithm of quantum computing in an S-bus system with one electron spin coupled to a many 19F nuclear spins.

  1. QCMPI: A parallel environment for quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabakin, Frank; Juliá-Díaz, Bruno

    2009-06-01

    QCMPI is a quantum computer (QC) simulation package written in Fortran 90 with parallel processing capabilities. It is an accessible research tool that permits rapid evaluation of quantum algorithms for a large number of qubits and for various "noise" scenarios. The prime motivation for developing QCMPI is to facilitate numerical examination of not only how QC algorithms work, but also to include noise, decoherence, and attenuation effects and to evaluate the efficacy of error correction schemes. The present work builds on an earlier Mathematica code QDENSITY, which is mainly a pedagogic tool. In that earlier work, although the density matrix formulation was featured, the description using state vectors was also provided. In QCMPI, the stress is on state vectors, in order to employ a large number of qubits. The parallel processing feature is implemented by using the Message-Passing Interface (MPI) protocol. A description of how to spread the wave function components over many processors is provided, along with how to efficiently describe the action of general one- and two-qubit operators on these state vectors. These operators include the standard Pauli, Hadamard, CNOT and CPHASE gates and also Quantum Fourier transformation. These operators make up the actions needed in QC. Codes for Grover's search and Shor's factoring algorithms are provided as examples. A major feature of this work is that concurrent versions of the algorithms can be evaluated with each version subject to alternate noise effects, which corresponds to the idea of solving a stochastic Schrödinger equation. The density matrix for the ensemble of such noise cases is constructed using parallel distribution methods to evaluate its eigenvalues and associated entropy. Potential applications of this powerful tool include studies of the stability and correction of QC processes using Hamiltonian based dynamics. Program summaryProgram title: QCMPI Catalogue identifier: AECS_v1_0 Program summary URL

  2. From transistor to trapped-ion computers for quantum chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yung, M.-H.; Casanova, J.; Mezzacapo, A.; McClean, J.; Lamata, L.; Aspuru-Guzik, A.; Solano, E.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few decades, quantum chemistry has progressed through the development of computational methods based on modern digital computers. However, these methods can hardly fulfill the exponentially-growing resource requirements when applied to large quantum systems. As pointed out by Feynman, this restriction is intrinsic to all computational models based on classical physics. Recently, the rapid advancement of trapped-ion technologies has opened new possibilities for quantum control and quantum simulations. Here, we present an efficient toolkit that exploits both the internal and motional degrees of freedom of trapped ions for solving problems in quantum chemistry, including molecular electronic structure, molecular dynamics, and vibronic coupling. We focus on applications that go beyond the capacity of classical computers, but may be realizable on state-of-the-art trapped-ion systems. These results allow us to envision a new paradigm of quantum chemistry that shifts from the current transistor to a near-future trapped-ion-based technology.

  3. From transistor to trapped-ion computers for quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Yung, M-H; Casanova, J; Mezzacapo, A; McClean, J; Lamata, L; Aspuru-Guzik, A; Solano, E

    2014-01-07

    Over the last few decades, quantum chemistry has progressed through the development of computational methods based on modern digital computers. However, these methods can hardly fulfill the exponentially-growing resource requirements when applied to large quantum systems. As pointed out by Feynman, this restriction is intrinsic to all computational models based on classical physics. Recently, the rapid advancement of trapped-ion technologies has opened new possibilities for quantum control and quantum simulations. Here, we present an efficient toolkit that exploits both the internal and motional degrees of freedom of trapped ions for solving problems in quantum chemistry, including molecular electronic structure, molecular dynamics, and vibronic coupling. We focus on applications that go beyond the capacity of classical computers, but may be realizable on state-of-the-art trapped-ion systems. These results allow us to envision a new paradigm of quantum chemistry that shifts from the current transistor to a near-future trapped-ion-based technology.

  4. Experimental Blind Quantum Computing for a Classical Client

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, He-Liang; Zhao, Qi; Ma, Xiongfeng; Liu, Chang; Su, Zu-En; Wang, Xi-Lin; Li, Li; Liu, Nai-Le; Sanders, Barry C.; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2017-08-01

    To date, blind quantum computing demonstrations require clients to have weak quantum devices. Here we implement a proof-of-principle experiment for completely classical clients. Via classically interacting with two quantum servers that share entanglement, the client accomplishes the task of having the number 15 factorized by servers who are denied information about the computation itself. This concealment is accompanied by a verification protocol that tests servers' honesty and correctness. Our demonstration shows the feasibility of completely classical clients and thus is a key milestone towards secure cloud quantum computing.

  5. Demonstration of measurement-only blind quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greganti, Chiara; Roehsner, Marie-Christine; Barz, Stefanie; Morimae, Tomoyuki; Walther, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Blind quantum computing allows for secure cloud networks of quasi-classical clients and a fully fledged quantum server. Recently, a new protocol has been proposed, which requires a client to perform only measurements. We demonstrate a proof-of-principle implementation of this measurement-only blind quantum computing, exploiting a photonic setup to generate four-qubit cluster states for computation and verification. Feasible technological requirements for the client and the device-independent blindness make this scheme very applicable for future secure quantum networks.

  6. Quantum Optical Implementations of Current Quantum Computing Paradigms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    Bacterial Spores,” at DARPA, Jan. 29, 2002. 10. M. O. Scully, “Quantum Maxwell demons ,” at Texas A&M University, March 19 (2002). 11. M. O...detectors,” at NEC, Princeton, April 5 (2002). 13. M. O. Scully, “Quantum thermodynamics: From quantum heat engines to Maxwell’s demons and beyond,” at...quantum heat engines to Maxwell’s demons and beyond,” International Conference on Quantum Information (ICQI), Oviedo, Spain, July 14-18, 2002. 18. M. O

  7. Quantum Computing in Fock Space Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, Alexander A.

    1997-04-01

    Fock space system (FSS) has unfixed number (N) of particles and/or degrees of freedom. In quantum computing (QC) main requirement is sustainability of coherent Q-superpositions. This normally favoured by low noise environment. High excitation/high temperature (T) limit is hence discarded as unfeasible for QC. Conversely, if N is itself a quantized variable, the dimensionality of Hilbert basis for qubits may increase faster (say, N-exponentially) than thermal noise (likely, in powers of N and T). Hence coherency may win over T-randomization. For this type of QC speed (S) of factorization of long integers (with D digits) may increase with D (for 'ordinary' QC speed polynomially decreases with D). This (apparent) paradox rests on non-monotonic bijectivity (cf. Georg Cantor's diagonal counting of rational numbers). This brings entire aleph-null structurality ("Babylonian Library" of infinite informational content of integer field) to superposition determining state of quantum analogue of Turing machine head. Structure of integer infinititude (e.g. distribution of primes) results in direct "Platonic pressure" resembling semi-virtual Casimir efect (presure of cut-off vibrational modes). This "effect", the embodiment of Pythagorean "Number is everything", renders Godelian barrier arbitrary thin and hence FSS-based QC can in principle be unlimitedly efficient (e.g. D/S may tend to zero when D tends to infinity).

  8. Random matrix model of adiabatic quantum computing

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, David R.; Adami, Christoph; Lue, Waynn; Williams, Colin P.

    2005-05-15

    We present an analysis of the quantum adiabatic algorithm for solving hard instances of 3-SAT (an NP-complete problem) in terms of random matrix theory (RMT). We determine the global regularity of the spectral fluctuations of the instantaneous Hamiltonians encountered during the interpolation between the starting Hamiltonians and the ones whose ground states encode the solutions to the computational problems of interest. At each interpolation point, we quantify the degree of regularity of the average spectral distribution via its Brody parameter, a measure that distinguishes regular (i.e., Poissonian) from chaotic (i.e., Wigner-type) distributions of normalized nearest-neighbor spacings. We find that for hard problem instances - i.e., those having a critical ratio of clauses to variables - the spectral fluctuations typically become irregular across a contiguous region of the interpolation parameter, while the spectrum is regular for easy instances. Within the hard region, RMT may be applied to obtain a mathematical model of the probability of avoided level crossings and concomitant failure rate of the adiabatic algorithm due to nonadiabatic Landau-Zener-type transitions. Our model predicts that if the interpolation is performed at a uniform rate, the average failure rate of the quantum adiabatic algorithm, when averaged over hard problem instances, scales exponentially with increasing problem size.

  9. Computational quantum magnetism: Role of noncollinear magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Arthur J.; Nakamura, Kohji

    2009-04-01

    We are witnessing today a golden age of innovation with novel magnetic materials and with discoveries important for both basic science and device applications. Computation and simulation have played a key role in the dramatic advances of the past and those we are witnessing today. A goal-driving computational science—simulations of every-increasing complexity of more and more realistic models has been brought into greater focus with greater computing power to run sophisticated and powerful software codes like our highly precise full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW) method. Indeed, significant progress has been achieved from advanced first-principles FLAPW calculations for the predictions of surface/interface magnetism. One recently resolved challenging issue is the role of noncollinear magnetism (NCM) that arises not only through the SOC, but also from the breaking of symmetry at surfaces and interfaces. For this, we will further review some specific advances we are witnessing today, including complex magnetic phenomena from noncollinear magnetism with no shape approximation for the magnetization (perpendicular MCA in transition-metal overlayers and superlattices; unidirectional anisotropy and exchange bias in FM and AFM bilayers; constricted domain walls important in quantum spin interfaces; and curling magnetic nano-scale dots as new candidates for non-volatile memory applications) and most recently providing new predictions and understanding of magnetism in novel materials such as magnetic semiconductors and multi-ferroic systems.

  10. Relation of perceived breathiness to laryngeal kinematics and acoustic measures based on computational modeling

    PubMed Central

    Samlan, Robin A.; Story, Brad H.; Bunton, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine 1) how specific vocal fold structural and vibratory features relate to breathy voice quality and 2) the relation of perceived breathiness to four acoustic correlates of breathiness. Method A computational, kinematic model of the vocal fold medial surfaces was used to specify features of vocal fold structure and vibration in a manner consistent with breathy voice. Four model parameters were altered: vocal process separation, surface bulging, vibratory nodal point, and epilaryngeal constriction. Twelve naïve listeners rated breathiness of 364 samples relative to a reference. The degree of breathiness was then compared to 1) the underlying kinematic profile and 2) four acoustic measures: cepstral peak prominence (CPP), harmonics-to-noise ratio, and two measures of spectral slope. Results Vocal process separation alone accounted for 61.4% of the variance in perceptual rating. Adding nodal point ratio and bulging to the equation increased the explained variance to 88.7%. The acoustic measure CPP accounted for 86.7% of the variance in perceived breathiness, and explained variance increased to 92.6% with the addition of one spectral slope measure. Conclusions Breathiness ratings were best explained kinematically by the degree of vocal process separation and acoustically by CPP. PMID:23785184

  11. Trapped Ion Quantum Computation by Adiabatic Passage

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Xuni; Wu Chunfeng; Lai, C. H.; Oh, C. H.

    2008-11-07

    We propose a new universal quantum computation scheme for trapped ions in thermal motion via the technique of adiabatic passage, which incorporates the advantages of both the adiabatic passage and the model of trapped ions in thermal motion. Our scheme is immune from the decoherence due to spontaneous emission from excited states as the system in our scheme evolves along a dark state. In our scheme the vibrational degrees of freedom are not required to be cooled to their ground states because they are only virtually excited. It is shown that the fidelity of the resultant gate operation is still high even when the magnitude of the effective Rabi frequency moderately deviates from the desired value.

  12. Number Partitioning via Quantum Adiabatic Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Toussaint, Udo; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We study both analytically and numerically the complexity of the adiabatic quantum evolution algorithm applied to random instances of combinatorial optimization problems. We use as an example the NP-complete set partition problem and obtain an asymptotic expression for the minimal gap separating the ground and exited states of a system during the execution of the algorithm. We show that for computationally hard problem instances the size of the minimal gap scales exponentially with the problem size. This result is in qualitative agreement with the direct numerical simulation of the algorithm for small instances of the set partition problem. We describe the statistical properties of the optimization problem that are responsible for the exponential behavior of the algorithm.

  13. Quantum computing using electron-nuclear double resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, Charles M.; Dowling, Jonathan P.; Hotaling, Steven P.

    1997-07-01

    We consider the use of Electron-Nuclear Double Resonance (ENDOR) techniques in quantum computing. ENDOR resolution as a possible limiting factor is discussed. It is found that ENDOR and double-ENDOR techniques have sufficient resolution for quantum computing applications.

  14. The Brain Is both Neurocomputer and Quantum Computer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hameroff, Stuart R.

    2007-01-01

    In their article, "Is the Brain a Quantum Computer,?" Litt, Eliasmith, Kroon, Weinstein, and Thagard (2006) criticize the Penrose-Hameroff "Orch OR" quantum computational model of consciousness, arguing instead for neurocomputation as an explanation for mental phenomena. Here I clarify and defend Orch OR, show how Orch OR and neurocomputation are…

  15. The Brain Is both Neurocomputer and Quantum Computer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hameroff, Stuart R.

    2007-01-01

    In their article, "Is the Brain a Quantum Computer,?" Litt, Eliasmith, Kroon, Weinstein, and Thagard (2006) criticize the Penrose-Hameroff "Orch OR" quantum computational model of consciousness, arguing instead for neurocomputation as an explanation for mental phenomena. Here I clarify and defend Orch OR, show how Orch OR and neurocomputation are…

  16. Demonstration of a small programmable quantum computer with atomic qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, S.; Linke, N. M.; Figgatt, C.; Landsman, K. A.; Wright, K.; Monroe, C.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum computers can solve certain problems more efficiently than any possible conventional computer. Small quantum algorithms have been demonstrated on multiple quantum computing platforms, many specifically tailored in hardware to implement a particular algorithm or execute a limited number of computational paths. Here we demonstrate a five-qubit trapped-ion quantum computer that can be programmed in software to implement arbitrary quantum algorithms by executing any sequence of universal quantum logic gates. We compile algorithms into a fully connected set of gate operations that are native to the hardware and have a mean fidelity of 98 per cent. Reconfiguring these gate sequences provides the flexibility to implement a variety of algorithms without altering the hardware. As examples, we implement the Deutsch-Jozsa and Bernstein-Vazirani algorithms with average success rates of 95 and 90 per cent, respectively. We also perform a coherent quantum Fourier transform on five trapped-ion qubits for phase estimation and period finding with average fidelities of 62 and 84 per cent, respectively. This small quantum computer can be scaled to larger numbers of qubits within a single register, and can be further expanded by connecting several such modules through ion shuttling or photonic quantum channels.

  17. Demonstration of a small programmable quantum computer with atomic qubits.

    PubMed

    Debnath, S; Linke, N M; Figgatt, C; Landsman, K A; Wright, K; Monroe, C

    2016-08-04

    Quantum computers can solve certain problems more efficiently than any possible conventional computer. Small quantum algorithms have been demonstrated on multiple quantum computing platforms, many specifically tailored in hardware to implement a particular algorithm or execute a limited number of computational paths. Here we demonstrate a five-qubit trapped-ion quantum computer that can be programmed in software to implement arbitrary quantum algorithms by executing any sequence of universal quantum logic gates. We compile algorithms into a fully connected set of gate operations that are native to the hardware and have a mean fidelity of 98 per cent. Reconfiguring these gate sequences provides the flexibility to implement a variety of algorithms without altering the hardware. As examples, we implement the Deutsch-Jozsa and Bernstein-Vazirani algorithms with average success rates of 95 and 90 per cent, respectively. We also perform a coherent quantum Fourier transform on five trapped-ion qubits for phase estimation and period finding with average fidelities of 62 and 84 per cent, respectively. This small quantum computer can be scaled to larger numbers of qubits within a single register, and can be further expanded by connecting several such modules through ion shuttling or photonic quantum channels.

  18. Popescu-Rohrlich correlations imply efficient instantaneous nonlocal quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadbent, Anne

    2016-08-01

    In instantaneous nonlocal quantum computation, two parties cooperate in order to perform a quantum computation on their joint inputs, while being restricted to a single round of simultaneous communication. Previous results showed that instantaneous nonlocal quantum computation is possible, at the cost of an exponential amount of prior shared entanglement (in the size of the input). Here, we show that a linear amount of entanglement suffices, (in the size of the computation), as long as the parties share nonlocal correlations as given by the Popescu-Rohrlich box. This means that communication is not required for efficient instantaneous nonlocal quantum computation. Exploiting the well-known relation to position-based cryptography, our result also implies the impossibility of secure position-based cryptography against adversaries with nonsignaling correlations. Furthermore, our construction establishes a quantum analog of the classical communication complexity collapse under nonsignaling correlations.

