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Sample records for measures blinks utilizing

  1. Detecting false intent using eye blink measures

    PubMed Central

    Marchak, Frank M.

    2013-01-01

    Eye blink measures have been shown to be diagnostic in detecting deception regarding past acts. Here we examined—across two experiments with increasing degrees of ecological validity—whether changes in eye blinking can be used to determine false intent regarding future actions. In both experiments, half of the participants engaged in a mock crime and then transported an explosive device with the intent of delivering it to a “contact” that would use it to cause a disturbance. Eye blinking was measured for all participants when presented with three types of questions: relevant to intent to transport an explosive device, relevant to intent to engage in an unrelated illegal act, and neutral questions. Experiment 1 involved standing participants watching a video interviewer with audio presented ambiently. Experiment 2 involved standing participants questioned by a live interviewer. Across both experiments, changes in blink count during and immediately following individual questions, total number of blinks, and maximum blink time length differentiated those with false intent from truthful intent participants. In response to questions relevant to intent to deliver an explosive device vs. questions relevant to intent to deliver illegal drugs, those with false intent showed a suppression of blinking during the questions when compared to the 10 s period after the end of the questions, a lower number of blinks, and shorter maximum blink duration. The results are discussed in relation to detecting deception about past activities as well as to the similarities and differences to detecting false intent as described by prospective memory and arousal. PMID:24130546

  2. Dopamine activation in Neuroticism as measured by spontaneous eye blink rate.

    PubMed

    Barbato, Giuseppe; Della Monica, Ciro; Costanzo, Antonio; De Padova, Vittoria

    2012-01-18

    Personality dimensions have been associated with different psychobiological systems. However, no agreement exists in literature on a specific role of a single neurotransmitter for each of the dimensions investigated. We studied the relationship of Neuroticism, Extraversion and Psychoticism as assessed by Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI) with spontaneous eye blink rate (BR), a non-invasive measure of central dopamine activity. A total of sixty-three healthy subjects (40 females, 23 males, mean age 24.2±3.9) were studied. Spontaneous blink rate and time of blink suppression were assessed by EOG measurement. Levels of Extraversion and Neuroticism were inversely correlated. In contrast with previous findings, a significant correlation between blink rate measures and Neuroticism was found. No significant correlation between blink measures and either Extraversion, or Psychoticism were found. The results appear consistent with a lower threshold for activation in neuroticism as suggested by Eysenck's original model.

  3. A guide to accurate measurement of diffusion using fluorescence correlation techniques with blinking quantum dot nanoparticle labels.

    PubMed

    Bachir, Alexia I; Kolin, David L; Heinze, Katrin G; Hebert, Benedict; Wiseman, Paul W

    2008-06-14

    Fluctuation-based fluorescence correlation techniques are widely used to study dynamics of fluorophore labeled biomolecules in cells. Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have been developed as bright and photostable fluorescent probes for various biological applications. However, the fluorescence intermittency of QDs, commonly referred to as "blinking", is believed to complicate quantitative correlation spectroscopy measurements of transport properties, as it is an additional source of fluctuations that contribute on a wide range of time scales. The QD blinking fluctuations obey power-law distributions so there is no single characteristic fluctuation time for this phenomenon. Consequently, it is highly challenging to separate fluorescence blinking fluctuations from those due to transport dynamics. Here, we quantify the bias introduced by QD blinking in transport measurements made using fluctuation methods. Using computer simulated image time series of diffusing point emitters with set "on" and "off" time emission characteristics, we show that blinking results in a systematic overestimation of the diffusion coefficients measured with correlation analysis when a simple diffusion model is used to fit the time correlation decays. The relative error depends on the inherent blinking power-law statistics, the sampling rate relative to the characteristic diffusion time and blinking times, and the total number of images in the time series. This systematic error can be significant; moreover, it can often go unnoticed in common transport model fits of experimental data. We propose an alternative fitting model that incorporates blinking and improves the accuracy of the recovered diffusion coefficients. We also show how to completely eliminate the bias by applying k-space image correlation spectroscopy, which completely separates the diffusion and blinking dynamics, and allows the simultaneous recovery of accurate diffusion coefficients and QD blinking probability distribution

  4. Detection and correction of blinking bias in image correlation transport measurements of quantum dot tagged macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Durisic, Nela; Bachir, Alexia I; Kolin, David L; Hebert, Benedict; Lagerholm, B Christoffer; Grutter, Peter; Wiseman, Paul W

    2007-08-15

    Semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) are becoming widely used as fluorescent labels for biological applications. Here we demonstrate that fluorescence fluctuation analysis of their diffusional mobility using temporal image correlation spectroscopy is highly susceptible to systematic errors caused by fluorescence blinking of the nanoparticles. Temporal correlation analysis of fluorescence microscopy image time series of streptavidin-functionalized (CdSe)ZnS QDs freely diffusing in two dimensions shows that the correlation functions are fit well to a commonly used diffusion decay model, but the transport coefficients can have significant systematic errors in the measurements due to blinking. Image correlation measurements of the diffusing QD samples measured at different laser excitation powers and analysis of computer simulated image time series verified that the effect we observe is caused by fluorescence intermittency. We show that reciprocal space image correlation analysis can be used for mobility measurements in the presence of blinking emission because it separates the contributions of fluctuations due to photophysics from those due to transport. We also demonstrate application of the image correlation methods for measurement of the diffusion coefficient of glycosyl phosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins tagged with QDs as imaged on living fibroblasts.

  5. Asymmetry of Blinking

    PubMed Central

    Kassem, Iris S.; Evinger, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Too investigate asymmetry in eyelid movements with blinking, the stability of the asymmetry, and its modifiability in normal humans. Methods Differences in the start time and amplitude between the two eyelids were assessed for voluntary blinks and reflex blinks evoked by supraorbital trigeminal nerve stimulation. These variables were also measured before and up to 18 months after 2 hours of unilateral upper lid restraint. Results With voluntary blinks, one eyelid consistently began to close earlier and made a larger eyelid movement than the other eyelid. Stimulation of the supraorbital branch of the trigeminal nerve evoked relatively larger amplitude blinks in one eyelid that correlated with the asymmetries of voluntary blinks. There was a continuum of eyelid asymmetry across all subjects that was stable and independent of other biological asymmetries, such as handedness. Briefly reducing eyelid mobility created a long-lasting change in eyelid asymmetry with blinking. Conclusions Eyelid asymmetry results from differences in the excitability of motoneurons in the left and right facial motor nuclei and does not appear to involve asymmetries in cortical inputs to the brain stem. Because adaptive processes modify the motoneuron excitability that creates eyelid asymmetry, these processes may underlie changes in blinking associated with facial palsy and may play a role in the development of disorders that affect one side of the face, such as hemifacial spasm. PMID:16384962

  6. Lifetime Blinking in Non Blinking Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimov, Victor; Ghosh, Yagnaseni; Steinbrueck, Andrea; Hollingsworth, Jennifer; Htoon, Han; Galland, Christophe

    2012-02-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) blinking is a common property of nanoscale light emitters. Nanocrystal quantum dots have often been used as model systems in studies of this intriguing phenomenon. Here, we use recently developed thick-shell CdSe/CdS NQDs to demonstrate a new regime of blinking where discrete fluctuations in the PL lifetime (``lifetime blinking'') occur without appreciable changes in the PL intensity. Single-dot measurements under controlled electrochemical charge injection [1] yield the PL lifetimes of neutral and charged excitons. We show that the observed ``lifetime blinking'' are due to random charging/discharging of the nanocrystal [2]. Indeed, the injection of electrons does not appreciably modify the PL quantum yield, which explains the coexistence of a nonblinking intensity with a ``blinking'' lifetime. At higher excitation power, charged excitons dominate the PL emission. We build a quantitative model showing that nanocrystal charging is caused by Auger-assisted ejection of a hole, producing negatively charged species. Importantly, Auger recombination that involves excitation of an electron is suppressed while hole-based processes remain efficient.[4pt] [1] Galland et al., Nature 479, 203-207 (2011)[0pt] [2] Galland et al., Submitted (2011)

  7. No Fatigue Effect on Blink Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, W.; Zangemeister, W.; Stark, L.

    1984-01-01

    Blink rate is reported to vary dependent upon ongoing task performance, perceptual, attentional and cognitive factors, and fatigue. Five levels of task difficulty were operationally defined and task performance as lines read aloud per minute were measured. A single noninvasive infrared TV eyetracker was modified to measure blinking and an on-line computer program identified and counted blinks while the subject performed the tasks. Blink rate decreased by 50% when either task performance increased (fast reading) or visual difficulty increased (blurred text); blink rate increased greatly during rest breaks. There was no change in blink rate during one hour experiments even though subjects complained of severe fatigue.

  8. A multi level system design for vigilance measurement based on head posture estimation and eyes blinking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyeb, Ines; Jemai, Olfa; Zaied, Mourad; ben Amar, Chokri

    2015-12-01

    Driving security is an important task for human society. The major challenge in the field of accident avoidance systems is the driver vigilance monitoring. The lack of vigilance can be noticed by various ways, such as, fatigue, drowsiness and distraction. Hence, the need of a reliable driver's vigilance decrease detection system which can alert drivers before a mishap happens. In this paper, we present a novel approach for vigilance estimation based on multilevel system by combining head movement analysis and eyes blinking. We have used Viola and Jones algorithm to analyse head movement and a classification system using wavelet networks for eyelid closure measuring. The contribution of our application is classifiying the vigilance state at multi level. This is different from the binary-class (awakening or hypovigilant state) existing in most popular systems.

  9. Luminescence blinking of a reacting quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Routzahn, Aaron L; Jain, Prashant K

    2015-04-01

    Luminescence blinking is an inherent feature of optical emission from individual fluorescent molecules and quantum dots. There have been intense efforts, although not with complete resolution, toward the understanding of the mechanistic origin of blinking and also its mitigation in quantum dots. As an advance in our microscopic view of blinking, we show that the luminescence blinking of a quantum dot becomes unusually heavy in the temporal vicinity of a reactive transformation. This stage of heavy blinking is a result of defects/dopants formed within the quantum dot on its path to conversion. The evolution of blinking behavior along the reaction path allows us to measure the lifetime of the critical dopant-related intermediate in the reaction. This work establishes luminescence blinking as a single-nanocrystal level probe of catalytic, photocatalytic, and electrochemical events occurring in the solid-state or on semiconductor surfaces.

  10. Measuring Resource Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Leggett, Laura E.; Khadaroo, Rachel G.; Holroyd-Leduc, Jayna; Lorenzetti, Diane L.; Hanson, Heather; Wagg, Adrian; Padwal, Raj; Clement, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A variety of methods may be used to obtain costing data. Although administrative data are most commonly used, the data available in these datasets are often limited. An alternative method of obtaining costing is through self-reported questionnaires. Currently, there are no systematic reviews that summarize self-reported resource utilization instruments from the published literature. The aim of the study was to identify validated self-report healthcare resource use instruments and to map their attributes. A systematic review was conducted. The search identified articles using terms like “healthcare utilization” and “questionnaire.” All abstracts and full texts were considered in duplicate. For inclusion, studies had to assess the validity of a self-reported resource use questionnaire, to report original data, include adult populations, and the questionnaire had to be publically available. Data such as type of resource utilization assessed by each questionnaire, and validation findings were extracted from each study. In all, 2343 unique citations were retrieved; 2297 were excluded during abstract review. Forty-six studies were reviewed in full text, and 15 studies were included in this systematic review. Six assessed resource utilization of patients with chronic conditions; 5 assessed mental health service utilization; 3 assessed resource utilization by a general population; and 1 assessed utilization in older populations. The most frequently measured resources included visits to general practitioners and inpatient stays; nonmedical resources were least frequently measured. Self-reported questionnaires on resource utilization had good agreement with administrative data, although, visits to general practitioners, outpatient days, and nurse visits had poorer agreement. Self-reported questionnaires are a valid method of collecting data on healthcare resource utilization. PMID:26962773

  11. Eye-Blink Behaviors in 71 Species of Primates

    PubMed Central

    Tada, Hideoki; Omori, Yasuko; Hirokawa, Kumi; Ohira, Hideki; Tomonaga, Masaki

    2013-01-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the associations between eye-blink behaviors and various other factors in primates. We video-recorded 141 individuals across 71 primate species and analyzed the blink rate, blink duration, and “isolated” blink ratio (i.e., blinks without eye or head movement) in relation to activity rhythms, habitat types, group size, and body size factors. The results showed close relationships between three types of eye-blink measures and body size factors. All of these measures increased as a function of body weight. In addition, diurnal primates showed more blinks than nocturnal species even after controlling for body size factors. The most important findings were the relationships between eye-blink behaviors and social factors, e.g., group size. Among diurnal primates, only the blink rate was significantly correlated even after controlling for body size factors. The blink rate increased as the group size increased. Enlargement of the neocortex is strongly correlated with group size in primate species and considered strong evidence for the social brain hypothesis. Our results suggest that spontaneous eye-blinks have acquired a role in social communication, similar to grooming, to adapt to complex social living during primate evolution. PMID:23741522

  12. Short-term memory across eye blinks.

    PubMed

    Irwin, David E

    2014-01-01

    The effect of eye blinks on short-term memory was examined in two experiments. On each trial, participants viewed an initial display of coloured, oriented lines, then after a retention interval they viewed a test display that was either identical or different by one feature. Participants kept their eyes open throughout the retention interval on some blocks of trials, whereas on others they made a single eye blink. Accuracy was measured as a function of the number of items in the display to determine the capacity of short-term memory on blink and no-blink trials. In separate blocks of trials participants were instructed to remember colour only, orientation only, or both colour and orientation. Eye blinks reduced short-term memory capacity by approximately 0.6-0.8 items for both feature and conjunction stimuli. A third, control, experiment showed that a button press during the retention interval had no effect on short-term memory capacity, indicating that the effect of an eye blink was not due to general motoric dual-task interference. Eye blinks might instead reduce short-term memory capacity by interfering with attention-based rehearsal processes.

  13. Effects of subthalamic deep brain stimulation on blink abnormalities of 6-OHDA lesioned rats

    PubMed Central

    Kaminer, Jaime; Thakur, Pratibha

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned rat model share blink abnormalities. In view of the evolutionarily conserved organization of blinking, characterization of blink reflex circuits in rodents may elucidate the neural mechanisms of PD reflex abnormalities. We examine the extent of this shared pattern of blink abnormalities by measuring blink reflex excitability, blink reflex plasticity, and spontaneous blinking in 6-OHDA lesioned rats. We also investigate whether 130-Hz subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) affects blink abnormalities, as it does in PD patients. Like PD patients, 6-OHDA-lesioned rats exhibit reflex blink hyperexcitability, impaired blink plasticity, and a reduced spontaneous blink rate. At 130 Hz, but not 16 Hz, STN DBS eliminates reflex blink hyperexcitability and restores both short- and long-term blink plasticity. Replicating its lack of effect in PD patients, 130-Hz STN DBS does not reinstate a normal temporal pattern or rate to spontaneous blinking in 6-OHDA lesioned rats. These data show that the 6-OHDA lesioned rat is an ideal model system for investigating the neural bases of reflex abnormalities in PD and highlight the complexity of PD's effects on motor control, by showing that dopamine depletion does not affect all blink systems via the same neural mechanisms. PMID:25673748

  14. Blink and you’ll miss it: the role of blinking in the perception of magic tricks

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Tamami

    2016-01-01

    Magicians use several techniques to deceive their audiences, including, for example, the misdirection of attention and verbal suggestion. We explored another potential stratagem, namely the relaxation of attention. Participants watched a video of a highly skilled magician whilst having their eye-blinks recorded. The timing of spontaneous eye-blinks was highly synchronized across participants. In addition, the synchronized blinks frequency occurred immediately after a seemingly impossible feat, and often coincided with actions that the magician wanted to conceal from the audience. Given that blinking is associated with the relaxation of attention, these findings suggest that blinking plays an important role in the perception of magic, and that magicians may utilize blinking and the relaxation of attention to hide certain secret actions. PMID:27069808

  15. Blink and you'll miss it: the role of blinking in the perception of magic tricks.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, Richard J; Nakano, Tamami

    2016-01-01

    Magicians use several techniques to deceive their audiences, including, for example, the misdirection of attention and verbal suggestion. We explored another potential stratagem, namely the relaxation of attention. Participants watched a video of a highly skilled magician whilst having their eye-blinks recorded. The timing of spontaneous eye-blinks was highly synchronized across participants. In addition, the synchronized blinks frequency occurred immediately after a seemingly impossible feat, and often coincided with actions that the magician wanted to conceal from the audience. Given that blinking is associated with the relaxation of attention, these findings suggest that blinking plays an important role in the perception of magic, and that magicians may utilize blinking and the relaxation of attention to hide certain secret actions. PMID:27069808

  16. Blink and you'll miss it: the role of blinking in the perception of magic tricks.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, Richard J; Nakano, Tamami

    2016-01-01

    Magicians use several techniques to deceive their audiences, including, for example, the misdirection of attention and verbal suggestion. We explored another potential stratagem, namely the relaxation of attention. Participants watched a video of a highly skilled magician whilst having their eye-blinks recorded. The timing of spontaneous eye-blinks was highly synchronized across participants. In addition, the synchronized blinks frequency occurred immediately after a seemingly impossible feat, and often coincided with actions that the magician wanted to conceal from the audience. Given that blinking is associated with the relaxation of attention, these findings suggest that blinking plays an important role in the perception of magic, and that magicians may utilize blinking and the relaxation of attention to hide certain secret actions.

  17. Eye Movements Blink the Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamienkowski, Juan E.; Navajas, Joaquin; Sigman, Mariano

    2012-01-01

    When presented with a sequence of visual stimuli in rapid succession, participants often fail to detect a second salient target, a phenomenon referred as the attentional blink (AB; Raymond, Shapiro, & Arnell, 1992; Shapiro, Raymond, & Arnell, 1997). On the basis of a vast corpus of experiments, several cognitive theories suggest that the blink…

  18. Unmasking the Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieuwenstein, Mark R.; Potter, Mary C.; Theeuwes, Jan

    2009-01-01

    When asked to identify 2 visual targets (T1 and T2 for the 1st and 2nd targets, respectively) embedded in a sequence of distractors, observers will often fail to identify T2 when it appears within 200-500 ms of T1--an effect called the "attentional blink". Recent work shows that attention does not blink when the task is to encode a sequence of…

  19. Withdrawal of voluntary inhibition unravels the off state of the spontaneous blink generator.

    PubMed

    Moraitis, Timoleon; Ghosh, Arko

    2014-12-01

    Involuntary movements such as spontaneous eye blinks can be successfully inhibited at will. Little do we know how the voluntary motor circuits countermand spontaneous blinks. Do the voluntary inhibitory commands act to pause or to turn off the endogenous blink generator, or does inhibition intersect and counter the generator׳s excitatory outputs? In theory, the time taken for the system to generate an after-inhibition blink will reflect onto the form of inhibition. For instance, if voluntary commands were to turn the blink generator off then the after-blink latency would be fixed to the inhibition offset and reflect the time it takes for the generator to rebound and turn on. In this study we measured the after-blink latency from the offset of voluntary inhibition. Volunteers inhibited their blinks in response to sound tones of randomly varying durations. At the offset volunteers withdrew the inhibition and relaxed. Interestingly, the spontaneous after-blinks were fixed to the offset of the inhibition as if the generator rebounded from an off state. The after-blink latency was not related to the duration of the inhibition, and inhibiting even for a small fraction of the mean inter-blink interval generated an after-blink time-locked to the inhibition offset. Interestingly, the insertion of voluntary blinks after inhibition further altered the blink generator by delaying the spontaneous after-blinks. We propose that the inhibition of spontaneous blinks at the level of the generator allows for highly effective voluntary countermanding. Nevertheless, the withdrawal of such inhibition was strongly associated with motor excitation.

  20. Trigeminal high-frequency stimulation produces short- and long-term modification of reflex blink gain

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Michael; Kaminer, Jaime; Enmore, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Reflex blinks provide a model system for investigating motor learning in normal and pathological states. We investigated whether high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the supraorbital branch of the trigeminal nerve before the R2 blink component (HFS-B) decreases reflex blink gain in alert rats. As with humans (Mao JB, Evinger C. J Neurosci 21: RC151, 2001), HFS-B significantly reduced blink size in the first hour after treatment for rats. Repeated days of HFS-B treatment produced long-term depression of blink circuits. Blink gain decreased exponentially across days, indicating a long-term depression of blink circuits. Additionally, the HFS-B protocol became more effective at depressing blink amplitude across days of treatment. This depression was not habituation, because neither long- nor short-term blink changes occurred when HFS was presented after the R2. To investigate whether gain modifications produced by HFS-B involved cerebellar networks, we trained rats in a delay eyelid conditioning paradigm using HFS-B as the unconditioned stimulus and a tone as the conditioned stimulus. As HFS-B depresses blink circuits and delay conditioning enhances blink circuit activity, occlusion should occur if they share neural networks. Rats acquiring robust eyelid conditioning did not exhibit decreases in blink gain, whereas rats developing low levels of eyelid conditioning exhibited weak, short-term reductions in blink gain. These results suggested that delay eyelid conditioning and long-term HFS-B utilize some of the same cerebellar circuits. The ability of repeated HFS-B treatment to depress trigeminal blink circuit activity long term implied that it may be a useful protocol to reduce hyperexcitable blink circuits that underlie diseases like benign essential blepharospasm. PMID:24285868

  1. Did Lavoisier Blink?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, William B.

    2004-01-01

    A question and answer session on whether Lavoisier made an agreement with the French mathematician, Comte Joseph-Louis Lagrange shortly before being beheaded that he would blink his eyes if he retained consciousness after being beheaded and that he was executed because of his revolutionary scientific views is described. The circumstances…

  2. Electron transition pathways of photoluminescence from 3C-SiC nanocrystals unraveled by steady-state, blinking and time-resolved photoluminescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Zhixing; Wu, Xinglong; Xu, Hao; Zhang, Ning; Nie, Shouping; Fu, Ying

    2016-07-01

    The cubic phase SiC nanocrystals (3C-SiC NCs) have been extensively studied for electronics and photonics applications. In this work we study the electron transition pathways of photoluminescence (PL) from 3C-SiC NCs. It is found through measuring the steady-state, blinking and time-resolved PL spectra that surface passivation by glycerol improved the steady-state PL intensity (it does not modify the emission wavelength) and the NCs fluoresced more steadily. The PL decay lifetimes are shown to be the same when the detection wavelength is modified to scan the broad PL peak, implying that the broad PL peak is originated from the distribution of NCs’ sizes. Furthermore, the PL decay lifetimes are not modified by the surface passivation. It is concluded that for PL, the electron is photoexcited from the ground state in the NC to a high-energy excited state, relaxes to the first excited state then radiatively recombines to the ground state to emit a photon. The photoexcited electron at the high-energy excited state could transit to the surface state, resulting in a reduced PL intensity and a decreased on-state dwell time in the blinking trajectory. The PL decay lifetime data implies that the two principal electron transition pathways of (a) high-energy excited state \\Rightarrow the first excited state \\Rightarrow the ground state, and (b) high-energy excited state \\Rightarrow surface state \\Rightarrow the ground state are independent from each other. We strongly believe that such a deep knowledge about 3C-SiC NCs will open new doors to harness them for novel applications.

  3. The Attentional Blink Does Not Prevent Character Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruthruff, Eric; Johnston, James C.; McCann, Robert; Reington, Roger W. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The standard RSVP Attentional Blink (AB) paradigm was modified so that RT to the second target could be measured. Character distortion, intended to prolong the letter-identification processing stage, had a marked effect at long lags (baseline condition), but virtually no effect at short lags where AB interference occurred. According to locus-of-slack logic, this pattern of results indicates that the attentional blink causes a processing bottleneck at some stage subsequent to letter identification.

  4. Eye-blinks in choice response tasks uncover hidden aspects of information processing

    PubMed Central

    Wascher, Edmund; Heppner, Holger; Möckel, Tina; Kobald, Sven Oliver; Getzmann, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous eye-blinks occur much more often than it would be necessary to maintain the tear film on the eyes. Various factors like cognitive demand, task engagement, or fatigue are influencing spontaneous blink rate. During cognitive information processing there is evidence that blinks occur preferably at moments that can be assigned to input stream segmentation. We investigated blinking behavior in three different visual choice response experiments (Experiment 1: spatial Stimulus-Response correspondence, Experiment 2: Change Detection, Experiment 3: Continuous performance Test - AX version). Blinks during the experimental tasks were suppressed when new information was expected, as well as during cognitive processing until the response was executed. Blinks in go trials occurred within a short and relatively constant interval after manual responses. However, blinks were not a side effect of manual behavior, as they occurred in a similar manner in no-go trials in which no manual response was executed. In these trials, blinks were delayed when a prepared response had to be inhibited, compared to trials in which no response was intended. Additionally, time on task effects for no-go blinks mirrored those obtained in go trials. Thus, blinks seem to provide a reliable measure for cognitive processing beyond (or rather additional to) manual responses. PMID:27152110

  5. Evidence for a diffusion-controlled mechanism for fluorescence blinking of colloidal quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Pelton, Matthew; Smith, Glenna; Scherer, Norbert F; Marcus, Rudolph A

    2007-09-01

    Fluorescence blinking in nanocrystal quantum dots is known to exhibit power-law dynamics, and several different mechanisms have been proposed to explain this behavior. We have extended the measurement of quantum-dot blinking by characterizing fluctuations in the fluorescence of single dots over time scales from microseconds to seconds. The power spectral density of these fluctuations indicates a change in the power-law statistics that occurs at a time scale of several milliseconds, providing an important constraint on possible mechanisms for the blinking. In particular, the observations are consistent with the predictions of models wherein blinking is controlled by diffusion of the energies of electron or hole trap states.

  6. Evidence for a diffusion-controlled mechanism for fluorescence blinking of colloidal quantum dots.

    SciTech Connect

    Pelton, M.; Smith, G.; Scherer, N. F.; Marcus, R. A.; Univ. of Chicago; California Inst. of Tech.

    2007-09-04

    Fluorescence blinking in nanocrystal quantum dots is known to exhibit power-law dynamics, and several different mechanisms have been proposed to explain this behavior. We have extended the measurement of quantum-dot blinking by characterizing fluctuations in the fluorescence of single dots over time scales from microseconds to seconds. The power spectral density of these fluctuations indicates a change in the power-law statistics that occurs at a time scale of several milliseconds, providing an important constraint on possible mechanisms for the blinking. In particular, the observations are consistent with the predictions of models wherein blinking is controlled by diffusion of the energies of electron or hole trap states.

  7. Infrared-based blink-detecting glasses for facial pacing: toward a bionic blink.

    PubMed

    Frigerio, Alice; Hadlock, Tessa A; Murray, Elizabeth H; Heaton, James T

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Facial paralysis remains one of the most challenging conditions to effectively manage, often causing life-altering deficits in both function and appearance. Facial rehabilitation via pacing and robotic technology has great yet unmet potential. A critical first step toward reanimating symmetrical facial movement in cases of unilateral paralysis is the detection of healthy movement to use as a trigger for stimulated movement. OBJECTIVE To test a blink detection system that can be attached to standard eyeglasses and used as part of a closed-loop facial pacing system. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Standard safety glasses were equipped with an infrared (IR) emitter-detector unit, oriented horizontally across the palpebral fissure, creating a monitored IR beam that became interrupted when the eyelids closed, and were tested in 24 healthy volunteers from a tertiary care facial nerve center community. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Video-quantified blinking was compared with both IR sensor signal magnitude and rate of change in healthy participants with their gaze in repose, while they shifted their gaze from central to far-peripheral positions, and during the production of particular facial expressions. RESULTS Blink detection based on signal magnitude achieved 100% sensitivity in forward gaze but generated false detections on downward gaze. Calculations of peak rate of signal change (first derivative) typically distinguished blinks from gaze-related eyelid movements. During forward gaze, 87% of detected blink events were true positives, 11% were false positives, and 2% were false negatives. Of the 11% false positives, 6% were associated with partial eyelid closures. During gaze changes, false blink detection occurred 6% of the time during lateral eye movements, 10% of the time during upward movements, 47% of the time during downward movements, and 6% of the time for movements from an upward or downward gaze back to the primary gaze. Facial expressions

  8. Spontaneous Eye-Blinking and Stereotyped Behavior in Older Persons with Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roebel, Amanda M.; MacLean, William E., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Previous research indicates that abnormal stereotyped movements are associated with central dopamine dysfunction and that eye-blink rate is a noninvasive, in vivo measure of dopamine function. We measured the spontaneous eye-blinking and stereotyped behavior of older adults with severe/profound mental retardation living in a state mental…

  9. Quantum dots: A charge for blinking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Todd D.; Peterson, Jeffrey J.

    2012-01-01

    No accepted description of luminescent blinking in quantum dots is currently available. Now, experiments probing the connection between charge and fluorescence intensity fluctuations unveil an unexpected source of blinking, significantly advancing our fundamental understanding of this baffling phenomenon.

  10. Blink Rate in Boys with Fragile X Syndrome: Preliminary Evidence for Altered Dopamine Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, J. E.; Symons, F. J.; Johnson, A.-M.; Hatton, D. D.; Boccia, M. L.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Dopamine, a neurotransmitter involved in motor and cognitive functioning, can be non-invasively measured via observation of spontaneous blink rates. Blink rates have been studied in a number of clinical conditions including schizophrenia, autism, Parkinsons, and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder with results implicating either…

  11. Spectrally resolved analysis of fluorescence blinking of single dye molecules in polymers at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, S. V.; Naumov, A. V.; Vainer, Yu. G.; Kador, Lothar

    2012-11-01

    We present a method for the spectrally resolved analysis of fluorescence blinking of single quantum emitters. It is based on the well-known technique of repeated recording of single-molecule (SM) fluorescence excitation spectra. The potential of our approach is presented for the example of single tetra-tert-butylterrylene molecules in an amorphous polymer matrix (polyisobutylene), which exhibit fluorescence blinking at cryogenic temperatures. Measuring the spectral dependence of the blinking statistics improves the possibility to clarify the microscopic nature of the dark state(s) of the emitters. We demonstrate how the blinking statistics can be definitely attributed to conformational changes in the local environment of a SM and how the parameters of the corresponding elementary excitations can be measured. The analysis of the blinking statistics as a function of the optical excitation frequency allows us to discriminate between photo-induced and spontaneous transitions into a dark state.

  12. Photoluminescence Blinking of Single-Crystal Methylammonium Lead Iodide Perovskite Nanorods Induced by Surface Traps

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) of organometal halide perovskite materials reflects the charge dynamics inside of the material and thus contains important information for understanding the electro-optical properties of the material. Interpretation of PL blinking of methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3) nanostructures observed on polycrystalline samples remains puzzling owing to their intrinsic disordered nature. Here, we report a novel method for the synthesis of high-quality single-crystal MAPbI3 nanorods and demonstrate a single-crystal study on MAPbI3 PL blinking. At low excitation power densities, two-state blinking was found on individual nanorods with dimensions of several hundred nanometers. A super-resolution localization study on the blinking of individual nanorods showed that single crystals of several hundred nanometers emit and blink as a whole, without showing changes in the localization center over the crystal. Moreover, both the blinking ON and OFF times showed power-law distributions, indicating trapping–detrapping processes. This is further supported by the PL decay times of the individual nanorods, which were found to correlate with the ON/OFF states. Furthermore, a strong environmental dependence of the nanorod PL blinking was revealed by comparing the measurements in vacuum, nitrogen, and air, implying that traps locate close to crystal surfaces. We explain our observations by proposing surface charge traps that are likely related to under-coordinated lead ions and methylammonium vacancies to result in the PL blinking observed here. PMID:27617323

  13. Photoluminescence Blinking of Single-Crystal Methylammonium Lead Iodide Perovskite Nanorods Induced by Surface Traps

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) of organometal halide perovskite materials reflects the charge dynamics inside of the material and thus contains important information for understanding the electro-optical properties of the material. Interpretation of PL blinking of methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3) nanostructures observed on polycrystalline samples remains puzzling owing to their intrinsic disordered nature. Here, we report a novel method for the synthesis of high-quality single-crystal MAPbI3 nanorods and demonstrate a single-crystal study on MAPbI3 PL blinking. At low excitation power densities, two-state blinking was found on individual nanorods with dimensions of several hundred nanometers. A super-resolution localization study on the blinking of individual nanorods showed that single crystals of several hundred nanometers emit and blink as a whole, without showing changes in the localization center over the crystal. Moreover, both the blinking ON and OFF times showed power-law distributions, indicating trapping–detrapping processes. This is further supported by the PL decay times of the individual nanorods, which were found to correlate with the ON/OFF states. Furthermore, a strong environmental dependence of the nanorod PL blinking was revealed by comparing the measurements in vacuum, nitrogen, and air, implying that traps locate close to crystal surfaces. We explain our observations by proposing surface charge traps that are likely related to under-coordinated lead ions and methylammonium vacancies to result in the PL blinking observed here.

  14. Capturing Attention When Attention "Blinks"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wee, Serena; Chua, Fook K.

    2004-01-01

    Four experiments addressed the question of whether attention may be captured when the visual system is in the midst of an attentional blink (AB). Participants identified 2 target letters embedded among distractor letters in a rapid serial visual presentation sequence. In some trials, a square frame was inserted between the targets; as the only…

  15. Looking at a blinking quantum emitter through time slots: The effect of blind times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchukina, A. L.; Eremchev, I. Yu.; Naumov, A. V.

    2015-09-01

    Most experimental observations of physical processes are naturally accompanied by "blind" ("dead") times, which in principle can distort the result of measurements. Here we analyze how the presence of blind times in measurements changes the measured statistics of blinking fluorescence of single quantum dots. We show that information can be extracted even for blinking processes with characteristic times longer than both blind times and time slots between them.

  16. Electroencephalographic topography measures of experienced utility.

    PubMed

    Pedroni, Andreas; Langer, Nicolas; Koenig, Thomas; Allemand, Michael; Jäncke, Lutz

    2011-07-20

    Economic theory distinguishes two concepts of utility: decision utility, objectively quantifiable by choices, and experienced utility, referring to the satisfaction by an obtainment. To date, experienced utility is typically measured with subjective ratings. This study intended to quantify experienced utility by global levels of neuronal activity. Neuronal activity was measured by means of electroencephalographic (EEG) responses to gain and omission of graded monetary rewards at the level of the EEG topography in human subjects. A novel analysis approach allowed approximating psychophysiological value functions for the experienced utility of monetary rewards. In addition, we identified the time windows of the event-related potentials (ERP) and the respective intracortical sources, in which variations in neuronal activity were significantly related to the value or valence of outcomes. Results indicate that value functions of experienced utility and regret disproportionally increase with monetary value, and thus contradict the compressing value functions of decision utility. The temporal pattern of outcome evaluation suggests an initial (∼250 ms) coarse evaluation regarding the valence, concurrent with a finer-grained evaluation of the value of gained rewards, whereas the evaluation of the value of omitted rewards emerges later. We hypothesize that this temporal double dissociation is explained by reward prediction errors. Finally, a late, yet unreported, reward-sensitive ERP topography (∼500 ms) was identified. The sources of these topographical covariations are estimated in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, the medial frontal gyrus, the anterior and posterior cingulate cortex and the hippocampus/amygdala. The results provide important new evidence regarding "how," "when," and "where" the brain evaluates outcomes with different hedonic impact.

  17. Electroencephalographic topography measures of experienced utility.

    PubMed

    Pedroni, Andreas; Langer, Nicolas; Koenig, Thomas; Allemand, Michael; Jäncke, Lutz

    2011-07-20

    Economic theory distinguishes two concepts of utility: decision utility, objectively quantifiable by choices, and experienced utility, referring to the satisfaction by an obtainment. To date, experienced utility is typically measured with subjective ratings. This study intended to quantify experienced utility by global levels of neuronal activity. Neuronal activity was measured by means of electroencephalographic (EEG) responses to gain and omission of graded monetary rewards at the level of the EEG topography in human subjects. A novel analysis approach allowed approximating psychophysiological value functions for the experienced utility of monetary rewards. In addition, we identified the time windows of the event-related potentials (ERP) and the respective intracortical sources, in which variations in neuronal activity were significantly related to the value or valence of outcomes. Results indicate that value functions of experienced utility and regret disproportionally increase with monetary value, and thus contradict the compressing value functions of decision utility. The temporal pattern of outcome evaluation suggests an initial (∼250 ms) coarse evaluation regarding the valence, concurrent with a finer-grained evaluation of the value of gained rewards, whereas the evaluation of the value of omitted rewards emerges later. We hypothesize that this temporal double dissociation is explained by reward prediction errors. Finally, a late, yet unreported, reward-sensitive ERP topography (∼500 ms) was identified. The sources of these topographical covariations are estimated in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, the medial frontal gyrus, the anterior and posterior cingulate cortex and the hippocampus/amygdala. The results provide important new evidence regarding "how," "when," and "where" the brain evaluates outcomes with different hedonic impact. PMID:21775593

  18. Real-Time Nanoscopy by Using Blinking Enhanced Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Tomonobu M.; Fukui, Shingo; Jin, Takashi; Fujii, Fumihiko; Yanagida, Toshio

    2010-01-01

    Superresolution optical microscopy (nanoscopy) is of current interest in many biological fields. Superresolution optical fluctuation imaging, which utilizes higher-order cumulant of fluorescence temporal fluctuations, is an excellent method for nanoscopy, as it requires neither complicated optics nor illuminations. However, it does need an impractical number of images for real-time observation. Here, we achieved real-time nanoscopy by modifying superresolution optical fluctuation imaging and enhancing the fluctuation of quantum dots. Our developed quantum dots have higher blinking than commercially available ones. The fluctuation of the blinking improved the resolution when using a variance calculation for each pixel instead of a cumulant calculation. This enabled us to obtain microscopic images with 90-nm and 80-ms spatial-temporal resolution by using a conventional fluorescence microscope without any optics or devices. PMID:20923631

  19. Suppressing the Fluorescence Blinking of Single Quantum Dots Encased in N-type Semiconductor Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Zhang, Guofeng; Wang, Zao; Li, Zhijie; Chen, Ruiyun; Qin, Chengbing; Gao, Yan; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang

    2016-09-01

    N-type semiconductor indium tin oxide (ITO) nanoparticles are used to effectively suppress the fluorescence blinking of single near-infrared-emitting CdSeTe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs), where the ITO could block the electron transfer from excited QDs to trap states and facilitate more rapid regeneration of neutral QDs by back electron transfer. The average blinking rate of QDs is significantly reduced by more than an order of magnitude and the largest proportion of on-state is 98%, while the lifetime is not considerably reduced. Furthermore, an external electron transfer model is proposed to analyze the possible effect of radiative, nonradiative, and electron transfer pathways on fluorescence blinking. Theoretical analysis based on the model combined with measured results gives a quantitative insight into the blinking mechanism.

  20. A MODEL FOR THE TEAR FILM AND OCULAR SURFACE TEMPERATURE FOR PARTIAL BLINKS

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Quan; Braun, R. J.; Driscoll, T. A.; King-Smith, P. E.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the dynamics of tear film and the associated temperature variation for partial blinks. We investigate the mechanism of fluid supply during partial blink cycles, and compare the film thickness with observation in vivo. We find that varying the thickness of the fluid layer beneath the moving upper lid improves the agreement for the in vivo measurement of tear film thickness after a half blink. By examining the flux of the fluid, we provide an explanation of this assumption. We also investigate the temperature dynamics both at the ocular surface and inside the simulated anterior chamber. Our simulation results suggest that the ocular surface temperature readjusts rapidly to normal temperature distribution after partial blinks. PMID:25635242

  1. Suppressing the Fluorescence Blinking of Single Quantum Dots Encased in N-type Semiconductor Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Zhang, Guofeng; Wang, Zao; Li, Zhijie; Chen, Ruiyun; Qin, Chengbing; Gao, Yan; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang

    2016-01-01

    N-type semiconductor indium tin oxide (ITO) nanoparticles are used to effectively suppress the fluorescence blinking of single near-infrared-emitting CdSeTe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs), where the ITO could block the electron transfer from excited QDs to trap states and facilitate more rapid regeneration of neutral QDs by back electron transfer. The average blinking rate of QDs is significantly reduced by more than an order of magnitude and the largest proportion of on-state is 98%, while the lifetime is not considerably reduced. Furthermore, an external electron transfer model is proposed to analyze the possible effect of radiative, nonradiative, and electron transfer pathways on fluorescence blinking. Theoretical analysis based on the model combined with measured results gives a quantitative insight into the blinking mechanism. PMID:27605471

  2. Suppressing the Fluorescence Blinking of Single Quantum Dots Encased in N-type Semiconductor Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Zhang, Guofeng; Wang, Zao; Li, Zhijie; Chen, Ruiyun; Qin, Chengbing; Gao, Yan; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang

    2016-01-01

    N-type semiconductor indium tin oxide (ITO) nanoparticles are used to effectively suppress the fluorescence blinking of single near-infrared-emitting CdSeTe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs), where the ITO could block the electron transfer from excited QDs to trap states and facilitate more rapid regeneration of neutral QDs by back electron transfer. The average blinking rate of QDs is significantly reduced by more than an order of magnitude and the largest proportion of on-state is 98%, while the lifetime is not considerably reduced. Furthermore, an external electron transfer model is proposed to analyze the possible effect of radiative, nonradiative, and electron transfer pathways on fluorescence blinking. Theoretical analysis based on the model combined with measured results gives a quantitative insight into the blinking mechanism. PMID:27605471

  3. Wafer temperature measurement: Status utilizing optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Schietinger, C.; Jensen, E.

    1996-12-01

    This paper reviews the current status and problems of optical fiber temperature measurements for RTP and single wafer processing. Included is a discussion of a range of fiber based options available and currently being utilized today. The advantages and disadvantages of the options are presented. In addition new data from the use of the Ripple Technique pyrometer is presented. Included are data from AT and T (Lucent Technologies) ripple pyrometer development. Lucent Technologies is evaluating and improving the ripple pyrometer on a number of different style production RTP furnaces. Recent advances in signal processing for very low level photo diode currents in the range of 10 e-14 amps, also is presented.

  4. Blinking

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... to prevent harmful substances from getting in the eyes. During the normal course of a day, a ... of 15 times a minute to keep the eyes healthy. The lacrimal gland provides lubricating fluid for ...

  5. Erosive Burning Study Utilizing Ultrasonic Measurement Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furfaro, James A.

