Science.gov

Sample records for measurements annual progress

  1. 77 FR 19662 - Pesticide Reregistration Performance Measures and Goals; Annual Progress Report; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-02

    ... AGENCY Pesticide Reregistration Performance Measures and Goals; Annual Progress Report; Notice of... notice announces the availability of EPA's progress report in meeting its performance measures and goals... information about EPA's annual achievements in meeting its performance measures and goals for...

  2. 78 FR 17204 - Pesticide Reregistration Performance Measures and Goals; Annual Progress Report; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ... AGENCY Pesticide Reregistration Performance Measures and Goals; Annual Progress Report; Notice of... notice announces the availability of EPA's progress report in meeting its performance measures and goals... information about EPA's annual achievements in meeting its performance measures and goals for...

  3. Annual Technical Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ayman I. Hawari

    2002-10-02

    This report describes the results generated during phase 1 of this project. During this phase, the main tools that are used to compute the thermal neutron scattering kernels for graphite, beryllium, beryllium oxide, zirconium hydride, light water, polyethylene were implemented and tested. This includes a modified NJOY/LEAPR code system, the GASKET code, and the ab initio condensed matter codes VASP and PHONON. Thermal neutron scattering kernels were generated for graphite, beryllium, beryllium oxide. In the case of graphite, new phonon spectra were examined. The first is a spectrum based on experiments performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the early seventies, and the second is generated using the ab initio methods. In the case of beryllium, and beryllium oxide, a synthetic approach for generating the phonon spectra was implemented. In addition, significant progress was made on an experiment to benchmark the graphite scattering kernels was made. The simulations of this experiment show that differences on the order of a few percent, in Pu-239 detector responses, can be expected due to the use of different scattering kernels. (B204) NOT A FINAL REPORT

  4. International intercomparison of environmental measurements. Annual progress report, March 31, 1995--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    This program was designed to address the following concerns: produce a quick snapshot of measurement capability in the international arena; identify the types and locations of gaps and measurement deficiencies; determine the feasibility to remediate the weaknesses identified; identify those laboratories of exceptional quality that may be used to evaluate international forensic problems.

  5. Significance of Selective Predation and Development of Prey Protection Measures for Juvenile Salmonids in the Columbia and Snake River Reservoirs: Annual Progress Report, February 1991-February 1992.

    SciTech Connect

    Poe, Thomas P.

    1992-12-31

    This document is the 1991 annual report of progress for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) research Project conducted by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). Our approach was to present the progress achieved during 1991 in a series of separate reports for each major project task. Each report is prepared in the format of a scientific paper and is able to stand alone, whatever the state of progress or completion. This project has two major goals. One is to understand the significance of selective predation and prey vulnerability by determining if substandard juvenile salmonids (dead, injured, stressed, diseased, or naive) are more vulnerable to predation by northern squawfish, than standard or normal juvenile salmonids. The second goal is to develop and test prey protection measures to control predation on juvenile salmonids by reducing predator-smolt encounters or predator capture efficiency.

  6. Annual Progress report - General Task

    SciTech Connect

    Wesnousky, S.G.

    1993-09-30

    This report provides a summary of progress for the project {open_quotes}Evaluation of the Geologic Relations and Seismotectonic Stability of the Yucca Mountain Area, Nevada Nuclear Waste Site Investigation (NNWSI).{close_quotes} A similar report was previously provided for the period of 1 October 1991 to 30 September 1992. The report initially covers the activities of the General Task and is followed by sections that describe the progress of the other ongoing tasks.

  7. Yakima Hatchery Experimental Design : Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Busack, Craig; Knudsen, Curtis; Marshall, Anne

    1991-08-01

    This progress report details the results and status of Washington Department of Fisheries' (WDF) pre-facility monitoring, research, and evaluation efforts, through May 1991, designed to support the development of an Experimental Design Plan (EDP) for the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP), previously termed the Yakima/Klickitat Production Project (YKPP or Y/KPP). This pre- facility work has been guided by planning efforts of various research and quality control teams of the project that are annually captured as revisions to the experimental design and pre-facility work plans. The current objective are as follows: to develop genetic monitoring and evaluation approach for the Y/KPP; to evaluate stock identification monitoring tools, approaches, and opportunities available to meet specific objectives of the experimental plan; and to evaluate adult and juvenile enumeration and sampling/collection capabilities in the Y/KPP necessary to measure experimental response variables.

  8. Basic Measures of Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calkins, Julia; Ling, Thomson; Moore, Eric; Halle, Tamara; Hair, Beth; Moore, Kris; Zaslow, Marty

    This document provides a compilation of measures of progress toward school readiness and three contributing conditions as used in several local, state, and national surveys. The report begins with a legend listing the surveys examined, their acronyms, and contact information. The remainder of the report, in tabular format, lists measures of…

  9. The use of dielectric and NMR measurements to determine the pore-scale location of organic. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, R.

    1998-06-01

    'The objective of the three-year research project is to investigate the effect of adsorbed organics on the dielectric and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) response of porous geological materials. This will allow the author to assess the use of dielectric and NMR measurements at a site to determine whether organic contaminants are present in the central volume of the pore space or are adsorbed to the solid surfaces. In addition, she proposes to use laboratory dielectric and NMR measurements to study the kinetics of the adsorption and desorption of organics. This report summarizes work completed after 20 months of a three-year project. The research involves the study of the NMR and dielectric behavior of sands with three types of solid surfaces: water-wet, where water spontaneously coats and adsorbs to the solid surfaces; hydrophobic, where water is repelled from the solid surfaces by an organosilane coating; and oil-wet, where oil coats the solid surfaces. The oil-wet case is representative of a contaminated soil, in which oil has become adsorbed to the solid surfaces.'

  10. PTAGIS Annual Progress Report, 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission.

    2002-05-01

    This is the annual report for the PTAGIS project. February 28, 2002 marked the end of the 2001/02 PTAGIS fiscal year. All critical project activities progressed on schedule. However, a number of activities that have been traditionally performed by PTAGIS have been curtailed due to lack of resources. These reduced activities include production and distribution of the ''PTAGIS Newsletter'', development of a robust Web-based interface to PTAGIS data, curtailment efforts to upgrade critical database server hardware systems and processes and other activities. The main reasons for the lack of resources are: (1) In June, 2001, the region made a decision to expedite the installation of PIT tag detection at Bonneville and McNary dams. BPA issued contract 7422 to PSMFC to provide labor and material to install these systems. Nearly every PTAGIS resource was dedicated to this effort; (2) The Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Northwest Power Planning Council and Bonneville Power Administration have not solicited project proposals and budgets for over two years. Project requirements (represented in increasing scope, scale and complexity) have increased, but funding has not.

  11. FY2011 Annual Progress Report for Propulsion Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Patrick B.; Schutte, Carol L.; Gibbs, Jerry L.

    2011-12-01

    Annual Progress Report for Propulsion Materials focusing on enabling and innovative materials technologies that are critical in improving the efficiency of advanced engines by providing enabling materials support for combustion, hybrid, and power electronics development.

  12. FY2012 Annual Progress Report for Propulsion Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Patrick B.; Schutte, Carol L.; Gibbs, Jerry L.

    2013-01-01

    FY2012 annual progress report focusing on enabling and innovative materials technologies that are critical in improving the efficiency of advanced engines by providing enabling materials support for combustion, hybrid, and power electronics development.

  13. Chesapeake Bay program annual progress report, wetlands workgroup, December 1991. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    The announcement by President Bush of a national no net loss wetlands policy is the result of growing public concern about the rapid loss of these important resources. Wetlands provide essential breeding, spawning, nesting and wintering habitats for a major portion of the region's fish and wildlife. In addition, wetlands function to purify surface water, moderate flood flows, maintain year round stream and river flows, reduce erosion and support commercial fishery and recreation industries. In recognition of the importance of wetlands to the environmental quality and economic productivity of the Bay, the Chesapeake Executive Council adopted the Chesapeake Bay Wetlands Policy in December 1988. The Policy includes a commitment to adopt an implementation plan. The annual report discusses the Living Resources Subcommittee's Wetlands Workgroup progress on these projects over the last year, and the near term goals for the next year. The progress to date includes work completed for the first phase and beginning to set up the second phase of the implementation plan.

  14. Wisconsin Occupational Information System. Annual Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Roger H.; And Others

    The first annual report of the Wisconsin Occupational Information System (WOIS) is a descriptive analysis of activities and procedures utilized during the initial grant period of July 14, 1975-July 13, 1976. This report is divided into eight sections summarizing the program of work during the first year. These include: (1) an overview of the…

  15. Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This Report summarizes the waste generation and pollution prevention activities of the major operational sites in the Department of Energy (DOE). We are witnessing progress in waste reduction from routine operations that are the focus of Department-wide reduction goals set by the Secretary on May 3,1996. The goals require that by the end of 1999, we reduce, recycle, reuse, and otherwise avoid waste generation to achieve a 50 percent reduction over 1993 levels. This Report provides the first measure of our progress in waste reduction and recycling against our 1993 waste generation baseline. While we see progress in reducing waste from our normal operations, we must begin to focus attention on waste generated by cleanup and facilities stabilization activities that are the major functions of the Office of Environmental Management. Reducing the generation of waste is one of the seven principles that I have established for the Office of Environmental Management Ten Year Plan. As part of our vision to complete a major portion of the environmental cleanup at DOE sites over the next ten years, we must utilize the potential of the pollution prevention program to reduce the cost of our cleanup program. We have included the Secretarial goals as part of the performance measures for the Ten Year Plan, and we are committed to implementing pollution prevention ideas. Through the efforts of both Federal and contractor employees, our pollution prevention program has reduced waste and the cost of our operations. I applaud their efforts and look forward to reporting further waste reduction progress in the next annual update of this Report.

  16. Measuring research progress in photovoltaics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, B.; Mcguire, P.

    1986-01-01

    The role and some results of the project analysis and integration function in the Flat-plate Solar Array (FSA) Project are presented. Activities included supporting the decision-making process, preparation of plans for project direction, setting goals for project activities, measuring progress within the project, and the development and maintenance of analytical models.

  17. 2010 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    In the past year, the DOE Hydrogen Program (the Program) made substantial progress toward its goals and objectives. The Program has conducted comprehensive and focused efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. With emphasis on applications that will effectively strengthen our nation's energy security and improve our stewardship of the environment, the Program engages in research, development, and demonstration of critical improvements in the technologies. Highlights of the Program's accomplishments can be found in the sub-program chapters of this report.

  18. 1999 annual progress report -- Energy conservation team

    SciTech Connect

    Chalk, S.

    1999-10-19

    This report highlights progress achieved during FY 1999 under the Light-duty Fuels Utilization R and D Program. The program is comprised of two elements: the Advanced Petroleum-Based APB Fuels Program which focused on developing and testing advanced fuels for use with compression-ignition direct-injection (CIDI) engines and fuel cells and the Alternative Fuels Program which focused on Natural gas and natural gas derived fuels. The report contains 17 summaries of industry and National Laboratory projects. Fuel efficient vehicles with very low emissions are essential to meet the challenges of climate change, energy security, and improved air quality. The authors anticipate cooperative efforts with the auto and energy industries to develop new and innovative technologies that will be used to make advanced transportation vehicles that are fuel efficient, clean, and safe.

  19. Running Start Annual Progress Report, 1996-97.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossland, Ron

    The Running Start program was created by the 1990 Washington State Legislature to expand educational options for public school students. Running Start allows eleventh and twelfth grade high school students to take college-level courses, tuition-free, at the 32 community and technical colleges in Washington. This annual progress report for 1996-97…

  20. 14 CFR 91.875 - Annual progress reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Operating Noise Limits § 91... submit an annual report to the FAA, Office of Environment and Energy, on the progress it has made toward... acquired with and without base level); (ii) Each Stage 2 airplane modified to Stage 3 noise...

  1. Federal Facility Agreement Annual Progress Report for FY 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, E.

    1999-08-04

    This FFA Annual Progress Report has been developed to summarize the information for activities performed during the Fiscal Year 1998 (October 1, 1997, to September 30, 1998) and activities planned for Fiscal Year 1999 by U.S. EPA, SCDHEC, and SRS at those units and areas identified for remediation in the Agreement.

  2. 2014 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-11-01

    The 2014 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2014 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  3. 2013 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-12-01

    The 2013 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2013 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  4. 2015 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2015-12-23

    The 2015 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2015 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production; hydrogen delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; systems analysis; and market transformation.

  5. 2011 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    SciTech Connect

    Satyapal, Sunita

    2011-11-01

    The 2011 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2011 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; education; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  6. Professional Development: Assisting Urban Schools in Making Annual Yearly Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Elizabeth D.; Gudwin, Denise M.; Salazar, Magda

    2007-01-01

    Under the No Child Left Behind Act (2002), all schools are required to demonstrate that all students make annual yearly progress (AYP). This can be difficult, particularly for students in urban schools and even more so for students with disabilities. The authors report on one large urban school district's attempts to provide support to 140 schools…

  7. Southeastern Community College Annual Progress Report, December 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, R. Gene

    Presenting information on the status of Southeastern Community College (SCC), in Iowa, this annual progress report highlights basic institutional data, financial information, and improvements and planned changes of the college as of 1995. Part 1 presents basic data on SCC, including facility locations, assessed property valuation, district…

  8. Progress in Scientific and Technical Communications, 1968 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Council for Science and Technology, Washington, DC. Committee on Scientific and Technical Information.

    This sixth annual report describes progress achieved by the Federal Government in improving the communication of scientific and technical information to support and enhance national science and technology. Included in the report are details regarding the scientific and technical activities of individual Federal Agencies, such as the Atomic Energy…

  9. Nuclear structure research. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, J.L.

    1993-10-31

    The most significant development this year has been the successful elucidation of the low-energy systematics of the very neutron-deficient Pr, Nd, Pm, and Sm isotopes. This includes an extensive set of Nilsson bandheads in {sup 133}Nd. Some serious errors in earlier decay scheme work were found. The results require some significant reassessments of mean-field calculations in this region. Part of our program continues to focus on shape coexistence and electric monopole (E0) transitions in nuclei. Following the discovery of coexisting ``gamma`` bands connected by E0 transitions in {sup 184}Pt, a similar behavior in {sup 186}Pt was established from {sup 186}Au decay data. This includes a pure E0 transition between states with J{sup {pi}} = 3{sup +}, just as was seen in {sup 184}Pt. Progress has been made in elucidating the low-energy systematics of the neutron-deficient Ir isotopes. A search for the population of the superdeformed band in {sup 194}Pb in the decay of {sup 194}Bi was unsuccessful. An extensive program of systematics for nuclei at and near N = Z has been initiated.

  10. Environmental Measurements Laboratory 1994 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Chieco, N.A.; Krey, P.W.; Beck, H.L.

    1995-08-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) for the calendar year 1994 and it serves as an annual report to the Director of the Office of Energy Research (ER), the Associate Director and staff of the Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), the manager and staff of the Chicago Field Office, and the authors colleagues. Emphasized are the progress and accomplishments of the year, rather than future plans or expectations. The technical summaries are grouped according to the following seven general program areas: environmental radiation and radioactivity; radiation transport and dosimetry; environmental radon, thoron, and related aerosols; atmospheric and surface pollutant studies related to global climate change; atmospheric chemistry; metrology, consultation, and emergency response; environmental management. EML`s mission is to address important scientific questions concerning human health and environmental impacts. Through its multidisciplinary staff, EML conducts experimental and theoretical research on radioactive and other energy-related pollutants, and provides DOE and other federal agencies with the in-house capability to respond effectively and efficiently with regard to quality assurance activities, environmental issues and related national security issues.

  11. Environmental Measurements Laboratory, annual report 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Krey, P.W.; Heit, M.

    1996-07-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) for the calendar year 1995 and serves as an annual report to the Director of the Office of Energy Research (ER), the Associate Director and staff of the Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), the Manager and staff of the Chicago Operations Office, and our colleagues. Emphasized are the progress and accomplishments of the year, rather than future plans or expectations. The technical summaries are grouped according to the following seven research program areas: (1) Environmental Radiation and Radioactivity; (2) Radiation Transport and Dosimetry; (3) Environmental Radon, Thoron, and Related Aerosols; (4) Atmospheric and Surface Pollutant Studies Related to Global Climate Change; (5) Atmospheric Chemistry; and (6) Metrology, Consultation, and Emergency Response Environmental Management The mission of EML is to address important scientific questions concerning human health and environmental impacts. Through its multidisciplinary staff, EML conducts experimental and theoretical research on radioactive and other energy-related pollutants and provides DOE and other federal agencies with the in-house capability to respond effectively and efficiently with regard to quality assurance activities, environmental issues, and related national security issues.

  12. Nuclear structure research. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, J.L.

    1995-07-31

    The most significant development this year has been the realization of a method for estimating EO transition strength in nuclei and the prediction that the de-excitation (draining) of superdeformed bands must take place, at least in some cases, by strong EO transitions. A considerable effort has been devoted to planning the nuclear structure physics that will be pursued using the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge. A significant effort has been devoted to HRIBF target development. This is a critical component of the HRIBF project. Exhaustive literature searches have been made for a variety of target materials with emphasis on thermodynamic properties. Vapor pressure measurements have been carried out. Experimental data sets for radioactive decays in the very neutron-deficient Pr-Eu and Ir-Tl regions have been under analysis. These decay schemes constitute parts of student Ph.D. theses. These studies are aimed at elucidating the onset of deformation in the Pr-Sm region and the characteristics of shape coexistence in the Ir-Bi region. Further experiments on shape coexistence in the neutron-deficient Ir-Bi region are planned using {alpha} decay studies at the FMA at ATLAS. The first experiment is scheduled for later this year.

  13. 1993 annual final progress report: July 1992 through June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, A.; Crotty, G.; Chen, Z.; Sana, P.; Salami, J.; Doolittle, A.; Pang, A.; Pham, T.

    1994-11-01

    This is the first annual report since the Inauguration of the University Center of Excellence for Photovoltaics Research and Development (UCEP) at Georgia Tech. The essential objective of the Center is to improve the fundamental understanding of the science and technology of advanced PV devices and materials, to provide training and enrich the educational experience of students in the field, and to increase US competitiveness by providing guidelines to industry and DOE for achieving cost-effective and high efficiency PV devices. These objectives are to be accomplished through a combination of research and education. This report summarizes the technical accomplishments, including modeling, processing, and characterization of cast multicrystalline silicon solar cells; use of modeling and PCD measurements to develop a road map for progressing toward 20% multicrystalline and 25% single crystalline cells; the development of a novel PECVD SiN/SiO{sub 2} AR coating that also provides good surface passivation; PECVD deposited SiO{sub 2} films with record low S and D{sub it} at the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface; and educational activities and accomplishments.

  14. Measurements of radon, thoron, isotopic uranium and thorium to determine occupational and environmental exposure and risk at Fernald Feed Materials Production Center. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, N.H.

    1998-06-01

    'The research objectives of this report are: (1) To develop an accurate personal radon/thoron monitor to quantitate exposure during remediation. This personal monitor is a miniaturization and modification of the area {sup 222}Rn monitor that has proven accuracy and precision. (2) To develop a personal aerosol particle size sampler, based on the principles of the novel sampler the author has developed. The sampler measures not only {sup 222}Rn decay product aerosol size but long lived nuclides. There are, as yet, no size distribution data on the aerosol particle size distribution of these nuclides during remediation, yet the aerosol particle size is the major determinant of lung dose. (3) To develop the sequential radiochemistry necessary to measure any environmental sample for {sup 228,230,232}Th, {sup 226,228}Ra, {sup 234,235,238}U and {sup 210}Pb. To utilize the radiochemistry to accurately trace and delineate these nuclides in the environment. To obtain historic and present radiochemical data to understand the need for supplemental soil/water etc. measurements.'

  15. A fundamental study of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using fiber optics for remote measurements of trace metals. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Goode, S.; Angel, S.M.

    1998-06-01

    'Improved technologies are required by DOE for characterization and monitoring for site clean-up and waste processing applications. Especially needed are field deployable methods and devices of real-time monitoring to reduce dependency on laboratory analyses which are costly and time consuming. Improved sensors are needed for on-site analyses to provide real-time analytical capabilities for screening level and/or decision-quality data. Matrices of interest to the DOE are soils (or other solids), slurries, and aqueous and non-aqueous solutions. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a useful method for determining the elemental composition of solids. This method has been recently reviewed and a number of different applications have been described. In the LIBS technique, a high-power pulsed laser is used to generate a plasma from the sample of interest. This phenomenon was first demonstrated in 1963 using a pulsed ruby laser. The elemental composition of the sample is accomplished by measuring the atomic emission from the atoms and ions in the plasma. There are many reports of the use of LIBS for measuring metals in solid substrates. There have also been LIBS investigations of aerosols, single particles, metals in solution including uranium, and even chlorinated species in solution. More recently, LIBS has been used for measuring Ba and Cr in soil using a fiber-optic cable. LIBS shows great potential for measuring metal contaminants in soils and on particles (e.g., stack emissions) based on their atomic emission in a laser-induced plasma. Another important application for this technique is the remote analysis of highly radioactive materials, such as the glasses produced by the Defense Waste Processing Facility. The use of fiber optics for both collection of the atomic emission and delivery of the laser to the sampling area could eliminate the need for sampling. In this work the authors study the time-evolution of the LIBS emission for different matrices to

  16. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 2000 Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2001-05-01

    This is the FY00 Annual Progress report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD Program, summarizes progress on each project conducted during FY00, characterizes the projects according to their relevance to major funding sources, and provides an index to principal investigators. Project summaries are grouped by LDRD component: Directed Research and Exploratory Research. Within each component, they are further grouped into the ten technical categories: (1) atomic, molecular, optical, and plasma physics, fluids, and beams, (2) bioscience, (3) chemistry, (4) computer science and software engineering, (5) engineering science, (6) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (7) instrumentation and diagnostics, (8) materials science, (9) mathematics, simulation, and modeling, and (10) nuclear and particle physics.

  17. 50 CFR 300.62 - Annual management measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Annual management measures. 300.62 Section... REGULATIONS Pacific Halibut Fisheries § 300.62 Annual management measures. Annual management measures may be... Assistant Administrator, with immediate regulatory effect. Such measures may include, inter alia,...

  18. 50 CFR 300.62 - Annual management measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Annual management measures. 300.62 Section... REGULATIONS Pacific Halibut Fisheries § 300.62 Annual management measures. Annual management measures may be... Assistant Administrator, with immediate regulatory effect. Such measures may include, inter alia,...

  19. Solar thermal power systems. Annual technical progress report, FY 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, Gerald W.

    1980-06-01

    The Solar Thermal Power Systems Program is the key element in the national effort to establish solar thermal conversion technologies within the major sectors of the national energy market. It provides for the development of concentrating mirror/lens heat collection and conversion technologies for both central and dispersed receiver applications to produce electricity, provide heat at its point of use in industrial processes, provide heat and electricity in combination for industrial, commercial, and residential needs, and ultimately, drive processes for production of liquid and gaseous fuels. This report is the second Annual Technical Progress Report for the Solar Thermal Power Systems Program and is structured according to the organization of the Solar Thermal Power Systems Program on September 30, 1979. Emphasis is on the technical progress of the projects rather than on activities and individual contractor efforts. Each project description indicates its place in the Solar Thermal Power Systems Program, a brief history, the significant achievements and real progress during FY 1979, also future project activities as well as anticipated significant achievements are forecast. (WHK)

  20. FY13 Annual Progress Report for SECA Core Technology Program

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Koeppel, Brian J.

    2014-01-31

    This progress report covers technical work performed during fiscal year 2013 at PNNL under Field Work Proposal (FWP) 40552. The report highlights and documents technical progress in tasks related to advanced cell and stack component materials development and computational design and simulation. Primary areas of emphasis for the materials development work were metallic interconnects and coatings, cathode and anode stability/degradation, glass seals, and advanced testing under realistic stack conditions: Metallic interconnects and coatings • Effects of surface modifications to AISI 441 (prior to application of protective spinel coatings) on oxide scale growth and adhesion were evaluated as a function of temperature and time. Cathode stability/degradation • Effects of cathode air humidity on performance and stability of SOFC cathodes were investigated by testing anode-supported cells as a function of time and temperature. • In-situ high temperature XRD measurements were used to correlate changes in cathode lattice structure and composition with performance of anode-supported button cells. Anode stability/degradation • Effects of high fuel steam content on Ni/YSZ anodes were investigated over a range of time and temperature. • Vapor infiltration and particulate additions were evaluated as a potential means of improving tolerance of Ni/YSZ anodes to sulfur-bearing fuel species. Glass seals • A candidate compliant glass-based seal materials were evaluated in terms of microstructural evolution and seal performance as a function of time and temperature. Stack fixture testing • The SECA CTP stack test fixture was used for intermediate and long-term evaluation of candidate materials and processes. Primary areas of emphasis for the computational modeling work were coarse methodology, degradation of stack components, and electrochemical modeling: Coarse methodology • Improvements were made to both the SOFC-MP and SOFC ROM simulation tools. Degradation of stack

  1. FY2014 Energy Storage R&D Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2015-03-01

    The Energy Storage research and development (R&D) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for projects focusing on batteries for plug-in electric vehicles. Program targets focus on overcoming technical barriers to enable market success including: (1) significantly reducing battery cost, (2) increasing battery performance (power, energy, durability), (3) reducing battery weight & volume, and (4) increasing battery tolerance to abusive conditions such as short circuit, overcharge, and crush. This report describes the progress made on the research and development projects funded by the Energy Storage subprogram in 2014. You can download individual sections at the following website, http://energy.gov/eere/vehicles/downloads/vehicle-technologies-office-2014-energy-storage-rd-annual-report.

  2. 10 CFR 905.14 - Does Western require annual IRP progress reports?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Does Western require annual IRP progress reports? 905.14 Section 905.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Integrated Resource Planning § 905.14 Does Western require annual IRP progress reports? Yes, customers must submit IRP...

  3. 21 CFR 601.70 - Annual progress reports of postmarketing studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Annual progress reports of postmarketing studies. 601.70 Section 601.70 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS LICENSING Postmarketing Studies § 601.70 Annual progress reports of postmarketing studies. (a) General requirements....

  4. 21 CFR 601.70 - Annual progress reports of postmarketing studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Annual progress reports of postmarketing studies. 601.70 Section 601.70 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS LICENSING Postmarketing Studies § 601.70 Annual progress reports of postmarketing studies. (a) General requirements....

  5. 21 CFR 601.70 - Annual progress reports of postmarketing studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Annual progress reports of postmarketing studies. 601.70 Section 601.70 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS LICENSING Postmarketing Studies § 601.70 Annual progress reports of postmarketing studies. (a) General requirements....

  6. Hungry Horse Mitigation : Flathead Lake : Annual Progress Report 2008.

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les

    2009-08-06

    , for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Work Element A in the Statement of Work is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of all remaining Work Elements.

  7. Hungry Horse Mitigation : Flathead Lake : Annual Progress Report 2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les

    2008-12-22

    , for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Work Element A in the Statement of Work is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of all remaining Work Elements.

  8. 78 FR 50075 - Statewide Communication Interoperability Plan Template and Annual Progress Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-16

    ... SECURITY Statewide Communication Interoperability Plan Template and Annual Progress Report AGENCY: National... Programs Directorate (NPPD), Office of Cybersecurity and Communications (CS&C), Office of Emergency Communications (OEC), will submit the following Information Collection Request to the Office of Management...

  9. Development and application of the electrochemical etching technique. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    This annual progress report documents further advances in the development and application of electrochemical etching of polycarbonate foils (ECEPF) for fast, intermediate, and thermal neutron dosimetry as well as alpha particle dosimetry. The fast (> 1.1 MeV) and thermal neutron dosimetry techniques were applied to a thorough investigation of the neutron contamination inherent in and about the primary x-ray beam of several medical therapy electron accelerators. Because of the small size of ECEPF dosimeters in comparison to other neutron meters, they have an unusually low perturbation of the radiation field under measurement. Due to this small size and the increased sensitivity of the ECEPF dosimeter over current techniques of measuring neutrons in a high photon field, the fast neutron contamination in the primary x-ray beam of all the investigated accelerators was measured with precision and found to be greater than that suggested by the other, more common, neutron dosimetry methods.

  10. Herbaceous Energy Corps Program: Annual progress report for FY 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, J.H.; Turhollow, A.F.; Johnston, J.W.

    1987-05-01

    This report describes the activities and accomplishments of the Herbaceous Energy Crops Program (HECP) for the year ending September 30, 1986. HECP is devoted to research on the development of terrestrial, nonwoody plant species for use as energy feedstocks. HECP emphasizes lignocellulosic forage crops. In FY 1986 screening and selection trials continued on 25 species of perennial and annual grasses and legumes in five projects in the Southeast and the Midwest-Lake States regions. Research also continued on the development of winter rapeseed as a diesel-fuel substitute. Activities in FY 1986 included genetic crosses and selections to incorporate atrazine resistance, development of Canola-quality winter rapeseed for the Southeast, and development of dwarf varieties. Production practices for double-cropped winter rapeseed in the Southeast were also examined. Exploratory research efforts in FY 1986 included the physiology and biochemistry of hydrocarbon production in latex-bearing plants, the productivity of cattail stands under sustained harvesting, the development of tissue culture techniques for hard-to-culture sorghum genotypes, and the start of a study to measure sustained productivity of old-field successional vegetation. Environmental and economic analyses in FY 1986 included studies on the uses of wetlands and wet soils, the use of lignocellulosic crops as an alcohol feedstock, the potential of direct combustion of lignocellulosic crops, and existing oilseed extraction facilities. 6 refs., 12 figs., 15 tabs.

  11. Measuring Well-Being and Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Acci, Luca

    2011-01-01

    Well-being is becoming a concept which is more and more involved in any world development consideration. A large amount of work is being carried out to study measurements of well-being, including a more holistic vision on the development and welfare of a country. This paper proposes an idea of well-being and progress being in equilibrium with each…

  12. GSA committees: Progress through service the Annual Program Committee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Costa, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    The GSA's Annual Program Committee (APC) is directly responsible for the GSA's meeting and other responsibilities especially before the main event. It decides on the locations, the number and content of the technical sessions, annual membership surveys, hospitality for the guests, field trips and more. In addition, it pays significant attention to creative thinking about geoscience discoveries and directions as well as identify new and emerging areas of earth science. APC is also looking for new ideas, approaches and directions.

  13. Symposium Papers-Progress in Radiation and Energy Balance Measurement Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    On November 2, 2004, an all-day symposium entitled “Progress in Radiation and Energy Balance Measurement Systems” was convened at the ASA-CSSA-SSSA annual meetings in Seattle, WA. Interest in the measurement of radiation and energy balance components at soil and plant canopy surfaces has seen a res...

  14. Oregon Migrant Health Project; Annual Progress Report 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Board of Health, Portland.

    In this 1969 annual report, 10 objectives of the Oregon Migrant Health Project--which served approximately 18,400 migrants during the project year--are listed. These objectives relate to providing for diagnostic and medical services, preventive medical services, and dental care, as well as promoting health awareness, education, and improved living…

  15. Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress 1999

    SciTech Connect

    2000-09-01

    This Annual Report summarizes and highlights waste generation, waste reduction, pollution prevention accomplishments, and cost avoidance for 44 U.S. Department of Energy reporting sites for Calendar Year 1999. This section summarizes Calendar Year 1999 Complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention accomplishments.

  16. Planning 1997-98, Progress 1996-97. Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platt, Gail M.

    Established in fall 1980, TheLearningCenter at South Plains College, in Texas, is designed to provide assistance to students seeking specialized services, offering developmental and college-level courses, peer-tutoring, computer-aided instruction, learning opportunities, and learning assessments. This annual report describes instructional…

  17. Annual progress report, July 1, 1979-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Research progress is reported for the year 1979-1980. The report is divided into sections dealing individually with the divisions of Biomolecular and Cellular Science, Environmental Biology, and Nuclear Medicine. The sections have been individually entered into EDB. (ACR)

  18. Reporting Florida's Annual Measurable Objectives (AMOs) in Compliance with ESEA Flexibility Requirements: Guide to Calculations for 2013-14

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This Annual Measurable Objective (AMO) is designed to keep Florida moving forward toward national and international competitiveness. Florida will compare its National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) scores to those of the top five states and its Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS), Progress in International…

  19. Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    This fourth Annual Report presents and analyzes 1995 DOE complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention activities at 40 reporting sites in 25 States, and trends DOE waste generation from 1991 through 1995. DOE has established a 50% reduction goal (relative to the 1993 baseline) for routine operations radioactive and hazardous waste generation, due by December 31, 1999. Routine operations waste generation decreased 37% from 1994 to 1995, and 43% overall from 1993--1995.

  20. Mineral cycling in soil and litter arthropod food chains. Annual progress report, February 1, 1983-January 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Crossley, D.A. Jr.

    1983-09-30

    This annual report describes progress in research on the influence of soil fauna on the general process of terrestrial decomposition. The major goal is to investigate the regulation of decomposition by soil arthropods. Methods have included radioactive tracer measurements of food chain dynamics, rates of nutrient or mineral element flow during decomposition, and simulation modeling. This year's report describes significant progress in defining the influence of soil arthropods in stimulating microbial immobilization of nutrients. Preliminary efforts to define the importance of the soil-litter macroarthropods are also reported.

  1. Integral Fast Reactor Program annual progress report, FY 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.I.; Walters, L.C.; Laidler, J.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Wade, D.C.; Lineberry, J.J.

    1994-12-01

    This report summarizes highlights of the technical progress made in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program in FY 1994. Technical accomplishments are presented in the following areas of the IFR technology development activities: metal fuel performance; pyroprocess development; safety experiments and analyses; core design development; fuel cycle demonstration; and LMR technology R&D.

  2. Integral Fast Reactor Program annual progress report, FY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    This report summarizes highlights of the technical progress made in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program in FY 1991. Technical accomplishments are presented in the following areas of the IFR technology development activities: (1) metal fuel performance, (2) pyroprocess development, (3) safety experiments and analyses, (4) core design development, (5) fuel cycle demonstration, and (6) LMR technology R&D.

  3. Integral Fast Reactor Program annual progress report, FY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    This report summarizes highlights of the technical progress made in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program in FY 1991. Technical accomplishments are presented in the following areas of the IFR technology development activities: (1) metal fuel performance, (2) pyroprocess development, (3) safety experiments and analyses, (4) core design development, (5) fuel cycle demonstration, and (6) LMR technology R D.

  4. Integral Fast Reactor Program. Annual progress report, FY 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.I.; Walters, L.C.; Laidler, J.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Wade, D.C.; Lineberry, M.J.

    1994-10-01

    This report summarizes highlights of the technical progress made in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program in FY 1993. Technical accomplishments are presented in the following areas of the IFR technology development activities: (1) metal fuel performance, (2) pyroprocess development, (3) safety experiments and analyses, (4) core design development, (5) fuel cycle demonstration, and (6) LMR technology R and D.

  5. 45 CFR 1357.16 - Annual progress and services reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... include the following— (1) A report on the specific accomplishments and progress made in the past fiscal... support services to be provided in the upcoming fiscal year highlighting any changes in services or program design and including the information required in 45 CFR 1357.15(n); (4) For States, a...

  6. Research on Automatic Classification, Indexing and Extracting. Annual Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, F.T.; And Others

    In order to contribute to the success of several studies for automatic classification, indexing and extracting currently in progress, as well as to further the theoretical and practical understanding of textual item distributions, the development of a frequency program capable of supplying these types of information was undertaken. The program…

  7. Integral Fast Reactor Program. Annual progress report, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.I.; Walters, L.C.; Laidler, J.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Wade, D.C.; Lineberry, M.J.

    1993-06-01

    This report summarizes highlights of the technical progress made in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program in FY 1992. Technical accomplishments are presented in the following areas of the IFR technology development activities: (1) metal fuel performance, (2) pyroprocess development, (3) safety experiments and analyses, (4) core design development, (5) fuel cycle demonstration, and (6) LMR technology R&D.

  8. Genetic Analysis of Oncorhynchus Nerka : 1991 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Brannon, E.L.; Setter, A.L.; Welsh, T.L.; Rocklage, S.J.

    1992-01-01

    The 1990 project to develop DNA assessment techniques for the purpose of determining relationships among populations of Oncorhynchus nerka demonstrated differences that had potential for such application. The work was continued in 1991 with specific application of the techniques to develop DNA probes that could be used in separating populations of 0. nerka associated with the lakes in the upper Salmon River, principally those in Redfish Lake. Research included sockeye-kokanee life history studies that might add supporting evidence for assessing the degree of difference or similarity among populations in the lake systems. This report summarizes the annual activities under the work plan.

  9. 50 CFR 622.457 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs). 622.457 Section 622.457 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY.... Virgin Islands § 622.457 Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and...

  10. 50 CFR 622.496 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs). 622.496 Section 622.496 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY.... Virgin Islands § 622.496 Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and...

  11. 50 CFR 622.439 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs). 622.439 Section 622.439 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY.... Virgin Islands § 622.439 Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and...

  12. 50 CFR 622.439 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs). 622.439 Section 622.439 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY.... Virgin Islands § 622.439 Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and...

  13. 50 CFR 622.496 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs). 622.496 Section 622.496 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY.... Virgin Islands § 622.496 Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and...

  14. 50 CFR 622.457 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs). 622.457 Section 622.457 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY.... Virgin Islands § 622.457 Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and...

  15. Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress 2000 [USDOE] [9th edition

    SciTech Connect

    2001-06-01

    This ninth edition of the Annual Report of Waste Generation and Pollution Prevention Progress highlights waste reduction, pollution prevention accomplishments, and cost savings/avoidance for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pollution Prevention Program for Fiscal Year 2000. This edition marks the first time that progress toward meeting the 2005 Pollution Prevention Goals, issued by the Secretary of Energy in November 1999, is being reported. In addition, the Annual Report has a new format, and now contains information on a fiscal year basis, which is consistent with other DOE reports.

  16. FY 2005 Annual Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen Program

    SciTech Connect

    2005-10-01

    In cooperation with industry, academia, national laboratories, and other government agencies, the Department of Energy's Hydrogen Program is advancing the state of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in support of the President's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative. The initiative seeks to develop hydrogen, fuel cell, and infrastructure technologies needed to make it practical and cost-effective for Americans to choose to use fuel cell vehicles by 2020. Significant progress was made in fiscal year 2005 toward that goal.

  17. 2015 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    SciTech Connect

    Popovich, Neil

    2015-12-01

    In the past year, the DOE Hydrogen Program (the Program) made substantial progress toward its goals and objectives. The Program has conducted comprehensive and focused efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. With emphasis on applications that will effectively strengthen our nation's energy security and improve our stewardship of the environment, the Program engages in research, development, and demonstration of critical improvements in the technologies. Highlights of the Program's accomplishments can be found in the sub-program chapters of this report.

  18. 2012 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-12-01

    In the past year, the DOE Hydrogen Program (the Program) made substantial progress toward its goals and objectives. The Program has conducted comprehensive and focused efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. With emphasis on applications that will effectively strengthen our nation's energy security and improve our stewardship of the environment, the Program engages in research, development, and demonstration of critical improvements in the technologies. Highlights of the Program's accomplishments can be found in the sub-program chapters of this report.

  19. Ionization in liquids [annual] progress report, 1993--1994

    SciTech Connect

    Bakale, G.

    1994-12-31

    Progress in 1993--94 was focused on delineating how ions of the model nonpolar spherical solute Buckminsterfullerene interact differently with various nonpolar solvents than does the ellipsoidal fullerene analog C-70, and exposing a variety of new audiences to the electrophilicity-carcinogenicity relationship in order to obtain fresh insight into this relationship that may lead to elucidation of the role of electrons in carcinogenesis and thereby a better understanding of the biological effects of ionizing radiation. To achieve these goals a new collaboration was established with scientists at Oak Ridge National Lab who have unique facilities to characterize fullerene and its radiolytic products.

  20. The theory of hadronic systems. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, W.R.

    1993-04-12

    This report briefly discusses progress on the following topics: isospin breaking in the pion-nucleon system; direct capture of pions into deeply bound atomic states; knock out of secondary components in the nucleus; study of the radii of neutron distributions in nuclei; the hadronic double scattering operator; transparency in pion production; asymmetry in pion scattering and charge exchange from polarized nuclei; the mechanism of pion absorption in nuclei; the neutron-proton charge-exchange reaction; modification of the fundamental structure of nucleons in nuclei; and antiproton annihilation in nuclei.

  1. Measuring disease progression in corticobasal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Huang, Nancy; Hornberger, Michael; Hodges, John R; Burrell, James R

    2014-08-01

    Corticobasal syndrome (CBS) is a complex neurodegenerative disorder with marked clinical, neuropsychological, and pathological heterogeneity. Measurement of disease progression in CBS is complex and little understood. This study aimed to establish clinical and neuropsychological indicators of prognosis in CBS. Patients with CBS were retrospectively recruited from a frontotemporal dementia specific research clinic. All patients underwent detailed clinical and neuropsychological testing including the frontotemporal dementia rating scale (FRS). Using the differences in FRS logit scores over a period of 12 months, CBS patients were divided into rapid and slow progressor groups. Demographic, clinical and neuropsychological features were compared between the two groups. Sixteen participants who met defined criteria were included (9 males, 7 females; mean age 65.8 ± 22 years; median symptom duration 51.8 ± 22 years; mean duration of follow-up 11.4 ± 2.8 months). There were no significant differences between the rapid and slow progressors in age, gender, symptom duration, motor/cognitive presentation, and ACE-R scores at baseline. Clinically, slow progressors were significantly more likely to have a motor speech disorder, with a trend for more frequent dysgraphia, whereas rapid progressors were more likely to exhibit surface dyslexia. Rapid and slow progressor groups did not differ on neuropsychological performance. The presence of motor speech disorder, dysgraphia, and surface dyslexia may be useful in differentiating patients with rapid progression of CBS from those with a more indolent disease course. PMID:24893591

  2. Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1999-09-01

    This seventh Annual Report presents and analyzes DOE Complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention activities at 45 reporting sites from 1993 through 1998. This section summarizes Calendar Year 1998 Complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention accomplishments. More detailed information follows this section in the body of the Report. In May 1996, the Secretary of Energy established a 50 percent Complex-Wide Waste Reduction Goal (relative to the 1993 baseline) for routine operations radioactive, mixed, and hazardous waste generation, to be achieved by December31, 1999. DOE has achieved its Complex-Wide Waste Reduction Goals for routine operations based upon a comparison of 1998 waste generation to the 1993 baseline. Excluding sanitary waste, routine operations waste generation decreased 67 percent overall from 1993 to 1998. However, for the first time since 1994, the total amount of materials recycled by the Complex decreased from 109,600 metric tons in 1997 to 92,800 metric tons in 1998. This decrease is attributed to the fact that in 1997, several large ''one-time only'' recycling projects were conducted throughout the Complex. In order to demonstrate commitment to DOE's Complex-wide recycling goal, it is important for sites to identify all potential large-scale recycling/reuse opportunities.

  3. Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    This sixth Annual Report presents and analyzes DOE Complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention activities at 36 reporting sites from 1993 through 1997. In May 1996, the Secretary of Energy established a 50 percent Complex-Wide Waste Reduction Goal (relative to the 1993 baseline) for routine operations radioactive and hazardous waste generation, to be achieved by December 31, 1999. Excluding sanitary waste, routine operations waste generation increased three percent from 1996 to 1997, and decreased 61 percent overall from 1993 to 1997. DOE has achieved its Complex-Wide Waste Reduction Goals for routine operations based upon a comparison of 1997 waste generation to the 1993 baseline. However, it is important to note that increases in low-level radioactive and low-level mixed waste generation could reverse this achievement. From 1996 to 1997, low-level radioactive waste generation increased 10 percent, and low-level mixed waste generation increased slightly. It is critical that DOE sites continue to reduce routine operations waste generation for all waste types, to ensure that DOE`s Complex-Wide Waste Reduction Goals are achieved by December 31, 1999.

  4. Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program: Annual progress report FY 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    In many ways, the Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program underwent a major transformation in Fiscal Year 1995 and these changes have continued to the present. When the Program was established in 1990 as the Advanced Industrial Concepts (AIC) Materials Program, the mission was to conduct applied research and development to bring materials and processing technologies from the knowledge derived from basic research to the maturity required for the end use sectors for commercialization. In 1995, the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) made radical changes in structure and procedures. All technology development was directed toward the seven ``Vision Industries`` that use about 80% of industrial energy and generated about 90% of industrial wastes. The mission of AIM has, therefore, changed to ``Support development and commercialization of new or improved materials to improve productivity, product quality, and energy efficiency in the major process industries.`` Though AIM remains essentially a National Laboratory Program, it is essential that each project have industrial partners, including suppliers to, and customers of, the seven industries. Now, well into FY 1996, the transition is nearly complete and the AIM Program remains reasonably healthy and productive, thanks to the superb investigators and Laboratory Program Managers. This Annual Report for FY 1995 contains the technical details of some very remarkable work by the best materials scientists and engineers in the world. Areas covered here are: advanced metals and composites; advanced ceramics and composites; polymers and biobased materials; and new materials and processes.

  5. Herbaceous Energy Crops Program. Annual progress report for FY 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, J.H.; Turhollow, A.F.; Johnston, J.W.

    1986-04-01

    This report describes the activities and accomplishments of the Herbaceous Energy Crops Program (HECP) for the year ending September 30, 1985. HECP emphasizes lignocellulosic forage crops. In FY 1985 screening and selection trails began on seven species of perennial and annual grasses and legumes in five projects in the Southeast and the Midwest-Lake State regions. Research also continued on the development of winter rapeseed as a disel-fuel substitute. Activities in FY 1985 included crosses and selections to incorporate atrazine resistance and reduced vernalization requirements in genotypes with desirable seed and oil qualities. Exploratory research efforts in FY 1985 included the physiology and biochemistry of hydrocarbon production in latex bearing plants, the productivity of cattail stands under sustained harvesting, and the development of tissue culture techniques for hard-to-culture sorghum genotypes. Environmental and economic analyses in FY 1985 included completion of a resource assessment of the southwestern United States, a study on successful new crop introductions, and initiation of studies on near-term markets for lignocellulosic energy crops and on vegetable oil extraction facilities. 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. The domestic natural gas and oil initiatve. First annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    This document is the first of a series of annual progress reports designed to inform the industry and the public of the accomplishments of the Domestic Natural Gas and Oil Initiative (the Initiative) and the benefits realized. Undertaking of the Initiative was first announced by Hazel O`Leary, Secretary of the Department of Energy (Department or DOE), in April 1993.

  7. 10 CFR 905.14 - Does Western require annual IRP progress reports?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Does Western require annual IRP progress reports? 905.14 Section 905.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Integrated Resource.... With Western's approval, customers may submit reports outside of the 30-day anniversary date window....

  8. 10 CFR 905.14 - Does Western require annual IRP progress reports?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Does Western require annual IRP progress reports? 905.14 Section 905.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Integrated Resource.... With Western's approval, customers may submit reports outside of the 30-day anniversary date window....

  9. 10 CFR 905.14 - Does Western require annual IRP progress reports?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Does Western require annual IRP progress reports? 905.14 Section 905.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Integrated Resource.... With Western's approval, customers may submit reports outside of the 30-day anniversary date window....

  10. 10 CFR 905.14 - Does Western require annual IRP progress reports?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Does Western require annual IRP progress reports? 905.14 Section 905.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Integrated Resource.... With Western's approval, customers may submit reports outside of the 30-day anniversary date window....

  11. FY2012 Annual Progress Report for Vehicle and Systems Simulation and Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Slezak, Lee

    2013-03-29

    Annual progress report that evaluates the technologies and performance characteristics of advanced automotive powertrain components and subsystems in an integrated vehicle systems context. These evaluations address light-, medium-, and heavy-duty vehicle platforms. This work is directed toward evaluating and verifying the targets of the VTO R&D teams and to providing guidance in establishing roadmaps for achievement of these goals.

  12. First Annual Progress Report, 1997-1998. Dalton College Strategic Plan, 1997-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton College, GA. Office of Institutional Research and Planning.

    This document is the first annual progress report for 1997-1998 of Dalton College's Strategic Plan for 1997-2000. It contains the following elements: (1) message from the president; (2) executive summary; (3) institutional profile, including students, faculty and curriculum, academic programs, and facilities; (4) mission statement; (5) planning…

  13. 76 FR 66946 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Annual Progress Reports for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ... for Empowerment Zones AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer, HUD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... reporting for Rounds, I, II, and III Empowerment Zones (EZs). HUD previously designated 30 EZs, which... lists the following information: Title of Proposal: Annual Progress Reports for Empowerment Zones....

  14. 76 FR 64369 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Annual Progress Reports for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ... for Empowerment Zones AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer, HUD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... current data reporting for Rounds, I, II, and III Empowerment Zones (EZs). HUD previously designated 30... lists the following information: Title of Proposal: Annual Progress Reports for Empowerment Zones....

  15. FY2011 Annual Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2011-12-01

    Annual Progress Report for the Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development (R&D) subprogram supporting the mission of the Vehicle Technologies Program by removing the critical technical barriers to commercialization of advanced internal combustion engines (ICEs) for passenger and commercial vehicles that meet future federal emissions regulations.

  16. Rural Development Progress: Fourth Annual Report of the Secretary of Agriculture to the Congress, 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knebel, John A.

    The fourth annual secretary of agriculture report on rural development progress (prepared in response to a directive from the Rural Development Act of 1972) presents the most recently available status data on employment, income, population, housing, and community services and facilities, discusses examples of federal efforts to improve or expand…

  17. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report period ending December 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, O.B. Jr.; Berry, L.A.; Sheffield, J.

    1987-10-01

    This annual report on fusion energy discusses the progress on work in the following main topics: toroidal confinement experiments; atomic physics and plasma diagnostics development; plasma theory and computing; plasma-materials interactions; plasma technology; superconducting magnet development; fusion engineering design center; materials research and development; and neutron transport. (LSP)

  18. Measuring Progressions: Assessment Structures Underlying a Learning Progression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Mark

    2009-01-01

    This article describes some of the underlying conceptualizations that have gone into the work of the BEAR Center in the development of learning progressions. The core of all of these developments has been the construct map, which is the first building block in the BEAR Assessment System (BAS). After introducing the concept of a learning…

  19. 50 CFR 622.41 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs). 622.41 Section 622.41 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY....41 Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs). (a... projected to reach the annual catch target (ACT) specified in § 622.39(a)(1)(v)(commercial quota),...

  20. Annual research progress report, FY 1980. Annual report 1 Oct 79-30 Sep 80

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, J.D.

    1980-10-01

    During Fiscal Year 1980 progress was attained at the Letterman Army Institute of Research in the following research areas: Basic and applied studies on blood, blood products and blood substitutes; physiology of hemorrhagic shock, pharmacological intervention of shock; the determination of coherent radiation exposure thresholds causing damage to the eye, definition and treatment for laser injuries of the skin and eye; military stress and combat effectiveness; evaluation and toxicology of insect repellents; defense against chemical agents. The progress made in this fiscal year is described in the reports of the work units presented.

  1. UCSD geothermal chemistry program; Annual progress report, FY 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Weare, J.H.

    1989-10-01

    The development of a geothermal resource requires a considerable financial commitment. As in other energy extraction ventures, the security of this investment can be jeopardized by the uncertain behavior of the resource under operating conditions. Many of the most significant problems limiting the development of geothermal power are related to the chemical properties of the high temperature and highly pressured formation fluids from which the energy is extracted. When the pressure and temperature conditions on these fluids are changed either during the production phase (pressure changes) or during the extraction phase (temperature changes) of the operation, the fluids which were originally in equilibrium under the new conditions by precipitation of solid materials (scales) or release of dissolved gases (some toxic) in the formation and well bores or in the plant equipment. Unfortunately, predicting the behavior of the production fluids is difficult, because it is a function of many variables. In order to address these problems the Department of Energy is developing a computer model describing the chemistry of geothermal fluids. The model under development at UCSD is based on recent progress in the physical chemistry of concentrated aqueous solutions, and is covered in this report.