  19. Universal Quantum Computing with Arbitrary Continuous-Variable Encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Hoi-Kwan; Plenio, Martin B.

    2016-09-01

    Implementing a qubit quantum computer in continuous-variable systems conventionally requires the engineering of specific interactions according to the encoding basis states. In this work, we present a unified formalism to conduct universal quantum computation with a fixed set of operations but arbitrary encoding. By storing a qubit in the parity of two or four qumodes, all computing processes can be implemented by basis state preparations, continuous-variable exponential-swap operations, and swap tests. Our formalism inherits the advantages that the quantum information is decoupled from collective noise, and logical qubits with different encodings can be brought to interact without decoding. We also propose a possible implementation of the required operations by using interactions that are available in a variety of continuous-variable systems. Our work separates the "hardware" problem of engineering quantum-computing-universal interactions, from the "software" problem of designing encodings for specific purposes. The development of quantum computer architecture could hence be simplified.

  20. Universal Quantum Computing with Arbitrary Continuous-Variable Encoding.

    PubMed

    Lau, Hoi-Kwan; Plenio, Martin B

    2016-09-02

    Implementing a qubit quantum computer in continuous-variable systems conventionally requires the engineering of specific interactions according to the encoding basis states. In this work, we present a unified formalism to conduct universal quantum computation with a fixed set of operations but arbitrary encoding. By storing a qubit in the parity of two or four qumodes, all computing processes can be implemented by basis state preparations, continuous-variable exponential-swap operations, and swap tests. Our formalism inherits the advantages that the quantum information is decoupled from collective noise, and logical qubits with different encodings can be brought to interact without decoding. We also propose a possible implementation of the required operations by using interactions that are available in a variety of continuous-variable systems. Our work separates the "hardware" problem of engineering quantum-computing-universal interactions, from the "software" problem of designing encodings for specific purposes. The development of quantum computer architecture could hence be simplified.

  1. Quantum Cryptography, Quantum Communication, and Quantum Computer in a Noisy Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Koji; Nakamura, Tadao

    2017-07-01

    First, we study several information theories based on quantum computing in a desirable noiseless situation. (1) We present quantum key distribution based on Deutsch's algorithm using an entangled state. (2) We discuss the fact that the Bernstein-Vazirani algorithm can be used for quantum communication including an error correction. Finally, we discuss the main result. We study the Bernstein-Vazirani algorithm in a noisy environment. The original algorithm determines a noiseless function. Here we consider the case that the function has an environmental noise. We introduce a noise term into the function f( x). So we have another noisy function g( x). The relation between them is g( x) = f( x) ± O( 𝜖). Here O( 𝜖) ≪ 1 is the noise term. The goal is to determine the noisy function g( x) with a success probability. The algorithm overcomes classical counterpart by a factor of N in a noisy environment.

  2. Experimental magic state distillation for fault-tolerant quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Souza, Alexandre M; Zhang, Jingfu; Ryan, Colm A; Laflamme, Raymond

    2011-01-25

    Any physical quantum device for quantum information processing (QIP) is subject to errors in implementation. In order to be reliable and efficient, quantum computers will need error-correcting or error-avoiding methods. Fault-tolerance achieved through quantum error correction will be an integral part of quantum computers. Of the many methods that have been discovered to implement it, a highly successful approach has been to use transversal gates and specific initial states. A critical element for its implementation is the availability of high-fidelity initial states, such as |0〉 and the 'magic state'. Here, we report an experiment, performed in a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) quantum processor, showing sufficient quantum control to improve the fidelity of imperfect initial magic states by distilling five of them into one with higher fidelity.

  3. Continuous-variable quantum computing in optical time-frequency modes using quantum memories.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Peter C; Kolthammer, W Steven; Nunn, Joshua; Barbieri, Marco; Datta, Animesh; Walmsley, Ian A

    2014-09-26

    We develop a scheme for time-frequency encoded continuous-variable cluster-state quantum computing using quantum memories. In particular, we propose a method to produce, manipulate, and measure two-dimensional cluster states in a single spatial mode by exploiting the intrinsic time-frequency selectivity of Raman quantum memories. Time-frequency encoding enables the scheme to be extremely compact, requiring a number of memories that are a linear function of only the number of different frequencies in which the computational state is encoded, independent of its temporal duration. We therefore show that quantum memories can be a powerful component for scalable photonic quantum information processing architectures.

  4. Secure Multiparty Quantum Computation for Summation and Multiplication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Run-Hua; Mu, Yi; Zhong, Hong; Cui, Jie; Zhang, Shun

    2016-01-01

    As a fundamental primitive, Secure Multiparty Summation and Multiplication can be used to build complex secure protocols for other multiparty computations, specially, numerical computations. However, there is still lack of systematical and efficient quantum methods to compute Secure Multiparty Summation and Multiplication. In this paper, we present a novel and efficient quantum approach to securely compute the summation and multiplication of multiparty private inputs, respectively. Compared to classical solutions, our proposed approach can ensure the unconditional security and the perfect privacy protection based on the physical principle of quantum mechanics.

  5. Secure Multiparty Quantum Computation for Summation and Multiplication

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Run-hua; Mu, Yi; Zhong, Hong; Cui, Jie; Zhang, Shun

    2016-01-01

    As a fundamental primitive, Secure Multiparty Summation and Multiplication can be used to build complex secure protocols for other multiparty computations, specially, numerical computations. However, there is still lack of systematical and efficient quantum methods to compute Secure Multiparty Summation and Multiplication. In this paper, we present a novel and efficient quantum approach to securely compute the summation and multiplication of multiparty private inputs, respectively. Compared to classical solutions, our proposed approach can ensure the unconditional security and the perfect privacy protection based on the physical principle of quantum mechanics. PMID:26792197

  6. Optimizing qubit resources for quantum chemistry simulations in second quantization on a quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moll, Nikolaj; Fuhrer, Andreas; Staar, Peter; Tavernelli, Ivano

    2016-07-01

    Quantum chemistry simulations on a quantum computer suffer from the overhead needed for encoding the Fermionic problem in a system of qubits. By exploiting the block diagonality of a Fermionic Hamiltonian, we show that the number of required qubits can be reduced while the number of terms in the Hamiltonian will increase. All operations for this reduction can be performed in operator space. The scheme is conceived as a pre-computational step that would be performed prior to the actual quantum simulation. We apply this scheme to reduce the number of qubits necessary to simulate both the Hamiltonian of the two-site Fermi-Hubbard model and the hydrogen molecule. Both quantum systems can then be simulated with a two-qubit quantum computer. Despite the increase in the number of Hamiltonian terms, the scheme still remains a useful tool to reduce the dimensionality of specific quantum systems for quantum simulators with a limited number of resources.

  7. Quantum Monte Carlo Endstation for Petascale Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Lubos Mitas

    2011-01-26

    NCSU research group has been focused on accomplising the key goals of this initiative: establishing new generation of quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) computational tools as a part of Endstation petaflop initiative for use at the DOE ORNL computational facilities and for use by computational electronic structure community at large; carrying out high accuracy quantum Monte Carlo demonstration projects in application of these tools to the forefront electronic structure problems in molecular and solid systems; expanding the impact of QMC methods and approaches; explaining and enhancing the impact of these advanced computational approaches. In particular, we have developed quantum Monte Carlo code (QWalk, www.qwalk.org) which was significantly expanded and optimized using funds from this support and at present became an actively used tool in the petascale regime by ORNL researchers and beyond. These developments have been built upon efforts undertaken by the PI's group and collaborators over the period of the last decade. The code was optimized and tested extensively on a number of parallel architectures including petaflop ORNL Jaguar machine. We have developed and redesigned a number of code modules such as evaluation of wave functions and orbitals, calculations of pfaffians and introduction of backflow coordinates together with overall organization of the code and random walker distribution over multicore architectures. We have addressed several bottlenecks such as load balancing and verified efficiency and accuracy of the calculations with the other groups of the Endstation team. The QWalk package contains about 50,000 lines of high quality object-oriented C++ and includes also interfaces to data files from other conventional electronic structure codes such as Gamess, Gaussian, Crystal and others. This grant supported PI for one month during summers, a full-time postdoc and partially three graduate students over the period of the grant duration, it has resulted in 13

  8. Quantum Computation by Optically Coupled Steady Atoms/Quantum-Dots Inside a Quantum Cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pradhan, P.; Wang, K. L.; Roychowdhury, V. P.; Anantram, M. P.; Mor, T.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    We present a model for quantum computation using $n$ steady 3-level atoms kept inside a quantum cavity, or using $n$ quantum-dots (QDs) kept inside a quantum cavity. In this model one external laser is pointed towards all the atoms/QDs, and $n$ pairs of electrodes are addressing the atoms/QDs, so that each atom is addressed by one pair. The energy levels of each atom/QD are controlled by an external Stark field given to the atom/QD by its external pair of electrodes. Transition between two energy levels of an individual atom/ QD are controlled by the voltage on its electrodes, and by the external laser. Interactions between two atoms/ QDs are performed with the additional help of the cavity mode (using on-resonance condition). Laser frequency, cavity frequency, and energy levels are far off-resonance most of the time, and they are brought to the resonance (using the Stark effect) only at the time of operations. Steps for a controlled-NOT gate between any two atoms/QDs have been described for this model. Our model demands some challenging technological efforts, such as manufacturing single-electron QDs inside a cavity. However, it promises big advantages over other existing models which are currently implemented, and might enable a much easier scale-up, to compute with many more qubits.

  9. Quantum Computation by Optically Coupled Steady Atoms/Quantum-Dots Inside a Quantum Cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pradhan, P.; Wang, K. L.; Roychowdhury, V. P.; Anantram, M. P.; Mor, T.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    We present a model for quantum computation using $n$ steady 3-level atoms kept inside a quantum cavity, or using $n$ quantum-dots (QDs) kept inside a quantum cavity. In this model one external laser is pointed towards all the atoms/QDs, and $n$ pairs of electrodes are addressing the atoms/QDs, so that each atom is addressed by one pair. The energy levels of each atom/QD are controlled by an external Stark field given to the atom/QD by its external pair of electrodes. Transition between two energy levels of an individual atom/ QD are controlled by the voltage on its electrodes, and by the external laser. Interactions between two atoms/ QDs are performed with the additional help of the cavity mode (using on-resonance condition). Laser frequency, cavity frequency, and energy levels are far off-resonance most of the time, and they are brought to the resonance (using the Stark effect) only at the time of operations. Steps for a controlled-NOT gate between any two atoms/QDs have been described for this model. Our model demands some challenging technological efforts, such as manufacturing single-electron QDs inside a cavity. However, it promises big advantages over other existing models which are currently implemented, and might enable a much easier scale-up, to compute with many more qubits.

  10. Non-quantum implementation of quantum computation algorithm using a spatial coding technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, N.; Ogura, Y.; Tanida, J.

    2005-07-01

    Non-quantum implementation of quantum information processing is studied. A spatial coding technique, which is one effective digital optical computing technique, is utilized to implement quantum teleportation efficiently. In the coding, quantum information is represented by the intensity and the phase of elemental cells. Correct operation is confirmed within the proposed scheme, which indicates the effectiveness of the proposed approach and a motive for further investigation.

  11. Digitized adiabatic quantum computing with a superconducting circuit.

    PubMed

    Barends, R; Shabani, A; Lamata, L; Kelly, J; Mezzacapo, A; Las Heras, U; Babbush, R; Fowler, A G; Campbell, B; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z; Chiaro, B; Dunsworth, A; Jeffrey, E; Lucero, E; Megrant, A; Mutus, J Y; Neeley, M; Neill, C; O'Malley, P J J; Quintana, C; Roushan, P; Sank, D; Vainsencher, A; Wenner, J; White, T C; Solano, E; Neven, H; Martinis, John M

    2016-06-09

    Quantum mechanics can help to solve complex problems in physics and chemistry, provided they can be programmed in a physical device. In adiabatic quantum computing, a system is slowly evolved from the ground state of a simple initial Hamiltonian to a final Hamiltonian that encodes a computational problem. The appeal of this approach lies in the combination of simplicity and generality; in principle, any problem can be encoded. In practice, applications are restricted by limited connectivity, available interactions and noise. A complementary approach is digital quantum computing, which enables the construction of arbitrary interactions and is compatible with error correction, but uses quantum circuit algorithms that are problem-specific. Here we combine the advantages of both approaches by implementing digitized adiabatic quantum computing in a superconducting system. We tomographically probe the system during the digitized evolution and explore the scaling of errors with system size. We then let the full system find the solution to random instances of the one-dimensional Ising problem as well as problem Hamiltonians that involve more complex interactions. This digital quantum simulation of the adiabatic algorithm consists of up to nine qubits and up to 1,000 quantum logic gates. The demonstration of digitized adiabatic quantum computing in the solid state opens a path to synthesizing long-range correlations and solving complex computational problems. When combined with fault-tolerance, our approach becomes a general-purpose algorithm that is scalable.

  12. Digitized adiabatic quantum computing with a superconducting circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barends, R.; Shabani, A.; Lamata, L.; Kelly, J.; Mezzacapo, A.; Heras, U. Las; Babbush, R.; Fowler, A. G.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Lucero, E.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J. Y.; Neeley, M.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Quintana, C.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C.; Solano, E.; Neven, H.; Martinis, John M.

    2016-06-01

    Quantum mechanics can help to solve complex problems in physics and chemistry, provided they can be programmed in a physical device. In adiabatic quantum computing, a system is slowly evolved from the ground state of a simple initial Hamiltonian to a final Hamiltonian that encodes a computational problem. The appeal of this approach lies in the combination of simplicity and generality; in principle, any problem can be encoded. In practice, applications are restricted by limited connectivity, available interactions and noise. A complementary approach is digital quantum computing, which enables the construction of arbitrary interactions and is compatible with error correction, but uses quantum circuit algorithms that are problem-specific. Here we combine the advantages of both approaches by implementing digitized adiabatic quantum computing in a superconducting system. We tomographically probe the system during the digitized evolution and explore the scaling of errors with system size. We then let the full system find the solution to random instances of the one-dimensional Ising problem as well as problem Hamiltonians that involve more complex interactions. This digital quantum simulation of the adiabatic algorithm consists of up to nine qubits and up to 1,000 quantum logic gates. The demonstration of digitized adiabatic quantum computing in the solid state opens a path to synthesizing long-range correlations and solving complex computational problems. When combined with fault-tolerance, our approach becomes a general-purpose algorithm that is scalable.

  13. Quantum computing with acceptor spins in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salfi, Joe; Tong, Mengyang; Rogge, Sven; Culcer, Dimitrie

    2016-06-01

    The states of a boron acceptor near a Si/SiO2 interface, which bind two low-energy Kramers pairs, have exceptional properties for encoding quantum information and, with the aid of strain, both heavy hole and light hole-based spin qubits can be designed. Whereas a light-hole spin qubit was introduced recently (arXiv:1508.04259), here we present analytical and numerical results proving that a heavy-hole spin qubit can be reliably initialised, rotated and entangled by electrical means alone. This is due to strong Rashba-like spin-orbit interaction terms enabled by the interface inversion asymmetry. Single qubit rotations rely on electric-dipole spin resonance (EDSR), which is strongly enhanced by interface-induced spin-orbit terms. Entanglement can be accomplished by Coulomb exchange, coupling to a resonator, or spin-orbit induced dipole-dipole interactions. By analysing the qubit sensitivity to charge noise, we demonstrate that interface-induced spin-orbit terms are responsible for sweet spots in the dephasing time {T}2* as a function of the top gate electric field, which are close to maxima in the EDSR strength, where the EDSR gate has high fidelity. We show that both qubits can be described using the same starting Hamiltonian, and by comparing their properties we show that the complex interplay of bulk and interface-induced spin-orbit terms allows a high degree of electrical control and makes acceptors potential candidates for scalable quantum computation in Si.