    2003-01-01

    A 6-segment subscale motor was developed to generate a range of internal environments from which multiple propellants could be characterized for erosive burning. The motor test bed was designed to provide a high Mach number, high mass flux environment. Propellant regression rates were monitored for each segment utilizing ultrasonic measurement techniques. These data were obtained for three propellants RSRM, ETM- 03, and Castor@ IVA, which span two propellant types, PBAN (polybutadiene acrylonitrile) and HTPB (hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene). The characterization of these propellants indicates a remarkably similar erosive burning response to the induced flow environment. Propellant burnrates for each type had a conventional response with respect to pressure up to a bulk flow velocity threshold. Each propellant, however, had a unique threshold at which it would experience an increase in observed propellant burn rate. Above the observed threshold each propellant again demonstrated a similar enhanced burn rate response corresponding to the local flow environment.

  6. Simultaneous Eye Tracking and Blink Detection with Interactive Particle Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Junwen; Trivedi, Mohan M.

    2007-12-01

    We present a system that simultaneously tracks eyes and detects eye blinks. Two interactive particle filters are used for this purpose, one for the closed eyes and the other one for the open eyes. Each particle filter is used to track the eye locations as well as the scales of the eye subjects. The set of particles that gives higher confidence is defined as the primary set and the other one is defined as the secondary set. The eye location is estimated by the primary particle filter, and whether the eye status is open or closed is also decided by the label of the primary particle filter. When a new frame comes, the secondary particle filter is reinitialized according to the estimates from the primary particle filter. We use autoregression models for describing the state transition and a classification-based model for measuring the observation. Tensor subspace analysis is used for feature extraction which is followed by a logistic regression model to give the posterior estimation. The performance is carefully evaluated from two aspects: the blink detection rate and the tracking accuracy. The blink detection rate is evaluated using videos from varying scenarios, and the tracking accuracy is given by comparing with the benchmark data obtained using the Vicon motion capturing system. The setup for obtaining benchmark data for tracking accuracy evaluation is presented and experimental results are shown. Extensive experimental evaluations validate the capability of the algorithm.

  7. Blink and Shrink: The Effect of the Attentional Blink on Spatial Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivers, Christian N. L.

    2004-01-01

    The detection or discrimination of the second of 2 targets in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) task is often temporarily impaired-a phenomenon termed the attentional blink. This study demonstrated that the attentional blink also affects localization performance. Spatial cues pointed out the possible target positions in a subsequent visual…

  8. Blink detection robust to various facial poses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won Oh; Lee, Eui Chul; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2010-11-30

    Applications based on eye-blink detection have increased, as a result of which it is essential for eye-blink detection to be robust and non-intrusive irrespective of the changes in the user's facial pose. However, most previous studies on camera-based blink detection have the disadvantage that their performances were affected by the facial pose. They also focused on blink detection using only frontal facial images. To overcome these disadvantages, we developed a new method for blink detection, which maintains its accuracy despite changes in the facial pose of the subject. This research is novel in the following four ways. First, the face and eye regions are detected by using both the AdaBoost face detector and a Lucas-Kanade-Tomasi (LKT)-based method, in order to achieve robustness to facial pose. Secondly, the determination of the state of the eye (being open or closed), needed for blink detection, is based on two features: the ratio of height to width of the eye region in a still image, and the cumulative difference of the number of black pixels of the eye region using an adaptive threshold in successive images. These two features are robustly extracted irrespective of the lighting variations by using illumination normalization. Thirdly, the accuracy of determining the eye state - open or closed - is increased by combining the above two features on the basis of the support vector machine (SVM). Finally, the SVM classifier for determining the eye state is adaptively selected according to the facial rotation. Experimental results using various databases showed that the blink detection by the proposed method is robust to various facial poses. PMID:20826183

  9. Blinking supervision in a working environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morcego, Bernardo; Argilés, Marc; Cabrerizo, Marc; Cardona, Genís; Pérez, Ramon; Pérez-Cabré, Elisabet; Gispets, Joan

    2016-02-01

    The health of the ocular surface requires blinks of the eye to be frequent in order to provide moisture and to renew the tear film. However, blinking frequency has been shown to decrease in certain conditions such as when subjects are conducting tasks with high cognitive and visual demands. These conditions are becoming more common as people work or spend their leisure time in front of video display terminals. Supervision of blinking frequency in such environments is possible, thanks to the availability of computer-integrated cameras. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to develop an algorithm for the detection of eye blinks and to test it, in a number of videos captured, while subjects are conducting a variety of tasks in front of the computer. The sensitivity of the algorithm for blink detection was found to be of 87.54% (range 30% to 100%), with a mean false-positive rate of 0.19% (range 0% to 1.7%), depending on the illumination conditions during which the image was captured and other computer-user spatial configurations. The current automatic process is based on a partly modified pre-existing eye detection and image processing algorithms and consists of four stages that are aimed at eye detection, eye tracking, iris detection and segmentation, and iris height/width ratio assessment.

  10. Blinking statistics of silicon quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Bruhn, Benjamin; Valenta, Jan; Sangghaleh, Fatemeh; Linnros, Jan

    2011-12-14

    The blinking statistics of numerous single silicon quantum dots fabricated by electron-beam lithography, plasma etching, and oxidation have been analyzed. Purely exponential on- and off-time distributions were found consistent with the absence of statistical aging. This is in contrast to blinking reports in the literature where power-law distributions prevail as well as observations of statistical aging in nanocrystal ensembles. A linear increase of the switching frequency with excitation power density indicates a domination of single-photon absorption processes, possibly through a direct transfer of charges to trap states without the need for a bimolecular Auger mechanism. Photoluminescence saturation with increasing excitation is not observed; however, there is a threshold in excitation (coinciding with a mean occupation of one exciton per nanocrystal) where a change from linear to square-root increase occurs. Finally, the statistics of blinking of single quantum dots in terms of average on-time, blinking frequency and blinking amplitude reveal large variations (several orders) without any significant correlation demonstrating the individual microscopic character of each quantum dot.

  11. Lifetime blinking in nonblinking nanocrystal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galland, Christophe; Ghosh, Yagnaseni; Steinbrück, Andrea; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Htoon, Han; Klimov, Victor I.

    2012-06-01

    Nanocrystal quantum dots are attractive materials for applications as nanoscale light sources. One impediment to these applications is fluctuations of single-dot emission intensity, known as blinking. Recent progress in colloidal synthesis has produced nonblinking nanocrystals; however, the physics underlying blinking suppression remains unclear. Here we find that ultra-thick-shell CdSe/CdS nanocrystals can exhibit pronounced fluctuations in the emission lifetimes (lifetime blinking), despite stable nonblinking emission intensity. We demonstrate that lifetime variations are due to switching between the neutral and negatively charged state of the nanocrystal. Negative charging results in faster radiative decay but does not appreciably change the overall emission intensity because of suppressed nonradiative Auger recombination for negative trions. The Auger process involving excitation of a hole (positive trion pathway) remains efficient and is responsible for charging with excess electrons, which occurs via Auger-assisted ionization of biexcitons accompanied by ejection of holes.

  12. Lifetime blinking in nonblinking nanocrystal quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Galland, Christophe; Ghosh, Yagnaseni; Steinbrück, Andrea; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A; Htoon, Han; Klimov, Victor I

    2012-06-19

    Nanocrystal quantum dots are attractive materials for applications as nanoscale light sources. One impediment to these applications is fluctuations of single-dot emission intensity, known as blinking. Recent progress in colloidal synthesis has produced nonblinking nanocrystals; however, the physics underlying blinking suppression remains unclear. Here we find that ultra-thick-shell CdSe/CdS nanocrystals can exhibit pronounced fluctuations in the emission lifetimes (lifetime blinking), despite stable nonblinking emission intensity. We demonstrate that lifetime variations are due to switching between the neutral and negatively charged state of the nanocrystal. Negative charging results in faster radiative decay but does not appreciably change the overall emission intensity because of suppressed nonradiative Auger recombination for negative trions. The Auger process involving excitation of a hole (positive trion pathway) remains efficient and is responsible for charging with excess electrons, which occurs via Auger-assisted ionization of biexcitons accompanied by ejection of holes.

  13. MEASUREMENT OF MERCURY IN CHINESE UTILITY COAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of analyzing representative samples of 20 Chinese utility coals for mercury content, and proximate, ultimate, and heating values. The data for these bituminous coals, obtained from China with the cooperation of the Chinese University of Mining Technology,...

  14. Modulation of the blink reflex and P3 component of the startle response during an interoceptive challenge.

    PubMed

    Alius, Manuela G; Pané-Farré, Christiane A; Löw, Andreas; Hamm, Alfons O

    2015-01-01

    The blink reflex component of the startle response is potentiated during processing of exteroceptive unpleasant stimuli. In contrast, blink magnitudes are often inhibited during interoceptive challenges. We measured respiration, blink magnitudes, and the P3 component to the acoustic startle probes in 34 participants while breathing against a mild resistance (mask-with-tubing) compared to breathing with no mask. Breathing through a mask with tubing resulted in increased inspiratory resistance as indicated by increased flow rate and tidal volume, a compensatory breathing pattern. Blink magnitudes to probes presented during the mask-with-tubing condition were inhibited compared to no-mask. Likewise, the probe P3 component was smaller during breathing through a mild resistance. These data suggest that startle inhibition during interoceptive challenges might be due to a shift in attention towards the mildly unpleasant interoceptive stimuli.

  15. High-speed camera characterization of voluntary eye blinking kinematics.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Kyung-Ah; Shipley, Rebecca J; Edirisinghe, Mohan; Ezra, Daniel G; Rose, Geoff; Best, Serena M; Cameron, Ruth E

    2013-08-01

    Blinking is vital to maintain the integrity of the ocular surface and its characteristics such as blink duration and speed can vary significantly, depending on the health of the eyes. The blink is so rapid that special techniques are required to characterize it. In this study, a high-speed camera was used to record and characterize voluntary blinking. The blinking motion of 25 healthy volunteers was recorded at 600 frames per second. Master curves for the palpebral aperture and blinking speed were constructed using palpebral aperture versus time data taken from the high-speed camera recordings, which show that one blink can be divided into four phases; closing, closed, early opening and late opening. Analysis of data from the high-speed camera images was used to calculate the palpebral aperture, peak blinking speed, average blinking speed and duration of voluntary blinking and compare it with data generated by other methods previously used to evaluate voluntary blinking. The advantages of the high-speed camera method over the others are discussed, thereby supporting the high potential usefulness of the method in clinical research.

  16. The Modified Blink Reflex and individual Differences in Speed of Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smyth, Mary; Anderson, Mike; Hammond, Geoff

    1999-01-01

    Studied a new method of measuring speed of processing, the modified blink reflex (MBR), in 2 experiments involving 57 adults. Findings are consistent with the view that interconnecting pathways allow higher level processing of a tone to prime the lower-level reflex pathway. Discusses implications for MBR and measurement of speed of processing.…

  17. An absolute scale for measuring the utility of money

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, P. J.

    2010-07-01

    Measurement of the utility of money is essential in the insurance industry, for prioritising public spending schemes and for the evaluation of decisions on protection systems in high-hazard industries. Up to this time, however, there has been no universally agreed measure for the utility of money, with many utility functions being in common use. In this paper, we shall derive a single family of utility functions, which have risk-aversion as the only free parameter. The fact that they return a utility of zero at their low, reference datum, either the utility of no money or of one unit of money, irrespective of the value of risk-aversion used, qualifies them to be regarded as absolute scales for the utility of money. Evidence of validation for the concept will be offered based on inferential measurements of risk-aversion, using diverse measurement data.

  18. The predictive validity of prospect theory versus expected utility in health utility measurement.

    PubMed

    Abellan-Perpiñan, Jose Maria; Bleichrodt, Han; Pinto-Prades, Jose Luis

    2009-12-01

    Most health care evaluations today still assume expected utility even though the descriptive deficiencies of expected utility are well known. Prospect theory is the dominant descriptive alternative for expected utility. This paper tests whether prospect theory leads to better health evaluations than expected utility. The approach is purely descriptive: we explore how simple measurements together with prospect theory and expected utility predict choices and rankings between more complex stimuli. For decisions involving risk prospect theory is significantly more consistent with rankings and choices than expected utility. This conclusion no longer holds when we use prospect theory utilities and expected utilities to predict intertemporal decisions. The latter finding cautions against the common assumption in health economics that health state utilities are transferable across decision contexts. Our results suggest that the standard gamble and algorithms based on, should not be used to value health. PMID:19833400

  19. The predictive validity of prospect theory versus expected utility in health utility measurement.

    PubMed

    Abellan-Perpiñan, Jose Maria; Bleichrodt, Han; Pinto-Prades, Jose Luis

    2009-12-01

    Most health care evaluations today still assume expected utility even though the descriptive deficiencies of expected utility are well known. Prospect theory is the dominant descriptive alternative for expected utility. This paper tests whether prospect theory leads to better health evaluations than expected utility. The approach is purely descriptive: we explore how simple measurements together with prospect theory and expected utility predict choices and rankings between more complex stimuli. For decisions involving risk prospect theory is significantly more consistent with rankings and choices than expected utility. This conclusion no longer holds when we use prospect theory utilities and expected utilities to predict intertemporal decisions. The latter finding cautions against the common assumption in health economics that health state utilities are transferable across decision contexts. Our results suggest that the standard gamble and algorithms based on, should not be used to value health.

  20. Delayed Attentional Engagement in the Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieuwenstein, Mark R.; Chun, Marvin M.; van der Lubbe, Rob H. J.; Hooge, Ignace T. C.

    2005-01-01

    Observers often miss the 2nd of 2 visual targets (first target [T1] and second target [T2]) when these targets are presented closely in time; the attentional blink (AB). The authors hypothesized that the AB occurs because the attentional response to T2 is delayed by T1 processing, causing T2 to lose a competition for attention to the item that…

  1. Biology Today: Of Wishbones, Beavers & Blinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Provided is a discussion of items covering a variety of fascinating biological topics which include: the elasticity of the furcula of starlings in flight, beavers increasing the greenhouse effect, effective invaders, traveling birds, the cuckoo deception, competitive sperm, hearing springs, heat and sight, blinking as punctuation, mutations, and…

  2. The Attention Cascade Model and Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Shui-I

    2008-01-01

    An attention cascade model is proposed to account for attentional blinks in rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) of stimuli. Data were collected using single characters in a single RSVP stream at 10 Hz [Shih, S., & Reeves, A. (2007). "Attentional capture in rapid serial visual presentation." "Spatial Vision", 20(4), 301-315], and single words,…

  3. Power Measurement Errors on a Utility Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bousman, William G.

    2002-01-01

    Extensive flight test data obtained from two recent performance tests of a UH 60A aircraft are reviewed. A power difference is calculated from the power balance equation and is used to examine power measurement errors. It is shown that the baseline measurement errors are highly non-Gaussian in their frequency distribution and are therefore influenced by additional, unquantified variables. Linear regression is used to examine the influence of other variables and it is shown that a substantial portion of the variance depends upon measurements of atmospheric parameters. Correcting for temperature dependence, although reducing the variance in the measurement errors, still leaves unquantified effects. Examination of the power difference over individual test runs indicates significant errors from drift, although it is unclear how these may be corrected. In an idealized case, where the drift is correctable, it is shown that the power measurement errors are significantly reduced and the error distribution is Gaussian. A new flight test program is recommended that will quantify the thermal environment for all torque measurements on the UH 60. Subsequently, the torque measurement systems will be recalibrated based on the measured thermal environment and a new power measurement assessment performed.

  4. Viscous drag measurements utilizing microfabricated cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Oden, P.I.; Chen, G.Y.; Steele, R.A.; Warmack, R.J.; Thundat, T.

    1996-06-01

    The influence of viscous drag forces on cantilevers is investigated using standard atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers. Viscosity effects on several geometrically different cantilevers manifest themselves as variations in resonance frequencies, quality factors, and cantilever response amplitudes. With this novel measurement, a single cantilever can be used to measure viscosities ranging from {eta}=10{sup {minus}2} to 10{sup 2} g/cms. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Objectivism in Information Utilization: Theory and Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leary, Mark R.; And Others

    A self-report scale was constructed and validated that measures individual differences in objectivism--the tendency to base one's judgments and beliefs upon empirical information and rational considerations. Validity data showed that, compared to people who score low on the Objectivism Scale, highly objective individuals enjoy thinking more, rely…

  6. Utilization of lasers for air data measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, J.

    1991-05-01

    The operating principles of the ALEV3 three axis laser Doppler anemometer, which was designed for flight tests with the A-320 and A-340 aircraft, are depicted. If mounted on the aircraft center of gravity, the ALEV-3 allows true flight velocity in three directions and angles of attack and sideslip to be directly measured with a very good accuracy, in particular flight areas such as limit buffeting, stall, high Mach numbers, or sideslip flights. Aircraft parameter estimation, calculation, and calibration results are presented. The accuracies of velocity, static pressure and aerodynamic angle measurements were compared with classical anemometers precisions. Flight tests results of the ALEV-1 one axis laser anemometer for A-320 are given as a reference.

  7. Compulsive Behavior and Eye Blink in Prader-Willi Syndrome: Neurochemical Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holsen, Laura; Thompson, Travis

    2004-01-01

    Compulsive behavior in Prader-Willi syndrome is well-documented, though the neurochemical basis of these behaviors remains unknown. We studied a group of 16 people with Prader-Willi syndrome and a comparison group of 19 people with intellectual disability. Using eye-blink rate as an indirect measure of central nervous system dopamine, we found a…

  8. Blinking triggered by the change in the solvent accessibility of a fluorescent molecule.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Kiyohiko; Koshimo, Takeshi; Maruyama, Atsushi; Majima, Tetsuro

    2014-09-18

    The more a fluorescent molecule is exposed to a solvent, the faster its triplet excited state is quenched by molecular oxygen. The changes in the solvent accessibility of a fluorescent molecule were probed by measuring the duration of the off time during the blinking of the fluorescence, which enabled analysis of the function of a molecular beacon-type probe.

  9. Labeling Cytosolic Targets in Live Cells with Blinking Probes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianmin; Chang, Jason; Yan, Qi; Dertinger, Thomas; Bruchez, Marcel; Weiss, Shimon

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of superresolution imaging methods, fast dynamic imaging of biological processes in live cells remains a challenge. A subset of these methods requires the cellular targets to be labeled with spontaneously blinking probes. The delivery and specific targeting of cytosolic targets and the control of the probes’ blinking properties are reviewed for three types of blinking probes: quantum dots, synthetic dyes, and fluorescent proteins. PMID:23930154

  10. Blinking correlation in nanocrystal quantum dots probed with novel laser scanning confocal microscopy methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hefti, Ryan Alf

    Semiconductor quantum dots have a vast array of applications: as fluorescent labels in biological systems, as physical or chemical sensors, as components in photovoltaic technology, and in display devices. An attribute of nearly every quantum dot is its blinking, or fluorescence intermittency, which tends to be a disadvantage in most applications. Despite the fact that blinking has been a nearly universal phenomenon among all types of fluorescent constructs, it is more prevalent in quantum dots than in traditional fluorophores. Furthermore, no unanimously accepted model of quantum dot blinking yet exists. The work encompassed by this dissertation began with an in-depth study of molecular motor protein dynamics in a variety of environments using two specially developed techniques, both of which feature applicability to live cell systems. Parked-beam confocal microscopy was utilized to increase temporal resolution of molecular motor motion dynamics by an order of magnitude over other popular methods. The second technique, fast-scanning confocal microscopy (FSCM), was used for long range observation of motor proteins. While using FSCM on motor protein assays, we discovered an unusual phenomenon. Single quantum dots seemingly communicated with neighboring quantum dots, indicated by a distinct correlation in their blinking patterns. In order to explain this novel correlation phenomenon, the majority of blinking models developed thus far would suggest a dipole-dipole interaction or a Coulomb interaction between singly charged quantum dots. However, our results indicate that the interaction energy is higher than supported by current models, thereby prompting a renewed examination. We propose that the blinking correlation we observed is due to a Coulomb interaction on the order of 3-4 elementary charges per quantum dot and that multiple charging of individual quantum dots may be required to plunge them into a non-emissive state. As a result of charging, charge carriers are

  11. Blink reflex latency after exposure to trichloroethylene in well water

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, R.G.; Chirico-Post, J.; Proctor, S.P.

    1988-03-01

    The electrophysiological measurement of the blink reflex (BR) can quantify the conduction latency in the reflex arc involving the Vth (trigeminal) and VIIth (facial) cranial nerves. We measured the electrophysiological BR in a population (N = 21), which had alleged chronic exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE) through the public drinking water at levels 30-80 times higher than the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Maximum Contamination Level (MCL). A highly significant difference was observed in the conduction latency means of the BR components (p less than .0001), when the study population was compared with laboratory controls (N = 27). This difference suggests a subclinical alteration of the Vth cranial nerve function due to chronic, environmental exposure to TCE.

  12. The Attentional Blink Provides Episodic Distinctiveness: Sparing at a Cost

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyble, Brad; Bowman, Howard; Nieuwenstein, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The attentional blink (J. E. Raymond, K. L. Shapiro, & K. M. Arnell, 1992) refers to an apparent gap in perception observed when a second target follows a first within several hundred milliseconds. Theoretical and computational work have provided explanations for early sets of blink data, but more recent data have challenged these accounts by…

  13. [Value of blink reflex studies in neurosurgical problems].

    PubMed

    Jamjoom, Z; Nahser, H C; Nau, H E

    1983-09-01

    Blinking reflex studies were done in neurosurgical patients with processes in the posterior fossa and idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia. Alterations were found in space occupying, ischemic, and traumatic lesions of the trigemino-facial system. The analysis of the components of the blinking reflex can give hints to the site of the lesion and also to the prognosis of the underlying process.

  14. Estimating an Evaluation Utilization Model Using Conjoint Measurement and Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, R. Burke

    1995-01-01

    The conjoint approach to measurement and analysis is demonstrated with a test of an evaluation utilization process-model that includes two endogenous variables (predicted participation and predicted instrumental evaluation). Conjoint measurement involves having respondents rate profiles that are analogues to concepts based on cells in a factorial…

  15. Mental workload and visual impairment: differences between pupil, blink, and subjective rating.

    PubMed

    Recarte, Miguel Angel; Pérez, Elisa; Conchillo, Angela; Nunes, Luis Miguel

    2008-11-01

    This research has two aims: (a) To study the concurrent validity of three measures of mental workload, NASA TLX rating scale, pupil dilation and blink rate, testing the hypothesis that they will provide convergent results using a single-task, and dissociative results for dual-task; and (b) To analyse their capability to predict visual search impairment. These three measures were analyzed in the same cognitive tasks in single-task and dual-task (cognitive task and visual search) conditions in a within-subjects experiment with twenty-nine participants. Mental workload measures showed concurrent validity under single-task condition, but a complex pattern of results arose in the dual-task condition: it is suggested that NASA TLX would be a subjective addition of the rating of each task; pupil dilation would measure the average arousal underlying the cognitive tasks; and the blink rate would produce opposite effects: whereas mental workload of cognitive tasks would increase blink rate, visual demand would inhibit it. All three measures were good predictors of visual impairment. The soundness of these measures is discussed with regard to the applied field of driving and other activities.

  16. Measuring equity in disability and healthcare utilization in Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Trani, Jean-Francois; Barbou-des-Courieres, Cecile

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses equity in health and healthcare utilization in Afghanistan based on a representative national household survey. Equitable access is a cornerstone of the Afghan health policy. We measured socioeconomic-related equity in access to public health care, using disability--because people with disabilities are poorer and more likely to use health care--and a concentration index (CI) and its decomposition. The socioeconomic-related equity in healthcare utilization was measured using a probit model and compared with an OLS model providing the horizontal inequity index (HI). We found a low rate of healthcare facilities utilization (25%). Disabled persons are using more healthcare facilities and have higher medical expenses. Disability is more frequently associated with older age, unemployed heads of household and lower education. The Cl of disability is 0.0221 indicating a pro-rich distribution of health. This pro-rich effect is higher in small households (CI decreases with size of the household, -0.0048) and safe (0.0059) areas. The CI of healthcare utilization is -0.0159 indicating a slightly pro-poor distribution of healthcare utilization but, overall, there is no difference in healthcare utilization by wealth status. Our study does not show major socioeconomic related inequity in disability and healthcare utilization in Afghanistan. This is due to the extreme and pervasive poverty found in Afghanistan. The absence of inequity in health access is explained by the uniform poverty of the population and the difficulty of accessing BPHS facilities (a basic package of health services), despite alarming health indicators.

  17. Object file continuity predicts attentional blink magnitude.

    PubMed

    Kellie, Frances J; Shapiro, Kimron L

    2004-05-01

    When asked to identify targets embedded within a rapid consecutive stream of visual stimuli, observers are less able to identify the second target (T2) when it is presented within half a second of the first (T1); this deficit has been termed the attentional blink (AB). Rapid serial visual presentation methodology was used to investigate the relationship between the AB and object files (episodic representations implicated in object identification and perceptual constancy). An inverse linear relationship was found between the degree of object file continuity and AB magnitude. An important locus of object file continuity was the intervening stream items between T1 and T2. The results are discussed in terms of the heuristic of the object file to preserve limited attentional capacity.

  18. Diurnal rhythms of visual accommodation and blink responses - Implication for flight-deck visual standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, M. R.; Randle, R. J.; Williams, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    Possible 24-h variations in accommodation responses were investigated. A recently developed servo-controlled optometer and focus stimulator were used to obtain monocular accommodation response data on four college-age subjects. No 24-h rhythm in accommodation was shown. Heart rate and blink rate also were measured and periodicity analysis showed a mean 24-h rhythm for both; however, blink rate periodograms were significant for only two of the four subjects. Thus, with the qualifications that college students were tested instead of pilots and that they performed monocular laboratory tasks instead of binocular flight-deck tasks, it is concluded that 24-h rhythms in accommodation responses need not be considered in setting visual standards for flight-deck tasks.

  19. Multiple time scale blinking in InAs quantum dot single-photon sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davanço, Marcelo; Hellberg, C. Stephen; Ates, Serkan; Badolato, Antonio; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2014-04-01

    We use photon correlation measurements to study blinking in single, epitaxially grown self-assembled InAs quantum dots situated in circular Bragg grating and microdisk cavities. The normalized second-order correlation function g(2)(τ) is studied across 11 orders of magnitude in time, and shows signatures of blinking over time scales ranging from tens of nanoseconds to tens of milliseconds. The g(2)(τ) data is fit to a multilevel system rate equation model that includes multiple nonradiating (dark) states, from which radiative quantum yields significantly less than 1 are obtained. This behavior is observed even in situations for which a direct histogramming analysis of the emission time-trace data produces inconclusive results.

  20. Synthesis of Non-blinking Semiconductor Quantum Dots Emitting in the Near-Infrared

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, Allison M.; Mangum, Benjamin D.; Piryatinski, Andrei; Park, Young-Shin; Htoon, Han; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.

    2012-06-21

    Our previous work demonstrates that Quasi-Type II CdSe/CdS core-shell quantum dots with thick shells (3-5 nm) exhibit unique photophysical characteristics, including improved chemical robustness over typical thin-shelled core/shell systems and the elimination of blinking through suppression of nonradiative Auger recombination. Here we describe a new thick-shelled heterostructure, InP/CdS, which exhibits a Type II bandgap alignment producing near-infrared (NIR) emission. Samples with a range of shell thicknesses were synthesized, enabling shell-thickness-dependent study of the absorbance and emission spectra, fluorescence lifetimes, and quantum yields. InP/CdS/ZnS core/shell/shell structures were also synthesized to reduce cadmium exposure for applications in the biological environment. Single particle spectroscopy indicates reduced blinking and improved photostability with increasing shell thickness, resulting in thick-shelled dots that are appropriate for single-particle tracking measurements with NIR emission.

  1. Coverage-mediated suppression of blinking in solid state quantum dot conjugated organic composite nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Nathan I; Early, Kevin T; Sill, Kevin; Odoi, Michael Y; Emrick, Todd; Barnes, Michael D

    2006-07-27

    Size-correlated single-molecule fluorescence measurements on CdSe quantum dots functionalized with oligo(phenylene vinylene) (OPV) ligands exhibit modified fluorescence intermittency (blinking) statistics that are highly sensitive to the degree of ligand coverage on the quantum dot surface. As evidenced by a distinct surface height signature, fully covered CdSe-OPV nanostructures (approximately 25 ligands) show complete suppression of blinking in the solid state on an integration time scale of 1 s. Some access to dark states is observed on finer time scales (100 ms) with average persistence times significantly shorter than those from ZnS-capped CdSe quantum dots. This effect is interpreted as resulting from charge transport from photoexcited OPV into vacant trap sites on the quantum dot surface. These results suggest exciting new applications of composite quantum dot/organic systems in optoelectronic systems.

  2. Accommodation, convergence, pupil diameter and eye blinks at a CRT display flickering near fusion limit.

    PubMed

    Jaschinski, W; Bonacker, M; Alshuth, E

    1996-01-01

    This study investigates possible effects of temporally modulated light stimulation near critical fusion frequency (CFF) when subjects observe a cathode ray tube (CRT) operated at different refresh rates. Various visual functions were measured in a series of tests of 2.5 min duration. In experiment 1, at a repetition rate of 50 Hz mean pupil size was 0.055 mm smaller than at 300 Hz. The precision of convergence and accommodation in binocular vision was not affected. In experiment 2, 300 Hz was compared with the lowest frequency that did not produce visible flicker for each subject. At the lower rate (55 to 90 Hz), mean accommodation in monocular vision was 0.06 D weaker, median eye blink duration was 6% shorter, and mean eye blink interval was 15% longer. Individual differences and possible fatigue effects of intermittent light at visual display units are discussed.

  3. Age effects on attentional blink performance in meditation.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Sara; Müller, Notger G; Melloni, Lucia

    2009-09-01

    Here we explore whether mental training in the form of meditation can help to overcome age-related attentional decline. We compared performance on the attentional blink task between three populations: A group of long-term meditation practitioners within an older population, a control group of age-matched participants and a control group of young participants. Members of both control groups had never practiced meditation. Our results show that long-term meditation practice leads to a reduction of the attentional blink. Meditation practitioners taken from an older population showed a reduction in blink as compared to a control group taken from a younger population, whereas, the control group age-matched to the meditators' group revealed a blink that was comparatively larger and broader. Our results support the hypothesis that meditation practice can: (i) alter the efficiency with which attentional resources are distributed and (ii) help to overcome age-related attentional deficits in the temporal domain.

  4. A novel approach to Hugoniot measurements utilizing transparent crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Fratanduono, D. E.; Eggert, J. H.; Akin, M. C.; Chau, R.; Holmes, N. C.

    2013-01-01

    A new absolute equation of state measurement technique is described and demonstrated measuring the shock state and the refractive index of MgO up to 226GPa. This technique utilizes steady shock waves and the high-pressure transparency of MgO under dynamic shock compression and release. Hugoniot measurements performed using this technique are consistent with the previous measurements. A linear dependence of the shocked refractive index and density is observed up to 226GPa, over a magnitude greater in pressure that previous studies. The transparency of MgO along the principal Hugoniot is higher than any other material reported to date. We observe a significant change in the refractive index of MgO as the Hugoniot elastic limit is exceeded due to the transition from uniaxial to hydrostatic strain. Measurements of the elastic-plastic two-wave structure in MgO indicate a nucleation time for plastic deformation.

  5. Emotional modulation of the attentional blink and the relation to interpersonal reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Kanske, Philipp; Schönfelder, Sandra; Wessa, Michèle

    2013-01-01

    The extent of the attentional blink effect on detection rates in rapid serial visual presentations is modulated by the emotionality of the stimuli. Emotionally salient stimuli are detected more often, even if presented in the attentional blink period, and elicit an enlarged P3 response, which has been interpreted as enhanced consolidation. This effect correlates with individual differences in trait affectivity such as anxiety or dysphoria. Here, we ask if it is also related to the capacity to detect emotions in others, i.e., to interpersonal social traits. We therefore presented emotional and neutral images depicting social scenes as targets in an attentional blink design and measured detection rates and event-related potentials. In addition, we recorded self-reports of empathy as measured by the Interpersonal Reactivity Index. The results show enhanced performance for emotional stimuli and increased P3 amplitudes, which correlated with individual differences in empathy. The data suggest that self-reported empathy goes along with enhanced processing of emotion in social stimuli, even under stimulus conditions that are suboptimal for conscious target detection. PMID:24130525

  6. Eye blinking in an avian species is associated with gaze shifts.

    PubMed

    Yorzinski, Jessica L

    2016-01-01

    Even when animals are actively monitoring their environment, they lose access to visual information whenever they blink. They can strategically time their blinks to minimize information loss and improve visual functioning but we have little understanding of how this process operates in birds. This study therefore examined blinking in freely-moving peacocks (Pavo cristatus) to determine the relationship between their blinks, gaze shifts, and context. Peacocks wearing a telemetric eye-tracker were exposed to a taxidermy predator (Vulpes vulpes) and their blinks and gaze shifts were recorded. Peacocks blinked during the majority of their gaze shifts, especially when gaze shifts were large, thereby timing their blinks to coincide with periods when visual information is already suppressed. They inhibited their blinks the most when they exhibited high rates of gaze shifts and were thus highly alert. Alternative hypotheses explaining the link between blinks and gaze shifts are discussed. PMID:27572457

  7. Eye blinking in an avian species is associated with gaze shifts

    PubMed Central

    Yorzinski, Jessica L.

    2016-01-01

    Even when animals are actively monitoring their environment, they lose access to visual information whenever they blink. They can strategically time their blinks to minimize information loss and improve visual functioning but we have little understanding of how this process operates in birds. This study therefore examined blinking in freely-moving peacocks (Pavo cristatus) to determine the relationship between their blinks, gaze shifts, and context. Peacocks wearing a telemetric eye-tracker were exposed to a taxidermy predator (Vulpes vulpes) and their blinks and gaze shifts were recorded. Peacocks blinked during the majority of their gaze shifts, especially when gaze shifts were large, thereby timing their blinks to coincide with periods when visual information is already suppressed. They inhibited their blinks the most when they exhibited high rates of gaze shifts and were thus highly alert. Alternative hypotheses explaining the link between blinks and gaze shifts are discussed. PMID:27572457

  8. Utility of de-escalatory confidence-building measures

    SciTech Connect

    Nation, J.

    1989-06-01

    This paper evaluates the utility of specific confidence-building de-escalatory measures and pays special attention to the evaluation of measures which place restrictions on or establish procedures for strategic forces. Some measures appear more promising than others. Potentially useful confidence-building measures largely satisfy defined criteria and include the phased return of strategic nuclear forces to peacetime bases and operations, the termination of interference with communications and NTMs (National Technical Means) and the termination of civil defense preparations. Less-promising CBMs include the standing down of supplemental early warning systems, the establishment of SSBN keep-out zones, and decreases in bomber alert rates. Establishment of SSBN keep-out zones and reduction in bomber rates are difficult to verify, while the standing-down of early warning systems provides little benefit at potentially large costs. Particular confidence-building measures (CBMs) may be most useful in building superpower confidence at specific points in the crisis termination phase. For example, a decrease in strategic bomber alert rates may provide some decrease in perception of the likelihood of war, but its potential costs, particularly in increasing bomber vulnerability, may limit its utility and implementation to the final crisis stages when the risks of re-escalation and surprise attack are lower.

  9. Utility measurement in healthcare: the things I never got to.

    PubMed

    Torrance, George W

    2006-01-01

    The present article provides a brief historical background on the development of utility measurement and cost-utility analysis in healthcare. It then outlines a number of research ideas in this field that the author never got to. The first idea is extremely fundamental. Why is health economics the only application of economics that does not use the discipline of economics? And, more importantly, what discipline should it use? Research ideas are discussed to investigate precisely the underlying theory and axiom systems of both Paretian welfare economics and the decision-theoretical utility approach. Can the two approaches be integrated or modified in some appropriate way so that they better reflect the needs of the health field? The investigation is described both for the individual and societal levels. Constructing a 'Robinson Crusoe' society of only a few individuals with different health needs, preferences and willingness to pay is suggested as a method for gaining insight into the problem. The second idea concerns the interval property of utilities and, therefore, QALYs. It specifically concerns the important requirement that changes of equal magnitude anywhere on the utility scale, or alternatively on the QALY scale, should be equally desirable. Unfortunately, one of the original restrictions on utility theory states that such comparisons are not permitted by the theory. It is shown, in an important new finding, that while this restriction applies in a world of certainty, it does not in a world of uncertainty, such as healthcare. Further research is suggested to investigate this property under both certainty and uncertainty. Other research ideas that are described include: the development of a precise axiomatic basis for the time trade-off method; the investigation of chaining as a method of preference measurement with the standard gamble or time trade-off; the development and training of a representative panel of the general public to improve the completeness

  10. Development of a terrain severity measurement system utilizing optical lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dembski, Nicholas; Rizzoni, Giorgio; Soliman, Ahmed

    2006-05-01

    A terrain severity measurement system utilizing non-contact optical scanning laser technologies employed in on-road profiling has been developed to make detailed measurements of the relative smoothness of all types of terrain from paved roads to extreme off-road conditions. The objectives included operation in all climatic conditions, simplified operation, and rapid availability of data. Accelerometers and inclinometers are used to measure laser sensor movement in order to eliminate measurement errors due to vehicle pitch and roll. A GPS receiver is used to correlate terrain profile information to position and elevation data. The end result is an accurate description of the longitudinal and lateral terrain profile that can be used to characterize the terrain and within vehicle modeling and simulation programs.

  11. Defensive eye-blink startle responses in a human experimental model of anxiety.

    PubMed

    Pinkney, Verity; Wickens, Robin; Bamford, Susan; Baldwin, David S; Garner, Matthew

    2014-09-01

    Inhalation of low concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) triggers anxious behaviours in rodents via chemosensors in the amygdala, and increases anxiety, autonomic arousal and hypervigilance in healthy humans. However, it is not known whether CO2 inhalation modulates defensive behaviours coordinated by this network in humans. We examined the effect of 7.5% CO2 challenge on the defensive eye-blink startle response. A total of 27 healthy volunteers completed an affective startle task during inhalation of 7.5% CO2 and air. The magnitude and latency of startle eye-blinks were recorded whilst participants viewed aversive and neutral pictures. We found that 7.5% CO2 increased state anxiety and raised concurrent measures of skin conductance and heart rate (HR). CO2 challenge did not increase startle magnitude, but slowed the onset of startle eye-blinks. The effect of CO2 challenge on HR covaried with its effects on both subjective anxiety and startle latency. Our findings are discussed with reference to startle profiles during conditions of interoceptive threat, increased cognitive load and in populations characterised by anxiety, compared with acute fear and panic. PMID:24899597

  12. Complete suppression of Blinking and convergence to a single emissive state in giant nanocrystal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malko, Anton; Sampat, Siddharth; Park, Young-Shin; Vela, Javier; Chen, Youngfen; Hollingsworth, Jennifer; Klimov, Victor; Htoon, Han

    2011-03-01

    We report a systematic study of photoluminescence (PL) emission intensities and lifetimes of individual core-shell CdSe/CdS ``giant'' nanocrystal quantum dots (gNQDs) as a function of the shell thickness. We observed a complete suppression of blinking for gNQDs overcoated with more than 16 monolayers (ML) of CdS shell. An analysis of the photon emission statistics reveals a highly super-Poissonian distribution for thin shell (4-12 ML) gNQDs and near perfect Poissonian distribution for non-blinking, thick-shell gNQDs. Measurements of PL decay rates as a function of PL intensity show that while PL lifetimes vary continuously with PL intensity for thin-shell gNQDs, only one PL decay constant is observed for the thicker shell gNQDs. This result clearly indicates that while the thin-shell gNQDs possess continuous distribution of emission states, PL of the non-blinking, thick-shell gNQDs originates from a single emissive state.

  13. Dynamics and function of the tear film in relation to the blink cycle

    PubMed Central

    Braun, R.J.; King-Smith, P.E.; Begley, C.G.; Li, Longfei; Gewecke, N.R.

    2014-01-01

    Great strides have recently been made in quantitative measurements of tear film thickness and thinning, mathematical modeling thereof and linking these to sensory perception. This paper summarizes recent progress in these areas and reports on new results. The complete blink cycle is used as a framework that attempts to unify the results that are currently available. Understanding of tear film dynamics is aided by combining information from different imaging methods, including fluorescence, retroillumination and a new high-speed stroboscopic imaging system developed for studying the tear film during the blink cycle. During the downstroke of the blink, lipid is compressed as a thick layer just under the upper lid which is often released as a narrow thick band of lipid at the beginning of the upstroke. “Rippling” of the tear film/air interface due to motion of the tear film over the corneal surface, somewhat like the flow of water in a shallow stream over a rocky streambed, was observed during lid motion and treated theoretically here. New mathematical predictions of tear film osmolarity over the exposed ocular surface and in tear breakup are presented; the latter is closely linked to new in vivo observations. Models include the effects of evaporation, osmotic flow through the cornea and conjunctiva, quenching of fluorescence, tangential flow of aqueous tears and diffusion of tear solutes and fluorescein. These and other combinations of experiment and theory increase our understanding of the fluid dynamics of the tear film and its potential impact on the ocular surface. PMID:25479602

  14. Relieving the attentional blink in the amblyopic brain with video games.

    PubMed

    Li, Roger W; Ngo, Charlie V; Levi, Dennis M

    2015-02-26

    Video game play induces a generalized recovery of a range of spatial visual functions in the amblyopic brain. Here we ask whether video game play also alters temporal processing in the amblyopic brain. When visual targets are presented in rapid succession, correct identification of the first target (T1) can interfere with identification of the second (T2). This is known as the "attentional blink". We measured the attentional blink in each eye of adults with amblyopia before and after 40 hours of active video game play, using a rapid serial visual presentation technique. After videogame play, we observed a ~40% reduction in the attentional blink (identifying T2 200 ms after T1) seen through the amblyopic eye and this improvement in performance transferred substantially to the untrained fellow sound eye. Our experiments show that the enhanced performance cannot be simply explained by eye patching alone, or to improved visual acuity, but is specific to videogame experience. Thus, videogame training might have important therapeutic applications for amblyopia and other visual brain disorders.