  2. Physical mapping of human chromosome 16. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, G.R.

    1993-08-01

    We aim to isolate cDNAs mapping to human chromosome 16 and localise such cDNAs on the high resolution physical map. In collaboration with LANL, PCR primers will be synthesised from cDNA sequences mapped to chromosome 16 and used as ESTs in the generation of mega-YAC contigs for this chromosome. Probing of high density cosmid grids will enable integration of the ESTs into cosmid contigs and location of the cosmid contigs on the YAC contig. A hn-cDNA library has been constructed from the hybrid CY18 which contains chromosome 16 as the only human chromosome. A modified screening protocol has been successfully developed and 15 hn-cDNA clones have been sequenced and localised on the hybrid map. Sequence analysis of four of these revealed that they were known cDNAs, which are now mapped to chromosome 16. Development of techniques to allow the isolation of longer cDNAs from the identified exons is in progress. This will depend on PCR amplification of cDNAs from a total human CDNA library.

  3. Autonomous Pathogen Detection System - FY02 Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Colston, B; Brown, S; Burris, K; Elkin, C; Hindson, B; Langlois, R; Masquelier, D; McBride, M; Metz, T; Nasarabadi, S; Makarewicz, T; Milznovich, F; Venkateswaran, K S; Visuri, S

    2002-11-11

    The objective of this project is to design, fabricate and field demonstrate a biological agent detection and identification capability, the Autonomous Pathogen Detector System (APDS). Integrating a flow cytometer and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detector with sample collection, sample preparation and fluidics will provide a compact, autonomously operating instrument capable of simultaneously detecting multiple pathogens and/or toxins. The APDS will operate in fixed locations, continuously monitoring air samples and automatically reporting the presence of specific biological agents. The APDS will utilize both multiplex immunoassays and nucleic acid assays to provide ''quasi-orthogonal'' multiple agent detection approaches to minimize false positives and increase the reliability of identification. Technical advances across several fronts must occur, however, to realize the full extent of the APDS. The end goal of a commercially available system for civilian biological weapon defense will be accomplished through three progressive generations of APDS instruments. The APDS is targeted for civilian applications in which the public is at high risk of exposure to covert releases of bioagent, such as major subway systems and other transportation terminals, large office complexes and convention centers. APDS is also designed to be part of a monitoring network of sensors integrated with command and control systems for wide-area monitoring of urban areas and major public gatherings. In this latter application there is potential that a fully developed APDS could add value to DoD monitoring architectures.

  4. Call progress time measurement in IP telephony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasnabish, Bhumip

    1999-11-01

    Usually a voice call is established through multiple stages in IP telephony. In the first stage, a phone number is dialed to reach a near-end or call-originating IP-telephony gateway. The next stages involve user identification through delivering an m-digit user-id to the authentication and/or billing server, and then user authentication by using an n- digit PIN. After that, the caller is allowed (last stage dial tone is provided) to dial a destination phone number provided that authentication is successful. In this paper, we present a very flexible method for measuring call progress time in IP telephony. The proposed technique can be used to measure the system response time at every stage. It is flexible, so that it can be easily modified to include new `tone' or a set of tones, or `voice begin' can be used in every stage to detect the system's response. The proposed method has been implemented using scripts written in Hammer visual basic language for testing with a few commercially available IP telephony gateways.

  5. Annual progress report, July 1, 1983-June 30, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Research in the Laboratory of Biomolecular and Celluler Sciences deals with proliferation, gene expression and differentiation in normal cells and in cells exposed to pollutants, carcinogens or tumor promoters. The research program of the Laboratory of Environmental Biology presents an integrated approach to studies of the functional interactions of the physical and biotic components of arid land ecosystems. Nuclear Medicine research has focussed on development of positron emission tomography, preparation of short-lived isotopes of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon and fluorine, use of these isotopes to label physiological substrates, tracer studies of cerebral biochemistry and physiology, measurement of regional myocardial fatty acid metabolism and blood flow. (AER)

  6. Mutagenicity of radon and radon daughters. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, H.H.

    1991-12-01

    The objective of our research is to investigate the dose-response relationship of the lethal and mutagenic effects of exposure of cells to radon and its decay products. Dose rate dependence and the nature of the DNA lesion will be studied, using the thymidine kinase and HPRT loci to measure mutation frequency. A deficiency in DNA repair is shown to lead to a greater proportion of mutants with intergenic lesions. The cytotoxic effects of radon and its daughters are similar in human TK6 lymphoblasts and mouse L5178Y lymphoblasts, the cell line used in previous experiments. The results of molecular analysis of four spontaneous and 25 X-radiation induced HPRT{sup {minus}} mutants. Eleven radon-induced HPRT{sup {minus}} mutants have been isolated, and will be analyzed in a similar fashion. 9 figs.

  7. High energy hadron-hadron collisions. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, T.T.

    1992-12-31

    Results of a study on high energy collisions with the geometrical model are summarized in three parts: (1) the elastic hadron-hadron collision, (2) the inelastic hadron-hadron collision, and (3) e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation. For elastic scattering, a modified form for the hadronic matter form factor of the proton was proposed which is still dipole in form but contains an energy--dependent range parameter. This new expression of the opacity function fits the elastic {bar p}p scattering very well from the ISR to S{bar p}pS energies. Extrapolation of this theory also yielded results {bar p}p in good agreement with the {bar p}p differential cross section measured at the Tevatron. For inelastic hadron-hadron collisions, we have made a systematic investigation of the single-particle momentum spectra in the entire S{bar p}pS energy region. Results are useful for the extrapolation of angular distribution to the higher SSC energies. In e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation, a detailed analysis of all available experimental multiplicity data from PETRA to LEP energies has been performed. The cluster size of emitted hadrons increases gradually with energy. Aside from high-energy collisions, the giant fullerene molecules were studied and precise algebraic eigenvalue expressions of the Hueckel problem for carbon-240 were obtained.

  8. Annual progress report, July 1, 1982-June 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    The research program is carried out in three laboratory units: (1) The Laboratory of Biomolecular and Cellular Sciences focuses on fundamental cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, gene expression and ecogenic transformation, particularly as related to endogenous factors and energy-related exogenous factors; (2) The Laboratory of Environmental Biology uses two primary study sites to address basic arid-region process studies. The long range goal of this program is the generation of data which will lead to the development of models having predictive value. Knowledge of physiological processes in both plants and animals, particularly as influenced by environmental conditions, is required to understand the structure and dynamics of the ecosystems. The carbon, nutrient and hydrological cycles require greater attention and will be the subject of research programs in the near future; and (3) The Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine measures the physiological behavior of small parts of the brain and heart in health and disease using radioactive tracer techniques employing emission computed tomography. The method is developed technically by rapidly synthesizing biological indicators labeled with short-lived positron emitting radionuclides produced in the laboratory cyclotron. Mathematical models are developed to explain the body distributions of these indicators which are imaged with emission tomographs. This multi-disciplinary effort finally produces cross-section pictures of body biochemistry obtained noninvasively in living patients. It is expected that this approach will result in earlier diagnosis of disease and more careful monitoring of treatment.

  9. Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems, Volume 1: Annual technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    This is the first annual technical progress report for The Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Systems Program. Two semi-annual technical progress reports were previously issued. This program was initially by the Department of Energy as an R D effort to establish the technology base for the commercial application of direct coal-fired gas turbines. The combustion system under consideration incorporates a modular three-stage slagging combustor concept. Fuel-rich conditions inhibit NO/sub x/ formation from fuel nitrogen in the first stage; coal ash and sulfur is subsequently removed from the combustion gases by an impact separator in the second stage. Final oxidation of the fuel-rich gases and dilution to achieve the desired turbine inlet conditions are accomplished in the third stage. 27 figs., 15 tabs.

  10. Underground Energy Storage Program: 1981 annual report. Volume I. Progress summary

    SciTech Connect

    Kannberg, L.D.

    1982-06-01

    This is the 1981 annual report for the Underground Energy Storage Program administered by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy. The two-volume document describes all of the major research funded under this program during the period March 1981 to March 1982. Volume I summarizes the activities and notable progress toward program objectives in both Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) and Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES). Major changes in program emphasis and structure are also documented.

  11. Measuring Client Progression in Adult Guidance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hearne, Lucy

    2007-01-01

    Currently, in the field of guidance, relevant stakeholders including guidance practitioners, educators and policy makers, have identified progression for adults in education and employment as one of the key outcomes of educational guidance. Lifelong guidance is now inextricably linked with lifelong learning as a mechanism to enhance individual…

  12. Large experiment data analysis collaboration. Annual progress report for period November 15, 1996 - November 14, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Callen, J. D.

    1997-08-01

    This is the second annual progress on the three-year Large Experiment Data Analysis Collaboration DOE grant DE-FGO2-92ER54139, which succeeded a previous four-year grant under the same grant number. This year most of the collaboration effort shifted from being with the TFTR program, to being with the DIII-D program, and most new research focused on the properties, causes and possible amelioration of neoclassical tearing modes. In addition, our studies of nonlocal electron heat transport in TFTR have attracted wider attention, and are now being transferred to similar research on DIII-D.

  13. FY2009 Annual Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2009-12-01

    Fiscal Year 2009 Annual Progress Report for the Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development (R&D) subprogram. The Advanced Combustion Engine R&D subprogram supports the mission of the VTP program by removing the critical technical barriers to commercialization of advanced internal combustion engines (ICEs) for passenger and commercial vehicles that meet future Federal emissions regulations. Dramatically improving the efficiency of ICEs and enabling their introduction in conventional as well as hybrid electric vehicles is the most promising and cost-effective approach to increasing vehicle fuel economy over the next 30 years.

  14. Research in theoretical elementary particle physics at the University of Florida: Task A. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Field, R.D.; Ramond, P.M.; Sikivie, P.; Thorn, C.B.

    1994-12-01

    This is the Annual Progress Report of the theoretical particle theory group at the University of Florida under DOE Grant DE-FG05-86ER40272. At present our group consists of four Full Professors (Field, Ramond, Thorn, Sikivie), one Associate Professor (Woodard), and two Assistant Professors (Qiu, Kennedy). In addition, we have four postdoctoral research associates and seven graduate students. The research of our group covers a broad range of topics in theoretical high energy physics including both theory and phenomenology. Included in this report is a summary of the last several years, an outline of our current research program.

  15. Nutrition and Child Growth and Development in Tunisia. Annual Progress Report, September 1, 1971--August 31, 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Harben Boutourline

    This annual report of the Yale Project describes the progress made on the nutrition and growth study of Tunisian children from September 1, 1971 through August 31, 1972. The report details: (1) the progress in analysis of the cross-sectional study data, which was completed as of June 30, 1972, and (2) the development of the present longitudinal…

  16. Beyond GDP: Classifying Alternative Measures for Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleys, Brent

    2012-01-01

    Both the potential pitfalls of macro-economic policies focused on stimulating economic growth and the problems involved in using GDP as a measure of well-being or economic welfare have long been recognized by economists and researchers from other social sciences. Therefore, it is no surprise that alternative measures for policy-making have been…

  17. Hofstede's measures of national culture and social progress.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Basu

    2003-06-01

    Using measures of national cultures published by Hofstede in 1991, this study examined their effects on the weighted index of social progress of 50 countries around the world. Empirical findings indicated that individualism was negatively associated, while power distance was positively associated with the social progress of nations.

  18. 50 CFR 622.388 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs). 622.388 Section 622.388 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY... Mexico and South Atlantic) § 622.388 Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and... tracking the ACL, recreational landings will be monitored based on the commercial fishing year, July...

  19. Compilation of 1988 annual reports of the Navy ELF (extremely low frequency) Communications System Ecological Monitoring Program. Volume 2. Annual progress report No. 7, January-December 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-08-01

    This is the seventh compilation of annual reports for the Navy's ELF Communications System Ecological Monitoring Program. The reports document the progress of eight studies performed during 1988 at the Wisconsin and Michigan Transmitting Facilities. The purpose of the monitoring is to determine whether electromagnetic fields produced by the ELF Communications System will affect resident biota or their ecological relationships.

  20. Prediction of the Long Term Stability of Polyester-Based Recording Media. First Annual Report, June 1982; Second Annual Report, August 1983; Progress Report, December 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Daniel W.; And Others

    This document comprises three progress reports for a 5-year environmental aging study aimed at establishing the lifetimes of magnetic tapes and the poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) base of photographic and electronic film under archival storage conditions. The first annual report (1982) introduces the rationale for the project, provides…

  1. ONLINE MEASUREMENT OF THE PROGRESS OF DECONTAMINATION

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01

    In order to determine if the sensor technology and the decontamination technology will face problems once integrated, a feasibility study (see Appendix B) was produced in which the effect of motion on the efficiency of a radiation sensor was measured. It was found that the effect is not negligible; however, it is not catastrophic, and if the sensors are properly calibrated, this obstacle can be overcome. During the first year of this project, many important tasks have been accomplished. The search for radiation sensors provided knowledge on the technologies commercially available. This, in turn, allowed for a proper assessment of the properties, limitations, different methods of measurement, and requirements of a large number of sensors. The best possible characterization and data collection instrument and decontamination technologies were chosen using the requirement information in Appendix A. There are technical problems with installing sensors within the blasting head, such as steel shot and dust interference. Therefore, the sensor array is placed so that it will measure the radioactivity after the blasting. Sensors are rather sensitive, and therefore it is not feasible to place the sensor windows in such an abrasive environment. Other factors, such as the need for radiation hardening in extreme cases, and the possible interference of gamma rays with the radio frequency modem, have been considered. These factors are expected to be negligible and can be revisited at the time of prototype production. Factors that need to be addressed are the vibrations of the blasting unit and how to isolate the sensor array from these. In addition, an electromagnetic survey must be performed to ensure there will be no interference with the electronic component that will be integrated. The integration design is shown in section 4.0.

  2. [Fast neutron cross section measurements]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, G.F.

    1992-10-26

    From its inception, the Nuclear Data Project at the University of Michigan has concentrated on two major objectives: (1) to carry out carefully controlled nuclear measurements of the highest possible reliability in support of the national nuclear data program, and (2) to provide an educational opportunity for students with interests in experimental nuclear science. The project has undergone a successful transition from a primary dependence on our photoneutron laboratory to one in which our current research is entirely based on a unique pulsed 14 MeV fast neutron facility. The new experimental facility is unique in its ability to provide nanosecond bursts of 14 MeV neutrons under conditions that are ``clean`` and as scatter-free as possible, and is the only one of its type currently in operation in the United States. It has been designed and put into operation primarily by graduate students, and has met or exceeded all of its important initial performance goals. We have reached the point of its routine operation, and most of the data are now in hand that will serve as the basis for the first two doctoral dissertations to be written by participating graduate students. Our initial results on double differential neutron cross sections will be presented at the May 1993 Fusion Reactor Technology Workshop. We are pleased to report that, after investing several years in equipment assembly and optimization, the project has now entered its ``data production`` phase.

  3. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Annual Report 2006

    SciTech Connect

    LR Roeder

    2005-11-30

    This annual report describes the purpose and structure of the ARM Climate Research Facility and ARM Science programs and presents key accomplishments in 2006. Noteworthy scientific and infrastructure accomplishments in 2006 include: • Collaborating with the Australian Bureau of Meteorology to lead the Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment, a major international field campaign held in Darwin, Australia • Successfully deploying the ARM Mobile Facility in Niger, Africa • Developing the new ARM Aerial Vehicles Program (AVP) to provide airborne measurements • Publishing a new finding on the impacts of aerosols on surface energy budget in polar latitudes • Mitigating a long-standing double-Intertropical Convergence Zone problem in climate models using ARM data and a new cumulus parameterization scheme.

  4. Developing Learning Progression-Based Teacher Knowledge Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Hui; Shin, HyoJeong; Johnson, Michele E.; Kim, JinHo; Anderson, Charles W.

    2015-01-01

    This study developed learning progression-based measures of science teachers' content knowledge (CK) and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). The measures focus on an important topic in secondary science curriculum using scientific reasoning (i.e., tracing matter, tracing energy, and connecting scales) to explain plants gaining weight and…

  5. Task A: Research in theoretical elementary particle physics at the University of Florida; Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Field, R.D.; Ramond, P.M.; Sikivie, P.; Thorn, C.B.

    1993-11-01

    This is the Annual Progress Report of the theoretical particle theory group at the University of Florida under DoE Grant DE-FG05-86ER40272. At present our group consists of four Full Professors (Field, Ramond, Thorn, Sikivie) and three Assistant Professors (Qiu, Woodard, Kennedy). Dallas Kennedy recently joined our group increasing the Particle Theory faculty to seven. In addition, we have three postdoctoral research associates, an SSC fellow, and eight graduate students. The research of our group covers a broad range of topics in theoretical high energy physics with balance between theory and phenomenology. Included in this report is a summary of the last several years of operation of the group and an outline of our current research program.

  6. Annual parallax measurements of a Mira variable star, U Lyncis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamezaki, Tatsuya; Nakagawa, Akiharu; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Handa, Toshihiro; Inoue, Kan-ichiro; Kurayama, Tomoharu; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Nagayama, Takumi; Ueno, Yuji

    2016-10-01

    We have measured the annual parallax of the water maser around a Mira star, U Lyncis (U Lyn) with VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA). The value of the parallax is 1.27 ± 0.06 mas, corresponding to a distance of 786^{+40}_{-36}pc. This is the first VLBI measurement of the parallax of U Lyn. We obtained the period and the apparent magnitude of U Lyn based on near-infrared observations with the Kagoshima University 1 m telescope. The period and the mean magnitude of the K' band are 437.9 day and +1.15 ± 0.09 mag, respectively. Using our measured parallax and period, we find that the location of U Lyn on the period-luminosity plane is consistent with its nature as a Mira variable fundamental mode pulsator. Also, we estimated the distance using the period-luminosity relationship, our period and apparent magnitude and this gave a difference of about 100 pc between our parallactic distance and the distance estimated by using the period-luminosity relationship. We estimated the luminosity, radius, and mass of U Lyn to be 10100 ± 420 L⊙, 391 ± 34 R⊙, and 1.9 ± 0.7 M⊙, respectively. We found 50 water maser spots with a distribution ˜ 13 au around the star and the motion implies the existence of an outflow.

  7. Annual parallax measurements of a Mira variable star, U Lyncis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamezaki, Tatsuya; Nakagawa, Akiharu; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Handa, Toshihiro; Inoue, Kan-ichiro; Kurayama, Tomoharu; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Nagayama, Takumi; Ueno, Yuji

    2015-06-01

    We have measured the annual parallax of the water maser around a Mira star, U Lyncis (U Lyn) with VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA). The value of the parallax is 1.27 ± 0.06 mas, corresponding to a distance of 786^{+40}_{-36}pc. This is the first VLBI measurement of the parallax of U Lyn. We obtained the period and the apparent magnitude of U Lyn based on near-infrared observations with the Kagoshima University 1 m telescope. The period and the mean magnitude of the K' band are 437.9 day and +1.15 ± 0.09 mag, respectively. Using our measured parallax and period, we find that the location of U Lyn on the period-luminosity plane is consistent with its nature as a Mira variable fundamental mode pulsator. Also, we estimated the distance using the period-luminosity relationship, our period and apparent magnitude and this gave a difference of about 100 pc between our parallactic distance and the distance estimated by using the period-luminosity relationship. We estimated the luminosity, radius, and mass of U Lyn to be 10100 ± 420 L⊙, 391 ± 34 R⊙, and 1.9 ± 0.7 M⊙, respectively. We found 50 water maser spots with a distribution ˜ 13 au around the star and the motion implies the existence of an outflow.

  8. Annual Program Progress Report under DOE/PHRI Cooperative Agreement: (July 1, 2001-June 30, 2002)

    SciTech Connect

    Palafox, Neal A., MD, MPH

    2002-07-31

    OAK B188 DOE/PHRI Special Medical Care Program in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI)Annual Program Progress Report. The DOE Marshall Islands Medical Program continued, in this it's 48th year, to provide medical surveillance for the exposed population from Rongelap and Utrik and the additional DOE patients. The program was inaugurated in 1954 by the Atomic Energy Commission following the exposure of Marshallese to fallout from a nuclear test (Castle Bravo) at Bikini Atoll. This year marks the fourth year in which the program has been carried out by PHRI under a cooperative agreement with DOE. The DOERHRI Special Medical Care Program, awarded the cooperative agreement on August 28, 1998, commenced its health care program on January 15, 1999, on Kwajalein and January 22, 1999, on Majuro. This report details the program for the July 1, 2001, through the June 30, 2002, period. The program provides year-round, on-site medical care to the DOE patient population residing in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) and annual examinations to those patients living in Hawaii and on the Continental U.S.

  9. In vivo mutagenicity and clastogenicity of ionizing radiation in nuclear medicine. Annual technical progress report, [1991

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, K.T.

    1991-12-31

    The overall goal of our research remains to investigate the mutagenic and clastogenic effects of exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation to human lymphocytes. Principally, we are studying hospital patients referred to a nuclear medicine department for diagnostic cardiac imaging and nuclear medicine technologies who administer radionuclides. Emphasis in the first year, as described in the first progress report, was on optimization of the hprt mutation assay, measurement of mutant frequencies in patients imaged with thallium-201, and measurement of mutant frequencies in controls. Emphasis in the second year has been on measurements of (1) chromosome aberrations in patients imaged with thallium-201, (2) mutant frequencies in patients imaged with technetium-99, (3) mutant frequencies in nuclear medicine technicians and physical therapists, (4) mutant frequencies in patients treated for Hodgkins disease with radiotherapy. The progress in these areas is described.

  10. Annual Report on Waste Generation and Waste Minimization Progress, 1991--1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This report is DOE`s first annual report on waste generation and waste minimization progress. Data presented in this report were collected from all DOE sites which met minimum threshold criteria established for this report. The fifty-seven site submittals contained herein represent data from over 100 reporting sites within 25 states. Radioactive, hazardous and sanitary waste quantities and the efforts to minimize these wastes are highlighted within the fifty-seven site submittals. In general, sites have made progress in moving beyond the planning phase of their waste minimization programs. This is evident by the overall 28 percent increase in the total amount of materials recycled from 1991 to 1992, as well as individual site initiatives. During 1991 and 1992, DOE generated a total of 279,000 cubic meters of radioactive waste and 243,000 metric tons of non-radioactive waste. These waste amounts include significant portions of process wastewater required to be reported to regulatory agencies in the state of Texas and the state of Tennessee. Specifically, the Pantex Plant in Texas treats an industrial wastewater that is considered by the Texas Water Commission to be a hazardous waste. In 1992, State regulated wastewater from the Pantex Plant represented 3,620 metric tons, 10 percent of the total hazardous waste generated by DOE. Similarly, mixed low-level wastewater from the TSCA Incinerator Facility at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site in Tennessee represented 55 percent of the total radioactive waste generated by DOE in 1992.

  11. Assessment of Food Chain Pathway Parameters in Biosphere Models: Annual Progress Report for Fiscal Year 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, Bruce A.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Fellows, Robert J.; Cataldo, Dominic A.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Gilmore, Tyler J.

    2004-12-02

    This Annual Progress Report describes the work performed and summarizes some of the key observations to date on the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s project Assessment of Food Chain Pathway Parameters in Biosphere Models, which was established to assess and evaluate a number of key parameters used in the food-chain models used in performance assessments of radioactive waste disposal facilities. Section 2 of this report describes activities undertaken to collect samples of soils from three regions of the United States, the Southeast, Northwest, and Southwest, and perform analyses to characterize their physical and chemical properties. Section 3 summarizes information gathered regarding agricultural practices and common and unusual crops grown in each of these three areas. Section 4 describes progress in studying radionuclide uptake in several representative crops from the three soil types in controlled laboratory conditions. Section 5 describes a range of international coordination activities undertaken by Project staff in order to support the underlying data needs of the Project. Section 6 provides a very brief summary of the status of the GENII Version 2 computer program, which is a “client” of the types of data being generated by the Project, and for which the Project will be providing training to the US NRC staff in the coming Fiscal Year. Several appendices provide additional supporting information.

  12. Compilation of 1989 annual reports of the Navy ELF Communications System Ecological Monitoring Program. Volume 2. tabs C-F. Annual progress report, Jan-Dec 89

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    This is the eighth compilation of annual reports for the Navy's ELF Communications Systems Ecological Monitoring Program. The reports document the progress of eight studies performed during 1989 near the Naval Radio Transmitting Facility -- Republic, Michigan. The purpose of the monitoring is to determine whether electromagnetic fields produced by the ELF Communications System will affect resident biota or their ecological relationships. Soil Amoeba: Arthropoda and Earthworms: Pollinating Insects: Small Mammals and Nesting Birds.

  13. Annual Progress Report of the Coastal Bend Migrant Council Health Project, San Patricio Migrant Health Center (Texas), 1973-1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coastal Bend Migrant Council, Mathis, TX. San Patricio Migrant Health Center.

    The annual medical progress report covers migrant health services in San Patricio County, Texas, from February 1, 1973 to January 31, 1974. The report discusses: staff, administration, cardiology, dental services, health services, medical services, outreach and environmental health services, prescription services, registration and identification,…

  14. 78 FR 65705 - Request for Comments on the Annual Progress Report on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-01

    ... Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Leasing Program 2012-2017 AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM... (Report) on the OCS Oil and Gas Leasing Program 2012-2017 (Five Year Program). The Annual Progress Report... the Five Year Program is available online at...

  15. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1982. Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 2090. [Lead abstract

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 12 of the 14 sections of the Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report. The other 2 sections deal with educational activities. The programs discussed deal with advanced fuel energy, toxic substances, environmental impacts of various energy technologies, biomass, low-level radioactive waste management, the global carbon cycle, and aquatic and terrestrial ecology. (KRM)

  16. Progression Measurement in Adult Guidance in Ireland: A Contested Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hearne, Lucy

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the findings of a research study on the longitudinal measurement of individual progression in the Irish Adult Education Guidance Initiative (AEGI). The research was underpinned by a critical constructivist methodology in its examination of the three main discourses of the client, practitioner, and policy maker in the field…

  17. Pewaukee School District, Wisconsin. Case Study: Measures of Academic Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Evaluation Association, 2015

    2015-01-01

    For more than a decade, Pewaukee School District Superintendent JoAnn Sternke has watched her district get better and better at its mission: opening the door to each student's future. The Wisconsin district began using Measures of Academic Progress® (MAP®) computer adaptive interim assessments from Northwest Evaluation Association™ (NWEA™) in 2004…

  18. FY 1991 Measurements and Characterization Branch annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Osterwald, C.R.; Dippo, P.C.

    1992-11-01

    The Measurements and Characterization Branch of the National Renewable Laboratory (NREL) provides comprehensive photovoltaic (PV) materials, devices, characterization, measurement, fabrication, modeling research, and support for the international PV research community, in the context of the US Department of Energy's Photovoltaic Research Program goals. This report summarizes the progress of the Branch from 31 January 1991 through 31 January 1992. The eight technical sections present a succinct overview of the capabilities and accomplishments of each group in the Branch. The Branch is comprised of the following groups: Surface and interface Analysis; Materials Characterization; Device Development; Electro-optical Characterization; Advanced PV module Performance and Reliability Research; Cell Performance Characterization; Surface Interactions, Modification, and Stability; and FTIR Spectroscopic Research. The including measurements and tests of PV materials, cells, submodules, and modules. The report contains a comprehensive bibliography of 77 branch originated journal and conference publications, which were authored in collaboration with, or in support of, approximately 135 university, industrial, government, and in-house research groups.

  19. FY 1991 Measurements and Characterization Branch annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Osterwald, C.R.; Dippo, P.C.

    1992-11-01

    The Measurements and Characterization Branch of the National Renewable Laboratory (NREL) provides comprehensive photovoltaic (PV) materials, devices, characterization, measurement, fabrication, modeling research, and support for the international PV research community, in the context of the US Department of Energy`s Photovoltaic Research Program goals. This report summarizes the progress of the Branch from 31 January 1991 through 31 January 1992. The eight technical sections present a succinct overview of the capabilities and accomplishments of each group in the Branch. The Branch is comprised of the following groups: Surface and interface Analysis; Materials Characterization; Device Development; Electro-optical Characterization; Advanced PV module Performance and Reliability Research; Cell Performance Characterization; Surface Interactions, Modification, and Stability; and FTIR Spectroscopic Research. The including measurements and tests of PV materials, cells, submodules, and modules. The report contains a comprehensive bibliography of 77 branch originated journal and conference publications, which were authored in collaboration with, or in support of, approximately 135 university, industrial, government, and in-house research groups.

  20. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2007

    SciTech Connect

    LR Roeder

    2007-12-01

    This annual report describes the purpose and structure of the program, and presents key accomplishments in 2007. Notable achievements include: • Successful review of the ACRF as a user facility by the DOE Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee. The subcommittee reinforced the importance of the scientific impacts of this facility, and its value for the international research community. • Leadership of the Cloud Land Surface Interaction Campaign. This multi-agency, interdisciplinary field campaign involved enhanced surface instrumentation at the ACRF Southern Great Plains site and, in concert with the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study sponsored by the DOE Atmospheric Science Program, coordination of nine aircraft through the ARM Aerial Vehicles Program. • Successful deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility in Germany, including hosting nearly a dozen guest instruments and drawing almost 5000 visitors to the site. • Key advancements in the representation of radiative transfer in weather forecast models from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. • Development of several new enhanced data sets, ranging from best estimate surface radiation measurements from multiple sensors at all ACRF sites to the extension of time-height cloud occurrence profiles to Niamey, Niger, Africa. • Publication of three research papers in a single issue (February 2007) of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.

  1. Idaho Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation : Annual Progress Report February 1, 2007 - January 31, 2008.

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, Timothy; Johnson, June; Putnam, Scott

    2008-12-01

    River stocks of steelhead and spring/summer Chinook salmon still have significant natural reproduction and thus are the focal species for this project's investigations. The overall goal is to monitor the abundance, productivity, distribution, and stock-specific life history characteristics of naturally produced steelhead trout and Chinook salmon in Idaho (IDFG 2007). We have grouped project tasks into three objectives, as defined in our latest project proposal and most recent statement of work. The purpose of each objective involves enumerating or describing individuals within the various life stages of Snake River anadromous salmonids. By understanding the transitions between life stages and associated controlling factors, we hope to achieve a mechanistic understanding of stock-specific population dynamics. This understanding will improve mitigation and recovery efforts. Objective 1. Measure 2007 adult escapement and describe the age structure of the spawning run of naturally produced spring/summer Chinook salmon passing Lower Granite Dam. Objective 2. Monitor the juvenile production of Chinook salmon and steelhead trout for the major population groups (MPGs) within the Clearwater and Salmon subbasins. Objective 3. Evaluate life cycle survival and the freshwater productivity/production of Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon. There are two components: update/refine a stock-recruit model and estimate aggregate smolt-to-adult survival. In this annual progress report, we present technical results for work done during 2007. Part 2 contains detailed results of INPMEP aging research and estimation of smolt-to-adult return rates for wild and naturally produced Chinook salmon (Objectives 1 and 3). Part 3 is a report on the ongoing development of a stock-recruit model for the freshwater phase of spring/summer Chinook salmon in the Snake River basin (Objective 3). Part 4 is a summary of the parr density data (Objective 2) collected in 2007 using the new site selection

  2. Measuring Progress toward the National Education Goals: Public Testimony, Volume 3. Summary of Testimony on Measures for Future Progress Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Goals Panel, Washington, DC.

    Patterns in general comments from public testimony and proposed future indicators (PFIs) presented at the National Education Goals Panel (NEGP) Regional Forums concerning recommendations by the six NEGP Resource Groups (RGPs) are outlined. The RGP recommendations focus on ways of measuring/monitoring the nation's/states' progress toward meeting…

  3. Mapping the denominator: spatial demography in the measurement of progress.

    PubMed

    Tatem, Andrew J

    2014-09-01

    Measuring progress towards international health goals requires a reliable baseline from which to measure change and recent methodological advancements have advanced our abilities to measure, model and map the prevalence of health issues using sophisticated tools. The provision of burden estimates generally requires linking these estimates with spatial demographic data, but for many resource-poor countries data on total population sizes, distributions, compositions and temporal trends are lacking, prompting a reliance on uncertain estimates. Modern technologies and data archives are offering solutions, but the huge range of uncertainties that exist today in spatial denominator datasets will still be around for many years to come. PMID:25125576

  4. Large area silicon sheet by EFG. Annual progress report, October 1, 1978-September 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-14

    The progress which has been made in 1978/1979 to evolve systems designs for growth stations which produce multiple silicon ribbons by the EFG process is reported. This progress culminated in the demonstration of five ribbon multiple growth in May 1979 and in recent advances toward improved electronic quality of ribbons grown from these machines. These advances were made in large measure by studies in which the composition of the gas environment around the meniscus area was varied. By introducing gases such as CO/sub 2/, CO, and CH/sub 4/ into this region, reproducible increases in diffusion length and cell performance have been realized, with the best large area (5 cm x 10 cm) cells exceeding 11% (AM1) efficiency.

  5. Kokanee Stock Status and Contribution Cabinet Gorge Hatchery, Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho, 1988 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, Edward C.

    1989-02-01

    The kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka rehabilitation program for Lake Pend Oreille continued to show progress during 1988. Estimated kokanee abundance in early September was 10.2 million fish. This estimate is 70% higher than 1987 and 140% higher than the populations's low point in 1986. Increased population size over the past two years is the result of two consecutive strong year classes produced from high recruitment of hatchery and wild fry. High recruitment of wild fry in 1988 resulted from good parental escapement (strong year class) in 1987 and relatively high fry survival. Hatchery fry made up 51% of total fry recruitment (73% of total fry biomass), which is the largest contribution since hatchery supplementation began in the 1970s. High hatchery fry abundance resulted from a large release (13 million fry) from Cabinet Gorge Hatchery and excellent fry survival (29%) during their first summer in Lake Pend Oreille. Improved fry release strategies enhanced survival, which doubled from 1987 to 1988 and was ten times higher than survival in 1986. Our research goal is to maintain 30% survival so we are very optimistic, but need to replicate additional years to address annual variability. 27 refs., 24 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Fusion Energy Division: Annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, O.B. Jr.; Berry, L.A.; Sheffield, J.

    1988-11-01

    The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a major part of the national fusion program, carries out research in nearly all areas of magnetic fusion. Collaboration among staff from ORNL, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., private industry, the academic community, and other fusion laboratories, in the United States and abroad, is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source. This report documents the program's achievements during 1987. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, it also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are external to the division (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program include the following: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, and development and testing of materials for fusion devices. Highlights from program activities are included in this report. 126 figs., 15 tabs.

  7. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1988: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    The goals and accomplishments of the Energy Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory are described in this annual progress report for Fiscal Year (FY) 1988. The Energy Division is a multidisciplinary research organization committed to (1) increasing the knowledge and understanding of the way society makes choices in energy use and energy-using technologies, (2) improving society's understanding of the environmental implications of changes in energy technology, and (3) improving and developing new energy-efficient technologies. The Energy Division's programmatic activities focus on four major areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) transportation and decision systems research, (3) technology research and development for improving the efficiency of energy and end-use technologies, and (4) electric power systems. The Division's total expenditures in FY 1988 were $44.3 million. The work is supported by the US Department of Energy, US Department of Defense, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 139 staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics.

  8. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, J.N.

    1992-04-01

    The Energy Division is one of 17 research divisions at Oak Ridge Laboratory. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this annual progress report for FY 1991. The division`s total expenditures in FY 1991 were $39.1 million. The work is supported by the US Department of Energy, US Department of Defense, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 124 technical staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics. The Energy Division`s programmatic activities focus on three major areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy conservation technologies, and (3) military transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities cover energy and resource analysis, the preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on waste management, analysis of emergency preparedness for natural and technological disasters, analysis of the energy and environmental needs of developing countries, technology transfer, and analysis of civilian transportation. Energy conservation technologies include electric power systems, building equipment (thermally activated heat pumps, advanced refrigeration systems, novel cycles), building envelopes (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), and technical issues for improving energy efficiency in existing buildings. Military transportation systems concentrate on research for sponsors within the US military on improving the efficiency of military deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination.

  9. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, J.N.

    1992-04-01

    The Energy Division is one of 17 research divisions at Oak Ridge Laboratory. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this annual progress report for FY 1991. The division's total expenditures in FY 1991 were $39.1 million. The work is supported by the US Department of Energy, US Department of Defense, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 124 technical staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics. The Energy Division's programmatic activities focus on three major areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy conservation technologies, and (3) military transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities cover energy and resource analysis, the preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on waste management, analysis of emergency preparedness for natural and technological disasters, analysis of the energy and environmental needs of developing countries, technology transfer, and analysis of civilian transportation. Energy conservation technologies include electric power systems, building equipment (thermally activated heat pumps, advanced refrigeration systems, novel cycles), building envelopes (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), and technical issues for improving energy efficiency in existing buildings. Military transportation systems concentrate on research for sponsors within the US military on improving the efficiency of military deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination.

  10. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

    1991-07-01

    The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) carries out research in most areas of magnetic confinement fusion. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source and is a strong and vital component of both the US fusion program and the international fusion community. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, this report also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are carried out by other ORNL organizations (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program and discussed in this report include the following: Experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, including remote handling, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, development and testing of materials for fusion devices, and exploration of opportunities to apply the unique skills, technology, and techniques developed in the course of this work to other areas. Highlights from program activities are included in this report.

  11. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Selden, R.H.

    1991-06-01

    The Energy Division is one of 17 research divisions at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The goals and accomplishments of the Energy Division are described in this annual progress report for FY 1990. The Energy Division is a multidisciplinary research organization committed to (1) increasing the knowledge and understanding of how societies make choices in energy use; (2) improving society's understanding of the environmental, social, and economic implications of technological change; (3) developing and transferring energy efficient technologies; and (4) developing improved transportation planning and policy. Disciplines of the 129 staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics. The Energy Division's programmatic activities focus on three major areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy conservation technologies, and (3) military transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities cover energy and resource analysis, the preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on waste management, analysis of emergency preparedness for natural and technological disasters, analysis of the energy and environmental needs of developing countries, technology transfer, and analysis of civilian transportation. Energy conservation technologies include building equipment (thermally activated heat pumps, chemical heat pumps, refrigeration systems, novel cycles), building enveloped (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), retrofits for existing buildings, and electric power systems. Military transportation systems concentrate on research for sponsors within the US military on improving the efficiency of military deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination. 48 refs., 34 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Impact of annual dosing with ivermectin on progression of onchocercal visual field loss.

    PubMed Central

    Cousens, S. N.; Cassels-Brown, A.; Murdoch, I.; Babalola, O. E.; Jatau, D.; Alexander, N. D.; Evans, J. E.; Danboyi, P.; Abiose, A.; Jones, B. R.

    1997-01-01

    Reported are the results of a randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled trial of annual ivermectin dosing in 34 rural communities, Kaduna State, northern Nigeria, where guinea savanna onchocerciasis is mesoendemic. A total of 939 individuals underwent Friedmann field analysis at the first examination and saw at least 19 spots in at least one eye. Of these, 636 (68%) completed a subsequent Friedmann field analysis 2-3 years later. The adjusted incidence rate ratio for the ivermectin group versus the placebo group was 0.64 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.42-0.98). There was some evidence that the impact of ivermectin was greatest among those who had received one dose of ivermectin. The majority of the deteriorations occurred in eyes that gave evidence of optic atrophy at the first examination. An analysis restricted to individuals with optic atrophy at baseline indicated a reduction of 45% in the incidence of visual field deterioration in the ivermectin group (95% CI: 8-67%). Previous findings have shown that ivermectin has an impact on the incidence of optic atrophy. Our results indicate, for the first time, that ivermectin has a substantial impact on the progression of visual field loss among those with pre-existing optic atrophy. PMID:9277010

  13. Technical Adequacy and Acceptability of Curriculum-Based Measurement and the Measures of Academic Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    January, Stacy-Ann A.; Ardoin, Scott P.

    2015-01-01

    Curriculum-based measurement in reading (CBM-R) and the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) are assessment tools widely employed for universal screening in schools. Although a large body of research supports the validity of CBM-R, limited empirical evidence exists supporting the technical adequacy of MAP or the acceptability of either measure for…

  14. DE-FG03-01ER15237 Annual Progress Report 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandra Navrotsky

    2003-06-06

    OAK B262 Annual report. We have investigated the thermodynamics of several nanoscale systems: Iron oxides: We have completed and published heat capacity and entropy data on goethite, lepidocrocite, and maghemite, as well as measured their heats of formation. We also have enthalpy of formation data for several poorly crystalline nanophase oxides (schwertmannite, ferrihydrite, and epsilon-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The next step is to measure thermodynamic properties as a function of surface area for several oxides. CoO-MgO: Thermochemical data for bulk samples are in press. Heat capacities have been measured for CoO, MgO, and some intermediate samples. Nanosized samples at several compositions are being prepared this summer. Thin films have been prepared and some solution calorimetry done, but additional sample preparation and characterization is needed. Hydration energetics: Our setups for gas adsorption calorimetry and water immersion calorimetry are being completed. We will test them with known materials (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, selected zeolites) and then proceed to work on TiO{sub 2}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and zeolites.

  15. Subseabed disposal program annual report, January-December 1980. Volume II. Appendices (principal investigator progress reports). Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hinga, K.R.

    1981-07-01

    Volume II of the sixth annual report describing the progress and evaluating the status of the Subseabed Disposal Program contains the appendices referred to in Volume I, Summary and Status. Because of the length of Volume II, it has been split into two parts for publication purposes. Part 1 contains Appendices A-Q; Part 2 contains Appendices R-MM. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each appendix for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  16. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Counce, D.M.; Wolff, P.P.

    1993-04-01

    Energy Division`s mission is to provide innovative solutions to energy and related Issues of national and global importance through interdisciplinary research and development. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this annual progress report for FY 1992. Energy Division`s total expenditures in FY 1992 were $42.8 million. The work is supported by the US Department of Energy, the US Department of Defense, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 116.5 technical staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics. The division`s programmatic activities cover three main areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy conservation technologies, and (3) military transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities involve energy and resource analysis, preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on waste management, technology transfer, analysis of energy and environmental needs in developing countries, and civilian transportation analysis. Energy conservation technologies focus on electric power systems, building envelopes (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), and methods to improve energy efficiency in existing buildings. Military transportation systems conduct research for sponsors within the US military to improve the efficiency of military deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination. Much of Energy Division`s research is valuable to other organizations as well as to sponsors. This information is disseminated by the staff`s involvement in professional and trade organizations and workshops; joint research with universities and private-sector firms; collaboration with state and local governments; presentation of work at conferences; and publication of research results in journals, reports, and conference proceedings.

  17. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, P.P.

    1994-07-01

    One of 17 research divisions at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Energy Division`s mission is to provide innovative solutions to energy and related issues of national and global importance through interdisciplinary research and development. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this annual progress report for FY1993. Energy Division is committed to (1) understanding the mechanisms by which societies make choices in energy use; (2) improving society`s understanding of the environmental, social, and economic implications of technological change; (3) developing and transferring energy-efficient technologies; (4) improving transportation policy and planning; (5) enhancing basic knowledge in the social sciences as related to energy and associated issues. Energy Division`s expenditures in FY1993 totaled $42 million. The work was supported by the US DOE, DOD, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 126.5 technical staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and computer sciences and data systems. The division`s programmatic activities cover three main areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy use and delivery technologies, and (3) transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities involve energy and resource analysis, preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on emergency preparedness, transportation analysis, and analysis of energy and environmental needs in developing countries. Energy use and delivery technologies focus on electric power systems, building equipment, building envelopes (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), and methods to improve energy efficiency in existing buildings. Transportation systems research is conducted both to improve the quality of civilian transportation and for sponsors within the US military to improve the efficiency of deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination.

  18. Joint inversion of geophysical data for site characterization and restoration monitoring. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, P.A.; Roberts, J.J.; Berryman, J.G.; Wildenschild, D.

    1998-06-01

    'The purpose of this project is to develop a computer code for joint inversion of seismic and electrical data, to improve underground imaging for site characterization and remediation monitoring. The computer code developed in this project will invert geophysical data to obtain direct estimates of porosity and saturation underground, rather than inverting for seismic velocity and electrical resistivity or other geophysical properties. This is intended to be a significant improvement in the state-of-the-art of underground imaging, since interpretation of data collected at a contaminated site would become much less subjective. Potential users include DOE scientists and engineers responsible for characterizing contaminated sites and monitoring remediation of contaminated sites. In this three-year project, the authors use a multi-phase approach consisting of theoretical and numerical code development, laboratory investigations, testing on available laboratory and borehole geophysics data sets, and a controlled field experiment, to develop practical tools for joint electrical and seismic data interpretation. This report summarizes work after about 1.7 years of a 3-year project. Progress on laboratory measurements is described first, followed by progress on developing algorithms for the inversion code to relate geophysical data to porosity and saturation.'

  19. Progress toward an EDM measurement in {sup225}Ra.

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, R. J.; Ahmad, I.; Bailey, K.; Graner, B.; Greene, J. P.; Korsch, W.; Lu, Z.-T.; Mueller, P.; O'Connor, T. P.; Sulai, I. A.; Trimble, W. L.

    2010-11-01

    Permanent electric dipole moments (EDMs) in atoms or molecules are a signature of time-reversal and parity violation and represent an important window onto physics beyond the Standard Model. We are developing a next generation EDM search based on laser-cooled and trapped {sup 225}Ra atoms. Due to octupole deformation of the nucleus, {sup 225}Ra is predicted to be two to three orders of magnitude more sensitive to T-violating interactions than {sup 199}Hg, which currently sets the most stringent limits in the nuclear sector. We will discuss progress toward realizing a first EDM measurement for {sup 225}Ra.

  20. Annual Progress Report, 1975. Southern Rural Development Center, Mississippi State University. SRDC Series Publication No. 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Rural Development Center, State College, MS.

    Included in this second annual report on the Southern Rural Development Center's (SRDC) 1974-75 plan of work are data re: orientation visits; regional workshops; technical consultants; liaison with regional agencies and organizations; information dissemination; annual evaluation; functional networks in the areas of land use issues, citizen…

  1. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford Site facilities: Annual progress report for 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, S.H.

    1988-09-01

    This report describes progress during 1987 of five Hanford Site ground water monitoring projects. Four of these projects are being conducted according to regulations based on the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 and the state Hazardous Waste Management Act. The fifth project is being conducted according to regulations based on the state Solid Waste Management Act. The five projects discussed herein are: 300 Area Process Trenches; 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins; 200 Areas Low-Level Burial Grounds; Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill; Solid Waste Landfill. For each of the projects, there are included, as applicable, discussions of monitoring well installations, water-table measurements, background and/or downgradient water quality and results of chemical analysis, and extent and rate of movement of contaminant plumes. 14 refs., 30 figs., 13 tabs.

  2. Measuring Progress: A Comparison of the GDP, HDI, GS and the RIE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natoli, Riccardo; Zuhair, Segu

    2011-01-01

    The current paper constructs a progress measurement appropriate for measuring multiple and different dimensions of progress. The paper is not meant to be a detailed discussion of the framework but rather a demonstrated application of the measure. The constructed resource-infrastructure-environment progress measure employs a non-monetary evaluation…

  3. Cavitational hydrothermal oxidation: A new remediation process. Annual progress report, September 1996--August 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Suslick, K.S.

    1997-11-21

    'During the past year, the authors have continued to make substantial scientific progress on the understanding of cavitation phenomena in aqueous media and applications of cavitation to remediation processes. The efforts have focused on three separate areas: sonoluminescence as a probe of conditions created during cavitational collapse in aqueous media, the use of cavitation for remediation of contaminated water, and an addition of the use of ultrasound in the synthesis of novel heterogeneous catalysts for hydrodehalogenation of halocarbons under mild conditions. In order to gain further understanding of the conditions present during cavitation, the author has continued his studies of sonoluminescence. He has made recent breakthroughs in the use of emission spectroscopy for temperature and pressure measurement of cavitation events, which he expects to publish shortly. He has been able to measure for the first time the temperature of cavitation in water during multi-bubble cavitation in the presence of aromatic hydrocarbons. The emission from excited states of C{sub 2} in water gives temperatures that are consistent with adiabatic compressional heating, with maximum temperatures of 4,300 K. Prior measurements of cavitation temperatures in low vapor pressure nonaqueous media gave somewhat higher temperatures of 5,000 K. This work lays permanently to rest exotic mechanisms for cavitational chemistry, at least for cavitation fields.'

  4. FY2013 Vehicle and Systems Simulation and Testing R&D Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-02-01

    FY 2013 annual report focuses on the following areas: vehicle modeling and simulation, component and systems evaluations, laboratory and field evaluations, codes and standards, industry projects, and vehicle systems optimization.

  5. Functional Requirements: 2014 No Child Left Behind--Annual Measurable Achievement Objectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This document describes the Minnesota No Child Left Behind (NCLB) calculation as it relates to measuring Title III districts for Annual Measurable Achievement Objectives (AMAO). In 2012, a new assessment was used to measure language proficiency skills for English Learners. New AMAO targets were created, and new values for determining individual…

  6. 34 CFR 106.43 - Standards for measuring skill or progress in physical education classes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards for measuring skill or progress in physical... Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 106.43 Standards for measuring skill or progress in physical education classes. If use of a single standard of measuring skill or progress in physical education...

  7. 34 CFR 106.43 - Standards for measuring skill or progress in physical education classes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standards for measuring skill or progress in physical... Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 106.43 Standards for measuring skill or progress in physical education classes. If use of a single standard of measuring skill or progress in physical education...

  8. 34 CFR 106.43 - Standards for measuring skill or progress in physical education classes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standards for measuring skill or progress in physical... Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 106.43 Standards for measuring skill or progress in physical education classes. If use of a single standard of measuring skill or progress in physical education...

  9. 34 CFR 106.43 - Standards for measuring skill or progress in physical education classes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards for measuring skill or progress in physical... Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 106.43 Standards for measuring skill or progress in physical education classes. If use of a single standard of measuring skill or progress in physical education...

  10. 34 CFR 106.43 - Standards for measuring skill or progress in physical education classes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for measuring skill or progress in physical... Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 106.43 Standards for measuring skill or progress in physical education classes. If use of a single standard of measuring skill or progress in physical education...

  11. Collaborative research: Hydrogeological-geophysical methods for subsurface site characterization. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, Y.; Morrison, F.; Rector, J.

    1997-10-31

    'In the first year of the project progress has been made in several areas which are central to the project. Development of Joint Hydrogcological-Geophysical Co-Interpretation Procedure A strong effort was invested in developing the concepts and the algorithm of the joint hydrogeological-geophysical co-interpretation approach. The reason for the concerted effort in that direction is the large amount of time the authors expect this task will take before completion, and also by the need to direct the data collection efforts. They are currently testing several ideas for co-interpretation, but they are at a quite advanced stage. They are testing these ideas using synthetic studies as well as some preliminary data that has been collected at the Lawrence Livermore National Lab site. Part of the efforts is in developing methods for estimation of the semi-variograms of the logconductivity based on direct measurements as well as on seimsic velocity measurements as obtained from cross-well tomography. Preliminary tests show that these two sources of data complement each other quite well: the direct measurements supply the medium to small wave number portion of the logconductivity spectra, while a high resolution seismic survey supplies a good coverage of the large wave number part of the spectra. They advanced significantly with formulating their approach for using Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) imaging techniques in shallow subsurface surveys. Synthetic surveys show that GPR maybe very suitable for mapping spatial variations in saturations. They have access to field data and are analyzing it. Some additional issues that were investigated are also listed.'