  14. Quantum computing with acceptor spins in silicon.

    PubMed

    Salfi, Joe; Tong, Mengyang; Rogge, Sven; Culcer, Dimitrie

    2016-06-17

    The states of a boron acceptor near a Si/SiO2 interface, which bind two low-energy Kramers pairs, have exceptional properties for encoding quantum information and, with the aid of strain, both heavy hole and light hole-based spin qubits can be designed. Whereas a light-hole spin qubit was introduced recently (arXiv:1508.04259), here we present analytical and numerical results proving that a heavy-hole spin qubit can be reliably initialised, rotated and entangled by electrical means alone. This is due to strong Rashba-like spin-orbit interaction terms enabled by the interface inversion asymmetry. Single qubit rotations rely on electric-dipole spin resonance (EDSR), which is strongly enhanced by interface-induced spin-orbit terms. Entanglement can be accomplished by Coulomb exchange, coupling to a resonator, or spin-orbit induced dipole-dipole interactions. By analysing the qubit sensitivity to charge noise, we demonstrate that interface-induced spin-orbit terms are responsible for sweet spots in the dephasing time [Formula: see text] as a function of the top gate electric field, which are close to maxima in the EDSR strength, where the EDSR gate has high fidelity. We show that both qubits can be described using the same starting Hamiltonian, and by comparing their properties we show that the complex interplay of bulk and interface-induced spin-orbit terms allows a high degree of electrical control and makes acceptors potential candidates for scalable quantum computation in Si.

  15. Universal quantum computation with a nonlinear oscillator network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Hayato

    2016-05-01

    We theoretically show that a nonlinear oscillator network with controllable parameters can be used for universal quantum computation. The initialization is achieved by a quantum-mechanical bifurcation based on quantum adiabatic evolution, which yields a Schrödinger cat state. All the elementary quantum gates are also achieved by quantum adiabatic evolution, in which dynamical phases accompanying the adiabatic evolutions are controlled by the system parameters. Numerical simulation results indicate that high gate fidelities can be achieved, where no dissipation is assumed.

  16. Adiabatic Quantum Computing and Quantum Walks: Algorithms and Architectures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-15

    0807.0929 Title: Environment-Assisted Quantum Transport Authors: Patrick Rebentrost, Masoud Mohseni, Ivan Kassal, Seth Lloyd, Alán Aspuru-Guzik...this effect, Environment Assisted Quantum Transport (ENAQT).The use of environmental effects to enhance transport rates appears to be ubiquitous in

  17. Photonic implementation for the topological cluster-state quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera-Martí, David A.; Fowler, Austin G.; Jennings, David; Rudolph, Terry

    2010-09-01

    An implementation of the topological cluster-state quantum computer is suggested, in which the basic elements are linear optics, measurements, and a two-dimensional array of quantum dots. This overcomes the need for nonlinear devices to create a lattice of entangled photons. Whereas the thresholds found for computational errors are quite satisfactory (above 10-3), the estimates of the minimum efficiencies needed for the detectors and quantum dots are beyond current technology’s reach. This is because we rely heavily on probabilistic entangling gates, which introduces loss into the scheme irrespective of detector and quantum-dot efficiencies.

  18. Quantum Computing in Solid State, and Coherent Behavior of Open Quantum Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    2 � Final Report for the ARO Grant DAAD-19-99-1-0342 Quantum Computing in Solid State, and Coherent Behavior of Open Quantum Systems...Our work to apply this method to qubits in quantum- computing architectures, is ongoing, continuing under the new ARO grant. In various collaborations...at http://arxiv.org/ftp/quant-ph/papers/0103/0103116.pdf). Technical reports submitted to ARO Annual Report for 1999 (covering September

  19. Hybrid annealing: Coupling a quantum simulator to a classical computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graß, Tobias; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2017-05-01

    Finding the global minimum in a rugged potential landscape is a computationally hard task, often equivalent to relevant optimization problems. Annealing strategies, either classical or quantum, explore the configuration space by evolving the system under the influence of thermal or quantum fluctuations. The thermal annealing dynamics can rapidly freeze the system into a low-energy configuration, and it can be simulated well on a classical computer, but it easily gets stuck in local minima. Quantum annealing, on the other hand, can be guaranteed to find the true ground state and can be implemented in modern quantum simulators; however, quantum adiabatic schemes become prohibitively slow in the presence of quasidegeneracies. Here, we propose a strategy which combines ideas from simulated annealing and quantum annealing. In such a hybrid algorithm, the outcome of a quantum simulator is processed on a classical device. While the quantum simulator explores the configuration space by repeatedly applying quantum fluctuations and performing projective measurements, the classical computer evaluates each configuration and enforces a lowering of the energy. We have simulated this algorithm for small instances of the random energy model, showing that it potentially outperforms both simulated thermal annealing and adiabatic quantum annealing. It becomes most efficient for problems involving many quasidegenerate ground states.

  20. Measurement-Based Linear Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Rafael N.; Gabay, Natasha C.; Rohde, Peter P.; Menicucci, Nicolas C.

    2017-03-01

    A major challenge in optical quantum processing is implementing large, stable interferometers. We offer a novel approach: virtual, measurement-based interferometers that are programed on the fly solely by the choice of homodyne measurement angles. The effects of finite squeezing are captured as uniform amplitude damping. We compare our proposal to existing (physical) interferometers and consider its performance for BosonSampling, which could demonstrate postclassical computational power in the near future. We prove its efficiency in time and squeezing (energy) in this setting.

  1. Symbolic Quantum Computation Simulation in SymPy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cugini, Addison; Curry, Matt; Granger, Brian

    2010-10-01

    Quantum computing is an emerging field which aims to use quantum mechanics to solve difficult computational problems with greater efficiency than on a classical computer. There is a need to create software that i) helps newcomers to learn the field, ii) enables practitioners to design and simulate quantum circuits and iii) provides an open foundation for further research in the field. Towards these ends we have created a package, in the open-source symbolic computation library SymPy, that simulates the quantum circuit model of quantum computation using Dirac notation. This framework builds on the extant powerful symbolic capabilities of SymPy to preform its simulations in a fully symbolic manner. We use object oriented design to abstract circuits as ordered collections of quantum gate and qbit objects. The gate objects can either be applied directly to the qbit objects or be represented as matrices in different bases. The package is also capable of performing the quantum Fourier transform and Shor's algorithm. A notion of measurement is made possible through the use of a non-commutative gate object. In this talk, we describe the software and show examples of quantum circuits on single and multi qbit states that involve common algorithms, gates and measurements.

  2. Architectural design for a topological cluster state quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devitt, Simon J.; Fowler, Austin G.; Stephens, Ashley M.; Greentree, Andrew D.; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.; Munro, William J.; Nemoto, Kae

    2009-08-01

    The development of a large scale quantum computer is a highly sought after goal of fundamental research and consequently a highly non-trivial problem. Scalability in quantum information processing is not just a problem of qubit manufacturing and control but it crucially depends on the ability to adapt advanced techniques in quantum information theory, such as error correction, to the experimental restrictions of assembling qubit arrays into the millions. In this paper, we introduce a feasible architectural design for large scale quantum computation in optical systems. We combine the recent developments in topological cluster state computation with the photonic module, a simple chip-based device that can be used as a fundamental building block for a large-scale computer. The integration of the topological cluster model with this comparatively simple operational element addresses many significant issues in scalable computing and leads to a promising modular architecture with complete integration of active error correction, exhibiting high fault-tolerant thresholds.

  3. Entanglement and deterministic quantum computing with one qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, Michel; Brodutch, Aharon; Mor, Tal

    2017-02-01

    The role of entanglement and quantum correlations in complex physical systems and quantum information processing devices has become a topic of intense study in the past two decades. In this work we present tools for learning about entanglement and quantum correlations in dynamical systems where the quantum states are mixed and the eigenvalue spectrum is highly degenerate. We apply these results to the deterministic quantum computing with one qubit (DQC1) computation model and show that the states generated in a DQC1 circuit have an eigenvalue structure that makes them difficult to entangle, even when they are relatively far from the completely mixed state. Our results strengthen the conjecture that it may be possible to find quantum algorithms that do not generate entanglement and yet still have an exponential advantage over their classical counterparts.

  4. Cryogenic setup for trapped ion quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandl, M. F.; van Mourik, M. W.; Postler, L.; Nolf, A.; Lakhmanskiy, K.; Paiva, R. R.; Möller, S.; Daniilidis, N.; Häffner, H.; Kaushal, V.; Ruster, T.; Warschburger, C.; Kaufmann, H.; Poschinger, U. G.; Schmidt-Kaler, F.; Schindler, P.; Monz, T.; Blatt, R.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the design of a cryogenic setup for trapped ion quantum computing containing a segmented surface electrode trap. The heat shield of our cryostat is designed to attenuate alternating magnetic field noise, resulting in 120 dB reduction of 50 Hz noise along the magnetic field axis. We combine this efficient magnetic shielding with high optical access required for single ion addressing as well as for efficient state detection by placing two lenses each with numerical aperture 0.23 inside the inner heat shield. The cryostat design incorporates vibration isolation to avoid decoherence of optical qubits due to the motion of the cryostat. We measure vibrations of the cryostat of less than ±20 nm over 2 s. In addition to the cryogenic apparatus, we describe the setup required for an operation with 40Ca+ and 88Sr+ ions. The instability of the laser manipulating the optical qubits in 40Ca+ is characterized by yielding a minimum of its Allan deviation of 2.4 ṡ 10-15 at 0.33 s. To evaluate the performance of the apparatus, we trapped 40Ca+ ions, obtaining a heating rate of 2.14(16) phonons/s and a Gaussian decay of the Ramsey contrast with a 1/e-time of 18.2(8) ms.

  5. Cryogenic setup for trapped ion quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Brandl, M F; van Mourik, M W; Postler, L; Nolf, A; Lakhmanskiy, K; Paiva, R R; Möller, S; Daniilidis, N; Häffner, H; Kaushal, V; Ruster, T; Warschburger, C; Kaufmann, H; Poschinger, U G; Schmidt-Kaler, F; Schindler, P; Monz, T; Blatt, R

    2016-11-01

    We report on the design of a cryogenic setup for trapped ion quantum computing containing a segmented surface electrode trap. The heat shield of our cryostat is designed to attenuate alternating magnetic field noise, resulting in 120 dB reduction of 50 Hz noise along the magnetic field axis. We combine this efficient magnetic shielding with high optical access required for single ion addressing as well as for efficient state detection by placing two lenses each with numerical aperture 0.23 inside the inner heat shield. The cryostat design incorporates vibration isolation to avoid decoherence of optical qubits due to the motion of the cryostat. We measure vibrations of the cryostat of less than ±20 nm over 2 s. In addition to the cryogenic apparatus, we describe the setup required for an operation with (40)Ca(+) and (88)Sr(+) ions. The instability of the laser manipulating the optical qubits in (40)Ca(+) is characterized by yielding a minimum of its Allan deviation of 2.4 ⋅ 10(-15) at 0.33 s. To evaluate the performance of the apparatus, we trapped (40)Ca(+) ions, obtaining a heating rate of 2.14(16) phonons/s and a Gaussian decay of the Ramsey contrast with a 1/e-time of 18.2(8) ms.

  6. Consciousness and Logic in a Quantum-Computing Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zizzi, Paola

    The early inflationary universe can be described in terms of quantum information. More specifically, the inflationary universe can be viewed as a superposed state of quantum registers. Actually, during inflation, one can speak of a quantum superposition of universes. At the end of inflation, only one universe is selected, by a mechanism called self-reduction, which is consistent with Penrose's objective reduction (OR) model. The quantum gravity threshold of (OR) is reached at the end of inflation, and corresponds to a superposed state of 109 quantum registers. This is also the number of superposed tubulins — qubits in our brain, which undergo the Penrose-Hameroff orchestrated objective reduction, (Orch OR), leading to a conscious event. Then, an analogy naturally arises between the very early quantum-computing universe, and our mind. In fact, we argue that at the end of in- flation, the universe underwent a cosmic conscious event, the so-called "Big Wow", which acted as an imprinting for the future minds to come, with future modes of computation, consciousness and logic. The postinflationary universe organized itself as a cellular automaton (CA) with two computational modes: quantum and classical, like the two conformations assumed by the cellular automaton of tubulins in our brain, as in Hameroff's model. In the quantum configuration, the universe quantum-evaluates recursive functions, which are the laws of physics in their most abstract form. To do so in a very efficient way, the universe uses, as subroutines, black holes - quantum computers and quantum minds, which operate in parallel. The outcomes of the overall quantum computation are the universals, the attributes of things in themselves. These universals are partially obtained also by the quantum minds, and are endowed with subjective meaning. The units of the subjective universals are qualia, which are strictly related to the (virtual) existence of Planckian black holes. Further, we consider two aspects

  7. Novel Approaches to Quantum Computation Using Solid State Qubits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-31

    Han, A scheme for the teleportation of multiqubit quantum information via the control of many agents in a network, submitted to Phys. Lett. A, 343...approach, Phys. Rev. B 70, 094513 (2004). 22. C.-P. Yang, S.-I. Chu, and S. Han, Efficient many party controlled teleportation of multiqubit quantum ...June 1, 2001- September 30, 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER "Novel Approaches to Quantum Computation Using Solid State Qubits" F49620

  8. Combining Dynamical Decoupling with Fault-Tolerant Quantum Computation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-17

    ar X iv :0 91 1. 32 02 v1 [ qu an t- ph ] 1 7 N ov 2 00 9 Combining dynamical decoupling with fault-tolerant quantum computation Hui Khoon Ng,1...Daniel A. Lidar,2 and John Preskill1 1Institute for Quantum Information, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA 2Departments...of Chemistry, Electrical Engineering, and Physics, and Center for Quantum Information Science & Technology, University of Southern California, Los

  9. Single Photon Holographic Qudit Elements for Linear Optical Quantum Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    in optical volume holography and designed and simulated practical single-photon, single-optical elements for qudit MUB-state quantum in- formation...Independent of the representation we use, the MUB states will ordinarily be modulated in both amplitude and phase. Recently a practical method has been...quantum computing with qudits (d ≥ 3) has been an efficient and practical quantum state sorter for photons whose complex fields are modulated in both

  10. Universal continuous-variable quantum computation without cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Hoi-Kwan; Plenio, Martin B.

    2017-02-01

    One limitation of the quantum computing capability of a continuous-variable system is determined by our ability to cool it to the ground state, because pure logical states, in which we accurately encode quantum information, are conventionally pure physical states that are constructed from the ground state. In this work, we present an alternative quantum computing formalism that encodes logical quantum information in mixed physical states. We introduce a class of mixed-state protocols that are based on a parity encoding, and propose an implementation of the universal logic gates by using realistic hybrid interactions. When compared with the conventional pure-state protocols, our formalism could relax the necessity, and hence the systemic requirements, of cooling. Additionally, the mixed-state protocols are inherently resilient to a wider class of noise processes and reduce the fundamental energy consumption in initialization. Our work broadens the range of candidates for continuous-variable quantum computers.

  11. Quantum Computation using Arrays of N Polar Molecules in Pendular States.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qi; Cao, Yudong; Kais, Sabre; Friedrich, Bretislav; Herschbach, Dudley

    2016-11-18

    We investigate several aspects of realizing quantum computation using entangled polar molecules in pendular states. Quantum algorithms typically start from a product state |00⋯0⟩ and we show that up to a negligible error, the ground states of polar molecule arrays can be considered as the unentangled qubit basis state |00⋯0⟩ . This state can be prepared by simply allowing the system to reach thermal equilibrium at low temperature (<1 mK). We also evaluate entanglement, characterized by concurrence of pendular state qubits in dipole arrays as governed by the external electric field, dipole-dipole coupling and number N of molecules in the array. In the parameter regime that we consider for quantum computing, we find that qubit entanglement is modest, typically no greater than 10(-4) , confirming the negligible entanglement in the ground state. We discuss methods for realizing quantum computation in the gate model, measurement-based model, instantaneous quantum polynomial time circuits and the adiabatic model using polar molecules in pendular states. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Resilience to Time-Correlated Noise in Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombín, Héctor

    2016-10-01

    Fault-tolerant quantum computation techniques rely on weakly correlated noise. Here, I show that it is enough to assume weak spatial correlations: Time correlations can take any form. In particular, single-shot error-correction techniques exhibit a noise threshold for quantum memories under spatially local stochastic noise.