  15. Evidence for the role of holes in blinking: negative and oxidized CdSe/CdS dots.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wei; Guyot-Sionnest, Philippe

    2012-10-23

    Thin shell CdSe/CdS colloidal quantum dots with a small 3 nm core diameter exhibit typical blinking and a binary PL intensity distribution. Electrochemical charging with one electron suppresses the blinking. With a larger core of 5 nm, the blinking statistics of on and off states is identical to that of a smaller core but the dots also display a grey state with a finite duration time (~6 ms) on glass. However, the grey state disappears on the electron-accepting ZnO nanocrystals film. In addition, the grey state PL lifetime on glass is similar to the trion lifetime measured from electrochemically charged dots. Therefore, the grey state is assigned to the photocharged negative dots. It is concluded that a grey state is always present as the dots get negatively photocharged even though it might not be observed due to the brightness of the trion and/or the duration time of the negative charge. With thick shell CdSe/CdS dots under electrochemical control, multiple charging, up to four electrons per dot, is observed as sequential changes in the photoluminescence lifetime which can be described by the Nernst equation. The small potential increment confirms the weak electron confinement with the thick CdS shell. Finally, the mechanism of hole-trapping and surface oxidation by the hole is proposed to account for the grey state and off state in the blinking.

  16. A moving overlay shrinks the attentional blink.

    PubMed

    Chua, Fook K

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a study examining the effects of overlaying a veil of spots on the letters in a central rapid serial visual presentation stream. Observers identified two target letters (T1 and T2, respectively) embedded in a stream of distractor letters printed in a different color. In Experiment 1, the attentional blink (AB) diminished when a different overlay veiled each letter, such that the spots appeared to move as the letters changed. Experiment 2 concerned whether the performance enhancement occurred because the overlay hampered processing of the lag 1 distractor, thus weakening the distractor's interference with T1. Experiment 3 focused on how changing the overlay at or around T1 affected the AB. The attention disengagement hypothesis was proposed to explain the common theme in the results-that performance was only enhanced when different overlays were applied to the T1 and lag 1 frames. The claim is that the AB reflects a failure of prompt attentional disengagement from T1, which, in turn, delays reengagement when T2 appears shortly thereafter. When T1's disappearance is accompanied by an overlay change, the perceptual system gets an additional cue signaling that the visual scene has changed, thereby inducing attentional disengagement. Apart from facilitating prompt reengagement at the next target, earlier disengagement also improves target recovery by excluding features of the trailing item, likely to be a distractor, from working memory.

  17. Detection of eye blink artifacts from single prefrontal channel electroencephalogram.

    PubMed

    Chang, Won-Du; Cha, Ho-Seung; Kim, Kiwoong; Im, Chang-Hwan

    2016-02-01

    Eye blinks are one of the most influential artifact sources in electroencephalogram (EEG) recorded from frontal channels, and thereby detecting and rejecting eye blink artifacts is regarded as an essential procedure for improving the quality of EEG data. In this paper, a novel method to detect eye blink artifacts from a single-channel frontal EEG signal was proposed by combining digital filters with a rule-based decision system, and its performance was validated using an EEG dataset recorded from 24 healthy participants. The proposed method has two main advantages over the conventional methods. First, it uses single-channel EEG data without the need for electrooculogram references. Therefore, this method could be particularly useful in brain-computer interface applications using headband-type wearable EEG devices with a few frontal EEG channels. Second, this method could estimate the ranges of eye blink artifacts accurately. Our experimental results demonstrated that the artifact range estimated using our method was more accurate than that from the conventional methods, and thus, the overall accuracy of detecting epochs contaminated by eye blink artifacts was markedly increased as compared to conventional methods. The MATLAB package of our library source codes and sample data, named Eyeblink Master, is open for free download.

  18. Delayed working memory consolidation during the attentional blink.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Edward K; Luck, Steven J

    2002-12-01

    After the detection of a target (T1) in a rapid stream of visual stimuli, there is a period of 400-600 msec during which a subsequent target (T2) is missed. This impairment in performance has been labeled the attentional blink. Recent theories propose that the attentional blink reflects a bottleneck in working memory consolidation such that T2 cannot be consolidated until after T1 is consolidated, and T2 is therefore masked by subsequent stimuli if it is presented while T1 is being consolidated. In support of this explanation, Giesbrecht & Di Lollo (1998) found that when T2 is the final item in the stimulus stream, no attentional blink is observed, because there are no subsequent stimuli that might mask T2. To provide a direct test of this explanation of the attentional blink, in the present study we used the P3 component of the event-related potential waveform to track the processing of T2. When T2 was followed by a masking item, we found that the P3 wave was completely suppressed during the attentional blink period, indicating that T2 was not consolidated in working memory. When T2 was the last item in the stimulus stream, however, we found that the P3 wave was delayed but not suppressed, indicating that T2 consolidation was not eliminated but simply delayed. These results are consistent with a fundamental limit on the consolidation of information in working memory.

  19. Probing and controlling fluorescence blinking of single semiconductor nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Hsien-Chen; Yuan, Chi-Tsu; Tang, Jau

    2011-01-01

    In this review we present an overview of the experimental and theoretical development on fluorescence intermittency (blinking) and the roles of electron transfer in semiconductor crystalline nanoparticles. Blinking is a very interesting phenomenon commonly observed in single molecule/particle experiments. Under continuous laser illumination, the fluorescence time trace of these single nanoparticles exhibit random light and dark periods. Since its first observation in the mid-1990s, this intriguing phenomenon has attracted wide attention among researchers from many disciplines. We will first present the historical background of the discovery and the observation of unusual inverse power-law dependence for the waiting time distributions of light and dark periods. Then, we will describe our theoretical modeling efforts to elucidate the causes for the power-law behavior, to probe the roles of electron transfer in blinking, and eventually to control blinking and to achieve complete suppression of the blinking, which is an annoying feature in many applications of quantum dots as light sources and fluorescence labels for biomedical imaging. PMID:22110871

  20. Automatic and Direct Identification of Blink Components from Scalp EEG

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Wanzeng; Zhou, Zhanpeng; Hu, Sanqing; Zhang, Jianhai; Babiloni, Fabio; Dai, Guojun

    2013-01-01

    Eye blink is an important and inevitable artifact during scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) recording. The main problem in EEG signal processing is how to identify eye blink components automatically with independent component analysis (ICA). Taking into account the fact that the eye blink as an external source has a higher sum of correlation with frontal EEG channels than all other sources due to both its location and significant amplitude, in this paper, we proposed a method based on correlation index and the feature of power distribution to automatically detect eye blink components. Furthermore, we prove mathematically that the correlation between independent components and scalp EEG channels can be translating directly from the mixing matrix of ICA. This helps to simplify calculations and understand the implications of the correlation. The proposed method doesn't need to select a template or thresholds in advance, and it works without simultaneously recording an electrooculography (EOG) reference. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can automatically recognize eye blink components with a high accuracy on entire datasets from 15 subjects. PMID:23959240

  1. Probing and controlling fluorescence blinking of single semiconductor nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ko, Hsien-Chen; Yuan, Chi-Tsu; Tang, Jau

    2011-01-01

    In this review we present an overview of the experimental and theoretical development on fluorescence intermittency (blinking) and the roles of electron transfer in semiconductor crystalline nanoparticles. Blinking is a very interesting phenomenon commonly observed in single molecule/particle experiments. Under continuous laser illumination, the fluorescence time trace of these single nanoparticles exhibit random light and dark periods. Since its first observation in the mid-1990s, this intriguing phenomenon has attracted wide attention among researchers from many disciplines. We will first present the historical background of the discovery and the observation of unusual inverse power-law dependence for the waiting time distributions of light and dark periods. Then, we will describe our theoretical modeling efforts to elucidate the causes for the power-law behavior, to probe the roles of electron transfer in blinking, and eventually to control blinking and to achieve complete suppression of the blinking, which is an annoying feature in many applications of quantum dots as light sources and fluorescence labels for biomedical imaging.

  2. Correlated Single Quantum Dot Blinking and Interfacial Electron Transfer Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shengye; Hsiang, Jung-Cheng; Zhu, Haiming; Song, Nianhui; Dickson, Robert M; Lian, Tianquan

    2010-08-31

    The electron transfer (ET) dynamics from core/multi-shell (CdSe/CdS(3ML)ZnCdS(2ML)ZnS(2ML)) quantum dots (QDs) to adsorbed Fluorescein (F27) molecules have been studied by single particle spectroscopy to probe the relationship between single QD interfacial electron transfer and blinking dynamics. Electron transfer from the QD to F27 and the subsequent recombination were directly observed by ensemble-averaged transient absorption spectroscopy. Single QD-F27 complexes show correlated fluctuation of fluorescence intensity and lifetime, similar to those observed in free QDs. With increasing ET rate (controlled by F27-to-QD ratio), the lifetime of on states decreases and relative contribution of off states increases. It was shown that ET is active for QDs in on states, the excited state lifetime of which reflects the ET rate, whereas in the off state QD excitons decay by Auger relaxation and ET is not a competitive quenching pathway. Thus, the blinking dynamics of single QDs modulate their interfacial ET activity. Furthermore, interfacial ET provides an additional pathway for generating off states, leading to correlated single QD interfacial ET and blinking dynamics in QD-acceptor complexes. Because blinking is a general phenomenon of single QDs, it appears that the correlated interfacial ET and blinking and the resulting intermittent ET activity are general phenomena for single QDs.

  3. Automatic and direct identification of blink components from scalp EEG.

    PubMed

    Kong, Wanzeng; Zhou, Zhanpeng; Hu, Sanqing; Zhang, Jianhai; Babiloni, Fabio; Dai, Guojun

    2013-08-16

    Eye blink is an important and inevitable artifact during scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) recording. The main problem in EEG signal processing is how to identify eye blink components automatically with independent component analysis (ICA). Taking into account the fact that the eye blink as an external source has a higher sum of correlation with frontal EEG channels than all other sources due to both its location and significant amplitude, in this paper, we proposed a method based on correlation index and the feature of power distribution to automatically detect eye blink components. Furthermore, we prove mathematically that the correlation between independent components and scalp EEG channels can be translating directly from the mixing matrix of ICA. This helps to simplify calculations and understand the implications of the correlation. The proposed method doesn't need to select a template or thresholds in advance, and it works without simultaneously recording an electrooculography (EOG) reference. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can automatically recognize eye blink components with a high accuracy on entire datasets from 15 subjects.

  4. Enhancing quantum Fisher information by utilizing uncollapsing measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Juan; Ding, Zhi-Yong; Ye, Liu

    2016-09-01

    As an indicator of estimation precision, quantum Fisher information (QFI) lies at the heart of quantum metrology theory. In this work, an effective scheme for enhancing QFI is proposed by utilizing quantum uncollapsing measurements. Two kinds of strategies for the arbitrary two-qubit pure state with weight parameter and phase parameter are implemented under different situations, respectively. We derive the explicit conditions for the optimal measurement strengths, and verify that the QFI can be improved quite well. Meanwhile, due to the relation of quantum correlation and QFI, the maximal value of QFI associated with phase parameter for pure state is always equal to 1. It is worth noting that the optimal measurement strength is only related to the weight parameter, as uncollapsing measurements operation does not induce any disturbance on the value of phase parameter. The scheme also can be extended to improve the parameter estimation precision for an N-qubit pure state. In addition, as an example, the situation of an arbitrary single-qubit state under amplitude damping channel is investigated. It is shown that our scheme also works well for enhancing QFI under decoherence.

  5. The Sparing Is Far from Spurious: Reevaluating Within-Trial Contingency Effects in the Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivers, Christian N. L.; Hulleman, Johan; Spalek, Thomas; Kawahara, Jun-ichiro; Di Lollo, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    The attentional blink is the marked deficit in awareness of a 2nd target (T2) when it is presented shortly after the 1st target (T1) in a stream of distractors. When the distractors between T1 and T2 are replaced by even more targets, the attentional blink is reduced or absent, indicating that the attentional blink results from online selection…

  6. Development of a Neutron Spectroscopic System Utilizing Compressed Sensing Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, Danilo; Cable Kurwitz, R.; Carron, Igor; DePriest, K. Russell

    2016-02-01

    A new approach to neutron detection capable of gathering spectroscopic information has been demonstrated. The approach relies on an asymmetrical arrangement of materials, geometry, and an ability to change the orientation of the detector with respect to the neutron field. Measurements are used to unfold the energy characteristics of the neutron field using a new theoretical framework of compressed sensing. Recent theoretical results show that the number of multiplexed samples can be lower than the full number of traditional samples while providing the ability to have some super-resolution. Furthermore, the solution approach does not require a priori information or inclusion of physics models. Utilizing the MCNP code, a number of candidate detector geometries and materials were modeled. Simulations were carried out for a number of neutron energies and distributions with preselected orientations for the detector. The resulting matrix (A) consists of n rows associated with orientation and m columns associated with energy and distribution where n < m. The library of known responses is used for new measurements Y (n × 1) and the solver is able to determine the system, Y = Ax where x is a sparse vector. Therefore, energy spectrum measurements are a combination of the energy distribution information of the identified elements of A. This approach allows for determination of neutron spectroscopic information using a single detector system with analog multiplexing. The analog multiplexing allows the use of a compressed sensing solution similar to approaches used in other areas of imaging. A single detector assembly provides improved flexibility and is expected to reduce uncertainty associated with current neutron spectroscopy measurement.

  7. Religion and the Attentional Blink: Depth of Faith Predicts Depth of the Blink

    PubMed Central

    Colzato, Lorenza S.; Hommel, Bernhard; Shapiro, Kimron L.

    2010-01-01

    Religion is commonly defined as a set of rules, developed as part of a culture. Here we provide evidence that practice in following these rules systematically changes the way people allocate their attention, as indicated by the attentional blink (AB), a deficit in reporting the second of two target stimuli presented in close succession in a rapid sequence of distracters. We provide evidence that Dutch Calvinists and Atheists, brought up in the same country and culture and controlled for race, intelligence, mood, personality traits, and age, differ with respect to the amount of resources invested into processing AB targets. Calvinists showed a larger AB than Atheists, which is consistent with the notion that people's attentional processing style reflects biases rewarded by their religious beliefs. PMID:21833216

  8. Delocalized and localized charged excitons in single CdSe/CdS dot-in-rods revealed by polarized photoluminescence blinking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihara, Toshiyuki; Sato, Ryota; Teranishi, Toshiharu; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2014-07-01

    CdSe/CdS heterostructured nanocrystals with quasi-type-II band alignments provide an interesting platform for studying the photoluminescence (PL) blinking associated with their unique morphologies. By using simultaneous measurements of the PL intensity, lifetime, and polarization anisotropy, we reveal the role of the electron delocalization during the blinking of single CdSe/CdS dot-in-rods. We found that a significant change in the PL polarization anisotropy distinguishes between two kinds of charged excitons with different electron delocalizations. We report our observation of unique polarized PL blinking governed by the band alignments and the Coulomb interactions between the charges inside and outside the dot-in-rod.

  9. Suppressed blinking behavior of thioglycolic acid capped CdTe quantum dot by amine functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Abhijit; Tamai, Naoto

    2011-12-01

    Prepared water soluble thioglycolic acid capped CdTe quantum dots (QDs) were further surface functionalized by ethylene diamine (EDA). Amine functionalized CdTe QDs demonstrate enhanced luminescence intensity at ensemble measurements and suppressed luminescence intermittency behavior at the single molecule level. A clear decrease in the power law exponent for "on" time behavior is observed in amine modified CdTe QDs. Our results show that surface of CdTe QDs modified by EDA can lead to an important physical mechanism to enhance fluorescence intensity, reduce blinking, and increase photostability.

  10. A fixed-links modeling approach to assess individual differences in the attentional blink: Analysis of behavioral and psychophysiological data.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Felicitas L; Rammsayer, Thomas H; Schweizer, Karl; Troche, Stefan J

    2015-07-01

    The attentional blink (AB) is a fundamental limitation of the ability to select relevant information from irrelevant information. It can be observed with the detection rate in an AB task as well as with the corresponding P300 amplitude of the event-related potential. In previous research, however, correlations between these two levels of observation were weak and rather inconsistent. A possible explanation of this finding might be that multiple processes underlie the AB and, thus, obscure a possible relationship between AB-related detection rate and the corresponding P300 amplitude. The present study investigated this assumption by applying a fixed-links modeling approach to represent behavioral individual differences in the AB as a latent variable. Concurrently, this approach enabled us to control for additional sources of variance in AB performance by deriving two additional latent variables. The correlation between the latent variable reflecting behavioral individual differences in AB magnitude and a corresponding latent variable derived from the P300 amplitude was high (r=.70). Furthermore, this correlation was considerably stronger than the correlations of other behavioral measures of the AB magnitude with their psychophysiological counterparts (all rs<.40). Our findings clearly indicate that the systematic disentangling of various sources of variance by utilizing the fixed-links modeling approach is a promising tool to investigate behavioral individual differences in the AB and possible psychophysiological correlates of these individual differences.

  11. Temporal cuing modulates alpha oscillations during auditory attentional blink.

    PubMed

    Shen, Dawei; Ross, Bernhard; Alain, Claude

    2016-07-01

    Attentional blink (AB) refers to the phenomenon whereby the correct identification of a visual or auditory target impairs processing of a subsequent probe. Although it has been shown that knowing in advance, when the probe would be presented, reduces the attentional blink and increases the amplitude of event-related potential (ERP) elicited by the probe, the neural mechanism by which attention mitigates the AB remains unclear. Here, we used time-frequency analysis to further explore the mechanism of the auditory attentional blink. Participants were presented a series of rapid auditory stimuli and asked to indicate whether a target and a probe were present in the sequence. In half of the trials, participants were cued to the probe position relative to the target ('Early' or 'Late'). Probe detection and ERP amplitude elicited by the probe decreased when the probe was presented shortly after the target compared to when it was presented later after the target. Importantly, the behavioral and ERP correlates of probe discrimination significantly improved when the 'Early' cue was presented. The improvement in processing the probe in the cued condition was accompanied by the decrease in alpha activity (8-13 Hz) after the time when the probe was expected; suggesting that successfully directing attention to time window where the probe would likely occur reduces the processing resources needed to suppress distractors. This in turn freed up available processing resources for the target and probe at the short-term consolidation stage, which ultimately reduced the auditory attentional blink. PMID:27152668

  12. Masking T1 Difficulty: Processing Time and the Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Visser, Troy A. W.

    2007-01-01

    When observers are presented with 2 targets in rapid succession, identification of the 1st is highly accurate, whereas identification of the 2nd is impaired at brief intertarget intervals (i.e., 200-500 ms). This 2nd-target deficit is known as the attentional blink (AB). According to bottleneck models, the AB arises because attending to the 1st…

  13. Viewpoint Costs Occur during Consolidation: Evidence from the Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dux, Paul E.; Harris, Irina M.

    2007-01-01

    Do the viewpoint costs incurred when naming rotated familiar objects arise during initial identification or during consolidation? To answer this question we employed an attentional blink (AB) task where two target objects appeared amongst a rapid stream of distractor objects. Our assumption was that while both targets and distractors undergo…

  14. The clinical utility of bone marker measurements in osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Wheater, Gillian; Elshahaly, Mohsen; Tuck, Stephen P; Datta, Harish K; van Laar, Jacob M

    2013-01-01

    Osteoporosis is characterised by low bone mass and structural deterioration of bone tissue, resulting in increased fragility and susceptibility to fracture. Osteoporotic fractures are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Direct medical costs from such fractures in the UK are currently estimated at over two billion pounds per year, resulting in a substantial healthcare burden that is expected to rise exponentially due to increasing life expectancy. Currently bone mineral density is the WHO standard for diagnosis of osteoporosis, but poor sensitivity means that potential fractures will be missed if it is used alone. During the past decade considerable progress has been made in the identification and characterisation of specific biomarkers to aid the management of metabolic bone disease. Technological developments have greatly enhanced assay performance producing reliable, rapid, non-invasive cost effective assays with improved sensitivity and specificity. We now have a greater understanding of the need to regulate pre-analytical sample collection to minimise the effects of biological variation. However, bone turnover markers (BTMs) still have limited clinical utility. It is not routinely recommended to use BTMs to select those at risk of fractures, but baseline measurements of resorption markers are useful before commencement of anti-resorptive treatment and can be checked 3-6 months later to monitor response and adherence to treatment. Similarly, formation markers can be used to monitor bone forming agents. BTMs may also be useful when monitoring patients during treatment holidays and aid in the decision as to when therapy should be recommenced. Recent recommendations by the Bone Marker Standards Working Group propose to standardise research and include a specific marker of bone resorption (CTX) and bone formation (P1NP) in all future studies. It is hoped that improved research in turn will lead to optimised markers for the clinical management of

  15. The (B)link Between Creativity and Dopamine: Spontaneous Eye Blink Rates Predict and Dissociate Divergent and Convergent Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chermahini, Soghra Akbari; Hommel, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    Human creativity has been claimed to rely on the neurotransmitter dopamine, but evidence is still sparse. We studied whether individual performance (N=117) in divergent thinking (alternative uses task) and convergent thinking (remote association task) can be predicted by the individual spontaneous eye blink rate (EBR), a clinical marker of…

  16. Musical Minds: Attentional Blink Reveals Modality-Specific Restrictions

    PubMed Central

    Martens, Sander; Wierda, Stefan M.; Dun, Mathijs; de Vries, Michal; Smid, Henderikus G. O. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Formal musical training is known to have positive effects on attentional and executive functioning, processing speed, and working memory. Consequently, one may expect to find differences in the dynamics of temporal attention between musicians and non-musicians. Here we address the question whether that is indeed the case, and whether any beneficial effects of musical training on temporal attention are modality specific or generalize across sensory modalities. Methodology/Principal Findings When two targets are presented in close temporal succession, most people fail to report the second target, a phenomenon known as the attentional blink (AB). We measured and compared AB magnitude for musicians and non-musicians using auditory or visually presented letters and digits. Relative to non-musicians, the auditory AB was both attenuated and delayed in musicians, whereas the visual AB was larger. Non-musicians with a large auditory AB tended to show a large visual AB. However, neither a positive nor negative correlation was found in musicians, suggesting that at least in musicians, attentional restrictions within each modality are completely separate. Conclusion/Significance AB magnitude within one modality can generalize to another modality, but this turns out not to be the case for every individual. Formal musical training seems to have a domain-general, but modality-specific beneficial effect on selective attention. The results fit with the idea that a major source of attentional restriction as reflected in the AB lies in modality-specific, independent sensory systems rather than a central amodal system. The findings demonstrate that individual differences in AB magnitude can provide important information about the modular structure of human cognition. PMID:25714836

  17. Anti-bunching and luminescence blinking suppression from plasmon-interacted single CdSe/ZnS quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Wei; Gong, Ming; Dong, Chun-Hua; Cui, Jin-Ming; Yang, Yong; Sun, Fang-Wen; Guo, Guang-Can; Han, Zheng-Fu

    2010-03-15

    CdSe/ZnS colloidal quantum dots generally exist as blinking phenomena during the luminescence process that remarkably influences its applications. In this work, we used the surface plasmonic effect to effectively modulate single quantum dots. Obvious contrasts have been observed by comparing single quantum dots on silica and gold films. The surface plasmon is shown to obviously suppress the blinking of single quantum dots. With further demonstrated second- order correlation measurements, an anti-bunching effect was observed. The anti-bunching dip gives the smallest value of g(2)(0) = 0.15, and the lifetime of the exciton has been reduced. This method presents the application's potential towards tunable high-emitting-speed single photon sources at room temperature.

  18. The Attentional Blink Is Not Affected by Backward Masking of T2, T2-Mask SOA, or Level of T2 Impoverishment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jannati, Ali; Spalek, Thomas M.; Lagroix, Hayley E. P.; Di Lollo, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Identification of the second of two targets (T2) is impaired when presented shortly after the first (T1). This "attentional blink" (AB) is thought to arise from a delay in T2 processing during which T2 is vulnerable to masking. Conventional studies have measured T2 accuracy which is constrained by the 100% ceiling. We avoided this problem by using…

  19. Multidimensional displacement vector measurement methods utilizing instantaneous phase.

    PubMed

    Sumi, Chikayoshi

    2005-01-01

    In this report, we propose two new methods for measuring multidimensional displacement vector using instantaneous ultrasound signal phase, i.e., the multidimensional autocorrelation method and the multidimensional Doppler's method. In order to realize high measurement accuracy, respective displacement vector measurement methods are combined with our proposed useful lateral modulation method, i.e., the lateral Gaussian envelop cosine modulation method. We further report measurement accuracy evaluated through simulations. These methods can be applied to tissue strain measurement, blood flow measurement, sonar measurement, etc.

  20. Tear lipid layer deficiency associated with incomplete blinking: A case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Meibomian gland obstruction induces hyposecretion of tear film lipids, which results in lipid layer deficiency and evaporative dry eye. Unfortunately, the importance of blinking in meibomian gland dysfunction has been largely overlooked, and it is not known whether incomplete blinking causes tear lipid deficiency, even in the unobstructed meibomian glands. Case presentation A 38-year-old woman suffering from foreign body sensations in her eyes was examined. The cornea was clear and tear secretion was normal. Lid margin abnormalities were not observed and the meibum was clear. However, the lipid layer was very thin, and the patient was given a diagnosis of incomplete blinking. The patient was made aware of her condition and asked to blink consciously and completely. After that, an immediate increase in lipid flow was observed. Conclusion Tear lipid layer deficiency can occur with incomplete blinking, even though meibomian gland structures are intact. This case highlights the importance of complete blinking. PMID:23855887

  1. Contingent negative variation indicates phasic arousal for externally cued unilateral eye blink in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Strenge, H; Kropp, P; Hoffmeister, J; Verri, A; Galli, C; Gerber, W D

    1999-04-30

    The contingent negative variation (CNV) as a slow cortical potential was used to investigate cortical processing of externally cued, voluntary unilateral eye blink. Probands blinked as a response within a modified two-stimulus reaction time paradigm. Reaction time and amplitudes of CNV were determined. The activity of the orbicularis oculi muscles (OO) was registered by surface electromyography (EMG). Probands who performed unilateral eye blinks with accurately inhibiting contralateral OO activity showed a significantly higher negativity of the early CNV component compared with the bilateral eye blink condition. This effect was confined to the beginning of unilateral blinking performance. It is suggested that the unilateral eye blink is a challenging motor task, initially requiring an increased cortically driven arousal and attention as revealed by increased early CNV components. PMID:10336183

  2. Signal detection methods for measurement of utility in animals.

    PubMed

    Wright, A A; Nevin, J A

    1974-03-01

    Analytic methods of signal detection theory were employed to assess the utility of reinforcers. Four pigeons were trained to detect the presence or absence of a stimulus by pecking one of two side keys in a trial-by-trial choice paradigm. The relative rate of positive reinforcement for correct choices was varied to offset the biasing effects of electric shock for incorrect right side-key choices. The effects of relative rate of reinforcement on bias were similar at all shock intensities even though the subjects' sensitivity changed during the course of the experiment. The relative rate of reinforcement required to produce equal bias was calculated and plotted against shock intensity to generate utility functions. The relative rate of reinforcement necessary to offset the bias induced by shock was an increasing function of shock intensity.

  3. Jaw, blink and corneal reflex latencies in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, E A; Ongerboer de Visser, B W; Barendswaard, E C; Arts, R J

    1985-01-01

    Jaw, blink and corneal reflexes, which all involve the trigeminal system, were recorded in 54 patients with multiple sclerosis; thirty-seven of these patients were classified as having definite multiple sclerosis and 17 as indefinite multiple sclerosis, according to Schumacher's criteria. The jaw reflex was abnormal less frequently than either of the other two reflexes, but in four cases it was the only abnormal reflex found. Testing a combination of two or three trigeminal reflexes did not yield a higher incidence of abnormalities than testing the blink or corneal reflex alone. Nine patients showed abnormal reflexes which were unexpected on the basis of clinical symptoms. The combined recordings demonstrate at least one abnormal reflex in 74% of the patients. The various types of reflex abnormalities reflect major damage to different parts of the trigeminal system and may therefore make an important contribution to the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. PMID:4087004

  4. Blinking in nanoscale systems: a universal theoretical framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkan-Kacso, Sandor; Frantsuzov, Pavel; Janko, Boldizsar

    2012-02-01

    Fluctuations of fluorescence intensity (blinking) is observed in many different kinds of optically active nanoscale objects. These fluctuations with extremely long-term correlations manifest on timescales longer than seconds and were observed in the emission of colloidal and self-assembled quantum dots, nanorods, nanowires, and some organic dyes. We suggest the idea of a universal physical mechanism underlying the blinking phenomenon. Here we show that the features of this universal mechanism can be captured phenomenologically by the multiple recombination center model (MRC) we proposed in a recent work to explaining single colloidal QD intermittency. Within the framework of the MRC model we qualitatively explain all the important features of fluorescence intensity fluctuations for a broad spectrum of nanoscale emitters.

  5. 3D super-resolution imaging with blinking quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Fruhwirth, Gilbert; Cai, En; Ng, Tony; Selvin, Paul R

    2013-11-13

    Quantum dots are promising candidates for single molecule imaging due to their exceptional photophysical properties, including their intense brightness and resistance to photobleaching. They are also notorious for their blinking. Here we report a novel way to take advantage of quantum dot blinking to develop an imaging technique in three-dimensions with nanometric resolution. We first applied this method to simulated images of quantum dots and then to quantum dots immobilized on microspheres. We achieved imaging resolutions (fwhm) of 8-17 nm in the x-y plane and 58 nm (on coverslip) or 81 nm (deep in solution) in the z-direction, approximately 3-7 times better than what has been achieved previously with quantum dots. This approach was applied to resolve the 3D distribution of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) molecules at, and inside of, the plasma membrane of resting basal breast cancer cells.

  6. Robustness of quantum dot power-law blinking.

    PubMed

    Bharadwaj, Palash; Novotny, Lukas

    2011-05-11

    Photon emission from quantum dots (QDs) and other quantum emitters is characterized by abrupt jumps between an "on" and an "off" state. In contrast to ions and atoms however, the durations of bright and dark periods in colloidal QDs curiously defy a characteristic time scale and are best described by a power-law probability distribution, i.e., ρ(τ) ∝ τ(-α). We controllably couple a single colloidal QD to a single gold nanoparticle and find that power-law blinking is preserved unaltered even as the gold nanoparticle drastically modifies the excitonic decay rate of the QD. This resilience of the power law to change provides evidence that blinking statistics are not swayed by environment-induced variations in kinetics and provides clues toward the mechanism responsible for universal fluorescence intermittency.

  7. Blinking Phase-Change Nanocapsules Enable Background-Free Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hannah, Alexander S.; Luke, Geoffrey P.; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2016-01-01

    Microbubbles are widely used as contrast agents to improve the diagnostic capability of conventional, highly speckled, low-contrast ultrasound imaging. However, while microbubbles can be used for molecular imaging, these agents are limited to the vascular space due to their large size (> 1 μm). Smaller microbubbles are desired but their ultrasound visualization is limited due to lower echogenicity or higher resonant frequencies. Here we present nanometer scale, phase changing, blinking nanocapsules (BLInCs), which can be repeatedly optically triggered to provide transient contrast and enable background-free ultrasound imaging. In response to irradiation by near-infrared laser pulses, the BLInCs undergo cycles of rapid vaporization followed by recondensation into their native liquid state at body temperature. High frame rate ultrasound imaging measures the dynamic echogenicity changes associated with these controllable, periodic phase transitions. Using a newly developed image processing algorithm, the blinking particles are distinguished from tissue, providing a background-free image of the BLInCs while the underlying B-mode ultrasound image is used as an anatomical reference of the tissue. We demonstrate the function of BLInCs and the associated imaging technique in a tissue-mimicking phantom and in vivo for the identification of the sentinel lymph node. Our studies indicate that BLInCs may become a powerful tool to identify biological targets using a conventional ultrasound imaging system. PMID:27570556

  8. The Correction of Eye Blink Artefacts in the EEG: A Comparison of Two Prominent Methods

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Sven; Falkenstein, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Background The study investigated the residual impact of eyeblinks on the electroencephalogram (EEG) after application of different correction procedures, namely a regression method (eye movement correction procedure, EMCP) and a component based method (Independent Component Analysis, ICA). Methodology/Principle Findings Real and simulated data were investigated with respect to blink-related potentials and the residual mutual information of uncorrected vertical electrooculogram (EOG) and corrected EEG, which is a measure of residual EOG contribution to the EEG. The results reveal an occipital positivity that peaks at about 250ms after the maximum blink excursion following application of either correction procedure. This positivity was not observable in the simulated data. Mutual information of vertical EOG and EEG depended on the applied regression procedure. In addition, different correction results were obtained for real and simulated data. ICA yielded almost perfect correction in all conditions. However, under certain conditions EMCP yielded comparable results to the ICA approach. Conclusion In conclusion, for EMCP the quality of correction depended on the EMCP variant used and the structure of the data, whereas ICA always yielded almost perfect correction. However, its disadvantage is the much more complex data processing, and that it requires a suitable amount of data. PMID:18714341

  9. CdSeS/ZnS alloyed nanocrystal lifetime and blinking studies under electrochemical control.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wei; Shah, Raman A; Guyot-Sionnest, Philippe

    2012-01-24

    Alloyed CdSeS nanocrystals allow tuning between the CdSe and CdS band edges while remaining relatively small. The CdSeS cores also lead to a reduced electron confinement energy and a slower biexciton decay rate compared to CdSe cores of similar sizes. A ZnS shell synthesis procedure allows stable CdSeS/ZnS colloidal quantum dots (QDs) suitable for single dot imaging. These are compared to CdSe/ZnS of similar core size. The blinking off-exponents of the CdSeS/ZnS dots in air and on a glass substrate were slightly larger. Using electrochemistry with ensemble and single dot measurements, the trion lifetime of CdSeS/ZnS dot is resolved to be ~0.75 ns, while it is about 0.15 ns for CdSe/ZnS. In addition, the blinking behavior of single CdSeS/ZnS QDs is largely suppressed when in the trion state.

  10. Blinking Phase-Change Nanocapsules Enable Background-Free Ultrasound Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hannah, Alexander S; Luke, Geoffrey P; Emelianov, Stanislav Y

    2016-01-01

    Microbubbles are widely used as contrast agents to improve the diagnostic capability of conventional, highly speckled, low-contrast ultrasound imaging. However, while microbubbles can be used for molecular imaging, these agents are limited to the vascular space due to their large size (> 1 μm). Smaller microbubbles are desired but their ultrasound visualization is limited due to lower echogenicity or higher resonant frequencies. Here we present nanometer scale, phase changing, blinking nanocapsules (BLInCs), which can be repeatedly optically triggered to provide transient contrast and enable background-free ultrasound imaging. In response to irradiation by near-infrared laser pulses, the BLInCs undergo cycles of rapid vaporization followed by recondensation into their native liquid state at body temperature. High frame rate ultrasound imaging measures the dynamic echogenicity changes associated with these controllable, periodic phase transitions. Using a newly developed image processing algorithm, the blinking particles are distinguished from tissue, providing a background-free image of the BLInCs while the underlying B-mode ultrasound image is used as an anatomical reference of the tissue. We demonstrate the function of BLInCs and the associated imaging technique in a tissue-mimicking phantom and in vivo for the identification of the sentinel lymph node. Our studies indicate that BLInCs may become a powerful tool to identify biological targets using a conventional ultrasound imaging system. PMID:27570556

  11. Relieving the Attentional Blink in the Amblyopic Brain with Video Games

    PubMed Central

    Li, Roger W.; Ngo, Charlie V.; Levi, Dennis M.

    2015-01-01

    Video game play induces a generalized recovery of a range of spatial visual functions in the amblyopic brain. Here we ask whether video game play also alters temporal processing in the amblyopic brain. When visual targets are presented in rapid succession, correct identification of the first target (T1) can interfere with identification of the second (T2). This is known as the “attentional blink”. We measured the attentional blink in each eye of adults with amblyopia before and after 40 hours of active video game play, using a rapid serial visual presentation technique. After videogame play, we observed a ~40% reduction in the attentional blink (identifying T2 200 ms after T1) seen through the amblyopic eye and this improvement in performance transferred substantially to the untrained fellow sound eye. Our experiments show that the enhanced performance cannot be simply explained by eye patching alone, or to improved visual acuity, but is specific to videogame experience. Thus, videogame training might have important therapeutic applications for amblyopia and other visual brain disorders. PMID:25715870

  12. Children Induce an Enhanced Attentional Blink in Child Molesters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beech, Anthony R.; Kalmus, Ellis; Tipper, Steven P.; Baudouin, Jean-Yves; Flak, Vanja; Humphreys, Glyn W.

    2008-01-01

    The attentional blink (AB) is a robust phenomenon that has been consistently reported in the cognitive literature. The AB is found when two target images (T1, T2) are presented within 500 ms of each other and errors are induced on the perceptual report of T2. The AB may increase when T1 has some salience to the viewer. This study examined the…

  13. Quantum dot blueing and blinking enables fluorescence nanoscopy.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Patrick; Staudt, Thorsten; Engelhardt, Johann; Hell, Stefan W

    2011-01-12

    We demonstrate superresolution fluorescence imaging of cells using bioconjugated CdSe/ZnS quantum dot markers. Fluorescence blueing of quantum dot cores facilitates separation of blinking markers residing closer than the diffraction barrier. The high number of successively emitted photons enables ground state depletion microscopy followed by individual marker return with a resolving power of the size of a single dot (∼12 nm). Nanoscale imaging is feasible with a simple webcam.

  14. Origin and control of blinking in quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efros, Alexander L.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2016-08-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals offer an enormous diversity of potential device applications, based on their size-tunable photoluminescence, high optical stability and 'bottom-up' chemical approaches to self-assembly. However, the promise of such applications can be seriously limited by photoluminescence intermittency in nanocrystal emission, that is, 'blinking', arising from the escape of either one or both of the photoexcited carriers to the nanocrystal surface. In the first scenario, the remaining nanocrystal charge quenches photoluminescence via non-radiative Auger recombination, whereas for the other, the exciton is thought to be intercepted before thermalization and does not contribute to the photoluminescence. This Review summarizes the current understanding of the mechanisms responsible for nanocrystal blinking kinetics as well as core-shell engineering efforts to control such phenomena. In particular, 'softening' of the core-shell confinement potential strongly suppresses non-radiative Auger processes in charged nanocrystals, with successful non-blinking implementations demonstrated in CdSe-CdS core-thick-shell nanocrystals and their modifications.

  15. Aircraft water vapor measurements utilizing an aluminum oxide hygrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, E.

    1973-01-01

    A hygrometer for water vapor measurements from an aircraft has been developed. An aluminum oxide hygrometer mounted in an aircraft Rosemount air temperature scoop was flown on NASA and USAF aircraft. Water vapor measurements were conducted up to 40,000 feet with penetration into the stratosphere. Good agreement was obtained with simultaneously flown remote sounders of water vapor. During transcontinental flights the hygrometer demonstrated adequate response to measure the natural variability of water vapor near the tropopause. Rapid response was demonstrated in pursuit of the jet wake of an F-104 at 35,000 feet.

  16. Aircraft water vapor measurements utilizing an aluminum oxide hygrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, E.

    1974-01-01

    A hygrometer for water vapor measurements from an aircraft was developed. An aluminum oxide hygrometer mounted in an aircraft Rosemount air temperature scoop was flown on the NASA Convair 990 and on a USAF B-57 aircraft. Water vapor measurements from the Convair 990 were conducted up to 40,000 ft with penetration into the stratosphere. Good agreement was obtained with simultaneously flown remote sounders of water vapor. During transcontinental flights the hygrometer demonstrated adequate response to measure the natural variability of water vapor near the tropopause. Rapid response was demonstrated in pursuit of the jet wake of an F-104 at 35,000 ft.

  17. Nondestructive measurement of esophageal biaxial mechanical properties utilizing sonometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aho, Johnathon M.; Qiang, Bo; Wigle, Dennis A.; Tschumperlin, Daniel J.; Urban, Matthew W.

    2016-07-01

    Malignant esophageal pathology typically requires resection of the esophagus and reconstruction to restore foregut continuity. Reconstruction options are limited and morbid. The esophagus represents a useful target for tissue engineering strategies based on relative simplicity in comparison to other organs. The ideal tissue engineered conduit would have sufficient and ideally matched mechanical tolerances to native esophageal tissue. Current methods for mechanical testing of esophageal tissues both in vivo and ex vivo are typically destructive, alter tissue conformation, ignore anisotropy, or are not able to be performed in fluid media. The aim of this study was to investigate biomechanical properties of swine esophageal tissues through nondestructive testing utilizing sonometry ex vivo. This method allows for biomechanical determination of tissue properties, particularly longitudinal and circumferential moduli and strain energy functions. The relative contribution of mucosal-submucosal layers and muscular layers are compared to composite esophagi. Swine thoracic esophageal tissues (n  =  15) were tested by pressure loading using a continuous pressure pump system to generate stress. Preconditioning of tissue was performed by pressure loading with the pump system and pre-straining the tissue to in vivo length before data was recorded. Sonometry using piezocrystals was utilized to determine longitudinal and circumferential strain on five composite esophagi. Similarly, five mucosa-submucosal and five muscular layers from thoracic esophagi were tested independently. This work on esophageal tissues is consistent with reported uniaxial and biaxial mechanical testing and reported results using strain energy theory and also provides high resolution displacements, preserves native architectural structure and allows assessment of biomechanical properties in fluid media. This method may be of use to characterize mechanical properties of tissue engineered esophageal

  18. Nondestructive measurement of esophageal biaxial mechanical properties utilizing sonometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aho, Johnathon M.; Qiang, Bo; Wigle, Dennis A.; Tschumperlin, Daniel J.; Urban, Matthew W.