  12. Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. Annual technical progress report, July 1, 1991--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Beier, E.W.

    1992-03-01

    This document is a technical progress report on work performed at the University of Pennsylvania during the current year on the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory project. The motivation for the experiment is the measurement of neutrinos emitted by the sun. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a second generation dedicated solar neutrino experiment which will extend the results of our work with the Kamiokande II detector by measuring three reactions of neutrinos rather than the single reaction measured by the Kamiokande experiment. The collaborative project includes physicists from Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Full funding for the construction of this facility was obtained in January 1990, and its construction is estimated to take five years. The motivation for the SNO experiment is to study the fundamental properties of neutrinos, in particular the mass and mixing parameters, which remain undetermined after decades of experiments in neutrino physics utilizing accelerators and reactors as sources of neutrinos. To continue the study of neutrino properties it is necessary to use the sun as a neutrino source. The long distance to the sun makes the search for neutrino mass sensitive to much smaller mass than can be studied with terrestrial sources. Furthermore, the matter density in the sun is sufficiently large to enhance the effects of small mixing between electron neutrinos and mu or tau neutrinos. This experiment, when combined with the results of the radiochemical {sup 37}Cl and {sup 71}Ga experiments and the Kamiokande II experiment, should extend our knowledge of these fundamental particles, and as a byproduct, improve our understanding of energy generation in the sun.

  13. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Shults, W.D.; Lyon, W.S.

    1980-05-01

    The progress is reported in the following sections: analytical methodology, mass and emission spectrometry, technical support, bio-organic analysis, nuclear and radiochemical analysis, and quality assurance. (DLC)

  14. Extended Burnup Demonstration Reactor Fuels Program. Annual progress report, April 1983-March 1984. [BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Exarhos, C.A.

    1985-06-20

    The US Department of Energy, Consumers Power Company, Exxon Nuclear Company, and General Public Utilities Nuclear Corporation have participated since 1979 in a cooperative Extended Burnup Demonstration Program. Under the program, standard ENC-fabricated reload fuel in the Big Rock Point and Oyster Creek reactor cores has been irradiated to discharge burnups at or beyond 35,000 MWD/MTU, one to two cycles beyond its originally projected exposure life. The program provides for examination of the fuel at poolside before and after each extended burnup cycle as well as for limited destructive hot cell examination. The 1984 progress report covers work performed under the EBD program between April 1983 and March 1984. Major milestones reached during the period include completion of a hot cell examination on four high burnup rods from Big Rock Point and of a poolside on the Oyster Creek EBD fuel at discharge. The hot cell examination of four rods at burnups to 37.2 GWD/MTU confirmed poolside measurements on the same fuel, showing the urania and gadolinia-bearing fuel rods to be in excellent condition. No major cladding degradation, pellet restructuring, or pellet-clad interaction was found in any of the samples examined. The Oyster Creek fuel, examined at an assembly average exposure of 34.5 GWD/MTU, showed good performance with regard to both diametral creepdown and clad oxide accumulation.

  15. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Imaging Neural Activity in the Human Brain: The Annual Progress

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shengyong; Li, Xiaoli

    2012-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is recently developed and applied to measure the hemodynamic response related to neural activity. The fMRI can not only noninvasively record brain signals without risks of ionising radiation inherent in other scanning methods, such as CT or PET scans, but also record signal from all regions of the brain, unlike EEG/MEG which are biased towards the cortical surface. This paper introduces the fundamental principles and summarizes the research progress of the last year for imaging neural activity in the human brain. Aims of functional analysis of neural activity from fMRI include biological findings, functional connectivity, vision and hearing research, emotional research, neurosurgical planning, pain management, and many others. Besides formulations and basic processing methods, models and strategies of processing technology are introduced, including general linear model, nonlinear model, generative model, spatial pattern analysis, statistical analysis, correlation analysis, and multimodal combination. This paper provides readers the most recent representative contributions in the area. PMID:22319550

  16. Fundamental chemistry and thermodynamics of hydrothermal oxidation processes. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Simonson, J.M.; Mesmer, R.E.; Blencoe, J.G.; Cummings, P.T.; Chialvo, A.A.

    1998-06-01

    'The objective of this research program is to provide fundamental scientific information on the physical and chemical properties of solutes in aqueous solutions at high temperatures needed to assess and enhance the applicability of hydrothermal oxidation (HTO) to the remediation of DOE hazardous and mixed wastes. Potential limitations to the use of HTO technology include formation of deposits (scale) from precipitation of inorganic solutes in the waste, corrosion arising from formation of strong acids on oxidation of some organic compounds (e.g., chlorinated hydrocarbons), and unknown effects of fluid density and phase behavior at high temperatures. Focus areas for this project include measurements of the solubility and speciation of actinides and surrogates in model HTO process streams at high temperatures, and the experimental and theoretical development of equations of state for aqueous mixtures under HTO process conditions ranging above the critical temperature of water. A predictive level of understanding of the chemical and physical properties of HTO process streams is being developed through molecular-level simulations of aqueous solutions at high temperatures. Advances in fundamental understanding of phase behavior, density, and solute speciation at high temperatures and pressures contribute directly to the ultimate applicability of this process for the treatment of DOE hazardous and mixed wastes. Research in this project has been divided into individual tasks, with each contributing to a unified understanding of HTO processing problems related to the treatment of DOE wastes. This report summarizes progress attained after slightly less than two years of this three-year project.'

  17. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a large and diversified organization. As such, it serves a multitude of functions for a clientele that exists both in and outside of ORNL. These functions fall into the following general categories: (1) Analytical Research, Development, and Implementation. The division maintains a program to conceptualize, investigate, develop, assess, improve, and implement advanced technology for chemical and physicochemical measurements. Emphasis is on problems and needs identified with ORNL and Department of Energy (DOE) programs; however, attention is also given to advancing the analytical sciences themselves. (2) Programmatic Research, Development, and Utilization. The division carries out a wide variety of chemical work that typically involves analytical research and/or development plus the utilization of analytical capabilities to expedite programmatic interests. (3) Technical Support. The division performs chemical and physicochemical analyses of virtually all types. The Analytical Chemistry Division is organized into four major sections, each of which may carry out any of the three types of work mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 4 of this report highlight progress within the four sections during the period January 1 to December 31, 1988. A brief discussion of the division's role in an especially important environmental program is given in Chapter 5. Information about quality assurance, safety, and training programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited in Chapters 7 and 8.

  18. Determining significant endpoints for ecological risk analyses. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, T.G.; Congdon, J.; Rowe, C.; Scott, D.; Bedford, J.; Whicker, F.W.

    1997-11-01

    'This report summarizes the first year''s progress of research funded under the Department of Energy''s Environmental Management Science Program. The research was initiated to better determine ecological risks from toxic and radioactive contaminants. More precisely, the research is designed to determine the relevancy of sublethal cellular damage to the performance of individuals and to identify characteristics of non-human populations exposed to chronic, low-level radiation, as is typically found on many DOE sites. The authors propose to establish a protocol to assess risks to non-human species at higher levels of biological organization by relating molecular damage to more relevant responses that reflect population health. They think that they can achieve this by coupling changes in metabolic rates and energy allocation patterns to meaningful population response variables, and by using novel biological dosimeters in controlled, manipulative dose/effects experiments. They believe that a scientifically defensible endpoint for measuring ecological risks can only be determined once its understood the extent to which molecular damage from contaminant exposure is detrimental at the individual and population levels of biological organization.'

  19. Functional magnetic resonance imaging for imaging neural activity in the human brain: the annual progress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shengyong; Li, Xiaoli

    2012-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is recently developed and applied to measure the hemodynamic response related to neural activity. The fMRI can not only noninvasively record brain signals without risks of ionising radiation inherent in other scanning methods, such as CT or PET scans, but also record signal from all regions of the brain, unlike EEG/MEG which are biased towards the cortical surface. This paper introduces the fundamental principles and summarizes the research progress of the last year for imaging neural activity in the human brain. Aims of functional analysis of neural activity from fMRI include biological findings, functional connectivity, vision and hearing research, emotional research, neurosurgical planning, pain management, and many others. Besides formulations and basic processing methods, models and strategies of processing technology are introduced, including general linear model, nonlinear model, generative model, spatial pattern analysis, statistical analysis, correlation analysis, and multimodal combination. This paper provides readers the most recent representative contributions in the area.

  20. The Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project, 2008 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Contor, Craig R.; Harris, Robin; King, Marty

    2009-06-10

    The Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (UBNPMEP) is funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as directed by section 4(h) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P.L.96-501). This project is in accordance with and pursuant to measures 4.2A, 4.3C.1, 7.1A.2, 7.1C.3, 7.1C.4 and 7.1D.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Work was conducted by the Fisheries Program of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR). The UBNPMEP is coordinated with two Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) research projects that also monitor and evaluate the success of the Umatilla Fisheries Restoration Plan. This project deals with the natural production component of the plan, and the ODFW projects evaluate hatchery operations (project No. 1990-005-00, Umatilla Hatchery M & E) and smolt outmigration (project No. 1989-024-01, Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival in the Lower Umatilla River). Collectively these three projects monitor and evaluate natural and hatchery salmonid production in the Umatilla River Basin. The need for natural production monitoring has been identified in multiple planning documents including Wy-Kan-Ush-Mi Wa-Kish-Wit Volume I, 5b-13 (CRITFC 1996), the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan (CTUIR & ODFW 1990), the Umatilla Basin Annual Operation Plan, the Umatilla Subbasin Summary (CTUIR & ODFW 2001), the Subbasin Plan (CTUIR & ODFW 2004), and the Comprehensive Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation Plan (CTUIR and ODFW 2006). Natural production monitoring and evaluation is also consistent with Section III, Basinwide Provisions, Strategy 9 of the 2000 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994, NPCC 2004). The Umatilla Basin M&E plan developed along with efforts to restore natural populations of spring and fall Chinook salmon, (Oncorhynchus tshawytsha), coho

  1. DOE Annual Progress Report: Water Needs and Constraints for Hydrogen Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, A; Daily, W

    2009-07-02

    hydrogen production and distribution. The narrow scope of the lifecycle analysis enables economic optimization at the plant level with respect to cooling and water treatment technologies. As water withdrawal and disposal costs increase, more expensive, but more water-efficient technologies become more attractive. Some of the benefits of these technologies are offset by their increased energy usage. We use the H2A hydrogen production model to determine the overall cost of hydrogen under a range of water cost and technology scenarios. At the regional level, we are planning on following the hydrogen roll-out scenarios envisioned by Greene and Leiby (2008) to determine the impact of hydrogen market penetration on various watersheds. The economics of various water technologies will eventually be incorporated into the temporal and geographic Macro System Model via a water module that automates the spreadsheet models described. At the time of this progress report, the major achievement for FY2009 has been the completion of the framework and analytical results of the economic optimization of water technology for hydrogen production. This accomplishment required the collection of cost and performance data for multiple cooling and water treatment technologies, as well as the integration of a water and energy balance model with the H2A framework. 22 (twenty-two) different combinations of production method (SMR, electrolysis), scale (centralized, forecourt), cooling (evaporative tower, dry) and water treatment (reverse osmosis, ion exchange) were evaluated. The following data were collected: water withdrawal, water discharge, electricity consumption, equipment footprint, equipment cost, installation cost, annual equipment and material costs and annual labor costs. These data, when consolidated, fit into a small number of input cells in H2A. Items such as capital cost end up as line-items for which there is space in the existing H2A spreadsheets. Items such as electricity use are added

  2. Mechanics of bubbles in sludges and slurries. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Gauglitz, P.A.; Terrones, G.; Denn, M.M.; Muller, S.J.; Rossen, W.R.

    1998-06-01

    'Previous studies have established that the waste level of Hanford tanks responds to barometric pressure changes, the compressibility of retained bubbles accounts for the level changes, and the volume of retained gas can be determined from the measured waste level and barometric pressure changes. However, interactions between the gas bubbles and rheologically complex waste cause inaccurate retained gas estimates and are not well understood. Because the retained gas is typically a flammable mixture of hydrogen, ammonia, and nitrous oxide, accurate determination of the retained gas volume is a critical component for establishing the safety hazard of the tanks. Accurate estimates of retained gas from level/pressure data are highly desirable because direct in-situ measurements are very expensive in an individual tank and impossible in many single-shell tanks. The objective of this research project is to gain a fundamental understanding of the interactions between gas bubbles and tank waste during barometric pressure fluctuations. It is expected that the elucidation of the bubble/waste interaction mechanisms will lead to the development of models for a more accurate determination of: gas content in Hanford tanks, waste properties from level/pressure data, and the effect that barometric pressure fluctuations have on the slow release of bubbles. The results of this research will support critical operations at the Hanford Site associated with the flammable gas safety hazard and future waste operations such as salt-well pumping, waste transfers, and sluicing/retrieval. This three-year research program, which began in FY 1998, is divided into four related problems. Progress has been made in each of the areas of modeling bubble behavior in continuum materials (sludges) from both a solid mechanics viewpoint and separately from a fluid mechanics viewpoint, modeling studies of compressible bubbles in particulate materials (slurries), and experimental studies of bubbles in both

  3. Measures of Salary Inequality. AIR 1986 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noe, Nicholas N.

    Measures of income and salary inequality used by economists were examined and applied against 1984-1985 faculty salary data. Attention was directed to salary inequality at each academic rank, as well as female-male inequality. The following measures were used: Lorenz Curve-Gini Coefficient, coefficient of variation, Theil's Index, and Atkinson's…

  4. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Progress Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Joanne; Meneghini, Robert; Kummerow, Christian D.; Meneghini, Robert; Hou, Arthur; Adler, Robert F.; Huffman, George; Barkstrom, Bruce; Wielicki, Bruce; Goodman, Steve

    1999-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of rain in the tropics and the accompanying latent heat release, NASA for the U.S. and NASDA for Japan have partnered in the design, construction and flight of an Earth Probe satellite to measure tropical rainfall and calculate the associated heating. Primary mission goals are 1) the understanding of crucial links in climate variability by the hydrological cycle, 2) improvement in the large-scale models of weather and climate 3) Improvement in understanding cloud ensembles and their impacts on larger scale circulations. The linkage with the tropical oceans and landmasses are also emphasized. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite was launched in November 1997 with fuel enough to obtain a four to five year data set of rainfall over the global tropics from 37'N to 37'S. This paper reports progress from launch date through the spring of 1999. The data system and its products and their access is described, as are the algorithms used to obtain the data. Some exciting early results from TRMM are described. Some important algorithm improvements are shown. These will be used in the first total data reprocessing, scheduled to be complete in early 2000. The reader is given information on how to access and use the data.

  5. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-04-01

    This annual report summarizes activities in the Aquatic Ecology, Earth Sciences, Environmental Analyses, and Terrestrial Ecology sections, as well as in the Fossil Energy, Biomass, Low-Level Waste Research and Management, and Global Carbon Cycle Programs. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each section. (ACR)

  6. FY2012 Annual Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-02-01

    Annual report on the work of the the Advanced Combustion Engine R&D subprogram. The Advanced Combustion Engine R&D subprogram supports the Vehicle Technologies Office mission by removing the critical technical barriers to commercialization of advanced internal combustion engines (ICEs) for passenger and commercial vehicles that meet future federal emissions regulations.

  7. Annual Progress Report, 1976. Southern Rural Development Center, Mississippi State University. SRDC Series Publication No. 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Rural Development Center, State College, MS.

    Covering the 1976 activities of the Southern Rural Development Center (SRDC), this third annual report describes SRDC's: history; organization; regional workshops; functional networks; network bibliographies and other publications; Title V reports; grant received for training in rural development; orientation visits; consultants; information…

  8. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    1992-01-01

    The following sentences highlight some of the technical activities carried out during 1991. They illustrate the diversity of programs and technical work performed within the Analytical Chemistry Division. Our neutron activation analysis laboratory at HFIR was placed into operation during 1991. We have combined inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP/MS) with a preparation procedure developed at the Argonne National Laboratory to measure ultra-trace levels of U, Pu, Np, and Am in body fluids, primarily urine. Much progress has been made over the last year in the interfacing of an rf-powered glow discharge source to a double-focusing mass spectrometer. Preliminary experiments using electrospray ionization combined with ion trap mass spectrometry show much promise for the analysis of metals in solution. A secondary ion microprobe has been constructed that permits determination of the distribution of organic compounds less than a monolayer thick on samples as large as 1 cm diameter. Fourier transform mass spectrometry has been demonstrated to be a highly effective tool for the detailed characterization of biopolymers, especially normal and modified oligonucleotides. Much has been accomplished in understanding the fundamentals of quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry. Work with ITMS instrumentation has led to the development of rapid methods for the detection of trace organics in environmental and physiological samples. A new type of time-of-flight mass spectrometer was designed for use with our positron ionization experiments. Fundamental research on chromatography at high concentrations and on gas-solid adsorption has continued. The preparation of a monograph on the chemistry of environmental tobacco smoke was completed this year.

  9. ORNL nuclear waste programs annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-05-01

    Research progress is reported in 20 activities under the headings: spent fuels, defense waste management, commercial waste management, remedial action, and conventional reactors. Separate entries were prepared for each activity.

  10. University of Florida, University research program in robotics. Annual technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, C.D. III; Tulenko, J.S.

    1994-05-01

    Progress is reported in the areas of environmental hardening, database, world modeling, vision, man-machine interface, advanced liquid metal reactor inspection robot, and articulated transporter/manipulator system (ATMS) development.

  11. Cancer and birth defects surveillance system for communities around the Savannah River Site. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Dunbar, J.B.

    1994-05-01

    The US DOE funded this grant to the Medical University of South Carolina for a cancer and birth defects registry for an initial three year period which was completed as of April 29, 1994. While this Technical Progress Report is prepared principally to document the activities of year 03, it also summarizes the accomplishments of the first two years in order to put into perspective the energy and progress of the program over the entire three year funding cycle.

  12. History and progress on accurate measurements of the Planck constant.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of the Planck constant, h, is entering a new phase. The CODATA 2010 recommended value is 6.626 069 57 × 10(-34) J s, but it has been a long road, and the trip is not over yet. Since its discovery as a fundamental physical constant to explain various effects in quantum theory, h has become especially important in defining standards for electrical measurements and soon, for mass determination. Measuring h in the International System of Units (SI) started as experimental attempts merely to prove its existence. Many decades passed while newer experiments measured physical effects that were the influence of h combined with other physical constants: elementary charge, e, and the Avogadro constant, N(A). As experimental techniques improved, the precision of the value of h expanded. When the Josephson and quantum Hall theories led to new electronic devices, and a hundred year old experiment, the absolute ampere, was altered into a watt balance, h not only became vital in definitions for the volt and ohm units, but suddenly it could be measured directly and even more accurately. Finally, as measurement uncertainties now approach a few parts in 10(8) from the watt balance experiments and Avogadro determinations, its importance has been linked to a proposed redefinition of a kilogram unit of mass. The path to higher accuracy in measuring the value of h was not always an example of continuous progress. Since new measurements periodically led to changes in its accepted value and the corresponding SI units, it is helpful to see why there were bumps in the road and where the different branch lines of research joined in the effort. Recalling the bumps along this road will hopefully avoid their repetition in the upcoming SI redefinition debates. This paper begins with a brief history of the methods to measure a combination of fundamental constants, thus indirectly obtaining the Planck constant. The historical path is followed in the section describing how the

  13. FY 1992 Measurements and Characterization Branch annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Dippo, P.C

    1993-03-01

    The Measurements and Characterization Branch actively supports the advancement of DOE/NREL goals for the development and implementation of the solar photovoltaic (PV) technology. The primary focus of the laboratories is to provide state-of-the-art analytical capabilities for materials and device characterization and fabrication. The branch houses a comprehensive facility that Is capable of providing information on the full range of PV components. A major objective of the branch is to aggressively pursue collaborative research with other government laboratories, universities, and industrial firms for the advancement of Pv technologies. Members of the branch disseminate research findings to the technical community in publications and presentations. The Measurements and Characterization Branch encompasses seven coordinated research groups, providing integrated research and development that covers all aspects of photovoltaic materials/devices characterization.

  14. Annual Continuation And Progress Report For Nuclear Theory At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Ormand, W. E.; Quaglioni, S.; Schunck, N.; Vogt, R.; Vranas, P.

    2015-10-26

    Nuclear Theory research under the auspices of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Physics (NP) is conducted within several funding sources and projects. These include base funding, and early career award, and a collaborative SciDAC-­3 award that is jointly funded by DOE/NP and the Advanced Simulations and Computations (ASC) effort within the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA). Therefore, this annual report is organized within the three primary sections covering these projects.

  15. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2008

    SciTech Connect

    LR Roeder

    2008-12-01

    The Importance of Clouds and Radiation for Climate Change: The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols, can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To reduce these scientific uncertainties, the ARM Program uses a unique twopronged approach: • The ARM Climate Research Facility, a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes; and • The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF and other data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report provides an overview of each of these components and a sample of achievements for each in fiscal year (FY) 2008.

  16. Measurement of Sinkhole Formation and Progression with InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. E.; Blom, R. G.

    2013-12-01

    The Bayou Corne Sinkhole initially formed in August 2012 from sidewall collapse of a brine cavern within the Napoleonville Salt Dome in southeastern Louisiana. The sinkhole, initially ~1 hectare in size, has expanded to ~10 hectare surface coverage by July 2013, as material continued to fill the subterranean void. Here we show that synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry (InSAR) could have reliably forecast the formation and location of the Bayou Corne Sinkhole at least a month in advance from the large precursory surface deformation that occurred in the area where the sinkhole later formed. The Mississippi delta region has been imaged since 2009 using the NASA Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR), and radar data over the Napoleonville Salt Dome had been acquired on 2 July 2012, only a month before the sinkhole developed. Using radar interferometry, we show significant surface deformation of up to 250 mm occurred between 23 June 2011, and 2 July 2012, in an extended area encompassing the sinkhole site. The InSAR results show no measurable deformation prior to 23 June 2011. The measured precursory deformation pattern is consistent with compressive loading at the surface due to removal of support caused by a vertically oriented subsurface fracture. The measured strains relate directly to subsurface geology, salt rock properties, and internal stresses caused by the salt dome sidewall collapse. Measurements made with UAVSAR since the sinkhole formation, between August 2012 and July 2013, show progression of the surface deformation well beyond the limited extent of the sinkhole itself, with growth of the sinkhole following the direction of maximum surface deformation. These results show that even in radar-challenging environments such as the swamplands of Bayou Corne, L-band InSAR can be used to study the underlying geophysics of sinkhole formation and, furthermore, that InSAR data collected operationally for hazard monitoring could

  17. Environmental Management Science Program awards. Fiscal year 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, A.; Benner, W.H.; DePaolo, D.J.; Faybishenko, B.; Majer, E.L.; Pallavicini, M.; Russo, R.E.; Shultz, P.G.; Wan, J.

    1997-10-01

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory was awarded eight Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in Fiscal Year 1996. This report summarizes the progress of each grant in addressing significant DOE site cleanup issues after completion of the first year of research. The technical progress made to date in each of the research projects is described in greater detail in individual progress reports. The focus of the research projects covers a diversity of areas relevant to site cleanup, including bioremediation, health effects, characterization, and mixed waste. Some of the projects cut across a number of focus areas. Three of the projects are directed toward characterization and monitoring at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, as a test case for application to other sites.

  18. Mechanism involved in trichloroethylene-induced liver cancer: Importance to environmental cleanup. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bull, R.J.

    1997-06-01

    'The Pacific Northwest National Lab. was awarded ten (10) Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in Fiscal Year 1996. This section gives a summary of how each grant is addressing significant DOE cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research is primarily focused in three areas-Tank Waste Remediation, Soil and Groundwater Cleanup, and Health Effects.'

  19. Report to Congress: 1995 Annual report on low-level radioactive waste management progress

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    This report is prepared in response to the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act, Public Law 96-573, 1980, as amended by the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, Public Law 99-240. The report summarizes the progress of states and compact regions during calendar year 1995 in establishing new disposal facilities for commercially-generated low-level radioactive waste. The report emphasizes significant issues and events that have affected progress, and also includes an introduction that provides background information and perspective on United States policy for low-level radioactive waste disposal.

  20. Aerial Measuring System Technical Integration Annual Report 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel Nevada Remote Sensing Laboratory

    2003-06-01

    Fiscal Year 2002 is the second year of a five-year commitment by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to invest in development of new and state-of-the-art technologies for the Aerial Measuring Systems (AMS) project. In 2000, NNSA committed to two million dollars for AMS Technical Integration (TI) for each of five years. The tragedy of September 11, 2001, profoundly influenced the program. NNSA redirected people and funding resources at the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) to more immediate needs. Funds intended for AMS TI were redirected to NNSA's new posture of leaning further forward throughout. AMS TI was brought to a complete halt on December 10, 2001. Then on April 30, 2002, NNSA Headquarters allowed the restart of AMS TI at the reduced level of $840,000. The year's events resulted in a slow beginning of several projects, some of which were resumed only a few weeks before the AMS TI Symposium held at RSL on July 30.

  1. Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending January 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-05-01

    Progress is reported in the following fields: coal chemistry, aqueous chemistry at high temperatures and pressures, geochemistry, high-temperature chemistry and thermodynamics of structural materials, chemistry of transuranium elements and compounds, separations chemistry, elecrochemistry, catalysis, chemical physics, theoretical chemistry, nuclear waste chemistry, chemistry of hazardous chemicals, and thermal energy storage.

  2. Polyoxometalates for radioactive waste treatment. Annual progress report, June 15, 1996--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, M.T.

    1997-01-01

    'Four areas of research have been investigated during the first year of this project: (1) Selective separations of Ln{sup 3+} and An{sup 4+}; (2) Very large tungstate complexes of Ln{sup 3+}; (3) U{sup 4+} and UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} polytungstate complexes; (4) Rhenium (technetium) polyoxometalates. Progress in each of these areas is summarized.'

  3. [Regulation of terpene metabolism]. Annual progress report, March 15, 1988--March 14, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, R.

    1989-12-31

    Progress in understanding of the metabolism of monoterpenes by peppermint and spearmint is recorded including the actions of two key enzymes, geranyl pyrophosphate:limonene cyclase and a UDP-glucose dependent glucosyl transferase; concerning the ultrastructure of oil gland senescence; enzyme subcellular localization; regulation of metabolism; and tissue culture systems.

  4. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, W.S.

    1984-05-01

    Progress and activities are reported in: analytical methodology, mass and emission spectrometry, radioactive materials analysis, bio/organic analysis, general and environmental analysis, and quality assurance and safety. Supplementary activities are also discussed, and a bibliography of publications is also included. (DLC)

  5. [Molecular cloning and structural characteristics of the R complex of maize]. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    Studies on the R complex in Maize continued Progress is discussed in the following areas: Establishing identity of R components and cloning of R components; CO allele origin; molecular organization of R-r complex; NCO allele origin; genetic analysis of R-r complex; studies of the Sn locus and reverse paramutation.

  6. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, W.S.

    1985-04-01

    Progress reports are presented for the following sections: analytical methodology; mass and emission spectroscopy; radioactive materials analysis; bio/organic analysis; and general and environmental analysis; quality assurance, safety, and tabulation analyses. In addition a list of publications and oral presentations and supplemental activities are included.

  7. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory annual technical progress report of ecological research, period ending July 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Vaitkus, M.R.; Wein, G.R.; Johnson, G.

    1993-11-01

    This progress report gives an overview of research programs at the Savannah River Site. Topics include; environmental operations support, wood stork foraging and breeding, defense waste processing, environmental stresses, alterations in the environment due to pollutants, wetland ecology, biodiversity, pond drawdown studies, and environmental toxicology.

  8. Expanding Opportunities for Success: Ohio's Third Annual Progress Report on Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Office of the Governor, Columbus.

    This document describes the progress that Ohio has made toward the six National Education Goals during the 1992-93 school year. Notable improvements have been made, particularly in Head Start programs and student performance on the Ohio Ninth-Grade Proficiency Tests. New baseline data are available for goals 5 (every American adult will be…

  9. 50 CFR 622.280 - Annual catch limits (ACLs) and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Dolphin and Wahoo Fishery Off the Atlantic States § 622.280 Annual catch limits (ACLs) and accountability measures (AMs). (a) Atlantic dolphin—(1) Commercial sector. (i) If commercial landings for Atlantic dolphin, as estimated by the SRD, reach or are projected to reach...

  10. Guide To The 2004 IMAGE Assessment: Illinois Measure Of Annual Growth In English And IMAGE Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) administered Illinois Measure of Annual Growth in English (IMAGE) tests in Spring 2004. IMAGE tests are administered to Limited English Proficient (LEP) students who have been in either a Transitional Bilingual Education (TBE) or Transitional Program of Instruction (TPI) program since September 30 of…

  11. Measuring Changes in Salaries and Wages in Public Schools. [Annual Edition].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Research Service, Arlington, VA.

    The Educational Research Service reports annually a statistical measure of salaries of public school system employees called the Composite Indicator of Changes (CIC) in Average Salaries and Wages Paid by Public School Systems. Each edition can be used to analyze trends in average salaries and wages paid to public school employees over the past 10…

  12. Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project : Annual Progress Report October 2007 - September 2008.

    SciTech Connect

    Bronson, James P.; Duke, Bill; Loffink, Ken

    2008-12-30

    In the late 1990s, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. Migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and providing trap and haul efforts when needed. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage and trapping facility design, operation, and criteria. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. Beginning in March of 2007, two work elements from the Walla Walla Fish Passage Operations Project were transferred to other projects. The work element Enumeration of Adult Migration at Nursery Bridge Dam is now conducted under the Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project and the work element Provide Transportation Assistance is conducted under the Umatilla Satellite Facilities Operation and Maintenance Project. Details of these activities can be found in those project's respective annual reports.

  13. Advanced MHD Algorithm for Solar and Space Science: lst Year Semi Annual Progress Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnack, Dalton D.; Lionello, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    We report progress for the development of MH4D for the first and second quarters of FY2004, December 29, 2002 - June 6, 2003. The present version of MH4D can now solve the full viscous and resistive MHD equations using either an explicit or a semi-implicit time advancement algorithm. In this report we describe progress in the following areas. During the two last quarters we have presented poster at the EGS-AGU-EUG Joint Assembly in Nice, France, April 6-11, 2003, and a poster at the 2003 International Sherwood Theory Conference in Corpus Christi, Texas, April 28-30 2003. In the area of code development, we have implemented the MHD equations and the semi-implicit algorithm. The new features have been tested.

  14. National flow cytometry and sorting research resource. Annual progress report, July, 1, 1994--June 30, 1995, Year 12

    SciTech Connect

    Jett, J.H.

    1995-04-27

    Research progress utilizing flow cytometry is described. Topics include: rapid kinetics flow cytometry; characterization of size determinations for small DNA fragments; statistical analysis; energy transfer measurements of molecular confirmation in micelles; and enrichment of Mus spretus chromosomes by dual parameter flow sorting and identification of sorted fractions by fluorescence in-situ hybridization onto G-banded mouse metaphase spreads.

  15. Year 3 Magnet Schools Assistance Program Annual Progress Report, 2009-10. E&R Report No. 10.09

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brasfield, Jon; Cárdenas, Virginia

    2010-01-01

    The three Magnet Schools Assistance Program (MSAP) schools: East Garner International Baccalaureate Magnet Middle School (EGMMS), Garner International Baccalaureate Magnet High School (GMHS), and Southeast Raleigh Leadership and Technology Magnet High School (SRMHS) have shown progress on MSAP performance measures during the 3rd year of the grant.…

  16. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hook, R. I.; Hildebrand, S. G.; Gehrs, C. W.; Sharples, F. E.; Shriner, D. S.; Stow, S. H.; Cushman, J. H.; Kanciruk, P.

    1993-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1992, which which extended from October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1992. This report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Section activities are described in the Earth and Atmospheric sciences, ecosystem studies, Environmental analysis, environmental biotechnology, and division operations.

  17. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Shultz, W.D.

    1986-05-01

    Progress reports are presented for the four major sections of the division: analytical spectroscopy, radioactive materials laboratories, inorganic chemistry, and organic chemistry. A brief discussion of the division's role in the Laboratory's Environmental Restoration and Facilities Upgrade is given. Information about quality assurance and safety programs is presented, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited.

  18. Geothermal drilling ad completion technology development program. Semi-annual progress report, April-September 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Varnado, S.G.

    1980-05-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, and completion technology. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986.

  19. 1989 Annual report on low-level radioactive waste management progress

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    This report summarizes the progress during 1989 of states and compacts in establishing new low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. It also provides summary information on the volume of low-level waste received for disposal in 1989 by commercially operated low-level waste disposal facilities. This report is in response to Section 7(b) of Title I of Public Law 99--240, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985. 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Annual progress report, October 1979-September 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Varnado, S.G.

    1980-11-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing research and development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

  1. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hook, R. I.; Hildebrand, S. G.; Gehrs, C. W.; Sharples, F. E.; Shriner, D. S.; Stow, S. H.; Cushman, J. H.; Kanciruk, P.

    1993-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1992, which which extended from October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1992. This report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division's major organizational units. Section activities are described in the Earth and Atmospheric sciences, ecosystem studies, Environmental analysis, environmental biotechnology, and division operations.

  2. Research in theoretical physics. Annual progress report, April 1, 1992--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Domokos, G.; Kovesi-Domokos, S.

    1992-12-01

    Progress made in the following areas is summarized: simulation of extensive air showers induced by interactions existing beyond the currently accepted ``Standard Model`` of elementary particle interactions; search for physics beyond the ``Standard Model`` in gluonic inclusive decays of heavy quarks; obtaining limits on the applicability of the special theory of relativity; an improved method of obtaining upper limits on the masses of primaries of extensive air showers associated with point sources in the sky. 8 figs., 1 tab., 73 refs.

  3. Fossil Energy Program annual progress report for April 1997 through March 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Judkins, R.R.

    1998-07-01

    This report covers progress made on research and development projects that contribute to the advancement of fossil energy technologies, covering the areas of coal, clean coal technology, gas, petroleum, and support to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Papers are arranged under the following topical sections: materials research and development; environmental analysis support; bioprocessing research; fossil fuels supplies modeling and research; and oil and gas production.

  4. Active layer hydrology for Imnavait Creek, Toolik, Alaska. Annual progress report, July 1984--January 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, D.L.

    1986-12-31

    In the annual hydrologic cycle, snowmelt is the most significant event at Imnavait Creek located near Toolik Lake, Alaska. Precipitation that has accumulated for more than 6 months on the surface melts in a relatively short period of 7 to 10 days once sustained melting occurs. During the ablation period, runoff dominates the hydrologic cycle. Some meltwater goes to rewetting the organic soils in the active layer. The remainder is lost primarily because of evaporation, since transpiration is not a very active process at this time. Following the snowmelt period, evapotranspiration becomes the dominate process, with base flow contributing the other watershed losses. It is important to note that the water initally lost by evapotranspiration entered the organic layer during melt. This water from the snowpack ensures that each year the various plant communities will have sufficient water to start a new summer of growth.

  5. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-05-01

    This eighth annual report of the Division covers work done during FY 1981 (October 1, 1980, through September 30, 1981). As with these documents in the past, the format follows approximately the organizational structure of the Energy Division. Chapters 2 through 6 summarize the activities of the sections of the Division: Environmental Impact Section, headed by H.E. Zittel; Regional and Urban Studies Section, R.M. Davis; Economic Analysis Section, R.B. Shelton; Data and Analysis Section, A.S. Loebl; and Efficiency and Renewables Research Section, J.W. Michel. In addition, work on a variety of projects which cut across section lines is reported in Chapter 7, Integrated Programs. These activities are under the supervision of T.J. Wilbanks, Associate Director for the Division. Separate abstracts are included for individual projects.

  6. Cancer and birth defects surveillance system for communities around the Savannah River Site. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Dunbar, J.B.

    1993-05-01

    This technical report presents the age-adjusted total, and race and sex specific geographic patterns of cancer mortality for South Carolina (SC) counties utilizing the 1953--1987 average annual age-adjusted mortality rates (AAMRs). The mortality information was obtained from the State Cancer Control Map and Data Program produced by the National Cancer Institute , Centers for Disease Control and the American Cancer Society. The AAMRs for selected primary sites are classified as significantly different or not significantly different from the corresponding United States and SC mortality rates. Categories for classification of the rates are determined using 95% confidence intervals. Geographic patterns of significantly high county AAMRs are identified and discussed. Individual county rates are not emphasized. The terminology, mortality rates used throughout this report pertains to the 1953--1987 AAMRS.

  7. Thermohaline circulations and global climate change. Annual progress report No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, H.P.

    1993-12-31

    The original project entitled ``Thennohaline Circulations and Global Climate Change`` was concerned with investigating the hypothesis that changes in surface thermal and hydrological forcing of the North Atlantic, changes that might be expected to accompany C0{sub 2}-induced global warming, could result in ocean-atmosphere interactions` exerting a positive feedback on the climate system. Because the North Atlantic is the source of much of the global ocean`s reservoir of deep water, and because this deep water could sequester large amounts of anthropogenically produced C0{sub 2}, changes in the rate of deep-water production are important to future climates. Since deep-water production is controlled by the annual cycle of the atmospheric forcing of the North Atlantic, and since this forcing depends on both hydrological and thermal processes as well as the windstress, there is the potential for feedback between the short-term response of the atmosphere to changing radiative forcing and the longer-term processes in the oceans. Work on this hypothesis led to a second line of investigation. The sensitivity of the annual cycle of the upper ocean to variable atmospheric forcing also determines the structure of the seasonal thermocline, and consequently it is necessary to include both synoptic-scale and interannual variability of atmospheric forcing to fully understand the potential effects of long-term trends of that forcing. Due to its large heat capacity and its nonlinear response to forcing, the upper ocean rectifies the forcing by radiative fluxes, turbulence, and windstress, creating responses on much longer time scales than those of the forcing.

  8. Compilation of 1986 annual reports of the Navy ELF (extremely low frequency) communications system ecological-monitoring program. Volume 1. Tabs A-C. Annual progress report, January-December 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-07-01

    This is the fifth compilation of annual reports for the Navy's ELF Communications System Ecological Monitoring Program. This report documents the progress of the following studies: Herbaceous Plant Cover and Tree Studies; Litter Decomposition and Microflora; and The Effects of Exposing the Slime Mold Physarum Polycephalum to Electromagnetic Fields.

  9. Ultrascale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT): Semi-Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D N

    2012-02-29

    This report summarizes work carried out by the Ultrascale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT) Team for the period of July 1, 2011 through December 31, 2011. It discusses highlights, overall progress, period goals, and collaborations and lists papers and presentations. The UV-CDAT team is positioned to address the following high-level visualization requirements: (1) Alternative parallel streaming statistics and analysis pipelines - Data parallelism, Task parallelism, Visualization parallelism; (2) Optimized parallel input/output (I/O); (3) Remote interactive execution; (4) Advanced intercomparison visualization; (5) Data provenance processing and capture; and (6) Interfaces for scientists - Workflow data analysis and visualization construction tools, Visualization interfaces.

  10. 2011 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program (Book)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-11-01

    In the past year, the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program (the Program) made substantial progress toward its goals and objectives. The Program has conducted comprehensive and focused efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. With emphasis on applications that will effectively strengthen our nation's energy security and improve our stewardship of the environment, the Program engages in research, development, and demonstration of critical improvements in the technologies. Highlights of the Program's accomplishments can be found in the sub-program chapters of this report.

  11. FY 2014 Annual Progress Report - Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development (Book)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-11-01

    In the past year, the DOE Hydrogen Program (the Program) made substantial progress toward its goals and objectives. The Program has conducted comprehensive and focused efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. With emphasis on applications that will effectively strengthen our nation's energy security and improve our stewardship of the environment, the Program engages in research, development, and demonstration of critical improvements in the technologies. Highlights of the Program's accomplishments can be found in the sub-program chapters of this report.

  12. Geothermal Energy R&D Program Annual Progress Report Fiscal Year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1994-04-01

    In this report, the DOE Geothermal Program activities were split between Core Research and Industrial Development. The technical areas covered are: Exploration Technology, Drilling Technology, Reservoir Technology (including Hot Dry Rock Research and The Geyser Cooperation), and Conversion Technology (power plants, materials, and direct use/direct heat). Work to design the Lake County effluent pipeline to help recharge The Geysers shows up here for the first time. This Progress Report is another of the documents that are reasonable starting points in understanding many of the details of the DOE Geothermal Program. (DJE 2005)

  13. Experimental and theoretical high energy physics research. Annual progress report, September 1, 1991--September 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    Progress in the various components of the UCLA High-Energy Physics Research program is summarized, including some representative figures and lists of resulting presentations and published papers. Principal efforts were directed at the following: (I) UCLA hadronization model, PEP4/9 e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} analysis, {bar P} decay; (II) ICARUS and astroparticle physics (physics goals, technical progress on electronics, data acquisition, and detector performance, long baseline neutrino beam from CERN to the Gran Sasso and ICARUS, future ICARUS program, and WIMP experiment with xenon), B physics with hadron beams and colliders, high-energy collider physics, and the {phi} factory project; (III) theoretical high-energy physics; (IV) H dibaryon search, search for K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{gamma}{gamma} and {pi}{sup 0}{nu}{bar {nu}}, and detector design and construction for the FNAL-KTeV project; (V) UCLA participation in the experiment CDF at Fermilab; and (VI) VLPC/scintillating fiber R & D.

  14. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division's major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units is a section devoted to lists of information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts environmental research and analyses associated with both energy technology development and the interactions between people and the environment. The division engages in basic and applied research for a diverse list of sponsors. While the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the primary sponsor ESD staff also perform research for other federal agencies, state agencies, and private industry. The division works collaboratively with federal agencies, universities, and private organizations in achieving its research objectives and hosts a large number of visiting investigators from these organizations. Given the diverse interdisciplinary specialization of its staff, ESD provides technical expertise on complex environmental problems and renders technical leadership for major environmental issues of national and local concern. This progress report highlights many of ESD's accomplishment in these and other areas in FY 1991.

  15. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units is a section devoted to lists of information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts environmental research and analyses associated with both energy technology development and the interactions between people and the environment. The division engages in basic and applied research for a diverse list of sponsors. While the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the primary sponsor ESD staff also perform research for other federal agencies, state agencies, and private industry. The division works collaboratively with federal agencies, universities, and private organizations in achieving its research objectives and hosts a large number of visiting investigators from these organizations. Given the diverse interdisciplinary specialization of its staff, ESD provides technical expertise on complex environmental problems and renders technical leadership for major environmental issues of national and local concern. This progress report highlights many of ESD`s accomplishment in these and other areas in FY 1991.

  16. Integrated, Comprehensive Alignment as a Foundation for Measuring Student Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martineau, Joseph; Paek, Pamela; Keene, John; Hirsch, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a comprehensive model of alignment that provides a foundation for meaningful reporting of students' academic progress over time. The model includes both horizontal and vertical alignment as integral parts of the development of content standards, test blueprints, items, item pools, instruments, performance level descriptors,…

  17. The Measurement of Progress and the Role of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Jon; Matthews, Erica

    2008-01-01

    Some talk of well-being, others of sustainable development, and some of progress. They may differ in their terminology, but those who preach these ideas are part of a growing global consensus--a consensus that believes societies need to look beyond Gross Domestic Product (GDP) to develop a more holistic view of the directions in which they are…

  18. Inflow Characterization for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Devices. FY-2011: Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Durgesh, Vibhav; Thomson, Jim; Polagye, Brian

    2011-06-09

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in collaboration with the Applied Physics Laboratory at the University of Washington (APL-UW), has carried out a detailed preliminary fluid flow field study at site selected for testing of marine and hydrokinetic turbines using Acoustic Doppler Velocimetry (ADV) measurements, Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) measurements, and Conductivity, Temperature and Depth (CTD) measurements. In FY-2011 these measurements were performed continuously for two weeks, in order to collect data during neap and spring tides, as well as during diurnal tidal variations.

  19. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Annual technical progress report of ecological research

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.H.

    1996-07-31

    The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA). The overall mission of the Laboratory is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts basic and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under a contract with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Significant accomplishments were made during the past year in the areas of research, education and service. The Laboratory`s research mission was fulfilled with the publication of two books and 143 journal articles and book chapters by faculty, technical and students, and visiting scientists. An additional three books and about 80 journal articles currently are in press. Faculty, technician and students presented 193 lectures, scientific presentations, and posters to colleges and universities, including minority institutions. Dr. J Vaun McArthur organized and conducted the Third Annual SREL Symposium on the Environment: New Concepts in Strewn Ecology: An Integrative Approach. Dr. Michael Newman conducted a 5-day course titled Quantitative Methods in Ecotoxicology, and Dr. Brian Teppen of The Advanced Analytical Center for Environmental Sciences (AACES) taught a 3-day short course titled Introduction to Molecular Modeling of Environmental Systems. Dr. I. Lehr Brisbin co-hosted a meeting of the Crocodile Special Interest Group. Dr. Rebecca Sharitz attended four symposia in Japan during May and June 1996 and conducted meetings of the Executive Committee and Board of the International Association for Ecology (ENTECOL).

  20. Research in radiobiology: Annual report of work in progress in the internal irradiation program

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.C.; Buster, D.S.

    1987-12-31

    In the early 1950's the Atomic Energy Commission established at the University of Utah a large, long-term study designed to investigate the toxicity of internally deposited radionuclides in beagles. The first animals were injected on December 1, 1952 and thus began an odyssey unusual in modern science both for its duration and continued scientific interest and relevance. The original dogs were injected with /sup 239/Pu and /sup 226/Ra. Later, studies were initiated with /sup 241/Am, /sup 249/Cf, /sup 252/Cf, /sup 253/Es, /sup 224/Ra, /sup 228/Ra, /sup 90/Sr, and /sup 228/Th. These studies were unique and have and will continue to contribute valuable scientific information on the behavior and effects of these substances in biological systems. We feel that the data collected from these studies will be useful for many decades to come as we ask more demanding questions relative to radionuclides and environmental, biological and health issues. While this publication will be the last of our series Research in Radiobiology, the lifespan carcinogenesis studies are continuing under a collaborative arrangement with the I.T.R.I. Beginning in 1988, the colony status tables of dogs in the Utah studies and reports of research by the Radiobiology faculty will be included in the annual I.T.R.I. report. Under our new collaborative arrangements with the I.T.R.I. for the conduct of the lifespan carcinogenesis studies, we expect a continued high level of scientific productivity from our faculty.

  1. Kootenai River Fisheries Investigation : Stock Status of Burbot : Project Progress Report 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Paragamian, Valughn L.; Laude Dorothy C.

    2008-12-26

    Objectives of this investigation were to (1) monitor the population status and recruitment of burbot Lota lota in the Kootenai River, Idaho and British Columbia, Canada during the winter of 2006-2007; (2) evaluate the selective withdrawal system in place at Libby Dam to maintain the river temperature near Bonners Ferry between 1-4 C (November-December) to improve burbot migration and spawning activity; and (3) determine if a hatching success of 10% of eyed burbot embryos could be achieved through extensive rearing and produce fingerlings averaging 9.8 cm in six months. Water temperature did not fall below the upper limit (4 C) until mid-January but was usually maintained between 1-4 C January through February and was acceptable. Snowpack was characterized by a 101% of normal January runoff forecast. Adult burbot were sampled with hoop nets and slat traps. Only three burbot were captured in hoop nets, all at Ambush Rock (rkm 244.5). No burbot were caught in either slat traps or juvenile sampling gear, indicating the population is nearly extirpated. Burbot catch per unit effort in hoop nets was 0.003 fish/net d. Extensive rearing was moved to a smaller private pond and will be reported in the 2008-2009 annual report.

  2. National Institute for Rocket Propulsion Systems 2012 Annual Report: A Year of Progress and Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, L. Dale; Doreswamy, Rajiv; Fry, Emma Kiele

    2013-01-01

    The National Institute for Rocket Propulsion Systems (NIRPS) maintains and advances U.S. leadership in all aspects of rocket propulsion for defense, civil, and commercial uses. The Institute's creation is in response to widely acknowledged concerns about the U.S. rocket propulsion base dating back more than a decade. U.S. leadership in rocket and missile propulsion is threatened by long-term industry downsizing, a shortage of new solid and liquid propulsion programs, limited ability to attract and retain fresh talent, and discretionary federal budget pressures. Numerous trade and independent studies cite erosion of this capability as a threat to national security and the U.S. economy resulting in a loss of global competitiveness for the U.S. propulsion industry. This report covers the period between May 2011 and December 2012, which includes the creation and transition to operations of NIRPS. All subsequent reports will be annual. The year 2012 has been an eventful one for NIRPS. In its first full year, the new team overcame many obstacles and explored opportunities to ensure the institute has a firm foundation for the future. NIRPS is now an active organization making contributions to the development, sustainment, and strategy of the rocket propulsion industry in the United States. This report describes the actions taken by the NIRPS team to determine the strategy, organizational structure, and goals of the Institute. It also highlights key accomplishments, collaborations with other organizations, and the strategic framework for the Institute.

  3. MHD air heater technology development. Annual technical progress report, January 1, 1980-December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    1981-03-01

    Progress on the technology development of the directly-fired high temperature air heater (HTAH) for MHD power plants is described in detail. The objective of task 1 is to continue development of ceramic materials technology for the directly-fired HTAH. The objectives of task 2 are to demonstrate the technical feasibility of operating a directly-fired HTAH (including both the heater matrix and valves), to continue obtaining information on life and corrosion resistance of HTAH materials, and to obtain design information for full-scale studies and future design work. The objectives of task 3 are to begin the identification of HTAH control requirements and control system needs, and to continue full-scale study efforts incorporating updated materials and design information in order to identify development needs for the HTAH development program. (WHK)

  4. 1994 annual report on low-level radioactive waste management progress

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    This report for calendar year 1994 summarizes the progress that states and compact regions made during the year in establishing new low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. Although events that have occurred in 1995 greatly alter the perspective in terms of storage versus disposal, the purpose of this report is to convey the concerns as evidenced during calendar year 1994. Significant developments occurring in 1995 are briefly outlined in the transmittal letter and will be detailed in the report for calendar year 1995. The report also provides summary information on the volume of low-level radioactive waste received for disposal in 1994 by commercially operated low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities, and is prepared is in response to Section 7(b) of Title I of Public Law 99-240, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985.

  5. Analytical Chemistry Division. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, W. S.

    1982-04-01

    The functions of the Analytical Chemistry Division fall into three general categories: (1) analytical research, development, and implementation; (2) programmatic research, development and utilization; (3) technical support. The Division is organized into five major sections each of which may carry out any type of work falling into the thre categories mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 5 of this report highlight progress within the five sections which are: analytical methodology; mass and emission spectrometry; analytical technical support; bio/organic analysis section; and nuclear and radiochemical analysis. A short summary introduces each chapter to indicate work scope. Information about quality assurance and safety programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Chapter 7 covers supplementary activities. Chapter 8 is on presentation of research results (publications, articles reviewed or referred for periodicals). Approximately 56 articles, 31 proceedings publications and 33 reports have been published, and 119 oral presentations given during this reporting period.

  6. Fossil Energy Program annual progress report for April 1994 through March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    This report covers progress made during the period April 1, 1994, through March 31, 1995, for research and development projects that contribute to the advancement of various fossil energy technologies. Projects on the Fossil Energy Program are supported by the DOE Office of Fossil Energy, and DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, the DOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, the DOE Fossil Energy Clean Coal Technology Program, the DOE Bartlesville Project Office, and the DOE Fossil Energy Office of Strategic Petroleum Reserve. The following research areas are covered in this report: Materials research and development; Environmental analysis support; Bioprocessing research; Coal combustion research; and Fossil fuels supplies modeling and research. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science an Technology database.