  13. A theoretical model of multi-agent quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihelic, F. Matthew

    2011-05-01

    The best design for practical quantum computing is one that emulates the multi-agent quantum logic function of natural biological systems. Such systems are theorized to be based upon a quantum gate formed by a nucleic acid Szilard engine (NASE) that converts Shannon entropy of encountered molecules into useful work of nucleic acid geometric reconfiguration. This theoretical mechanism is logically and thermodynamically reversible in this special case because it is literally constructed out of the (nucleic acid) information necessary for its function, thereby allowing the nucleic acid Szilard engine to function reversibly because, since the information by which it functions exists on both sides of the theoretical mechanism simultaneously, there would be no build-up of information within the theoretical mechanism, and therefore no irreversible thermodynamic energy cost would be necessary to erase information inside the mechanism. This symmetry breaking Szilard engine function is associated with emission and/or absorption of entangled photons that can provide quantum synchronization of other nucleic acid segments within and between cells. In this manner nucleic acids can be considered as a natural model of topological quantum computing in which the nonabelian interaction of genes can be represented within quantum knot/braid theory as anyon crosses determined by entropic loss or gain that leads to changes in nucleic acid covalent bond angles. This naturally occurring biological form of topological quantum computing can serve as a model for workable man-made multi-agent quantum computing systems.

  14. Quantum-dot cluster-state computing with encoded qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, Yaakov S.; Hellberg, C. Stephen; Levy, Jeremy

    2005-08-15

    A class of architectures is advanced for cluster-state quantum computation using quantum dots. These architectures include using single and multiple dots as logical qubits. Special attention is given to supercoherent qubits introduced by Bacon et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 247902 (2001)] for which we discuss the effects of various errors and present a means of error protection.

  15. Preparing ground States of quantum many-body systems on a quantum computer.

    PubMed

    Poulin, David; Wocjan, Pawel

    2009-04-03

    Preparing the ground state of a system of interacting classical particles is an NP-hard problem. Thus, there is in general no better algorithm to solve this problem than exhaustively going through all N configurations of the system to determine the one with lowest energy, requiring a running time proportional to N. A quantum computer, if it could be built, could solve this problem in time sqrt[N]. Here, we present a powerful extension of this result to the case of interacting quantum particles, demonstrating that a quantum computer can prepare the ground state of a quantum system as efficiently as it does for classical systems.

  16. Preparing Ground States of Quantum Many-Body Systems on a Quantum Computer

    SciTech Connect

    Poulin, David; Wocjan, Pawel

    2009-04-03

    Preparing the ground state of a system of interacting classical particles is an NP-hard problem. Thus, there is in general no better algorithm to solve this problem than exhaustively going through all N configurations of the system to determine the one with lowest energy, requiring a running time proportional to N. A quantum computer, if it could be built, could solve this problem in time {radical}(N). Here, we present a powerful extension of this result to the case of interacting quantum particles, demonstrating that a quantum computer can prepare the ground state of a quantum system as efficiently as it does for classical systems.

  17. Experimental quantum computing to solve systems of linear equations.

    PubMed

    Cai, X-D; Weedbrook, C; Su, Z-E; Chen, M-C; Gu, Mile; Zhu, M-J; Li, Li; Liu, Nai-Le; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2013-06-07

    Solving linear systems of equations is ubiquitous in all areas of science and engineering. With rapidly growing data sets, such a task can be intractable for classical computers, as the best known classical algorithms require a time proportional to the number of variables N. A recently proposed quantum algorithm shows that quantum computers could solve linear systems in a time scale of order log(N), giving an exponential speedup over classical computers. Here we realize the simplest instance of this algorithm, solving 2×2 linear equations for various input vectors on a quantum computer. We use four quantum bits and four controlled logic gates to implement every subroutine required, demonstrating the working principle of this algorithm.

  18. Blind quantum computation protocol in which Alice only makes measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimae, Tomoyuki; Fujii, Keisuke

    2013-05-01

    Blind quantum computation is a new secure quantum computing protocol which enables Alice (who does not have sufficient quantum technology) to delegate her quantum computation to Bob (who has a full-fledged quantum computer) in such a way that Bob cannot learn anything about Alice's input, output, and algorithm. In previous protocols, Alice needs to have a device which generates quantum states, such as single-photon states. Here we propose another type of blind computing protocol where Alice does only measurements, such as the polarization measurements with a threshold detector. In several experimental setups, such as optical systems, the measurement of a state is much easier than the generation of a single-qubit state. Therefore our protocols ease Alice's burden. Furthermore, the security of our protocol is based on the no-signaling principle, which is more fundamental than quantum physics. Finally, our protocols are device independent in the sense that Alice does not need to trust her measurement device in order to guarantee the security.

  19. Secure entanglement distillation for double-server blind quantum computation.

    PubMed

    Morimae, Tomoyuki; Fujii, Keisuke

    2013-07-12

    Blind quantum computation is a new secure quantum computing protocol where a client, who does not have enough quantum technologies at her disposal, can delegate her quantum computation to a server, who has a fully fledged quantum computer, in such a way that the server cannot learn anything about the client's input, output, and program. If the client interacts with only a single server, the client has to have some minimum quantum power, such as the ability of emitting randomly rotated single-qubit states or the ability of measuring states. If the client interacts with two servers who share Bell pairs but cannot communicate with each other, the client can be completely classical. For such a double-server scheme, two servers have to share clean Bell pairs, and therefore the entanglement distillation is necessary in a realistic noisy environment. In this Letter, we show that it is possible to perform entanglement distillation in the double-server scheme without degrading the security of blind quantum computing.

  20. Computing protein infrared spectroscopy with quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Besley, Nicholas A

    2007-12-15

    Quantum chemistry is a field of science that has undergone unprecedented advances in the last 50 years. From the pioneering work of Boys in the 1950s, quantum chemistry has evolved from being regarded as a specialized and esoteric discipline to a widely used tool that underpins much of the current research in chemistry today. This achievement was recognized with the award of the 1998 Nobel Prize in Chemistry to John Pople and Walter Kohn. As the new millennium unfolds, quantum chemistry stands at the forefront of an exciting new era. Quantitative calculations on systems of the magnitude of proteins are becoming a realistic possibility, an achievement that would have been unimaginable to the early pioneers of quantum chemistry. In this article we will describe ongoing work towards this goal, focusing on the calculation of protein infrared amide bands directly with quantum chemical methods.

  1. Experimental demonstration of a programmable quantum computer by NMR.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaehyun; Lee, Jae-Seung; Hwang, Taesoon; Lee, Soonchil

    2004-01-01

    A programmable quantum computer is experimentally demonstrated by nuclear magnetic resonance using one qubit for the program and two qubits for data. A non-separable two-qubit operation is performed in a programmable way to show the successful demonstration. Projective measurements required in the programmable quantum computer are simulated by averaging the results of experiments just like when producing an effective pure state.

  2. Universal linear Bogoliubov transformations through one-way quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Ukai, Ryuji; Yoshikawa, Jun-ichi; Iwata, Noriaki; Furusawa, Akira; Loock, Peter van

    2010-03-15

    We show explicitly how to realize an arbitrary linear unitary Bogoliubov (LUBO) transformation on a multimode quantum state through homodyne-based one-way quantum computation. Any LUBO transformation can be approximated by means of a fixed, finite-sized, sufficiently squeezed Gaussian cluster state that allows for the implementation of beam splitters (in form of three-mode connection gates) and general one-mode LUBO transformations. In particular, we demonstrate that a linear four-mode cluster state is a sufficient resource for an arbitrary one-mode LUBO transformation. Arbitrary-input quantum states including non-Gaussian states could be efficiently attached to the cluster through quantum teleportation.

  3. Thermalization in nature and on a quantum computer.

    PubMed

    Riera, Arnau; Gogolin, Christian; Eisert, Jens

    2012-02-24

    In this work, we show how Gibbs or thermal states appear dynamically in closed quantum many-body systems, building on the program of dynamical typicality. We introduce a novel perturbation theorem for physically relevant weak system-bath couplings that is applicable even in the thermodynamic limit. We identify conditions under which thermalization happens and discuss the underlying physics. Based on these results, we also present a fully general quantum algorithm for preparing Gibbs states on a quantum computer with a certified runtime and error bound. This complements quantum Metropolis algorithms, which are expected to be efficient but have no known runtime estimates and only work for local Hamiltonians.

  4. Quantum computation for large-scale image classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Yue; Chen, Hanwu; Tan, Jianing; Li, Xi

    2016-10-01

    Due to the lack of an effective quantum feature extraction method, there is currently no effective way to perform quantum image classification or recognition. In this paper, for the first time, a global quantum feature extraction method based on Schmidt decomposition is proposed. A revised quantum learning algorithm is also proposed that will classify images by computing the Hamming distance of these features. From the experimental results derived from the benchmark database Caltech 101, and an analysis of the algorithm, an effective approach to large-scale image classification is derived and proposed against the background of big data.

  5. Noise resistance of adiabatic quantum computation using random matrix theory

    SciTech Connect

    Roland, Jeremie; Cerf, Nicolas J.

    2005-03-01

    Besides the traditional circuit-based model of quantum computation, several quantum algorithms based on a continuous-time Hamiltonian evolution have recently been introduced, including for instance continuous-time quantum walk algorithms as well as adiabatic quantum algorithms. Unfortunately, very little is known today about the behavior of these Hamiltonian algorithms in the presence of noise. Here, we perform a fully analytical study of the resistance to noise of these algorithms using perturbation theory combined with a theoretical noise model based on random matrices drawn from the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble, whose elements vary in time and form a stationary random process.

  6. ONSET OF CHAOS IN A MODEL OF QUANTUM COMPUTATION

    SciTech Connect

    G. BERMAN; ET AL

    2001-02-01

    Recently, the question of a relevance of the so-called quantum chaos has been raised in applications to quantum computation [2,3]. Indeed, according to the general approach to closed systems of finite number of interacting Fermi-particles (see, e.g. [4,5]), with an increase of an interaction between qubits a kind of chaos is expected to emerge in the energy spectra and structure of many-body states. Specifically, the fluctuations of energy levels and components of the eigenstates turn out to be very strong and described by the Random Matrix Theory. Clearly, if this happens in a quantum computer, it may lead to a destruction of the coherence of quantum computations due to internal decoherence inside many-body states. It is important to stress that quantum chaos occurs not only in the systems with random interaction, but also for purely dynamical interaction. In the latter case, the mechanism of chaos is due to a complex (non-linear) form of a two-body interaction represented in the basis of non-interacting particles. Numerical analysis [2] of a simplest model of quantum computer (2D model of 1/2-spins with a random interqubit interaction J) shows that with an increase of the number L of qubits, the chaos threshold J{sub cr} decreases as J{sub cr} {infinity} 1/L. On this ground, it was claimed that the onset of quantum chaos could be dangerous for quantum computers, since their effectiveness requires L >> 1. On the other hand, in [3] it was argued that in order to treat this problem properly, one needs to distinguish between chaotic properties of stationary states, and the dynamical process of quantum computation.

  7. Spin Glass a Bridge Between Quantum Computation and Statistical Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohzeki, Masayuki

    2013-09-01

    In this chapter, we show two fascinating topics lying between quantum information processing and statistical mechanics. First, we introduce an elaborated technique, the surface code, to prepare the particular quantum state with robustness against decoherence. Interestingly, the theoretical limitation of the surface code, accuracy threshold, to restore the quantum state has a close connection with the problem on the phase transition in a special model known as spin glasses, which is one of the most active researches in statistical mechanics. The phase transition in spin glasses is an intractable problem, since we must strive many-body system with complicated interactions with change of their signs depending on the distance between spins. Fortunately, recent progress in spin-glass theory enables us to predict the precise location of the critical point, at which the phase transition occurs. It means that statistical mechanics is available for revealing one of the most interesting parts in quantum information processing. We show how to import the special tool in statistical mechanics into the problem on the accuracy threshold in quantum computation. Second, we show another interesting technique to employ quantum nature, quantum annealing. The purpose of quantum annealing is to search for the most favored solution of a multivariable function, namely optimization problem. The most typical instance is the traveling salesman problem to find the minimum tour while visiting all the cities. In quantum annealing, we introduce quantum fluctuation to drive a particular system with the artificial Hamiltonian, in which the ground state represents the optimal solution of the specific problem we desire to solve. Induction of the quantum fluctuation gives rise to the quantum tunneling effect, which allows nontrivial hopping from state to state. We then sketch a strategy to control the quantum fluctuation efficiently reaching the ground state. Such a generic framework is called

  8. Quantum perceptron over a field and neural network architecture selection in a quantum computer.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Adenilton José; Ludermir, Teresa Bernarda; de Oliveira, Wilson Rosa

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we propose a quantum neural network named quantum perceptron over a field (QPF). Quantum computers are not yet a reality and the models and algorithms proposed in this work cannot be simulated in actual (or classical) computers. QPF is a direct generalization of a classical perceptron and solves some drawbacks found in previous models of quantum perceptrons. We also present a learning algorithm named Superposition based Architecture Learning algorithm (SAL) that optimizes the neural network weights and architectures. SAL searches for the best architecture in a finite set of neural network architectures with linear time over the number of patterns in the training set. SAL is the first learning algorithm to determine neural network architectures in polynomial time. This speedup is obtained by the use of quantum parallelism and a non-linear quantum operator. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Building logical qubits in a superconducting quantum computing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambetta, Jay M.; Chow, Jerry M.; Steffen, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    The technological world is in the midst of a quantum computing and quantum information revolution. Since Richard Feynman's famous `plenty of room at the bottom' lecture (Feynman, Engineering and Science23, 22 (1960)), hinting at the notion of novel devices employing quantum mechanics, the quantum information community has taken gigantic strides in understanding the potential applications of a quantum computer and laid the foundational requirements for building one. We believe that the next significant step will be to demonstrate a quantum memory, in which a system of interacting qubits stores an encoded logical qubit state longer than the incorporated parts. Here, we describe the important route towards a logical memory with superconducting qubits, employing a rotated version of the surface code. The current status of technology with regards to interconnected superconducting-qubit networks will be described and near-term areas of focus to improve devices will be identified. Overall, the progress in this exciting field has been astounding, but we are at an important turning point, where it will be critical to incorporate engineering solutions with quantum architectural considerations, laying the foundation towards scalable fault-tolerant quantum computers in the near future.

  10. QDENSITY/QCWAVE: A Mathematica quantum computer simulation update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabakin, Frank

    2016-04-01

    The Mathematica quantum computer simulation packages QDENSITY and QCWAVE are updated for Mathematica 9-10.3. An overview is given of the new QDensity, QCWave, BTSystem and Circuits packages, which includes: (1) improved treatment of tensor products of states and density matrices, (2) major extension to include qutrit (triplet), as well as qubit (binary) and hybrid qubit/qutrit systems in the associated BTSystem package, (3) updated sample quantum computation algorithms, (4) entanglement studies, including Schmidt decomposition, entropy, mutual information, partial transposition, and calculation of the quantum discord. Examples of Bell's theorem and concurrence are also included. This update will hopefully aid in studies of QC dynamics.

  11. Scalable digital hardware for a trapped ion quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mount, Emily; Gaultney, Daniel; Vrijsen, Geert; Adams, Michael; Baek, So-Young; Hudek, Kai; Isabella, Louis; Crain, Stephen; van Rynbach, Andre; Maunz, Peter; Kim, Jungsang

    2016-12-01

    Many of the challenges of scaling quantum computer hardware lie at the interface between the qubits and the classical control signals used to manipulate them. Modular ion trap quantum computer architectures address scalability by constructing individual quantum processors interconnected via a network of quantum communication channels. Successful operation of such quantum hardware requires a fully programmable classical control system capable of frequency stabilizing the continuous wave lasers necessary for loading, cooling, initialization, and detection of the ion qubits, stabilizing the optical frequency combs used to drive logic gate operations on the ion qubits, providing a large number of analog voltage sources to drive the trap electrodes, and a scheme for maintaining phase coherence among all the controllers that manipulate the qubits. In this work, we describe scalable solutions to these hardware development challenges.