    2016-07-01

    Malignant esophageal pathology typically requires resection of the esophagus and reconstruction to restore foregut continuity. Reconstruction options are limited and morbid. The esophagus represents a useful target for tissue engineering strategies based on relative simplicity in comparison to other organs. The ideal tissue engineered conduit would have sufficient and ideally matched mechanical tolerances to native esophageal tissue. Current methods for mechanical testing of esophageal tissues both in vivo and ex vivo are typically destructive, alter tissue conformation, ignore anisotropy, or are not able to be performed in fluid media. The aim of this study was to investigate biomechanical properties of swine esophageal tissues through nondestructive testing utilizing sonometry ex vivo. This method allows for biomechanical determination of tissue properties, particularly longitudinal and circumferential moduli and strain energy functions. The relative contribution of mucosal–submucosal layers and muscular layers are compared to composite esophagi. Swine thoracic esophageal tissues (n  =  15) were tested by pressure loading using a continuous pressure pump system to generate stress. Preconditioning of tissue was performed by pressure loading with the pump system and pre-straining the tissue to in vivo length before data was recorded. Sonometry using piezocrystals was utilized to determine longitudinal and circumferential strain on five composite esophagi. Similarly, five mucosa–submucosal and five muscular layers from thoracic esophagi were tested independently. This work on esophageal tissues is consistent with reported uniaxial and biaxial mechanical testing and reported results using strain energy theory and also provides high resolution displacements, preserves native architectural structure and allows assessment of biomechanical properties in fluid media. This method may be of use to characterize mechanical properties of tissue engineered

  19. Nondestructive measurement of esophageal biaxial mechanical properties utilizing sonometry.

    PubMed

    Aho, Johnathon M; Qiang, Bo; Wigle, Dennis A; Tschumperlin, Daniel J; Urban, Matthew W

    2016-07-01

    Malignant esophageal pathology typically requires resection of the esophagus and reconstruction to restore foregut continuity. Reconstruction options are limited and morbid. The esophagus represents a useful target for tissue engineering strategies based on relative simplicity in comparison to other organs. The ideal tissue engineered conduit would have sufficient and ideally matched mechanical tolerances to native esophageal tissue. Current methods for mechanical testing of esophageal tissues both in vivo and ex vivo are typically destructive, alter tissue conformation, ignore anisotropy, or are not able to be performed in fluid media. The aim of this study was to investigate biomechanical properties of swine esophageal tissues through nondestructive testing utilizing sonometry ex vivo. This method allows for biomechanical determination of tissue properties, particularly longitudinal and circumferential moduli and strain energy functions. The relative contribution of mucosal-submucosal layers and muscular layers are compared to composite esophagi. Swine thoracic esophageal tissues (n  =  15) were tested by pressure loading using a continuous pressure pump system to generate stress. Preconditioning of tissue was performed by pressure loading with the pump system and pre-straining the tissue to in vivo length before data was recorded. Sonometry using piezocrystals was utilized to determine longitudinal and circumferential strain on five composite esophagi. Similarly, five mucosa-submucosal and five muscular layers from thoracic esophagi were tested independently. This work on esophageal tissues is consistent with reported uniaxial and biaxial mechanical testing and reported results using strain energy theory and also provides high resolution displacements, preserves native architectural structure and allows assessment of biomechanical properties in fluid media. This method may be of use to characterize mechanical properties of tissue engineered esophageal

  20. Neuromagnetic brain responses to other person's eye blinks seen on video

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Anne; Helokunnas, Siiri; Pihko, Elina; Hari, Riitta

    2014-01-01

    Eye blinks, typically occurring 15–20 times per minute, rarely capture attention during face-to-face interaction. To determine the extent to which eye blinks affect the viewer's brain activity, we recorded magnetoencephalographic brain responses to natural blinks, and to the same blinks slowed down to 38% of the original speed. The stimuli were presented on video once every 2.3–6.2 s. As a control, we presented two horizontal black bars moving with the same time courses and the same extent as the eyelids in the blink video. Both types of blinks and bars elicited clear responses peaking at about 200 ms in the occipital areas, with no systematic differences between hemispheres. For the bars, these main responses were (as expected) weaker (by 24%) and later (by 33 ms) to slow-motion than normal-speed stimuli. For blinks, however, the responses to both normal-speed and slow-motion stimuli were of the same amplitude and latency. Our results demonstrate that the brain not only responds to other persons' eye blinks, but that the responses are as fast and of equal size even when the blinks are considerably slowed down. We interpret this finding to reflect the increased social salience of the slowed-down blinks that counteracted the general tendency of the brain to react more weakly and more slowly to slowly- vs. quickly-changing stimuli. This finding may relate to the social importance of facial gestures, including eye blinks. PMID:24796310

  1. Non-contact scanning measurement utilizing a space mapping method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ming; Lin, Kao-Hui

    1998-12-01

    In this study, a novel approach to a measuring methodology and calibration method for an optical non-contact scanning probe system is proposed and verified by experiments. The optical probe consists of a line laser diode and two charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras and is placed on a computer numerical control (CNC) machine to measure the workpiece profiles. A space mapping method using the least-squares algorithm is presented for the probe calibration and profile measurement. This method provides a simple and accurate calculation of the relationship between the real space plane and its related image space plane in a CCD camera. A transparent grid with regularly spaced nodal points is used to construct the space mapping function. The space coordinate of an object can be obtained from its image in the CCD camera via the mapping function. The measured profile data are smoothed by the B-spline blending function and can be transferred to a CAD/CAM package for industrial applications. Experimental results show that this technique can determine the 3-D profile of an object with an accuracy of 60 μm.

  2. Measurement of nuclear fuel pin hydriding utilizing epithermal neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.H.; Farkas, D.M.; Lutz, D.R.

    1996-12-31

    The measurement of hydrogen or zirconium hydriding in fuel cladding has long been of interest to the nuclear power industry. The detection of this hydrogen currently requires either destructive analysis (with sensitivities down to 1 {mu}g/g) or nondestructive thermal neutron radiography (with sensitivities on the order of a few weight percent). The detection of hydrogen in metals can also be determined by measuring the slowing down of neutrons as they collide and rapidly lose energy via scattering with hydrogen. This phenomenon is the basis for the {open_quotes}notched neutron spectrum{close_quotes} technique, also referred to as the Hysen method. This technique has been improved with the {open_quotes}modified{close_quotes} notched neutron spectrum technique that has demonstrated detection of hydrogen below 1 {mu}g/g in steel. The technique is nondestructive and can be used on radioactive materials. It is proposed that this technique be applied to the measurement of hydriding in zirconium fuel pins. This paper summarizes a method for such measurements.

  3. UTILITY OF SURROGATES FOR MEASURING CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYST INFECTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The water industry must assess whether Cryptosporidium oocysts detected in source and finished water are viable and/or infectious. Initial approaches measuring the infectious nature of C. parvum oocysts have focused on in vitro excystation and in vitro vital dye staining. Recen...

  4. UTILITY OF SURROGATES FOR MEASURING CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS INFECTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The water industry must assess whether Cryptosporidium oocysts detected in source and finished water are viable and/or infectious. Initial approaches measuring the infectious nature of C. parvum oocysts have focused on in vitro excystation and in vitro vital dye staining. Recen...

  5. Working memory capacity, intelligence, and the magnitude of the attentional blink revisited.

    PubMed

    Martens, Sander; Johnson, Addie

    2009-01-01

    The attentional blink (AB) is a well-established phenomenon in the study of attention. This deficit in reporting the second of two targets presented in rapid serial visual presentation when it occurs 200-500 ms after the first is considered to reflect a fundamental limitation in attentional processing. However, we recently reported that some individuals do not show an AB, and presented psychophysiological evidence that target processing differs between blinkers and non-blinkers. One possibility is that non-blinkers may have a larger WM capacity, allowing better attentional control. Here we explore the relation between the magnitude of the AB, general intelligence, and different measures of working memory (WM) and short-term memory (STM) capacity. Surprisingly, no correlation was found between memory capacity measures and AB magnitude, raising doubts about the generalizability of earlier findings of such a relationship.

  6. Outcome measures for palliative oxygen therapy: relevance and practical utility.

    PubMed

    Antoniu, Sabina; Mihaltan, Florin

    2014-06-01

    Dyspnea is a common symptom in many advanced malignant and non-malignant diseases and often is refractory to the usual therapies. In such circumstances palliative care approaches are necessary and among them palliative care oxygen therapy can be applied although currently its effectiveness is rather uncertain. Palliative oxygen therapy can be given on either continuous basis or on demand. Often the continuous palliative oxygen therapy is seen as long-term oxygen therapy although their aims are rather different. Palliative oxygen therapy was evaluated in populations with mixed underlying diseases, with outcome measures not only the most appropriate for the setting and therefore these limitations might have influenced the overall perceived therapeutic benefit. Therefore an evaluation of this method in subsets defined based on the etiology and pathogenic mechanisms and with appropriate outcome measures would help to better define the criteria for its indication and would increase its acceptability.

  7. Measuring Constraint-Set Utility for Partitional Clustering Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Ian; Wagstaff, Kiri L.; Basu, Sugato

    2006-01-01

    Clustering with constraints is an active area of machine learning and data mining research. Previous empirical work has convincingly shown that adding constraints to clustering improves the performance of a variety of algorithms. However, in most of these experiments, results are averaged over different randomly chosen constraint sets from a given set of labels, thereby masking interesting properties of individual sets. We demonstrate that constraint sets vary significantly in how useful they are for constrained clustering; some constraint sets can actually decrease algorithm performance. We create two quantitative measures, informativeness and coherence, that can be used to identify useful constraint sets. We show that these measures can also help explain differences in performance for four particular constrained clustering algorithms.

  8. [The clinical utility of C-peptide measurement in diabetology].

    PubMed

    Otto-Buczkowska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    C-peptide is produced in equal amounts to insulin and is the best measure of endogenous insulin secretion in patients with diabetes. Measurement of insulin secretion using C-peptide can be helpful in clinical practice: differences in insulin secretion are fundamental to different requirements in the treatment of diabetes. An important clinical role of C-peptide is differentiating between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Low basal C-peptide can be considered as criterion for transferring the patients, initially diagnosed as type 2 diabetes, in the type 1 diabetes group. C-peptide level may be a good predictor of the clinical partial remission during the first year of type 1 diabetes. Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is a special form of diabetes that is clinically similar to type 2 diabetes but with positivity for pancreatic autoantibodies and lower C-peptide levels. The measurement of C-peptide level and of immunological markers may represent important additional tools for establishing the correct diagnosis. The natural course of these patients shows that C-peptide will decrease with time in parallel with the curve for C-peptide in classical type 1 diabetic patients. Persistence of C-peptide is an important clinical feature of MODY. It is particularly important to identify these patients as they are commonly misdiagnosed as type 1 diabetes and treated with insulin, C-peptide can be used to assist in patient selection for islet cell transplantation and post-transplant monitoring. High uncorrected fasting C-peptid in the presence of hyperglycemia may suggest insulin resistance.

  9. Implications of utilization shifts on medical-care price measurement.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Abe; Liebman, Eli; Shapiro, Adam Hale

    2015-05-01

    The medical-care sector often experiences changes in medical protocols and technologies that cause shifts in treatments. However, the commonly used medical-care price indexes reported by the Bureau of Labor Statistics hold the mix of medical services fixed. In contrast, episode expenditure indexes, advocated by many health economists, track the full cost of disease treatment, even as treatments shift across service categories (e.g., inpatient to outpatient hospital). In our data, we find that these two conceptually different measures of price growth show similar aggregate rates of inflation over the 2003-2007 period. Although aggregate trends are similar, we observe differences when looking at specific disease categories.

  10. The Role of the Magnocellular and Parvocellular Pathways in the Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieuwenhuis, Sander; Jepma, Marieke; La Fors, Sabrina; Olivers, Christian N. L.

    2008-01-01

    The attentional blink refers to the transient impairment in perceiving the 2nd of two targets presented in close temporal proximity in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) stream. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect on human attentional-blink performance of disrupting the function of the magnocellular pathway--a major…

  11. Exploring the characteristics of the attentional blink paradigm when used to discover concealed knowledge.

    PubMed

    Niziurski, Julie; Andre, Jeffrey

    2015-12-01

    Ganis and Patnaik (Appl Psychophysiol Biofeedback 34:189-196, 2009) reported that the attentional blink paradigm using faces could be used to detect the presence of concealed knowledge. The attentional blink is defined as the inability to successfully detect the second of two target items presented within a short inter-stimulus interval. The present study tested the use of the attentional blink paradigm in a concealed knowledge test by investigating the effect that familiar faces may have on the attentional blink. Participants completed 200 trials where they were told to look for the same familiar target (Target 2; actor Brad Pitt) that was intermixed with neutral face stimuli and one other familiar face (Target 1; actor George Clooney). Target 1 was to act as the concealed knowledge as participants familiar with Target 1 would be distracted by his unannounced presence and report not seeing Target 2 thereby showing an attentional blink. Despite all participants being familiar with Target 2, an attentional blink still occurred, but with higher than normal Target 2 accuracy rates. Overall, we found support for using the AB paradigm with the concealed knowledge test; however, a possible countermeasure to the attentional blink is familiarity with Target 2 as eight of 21 participants who recognized Target 1 (the concealed knowledge) were also able to detect Target 2 on 100 % of the trials where Target 1's presence should have created an attentional blink. PMID:26162299

  12. Crop identification and acreage measurement utilizing ERTS imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonsteen, D. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1972-01-01

    There are no author-identified significant results in this report. The microdensitometer will be used to analyze data acquired by ERTS-1 imagery. The classification programs and software packages have been acquired and are being prepared for use with the information as it is received. Photo and digital tapes have been acquired for coverage of virtually 100 percent of the test site areas. These areas are located in South Dakota, Idaho, Missouri, and Kansas. Hass 70mm color infrared, infrared, black and white high altitude aerial photography of the test sites is available. Collection of ground truth for updating the data base has been completed and a computer program written to count the number of fields and give total acres by size group for the segments in each test site. Results are given of data analysis performed on digitized data from densitometer measurements of fields of corn, sugar, beets, and alfalfa in Kansas.

  13. Moire technique utilization for detection and measurement of scoliosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawieska, Dorota; Podlasiak, Piotr

    1993-02-01

    Moire projection method enables non-contact measurement of the shape or deformation of different surfaces and constructions by fringe pattern analysis. The fringe map acquisition of the whole surface of the object under test is one of the main advantages compared with 'point by point' methods. The computer analyzes the shape of the whole surface and next user can selected different points or cross section of the object map. In this paper a few typical examples of an application of the moire technique in solving different medical problems will be presented. We will also present to you the equipment the moire pattern analysis is done in real time using the phase stepping method with CCD camera.

  14. Correlations between subsequent blinking events in single quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Volkán-Kacsó, Sándor; Frantsuzov, Pavel A; Jankó, Boldizsár

    2010-08-11

    We explain the long-range correlations found by Stefani and his co-workers between blinking times of single colloidal quantum dot emission. Our explanation is based on the multiple recombination center model we recently suggested. The model produces positive correlations between subsequent on--on and off--off times and negative on--off correlations, as observed in the experiment. We also reproduce qualitatively the dependence of correlations between subsequent on--on, on-off, and off--off times on the number of switching events separating them.

  15. Noisy cooperative intermittent processes: From blinking quantum dots to human consciousness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allegrini, Paolo; Paradisi, Paolo; Menicucci, Danilo; Bedini, Remo; Gemignani, Angelo; Fronzoni, Leone

    2011-07-01

    We study the superposition of a non-Poisson renewal process with the presence of a superimposed Poisson noise. The non-Poisson renewals mark the passage between meta-stable states in system with self-organization. We propose methods to measure the amount of information due to the two independent processes independently, and we see that a superficial study based on the survival probabilities yield stretched-exponential relaxations. Our method is in fact able to unravel the inverse-power law relaxation of the isolated non-Poisson processes, even when noise is present. We provide examples of this behavior in system of diverse nature, from blinking nano-crystals to weak turbulence. Finally we focus our discussion on events extracted from human electroencephalograms, and we discuss their connection with emerging properties of integrated neural dynamics, i.e. consciousness.

  16. The temporal locus of the interaction between working memory consolidation and the attentional blink.

    PubMed

    Akyürek, Elkan G; Leszczyński, Marcin; Schubö, Anna

    2010-11-01

    An increase in concurrent working memory load has been shown to amplify the attentional blink. The present study investigated the temporal locus of this phenomenon, by using a dual rapid serial visual presentation paradigm that enabled the measurement of lateralized event-related potentials. The P3 component was shown to be affected by both working memory load and the lag between the target stimuli, consistent with current models of temporal attention and a functional explanation of the P3 in terms of memory consolidation. P3 amplitude was reduced for short target lags and high memory loads. The P2 component was affected by lag only, and not memory load. Importantly, the N2pc component was modulated also by both lag and memory load. The results showed that early attentional processing (as marked by the N2pc) was suppressed by increased involvement of working memory, a phenomenon not well predicted by many current theories of temporal attention.

  17. Hippocampectomy disrupts trace eye-blink conditioning in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Moyer, James R; Deyo, Richard A; Disterhoft, John F

    2015-08-01

    The role of the hippocampus (HFC) in trace eye-blink conditioning was evaluated using a 100-ms tone conditioned stimulus (CS), a 300- or 500-ms trace interval, and a 150-ms air puff unconditioned stimulus (UCS). Rabbits received complete hippocampectomy (dorsal & ventral), sham lesions, or neocortical lesions. Hippocampectomy produced differential effects in relation to the trace interval used. With a 300-ms trace interval, HPC-lesioned Ss showed profound resistance to extinction after acquisition. With a 500-ms trace interval, HPC-lesioned Ss did not learn the task (only 22% conditioned responses (CRs) after 25 sessions, whereas controls showed >80% after 10 sessions), and on the few trials in which a CR occurred, most were "nonadaptive" short-latency CRs (i.e., they started during or just after the CS and always terminated prior to UCS onset). The authors conclude that the HPC encodes a temporal relationship between CS and UCS, and when the trace interval is long enough (e.g., 500 ms), that the HPC is necessary for associative learning of the conditioned eye-blink response.

  18. Human breathing and eye blink rate responses to airborne chemicals.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, J C; Kendal-Reed, M; Utell, M J; Cain, W S

    2001-01-01

    Increased levels of air pollution have been linked with morbidity and mortality, but mechanisms linking physiologic responses to quality of life and productivity issues remain largely unknown. Individuals often report irritation of the nose and/or eyes upon exposures to environmental contaminants. Evaluation of these self-reports would be greatly aided by the development of valid physiological markers. Chamber studies (unencumbered exposures) of nonsmoker responses to environmental tobacco smoke offer two candidate end points: (a) Tidal volume increases and breathing frequency declines with stimuli that elicit only moderate irritation. (b) Eye blink rate increases only with a concentration sufficiently high to cause progressive worsening of eye irritation with prolonged exposure. Experiments with very brief nasal-only presentations also suggest the value of breathing changes as sensitive markers of irritation: (a) Tidal volume is inversely related to perceived nasal irritation (NI) intensity in both normal and anosmic (lacking olfactory input) individuals, although normals exhibit greater NI sensitivity. (b) Inhalation duration, in both groups, declines only with trigeminal activation sufficient to cause readily perceptible NI in anosmics. Changes in eye blink rate and breathing may be useful in the investigation of irritation and other effects of air pollution, and could be quite useful in investigations of mixtures of volatile organic compounds. PMID:11544155

  19. Hot spot assisted blinking suppression of CdSe quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Liu; Tong, Xuan; Zhang, Xu; Ren, Naifei; Jiang, Bo; Lu, Haifei

    2016-05-01

    This work compares the blinking of CdSe QDs on glass, single silver nanowire, and double aligned nanowires. The corresponding on-time fractions of these three cases are 50%, 70% and 85% respectively, which indicates that aligned double nanowires shows more efficient suppression than that of single nanowire. This phenomenon is attributed to the higher concentration of hot electron from hot spot between nanowires. Occupation of the non-radiative recombination centers by hot electrons from silver nanowires can be explained for the suppressed blinking behavior. The result has provided a novel pathway of suppressing the blinking behavior of QDs through plasmonic hot spot.

  20. Blinking in quantum dots: The origin of the grey state and power law statistics.

    PubMed

    Ye, Mao; Searson, Peter C

    2011-09-16

    Quantum dot (QD) blinking is characterized by switching between an "on" state and an "off" state, and a power-law distribution of on and off times with exponents from 1.0 to 2.0. The origin of blinking behavior in QDs, however, has remained a mystery. Here we describe an energy-band model for QDs that captures the full range of blinking behavior reported in the literature and provides new insight into features such as the gray state, the power-law distribution of on and off times, and the power-law exponents.

  1. Blinking in quantum dots: The origin of the grey state and power law statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Mao; Searson, Peter C.

    2011-09-01

    Quantum dot (QD) blinking is characterized by switching between an “on” state and an “off” state, and a power-law distribution of on and off times with exponents from 1.0 to 2.0. The origin of blinking behavior in QDs, however, has remained a mystery. Here we describe an energy-band model for QDs that captures the full range of blinking behavior reported in the literature and provides new insight into features such as the gray state, the power-law distribution of on and off times, and the power-law exponents.

  2. Utilizing Photogrammetry and Strain Gage Measurement to Characterize Pressurization of an Inflatable Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valle, Gerard D.; Selig, Molly; Litteken, Doug; Oliveras, Ovidio

    2012-01-01

    This paper documents the integration of a large hatch penetration into an inflatable module. This paper also documents the comparison of analytical load predictions with measured results utilizing strain measurement. Strain was measured by utilizing photogrammetric measurement and through measurement obtained from strain gages mounted to selected clevises that interface with the structural webbings. Bench testing showed good correlation between strain measurement obtained from an extensometer and photogrammetric measurement especially after the fabric has transitioned through the low load/high strain region of the curve. Test results for the full-scale torus showed mixed results in the lower load and thus lower strain regions. Overall strain, and thus load, measured by strain gages and photogrammetry tracked fairly well with analytical predictions. Methods and areas of improvements are discussed.

  3. Efficient and robust pupil size and blink estimation from near-field video sequences for human-machine interaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Siyuan; Epps, Julien

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring pupil and blink dynamics has applications in cognitive load measurement during human-machine interaction. However, accurate, efficient, and robust pupil size and blink estimation pose significant challenges to the efficacy of real-time applications due to the variability of eye images, hence to date, require manual intervention for fine tuning of parameters. In this paper, a novel self-tuning threshold method, which is applicable to any infrared-illuminated eye images without a tuning parameter, is proposed for segmenting the pupil from the background images recorded by a low cost webcam placed near the eye. A convex hull and a dual-ellipse fitting method are also proposed to select pupil boundary points and to detect the eyelid occlusion state. Experimental results on a realistic video dataset show that the measurement accuracy using the proposed methods is higher than that of widely used manually tuned parameter methods or fixed parameter methods. Importantly, it demonstrates convenience and robustness for an accurate and fast estimate of eye activity in the presence of variations due to different users, task types, load, and environments. Cognitive load measurement in human-machine interaction can benefit from this computationally efficient implementation without requiring a threshold calibration beforehand. Thus, one can envisage a mini IR camera embedded in a lightweight glasses frame, like Google Glass, for convenient applications of real-time adaptive aiding and task management in the future. PMID:24691198

  4. Efficient and robust pupil size and blink estimation from near-field video sequences for human-machine interaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Siyuan; Epps, Julien

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring pupil and blink dynamics has applications in cognitive load measurement during human-machine interaction. However, accurate, efficient, and robust pupil size and blink estimation pose significant challenges to the efficacy of real-time applications due to the variability of eye images, hence to date, require manual intervention for fine tuning of parameters. In this paper, a novel self-tuning threshold method, which is applicable to any infrared-illuminated eye images without a tuning parameter, is proposed for segmenting the pupil from the background images recorded by a low cost webcam placed near the eye. A convex hull and a dual-ellipse fitting method are also proposed to select pupil boundary points and to detect the eyelid occlusion state. Experimental results on a realistic video dataset show that the measurement accuracy using the proposed methods is higher than that of widely used manually tuned parameter methods or fixed parameter methods. Importantly, it demonstrates convenience and robustness for an accurate and fast estimate of eye activity in the presence of variations due to different users, task types, load, and environments. Cognitive load measurement in human-machine interaction can benefit from this computationally efficient implementation without requiring a threshold calibration beforehand. Thus, one can envisage a mini IR camera embedded in a lightweight glasses frame, like Google Glass, for convenient applications of real-time adaptive aiding and task management in the future.

  5. Utilizing Curriculum-Based Measurements of Writing in Third and Fifth Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dombek, Jennifer Lucas

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to address the utility of curriculum-based measurements of written expression (CBM-W) for predicting writing growth longitudinally and address the extent to which CBM-W relate to other academic and behavior measures. CBM-W has been shown to be an appropriate and useful method for assessing and monitoring writing skill…

  6. On the failure of distractor inhibition in the attentional blink.

    PubMed

    Dux, Paul E; Harris, Irina M

    2007-08-01

    We investigated whether a failure of distractor inhibition contributes to the magnitude of the attentional blink (AB). Subjects viewed dual-target rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) streams, where the distractors that directly preceded and succeeded Target 2 (T2-1, T2+ 1) were either identical to each other or different. Previously, Dux, Coltheart, and Harris (2006) found enhanced target report in RSVP due to repetition of distractors around Target 1, which was interpreted as evidence of distractor inhibition. Here, distractor repetition again attenuated the AB, but only at lag 2, the Target 2 position where T2-1 would have undergone attentive processing. Our results demonstrate that the distractor repetition effect is dependent on attention, and that a failure to inhibit distractors contributes to the AB.

  7. Non-blinking single-photon emitters in silica.

    PubMed

    Rabouw, Freddy T; Cogan, Nicole M B; Berends, Anne C; Stam, Ward van der; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel; Koenderink, A Femius; Krauss, Todd D; Donega, Celso de Mello

    2016-01-01

    Samples for single-emitter spectroscopy are usually prepared by spin-coating a dilute solution of emitters on a microscope cover slip of silicate based glass (such as quartz). Here, we show that both borosilicate glass and quartz contain intrinsic defect colour centres that fluoresce when excited at 532 nm. In a microscope image the defect emission is indistinguishable from spin-coated emitters. The emission spectrum is characterised by multiple peaks with the main peak between 2.05 and 2.20 eV, most likely due to coupling to a silica vibration with an energy that varies between 160 and 180 meV. The defects are single-photon emitters, do not blink, and have photoluminescence lifetimes of a few nanoseconds. Photoluminescence from such defects may previously have been misinterpreted as originating from single nanocrystal quantum dots. PMID:26892489

  8. Non-blinking single-photon emitters in silica

    PubMed Central

    Rabouw, Freddy T.; Cogan, Nicole M. B.; Berends, Anne C.; Stam, Ward van der; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel; Koenderink, A. Femius; Krauss, Todd D.; Donega, Celso de Mello

    2016-01-01

    Samples for single-emitter spectroscopy are usually prepared by spin-coating a dilute solution of emitters on a microscope cover slip of silicate based glass (such as quartz). Here, we show that both borosilicate glass and quartz contain intrinsic defect colour centres that fluoresce when excited at 532 nm. In a microscope image the defect emission is indistinguishable from spin-coated emitters. The emission spectrum is characterised by multiple peaks with the main peak between 2.05 and 2.20 eV, most likely due to coupling to a silica vibration with an energy that varies between 160 and 180 meV. The defects are single-photon emitters, do not blink, and have photoluminescence lifetimes of a few nanoseconds. Photoluminescence from such defects may previously have been misinterpreted as originating from single nanocrystal quantum dots. PMID:26892489

  9. Distortion of power law blinking with binning and thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amecke, Nicole; Heber, André; Cichos, Frank

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescence intermittency is a random switching between emitting (on) and non-emitting (off) periods found for many single chromophores such as semiconductor quantum dots and organic molecules. The statistics of the duration of on- and off-periods are commonly determined by thresholding the emission time trace of a single chromophore and appear to be power law distributed. Here we test with the help of simulations if the experimentally determined power law distributions can actually reflect the underlying statistics. We find that with the experimentally limited time resolution real power law statistics with exponents αon/off ≳ 1.6, especially if αon ≠ αoff would not be observed as such in the experimental data after binning and thresholding. Instead, a power law appearance could simply be obtained from the continuous distribution of intermediate intensity levels. This challenges much of the obtained data and the models describing the so-called power law blinking.

  10. Non-blinking single-photon emitters in silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabouw, Freddy T.; Cogan, Nicole M. B.; Berends, Anne C.; Stam, Ward Van Der; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel; Koenderink, A. Femius; Krauss, Todd D.; Donega, Celso De Mello

    2016-02-01

    Samples for single-emitter spectroscopy are usually prepared by spin-coating a dilute solution of emitters on a microscope cover slip of silicate based glass (such as quartz). Here, we show that both borosilicate glass and quartz contain intrinsic defect colour centres that fluoresce when excited at 532 nm. In a microscope image the defect emission is indistinguishable from spin-coated emitters. The emission spectrum is characterised by multiple peaks with the main peak between 2.05 and 2.20 eV, most likely due to coupling to a silica vibration with an energy that varies between 160 and 180 meV. The defects are single-photon emitters, do not blink, and have photoluminescence lifetimes of a few nanoseconds. Photoluminescence from such defects may previously have been misinterpreted as originating from single nanocrystal quantum dots.

  11. Non-blinking quantum dot with a plasmonic nanoshell resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Botao; Giovanelli, Emerson; Habert, Benjamin; Spinicelli, Piernicola; Nasilowski, Michel; Xu, Xiangzhen; Lequeux, Nicolas; Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Marquier, Francois; Greffet, Jean-Jacques; Dubertret, Benoit

    2015-02-01

    Colloidal semiconductor quantum dots are fluorescent nanocrystals exhibiting exceptional optical properties, but their emission intensity strongly depends on their charging state and local environment. This leads to blinking at the single-particle level or even complete fluorescence quenching, and limits the applications of quantum dots as fluorescent particles. Here, we show that a single quantum dot encapsulated in a silica shell coated with a continuous gold nanoshell provides a system with a stable and Poissonian emission at room temperature that is preserved regardless of drastic changes in the local environment. This novel hybrid quantum dot/silica/gold structure behaves as a plasmonic resonator with a strong Purcell factor, in very good agreement with simulations. The gold nanoshell also acts as a shield that protects the quantum dot fluorescence and enhances its resistance to high-power photoexcitation or high-energy electron beams. This plasmonic fluorescent resonator opens the way to a new family of plasmonic nanoemitters with robust optical properties.

  12. Non-blinking quantum dot with a plasmonic nanoshell resonator.

    PubMed

    Ji, Botao; Giovanelli, Emerson; Habert, Benjamin; Spinicelli, Piernicola; Nasilowski, Michel; Xu, Xiangzhen; Lequeux, Nicolas; Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Marquier, Francois; Greffet, Jean-Jacques; Dubertret, Benoit

    2015-02-01

    Colloidal semiconductor quantum dots are fluorescent nanocrystals exhibiting exceptional optical properties, but their emission intensity strongly depends on their charging state and local environment. This leads to blinking at the single-particle level or even complete fluorescence quenching, and limits the applications of quantum dots as fluorescent particles. Here, we show that a single quantum dot encapsulated in a silica shell coated with a continuous gold nanoshell provides a system with a stable and Poissonian emission at room temperature that is preserved regardless of drastic changes in the local environment. This novel hybrid quantum dot/silica/gold structure behaves as a plasmonic resonator with a strong Purcell factor, in very good agreement with simulations. The gold nanoshell also acts as a shield that protects the quantum dot fluorescence and enhances its resistance to high-power photoexcitation or high-energy electron beams. This plasmonic fluorescent resonator opens the way to a new family of plasmonic nanoemitters with robust optical properties.

  13. Non-blinking single-photon emitters in silica

    DOE PAGES

    Rabouw, Freddy T.; Cogan, Nicole M. B.; Berends, Anne C.; Stam, Ward van der; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel; Koenderink, A. Femius; Krauss, Todd D.; Donega, Celso de Mello

    2016-02-19

    Samples for single-emitter spectroscopy are usually prepared by spin-coating a dilute solution of emitters on a microscope cover slip of silicate based glass (such as quartz). Here, we show that both borosilicate glass and quartz contain intrinsic defect colour centres that fluoresce when excited at 532 nm. In a microscope image the defect emission is indistinguishable from spin-coated emitters. The emission spectrum is characterised by multiple peaks with the main peak between 2.05 and 2.20 eV, most likely due to coupling to a silica vibration with an energy that varies between 160 and 180 meV. The defects are single-photon emitters,more » do not blink, and have photoluminescence lifetimes of a few nanoseconds. Furthermore, photoluminescence from such defects may previously have been misinterpreted as originating from single nanocrystal quantum dots.« less

  14. Filter Feeding, Chaotic Filtration, and a Blinking Stokeslet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, J. R.; Otto, S. R.; Blake, D. A.

    The filtering mechanisms in bivalve molluscs, such as the mussel Mytilus edulis, and in sessile organisms, such as Vorticella or Stentor, involve complex fluid mechanical phenomena. In the former example, three different sets of cilia serving different functions are involved in the process whereas in the sessile organisms the flexibility and contractile nature of the stalk may play an important role in increasing the filtering efficiency of the organisms. In both cases, beating microscopic cilia are the ``engines'' driving the fluid motion, so the fluid mechanics will be dominated entirely by viscous forces. A fluid mechanical model is developed for the filtering mechanism in mussels that enables estimates to be made of the pressure drop through the gill filaments due to (i) latero-frontal filtering cilia, (ii) the lateral (pumping) cilia, and (iii) through the non-ciliated zone of the ventral end of the filament. The velocity profile across the filaments indicates that a backflow can occur in the centre of the channel leading to the formation of two ``standing'' eddies which may drive particles towards the mucus-laden short cilia, the third set of cilia. Filter feeding in the sessile organisms is modelled by a point force above a rigid boundary. The point force periodically changes its point of application according to a given protocol (a blinking stokeslet). The resulting fluid field is illustrated via Poincaré sections and particle dispersion-showing the potential for a much improved filtering efficiency. Returning to filter feeding in bivalve molluscs, this concept is extended to a pair of blinking stokeslets above a rigid boundary to give insight into possible mechanisms for movement of food particles onto the short mucus-bearing cilia. The appendix contains a Latin and English version of an ``Ode of Achievement'' in celebration of Sir James Lighthill's contributions to mathematics and fluid mechanics.

  15. Effect of Seated Trunk Posture on Eye Blink Startle and Subjective Experience: Comparing Flexion, Neutral Upright Posture, and Extension of Spine

    PubMed Central

    Ceunen, Erik; Zaman, Jonas; Vlaeyen, Johan W. S.; Dankaerts, Wim; Van Diest, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    Postures are known to be able to affect emotion and motivation. Much less is known about whether (affective) modulation of eye blink startle occurs following specific postures. The objective of the current study was to explore this. Participants in the present study were requested to assume three different sitting postures: with the spine flexed (slouched), neutral upright, and extended. Each posture was assumed for four minutes, and was followed by the administration of brief self-report questionnaires before proceeding to the next posture. The same series of postures and measures were repeated prior to ending the experiment. Results indicate that, relative to the other postures, the extended sitting posture was associated with an increased startle, was more unpleasant, arousing, had smaller levels of dominance, induced more discomfort, and was perceived as more difficult. The upright and flexed sitting postures differed in the level of self-reported positive affect, but not in eye blink startle amplitudes. PMID:24516664

  16. Defect-Induced Photoluminescence Blinking of Single Epitaxial InGaAs Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Fengrui; Cao, Zengle; Zhang, Chunfeng; Wang, Xiaoyong; Xiao, Min

    2015-03-01

    Here we report two types of defect-induced photoluminescence (PL) blinking behaviors observed in single epitaxial InGaAs quantum dots (QDs). In the first type of PL blinking, the ``off'' period is caused by the trapping of hot electrons from the higher-lying excited state (absorption state) to the defect site so that its PL rise lifetime is shorter than that of the ``on'' period. For the ``off'' period in the second type of PL blinking, the electrons relax from the first excited state (emission state) into the defect site, leading to a shortened PL decay lifetime compared to that of the ``on'' period. This defect-induced exciton quenching in epitaxial QDs, previously demonstrated also in colloidal nanocrystals, confirms that these two important semiconductor nanostructures could share the same PL blinking mechanism.

  17. Study: Trained Experts Can Spot Breast Cancer in 'Blink of An Eye'

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160675.html Study: Trained Experts Can Spot Breast Cancer in 'Blink ... abnormal mammograms in a half-second, a new study says. The experiments by American and British researchers ...

  18. Temporal Interactions of Air-Puff–Evoked Blinks and Saccadic Eye Movements: Insights Into Motor Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Neeraj J.; Bonadonna, Desiree K.

    2013-01-01

    Following the initial, sensory response to stimulus presentation, activity in many saccade-related burst neurons along the oculomotor neuraxis is observed as a gradually increasing low-frequency discharge hypothesized to encode both timing and metrics of the impending eye movement. When the activity reaches an activation threshold level, these cells discharge a high-frequency burst, inhibit the pontine omnipause neurons (OPNs) and trigger a high-velocity eye movement known as saccade. We tested whether early cessation of OPN activity, prior to when it ordinarily pauses, acts to effectively lower the threshold and prematurely trigger a movement of modified metrics and/or dynamics. Relying on the observation that OPN discharge ceases during not only saccades but also blinks, air-puffs were delivered to one eye to evoke blinks as monkeys performed standard oculomotor tasks. We observed a linear relationship between blink and saccade onsets when the blink occurred shortly after the cue to initiate the movement but before the average reaction time. Blinks that preceded and overlapped with the cue increased saccade latency. Blinks evoked during the overlap period of the delayed saccade task, when target location is known but a saccade cannot be initiated for correct performance, failed to trigger saccades prematurely. Furthermore, when saccade and blink execution coincided temporally, the peak velocity of the eye movement was attenuated, and its initial velocity was correlated with its latency. Despite the perturbations, saccade accuracy was maintained across all blink times and task types. Collectively, these results support the notion that temporal features of the low-frequency activity encode aspects of a premotor command and imply that inhibition of OPNs alone is not sufficient to trigger saccades. PMID:15469959

  19. Bilingualism and the increased attentional blink effect: evidence that the difference between bilinguals and monolinguals generalizes to different levels of second language proficiency.

    PubMed

    Khare, Vatsala; Verma, Ark; Kar, Bhoomika; Srinivasan, Narayanan; Brysbaert, Marc

    2013-11-01

    The attentional blink task involves rapid serial presentation of visual stimuli, two of which the participants have to report. The usual finding is that participants are impaired at reporting the second target if it appears in close temporal proximity to the first target. Previous research has shown that the effect is stronger in bilinguals than monolinguals. We investigated whether the difference between monolinguals and proficient bilinguals can be extended to bilinguals of different proficiency levels. Therefore, we replicated the paradigm in a large sample of Hindi-English bilinguals with different proficiency levels of English, as measured with a validated vocabulary test. We additionally measured the participants' intelligence with the raven progressive matrices. We found that the size of the attentional blink effect correlates with the degree of second language proficiency and not with the degree of intelligence. This indicates that research on executive control functions can be done with bilinguals of different proficiency levels. Our results are also in line with recent findings showing that the attentional blink effect is not primarily due to limited processing resources.

  20. Measuring Health Utilities in Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Thorrington, Dominic; Eames, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this review was to evaluate the use of all direct and indirect methods used to estimate health utilities in both children and adolescents. Utilities measured pre- and post-intervention are combined with the time over which health states are experienced to calculate quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Cost-utility analyses (CUAs) estimate the cost-effectiveness of health technologies based on their costs and benefits using QALYs as a measure of benefit. The accurate measurement of QALYs is dependent on using appropriate methods to elicit health utilities. Objective We sought studies that measured health utilities directly from patients or their proxies. We did not exclude those studies that also included adults in the analysis, but excluded those studies focused only on adults. Methods and Findings We evaluated 90 studies from a total of 1,780 selected from the databases. 47 (52%) studies were CUAs incorporated into randomised clinical trials; 23 (26%) were health-state utility assessments; 8 (9%) validated methods and 12 (13%) compared existing or new methods. 22 unique direct or indirect calculation methods were used a total of 137 times. Direct calculation through standard gamble, time trade-off and visual analogue scale was used 32 times. The EuroQol EQ-5D was the most frequently-used single method, selected for 41 studies. 15 of the methods used were generic methods and the remaining 7 were disease-specific. 48 of the 90 studies (53%) used some form of proxy, with 26 (29%) using proxies exclusively to estimate health utilities. Conclusions Several child- and adolescent-specific methods are still being developed and validated, leaving many studies using methods that have not been designed or validated for use in children or adolescents. Several studies failed to justify using proxy respondents rather than administering the methods directly to the patients. Only two studies examined missing responses to the methods administered with

  1. Fabry-Perot interferometer utilized for displacement measurement in a large measuring range

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yung-Cheng; Shyu, Lih-Horng; Chang, Chung-Ping

    2010-09-15

    The optical configuration of a Fabry-Perot interferometer is uncomplicated. This has already been applied in different measurement systems. For the displacement measurement with the Fabry-Perot interferometer, the result is significantly influenced by the tilt angles of the measurement mirror in the interferometer. Hence, only for the rather small measuring range, the Fabry-Perot interferometer is available. The goal of this investigation is to enhance the measuring range of Fabry-Perot interferometer by compensating the tilt angles. To verify the measuring characteristic of the self-developed Fabry-Perot interferometer, some comparison measurements with a reference standard have been performed. The maximum deviation of comparison experiments is less than 0.3 {mu}m in the traveling range of 30 mm. The experimental results show that the Fabry-Perot interferometer is highly stable, insensitive to environment effects, and can meet the measuring requirement of the submicrometer order.

  2. Photon counting statistics for blinking CdSe-ZnS quantum dots: a Lévy walk process.

    PubMed

    Margolin, G; Protasenko, V; Kuno, M; Barkai, E

    2006-09-28

    We analyze photon statistics of blinking CdSe-ZnS nanocrystals interacting with a continuous wave laser field, showing that the process is described by a ballistic Lévy walk. In particular, we show that Mandel's Q parameter, describing the fluctuations of the photon counts, is increasing with time even in the limit of long time. This behavior is in agreement with the theory of Silbey and co-workers (Jung et al. Chem. Phys. 2002, 284, 181), and in contrast to all existing examples where Q approaches a constant, independent of time in the long time limit. We then analyze the distribution of the time averaged intensities, showing that they exhibit a nonergodic behavior, namely, the time averages remain random even in the limit of a long measurement time. In particular, the distribution of occupation times in the on-state compares favorably to a theory of weak ergodicity breaking of blinking nanocrystals. We show how our data analysis yields information on the amplitudes of power-law decaying on and off time distributions, information not available using standard data analysis of on and off time histograms. Photon statistics reveals fluctuations in the intensity of the bright state indicating that it is composed of several states. Photon statistics exhibits a Lévy walk behavior also when an ensemble of 100 dots is investigated, indicating that the strange kinetics can be observed already at the level of small ensembles. PMID:16986903

  3. Fabry-Pérot interferometer utilized for displacement measurement in a large measuring range.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yung-Cheng; Shyu, Lih-Horng; Chang, Chung-Ping

    2010-09-01

    The optical configuration of a Fabry-Pérot interferometer is uncomplicated. This has already been applied in different measurement systems. For the displacement measurement with the Fabry-Pérot interferometer, the result is significantly influenced by the tilt angles of the measurement mirror in the interferometer. Hence, only for the rather small measuring range, the Fabry-Pérot interferometer is available. The goal of this investigation is to enhance the measuring range of Fabry-Pérot interferometer by compensating the tilt angles. To verify the measuring characteristic of the self-developed Fabry-Pérot interferometer, some comparison measurements with a reference standard have been performed. The maximum deviation of comparison experiments is less than 0.3 μm in the traveling range of 30 mm. The experimental results show that the Fabry-Pérot interferometer is highly stable, insensitive to environment effects, and can meet the measuring requirement of the submicrometer order.