  7. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1994, which extended from October 1, 1993, through September 30, 1994. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units are sections highlighting ESD Scientific, Technical, and Administrative Achievement awards and listing information necessary to covey the scope of the work in the division. An organizational chart of staff and long-term guests who wee in ESD at the end of FY 1994 is located in the final section of the report.

  8. A novel biomarker for beryllium sensitization in humans. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Albertini, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    'Overall, this project is designed to identify the beryllium reactive T-cell clones that are proliferating in vivo in individuals sensitized to beryllium. The basic method for identifying such clones is the hprt T-cell mutation assay. The rationale is that in vivo proliferating T-lymphocytes are more likely to undergo hprt mutations and/or be included in hprt mutant fractions of T-cells isolated from peripheral blood. T-lymphocytes isolated as hprt mutants from beryllium sensitized individuals are propagated in vitro and characterized for T-cell receptor (TCR)/3 gene usage patterns and antigen reactivity. Results will be compared with similar characteristics determined for T-cell clones from the same individuals that were developed in vitro from peripheral blood lymphocytes by beryllium stimulation. This research project has several specific aims. Progress for the year 10/1/96 to 9/30/97 is given.'

  9. Spray forming -- Aluminum: Third annual report (Phase 2). Technical progress -- Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Kozarek, R.L.

    1998-04-20

    Commercial production of aluminum sheet and plate by spray atomization and deposition is a potentially attractive manufacturing alternative to conventional ingot metallurgy/hot-milling and to continuous casting processes because of reduced energy requirements and reduced cost. To realize the full potential of the technology, the Aluminum Company of America (Alcoa), under contract by the US Department of Energy, is investigating currently available state-of-the-art atomization devices to develop nozzle design concepts whose spray characteristics are tailored for continuous sheet production. This third technical progress report will summarize research and development work conducted during the period 1997 October through 1998 March. Included are the latest optimization work on the Alcoa III nozzle, results of spray forming runs with 6111 aluminum alloy and preliminary rolling trials of 6111 deposits.

  10. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1993, which extended from October 1, 1992, through September 30, 1993. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units are sections highlighting ESD Scientific, Technical, and Administrative Achievement awards and listing information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. An organizational chart of staff and long-term guests who were in ESD and the end of FY 1993 is located in the final section of the report.

  11. Fossil Energy Program Annual Progress Report for the Period April 1, 2000 through March 31, 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Judkins, RR

    2001-06-14

    This report covers progress made at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on research and development projects that contribute to the advancement of fossil energy technologies. Projects on the ORNL Fossil Energy Program are supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy, the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the DOE Fossil Energy Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program, the DOE National Petroleum Technology Office, and the DOE Fossil Energy Office of Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The ORNL Fossil Energy Program research and development activities cover the areas of coal, clean coal technology, gas, petroleum, and support to the SPR. An important part of the Fossil Energy Program is technical management of all activities on the DOE Fossil Energy Advanced Research (AR) Materials Program. The AR Materials Program involves research at other DOE and government laboratories, at universities, and at industrial organizations.

  12. Spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development Program. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    This report provides information on the progress of activities during fiscal year 1993 in the Spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development Program (SF&WMTDP) at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). As a new program, efforts are just getting underway toward addressing major issues related to the fuel and waste stored at the ICPP. The SF&WMTDP has the following principal objectives: Investigate direct dispositioning of spent fuel, striving for one acceptable waste form; determine the best treatment process(es) for liquid and calcine wastes to minimize the volume of high level radioactive waste (HLW) and low level waste (LLW); demonstrate the integrated operability and maintainability of selected treatment and immobilization processes; and assure that implementation of the selected waste treatment process is environmentally acceptable, ensures public and worker safety, and is economically feasible.

  13. Fossil Energy Program annual progress report for April 1993 through March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Judkins, R.R.

    1994-06-01

    This report covers progress made during the period April 1, 1993, through March 31, 1994, for research and development projects that contribute to the advancement of various fossil energy technologies. Projects on the Fossil Energy Program are supported by the DOE Office of Fossil Energy, the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, the DOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, the DOE Fossil Energy Clean Coal Technology Program, the DOE Bartlesville Project Office, the DOE Fossil Energy Office of Petroleum Reserves, and the US Agency for International Development. The five areas of research covered in this report are: Materials research and development; Environmental analysis and support; Bioprocessing; Coal combustion; and Fossil fuels supplies modeling and research. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  14. Advanced biomass research program. Annual report for 1987. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.H.

    1989-01-01

    These results are from an interdisciplinary program researching plant growth and bioconversion processes for enhancing methane from biomass. Modern molecular and cellular biology approaches are being used to characterize the genes and to develop methods for accomplishing transformations to improve biomass quality by regulating plant chemicals. Quality is being emphasized since quantities of 25 Mg/ha can be sustained for five years and conditions for higher yields of some grasses were identified. Breeding has succeeded in the development of hexaploids that produce seeds, and vegetative propagation from tissue cultures for asexual species. Gel seeding of tissue culture derived plantlets inoculated with mycrohizal to improve survivability has shown promise. Biological methane potential assays have revealed the effects of harvesting frequency, storage and the proportion of plant parts on methane yields. Non-hydrolytical depolymerization of polypectate and hydrolytic degradation of cellulose occur more rapidly at near neutral pH's. A gene encoding for the xylan-degrading enzymes was isolated. These enzymes are repressed by glucose. Kinetic modeling of these reactions is progressing. Methods of describing the microbial community structure in digesters are being developed and used to monitor digester health and performance. Polyclonal antibodies for 9 methanogenic bacteria were developed, propionate and butyrate inhibited dissimilation of large organic polymers, the cellular location of key enzyme were revealed and cellulolytic bacteria were found to attack cells from inside the lumen. Controls of formate production and conversion to gas were identified and the genes for the hydrogenase enzymes in the conversions were cloned. System analysis allows the authors to assess the impact of research progress on cost factors. Sixty scientific papers reporting program results were published in 1987.

  15. Biomass energy technology annual technical progress report, FY 1982. Volume II. Technical summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The goal of the BET program is to conduct an integrated R and D program for feedstock production and conversion of organic materials to economically produce energy products that will significantly contribute to meeting long-term US energy needs. In feedstock production, laboratory investigations are being performed to reduce the risks associated with the production of microalgal oils that can be used for energy applications and high-value chemical substitutes. Research also is being done on the biochemical mechanisms that control hydrocarbon production by macroalgal species. There has been significant progress in the DOE Short-Rotation Woods Crops Program aimed at increasing yields of biomass through both improved traditional/conventional silvicultural techniques and short-rotation intensive culture. Studies that evaluate the potential of milkweed as an energy feedstock were completed in FY 1982. In thermochemical conversion, evaluations of a variety of high-performance gasification systems for producing medium-Btu gas and synthesis gas were concluded in FY 1982. Free market forces are expected to stimulate private sector interest in developing the technology and marketing needed to commercialize medium-Btu gasification systems. Medium-Btu gases have numerous beneficial industrial applications, and this technology is close to entry into the marketplace. Progress has been made in FY 1982 toward understanding the basic mechanisms and kinetics affecting the thermochemical processing of biomass through fast pyrolysis and direct liquefaction techniques. In biochemical conversion, fundamental research is being performed on the anaerobic digestion process. FY 1982 research activities also included laboratory-scale experiments on photobiological methods for hydrogen production. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each of the 3 program areas for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

  16. Economic impact of stimulated technological activity. Part 1: Overall economic impact of technological progress: Its measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Investigations were performed at the national economic level to explore the aggregate effects of technological progress on economic growth. Inadequacies in existing marco-economic yardsticks forced the study to focus on the cost savings effects achieved through technological progress. The central questions discussed in this report cover: (1) role of technological progress in economic growth, (2) factors determining the rate of economic growth due to technological progress; (3) quantitative measurements of relationships between technological progress, its determinants, and subsequent economic growth; and (4) effects of research and development activities of the space program. For Part 2, see N72-32174.

  17. Reevaluating Measures of Disease Progression in Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Statland, Jeffrey M.; McDermott, Michael P.; Heatwole, Chad; Martens, William B.; Pandya, Shree; van der Kooi, E.L.; Kissel, John T.; Wagner, Kathryn R.; Tawil, Rabi

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of the molecular pathophysiology of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) have identified potential therapeutic targets. Consequently, an accurate understanding of disease progression in FSHD is crucial for the design of future clinical trials. Data from 228 subjects in 3 clinical trials and 1 natural history study were compared to examine disease progression in FSHD. All studies utilized the same techniques for manual muscle testing and maximum voluntary isometric contraction testing. Both techniques yield a total strength score that can be followed over time as an indicator of disease progression. Whereas natural history data showed a decrease in strength over 1 year, there was an apparent increase in strength at 6 months in 2 of the 3 clinical trials in both the placebo and treatment groups, that persisted for up to 1 year for maximum voluntary isometric contraction testing. Variability estimates from the clinical trial data were consistent with those seen in the natural history data. Patients in clinical trials in FSHD may have better outcomes than those in natural history studies, regardless of treatment assignment, emphasizing the importance of placebo groups and the need for caution when interpreting the strength results of controlled and uncontrolled trials. PMID:23406877

  18. Captive Rearing Program for Salmon River Chinook Salmon : Project Progress Report, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Venditti, David A.

    2003-10-01

    distributed themselves throughout the study section and displayed a progression of habitat associations and behavior consistent with progressing maturation and the onset of spawning. Five of the 18 redds spawned by captive-reared parents were hydraulically sampled to assess survival to the eyed stage of development. Eyed-eggs were collected from four of these, and survival to this stage ranged from 0%-89%. Expanding these results to the remaining redds produced an estimate of 15,000 eyed-eggs being produced by captive-reared fish.

  19. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts research on the environmental aspects of existing and emerging energy systems and applies this information to ensure that technology development and energy use are consistent with national environmental health and safety goals. Offering an interdisciplinary resource of staff and facilities to address complex environmental problems, the division is currently providing technical leadership for major environmental issues of national concern: (1) acidic deposition and related environmental effects, (2) effects of increasing concentrations of atmospheric CO{sub 2} and the resulting climatic changes to ecosystems and natural and physical resources, (3) hazardous chemical and radioactive waste disposal and remediation research and development, and (4) development of commercial biomass energy production systems. This progress report outlines ESD's accomplishments in these and other areas in FY 1990. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases in the following areas: ecosystem studies; environmental analyses; environmental toxicology; geosciences; technical and administrative support; biofuels feedstock development program; carbon dioxide information analysis and research program; and environmental waste program.

  20. Combined macroscopic and microscopic approach to the fracture of metals. Annual progress report, 1980-1981

    SciTech Connect

    Asaro, R. J.; Gurland, J.; Needleman, A.; Rice, J. R.

    1981-06-01

    Recent progress was achieved in refining and generalizing the methods previously developed for treating the stable crack growth problem, with particular attention to the approximate asymptotic solution of Rice, Drugan and Sham for stress and deformation fields near the tip of a growing crack. The microstructural aspects of ductile fracture were studied in dual-phase steels and high-strength 4340 steels. Very interesting results were obtained in the work on hydrogen effects in steels. In medium strength steels, the ductility-reducing effect of hydrogen is tentatively attributed to the accumulation of hydrogen at internal interfaces with a resulting loss in the resistance to interfacial separation. Extension of Needleman and Rice's work on the growth of cavities at elevated temperatures to the investigation of the effects of triaxial stressing relates the rate of void growth by grain boundary diffusion and dislocation creep to the triaxiality. It provides a good model to analyze the growth of macro-cracks in polycrystals by the mechanisms of growth and coalescence of micro-voids.

  1. Interfacial radiolysis effects in tank waste speciation. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Orlando, T.M.; Camaioni, D.; Meisel, D.

    1998-06-01

    'The purpose of this program is to deliver pertinent, fundamental information that can be used to make technically defensible decisions on safety issues and processing strategies associated with storage and clean up of DOE mixed chemical and radioactive wastes. The radioactive and chemical wastes present in DOE underground storage tanks contain complex mixtures of sludges, salts, and supernatant liquids. These mixtures, which contain a wide variety of oxide materials, aqueous solvents, and organic components, are constantly bombarded with gamma quanta, beta and alpha particles produced via the decay of radioactive isotopes. Currently, there is a vital need to understand radiolysis of organic and inorganic species present in mixed waste tanks because these processes: (a) produce mixtures of toxic, flammable, and potentially explosive gases (i.e., H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O and volatile organics) (b) degrade organics, possibly to gas-generating organic fragments, even as the degradation reduces the hazards associated with nitrate-organic mixtures, (c) alter the surface chemistry of insoluble colloids in tank sludge, influencing sedimentation and the gas/solid interactions that may lead to gas entrapment phenomena. This report summarizes the technical achievements of a 3-year project that is now in its 2nd year. Progress in three areas is reported: (1) radiation effects at NaNO 3 crystal interfaces, (2) reactions of organic complexants with NO{sub 2} in water, and (3) radiation effects in oxide particles.'

  2. Survey of protected terrestrial vertebrates on the Oak Ridge Reservation 1995 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Vail, E.R.; Mitchell, J.M.; Webb, J.W.; King, A.L.; Hamlett, P.A.

    1995-11-01

    This progress report discusses surveys of protected terrestrial vertebrates on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) from October 1994 through September 1995. These surveys are important to help avoid or minimize potential impacts of projects on the ORR to species listed as threatened, endangered, or in need of management by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. Currently, there are 69 species of federally or state-listed terrestrial vertebrates that may occur in Tennessee. Not all of these are expected to occur on the ORR, nor do resources permit comprehensive sampling for all of them over the entire ORR. To effectively organize sampling efforts, listed animal species that might be present were targeted using a prioritization system based on historical and recent sightings, species distributions, literature reviews, and personal communications. Sampling was conducted during the time of the year when each targeted species would most likely be encountered. Several trapping and surveying methods were used, including pitfall traps, Sherman traps, seining, artificial covers, and cave and avian surveys.

  3. Development of nuclear analysis capabilities for DOE waste management activities. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, C.V.; DeHart, M.D.; Broadhead, B.L.; Hopper, C.M.

    1998-06-01

    'The objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate prototypic analysis capabilities that can be used by the nuclear safety analysis practitioners to: (1) demonstrate a more thorough understanding of the underlying physics phenomena that can lead to improved reliability and defensibility of safety evaluations; and (2) optimize operations related to the handling, storage, transportation, and disposal of fissile material and DOE spent fuel. To address these problems, the project will investigate the implementation of sensitivity and uncertainty methods within existing Monte Carlo codes used for criticality safety analyses, as well as within a new deterministic code that allows specification of arbitrary grids to accurately model the geometry details required in a criticality safety analysis. This capability can facilitate improved estimations of the required subcritical margin and potentially enable the use of a broader range of experiments in the validation process. The new arbitrary-grid radiation transport code will also enable detailed geometric modeling valuable for improved accuracy in application to a myriad of other problems related to waste characterization. Application to these problems will also be explored. This report summarizes the progress achieved after only seven months of work on a three-year project.'

  4. Nature and mechanism of induction of mutations. Annual progress report, August 1, 1980-October 1, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Nilan, R.A.; Kleinhofs, A.; Konzak, C.F.

    1981-10-01

    New knowledge of the mechanism of mutation induction and the nature of mutations in eukaryotes continues to be developed from experiments involving sodium azide. Azide is a potent mutagen in bacteria and in higher plants but it is weakly mutagenic and not carcinogenic in mammalian systems. It was determined that azide acted through a promutagen or organic metabolite both in barley and bacterial cells. This metabolite has been isolated and characterized. During the past year, considerable progress has been made in understanding the pathway by which the metabolite is synthesized in barley and bacteria. It can be synthesized in vitro both in bacteria and barley and some additional knowledge of the structure of the metabolite is being revealed through chemical synthesis of the metabolite. Additional information concerning the lack of azide mutagenicity in mammalian cells has been developed through the detailed studies of the action of azide and its metabolite from bacteria and barley on sister-chromatid exchanges in mammalian cells. Neither azide nor its metabolites of bacteria and barley are particularly effective, and to date no metabolite has been detected in mammalian cells. Azide-induced mutants in barley have been utilized in barley improvement, in probing the pathways of a number of biochemical and physiological processes and in understanding the structure of gene loci and the nature of mutations induced.

  5. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a large and diversified organization. As such, it serves a multitude of functions for a clientele that exists both in and outside of ORNL. These functions fall into the following general categories: Analytical Research, Development and Implementation; Programmatic Research, Development, and Utilization; and Technical Support. The Analytical Chemistry Division is organized into four major sections, each which may carry out any of the three types of work mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 4 of this report highlight progress within the four sections during the period January 1 to December 31, 1989. A brief discussion of the division's role in an especially important environmental program is given in Chapter 5. Information about quality assurance, safety, and training programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited in Chapters 7 and 8. Approximately 69 articles, 41 proceedings, and 31 reports were published, and 151 oral presentations were given during this reporting period. Some 308,981 determinations were performed.

  6. Respiratory chain of alkalophilic bacteria. Annual progress report, June 15, 1981-May 15, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Krulwich, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    In view of the increased energy cost of life at extremely alkaline pH, the extraordinary qualitative and quantitative array of respiratory chain components of alkalophilic bacteria, and the normal growth yields and O/sub 2/ consumption rates of such organisms, it has been proposed that the obligately alkalophilic bacteria possess structural/functional properties of the respiratory chain such that particularly efficient energy conservation is facilitated. The respiratory chain components of Bacillus alcalophilus have been studied in comparison with its non-alkalophilic mutant derivative; a similar study of Bacillus firmus RAB and non-alkalophilic RABN is now partially completed. The alkalophiles contain high quantities of many distinct redox carriers as compared to their derivative and other non-alkalophiles. Determinations of H/sup +/7O ratios are now in progress. A system for study of the regulation of cytochrome expression, as a function of pH, has been developed. Failure of obligate alkalophiles to grow at pH 7.0 now appears to relate to the low membrane potentials produced by respiration at that pH, rather than a failure of pH homeostasis. Since alkalophilic cells are found to be viable at pH 7.0, incubations can be conducted for study of functional and regulatory aspects of respiration.

  7. Synthesis and design of silicide intermetallic materials. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.; Castro, R.G.; Butt, D.P.; Park, Y.; Vaidya, R.U.; Hollis, K.J.; Kung, H.H.

    1999-03-01

    The overall objective of this program is to develop structural silicide-based materials with optimum combinations of elevated temperature strength/creep resistance, low temperature fracture toughness, and high temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance for applications of importance to the US processing industry. A further objective is to develop silicide-based prototype industrial components. The ultimate aim of the program is to work with industry to transfer the structural silicide materials technology to the private sector in order to promote international competitiveness in the area of advanced high temperature materials and important applications in major energy-intensive US processing industries. The program presently has a number of developing industrial connections, including a CRADA with Johns Manville Corporation targeted at the area of MoSi{sub 2}-based high temperature materials and components for fiberglass melting and processing applications. The authors are also developing an interaction with the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) to develop silicides for high temperature radiant gas burner applications, for the glass and other industries. With Combustion Technology Inc., they are developing silicide-based periscope sight tubes for the direct observation of glass melts. With Accutru International Corporation, they are developing silicide-based protective sheaths for self-verifying temperature sensors which may be used in glass furnaces and other industrial applications. The progress made on the program in this period is summarized.

  8. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, W.S.

    1983-05-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Dvision of Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL) serves a multitude of functions for a clientele that exists both in and outside ORNL. These functions fall into the following general categories: (1) analytical research, development, and implementation; (2) programmatic research, development, and utilization; and (3) technical support. The Division is organized into five major sections, each of which may carry out any type of work falling in the three categories mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 5 of this report highlight progress within the five sections (analytical methodology, mass and emission spectrometry, radioactive materials, bio/organic analysis, and general and environmental analysis) during the period January 1, 1982 to December 31, 1982. A short summary introduces each chapter to indicate work scope. Information about quality assurance and safety programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited in Chapters 7 and 8. Approximately 61 articles, 32 proceedings publications and 37 reports have been published, and 107 oral presentations were given during this reporting period.

  9. Human genetic marker for resistance to radiations and chemicals. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, H.B.

    1998-06-01

    'The broad objective of the project is to understand the molecular basis for the response of cells to radiations and chemicals, with the pragmatic goal of being able to identify human subpopulations that are exceptionally sensitive to DNA damaging agents. The project focuses on HRAD9, a human orthologue of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe gene rad9. S. pombe rad9::ura4+ mutant cells are highly sensitive to ionizing radiation, UV and many chemicals, such as the DNA synthesis inhibitor hydroxyurea. They also lack the ability to delay cycling transiently in S phase or in G2 following a block in DNA replication or after incurring DNA damage, respectively -i.e., they lack checkpoint controls. The attempt by mutant cells to progress through mitosis in the absence of fully intact DNA accounts at least in part for their sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. Cells bearing rad9::ura4+ also aberrantly regulate UVDE, an enzyme that participates in a secondary DNA excision repair pathway. The key role played by S. pombe rad9 in promoting resistance to chemicals and radiations suggests that the evolutionarily conserved human cognate also has important functions in mammals. The first set of aims in this proposal centers on characterizing the structure and expression of HRAD9, to assess structure/function relationships and potentially link protein activity to a specific tissue. The next set of aims focuses on determining the role of HRAD9 in radio/chemoresponsiveness and cancer.'

  10. Studies in premixed combustion. Annual progress report, November 1, 1992--October 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Sivashinsky, G.I.

    1993-03-01

    During the period under review, significant progress was been made in studying the intrinsic dynamics of premixed flames and the problems of flame-flow interaction. (1) A weakly nonlinear model for Bunsen burner stabilized flames was proposed and employed for the simulation of three-dimensional polyhedral flames -- one of the most graphic manifestations of thermal-diffusive instability in premixed combustion. (2) A high-precision large-scale numerical simulation of Bunsen burner tip structure was conducted. The results obtained supported the earlier conjecture that the tip opening observed in low Lewis number systems is a purely optical effect not involving either flame extinction or leakage of unburned fuel. (3) A one-dimensional model describing a reaction wave moving through a unidirectional periodic flow field is proposed and studied numerically. For long-wavelength fields the system exhibits a peculiar non-uniqueness of possible propagation regimes. The transition from one regime to another occurs in a manner of hysteresis.

  11. [Conversion of acetic acid to methane by thermophiles]. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Zinder, S.H.

    1994-02-01

    Acetate is the precursor of approximately two-thirds of the methane produced by anaerobic bioreactors and many other methanogenic habitats. Besides their intrinsic interest, thermophilic acetotrophic methanogenic cultures usually grow at least twice as fast as their mesophilic counterparts, making them more amenable to study. In recent years, attention has been mainly focused on the thermophilic acetate utilizing methanogen Methanothrix strain CALS-1. Methanothrix, also called Methanosaeta, is one of only two methanogenic genera known to convert acetate to methane, the other being Methanosarcina. The faster-growing more versatile Methanosarcina has been better studied. However, when one examines anaerobic digestor contents, Methanothrix is often the dominant acetate-utilizing methanogen. As described in previous progress reports, the authors have achieved methanogenesis from acetate in cell-free extracts of Methanothrix strain CALS-1 grown in a pH auxostat. Using these cell extracts, specific activities for methanogenesis from acetate and ATP of 100--300 nmol/min were routinely obtained, levels comparable to the rate in whole cells, which is not usually the case in methanogenic extracts. Recently obtained results are given and discussed for the following: Methanogenesis in crude extracts; Role of the cell membrane in methanogenesis from acetate; Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase; Novel thermophilic cultures converting acetate to methane; and Methanol-utilizing methanogen.

  12. DOE/EPSCoR Traineeship Program: Progress report, academic year 1992--93. Annual report 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, D.; Steadman, J.

    1993-12-31

    This progress report reviews the University of Wyoming`s approach to implementing the DOE Traineeship Program, and briefly describes the research performed by the DOE/EPSCoR Trainees during the academic year, 1992--1993. These brief descriptions of individual research projects demonstrate the wide scope of energy-related research that the DOE-EPSCoR Traineeships have initiated in Wyoming. The availability of this funding has encouraged many talented students to continue their education in fields of interest to DOE. These additional bright, energetic graduate students have improved the educational atmosphere for everyone. The visibility of the DOE program has sharpened the focus of the science and engineering departments on the energy-related research of importance to Wyoming and DOE. The impact of the DOE Traineeships in Wyoming has been substantial and very positive. It has not only increased the number of students studying in energy-related disciplines, but has also increased the quality of their graduate research. The program has also increased the visibility of DOE in Wyoming and has helped focus attention on the energy and environmental graduate education which is so essential to the University and the State.

  13. Symmetric tandem mirror program. Annual progress report, period ending October 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    A technique for measuring the spatial distribution of the diamagnetism of the energetic electron plasma was developed. Using this technique, it was determined that high-..beta.. plasmas (..beta.. approx. 50%) are indeed produced with their pressure peak near the second harmonic locations in the plane midway between the mirror coils. Measurements of the cold plasma properties (Te, n/sub e/) led to deeper understanding of the plasma equilibrium. It was found that the electron temperature is controlled by adjustment of the neutral density (10 < Te < 50 eV). The cold plasma density is determined by the applied power. It was found that the minimum ratio of cold to hot electron density for which stable equilibria exist is approximately unity (with an uncertainty of a factor of three remaining in the measurements).

  14. Application of modern diagnostic methods to environmental improvement. Annual progress report, October 1994--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, W.S.

    1995-12-01

    The Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL), an interdisciplinary research department in the College of Engineering at Mississippi State University (MSU), is under contract with the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and apply advanced diagnostic instrumentation and analysis techniques to aid in solving DOE`s nuclear waste problem. The program is a comprehensive effort which includes five focus areas: advanced diagnostic systems; development/application; torch operation and test facilities; process development; on-site field measurement and analysis; technology transfer/commercialization. As part of this program, diagnostic methods will be developed and evaluated for characterization, monitoring and process control. Also, the measured parameters, will be employed to improve, optimize and control the operation of the plasma torch and the overall plasma treatment process. Moreover, on-site field measurements at various DOE facilities are carried out to aid in the rapid demonstration and implementation of modern fieldable diagnostic methods. Such efforts also provide a basis for technology transfer.

  15. Experimental studies of pion-nucleus interactions at intermediate energies. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    This report summarizes investigations of various pion-nucleus interactions and nucleon-nucleus charge-exchange reactions. The work was carried out with the LAMPF accelerator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the cyclotrons at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) near Zurich, Switzerland, and at Indiana University (IUCF), as a collaborative effort among several laboratories and universities. The experimental activity at LAMPF involved measurements of new data on pion double-charge-exchange scattering, some initial work on a new Neutral Meson Spectrometer system, a search for deeply-bound pionic atoms, measurements of elastic scattering, and studies of the (n,p) reaction on various nuclei. At PSI measurements of pion quasielastic scattering were carried out, with detection of the recoil proton. Work on the analysis of data from a previous experiment at PSI on pion absorption in nuclei was continued. This experiment involved using a detector system that covered nearly the full solid angle.

  16. Environmental analysis of endocrine disrupting effects from hydrocarbon contaminants in the ecosystem. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McLachlan, J.

    1998-06-01

    'The objective of this project is to determine how environmental contaminants, namely hydrocarbons, can act as hormones or anti-hormones (i.e., environmental hormones) in different species present in aquatic ecosystems. Species of particular focus are those which can serve as sentinel species (e.g., amphibians) and, thus, provide early warning signals for more widespread impacts on an ecosystem and its wildlife and human inhabitants. This reports the progress of 1.5 years of a three-year grant awarded to the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR). A growing body of evidence suggests that chemicals in the environment can disrupt the endocrine system of animals (i.e., wildlife and humans) and adversely impact the development of these species. Because of the multitude of known endocrine-disrupting chemicals and the numerous industrial and government sectors producing these chemicals, almost every federal agency has initiated research on the endocrine effects of chemicals relevant to their operations. This study represents the Department of Energy (DOE) Basic Energy Sciences'' only research on the impacts of endocrine-disrupting chemicals. The activities employed by this project to determine these impacts include development of biotechnology screens (in vitro), animal screens (in vivo), and other analyses of aquatic ecosystem biomarkers of exposure. The results from this study can elucidate how chemicals in the environment, including those from DOE activities, can signal (and alter) the development of a number of species in aquatic ecosystems. These signals can have detrimental impacts not only on an organismal level, but also on community, population, and entire ecosystem levels, including humans.'

  17. Mixing rocesses in high-level waste tanks. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, P.F.

    1998-06-01

    'Flammable gases can be generated in DOE high-level waste tanks, including radiolytic hydrogen, and during cesium precipitation from salt solutions, benzene. Under normal operating conditions the potential for deflagration or detonation from these gases is precluded by purging and ventilation systems, which remove the flammable gases and maintain a well-mixed condition in the tanks. Upon failure of the ventilation system, due to seismic or other events, however, it has proven more difficult to make strong arguments for well-mixed conditions, due to the potential for density-induced stratification which can potentially sequester fuel or oxidizer at concentrations significantly higher than average. This has complicated the task of defining the safety basis for tank operation. Waste-tank mixing processes have considerable overlap with similar large-enclosure mixing processes that occur in enclosure fires and nuclear reactor containments. Significant differences also exist, so that modeling techniques that have been developed previously can not be directly applied to waste tanks. In particular, mixing of air introduced through tank roof penetrations by buoyancy and pressure driven exchange flows, mixed convection induced by an injected high-velocity purge jet interacting with buoyancy driven flow, and onset and breakdown of stable stratification under the influence of an injected jet have not been adequately studied but are important in assessing the potential for accumulation of high-concentration pockets of fuel and oxygen. Treating these phenomena requires a combination of experiments and the development of new, more general computational models than those that have been developed for enclosure fires. U.C. Berkeley is now completing the second year of its three-year project that started in September, 1996. Excellent progress has been made in several important areas related to waste-tank ventilation and mixing processes.'

  18. Investigations of intermetallic alloy hydriding mechanisms. Annual progress report, May 1 1979-April 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Livesay, B.R.; Larsen, J.W.

    1980-05-01

    Investigations are being conducted on mechanisms involved with the hydrogen-metal interactions which control the absorption and desorption processes in intermetallic compounds. The status of the following investigations is reported: modeling of hydride formation; microbalance investigations; microstructure investigations; flexure experiments; resistivity experiments; and nuclear backscattering measurements. These investigations concern fundamental hydrogen interaction mechanisms involved in storage alloys.

  19. Inflow Characterization for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Devices. FY-2010 Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Durgesh, Vibhav; Thomson, Jim; Polagye, Brian

    2011-01-31

    Marine and Hydro Kinetic devices (MHK) are being widely studied as a source of renewable energy. The Marrowstone Island site is a potential location for installing MHK devices because the tidal currents observed that are sufficient for power generation. In order to quantify the effects of turbulence on MHK devices and the surrounding environment at this site, a prelimi- nary fluid flow field study was conducted here by the Pacific Northwest National Lab (PNNL) in collaboration with the Applied Physics Lab at the University of Washington (APL-UW). This study entailed continuous The Acoustic Doppler Velocimetry (ADV), Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) and Conductivity, Temperature and Depth (CTD) measurements from May 4, 2010 to May 22, 2010, in order to obtain information about turbulence effects during different tidal conditions. The instruments used for collecting the above measurements were deployed at the Marrowstone site using a R/V Jack Robertson provided by the University of Washington (APL-UW). All the measurements were taken at the site with an average depth of 22 m below the sea surface. ADV acquired velocity data at 32 Hz sampling frequency at 4.6 m above the seabed, and ADCP acquired velocity profile data at a sampling frequency of 2 Hz, from a height of 2.6 m above the seabed to the surface with a bin resolution of 0.5 m. The ADV and ADCP measurements showed that the horizontal velocity had a turbulence intensity of 10%. Further- more, the spectral analysis from ADV measurements showed that the flow is fully turbulent with -5/3 slope in the inertial sub-range of the spectra. Moreover, the temporal-frequency analysis showed presence of ”eddies” at high frequencies. These preliminary studies provided initial flow field and site characteristics, showed the limitations of the instruments used and highlighted changes that need to be made in the experimental setup for deployment in FY-2011 studies.

  20. Nuclear research with heavy ions. Annual progress report. January 1, 1980-December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, M.

    1980-10-01

    The program of research is oriented towards experimental studies of the interactions between heavy ions and complex nuclei. These interactions are probed by detailed measurements of light-charged-particle emission using counter telescopes for atomic number and mass number identification. Singles measurements of the charged-particle energy spectra and angular distributions, together with coincidence correlations with heavy nuclear-reaction fragments, provide insight into the contributing reaction mechanisms. The application of the statistical model to the appropriate experimental data allows the determination of parameters necessary to calibrate the theory, and gives indications of dynamical control vs. equilibrium in the several degrees of freedom associated with the nuclear collisions. A large body of data are presented and discussed for /sup 40/Ar reactions with /sup 116/Sn, /sup 154/Sm, /sup 164/Dy, and /sup 197/Au targets. Complete results are also given for twelve reactions which produce /sup 194/Hg compound nuclei at several excitation energies.

  1. Acoustic probe for solid-gas-liquid suspensions. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Tavlarides, L.L.; Sangani, A.S.; Greenwood, M.S.

    1998-06-01

    'The proposed research will develop an acoustic probe for monitoring particle size and volume fraction in slurries in the absence and presence of gas. The goals are to commission and verify the probe components and system operation, develop theory for the forward and inverse problems for acoustic wave propagation through a three phase medium, and experimentally verify the theoretical analysis. The acoustic probe will permit measurement of solid content in gas-liquid-solid waste slurries in tanks across the DOE complex.'

  2. Extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray diagnostics of high-temperature plasmas. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Moos, H W; Armstrong, L Jr

    1980-01-01

    The work performed from mid-January 1979 through 1980 is described. EUV diagnostic studies have been performed at the Alcator A and C Tokamaks, and on TMX. A toroidal asymmetry has been found in the low density phase of Alcator A. The confinement time of impurities has been measured on Alcator A. Impurity concentrations in the center cell of TMX have been studied using EUV spectroscopic techniques. A time resolving spectrograph with 1024 detector elements is essentially complete.

  3. Establishing a quantitative functional relationship between capillary pressure, saturation and interfacial area. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Montemagno, C.D.

    1997-01-01

    'There is a fundamental knowledge gap associated with the in situ remediation of non-aqueous phase pollutants. Currently it is not possible to accurately determine the interfacial surface area of non-aqueous contaminants. As a result it is impossible to (1) accurately establish the health and environmental risk associated with the pollution: (2) precisely quantify and evaluate the potential efficacy of various in situ treatment technologies; and (3) conduct reliable performance assessments of the applied remediation technology during and after the clean-up. The global goal of this investigation is to try to remedy these shortcomings through the development of a formalized functional relationship between interfacial area (a), phase saturation (S) and capillary pressure (P). The development of this relationship will allow the direct determination of the fluid-fluid interfacial area from field measurements. Quantitative knowledge of the surface area of the non-aqueous phase pollutant facilitates accurate predictions of both the rate of dissolution and the contact area available for treatment. In addition. if saturation and capillary pressure measurements are made during the remediation process. both the spatial and temporal effectiveness of the remediation technology can be quantified. This information can then be used to optimize the restoration program. The project objective will be achieved through an integrated and focused research program that is comprised of theoretical computational and experimental efforts. These efforts are organized into a framework of four tasks: (1) improve on newly developed laboratory techniques to quantify and directly measure the functional relationship between phase interfacial area (a), saturation (S) and capillary pressure (P). (2) Develop new computational algorithms in conjunction with laboratory measurements to predict P, S and a. (3) Test existing theory and develop new theory to describe the relationship between P, S and a at

  4. Application of modern diagnostic methods to environmental improvement. Annual progress report, January--October 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, W.S.

    1994-12-01

    The Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL), a research department in the College of Engineering at Mississippi State University (MSU), is under contract with the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and apply advanced diagnostic instrumentation and analysis techniques to real world processes; measurements are made in hot, highly corrosive atmospheres in which conventional measurement devices are ineffective. Task 1 of this agreement is concerned with the development and application of various diagnostic methods to characterize the plasma properties, the melt properties and the downstream emissions from a plasma torch facility designed to vitrify mixed waste. Correlation of the measured properties with the operating parameters of the torch will be sought to improve, optimize and control the overall operation of the plasma treatment process. As part of this program, diagnostic methods will be developed and evaluated for characterization, monitoring and control purposes of treatment processes in general. Task 2 of this agreement is concerned with the development of a system to monitor and control the combustion stoichiometry in real time in order to minimize environmental impact and maximize process efficiency. Staged fuel injection is also being studied to minimize NO{sub x} formation.

  5. Cavitational hydrothermal oxidation: A new remediation process. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Suslick, K.S.

    1998-06-01

    'The primary goal is to develop a quantitative understanding of cavitation phenomena in aqueous media and the development of applications of cavitation to remediation processes. Efforts have focused on three separate areas: sonoluminescence as a probe of conditions created during cavitational collapse in aqueous media, the use of cavitation for remediation of contaminated water, and an addition of the use of ultrasound in the synthesis of novel heterogeneous catalysts for hydrodehalogenation of halocarbons under mild conditions. This report summarizes work after one year of a three year project. In order to gain further understanding of the conditions present during cavitation, the author has continued his studies of sonoluminescence. He has made recent breakthroughs in the use of emission spectroscopy for temperature and pressure measurement of cavitation events, which he expects to publish shortly. He has been able to measure for the first time the temperature of cavitation in water during multi-bubble cavitation in the presence of aromatic hydrocarbons. The emission from excited states of C{sub 2} in water gives temperatures that are consistent with adiabatic compressional heating, with maximum temperatures of 4,300 K. Prior measurements of cavitation temperatures in low vapor pressure nonaqueous media gave somewhat higher temperatures of 5,000 K. This work lays permanently to rest exotic mechanisms for cavitational chemistry, at least for cavitation fields.'

  6. Measuring performance of parallel computers. Progress report, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, F.

    1994-07-01

    Performance Measurement - the authors have developed a taxonomy of parallel algorithms based on data motion and example applications have been coded for each class of the taxonomy. Computational benchmark kernels have been extracted for several applications, and detailed measurements have been performed. Algorithms for Massively Parallel SIMD machines - measurement results and computational experiences indicate that top performance will be achieved by `iteration` type algorithms running on massively parallel SIMD machines. Reformulation as iteration may entail unorthodox approaches based on probabilistic methods. The authors have developed such methods for some applications. Here they discuss their approach to performance measurement, describe the taxonomy and measurements which have been made, and report on some general conclusions which can be drawn from the results of the measurements.

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of subsurface water content. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickx, J.M.H.

    1997-01-01

    'During the period from October 1997 to January 1998 the author has further developed the understanding of NMR physics, improved software for forward and inverse modeling of the NMR signal, and conducted field tests on sites in Colorado and New Mexico. One important result from the forward modeling was that the field strength of the signals is concentrated under the loop. This indicates that little lateral dissipation occurs. The author received the NUMIS/NMR system (manufactured by IRIS Instruments, France) in late July, 1997. In July and early August, 1997, potential test sites were visited, and several test sites were selected and permitted. The first NMR test measurements were made in mid-August, 1997. The instrument malfunctioned during mid-September, 1997, and was returned to IRIS for repairs. Time lost due to malfunction, repairs, and shipping was about one month. Many NMR measurements have been made at sites in Colorado and New Mexico. Parks often have been selected as test sites due to ease of permitting, the relatively large open space, and general lack of powerlines. Noise from power lines severely degrades the NMR data quality. The NMR data acquired at the first three sites in Colorado (Bear Creek, Clear Creek, and Prospect) was either severely distorted by powerline noise or did not indicate significant groundwater occurrences. The NMR data taken at Cherry Creek were of good quality and also indicated significant groundwater. The NMR data acquired at three sites with relatively shallow ground water levels around Socorro, New Mexico, did not detect any ground water due to severe signal distortion by magnetite, a magnetic mineral. Measurements in a compact sand stone near Santa Rosa and in a limestone near Artesia, New Mexico, gave excellent results. Overall, the NMR technique proves capable of detecting subsurface ground water under the right conditions: little noise from power lines and absence of magnetite.'

  8. Support services for Ceramic Fiber-Ceramic Matrix Composites. Annual technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, J.P.

    1995-09-20

    Higher working-fluid temperatures are required to boost efficiency, exposing subsystems to more corrosive environments. Issues of special concern to ceramists are corrosion and blinding of hot-gas particulate filters and catastrophic failure of high-temperature ceramic heat exchangers. Fuel and operational factors that affect the corrosion rates of structural ceramics in coal-fired combustor systems are described, with examples of the corrosion of silicon carbide-based materials. Attention is focused on hot-gas particulate filtration and heat exchangers; gasification systems are also discussed. Objective of the report is to help the experimentalist measuring these factors to better design tests.

  9. Research in high energy physics. Annual technical progress report, December 1, 1993--November 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, S.L.; Tata, X.

    1996-11-01

    The high energy physics research program at the University of Hawaii is directed toward the study of the properties of the elementary particles and the application of the results of these studies to the understanding of the physical world. Experiments using high energy accelerators are aimed at searching for new particles, testing current theories, and measuring properties of the known particles. Experiments using cosmic rays address particle physics and astrophysical issues. Theoretical physics research evaluates experimental results in the context of existing theories and projects the experimental consequences of proposed new theories.

  10. Molecular genetics of metal detoxification: Prospects for phytoremediation. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Ow, D.W.

    1997-10-15

    'The authors proposed to characterize a number of fission yeast mutants that are hypersensitivity to cadmium and deficient in the production of metal-peptide complexes. For each of the mutants the authors sought to clone the gene responsible for the mutant phenotype and more importantly to define the gene function. They summarize the progress made thus far for each of the mutants. Mutants that hypoproduce phytochelatins are: (1) DS12--The gene has been cloned, but a full length cDNA remains to be isolated. They believe the longest clone is short at the 5 feet end by less than 100 bp. This gene encodes sulfite reductase and its function is needed for Pb-induced sulfide production, but not Cd-induced sulfide production. Since this enzyme acts upstream of cysteine biosynthesis, the likely reason that this mutant hypoproduces phytochelatins is that it fails to produce sufficient cysteine during Cd stress. (2) JS563--The gene has been cloned and found to encode a sulfide dehydrogenase. In vitro, the authors found that the protein binds FAD, converts S{sup 2-} to S{sup 0} while reducing quinone. The protein is membrane associated and has been localized to the mitochondria. Its likely function is to detoxify sulfide in the mitochondria resulting from cadmium-induced sulfide production. The sulfide electrons are likely used for the electron transport chain. Cells that have a defect in this enzyme cannot oxidize mitochondrial S{sup 2-} resulting in high toxic levels of S{sup 2-} during Cd stress. In addition, the high S{sup 2-} level precipitates Cd{sup 2-} to form CdS, and the lack of free Cd{sup 2+} fails to induce phytochelatin synthase activity to produce phytochelatin peptides. (3) JS282--The genomic clone that restores Cd tolerance to JS282 has been isolated. Surprisingly, this genomic clone when present in a multicopy vector in a wild type background causes hypersensitivity to Cd and selenium. The cDNA corresponding to the genomic clone has been isolated and its

  11. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Annual Technical Progress Report of Ecological Research, June 30, 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Paul M. Bertsch,

    2002-06-30

    The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of The University of Georgia (UGA) and has been conducting ecological research on the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina for 50 years. The overall mission of the Laboratory is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts fundamental and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The Laboratory's research mission during the 2002 fiscal year was fulfilled with the publication of 76 journal articles and book chapters by faculty, technical staff, students, and visiting scientists. An additional 50 journal articles have been submitted or are in press. Other noteworthy events took place as faculty members, staff, and graduate students received awards. These are described in the section titled Special Accomplishments of Faculty, Staff, Students, and Administration on page 51. Notable scientific accomplishments include work conducted on contaminant transport, stable isotopes, sandhills ecology, and phytoremediation: (1) A collaborative study between Dr. Tom Hinton at SREL and scientists at SRTC demonstrated the feasibility of using illite clay to sequester 137Cs in sediments along the P and R reactor cooling canal system, where approximately 3,000 acres of land are contaminated. Overall, the study showed significant decreases in cesium concentrations and bioavailability following the addition of illite with no sign of harm to the ecosystem. While the cesium remains sequestered from the biosphere, its radioactivity decays and the process progresses from contaminant immobilization to remediation. (2) SREL's stable isotope laboratory is now fully functional. Stable isotope distributions in nature can provide important insights into many historical and current environmental processes. Dr. Christopher Romanek is leading SREL's research in this area

  12. Lake Roosevelt White Sturgeon Recovery Project : Annual Progress Report, January 2003 – March 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, Matthew D.; McLellan, Jason G.

    2009-07-15

    This report summarizes catch data collected from white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus in Lake Roosevelt during limited setlining and gill netting activities in the fall of 2003, and documents progress toward development of a U.S. white sturgeon conservation aquaculture program for Lake Roosevelt. From 27-30 October, 42 overnight small mesh gill net sets were made between Marcus and Northport, WA for a total catch of 15 juvenile white sturgeon (275-488 mm FL). All sturgeon captured were of Canadian hatchery origin. These fish had been previously released as sub-yearlings into the Canadian portion (Keenleyside Reach) of the Transboundary Reach of the Columbia River during 2002 and 2003. Most sturgeon (n=14) were caught in the most upstream area sampled (Northport) in low velocity eddy areas. Five fish exhibited pectoral fin deformities (curled or stunted). Growth rates were less than for juvenile sturgeon captured in the Keenleyside Reach but condition factor was similar. Condition factor was also similar to that observed in juvenile sturgeon (ages 1-8) captured in the unimpounded Columbia River below Bonneville Dam between 1987-92. From 10-14 November, 28 overnight setline sets were made in the Roosevelt Reach between the confluence of the Spokane River and Marcus Island for a total catch of 17 white sturgeon (94-213 cm FL). Catch was greatest in the most upstream areas sampled, a distribution similar to that observed during a WDFW setline survey in Lake Roosevelt in 1998. The mean W{sub r} index of 110% for fish captured this year was higher than the mean W{sub r} of 91% for fish captured in 1998. Excellent fish condition hindered surgical examination of gonads as lipid deposits made the ventral body wall very thick and difficult to penetrate with available otoscope specula. Acoustic tags (Vemco model V16 coded pingers, 69 kHz, 48-month life expectancy) were internally applied to 15 fish for subsequent telemetry investigations of seasonal and reproductively

  13. Idaho Habitat/Natural Production Monitoring, Pt. I: General Monitoring Subproject : Annual Progress Report 1990.

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, Bruce A.; Scully, Richard J.; Petrosky, Charles Edward

    1992-01-01

    The Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) has been monitoring and evaluating proposed and existing habitat improvement projects for rainbow-steelhead trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, hereafter called steelhead, and chinook salmon O. tshawytscha, hereafter called chinook, in the Clearwater and Salmon River drainages for the past seven years. Projects included in the evaluation are funded by, or proposed for funding by, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Northwest Power Planning Act as off-site mitigation for downstream hydropower development on the Snake and Columbia rivers. This evaluation project is also funded under the same authority (Fish and Wildlife Program, Northwest Power Planning Council). A mitigation record is being developed using increased carrying capacity and/or survival as the best measure of benefit from a habitat enhancement project. Determination of full benefit from a project depends on completion or maturation of the project and presence of adequate numbers of fish to document actual increases in fish production. The depressed status of upriver anadromous stocks has precluded measuring full benefits of any habitat project in Idaho. Partial benefit is credited to the mitigation record in the interim period of run restoration.

  14. D-T neutron generator development for cancer therapy. 1980 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, F.M.; Walko, R.J.; Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Cowgill, D.F.; Riedel, A.A.; O'Hagan, J.B.

    1980-05-01

    This report summarizes the work completed during the first year of a two-year grant by NCI/HEW to investigate the feasibility of developing a D-T neutron generator for use in cancer therapy. Experiments have continued on the Target Test Facility (TTF) developed during a previous grant to investigate high-temperature metal hydrides for use as target materials. The high voltage reliability of the TTF has been improved so that 200 kV, 200 mA operation is now routine. In recent target tests, the D-D neutron production rate was measured to be > 1 x 10/sup 11//s, a rate that corresponds to a D-T neutron production rate of > 1 x 10/sup 13//s - the desired rate for use in cancer therapy. Deuterium concentration depth profiles in the target, measured during intense ion beam bombardment, show that deuterium is depleted near the surface of the target due to impurities implanted by the ion beam. Recent modifications of the duopigatron ion source to reduce secondary electron damage to the electrodes also improved the ion source efficiency by about 40%. An ultra high vacuum version of the TTF is now being constructed to determine if improved vacuum conditions will reduce ion source impurities to a sufficiently low level that the deuterium near the surface of the target is not depleted. Testing will begin in June 1980.

  15. Long-term risk from actinides in the environment: Modes of mobility. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Breshears, D.D.; Whicker, J.J.; Ibrahim, S.A.; Whicker, F.W.; Hakonson, T.E.

    1998-06-01

    'The mobility of actinides in surface soils is a key issue of concern at several DOE facilities in arid and semiarid environments, including Rocky Flats, Hanford, Nevada Test Site, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Key sources of uncertainty in assessing Pu mobility are the magnitudes of mobility resulting from three modes of transport: (1) wind erosion, (2) water erosion, and (3) vertical migration. Each of these three processes depend on numerous environmental factors and they compete with one another, particularly for actinides in very shallow soils ({approximately} 1 mm). The overall goal of the study is to quantify the mobility of soil actinides from all three modes. The authors study is using field measurements, laboratory experiments, and ecological modeling to address these three processes at three DOE facilities where actinide kinetics are of concern: WIPP, Rocky Flats, and Hanford. Wind erosion is being measured with suite of monitoring equipment, water erosion is being studied with rainfall simulation experiments, vertical migration is being studied in controlled laboratory experiments, and the three processes are being integrated using ecological modeling. Estimates for clean up of soil actinides for the extensive tracts of DOE land range to hundreds of billion $ in the US. Without studies of these processes, unnecessary clean-up of these areas may waste billions of dollars and cause irreparable ecological damage through the soil removal. Further, the outcomes of litigation against DOE are dependent on quantifying the mobility of actinides in surface soils.'

  16. Long-term risk from actinides in the environment: Modes of mobility. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Breshears, D.D.; Whicker, J.J.; Ibrahim, S.A.; Whicker, F.W.; Hakonson, T.E.; Kirchner, T.