  12. Negative quasi-probability as a resource for quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitch, Victor; Ferrie, Christopher; Gross, David; Emerson, Joseph

    2012-11-01

    A central problem in quantum information is to determine the minimal physical resources that are required for quantum computational speed-up and, in particular, for fault-tolerant quantum computation. We establish a remarkable connection between the potential for quantum speed-up and the onset of negative values in a distinguished quasi-probability representation, a discrete analogue of the Wigner function for quantum systems of odd dimension. This connection allows us to resolve an open question on the existence of bound states for magic state distillation: we prove that there exist mixed states outside the convex hull of stabilizer states that cannot be distilled to non-stabilizer target states using stabilizer operations. We also provide an efficient simulation protocol for Clifford circuits that extends to a large class of mixed states, including bound universal states.

  13. Exponential rise of dynamical complexity in quantum computing through projections

    PubMed Central

    Burgarth, Daniel Klaus; Facchi, Paolo; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Nakazato, Hiromichi; Pascazio, Saverio; Yuasa, Kazuya

    2014-01-01

    The ability of quantum systems to host exponentially complex dynamics has the potential to revolutionize science and technology. Therefore, much effort has been devoted to developing of protocols for computation, communication and metrology, which exploit this scaling, despite formidable technical difficulties. Here we show that the mere frequent observation of a small part of a quantum system can turn its dynamics from a very simple one into an exponentially complex one, capable of universal quantum computation. After discussing examples, we go on to show that this effect is generally to be expected: almost any quantum dynamics becomes universal once ‘observed’ as outlined above. Conversely, we show that any complex quantum dynamics can be ‘purified’ into a simpler one in larger dimensions. We conclude by demonstrating that even local noise can lead to an exponentially complex dynamics. PMID:25300692

  14. Exponential rise of dynamical complexity in quantum computing through projections.

    PubMed

    Burgarth, Daniel Klaus; Facchi, Paolo; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Nakazato, Hiromichi; Pascazio, Saverio; Yuasa, Kazuya

    2014-10-10

    The ability of quantum systems to host exponentially complex dynamics has the potential to revolutionize science and technology. Therefore, much effort has been devoted to developing of protocols for computation, communication and metrology, which exploit this scaling, despite formidable technical difficulties. Here we show that the mere frequent observation of a small part of a quantum system can turn its dynamics from a very simple one into an exponentially complex one, capable of universal quantum computation. After discussing examples, we go on to show that this effect is generally to be expected: almost any quantum dynamics becomes universal once 'observed' as outlined above. Conversely, we show that any complex quantum dynamics can be 'purified' into a simpler one in larger dimensions. We conclude by demonstrating that even local noise can lead to an exponentially complex dynamics.

  15. New Approaches to Quantum Computing using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Colvin, M; Krishnan, V V

    2003-02-07

    The power of a quantum computer (QC) relies on the fundamental concept of the superposition in quantum mechanics and thus allowing an inherent large-scale parallelization of computation. In a QC, binary information embodied in a quantum system, such as spin degrees of freedom of a spin-1/2 particle forms the qubits (quantum mechanical bits), over which appropriate logical gates perform the computation. In classical computers, the basic unit of information is the bit, which can take a value of either 0 or 1. Bits are connected together by logic gates to form logic circuits to implement complex logical operations. The expansion of modern computers has been driven by the developments of faster, smaller and cheaper logic gates. As the size of the logic gates become smaller toward the level of atomic dimensions, the performance of such a system is no longer considered classical but is rather governed by quantum mechanics. Quantum computers offer the potentially superior prospect of solving computational problems that are intractable to classical computers such as efficient database searches and cryptography. A variety of algorithms have been developed recently, most notably Shor's algorithm for factorizing long numbers into prime factors in polynomial time and Grover's quantum search algorithm. The algorithms that were of only theoretical interest as recently, until several methods were proposed to build an experimental QC. These methods include, trapped ions, cavity-QED, coupled quantum dots, Josephson junctions, spin resonance transistors, linear optics and nuclear magnetic resonance. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is uniquely capable of constructing small QCs and several algorithms have been implemented successfully. NMR-QC differs from other implementations in one important way that it is not a single QC, but a statistical ensemble of them. Thus, quantum computing based on NMR is considered as ensemble quantum computing. In NMR quantum computing, the spins with

  16. Quantum Computing: Selected Internet Resources for Librarians, Researchers, and the Casually Curious

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cirasella, Jill

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an annotated selection of the most important and informative Internet resources for learning about quantum computing, finding quantum computing literature, and tracking quantum computing news. All of the quantum computing resources described in this article are freely available, English-language web sites that fall into one…

  17. Quantum Computing: Selected Internet Resources for Librarians, Researchers, and the Casually Curious

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cirasella, Jill

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an annotated selection of the most important and informative Internet resources for learning about quantum computing, finding quantum computing literature, and tracking quantum computing news. All of the quantum computing resources described in this article are freely available, English-language web sites that fall into one…

  18. Quantum Computation Based on Photons with Three Degrees of Freedom

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ming-Xing; Li, Hui-Ran; Lai, Hong; Wang, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Quantum systems are important resources for quantum computer. Different from previous encoding forms using quantum systems with one degree of freedom (DoF) or two DoFs, we investigate the possibility of photon systems encoding with three DoFs consisting of the polarization DoF and two spatial DoFs. By exploring the optical circular birefringence induced by an NV center in a diamond embedded in the photonic crystal cavity, we propose several hybrid controlled-NOT (hybrid CNOT) gates operating on the two-photon or one-photon system. These hybrid CNOT gates show that three DoFs may be encoded as independent qubits without auxiliary DoFs. Our result provides a useful way to reduce quantum simulation resources by exploring complex quantum systems for quantum applications requiring large qubit systems. PMID:27174302

  19. Computational Role of Tunneling in a Programmable Quantum Annealer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boixo, Sergio; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Shabani, Alireza; Isakov, Sergei V.; Dykman, Mark; Amin, Mohammad; Mohseni, Masoud; Denchev, Vasil S.; Neven, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Quantum tunneling is a phenomenon in which a quantum state tunnels through energy barriers above the energy of the state itself. Tunneling has been hypothesized as an advantageous physical resource for optimization. Here we present the first experimental evidence of a computational role of multiqubit quantum tunneling in the evolution of a programmable quantum annealer. We developed a theoretical model based on a NIBA Quantum Master Equation to describe the multi-qubit dissipative cotunneling effects under the complex noise characteristics of such quantum devices.We start by considering a computational primitive, the simplest non-convex optimization problem consisting of just one global and one local minimum. The quantum evolutions enable tunneling to the global minimum while the corresponding classical paths are trapped in a false minimum. In our study the non-convex potentials are realized by frustrated networks of qubit clusters with strong intra-cluster coupling. We show that the collective effect of the quantum environment is suppressed in the critical phase during the evolution where quantum tunneling decides the right path to solution. In a later stage dissipation facilitates the multiqubit cotunneling leading to the solution state. The predictions of the model accurately describe the experimental data from the D-WaveII quantum annealer at NASA Ames. In our computational primitive the temperature dependence of the probability of success in the quantum model is opposite to that of the classical paths with thermal hopping. Specially, we provide an analysis of an optimization problem with sixteen qubits,demonstrating eight qubit cotunneling that increases success probabilities. Furthermore, we report results for larger problems with up to 200 qubits that contain the primitive as subproblems.

  20. Limits on the Power of Some Models of Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Gerardo; Somma, Rolando; Barnum, Howard; Knill, Emanuel

    2006-09-01

    We consider quantum computational models defined via a Lie-algebraic theory. In these models, specified initial states are acted on by Lie-algebraic quantum gates and the expectation values of Lie algebra elements are measured at the end. We show that these models can be efficiently simulated on a classical computer in time polynomial in the dimension of the algebra, regardless of the dimension of the Hilbert space where the algebra acts. Similar results hold for the computation of the expectation value of operators implemented by a gate-sequence. We introduce a Lie-algebraic notion of generalized mean-field Hamiltonians and show that they are efficiently (exactly) solvable by means of a Jacobi-like diagonalization method. Our results generalize earlier ones on fermionic linear optics computation and provide insight into the source of the power of the conventional model of quantum computation.

  1. Limits on the Power of Some Models of Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Gerardo; Somma, Rolando; Barnum, Howard; Knill, Emanuel

    We consider quantum computational models defined via a Lie-algebraic theory. In these models, specified initial states are acted on by Lie-algebraic quantum gates and the expectation values of Lie algebra elements are measured at the end. We show that these models can be efficiently simulated on a classical computer in time polynomial in the dimension of the algebra, regardless of the dimension of the Hilbert space where the algebra acts. Similar results hold for the computation of the expectation value of operators implemented by a gate-sequence. We introduce a Lie-algebraic notion of generalized mean-field Hamiltonians and show that they are efficiently (exactly) solvable by means of a Jacobi-like diagonalization method. Our results generalize earlier ones on fermionic linear optics computation and provide insight into the source of the power of the conventional model of quantum computation.

  2. Nonadiabatic Holonomic Quantum Computation with Dressed-State Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Zheng-Yuan; Gu, Feng-Lei; Hong, Zhuo-Ping; Yang, Zi-He; Zhang, Dan-Wei; Hu, Yong; You, J. Q.

    2017-05-01

    Implementing holonomic quantum computation is a challenging task as it requires complicated interaction among multilevel systems. Here we propose to implement nonadiabatic holonomic quantum computation based on dressed-state qubits in circuit QED. An arbitrary holonomic single-qubit gate can be conveniently achieved using external microwave fields and tuning their amplitudes and phases. Meanwhile, nontrivial two-qubit gates can be implemented in a coupled-cavities scenario assisted by a grounding superconducting quantum-interference device (SQUID) with tunable interaction, where the tuning is achieved by modulating the ac flux threaded through the SQUID. In addition, our proposal is directly scalable, up to a two-dimensional lattice configuration. In the present scheme, the dressed states involve only the lowest two levels of each transmon qubit, and the effective interactions exploited are all of resonant nature. Therefore, we release the main difficulties for physical implementation of holonomic quantum computation on superconducting circuits.

  3. Continuous-Variable Instantaneous Quantum Computing is Hard to Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douce, T.; Markham, D.; Kashefi, E.; Diamanti, E.; Coudreau, T.; Milman, P.; van Loock, P.; Ferrini, G.

    2017-02-01

    Instantaneous quantum computing is a subuniversal quantum complexity class, whose circuits have proven to be hard to simulate classically in the discrete-variable realm. We extend this proof to the continuous-variable (CV) domain by using squeezed states and homodyne detection, and by exploring the properties of postselected circuits. In order to treat postselection in CVs, we consider finitely resolved homodyne detectors, corresponding to a realistic scheme based on discrete probability distributions of the measurement outcomes. The unavoidable errors stemming from the use of finitely squeezed states are suppressed through a qubit-into-oscillator Gottesman-Kitaev-Preskill encoding of quantum information, which was previously shown to enable fault-tolerant CV quantum computation. Finally, we show that, in order to render postselected computational classes in CVs meaningful, a logarithmic scaling of the squeezing parameter with the circuit size is necessary, translating into a polynomial scaling of the input energy.

  4. Continuous-Variable Instantaneous Quantum Computing is Hard to Sample.

    PubMed

    Douce, T; Markham, D; Kashefi, E; Diamanti, E; Coudreau, T; Milman, P; van Loock, P; Ferrini, G

    2017-02-17

    Instantaneous quantum computing is a subuniversal quantum complexity class, whose circuits have proven to be hard to simulate classically in the discrete-variable realm. We extend this proof to the continuous-variable (CV) domain by using squeezed states and homodyne detection, and by exploring the properties of postselected circuits. In order to treat postselection in CVs, we consider finitely resolved homodyne detectors, corresponding to a realistic scheme based on discrete probability distributions of the measurement outcomes. The unavoidable errors stemming from the use of finitely squeezed states are suppressed through a qubit-into-oscillator Gottesman-Kitaev-Preskill encoding of quantum information, which was previously shown to enable fault-tolerant CV quantum computation. Finally, we show that, in order to render postselected computational classes in CVs meaningful, a logarithmic scaling of the squeezing parameter with the circuit size is necessary, translating into a polynomial scaling of the input energy.

  5. Entropic Lattice Boltzmann Models and Quantum Computation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    cellular automata, quantum cellular automata, action principles, periodic orbits, turbulence U U U UL 8 Bruce M. Boghosian (617) 627–3054 Contents 1...thereof . . 6 2.5 Lattice Boltzmann algorithm for periodic unstable orbits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 3 Personnel Supported 7 3.1 2005...continue to work on it in the remaining period of this grant. There are reasons for optimism in the search for quantum circuits described above. First, if

  6. Computational Issues in the Control of Quantum Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabitz, Herschel

    2003-03-01

    Computational Issues in the Control of Quantum Dynamics Phenomena Herschel Rabitz Department of Chemistry Princeton University The control of quantum phenomena embraces a variety of applications, with the most common implementation involving tailored laser pulses to steer the dynamics of a quantum system towards some specified observable outcome. The theoretical and computational aspects of this subject are intimately tied to the growing experimental capabilities, especially the ability to perform massive numbers of high throughput experiments. Computational studies in this context have special roles. Especially important is the use of computational techniques to develop new control algorithms, which ultimately would be implemented in the laboratory to guide the control of complex quantum systems. Beyond control alone, many of the same concepts can be exploited for the performance of experiments optimally tuned for inversion, to extract Hamiltonian information. The latter scenario poses very high demands on the efficiency of solving the quantum dynamics equations to extract the information content from the experimental data. The concept of exploiting a computational quantum control tool kit will be introduced as a means for addressing many of these challenges.

  7. LDRD final report on quantum computing using interacting semiconductor quantum wires.

    SciTech Connect

    Lyo, Sungkwun Kenneth; Dunn, Roberto G.; Lilly, Michael Patrick; Tibbetts, Denise R. ); Stephenson, Larry L.; Seamons, John Andrew; Reno, John Louis; Bielejec, Edward Salvador; Simmons, Jerry Alvon

    2006-01-01

    For several years now quantum computing has been viewed as a new paradigm for certain computing applications. Of particular importance to this burgeoning field is the development of an algorithm for factoring large numbers which obviously has deep implications for cryptography and national security. Implementation of these theoretical ideas faces extraordinary challenges in preparing and manipulating quantum states. The quantum transport group at Sandia has demonstrated world-leading, unique double quantum wires devices where we have unprecedented control over the coupling strength, number of 1 D channels, overlap and interaction strength in this nanoelectronic system. In this project, we study 1D-1D tunneling with the ultimate aim of preparing and detecting quantum states of the coupled wires. In a region of strong tunneling, electrons can coherently oscillate from one wire to the other. By controlling the velocity of the electrons, length of the coupling region and tunneling strength we will attempt to observe tunneling oscillations. This first step is critical for further development double quantum wires into the basic building block for a quantum computer, and indeed for other coupled nanoelectronic devices that will rely on coherent transport. If successful, this project will have important implications for nanoelectronics, quantum computing and information technology.