  4. Assessing the Utility of a Daily Log for Measuring Principal Leadership Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camburn, Eric M.; Spillane, James P.; Sebastian, James

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines the feasibility and utility of a daily log for measuring principal leadership practice. Setting and Sample: The study was conducted in an urban district with approximately 50 principals. Approach: The log was assessed against two criteria: (a) Is it feasible to induce strong cooperation and high response rates among…

  5. Utility of Clinical Swallowing Examination Measures for Detecting Aspiration Post-Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullough, G. H.; Rosenbek, J. C.; Wertz, R. T.; McCoy, S.; Mann, G.; McCullough, K.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the utility of clinical swallowing examination (CSE) measures for detecting aspiration as defined by videofluoroscopic swallowing examination (VFSE). This study, involving 165 participants, is a follow-up to a previously published investigation of 60 participants. Findings are compared with that…

  6. A structured review of health utility measures and elicitation in advanced/metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yanni; Wolfram, Verena; Cook, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Background Health utilities are increasingly incorporated in health economic evaluations. Different elicitation methods, direct and indirect, have been established in the past. This study examined the evidence on health utility elicitation previously reported in advanced/metastatic breast cancer and aimed to link these results to requirements of reimbursement bodies. Methods Searches were conducted using a detailed search strategy across several electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and EconLit databases), online sources (Cost-effectiveness Analysis Registry and the Health Economics Research Center), and web sites of health technology assessment (HTA) bodies. Publications were selected based on the search strategy and the overall study objectives. Results A total of 768 publications were identified in the searches, and 26 publications, comprising 18 journal articles and eight submissions to HTA bodies, were included in the evidence review. Most journal articles derived utilities from the European Quality of Life Five-Dimensions questionnaire (EQ-5D). Other utility measures, such as the direct methods standard gamble (SG), time trade-off (TTO), and visual analog scale (VAS), were less frequently used. Several studies described mapping algorithms to generate utilities from disease-specific health-related quality of life (HRQOL) instruments such as European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire – Core 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30), European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire – Breast Cancer 23 (EORTC QLQ-BR23), Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy – General questionnaire (FACT-G), and Utility-Based Questionnaire-Cancer (UBQ-C); most used EQ-5D as the reference. Sociodemographic factors that affect health utilities, such as age, sex, income, and education, as well as disease progression, choice of utility elicitation method, and country settings, were identified

  7. A comparison of four different approaches to measuring health utility in depressed patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A variety of instruments are used to measure health related quality of life. Few data exist on the performance and agreement of different instruments in a depressed population. The aim of this study was to investigate agreement between, and suitability of, the EQ-5D-3L, EQ-5D Visual Analogue Scale (EQ-5D VAS), SF-6D and SF-12 new algorithm for measuring health utility in depressed patients. Methods The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland and Altman approaches were used to assess agreement. Instrument sensitivity was analysed by: (1) plotting utility scores for the instruments against one another; (2) correlating utility scores and depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)); and (3) using Tukey’s procedure. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis assessed instrument responsiveness to change. Acceptability was assessed by comparing instrument completion rates. Results The overall ICC was 0.57. Bland and Altman plots showed wide limits of agreement for each pair wise comparison, except between the SF-6D and SF-12 new algorithm. Plots of utility scores displayed ’ceiling effects’ in the EQ-5D-3L index and ’floor effects’ in the SF-6D and SF-12 new algorithm. All instruments showed a negative monotonic relationship with BDI, but the EQ-5D-3L index and EQ-5D VAS could not differentiate between depression severity sub-groups. The SF-based instruments were better able to detect changes in health state over time. There was no difference in completion rates of the four instruments. Conclusions There was a lack of agreement between utility scores generated by the different instruments. According to the criteria of sensitivity, responsiveness and acceptability that we applied, the SF-6D and SF-12 may be more suitable for the measurement of health related utility in a depressed population than the EQ-5D-3L, which is the instrument currently recommended by NICE. PMID:23659557

  8. The attentional blink in typically developing and reading-disabled children.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Barry J A; van den Bos, Kees P; van der Meulen, Bieuwe F; Minnaert, Alexander E M G

    2015-11-01

    This study's research question was whether selective visual attention, and specifically the attentional blink (AB) as operationalized by a dual target rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) task, can explain individual differences in word reading (WR) and reading-related phonological performances in typically developing children and reading-disabled subgroups. A total of 407 Dutch school children (Grades 3-6) were classified either as typically developing (n = 302) or as belonging to one of three reading-disabled subgroups: reading disabilities only (RD-only, n = 69), both RD and attention problems (RD+ADHD, n = 16), or both RD and a specific language impairment (RD+SLI, n = 20). The RSVP task employed alphanumeric stimuli that were presented in two blocks. Standardized Dutch tests were used to measure WR, phonemic awareness (PA), and alphanumeric rapid naming (RAN). Results indicate that, controlling for PA and RAN performance, general RSVP task performance contributes significant unique variance to the prediction of WR. Specifically, consistent group main effects for the parameter of AB(minimum) were found, whereas there were no AB-specific effects (i.e., AB(width) and AB(amplitude)) except for the RD+SLI group. Finally, there was a group by measurement interaction, indicating that the RD-only and comorbid groups are differentially sensitive for prolonged testing sessions. These results suggest that more general factors involved in RSVP processing may explain the group differences found. PMID:26079274

  9. Distortion of power law blinking with binning and thresholding

    SciTech Connect

    Amecke, Nicole; Heber, André; Cichos, Frank

    2014-03-21

    Fluorescence intermittency is a random switching between emitting (on) and non-emitting (off) periods found for many single chromophores such as semiconductor quantum dots and organic molecules. The statistics of the duration of on- and off-periods are commonly determined by thresholding the emission time trace of a single chromophore and appear to be power law distributed. Here we test with the help of simulations if the experimentally determined power law distributions can actually reflect the underlying statistics. We find that with the experimentally limited time resolution real power law statistics with exponents α{sub on/off} ≳ 1.6, especially if α{sub on} ≠ α{sub off} would not be observed as such in the experimental data after binning and thresholding. Instead, a power law appearance could simply be obtained from the continuous distribution of intermediate intensity levels. This challenges much of the obtained data and the models describing the so-called power law blinking.

  10. Object file continuity and the auditory attentional blink.

    PubMed

    Shen, Dawei; Mondor, Todd A

    2008-07-01

    Three experiments were designed to investigate the causes of the auditory attentional blink (AB). Experiments 1A and 1B revealed that there was a larger auditory AB when the target and the distractors were different in two attributes than when they were different in only one attribute. Experiments 2A and 2B showed that for pure-tone distractor sequences, there were small auditory AB deficits when both the target and the probe were different from the distractors in two attributes or in one attribute; however, for pulse distractor sequences, there was a large auditory AB when both the target and the probe were different from the distractors in one attribute, but not when they were different in two attributes. Experiments 3A and 3B revealed that regardless of the relationship of the target to the subsequent distractors, a large AB was generated if it was the first sound in a sequence. Moreover, only a very small AB was apparent when the distractors following the probe were replaced by silence. These results indicated that the auditory AB is affected by both the requirement of creating and consolidating a new object file for the target and the overwriting of the probe by the distractors following it.

  11. Estimation of utility values from visual analog scale measures of health in patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Oddershede, Lars; Andreasen, Jan Jesper; Ehlers, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In health economic evaluations, mapping can be used to estimate utility values from other health outcomes in order to calculate quality adjusted life-years. Currently, no methods exist to map visual analog scale (VAS) scores to utility values. This study aimed to develop and propose a statistical algorithm for mapping five dimensions of health, measured on VASs, to utility scores in patients suffering from cardiovascular disease. Methods Patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting at Aalborg University Hospital in Denmark were asked to score their health using the five VAS items (mobility, self-care, ability to perform usual activities, pain, and presence of anxiety or depression) and the EuroQol 5 Dimensions questionnaire. Regression analysis was used to estimate four mapping models from patients’ age, sex, and the self-reported VAS scores. Prediction errors were compared between mapping models and on subsets of the observed utility scores. Agreement between predicted and observed values was assessed using Bland–Altman plots. Results Random effects generalized least squares (GLS) regression yielded the best results when quadratic terms of VAS scores were included. Mapping models fitted using the Tobit model and censored least absolute deviation regression did not appear superior to GLS regression. The mapping models were able to explain approximately 63%–65% of the variation in the observed utility scores. The mean absolute error of predictions increased as the observed utility values decreased. Conclusion We concluded that it was possible to predict utility scores from VAS scores of the five dimensions of health used in the EuroQol questionnaires. However, the use of the mapping model may be inappropriate in more severe conditions. PMID:24453497

  12. Blinking effect and the use of quantum dots in single molecule spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rombach-Riegraf, Verena; Oswald, Peter; Bienert, Roland; Petersen, Jan; Domingo, M.P.; Pardo, Julian; Graeber, P.; Galvez, E.M.

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is possible to eliminate the blinking effect of a water-soluble QD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We provide a direct method to study protein function and dynamics at the single level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer QD, potent tool for single molecule studies of biochemical and biological processes. -- Abstract: Luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots, QD) have unique photo-physical properties: high photostability, brightness and narrow size-tunable fluorescence spectra. Due to their unique properties, QD-based single molecule studies have become increasingly more popular during the last years. However QDs show a strong blinking effect (random and intermittent light emission), which may limit their use in single molecule fluorescence studies. QD blinking has been widely studied and some hypotheses have been done to explain this effect. Here we summarise what is known about the blinking effect in QDs, how this phenomenon may affect single molecule studies and, on the other hand, how the 'on'/'off' states can be exploited in diverse experimental settings. In addition, we present results showing that site-directed binding of QD to cysteine residues of proteins reduces the blinking effect. This option opens a new possibility of using QDs to study protein-protein interactions and dynamics by single molecule fluorescence without modifying the chemical composition of the solution or the QD surface.

  13. Controllable blinking-to-nonblinking behavior of aqueous CdTeS Alloyed quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chaoqing; Liu, Heng; Zhang, Aidi; Ren, Jicun

    2014-02-10

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are very important optical nanomaterials with a wide range of potential applications. However, the blinking of single QDs is an intrinsic drawback for some biological and photoelectric applications based on single-dot emission. In this work, we systematically investigated the effects of certain synthetic conditions on the blinking behavior of aqueous CdTeS alloyed QDs, and observed that blinking behaviors of QDs were able to be controlled by the structure and concentration of the thiol compounds that were used as surface ligands. In optimal conditions, completely nonblinking QDs were prepared using certain thiol ligands as stabilizers in aqueous phase. The suppressed blinking mechanism was mainly attributed to elimination of QDs surface traps by coordination of thiol ligands with vacant Cd atoms, formation of appropriate CdS coating on QDs, and controlling the growth dynamics of QDs. Nonblinking QDs show high quantum yield, small size, and good solubility, and will be applied to some fields that were previously limited by blinking of traditional QDs.

  14. Two types of luminescence blinking revealed by spectroelectrochemistry of single quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galland, Christophe; Ghosh, Yagnaseni; Steinbrueck, Andrea; Sykora, Milan; Hollingsworth, Jennifer; Klimov, Victor; Htoon, Han

    2012-02-01

    The phenomenon of fluorescence intermittency (blinking between ON/OFF states) has been observed for both naturally occurring fluorophores and artificial nanostructures. This study aims to resolve the long-standing controversy surrounding the origin of photoluminescence blinking in core/shell nanocrystal quantum dots. Researchers usually evoke the Auger, or A-type, mechanism in which photo-ionization of the dot leads to the OFF state, but recent observations have raised doubts about this explanation. Here we report time-resolved photoluminescence studies of individual nanocrystal quantum dots performed while electrochemically controlling the degree of their charging [1]. We find that a second mechanism (called B-type) is the dominant cause for blinking. During B-type blinking, a photo-excited, ``hot'' electron is trapped in a surface state before being released to the core; the luminescence is quenched without any Auger process. By controlling the applied potential and the shell thickness, we can control the frequency and type of blinking, or suppress it completely. [4pt] [1] Galland et al., Nature 479, 203-207 (2011).

  15. Emergency Preparedness Education for Nurses: Core Competency Familiarity Measured Utilizing an Adapted Emergency Preparedness Information Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Georgino, Madeline M; Kress, Terri; Alexander, Sheila; Beach, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to measure trauma nurse improvement in familiarity with emergency preparedness and disaster response core competencies as originally defined by the Emergency Preparedness Information Questionnaire after a focused educational program. An adapted version of the Emergency Preparedness Information Questionnaire was utilized to measure familiarity of nurses with core competencies pertinent to first responder capabilities. This project utilized a pre- and postsurvey descriptive design and integrated education sessions into the preexisting, mandatory "Trauma Nurse Course" at large, level I trauma center. A total of 63 nurses completed the intervention during May and September 2014 sessions. Overall, all 8 competencies demonstrated significant (P < .001; 98% confidence interval) improvements in familiarity. In conclusion, this pilot quality improvement project demonstrated a unique approach to educating nurses to be more ready and comfortable when treating victims of a disaster. PMID:26352654

  16. An investigation into the temporal dimension of the Mozart effect: evidence from the attentional blink task.

    PubMed

    Ho, Cristy; Mason, Oliver; Spence, Charles

    2007-05-01

    In the present study, we examined whether the 'Mozart effect' would influence participants' temporal attention using a visual attentional blink (AB) task that provides a reliable measure of the temporal dynamics of visual attention. The 'Mozart effect' refers to the specific claim that listening to Mozart's Sonata for Two Pianos in D Major, K.448 can improve the performance in spatio-temporal tasks. Participants had to try and identify two target digits (in their correct order of presentation) presented amongst a stream of distractor letters in three different conditions (presented in separate blocks of trials): while listening to the Mozart sonata played normally, while listening to the same Mozart sonata played in reverse, and while in silence. The results showed that the participants were able to detect the second target (T2) significantly more accurately (given the correct detection of the first target, T1) in the AB stream when the Mozart sonata was played normally than in either of the other two conditions. Possible explanations for the differential effects of Mozart's music being played normally and in reverse and potential confounds in previous studies reporting a facilitatory 'Mozart effect' are discussed. Our results therefore provide the first empirical demonstration supporting the existence of a purely temporal component to the 'Mozart effect' using a non-spatial visual AB task.

  17. Plasmonic effect on photon antibunching and blinking behavior of single quantum dots near gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Swayandipta; Zhou, Yadong; Tian, Xiangdong; Jenkins, Julie A.; Chen, Ou; Zou, Shengli; Zhao, Jing

    2015-02-01

    In this work, we investigated how the blinking statistics and the photon antibunching behavior of single CdSe/CdS core/shell quantum dots(QDs) get modified in the presence of gold nanoparticles(Au NPs) overcoated with a silica shell of varying thickness.(Au@SiO2). The Au@SiO2 NPs have distinct plasmon resonance peaks which overlap with the absorption and emission of QDs, thereby effectively increasing the mutual plasmon-exciton interactions between them. From the second-order photoluminescence intensity cross-correlation measurements, we observed that in the regime of low excitation power, the relative ratio of the biexciton/exciton (BX/X) quantum yield (QY) and lifetimes of the single QDs in presence of the plasmonic substrates get significantly modified as compared to the QDs on glass. An electrodynamics model was developed to further quantify the effect of plasmons on the emission intensity, QY and lifetimes of X and BX of single QDs. The theoretical studies also indicated that the relative position of the QDs and orientation of the electric field are the critical factors regulating the emission properties of Xs and BXs.

  18. Non-blinking single-photon generation with anisotropic colloidal nanocrystals: towards room-temperature, efficient, colloidal quantum sources.

    PubMed

    Pisanello, Ferruccio; Leménager, Godefroy; Martiradonna, Luigi; Carbone, Luigi; Vezzoli, Stefano; Desfonds, Pascal; Cozzoli, Pantaleo Davide; Hermier, Jean-Pierre; Giacobino, Elisabeth; Cingolani, Roberto; De Vittorio, Massimo; Bramati, Alberto

    2013-04-11

    Blinking and single-photon emission can be tailored in CdSe/CdS core/shell colloidal dot-in-rods. By increasing the shell thickness it is possible to obtain almost non-blinking nanocrystals, while the shell length can be used to control single-photon emission probability.

  19. Detection of single-nucleotide variations by monitoring the blinking of fluorescence induced by charge transfer in DNA.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Kiyohiko; Majima, Tetsuro; Maruyama, Atsushi

    2013-08-19

    Charge transfer dynamics in DNA: Photo-induced charge separation and charge-recombination dynamics in DNA was assessed by monitoring the blinking of fluorescence. Single nucleotide variations, mismatch and one base deletion, were differentiated based on the length of the off-time of the blinking, which corresponds to the lifetime of the charge-separated state. PMID:23846860

  20. Utility of ketone measurement in the prevention, diagnosis and management of diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Misra, S; Oliver, N S

    2015-01-01

    Ketone measurement is advocated for the diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis and assessment of its severity. Assessing the evidence base for ketone measurement in clinical practice is challenging because multiple methods are available but there is a lack of consensus about which is preferable. Evaluating the utility of ketone measurement is additionally problematic because of variability in the biochemical definition of ketoacidosis internationally and in the proposed thresholds for ketone measures. This has led to conflicting guidance from expert bodies on how ketone measurement should be used in the management of ketoacidosis. The development of point-of-care devices that can reliably measure the capillary blood ketone β-hydroxybutyrate (BOHB) has widened the spectrum of applications of ketone measurement, but whether the evidence base supporting these applications is robust enough to warrant their incorporation into routine clinical practice remains unclear. The imprecision of capillary blood ketone measures at higher values, the lack of availability of routine laboratory-based assays for BOHB and the continued cost-effectiveness of urine ketone assessment prompt further discussion on the role of capillary blood ketone assessment in ketoacidosis. In the present article, we review the various existing methods of ketone measurement, the precision of capillary blood ketone as compared with other measures, its diagnostic accuracy in predicting ketoacidosis and other clinical applications including prevention, assessment of severity and resolution of ketoacidosis.

  1. The fearful-face advantage is modulated by task demands: evidence from the attentional blink.

    PubMed

    Stein, Timo; Peelen, Marius V; Funk, Johanna; Seidl, Katharina N

    2010-02-01

    Fearful faces receive privileged access to awareness relative to happy and nonemotional faces. We investigated whether this advantage depends on currently available attentional resources. In an attentional blink paradigm, observers detected faces presented during the attentional blink period that could depict either a fearful or a happy expression. Perceptual load of the blink-inducing target was manipulated by increasing flanker interference. For the low-load condition, fearful faces were detected more often than happy faces, replicating previous reports. More important, this advantage for fearful faces disappeared for the high-load condition, during which fearful and happy faces were detected equally often. These results suggest that the privileged access of fearful faces to awareness does not occur mandatorily, but instead depends on attentional resources.

  2. COMMUNALITIES AND DIFFERENCES IN FEAR POTENTIATION BETWEEN CARDIAC DEFENSE AND EYE-BLINK STARTLE

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, María B.; Guerra, Pedro; Muñoz, Miguel A.; Mata, José Luís; Bradley, Margaret M.; Lang, Peter J.; Vila, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    This study examines similarities and differences in fear potentiation between two protective reflexes: cardiac defense and eye-blink startle. Women reporting intense fear of animals but low fear of blood or intense fear of blood but low fear of animals viewed pictures depicting blood or the feared animal for 6 s in 2 separate trials in counterbalanced order. An intense burst of white noise, able to elicit both a cardiac defense response and a reflexive startle blink, was presented 3.5 s after picture onset. Both cardiac and blink responses were potentiated when highly fearful individuals viewed fearful pictures. However, differences appeared concerning picture order. This pattern of results indicates communalities and differences among protective reflexes that are relevant for understanding the dynamics of emotional reflex modulation. PMID:19572906

  3. Photoluminenscence blinking dynamics of colloidal quantum dots in the presence of controlled external electron traps.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhihua; Cotlet, Mircea

    2012-01-23

    The effect of the external charge trap on the photoluminescence blinking dynamics of individual colloidal quantum dots is investigated with a series of colloidal quantum dot-bridge-fullerene dimers with varying bridge lengths, where the fullerene moiety acts as a well-defined, well-positioned external charge trap. It is found that charge transfer followed by charge recombination is an important mechanism in determining the blinking behavior of quantum dots when the external trap is properly coupled with the excited state of the quantum dot, leading to a quasi-continuous distribution of 'on' states and an early fall-off from a power-law distribution for both 'on' and 'off' times associated with quantum dot photoluminescence blinking.

  4. Delayed Exciton Emission and Its Relation to Blinking in CdSe Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Rabouw, Freddy T; Kamp, Marko; van Dijk-Moes, Relinde J A; Gamelin, Daniel R; Koenderink, A Femius; Meijerink, Andries; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniël

    2015-11-11

    The efficiency and stability of emission from semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots (QDs) is negatively affected by "blinking" on the single-nanocrystal level, that is, random alternation of bright and dark periods. The time scales of these fluctuations can be as long as many seconds, orders of magnitude longer than typical lifetimes of exciton states in QDs. In this work, we investigate photoluminescence from QDs delayed over microseconds to milliseconds. Our results prove the existence of long-lived charge-separated states in QDs. We study the properties of delayed emission as a direct way to learn about charge carrier separation and recovery of the exciton state. A new microscopic model is developed to connect delayed emission to exciton recombination and blinking from which we conclude that bright periods in blinking are in fact not characterized by uninterrupted optical cycling as often assumed.

  5. Near-complete suppression of quantum dot blinking in ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Hohng, Sungchul; Ha, Taekjip

    2004-02-11

    Colloidal semiconductor quantum dots are attractive fluorophores for multicolor imaging because of broad absorption and narrow emission spectra, and they are brighter and far more photostable than organic dyes. However, severe intermittence in emission (also known as blinking) has been universally observed from single dots and has been considered an intrinsic limitation difficult to overcome. This is unfortunate because growing applications in spectroscopy of single biological molecules and quantum information processing using single photon sources could greatly benefit from long-lasting and nonblinking single-molecule emitters. For instance, in a recent application of single-dot imaging, the tracking of membrane receptors was interrupted frequently due to the stroboscopic nature of recording. Blinking can also reduce the brightness in ensemble imaging via signal saturation. Here we show that the quantum dot blinking can be suppressed with the emission duty cycle approaching 100% while maintaining biocompatibility.

  6. Suppressed blinking behavior of CdSe/CdS QDs by polymer coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Aidi; Bian, Yannan; Wang, Jinjie; Chen, Kuiyong; Dong, Chaoqing; Ren, Jicun

    2016-02-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are very important fluorescent nanocrystals with excellent optical properties. However, QDs, at the single-particle level, show severe fluorescence intermittency (or blinking) on a wide time scale from milliseconds to minutes, which limits certain optical and biological applications. Generally, blinking behavior of QDs strongly depends on their surface state and surrounding environment. Therefore, current blinking suppression approaches are mostly focused on the introduction of an inorganic shell and organic small molecule compounds. In this study, we described a ``bottom up'' approach for the synthesis of CdSe/CdS/polymer core/shell/shell QDs via the in situ one-pot polymerization approach in order to control the blinking behavior of QDs. Three monomers (dithiothreitol (DTT), phenylenediamine (PDA), and hexamethylenediamine (HDA)) were respectively used to polymerize with hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene (HCCP), and then the polyphosphazene polymers were obtained with cyclotriphosphazene as the basic macromolecular backbone. By regulating the molar ratios of the activated comonomers, we can control the blinking behavior of CdSe/CdS/polymer QDs. Under the optimal conditions, the percentage of ``non-blinking'' CdSe/CdS/polymer QDs (the ``on time'' fraction > 99% of the overall observation time) was up to 78%. The suppression mechanism was attributed to the efficient passivation of QD surface traps by the sulfhydryl or phenyl groups in the polyphosphazene polymers.Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are very important fluorescent nanocrystals with excellent optical properties. However, QDs, at the single-particle level, show severe fluorescence intermittency (or blinking) on a wide time scale from milliseconds to minutes, which limits certain optical and biological applications. Generally, blinking behavior of QDs strongly depends on their surface state and surrounding environment. Therefore, current blinking suppression approaches are

  7. Photoluminescence Blinking Dynamics of Colloidal Quantum Dots in the Presence of Controlled External Electron Traps

    SciTech Connect

    Cotlet, M.; Xu, Z.

    2012-01-23

    The effect of the external charge trap on the photoluminescence blinking dynamics of individual colloidal quantum dots is investigated with a series of colloidal quantum dot-bridge-fullerene dimers with varying bridge lengths, where the fullerene moiety acts as a well-defined, well-positioned external charge trap. It is found that charge transfer followed by charge recombination is an important mechanism in determining the blinking behavior of quantum dots when the external trap is properly coupled with the excited state of the quantum dot, leading to a quasi-continuous distribution of 'on' states and an early fall-off from a power-law distribution for both 'on' and 'off' times associated with quantum dot photoluminescence blinking.

  8. A Review of Acculturation Measures and Their Utility in Studies Promoting Latino Health

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Phyllis M.; Pomery, Elizabeth A.; Latimer, Amy E.; Martinez, Josefa L.; Salovey, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The authors reviewed the acculturation literature with the goal of identifying measures used to assess acculturation in Hispanic populations in the context of studies of health knowledge, attitudes, and behavior change. Twenty-six acculturation measures were identified and summarized. As the Hispanic population continues to grow in the United States, there is a need to develop rigorous acculturation measures that include health indicators. Findings suggest that multidimensional acculturation scales are robust measurement tools when assessing nationality, cultural awareness, media and language preferences, and health status. Furthermore, aspects of Hispanic cultural lifestyle, such as beliefs about nutrition and physical activity, affect health care utilization, treatment, and prevention. Health communication researchers should consider aspects of cultural values and beliefs, and their impact on health status, for future research and health promotion interventions. PMID:20582238

  9. Three-Dimensional Shape Measurement Method for Micro Droplet Utilizing Micro LIF Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugii, Yasuhiko; Horita, Ryo

    This paper describes a novel measurement technique for three-dimensional shape of micro droplet utilizing micro LIF (Laser Induced Fluorescence) technique. A measurement system consisted of microscope equipped with 10x lens, high sensitive CCD camera, mercury lamp, optical filters and so on. Calibration curve between thickness of micro droplet and emission of fluorescence dye solution was obtained by the use of the PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) microchip, whose depth varied from 10 to 95 μm fabricated using photo lithography technique. The microchip based calibration method provides high measurement accuracy and eliminate photobleaching effect. Measurement accuracy of the present method in depth direction was about 0.57 μm assessed using laser con-focal microscope and the spatial resolution in the horizontal plane became 6.7 μm. The technique is useful to investigate a gas-liquid two-phase flow in micro scale.

  10. Abnormalities of the blink reflex in burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jääskeläinen, S K; Forssell, H; Tenovuo, O

    1997-12-01

    To our knowledge, this is the first report on pain-related abnormalities of the eye blink reflex (BR) in a clinical pain patient population. The objective of this study was to evaluate the possible neuropathic mechanisms underlying the burning mouth syndrome (BMS), by means of objective electrophysiological examination of the trigemino-facial system. We studied the BR with stimulation of the supraorbital nerve (SON) with particular emphasis on the occurrence of the pain-related ultralate R3 components, and the habituation response of the R2 components. The subjects consisted of eleven BMS patients and 10 healthy control subjects. All patients underwent thorough clinical oral and neurological examinations. The motor function of the trigeminal nerve was assessed with a jaw reflex recording, and a needle-EMG examination of the facial and masticatory muscles was performed in the patients with abnormalities in the BR recordings. The jaw reflexes, the latencies of the BR components, and the needle-EMG examinations were normal in all patients. As a group, the BMS patients had statistically significantly higher stimulus thresholds for the tactile R 1 components of the BR compared with the control subjects. With non-noxious stimulation, the BMS patients showed more frequently pain-related R3 components (11/22 SONs) compared with the controls (3/20 SONs). In addition, four BMS patients had abnormal habituation of the R2 components. In two of these patients, the findings were segmental (i.e., unilateral), coinciding with the side of the subjective BM symptoms. The abnormalities of the BR tests appeared to be related to longer disease duration. Our results suggest a possible pathologic involvement of the nervous system in chronic BMS.

  11. Ultimate Heat Sink Thermal Performance and Water Utilization: Measurements on Cooling and Spray Ponds

    SciTech Connect

    Athey, G. F.; Hadlock, R. K.; Abbey, O. B.

    1982-02-01

    A data acquisition research program, entitled "Ultimate Heat Sink Performance Field Experiments," has been brought to completion. The primary objective is to obtain the requisite data to characterize thermal performance and water utilization for cooling ponds and spray ponds at elevated temperature. Such data are useful for modeling purposes, but the work reported here does not contain modeling efforts within its scope. The water bodies which have been studied are indicative of nuclear reactor ultimate heat sinks, components of emergency core cooling systems. The data reflect thermal performance and water utilization for meteorological and solar influences which are representative of worst-case combinations of conditions. Constructed water retention ponds, provided with absolute seals against seepage, have been chosen as facilities for the measurement programs; the first pond was located at Raft River, Idaho, and the second at East Mesa, California. The data illustrate and describe, for both cooling ponds and spray ponds, thermal performance and water utilization as the ponds cool from an initially elevated temperature. To obtain the initial elevated temperature, it has been convenient to conduct the measurements at geothermal sites having large supplies and delivery rates of hot geothermal fluid. The data are described and discussed in the text, and presented in the form of data volumes as appendices.

  12. Three dimensional time-gated tracking of non-blinking quantum dots in live cells

    DOE PAGES

    DeVore, Matthew S.; Werner, James H.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Keller, Aaron M.; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Wilson, Bridget S.; Cleyrat, Cedric; Lidke, Diane S.; Ghosh, Yagnaseni; Stewart, Michael H.; et al

    2015-03-12

    Single particle tracking has provided a wealth of information about biophysical processes such as motor protein transport and diffusion in cell membranes. However, motion out of the plane of the microscope or blinking of the fluorescent probe used as a label generally limits observation times to several seconds. Here, we overcome these limitations by using novel non-blinking quantum dots as probes and employing a custom 3D tracking microscope to actively follow motion in three dimensions (3D) in live cells. As a result, signal-to-noise is improved in the cellular milieu through the use of pulsed excitation and time-gated detection.

  13. Three dimensional time-gated tracking of non-blinking quantum dots in live cells

    PubMed Central

    DeVore, Matthew S.; Stich, Dominik G.; Keller, Aaron M.; Ghosh, Yagnaseni; Goodwin, Peter M.; Phipps, Mary E.; Stewart, Michael H.; Cleyrat, Cédric; Wilson, Bridget S.; Lidke, Diane S.; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Werner, James H.

    2015-01-01

    Single particle tracking has provided a wealth of information about biophysical processes such as motor protein transport and diffusion in cell membranes. However, motion out of the plane of the microscope or blinking of the fluorescent probe used as a label generally limits observation times to several seconds. Here, we overcome these limitations by using novel non-blinking quantum dots as probes and employing a custom 3D tracking microscope to actively follow motion in three dimensions (3D) in live cells. Signal-to-noise is improved in the cellular milieu through the use of pulsed excitation and time-gated detection. PMID:25932286

  14. Three dimensional time-gated tracking of non-blinking quantum dots in live cells

    SciTech Connect

    DeVore, Matthew S.; Werner, James H.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Keller, Aaron M.; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Wilson, Bridget S.; Cleyrat, Cedric; Lidke, Diane S.; Ghosh, Yagnaseni; Stewart, Michael H.; Stich, Dominik G.; Phipps, Mary E.

    2015-12-03

    Single particle tracking has provided a wealth of information about biophysical processes such as motor protein transport and diffusion in cell membranes. However, motion out of the plane of the microscope or blinking of the fluorescent probe used as a label generally limits observation times to several seconds. Here, we overcome these limitations by using novel non-blinking quantum dots as probes and employing a custom 3D tracking microscope to actively follow motion in three dimensions (3D) in live cells. As a result, signal-to-noise is improved in the cellular milieu through the use of pulsed excitation and time-gated detection.

  15. Fluctuating reaction rate and non-exponential blinking statistics in single-enzyme kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jau; Yeh, Yi-Cheun; Tai, Po-Tse

    2008-09-01

    Extending the Michaelis-Menten kinetic scheme, we consider a three-state diffusion-controlled reaction model to investigate the effects of fluctuating reaction rate on the blinking statistics of single-enzyme catalytic reactions. As a result of conformational changes, the barrier-height and the reaction rate for the bottleneck enzymatic reaction could fluctuate in time, leading to non-exponential blinking statistics. To illustrate model applications, some reported experimental data for single β-galactosidase molecules were reanalyzed here to extract useful kinetic parameters.

  16. Three dimensional time-gated tracking of non-blinking quantum dots in live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVore, Matthew S.; Stich, Dominik G.; Keller, Aaron M.; Ghosh, Yagna; Goodwin, Peter M.; Phipps, Mary E.; Stewart, Michael H.; Cleyrat, Cédric; Wilson, Bridget S.; Lidke, Diane S.; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Werner, James H.

    2015-03-01

    Single particle tracking has provided a wealth of information about biophysical processes such as motor protein transport and diffusion in cell membranes. However, motion out of the plane of the microscope or blinking of the fluorescent probe used as a label generally limits observation times to several seconds. Here, we overcome these limitations by using novel non-blinking quantum dots as probes and employing a custom 3D tracking microscope to actively follow motion in three dimensions (3D) in live cells. Signal-to-noise is improved in the cellular milieu through the use of pulsed excitation and time-gated detection.

  17. Analyzing blinking effects in super resolution localization microscopy with single-photon SPAD imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolovic, Ivan Michel; Burri, Samuel; Bruschini, Claudio; Hoebe, Ron; Charbon, Edoardo

    2016-02-01

    For many scientific applications, electron multiplying charge coupled devices (EMCCDs) have been the sensor of choice because of their high quantum efficiency and built-in electron amplification. Lately, many researchers introduced scientific complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (sCMOS) imagers in their instrumentation, so as to take advantage of faster readout and the absence of excess noise. Alternatively, single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) imagers can provide even faster frame rates and zero readout noise. SwissSPAD is a 1-bit 512×128 SPAD imager, one of the largest of its kind, featuring a frame duration of 6.4 μs. Additionally, a gating mechanism enables photosensitive windows as short as 5 ns with a skew better than 150 ps across the entire array. The SwissSPAD photon detection efficiency (PDE) uniformity is very high, thanks on one side to a photon-to-digital conversion and on the other to a reduced fraction of "hot pixels" or "screamers", which would pollute the image with noise. A low native fill factor was recovered to a large extent using a microlens array, leading to a maximum PDE increase of 12×. This enabled us to detect single fluorophores, as required by ground state depletion followed by individual molecule return imaging microscopy (GSDIM). We show the first super resolution results obtained with a SPAD imager, with an estimated localization uncertainty of 30 nm and resolution of 100 nm. The high time resolution of 6.4 μs can be utilized to explore the dye's photophysics or for dye optimization. We also present the methodology for the blinking analysis on experimental data.

  18. Blinking suppression and intensity recurrences in single CdSe-oligo(phenylene vinylene) nanostructures: experiment and kinetic model.

    PubMed

    Early, K T; McCarthy, K D; Hammer, N I; Odoi, M Y; Tangirala, R; Emrick, T; Barnes, M D

    2007-10-24

    We report time-resolved single molecule fluorescence imaging of individual CdSe quantum dots that are functionalized with oligomeric conjugated organic ligands. The fluorescence intensity trajectories from these composite nanostructures display both a strong degree of blinking suppression and intensity fluctuations with characteristic recurrence times on the order of 10-60 s. In addition, fluorescence decay rate measurements of individual hybrid nanostructures indicate significantly modified non-radiative quantum dot decay rates relative to conventional ZnS-capped CdSe quantum dots. We show that a modified diffusive reaction coordinate model with slow fluctuations in quantum dot electron energies (1S(e), 1P(e)) can reproduce the experimentally observed behaviour.

  19. Edge Length and Surface Area of a Blank: Experimental Assessment of Measures, Size Predictions and Utility

    PubMed Central

    Dogandžić, Tamara; Braun, David R.; McPherron, Shannon P.

    2015-01-01

    Blank size and form represent one of the main sources of variation in lithic assemblages. They reflect economic properties of blanks and factors such as efficiency and use life. These properties require reliable measures of size, namely edge length and surface area. These measures, however, are not easily captured with calipers. Most attempts to quantify these features employ estimates; however, the efficacy of these estimations for measuring critical features such as blank surface area and edge length has never been properly evaluated. In addition, these parameters are even more difficult to acquire for retouched implements as their original size and hence indication of their previous utility have been lost. It has been suggested, in controlled experimental conditions, that two platform variables, platform thickness and exterior platform angle, are crucial in determining blank size and shape meaning that knappers can control the interaction between size and efficiency by selecting specific core angles and controlling where fracture is initiated. The robustness of these models has rarely been tested and confirmed in context other than controlled experiments. In this paper, we evaluate which currently employed caliper measurement methods result in the highest accuracy of size estimations of blanks, and we evaluate how platform variables can be used to indirectly infer aspects of size on retouched artifacts. Furthermore, we investigate measures of different platform management strategies that control the shape and size of artifacts. To investigate these questions, we created an experimental lithic assemblage, we digitized images to calculate 2D surface area and edge length, which are used as a point of comparison for the caliper measurements and additional analyses. The analysis of aspects of size determinations and the utility of blanks contributes to our understanding of the technological strategies of prehistoric knappers and what economic decisions they made

  20. Utility and limitations of measures of health inequities: a theoretical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Alonge, Olakunle; Peters, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary box What is already known on this subject? Various measures have been used in quantifying health inequities among populations in recent times; most of these measures were derived to capture the socioeconomic inequalities in health. These different measures do not always lend themselves to common interpretation by policy makers and health managers because they each reflect limited aspects of the concept of health inequities. What does this study add? To inform a more appropriate application of the different measures currently used in quantifying health inequities, this article explicates common theories underlying the definition of health inequities and uses this understanding to show the utility and limitations of these different measures. It also suggests some key features of an ideal indicator based on the conceptual understanding, with the hope of influencing future efforts in developing more robust measures of health inequities. The article also provides a conceptual ‘product label’ for the common measures of health inequities to guide users and ‘consumers’ in making more robust inferences and conclusions. This paper examines common approaches for quantifying health inequities and assesses the extent to which they incorporate key theories necessary for explicating the definition of health inequity. The first theoretical analysis examined the distinction between inter-individual and inter-group health inequalities as measures of health inequities. The second analysis considered the notion of fairness in health inequalities from different philosophical perspectives. To understand the extent to which different measures of health inequities incorporate these theoretical explanations, four criteria were used to assess each measure: 1) Does the indicator demonstrate inter-group or inter-individual health inequalities or both; 2) Does it reflect health inequalities in relation to socioeconomic position; 3) Is it sensitive to the absolute transfer of

  1. About the parametrizations utilized to perform magnetic moments measurements using the transient field technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, A. M.; Torres, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    The experimental study of nuclear magnetic moments, using the Transient Field technique, makes use of spin-orbit hyperfine interactions to generate strong magnetic fields, above the kilo-Tesla regime, capable to create a precession of the nuclear spin. A theoretical description of such magnetic fields is still under theoretical research, and the use of parametrizations is still a common way to address the lack of theoretical information. In this contribution, a review of the main parametrizations utilized in the measurements of Nuclear Magnetic Moments will be presented, the challenges to create a theoretical description from first principles will be discussed.

  2. Multiplex in-cylinder pressure measurement utilizing an optical fiber with specific refractive-index composition.

    PubMed

    Komachiya, M; Sonobe, H; Oho, S; Kurita, M; Nakazawa, T; Sasayama, T

    1996-03-01

    An approach to multiplex in-cylinder pressure measurement that utilizes a single-mode optical fiber with specific refractive-index composition has been proposed. The sensing fiber has been designed to show a certain amount of optical power loss with a small change in the fiber-local-bend radius. Along with pressure-transferring diaphragms the sensing fiber was embedded into the head gasket of a four-cylinder gasoline engine. The internal-pressure change in each combustion chamber was detected on the basis of bending power loss in the fiber. Combustion pressure peaks for each cylinder were clearly observed.

  3. Method and apparatus for measuring gravitational acceleration utilizing a high temperature superconducting bearing

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, J.R.

    2000-06-27

    Gravitational acceleration is measured in all spatial dimensions with improved sensitivity by utilizing a high temperature superconducting (HTS) gravimeter. The HTS gravimeter is comprised of a permanent magnet suspended in a spaced relationship from a high temperature superconductor, and a cantilever having a mass at its free end is connected to the permanent magnet at its fixed end. The permanent magnet and superconductor combine to form a bearing platform with extremely low frictional losses, and the rotational displacement of the mass is measured to determine gravitational acceleration. Employing a high temperature superconductor component has the significant advantage of having an operating temperature at or below 77 K, whereby cooling may be accomplished with liquid nitrogen.

  4. Method and Apparatus for measuring Gravitational Acceleration Utilizing a high Temperature Superconducting Bearing

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, John R.

    1998-11-06

    Gravitational acceleration is measured in all spatial dimensions with improved sensitivity by utilizing a high temperature superconducting (HTS) gravimeter. The HTS gravimeter is comprised of a permanent magnet suspended in a spaced relationship from a high temperature superconductor, and a cantilever having a mass at its free end is connected to the permanent magnet at its fixed end. The permanent magnet and superconductor combine to form a bearing platform with extremely low frictional losses, and the rotational displacement of the mass is measured to determine gravitational acceleration. Employing a high temperature superconductor component has the significant advantage of having an operative temperature at or below 77K, whereby cooling maybe accomplished with liquid nitrogen.

  5. Utilization of Software Tools for Uncertainty Calculation in Measurement Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangl, Hubert; Zine-Zine, Mariam; Hoermaier, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    Despite its importance, uncertainty is often neglected by practitioners in the design of system even in safety critical applications. Thus, problems arising from uncertainty may only be identified late in the design process and thus lead to additional costs. Although there exists numerous tools to support uncertainty calculation, reasons for limited usage in early design phases may be low awareness of the existence of the tools and insufficient training in the practical application. We present a teaching philosophy that addresses uncertainty from the very beginning of teaching measurement science, in particular with respect to the utilization of software tools. The developed teaching material is based on the GUM method and makes use of uncertainty toolboxes in the simulation environment. Based on examples in measurement science education we discuss advantages and disadvantages of the proposed teaching philosophy and include feedback from students.