    1998-06-01

    'The mobility of actinides in surface soils is a key issue of concern at several DOE facilities in arid and semiarid environments, including Rocky Flats, Hanford, Nevada Test Site, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Key sources of uncertainty in assessing Pu mobility are the magnitudes of mobility resulting from three modes of transport: (1) wind erosion, (2) water erosion, and (3) vertical migration. Each of these three processes depend on numerous environmental factors and they compete with one another, particularly for actinides in very shallow soils ({approximately} 1 \\265m). The overall goal of the study is to quantify the mobility of soil actinides from all three modes. The authors study is using field measurements, laboratory experiments, and ecological modeling to address these three processes at three DOE facilities where actinide kinetics are of concern: WIPP, Rocky Flats, and Hanford. Wind erosion is being measured with suite of monitoring equipment, water erosion is being studied with rainfall simulation experiments, vertical migration is being studied in controlled laboratory experiments, and the three processes are being integrated using ecological modeling. Estimates for clean up of soil actinides for the extensive tracts of DOE land range to hundreds of billion $ in the US Without studies of these processes, unnecessary clean-up of these areas may waste billions of dollars and cause irreparable ecological damage through the soil removal. Further, the outcomes of litigation against DOE are dependent on quantifying the mobility of actinides in surface soils. This report provides a summary of work for the first year of a 3-year project; subcontracts to collaborating institutions (Colorado State University and New Mexico State University) were not in place until late December 1997, and hence this report focuses on the results of the 5 months from January through May 1998

  17. Aquifer transport of Th, U, Ra, and Rn in solution and colloids. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserburg, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    'Preparations have been made to collect groundwater samples from the unconfined Pleistocene aquifer on Long Island, N.Y. from wells at Brookhaven National Lab.. Dr. Jan Naidu of the Brookhaven Safety and Environmental Protection Division has been intimately involved with the groundwater monitoring program at the site for many years, and has provided us with detailed information regarding site hydrogeology, groundwater chemistry, and monitor well locations and construction. In consultation with Dr. Naidu, a series of wells have been chosen for sampling that extend over a distance of {approximately}5000 feet along a single flow path, with estimated water ages of up to {approximately}20 years. Since the recharge area for these waters has been the source of low levels of tritium (and possibly {sup 90}Sr) contamination, there has been considerable interest in the hydrogeology and chemistry of the area, and all information gathered at the site will be provided to BNL staff. Groundwater sampling is planned for the autumn of 1997. At this time, aquifer materials will also be obtained from the drill core repository of the USGS office in Long Island, where Mr. Henry Ku has indicated that material will be available for the use. As a complement to the studies of U and Th series nuclides, the sampling plan is being extended to include analysis of He isotopes. Concentrations of {sup 4}He are expected to largely reflect the time-integrated recoil production by decay of the U and Th series nuclides, without losses due to adsorption or decay, and will be compared to {sup 222}Rn concentrations, which provide recoil rates over short time periods. The concentrations of {sup 3}He due to decay of contaminant {sup 3}H in these waters will also be measured, and a comparison between the measured concentrations and that produced in the waters since the time of recharge will provide an indication of whether gas losses have occurred. Arrangements have been made to collaborate in this phase of

  18. Development of Rations for the Enhanced Survival of Salmon, 1981-1990 Progress (Annual) Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Richard D.

    1990-12-01

    The nutritional quality of feed plays an important role in determining the health and ``fitness`` of smolts. Commercial fish meal, the major source of protein in salmon rations, may be reduced in quality from poor drying techniques during manufacture. Dietary stress in the hatchery may result. This investigation tests the hypothesis that protein quality of fish rations can influence the survival of smolts and the ultimate return of adults. The test involves a comparison between performances of coho (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) reared on rations containing very high quality protein derived from vacuum dried meals and those of fish reared on commercial rations, with commercial fish meal as a source of protein. Survival and return of several brood years of test and control fish are used to measure the influence of ration on survival. This report includes recovery data from these marked fish collected 1982 through September 1990.

  19. Photovoltaic Cz silicon module improvements. Annual technical progress report, November 9, 1995--November 8, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    King, R.R.; Mitchell, K.W.; Jester, T.L.

    1998-02-01

    Work focused on reducing the cost per watt of Cz silicon photovoltaic modules under Phase I of Siemens Solar Industries` DOE/NREL PVMaT 4A subcontract is described. Module cost components are analyzed and solutions to high-cost items are discussed in terms of specific module designs. The approaches of using larger cells and modulus to reduce per-part processing cost, and of minimizing yield loss are particularly leveraging. Yield components for various parts of the fabrication process and various types of defects are shown, and measurements of the force required to break wafers throughout the cell fabrication sequence are given. The most significant type of yield loss is mechanical breakage. The implementation of statistical process control on key manufacturing processes at Siemens Solar Industries is described. Module configurations prototyped during Phase I of this project and scheduled to begin production in Phase II have a projected cost per watt reduction of 19%.

  20. Development of gas chromatographic system for dissolved organic carbon analysis in seawater. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Chipman, D.W.; Takahashi, T.

    1992-12-01

    During the first six months of this two-year grant, we have completed the construction of the analytical portion of a prototype gas chromatograph-based system for the analysis of dissolved organic carbon in seawater. We also have begun testing the procedures to be used to cryogenically concentrate and transfer carbon dioxide from the oxidizing atmosphere of the high-temperature furnace into the reducing hydrogen carrier gas of the gas chromatograph. During the second half of the first year, we will construct the high-temperature catalytic oxidation furnace and test the entire system on laboratory-prepared aqueous solutions of various organic compounds. Also during this period, we will take part in an initial scoping study within the Cape Hatteras field area on board the R/V Gyre. This study will involve both the collection of samples of seawater for organic and inorganic carbon analysis and the measurement of surface-water pCO{sub 2}.

  1. Fiber optic chemical sensors for characterizing the carbon cycle in ocean margin regions. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    DeGrandpre, M.D.; Sayles, F.L.

    1993-04-13

    The overall objective of our DOE-Ocean Margins Programs grant is to develop a pCO{sub 2} sensor for long-term monitoring of pCO{sub 2} in the ocean margins and to establish a proving ground for the development of other chemical sensors for characterizing the carbon cycle in these regions. We have succeeded in keeping with the approximate timeline outlined in the original proposal, which, for year 1 included the following objectives: Continue sensor optimization, test response characteristics (reagent and sample flow rates, temperature), introduce position sensitive photodiode and photodiode array spectrophotometers and evaluate, develop reliable and reproducible fabrication techniques, develop sensor based on preliminary studies optimized for field measurements (minimize size and power requirements), test long-term stability of the sensor in the laboratory, determine susceptibility to fouling and corrosion. This work is summarized below along with a brief review of the sensor`s operating principle.

  2. Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan, 1990-2003 Progress (Annual) Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks; Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

    1993-03-10

    In this document the authors present mitigation implementation activities to protect and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. This plan only addresses non-operational actions (mitigation measures that do not affect dam operation) described in the 'Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam' (Mitigation Plan) submitted to the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) in March 1991 and in accordance with subsequent Council action on that Mitigation Plan. Operational mitigation was deferred for consideration under the Columbia Basin System Operation Review (SOR) process. This document represents an implementation plan considered and conditionally approved by the Council in March of 1993.

  3. Partitioning tracers for in-situ detection and quantification of dense nonaqueous. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Brusseau, M.L.

    1997-11-10

    'The overall goal of the proposed project is to explore the use of partitioning tracers to characterize dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) in subsurface systems. Bulk-phase partitioning tracers will be investigated to detect and determine DNAPL saturation, while interface partitioning tracers will be investigated to measure the area of the DNAPL-water interface. The specific objectives that will be addressed to accomplish this goal are: (1) investigate the use of partitioning tracers to detect and determine both the saturation and interfacial area of DNAPLs in saturated porous media; (2) investigate the effect of rate-limited mass transfer on the transport behavior of partitioning tracers; (3) investigate the effect of porous-media heterogeneity on the transport behavior of partitioning tracers; and (4) develop and evaluate mathematical models capable of simulating the transport of partitioning tracers in complex systems.'

  4. Determining significant endpoints for ecological risk analyses. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, T.G.; Congdon, J.; Scott, D.; Rowe, C.; Bedford, J.; Whicker, W.

    1998-06-01

    'The goal of this report is to establish a protocol for assessing risks to non-human populations exposed to environmental stresses typically found on many DOE sites. The authors think that they can achieve this by using novel biological dosimeters in controlled, manipulative dose/effects experiments, and by coupling changes in metabolic rates and energy allocation patterns to meaningful population response variables (such as age-specific survivorship, reproductive output, age at maturity and longevity). This research is needed to determine the relevancy of sublethal cellular damage to the performance of individuals and populations exposed to chronic, low-level radiation, and radiation with concomitant exposure to chemicals. They believe that a scientifically defensible endpoint for measuring ecological risks can only be determined once its understood the extent to which molecular damage from contaminant exposure is detrimental at the individual and population levels of biological organization. The experimental facility will allow them to develop a credible assessment tool for appraising ecological risks, and to evaluate the effects of radionuclide/chemical synergisms on non-human species. This report summarizes work completed midway of a 3-year project that began in November 1996. Emphasis to date has centered on three areas: (1) developing a molecular probe to measure stable chromosomal aberrations known as reciprocal translocations, (2) constructing an irradiation facility where the statistical power inherent in replicated mesocosms can be used to address the response of non-human organisms to exposures from low levels of radiation and metal contaminants, and (3) quantifying responses of organisms living in contaminated mesocosms and field sites.'

  5. Progress on a Rayleigh Scattering Mass Flux Measurement Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke-Fagan, Amy F.; Clem, Michelle M.; Elam, Kristie A.; Hirt, Stefanie M.

    2010-01-01

    A Rayleigh scattering diagnostic has been developed to provide mass flux measurements in wind tunnel flows. Spectroscopic molecular Rayleigh scattering is an established flow diagnostic tool that has the ability to provide simultaneous density and velocity measurements in gaseous flows. Rayleigh scattered light from a focused 10 Watt continuous-wave laser beam is collected and fiber-optically transmitted to a solid Fabry-Perot etalon for spectral analysis. The circular interference pattern that contains the spectral information that is needed to determine the flow properties is imaged onto a CCD detector. Baseline measurements of density and velocity in the test section of the 15 cm x 15 cm Supersonic Wind Tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center are presented as well as velocity measurements within a supersonic combustion ramjet engine isolator model installed in the tunnel test section.

  6. Measuring the Quality of Life: Are We Making Progress?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, David C.; Long, Cathryn J.

    1976-01-01

    Perspective on the term, "quality of life," is developed through reading and photographic selections, and ways of measuring life quality are suggested. Statistical tables offer comparative national and global data on indicators including population, literacy, nutrition, government expenditures. (AV)

  7. Progress in Measurement of Carbon Dioxide Using a Broadband Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, William S.

    2010-01-01

    In order to better understand the budget of carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere it is necessary to develop a global high precision understanding of the carbon dioxide column. In order to uncover the 'missing sink" that is responsible for the large discrepancies in the budget as we presently understand it calculation has indicated that measurement accuracy on the order of 1 ppm is necessary. Because typical column average CO2 has now reached 380 ppm this represents a precision on the order of .25% for these column measurements. No species has ever been measured from space at such a precision. In recognition of the importance of understanding the CO2 budget in order to evaluate its impact on global warming the National Research Council in its decadal survey report to NASA recommended planning for a laser based total CO2 mapping mission in the near future. The extreme measurement accuracy requirements on this mission places very strong requirements on the laser system used for the measurement. This work presents an overview of the characteristics necessary in a laser system used to make this measurement. Consideration is given to the temperature dependence, pressure broadening, and pressure shift of the CO2 lines themselves and how these impact the laser system characteristics We have been examining the possibility of making precise measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxide using broad band source of radiation. This means that many of the difficulties in wavelength control can be treated in the detector portion of the system rather than the laser source. It also greatly reduces the number of individual lasers required to make a measurement. Simplifications such as these are extremely desirable for systems designed to operate from space.

  8. Acoustic probe for solid-gas-liquid suspensions. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Tavlarides, L.L.; Sangani, A.S.

    1997-01-01

    'Acoustic probes have shown promise to be quite effective in determining the solid content in solid-liquid suspensions. However, the presence of small amounts of gas in the waste slurries stored in tanks across the DOE complex prevents straightforward application for characterization of these slurries. The proposed research will develop an acoustic probe for monitoring particle size and volume fraction in slurries in the absence and the presence of gas bubbles. Theoretical Analysis Accomplished: Attenuation of sound waves depends on the size distribution of the solids and the volume fraction of solids. These can in principle be calculated from attenuation measured over a range of frequencies. However, small amounts of bubbles distort the measured attenuation. A typical result from theoretical analysis for the attenuation of solid- gas-liquid systems is given in Figure 1. The total attenuation of a sound wave v(o) equals the sum of contributions by a large number of ''bins'' of particle sizes. This notion yields the following equation for the (hitherto) unknown number density of solid particles as a function of particle radius N(a): j k(o,a)N(a)da = v(o), where the kernel k(o,a) is obtained from analysis. If N(a) is given, the above equation is used to calculate the attenuation v(o). This is referred to as solving the ''forward problem''. Solving for N(a) with v(o) given is the ''inverse problem''. A complication that one faces when trying to solve the inverse problem is that the stated problem is mathematically ill-posed, i.e., small fluctuations in v(o) cause large fluctuations in the result for the number density. Therefore the problem needs to be ''regularized'', i.e., the stated problem needs to be changed slightly such as to make it well-posed. This has been done by others for gas-liquid systems in the past. This approach is currently being applied in the present project to solid-liquid systems. As is shown in Figure 2, it successfully recovers the number

  9. Fundamental chemistry and thermodynamics of hydrothermal oxidation processes. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Simonson, J.M.; Mesmer, R.E.; Blencoe, J.G.; Cummings, P.T.; Chialvo, A.A.

    1997-09-01

    'The objective of this research program is to provide fundamental scientific information on the physical and chemical properties of solutes in aqueous solutions at high temperatures needed to assess and improve the applicability of hydrothermal oxidation (HTO) to the remediation of US Department of Energy (DOE) hazardous and mixed wastes. Investigators in two divisions at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Chemical and Analytical Sciences, and Chemical Technology) and at the University of Tennessee are focused on the solubility and speciation of actinides and surrogates in model HTO process streams at high temperatures, on the experimental and theoretical development of equations of state for aqueous mixtures containing noncondensible gases under HTO process conditions ranging above the critical temperature of water, and on achieving a predictive level of understanding of the chemical and physical properties of HTO process streams through molecular-level simulations of aqueous solutions at high temperatures. Specific tasks in these three efforts over the past year include measurements of solubility and identification of stable solid phases for UO{sub 3} in aqueous carbonate solutions at temperatures above 100 C, measurements of fluid-phase coexistence boundaries and densities of mixtures in (H{sub 2}O + N{sub 2} + CO{sub 2}) mixtures at high temperatures and pressures, and molecular dynamics simulations of water and aqueous solutions addressing the speciation of simple ionic solutes and the structure of water and aqueous solutions as functions of temperature and density. Research in this project has been divided into individual tasks, each addressing a particular scientific question and each contributing to a unified understanding of HTO processing problems related to the treatment of DOE hazardous and mixed wastes. The three primary tasks are (1) the determination of solubilities of inorganic compounds including actinides and surrogates to determine their likely fate

  10. Evaluation of Lower Umatilla River Channel Modifications Below Three Mile Dam, 1984 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Nigro, Anthony A.; Ward, David L.

    1985-05-01

    This report summarizes results of the first year of a study initiated in September 1984 to evaluate the adequacy of channel modifications made in the lower Umatilla River to improve adult anadromous salmonid passage to Three Mile Dam (RKm 5.6), determine if fish passage or delay problems exist at Three Mile Dam and recommend site specific corrective measures if needed. Movements of steelhead (Salmo gairdneri) were monitored using mark and recapture and radio telemetry techniques. Thirty-four steelhead were marked with T-anchor tags and released in the lower river. Fifteen of those marked were also fitted with radio transmitters. Three radiotagged steelhead migrated through channel modifications to Three Mile Dam. Two of these fish migrated to the dam in less than 26 hours, but held just below the dam for 7 and 10 days before entering the ladders. The third steelhead delayed for 30 days and entered the west ladder within 24 hours of arrival at the dam. Two other radiotagged steelhead moved upstream through some of the channel modifications but did not migrate to the dam. Only one of 19 marked steelhead not fitted with transmitters was recovered at Three Mile Dam. 14 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Particle deposition in human and canine tracheobronchial casts. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.S.

    1991-11-15

    The aim of this work is to measure deposition patterns and efficiencies of aerosol particles within realistic, single-pathway physical models of the tracheobronchial airways of humans and experimental animals over a range of particle sizes for a variety of respiratory modes and rates. This will provide data needed to assess the dose to the bronchial epithelium from inhaled radon progeny. In prior grant years an empirical expression for diffusional deposition efficiency of particles in the upper airways was obtained based on experimental data collected in central airway casts. The work also provided new quantitative data of airflow distribution in a realistic central airway cast for two species for both steady and pulsatile inspiratory flow and for expiratory flow. Theoretical studies were then extended based on a developing flow model. We concluded that although the developing flow model is a better predictor of the data than assumption of parabolic flow, the predicted deposition is significantly lower than that predicted by our best fit equation. In the current year the experimental results were evaluated in terms of the parametric solution of the convective diffusion equation.

  12. Development of Rations for the Enhanced Survival of Salmon, 1987-1988 Progress (Annual) Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Richard D.

    1988-12-01

    The nutritional quality of feed plays an important role in determining the health and fitness of smolts. Commercial fish meal, the major source of protein in salmon rations, may be reduced in quality from poor drying techniques during manufacture. Dietary stress in the hatchery may result. This investigation tests the hypothesis that protein quality of fish rations can influence the survival of smolts and the ultimate return of adults. The test involves a comparison between performances of coho and chinook salmon reared on rations containing very high quality protein derived from vacuum dried meals and those of fish reared on commercial rations, with commercial fish meal as a source of protein. Survival and return of several brood years of test and control fish are used to measure the influence of ration on survival. Rearing and release of tagged fish to date include 1982, 1983, 1984 and 1985 broods of coho salmon; the 1983 and 1984 broods of fall chinook (tule stock) salmon; and the 1985 and 1986 broods of fall chinook (upriver bright stock) salmon. This report includes recovery data from these marked fish collected through September 1988.

  13. Elevated-temperature fracture toughness and fatigue testing of steels for geothermal applications. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Cutler, R.A.; Goodman, E.C.; Guest, R.V.; Hendrickson, R.R.; Leslie, W.C.

    1980-11-01

    Conventional drill bit steels exhibit increased wear and decreased toughness when run at elevated temperatures in geothermal wells. Bits are therefore run at lower speeds and lighter loads, resulting in lower penetration rates for geothermal wells than for conventional rock drilling. Carpenter EX-00053, Timken CBS 600, Timken CBS 1000M and Vasco X-2M, steels with improved hot hardness (improved wear resistance), were tested in conjunction with the steels used for cones (AISI 4820 and 9315) and lugs (AISI 8620 and 9315) in conventional roller cone rock bits. Shortrod fracture toughness measurements were made on each of these steels between room temperature and 400/sup 0/C. Fatigue crack resistance was determined at 300/sup 0/C for high-temperature steels and at room temperature for conventional steels. Scanning electron microscopy analyses of the fractured short-rod specimens were correlated with observed crack behavior from the test records. Test results are discussed, recommendations made for further testing and preliminary steel selections made for improved geothermal bits.

  14. Physics of DNAPL migration and remediation in the presence of heterogeneities. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, S.; Glass, R.

    1997-01-01

    'The authors are in the process of conducting well-controlled laboratory experiments to better understand the physics of DNAPL migration and remediation in the presence of heterogeneities. These experiments are being used to develop and test an upscaled percolation model, a new approach for modeling DNAPL migration. In addition, numerical simulators under current use in evaluating remediation techniques will be compared against the remediation experiments. They are making use of their unique experimental capabilities in the Subsurface Flow and Transport Processes Laboratory at Sandia to conduct controlled, systematic, repeatable experiments that first consider the physics of DNAPL migration in initially water-saturated, heterogeneous porous media and then evaluate the efficacy of a suite of promising remediation techniques for remediating DNAPLs from heterogeneous aquifers. The results of the migration experiments are being used to test and continue development of new modeling approaches based on upscaled percolation theory developed by us. The remediation experiments include visual and quantitative measures of each remediation technique''s performance. The results of the remediation experiments will be used to test, for the first time, within heterogeneous media, the quantitative performance of remediation design codes (two-phase flow codes that incorporate compositional models).'

  15. Experimental studies of pion-nucleus interactions at intermediate energies. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    This report summarizes the work on experimental research in intermediate energy nuclear physics carried out at New Mexico State University in 1991 under a great from the US Department of Energy. Most of these studies have involved investigations of various pion-nucleus interactions. The work has been carried out both with the LAMPF accelerator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and with the cyclotron at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) near Zurich, Switzerland. Part of the experimental work involves measurements of new data on double-charge-exchange scattering, using facilities at LAMPF which we helped modify, and on pion absorption, using a new detector system at PSI that covers nearly the full solid-angle region which we helped construct. Other work involved preparation for future experiments using polarized nuclear targets and a new high-resolution spectrometer system for detecting {pi}{sup 0} mesons. We also presented several proposals for works to be done in future years, involving studies related to pi-mesonic atoms, fundamental pion-nucleon interactions, studies of the difference between charged and neutral pion interactions with the nucleon, studies of the isospin structure of pion-nucleus interactions, and pion scattering from polarized {sup 3}He targets. This work is aimed at improving our understanding of the pion-nucleon interaction, of the pion-nucleus interaction mechanism, and of nuclear structure.

  16. Idaho Habitat/Natural Production Monitoring, Part II: Intensive Monitoring Subproject : Annual Progress Report 1990.

    SciTech Connect

    Kiefer, Russell B.; Forster, Katharine A.

    1992-04-01

    Project 83-7 was established under the Northeast Power Planning Council's 1982 Fish and Wildlife Program, Measure 704 (d) (1) to monitor natural production of anadromous fish, evaluate Bonneville Power Administration habitat improvement project, and develop a credit record for off-site mitigation projects in Idaho. Project 83-7 is divided into two sub-projects: general and intensive monitoring. Results of the intensive monitoring sub-project are reported here. Results from the general monitoring sub-project will be reported in a separate document. The purpose of this intensive monitoring project is to determine the number of returning chinook and steelhead adults necessary to achieve optimal smolt production, and develop mitigation accounting based on increases in smolt production. Two locations are being intensively studied to meet these objectives. Information from this research will be applied to parr monitoring streams statewide to develop escapement objectives and determine success of habitat enhancement projects. Field work began in 1987 in upper Salmon River and Crooked River (South Fork Clearwater River tributary). Methods include using weirs to trap adults, conducting ground and aerial redd counts, snorkeling to estimate parr populations, PIT-tagging juveniles to determine parr-tosmolt survival, trapping fall and spring downstream emigrants with scoop traps, and outplanting adults to determine juvenile carrying capacity. PIT tags also provide a wide range of other information such as migration timing, effects of flow and passage conditions on smolt survival, other factors affecting smolt survival, and growth.

  17. Toroidal pinch experiments. Annual progress report, November 24, 1992--November 23, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, S.

    1994-01-24

    The effect of boundary conditions on plasma confinement in the reversed field pinch (RFP) was studied. Early theoretical studies of the magnetohydrodynamic stability of the reversed field pinch had shown that the pinch was unstable unless it was surrounded by a conducting shell which prevented the penetration of the magnetic field during the lifetime of the pinch. The presence of the sheer, however, complicated construction and prevented control of the plasma equilibrium by feedback systems. This research project was undertaken to determine the effect on confinement of varying the magnetic penetration time of the shell. A reversed field pinch, the Reversatron, was constructed so that shells of varying thickness could be installed. Shells were made with magnetic penetration times both longer and shorter than the duration of the plasma discharge. These shells allowed the performance to be determined as a function of the magnetic penetration time of the shell. This research showed that a shell with a short penetration time degraded the discharges. Diagnostic measurements showed reductions in plasma current, discharge duration, and the Doppler temperature of impurity ions and showed increases in the plasma resistivity and loop voltage. The greater power input and lower temperature implied a reduced energy confinement time. Magnetic diagnostics showed that two classes of MHD instabilities with poloidal mode number m = 1 were responsible for the degraded confinement. These were the dynamo modes resonant on the magentic axis (with toroidal mode numbers -9, -10, -11, -12) and the external kink modes (with toroidal mode numbers 3, 4, 5, and 6).

  18. Development of Rations for the Enhanced Survival of Salmon, 1988-1989 Progress (Annual) Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Richard D.

    1990-03-01

    The nutritional quality of feed plays an important role in determining the health and fitness'' of smolts. Commercial fish meal, the major source of protein in salmon rations, may be reduced in quality from poor drying techniques during manufacture. Dietary stress in the hatchery may result. This investigation test the hypothesis that protein quality of fish rations can influence the survival of smolts and the ultimate return of adults. The test involves a comparison between performances of coho (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) reared on rations containing very high quality protein derived from vacuum dried meals and those of fish reared on commercial rations, with commercial fish meal as a source of protein. Survival and return of several brood years of test and control fish are used to measure the influence of ration on survival. Rearing and release of tagged fish to date include 1982, 1983, 1984 and 1985 broods of coho salmon (Sandy stock); the 1983 and 1984 broods of fall chinook (tule stock) salmon; and the 1985 and 1986 broods of fall chinook (upriver bright stock) salmon. This report includes recovery data from these marked fish collected through September 1989. 2 tabs.

  19. Solvent refined coal (SRC) process. Annual technical progress report, January 1979-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    A set of statistically designed experiments was used to study the effects of several important operating variables on coal liquefaction product yield structures. These studies used a Continuous Stirred-Tank Reactor to provide a hydrodynamically well-defined system from which kinetic data could be extracted. An analysis of the data shows that product yield structures can be adequately represented by a correlative model. It was shown that second-order effects (interaction and squared terms) are necessary to provide a good model fit of the data throughout the range studied. Three reports were issued covering the SRC-II database and yields as functions of operating variables. The results agree well with the generally-held concepts of the SRC reaction process, i.e., liquid phase hydrogenolysis of liquid coal which is time-dependent, thermally activated, catalyzed by recycle ash, and reaction rate-controlled. Four reports were issued summarizing the comprehensive SRC reactor thermal response models and reporting the results of several studies made with the models. Analytical equipment for measuring SRC off-gas composition and simulated distillation of coal liquids and appropriate procedures have been established.

  20. NREL Solar Radiation Resource Assessment Project: Status and outlook. FY 1991 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Renne, D.; Riordan, C.; Maxwell, E.; Stoffel, T.; Marion, B.; Rymes, M.; Wilcox, S.; Myers, D.

    1992-05-01

    This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of NREL`s Solar Radiation Resource Assessment Project during fiscal year 1991. Currently, the primary focus of the SRRAP is to produce a 1961--1990 National Solar Radiation Data Base, providing hourly values of global horizontal, diffuse, and direct normal solar radiation at approximately 250 sites around the United States. Because these solar radiation quantities have been measured intermittently at only about 50 of these sites, models were developed and applied to the majority of the stations to provide estimates of these parameters. Although approximately 93% of the data base consists of modeled data this represents a significant improvement over the SOLMET/ERSATZ 1952--1975 data base. The magnitude and importance of this activity are such that the majority of SRRAP human and financial in many other activities, which are reported here. These include the continued maintenance of a solar radiation monitoring network in the southeast United States at six Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU`s), the transfer of solar radiation resource assessment technology through a variety of activities, participation in international programs, and the maintenance and operation of NREL`s Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. 17 refs.

  1. US Army Medical Materiel development activity, 1987 annual report. Progress report, 1 January-31 December 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, C.E.

    1988-05-06

    Information relating to accomplishments in military medicine in three areas is presented. The Project Management Support Division (PMSD) provides centralized administrative, financial management, contracting, and logistical support to the Project Managers and staff. The Biological Systems Project Management Division manages the development and acquisition of biological products to prevent casualties or loss of soldier effectiveness due to disease. These diseases may be naturally acquired (close contact, unsanitary conditions, contaminated environment, biting insects), or delivered deliberately (aerosols). Product Officers exploit domestic and foreign medical technology to remedy deficiencies identified by the Combat Developer and monitor research projects for their application to disease protective measures. The Pharmaceutical Systems Project Management Division centrally manages the development and the initial production of pharmaceutical products (antidotes and drugs), related drug delivery systems (autoinjectors and transdermal patches), and decontamination products. These products are fielded as preventive, protective, and therapeutic modalities for use against chemical and biological warfare threats, certain endemic diseases, and the treatment of combat casualties. The Applied Medical Systems Project Management Division is a multidisciplinary team with broad mission responsibilities to centrally manage the development and initial production of applied medical products, related diagnostic equipment, optical corrective devices for protective masks, and pesticide delivery systems.

  2. Progress in Infrared Pyrometry Measurements of Shocked Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Cazamias, J U; Hare, D E; Poulsen, P

    2001-11-05

    Temperature measurement is one of the grand challenges still facing experimental shock physics. A shock experiment fundamentally measures E({sigma}{sub x}, {var_epsilon}{sub 11}) which is an incomplete equation of state since temperature (or entropy) remains unspecified. Ideally, one would like to experimentally determine a free energy F(T, {var_epsilon}{sub ij}) from which all other thermo-mechanical properties might be derived. In practice, temperature measurement would allow direct comparison with theory/simulation since T and {var_epsilon}{sub 11} are in most theories the underlying variables. Temperature is a sensitive measure of energy partitioning, knowledge of which would increase our understanding phase boundaries and thermally activated processes (such as chemical reactivity (including dissociation and ionization)). Temperature measurement would also allow a thermodynamically consistent coupling of hydrodynamic equations of state to the material's constitutive (deformation) behavior. The measurement of the temperature of a material that has undergone severe strains at small time-scales is extremely difficult, and we are developing a method using infrared reflectance and pyrometry. The emitted power from a warm surface is measured over a range of wavelengths using a multi-channel IR detector with a response time of {approx}0.1 {micro}s. Each channel of the detector passes the radiation from a selected wavelength interval into a detector. Pyrometers typically have anywhere from three to six channels, and not all channels may have enough signal to contribute to the measurement under any given condition. The difficulty in the measurement lies in relating the radiance (power per unit area per solid angle) in each channel to the temperature of the surface since the radiance is determined not only by the temperature, but also by the emissivity of the surface. The emissivity is not a constant for any real surface, but varies both with angle of observation and

  3. Measuring progress of the global sea level observing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodworth, Philip L.; Aarup, Thorkild; Merrifield, Mark; Mitchum, Gary T.; Le Provost, Christian

    Sea level is such a fundamental parameter in the sciences of oceanography geophysics, and climate change, that in the mid-1980s, the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) established the Global Sea Level Observing System (GLOSS). GLOSS was to improve the quantity and quality of data provided to the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL), and thereby, data for input to studies of long-term sea level change by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). It would also provide the key data needed for international programs, such as the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) and later, the Climate Variability and Predictability Programme (CLIVAR).GLOSS is now one of the main observation components of the Joint Technical Commission for Oceanography and Marine Meteorology (JCOMM) of IOC and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). Progress and deficiencies in GLOSS were presented in July to the 22nd IOC Assembly at UNESCO in Paris and are contained in the GLOSS Assessment Report (GAR) [IOC, 2003a].

  4. Studies of particle interactions in bubble chamber, spark chambers and counter experiments. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Holloway, L.E.; O'Halloran, T.A. Jr.; Simmons, R.O.

    1983-07-01

    During the past six years we have carried out and planned experiments which predominantly studied the production and decay of particles containing charmed quarks. A series of photoproduction and neutron production experiments started with the very early observation of the production of J/psi by neutrons and by photons at Fermilab. From subsequent experiments using these neutral beams and the basic detecting system, we have reported results on the photoproduction of the ..lambda../sub c/ charmed baryon and the D and D* charmed mesons. More recent runs are studying the high energy photoproduction of vector mesons including the psi'. The present experiment in this sequence is using neutrons to produce a large number of D mesons. Another series of experiments at Fermilab set out to study the hadronic production of charmed mesons. The Chicago Cyclotron facility was modified with a detector sensitive to various possible production mechanisms. The experiments were a success; clean signals of D mesons were observed to be produced by pions, and also the production of chi/sub c/ with the subsequent decay via a ..gamma..-ray to psi was observed. The charmonium experiments run this year have better photon resolution for measuring the decays of chi/sub c/ to psi. We are part of a collaboration which is working on the Collider Detector Facility for Fermilab. The CDF at Fermilab is a possible source of (weak) intermediate vector bosons from the collisions of protons and anti-protons. Our responsibilities in the CDF include both the construction of the muon detector and the designing, planning, and testing of the FASTBUS electronics. The second part of our weak interaction program is the Neutrino Oscillation experiment which is now under construction at Brookhaven.

  5. Federal Facility Agreement Annual Progress Report for Fiscal Year 1999 Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations (DOE-ORO) EM Program adopted a watershed approach for performing Remedial Investigations (RIs) and characterizations for ORR because it is an effective system for determining the best methods for protecting and restoring aquatic ecosystems and protecting human health. The basic concept is that water quality and ecosystem problems are best solved at the watershed level rather than at the individual water-body or discharger level. The watershed approach requires consideration of all environmental concerns, including needs to protect public health, critical habitats such as wetlands, biological integrity, and surface and ground waters. The watershed approach provides an improved basis for management decisions concerning contaminant sources and containment. It allows more direct focus by stakeholders on achieving ecological goals and water quality standards rather than a measurement of program activities based on numbers of permits or samples. The watershed approach allows better management strategies for investigations, therefore maximizing the utilization of scarce resources. Feasibility studies (FSs) evaluate various alternatives in terms of environmental standards, the protection of human health and the environment, and the costs of implementation to find the optimum solution among them. Society has to decide how much it is willing to spend to meet the standards and to be protective. Conducting FSs is the process of trading off those criteria to pick that optimum point that society wants to achieve. Performing this analysis at the watershed scale allows those trade-offs to be made meaningfully. In addition, a Land Use Control Assurance Plan for the ORR was prepared to identify the strategy for assuring the long-term effectiveness of land use controls. These land use controls will be relied upon to protect human health and the environment at areas of the ORR undergoing remediation pursuant to the Comprehensive

  6. Sources of ozone and sulfate in northeastern United States. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Husain, L.

    1980-06-30

    Ozone observed at Whiteface Mountain, NY, may be derived from the stratosphere, photochemical production from pollutant NO/sub x/ and hydrocarbons emitted in urban/industrial areas, with subsequent transport of O/sub 3/ to Whiteface Mountain, and/or photochemical production from NO/sub x/ and hyodrocarbons including terpenes, etc., emitted from vegetation in the vicinity of Whiteface Mountain. The principal objective of this work was to assess /sup 7/Be and /sup 32/P as stratospheric tracers and, if possible, use them to quantify stratospheric O/sub 3/. Other objectives of this program were: to study the relationship between O/sub 3/ and SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, use SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ as an indicator of photochemical production originating in urban areas, to study the long-range transport of pollutants and try to identify emission sources and establish daily, monthly, and seasonal variations of SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ and trace elements thus generating a data base to study long-term trends. The salient features of this study were the first determinations of /sup 7/Be/O/sub 3/ ratios in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere and gathering continuous data of radionuclides /sup 7/Be, /sup 32/P, and /sup 33/P along with O/sub 3/, SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, and several trace elements. Some of the significant accomplishments of this study are: a quantitative relationships between /sup 7/Be and O/sub 3/ in the stratosphere was established, and it is applied to estimate stratospheric O/sub 3/ on a global and episodic basis; global /sup 7/Be measurements suggest that the stratospheric influx in the northern hemisphere is twice that in the southern; and, the /sup 7/Be//sup 32/P ratios yield an average transport time of approx. 7 days during spring and summer for stratospheric air from tropopause to Whiteface Mountain, supporting tropopause folding as the predominant mechanism of stratospheric-tropospheric exchange during spring and summer. (JGB)

  7. Seismic-reflection and ground penetrating radar for environmental site characterization. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Steeples, D.W.; Plumb, R.

    1998-06-01

    the seismic reflection data and the ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data over time. Two factors drive these changes: First, the soil-moisture conditions vary on a seasonal basis at the site. Second, the water table rises and falls on the order of one meter in response to changes in the level of the Arkansas River and in response to the many irrigation wells found nearby. At the test site in the Arkansas River alluvial valley near Great Bend, Kansas, surface material consists of unconsolidated medium- to coarse-grained sand interspersed with clay stringers and lenses deposited by the Arkansas River. A hand-augered test hole 5 meters from the seismic line revealed sand to a depth of about 1.5 meters, where a hard pan was found presumably a clay layer. At the time of the seismic and GPR surveys, the water table was at a depth of 2.1 meters, based on a measurement in a test well located 25 meters from the seismic line. A well drilled about 40 meters away from the seismic line encountered bedrock (a fine- to medium-grained Cretaceous-age sandstone) at a depth of 29 meters.'

  8. Libby Mitigation Program, 2007 Annual Progress Report: Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam.

    SciTech Connect

    Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, J.; Garrow, L.

    2009-05-26

    basin streams and lakes. 'Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan.

  9. Plant rhizosphere effects on metal mobilization and transport. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, T.W.M.; Higashi, R.M.; Crowley, D.E.

    1997-10-01

    'During the funding period of 1996--1997, the authors explored the utility of multi-nuclear, two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for a comprehensive analysis of barley root exudates collected under Fe sufficient and deficient conditions. As both structural and quantitative information was obtained directly from crude root exudates using this approach, no tedious sample fractionation was necessary, which will greatly facilitate future chemical characterization of root exudates in general. They found that the phytosiderophore mugineic acids (including 2{prime}-deoxymugineic acid, mugineic acid, and 3-epi-hydroxymugineic acid) were readily identified and quantified in crude exudate samples along with a number of amino and organic acids. The amount of mugineic acids excreted was correlated positively with the extent of Fe deficiency with 3-epi-hydroxymugineic acid being the most prominent component. The total Fe chelating capacity was also measured using the ferrozine assay and compared with the production of the mugineic acids. They were surprised to find that the mugineic acids may account for a part of the Fe chelating capacity, especially under mild and moderatley Fe deficient conditions. Lactate, alanine, y-aminobutyrate, malate, and glycinebetaine collectively may contribute to a significant fraction of the Fe chelating capacity. In light of the known stimulatory effect of alanine and citrate on metal availability to algae (Campell, 1995), the function of these low molecular weight metabolites as vehicles for Fe or metal uptake in general warrant further investigation. This work is now published in Analytical Biochemistry 251, 57-68 ( 1997). They then proceeded to apply the above approach to investigate the interaction of elevated cadmium (Cd) with Fe deficiency in gramineous plants. They have completed one each series of cadmium (Cd) treatments of barley and wheat seedlings under Fe

  10. Photooxidation of organic wastes using semiconductor nanoclusters. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcoxon, J.P.; Martin, J.E.; Thurston, T.R.; Kelley, D.F.; Samara, G.

    1997-01-01

    charge separation. The hole left behind on MoS{sub 2} is then used to oxidize the organic im-purities. In its reduced form bypridine complexes to the oxidized organic impurity and precipitates out of solution. The authors studied the chemistry of this process by high pressure liquid chromatography which separates each of the chemicals in the solution from the MoS{sub 2} photocatalyst. The results of this experiment are shown in figure 2. The initially present organic impurity peak at t-5.2 minutes (an organic chloride) is destroyed as more bypridine is added until it cannot be detected. However, the amount of nanosize MoS{sub 2} remains un-changed, as measured by the area under the MoS{sub 2} elation peak. Another, broader, organic peak observed in this figure at t4.7 minutes also is destroyed by the MoS{sub 2} as additional bpy is added, and, at higher levels of bpy (not shown) this chemical is completely oxidized and precipitated out of solution as well. The white precipitate which forms can be removed from the solvent.'

  11. Progress on the measurement of the francium anapole moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Dong; Hood, Jonathan; Lynam, Steven; Orozco, Luis; Gomez, Eduardo; Aubin, Seth; Gwinner, Gerald; Behr, John; Pearson, Matthew; Jackson, Peter; Melconian, Dan; Flambaum, Victor; Sprouse, Gene

    2010-03-01

    We present the current status of the experimental effort towards the measurement of the anapole moment in francium. The anapole is a parity violating, time-reversal conserving nuclear moment that arises from the weak interaction among nucleons. The anapole moment is nuclear spin dependent (nsd) and sensitive to the configuration of nuclear structure. Our experimental scheme is to perform a direct measurement of the nsd parity violation, by driving a parity forbidden E1 transition between hyperfine ground states in a series of francium isotopes inside a blue detuned dipole trap at the electric anti-node of a microwave cavity. We explore theoretical aspects and experimental requirements on the possible tests using rubidium isotopes. The experiment will be at the ISAC radioactive beam facility of TRIUMF. Work supported by NSF and DOE USA, NSERC and NRC Canada, CONACYT Mexico.

  12. Microsensors for in-situ chemical, physical, and radiological characterization of mixed waste. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Thundat, T.G.; Warmack, R.J.; Dabestani, R.; Britt, P.; Bonnesen, P.V.; Brown, G.M.

    1998-06-01

    'A widespread need exists for portable, real-time, in-situ chemical, physical, and radiological sensors for characterization of mixed wastes, groundwater, contaminated solids, and process streams. None of the currently available technologies offer a clear path to the development of sensors that are miniature, cost-effective, selective, highly sensitive with a wide dynamic range, and have the ability to work in air or liquid while providing chemical, physical, and radiological information. The objective of this research program is to conduct the fundamental research necessary to develop microcantilever-based micromechanical sensors for in-situ characterization of groundwater, sediments, and mixed wastes. Chemical selectivity will be achieved by coupling surface modification chemistry with molecular recognition agents. Physical measurements of adsorption (absorption) induced deflection (bending) and resonance frequency variation of microcantilevers can be achieved with extreme precision resulting in ppb-ppt sensitivity. Good progress has been made in the first nine months of this project. Progress has been made in three focus areas: radiation detection, detection of heavy metals in water, modification of microcantilever surfaces for chemical selectivity, and pH measurement.'

  13. Comparing Computer Adaptive and Curriculum-Based Measures of Math in Progress Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Edward S.; Dennis, Minyi Shih; Fu, Qiong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the use of a Computer Adaptive Test and Curriculum-Based Measurement in the assessment of mathematics. This study also investigated the degree to which slope or rate of change predicted student outcomes on the annual state assessment of mathematics above and beyond scores of single point screening…

  14. Progress in Measurement of Carbon Dioxide Using a Broadband LIDAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, William S.; Georgieva, Elena; Huang, Wen

    2010-01-01

    Innovative active system using advanced source technology development will enable precise daytime or nighttime measurements of column CO2. Directly responds to NRC DS ASCENDS mission. Number of lasers is reduced compared to competing technologies which reduces the complexity of sensor and thus the cost and risk of failure. Knowledge gained from previously developed passive sensor decreases the risk and cost of the present lidar system development. The instrument can play a significant role as an intercomparison instrument for OCO (Orbiting Carbon Observatory) if it is rebuilt and launched as well as other laser based instruments under development for participation in ASCENDS. It can play a role as an airborne instrument in its own right in addressing the problems of scale arising from differences between point observations by the existing ground based CO2 network and wider area measurements obtained by satellites. Developed 2.0 micron broadband system as well and will compare performance of both systems to choose optimal approach for ASCENDS. Have begun development of approach that uses array detectors instead of APD. This approach will have lower noise than APD and may simplify design of the detector optical train.

  15. Simple measures of progress and outcome in the evaluation of mental health services.

    PubMed

    Newman, F L; Hunter, R H; Irving, D

    1987-01-01

    There is a tautology regarding the use of progress and outcome measures. Such measures are easy to use in a reliable and valid fashion if the language of the measures is used as an integral part of (a) treatment planning and progress review, (b) clinical supervision, and (c) program management. The paper describes example guidelines and uses of measures in each of these functions. Also included are listings of scales with documented reliability and validity (by target population) and some sources for finding computer software for scoring some of the scales.

  16. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Little, J. B.

    1981-06-01

    Emphasis during the past year has been on studies of the effects of potential promoting agents on radiation transformation, and of transformation by internal radionuclides emitting high LET radiation. We have also carried out a detailed investigation of the dosimetry of our alpha radiation source. Preliminary studies on the mechanisms of radiation transformation have been initiated as described in the previous proposal. Studies on promotion have focused on the effects of: (1) the endogenous steroid hormone 17-..beta..-estradiol; (2) the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent indomethacin; (3) the endogenous growth factor called Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF); and (4) Melittin, a stimulator of prostaglandins synthesis.

  17. Annual progress report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duric, Nebojsa

    1992-01-01

    The emission components of spiral galaxies between 12 microns and 90 cm are identified. Additionally, an attempt to understand the relationships between them was made. The specific goal was to gain some understanding on the nature of the radio-infrared correlation. The results are summarized.

  18. Joint inversion of geophysical data for site characterization and restoration monitoring. FY97 annual progress report for EMSP

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, P.A.; Berryman, J.G.; Bonner, B.P.; Roberts, J.J.; Wildenschild, D.

    1997-01-01

    'The purpose of this project is to develop a computer code for joint in-version of seismic and electrical data, to improve underground imaging for site characterization and remediation monitoring. The computer code developed in this project will invert geophysical data to obtain direct estimates of porosity and saturation underground, rather than inverting for seismic velocity and electrical resistivity or other geophysical properties. This is intended to be a significant improvement in the state-of-the-art of under-ground imaging, since interpretation of data collected at a contaminated site would become much less subjective. The schedule of this project is as follows: In the first year, investigators perform laboratory measurements of elastic and electrical properties of sand-clay mixtures containing various fluids. Investigators also develop methods of relating measurable geophysical properties to porosity and saturation by using rock physics theories, geostatistical, and empirical techniques together with available laboratory measurements. In the second year, investigators finish any necessary laboratory measurements and apply the methods de-veloped in the first year to invert available borehole log data to predict measured properties of cores and sediments from a borehole. Investigators refine the inversion code in the third year and carry out a field experiment to collect seismic and electrical data. Investigators then use the inversion code to invert the field data to produce estimates of porosity and saturation in the field area where the data were collected. This report describes progress made in the first year of this three-year project.'

  19. Solar XUV and VUV irradiances: Measurement and Modeling Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W.

    2004-12-01

    Solar soft X-ray (XUV) and Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) spectral irradiances are particularly important for space system engineering, aeronomy, and climate change research since these wavelengths deposit their energy in the thermosphere, mesosphere, and stratosphere as well as create the ionosphere. Because solar spectral irradiances are a foundation for understanding scattering and photoabsorption processes in atmospheres and ionospheres, it is important to provide user communities with accurate, precise and time-resolved solar irradiance products. We present an overview of the solar irradiance community's recent space-based measurements and empirical as well as physics-based modeling for short (minutes to hours), medium (hours to days), and long (weeks to months) time scale irradiance variations as related to energy deposition processes for the thermosphere and ionosphere. In addition, we describe the ISO 21348 standard which provides a common process for determining solar irradiances.

  20. Emerging interpretations of quantum mechanics and recent progress in quantum measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, M. L.

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this paper is to provide a brief discussion on the quantum measurement process, by reviewing select examples highlighting recent progress towards its understanding. The areas explored include an outline of the measurement problem, the standard interpretation of quantum mechanics, quantum to classical transition, types of measurement (including weak and projective measurements) and newly emerging interpretations of quantum mechanics (decoherence theory, objective reality, quantum Darwinism and quantum Bayesianism).

  1. Measuring developmental progress of children with autism spectrum disorder on school entry using parent report.

    PubMed

    Charman, Tony; Howlin, Patricia; Berry, Bryony; Prince, Emily

    2004-03-01

    Increasing numbers of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are diagnosed in the preschool years, and their educational progress must be monitored. Parent questionnaire data can augment psychometric assessments and individual planning at low cost. One hundred and twenty-five parents of UK children who entered dedicated autism primary schools and units in two consecutive calendar years were asked to complete three questionnaires. Fifty-seven parents repeated the questionnaire measures one year later. Encouraging developmental progress was observed on the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales-Screener. Symptom severity as measured by the Social Communication Questionnaire did not change over time. The pattern of change scores on the Autism Treatment Evaluation Checklist was mixed, and confounding disadvantages this questionnaire. The study demonstrated that it is possible to collect useful information on the progress of children with ASD using parents as informants. Such data would assist in judging claims regarding developmental progress within particular programmes.

  2. Examining the Technical Adequacy of Progress Monitoring Using Early Writing Curriculum-Based Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampton, David D.; Lembke, Erica S.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine 4 early writing measures used to monitor the early writing progress of 1st-grade students. We administered the measures to 23 1st-grade students biweekly for a total of 16 weeks. We obtained 3-min samples and conducted analyses for each 1-min increment. We scored samples using 2 different methods: correct…

  3. Measuring progress

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, C.B.

    1995-05-01

    Problems that surfaced during the past several years of deregulation of pipeline industries seemed to be in the lack of systems integration. The various pipeline systems couldn`t communicate with each other because of the drawbacks of single-source hardware and software. The success story for the industry was in gas metering. Most companies installed enhanced metering and monitoring equipment, but the paper explains why more has to be done to make the industry run smoothly.

  4. Construct Validity and Measurement Invariance of Computerized Adaptive Testing: Application to Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) Using Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Shudong; McCall, Marty; Jiao, Hong; Harris, Gregg

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this study are twofold. First, to investigate the construct or factorial structure of a set of Reading and Mathematics computerized adaptive tests (CAT), "Measures of Academic Progress" (MAP), given in different states at different grades and academic terms. The second purpose is to investigate the invariance of test factorial…

  5. Compilation of 1985 annual reports of the Navy elf (extremely low frequency) communications system ecological monitoring program. Volume 1. Tabs A-C. Annual progress report, January-December 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, C.; Bruhn, J.; Cattelino, P.; Fuller, L.; Jurgensen, M.

    1986-07-01

    This is the fourth compilation of annual reports for the Navy's ELF Communications System Ecological Monitoring Program. The reports document the progress of ten studies performed during 1985 at the Wisconsin and Michigan Transmitting Facilities. The purpose of the monitoring is to determine whether electromagnetic fields produced by the ELF Communications System will affect resident biota or their ecological relationships. This volume consists of three reports: Herbaceous Plant Cover and Tree Studies; Litter Decomposition and Microflora; and The Effects of Exposing the Slime MOld Physarum polycephalum to Electromagnetic Fields.

  6. Temporal trajectory and progression score estimation from voxelwise longitudinal imaging measures: Application to amyloid imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bilgel, Murat; Jedynak, Bruno; Wong, Dean F.; Resnick, Susan M.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2015-01-01

    Cortical β-amyloid deposition begins in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) years before the onset of any clinical symptoms. It is therefore important to determine the temporal trajectories of amyloid deposition in these earliest stages in order to better understand their associations with progression to AD. A method for estimating the temporal trajectories of voxelwise amyloid as measured using longitudinal positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is presented. The method involves the estimation of a score for each subject visit based on the PET data that reflects their amyloid progression. This amyloid progression score allows subjects with similar progressions to be aligned and analyzed together. The estimation of the progression scores and the amyloid trajectory parameters are performed using an expectation-maximization algorithm. The correlations among the voxel measures of amyloid are modeled to reflect the spatial nature of PET images. Simulation results show that model parameters are captured well at a variety of noise and spatial correlation levels. The method is applied to longitudinal amyloid imaging data considering each cerebral hemisphere separately. The results are consistent across the hemispheres and agree with a global index of brain amyloid known as mean cortical DVR. Unlike mean cortical DVR, which depends on a priori defined regions, the progression score extracted by the method is data-driven and does not make assumptions about regional longitudinal changes. Compared to regressing on age at each voxel, the longitudinal trajectory slopes estimated using the proposed method show better localized longitudinal changes. PMID:26221692

  7. The $17.1 billion problem: the annual cost of measurable medical errors.

    PubMed

    Van Den Bos, Jill; Rustagi, Karan; Gray, Travis; Halford, Michael; Ziemkiewicz, Eva; Shreve, Jonathan

    2011-04-01

    At a minimum, high-quality health care is care that does not harm patients, particularly through medical errors. The first step in reducing the large number of harmful medical errors that occur today is to analyze them. We used an actuarial approach to measure the frequency and costs of measurable US medical errors, identified through medical claims data. This method focuses on the analysis of comparative rates of illness, using mathematical models to assess the risk of occurrence and to project costs to the total population. We estimate that the annual cost of measurable medical errors that harm patients was $17.1 billion in 2008. Pressure ulcers were the most common measurable medical error, followed by postoperative infections and by postlaminectomy syndrome, a condition characterized by persistent pain following back surgery. A total of ten types of errors account for more than two-thirds of the total cost of errors, and these errors should be the first targets of prevention efforts.