  8. Quantum Monte Carlo Endstation for Petascale Computing

    SciTech Connect

    David Ceperley

    2011-03-02

    CUDA GPU platform. We restructured the CPU algorithms to express additional parallelism, minimize GPU-CPU communication, and efficiently utilize the GPU memory hierarchy. Using mixed precision on GT200 GPUs and MPI for intercommunication and load balancing, we observe typical full-application speedups of approximately 10x to 15x relative to quad-core Xeon CPUs alone, while reproducing the double-precision CPU results within statistical error. We developed an all-electron quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) method for solids that does not rely on pseudopotentials, and used it to construct a primary ultra-high-pressure calibration based on the equation of state of cubic boron nitride. We computed the static contribution to the free energy with the QMC method and obtained the phonon contribution from density functional theory, yielding a high-accuracy calibration up to 900 GPa usable directly in experiment. We computed the anharmonic Raman frequency shift with QMC simulations as a function of pressure and temperature, allowing optical pressure calibration. In contrast to present experimental approaches, small systematic errors in the theoretical EOS do not increase with pressure, and no extrapolation is needed. This all-electron method is applicable to first-row solids, providing a new reference for ab initio calculations of solids and benchmarks for pseudopotential accuracy. We compared experimental and theoretical results on the momentum distribution and the quasiparticle renormalization factor in sodium. From an x-ray Compton-profile measurement of the valence-electron momentum density, we derived its discontinuity at the Fermi wavevector finding an accurate measure of the renormalization factor that we compared with quantum-Monte-Carlo and G0W0 calculations performed both on crystalline sodium and on the homogeneous electron gas. Our calculated results are in good agreement with the experiment. We have been studying the heat of formation for various Kubas complexes of molecular

  9. Geometric algebra and information geometry for quantum computational software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cafaro, Carlo

    2017-03-01

    The art of quantum algorithm design is highly nontrivial. Grover's search algorithm constitutes a masterpiece of quantum computational software. In this article, we use methods of geometric algebra (GA) and information geometry (IG) to enhance the algebraic efficiency and the geometrical significance of the digital and analog representations of Grover's algorithm, respectively. Specifically, GA is used to describe the Grover iterate and the discretized iterative procedure that exploits quantum interference to amplify the probability amplitude of the target-state before measuring the query register. The transition from digital to analog descriptions occurs via Stone's theorem which relates the (unitary) Grover iterate to a suitable (Hermitian) Hamiltonian that controls Schrodinger's quantum mechanical evolution of a quantum state towards the target state. Once the discrete-to-continuos transition is completed, IG is used to interpret Grover's iterative procedure as a geodesic path on the manifold of the parametric density operators of pure quantum states constructed from the continuous approximation of the parametric quantum output state in Grover's algorithm. Finally, we discuss the dissipationless nature of quantum computing, recover the quadratic speedup relation, and identify the superfluity of the Walsh-Hadamard operation from an IG perspective with emphasis on statistical mechanical considerations.

  10. Blind quantum computation over a collective-noise channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Yuki; Fujii, Keisuke; Ikuta, Rikizo; Yamamoto, Takashi; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2016-05-01

    Blind quantum computation (BQC) allows a client (Alice), who only possesses relatively poor quantum devices, to delegate universal quantum computation to a server (Bob) in such a way that Bob cannot know Alice's inputs, algorithm, and outputs. The quantum channel between Alice and Bob is noisy, and the loss over the long-distance quantum communication should also be taken into account. Here we propose to use decoherence-free subspace (DFS) to overcome the collective noise in the quantum channel for BQC, which we call DFS-BQC. We propose three variations of DFS-BQC protocols. One of them, a coherent-light-assisted DFS-BQC protocol, allows Alice to faithfully send the signal photons with a probability proportional to a transmission rate of the quantum channel. In all cases, we combine the ideas based on DFS and the Broadbent-Fitzsimons-Kashefi protocol, which is one of the BQC protocols, without degrading unconditional security. The proposed DFS-based schemes are generic and hence can be applied to other BQC protocols where Alice sends quantum states to Bob.

  11. Analysis of an Atom-Optical Architecture for Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devitt, Simon J.; Stephens, Ashley M.; Munro, William J.; Nemoto, Kae

    Quantum technology based on photons has emerged as one of the most promising platforms for quantum information processing, having already been used in proof-of-principle demonstrations of quantum communication and quantum computation. However, the scalability of this technology depends on the successful integration of experimentally feasible devices in an architecture that tolerates realistic errors and imperfections. Here, we analyse an atom-optical architecture for quantum computation designed to meet the requirements of scalability. The architecture is based on a modular atom-cavity device that provides an effective photon-photon interaction, allowing for the rapid, deterministic preparation of a large class of entangled states. We begin our analysis at the physical level, where we outline the experimental cavity quantum electrodynamics requirements of the basic device. Then, we describe how a scalable network of these devices can be used to prepare a three-dimensional topological cluster state, sufficient for universal fault-tolerant quantum computation. We conclude at the application level, where we estimate the system-level requirements of the architecture executing an algorithm compiled for compatibility with the topological cluster state.

  12. Bifurcation-based adiabatic quantum computation with a nonlinear oscillator network.

    PubMed

    Goto, Hayato

    2016-02-22

    The dynamics of nonlinear systems qualitatively change depending on their parameters, which is called bifurcation. A quantum-mechanical nonlinear oscillator can yield a quantum superposition of two oscillation states, known as a Schrödinger cat state, via quantum adiabatic evolution through its bifurcation point. Here we propose a quantum computer comprising such quantum nonlinear oscillators, instead of quantum bits, to solve hard combinatorial optimization problems. The nonlinear oscillator network finds optimal solutions via quantum adiabatic evolution, where nonlinear terms are increased slowly, in contrast to conventional adiabatic quantum computation or quantum annealing, where quantum fluctuation terms are decreased slowly. As a result of numerical simulations, it is concluded that quantum superposition and quantum fluctuation work effectively to find optimal solutions. It is also notable that the present computer is analogous to neural computers, which are also networks of nonlinear components. Thus, the present scheme will open new possibilities for quantum computation, nonlinear science, and artificial intelligence.

  13. Bifurcation-based adiabatic quantum computation with a nonlinear oscillator network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Hayato

    2016-02-01

    The dynamics of nonlinear systems qualitatively change depending on their parameters, which is called bifurcation. A quantum-mechanical nonlinear oscillator can yield a quantum superposition of two oscillation states, known as a Schrödinger cat state, via quantum adiabatic evolution through its bifurcation point. Here we propose a quantum computer comprising such quantum nonlinear oscillators, instead of quantum bits, to solve hard combinatorial optimization problems. The nonlinear oscillator network finds optimal solutions via quantum adiabatic evolution, where nonlinear terms are increased slowly, in contrast to conventional adiabatic quantum computation or quantum annealing, where quantum fluctuation terms are decreased slowly. As a result of numerical simulations, it is concluded that quantum superposition and quantum fluctuation work effectively to find optimal solutions. It is also notable that the present computer is analogous to neural computers, which are also networks of nonlinear components. Thus, the present scheme will open new possibilities for quantum computation, nonlinear science, and artificial intelligence.

  14. Bifurcation-based adiabatic quantum computation with a nonlinear oscillator network

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Hayato

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of nonlinear systems qualitatively change depending on their parameters, which is called bifurcation. A quantum-mechanical nonlinear oscillator can yield a quantum superposition of two oscillation states, known as a Schrödinger cat state, via quantum adiabatic evolution through its bifurcation point. Here we propose a quantum computer comprising such quantum nonlinear oscillators, instead of quantum bits, to solve hard combinatorial optimization problems. The nonlinear oscillator network finds optimal solutions via quantum adiabatic evolution, where nonlinear terms are increased slowly, in contrast to conventional adiabatic quantum computation or quantum annealing, where quantum fluctuation terms are decreased slowly. As a result of numerical simulations, it is concluded that quantum superposition and quantum fluctuation work effectively to find optimal solutions. It is also notable that the present computer is analogous to neural computers, which are also networks of nonlinear components. Thus, the present scheme will open new possibilities for quantum computation, nonlinear science, and artificial intelligence. PMID:26899997

  15. Quantum computing on lattices using global two-qubit gates

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanyos, G.; Massar, S.; Nagy, A. B.

    2005-08-15

    We study the computation power of lattices composed of two-dimensional systems (qubits) on which translationally invariant global two-qubit gates can be performed. We show that if a specific set of six global two qubit gates can be performed and if the initial state of the lattice can be suitably chosen, then a quantum computer can be efficiently simulated.

  16. Computational quantum chemistry and adaptive ligand modeling in mechanistic QSAR.

    PubMed

    De Benedetti, Pier G; Fanelli, Francesca

    2010-10-01

    Drugs are adaptive molecules. They realize this peculiarity by generating different ensembles of prototropic forms and conformers that depend on the environment. Among the impressive amount of available computational drug discovery technologies, quantitative structure-activity relationship approaches that rely on computational quantum chemistry descriptors are the most appropriate to model adaptive drugs. Indeed, computational quantum chemistry descriptors are able to account for the variation of the intramolecular interactions of the training compounds, which reflect their adaptive intermolecular interaction propensities. This enables the development of causative, interpretive and reasonably predictive quantitative structure-activity relationship models, and, hence, sound chemical information finalized to drug design and discovery.

  17. Dominant strategies in two-qubit quantum computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Faisal Shah

    2015-06-01

    Nash equilibrium is a solution concept in non-strictly competitive, noncooperative game theory that finds applications in various scientific and engineering disciplines. A non-strictly competitive, noncooperative game model is presented here for two-qubit quantum computations that allows for the characterization of Nash equilibrium in these computations via the inner product of their state space. Nash equilibrium outcomes are optimal under given constraints and therefore offer a game-theoretic measure of constrained optimization of two-qubit quantum computations.

  18. On the 'principle of the quantumness', the quantumness of Relativity, and the computational grand-unification

    SciTech Connect

    D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro

    2010-05-04

    I will argue that the proposal of establishing operational foundations of Quantum Theory should have top-priority, and that the Lucien Hardy's program on Quantum Gravity should be paralleled by an analogous program on Quantum Field Theory (QFT), which needs to be reformulated, notwithstanding its experimental success. In this paper, after reviewing recently suggested operational 'principles of the quantumness', I address the problem on whether Quantum Theory and Special Relativity are unrelated theories, or instead, if the one implies the other. I show how Special Relativity can be indeed derived from causality of Quantum Theory, within the computational paradigm 'the universe is a huge quantum computer', reformulating QFT as a Quantum-Computational Field Theory (QCFT). In QCFT Special Relativity emerges from the fabric of the computational network, which also naturally embeds gauge invariance. In this scheme even the quantization rule and the Planck constant can in principle be derived as emergent from the underlying causal tapestry of space-time. In this way Quantum Theory remains the only theory operating the huge computer of the universe.Is the computational paradigm only a speculative tautology (theory as simulation of reality), or does it have a scientific value? The answer will come from Occam's razor, depending on the mathematical simplicity of QCFT. Here I will just start scratching the surface of QCFT, analyzing simple field theories, including Dirac's. The number of problems and unmotivated recipes that plague QFT strongly motivates us to undertake the QCFT project, since QCFT makes all such problems manifest, and forces a re-foundation of QFT.

  19. Quantum Gauss-Jordan Elimination and Simulation of Accounting Principles on Quantum Computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diep, Do Ngoc; Giang, Do Hoang; Van Minh, Nguyen

    2017-06-01

    The paper is devoted to a version of Quantum Gauss-Jordan Elimination and its applications. In the first part, we construct the Quantum Gauss-Jordan Elimination (QGJE) Algorithm and estimate the complexity of computation of Reduced Row Echelon Form (RREF) of N × N matrices. The main result asserts that QGJE has computation time is of order 2 N/2. The second part is devoted to a new idea of simulation of accounting by quantum computing. We first expose the actual accounting principles in a pure mathematics language. Then, we simulate the accounting principles on quantum computers. We show that, all accounting actions are exhousted by the described basic actions. The main problems of accounting are reduced to some system of linear equations in the economic model of Leontief. In this simulation, we use our constructed Quantum Gauss-Jordan Elimination to solve the problems and the complexity of quantum computing is a square root order faster than the complexity in classical computing.

  20. Kochen-Specker Theorem as a Precondition for Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Koji; Nakamura, Tadao

    2016-12-01

    We study the relation between the Kochen-Specker theorem (the KS theorem) and quantum computing. The KS theorem rules out a realistic theory of the KS type. We consider the realistic theory of the KS type that the results of measurements are either +1 or -1. We discuss an inconsistency between the realistic theory of the KS type and the controllability of quantum computing. We have to give up the controllability if we accept the realistic theory of the KS type. We discuss an inconsistency between the realistic theory of the KS type and the observability of quantum computing. We discuss the inconsistency by using the double-slit experiment as the most basic experiment in quantum mechanics. This experiment can be for an easy detector to a Pauli observable. We cannot accept the realistic theory of the KS type to simulate the double-slit experiment in a significant specific case. The realistic theory of the KS type can not depicture quantum detector. In short, we have to give up both the observability and the controllability if we accept the realistic theory of the KS type. Therefore, the KS theorem is a precondition for quantum computing, i.e., the realistic theory of the KS type should be ruled out.

  1. Nonunitary quantum computation in the ground space of local Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usher, Naïri; Hoban, Matty J.; Browne, Dan E.

    2017-09-01

    A central result in the study of quantum Hamiltonian complexity is that the k -local Hamiltonian problem is quantum-Merlin-Arthur-complete. In that problem, we must decide if the lowest eigenvalue of a Hamiltonian is bounded below some value, or above another, promised one of these is true. Given the ground state of the Hamiltonian, a quantum computer can determine this question, even if the ground state itself may not be efficiently quantum preparable. Kitaev's proof of QMA-completeness encodes a unitary quantum circuit in QMA into the ground space of a Hamiltonian. However, we now have quantum computing models based on measurement instead of unitary evolution; furthermore, we can use postselected measurement as an additional computational tool. In this work, we generalize Kitaev's construction to allow for nonunitary evolution including postselection. Furthermore, we consider a type of postselection under which the construction is consistent, which we call tame postselection. We consider the computational complexity consequences of this construction and then consider how the probability of an event upon which we are postselecting affects the gap between the ground-state energy and the energy of the first excited state of its corresponding Hamiltonian. We provide numerical evidence that the two are not immediately related by giving a family of circuits where the probability of an event upon which we postselect is exponentially small, but the gap in the energy levels of the Hamiltonian decreases as a polynomial.

  2. From transistor to trapped-ion computers for quantum chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Yung, M.-H.; Casanova, J.; Mezzacapo, A.; McClean, J.; Lamata, L.; Aspuru-Guzik, A.; Solano, E.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few decades, quantum chemistry has progressed through the development of computational methods based on modern digital computers. However, these methods can hardly fulfill the exponentially-growing resource requirements when applied to large quantum systems. As pointed out by Feynman, this restriction is intrinsic to all computational models based on classical physics. Recently, the rapid advancement of trapped-ion technologies has opened new possibilities for quantum control and quantum simulations. Here, we present an efficient toolkit that exploits both the internal and motional degrees of freedom of trapped ions for solving problems in quantum chemistry, including molecular electronic structure, molecular dynamics, and vibronic coupling. We focus on applications that go beyond the capacity of classical computers, but may be realizable on state-of-the-art trapped-ion systems. These results allow us to envision a new paradigm of quantum chemistry that shifts from the current transistor to a near-future trapped-ion-based technology. PMID:24395054

  3. Continuous-variable quantum computing on encrypted data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Kevin; Jacobsen, Christian S.; Schäfermeier, Clemens; Gehring, Tobias; Weedbrook, Christian; Andersen, Ulrik L.

    2016-12-01

    The ability to perform computations on encrypted data is a powerful tool for protecting a client's privacy, especially in today's era of cloud and distributed computing. In terms of privacy, the best solutions that classical techniques can achieve are unfortunately not unconditionally secure in the sense that they are dependent on a hacker's computational power. Here we theoretically investigate, and experimentally demonstrate with Gaussian displacement and squeezing operations, a quantum solution that achieves the security of a user's privacy using the practical technology of continuous variables. We demonstrate losses of up to 10 km both ways between the client and the server and show that security can still be achieved. Our approach offers a number of practical benefits (from a quantum perspective) that could one day allow the potential widespread adoption of this quantum technology in future cloud-based computing networks.

  4. Entanglement-Based Machine Learning on a Quantum Computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, X.-D.; Wu, D.; Su, Z.-E.; Chen, M.-C.; Wang, X.-L.; Li, Li; Liu, N.-L.; Lu, C.-Y.; Pan, J.-W.

    2015-03-01

    Machine learning, a branch of artificial intelligence, learns from previous experience to optimize performance, which is ubiquitous in various fields such as computer sciences, financial analysis, robotics, and bioinformatics. A challenge is that machine learning with the rapidly growing "big data" could become intractable for classical computers. Recently, quantum machine learning algorithms [Lloyd, Mohseni, and Rebentrost, arXiv.1307.0411] were proposed which could offer an exponential speedup over classical algorithms. Here, we report the first experimental entanglement-based classification of two-, four-, and eight-dimensional vectors to different clusters using a small-scale photonic quantum computer, which are then used to implement supervised and unsupervised machine learning. The results demonstrate the working principle of using quantum computers to manipulate and classify high-dimensional vectors, the core mathematical routine in machine learning. The method can, in principle, be scaled to larger numbers of qubits, and may provide a new route to accelerate machine learning.