  6. Method and apparatus for measuring gravitational acceleration utilizing a high temperature superconducting bearing

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.

    2000-01-01

    Gravitational acceleration is measured in all spatial dimensions with improved sensitivity by utilizing a high temperature superconducting (HTS) gravimeter. The HTS gravimeter is comprised of a permanent magnet suspended in a spaced relationship from a high temperature superconductor, and a cantilever having a mass at its free end is connected to the permanent magnet at its fixed end. The permanent magnet and superconductor combine to form a bearing platform with extremely low frictional losses, and the rotational displacement of the mass is measured to determine gravitational acceleration. Employing a high temperature superconductor component has the significant advantage of having an operating temperature at or below 77K, whereby cooling may be accomplished with liquid nitrogen.

  7. The Effect of Geographic Units of Analysis on Measuring Geographic Variation in Medical Services Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Heon; Hwang, Kyosang; Lee, Taesik

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: We aimed to evaluate the effect of geographic units of analysis on measuring geographic variation in medical services utilization. For this purpose, we compared geographic variations in the rates of eight major procedures in administrative units (districts) and new areal units organized based on the actual health care use of the population in Korea. Methods: To compare geographic variation in geographic units of analysis, we calculated the age–sex standardized rates of eight major procedures (coronary artery bypass graft surgery, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, surgery after hip fracture, knee-replacement surgery, caesarean section, hysterectomy, computed tomography scan, and magnetic resonance imaging scan) from the National Health Insurance database in Korea for the 2013 period. Using the coefficient of variation, the extremal quotient, and the systematic component of variation, we measured geographic variation for these eight procedures in districts and new areal units. Results: Compared with districts, new areal units showed a reduction in geographic variation. Extremal quotients and inter-decile ratios for the eight procedures were lower in new areal units. While the coefficient of variation was lower for most procedures in new areal units, the pattern of change of the systematic component of variation between districts and new areal units differed among procedures. Conclusions: Geographic variation in medical service utilization could vary according to the geographic unit of analysis. To determine how geographic characteristics such as population size and number of geographic units affect geographic variation, further studies are needed. PMID:27499165

  8. Cardiac Modulation of Startle: Effects on Eye Blink and Higher Cognitive Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, Andre; Reichert, Carolin F.; Richter, Steffen; Lass-Hennemann, Johanna; Blumenthal, Terry D.; Schachinger, Hartmut

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac cycle time has been shown to affect pre-attentive brainstem startle processes, such as the magnitude of acoustically evoked reflexive startle eye blinks. These effects were attributed to baro-afferent feedback mechanisms. However, it remains unclear whether cardiac cycle time plays a role in higher startle-related cognitive processes, as…

  9. Correlation between Inter-Blink Interval and Episodic Encoding during Movie Watching

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Young Seok; Chang, Won-du; Park, Jinsick; Im, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Sang In; Kim, In Young; Jang, Dong Pyo

    2015-01-01

    Human eye blinking is cognitively suppressed to minimize loss of visual information for important real-world events. Despite the relationship between eye blinking and cognitive state, the effect of eye blinks on cognition in real-world environments has received limited research attention. In this study, we focused on the temporal pattern of inter-eye blink interval (IEBI) during movie watching and investigated its relationship with episodic memory. As a control condition, 24 healthy subjects watched a nature documentary that lacked a specific story line while electroencephalography was performed. Immediately after viewing the movie, the subjects were asked to report its most memorable scene. Four weeks later, subjects were asked to score 32 randomly selected scenes from the movie, based on how much they were able to remember and describe. The results showed that the average IEBI was significantly longer during the movie than in the control condition. In addition, the significant increase in IEBI when watching a movie coincided with the most memorable scenes of the movie. The results suggested that the interesting episodic narrative of the movie attracted the subjects’ visual attention relative to the documentary clip that did not have a story line. In the episodic memory test executed four weeks later, memory performance was significantly positively correlated with IEBI (p<0.001). In summary, IEBI may be a reliable bio-marker of the degree of concentration on naturalistic content that requires visual attention, such as a movie. PMID:26529091

  10. Too Much Control Can Hurt: A Threaded Cognition Model of the Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taatgen, Niels A.; Juvina, Ion; Schipper, Marc; Borst, Jelmer P.; Martens, Sander

    2009-01-01

    Explanations for the attentional blink (AB; a deficit in identifying the second of two targets when presented 200-500ms after the first) have recently shifted from limitations in memory consolidation to disruptions in cognitive control. With a new model based on the threaded cognition theory of multi-tasking we propose a different explanation: the…

  11. Distractor Devaluation Effect in the Attentional Blink: Direct Evidence for Distractor Inhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kihara, Ken; Yagi, Yoshihiko; Takeda, Yuji; Kawahara, Jun I.

    2011-01-01

    When two targets (T1 and T2) are embedded in rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP), T2 is often missed (attentional blink, AB) if T2 follows T1 by less than 500 ms. Some have proposed that inhibition of a distractor following T1 contributes to the AB, but no direct evidence supports this proposal. This study examined distractor inhibition by…

  12. Perception of Temporal Order Is Impaired during the Time Course of the Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spalek, Thomas M.; Lagroix, Hayley E. P.; Yanko, Matthew R.; Di Lollo, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Identification accuracy for the second of two target (T2) is impaired when presented shortly after the first (T1). Does this attentional blink (AB) also impair the perception of the order of presentation? In four experiments, three letter targets (T1, T2, T3) were inserted in a stream of digit distractors displayed in rapid serial visual…

  13. Correlation between Inter-Blink Interval and Episodic Encoding during Movie Watching.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young Seok; Chang, Won-du; Park, Jinsick; Im, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Sang In; Kim, In Young; Jang, Dong Pyo

    2015-01-01

    Human eye blinking is cognitively suppressed to minimize loss of visual information for important real-world events. Despite the relationship between eye blinking and cognitive state, the effect of eye blinks on cognition in real-world environments has received limited research attention. In this study, we focused on the temporal pattern of inter-eye blink interval (IEBI) during movie watching and investigated its relationship with episodic memory. As a control condition, 24 healthy subjects watched a nature documentary that lacked a specific story line while electroencephalography was performed. Immediately after viewing the movie, the subjects were asked to report its most memorable scene. Four weeks later, subjects were asked to score 32 randomly selected scenes from the movie, based on how much they were able to remember and describe. The results showed that the average IEBI was significantly longer during the movie than in the control condition. In addition, the significant increase in IEBI when watching a movie coincided with the most memorable scenes of the movie. The results suggested that the interesting episodic narrative of the movie attracted the subjects' visual attention relative to the documentary clip that did not have a story line. In the episodic memory test executed four weeks later, memory performance was significantly positively correlated with IEBI (p<0.001). In summary, IEBI may be a reliable bio-marker of the degree of concentration on naturalistic content that requires visual attention, such as a movie.

  14. Correlation between Inter-Blink Interval and Episodic Encoding during Movie Watching.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young Seok; Chang, Won-du; Park, Jinsick; Im, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Sang In; Kim, In Young; Jang, Dong Pyo

    2015-01-01

    Human eye blinking is cognitively suppressed to minimize loss of visual information for important real-world events. Despite the relationship between eye blinking and cognitive state, the effect of eye blinks on cognition in real-world environments has received limited research attention. In this study, we focused on the temporal pattern of inter-eye blink interval (IEBI) during movie watching and investigated its relationship with episodic memory. As a control condition, 24 healthy subjects watched a nature documentary that lacked a specific story line while electroencephalography was performed. Immediately after viewing the movie, the subjects were asked to report its most memorable scene. Four weeks later, subjects were asked to score 32 randomly selected scenes from the movie, based on how much they were able to remember and describe. The results showed that the average IEBI was significantly longer during the movie than in the control condition. In addition, the significant increase in IEBI when watching a movie coincided with the most memorable scenes of the movie. The results suggested that the interesting episodic narrative of the movie attracted the subjects' visual attention relative to the documentary clip that did not have a story line. In the episodic memory test executed four weeks later, memory performance was significantly positively correlated with IEBI (p<0.001). In summary, IEBI may be a reliable bio-marker of the degree of concentration on naturalistic content that requires visual attention, such as a movie. PMID:26529091

  15. Attentional and Perceptual Factors Affecting the Attentional Blink for Faces and Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landau, Ayelet N.; Bentin, Shlomo

    2008-01-01

    When 2 different visual targets presented among different distracters in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) are separated by 400 ms or less, detection and identification of the 2nd targets are reduced relative to longer time intervals. This phenomenon, termed the "attentional blink" (AB), is attributed to the temporary engagement of a…

  16. Attention Blinks for Selection, Not Perception or Memory: Reading Sentences and Reporting Targets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Mary C.; Wyble, Brad; Olejarczyk, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    In whole report, a sentence presented sequentially at the rate of about 10 words/s can be recalled accurately, whereas if the task is to report only two target words (e.g., red words), the second target suffers an attentional blink if it appears shortly after the first target. If these two tasks are carried out simultaneously, is there an…

  17. Different Attentional Blink Tasks Reflect Distinct Information Processing Limitations: An Individual Differences Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Ashleigh J.; Dux, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    To study the temporal dynamics and capacity-limits of attentional selection and encoding, researchers often employ the attentional blink (AB) phenomenon: subjects' impaired ability to report the second of two targets in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) stream that appear within 200-500 ms of one another. The AB has now been the subject of…

  18. Blinking effect and the use of quantum dots in single molecule spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rombach-Riegraf, Verena; Oswald, Peter; Bienert, Roland; Petersen, Jan; Domingo, M P; Pardo, Julian; Gräber, P; Galvez, E M

    2013-01-01

    Luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots, QD) have unique photo-physical properties: high photostability, brightness and narrow size-tunable fluorescence spectra. Due to their unique properties, QD-based single molecule studies have become increasingly more popular during the last years. However QDs show a strong blinking effect (random and intermittent light emission), which may limit their use in single molecule fluorescence studies. QD blinking has been widely studied and some hypotheses have been done to explain this effect. Here we summarise what is known about the blinking effect in QDs, how this phenomenon may affect single molecule studies and, on the other hand, how the "on"/"off" states can be exploited in diverse experimental settings. In addition, we present results showing that site-directed binding of QD to cysteine residues of proteins reduces the blinking effect. This option opens a new possibility of using QDs to study protein-protein interactions and dynamics by single molecule fluorescence without modifying the chemical composition of the solution or the QD surface.

  19. Eye-Blink Conditioning Is Associated with Changes in Synaptic Ultrastructure in the Rabbit Interpositus Nuclei

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Andrew C. W.; Connor, Steve; Hinchcliff, Richard; LeBoutillier, Janelle C.; Thompson, Richard F.; Petit, Ted L.

    2007-01-01

    Eye-blink conditioning involves the pairing of a conditioned stimulus (usually a tone) to an unconditioned stimulus (air puff), and it is well established that an intact cerebellum and interpositus nucleus, in particular, are required for this form of classical conditioning. Changes in synaptic number or structure have long been proposed as a…

  20. Photoluminescence blinking and carrier dynamics in giant nanocrystals with different electron confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampat, Sid; Guo, Yijun; Vela, Javier; Malko, Anton

    2012-02-01

    Quantum dots have shown great promise as high quantum yield photon sources for applications in bioimaging, LEDs, lasers, etc. However, their photoluminescence (PL) intermittency (blinking) often complicates practical implementations. Recently, a new breed of giant nanocrystal quantum dots (gNQDs) with a large number of shell monolayers (ML) has been developed that show strongly suppressed blinkingootnotetextY. Chen et al., JACS 130, 5026 (2008) and existence of multiexcitons.ootnotetextY.S. Park et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 187401 (2011)^,ootnotetextA. V. Malko et al., Nano Lett., accepted (2011) So far, their PL emission has been limited to around 630nm. In this work, we broadened this approach and extended gNQD emission to shorter wavelength in the visible spectrum. We investigated photostable CdSe/CdS gNQDs with small (480nm emission) core and compared them to large (625nm emission) core non-blinking gNQDs with similar shell thickness (14-17 ML). The small core dots show increased blinking behavior and shorter PL decay times in comparison to large core dots. The observed difference in blinking behavior is suggestive of different carrier confinement regimes leading to enhanced electron trapping at the dot's surface as well as modifications to non-radiative Auger recombination rates.

  1. The Role of the Magnocellular Visual Pathway in the Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Geoffrey W.; Lambeth, Sandra E.; Day, Ross H.; Gould, Ian C.; Castles, Anne E.

    2012-01-01

    Visual attention has temporal limitations. In the attentional blink (AB) a stream of stimuli such as letters or digits are presented to a participant on a computer monitor at a rapid rate. Embedded in the stream are two targets that the participant must try to identify. Identification of the second target is severely impaired if it is presented…

  2. Associative and non-associative blinking in classically conditioned adult rats.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, Derick H; Vogel, Richard W; Steinmetz, Joseph E

    2009-03-01

    Over the last several years, a growing number of investigators have begun using the rat in classical eyeblink conditioning experiments, yet relatively few parametric studies have been done to examine the nature of conditioning in this species. We report here a parametric analysis of classical eyeblink conditioning in the adult rat using two conditioned stimulus (CS) modalities (light or tone) and three interstimulus intervals (ISI; 280, 580, or 880 ms). Rats trained at the shortest ISI generated the highest percentage of conditioned eyeblink responses (CRs) by the end of training. At the two longer ISIs, rats trained with the tone CS produced unusually high CR percentages over the first few acquisition sessions, relative to rats trained with the light CS. Experiment 2 assessed non-associative blink rates in response to presentations of the light or tone, in the absence of the US, at the same ISI durations used in paired conditioning. Significantly more blinks occurred with longer than shorter duration lights or tones. A higher blink rate was also recorded at all three durations during the early tone-alone sessions. The results suggest that early in classical eyeblink conditioning, rats trained with a tone CS may emit a high number of non-associative blinks, thereby inflating the CR frequency reported at this stage of training. PMID:19071146

  3. Spontaneous eye blink rate predicts learning from negative, but not positive, outcomes.

    PubMed

    Slagter, Heleen A; Georgopoulou, Katerina; Frank, Michael J

    2015-05-01

    A large body of research shows that striatal dopamine critically affects the extent to which we learn from the positive and negative outcomes of our decisions. In this study, we examined the relationship between reinforcement learning and spontaneous eye blink rate (sEBR), a cheap, non-invasive, and easy to obtain marker of striatal dopaminergic activity. Based on previous findings from pharmacological and patient studies, our main prediction was that in healthy individuals, low blink rates (and concomitant lower striatal dopamine levels) would be associated with better learning from negative choices, while high blink rates (and concomitant higher striatal dopamine levels) would be associated with learning from positive choices. Behavioral analyses showed that in healthy individuals, lower blink rates were indeed associated with greater learning from negative outcomes, indicating that lower dopamine levels per se may enhance avoidance learning. Yet, higher EBR was not associated with better learning from positive outcomes. These observations support the notion that sEBR reflects tonic dopamine levels, and suggest that sEBR may specifically relate to dopamine D2 receptor function, given the importance of the dopaminergic D2 pathway in avoidance learning. More generally, these findings highlight the usefulness of sEBR as a non-invasive and cheap method for assessing the relationship between striatal dopaminergic function and behavior.

  4. Effects of Affective Stimuli Mode on Eye Blink Rate and Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiner, Elliot A.; Concepcion, Paul

    1975-01-01

    This study investigated the physiological responses to affective visual and auditory stimuli with eye-blink rate (EBR) as the physiological indicator and examined the relationship between this response and subjective anxiety-level ratings by means of Zuckerman and Lubin's Multiple Affect Adjective Check-list (MACCL). (Author)

  5. Attentional Blink in Young People with High-Functioning Autism and Asperger's Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinehart, Nicole; Tonge, Bruce; Brereton, Avril; Bradshaw, John

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the temporal characteristics of information processing in individuals with high-functioning autism and Asperger's disorder using a rapid serial visual presentation paradigm. The results clearly showed that such people demonstrate an attentional blink of similar magnitude to comparison groups. This supports the…

  6. Alteration of Attentional Blink in High Functioning Autism: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amirault, Marion; Etchegoyhen, Kattalin; Delord, Sandrine; Mendizabal, Sandrine; Kraushaar, Caroline; Hesling, Isabelle; Allard, Michele; Bouvard, Manuel; Mayo, Willy

    2009-01-01

    Autism is characterized by deficits in attention. However, no study has investigated the dynamics of attentional processes in autistic patients yet. The attentional blink (AB) paradigm provides information about the temporal dynamics of attention in particular about the allocation and the duration of an attentional episode. We compared 11 high…

  7. Modulation of Attentional Blink with Emotional Faces in Typical Development and in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yerys, Benjamin E.; Ruiz, Ericka; Strang, John; Sokoloff, Jennifer; Kenworthy, Lauren; Vaidya, Chandan J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The attentional blink (AB) phenomenon was used to assess the effect of emotional information on early visual attention in typically developing (TD) children and children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The AB effect is the momentary perceptual unawareness that follows target identification in a rapid serial visual processing…

  8. Visual Search Is Postponed during the Attentional Blink until the System Is Suitably Reconfigured

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghorashi, S. M. Shahab; Smilek, Daniel; Di Lollo, Vincent

    2007-01-01

    J. S. Joseph, M. M. Chun, and K. Nakayama (1997) found that pop-out visual search was impaired as a function of intertarget lag in an attentional blink (AB) paradigm in which the 1st target was a letter and the 2nd target was a search display. In 4 experiments, the present authors tested the implication that search efficiency should be similarly…

  9. Resting EEG in Alpha and Beta Bands Predicts Individual Differences in Attentional Blink Magnitude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLean, Mary H.; Arnell, Karen M.; Cote, Kimberly A.

    2012-01-01

    Accuracy for a second target (T2) is reduced when it is presented within 500 ms of a first target (T1) in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP)--an attentional blink (AB). There are reliable individual differences in the magnitude of the AB. Recent evidence has shown that the attentional approach that an individual typically adopts during a…

  10. Utility of the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure as an admission and outcome measure in interdisciplinary community-based geriatric rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Enemark Larsen, Anette; Carlsson, Gunilla

    2012-03-01

    In a community-based geriatric rehabilitation project, the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) was used to develop a coordinated, interdisciplinary, and client-centred approach focusing on occupational performance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of the COPM as an admission and outcome measure in an interdisciplinary geriatric rehabilitation context in Denmark. Eighteen occupational and physiotherapists administered the COPM among elderly citizens. Of 185 citizens referred to the study, 152 were admitted to rehabilitation based on health indices, and 124 completed the COPM after their admission, identifying 404 occupational performance issues in all. Post-assessment data were obtained from 95 participants and revealed statistically significant positive change (p < 0.001) in both performance and satisfaction with performance. Furthermore the therapists answered a questionnaire evaluating their experiences, showing that they found development in knowledge and community between the professions to benefit both therapists and citizens, and gained a better insight into their clients' everyday lives through the COPM. In conclusion, the COPM may be useful as an admission and outcome measurement for the rehabilitation of elderly citizens; however, aspects of education and administration must be considered before the instrument can be successfully administered in an interdisciplinary geriatric rehabilitation context.

  11. Factors Impacting Student Service Utilization at Ontario Colleges: Key Performance Indicators as a Measure of Success: A Niagara College View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veres, David

    2015-01-01

    Student success in Ontario College is significantly influenced by the utilization of student services. At Niagara College there has been a significant investment in student services as a strategy to support student success. Utilizing existing KPI data, this quantitative research project is aimed at measuring factors that influence both the use of…

  12. PET evidence for a role for striatal dopamine in the attentional blink: functional implications.

    PubMed

    Slagter, Heleen A; Tomer, Rachel; Christian, Bradley T; Fox, Andrew S; Colzato, Lorenza S; King, Carlye R; Murali, Dhanabalan; Davidson, Richard J

    2012-09-01

    Our outside world changes continuously, for example, when driving through traffic. An important question is how our brain deals with this constant barrage of rapidly changing sensory input and flexibly selects only newly goal-relevant information for further capacity-limited processing in working memory. The challenge our brain faces is experimentally captured by the attentional blink (AB): an impairment in detecting the second of two target stimuli presented in close temporal proximity among distracters. Many theories have been proposed to explain this deficit in processing goal-relevant information, with some attributing the AB to capacity limitations related to encoding of the first target and others assigning a critical role to on-line selection mechanisms that control access to working memory. The current study examined the role of striatal dopamine in the AB, given its known role in regulating the contents of working memory. Specifically, participants performed an AB task and their basal level of dopamine D2-like receptor binding was measured using PET and [F-18]fallypride. As predicted, individual differences analyses showed that greater D2-like receptor binding in the striatum was associated with a larger AB, implicating striatal dopamine and mechanisms that control access to working memory in the AB. Specifically, we propose that striatal dopamine may determine the AB by regulating the threshold for working memory updating, providing a testable physiological basis for this deficit in gating rapidly changing visual information. A challenge for current models of the AB lies in connecting more directly to these neurobiological data. PMID:22663253

  13. Post-perceptual processing during the attentional blink is modulated by inter-trial task expectancies

    PubMed Central

    Sy, Jocelyn L.; Elliott, James C.; Giesbrecht, Barry

    2013-01-01

    The selective processing of goal-relevant information depends on an attention system that can flexibly adapt to changing task demands and expectations. Evidence from visual search tasks indicates that the perceptual selectivity of attention increases when the bottom-up demands of the task increase and when the expectations about task demands engendered by trial history are violated. Evidence from studies of the attentional blink (AB), which measures the temporal dynamics of attention, also indicates that perceptual selectivity during the AB is increased if the bottom-up task demands are increased. The present work tested whether expectations about task demands engendered by trial history also modulate perceptual selectivity during the AB. Two experiments tested the extent to which inter-trial switches in task demands reduced post-perceptual processing of targets presented during the AB. Experiment 1 indexed post-perceptual processing using the event-related potential (ERP) technique to isolate the context sensitive N400 ERP component evoked by words presented during the AB. Experiment 2 indexed post-perceptual processing using behavioral performance to determine the extent to which personal names survive the AB. The results of both experiments revealed that both electrophysiological (Exp. 1) and behavioral (Exp. 2) indices of post-perceptual processing were attenuated when consecutive trials differed in terms of their perceptual demands. The results are consistent with the notion that the selectivity of attention during the AB is modulated not only by within-trial task demands, but also can be flexibly determined by trial-by-trial expectations. PMID:24115924

  14. A Hardened CARS System Utilized for Temperature Measurements in a Supersonic Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antcliff, Richard R.; Smith, Michael W.; Jarret, Olin, Jr.; Northam, G. Burton; Cutler, Andrew D.; Taylor, David J.

    1990-01-01

    A coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) system has been hardened for use in a NASA Langley supersonic combustion test cell. The system can obtain temperature cross sections of the flow at three locations. The system is environmentally protected and remotely operated. Measurements were made in a scram-jet combustor model consisting of a rear- ward-facing step, followed by an expansion duct. The duct is nominally 4 feet in length. The free stream conditions were Mach 2, with static pressure which ranged from 0.8 to 1.9 atm, and a static temperature of approximately 800K. Three vertical slots were machined into each side of the duct to allow optical access. The CARS system utilized a planar BOXCARS beam arrangement. This arrangement allowed the laser beams to pass through the vertical slots in the tunnel. Translation stages were utilized to move the focussing volume within the tunnel. These stages allowed complete cross sections to be obtained at each slot location. A fiber optic carried the signal to a remotely located monochrometer and reticon detector.Data for two different flow conditions were taken at each of the three slot locations. These two conditions provided a comparison between reacting and non-reacting mixing of injected hydrogen fuel with the combustion heated supersonic stream.

  15. A hardened CARS system utilized for temperature measurements in a supersonic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antcliff, Richard R.; Smith, Michael W.; Jarrett, Olin, Jr.; Northam, G. Burton; Cutler, Andrew D.

    1991-01-01

    A coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) system has been hardened for utilization in a NASA Langley supersonic combustion test cell that can obtain temperature cross sections of the flow at three locations. This system is remotely operated and environmentally protected. Measurements were obtained in a scramjet combustor model consisting of a rearward-facing step, followed by an expansion duct. The freestream conditions were Mach 2, with static pressure that ranged from 0.8 to 1.9 atm, and a static temperature of about 800 K. Data for two different flow conditions were obtained that provided a comparison between reacting and nonreacting mixing of injected hydrogen fuel with the combustion-heated supersonic stream.

  16. Attofarad resolution capacitance-voltage measurement of nanometer scale field effect transistors utilizing ambient noise.

    PubMed

    Gokirmak, Ali; Inaltekin, Hazer; Tiwari, Sandip

    2009-08-19

    A high resolution capacitance-voltage (C-V) characterization technique, enabling direct measurement of electronic properties at the nanoscale in devices such as nanowire field effect transistors (FETs) through the use of random fluctuations, is described. The minimum noise level required for achieving sub-aF (10(-18) F) resolution, the leveraging of stochastic resonance, and the effect of higher levels of noise are illustrated through simulations. The non-linear DeltaC(gate-source/drain)-V(gate) response of FETs is utilized to determine the inversion layer capacitance (C(inv)) and carrier mobility. The technique is demonstrated by extracting the carrier concentration and effective electron mobility in a nanoscale Si FET with C(inv) = 60 aF. PMID:19636094

  17. Utilizing MRI to measure the transcytolemmal water exchange rate for the rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirk, James D.; Bretthorst, G. Larry; Neil, Jeffrey J.

    2001-05-01

    Understanding the exchange of water between the intra- and extracellular compartments of the brain is important both for understanding basic physiology and for the interpretation of numerous MRI results. However, due to experimental difficulties, this basic property has proven difficult to measure in vivo. In our experiments, we will track overall changes in the relaxation rate constant of water in the rat brain following the administration of gadoteridol, a relaxation agent, to the extracellular compartment. From these changes, we will utilize probability theory and Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations to infer the compartment specific water exchange and relaxation rate constants. Due to the correlated nature of these parameters and our inability to independently observe them, intelligent model selection is critical. Through analysis of simulated data sets, we refine our choice of model and method of data collection to optimize applicability to the in vivo situation.

  18. The utility of automated measures of ocular metrics for detecting driver drowsiness during extended wakefulness.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Melinda L; Kennedy, Gerard A; Clarke, Catherine; Gullo, Melissa; Swann, Philip; Downey, Luke A; Hayley, Amie C; Pierce, Rob J; Howard, Mark E

    2016-02-01

    Slowed eyelid closure coupled with increased duration and frequency of closure is associated with drowsiness. This study assessed the utility of two devices for automated measurement of slow eyelid closure in a standard poor performance condition (alcohol) and following 12-h sleep deprivation. Twenty-two healthy participants (mean age=20.8 (SD 1.9) years) with no history of sleep disorders participated in the study. Participants underwent one baseline and one counterbalanced session each over two weeks; one 24-hour period of sleep deprivation, and one daytime session during which alcohol was consumed after a normal night of sleep. Participants completed a test battery consisting of a 30-min simulated driving task, a 10-min Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT) and the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS) each in two baseline sessions, and in two randomised, counterbalanced experimental sessions; following sleep deprivation and following alcohol consumption. Eyelid closure was measured during both tasks using two automated devices (Copilot and Optalert™). There was an increase in the proportion of time with eyelids closed and the Johns Drowsiness Score (incorporating relative velocity of eyelid movements) following sleep deprivation using Optalert (p<0.05 for both). These measures correlated significantly with crashes, PVT lapses and subjective sleepiness (r-values 0.46-0.69, p<0.05). No difference between the two sessions for PERCLOS recorded during the PVT or the driving task as measured by the Copilot. The duration of eyelid closure predicted frequent lapses following sleep deprivation (which were equivalent to the average lapses at a blood alcohol concentration of 0.05% - area under curve for ROC curve 0.87, p<0.01). The duration of time with slow eyelid closure, assessed by the automated devices, increased following sleep deprivation and was associated with deterioration in psychomotor performance and subjective sleepiness. Comprehensive algorithms inclusive of

  19. Novel design and sensitivity analysis of displacement measurement system utilizing knife edge diffraction for nanopositioning stages.

    PubMed

    Lee, ChaBum; Lee, Sun-Kyu; Tarbutton, Joshua A

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a novel design and sensitivity analysis of a knife edge-based optical displacement sensor that can be embedded with nanopositioning stages. The measurement system consists of a laser, two knife edge locations, two photodetectors, and axillary optics components in a simple configuration. The knife edge is installed on the stage parallel to its moving direction and two separated laser beams are incident on knife edges. While the stage is in motion, the direct transverse and diffracted light at each knife edge is superposed producing interference at the detector. The interference is measured with two photodetectors in a differential amplification configuration. The performance of the proposed sensor was mathematically modeled, and the effect of the optical and mechanical parameters, wavelength, beam diameter, distances from laser to knife edge to photodetector, and knife edge topography, on sensor outputs was investigated to obtain a novel analytical method to predict linearity and sensitivity. From the model, all parameters except for the beam diameter have a significant influence on measurement range and sensitivity of the proposed sensing system. To validate the model, two types of knife edges with different edge topography were used for the experiment. By utilizing a shorter wavelength, smaller sensor distance and higher edge quality increased measurement sensitivity can be obtained. The model was experimentally validated and the results showed a good agreement with the theoretically estimated results. This sensor is expected to be easily implemented into nanopositioning stage applications at a low cost and mathematical model introduced here can be used for design and performance estimation of the knife edge-based sensor as a tool. PMID:25273778

  20. Can we understand, control and use the blinking of quantum dots in biological surroundings?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durisic, Nela

    Semiconductor nanocrystals, also known as quantum dots (QDs), are evoking remarkable technological and scientific interest due to their fascinating size-dependent electronic and optical properties. Many biophysical studies to date have used effectively as brighter and more photostable replacement of organic dyes. In this thesis we focus on the most prominent feature of their photophysical properties, a random switching between emitting and non-emitting states, also known as fluorescence intermittency, or "blinking," in order to better understand the mechanism of quantum dot emission and how it reflects interaction with their immediate environment. We first designed and built a total internal reflection florescent microscope (TIRFM) with single molecule detection capabilities and determined optimal conditions for single QD studies. We then used image correlation techniques to show that the change in blinking dynamics could be detected and that it could complicate interpretation of the commonly used analytical techniques that rely on intensity fluctuations as reporters of particle mobility. In particular, we demonstrated that the transport coefficients recovered from fluorescence fluctuation analysis of diffusional mobility using temporal image correlation spectroscopy (TICS) had significant systematic errors due to blinking of the nanoparticles. We then performed a thorough, systematic study of the effects of protons on QDs' photochemical stability by varying the pH of their aqueous environment and related the single particle properties to properties of an ensemble of QDs. As pH was lowered, shorter "on" times and longer "off" times were observed, brightness of single QDs decreased and the number of permanently non-emitting QDs (dark fraction) increased. Based on these results, we proposed a coupled role for H+ ions by which they first reduced the intensity of the emitting state as well as affected probabilities of the QD to switch between the "on" and "off" states

  1. Utilizing Multidimensional Measures of Race in Education Research: The Case of Teacher Perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Irizarry, Yasmiyn

    2015-01-01

    Education scholarship on race using quantitative data analysis consists largely of studies on the black-white dichotomy, and more recently, on the experiences of student within conventional racial/ethnic categories (white, Hispanic/Latina/o, Asian, black). Despite substantial shifts in the racial and ethnic composition of American children, studies continue to overlook the diverse racialized experiences for students of Asian and Latina/o descent, the racialization of immigration status, and the educational experiences of Native American students. This study provides one possible strategy for developing multidimensional measures of race using large-scale datasets and demonstrates the utility of multidimensional measures for examining educational inequality, using teacher perceptions of student behavior as a case in point. With data from the first grade wave of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Cohort of 1998–1999, I examine differences in teacher ratings of Externalizing Problem Behaviors and Approaches to Learning across fourteen racialized subgroups at the intersections of race, ethnicity, and immigrant status. Results show substantial subgroup variation in teacher perceptions of problem and learning behaviors, while also highlighting key points of divergence and convergence within conventional racial/ethnic categories. PMID:26413559

  2. Quality of Life, Health Status, and Health Service Utilization Related to a New Measure of Health Literacy FLIGHT/VIDAS

    PubMed Central

    Ownby, Raymond L; Acevedo, Amarilis; Jacobs, Robin J.; Caballero, Joshua; Waldrop-Valverde, Drenna

    2014-01-01

    Objective Researchers have identified significant limitations in some currently-used measures of health literacy. The purpose of this paper is to present data on the relation of health-related quality of life, health status, and health service utilization to performance on a new measure of health literacy in a nonpatient population. Methods The new measure was administered to 475 English- and Spanish-speaking community-dwelling volunteers along with existing measures of health literacy and assessments of health-related quality of life, health status, and healthcare service utilization. Relations among measures were assessed via correlations and health status and utilization was tested across levels of health literacy using ANCOVA models. Results The new health literacy measure is significantly related to existing measures of health literacy as well as to participants’ health-related quality of life. Persons with lower levels of health literacy reported more health conditions, more frequent physical symptoms, and greater healthcare service utilization. Conclusion The new measure of health literacy is valid and shows relations to measures of conceptually-related constructs such as quality of life and health behaviors. Practice Implications: FLIGHT/VIDAS may be useful to researchers and clinicians interested in a computer administered and scored measure of health literacy. PMID:24856447

  3. Frequency Matters: Beta Band Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation Induces Parkinsonian-like Blink Abnormalities in Normal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kaminer, Jaime; Thakur, Pratibha; Evinger, Craig

    2014-01-01

    The synchronized beta band oscillations in the basal ganglia-cortical networks in Parkinson's disease (PD) may be responsible for PD motor symptoms or an epiphenomenon of dopamine loss. We investigated the causal role of beta band activity in PD motor symptoms by testing the effects of beta frequency subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) on blink reflex excitability, amplitude, and plasticity in normal rats. Delivering 16 Hz STN DBS produced the same increase in blink reflex excitability and impairment in blink reflex plasticity in normal rats as occurs in rats with 6-OHDA lesions and PD patients. These deficits were not an artifact of STN DBS because when these normal rats received 130 Hz STN DBS, their blink characteristics were the same as without STN DBS. To demonstrate the blink reflex disturbances with 16 Hz STN DBS were frequency specific, we tested the same rats with 7 Hz STN DBS, a theta band frequency typical of dystonia. In contrast to beta stimulation, 7 Hz DBS exaggerated blink reflex plasticity as occurs in focal dystonia. Thus, without destroying dopamine neurons or blocking dopamine receptors, frequency specific STN DBS can be used to create PD- or dystonic-like symptoms in a normal rat. PMID:25146113

  4. Low dimensional temporal organization of spontaneous eye blinks in adults with developmental disabilities and stereotyped movement disorder.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mei-Hua; Bodfish, James W; Lewis, Mark H; Newell, Karl M

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the mean rate and time-dependent sequential organization of spontaneous eye blinks in adults with intellectual and developmental disability (IDD) and individuals from this group who were additionally categorized with stereotypic movement disorder (IDD+SMD). The mean blink rate was lower in the IDD+SMD group than the IDD group and both of these groups had a lower blink rate than a contrast group of healthy adults. In the IDD group the n to n+1 sequential organization over time of the eye-blink durations showed a stronger compensatory organization than the contrast group suggesting decreased complexity/dimensionality of eye-blink behavior. Very low blink rate (and thus insufficient time series data) precluded analysis of time-dependent sequential properties in the IDD+SMD group. These findings support the hypothesis that both IDD and SMD are associated with a reduction in the dimension and adaptability of movement behavior and that this may serve as a risk factor for the expression of abnormal movements.

  5. A framework to utilize turbulent flux measurements for mesoscale models and remote sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babel, W.; Huneke, S.; Foken, T.

    2011-05-01

    Meteorologically measured fluxes of energy and matter between the surface and the atmosphere originate from a source area of certain extent, located in the upwind sector of the device. The spatial representativeness of such measurements is strongly influenced by the heterogeneity of the landscape. The footprint concept is capable of linking observed data with spatial heterogeneity. This study aims at upscaling eddy covariance derived fluxes to a grid size of 1 km edge length, which is typical for mesoscale models or low resolution remote sensing data. Here an upscaling strategy is presented, utilizing footprint modelling and SVAT modelling as well as observations from a target land-use area. The general idea of this scheme is to model fluxes from adjacent land-use types and combine them with the measured flux data to yield a grid representative flux according to the land-use distribution within the grid cell. The performance of the upscaling routine is evaluated with real datasets, which are considered to be land-use specific fluxes in a grid cell. The measurements above rye and maize fields stem from the LITFASS experiment 2003 in Lindenberg, Germany and the respective modelled timeseries were derived by the SVAT model SEWAB. Contributions from each land-use type to the observations are estimated using a forward lagrangian stochastic model. A representation error is defined as the error in flux estimates made when accepting the measurements unchanged as grid representative flux and ignoring flux contributions from other land-use types within the respective grid cell. Results show that this representation error can be reduced up to 56 % when applying the spatial integration. This shows the potential for further application of this strategy, although the absolute differences between flux observations from rye and maize were so small, that the spatial integration would be rejected in a real situation. Corresponding thresholds for this decision have been estimated as

  6. Nitrogen Species in the Post-Pinatubo Stratosphere: Model Analysis Utilizing UARS Measurements. Appendix F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, Michael Y.; Rodriguez, Jose M.; Hu, Wenjie; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Weisenstein, Debra K.; Kumer, John B.; Mergenthaler, John L.; Russell, James M., III; Koike, Makoto; Yue, Glenn K.

    1999-01-01

    We present an analysis of the impact of heterogeneous chemistry on the partitioning of nitrogen species measured by the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) instruments. The UARS measurements utilized include N2O, HNO3, and ClONO2 from the cryogenic limb array etalon spectrometer (CLAES), version 7 (v.7), and temperature, methane, ozone, H2O, HCl, NO and NO2 from the halogen occultation experiment (HALOE), version 18. The analysis is carried out for the UARS data obtained between January 1992 and September 1994 in the 100- to 1-mbar (approx. 17-47 km) altitude range and over 10 deg latitude bins from 70 deg S to 70 deg N. The spatiotemporal evolution of aerosol surface area density (SAD) is adopted from analysis of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II data. A diurnal steady state photochemical box model, constrained by the temperature, ozone, H2O, CH4, aerosol SAD, and columns of O2 and O3 above the point of interest, has been used as the main tool to analyze these data. Total inorganic nitrogen (NOY) is obtained by three different methods: (1) as a sum of the UARS-measured NO, NO2, HNO3, and ClONO2; (2) from the N2O-NOY correlation; and (3) from the CH4-NOY correlation. To validate our current understanding of stratospheric heterogeneous chemistry for post-Pinatubo conditions, the model-calculated monthly averaged NO(x)/NO(y) ratios and the NO, NO2, and HNO3 profiles are compared with the UARS-derived data. In general, the UARS-constrained box model captures the main features of nitrogen species partitioning in the post-Pinatubo years, such as recovery of NO(x) after the eruption, their seasonal variability and vertical profiles. However, the model underestimates the NO2 content, particularly in the 30- to 7-mbar (approx. 23-32 km) range. Comparisons of the calculated temporal behavior of the partial columns of NO2 and HNO3 and ground-based measurements at 45 deg S and 45 deg N are also presented. Our analysis indicates that ground

  7. Nitrogen Species in the Post-Pinatubo Stratosphere: Model Analysis Utilizing UARS Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, Michael Y.; Rodriguez, Jose M.; Hu, Wen-Jie; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Weisenstein, Debra K.; Kumer, John B.; Mergenthaler, John L.; Russel, James M., III; Koike, Makoto; Yue, Glenn K.

    1999-01-01

    We present an analysis of the impact of heterogeneous chemistry on the partitioning of nitrogen species measured by the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) instruments. The UARS measurements utilized include N2O, HNO3, and ClONO2 from the cryogenic limb array etalon spectrometer (CLAES), version 7 (v.7), and temperature, methane, ozone, H2O, HCl, NO and NO2 from the halogen occultation experiment (HALOE), version 18. The analysis is carried out for the UARS data obtained between January 1992 and September 1994 in the 100-to 1-mbar (approx. 17-47 km) altitude range and over 10 degrees latitude bins from 70 S to 70 N. The spatiotemporal evolution of aerosol surface area density (SAD) is adopted from analysis of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II data. A diurnal steady state photochemical box model, constrained by the temperature, ozone, H2O, CH4, aerosol SAD, and columns of O2 and O3 above the point of interest, has been used as the main tool to analyze these data. Total inorganic nitrogen (NOy) is obtained by three different methods: (1) as a sum of the UARS-measured NO, NO2, HNO3, and ClONO2; (2) from the N2O-NOy correlation, and (3) from the CH4-NOy correlation. To validate our current understanding of stratospheric heterogeneous chemistry for post-Pinatubo conditions, the model-calculated monthly averaged NOx/NOy ratios and the NO, NO2, and HNO3 profiles are compared with the UARS-derived data. In general, the UARS-constrained box model captures the main features of nitrogen species partitioning in the post-Pinatubo years, such as recovery of NOx after the eruption, their seasonal variability and vertical profiles. However, the model underestimates the NO2 content, particularly in the 30- to 7-mbar (approx.23-32 km) range. Comparisons of the calculated temporal behavior of the partial columns of NO2 and HNO3 and ground-based measurements at 45 S and 45 N are also presented. Our analysis indicates that ground-based and HALOE v.18

  8. Nitrogen Species in the Post-Pinatubo Stratosphere: Model Analysis Utilizing UARS Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, M. Y.; Rodriquez, J. M.; Hu, W.; Ko, M. K. W.; Weisenstein, D. K.; Mergenthaler, J. L.; Russell, J. M., III; Koike, M.; Yue, G. K.