  8. Annual sediment flux estimates in a tidal strait using surrogate measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ganju, N.K.; Schoellhamer, D.H.

    2006-01-01

    Annual suspended-sediment flux estimates through Carquinez Strait (the seaward boundary of Suisun Bay, California) are provided based on surrogate measurements for advective, dispersive, and Stokes drift flux. The surrogates are landward watershed discharge, suspended-sediment concentration at one location in the Strait, and the longitudinal salinity gradient. The first two surrogates substitute for tidally averaged discharge and velocity-weighted suspended-sediment concentration in the Strait, thereby providing advective flux estimates, while Stokes drift is estimated with suspended-sediment concentration alone. Dispersive flux is estimated using the product of longitudinal salinity gradient and the root-mean-square value of velocity-weighted suspended-sediment concentration as an added surrogate variable. Cross-sectional measurements validated the use of surrogates during the monitoring period. During high freshwater flow advective and dispersive flux were in the seaward direction, while landward dispersive flux dominated and advective flux approached zero during low freshwater flow. Stokes drift flux was consistently in the landward direction. Wetter than average years led to net export from Suisun Bay, while dry years led to net sediment import. Relatively low watershed sediment fluxes to Suisun Bay contribute to net export during the wet season, while gravitational circulation in Carquinez Strait and higher suspended-sediment concentrations in San Pablo Bay (seaward end of Carquinez Strait) are responsible for the net import of sediment during the dry season. Annual predictions of suspended-sediment fluxes, using these methods, will allow for a sediment budget for Suisun Bay, which has implications for marsh restoration and nutrient/contaminant transport. These methods also provide a general framework for estimating sediment fluxes in estuarine environments, where temporal and spatial variability of transport are large. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  9. Measuring Accreditation Activity and Progress: Findings from a Survey of Indiana Local Health Departments, 2013.

    PubMed

    Meyerson, Beth E; Barnes, Priscilla R; King, Jerry; Degi, Lindsey S; Halverson, Paul K; Polmanski, Haley F

    2015-01-01

    A 2013 survey of Indiana local health departments (LHDs) measured accreditation activity and progress. Reported activities were categorized using the Public Health Accreditation Board's (PHAB's) accreditation steps as a guiding framework and matched with selected sociodemographic, organizational, and technical assistance variables. Findings indicated that 42 (59.2%) of responding Indiana LHDs reported pursuing accreditation. Of LHDs pursuing accreditation, 21 were at the initial introductory step, 18 were at the prerequisite step, one reported submitting an application to PHAB, and two reported no activity, yet intent to pursue accreditation. Reported receipt of technical assistance was associated with accreditation progress (p=0.01) and, specifically, with being at the prerequisite step. Facilitating the pursuit of LHD accreditation in states with low public health investment is possible with targeted accreditation resources. Finding meaningful measures of accreditation progress will help advance the study of factors associated with LHD accreditation on a broad scale and for the long term. PMID:26327722

  10. Creatinine measurements often yielded false estimates of progression in chronic renal failure

    SciTech Connect

    Walser, M.; Drew, H.H.; LaFrance, N.D.

    1988-09-01

    In 9 of 22 observation periods (lasting an average of 15 months) in 17 patients with moderate to severe chronic renal failure (GFR 4 to 23 ml/min), rates of progression as estimated from the linear regression on time of 24-hour creatinine clearance (b1) differed significantly from rates of progression as estimated from the regression on time of urinary clearance of 99mTc-DTPA (b2), during all or part of the period of observation. b1 exceeded b2 in four cases and was less than b2 in the other five. Thus there were gradual changes in the fractional tubular secretion of creatinine in individual patients, in both directions. Owing to these changes, measurements of creatinine clearance gave erroneous impressions of the rate or existence of progression during all or a portion of the period of observation in nearly half of these patients. In the 22 studies as a group, using the entire periods of observation, b1 indicated significantly more rapid progression (by 0.18 +/- 0.06 ml/min/month, P less than 0.01) than did b2, and had a significantly greater variance. Measurements of progression based on the rate of change of reciprocal plasma creatinine (multiplied by an average rate of urinary creatinine excretion in each study) were equally misleading, even though less variable. We conclude that sequential creatinine measurements are often misleading as measures of progression and should, when feasible, be replaced by urinary clearance of isotopes in following patients with chronic renal failure.

  11. 1993 Annual progress report for subsidiary agreement No. 2 (1991--1996) between AECL and US/DOE for a radioactive waste management technical co-operative program

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    A coordinated research program on radioactive waste disposal is being carried out by the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and the US Department of Energy. This annual report describes progress in the following eight studies: Fundamental materials investigations; In-situ stress determination; Development of a spent fuel dissolution model; Large block tracer test--Experimental testing of retardation models; Laboratory and field tests of in-situ hydrochemical tools; Cigar Lake--Analogue study, actinide and fission product geochemistry; Performance assessment technology exchange; and Development of multiple-well hydraulic test and field tracer test methods.

  12. The Impact of the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) Program on Student Reading Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordray, David S.; Pion, Georgine M.; Brandt, Chris; Molefe, Ayrin

    2013-01-01

    One of the most widely used commercially available systems incorporating benchmark assessment and training in differentiated instruction is the Northwest Evaluation Association's (NWEA) Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) program. The MAP program involves two components: (1) computer-adaptive assessments administered to students three to four…

  13. Robust Regression for Slope Estimation in Curriculum-Based Measurement Progress Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer, Sterett H.; Lyons, Alina F.; Johnston, Lauren E.; Millhoff, Courtney L.

    2015-01-01

    Although ordinary least-squares (OLS) regression has been identified as a preferred method to calculate rates of improvement for individual students during curriculum-based measurement (CBM) progress monitoring, OLS slope estimates are sensitive to the presence of extreme values. Robust estimators have been developed that are less biased by…

  14. The "Measurement of Economic Performance and Social Progress" Report and Quality of Life: Moving Forward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rojas, Mariano

    2011-01-01

    In 2009 the Stiglitz Commission presented its report on the Measurement of Progress in Societies. The report was commissioned by President Sarkozy of France in 2008. Among its members, the Commission had five Nobel laureates. The report emphasizes three areas which require further attention by statistical offices and policy makers: A better…

  15. Measuring progress in multirobot research with rating methods--the RoboCup example.

    PubMed

    Shmilovici, Armin; Ramkddam, Foaid; Lopez, Beatriz; de la Rosa, Josep Lluis

    2004-04-01

    Rating the intelligence of artificially made systems is important for measuring progress in scientific and engineering methods. Unfortunately, there is currently no universal agreement about what is considered an intelligent system, and how to measure its intelligence. This research focus on measuring the progress in the robotic technologies deployed for the RoboCup competitions, since one of the original premises of those competitions was to advance the development of intelligent robotic systems. A method used for rating the competence of human chess players is adapted for measuring the advancement in the competence of robotic teams. The results indicate significant yearly improvements in the capabilities of the robotic teams. The same method can be used to indirectly quantify the benefits in specific technology choices. PMID:15376876

  16. PACE Continuous Innovation Indicators-a novel tool to measure progress in cancer treatments.

    PubMed

    Paddock, Silvia; Brum, Lauren; Sorrow, Kathleen; Thomas, Samuel; Spence, Susan; Maulbecker-Armstrong, Catharina; Goodman, Clifford; Peake, Michael; McVie, Gordon; Geipel, Gary; Li, Rose

    2015-01-01

    Concerns about rising health care costs and the often incremental nature of improvements in health outcomes continue to fuel intense debates about 'progress' and 'value' in cancer research. In times of tightening fiscal constraints, it is increasingly important for patients and their representatives to define what constitutes 'value' to them. It is clear that diverse stakeholders have different priorities. Harmonisation of values may be neither possible nor desirable. Stakeholders lack tools to visualise or otherwise express these differences and to track progress in cancer treatments based on variable sets of values. The Patient Access to Cancer care Excellence (PACE) Continuous Innovation Indicators are novel, scientifically rigorous progress trackers that employ a three-step process to quantify progress in cancer treatments: 1) mine the literature to determine the strength of the evidence supporting each treatment; 2) allow users to weight the analysis according to their priorities and values; and 3) calculate Evidence Scores (E-Scores), a novel measure to track progress, based on the strength of the evidence weighted by the assigned value. We herein introduce a novel, flexible value model, show how the values from the model can be used to weight the evidence from the scientific literature to obtain E-Scores, and illustrate how assigning different values to new treatments influences the E-Scores. The Indicators allow users to learn how differing values lead to differing assessments of progress in cancer research and to check whether current incentives for innovation are aligned with their value model. By comparing E-Scores generated by this tool, users are able to visualise the relative pace of innovation across areas of cancer research and how stepwise innovation can contribute to substantial progress against cancer over time. Learning from experience and mapping current unmet needs will help to support a broad audience of stakeholders in their efforts to

  17. Tophus measurement as an outcome measure for clinical trials of chronic gout: progress and research priorities.

    PubMed

    Dalbeth, Nicola; McQueen, Fiona M; Singh, Jasvinder A; MacDonald, Patricia A; Edwards, N Lawrence; Schumacher, H Ralph; Simon, Lee S; Stamp, Lisa K; Neogi, Tuhina; Gaffo, Angelo L; Khanna, Puja P; Becker, Michael A; Taylor, William J

    2011-07-01

    Despite the recognition that tophus regression is an important outcome measure in clinical trials of chronic gout, there is no agreed upon method of tophus measurement. A number of methods have been used in clinical trials of chronic gout, from simple physical measurement techniques to more complex advanced imaging methods. This article summarizes methods of tophus measurement and discusses their properties. Physical measurement using Vernier calipers meets most aspects of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) filter. Rigorous testing of the complex methods, particularly with respect to reliability and sensitivity to change, is needed to determine the appropriate use of these methods. Further information is also required regarding which method of physical measurement is best for use in future clinical trials. The need to develop and test a patient-reported outcome measure of tophus burden is also highlighted.

  18. 50 CFR 622.411 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Spiny Lobster Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico and... measures (AMs). For recreational and commercial spiny lobster landings combined, the ACL is 7.32 million...

  19. 50 CFR 622.411 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Spiny Lobster Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico and... measures (AMs). For recreational and commercial spiny lobster landings combined, the ACL is 7.32 million...

  20. Equity in water and sanitation: developing an index to measure progressive realization of the human right.

    PubMed

    Luh, Jeanne; Baum, Rachel; Bartram, Jamie

    2013-11-01

    We developed an index to measure progressive realization for the human right to water and sanitation. While in this study we demonstrate its application to the non-discrimination and equality component for water, the conceptual approach of the index can be used for all the different components of the human right. The index was composed of one structural, one process, and two outcome indicators and is bound between -1 and 1, where negative values indicate regression and positive values indicate progressive realization. For individual structural and process indicators, only discrete values such as -1, -0.5, 0, 0.5, and 1 were allowed. For the outcome indicators, any value between -1 and 1 was possible, and a State's progress was evaluated using rates of change. To create an index that would allow for fair comparisons between States and across time, these rates of change were compared to benchmarked rates, which reflect the maximum rates a State can achieve. Using this approach, we calculated the index score for 56 States in 2010 for which adequate data were available and demonstrated that these index scores were not dependent on factors such as achieved level of coverage or gross national income. The proposed index differs from existing measures of inequality as it measures rate of change and not level of achievement, and thus addresses the principle of progressive realization that is fundamental to human rights.

  1. Significance of Selective Predation and Development of Prey Protection Measures for Juvenile Salmonids in the Columbia and Snake River Reservoirs: Annual Report, February 1992-February 1993.

    SciTech Connect

    Poe, Thomas P.; Gadomski, Dena M.

    1994-09-01

    This document is the 1992 annual report of progress for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) research Project No. 82-003 conducted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), the Oregon Cooperative Fishery Research Unit (OCFRU), and the Idaho Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit (ICFWRU). The approach was to present the progress achieved during 1992 in a series of separate reports for each major project task. Each report is prepared in the format of a scientific paper and is able to stand alone, whatever the state of progress or completion. Reports 1, 2, and 4 consist of the Abstract only (journal papers were submitted in lieu of reports). This project has two major goals. One is to understand the significance of selective predation and prey vulnerability by determining if substandard juvenile salmonids (dead, injured, stressed, diseased, or naive) are more vulnerable to predation by northern squawfish, Ptychocheilus oregonensis, than standard or normal juvenile salmonids. The second goal is to develop and test prey protection measures to control predation on juvenile salmonids by reducing predator-smolt encounters or predator capture efficiency. Separate abstracts have been submitted to the database for the seven articles in this report.

  2. Building a Grad Nation: Progress and Challenge in Ending the High School Dropout Epidemic. Annual Update 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balfanz, Robert; Bridgeland, John M.; Fox, Joanna Hornig; DePaoli, Jennifer L.; Ingram, Erin S.; Maushard, Mary

    2014-01-01

    This fifth annual update on America's high school dropout crisis shows that, for the first time in history, the nation has crossed the 80 percent high school graduation rate threshold and remains on pace, for the second year in a row, to meet the goal of a 90 percent high school graduation rate by the Class of 2020. This report highlights key…

  3. Building a Grad Nation: Progress and Challenge in Ending the High School Dropout Epidemic. Annual Update 2015

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePaoli, Jennifer L.; Fox, Joanna Hornig; Ingram, Erin S.; Maushard, Mary; Bridgeland, John M.; Balfanz, Robert

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, the national high school graduation rate hit a record high of 81.4 percent, and for the third year in a row, the nation remained on pace to meet the 90 percent goal by the Class of 2020. This sixth annual update on America's high school dropout challenge shows that these gains have been made possible by raising graduation rates for…

  4. PACE Continuous Innovation Indicators—a novel tool to measure progress in cancer treatments

    PubMed Central

    Paddock, Silvia; Brum, Lauren; Sorrow, Kathleen; Thomas, Samuel; Spence, Susan; Maulbecker-Armstrong, Catharina; Goodman, Clifford; Peake, Michael; McVie, Gordon; Geipel, Gary; Li, Rose

    2015-01-01

    Concerns about rising health care costs and the often incremental nature of improvements in health outcomes continue to fuel intense debates about ‘progress’ and ‘value’ in cancer research. In times of tightening fiscal constraints, it is increasingly important for patients and their representatives to define what constitutes ’value’ to them. It is clear that diverse stakeholders have different priorities. Harmonisation of values may be neither possible nor desirable. Stakeholders lack tools to visualise or otherwise express these differences and to track progress in cancer treatments based on variable sets of values. The Patient Access to Cancer care Excellence (PACE) Continuous Innovation Indicators are novel, scientifically rigorous progress trackers that employ a three-step process to quantify progress in cancer treatments: 1) mine the literature to determine the strength of the evidence supporting each treatment; 2) allow users to weight the analysis according to their priorities and values; and 3) calculate Evidence Scores (E-Scores), a novel measure to track progress, based on the strength of the evidence weighted by the assigned value. We herein introduce a novel, flexible value model, show how the values from the model can be used to weight the evidence from the scientific literature to obtain E-Scores, and illustrate how assigning different values to new treatments influences the E-Scores. The Indicators allow users to learn how differing values lead to differing assessments of progress in cancer research and to check whether current incentives for innovation are aligned with their value model. By comparing E-Scores generated by this tool, users are able to visualise the relative pace of innovation across areas of cancer research and how stepwise innovation can contribute to substantial progress against cancer over time. Learning from experience and mapping current unmet needs will help to support a broad audience of stakeholders in their

  5. 50 CFR 622.388 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... accountability measures (AMs). (a) Gulf migratory group king mackerel—(1) Commercial sector. If commercial... king mackerel of zero, unless the best scientific information available determines that a bag limit... through June 1. (b) Atlantic migratory group king mackerel—(1) Commercial sector—(i) If...

  6. Studies of the repair of radiation-induced genetic damage in Drosophila. Annual progress report, February 1-July 1, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Research progress is reported in the following areas: (1) characterization of a photo-repair deficient mutant in Drosophila; (2) the role of poly(ADPR)polymerase in Drosophila repair; and (3) service functions. (ACR)

  7. Multi-body forces and the energetics of transition metals, alloys, and semiconductors. Annual progress report, (1991--1992)

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsson, A.E.

    1992-11-01

    Progress over the past year is divided into 3 areas: potential-energy functions for transition-metal aluminides; electronic structure and energetics of complex structures and quasicrystals; and ceramic materials (PdO, PtO).

  8. Measurement and correlation of conditions for entrapment and mobilization of residual oil. First annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, N.R.

    1982-09-01

    Substantial progress has been made in four major task areas. The first task is to establish the limits of reliability of laboratory waterflooding as an evaluation tool. Wettability is identified as a key variable. Work is being extended to wetting properties of crude oils and core flooding. The second task concerns the effects of high capillary number flows on trapping phenomena and residual oil saturation. Correlations of capillary number and relative permeability behavior at reduced residual saturations have been developed for displacement in sandstones. The third task deals with mechanisms of mobilization and entrapment of residual oil. Detailed accounts have recently been presented of work on relative permeability at reduced residual oil saturations and for factors which affect the magnitude and distribution of residual oil. Work on the fourth task concerns the detailed structure of residual oil. The size distribution of residual oil blobs, obtained under various displacement conditions, is being measured by various size-analysis methods.

  9. Recent progress in the measurement of temperature and salinity by optical scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, D. J.; Mcdermid, I. S.; Breckinridge, J. B.; Bell, J. A.; Zanoni, R.

    1984-01-01

    Recent progress is described in the use of Brillouin and Raman scattering for the measurement of temperature and salinity in the ocean. The use of Brillouin scattering is described for the measurement of the sound velocity, and the use of Raman scattering is described for the independent measurement of the temperature and salinity. Coupling these techniques permits the assessment of both temperature and salinity. The experimental techniques are described together with the results of recent experiments and an assessment of the errors to be expected.

  10. Micrometeorological measurements over 3 years reveal differences in N2 O emissions between annual and perennial crops.

    PubMed

    Abalos, Diego; Brown, Shannon E; Vanderzaag, Andrew C; Gordon, Robert J; Dunfield, Kari E; Wagner-Riddle, Claudia

    2016-03-01

    Perennial crops can deliver a wide range of ecosystem services compared to annual crops. Some of these benefits are achieved by lengthening the growing season, which increases the period of crop water and nutrient uptake, pointing to a potential role for perennial systems to mitigate soil nitrous oxide (N2 O) emissions. Employing a micrometeorological method, we tested this hypothesis in a 3-year field experiment with a perennial grass-legume mixture and an annual corn monoculture. Given that N2 O emissions are strongly dependent on the method of fertilizer application, two manure application options commonly used by farmers for each crop were studied: injection vs. broadcast application for the perennial; fall vs. spring application for the annual. Across the 3 years, lower N2 O emissions (P < 0.001) were measured for the perennial compared to the annual crop, even though annual N2 O emissions increased tenfold for the perennial after ploughing. The percentage of N2 O lost per unit of fertilizer applied was 3.7, 3.1 and 1.3 times higher for the annual for each consecutive year. Differences in soil organic matter due to the contrasting root systems of these crops are probably a major factor behind the N2 O reduction. We found that a specific manure management practice can lead to increases or reductions in annual N2 O emissions depending on environmental variables. The number of freeze-thaw cycles during winter and the amount of rainfall after fertilization in spring were key factors. Therefore, general manure management recommendations should be avoided because interannual weather variability has the potential to determine if a specific practice is beneficial or detrimental. The lower N2 O emissions of perennial crops deserve further research attention and must be considered in future land-use decisions. Increasing the proportion of perennial crops in agricultural landscapes may provide an overlooked opportunity to regulate N2 O emissions. PMID:26491961

  11. Building a Grad Nation: Progress and Challenge in Ending the High School Dropout Epidemic. Annual Update, 2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balfanz, Robert; Bridgeland, John M.; Bruce, Mary; Fox, Joanna Hornig

    2013-01-01

    This fourth annual update on America's high school dropout crisis shows that for the first time the nation is on track to meet the goal of a 90 percent high school graduation rate by the Class of 2020--if the pace of improvement from 2006 to 2010 is sustained over the next 10 years. The greatest gains have occurred for the students of color and…

  12. Fiscal Year 1994 progress in implementing Section 120 of the Comprehensive Environmental Rresponse, Compensation, and Liability Act. Eighth annual report to Congress

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    Congress passed the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) (Public Law 96-510), commonly known as Superfund, in 1980. The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) (Public Law 99-499), which amended CERCLA in 1986, added Section 120 regarding the cleanup of contaminated sites at Federal facilities. Under Section 120(e)(5) of CERCLA, each department, agency, or instrumentality of the Federal government responsible for compliance with Section 120 must submit an annual report to Congress concerning its progress in implementing the requirements of Section 120. The report must include information on the progress in reaching Interagency Agreements (IAGs), conducting Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Studies (RI/FSs), and performing remedial actions. Federal agencies that own or operate facilities on the National Priorities List (NPL) are required to begin an RI/FS for these facilities within 6 months after being placed on the NPL. Remediation of these facilities is addressed in an IAG between the Federal agency, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and in some instances the state within which the facility is located. This report, prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Environmental Management, is being submitted to Congress in accordance with Section 120(e)(5) of CERCLA. It is DOE`s Eighth Annual Report to Congress and provides information on DOE`s progress in implementing CERCLA Section 120 in Fiscal Year 1994 (FY 94), i.e., from October 1, 1993, to September 30, 1994. In this report the words {open_quotes}site{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}facility{close_quotes} are used interchangeably.

  13. Validation of a fornix depth measurer: a putative tool for the assessment of progressive cicatrising conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Geraint P; Saw, Valerie P J; Saeed, Tariq; Evans, Simon T; Cottrell, Paul; Curnow, S John; Nightingale, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Background/aims Documentation of conjunctival forniceal foreshortening in cases of progressive cicatrising conjunctivitis (PCC) is important in ascertaining disease stage and progression. Lower fornix shortening is often documented subjectively or semi-objectively, whereas upper forniceal obliteration is seldom quantified. Although tools such as fornix depth measurers (FDMs) have been described, their designs limit upper fornix measurement. The purpose of this study was to custom-design a FDM to evaluate the upper fornix and to assess variability in gauging fornix depth. Methods A polymethylmethacrylate FDM was constructed using industry-standard jewellery computer software and machinery. Two observers undertook a prospective independent evaluation of central lower fornix depth in a heterogeneous cohort of patients with clinically normal and abnormal conjunctival fornices both subjectively and by using the FDM (in mm). Upper central fornix depth was also measured. Agreement was assessed using Bland–Altman plots. Results Fifty-one eyes were evaluated. There was 100% intraobserver agreement to within 1 mm for each observer for lower fornix measurement. The mean difference in fornix depth loss using the FDM between observer 1 and 2 was 1.19%, with 95% confidence of agreement (±2SD) of −15% to +20%. In total, 86% (44/51) of measurements taken by the two observers agreed to within 10% of total lower fornix depth (ie, ±1 mm) versus only 63% (32/51) of the subjective measurements. Mean upper fornix difference was 0.57 mm, with 95% confidence of agreement of between −2 and +3 mm. Conclusions This custom-designed FDM is well tolerated by patients and shows low intraobserver and interobserver variability. This enables repeatable and reproducible measurement of upper and lower fornix depths, facilitating improved rates of detection and better monitoring of progression of conjunctival scarring. PMID:20956276

  14. Annual Review of Competence Progression (ARCP) performance of doctors who passed Professional and Linguistic Assessments Board (PLAB) tests compared with UK medical graduates: national data linkage study

    PubMed Central

    Illing, Jan; Kasim, Adetayo S; McLachlan, John C

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine whether use of the Professional and Linguistic Assessments Board (PLAB) examination system used to grant registration for international medical graduates results in equivalent postgraduate medical performance, as evaluated at Annual Review of Competence Progression (ARCP), between UK based doctors who qualified overseas and those who obtained their primary medical qualification from UK universities. Design Observational study linking ARCP outcome data from the UK deaneries with PLAB test performance and demographic data held by the UK General Medical Council (GMC). Setting Doctors in postgraduate training for a medical specialty or general practice in the UK and doctors obtaining GMC registration via the PLAB system. Participants 53 436 UK based trainee doctors with at least one competency related ARCP outcome reported during the study period, of whom 42 017 were UK medical graduates and 11 419 were international medical graduates who were registered following a pass from the PLAB route. Main outcome measure Probability of obtaining a poorer versus a more satisfactory category of outcome at ARCP following successful registration as a doctor in the UK. Results International medical graduates were more likely to obtain a less satisfactory outcome at ARCP compared with UK graduates. This finding persisted even after adjustment for the potential influence of sex, age, years of UK based practice, and ethnicity and exclusion of outcomes associated with postgraduate examination failure (odds ratio 1.63, 95% confidence interval 1.30 to 2.06). However, international medical graduates who scored in the highest twelfth at part 1 of the PLAB (at least 32 points above the pass mark) had ARCP outcomes that did not differ significantly from those of UK graduates. Conclusions These findings suggest that the PLAB test used for registration of international medical graduates is not generally equivalent to the requirements for UK graduates. The

  15. On the measurement of a weak classical force coupled to a harmonic oscillator: experimental progress

    SciTech Connect

    Bocko, M.F.; Onofrio, R.

    1996-07-01

    Several high-precision physics experiments are approaching a level of sensitivity at which the intrinsic quantum nature of the experimental apparatus is the dominant source of fluctuations limiting the sensitivity of the measurements. This quantum limit is embodied by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, which prohibits arbitrarily precise simultaneous measurements of two conjugate observables of a system but allows one-time measurements of a single observable with any precision. The dynamical evolution of a system immediately following a measurement limits the class of observables that may be measured repeatedly with arbitrary precision, with the influence of the measurement apparatus on the system being confined strictly to the conjugate observables. Observables having this feature, and the corresponding measurements performed on them, have been named quantum nondemolition or back-action evasion observables. In a previous review (Caves {ital et} {ital al}., 1980, Rev. Mod. Phys. {bold 52}, 341) a quantum-mechanical analysis of quantum nondemolition measurements of a harmonic oscillator was presented. The present review summarizes the experimental progress on quantum nondemolition measurements and the classical models developed to describe and guide the development of practical implementations of quantum nondemolition measurements. The relationship between the classical and quantum theoretical models is also reviewed. The concept of quantum nondemolition and back-action evasion measurements originated in the context of measurements on a macroscopic mechanical harmonic oscillator, though these techniques may be useful in other experimental contexts as well, as is discussed in the last part of this review. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  16. Measuring Changes in Energy Efficiency for the Annual Energy Outlook 2002

    EIA Publications

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology used to develop the National Energy Modeling System estimate of projected aggregate energy efficiency and to describe the results of applying it to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 (AEO2002) reference case.

  17. Variation in the annual average radon concentration measured in homes in Mesa County, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Rood, A.S.; George, J.L.; Langner, G.H. Jr.

    1990-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the variability in the annual average indoor radon concentration. The TMC has been collecting annual average radon data for the past 5 years in 33 residential structures in Mesa County, Colorado. This report is an interim report that presents the data collected up to the present. Currently, the plans are to continue this study in the future. 62 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

  18. Fiscal year 1995 progress in implementing Section 120 of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. Ninth annual report to Congress

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    Congress passed the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) (Public Law 96-510), commonly known as Superfund, in 1980. The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) which amended CERCLA in 1986, added Section 120 regarding the cleanup of contaminated sites at Federal facilities. Under Section 120(e)(5) of CERCLA, each department, agency, or instrumentality of the Federal government responsible for compliance with Section 120 must submit an annual report to Congress concerning its progress in implementing the requirements of Section 120. The report must include information on the progress in reaching Interagency Agreements (IAGs), conducting Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Studies (RI/FSs), and performing remedial action. Federal agencies that own or operate facilities on the National priorities List (NPL) are required to begin an RI/FS for these facilities within 6 months after being placed on the NPL. Remediation of these facilities is addressed in an IAG between the Federal agency, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and in some instances the state within which the facility is located. This report provides the status of ongoing activities being performed in support of CERCLA Section 120 at DOE facilities. This includes activities conducted to reach IAGs and progress in conducting remedial actions.

  19. High temperature turbine technology program. Phase II. Technology test and support studies. Annual technical progress report, January 1, 1979-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Work performed on the High Temperature Turbine Technology Program, Phase II - Technology Test and Support Studies during the period from January 1, 1979 through December 31, 1979 is summarized. Objectives of the program elements as well as technical progress and problems encountered during this Phase II annual reporting period are presented. Progress on design, fabrication and checkout of test facilities and test rigs is described. LP turbine cascade tests were concluded. 350 hours of testing were conducted on the LP rig engine first with clean distillate fuel and then with fly ash particulates injected into the hot gas stream. Design and fabrication of the turbine spool technology rig components are described. TSTR 60/sup 0/ sector combustor rig fabrication and testing are reviewed. Progress in the design and fabrication of TSTR cascade rig components for operation on both distillate fuel and low Btu gas is described. The new coal-derived gaseous fuel synthesizing facility is reviewed. Results and future plans for the supporting metallurgical programs are discussed.

  20. Building a Grad Nation: Progress and Challenge in Ending the High School Dropout Epidemic. Annual Update, 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balfanz, Robert; Bridgeland, John M.; Bruce, Mary; Fox, Joanna Hornig

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, the authors shared a Civic Marshall Plan to create a Grad Nation. Through that first report and subsequent update, they saw hopeful signs of progress in boosting high school graduation rates in communities across the country. This 2012 report shows that high school graduation rates continue to improve nationally and across many states and…

  1. Electronics Research Laboratory, Plasma Theory and Simulation Group annual progress report, January 1, 1989--December 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Birdsall, C.K.

    1989-12-31

    This is a brief progress report, covering our research in general plasma theory and simulation, plasma-wall physics theory and simulation, and code development. Reports written in this period are included with this mailing. A publications list plus abstracts for two major meetings are included.

  2. Building a Grad Nation: Progress and Challenge in Ending the High School Dropout Epidemic. Annual Update, 2010-2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balfanz, Robert; Bridgeland, John M.; Fox, Joanna Hornig; Moore, Laura A.

    2011-01-01

    America continues to make progress in meeting its high school dropout challenge. Leaders in education, government, nonprofits and business have awakened to the individual, social and economic costs of the dropout crisis and are working together to solve it. This year, all states, districts, and schools are required by law to calculate high school…

  3. Surface and interface electronic structure: Sixth year activity report. [Annual progress report], December 1, 1991--November 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Kevan, S D

    1992-12-31

    Several productive runs were made on beamline U4A at NSLS. An upgrade of angle-resolved photoemission spectrometer was largely completed on the beamline. Progress was made on studies of surface states and reconstruction on Mo(001) and W(001), and of surface states and resonances on Pt(111).

  4. Progress towards a precision measurement of the n=2 triplet P fine structure of atomic helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, K.; Fitzakerley, D. W.; George, M. C.; Vutha, A. C.; Storry, C. H.; Hessels, E. A.

    2016-05-01

    We report progress on the measurement of the J = 1 to J = 2 23 P fine-structure interval of atomic helium. The measurement uses a liquid-nitrogen-cooled DC discharge source of metastable helium and the atomic beam is laser cooled in the transverse directions. The atoms are excited to 23 P by a 1083-nm diode laser, and the fine-structure transition is driven by microwaves using the frequency-offset separated oscillatory fields technique. The transition is detected by further laser excitation to a Rydberg state, followed by Stark ionization. This work is supported by NSERC, CRC.

  5. In vivo measurements of bone-seeking radionuclides. Annual report, December 1, 1982-November 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, N.

    1983-01-01

    This report summarizes results obtained in seven areas. Five subjects with well defined Am-241 body burdens have been measured using NaI-CsI(T1) detectors surrounding the head or positioned over the anterior knee surfaces. The observed ratio of net count-rate at the skull to net count-rate at the anterior knee surfaces was found to vary with values ranging from 1.16 to 2.45. Previously developed calibration values for men have been determined to be inadequate for application to female workers due to the variability in chest wall thickness and different photon attenuation characteristics of breast tissue in women. The relative count-rates for each individual among the counting geometries reflected the attenuation of the Nb-92m x-rays in the overlying tissue. The measurement performed with a single phoswich detector positioned centrally over the sternum surprisingly gave the highest count-rate for two out of the four subjects. It is expected that the net counts/x-ray emitted for each individual, when plotted as a function of overlying absorber thickness, will produce a series of single exponential curves which can be used to predict the absolute calibration value for Nb-92m in the lungs. Additional studies describing the time-related fate and distribution in the body of radon and radon daughters present as a result of drinking this well water are currently in progress. There appears to be a possibility of obtaining a significantly increased and variable whole body count-rate as related to a function of the quantity of water consumed and the time of in vivo measurement. Subjects who were treated therapeutically with radon seeds 25 to 34 years ago were observed in our whole body counting facility using NaI-CsI(T1) detectors. The radiation dose due to the characteristic Pu x-ray, the bremsstrahlung continuum and any beta radiation penetrating the gold sheath, is being determined.

  6. Magnetic relaxation: Coal swelling, extraction, pore size. Annual technical progress report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992 and Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1992--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Doetschman, D.C.

    1992-11-06

    The goals for year I of the grant were to extract the Argonne Coals, to swell them, to reswell their residues, to seal the various samples for measurements, to perform analyses of the samples and to measure their NMR decays. Because of an unexpected characteristic of the extraction process, more detailed analyses of the samples are being done than originally anticipated. The mass spectrometric analyses have not been completed. Because routine NMR analyses needed to be done in greater detail than anticipated, the NMR decay measurements have also been delayed. In order to offset these delays, all of the EPR samples, which were to have been examined in year III, have been prepared and a substantial proportion of the pulsed EPR measurements have been made.

  7. Identification of the Spawning, Rearing, and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, 1991 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Rondorf, Dennis W.; Miller, William H.

    1993-07-01

    This document is the 1991 annual progress report for selected studies of fall chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha conducted by the US Fish and Wildlife Service. The decline in abundance of fall chinook salmon in the Snake River basin has become a growing concern. In April 1992, Snake River fall chinook salmon were listed as ``threatened`` under the Endangered Species Act. Effective recovery efforts for fall chinook salmon can not be developed until we increase our knowledge of the factors that are limiting the various life history stages. This study attempts to identify those physical and biological factors which influence spawning of fall chinook salmon in the free-flowing Snake River and their rearing and seaward migration through Columbia River basin reservoirs.

  8. Modeling the Magnetic and Thermal Structure of Active Regions: 1st Year 1st Semi-Annual Progress Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran

    2003-01-01

    This report covers technical progress during the first six months of the first year of NASA SR&T contract "Modeling the Magnetic and Thermal Structure of Active Regions", NASW-03008, between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation, and covers the period January 14, 2003 to July 13, 2003. Under this contract SAIC has conducted research into theoretical modeling of the properties of active regions using the MHD model.

  9. Analysis of the structural parameters that influence gas production from the Devonian shale. Annual progress report, 1979-1980

    SciTech Connect

    Negus-de Wys, J.; Dixon, J. M.; Evans, M. A.; Lee, K. D.; Ruotsala, J. E.; Wilson, T. H.; Williams, R. T.

    1980-10-01

    The executive study presents the results and progress of efforts toward understanding shale gas production from the Devonian shale in Appalachia. A correlation was found between the geochemical parameters of the shale in eastern Kentucky and shale gas production there. Tasks on resource inventory tasks and shale characterization include regional structure studies, production studies, geophysical studies, structure studies, fracture density and orientation, and fracture studies. (DLC)

  10. Measuring progress toward the Millennium Development Goals and the missing millions.

    PubMed

    Carr-Hill, Roy A

    2013-01-01

    The 2015 target date for achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) is fast approaching, but there is very little discussion of the validity of the indicators used to measure progress. In particular, there has been little attention given to the problems that arise when assessments of progress are based on household surveys. These are inappropriate for obtaining information about the poorest of the poor. Typically, they omit by design those not in households because they are homeless; those who are in institutions; and mobile, nomadic or pastoralist populations; and, in practice, household surveys will typically under-represent those in fragile, disjointed or multiple occupancy households; and those in urban slums and insecure areas of a country. Those six subgroups constitute a pretty comprehensive ostensive definition of the "poorest of the poor." Between 300 and 500 million people--mainly in developing countries--will be missed worldwide from the sampling frames of household surveys.

  11. Measuring progress toward the Millennium Development Goals and the missing millions.

    PubMed

    Carr-Hill, Roy A

    2013-01-01

    The 2015 target date for achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) is fast approaching, but there is very little discussion of the validity of the indicators used to measure progress. In particular, there has been little attention given to the problems that arise when assessments of progress are based on household surveys. These are inappropriate for obtaining information about the poorest of the poor. Typically, they omit by design those not in households because they are homeless; those who are in institutions; and mobile, nomadic or pastoralist populations; and, in practice, household surveys will typically under-represent those in fragile, disjointed or multiple occupancy households; and those in urban slums and insecure areas of a country. Those six subgroups constitute a pretty comprehensive ostensive definition of the "poorest of the poor." Between 300 and 500 million people--mainly in developing countries--will be missed worldwide from the sampling frames of household surveys. PMID:23713207

  12. Operation and research at the Ithaca MAP3S regional precipitation chemistry site: Annual progress report for 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, T.J.; Likens, G.E.

    1988-07-01

    Ten complete years of precipitation chemistry data, 1977 to 1986, are summarized for the Ithaca MAP3S site. For comparison purposed selected data from the eight other MAP3S sites are included. Notable findings include the following: 1) Monthly concentrations of H/sup +/, SO/sub 4//sup 2/minus//, NO/sub 3//sup /minus//, and NH/sub 4//sup +/ show a high degree of variability from year to year. 2) The Ithaca Site shows a statistically significant (p = 0.05) decline, from 1977 to 1986, in annual volume-weighed H/sup +/ concentration. 3) A statistically significant (p = 0.05) increase in annual volume-weighted NH/sub 4//sup +/ concentration also occurs for this time period at the Ithaca site. 4) Ohio, from 1979 to 1986, shows a significant (p = 0.05) decline in volume-weighted H/sup +/ and SO/sub 4//sup 2/minus// concentration. 5) While there is not a significant (p = 0.05) linear relationship between emissions of SO/sub 2/ and SO/sub 4//sup /minus// concentrations, and emissions of NO/sub x/ and NO/sub 3//sup /minus// concentrations, there is a significant positive relationship for emissions of SO/sub 2/ plus NO/sub x/ versus H/sup +/ concentrations at Ithaca (p = 0.10) and Ohio (p = 0.05). 6) 15% to 30% of dry-deposited particles at the Ithaca site are anthropogenicly derived. On a mass basis, one third of the calcium species are CaSO/sub 4/, probably derived from the conversion of CaCO/sub 3/ interacting with SO/sub 2/ or acidic sulfate. Experimental results suggest this conversion can occur at rates from 0% to 20% per day in the Ithaca area. 13 refs., 23 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. The purple line as a measure of labour progress: a longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Vaginal examination (VE) and assessment of the cervix is currently considered to be the gold standard for assessment of labour progress. It is however inherently imprecise with studies indicating an overall accuracy for determining the diameter of the cervix at between 48-56%. Furthermore, VEs can be unpleasant, intrusive and embarrassing for women, and are associated with the risk of introducing infection. In light of increasing concern world wide about the use of routine interventions in labour it may be time to consider alternative, less intrusive means of assessing progress in labour. The presence of a purple line during labour, seen to rise from the anal margin and extend between the buttocks as labour progresses has been reported. The study described in this paper aimed to assess in what percentage of women in labour a purple line was present, clear and measurable and to determine if any relationship existed between the length of the purple line and cervical dilatation and/or station of the fetal head. Methods This longitudinal study observed 144 women either in spontaneous labour (n = 112) or for induction of labour (n = 32) from admission through to final VE. Women were examined in the lateral position and midwives recorded the presence or absence of the line throughout labour immediately before each VE. Where present, the length of the line was measured using a disposable tape measure. Within subjects correlation, chi-squared test for independence, and independent samples t-test were used to analyse the data. Results The purple line was seen at some point in labour for 109 women (76%). There was a medium positive correlation between length of the purple line and cervical dilatation (r = +0.36, n = 66, P = 0.0001) and station of the fetal head (r = +0.42, n = 56, P < 0.0001). Conclusions The purple line does exist and there is a medium positive correlation between its length and both cervical dilatation and station of the fetal head. Where the

  14. Current Scientific Progress and Future Scientific Prospects Enabled by Spaceborne Precipitation Radar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Im, Eastwood; Tripoli, Gregory J.; Yang, Song

    2008-01-01

    First, we examine current scientific progress and understanding that have been possible through use of spaceborne precipitation radar measurements being provided by the TRMM and CloudSat satellites. Second, we look across a future 20-year time frame to assess how and why anticipated improvements in space radar systems will further advance scientific progress into topic areas once considered beyond the realm of space-based remote sensing. JAXA's 13.8 GHz Ku-band cross-track scanning Precipitation Radar (PR) developed for flight on NASA's non-sun-synchronous, diurnally-precessing TRMM satellite, was the first Earth radar flown in space that was designed specifically for precipitation measurement. Its proven accuracy in measuring global rainfall in the tropics and sub-tropics and its unanticipated longevity in continuing these measurements beyond a full decade have established the standards against which all follow-up and future space radars will be evaluated. In regards to the current PR measurement time series, we will discuss a selection of major scientific discoveries and impacts which have set the stage for future radar measuring systems. In fact, the 2nd contemporary space radar applicable for terrestrial precipitation measurement, i.e., JPL-CSA's 94 GHz nadir-staring Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) flown on NASA's sun-synchronous CloudSat satellite, although designed primarily for measurement of non-precipitating cloud hydrometeors and aerosols, has also unquestionably advanced precipitation measurement because CPR's higher frequency and greatly increased sensitivity (approximately 30 dBZ) has enabled global observations of light rain rate spectrum processes (i.e., rain rates below 0.05 mm per hourand of precipitation processes in the high troposphere (particularly ice phase processes). These processes are beyond reach of the TRMM radar because the PR sensitivity limit is approximately 17 dBZ which means its lower rain rate cutoff is around 0.3 mm per hour and its

  15. [Measurement and estimation methods and research progress of snow evaporation in forests].

    PubMed

    Li, Hui-Dong; Guan, De-Xin; Jin, Chang-Jie; Wang, An-Zhi; Yuan, Feng-Hui; Wu, Jia-Bing

    2013-12-01

    Accurate measurement and estimation of snow evaporation (sublimation) in forests is one of the important issues to the understanding of snow surface energy and water balance, and it is also an essential part of regional hydrological and climate models. This paper summarized the measurement and estimation methods of snow evaporation in forests, and made a comprehensive applicability evaluation, including mass-balance methods (snow water equivalent method, comparative measurements of snowfall and through-snowfall, snow evaporation pan, lysimeter, weighing of cut tree, weighing interception on crown, and gamma-ray attenuation technique) and micrometeorological methods (Bowen-ratio energy-balance method, Penman combination equation, aerodynamics method, surface temperature technique and eddy covariance method). Also this paper reviewed the progress of snow evaporation in different forests and its influencal factors. At last, combining the deficiency of past research, an outlook for snow evaporation rearch in forests was presented, hoping to provide a reference for related research in the future.

  16. Integrative studies of thermoregulation in ectothermic vertebrates in aquatic habitats. Annual progress report, 1 October 1980-30 September 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Spotila, J R

    1981-05-01

    Field experiments are underway to determine the behavioral mechanisms by which largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides, respond to rapid temperature changes in their natural environment. Laboratory experiments are clarifying the relationship between basking behavior of the turtle, Pseudemys scripta and its nutritional state. Important progress has been made in the development and miniaturization of a multichannel, temperature sensing, radio transmitter for fish. Theoretical analysis and mathematical modeling have defined the realized and fundamental climate space of P. scripta and allows the prediction of the behavior of this turtle.

  17. Use of corn-distiller's solubles from an ethanol plant for aquaculture. Semi-annual technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Kohler, C.C.; Lewis, W.M.

    1982-03-12

    It appears reasonable that potential exists for using corn distiller's solubles for the controlled production of aquatic organisms (aquaculture). Results of initial laboratory studies which have focused on assessing the short-term effects of various concentrations of corn distiller's solubles on water quality and aquatic organisms (fish, macrocrustaceans, microcrustaceans, and algae) are described. These results, coupled with results of studies currently in progress, will be used to identify a suitable quantity of corn distiller's solubles for daily application to the earthen ponds that will be used in the field production trials.

  18. Exploratory energy research program of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Annual progress report, June 1, 1982- May 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Progress is reported for the following: solar energy laboratory for the roof of Holmes Hall; a freon boiler for alternate energy power cycles; boiling heat transfer in geothermal systems; building energy conservation in Hawaii; combustion properties of biomass pyrolysis products; concentrator solar cell development; materials problems in natural energy development; sail-assisted technology for Pacific marine transportation; electrochemical evaluation of hydrogen systems storage in transition metal hydrides; seismic and thermal properties of Hawaiian basalts; chemical dynamics of OTEC chlorination; and studies of the interaction of hydrogen and deuterium with transition metals and their alloys at high pressure.

  19. Research project on CO{sub 2}-induced climate change. Annual progress report, March 1, 1994--February 28, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Cess, R.D.; Hameed, S.

    1995-01-01

    This summarizes current progress in the research project at SUNY Stony Brook on CO2-induced climate change. Three tasks are described, corresponding to the task categories in the USDOE/PRC CAS cooperative project on climate change. Task 1, led by Dr. Robert Cess, concerns the intercomparison of CO2 related climatic warming in contemporary general circulation models. Task 2, directed by Dr. Sultan Hameed, looks at understanding the natural variability in climatic data and comparing its significant features between observations and model simulations. Task 3, also directed by Dr. Hameed focuses on analysis of historical climate data developed at the institute of Geography of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  20. Transport function and reaction mechanism of vacuolar H{sup +}- translocation inorganic pyrophosphatase. Annual technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    These studies describe progress made in the definition of the transport capabilities and reaction mechanism of the V-PPase through biochemical analyses of native membrane vesicles isolated from etiolated hypocotyls of Vigna radiate and by reconstitution of the purified enzyme into artificial liposomes; delineation of the ligand requirements of the V-PPase; and the delineation of sequence motifs implicated in substrate-binding through the development of strategies for selective cleavage of the M{sub r} 66,000 polypeptide and the mapping of covalently modified peptide fragments.

  1. Measuring Changes in Salaries and Wages in Public Schools: 2000 Edition. 27th Annual Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Alicia R.; Cooke, Willa D.; Davis, Andrea M.; Miller, Oronde A.; Lewis, JoAnn

    This annual survey reports comparable salary data for 22 professional positions. The purpose of this edition is to aid in the analysis of trends in average salaries and wages paid public-school employees in the six component groups of school personnel over the previous 10 years. This report shows how the Composite Indicator of Changes (CIC) in…

  2. Sativex(®) and clinical-neurophysiological measures of spasticity in progressive multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Leocani, Letizia; Nuara, Arturo; Houdayer, Elise; Schiavetti, Irene; Del Carro, Ubaldo; Amadio, Stefano; Straffi, Laura; Rossi, Paolo; Martinelli, Vittorio; Vila, Carlos; Sormani, Maria Pia; Comi, Giancarlo

    2015-11-01

    Despite the proven efficacy of Sativex(®) (9-delta-tetrahydrocannabinol plus cannabidiol) oromucosal spray in reducing spasticity symptoms in multiple sclerosis (MS), little is known about the neurophysiological correlates of such effects. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of Sativex on neurophysiological measures of spasticity (H/M ratio) and corticospinal excitability in patients with progressive MS. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Consecutive subjects with progressive MS and lower limb spasticity referred to our center were randomized to 4 weeks' treatment (including 2 weeks' titration) with Sativex or placebo, with crossover after a 2-week washout. Clinical and neurophysiological measures (H/M ratio and cortical excitability) of spasticity were assessed. The H/M ratio was the primary outcome, with sample size calculation of 40 patients. Of 44 recruited patients, 34 were analyzed due to 6 drop-outs and 4 exclusions, which lowered the power of the study to show differences between treatments. Neurophysiological measures did not differ significantly according to treatment and did not correlate significantly with clinical response. Response on the modified Ashworth scale (at least 20 % improvement) was significantly more frequent after Sativex than placebo (50 vs 23.5 %; p = 0.041; McNemar). Side effects did not differ significantly according to treatment. Our findings confirm the clinical benefit of Sativex on MS spasticity. The lack of corresponding changes in corticospinal excitability and on the monosynaptic component, of the stretch reflex, although in a limited sample size, points to the involvement of other spinal and supraspinal mechanisms in the physiopathology of spasticity in progressive MS. PMID:26289497

  3. A draft framework for measuring progress towards the development of a national health information infrastructure

    PubMed Central

    Sittig, Dean F; Shiffman, Richard N; Leonard, Kevin; Friedman, Charles; Rudolph, Barbara; Hripcsak, George; Adams, Laura L; Kleinman, Lawrence C; Kaushal, Rainu

    2005-01-01

    Background American public policy makers recently established the goal of providing the majority of Americans with electronic health records by 2014. This will require a National Health Information Infrastructure (NHII) that is far more complete than the one that is currently in its formative stage of development. We describe a conceptual framework to help measure progress toward that goal. Discussion The NHII comprises a set of clusters, such as Regional Health Information Organizations (RHIOs), which, in turn, are composed of smaller clusters and nodes such as private physician practices, individual hospitals, and large academic medical centers. We assess progress in terms of the availability and use of information and communications technology and the resulting effectiveness of these implementations. These three attributes can be studied in a phased approach because the system must be available before it can be used, and it must be used to have an effect. As the NHII expands, it can become a tool for evaluating itself. Summary The NHII has the potential to transform health care in America – improving health care quality, reducing health care costs, preventing medical errors, improving administrative efficiencies, reducing paperwork, and increasing access to affordable health care. While the President has set an ambitious goal of assuring that most Americans have electronic health records within the next 10 years, a significant question remains "How will we know if we are making progress toward that goal?" Using the definitions for "nodes" and "clusters" developed in this article along with the resulting measurement framework, we believe that we can begin a discussion that will enable us to define and then begin making the kinds of measurements necessary to answer this important question. PMID:15953388

  4. Measurement of Educational Progress in the Context of Local Demographics: Using General Outcome Measurement as a Basis for the Development and Use of Local Norms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koehler-Hak, Kathrine M.

    2014-01-01

    General outcome measurement, a specific type of formative evaluation, can be used to assess progress toward long-term academic goals. Curriculum-based measurement is a widely used type of general outcome measurement. When used to develop local norms, curriculum-based measurement data are helpful in making individual student and systems-level…

  5. Fiscal year 1996 progress in implementing Section 120 of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. Tenth annual report to Congress

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    Congress passed the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) (Public Law 96-510), commonly known as Superfund, in 1980. The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) (Public Law 99-499), which amended CERCLA in 1986, added Section 120 regarding the cleanup of contaminated sites at Federal facilities. Under Section 120(e)(5) of CERCLA, each department, agency, or instrumentality of the Federal government responsible for compliance with Section 120 must submit an annual report to Congress concerning its progress in implementing the requirements of Section 120. The report must include information on the progress in reaching Interagency Agreements (IAGs), conducting remedial investigation and feasibility studies (RI/FSs), and performing remedial actions. Federal agencies that own or operate facilities on the National Priorities List (NPL) are required to begin an RI/FS for these facilities within 6 months after being placed on the NPL. Remediation of these facilities is addressed in an IAG between the Federal agency, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and in some instances the state within which the facility is located.