  5. Continuous-variable quantum computing on encrypted data

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Kevin; Jacobsen, Christian S.; Schäfermeier, Clemens; Gehring, Tobias; Weedbrook, Christian; Andersen, Ulrik L.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to perform computations on encrypted data is a powerful tool for protecting a client's privacy, especially in today's era of cloud and distributed computing. In terms of privacy, the best solutions that classical techniques can achieve are unfortunately not unconditionally secure in the sense that they are dependent on a hacker's computational power. Here we theoretically investigate, and experimentally demonstrate with Gaussian displacement and squeezing operations, a quantum solution that achieves the security of a user's privacy using the practical technology of continuous variables. We demonstrate losses of up to 10 km both ways between the client and the server and show that security can still be achieved. Our approach offers a number of practical benefits (from a quantum perspective) that could one day allow the potential widespread adoption of this quantum technology in future cloud-based computing networks. PMID:27966528

  6. Entanglement-based machine learning on a quantum computer.

    PubMed

    Cai, X-D; Wu, D; Su, Z-E; Chen, M-C; Wang, X-L; Li, Li; Liu, N-L; Lu, C-Y; Pan, J-W

    2015-03-20

    Machine learning, a branch of artificial intelligence, learns from previous experience to optimize performance, which is ubiquitous in various fields such as computer sciences, financial analysis, robotics, and bioinformatics. A challenge is that machine learning with the rapidly growing "big data" could become intractable for classical computers. Recently, quantum machine learning algorithms [Lloyd, Mohseni, and Rebentrost, arXiv.1307.0411] were proposed which could offer an exponential speedup over classical algorithms. Here, we report the first experimental entanglement-based classification of two-, four-, and eight-dimensional vectors to different clusters using a small-scale photonic quantum computer, which are then used to implement supervised and unsupervised machine learning. The results demonstrate the working principle of using quantum computers to manipulate and classify high-dimensional vectors, the core mathematical routine in machine learning. The method can, in principle, be scaled to larger numbers of qubits, and may provide a new route to accelerate machine learning.

  7. Continuous-variable quantum computing on encrypted data.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Kevin; Jacobsen, Christian S; Schäfermeier, Clemens; Gehring, Tobias; Weedbrook, Christian; Andersen, Ulrik L

    2016-12-14

    The ability to perform computations on encrypted data is a powerful tool for protecting a client's privacy, especially in today's era of cloud and distributed computing. In terms of privacy, the best solutions that classical techniques can achieve are unfortunately not unconditionally secure in the sense that they are dependent on a hacker's computational power. Here we theoretically investigate, and experimentally demonstrate with Gaussian displacement and squeezing operations, a quantum solution that achieves the security of a user's privacy using the practical technology of continuous variables. We demonstrate losses of up to 10 km both ways between the client and the server and show that security can still be achieved. Our approach offers a number of practical benefits (from a quantum perspective) that could one day allow the potential widespread adoption of this quantum technology in future cloud-based computing networks.

  8. Quantum computing with spin cluster qubits.

    PubMed

    Meier, Florian; Levy, Jeremy; Loss, Daniel

    2003-01-31

    We study the low energy states of finite spin chains with isotropic (Heisenberg) and anisotropic (XY and Ising-like) antiferromagnetic exchange interaction with uniform and nonuniform coupling constants. We show that for an odd number of sites a spin cluster qubit can be defined in terms of the ground state doublet. This qubit is remarkably insensitive to the placement and coupling anisotropy of spins within the cluster. One- and two-qubit quantum gates can be generated by magnetic fields and intercluster exchange, and leakage during quantum gate operation is small. Spin cluster qubits inherit the long decoherence times and short gate operation times of single spins. Control of single spins is hence not necessary for the realization of universal quantum gates.

  9. Towards a fullerene-based quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, Simon C.; Ardavan, Arzhang; Briggs, G. Andrew D.; Britz, David A.; Gunlycke, Daniel; Jefferson, John; Jones, Mark A. G.; Leigh, David F.; Lovett, Brendon W.; Khlobystov, Andrei N.; Lyon, S. A.; Morton, John J. L.; Porfyrakis, Kyriakos; Sambrook, Mark R.; Tyryshkin, Alexei M.

    2006-05-01

    Molecular structures appear to be natural candidates for a quantum technology: individual atoms can support quantum superpositions for long periods, and such atoms can in principle be embedded in a permanent molecular scaffolding to form an array. This would be true nanotechnology, with dimensions of order of a nanometre. However, the challenges of realizing such a vision are immense. One must identify a suitable elementary unit and demonstrate its merits for qubit storage and manipulation, including input/output. These units must then be formed into large arrays corresponding to an functional quantum architecture, including a mechanism for gate operations. Here we report our efforts, both experimental and theoretical, to create such a technology based on endohedral fullerenes or 'buckyballs'. We describe our successes with respect to these criteria, along with the obstacles we are currently facing and the questions that remain to be addressed.

  10. Quantum-enhanced Sensing and Efficient Quantum Computation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-27

    detectors with multiport inteferometers, and used many of the same techniques with nanowire (faster but less efficient) detectors. They demonstrated single...in‐situ quantum state engineering. Finally, we note that we have also adapted the CDL to  simultaneously operate superconducting  nanowire  detectors...along with TESs. While  nanowire   detectors have yet to match the efficiency or counting capabilities of TESs, detector response times  shortened by a

  11. From computational quantum chemistry to computational biology: experiments and computations are (full) partners.

    PubMed

    Ma, Buyong; Nussinov, Ruth

    2004-12-01

    Computations are being integrated into biological research at an increasingly fast pace. This has not only changed the way in which biological information is managed; it has also changed the way in which experiments are planned in order to obtain information from nature. Can experiments and computations be full partners? Computational chemistry has expanded over the years, proceeding from computations of a hydrogen molecule toward the challenging goal of systems biology, which attempts to handle the entire living cell. Applying theories from ab initio quantum mechanics to simplified models, the virtual worlds explored by computations provide replicas of real-world phenomena. At the same time, the virtual worlds can affect our perception of the real world. Computational biology targets a world of complex organization, for which a unified theory is unlikely to exist. A computational biology model, even if it has a clear physical or chemical basis, may not reduce to physics and chemistry. At the molecular level, computational biology and experimental biology have already been partners, mutually benefiting from each other. For the perception to become reality, computation and experiment should be united as full partners in biological research.

  12. PERSPECTIVE: From computational quantum chemistry to computational biology: experiments and computations are (full) partners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Buyong; Nussinov, Ruth

    2004-12-01

    Computations are being integrated into biological research at an increasingly fast pace. This has not only changed the way in which biological information is managed; it has also changed the way in which experiments are planned in order to obtain information from nature. Can experiments and computations be full partners? Computational chemistry has expanded over the years, proceeding from computations of a hydrogen molecule toward the challenging goal of systems biology, which attempts to handle the entire living cell. Applying theories from ab initio quantum mechanics to simplified models, the virtual worlds explored by computations provide replicas of real-world phenomena. At the same time, the virtual worlds can affect our perception of the real world. Computational biology targets a world of complex organization, for which a unified theory is unlikely to exist. A computational biology model, even if it has a clear physical or chemical basis, may not reduce to physics and chemistry. At the molecular level, computational biology and experimental biology have already been partners, mutually benefiting from each other. For the perception to become reality, computation and experiment should be united as full partners in biological research.

  13. Universal quantum computation with hybrid spin-Majorana qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Silas; Schrade, Constantin; Klinovaja, Jelena; Loss, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically propose a set of universal quantum gates acting on a hybrid qubit formed by coupling a quantum-dot spin qubit and Majorana fermion qubit. First, we consider a quantum dot that is tunnel coupled to two topological superconductors. The effective spin-Majorana exchange facilitates a hybrid cnot gate for which either qubit can be the control or target. The second setup is a modular scalable network of topological superconductors and quantum dots. As a result of the exchange interaction between adjacent spin qubits, a cnot gate is implemented that acts on neighboring Majorana qubits and eliminates the necessity of interqubit braiding. In both setups, the spin-Majorana exchange interaction allows for a phase gate, acting on either the spin or the Majorana qubit, and for a swap or hybrid swap gate which is sufficient for universal quantum computation without projective measurements.

  14. Scheme for Entering Binary Data Into a Quantum Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Colin

    2005-01-01

    A quantum algorithm provides for the encoding of an exponentially large number of classical data bits by use of a smaller (polynomially large) number of quantum bits (qubits). The development of this algorithm was prompted by the need, heretofore not satisfied, for a means of entering real-world binary data into a quantum computer. The data format provided by this algorithm is suitable for subsequent ultrafast quantum processing of the entered data. Potential applications lie in disciplines (e.g., genomics) in which one needs to search for matches between parts of very long sequences of data. For example, the algorithm could be used to encode the N-bit-long human genome in only log2N qubits. The resulting log2N-qubit state could then be used for subsequent quantum data processing - for example, to perform rapid comparisons of sequences.

  15. A scalable architecture for quantum computation with molecular nanomagnets.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, M D; Zueco, D; Roubeau, O; Aromí, G; Majer, J; Luis, F

    2016-11-14

    A proposal for a magnetic quantum processor that consists of individual molecular spins coupled to superconducting coplanar resonators and transmission lines is carefully examined. We derive a simple magnetic quantum electrodynamics Hamiltonian to describe the underlying physics. It is shown that these hybrid devices can perform arbitrary operations on each spin qubit and induce tunable interactions between any pair of them. The combination of these two operations ensures that the processor can perform universal quantum computations. The feasibility of this proposal is critically discussed using the results of realistic calculations, based on parameters of existing devices and molecular qubits. These results show that the proposal is feasible, provided that molecules with sufficiently long coherence times can be developed and accurately integrated into specific areas of the device. This architecture has an enormous potential for scaling up quantum computation thanks to the microscopic nature of the individual constituents, the molecules, and the possibility of using their internal spin degrees of freedom.

  16. How to simulate a universal quantum computer using negative probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Holger F.

    2009-07-01

    The concept of negative probabilities can be used to decompose the interaction of two qubits mediated by a quantum controlled-NOT into three operations that require only classical interactions (that is, local operations and classical communication) between the qubits. For a single gate, the probabilities of the three operations are 1, 1 and -1. This decomposition can be applied in a probabilistic simulation of quantum computation by randomly choosing one of the three operations for each gate and assigning a negative statistical weight to the outcomes of sequences with an odd number of negative probability operations. The maximal exponential speed-up of a quantum computer can then be evaluated in terms of the increase in the number of sequences needed to simulate a single operation of the quantum circuit.

  17. Characterization of scalable ion traps for quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, R. J.; Bollinger, J. J.; Leibfried, D.; Seidelin, S.; Britton, J.; Wesenberg, J. H.; Shiga, N.; Amini, J. M.; Blakestad, R. B.; Brown, K. R.; Home, J. P.; Itano, W. M.; Jost, J. D.; Langer, C.; Ozeri, R.; Wineland, D. J.

    2007-03-01

    We discuss the experimental characterization of several scalable ion trap architectures for quantum information processing. We have developed an apparatus for testing planar ion trap chips which features: a standardized chip carrier for ease of interchanging traps, a single-laser Raman cooling scheme, and photo-ionization loading of Mg^+ ions. The primary benchmark for a given trap is the heating rate of the ion motional degrees of freedom, which can reduce multi-ion quantum gate fidelities. As the heating rate depends on the ion trap geometry and materials, our testing apparatus allows for efficient iteration and optimization of trap parameters. With the recent ability to fabricate planar traps with sufficiently low heating rates for quantum computation ^2, we describe current results on the simulation and fabrication of planar traps with multiple intersecting trapping zones for versatile ion choreography. S. Seidelin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 253003 (2006). J. Kim, et al., Quantum Inf. Comput. 5, 515 (2005).

  18. Linear optical quantum computing in a single spatial mode.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Peter C; Metcalf, Benjamin J; Spring, Justin B; Moore, Merritt; Jin, Xian-Min; Barbieri, Marco; Kolthammer, W Steven; Walmsley, Ian A

    2013-10-11

    We present a scheme for linear optical quantum computing using time-bin-encoded qubits in a single spatial mode. We show methods for single-qubit operations and heralded controlled-phase (cphase) gates, providing a sufficient set of operations for universal quantum computing with the Knill-Laflamme-Milburn [Nature (London) 409, 46 (2001)] scheme. Our protocol is suited to currently available photonic devices and ideally allows arbitrary numbers of qubits to be encoded in the same spatial mode, demonstrating the potential for time-frequency modes to dramatically increase the quantum information capacity of fixed spatial resources. As a test of our scheme, we demonstrate the first entirely single spatial mode implementation of a two-qubit quantum gate and show its operation with an average fidelity of 0.84±0.07.

  19. Quantum computation in the analysis of hyperspectral data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Richard B.; Ghoshal, Debabrata; Jayanna, Anil

    2004-08-01

    Recent research on the topic of quantum computation provides us with some quantum algorithms with higher efficiency and speedup compared to their classical counterparts. In this paper, it is our intent to provide the results of our investigation of several applications of such quantum algorithms - especially the Grover's Search algorithm - in the analysis of Hyperspectral Data. We found many parallels with Grover's method in existing data processing work that make use of classical spectral matching algorithms. Our efforts also included the study of several methods dealing with hyperspectral image analysis work where classical computation methods involving large data sets could be replaced with quantum computation methods. The crux of the problem in computation involving a hyperspectral image data cube is to convert the large amount of data in high dimensional space to real information. Currently, using the classical model, different time consuming methods and steps are necessary to analyze these data including: Animation, Minimum Noise Fraction Transform, Pixel Purity Index algorithm, N-dimensional scatter plot, Identification of Endmember spectra - are such steps. If a quantum model of computation involving hyperspectral image data can be developed and formalized - it is highly likely that information retrieval from hyperspectral image data cubes would be a much easier process and the final information content would be much more meaningful and timely. In this case, dimensionality would not be a curse, but a blessing.

  20. Noise tailoring for scalable quantum computation via randomized compiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallman, Joel J.; Emerson, Joseph

    2016-11-01

    Quantum computers are poised to radically outperform their classical counterparts by manipulating coherent quantum systems. A realistic quantum computer will experience errors due to the environment and imperfect control. When these errors are even partially coherent, they present a major obstacle to performing robust computations. Here, we propose a method for introducing independent random single-qubit gates into the logical circuit in such a way that the effective logical circuit remains unchanged. We prove that this randomization tailors the noise into stochastic Pauli errors, which can dramatically reduce error rates while introducing little or no experimental overhead. Moreover, we prove that our technique is robust to the inevitable variation in errors over the randomizing gates and numerically illustrate the dramatic reductions in worst-case error that are achievable. Given such tailored noise, gates with significantly lower fidelity—comparable to fidelities realized in current experiments—are sufficient to achieve fault-tolerant quantum computation. Furthermore, the worst-case error rate of the tailored noise can be directly and efficiently measured through randomized benchmarking protocols, enabling a rigorous certification of the performance of a quantum computer.

  1. Three-Dimensional Wiring for Extensible Quantum Computing: The Quantum Socket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béjanin, J. H.; McConkey, T. G.; Rinehart, J. R.; Earnest, C. T.; McRae, C. R. H.; Shiri, D.; Bateman, J. D.; Rohanizadegan, Y.; Penava, B.; Breul, P.; Royak, S.; Zapatka, M.; Fowler, A. G.; Mariantoni, M.