    1998-01-01

    We present an analysis of the impact of heterogeneous chemistry on the partitioning of nitrogen species measured by the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) instruments. The UARS measurements utilized include: N2O, HNO3 and ClONO2 (Cryogen Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES), version 7), temperature, methane, ozone, H2O, HCl, NO and NO2 (HALogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE), version 18). The analysis is carried out for the data from January 1992 to September 1994 in the 100-1 mbar (approx.17-47 km) altitude range and over 10 degree latitude bins from 70degS to 70degN. Temporal-spatial evolution of aerosol surface area density (SAD) is adopted according to the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) 11 data. A diurnal steady-state photochemical box model, constrained by the temperature, ozone, H2O, CH4, aerosol SAD and columns of O2 and O3 above the point of interest, has been used as the main tool to analyze these data. Total inorganic nitrogen (NO(y)) is obtained by three different methods: (1) as a sum of the UARS measured NO, NO2, HNO3, and ClONO2; (2) from the N2O-NO(y) correlation, and (3) from the CH4-NO(y) correlation. To validate our current understanding of stratospheric heterogeneous chemistry for post-Pinatubo conditions, the model-calculated NO(x)/NO(y) ratios and the NO, NO2, and HNO3 profiles are compared to the UARS-derived data. In general, the UARS-constrained box model captures the main features of nitrogen species partitioning in the post-Pinatubo years. However, the model underestimates the NO2 content, particularly, in the 30-7 mbar (approx. 23-32 km) range. Comparisons of the calculated temporal behavior of the partial columns of NO2 and HNO3 and ground based measurements at 45degS and 45degN are also presented. Our analysis indicates that ground-based and HALOE v. 18 measurements of the NO2 vertical columns are consistent within the range of their uncertainties and are systematically higher (up to 50%) than the model

  9. Nitrogen Species in the Post-Pinatubo Stratosphere: Model Analysis Utilizing UARS Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, M. Y.; Rodriguez, J. M.; Hu, W.; Ko, M. K. W.; Weisenstein, D. K.; Kumer, J. B.; Mergenthaler, J. L.; Russell, J. M., III; Koike, M.; Yue, G. K.

    1998-01-01

    We present an analysis of the impact of heterogeneous chemistry on the partitioning of nitrogen species measured by the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) instruments. The UARS measurements utilized include: N2O, HNO3 and ClONO2 (Cryogen Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES), version 7), temperature, methane, ozone, H2O, HCI, NO and NO2 (HALogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE), version 18). The analysis is carried out for the data from January 1992 to September 1994 in the 100-1 mbar (approximately 17-47 km) altitude range and over 10 degree latitude bins from 70 deg S to 70 deg N. Temporal-spatial evolution of aerosol surface area density (SAD) is adopted according to the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II data. A diurnal steady-state photochemical box model, constrained by the temperature, ozone, H2O, CH4, aerosol SAD and columns of O2 and O3 above the point of interest, has been used as the main tool to analyze these data. Total inorganic nitrogen (NOy) is obtained by three different methods: (1) as a sum of the UARS measured NO, NO2, HNO3, and CIONO2; (2) from the N2O-NOy correlation, (3) from the CH4-NOy correlation. To validate our current understanding of stratospheric heterogeneous chemistry for post-Pinatubo conditions, the model-calculated NOx/NOy ratios and the NO, NO2, and HNO3 profiles are compared to the UARS-derived data. In general, the UARS-constrained box model captures the main features of nitrogen species partitioning in the post-Pinatubo years. However, the model underestimates the NO2 content, particularly, in the 30-7 mbar (approximately 23-32 km) range. Comparisons of the calculated temporal behavior of the partial columns of NO2 and HNO3 and ground based measurements at 45 deg S and 45 deg N are also presented. Our analysis indicates that ground-based and HALOE v.18 measurements of the NO2 vertical columns are consistent within the range of their uncertainties and are systematically higher (up to 50%) than the model

  10. The influence of stimulus sex and emotional expression on the attentional blink.

    PubMed

    Stebbins, Hilary E; Vanous, Jesse B

    2015-08-01

    Past studies have demonstrated that angry faces used as the first target (T1) in an attentional blink paradigm interfere with processing of a second, neutral target (T2). However, despite research that suggests that the sex and emotional expression of a face are confounded, no study has investigated whether the sex of a stimulus might interact with emotional expression to influence the attentional blink. In the current study, both the sex and emotional expression of a T1 stimulus were manipulated to assess participants' ability to report the presences of a subsequent neutral target. Although the findings revealed limited evidence to support an interaction between sex and emotion, both the sex and emotional expression of the T1 stimulus were found to independently affect reporting of T2. These findings suggest that both emotional expression and stimulus sex are important in the temporal allocation of attentional resources to faces.

  11. Quantum-confined emission and fluorescence blinking of individual exciton complexes in CdSe nanowires.

    PubMed

    Franz, Dennis; Reich, Aina; Strelow, Christian; Wang, Zhe; Kornowski, Andreas; Kipp, Tobias; Mews, Alf

    2014-11-12

    One-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures combine electron mobility in length direction with the possibility of tailoring the physical properties by confinement effects in radial direction. Here we show that thin CdSe quantum nanowires exhibit low-temperature fluorescence spectra with a specific universal structure of several sharp lines. The structure strongly resembles the pattern of bulk spectra but show a diameter-dependent shift due to confinement effects. Also the fluorescence shows a pronounced complex blinking behavior with very different blinking dynamics of different emission lines in one and the same spectrum. Time- and space-resolved optical spectroscopy are combined with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy of the very same quantum nanowires to establish a detailed structure-property relationship. Extensive numerical simulations strongly suggest that excitonic complexes involving donor and acceptor sites are the origin of the feature-rich spectra.

  12. Eliminating the Attentional Blink through Binaural Beats: A Case for Tailored Cognitive Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Reedijk, Susan A.; Bolders, Anne; Colzato, Lorenza S.; Hommel, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing human cognitive performance is a topic that continues to spark scientific interest. Studies into cognitive-enhancement techniques often fail to take inter-individual differences into account, however, which leads to underestimation of the effectiveness of these techniques. The current study investigated the effect of binaural beats, a cognitive-enhancement technique, on attentional control in an attentional blink (AB) task. As predicted from a neurocognitive approach to cognitive control, high-frequency binaural beats eliminated the AB, but only in individuals with low spontaneous eye-blink rates (indicating low striatal dopamine levels). This suggests that the way in which cognitive-enhancement techniques, such as binaural beats, affect cognitive performance depends on inter-individual differences. PMID:26089802

  13. Effects of monotherapy and polytherapy on the blink reflex in epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Lancman, M E; Cristiano, E; Golimstok, A; Granillo, R J

    1993-01-01

    We performed the blink reflex (BR) in 20 normal volunteers, 13 epileptic patients receiving antiepileptic drug (AED) monotherapy, and 13 epileptic patients receiving AED polytherapy. Comparison of R1, ipsilateral and contralateral R2 and VIIth nerve latencies in the three groups showed no statistically significant differences R1 and VIIth nerve latencies among the three groups. There were statistically significant differences between the polytherapy group and the monotherapy and control groups in comparisons of ipsilateral and contralateral R2. There were no significant differences between the monotherapy group and the control group for ipsilateral and contralateral R2. We hypothesized that AED polytherapy might interfere with synaptic transmission in the polysynaptic pathway of the blink reflex, prolonging the latency of R2. These results provide further evidence of the pathophysiologic effects associated with polytherapy in epileptic patients.

  14. Task-Set Reconfiguration Suspends Perceptual Processing: Evidence from Semantic Priming during the Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vachon, Francois; Tremblay, Sebastien; Jones, Dylan M.

    2007-01-01

    When two visual targets, Target 1 (T1) and Target 2 (T2), are presented among a rapid sequence of distractors, processing of T1 produces an attentional blink. Typically, processing of T2 is markedly impaired, except when T1 and T2 are adjacent (Lag 1 sparing). However, if a shift of task set--a change in task requirements from T1 to T2--occurs,…

  15. Multimodality evoked potentials and electrically elicited blink reflex in optic neuritis.

    PubMed

    Tackmann, W; Ettlin, T; Strenge, H

    1982-01-01

    Pattern shift visual evoked potentials, brain stem auditory evoked potentials, spinal and scalp recorded somatosensory evoked potentials, and electrically elicited blink reflexes were investigated in 32 patients with isolated optic neuritis. Eleven patients were shown to have one additional lesion in the central nervous system outside the optic nerve. Therefore, cases with optic neuritis of unknown origin should be considered as possible cases of multiple sclerosis. PMID:6181223

  16. The Predictive Utility of a Brief Kindergarten Screening Measure of Child Behavior Problems

    PubMed Central

    Racz, Sarah Jensen; King, Kevin M.; Wu, Johnny; Witkiewitz, Katie; McMahon, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Kindergarten teacher ratings, such as those from the Teacher Observation of Classroom Adaptation–Revised (TOCA-R), are a promising cost- and time-effective screening method to identify children at risk for later problems. Previous research with the TOCA-R has been mainly limited to outcomes in a single domain measured during elementary school. The goal of the current study was to examine the ability of TOCA-R sum scores to predict outcomes in multiple domains across distinct developmental periods (i.e., late childhood, middle adolescence, late adolescence). Method We used data from the Fast Track Project, a large multisite study with children at risk for conduct problems (n = 752; M age at start of study = 6.55 years; 57.7% male; 49.9% Caucasian, 46.3% African American). Kindergarten TOCA-R sum scores were used as the predictor in regression analyses; outcomes included school difficulties, externalizing diagnoses and symptom counts, and substance use. Results TOCA-R sum scores predicted school outcomes at all time points, diagnosis of ADHD in 9th grade, several externalizing disorder symptom counts, and cigarette use in 12th grade. Conclusions The findings demonstrate the predictive utility of the TOCA-R when examining outcomes within the school setting. Therefore, these results suggest the 10-item TOCA-R may provide a quick and accurate screening of children at risk for later problems. Implications for prevention and intervention programs are discussed. PMID:23544679

  17. Effects of Visual Cortex Activation on the Nociceptive Blink Reflex in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Sava, Simona L.; de Pasqua, Victor; Magis, Delphine; Schoenen, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Bright light can cause excessive visual discomfort, referred to as photophobia. The precise mechanisms linking luminance to the trigeminal nociceptive system supposed to mediate this discomfort are not known. To address this issue in healthy human subjects we modulated differentially visual cortex activity by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) or flash light stimulation, and studied the effect on supraorbital pain thresholds and the nociceptive-specific blink reflex (nBR). Low frequency rTMS that inhibits the underlying cortex, significantly decreased pain thresholds, increased the 1st nBR block ipsi- and contralaterally and potentiated habituation contralaterally. After high frequency or sham rTMS over the visual cortex, and rMS over the right greater occipital nerve we found no significant change. By contrast, excitatory flash light stimulation increased pain thresholds, decreased the 1st nBR block of ipsi- and contralaterally and increased habituation contralaterally. Our data demonstrate in healthy subjects a functional relation between the visual cortex and the trigeminal nociceptive system, as assessed by the nociceptive blink reflex. The results argue in favour of a top-down inhibitory pathway from the visual areas to trigemino-cervical nociceptors. We postulate that in normal conditions this visuo-trigeminal inhibitory pathway may avoid disturbance of vision by too frequent blinking and that hypoactivity of the visual cortex for pathological reasons may promote headache and photophobia. PMID:24936654

  18. TRPM8 is a neuronal osmosensor that regulates eye blinking in mice

    PubMed Central

    Quallo, Talisia; Vastani, Nisha; Horridge, Elisabeth; Gentry, Clive; Parra, Andres; Moss, Sian; Viana, Felix; Belmonte, Carlos; Andersson, David A.; Bevan, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Specific peripheral sensory neurons respond to increases in extracellular osmolality but the mechanism responsible for excitation is unknown. Here we show that small increases in osmolality excite isolated mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons expressing the cold-sensitive TRPM8 channel (transient receptor potential channel, subfamily M, member 8). Hyperosmotic responses were abolished by TRPM8 antagonists, and were absent in DRG and TG neurons isolated from Trpm8−/− mice. Heterologously expressed TRPM8 was activated by increased osmolality around physiological levels and inhibited by reduced osmolality. Electrophysiological studies in a mouse corneal preparation demonstrated that osmolality regulated the electrical activity of TRPM8-expressing corneal afferent neurons. Finally, the frequency of eye blinks was reduced in Trpm8−/− compared with wild-type mice and topical administration of a TRPM8 antagonist reduced blinking in wild-type mice. Our findings identify TRPM8 as a peripheral osmosensor responsible for the regulation of normal eye-blinking in mice. PMID:25998021

  19. Modified power law behavior in quantum dot blinking: a novel role for biexcitons and auger ionization.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Jeffrey J; Nesbitt, David J

    2009-01-01

    Single photon detection methods are used to acquire fluorescence trajectories from single CdSe/ZnS colloidal quantum dots (QDs) and analyze their blinking behavior. Although the "off-time" distributions follow ideal power law behavior at all wavelengths and intensities, significant deviations from power law behavior are observed for the "on-times". Specifically, with improved time resolution, trajectory durations, and photon statistics, we report a near-exponential falloff of on-time probability distributions at long times. Investigation of this falloff behavior as a function of laser wavelength and power demonstrate that these deviations originate from multiexciton dynamics, whose formation probabilities can be very low on a "per laser pulse" basis, but become nearly unity on the time scales of the longest on-times. The near quadratic, power-dependent results indicate the predominant role of biexcitons in the long time on-to-off blinking dynamics, which can be interpreted in terms of an Auger ionization event. In conjunction with Poisson modeling of the photon statistics, the data is consistent with QD ionization efficiencies of order approximately 10(-5) and highlight a novel role for biexcitons and Auger ionization in QD blinking.

  20. Effects of visual cortex activation on the nociceptive blink reflex in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Sava, Simona L; de Pasqua, Victor; Magis, Delphine; Magis, Delphine; Schoenen, Jean; Schoenen, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Bright light can cause excessive visual discomfort, referred to as photophobia. The precise mechanisms linking luminance to the trigeminal nociceptive system supposed to mediate this discomfort are not known. To address this issue in healthy human subjects we modulated differentially visual cortex activity by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) or flash light stimulation, and studied the effect on supraorbital pain thresholds and the nociceptive-specific blink reflex (nBR). Low frequency rTMS that inhibits the underlying cortex, significantly decreased pain thresholds, increased the 1st nBR block ipsi- and contralaterally and potentiated habituation contralaterally. After high frequency or sham rTMS over the visual cortex, and rMS over the right greater occipital nerve we found no significant change. By contrast, excitatory flash light stimulation increased pain thresholds, decreased the 1st nBR block of ipsi- and contralaterally and increased habituation contralaterally. Our data demonstrate in healthy subjects a functional relation between the visual cortex and the trigeminal nociceptive system, as assessed by the nociceptive blink reflex. The results argue in favour of a top-down inhibitory pathway from the visual areas to trigemino-cervical nociceptors. We postulate that in normal conditions this visuo-trigeminal inhibitory pathway may avoid disturbance of vision by too frequent blinking and that hypoactivity of the visual cortex for pathological reasons may promote headache and photophobia. PMID:24936654

  1. Tritium-helium dating in the sargasso sea: a measurement of oxygen utilization rates.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, W J

    1977-04-15

    The newly developed technique of "tritium-helium dating" has been used to investigate in situ rates of oceanic oxygen utilization. As an example, an apparent oxygen utilization rate of 0.20 +/- 0.02 milliliter per liter of water per year has been obtained for the Subtropical Mode water (18 degrees C water) in the Sargasso Sea.

  2. 43 CFR 3275.15 - How accurately must I measure my production and utilization?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... production and utilization? 3275.15 Section 3275.15 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000... production and utilization? It depends on whether you use a meter to calculate Federal production or...

  3. Comparison and Relative Utility of Inequality Measurements: As Applied to Scotland’s Child Dental Health

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Yvonne I.; McMahon, Alex D.; Macpherson, Lorna M. D.

    2013-01-01

    This study compared and assessed the utility of tests of inequality on a series of very large population caries datasets. National cross-sectional caries datasets for Scotland’s 5-year-olds in 1993/94 (n = 5,078); 1995/96 (n = 6,240); 1997/98 (n = 6,584); 1999/00 (n = 6,781); 2002/03 (n = 9,747); 2003/04 (n = 10,956); 2005/06 (n = 10,945) and 2007/08 (n = 12,067) were obtained. Outcomes were based on the d3mft metric (i.e. the number of decayed, missing and filled teeth). An area-based deprivation category (DepCat) measured the subjects’ socioeconomic status (SES). Simple absolute and relative inequality, Odds Ratios and the Significant Caries Index (SIC) as advocated by the World Health Organization were calculated. The measures of complex inequality applied to data were: the Slope Index of Inequality (absolute) and a variety of relative inequality tests i.e. Gini coefficient; Relative Index of Inequality; concentration curve; Koolman & Doorslaer’s transformed Concentration Index; Receiver Operator Curve and Population Attributable Risk (PAR). Additional tests used were plots of SIC deciles (SIC10) and a Scottish Caries Inequality Metric (SCIM10). Over the period, mean d3mft improved from 3.1(95%CI 3.0–3.2) to 1.9(95%CI 1.8–1.9) and d3mft = 0% from 41.1(95%CI 39.8–42.3) to 58.3(95%CI 57.8–59.7). Absolute simple and complex inequality decreased. Relative simple and complex inequality remained comparatively stable. Our results support the use of the SII and RII to measure complex absolute and relative SES inequalities alongside additional tests of complex relative inequality such as PAR and Koolman and Doorslaer’s transformed CI. The latter two have clear interpretations which may influence policy makers. Specialised dental metrics (i.e. SIC, SIC10 and SCIM10) permit the exploration of other important inequalities not determined by SES, and could be applied to many other types of disease where ranking of morbidity

  4. Direct measurement of off-state trapping rate fluctuations in single quantum dot fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Cordones, Amy A; Bixby, Teresa J; Leone, Stephen R

    2011-08-10

    Fluorescence decay times measured during the off-state of single CdSe/ZnS quantum dot blinking are found to decrease with increasing off-state duration, contradicting the charging model widely considered to explain the blinking phenomenon. The change in the nonradiative process of a short off-state duration compared to a long one is investigated here through simultaneous measurement of fluorescence decay and blinking behavior. The results are investigated in the framework of two models based on fluctuating trapping rates.

  5. Non-blinking (Zn)CuInS/ZnS Quantum Dots Prepared by In Situ Interfacial Alloying Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Aidi; Dong, Chaoqing; Li, Liang; Yin, Jinjin; Liu, Heng; Huang, Xiangyi; Ren, Jicun

    2015-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are very important optical nanomaterials with a wide range of potential applications. However, blinking behavior of single QD is an intrinsic drawback for some biological and photoelectric applications based on single-particle emission. Herein we present a rational strategy for fabrication of non-blinking (Zn)CuInS/ZnS QDs in organic phase through in situ interfacial alloying approach. This new strategy includes three steps: synthesis of CuInS QDs, eliminating the interior traps of QDs by forming graded (Zn)CuInS alloyed QDs, modifying the surface traps of QDs by introducing ZnS shells onto (Zn)CuInS QDs using alkylthiols as sulfur source and surface ligands. The suppressed blinking mechanism was mainly attributed to modifying QDs traps from interior to exterior via a step-by-step modification. Non-blinking QDs show high quantum yield, symmetric emission spectra and excellent crystallinity, and will enable applications from biology to optoelectronics that were previously hindered by blinking behavior of traditional QDs. PMID:26458511

  6. Non-blinking (Zn)CuInS/ZnS Quantum Dots Prepared by In Situ Interfacial Alloying Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Aidi; Dong, Chaoqing; Li, Liang; Yin, Jinjin; Liu, Heng; Huang, Xiangyi; Ren, Jicun

    2015-10-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are very important optical nanomaterials with a wide range of potential applications. However, blinking behavior of single QD is an intrinsic drawback for some biological and photoelectric applications based on single-particle emission. Herein we present a rational strategy for fabrication of non-blinking (Zn)CuInS/ZnS QDs in organic phase through in situ interfacial alloying approach. This new strategy includes three steps: synthesis of CuInS QDs, eliminating the interior traps of QDs by forming graded (Zn)CuInS alloyed QDs, modifying the surface traps of QDs by introducing ZnS shells onto (Zn)CuInS QDs using alkylthiols as sulfur source and surface ligands. The suppressed blinking mechanism was mainly attributed to modifying QDs traps from interior to exterior via a step-by-step modification. Non-blinking QDs show high quantum yield, symmetric emission spectra and excellent crystallinity, and will enable applications from biology to optoelectronics that were previously hindered by blinking behavior of traditional QDs.

  7. USING RESPIROMETRY TO MEASURE HYDROGEN UTILIZATION IN SULFATE REDUCING BACTERIA IN THE PRESENCE OF COPPER AND ZINC

    EPA Science Inventory

    A respirometric method has been developed to measure hydrogen utilization by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). One application of this method has been to test inhibitory metals effects on the SRB culture used in a novel acid mine drainage treatment technology. As a control param...

  8. Suppressed blinking and auger recombination in near-infrared type-II InP/CdS nanocrystal quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Allison M; Mangum, Benjamin D; Piryatinski, Andrei; Park, Young-Shin; Hannah, Daniel C; Casson, Joanna L; Williams, Darrick J; Schaller, Richard D; Htoon, Han; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A

    2012-11-14

    Nonblinking excitonic emission from near-infrared and type-II nanocrystal quantum dots (NQDs) is reported for the first time. To realize this unusual degree of stability at the single-dot level, novel InP/CdS core/shell NQDs were synthesized for a range of shell thicknesses (~1-11 monolayers of CdS). Ensemble spectroscopy measurements (photoluminescence peak position and radiative lifetimes) and electronic structure calculations established the transition from type-I to type-II band alignment in these heterostructured NQDs. More significantly, single-NQD studies revealed clear evidence for blinking suppression that was not strongly shell-thickness dependent, while photobleaching and biexciton lifetimes trended explicitly with extent of shelling. Specifically, very long biexciton lifetimes-up to >7 ns-were obtained for the thickest-shell structures, indicating dramatic suppression of nonradiative Auger recombination. This new system demonstrates that electronic structure and shell thickness can be employed together to effect control over key single-dot and ensemble NQD photophysical properties.

  9. Utilizing Precision Teaching To Measure Growth of Reading Comprehension Skills in Low Achieving Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nitti, Joanne M.

    A practicum addressed the problem of reading comprehension skills in low achieving students by monitoring their progress utilizing precision teaching. Based on referrals from classroom teachers, guidance counselors, and parents, five students ranging in ability levels from kindergarten through grade 8 were accepted into the program for one or more…

  10. Temporal correlation of blinking events in CdSe/ZnS and Si/SiO2 nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruhn, Benjamin; Qejvanaj, Fatjon; Gregorkiewicz, Tom; Linnros, Jan

    2014-11-01

    Well passivated single Si/SiO2 nanoparticles obey mono-exponential blinking statistics, whereas CdSe/ZnS quantum dots follow an apparent (truncated) power-law. Log-normal distributions are found to describe the interval length histograms at least as well as power-laws, while at the same time being more physically feasible and significantly easing the determination of the exponential cutoff in the ON-time distribution. The correlation of an ON- (OFF-)interval with its temporally displaced ON (OFF) neighbors, as well as that of intermixed intervals (ON with OFF and OFF with ON neighbors) has been studied. As expected from purely random processes, the correlation coefficients for events in silicon nanocrystals equal zero, whereas positive correlations between the pure and negative correlations between the mixed states in CdSe quantum dots hint at a switching process between two distinct blinking regimes that are slower than the blinking itself.

  11. Eye blink artifact rejection in single-channel electroencephalographic signals by complete ensemble empirical mode decomposition and independent component analysis.

    PubMed

    Kanoga, Suguru; Mitsukura, Yasue

    2015-01-01

    To study an eye blink artifact rejection scheme from single-channel electroencephalographic (EEG) signals has been now a major challenge in the field of EEG signal processing. High removal performance is still needed to more strictly investigate pattern of EEG features. This paper proposes a new eye blink artifact rejection scheme from single-channel EEG signals by combining complete ensemble empirical mode decomposition (CEEMD) and independent component analysis (ICA). We compare the separation performance of our proposed scheme with existing schemes (wavelet-ICA, EMD-ICA, and EEMD-ICA) though real-life data by using signal-to-noise ratio. As a result, CEEMD-ICA showed high performance (11.86 dB) than all other schemes (10.78, 10.59, and 11.30 dB) in the ability of eye blink artifact removal.

  12. Light-assisted non-Poissonian fluorescence blinking from bosonic composite reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Budini, Adrian A.

    2007-08-15

    Single fluorophore systems attached to complex hosting molecules may exhibit a light-assisted fluorescence blinking phenomenon between two or more different intensity states whose sojourn statistic depends on the pumping laser intensity and also may depart from an exponential law. In contrast with standard phenomenological models, here we demonstrate that such kind of radiation patterns can be microscopically derived and characterized by describing the fluorophore decay through a composite reservoir where quantum degrees of freedom associated to the host molecule mediate the interaction between the fluorophore and a bosonic bath associated to its natural decay.

  13. Reduced blinking behavior of single 2-mercapto ethanol capped CdTe quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Abhijit; Tamai, Naoto

    2013-11-01

    Water soluble small size CdTe QDs were synthesized by using 2-mercapto ethanol (2ME) as stabilizer. The optimum size of QDs was obtained after certain time of reflux. Synthesized 2ME capped CdTe QDs show large Stokes shifted photoluminescence. At the single particle detection level, 2ME capped CdTe QDs showed reduced blinking behavior compared to that of TGA capped CdTe QDs. These results indicate that the thiol moiety of 2ME, which is a strong electron donor, saturated the surface traps with electrons, preventing the traps from accepting the Auger ionized electrons from the core of CdTe QD.

  14. Two color blinking of single strain-induced GaAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Bertram, D.; Hanna, M.C.; Nozik, A.J.

    1999-05-01

    In this letter we report on a temporal instability in the ground and excited state luminescence of a single strain-induced quantum dot. Using a microscopic photoluminescence technique, we record spectra from a single strain-induced quantum dot in the GaAs/(AlGa)As material system. On a time scale of seconds the luminescence shows an increase and decrease in intensity with an increase of the ground state luminescence correlating with a decrease in the excited state luminescence intensity and vice versa. We term the observed effect two color blinking. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Solution control of radiative and nonradiative lifetimes: a novel contribution to quantum dot blinking suppression.

    PubMed

    Fomenko, Vasiliy; Nesbitt, David J

    2008-01-01

    Time-correlated single photon counting methods are used with confocal microscopy and maximum likelihood estimation analysis to obtain fluorescence lifetime trajectories for single quantum dots with KHz update rates. This technique reveals that control of the solution environment can influence both radiative (k(rad)) and nonradiative (k(nonrad)) pathways for electron-hole recombination emission in a single quantum dot and provides a novel contribution mechanism to nearly complete suppression of quantum dot blinking, specifically by an increase in k(rad*).

  16. Measurement of patient-derived utility values for periodontal health using a multi-attribute scale.

    PubMed

    Bellamy, C A; Brickley, M R; McAndrew, R

    1996-09-01

    Periodontal health states are difficult to quantify and no formal scale quantifying patients' utilities for periodontal health states exits. Multi-attribute utility (MAU) techniques were used to develop such a scale. The MAU scale may be used to quantify patients' assessment of their current periodontal health and that of possible treatment outcomes. Such data, combined with probability values in formal decision analysis techniques would result in improved rationality of treatment planning for periodontal disease. 20 patients attending for routine undergraduate care were interviewed. Data from these interviews were sorted into groups of common interest (domains). Intra-domain health statements were complied from the interview content. 21 patients ranked the intra-domain statements on a scale of 0-100. This same group of patients also performed an inter-domain weighting. Mean results showed that patients were 2X as concerned with how they felt and with the prognosis of possible outcomes, than with how they looked and what facts they knew about their oral health. However, the real value of utilities research lies in application of individual results to treatment planning as there is a wide range of opinion regarding outcome health states. PMID:8891929

  17. Blinking suppression in CdSe/ZnS single quantum dots by TiO2 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Morihiko; Nakanishi, Shunsuke; Itoh, Tamitake; Ishikawa, Mitsuru; Biju, Vasudevanpillai

    2010-08-24

    The photoluminescence of semiconductor quantum dots and fluorescence of single molecules intermittently turn ON and OFF, a phenomenon referred to as blinking. In quantum dots, blinking occurs as a result of intermittent Auger ionization, which results in the formation of positively charged quantum dots. Due to strong Coulombic interactions, successive photoactivation of a charged quantum dot results in nonradiative carrier recombination, inducing long-lived OFF states in the intensity trajectories. Blinking is an undesirable property with respect to applications of quantum dots toward single-molecule imaging and single-photon logic devices. Here we report significant blinking suppression for CdSe/ZnS single quantum dots in the presence of TiO(2) nanoparticles. In this work, we continuously recorded photoluminescence intensity trajectories of single quantum dots with and without TiO(2) nanoparticles. Interestingly, the intensity trajectory of a single quantum dot that was covalently tethered on a cover glass and dipped in water resulted in near-complete blinking suppression as soon as a TiO(2) nanoparticle solution was introduced. The blinking suppression was associated with a decrease in the photoluminescence intensity but without considerable changes in the photoluminescence lifetime, indicating that nonradiative carrier recombination in quantum dots was channeled into electron transfer to TiO(2) nanoparticles and back electron transfer to quantum dots. On the basis of these experiments and recent reports on photoinduced electron transfer from quantum dots to TiO(2) nanoparticles, we hypothesize that blinking of a quantum dot can be suppressed by increasing the rate of nonradiative regeneration of its neutral state by interfacing with a well-defined charge carrier trap such as an electron acceptor, which accepts an electron during Auger ionization and neutralizes the charged quantum dot by back electron transfer. Correlation between blinking suppression and

  18. Oral Administration of Royal Jelly Restores Tear Secretion Capacity in Rat Blink-Suppressed Dry Eye Model by Modulating Lacrimal Gland Function

    PubMed Central

    Imada, Toshihiro; Nakamura, Shigeru; Kitamura, Naoki; Shibuya, Izumi; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Tears are secreted from the lacrimal gland (LG), a dysfunction in which induces dry eye, resulting in ocular discomfort and visual impairment. Honey bee products are used as a nutritional source in daily life and medicine; however, little is known about their effects on dry eye. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of honey bee products on tear secretion capacity in dry eye. We selected raw honey, propolis, royal jelly (RJ), pollen, or larva from commercially available honey bee products. Tear secretion capacity was evaluated following the oral administration of each honey bee product in a rat blink-suppressed dry eye model. Changes in tear secretion, LG ATP content, and LG mitochondrial levels were measured. RJ restored the tear secretion capacity and decrease in LG ATP content and mitochondrial levels to the largest extent. Royal jelly can be used as a preventative intervention for dry eye by managing tear secretion capacity in the LG. PMID:25243778

  19. What Ambulatory Care Managers Need to Know About Examination Room Utilization Measurement and Analysis.

    PubMed

    Klarich, Mark J; Rea, Ronald W; Lal, Tarun Mohan; Garcia, Angel L; Steffens, Fay L

    2016-01-01

    Demand for ambulatory care visits is projected to increase 22% between 2008 and 2025. Given this growth, ambulatory care managers need to proactively plan for efficient use of scarce resources (ie, space, equipment, and staff). One important component of ambulatory care space (the number of examination rooms) is dependent on multiple factors, including variation in demand, hours of operation, scheduling, and staff. The authors (1) outline common data collection methods, (2) highlight analysis and reporting considerations for examination room utilization, and (3) provide a strategic framework for short- and long-term decision making for facility design or renovation. PMID:27232683

  20. Measurement of Peak Esophageal Luminal Cross Sectional Area Utilizing Nadir Intraluminal Impedance

    PubMed Central

    Zifan, Ali; Ledgerwood-Lee, Melissa; Mittal, Ravinder K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII) is currently used to monitor gastroesophageal reflux and esophageal bolus clearance. We describe a novel methodology to measure maximal luminal CSA during bolus transport from MII measurements. METHODS Studies were conducted in-vitro (test tubes) and in-vivo (healthy subjects). Concurrent MII, HRM, and intraluminal ultrasound (US) were recorded 7 cm above the lower esophageal sphincter. Swallows with two concentrations of saline, 0.1N and 0.5N, of bolus volumes 5cc, 10cc and 15cc were performed. The CSA was estimated by solving two algebraic Ohm’s law equations, resulting from the two saline solutions. The CSA calculated from impedance method was compared with the CSA measured from the intraluminal US images. KEY RESULTS The CSA measured in duplicate from B-mode US images showed a mean difference between the two manual delineations to be near zero, and the repeatability coefficient was within 7.7% of the mean of the two CSA measurements. The calculated CSA from the impedance measurements strongly correlated with the US measured CSA (R2 ≅ 0.98). A detailed statistical analysis of the impedance and US measured CSA data indicated that the 95% limits of agreement between the two methods ranged from −9.1 to 13mm2. The root mean square error (RMS) of the two measurements was 4.8% of the mean US-measured CSA. CONCLUSIONS We describe a novel methodology to measure peak esophageal luminal CSA during peristalsis. Further studies are needed to determine if it is possible to measure patterns of luminal distension during peristalsis across the entire length of the esophagus. PMID:25930157

  1. The utility of surface magnetic field measurements in the MAGSAT program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.; Fabiano, E. B.; Mead, G. D.

    1978-01-01

    To take full advantage of the global, vector, survey by the Magsat satellite, and international program of augmented surface measurements was proposed. For secular variation and upper mantle conductivity the proposed measurements are global. The repeat station measurements for secular variation should be occupied at 2-3 year intervals. A special observing period in November and December of 1979 is proposed during which simultaneous, continuous, global measurements for upper mantle conductivity studies are to be gathered. Finally, it is recommended that the networks in operation during the IMS extend their operation through the Fall of 1980 to provide correlative data useful for high latitude disturbance studies and for crustal conductivity studies.

  2. Charge Blinking Statistics of Semiconductor Nanocrystals Revealed by Carbon Nanotube Single Charge Sensors.

    PubMed

    Zbydniewska, Ewa; Duzynska, Anna; Popoff, Michka; Hourlier, Djamila; Lenfant, Stéphane; Judek, Jaroslaw; Zdrojek, Mariusz; Mélin, Thierry

    2015-10-14

    We demonstrate the relation between the optical blinking of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) and their electrical charge blinking for which we provide the first experimental observation of power-law statistics. To show this, we harness the performance of CdSe/ZnS NCs coupled with carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs), which act as single charge-sensitive electrometers with submillisecond time resolution, at room temperature. A random telegraph signal (RTS) associated with the NC single-trap charging is observed and exhibits power-law temporal statistics (τ(-α), with α in the range of ∼1-3), and a Lorentzian current noise power spectrum with a well-defined 1/f(2) corner. The spectroscopic analysis of the NC-CNTFET devices is consistent with the charging of NC defect states with a charging energy of Ec ≥ 200 meV. These results pave the way for a deeper understanding of the physics and technology of nanocrystal-based optoelectronic devices.

  3. Climbing Fiber Regulation of Spontaneous Purkinje Cell Activity and Cerebellum-Dependent Blink Responses123

    PubMed Central

    Bengtsson, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Abstract It has been known for a long time that GABAergic Purkinje cells in the cerebellar cortex, as well as their target neurons in the cerebellar nuclei, are spontaneously active. The cerebellar output will, therefore, depend on how input is integrated into this spontaneous activity. It has been shown that input from climbing fibers originating in the inferior olive controls the spontaneous activity in Purkinje cells. While blocking climbing fiber input to the Purkinje cells causes a dramatic increase in the firing rate, increased climbing fiber activity results in reduced Purkinje cell activity. However, the exact calibration of this regulation has not been examined systematically. Here we examine the relation between climbing fiber stimulation frequency and Purkinje cell activity in unanesthetized decerebrated ferrets. The results revealed a gradual suppression of Purkinje cell activity, starting at climbing fiber stimulation frequencies as low as 0.5 Hz. At 4 Hz, Purkinje cells were completely silenced. This effect lasted an average of 2 min after the stimulation rate was reduced to a lower level. We also examined the effect of sustained climbing fiber stimulation on overt behavior. Specifically, we analyzed conditioned blink responses, which are known to be dependent on the cerebellum, while stimulating the climbing fibers at different frequencies. In accordance with the neurophysiological data, the conditioned blink responses were suppressed at stimulation frequencies of ≥4 Hz. PMID:26839917

  4. Eye complaints in the office environment: precorneal tear film integrity influenced by eye blinking efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Wolkoff, P; Nojgaard, J; Troiano, P; Piccoli, B

    2005-01-01

    To achieve a common base for understanding work related eye complaints in the office environment, it is necessary to merge approaches from indoor air science, occupational health, and ophthalmology. Based on database searches, it is concluded that precorneal tear film (PTF) alteration leads to eye complaints that may be caused by: (1) thermal factors (low relative humidity; high room temperature); (2) demanding task content (attention decreases blinking and widens the exposed ocular surface area); and (3) individual characteristics (for example, tear film alterations, blinking anomalies, gland dysfunctions, and use of contact lenses). These factors and conditions are able to progressively increase water evaporation and faster thinning of the PTF, which causes dryness and dry spot formation on the cornea, possibly followed by corneal and conjunctiva epithelial alterations and eye complaints. Another possible cause of eye complaints is certain irritating chemical compounds, in addition to oxidation mixtures that are formed in reactions between ozone and unsaturated organic compounds (alkenes). The effect may be exacerbated by low relative humidity. PMID:15613602

  5. A spontaneously blinking fluorophore based on intramolecular spirocyclization for live-cell super-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Uno, Shin-Nosuke; Kamiya, Mako; Yoshihara, Toshitada; Sugawara, Ko; Okabe, Kohki; Tarhan, Mehmet C; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Funatsu, Takashi; Okada, Yasushi; Tobita, Seiji; Urano, Yasuteru

    2014-08-01

    Single-molecule localization microscopy is used to construct super-resolution images, but generally requires prior intense laser irradiation and in some cases additives, such as thiols, to induce on-off switching of fluorophores. These requirements limit the potential applications of this methodology. Here, we report a first-in-class spontaneously blinking fluorophore based on an intramolecular spirocyclization reaction. Optimization of the intramolecular nucleophile and rhodamine-based fluorophore (electrophile) provide a suitable lifetime for the fluorescent open form, and equilibrium between the open form and the non-fluorescent closed form. We show that this spontaneously blinking fluorophore is suitable for single-molecule localization microscopy imaging deep inside cells and for tracking the motion of structures in living cells. We further demonstrate the advantages of this fluorophore over existing methodologies by applying it to nuclear pore structures located far above the coverslip with a spinning-disk confocal microscope and for repetitive time-lapse super-resolution imaging of microtubules in live cells for up to 1 h. PMID:25054937

  6. The ``blinking'' stokeslet: a paradigm for feeding and mixing flows in biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, John; Otto, Stephen; Yannacopoulos, Athanasios; Orme, Belinda

    1999-11-01

    Mixing and transport processes associated with slow viscous flows are studied in the context of a blinking stokeslet above a rigid plane boundary. Whilst the motivation for this study comes from feeding currents due to cilia or flagella in micro-organisms, other applications in physiological fluid mechanics where eddying motions occur include: the enhanced mixing that may arise in `bolus' flow between red blood cells, peristaltic motion and airflow in alveoli. There will also be further applications to micro-engineering flows at micron length scales. This study is therefore of generic interest because it analyses the opportunity for enhanced transport and mixing in a Stokes flow environment in which one or more eddies are a central feature. Earlier studies have shown that the blinking stokeslet system can have a chaotic structure. Poincaré sections and local Lyapunov exponents are used to explore the structure of the system and to give a quantitative description of mixing; calculations of barriers to diffusion are also presented. The enhancement to mixing and the consequent ramifications for filter feeding due to chaotic advection are demonstrated.

  7. Charge Blinking Statistics of Semiconductor Nanocrystals Revealed by Carbon Nanotube Single Charge Sensors.

    PubMed

    Zbydniewska, Ewa; Duzynska, Anna; Popoff, Michka; Hourlier, Djamila; Lenfant, Stéphane; Judek, Jaroslaw; Zdrojek, Mariusz; Mélin, Thierry

    2015-10-14

    We demonstrate the relation between the optical blinking of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) and their electrical charge blinking for which we provide the first experimental observation of power-law statistics. To show this, we harness the performance of CdSe/ZnS NCs coupled with carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs), which act as single charge-sensitive electrometers with submillisecond time resolution, at room temperature. A random telegraph signal (RTS) associated with the NC single-trap charging is observed and exhibits power-law temporal statistics (τ(-α), with α in the range of ∼1-3), and a Lorentzian current noise power spectrum with a well-defined 1/f(2) corner. The spectroscopic analysis of the NC-CNTFET devices is consistent with the charging of NC defect states with a charging energy of Ec ≥ 200 meV. These results pave the way for a deeper understanding of the physics and technology of nanocrystal-based optoelectronic devices. PMID:26418364

  8. Measuring the Perceived Reality of Television: Perceived Plausibility, Perceived Superficiality and the Degree of Personal Utility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, William R.; And Others

    A tool was devised to measure the perceived reality of television, an important variable in understanding how television influences an individual's perception of social reality. This was accomplished by using a research plan that allowed university subjects to generate the measures used for tapping the "reality" of television content. University…

  9. A Review of Acculturation Measures and Their Utility in Studies Promoting Latino Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Phyllis M.; Pomery, Elizabeth A.; Latimer, Amy E.; Martinez, Josefa L.; Salovey, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The authors reviewed the acculturation literature with the goal of identifying measures used to assess acculturation in Hispanic populations in the context of studies of health knowledge, attitudes, and behavior change. Twenty-six acculturation measures were identified and summarized. As the Hispanic population continues to grow in the United…

  10. 43 CFR 3275.15 - How accurately must I measure my production and utilization?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... royalty: (1) If the meter measures electricity, it must have an accuracy of ±0.25% or better of reading... an accuracy reading of ±2 percent or better; (3) If the meter measures steam flowing at less than 100,000 lbs/hr on a monthly basis, it must have an accuracy reading of ±4 percent or better; (4) If...

  11. 43 CFR 3275.15 - How accurately must I measure my production and utilization?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... royalty: (1) If the meter measures electricity, it must have an accuracy of ±0.25% or better of reading... an accuracy reading of ±2 percent or better; (3) If the meter measures steam flowing at less than 100,000 lbs/hr on a monthly basis, it must have an accuracy reading of ±4 percent or better; (4) If...

  12. 43 CFR 3275.15 - How accurately must I measure my production and utilization?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... royalty: (1) If the meter measures electricity, it must have an accuracy of ±0.25% or better of reading... an accuracy reading of ±2 percent or better; (3) If the meter measures steam flowing at less than 100,000 lbs/hr on a monthly basis, it must have an accuracy reading of ±4 percent or better; (4) If...

  13. Information Utility: Quantifying the Total Psychometric Information Provided by a Measure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markon, Kristian E.