  6. Superconductivity program for electric systems, Superconductivity Technology Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, annual progress report for fiscal year 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, J.O.; Newnam, B.E.; Peterson, D.E.

    1999-03-01

    Development of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) has undergone tremendous progress during the past year. Kilometer tape lengths and associated magnets based on BSCCO materials are now commercially available from several industrial partners. Superconducting properties in the exciting YBCO coated conductors continue to be improved over longer lengths. The Superconducting Partnership Initiative (SPI) projects to develop HTS fault current limiters and transmission cables have demonstrated that HTS prototype applications can be produced successfully with properties appropriate for commercial applications. Research and development activities at LANL related to the HTS program for Fiscal Year 1997 are collected in this report. LANL continues to support further development of Bi2223 and Bi2212 tapes in collaboration with American Superconductor Corporation (ASC) and Oxford Superconductivity Technology, Inc. (OSTI), respectively. The tape processing studies involving novel thermal treatments and microstructural characterization have assisted these companies in commercializing these materials. The research on second-generation YBCO-coated conductors produced by pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) over buffer template layers produced by ion beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) continues to lead the world. The applied physics studies of magnetic flux pinning by proton and heavy ion bombardment of BSCCO and YBCO tapes have provided many insights into improving the behavior of these materials in magnetic fields. Sections 4 to 7 of this report contain a list of 29 referred publications and 15 conference abstracts, a list of patent and license activities, and a comprehensive list of collaborative agreements in progress and completed.

  7. Thermohaline circulations and global climate change. Annual progress report no. 3, January 15, 1992--December 14, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, H.P.

    1992-12-01

    This report discusses research activities conducted during the period 15 January 1992--14 December 1992. Thermohaline Circulations and Global Climate Change is concerned with investigating the hypothesis that changes in surface thermal and hydrological forcing of the North Atlantic, changes that might be expected to accompany C0{sub 2}-induced global warming, could result in ocean-atmosphere interactions` exerting a positive feedback on the climate system. Because the North Atlantic is the source of much of the global ocean`s reservoir of deep water, and because this deep water could sequester large amounts of anthropogenically produced C0{sub 2}, changes in the rate of deep-water production are important to future climates. Since deep-water Production is controlled, in part, by the annual cycle of the atmospheric forcing of the North Atlantic, and since this forcing depends strongly on both hydrological and thermal processes as well as the windstress, there is the potential for feedback between the relatively short-term response of the atmosphere to changing radiative forcing and the longer-term processes in the oceans. Work over the past 11 months has proceeded according to the continuation discussion of last January and several new results have arisen.

  8. Thermohaline circulations and global climate change. Annual progress report No. 2, [15 January 1991--14 January 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, H.P.

    1992-03-01

    ``Thermohaline Circulations and Global Climate Change`` is concerned with investigating the hypothesis that changes in surface thermal and hydrological forcing of the North Atlantic, changes that might be expected to accompany CO{sub 2}-induced global warming, could result in ocean-atmosphere interactions` exerting a positive feedback on the climate system. Because the North Atlantic is the source of much of the global ocean`s reservoir of deep water, and because this deep water could sequester large amounts of anthropogenically produced Co{sub 2}, changes in the rate of deep-water production are important to future climates. Since deep-water production is controlled, in part, by the annual cycle of the atmospheric forcing of the North Atlantic, and since this forcing depends strongly on both hydrological and thermal processes as well as the windstress, there is the potential for feedback between the relatively short-term response of the atmosphere to changing radiative forcing and the longer-term processes in the oceans. Work over the past 12 months has proceeded in several directions.

  9. Kokanee Stock Status and Contribution of Cabinet Gorge Hatchery, Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho, 1985 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, Edward C.

    1986-07-01

    Mid-water trawling techniques were used during September to estimate kokanee population abundance, structure and survival. Abundance in 1985 was estimated at 4.5 million fish (198 per hectare), down from over 12 million kokanee in 1974 when the population was first monitored. Hatchery fry production (<6 million annually) has stabilized kokanee abundance since its initial decline in the late 1960s. Wild fry recruitment has remained relatively stable at 1.8 million since 1978; whereas recruitment of hatchery-reared fry has ranged from 0.09 to 1.98 million. The 1985 creel survey indicated that kokanee harvest rates remain low, with approximately one kokanee harvested per hour of effort from April to August. Catch rates were as high as 3.5 fish per hour during the mid-1960s. The zooplankton community was monitored with periodic plankton tows. Zooplankton composition in 1985 was similar to previous years and appears to have stabilized following the introduction of mysids, with peak cladoceran production occurring several weeks after peak kokanee emergence. Delayed release of hatchery fry resulted in higher survival of hatchery (7.3%) than wild (0.43%) kokanee fry. Other release strategies will be tested as more fry become available.

  10. NEUTRON MULTIPLICITY AND ACTIVE WELL NEUTRON COINCIDENCE VERIFICATION MEASUREMENTS PERFORMED FOR MARCH 2009 SEMI-ANNUAL DOE INVENTORY

    SciTech Connect

    Dewberry, R.; Ayers, J.; Tietze, F.; Klapper, K.

    2010-02-05

    The Analytical Development (AD) Section field nuclear measurement group performed six 'best available technique' verification measurements to satisfy a DOE requirement instituted for the March 2009 semi-annual inventory. The requirement of (1) yielded the need for SRNL Research Operations Department Material Control & Accountability (MC&A) group to measure the Pu content of five items and the highly enrich uranium (HEU) content of two. No 14Q-qualified measurement equipment was available to satisfy the requirement. The AD field nuclear group has routinely performed the required Confirmatory Measurements for the semi-annual inventories for fifteen years using sodium iodide and high purity germanium (HpGe) {gamma}-ray pulse height analysis nondestructive assay (NDA) instruments. With appropriate {gamma}-ray acquisition modeling, the HpGe spectrometers can be used to perform verification-type quantitative assay for Pu-isotopics and HEU content. The AD nuclear NDA group is widely experienced with this type of measurement and reports content for these species in requested process control, MC&A booking, and holdup measurements assays Site-wide. However none of the AD HpGe {gamma}-ray spectrometers have been 14Q-qualified, and the requirement of reference 1 specifically excluded a {gamma}-ray PHA measurement from those it would accept for the required verification measurements. The requirement of reference 1 was a new requirement for which the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Research Operations Department (ROD) MC&A group was unprepared. The criteria for exemption from verification were: (1) isotope content below 50 grams; (2) intrinsically tamper indicating or TID sealed items which contain a Category IV quantity of material; (3) assembled components; and (4) laboratory samples. Therefore all (SRNL) Material Balance Area (MBA) items with greater than 50 grams total Pu or greater than 50 grams HEU were subject to a verification measurement. The pass

  11. Dual cure low-VOC coating process: Phase 3. Semi-annual technical progress report, October 1992--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kinzer, K.E.

    1993-11-01

    Objective of Phase 3 is to complete proof-of-principle testing in full-scale systems of the dual cure photocatalyst technology developed in earlier phases. Phase 3 commercial applications are aerospace topcoats, aerospace primers, and solventless manufacture of tape backings. Progress was made in improving urethane/acrylate formulation for aerospace topcoats, particularly in reverse impact, initial gloss, and loss retention during accelerated weathering. Formulations have now been developed which meet all initial criteria; the formulation was optimized. Aerospace primer formulations based on epoxy/flexibilizer systems were evaluated. Because of cure consistency problems and the increased need for non-chromated primers, work on aerospace primer system was de-emphasized to allow greater effort on development and commercialization of aerospace topcoat. Work on solventless backing saturants for electrical tape backings has been completed; optimal dual cure resin formulations have been used in preparing complete tape constructions.

  12. Managing tight-binding receptors for new separations technologies. Annual progress report, September 15, 1996--June 10, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Busch, D.H.; Givens, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    'This program is fully staffed and all proposed investigations are proceeding as outlined in the Task Schedule of the original proposal. The program aims remain unchanged and excellent progress is reported below. The authors anticipate no substantial unexpended funds from the first year''s budget at the end of the first year of support. Any such remaining funds will certainly be less than 10% of the budget; less than 5% is expected. Three projects make up this program and each focuses on a single aspect of the major problem of overcoming the inherent slow reaction rates of tight-binding ligands. In a logical order, Project 1 addresses the rates of formation of metal complexes using tight-binding ligands; Project 2 addresses the rate of release of metal ions from complexes with tight-binding ligands; and Project 3 provides the possibility of a new technology that should be unimpeded by the inherent dilatory rates.'

  13. Mechanisms, chemistry, and kinetics of anaerobic biodegradation of cis-dichloroethylene and vinyl chloride. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, P.L.; Spormann, A.M.

    1998-06-01

    'The objectives of this study are to: (1) determine the biochemical pathways for reductive dehalogenation of cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE) and vinyl chloride (VC), including identification of the enzymes involved, (2) determine the chemical requirements, especially the type and quantity of electron donors needed by the microorganisms for reductive dehalogenation, and (3) evaluate the kinetics of the process with respect to the concentration of both the electron donors and the electron acceptors (cDCE and VC). Progress has been made under each of the three primary objectives. One manuscript related to the first objective has been published. Manuscripts related to the other two objectives have been submitted for publication. Findings related to the three objectives are summarized.'

  14. Petrology of Cretaceous coals from northwestern Alaska. Semi-annual progress report, September 1, 1980-August 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, P.D.

    1981-03-01

    Coal of the Cretaceous age from northwestern Alaska has been sampled, crushed and pelletized for reflectivity measurement and petrographic examination. Reflectance measurements have been completed on 21 samples. The samples (300) were obtained from seismic shotholes, Auger holes, test wells and by channel sampling. (LTN)

  15. Comparing computer adaptive and curriculum-based measures of math in progress monitoring.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Edward S; Dennis, Minyi Shih; Fu, Qiong

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the use of a Computer Adaptive Test and Curriculum-Based Measurement in the assessment of mathematics. This study also investigated the degree to which slope or rate of change predicted student outcomes on the annual state assessment of mathematics above and beyond scores of single point screening assessments (i.e., the computer adaptive test or the CBM assessment just before the administration of the state assessment). Repeated measurement of mathematics once per month across a 7-month period using a Computer Adaptive Test (STAR-Math) and Curriculum-Based Measurement (CBM, AIMSweb Math Computation, AIMSweb Math Concepts/Applications) was collected for a maximum total of 250 third, fourth, and fifth grade students. Results showed STAR-Math in all 3 grades and AIMSweb Math Concepts/Applications in the third and fifth grades had primarily linear growth patterns in mathematics. AIMSweb Math Computation in all grades and AIMSweb Math Concepts/Applications in Grade 4 had decelerating positive trends. Predictive validity evidence showed the strongest relationships were between STAR-Math and outcomes for third and fourth grade students. The blockwise multiple regression by grade revealed that slopes accounted for only a very small proportion of additional variance above and beyond what was explained by the scores obtained on a single point of assessment just prior to the administration of the state assessment.

  16. Magnetic measurements of the transuranium elements and charge state characterization of actinides in monazite. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Huray, P. G.

    1980-01-01

    A micromagnetic susceptometer for the purpose of measuring extremely small sample quantities (on the microgram level) was designed, constructed, and calibrated in previous years. (The 1979 progress report gives details of its operation.) This device has operated without significant downtime in this funding period, and much progress has been made in the magnetic characterization of elements beyond Am in the periodic table. This program has roughly doubled man's knowledge of magnetism in Cm, Bk, and Cf, and includes the only Es magnetic measurements to date. The incorporation of an automatic data collection system in this period has made analysis much more accurate, and has allowed quicker turnaround of compounds and metals for study. Results obtained for the compounds and metals studied this year are summarized. The lanthanide orthophosphates are being investigated as an alternate means of primary containment for high-level actinide wastes. Researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory are involved in preparation of actinide-doped compounds for all of the lanthanide transition series (La through Lu) for a study of leaching characteristics and E.S.R. classification. To aid this study the charge state of /sup 237/Np or /sup 57/Fe has been identified, either in the as-prepared compounds or following radioactive decay of /sup 241/Am via the Moessbauer Effect. The final charge state will be an influential variable in the immobilization characteristics of the waste products stored in this synthetic monazite form. 10 figures, 1 table. (RWR)

  17. Innovative techniques for the description of reservoir heterogeneity using tracers. Second technical annual progress report, October 1991--September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, G.A.; Sepehrnoori, K.

    1992-12-31

    This second annual report on innovative uses of tracers for reservoir characterization contains four sections each describing a novel use of oilfield tracers. The first section describes and illustrates the use of a new single-well tracer test to estimate wettability. This test consists of the injection of brine containing tracers followed by oil containing tracers, a shut-in period to allow some of the tracers to react, and then production of the tracers. The inclusion of the oil injection slug with tracers is unique to this test, and this is what makes the test work. We adapted our chemical simulator, UTCHEM, to enable us to study this tracer method and made an extensive simulation study to evaluate the effects of wettability based upon characteristic curves for relative permeability and capillary pressure for differing wetting states typical of oil reservoirs. The second section of this report describes a new method for analyzing interwell tracer data based upon a type-curve approach. Theoretical frequency response functions were used to build type curves of ``transfer function`` and ``phase spectrum`` that have dimensionless heterogeneity index as a parameter to characterize a stochastic permeability field. We illustrate this method by analyzing field tracer data. The third section of this report describes a new theory for interpreting interwell tracer data in terms of channeling and dispersive behavior for reservoirs. Once again, a stochastic approach to reservoir description is taken. The fourth section of this report describes our simulation of perfluorocarbon gas tracers. This new tracer technology developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory is being tested at the Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 in California. We report preliminary simulations made of these tracers in one of the oil reservoirs under evaluation with these tracers in this field. Our compostional simulator (UTCOMP) was used for this simulation study.

  18. X-ray and {Gamma}-ray spectroscopy of solids under pressure. Annual technical progress report, November 1996--October 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Ingalls, R.L.

    1997-04-30

    This report describes our recent synchrotron x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements on a number of systems that undergo pressure induced changes in local structure at high pressure. Our general technique is based upon a pressure cell which utilizes scintered boron carbide anvils, since diamond anvils generally produce Bragg glitches which spoil the high quality EXAFS necessary for precision structural measurements. Sample pressure is determined at the beam-line by measuring and analyzing, via XAFS, the compression of some cubic material contained within the sample chamber. Recently we have extended this work to 77 K using helium gas for the applied force, rather than hydraulic oil.

  19. Clinical cancer advances 2011: Annual Report on Progress Against Cancer from the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Vogelzang, Nicholas J; Benowitz, Steven I; Adams, Sylvia; Aghajanian, Carol; Chang, Susan Marina; Dreyer, Zoann Eckert; Janne, Pasi A; Ko, Andrew H; Masters, Greg A; Odenike, Olatoyosi; Patel, Jyoti D; Roth, Bruce J; Samlowski, Wolfram E; Seidman, Andrew D; Tap, William D; Temel, Jennifer S; Von Roenn, Jamie H; Kris, Mark G

    2012-01-01

    A message from ASCO'S President. It has been forty years since President Richard Nixon signed the National Cancer Act of 1971, which many view as the nation's declaration of the "War on Cancer." The bill has led to major investments in cancer research and significant increases in cancer survival. Today, two-thirds of patients survive at least five years after being diagnosed with cancer compared with just half of all diagnosed patients surviving five years after diagnosis in 1975. The research advances detailed in this year's Clinical Cancer Advances demonstrate that improvements in cancer screening, treatment, and prevention save and improve lives. But although much progress has been made, cancer remains one of the world's most serious health problems. In the United States, the disease is expected to become the nation's leading cause of death in the years ahead as our population ages. I believe we can accelerate the pace of progress, provided that everyone involved in cancer care works together to achieve this goal. It is this viewpoint that has shaped the theme for my presidential term: Collaborating to Conquer Cancer. In practice, this means that physicians and researchers must learn from every patient's experience, ensure greater collaboration between members of a patient's medical team, and involve more patients in the search for cures through clinical trials. Cancer advocates, insurers, and government agencies also have important roles to play. Today, we have an incredible opportunity to improve the quality of cancer care by drawing lessons from the real-world experiences of patients. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is taking the lead in this area, in part through innovative use of health information technology. In addition to our existing quality initiatives, ASCO is working with partners to develop a comprehensive rapid-learning system for cancer care. When complete, this system will provide physicians with personalized, real

  20. Progress Toward Luminescence-Based VAATE Turbine Blade And Vane Temperature Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Tom P.; Allison, Stephen W; Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Niska, R. H.; Condevaux, J. J.; Wolfe, Doug E.; Jordan, Eric H.; Heeg, Bauke

    2012-01-01

    Progress towards fielding luminescence-based temperature measurements for the Versatile Affordable Advanced Turbine Engine (VAATE) program is described. The near term programmatic objective is to monitor turbine vane temperatures and health by luminescence from a rare-earth doped thermal barrier coating (TBC), or from a thermographic phosphor layer coated onto a TBC. The first goal is to establish the temperature measurement capability to 1300 C with 1 percent uncertainty in a test engine. An eventual goal is to address rotating turbine blades in an F135 engine. The project consists of four phases, of which the first two have been completed and are described in this paper. The first phase involved laser heating of a 2.54-cm-diameter test sample, coated with a TBC and a thermographic phosphor layer, to produce a thermal gradient across the TBC layer similar to that expected in a turbine engine. Phosphor temperatures correlated well with those measured by long wavelength pyrometry. In the second phase, 10x10- cm coupons were exposed to a jet fuel flame at a burner rig facility. The thermographic phosphor/TBC combination survived the aggressive flame and high exhaust gas velocity, even though the metal substrate melted. Reliable temperature measurements were made up to about 1400 C using YAG:Dy as the thermographic phosphor. In addition, temperature measurements using YAG:Tm showed very desirable background radiation suppression.

  1. Experimental and theoretical high energy physics research. Annual grant progress report (FDP), January 15, 1993--January 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, D.B.

    1993-10-01

    Progress on seven tasks is reported. (I)UCLA hadronization model, antiproton decay, PEP4/9 e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} analysis: In addition to these topics, work on CP and CPT phenomenology at a {phi} factory and letters of support on the hadronization project are included. (II)ICARUS detector and rare B decays with hadron beams and colliders: Developments are summarized and some typcial events as shown; in addition, the RD5 collaboration at CERN and the asymmetric {phi} factory project are sketched. (III)Theoretical physics: Feynman diagram calculations in gauge theory; supersymmetric standard model; effects of quantum gravity in breaking of global symmetries; models of quark and lepton substructure; renormalized field theory; large-scale structure in the universe and particle-astrophysics/early universe cosmology. (IV)H dibaryon search at BNL, kaon experiments (E799/KTeV) at Fermilab: Project design and some scatterplots are given. (V)UCLA participation in the experiment CDF at Fermilab. (VI)Detectors for hadron physics at ultrahigh energy colliders: Scintillating fiber and visible light photon counter research. (VII)Administrative support and conference organization.

  2. Kokanee Stock Status and Contribution of Cabinet Gorge Hatchery, Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho, 1989 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Hoelscher, Brian

    1990-04-01

    The kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka rehabilitation program for Lake Pend Oreille continued to show progress during 1989. Estimated kokanee abundance in late August was 7.71 million fish. Decreased population size is the result of lower hatchery and wild fry recruitment and low age 1+ survival. Lower recruitment of wild fry in 1989 resulted from a smaller parental escapement in 1988 and lower wild fry survival. Six fry release strategies were evaluated in 1989. Two groups were released in Clark Fork River to help improve a spawning run to Cabinet Gorge Hatchery. Survival from the mid-summer release, which was barged down Clark Fork River to avoid low flow problems, was not significantly different from the early release. The final assessment of these release strategies will be evaluated when adults return to Cabinet gorge Hatchery in 1992 and 1993. Fry released to support the Sullivan Springs Creek spawning run also survived will in 1989. Two open-water releases were made during early and mid-summer. 30 refs., 26 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Measuring cell cycle progression kinetics with metabolic labeling and flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Fleisig, Helen; Wong, Judy

    2012-01-01

    metabolic processes for each cell cycle stage are useful in blocking the progression of the cell cycle to the next stage. For example, the ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor hydroxyurea halts cells at the G1/S juncture by limiting the supply of deoxynucleotides, the building blocks of DNA. Other notable chemicals include treatment with aphidicolin, a polymerase alpha inhibitor for G1 arrest, treatment with colchicine and nocodazole, both of which interfere with mitotic spindle formation to halt cells in M phase and finally, treatment with the DNA chain terminator 5-fluorodeoxyridine to initiate S phase arrest. Treatment with these chemicals is an effective means of synchronizing an entire population of cells at a particular phase. With removal of the chemical, cells rejoin the cell cycle in unison. Treatment of the test agent following release from the cell cycle blocking chemical ensures that the drug response elicited is from a uniform, cell cycle stage-specific population. However, since many of the chemical synchronizers are known genotoxic compounds, teasing apart the participation of various response pathways (to the synchronizers vs. the test agents) is challenging. Here we describe a metabolic labeling method for following a subpopulation of actively cycling cells through their progression from the DNA replication phase, through to the division and separation of their daughter cells. Coupled with flow cytometry quantification, this protocol enables for measurement of kinetic progression of the cell cycle in the absence of either mechanically- or chemically- induced cellular stresses commonly associated with other cell cycle synchronization methodologies. In the following sections we will discuss the methodology, as well as some of its applications in biomedical research. PMID:22665142

  4. Energy-related atomic and molecular structure and scattering studies. Annual progress report, July 1, 1979-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Bederson, B.

    1980-03-01

    The basic goals of this program concern the experimental determination of properties of atoms and simple molecules that are important in a wide range of energy-related processes. In particular we have initiated measurements of polarizabilities of highly polar molecules and dimers, and of a number of atoms distributed through the periodic table, and, of the scattering of low energy electrons by highly polar molecules. For this latter series of measurements an entirely new apparatus has been designed and its external components have been completed. A new electron optics assembly has also been designed and is currently under construction. Details of all these projects are presented; analysis and data of the polarizability measurements are also given.

  5. Laser Sounder for Global Measurement of CO2 Concentrations in the Troposphere from Space: Progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Krainak, M.; Riris, H. J.; Sun, X.; Riris, H.; Andrews, A. E.; Collatz, J.

    2004-01-01

    We describe progress toward developing a laser-based technique for the remote measurement of the tropospheric CO2 concentrations from orbit. Our goal is to demonstrate a lidar technique and instrument technology that will permit measurements of the CO2 column abundance in the lower troposphere from aircraft at the few ppm level, with a capability of scaling to permit global CO2 measurements from orbit. Accurate measurements of the tropospheric CO2 mixing ratio from space are challenging due to the many potential error sources. These include possible interference from other trace gas species, the effects of temperature, clouds, aerosols & turbulence in the path, changes in surface reflectivity, and variability in dry air density caused by changes in atmospheric pressure, water vapor and topographic height. Some potential instrumental errors include frequency drifts in the transmitter, small transmission and sensitivity drifts in the instrument. High signal-to-noise ratios and measurement stability are needed for mixing ratio estimates at the few ppm level. We have been developing a laser sounder approach as a candidate for a future space mission. It utilizes multiple different laser transmitters to permit simultaneous measurement of CO2 and O2 extinction, and aerosol backscatter in the same measurement path. It directs the narrow co-aligned laser beams from the instrument's fiber lasers toward nadir, and measures the energy of the strong laser echoes reflected from the Earth's land and water surfaces. During the measurement its narrow linewidth lasers are rapidly tuned on- and off- selected CO2 line near 1572 nm and an O2 absorption line near 770 nm. The receiver measures the energies of the laser echoes from the surface and any clouds and aerosols in the path with photon counting detectors. Ratioing the on- to off-line echo pulse energies for each gas permits the column extinction and column densities of CO2 and O2 to be estimated simultaneously via the

  6. Laser Sounder for Global Measurement of CO2 Concentrations in the Lower Troposphere from Space: Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Krainak, M. A.; Riris, H.; Sun, X.; Burris, J.; Gates, A.; Collatz, J.

    2004-12-01

    We describe progress toward developing a laser-based technique for the remote measurement of the tropospheric CO2 concentrations from orbit. Our goal is to demonstrate a lidar technique and instrument technology that will permit measurements of the CO2 column abundance in the lower troposphere from aircraft at the few ppm level, with a capability of scaling to permit global CO2 measurements from orbit. Accurate measurements of the tropospheric CO2 mixing ratio from space are challenging due to the many potential error sources. These including possible interference from other trace gas species, the effects of temperature, clouds, aerosols & turbulence in the path, changes in surface reflectivity, and variability in dry air density caused by changes in atmospheric pressure, water vapor and topographic height. Some potential instrumental errors include frequency drifts in the transmitter, small transmission and sensitivity drifts in the instrument. High signal-to-noise ratios and measurement stability are needed for mixing ratio estimates at the few ppm level. We have been developing a laser sounder approach as a candidate for a future space mission. It utilizes multiple different laser transmitters to permit simultaneous measurement of CO2 and O2 extinction, and aerosol backscatter in the same measurement path. It directs the narrow co-aligned laser beams from the instrument's fiber lasers toward nadir, and measures the energy of the strong laser echoes reflected from the Earth's land and water surfaces. During the measurement its narrow linewidth lasers are rapidly tuned on- and off- selected CO2 line near 1572 nm and an O2 absorption line near 770 nm. The receiver measures the energies of the laser echoes from the surface and any clouds and aerosols in the path with photon counting detectors. Ratioing the on- to off-line echo pulse energies for each gas permits the column extinction and column densities of CO2 and O2 to be estimated simultaneously via the

  7. The Science and Engineering of Durable Ultralow PGM Catalysts- 2012 DOE-EERE-FCT annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Garzon, Fernando H.

    2012-07-16

    Minimizing the quantity of Pt group metals used in polymer membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is one of the remaining grand challenges for fuel cell commercialization. Tremendous progress has been achieved over the last two decades in decreasing the Pt loading required for efficient fuel cell performance. Unfortunately, the fluctuations in the price of Pt represent a substantial barrier to the economics of widespread fuel cell use. Durability and impurity tolerance are also challenges that are tightly coupled to fuel cell Pt electrode loading. Traditional approaches to decreasing the amount of Pt required for good performance include: (1) Increasing mass activity by decreasing Pt particle size by supporting on carbon; (2) Alloy formulation Pt-Co, Pt-Cr alloys to improve mass activity; (3) Increasing Pt utilization by optimization of electronic and ionic contact of the Pt particles; (4) Improving conductivity of the electronic and ionic conducting constituents of the membrane electrode assembly; and (5) Improving reactant to and product mass transport away from the electroactive sites. Recent novel approaches include the nanoengineering of core shell catalysts and Pt particles of unusual geometries such as nanowires/whiskers. The success of the aforementioned approaches has been great; however further advances using such approaches have been hampered by a lack of underlining scientific understanding of the catalyst activity, particle growth mechanisms, and optimization strategies for designing composite electrodes The objectives of this report are: (1) Development of durable, high mass activity Platinum Group Metal (PGM) cathode catalysts-enabling lower cost fuel cells; (2) Elucidation of the fundamental relationships between PGM catalyst shape, particle size and activity to help design better catalysts; (3) Optimization of the cathode electrode layer to maximize the performance of PGM catalysts-improving fuel cell performance and lowering cost; (4) Understanding the

  8. Development of advanced in situ techniques for chemistry monitoring and corrosion mitigation in SCWO environments. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Z.; Zhou, X.Y.; Lvov, S.N.; Macdonald, D.D.

    1997-10-01

    'This report evaluates the first year''s results of the research on the development of advanced electrochemical sensors for use in high subcritical and supercritical aqueous environments. The work has emphasized the designing of an advanced reference electrode, and the development of high-temperature pH and redox sensors for characterizing the fundamental properties of supercritical aqueous solutions. Also, electrochemical noise sensors have been designed for characterizing metal/water interactions, including corrosion processes. A test loop has been designed and constructed to meet the expected operation conditions. The authors have also developed an approach to define a practical pH scale for use with supercritical aqueous systems and an operational electrochemical thermocell was tested for pH measurements in HCl + NaCl aqueous solutions. The potentials of the thermocell for several HCl(aq) solutions of different concentrations have been measured over wide ranges of temperature from 25 to 400 C and for flow rates from 0.1 to 1.5 cm min{sup -1} . The corresponding pH differences ({Delta}pH) for two HCl(aq) concentrations in 0.1 NaCl(aq) solution have been experimentally derived and thermodynamically analyzed. Their first experimental measurements, and subsequent theoretical analysis, clearly demonstrate the viability of pH measurements in high subcritical and supercritical aqueous solutions with a high accuracy of \\2610.02 to 0.05 units.'

  9. [Surfaces and thin films studied by picosecond ultrasonics]. Annual progress report, [December 1, 1993--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Maris, H.J.

    1994-10-01

    We are using picosecond optics techniques to perform ultrasonic and thermal transport measurements on thin films and nanostructures. We are investigating the basic physics of sound and phonon propagation in solids, and also attempting to develop practical techniques for the ultrasonic evaluation of thin-film nanostructures.

  10. Progress towards an electron electric dipole moment measurement with laser-cooled atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solmeyer, Neal

    This dissertation recounts the progress made towards a measurement of the electron electric dipole moment. The existence of a permanent electric dipole moment of any fundamental particle would imply that both time reversal and parity invariance are violated. If an electric dipole moment were measured within current experimental limits it would be the first direct evidence for physics beyond the standard model. For our measurement we use laser-cooled alkali atoms trapped in a pair of 1D optical lattices. The lattices run through three electric field plates so that the two groups of atoms see opposing electric fields. The measurement chamber is surrounded by a four layer mu-metal magnetic shield. Under electric field quantization, the atoms are prepared in a superposition of magnetic sublevels that is sensitive to the electron electric dipole moment in Ramsey-like spectroscopy. The experiment requires very large electric fields and very small magnetic fields. Engineering a system compatible with both of these goals simultaneously is not trivial. Searches for electric dipole moments using neutral atoms in optical lattices have much longer possible interaction times and potentially give more precise information about the inherent symmetry breaking than other methods. This comes at the cost of a higher sensitivity to magnetic fields and possible sources of error associated with the trapping light. If noise and systematic errors can be controlled to our design specifications our experiment will significantly improve the current experimental limit of the electron electric dipole moment.

  11. Monitoring breast tumor progression by photoacoustic measurements: a xenograft mice model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priya, Mallika; Satish Rao, Bola Sadashiva; Chandra, Subhash; Datta, Anirbit; Nayak, Subramanya G.; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2015-10-01

    The current study reports the photoacoustic spectroscopy-based assessment of breast tumor progression in a nude mice xenograft model. The tumor was induced through subcutaneous injection of MCF-7 cells in female nude mice and was monitored for 20 days until the tumor volume reached 1000 mm3. The tumor tissues were extracted at three different time points (days 10, 15, and 20) after tumor inoculation and subjected to photoacoustic spectral recordings in time domain ex vivo at 281 nm pulsed laser excitations. The spectra were converted into the frequency domain using the fast Fourier transformed tools of MATLAB® algorithms and further utilized to extract seven statistical features (mean, median, area under the curve, variance and standard deviation, skewness and kurtosis) from each time point sample to assess the tumor growth with wavelet principal component analysis based logistic regression analysis performed on the data. The prediction accuracies of the analysis for day 10 versus day 15, day 15 versus day 20, and day 10 versus day 20 were found to be 92.31, 87.5, and 95.2%, respectively. Also, receiver operator characteristics area under the curve analysis for day 10 versus day 15, day 15 versus day 20, and day 10 versus day 20 were found to be 0.95, 0.85, and 0.93, respectively. The ability of photoacoustic measurements in the objective assessment of tumor progression has been clearly demonstrated, indicating its clinical potential.

  12. Reservoir characterization by crosshole seismic imaging. Semi-annual progress report, 15 September 1991--14 September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Turpening, R.

    1992-06-10

    This report covers the investigation on the field use of crosshole measurements in reservoir characterization. This investigation was planned for a four year effort. (Year 1) Preparation. (Year 2) Use of vertically polarized shear waves. (Year 3) Addition of horizontally polarized shear waves. (Year 4) Present static image of reservoir properties and observe the time varying phenomena in reservoir by reshooting high frequency compressional (P) survey. This report covers the first six months of the third year.

  13. TFTR Experimental Data Analysis Collaboration. Annual Progress Report covering the period November 15, 1993 - November 14, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Callen, J.D.

    1994-06-01

    The research performed during the third year of this grant concentrated on a few key TFTR experimental data analysis issues: (1) characterization of MHD mode activity in TFTR; (2) comparison of low mode number MHD modes with neoclassical MHD theory; (3) further developments in local electron heat transient transport measurements; and (4) some other topics. Emphasis is placed on differences in these characteristics in DT and DD plasmas.

  14. Novel techniques for slurry bubble column hydrodynamics. Annual technical progress report No. 1, July 1, 1995--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Dudukovic, M.P.; Fan, L.S.; Chang, Min

    1997-05-01

    The objective of this cooperative research effort between Washington University, Ohio State University and Exxon Research and Engineering Company is to improve the basis for scale-up and operation of slurry bubble column reactors for syngas conversion and other coal conversion processes by increased reliance on experimentally verified hydrodynamic models. The first year of this three year program was spent on developing and tuning the experimental tools that can provide accurate measurement of pertinent hydrodynamic quantities, such as velocity field and holdup distribution, for validation of hydrodynamic models. Advances made in preparing the unique Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracing (CARPT) technique for use in high pressure systems are described in this report The work done on developing a reliable beat transfer coefficient measurement probe at operating conditions of interest is also described. Finally, the work done in preparing the Exxon pilot plant facilities for high pressure runs and pertinent hydrodynamic measurements is outlined together with preliminary studies of matching the fluid dynamics program predictions and data in a two dimensional column.

  15. Novel ceramic-polymer composite membranes for the separation of hazardous liquid waste. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Y.

    1998-06-01

    'This report summarizes the work progress over the last 1.75 years of a 3 year project. The objectives of the project have been to develop a new class of ceramic-supported polymeric membranes that could be tailored-designed for a wide-range of applications in remediation and pollution prevention. To date, a new class of chemically-modified ceramic membranes was developed for the treatment of oil-in-water emulsions and for the pervaporation removal of volatile organics from aqueous systems. These new ceramic-supported polymer (CSP) membranes are fabricated by modifying the pore surface of a ceramic membrane support by a graft polymerization process (Chaimberg and Cohen, 1994). The graft polymerization process consists of activating the membrane surface with alkoxy vinyl silanes onto which vinyl monomers are added via free-radical graft polymerization resulting in a thin surface layer of terminally anchored polymer chains. Reaction conditions are selected based on knowledge of the graft polymerization kinetics for the specific polymer/substrate system. The resultant ceramic-supported polymer (CSP) membrane is a composite structure in which mechanical strength is provided by the ceramic support and the selectivity is determined by the covalently bonded polymer brush layer. Thus, one of the unique attributes of the CSP membrane is that it can be used in environments where the polymer layer is swollen (or even completely miscible) in the mixture to be separated (Castro et al., 1993). It is important to note that the above modification process is carried out under mild conditions (e.g., temperature of about 70 C) and is well suited for large scale commercial application. In a series of studies, the applicability of a polyvinylpyrrolidone CSP membrane was demonstrated for the treatment of oil-in-water emulsion under a variety of flow conditions (Castro et al.,1996). Improved membrane performance was achieved due to minimization of surface adsorption of the oil components

  16. The annual radiation balance of the earth-atmosphere system during 1969-70 from Nimbus 3 measurements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raschke, E.; Vonder Haar, T. H.; Bandeen, W. R.; Pasternak , M.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of reflected solar radiation and emitted thermal radiation taken with a radiometer on the meteorological satellite Nimbus 3 during 10 semi-monthly periods (April-15 August, 3-17 October, 1969; 21 January-3 February, 1970) provided for the first time high-resolution data on the earth's annual global radiation budget. Results on the planetary albedo, the amount of absorbed solar radiation, the infrared radiation loss to space, and the radiation balance of the earth-atmosphere system are discussed at various scales: global, hemispherical, and zonal averages; as well as global and polar maps with a spatial resolution of about synoptic scale.

  17. Laser trapping of Ra-225 and Ra-226 and progress towards an electric dipole moment measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guest, J. R.; Scielzo, N. D.; Ahmad, I.; Bailey, K.; Greene, J. P.; Holt, R. J.; Lu, Z.-T.; O'Connor, T. P.; Potterveld, D. H.

    2006-10-01

    Permanent electric dipole moments (EDMs) in atoms or molecules are signatures of Time (T)-and Parity (P)-violation and represent an important window onto physics beyond the Standard Model. We are developing a next generation EDM search around laser-cooled and trapped Ra-225 (t1/2 = 15 d). Due to octupole deformation of the nucleus, Ra-225 is predicted to be two to three orders of magnitude more sensitive to T-violating interactions than Hg-199, which currently sets the most stringent limits in the nuclear sector. We will discuss our progress, including the successful laser cooling and trapping of Ra-225 and Ra-226 atoms. We have demonstrated transverse cooling, Zeeman slowing, and capture of Ra-225 and Ra-226 atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). By driving a second atomic transition, we have extended the lifetime of the trap from milliseconds to seconds and performed necessary spectroscopic measurements.

  18. Designing and measuring the progress and impact of health research capacity strengthening initiatives

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Strengthening capacity in poorer countries to generate multi-disciplinary health research and to utilise research findings, is one of the most effective ways of advancing the countries' health and development. This paper explores current knowledge about how to design health research capacity strengthening (RCS) programmes and how to measure their progress and impact. It describes a systematic, evidence-based approach for designing such programmes and highlights some of the key challenges that will be faced in the next 10 years. These include designing and implementing common frameworks to facilitate comparisons among capacity strengthening projects, and developing monitoring indicators that can capture their interactions with knowledge users and their impact on changes in health systems.

  19. 1995 Annual report on waste generation and waste mainization progress as required by DOE order 5400.1, Hanford site

    SciTech Connect

    Betsch, M.D.

    1996-09-24

    While waste generation numbers are important, the true measure of success is waste minimized. Many Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention (WMin/P2) successes at the Hanford Site occur every day without formal recognition as pollution prevention, as they have become part of a culture of best management practices. As an example, the success of the excess and reuse program, both informal and formal, documents the Wmin/P2 culture that exists in the pollution prevention representatives and employees at the facilities.

  20. PREDICTING FOOT PROGRESSION ANGLE DURING GAIT USING TWO CLINICAL MEASURES IN HEALTHY ADULTS, A PRELIMINARY STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Winters, Kyle; Kampwerth, Teri; McAfee, Blake; Payne, Lisa; Roeckenhaus, Tara; Ross, Sandy A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background The foot progression angle (FPA) is related to the transverse plane rotation of the lower extremities and associated with many lower extremity conditions. Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine how two commonly used clinical measures, tibio-fibular torsion (TF) and hip rotation, can be used to predict FPA during gait in healthy adults. Study Design Cross-sectional study design Methods Passive hip internal and external rotation ranges of motion and TF torsion were measured with a 12-inch goniometer while the FPA (degree of toe-in/out) was measured with the GAITRite during midstance in sixty participants. The data was analyzed using a multiple regression model. Results Hip ER was not significant and was therefore excluded from the final model. The final model included passive hip IR and TF torsion (F = 19.64; p < .001; multiple R2 = .41; adjusted R2 = .39). Simple binary correlations showed that hip IR had a moderate negative correlation (r = -.40) with FPA (the greater the hip IR, the greater the in-toeing) while TF torsion had a positive correlation (r = .39) with FPA (the greater the external TF torsion. the greater the out-toeing). Conclusions Greater amount of passive hip IR predicts in-toeing while greater TF torsion predicts out-toeing of the foot during midstance phase of gait. Level of Evidence Level 2 PMID:27274426

  1. Progress Toward an Absolute Measurement of Electron Impact Excitation of Si^2+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisenfeld, D. B.; Janzen, P. H.; Gardner, L. D.; Kohl, J. L.

    1997-04-01

    We are in the process of measuring the electron impact excitation (EIE) absolute rate coefficients for Si^2+(3s^2 ^1S - 3s3p ^1P) and Si^2+(3s3p ^3P^o - 3p^2 ^3P) for energies near threshold. A beams modulation technique with inclined electron and ion beams is being used. The radiation from the excited ions at λ 120.6 nm and λ 130.0 nm is detected using an absolutely calibrated optical system that subtends slightly over π steradians. The population of the Si^2+(3s3p ^3P^o) metastable state in the incident ion beam is determined by making an absolute measurement of the intensity of the λ 189.2 nm light from the beam due to radiative decay of the metastable state(G. P. Layfatis and J. L. Kohl, Phys. Rev. A 36), 59 (1987).. Because of the high density of overlapping resonances above threshold, the cross sections should exhibit a complex energy dependence(D. C. Griffin et al)., Phys. Rev. A 47, 2871 (1993).. We expect to resolve some of this structure. Research progress and the experimental apparatus will be described. There are no previous measurements of EIE in a Mg-like system, nor of EIE in a metastable ion. This work was supported in part by NASA Supporting Research and Technology Program in Solar Physics grant NAGW-1687 and NASA Training Grant NGT-51081.

  2. PROGRESS IN TUNE, COUPLING, AND CHROMATICITY MEASUREMENT AND FEEDBACK DURING RHIC RUN 7

    SciTech Connect

    CAMERON,P.; DELLAPENNA, A.; HOFF, L.; LUO, Y.; MARUSIC, A.; SCHULTHEISS, C.; TEPIKIAN, S.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    Tune feedback was first implemented in RHIC in 2002, as a specialist activity. The transition of the tune feedback system to full operational status was impeded by dynamic range problems, as well as by overall loop instabilities driven by large coupling. The dynamic range problem was solved by the CERN development of the Direct Diode Detection Analog Front End. Continuous measurement of all projections of the betatron eigenmodes made possible the world's first implementation of coupling feedback during beam acceleration, resolving the problem of overall loop instabilities. Simultaneous tune and coupling feedbacks were utilized as specialist activities for ramp development during the 2006 RHIC run. At the beginning of the 2007 RHIC run there remained two obstacles to making these feedbacks fully operational in RHIC - chromaticity measurement and control, and the presence of strong harmonics of the power line frequency in the betatron spectrum. We report on progress in tune, coupling, and chromaticity measurement and feedback, and discuss the relevance of our results to LHC commissioning.

  3. 75 FR 30780 - National Conference on Weights and Measures 95th Annual Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    .... ] Commercial Hydrogen Gas Measuring Devices Item 360-1. Tentative Code for Hydrogen Gas-Measuring Devices--The... commercial measuring equipment used to deliver hydrogen fuel to highway vehicles, which are currently... Development of Commercial Hydrogen Measurement Standards that included key stakeholders and experts...

  4. A Portfolio Analysis Tool for Measuring NASAs Aeronautics Research Progress toward Planned Strategic Outcomes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tahmasebi, Farhad; Pearce, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Description of a tool for portfolio analysis of NASA's Aeronautics research progress toward planned community strategic Outcomes is presented. The strategic planning process for determining the community Outcomes is also briefly described. Stakeholder buy-in, partnership performance, progress of supporting Technical Challenges, and enablement forecast are used as the criteria for evaluating progress toward Outcomes. A few illustrative examples are also presented.

  5. A COMPARISON OF WINTER SHORT-TERM AND ANNUAL AVERAGE RADON MEASUREMENTS IN BASEMENTS OF A RADON-PRONE REGION AND EVALUATION OF FURTHER RADON TESTING INDICATORS

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Nirmalla G.; Steck, Daniel J.; Field, R. William

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate the temporal variability between basement winter short-term (7 to 10 days) and basement annual radon measurements. Other objectives were to test the short-term measurement’s diagnostic performance at two reference levels and to evaluate its ability to predict annual average basement radon concentrations. Electret ion chamber (short-term) and alpha track (annual) radon measurements were obtained by trained personnel in Iowa residences. Overall, the geometric mean of the short-term radon concentrations (199 Bq m−3) was slightly greater than the geometric mean of the annual radon concentrations (181 Bq m−3). Short-term tests incorrectly predicted that the basement annual radon concentrations would be below 148 Bq m−3 12% of the time and 2% of the time at 74 Bq m−3. The short-term and annual radon concentrations were strongly correlated (r=0.87, p<0.0001). The foundation wall material of the basement was the only significant factor to have an impact on the absolute difference between the short-term and annual measurements. The findings from this study provide evidence of a substantially lower likelihood of obtaining a false negative result from a single short-term test in a region with high indoor radon potential when the reference level is lowered to 74 Bq m−3. PMID:24670901

  6. Annual Continuation And Progress Report For Low-Energy Nuclear Physics Research At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Scielzo, N. D.; Wu, C.

    2015-10-27

    (I)In this project, the Beta-­decay Paul Trap, an open-­geometry RFQ ion trap that can be instrumented with sophisticated radiation detection arrays, is used for precision β-­decay studies. Measurements of β-­decay angular correlations, which are sensitive to exotic particles and other phenomena beyond the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics that may occur at the TeV-­energy scale, are being performed by taking advantage of the favorable properties of the mirror 8Li and 8B β± decays and the benefits afforded by using trapped ions. By detecting the β and two α particles emitted in these decays, the complete kinematics can be reconstructed. This allows a simultaneous measurement of the β-­n, β-­n-­α, and β-α correlations and a determination of the neutrino energy and momentum event by event. In addition, the 8B neutrino spectrum, of great interest in solar neutrino oscillation studies, can be determined in a new way. Beta-­delayed neutron spectroscopy is also being performed on neutron-­rich isotopes by studying the β-­decay recoil ions that emerge from the trap with high efficiency, good energy resolution, and practically no backgrounds. This novel technique is being used to study isotopes of mass-­number A~130 in the vicinity of the N=82 neutron magic number to help understand the rapid neutron-­capture process (r-­process) that creates many of the heavy isotopes observed in the cosmos. (II)A year-long CHICO2 campaign at ANL/ATLAS together with GRETINA included a total of 10 experiments, seven with the radioactive beams from CARIBU and three with stable beams, with 82 researchers involved from 27 institutions worldwide. CHICO2 performed flawlessly during this long campaign with achieved position resolution matching to that of GRETINA, which greatly enhances the sensitivity in the study of nuclear γ-­ray spectroscopy. This can be demonstrated in our results on 144Ba and 146

  7. Measurement of solids motion in gas-fluidized beds. Technical progress report, 1 October 1982-31 December 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.M.; Chao, B.T.

    1982-01-01

    This technical progress report covers the progress made during the fifth quarter of the project entitled Measurements of Solids Motion in Gas Fluidized Beds under Grant No. DOE-F22-81PC40804 during the period 1 October through 31 December 1982. The research concerns the measurement of solids particle velocity distribution and residence time distribution using the Computer-Aided Particle Tracking Facility (CAPTF) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The experimental equipment and measuring methods used to determine particle size distribution and particle motion and the results obtained are presented.

  8. Curriculum-Based Measurement in Science Learning: Vocabulary-Matching as an Indicator of Performance and Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espin, Christine A.; Busch, Todd W.; Lembke, Erica S.; Hampton, David D.; Seo, Kyounghee; Zukowski, Beth A.

    2013-01-01

    The technical adequacy of curriculum-based measures in the form of short and simple vocabulary-matching probes to predict students' performance and progress in science at the secondary level was investigated. Participants were 198 seventh-grade students from 10 science classrooms. Curriculum-based measurements (CBM) were 5-min…

  9. Environmental management technology demonstration and commercialization. Semi-annual progress report, April 1, 1995--October 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    Several field-portable (e.g., gas chromatrography (GC), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)) instruments are available for the measurement of organic pollutants. However, solid samples such as soils, sludges, and sediments must first be extracted before analysis can be performed. Conventional extraction methods based on liquid solvent (e.g., Soxhlet extraction) are not practical in the field because of the large volumes fo solvents required as well as clumsy apparatus and glassware. However, supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) has been demonstrated in several studies by the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERS) to extract a broad range of organic pollutants from soils and sediments successfully. Of the approximately 100 major organic pollutants identified as problems for the US Department of Energy (DOE) sites, our SFE laboratory has demonstrated efficient SFE recoveries for about half, and published literature has addressed an additional 40%. SFE in the off-line mode (i.e., collection of extracted organics in a small voluem of liquid solvent) has also been demonstrated to be easily performed in the field with only generator electrical power for support. Recent advances in flow restrictor design have virtually eliminated the mechanical problems previously associated with the performance of SFE in the field.

  10. Southern ocean controls on current ice shelf evolution. Annual progress report, September 1, 1993--August 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hellmer, H.H.; Jacobs, S.S.

    1994-04-01

    A seasonal cycle of shelf water temperatures and salinities observed at the eastern Ross Ice Shelf edge was used to force a two-dimensional thermohaline circulation model adapted to two different sub-ice cavity paths around Roosevelt Island. Model results verified by current meter measurements reveal that shelf water flowing into the cavity west of Roosevelt Island might follow a sub-ice path with nearly constant water column thickness of 200 m. This would largely exclude the grounding line of the northern Siple Coast from the contact with open ocean water masses. In contrast to the forcing with time-independent summer profiles, seasonal forcing causes a higher spatial and temporal variability of the cavity`s circulation and property distribution. At the model`s open boundaries the intermitted inflow of shelf water displaces the meltwater outflow originating from the interior ice shelf base to greater depth and initiates an additional shallow meltwater plume. The average melting along the ice shelf base increases from 0.07 m/a to 0.38.m/a due to seasonality in shelf water characteristics, and to 2.3 m/a, if we introduce a 100-year temperature rise of 1{degree}C. The rate decreases, if salinity simultanously decreases; a possible scenario, if the enhanced meltwater outflow mixes with shelf water in front of the ice shelves.

  11. Chemical interactions between protein molecules and polymer membrane materials. Annual progress report, February 1, 1994--October 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, J.A.; Belfort, G.

    1994-08-25

    During the past year, the authors have used the Surface Forces Apparatus (SFA) to measure the intermolecular forces between a model protein (hen egg-white lysozyme) and a model hydrophilic surface (mica), between lysozyme and itself and between lysozyme and a model hydrophobic surface composed of a crosslinked alkoxysilane surfactant (hexadecyltriethoxysilane, HTE). As expected, repulsive forces are dominant between the hydrophilic surfaces with the same charge (lysozyme-lysozyme) while attractive forces are dominant between oppositely charged surfaces (lysozyme-mica) and between the lysozyme and the hydrophobic surface. The DLVO theory for charged surfaces was found to agree with the results of the lysozyme-lysozyme interaction. Efforts also have been focused on trying to create a well-formed, defect-free monolayer of the HTE on the surface of the mica using a Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) apparatus. A smooth, defect-free surface is desired for the intermolecular force studies. Atomic force microscopy has been used to determine the topography of the HTE films.

  12. Nuclear chemistry research and spectroscopy with radioactive sources. Twenty-first annual progress report, February 1, 1985-January 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, R.W.

    1985-08-31

    The nuclear chemistry group in the School of Chemistry continues investigating the radioactive decay of nuclei far from stability under this DOE contract. These nuclei are produced with heavy ions from the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) and studied on-line with the University Isotope Separator at Oak Ridge (UNISOR). Radioactive decay represents a unique method for the population of low-energy, low-spin structures in nuclei, and new phenomena which do not occur near stability can be explored. Our research encompasses three aspects of nuclear structure: (1) nuclear spectroscopy with detailed elelt, e elt, Xelt, etc., multiparameter coincidence spectrometry; (2) on-line laser hyperfine structure (hfs) and isotope shift measurements for the determination of nuclear quadrupole moments, nuclear spins, and changes in mean nuclear charge radii as a means of revealing systematic shape changes in nuclei; and (3) theoretical calculations of predictions of nuclear models for comparison with experimental level structures in nuclei studied at UNISOR. 20 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Colloids in groundwater: Their mobilization, subsurface transport, and sorption affinity for toxic chemicals. Annual technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Gschwend, P.M.