    2016-10-01

    Quantum computing architectures are on the verge of scalability, a key requirement for the implementation of a universal quantum computer. The next stage in this quest is the realization of quantum error-correction codes, which will mitigate the impact of faulty quantum information on a quantum computer. Architectures with ten or more quantum bits (qubits) have been realized using trapped ions and superconducting circuits. While these implementations are potentially scalable, true scalability will require systems engineering to combine quantum and classical hardware. One technology demanding imminent efforts is the realization of a suitable wiring method for the control and the measurement of a large number of qubits. In this work, we introduce an interconnect solution for solid-state qubits: the quantum socket. The quantum socket fully exploits the third dimension to connect classical electronics to qubits with higher density and better performance than two-dimensional methods based on wire bonding. The quantum socket is based on spring-mounted microwires—the three-dimensional wires—that push directly on a microfabricated chip, making electrical contact. A small wire cross section (approximately 1 mm), nearly nonmagnetic components, and functionality at low temperatures make the quantum socket ideal for operating solid-state qubits. The wires have a coaxial geometry and operate over a frequency range from dc to 8 GHz, with a contact resistance of approximately 150 m Ω , an impedance mismatch of approximately 10 Ω , and minimal cross talk. As a proof of principle, we fabricate and use a quantum socket to measure high-quality superconducting resonators at a temperature of approximately 10 mK. Quantum error-correction codes such as the surface code will largely benefit from the quantum socket, which will make it possible to address qubits located on a two-dimensional lattice. The present implementation of the socket could be readily extended to accommodate a

  2. Quantum Computational Complexity of Spin Glasses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-19

    the absence of an external magnetic field, and the Robertson - Seymour theorem from graph theory. We gave as an example a set of quantum circuits with a...classical algorithm for the Ising partition function of any planar graph in the absence of an external magnetic field, and the Robertson - Seymour theorem

  3. Prime factorization using quantum annealing and computational algebraic geometry

    PubMed Central

    Dridi, Raouf; Alghassi, Hedayat

    2017-01-01

    We investigate prime factorization from two perspectives: quantum annealing and computational algebraic geometry, specifically Gröbner bases. We present a novel autonomous algorithm which combines the two approaches and leads to the factorization of all bi-primes up to just over 200000, the largest number factored to date using a quantum processor. We also explain how Gröbner bases can be used to reduce the degree of Hamiltonians. PMID:28220854

  4. Prime factorization using quantum annealing and computational algebraic geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dridi, Raouf; Alghassi, Hedayat

    2017-02-01

    We investigate prime factorization from two perspectives: quantum annealing and computational algebraic geometry, specifically Gröbner bases. We present a novel autonomous algorithm which combines the two approaches and leads to the factorization of all bi-primes up to just over 200000, the largest number factored to date using a quantum processor. We also explain how Gröbner bases can be used to reduce the degree of Hamiltonians.

  5. Contextuality and Wigner-function negativity in qubit quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raussendorf, Robert; Browne, Dan E.; Delfosse, Nicolas; Okay, Cihan; Bermejo-Vega, Juan

    2017-05-01

    We describe schemes of quantum computation with magic states on qubits for which contextuality and negativity of the Wigner function are necessary resources possessed by the magic states. These schemes satisfy a constraint. Namely, the non-negativity of Wigner functions must be preserved under all available measurement operations. Furthermore, we identify stringent consistency conditions on such computational schemes, revealing the general structure by which negativity of Wigner functions, hardness of classical simulation of the computation, and contextuality are connected.

  6. Computer studies of multiple-quantum spin dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Murdoch, J.B.

    1982-11-01

    The excitation and detection of multiple-quantum (MQ) transitions in Fourier transform NMR spectroscopy is an interesting problem in the quantum mechanical dynamics of spin systems as well as an important new technique for investigation of molecular structure. In particular, multiple-quantum spectroscopy can be used to simplify overly complex spectra or to separate the various interactions between a nucleus and its environment. The emphasis of this work is on computer simulation of spin-system evolution to better relate theory and experiment.

  7. Topological quantum computing with Read-Rezayi states.

    PubMed

    Hormozi, L; Bonesteel, N E; Simon, S H

    2009-10-16

    Read-Rezayi fractional quantum Hall states are among the prime candidates for realizing non-Abelian anyons which, in principle, can be used for topological quantum computation. We present a prescription for efficiently finding braids which can be used to carry out a universal set of quantum gates on encoded qubits based on anyons of the Read-Rezayi states with k>2, k not equal 4. This work extends previous results which only applied to the case k=3 (Fibonacci) and clarifies why, in that case, gate constructions are simpler than for a generic Read-Rezayi state.

  8. Exploiting geometric degrees of freedom in topological quantum computing

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Haitan; Wan Xin

    2009-07-15

    In a topological quantum computer, braids of non-Abelian anyons in a (2+1)-dimensional space time form quantum gates, whose fault tolerance relies on the topological, rather than geometric, properties of the braids. Here we propose to create and exploit redundant geometric degrees of freedom to improve the theoretical accuracy of topological single- and two-qubit quantum gates. We demonstrate the power of the idea using explicit constructions in the Fibonacci model. We compare its efficiency with that of the Solovay-Kitaev algorithm and explain its connection to the leakage errors reduction in an earlier construction [H. Xu and X. Wan, Phys. Rev. A 78, 042325 (2008)].

  9. Positive Wigner Functions Render Classical Simulation of Quantum Computation Efficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mari, A.; Eisert, J.

    2012-12-01

    We show that quantum circuits where the initial state and all the following quantum operations can be represented by positive Wigner functions can be classically efficiently simulated. This is true both for continuous-variable as well as discrete variable systems in odd prime dimensions, two cases which will be treated on entirely the same footing. Noting the fact that Clifford and Gaussian operations preserve the positivity of the Wigner function, our result generalizes the Gottesman-Knill theorem. Our algorithm provides a way of sampling from the output distribution of a computation or a simulation, including the efficient sampling from an approximate output distribution in the case of sampling imperfections for initial states, gates, or measurements. In this sense, this work highlights the role of the positive Wigner function as separating classically efficiently simulable systems from those that are potentially universal for quantum computing and simulation, and it emphasizes the role of negativity of the Wigner function as a computational resource.

  10. Ground-state geometric quantum computing in superconducting systems

    SciTech Connect

    Solinas, P.; Moettoenen, M.

    2010-11-15

    We present a theoretical proposal for the implementation of geometric quantum computing based on a Hamiltonian which has a doubly degenerate ground state. Thus the system which is steered adiabatically, remains in the ground-state. The proposed physical implementation relies on a superconducting circuit composed of three SQUIDs and two superconducting islands with the charge states encoding the logical states. We obtain a universal set of single-qubit gates and implement a nontrivial two-qubit gate exploiting the mutual inductance between two neighboring circuits, allowing us to realize a fully geometric ground-state quantum computing. The introduced paradigm for the implementation of geometric quantum computing is expected to be robust against environmental effects.

  11. Degree of quantum correlation required to speed up a computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Alastair

    2015-12-01

    The one-clean-qubit model of quantum computation (DQC1) efficiently implements a computational task that is not known to have a classical alternative. During the computation, there is never more than a small but finite amount of entanglement present, and it is typically vanishingly small in the system size. In this paper, we demonstrate that there is nothing unexpected hidden within the DQC1 model—Grover's search, when acting on a mixed state, provably exhibits a speedup over classical, with guarantees as to the presence of only vanishingly small amounts of quantum correlations (entanglement and quantum discord)—while arguing that this is not an artifact of the oracle-based construction. We also present some important refinements in the evaluation of how much entanglement may be present in the DQC1 and how the typical entanglement of the system must be evaluated.

  12. Positive Wigner functions render classical simulation of quantum computation efficient.

    PubMed

    Mari, A; Eisert, J

    2012-12-07

    We show that quantum circuits where the initial state and all the following quantum operations can be represented by positive Wigner functions can be classically efficiently simulated. This is true both for continuous-variable as well as discrete variable systems in odd prime dimensions, two cases which will be treated on entirely the same footing. Noting the fact that Clifford and Gaussian operations preserve the positivity of the Wigner function, our result generalizes the Gottesman-Knill theorem. Our algorithm provides a way of sampling from the output distribution of a computation or a simulation, including the efficient sampling from an approximate output distribution in the case of sampling imperfections for initial states, gates, or measurements. In this sense, this work highlights the role of the positive Wigner function as separating classically efficiently simulable systems from those that are potentially universal for quantum computing and simulation, and it emphasizes the role of negativity of the Wigner function as a computational resource.

  13. Elliptical ion traps and trap arrays for quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devoe, Ralph G.

    1998-08-01

    The properties of a rf quadrupole trap, the elliptical ion trap, are derived. Elliptical traps can confine large numbers of ions in the Lamb-Dicke regime due to a hitherto unrecognized mechanism unique to one-dimensional Coulomb crystals, implicit in the theories of Dubin and Schiffer. This follows from a linear crystal stability condition, which uniquely relates the crystal size to ellipticity, and a micromotion relation, which reveals a 1/5-root dependence on the number of trapped ions. Elliptical traps offer several advantages over linear traps in the Cirac-Zoller model of quantum computing, both for initial tests and as a potential method of creating a full-scale quantum computer. Numerical solutions of a one-electrode structure show that microscopic elliptical traps, each containing ~100 ions, can be constructed at a density of 100 traps/cm2, making possible arrays containing >106 ions in the Lamb-Dicke regime for precision spectroscopy or quantum computation.

  14. Exploring quantum computing application to satellite data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, S.; Zhang, S. Q.

    2015-12-01

    This is an exploring work on potential application of quantum computing to a scientific data optimization problem. On classical computational platforms, the physical domain of a satellite data assimilation problem is represented by a discrete variable transform, and classical minimization algorithms are employed to find optimal solution of the analysis cost function. The computation becomes intensive and time-consuming when the problem involves large number of variables and data. The new quantum computer opens a very different approach both in conceptual programming and in hardware architecture for solving optimization problem. In order to explore if we can utilize the quantum computing machine architecture, we formulate a satellite data assimilation experimental case in the form of quadratic programming optimization problem. We find a transformation of the problem to map it into Quadratic Unconstrained Binary Optimization (QUBO) framework. Binary Wavelet Transform (BWT) will be applied to the data assimilation variables for its invertible decomposition and all calculations in BWT are performed by Boolean operations. The transformed problem will be experimented as to solve for a solution of QUBO instances defined on Chimera graphs of the quantum computer.

  15. Investigation of Quantum Computing With Laughlin Quasiparticles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-31

    Review B 72, 075342, 1-8 (2005) F.E.Camino, W.Zhou, and V.J.Goldman Aharonov - Bohm electron interferometer in the integer quantum Hall regime Physical...Review B 72, 155313, 1-6 (2005) F.E.Camino, W.Zhou, and V.J.Goldman Aharonov - Bohm Superperiod in a Laughlin Quasiparticle Interferometer Physical...is the number of particles being encircled. This quantization condition explicitly adds the Aharonov - Bohm and the statistical contributions to the

  16. Dynamical localization simulated on a few-qubit quantum computer

    SciTech Connect

    Benenti, Giuliano; Montangero, Simone; Casati, Giulio; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2003-05-01

    We show that a quantum computer operating with a small number of qubits can simulate the dynamical localization of classical chaos in a system described by the quantum sawtooth map model. The dynamics of the system is computed efficiently up to a time t{>=}l, and then the localization length l can be obtained with accuracy {nu} by means of order 1/{nu}{sup 2} computer runs, followed by coarse-grained projective measurements on the computational basis. We also show that in the presence of static imperfections, a reliable computation of the localization length is possible without error correction up to an imperfection threshold which drops polynomially with the number of qubits.

  17. Towards robust dynamical decoupling and high fidelity adiabatic quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiroz, Gregory

    Quantum computation (QC) relies on the ability to implement high-fidelity quantum gate operations and successfully preserve quantum state coherence. One of the most challenging obstacles for reliable QC is overcoming the inevitable interaction between a quantum system and its environment. Unwanted interactions result in decoherence processes that cause quantum states to deviate from a desired evolution, consequently leading to computational errors and loss of coherence. Dynamical decoupling (DD) is one such method, which seeks to attenuate the effects of decoherence by applying strong and expeditious control pulses solely to the system. Provided the pulses are applied over a time duration sufficiently shorter than the correlation time associated with the environment dynamics, DD effectively averages out undesirable interactions and preserves quantum states with a low probability of error, or fidelity loss. In this study various aspects of this approach are studied from sequence construction to applications of DD to protecting QC. First, a comprehensive examination of the error suppression properties of a near-optimal DD approach is given to understand the relationship between error suppression capabilities and the number of required DD control pulses in the case of ideal, instantaneous pulses. While such considerations are instructive for examining DD efficiency, i.e., performance vs the number of control pulses, high-fidelity DD in realizable systems is difficult to achieve due to intrinsic pulse imperfections which further contribute to decoherence. As a second consideration, it is shown how one can overcome this hurdle and achieve robustness and recover high-fidelity DD in the presence of faulty control pulses using Genetic Algorithm optimization and sequence symmetrization. Thirdly, to illustrate the implementation of DD in conjunction with QC, the utilization of DD and quantum error correction codes (QECCs) as a protection method for adiabatic quantum

  18. Efficient computations of quantum canonical Gibbs state in phase space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondar, Denys I.; Campos, Andre G.; Cabrera, Renan; Rabitz, Herschel A.

    2016-06-01

    The Gibbs canonical state, as a maximum entropy density matrix, represents a quantum system in equilibrium with a thermostat. This state plays an essential role in thermodynamics and serves as the initial condition for nonequilibrium dynamical simulations. We solve a long standing problem for computing the Gibbs state Wigner function with nearly machine accuracy by solving the Bloch equation directly in the phase space. Furthermore, the algorithms are provided yielding high quality Wigner distributions for pure stationary states as well as for Thomas-Fermi and Bose-Einstein distributions. The developed numerical methods furnish a long-sought efficient computation framework for nonequilibrium quantum simulations directly in the Wigner representation.

  19. Adiabatic quantum computing with spin qubits hosted by molecules.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Satoru; Nakazawa, Shigeaki; Sugisaki, Kenji; Sato, Kazunobu; Toyota, Kazuo; Shiomi, Daisuke; Takui, Takeji

    2015-01-28

    A molecular spin quantum computer (MSQC) requires electron spin qubits, which pulse-based electron spin/magnetic resonance (ESR/MR) techniques can afford to manipulate for implementing quantum gate operations in open shell molecular entities. Importantly, nuclear spins, which are topologically connected, particularly in organic molecular spin systems, are client qubits, while electron spins play a role of bus qubits. Here, we introduce the implementation for an adiabatic quantum algorithm, suggesting the possible utilization of molecular spins with optimized spin structures for MSQCs. We exemplify the utilization of an adiabatic factorization problem of 21, compared with the corresponding nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) case. Two molecular spins are selected: one is a molecular spin composed of three exchange-coupled electrons as electron-only qubits and the other an electron-bus qubit with two client nuclear spin qubits. Their electronic spin structures are well characterized in terms of the quantum mechanical behaviour in the spin Hamiltonian. The implementation of adiabatic quantum computing/computation (AQC) has, for the first time, been achieved by establishing ESR/MR pulse sequences for effective spin Hamiltonians in a fully controlled manner of spin manipulation. The conquered pulse sequences have been compared with the NMR experiments and shown much faster CPU times corresponding to the interaction strength between the spins. Significant differences are shown in rotational operations and pulse intervals for ESR/MR operations. As a result, we suggest the advantages and possible utilization of the time-evolution based AQC approach for molecular spin quantum computers and molecular spin quantum simulators underlain by sophisticated ESR/MR pulsed spin technology.

  20. Quantum annealing: The fastest route to quantum computation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smorra, C.; Blaum, K.; Bojtar, L.; Borchert, M.; Franke, K. A.; Higuchi, T.; Leefer, N.; Nagahama, H.; Matsuda, Y.; Mooser, A.; Niemann, M.; Ospelkaus, C.; Quint, W.; Schneider, G.; Sellner, S.; Tanaka, T.; Van Gorp, S.; Walz, J.; Yamazaki, Y.; Ulmer, S.

    2015-11-01

    The Baryon Antibaryon Symmetry Experiment (BASE) aims at performing a stringent test of the combined charge parity and time reversal (CPT) symmetry by comparing the magnetic moments of the proton and the antiproton with high precision. Using single particles in a Penning trap, the proton/antiproton g-factors, i.e. the magnetic moment in units of the nuclear magneton, are determined by measuring the respective ratio of the spin-precession frequency to the cyclotron frequency. The spin precession frequency is measured by non-destructive detection of spin quantum transitions using the continuous Stern-Gerlach effect, and the cyclotron frequency is determined from the particle*s motional eigenfrequencies in the Penning trap using the invariance theorem. By application of the double Penning-trap method we expect that in our measurements a fractional precision of δ g/ g 10-9 can be achieved. The successful application of this method to the antiproton will consist a factor 1000 improvement in the fractional precision of its magnetic moment. The BASE collaboration has constructed and commissioned a new experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) of CERN. This article describes and summarizes the physical and technical aspects of this new experiment.