    1992-07-10

    Our originally stated objectives included: (1) development of a quantitative source function for colloid mobilization to groundwater, and (2) assessment of the most important colloidal phases to which nonpolar compounds sorb. We have been pursuing a series of studies to elucidate the roles of colloidal phases in subsurface environments. Most notably, we have discovered the critical role of secondary cementitious phases like goethite. We developed a new procedure for measuring ``surface iron oxides`` which is a great improvement over earlier methodologies. Currently, we are developing a unifying model with which we can predict the mobilization of colloids to groundwater flowing through such porous media. Also, we have been able to show that groundwater samples contain colloidal phases in sufficient quantities and of suitable properties to enhance the mobile load of toxic compounds like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Finally, we have synthesized our varied field investigations from sites in Massachusetts, New Jersey, Delaware, Nevada, Connecticut, and New York to yield a protocol for other researchers interested in evaluating colloids in groundwater. These accomplishments are discussed in more detail below. Through these efforts, we have become increasingly convinced of the central role played by colloidal phases in numerous subsurface phenomena controlling contaminant fates.

  14. Financial Measures Conference: Progress in Measuring Financial Conditions of Colleges and Universities. Proceedings of the 1979 Working Conference (Annapolis, Maryland, September 27-28, 1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stich, Judith, Ed.

    Proceedings of the 1979 Financial Measures Conference which assess "Progress in Measuring Financial Conditions of Colleges and Universities" are presented. Focus is the prospective uses of financial indicators and the results of attempts to employ indicators at the institutional, state, regional, and federal levels for management, and policy…

  15. US Physician Practices Spend More Than $15.4 Billion Annually To Report Quality Measures.

    PubMed

    Casalino, Lawrence P; Gans, David; Weber, Rachel; Cea, Meagan; Tuchovsky, Amber; Bishop, Tara F; Miranda, Yesenia; Frankel, Brittany A; Ziehler, Kristina B; Wong, Meghan M; Evenson, Todd B

    2016-03-01

    Each year US physician practices in four common specialties spend, on average, 785 hours per physician and more than $15.4 billion dealing with the reporting of quality measures. While much is to be gained from quality measurement, the current system is unnecessarily costly, and greater effort is needed to standardize measures and make them easier to report. PMID:26953292

  16. Room temperature measurements of volatiles from crushed coal: First annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, J.R.; Halpern, J.B.

    1987-12-10

    At the end of the first year of this project, construction of the grinding apparatus has been completed and preliminary work has been done to optimize the experimental design. Progress was greatly hampered by late delivery of the grinding apparatus. This equipment was specified in October 1986 and ordered by the University in November 1986 and delivered in the middle of June 1987. Other tasks accomplished in the first year included repair, alignment and calibration of subsidiary apparatus including a TGA system and a bomb calorimeter. 6 figs.

  17. 1994 Annual report on waste generation and waste minimization progress as required by DOE Order 5400.1, Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    Many Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention successes at the Hanford Site occur every day without formal recognition. A few of the successful projects are: T-Plant helps facilities reuse equipment by offering decontamination services for items such as gas cylinders, trucks, and railcars, thus saving disposal and equipment replacement costs. Custodial Services reviewed its use of 168 hazardous cleaning products, and, through a variety of measures, replaced them with 38 safer substitutes, one for each task. Scrap steel contaminated with low level radioactivity from the interim stabilization of 107-K and 107-C was decontaminated and sold to a vendor for recycling. Site-wide programs include the following: the Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (P2OA) program at the Hanford site was launched during 1994, including a training class, a guidance document, technical assistance, and goals; control over hazardous materials purchased was achieved by reviewing all purchase requisitions of a chemical nature; the Office Supply Reuse Program was established to redeploy unused or unwanted office supply items. In 1994, pollution prevention activities reduced approximately 274,000 kilograms of hazardous waste, 2,100 cubic meters of radioactive and mixed waste, 14,500,000 kilograms of sanitary waste, and 215,000 cubic meters off liquid waste and waste water. Pollution Prevention activities also saved almost $4.2 million in disposal, product, and labor costs. Overall waste generation increased in 1994 due to increased work and activity typical for a site with an environmental restoration mission. However, without any Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention activities, solid radioactive waste generation at Hanford would have been 25% higher, solid hazardous waste generation would have been 30% higher, and solid sanitary waste generation would have been 60% higher.

  18. Kokanee Stock Status and Contribution of Cabinet Gorge Hatchery, Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho, 1987 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, Edward C.

    1988-05-01

    Estimated kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka abundance in Lake Pend Oreille was 6.01 million during late summer 1987. This estimate is 40% higher than the 1986 estimate and is the second largest population estimate since 1977. Higher abundance is predominantly a result of enhanced fry survival and recruitment. Hatchery-reared fry contribution was 22% of total fry recruitment in 1987, compared to 8% in 1986, and resulted from a fivefold increase in survival. Much of this improvement can be attributed to the large (52 mm) fry produced at Cabinet Gorge Hatchery in 1987 and represents the first measurable contribution of the new hatchery to the kokanee rehabilitation program. Survival of hatchery-reared fry released into Clark Fork River was nearly one-half that of fry released into Sullivan Springs due to poor flow conditions and potentially high predation during migration from Cabinet Gorge Hatchery to Lake Pend Oreille. Wild fry survival was enhanced by early availability of forage (cladocern zooplankton) during fry emergence in late spring. Cladoceran production began three weeks earlier in 1987 than 1986, which resulted from reduced Mysis abundance and earlier thermal stratification of Lake Pend Oreille, which helped segregate cladocerans from mysid predation. Kokanee dry otolith coding was evaluated to provide a reliable long-term mark. Analysis of daily growth increments on otoliths was used successfully in 1987 to differentiate fry from various release sites. The technique will be refined during 1988 to include coding fry otoliths with water temperature fluctuations during hatchery residence. 23 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. PROGRESS OF THE AVNG SYSTEM - ATTRIBUTE VERIFICATION SYSTEM WITH INFORMATION BARRIERS FOR MASS AND ISOTOPICS MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Budnikov, D; Bulatov, M; Jarikhine, I; Lebedev, B; Livke, A; Modenov, A; Morkin, A; Razinkov, S; Safronov, S; Tsaregorodtsev, D; Vlokh, A; Yakovleva, S; Elmont, T; Langner, D; MacArthur, D; Mayo, D; Smith, M; Luke, S J

    2005-05-27

    An attribute verification system (AVNG) with information barriers for mass and isotopics measurements has been designed and its fabrication is nearly completed. The AVNG is being built by scientists at the Russian Federal Nuclear Center-VNIIEF, with support of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Such a system could be used to verify the presence of several unclassified attributes of classified material with no classified information release. The system is comprised of a neutron multiplicity counter and gamma-spectrometry system based on a high purity germanium gamma detector (nominal relative efficiency {at} 1332 keV 50%) and digital gamma-ray spectrometer DSPEC{sup PLUS}. The neutron multiplicity counter is a three ring counter with 164 {sup 3}He tubes. The system was designed to measure prototype containers 491 mm in diameter and 503 mm high. This paper provides a brief history of the project and documents the progress of this effort with drawings and photographs.

  20. Simulation and measurement of optical aberrations of injection molded progressive addition lenses.

    PubMed

    Li, Likai; Raasch, Thomas W; Yi, Allen Y

    2013-08-20

    Injection molding is an important mass-production tool in the optical industry. In this research our aim is to develop a process of combining ultraprecision diamond turning and injection molding to create a unique low-cost manufacturing process for progressive addition lenses (PALs). In industry, it is a well-known fact that refractive index variation and geometric deformation of injection molded lenses due to the rheological properties of polymers will distort their optical performance. To address this problem, we developed a method for determining the optical aberrations of the injection molded PALs. This method involves reconstructing the wavefront pattern in the presence of uneven refractive index distribution and surface warpage using a finite element method. In addition to numerical modeling, a measurement system based on a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor was used to verify the modeling results. The measured spherocylindrical powers and aberrations of the PALs were in good agreement with the model. Consequently, the optical aberrations of injection molded PALs were successfully predicted by finite element modeling. In summary, it was demonstrated in this study that numerically based optimization for PAL manufacturing is feasible. PMID:24085007

  1. [New progress on three-dimensional movement measurement analysis of human spine].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xiao-wen; He, Xi-jing; Huang, Si-hua; Liang, Bao-bao; Yu, Zi-rui

    2015-05-01

    Spinal biomechanics, especially the range of spine motion,has close connection with spinal surgery. The change of the range of motion (ROM) is an important indicator of diseases and injuries of spine, and the essential evaluating standards of effect of surgeries and therapies to spine. The analysis of ROM can be dated to the time of the invention of X-ray and even that before it. With the development of science and technology as well as the optimization of various types of calculation methods, diverse measuring methods have emerged, from imaging methods to non-imaging methods, from two-dimensional to three-dimensional, from measuring directly on the X-ray films to calculating automatically by computer. Analysis of ROM has made great progress, but there are some older methods cannot meet the needs of the times and disappear, some classical methods such as X-ray still have vitality. Combining different methods, three dimensions and more vivo spine research are the trend of analysis of ROM. And more and more researchers began to focus on vivo spine research. In this paper, the advantages and disadvantages of the methods utilized recently are presented through viewing recent literatures, providing reference and help for the movement analysis of spine. PMID:26193733

  2. Progress of the AVNG System - Attribute Verification System with Information Barriers for Mass Isotopics Measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Budnikov, D.; Bulatov, M.; Jarikhine, I.; Lebedev, B.; Livke, A.; Modenov, A.; Morkin, A.; Razinkov, S.; Tsaregorodtsev, D.; Vlokh, A.; Yakovleva, S.; Elmont, T. H.; Langner, D. C.; MacArthur, D. W.; Mayo, D. R.; Smith, M. K.; Luke, S. J.

    2005-01-01

    An attribute verification system (AVNG) with information barriers for mass and isotopics measurements has been designed and its fabrication is nearly completed. The AVNG is being built by scientists at the Russian Federal Nuclear Center-VNIIEF, with support of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Such a system could be used to verify the presence of several unclassified attributes of classified material with no classified information release. The system is comprised of a neutron multiplicity counter and gamma-spectrometry system based on a high purity germanium gamma detector (nominal relative efficiency @ 1332 keV 50%) and digital gamma-ray spectrometer DSPEC{sup PLUS}. The neutron multiplicity counter is a three ring counter with 164 {sup 3}He tubes. The system was designed to measure prototype containers 491 mm in diameter and 503 mm high. This paper provides a brief history of the project and documents the progress of this effort with drawings and photographs.

  3. Kokanee Impacts Assessment and Monitoring on Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho, Annual Progress Report for October 1995-September 1996.

    SciTech Connect

    Maiolie, Melo A.

    1998-09-01

    lower than the rate measured for kokanee released at Sullivan Springs. Different size groups of fry were stocked at Sullivan Springs in 1991 and 1992. The largest size group (60 mm total length) returned at the highest rate of 2.1% when they matured. Smaller fry (37 mm and 50 mm total length) returned at a rate of about 1.5%.

  4. Annual laminae as measured using fluorescence in historic stalagmites from Baradla Cave, Aggtelek National Park, Hungary.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beynen, P.; Ford, D.; Schwarcz, H.

    2012-04-01

    Calcite and aragonite speleothems (stalactites and stalagmites) deposited in caves often display fluorescence. It may take the form of couplets of greater and lesser intensity that have been shown to be annual pairs in some carefully controlled instances such as deposits in 20th Century canal tunnels. The variations of intensity are related to seasonal variations in concentrations of fluorophores (chiefly fulvic acids) in the feed water to the speleothem. To test for the possibility and replicability of couplet formation two small stalagmites likely to be of historic age were collected in Baradla Cave, Aggtelek National Park, Hungary, in 1992. This is a large cave in Triassic limestones and dolomites that have been intensely deformed by Carpathian tectonism to allow ready ground water penetration. As a consequence, it is profusely decorated with speleothems and has been a tourist attraction since the 18th Century. The samples were taken ten metres apart in an abandoned river passage at a depth of 40-60 m beneath the surface, which is mantled with terra rossas, rendzinas and luvisols mostly less than 50 cm in thickness. The vegetation cover is deciduous forest with small patches of grassland, spruce and pine. At a nearby meteorological station 30-year mean January and July temperatures are -3.5o C and 18.5o C respectively. Annual mean precipitation is 560 mm, with a summer maximum and actual evapotranspiration less than 400 mm. Samples AGG-1 and -2 were bright white calcite stalagmites 90 and 70 mm in length respectively and 40-50 mm in width. They were growing on the blackened stumps of larger stalagmites that had been taken as souvenirs. Blackening was caused by smoky torches used in the earliest days of tourism, and replaced by lanterns around 1820 CE. 2 mm thick slices were cut perpendicular to the growth axes of the samples, polished, excited by electronic flash gun and photographed at 1/60th second with Kodak TMAX ISO 3200 film, using multiple exposures to

  5. Logopenic and nonfluent variants of primary progressive aphasia are differentiated by acoustic measures of speech production.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Kirrie J; Savage, Sharon; Leyton, Cristian E; Vogel, Adam P; Hornberger, Michael; Hodges, John R

    2014-01-01

    Differentiation of logopenic (lvPPA) and nonfluent/agrammatic (nfvPPA) variants of Primary Progressive Aphasia is important yet remains challenging since it hinges on expert based evaluation of speech and language production. In this study acoustic measures of speech in conjunction with voxel-based morphometry were used to determine the success of the measures as an adjunct to diagnosis and to explore the neural basis of apraxia of speech in nfvPPA. Forty-one patients (21 lvPPA, 20 nfvPPA) were recruited from a consecutive sample with suspected frontotemporal dementia. Patients were diagnosed using the current gold-standard of expert perceptual judgment, based on presence/absence of particular speech features during speaking tasks. Seventeen healthy age-matched adults served as controls. MRI scans were available for 11 control and 37 PPA cases; 23 of the PPA cases underwent amyloid ligand PET imaging. Measures, corresponding to perceptual features of apraxia of speech, were periods of silence during reading and relative vowel duration and intensity in polysyllable word repetition. Discriminant function analyses revealed that a measure of relative vowel duration differentiated nfvPPA cases from both control and lvPPA cases (r(2) = 0.47) with 88% agreement with expert judgment of presence of apraxia of speech in nfvPPA cases. VBM analysis showed that relative vowel duration covaried with grey matter intensity in areas critical for speech motor planning and programming: precentral gyrus, supplementary motor area and inferior frontal gyrus bilaterally, only affected in the nfvPPA group. This bilateral involvement of frontal speech networks in nfvPPA potentially affects access to compensatory mechanisms involving right hemisphere homologues. Measures of silences during reading also discriminated the PPA and control groups, but did not increase predictive accuracy. Findings suggest that a measure of relative vowel duration from of a polysyllable word repetition task

  6. Logopenic and Nonfluent Variants of Primary Progressive Aphasia Are Differentiated by Acoustic Measures of Speech Production

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Kirrie J.; Savage, Sharon; Leyton, Cristian E.; Vogel, Adam P.; Hornberger, Michael; Hodges, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Differentiation of logopenic (lvPPA) and nonfluent/agrammatic (nfvPPA) variants of Primary Progressive Aphasia is important yet remains challenging since it hinges on expert based evaluation of speech and language production. In this study acoustic measures of speech in conjunction with voxel-based morphometry were used to determine the success of the measures as an adjunct to diagnosis and to explore the neural basis of apraxia of speech in nfvPPA. Forty-one patients (21 lvPPA, 20 nfvPPA) were recruited from a consecutive sample with suspected frontotemporal dementia. Patients were diagnosed using the current gold-standard of expert perceptual judgment, based on presence/absence of particular speech features during speaking tasks. Seventeen healthy age-matched adults served as controls. MRI scans were available for 11 control and 37 PPA cases; 23 of the PPA cases underwent amyloid ligand PET imaging. Measures, corresponding to perceptual features of apraxia of speech, were periods of silence during reading and relative vowel duration and intensity in polysyllable word repetition. Discriminant function analyses revealed that a measure of relative vowel duration differentiated nfvPPA cases from both control and lvPPA cases (r2 = 0.47) with 88% agreement with expert judgment of presence of apraxia of speech in nfvPPA cases. VBM analysis showed that relative vowel duration covaried with grey matter intensity in areas critical for speech motor planning and programming: precentral gyrus, supplementary motor area and inferior frontal gyrus bilaterally, only affected in the nfvPPA group. This bilateral involvement of frontal speech networks in nfvPPA potentially affects access to compensatory mechanisms involving right hemisphere homologues. Measures of silences during reading also discriminated the PPA and control groups, but did not increase predictive accuracy. Findings suggest that a measure of relative vowel duration from of a polysyllable word repetition task

  7. 50 CFR 640.28 - Annual catch limits (ACLs) and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE SPINY LOBSTER FISHERY OF THE GULF... accountability measures (AMs). For recreational and commercial spiny lobster landings combined, the ACL is...

  8. [Measurements of surface ocean carbon dioxide partial pressure during WOCE]. Summary of research progress

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    This paper discusses the research progress of the second year of research under ``Measurement of Surface Ocean Carbon Dioxide Partial Pressure During WOCE`` and proposes to continue measurements of underway pCO{sub 2}. During most of the first year of this grant, our efforts to measure pCO{sub 2} on WOCE WHP legs were frustrated by ship problems. The R/V Knorr, which was originally scheduled to carry out the first work on WHP lines P19 and P16 in the southeastem Pacific during the 1990-91 austral summer, was delayed in the shipyard during her mid-life refit for more than a year. In the interim, the smaller R/V Thomas Washington, was pressed into service to carry out lower-latitude portions of WHP lines P16 and P17 during mid-1991 (TUNES Expedition). We installed and operated our underway chromatographic system on this expedition, even though space and manpower on this smaller vessel were limited and no one from our group would be aboard any of the 3 WHP expedition legs. The results for carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide are shown. A map of the cruise track is shown for each leg, marked with cumulative distance. Following each track is a figure showing the carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide results as a function of distance along this track. The results are plotted as dry-gas mole fractions (in ppm and ppb, respectively) in air and in gas equilibrated with surface seawater at a total pressure equal to the barometric pressure. The air data are plotted as a 10-point running mean, and appear as a roughly horizontal line. The seawater data are plotted as individual points, using a 5-point Gaussian smoother. Equal values Of xCO{sub 2} in air and surface seawater indicate air-sea equilibrium.

  9. Medium energy measurements of N-N parameters. Progress report: January 1, 1990--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrose, D.; Bachman, M.; Coffey, P.; Glass, G.; Jobst, B.; McNaughton, K.H.; Nguyen, C.; Riley, P.J.

    1993-10-01

    The authors report here progress made during the three year period January 1, 1990, to December 31, 1993, for the Department of Energy Three-Year Grant No. DE-FG05-88ER40446, third year. A major part of the work has been associated with nucleon-nucleon (N-N) research carried out at the Nucleon Physics Laboratory (NPL) at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). During this period they also completed data acquisition and analyses of a TRIUMF experiment, but they have no further plans for experimental work at TRIUMF. Other research has been and will be continued to be carried out at BNL, and involves two rare kaon decay experiments, BNL E791, now completed, and a second generation rare kaon decay experiment, E871, which has just this summer completed an engineering test run. The authors are now also members of a proposed experiment, STAR, (Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC) to be carried out at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider facility, RHIC, at BNL. The past three years have been a time of rapid change in the focus of the experimental program. A LAMPF experiment, E1097, in which they spent a large amount of effort during the past three years, was terminated due to funding shortages after they had fabricated the detector, but before data acquisition, and consequently they increased their participation in the rare kaon experiment at BNL, E871. It now appears that there will be no LAMPF N-N program after 1993, so that the research efforts will concentrate on the BNL rare kaon decay measurement, E871, and on STAR. The authors expect that STAR, which requires the fabrication of a large colliding beam detector facility, will use an increasing amount of their research efforts during the next few years. In what follows they describe recent progress on the LAMPF and TRIUMF N-N measurements, on the BNL rare kaon decay work, and on the initial work with the STAR group.

  10. River methane hot-spots: Continuous methane ebullition measurements over an annual cycle linked to river sediment production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Jeremy; Maeck, Andreas; Ashboul, Zeyad; Lorke, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Hot spot methane ebullition from impounded river reaches matches high rates observed around the globe. Ebullition dominates total methane flux in the Saar River (Germany) and is largely determined by sediment deposition rate. Using automated bubble traps developed in-house, and deployed over a year at four sites, we collected high resolution data showing that hydrodynamic disturbances from shipping, lock operations and hydrograph events trigger ebullition episodes. Reverse smoothing was used to integrate the observed ebullition back in time, and helped in visualizing the data, and provides a time-series closer to methane accumulation in the sediments, whereas ebullition shows the triggering and release of the accumulated gas. One major hydrological disturbance of shallow-water sediment released around 13% of the total annual ebullition at that site, and ebullition generally followed the seasonal sediment temperature variations. The same event damped ebullition from deeper water sites. Total annual ebullition values ranged from 200 to 500 gCH4 m-2 yr-1. Ebullition from shallow water sediments in winter ceased for extended periods, but continued un-broken from deeper sites. With on-going measurements we believe these findings will help to improve estimates and the modelling of methane emissions from impounded river systems.

  11. Integrated approach towards the application of horizontal wells to improve waterflooding performance. Annual progress report, January 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Kelkar, M.; Liner, C.; Kerr, D.

    1997-01-01

    This annual report describes the progress during the fourth year of the project on {open_quotes}Integrated Approach Towards the Application of Horizontal Wells to Improve Waterflooding Performance{close_quotes}. The project involves using an integrated approach to characterize the reservoir followed by proposing an appropriate reservoir management strategy to improve the field performance. In the first stage of the project, the type of data we integrated include cross borehole seismic surveys, geological interpretation based on the logs and the cores, and the engineering information. In contrast, during the second stage of the project, we intend to use only conventional data to construct the reservoir description. This report covers the results of the implementation from the first stage of the project. It also discusses the work accomplished so far for the second stage of the project. The production from the Self Unit (location of Stage 1) has sustained an increase of 30 bbls/day over a year with an additional increase anticipated with further implementation. We have collected available core, log and production data from Section 16 in the Berryhill Glenn Unit and have finished the geological description. Based on the geological description and the associated petrophysical properties, we have developed a new indexing procedure for identifying the areas with the most potential. We are also investigating an adjoining tract formerly operated by Chevron where successful miceller-polymer flood was conducted. This will help us in evaluating the reasons for the success of the flood. Armed with this information, we will conduct a detailed geostatistical and flow simulation study and recommend the best reservoir management plan to improve the recovery of the field.

  12. Effects of aqueous effluents from in situ fossil fuel processing technologies on aquatic systems. Annual progress report, January 1-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, H.L.

    1980-01-04

    This is the third annual progress report for a continuing EPA-DOE jointly funded project to evaluate the effects of aqueous effluents from in situ fossil-fuel processing technologies on aquatic biota. The project is organized into four project tasks: (1) literature review; (2) process water screening; (3) methods development; and (4) recommendations. Our Bibliography of aquatic ecosystem effects, analytical methods and treatment technologies for organic compounds in advanced fossil-fuel processing effluents was submitted to the EPA for publication. The bibliography contains 1314 citations indexed by chemicals, keywords, taxa and authors. We estimate that the second bibliography volume will contain approximately 1500 citations and be completed in February. We compiled results from several laboratories of inorganic characterizations of 19 process waters: 55 simulated in situ oil-shale retort waters; and Hanna-3, Hanna-4B 01W and Lawrence Livermore Hoe Creek underground coal gasification condenser waters. These process waters were then compared to a published summary of the analyses from 18 simulated in situ oil-shale retort waters. We completed this year 96-h flow-through toxicity bioassays with fathead minnows and rainbow trout and 48-h flow-through bioassays with Daphnia pulicaria exposed to 5 oil-shale process waters, 1 tar-sand process water, 2 underground coal gasification condenser waters, 1 post-gasification backflood condenser water, as well as 2 bioassays with fossil-fuel process water constituents. The LC/sub 50/ toxicity values for these respective species when exposed to these waters are given in detail. (LTN)

  13. Hydrologic conditions, habitat characteristics, and occurrence of fishes in the Apalachicola River floodplain, Florida; second annual report of progress, October 1993-September 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Light, Helen M.; Darst, Melanie R.; Grubbs, J.W.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes progress and interim results of the second year of a 4-year study. The purpose of the 4-year study is to describe aquatic habitat types in the Apalachicola River floodplain and quantify the amount of habitat inundated by the river at various stages. Final results will be used to determine possible effects of altered flows on floodplain habitats and their associated fish communities. The study is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Northwest Florida Water Management District as part of a comprehensive study of water needs throughout two large river basins in Florida, Georgia, and Alabama. By the end of the second year, approxi- mately 80 to 90 percent of field data collection was completed. Water levels at 56 floodplain and main channel locations at study sites were read numerous times during low water and once or twice during high water. Rating curves estimating the relationship between stage at a floodplain site and flow of the Apalachicola River at Chattahoochee are presented for 3 sites in the upper river. Elevation, substrate type, and amount of vegetative structure were described at 27 cross sections representing eight different floodplain tributary types at upper, middle, and lower river study sites. A summary of substrate and structure information from all cross sections is presented. Substrate and structure characteristics of floodplain habitats inundated when river flow was at record low flow, mean annual low flow, and mean flow are described for 3 cross sections in the upper river. Digital coverage of high-altitude infra-red aerial photography was processed for use in a Geographic Information System which will be used to map aquatic habitats in the third year of the study. A summary of the literature on fish utilization of floodplain habitats is described. Eighty-one percent of the species collected in the main channel of the Apalachicola River are known to occur in floodplain habitats of eastern

  14. Alzheimer's disease progression model based on integrated biomarkers and clinical measures

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yue; Li, Liang; Zhou, Tian-yan; Lu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Biomarkers and image markers of Alzheimer's disease (AD), such as cerebrospinal fluid Aβ42 and p-tau, are effective predictors of cognitive decline or dementia. The aim of this study was to integrate these markers with a disease progression model and to identify their abnormal ranges. Methods: The data of 395 participants, including 86 normal subjects, 108 early mild cognitive impairment (EMCI) subjects, 120 late mild cognitive impairment (LMCI) subjects, and 81 AD subjects were obtained from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database. For the participants, baseline and long-term data on cerebrospinal fluid Aβ42 and p-tau, hippocampal volume, and ADAS-cog were available. Various linear and nonlinear models were tested to determine the associations among the ratio of Aβ42 to p-tau (the Ratio), hippocampal volume and ADAS-cog. Results: The most likely models for the Ratio, hippocampal volume, and ADAS-cog (logistic, Emax, and linear models, respectively) were used to construct the final model. Baseline disease state had an impact on all the 3 endpoints (the Ratio, hippocampal volume, and ADAS-cog), while APOEε4 genotype and age only influence the Ratio and hippocampal volume. Conclusion: The Ratio can be used to identify the disease stage for an individual, and clinical measures integrated with the Ratio improve the accuracy of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to AD conversion forecasting. PMID:25088003

  15. Progress Towards a New Measurement of the Electric Dipole Moment of ^199Hg.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swallows, M. D.; Griffith, W. C.; Heckel, B. R.; Fortson, E. N.; Romalis, M. V.

    2007-06-01

    We are currently undertaking a four vapor cell search for the permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of ^199Hg. The existence of a nonzero EDM would imply a source of CP violation beyond the standard model. The present limit on the EDM of ^199 Hg is |dHg| < 2.1 x10-28 ,,, which was established several years ago by our group at the University of Washington. In that experiment, two quartz vapor cells containing polarized Hg vapor were placed in parallel magnetic and anti-parallel electric fields (the use of two cells permitted the removal of common-mode effects), and the spin precession frequency was measured using an optical technique. In our current experiment, two additional cells at zero electric field serve to cancel magnetic gradient noise and to improve limits on systematic effects due to charging and leakage currents. We have recently overcome several systematic issues and begun acquiring data with our upgraded apparatus. To prevent experimenter bias from influencing the data, we have also instituted a blind analysis protocol. The statistical error of the data at the time of this writing was ±0.15x10-28 e cm, and we hope to improve the sensitivity by a further factor of two. We will discuss recent progress and our plans to place improved limits on systematic effects.

  16. Velocity Measurements at Three Fish Screening Facilities in the Yakima Basin, Washington : Summer 1989 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Abernethy, C. Scott; Neitzel, Duane A.; Lusty, E. William

    1990-09-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) measured the velocity conditions at three fish screening facilities in the Yakima River Basin: Wapato, Chandler, and Easton Screens. The measurement objectives were different at the three screens. At Wapato, approach and sweep velocities were measured to evaluate the effect of rearing pens in the screen forebay. A complete survey was performed at the Chandler Screens. At Easton, velocity was measured behind the screens to provide information for the installation of porosity boards to balance flow through the screens. Salmon-rearing pens used at the Wapato Canal had a minimal effect on the magnitude of approach and sweep velocities at the face of the drum screens, although the pens caused increased turbulence and variability in water velocities. The net pens did not appear to affect flows through the three fish bypasses. 8 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. A century of progress in the sciences due to atomic weight and isotopic composition measurements.

    PubMed

    De Laeter, J R; Peiser, H S

    2003-01-01

    Even before the 20th century, a consistent set of internationally accepted atomic weights was an important objective of the scientific community because of the fundamental importance of these values to science, technology and trade. As the 20th century progressed, physicists, geoscientists, and metrologists collaborated with chemists to revolutionize the science of atomic weights. At the beginning of the century, atomic weights were determined from mass relationships between chemical reactants and products of known stoichiometry. They are now derived from the measured isotopic composition of elements and the atomic masses of the isotopes. Accuracy in measuring atomic weights has improved continually, leading to the revelation of small but significant variations in the isotope abundances of many elements in their normal terrestrial occurrences caused by radioactivity and a variety of physicochemical and biochemical fractionation mechanisms. This atomic-weight variability has now been recognized as providing new scientific insights into and knowledge of the history of materials. Atomic weights, except those of the monoisotopic elements, are thus no longer regarded as "constants of nature". At the beginning of the 20th century, two scales for atomic weights were in common use: that based on the atomic weight of hydrogen being 1 and that based on the atomic weight of oxygen being 16. Atomic weights are now scaled to (12)C, which has the value 12 exactly. Accurate atomic weights of silicon, silver, and argon, have enabled the values of the Avogadro, Faraday and Universal Gas constants, respectively, to be established, with consequent effects on other fundamental constants.

  18. Learning from data: recognizing glaucomatous defect patterns and detecting progression from visual field measurements.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Siamak; Goldbaum, Michael H; Balasubramanian, Madhusudhanan; Medeiros, Felipe A; Zangwill, Linda M; Liebmann, Jeffrey M; Girkin, Christopher A; Weinreb, Robert N; Bowd, Christopher

    2014-07-01

    A hierarchical approach to learn from visual field data was adopted to identify glaucomatous visual field defect patterns and to detect glaucomatous progression. The analysis pipeline included three stages, namely, clustering, glaucoma boundary limit detection, and glaucoma progression detection testing. First, cross-sectional visual field tests collected from each subject were clustered using a mixture of Gaussians and model parameters were estimated using expectation maximization. The visual field clusters were further estimated to recognize glaucomatous visual field defect patterns by decomposing each cluster into several axes. The glaucoma visual field defect patterns along each axis then were identified. To derive a definition of progression, the longitudinal visual fields of stable glaucoma eyes on the abnormal cluster axes were projected and the slope was approximated using linear regression (LR) to determine the confidence limit of each axis. For glaucoma progression detection, the longitudinal visual fields of each eye on the abnormal cluster axes were projected and the slope was approximated by LR. Progression was assigned if the progression rate was greater than the boundary limit of the stable eyes; otherwise, stability was assumed. The proposed method was compared to a recently developed progression detection method and to clinically available glaucoma progression detection software. The clinical accuracy of the proposed pipeline was as good as or better than the currently available methods.

  19. Learning from data: recognizing glaucomatous defect patterns and detecting progression from visual field measurements.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Siamak; Goldbaum, Michael H; Balasubramanian, Madhusudhanan; Medeiros, Felipe A; Zangwill, Linda M; Liebmann, Jeffrey M; Girkin, Christopher A; Weinreb, Robert N; Bowd, Christopher

    2014-07-01

    A hierarchical approach to learn from visual field data was adopted to identify glaucomatous visual field defect patterns and to detect glaucomatous progression. The analysis pipeline included three stages, namely, clustering, glaucoma boundary limit detection, and glaucoma progression detection testing. First, cross-sectional visual field tests collected from each subject were clustered using a mixture of Gaussians and model parameters were estimated using expectation maximization. The visual field clusters were further estimated to recognize glaucomatous visual field defect patterns by decomposing each cluster into several axes. The glaucoma visual field defect patterns along each axis then were identified. To derive a definition of progression, the longitudinal visual fields of stable glaucoma eyes on the abnormal cluster axes were projected and the slope was approximated using linear regression (LR) to determine the confidence limit of each axis. For glaucoma progression detection, the longitudinal visual fields of each eye on the abnormal cluster axes were projected and the slope was approximated by LR. Progression was assigned if the progression rate was greater than the boundary limit of the stable eyes; otherwise, stability was assumed. The proposed method was compared to a recently developed progression detection method and to clinically available glaucoma progression detection software. The clinical accuracy of the proposed pipeline was as good as or better than the currently available methods. PMID:24710816

  20. International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry: 1999 Annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenberg, Nancy R. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This volume of reports is the 1999 Annual Report of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry -IVS. The individual reports were contributed by VLBI groups in the international geodetic community who constitute the components of IVS. The 1999 Annual Report documents the work of the IVS components for the year ending March 1, 1999, the official inauguration date of IVS. As the newest of the space technique services, IVS decided to publish this Annual Report as a reference to our organization and its components. The entire contents of this Annual Report also appear on the IVS website at: http://ivscc.gsfc.nasa.gov/pub/arl999. The IVS 1999 Annual Report will be a valuable reference for information about IVS and its components. This Annual Report will serve as a baseline from which we can measure the anticipated progress of IVS in coming years.

  1. Solar ultraviolet irradiance at Tierra Del Fuego: Comparison of measurements and calculations over a full annual cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Susana B.; Frederick, John E.; Lucas, Timothy; Booth, C. Rocky; Smolskaia, Irina

    A spectroradiometer located at Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina obtained a high quality data set on the solar ultraviolet (UV) spectral irradiance for a full annual cycle during 1992. The unique aspect of the ground-based irradiances is their ability to characterize the effects of cloudiness. Measured irradiances at 340 nm can be used to characterize the attenuation provided by cloudy skies. When irradiances at shorter wavelengths, 302.5-320.0 nm, are adjusted for this attenuation, they show good agreement with radiative transfer calculations which assume clear skies and utilize data from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) as inputs. The differences which exist are qualitatively consistent with the neglect of spherical geometry in the calculated irradiances.

  2. 78 FR 38946 - National Conference on Weights and Measures 98th Annual Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-28

    .... Electricity Sold as Vehicle Fuel.--Electrical energy transferred to and/or stored onboard an electric vehicle... the purpose of measuring, delivering, and computing the price of electrical energy delivered to the... resulting in periods of reduced, and/or interrupted transfer of electrical energy. 2.XX.1.5. Nominal...

  3. 77 FR 66 - Western Pacific Fisheries; 2012 Annual Catch Limits and Accountability Measures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-03

    ... measures (AMs); that process is codified at 50 CFR 665.4 (76 FR 37285, June 27, 2011). The regulations... Island Marine National Monument (74 FR 1565, January 12, 2009), and there is no habitat to support such.... They include all species of gold coral (73 FR 47098, August 13, 2008), all species of...

  4. 78 FR 6798 - Western Pacific Fisheries; 2013 Annual Catch Limits and Accountability Measures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... also provided in the 2012 proposed and final specifications (77 FR 66, January 3, 2012, and 77 FR 6019... measures (AMs); that process is codified at 50 CFR 665.4 (76 FR 37285, June 27, 2011). The regulations... Proclamation 8336, which established the Pacific Remote Island Marine National Monument (74 FR 1565, January...

  5. Expected Annual Emergency Miles per Ambulance: An Indicator for Measuring Availability of Emergency Medical Services Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, P. Daniel; Probst, Janice C.; Moore, Charity G.

    2006-01-01

    Context: To ensure equitable access to prehospital care, as recommended by the Rural and Frontier Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Agenda for the Future, policymakers will need a uniform measure of EMS infrastructure. Purpose and Methods: This paper proposes a county-level indicator of EMS resource availability that takes into consideration…

  6. 50 CFR 622.280 - Annual catch limits (ACLs) and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... accountability measures (AMs). 622.280 Section 622.280 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT... commercial ACL of 1,065,524 lb (483,314 kg), round weight, the AA will file a notification with the Office of... recreational ACL of 13,530,692 lb (6,137,419 kg), round weight, then during the following fishing...

  7. The Resource-Infrastructure-Environment Index for Measuring Progress: An Application to Australia, Mexico and the US

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natoli, Riccardo; Zuhair, Segu

    2013-01-01

    The resource-infrastructure-environment (RIE) index was proposed as an alternative measure of progress which was then employed to: (1) compare the aggregate (single summary) index findings between Australia (mid-industrialised nation), Mexico (emerging economy), and the US (highly industrialised nation); and (2) compare the RIE index against the…

  8. A Tool for Measuring NASA's Aeronautics Research Progress Toward Planned Strategic Community Outcomes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tahmasebi, Farhad; Pearce, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Description of a tool for portfolio analysis of NASA's Aeronautics research progress toward planned community strategic Outcomes is presented. For efficiency and speed, the tool takes advantage of a function developed in Excels Visual Basic for Applications. The strategic planning process for determining the community Outcomes is also briefly discussed. Stakeholder buy-in, partnership performance, progress of supporting Technical Challenges, and enablement forecast are used as the criteria for evaluating progress toward Outcomes. A few illustrative examples of using the tool are also presented.

  9. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes. Annual report, October 1990--September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G.; Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S. |

    1991-12-31

    The overall objective of this program is the development of predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. This program will merge significant advances made in measuring and quantitatively describing the mechanisms in coal conversion behavior. Comprehensive computer codes for mechanistic modeling of entrained-bed gasification. Additional capabilities in predicting pollutant formation will be implemented and the technology will be expanded to fixed-bed reactors.

  10. Measurement and Basic Physics Committee of the U.S. Cross-Section Evaluation Working Group annual report 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.L.; McLane, V.

    1997-10-01

    The Cross-Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) is a long-standing committee charged with responsibility for organizing and overseeing the US cross-section evaluation effort. It`s main product is the official US evaluated nuclear data file, ENDF. In 1992 CSEWG added the Measurements Committee to its list of standing committees and subcommittees. This action was based on a recognition of the importance of experimental data in the evaluation process as well as the realization that measurement activities in the US were declining at an alarming rate and needed considerable encouragement to avoid the loss of this resource. The mission of the Committee is to maintain contact with experimentalists in the Us and to encourage them to contribute to the national nuclear data effort. Improved communication and the facilitation of collaborative activities are among the tools employed in achieving this objective. In 1994 the Committee was given an additional mission, namely, to serve as an interface between the applied interests represented in CSEWG and the basic nuclear science community. Accordingly, its name was changed to the Measurement and Basic Physics Committee. The present annual report is the third such document issued by the Committee. It contains voluntary contributions from several laboratories in the US. Their contributions were submitted to the Chairman for compilation and editing.

  11. The Valuable Role of Measuring Serum Lipid Profile in Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Ghahremanfard, Farahnaz; Mirmohammadkhani, Majid; Shahnazari, Banafsheh; Gholami, Golnaz; Mehdizadeh, Jamileh

    2015-01-01

    Objective Serum lipid levels are not only associated with etiology, but also with prognosis in cancer. To investigate this issue further, we aimed to evaluate the serum levels of lipids in association with the most important prognostic indicators in cancer patients at the start of chemotherapy. Methods In a retrospective cross-sectional study, using existing medical records obtained from 2009–2014, the data of all incident cancer cases in Iranian patients referred to the Semnan oncology clinic for chemotherapy were analyzed. Data on demographics, cancer type, prognostic indicators (e.g. lymph node involvement, metastasis, and stage of disease), as well as the patient’s lipid profile were collected. We used multiple logistic regression models to show the relationship between prognosis indicators and lipid profile adjusting for age, gender, and type of cancer. Results The data of 205 patients was gathered. We found a significant difference in the lipid profile between different types of cancers (breast, colon, gastric, and ovarian). With the exception of high-density lipoprotein levels in women, which were higher than in men, the means of other lipid profiles were similar between the genders. There was a significant association between higher levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL >110mg/dL) in the serum and metastasis (adjusted odds ratio=2.4, 95% CI 1.2–3.5). No significant association was reported between lipid profile and lymph nodes involvement and stage of the disease. Conclusion Our study suggested a benefit of measuring serum levels of lipids for predicting cancer progression. Increased LDL levels can be considered a predictive factor for increasing the risk of metastasis. PMID:26421116

  12. "MARK I" MEASUREMENT METHODOLOGY FOR POLLUTION PREVENTION PROGRESS OCCURRING AS A RESULT OF PRODUCT DECISIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A methodology for assessing progress in pollution prevention resulting from product redesign, reformulation or replacement is described. The method compares the pollution generated by the original product with that from the modified or replacement product, taking into account, if...

  13. Multiyear Multiseasonal Changes in Leaf and Canopy Traits Measured by AVIRIS over Ecosystems with Different Functional Type Characteristics Through the Progressive California Drought 2013-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustin, S.; Roth, K. L.; Huesca, M.; Casas, A.; Adeline, K.; Drewry, D.; Koltunov, A.; Ramirez, C.

    2015-12-01

    Given the known heterogeneity in ecological processes within plant communities in California, we questioned whether the concept of conventional plant functional types (cPFTs) was adequate to characterize the functionality of the dominant species in these communities. We examined seasonal (spring, summer, fall) airborne AVIRIS and MASTER imagery collected during three years of progressive drought in California, and airborne LiDAR acquired once, for ecosystems that represent a wide range of plant functional types, from annual agriculture and herbaceous perennial wetlands, to forests and shrublands, including broadleaf deciduous and evergreen species and conifer species. These data were used to determine the extent to which changes in canopy chemistry could be detected, quantified, and related to leaf and canopy traits that are indicators of physiological functioning (water content, Leaf Mass Area, total C, N, and pigments (chlorophyll a, b, and carotenoids). At the canopy scale we measured leaf area index, and for forests — species, height, canopy area, DBH, deciduous or evergreen, broadleaf or needleleaf, and gap size. Strong correlations between leaf and canopy traits were predictable and quantifiable from spectroscopy data. Key structural properties of canopy height, biomass and complexity, a measure of spatial and vertical heterogeneity, were predicted by AVIRIS and validated against LiDAR data. Our data supports the hypothesis that optical sensors provide more detailed information about the distribution and variability in leaf and canopy traits related to plant functionality than cPFTs.

  14. White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; Annual Progress Report, April 2007 - March 2008.

    SciTech Connect

    Mallette, Christine

    2009-07-28

    We report on our progress from April 2007 through March 2008 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW; Report A), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW; Report B), Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC; Report C), and Montana State University (MSU; Report D). This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete; therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported.

  15. Measurements of carbon dioxide in the Southern Ocean along the WOCE S-4 section. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Chipman, D.W.; Rubin, S.I.; Takahashi, T.

    1992-08-01

    During the fist year of this two-year grant, we have completed the data acquisition phase at sea along the WOCE-S4 section located along 67{degree}S between 73{degree}W and 172{degree}E in the Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean. The expedition was carried out aboard the Russian Research Ship ``Akademik IOFFE`` in the period February 14 through April 6, 1992. The total CO{sub 2} concentration and pCO{sub 2} in a total of about 1290 water samples were determined using a coulometer for total CO{sub 2} and an equilibrator/gas chromatograph system for pCO{sub 2}. Surface water samples were analyzed at all the 112 hydrographic stations occupied. Complete or partial profiles were obtained at 58 stations. In addition, a total of 172 determinations were made at sea for 62 bottles of the Standard Reference Solution.

  16. SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Semi-Annual Progress Report for the Period April 1, 2009 through September 30, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Dean N.; Foster, I. T.; Middleton, D. E.

    2009-10-15

    This report summarizes work carried out by the ESG-CET during the period April 1, 2009 through September 30, 2009. It includes discussion of highlights, overall progress, period goals, collaborations, papers, and presentations. To learn more about our project, and to find previous reports, please visit the Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) website. This report will be forwarded to the DOE SciDAC program management, the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER) program management, national and international collaborators and stakeholders (e.g., the Community Climate System Model (CCSM), the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5), the Climate Science Computational End Station (CCES), the SciDAC II: A Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science, the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP), and other wide-ranging climate model evaluation activities). During this semi-annual reporting period, the ESG-CET team continued its efforts to complete software components needed for the ESG Gateway and Data Node. These components include: Data Versioning, Data Replication, DataMover-Lite (DML) and Bulk Data Mover (BDM), Metrics, Product Services, and Security, all joining together to form ESG-CET's first beta release. The launch of the beta release is scheduled for late October with the installation of ESG Gateways at NCAR and LLNL/PCMDI. Using the developed ESG Data Publisher, the ESG II CMIP3 (IPCC AR4) data holdings - approximately 35 TB - will be among the first datasets to be published into the new ESG enterprise system. In addition, the NCAR's ESG II data holdings will also be published into the new system - approximately 200 TB. This period also saw the testing of the ESG Data Node at various collaboration sites, including: the British Atmospheric Data Center (BADC), the Max-Planck-Institute for Meteorology, the University of Tokyo Center for

  17. Investigatigating inter-/intra-annual variability of surface hydrology at northern high latitude from spaceborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, K.; Duguay, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    Lakes encompass a large part of the surface cover in the northern boreal and tundra areas of northern Canada and are therefore a significant component of the terrestrial hydrological system. To understand the hydrologic cycle over subarctic and arctic landscapes, estimating surface parameters such as surface net radiation, soil moisture, and surface albedo is important. Although ground-based field measurements provide a good temporal resolution, these data provide a limited spatial representation and are often restricted to the summer period (from June to August), and few surface-based stations are located in high-latitude regions. In this respect, spaceborne remote sensing provides the means to monitor surface hydrology and to estimate components of the surface energy balance with reasonable spatial and temporal resolutions required for hydrological investigations, as well as for providing more spatially representative lake-relevant information than available from in situ measurements. The primary objective of this study is to quantify the sources of temporal and spatial variability in surface albedo over subarctic wetland from satellite derived albedo measurements in the Hudson Bay Lowlands near Churchill, Manitoba. The spatial variability in albedo within each land-cover type is investigated through optical satellite imagery from Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper, Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus, and Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager obtained in different seasons from spring into fall (April and October) over a 30-year period (1984-2013). These data allowed for an examination of the spatial variability of surface albedo under relatively dry and wet summer conditions (i.e. 1984, 1998 versus 1991, 2005). A detailed analysis of Landsat-derived surface albedo (ranging from 0.09 to 0.15) conducted in the Churchill region for August is inversely related to surface water fraction calculated from Landsat images. Preliminary analysis of surface albedo observed between

  18. Greenland annual accumulation along the EGIG line, 1959-2004, from ASIRAS airborne radar and neutron-probe density measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overly, Thomas B.; Hawley, Robert L.; Helm, Veit; Morris, Elizabeth M.; Chaudhary, Rohan N.

    2016-08-01

    We report annual snow accumulation rates from 1959 to 2004 along a 250 km segment of the Expéditions Glaciologiques Internationales au Groenland (EGIG) line across central Greenland using Airborne SAR/Interferometric Radar Altimeter System (ASIRAS) radar layers and high resolution neutron-probe (NP) density profiles. ASIRAS-NP-derived accumulation rates are not statistically different (95 % confidence interval) from in situ EGIG accumulation measurements from 1985 to 2004. ASIRAS-NP-derived accumulation increases by 20 % below 3000 m elevation, and increases by 13 % above 3000 m elevation for the period 1995 to 2004 compared to 1985 to 1994. Three Regional Climate Models (PolarMM5, RACMO2.3, MAR) underestimate snow accumulation below 3000 m by 16-20 % compared to ASIRAS-NP from 1985 to 2004. We test radar-derived accumulation rates sensitivity to density using modeled density profiles in place of NP densities. ASIRAS radar layers combined with Herron and Langway (1980) model density profiles (ASIRAS-HL) produce accumulation rates within 3.5 % of ASIRAS-NP estimates in the dry snow region. We suggest using Herron and Langway (1980) density profiles to calibrate radar layers detected in dry snow regions of ice sheets lacking detailed in situ density measurements, such as those observed by the Operation IceBridge campaign.

  19. Measurement of the seasonal and annual variability of total column aerosol in a northeastern U.S. network

    SciTech Connect

    Michalsky, J.J.; Schlemmer, J.A.; Harrison, L.C.; Berkheiser, W.E. III; Larson, N.R.; Laulainen, N.S.

    1994-09-01

    A network of multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometers has operated since late 1991 in the northeastern US. The data acquired are simultaneous measurements of total and diffuse horizontal irradiances in six narrowband filtered detectors and one broadband shortwave detector. The direct normal irradiances are calculated from these measurements. These direct data are corrected for cosine response and used to calculate extraterrestrial irradiance (I{sub o}) using the Langley method of regressing the natural logarithm of direct irradiance versus air mass. With frequent determinations of I{sub o}, changes in I{sub o} caused by soiling and filter degradation, for example, can be tracked. Using these I{sub o}`s, total optical depth is calculated for every clear 30-minute period in the record. Consequently, total optical depth may be obtained on a fair number of days throughout the year. Using daily average total optical depth the authors have calculated aerosol optical depths for five wavelengths by subtracting Rayleigh scattering optical depths and Chappuis ozone absorption optical depths at each wavelength. The aerosol pattern at nearly every site is an annual cycle superimposed on a decaying stratospheric loading associated with the Mount Pinatubo volcanic eruption. An attempt is made to remove the volcanic signal using data from another site.

  20. Progressive evolution and a measure for its noise-dependent complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fussy, Siegfried; Grössing, Gerhard; Schwabl, Herbert

    1999-03-01

    A recently introduced model of macroevolution is studied on two different levels of systems analysis. Firstly, the systems dynamics and properties, above all the growth of complexity of the evolutionary units during the long-term evolution, are discussed, and, secondly, the complexity of the model itself, i.e. the richness of its various features, is studied with regard to a control parameter representing a background noise within the systems dynamics. The same is done with a randomized version of the model. The model is based on a normalized one-dimensional coupled map lattice with locally interacting sites representing different species. The evolution of the sites' values representing the fitness of the species is governed by a usual diffusion rule and an additional memory- or random-based feedback loop. The introduction of a realistic background noise limiting the range of the feedback operation yields a pattern signature in fitness space with a distribution of temporal boost/mutation distances similar to a punctuated equilibrium behavior. Furthermore, the behavior of the mean lifetimes of "high" fitness values is correlated with the resolution-like parameter ɛ via a power law, a phenomenon called "fractal evolution." Based on simple functional properties of the power law, an additional feedback loop is introduced to use the intrinsic fluctuations of the whole fitness landscape as a driving force to change adaptively the systems resolution. On long-term scales, the dynamical system properties exhibit a clear tendency towards progressive evolution potentials for each species. For both model versions, the memory-based and the random-based one, we achieve some basic mechanisms of evolutionary dynamics like coevolution, punctuated equilibrium with regard to internal or external changes during evolution, coordinated stasis for groups of species, and self-organized growth of complexity for all evolutionary units of the array leading to a kind of "Red