    2013-01-01

    Although advances have improved our ability to describe the measurement precision of a test, it often remains challenging to summarize how well a test is performing overall. Reliability, for example, provides an overall summary of measurement precision, but it is sample-specific and might not reflect the potential usefulness of a test if the…

  14. Brain metabolism in autism. Resting cerebral glucose utilization rates as measured with positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Rumsey, J.M.; Duara, R.; Grady, C.; Rapoport, J.L.; Margolin, R.A.; Rapoport, S.I.; Cutler, N.R.

    1985-05-01

    The cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was studied in ten men (mean age = 26 years) with well-documented histories of infantile autism and in 15 age-matched normal male controls using positron emission tomography and (F-18) 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Positron emission tomography was completed during rest, with reduced visual and auditory stimulation. While the autistic group as a whole showed significantly elevated glucose utilization in widespread regions of the brain, there was considerable overlap between the two groups. No brain region showed a reduced metabolic rate in the autistic group. Significantly more autistic, as compared with control, subjects showed extreme relative metabolic rates (ratios of regional metabolic rates to whole brain rates and asymmetries) in one or more brain regions.

  15. Distance and depth measurements of radioactive objects utilizing rotating slant-hole collimators.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, J L; Kopp, D T; Lasher, J C; Blumhardt, R

    1988-01-01

    It is desirable to have an accurate method to determine the depth of various organs which are commonly imaged in nuclear medicine. The method presented here utilizes the geometrical characteristics of the rotating slant-hole collimator to calculate distances and depth. The accuracy of the calculated distance was evaluated for point sources in air separated by 11 cm. The reproducibility of the calculated distance was evaluated as a function of the extent of collimator rotation between observations for angular differences of 45 degrees, 90 degrees, 135 degrees, and 180 degrees. The theory of the method is discussed and the relative error in distance calculation analyzed mathematically as a function of (1) collimator rotation angle error, (2) collimator slant angle error, and (3) position calculation error. Our findings indicate this method to be accurate to within 2% with a reproducibility range of 3%-5% for point sources.

  16. Improving ion mobility measurement sensitivity by utilizing helium in an ion funnel trap.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Yehia M; Garimella, Sandilya V B; Tolmachev, Aleksey V; Baker, Erin S; Smith, Richard D

    2014-06-01

    Ion mobility instruments that utilize nitrogen as buffer gas are often preceded by an ion trap and accumulation region that also uses nitrogen, and for different inert gases, no significant effects upon performance are expected for ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) of larger ions. However, we have observed significantly improved performance for an ion funnel trap upon adding helium; the signal intensities for higher m/z species were improved by more than an order of magnitude compared to using pure nitrogen. The effect of helium upon IMS resolving power was also studied by introducing a He/N2 gas mixture into the drift cell, and in some cases, a slight improvement was observed compared to pure N2. The improvement in signal can be largely attributed to faster and more efficient ion ejection into the drift tube from the ion funnel trap.

  17. 43 CFR 3272.12 - What environmental protection measures must I include in my utilization plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... minimum, your proposed measures to: (1) Prevent or control fires; (2) Prevent soil erosion; (3) Protect... resources; (6) Minimize air and noise pollution; and (7) Minimize hazards to public health and safety...

  18. 43 CFR 3272.12 - What environmental protection measures must I include in my utilization plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... minimum, your proposed measures to: (1) Prevent or control fires; (2) Prevent soil erosion; (3) Protect... resources; (6) Minimize air and noise pollution; and (7) Minimize hazards to public health and safety...

  19. 43 CFR 3272.12 - What environmental protection measures must I include in my utilization plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... minimum, your proposed measures to: (1) Prevent or control fires; (2) Prevent soil erosion; (3) Protect... resources; (6) Minimize air and noise pollution; and (7) Minimize hazards to public health and safety...

  20. 43 CFR 3272.12 - What environmental protection measures must I include in my utilization plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... minimum, your proposed measures to: (1) Prevent or control fires; (2) Prevent soil erosion; (3) Protect... resources; (6) Minimize air and noise pollution; and (7) Minimize hazards to public health and safety...

  1. Fundamental Kinetics Database Utilizing Shock Tube Measurements (Volumes 1, 2, 3, 4, and Volume 6)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Davidson, D. F.; Hanson, R. K

    The data from shock tube experiments generally takes three forms: ignition delay times, species concentration time-histories and reaction rate measurements. Volume 1 focuses on ignition delay time data measured and published by the Shock Tube Group in the Mechanical Engineering Department of Stanford University. The cut-off date for inclusion into this volume was January 2005. Volume 2 focuses on species concentration time-histories and was cut off December 2005. The two volumes are in PDF format and are accompanied by a zipped file of supporting data. Volume 3 was issued in 2009. Volume 4, Ignition delay times measurements came out in May, 2014, along with Reaction Rates Measurements, Vol 6. Volume 5 is not available at this time.

  2. Ultrasonic transmission measurements in the characterization of viscoelasticity utilizing polymeric waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bause, Fabian; Rautenberg, Jens; Feldmann, Nadine; Webersen, Manuel; Claes, Leander; Gravenkamp, Hauke; Henning, Bernd

    2016-10-01

    For the numerical simulation of acoustic wave propagation in (measurement) systems and their design, the use of reliable material models and material parameters is a central issue. Especially in polymers, acoustic material parameters cannot be evaluated based on quasistatically measured parameters, as are specified in data sheets by the manufacturers. In this work, a measurement method is presented which quantifies, for a given polymeric material sample, a complex-valued and frequency-dependent material model. A novel three-dimensional approach for modeling viscoelasticity is introduced. The material samples are designed as hollow cylindrical waveguides to account for the high damping characteristics of the polymers under test and to provide an axisymmetric structure for good performance of waveguide modeling and reproducible coupling conditions arising from the smaller coupling area in the experiment. Ultrasonic transmission measurements are carried out between the parallel faces of the sample. To account for the frequency dependency of the material properties, five different transducer pairs with ascending central frequency from 750~\\text{kHz} to 2.5~\\text{MHz} are used. After passing through the sample, each of the five received signals contains information on the material parameters which are determined in an inverse procedure. The solution of the inverse problem is carried out by iterative comparison of an innovative forward SBFEM-based simulations of the entire measurement system with the experimentally determined measurement data. For a given solution of the inverse problem, an estimate of the measurement uncertainty of each identified material parameter is calculated. Moreover, a second measurement setup, based on laser-acoustic excitation of Lamb modes in plate-shaped specimens, is presented. Using this setup, the identified material properties can be verified on samples with a varied geometry, but made from the same material.

  3. On the Labile Memory Buffer in the Attentional Blink: Masking the T2 Representation by Onset Transients Mediates the AB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jannati, Ali; Spalek, Thomas M.; Di Lollo, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Report of a second target (T2) is impaired when presented within 500 ms of the first (T1). This attentional blink (AB) is known to cause a delay in T2 processing during which T2 must be stored in a labile memory buffer. We explored the buffer's characteristics using different types of masks after T2. These characteristics were inferred by…

  4. Brief Report: Attenuated Emotional Suppression of the Attentional Blink in Autism Spectrum Disorder--Another Non-Social Abnormality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaigg, Sebastian B.; Bowler, Dermot M.

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-five individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder and 25 typically developed individuals participated in an Attentional Blink paradigm to determine whether emotional words would capture attention similarly in the two groups. Whilst the emotionality of words facilitated attention in typical comparison participants, this effect was attenuated in…

  5. DTI measures track and predict motor function outcomes in stroke rehabilitation utilizing BCI technology.

    PubMed

    Song, Jie; Nair, Veena A; Young, Brittany M; Walton, Leo M; Nigogosyan, Zack; Remsik, Alexander; Tyler, Mitchell E; Farrar-Edwards, Dorothy; Caldera, Kristin E; Sattin, Justin A; Williams, Justin C; Prabhakaran, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Tracking and predicting motor outcomes is important in determining effective stroke rehabilitation strategies. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) allows for evaluation of the underlying structural integrity of brain white matter tracts and may serve as a potential biomarker for tracking and predicting motor recovery. In this study, we examined the longitudinal relationship between DTI measures of the posterior limb of the internal capsule (PLIC) and upper-limb motor outcomes in 13 stroke patients (median 20-month post-stroke) who completed up to 15 sessions of intervention using brain-computer interface (BCI) technology. Patients' upper-limb motor outcomes and PLIC DTI measures including fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (AD), radial diffusivity (RD), and mean diffusivity (MD) were assessed longitudinally at four time points: pre-, mid-, immediately post- and 1-month-post intervention. DTI measures and ratios of each DTI measure comparing the ipsilesional and contralesional PLIC were correlated with patients' motor outcomes to examine the relationship between structural integrity of the PLIC and patients' motor recovery. We found that lower diffusivity and higher FA values of the ipsilesional PLIC were significantly correlated with better upper-limb motor function. Baseline DTI ratios were significantly correlated with motor outcomes measured immediately post and 1-month-post BCI interventions. A few patients achieved improvements in motor recovery meeting the minimum clinically important difference (MCID). These findings suggest that upper-limb motor recovery in stroke patients receiving BCI interventions relates to the microstructural status of the PLIC. Lower diffusivity and higher FA measures of the ipsilesional PLIC contribute toward better motor recovery in the stroke-affected upper-limb. DTI-derived measures may be a clinically useful biomarker in tracking and predicting motor recovery in stroke patients receiving BCI interventions.

  6. The Clinical Utility of a Low Serum Ceruloplasmin Measurement in the Diagnosis of Wilson Disease.

    PubMed

    Kelly, D; Crotty, G; O'Mullane, J; Stapleton, M; Sweeney, B; O'Sullivan, S S

    2016-01-01

    The first step in screening for potential Wilson disease is serum ceruloplasmin testing, whereby a level of less than 0.2g/L is suggestive of the disease. We aimed to determine what proportion of an Irish population had a low ceruloplasmin level, whether low measurements were appropriately followed-up and what were the clinical outcomes. We conducted a retrospective review of all serum ceruloplasmin measurements between August 2003 and October 2009 in a large tertiary referral centre in Southern Ireland. Clinical data, serum ceruloplasmin, liver function tests, urinary copper and liver biopsy reports were all recorded where available. 1573 patients had a serum ceruloplasmin measurement during the 7-year study period. 96 patients (6.1%) had a ceruloplasmin level < 0.2g/L and of these only 3 patients had Wilson disease. There was only 1 new diagnosis. Only 27 patients (28.1%) had some form of confirmatory testing performed. In our centre's experience, the positive predictive value of a significantly low ceruloplasmin level is 11.1% (95% CI 2.91-30.3%). In practice a low serum ceruloplasmin measurement is often not followed by appropriate confirmatory testing. Measuring serum ceruloplasmin as a singular diagnostic test for Wilson disease or as part of the battery of unselected liver screening tests is inappropriate and low-yield.

  7. Utilizing measure-based feedback in control-mastery theory: A clinical error.

    PubMed

    Snyder, John; Aafjes-van Doorn, Katie

    2016-09-01

    Clinical errors and ruptures are an inevitable part of clinical practice. Often times, therapists are unaware that a clinical error or rupture has occurred, leaving no space for repair, and potentially leading to patient dropout and/or less effective treatment. One way to overcome our blind spots is by frequently and systematically collecting measure-based feedback from the patient. Patient feedback measures that focus on the process of psychotherapy such as the Patient's Experience of Attunement and Responsiveness scale (PEAR) can be used in conjunction with treatment outcome measures such as the Outcome Questionnaire 45.2 (OQ-45.2) to monitor the patient's therapeutic experience and progress. The regular use of these types of measures can aid clinicians in the identification of clinical errors and the associated patient deterioration that might otherwise go unnoticed and unaddressed. The current case study describes an instance of clinical error that occurred during the 2-year treatment of a highly traumatized young woman. The clinical error was identified using measure-based feedback and subsequently understood and addressed from the theoretical standpoint of the control-mastery theory of psychotherapy. An alternative hypothetical response is also presented and explained using control-mastery theory. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27631857

  8. Sounding rocket measurement of the absolute solar EUV flux utilizing a silicon photodiode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogawa, H. S.; Mcmullin, D.; Judge, D. L.; Canfield, L. R.

    1990-01-01

    A newly developed stable and high quantum efficiency silicon photodiode was used to obtain an accurate measurement of the integrated absolute magnitude of the solar extreme UV photon flux in the spectral region between 50 and 800 A. The adjusted daily 10.7-cm solar radio flux and sunspot number were 168.4 and 121, respectively. The unattenuated absolute value of the solar EUV flux at 1 AU in the specified wavelength region was 6.81 x 10 to the 10th photons/sq cm per s. Based on a nominal probable error of 7 percent for National Institute of Standards and Technology detector efficiency measurements in the 50- to 500-A region (5 percent on longer wavelength measurements between 500 and 1216 A), and based on experimental errors associated with the present rocket instrumentation and analysis, a conservative total error estimate of about 14 percent is assigned to the absolute integral solar flux obtained.

  9. Continuous 30-day measurements utilizing the monkey metabolism pod. [study of weightlessness effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, N.; Kodama, A. M.; Mains, R. C.; Rahlmann, D. F.; Grunbaum, B. W.

    1977-01-01

    A fiberglass system was previously described, using which quantitative physiological measurements could be made to study the effects of weightlessness on 10 to 14 kg adult monkeys maintained in comfortable restraint under space flight conditions. Recent improvements in the system have made it possible to obtain continuous measurements of respiratory gas exchange, cardiovascular function, and mineral balance for periods of up to 30 days on pig-tailed monkeys. It has also been possible to operate two pods which share one set of instrumentation, thereby permitting simultaneous measurements to be made on two animals by commutating signal outputs from the pods. In principle, more than two pods could be operated in this fashion. The system is compatible with Spacelab design. Representative physiological data from ground tests of the system are presented.

  10. Clinical utility of laser-Doppler vibrometer measurements in live normal and pathologic human ears.

    PubMed

    Rosowski, John J; Nakajima, Hideko H; Merchant, Saumil N

    2008-01-01

    The laser-Doppler vibrometer (LDV) is a research tool that can be used to quickly measure the sound-induced velocity of the tympanic membrane near the umbo (the inferior tip of the malleus) in live human subjects and patients. In this manuscript we demonstrate the LDV to be a sensitive and selective tool for the diagnosis and differentiation of various ossicular disorders in patients with intact tympanic membranes and aerated middle ears. Patients with partial or total ossicular interruption or malleus fixation are readily separated from normal-hearing subjects with the LDV. The combination of LDV measurements and air-bone gap can distinguish patients with fixed stapes from those with normal ears. LDV measurements can also help differentiate air-bone gaps produced by ossicular pathologies from those associated with pathologies of inner-ear sound conduction such as a superior semicircular canal dehiscence.

  11. Utility of an open field Shack-Hartmann aberrometer for measurement of refractive error in infants and young children

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Erin M.; Miller, Joseph M.; Schwiegerling, Jim

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE To assess the utility of an open-field Shack-Hartmann aberrometer for measurement of refractive error without cycloplegia in infants and young children. METHOD Data included 2698 subject encounters with Native American infants and children aged 6 months to <8 years. We attempted right eye measurements without cycloplegia using the pediatric wavefront evaluator (PeWE) on all participants while they viewed near (50 cm) and distant (2 m) fixation targets. Cycloplegic autorefraction (Rmax [Nikon Retinomax K-plus2]) measurements were obtained for children aged ≥3 years. RESULTS The success rates of noncycloplegic PeWE measurement for near (70%) and distant targets (56%) significantly improved with age. Significant differences in mean spherical equivalent (M) across near versus distant fixation target conditions were consistent with the difference in accommodative demand. Differences in astigmatism measurements for near versus distant target conditions were not clinically significant. Noncycloplegic PeWE and cycloplegic Rmax measurements of M and astigmatism were strongly correlated. Mean noncycloplegic PeWE M was significantly more myopic or less hyperopic and astigmatism measurements tended to be greater in magnitude compared with cycloplegic Rmax. CONCLUSIONS The PeWE tended to overestimate myopia and underestimate hyperopia when cycloplegia was not used. The PeWE is useful for measuring accommodation and astigmatism. PMID:24160970

  12. Cell compressibility studies utilizing noncontact hydrostatic pressure measurements on single living cells in a microchamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, L. A. G.; Liu, A. Q.; Yu, Y. F.; Zhang, C.; Lim, C. S.; Ng, S. H.; Yap, P. H.; Gao, H. J.

    2008-06-01

    A micro-optical-fluidic system (MOFS), which integrates a force generating device and an optical detector, is designed to measure the bulk modulus of a single living cell in real time under a controlled hydrostatic pressure. In this design, the accuracy of the bulk modulus measurement is improved because neither the force generating device nor the optical detector needs to be in contact with the cells. The MOFS device has been used to investigate the mechanotransduction of THP-1 human acute monocytic leukemia cells and the effects of the toxin lipopolysaccharide and colchicine on various properties of these cells.

  13. Utilization of AERONET polarimetric measurements for improving retrieval of aerosol microphysics: GSFC, Beijing and Dakar data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedarenka, Anton; Dubovik, Oleg; Goloub, Philippe; Li, Zhengqiang; Lapyonok, Tatyana; Litvinov, Pavel; Barel, Luc; Gonzalez, Louis; Podvin, Thierry; Crozel, Didier

    2016-08-01

    The study presents the efforts on including the polarimetric data to the routine inversion of the radiometric ground-based measurements for characterization of the atmospheric aerosols and analysis of the obtained advantages in retrieval results. First, to operationally process the large amount of polarimetric data the data preparation tool was developed. The AERONET inversion code adapted for inversion of both intensity and polarization measurements was used for processing. Second, in order to estimate the effect from utilization of polarimetric information on aerosol retrieval results, both synthetic data and the real measurements were processed using developed routine and analyzed. The sensitivity study has been carried out using simulated data based on three main aerosol models: desert dust, urban industrial and urban clean aerosols. The test investigated the effects of utilization of polarization data in the presence of random noise, bias in measurements of optical thickness and angular pointing shift. The results demonstrate the advantage of polarization data utilization in the cases of aerosols with pronounced concentration of fine particles. Further, the extended set of AERONET observations was processed. The data for three sites have been used: GSFC, USA (clean urban aerosol dominated by fine particles), Beijing, China (polluted industrial aerosol characterized by pronounced mixture of both fine and coarse modes) and Dakar, Senegal (desert dust dominated by coarse particles). The results revealed considerable advantage of polarimetric data applying for characterizing fine mode dominated aerosols including industrial pollution (Beijing). The use of polarization corrects particle size distribution by decreasing overestimated fine mode and increasing the coarse mode. It also increases underestimated real part of the refractive index and improves the retrieval of the fraction of spherical particles due to high sensitivity of polarization to particle shape

  14. UTILIZING THE PAKS METHOD FOR MEASURING ACROLEIN AND OTHER ALDEHYDES IN DEARS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acrolein is a hazardous air pollutant of high priority due to its high irritation potency and other potential adverse health effects. However, a reliable method is currently unavailable for measuring airborne acrolein at typical environmental levels. In the Detroit Exposure and A...

  15. Clinical Utility of the Modified Stroop Task as a Treatment Outcome Measure: Questions Raised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Jillian R.; Mitchell, Philip B.; Touyz, Stephen W.; Griffiths, Rosalyn A.; Beumont, Pierre J. V.

    2004-01-01

    Data from an outpatient treatment trial for anorexia nervosa were examined to gain preliminary insights as to whether the modified Stroop colour-naming task might offer a useful measure of treatment outcome. It was hypothesised that interference for eating-, weight- and shape-related words on a modified version on the Stroop colour-naming task…

  16. A Review of the Accuracy and Utility of Motion Sensors to Measure Physical Activity of Frail, Older Hospitalized Patients.

    PubMed

    McCullagh, Ruth; Brady, Noeleen M; Dillon, Christina; Horgan, N Frances; Timmons, Suzanne

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this review was to examine the utility and accuracy of commercially available motion sensors to measure step-count and time spent upright in frail older hospitalized patients. A database search (CINAHL and PubMed, 2004-2014) and a further hand search of papers' references yielded 24 validation studies meeting the inclusion criteria. Fifteen motion sensors (eight pedometers, six accelerometers, and one sensor systems) have been tested in older adults. Only three have been tested in hospital patients, two of which detected postures and postural changes accurately, but none estimated step-count accurately. Only one motion sensor remained accurate at speeds typical of frail older hospitalized patients, but it has yet to be tested in this cohort. Time spent upright can be accurately measured in the hospital, but further validation studies are required to determine which, if any, motion sensor can accurately measure step-count. PMID:26583827

  17. Global brightness temperature spectra at high wavenumbers utilizing satellite microwave measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanford, J. L.

    1980-05-01

    Satellite microwave brightness temperature (radiance) measurements represent weighted mean temperatures in a certain atmospheric layer. The high density of measurements along a polar-orbiting satellite track allows estimates of the brightness temperature variance spectrum at high meridional wavenumbers. Global data from the Nimbus 6 SCAMS microwave instrument sensitive to the 100-300 mb layer have been analyzed for 30 days in August 1975. The results reveal that the brightness temperature variance spectrum can be fit to the form k to the m power over the range k = 22 to 59 (horizontal wavelengths 1800 to 700 km). Using 95% confidence intervals, the fit yields m = minus 3.1 plus or minus 0.3. These results appear to have significance for estimates of energy cascade between different motion scales in the very high wavenumber regime.

  18. Eddy current nondestructive testing device for measuring variable characteristics of a sample utilizing Walsh functions

    DOEpatents

    Libby, Hugo L.; Hildebrand, Bernard P.

    1978-01-01

    An eddy current testing device for measuring variable characteristics of a sample generates a signal which varies with variations in such characteristics. A signal expander samples at least a portion of this generated signal and expands the sampled signal on a selected basis of square waves or Walsh functions to produce a plurality of signal components representative of the sampled signal. A network combines these components to provide a display of at least one of the characteristics of the sample.

  19. Utilizing Electroencephalography Measurements for Comparison of Task-Specific Neural Efficiencies: Spatial Intelligence Tasks.

    PubMed

    Call, Benjamin J; Goodridge, Wade; Villanueva, Idalis; Wan, Nicholas; Jordan, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    Spatial intelligence is often linked to success in engineering education and engineering professions. The use of electroencephalography enables comparative calculation of individuals' neural efficiency as they perform successive tasks requiring spatial ability to derive solutions. Neural efficiency here is defined as having less beta activation, and therefore expending fewer neural resources, to perform a task in comparison to other groups or other tasks. For inter-task comparisons of tasks with similar durations, these measurements may enable a comparison of task type difficulty. For intra-participant and inter-participant comparisons, these measurements provide potential insight into the participant's level of spatial ability and different engineering problem solving tasks. Performance on the selected tasks can be analyzed and correlated with beta activities. This work presents a detailed research protocol studying the neural efficiency of students engaged in the solving of typical spatial ability and Statics problems. Students completed problems specific to the Mental Cutting Test (MCT), Purdue Spatial Visualization test of Rotations (PSVT:R), and Statics. While engaged in solving these problems, participants' brain waves were measured with EEG allowing data to be collected regarding alpha and beta brain wave activation and use. The work looks to correlate functional performance on pure spatial tasks with spatially intensive engineering tasks to identify the pathways to successful performance in engineering and the resulting improvements in engineering education that may follow. PMID:27584838

  20. The attentional blink is related to phonemic decoding, but not sight-word recognition, in typically reading adults.

    PubMed

    Tyson-Parry, Maree M; Sailah, Jessica; Boyes, Mark E; Badcock, Nicholas A

    2015-10-01

    This research investigated the relationship between the attentional blink (AB) and reading in typical adults. The AB is a deficit in the processing of the second of two rapidly presented targets when it occurs in close temporal proximity to the first target. Specifically, this experiment examined whether the AB was related to both phonological and sight-word reading abilities, and whether the relationship was mediated by accuracy on a single-target rapid serial visual processing task (single-target accuracy). Undergraduate university students completed a battery of tests measuring reading ability, non-verbal intelligence, and rapid automatised naming, in addition to rapid serial visual presentation tasks in which they were required to identify either two (AB task) or one (single target task) target/s (outlined shapes: circle, square, diamond, cross, and triangle) in a stream of random-dot distractors. The duration of the AB was related to phonological reading (n=41, β=-0.43): participants who exhibited longer ABs had poorer phonemic decoding skills. The AB was not related to sight-word reading. Single-target accuracy did not mediate the relationship between the AB and reading, but was significantly related to AB depth (non-linear fit, R(2)=.50): depth reflects the maximal cost in T2 reporting accuracy in the AB. The differential relationship between the AB and phonological versus sight-word reading implicates common resources used for phonemic decoding and target consolidation, which may be involved in cognitive control. The relationship between single-target accuracy and the AB is discussed in terms of cognitive preparation.

  1. The attentional blink is related to phonemic decoding, but not sight-word recognition, in typically reading adults.

    PubMed

    Tyson-Parry, Maree M; Sailah, Jessica; Boyes, Mark E; Badcock, Nicholas A

    2015-10-01

    This research investigated the relationship between the attentional blink (AB) and reading in typical adults. The AB is a deficit in the processing of the second of two rapidly presented targets when it occurs in close temporal proximity to the first target. Specifically, this experiment examined whether the AB was related to both phonological and sight-word reading abilities, and whether the relationship was mediated by accuracy on a single-target rapid serial visual processing task (single-target accuracy). Undergraduate university students completed a battery of tests measuring reading ability, non-verbal intelligence, and rapid automatised naming, in addition to rapid serial visual presentation tasks in which they were required to identify either two (AB task) or one (single target task) target/s (outlined shapes: circle, square, diamond, cross, and triangle) in a stream of random-dot distractors. The duration of the AB was related to phonological reading (n=41, β=-0.43): participants who exhibited longer ABs had poorer phonemic decoding skills. The AB was not related to sight-word reading. Single-target accuracy did not mediate the relationship between the AB and reading, but was significantly related to AB depth (non-linear fit, R(2)=.50): depth reflects the maximal cost in T2 reporting accuracy in the AB. The differential relationship between the AB and phonological versus sight-word reading implicates common resources used for phonemic decoding and target consolidation, which may be involved in cognitive control. The relationship between single-target accuracy and the AB is discussed in terms of cognitive preparation. PMID:26277018

  2. Utility of measuring serum or red blood cell folate in the era of folate fortification of flour.

    PubMed

    Gilfix, Brian M

    2014-05-01

    Folic acid is an essential nutrient involved in one-carbon metabolism. Insufficient folate can result in megaloblastic anemia and an increased risk of neural tube defects. In response to the latter, some governments have mandated the fortification of flour with folate. This had resulted in a documented rise in the serum and red blood cell folate levels in the population. This has impacted the potential utility of folate measurements to detect folate deficiency in the clinical context. Folate measurements, whether done in serum or red blood cells, are subject to analytical variation, especially the latter, which also affects the utility of such measurements. Examining the literature reveals that in clinical situations, generally <1% of the subjects will have folate deficiency regardless of potentially pre-disposing factors (e.g. anemia, anti-folate agents, inflammatory bowel disease). Data from our center for both pediatric and adult populations is presented that supports this observation. Consequently, there exists very few indications for folate determinations (unexplained macrocytosis, inborn errors of metabolism) and it may be more efficient to simply treat suspected cases. PMID:24486651

  3. Charge-tunnelling and self-trapping: common origins for blinking, grey-state emission and photoluminescence enhancement in semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, M. A.; Fisher, A. A. E.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding instabilities in the photoluminescence (PL) from light emitting materials is crucial to optimizing their performance for different applications. Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) offer bright, size tunable emission, properties that are now being exploited in a broad range of developing technologies from displays and solar cells to biomaging and optical storage. However, instabilities such as photoluminescence intermittency, enhancement and bleaching of emission in these materials can be detrimental to their utility. Here, we report dielectric dependent blinking, intensity-``spikes'' and low-level, ``grey''-state emission, as well as PL enhancement in ZnS capped CdSe QDs; observations that we found consistent with a charge-tunnelling and self-trapping (CTST) description of exciton-dynamics on the QD-host system. In particular, modulation of PL in grey-states and PL enhancement are found to have a common origin in the equilibrium between exciton charge carrier core and surface-states within the CTST framework. Parameterized in terms of size and electrostatic properties of the QD and its nanoenvironment, the CTST offers predictive insight into exciton-dynamics in these nanomaterials.Understanding instabilities in the photoluminescence (PL) from light emitting materials is crucial to optimizing their performance for different applications. Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) offer bright, size tunable emission, properties that are now being exploited in a broad range of developing technologies from displays and solar cells to biomaging and optical storage. However, instabilities such as photoluminescence intermittency, enhancement and bleaching of emission in these materials can be detrimental to their utility. Here, we report dielectric dependent blinking, intensity-``spikes'' and low-level, ``grey''-state emission, as well as PL enhancement in ZnS capped CdSe QDs; observations that we found consistent with a charge-tunnelling and self-trapping (CTST

  4. Measurement variability and sincerity of effort: clinical utility of isokinetic strength coefficient of variation scores.

    PubMed

    Birmingham, T B; Kramer, J F; Speechley, M; Chesworth, B M; MacDermid, J

    1998-06-01

    Although the use of measures of strength variability as a means of judging sincerity of effort is becoming common practice, the accuracy of doing so has been questioned. Coefficient of variation (CV) cut-off points, indicating the upper limit of variability for repeated maximal efforts, are routinely used to identify workers providing submaximal efforts during various strength tests. However, the stability of the CV itself has not been considered when comparing an individual's observed CV score to these cut-off points. The purpose of the present study was to examine the day-to-day variability of the CV calculated from maximal isokinetic knee extension efforts, and to describe how this measurement error affects the accuracy of the CV as a distinguishing criterion between maximal and submaximal efforts. Thirty-one healthy males (mean age 25 +/- 4.5 years) completed three maximal and three submaximal isokinetic knee extension efforts on two separate occasions. Although submaximal CVs were significantly greater than maximal CVs (15.6 versus 3.7%; p < 0.01), there was considerable overlap between submaximal and maximal CV frequency distributions. More importantly, an individual observed CV could vary +/- 3.1% as a result of day-to-day variation or measurement error. This range in possible CV scores should be considered when comparing an individual's score to proposed cut-off points. Since individual CVs vary considerably from day-to-day, and since precise cut-off values distinguishing between maximal and submaximal conditions cannot be identified, CV scores must be interpreted cautiously, and the potential errors in relying extensively on this approach to identifying insincere efforts should be recognised.

  5. Heart rate dynamics in patients with stable angina pectoris and utility of fractal and complexity measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makikallio, T. H.; Ristimae, T.; Airaksinen, K. E.; Peng, C. K.; Goldberger, A. L.; Huikuri, H. V.

    1998-01-01

    Dynamic analysis techniques may uncover abnormalities in heart rate (HR) behavior that are not easily detectable with conventional statistical measures. However, the applicability of these new methods for detecting possible abnormalities in HR behavior in various cardiovascular disorders is not well established. Conventional measures of HR variability were compared with short-term (< or = 11 beats, alpha1) and long-term (> 11 beats, alpha2) fractal correlation properties and with approximate entropy of RR interval data in 38 patients with stable angina pectoris without previous myocardial infarction or cardiac medication at the time of the study and 38 age-matched healthy controls. The short- and long-term fractal scaling exponents (alpha1, alpha2) were significantly higher in the coronary patients than in the healthy controls (1.34 +/- 0.15 vs 1.11 +/- 0.12 [p <0.001] and 1.10 +/- 0.08 vs 1.04 +/- 0.06 [p <0.01], respectively), and they also had lower approximate entropy (p <0.05), standard deviation of all RR intervals (p <0.01), and high-frequency spectral component of HR variability (p <0.05). The short-term fractal scaling exponent performed better than other heart rate variability parameters in differentiating patients with coronary artery disease from healthy subjects, but it was not related to the clinical or angiographic severity of coronary artery disease or any single nonspectral or spectral measure of HR variability in this retrospective study. Patients with stable angina pectoris have altered fractal properties and reduced complexity in their RR interval dynamics relative to age-matched healthy subjects. Dynamic analysis may complement traditional analyses in detecting altered HR behavior in patients with stable angina pectoris.

  6. Utilizing Turbidity and Measurements of Suspended Sediment Concentrations to Better Understand Sediment Transport within Urban Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkins, T. M.; Napieralski, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    The Rouge River watershed in Southeast Michigan is an urban watershed, which has been exposed to more than 100 years of anthropogenic activities related to industrialization and urbanization. This urbanization has degraded water quality by increasing erosion and altering the transport mechanism and chemistry of bed and suspended sediments. This study aims to explore the relationship between development within the Lower Rouge watershed and watershed hydrology through an examination of USGS discharge data, stream water quality and suspended sediment loads during storm and base flow. Two YSI dataloggers are used to continuously measure water quality parameters during baseflow and storm events (varying hydrologic conditions), including: turbidity, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, salinity, total dissolved solids, and temperature. Depth-integrated sediment samples are collected and analyzed for sediment concentration using Imhoff cones and filtration methods. Correlations between discharge weighted continuous turbidity measurements and discharge weighted suspended sediment samples are used to estimate sediment loads; essentially, turbidity readings and measured sediment concentrations form a near-linear relationship. In addition, sediment samples are analyzed for inorganic heavy metal contaminants common to Southeast Michigan to characterize both suspended sediments and sediments frequently deposited on adjacent floodplains. These metals (i.e. Lead, Copper, Chromium, Nickle) are commonly known as the “Michigan Metals” and represent indicator species of mobilized and deposited contaminants associated with urbanization and industrialization. The results will provide a baseline for better understanding the transport and fate of contaminated sediments within the Rouge watershed, as well as guide ongoing development and management practices along the Rouge River.

  7. Progress in utilization of a mobile laboratory for making storm electricity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, W. David

    1988-01-01

    A mobile atmospheric science laboratory has been used to intercept and track storms on the Great Plains region of the U.S., with the intention of combining the data obtained with those from Doppler and conventional radars, NASA U-2 aircraft overflights, balloon soundings, and fixed-base storm electricity measurements. The mobile lab has proven to be valuable in the gathering of ground truth verifications for the two commercially operated lightning ground-strike locating systems. Data acquisition has recently been expanded by means of mobile ballooning before and during storms.

  8. Measuring relative utilization of aerobic glycolysis in breast cancer cells by positional isotopic discrimination.

    PubMed

    Yang, Da-Qing; Freund, Dana M; Harris, Benjamin R E; Wang, Defeng; Cleary, Margot P; Hegeman, Adrian D

    2016-09-01

    The ability of cancer cells to produce lactate through aerobic glycolysis is a hallmark of cancer. In this study, we established a positional isotopic labeling and LC-MS-based method that can specifically measure the conversion of glucose to lactate in glycolysis. We show that the rate of aerobic glycolysis is closely correlated with glucose uptake and lactate production in breast cancer cells. We also found that the production of [3-(13) C]lactate is significantly elevated in metastatic breast cancer cells and in early stage metastatic mammary tumors in mice. Our findings may enable the development of a biomarker for the diagnosis of aggressive breast cancer. PMID:27531463

  9. Orbit Determination Analysis Utilizing Radiometric and Laser Ranging Measurements for GPS Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Bryan W.

    2007-01-01

    While navigation systems for the determination of the orbit of the Global Position System (GPS) have proven to be very effective, the current issues involve lowering the error in the GPS satellite ephemerides below their current level. In this document, the results of an orbit determination covariance assessment are provided. The analysis is intended to be the baseline orbit determination study comparing the benefits of adding laser ranging measurements from various numbers of ground stations. Results are shown for two starting longitude assumptions of the satellite location and for nine initial covariance cases for the GPS satellite state vector.

  10. Utilizing the N beam position monitor method for turn-by-turn optics measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langner, A.; Benedetti, G.; Carlà, M.; Iriso, U.; Martí, Z.; de Portugal, J. Coello; Tomás, R.

    2016-09-01

    The N beam position monitor method (N -BPM) which was recently developed for the LHC has significantly improved the precision of optics measurements that are based on BPM turn-by-turn data. The main improvement is due to the consideration of correlations for statistical and systematic error sources, as well as increasing the amount of BPM combinations which are used to derive the β -function at one location. We present how this technique can be applied at light sources like ALBA, and compare the results with other methods.

  11. Utilizing The Synergy of Airborne Backscatter Lidar and In-Situ Measurements for Evaluating CALIPSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsekeri, Alexandra; Amiridis, Vassilis; Marenco, Franco; Marinou, Eleni; Rosenberg, Phil; Solomos, Stavros; Trembath, Jamie; Allan, James; Bacak, Asan; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-06-01

    Airborne campaigns dedicated to satellite validation are crucial for the effective global aerosol monitoring. CALIPSO is currently the only active remote sensing satellite mission, acquiring the vertical profiles of the aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficients. Here we present a method for CALIPSO evaluation from combining lidar and in-situ airborne measurements. The limitations of the method have to do mainly with the in-situ instrumentation capabilities and the hydration modelling. We also discuss the future implementation of our method in the ICE-D campaign (Cape Verde, August 2015).

  12. Religious social capital: Its measurement and utility in the study of the social determinants of health

    PubMed Central

    Maselko, Joanna; Hughes, Cayce; Cheney, Rose

    2014-01-01

    As a social determinant of health, religiosity remains not well understood, despite the prevalence of religious activity and prominence of religious institutions in most societies. This paper introduces a working measure of Religious Social Capital and presents preliminary associations with neighborhood social capital and urban stressors. Religious social capital is defined as the social resources available to individuals and groups through their social connections with a religious community. Domains covered include group membership, social integration, values/norms, bonding/bridging trust as well as social support. Cross-sectional data come from a convenience sample of 104 community dwelling adults residing in a single urban neighborhood in a large US city, who also provided information on neighborhood social capital, and experiences of urban stressors. Results suggest that religious social capital is a valid construct that can be reliably measured. All indicators of religious social capital were higher among those who frequently attended religious services, with the exception of bridging trust (trust of people from different religious groups). A weak, inverse, association was also observed between religious and neighborhood social capital levels. Levels of religious social capital were correlated with higher levels of reported urban stressors, while neighborhood social capital was correlated with lower urban stressor levels. A significant percent of the sample was unaffiliated with a religious tradition and these individuals were more likely to be male, young and more highly educated. Social capital is a promising construct to help elucidate the influence of religion on population health. PMID:21802182

  13. Religious social capital: its measurement and utility in the study of the social determinants of health.

    PubMed

    Maselko, Joanna; Hughes, Cayce; Cheney, Rose

    2011-09-01

    As a social determinant of health, religiosity remains not well understood, despite the prevalence of religious activity and prominence of religious institutions in most societies. This paper introduces a working measure of Religious Social Capital and presents preliminary associations with neighborhood social capital and urban stressors. Religious social capital is defined as the social resources available to individuals and groups through their social connections with a religious community. Domains covered include group membership, social integration, values/norms, bonding/bridging trust as well as social support. Cross-sectional data come from a convenience sample of 104 community dwelling adults residing in a single urban neighborhood in a large US city, who also provided information on neighborhood social capital, and experiences of urban stressors. Results suggest that religious social capital is a valid construct that can be reliably measured. All indicators of religious social capital were higher among those who frequently attended religious services, with the exception of bridging trust (trust of people from different religious groups). A weak, inverse, association was also observed between religious and neighborhood social capital levels. Levels of religious social capital were correlated with higher levels of reported urban stressors, while neighborhood social capital was correlated with lower urban stressor levels. A significant percent of the sample was unaffiliated with a religious tradition and these individuals were more likely to be male, young and more highly educated. Social capital is a promising construct to help elucidate the influence of religion on population health.

  14. On-line engine torque and torque fluctuation measurement for engine control utilizing crankshaft speed fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Citron, S.J.

    1987-10-06

    An adaptive idle control system is described for an internal combustion engine. It consists of an engine fuel distribution system, means for coupling the engine fuel distribution system to the engine's cylinders, means for sensing engine crankshaft position, and a clock for generating a time base. There is also a means for obtaining a measure of slowest crankshaft speed independent of the occurrence of a top dead center position of the engine crankshaft during the power stroke of each cylinder, means for coupling the clock and the crankshaft position sensor to the means for obtaining a measure of crankshaft speed, means for calculating an index of performance for each of the various cylinders, means for coupling the performance index calculating means to the clock and the crankshaft position sensor, and means for calculating engine roughness based upon the indices of performance. Plus there are means for coupling the roughness calculating means to the performance index calculating means, means for comparing the roughness to a roughness set point and adjusting the throttle in response to the comparison to control the idle speed of the engine, means for coupling the comparing and adjusting means to the throttle, means for determining the roughness set point in response to the indices of performance, and means for coupling the roughness set point determining means to the performance index calculating means.

  15. Method for non-intrusively identifying a contained material utilizing uncollided nuclear transmission measurements

    DOEpatents

    Morrison, John L.; Stephens, Alan G.; Grover, S. Blaine

    2001-11-20

    An improved nuclear diagnostic method identifies a contained target material by measuring on-axis, mono-energetic uncollided particle radiation transmitted through a target material for two penetrating radiation beam energies, and applying specially developed algorithms to estimate a ratio of macroscopic neutron cross-sections for the uncollided particle radiation at the two energies, where the penetrating radiation is a neutron beam, or a ratio of linear attenuation coefficients for the uncollided particle radiation at the two energies, where the penetrating radiation is a gamma-ray beam. Alternatively, the measurements are used to derive a minimization formula based on the macroscopic neutron cross-sections for the uncollided particle radiation at the two neutron beam energies, or the linear attenuation coefficients for the uncollided particle radiation at the two gamma-ray beam energies. A candidate target material database, including known macroscopic neutron cross-sections or linear attenuation coefficients for target materials at the selected neutron or gamma-ray beam energies, is used to approximate the estimated ratio or to solve the minimization formula, such that the identity of the contained target material is discovered.

  16. Development of a probing system for a micro-coordinate measuring machine by utilizing shear-force detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, So; Kodama, Issei; Gao, Wei

    2014-06-01

    This paper introduces a newly developed probing system for a micro-coordinate measurement machine (micro-CMM) based on an interaction force generated by the water layer on the surface of the measuring object. In order to measure the dimensions of the micrometric structures, a probing system using a nanopipette ball stylus has been developed. A glass microsphere with diameter of 9 µm is used as a stylus tip of the probing system. The glass nanopipette, which is fabricated from a capillary glass tube by a thermal pulling process, is employed as a stylus shaft to improve the fixation strength of the stylus tip. The approach between the stylus tip and the surface of the measuring object can be detected by utilizing the method of shear-force detection. The stylus is oscillated in the lateral direction at its resonant frequency to detect an interaction force owing to the viscoelasticity of the meniscus layer existing on the surface of the measuring object. The oscillation amplitude is decreased by the shear-force applied to the stylus tip. In this study, the basic characteristics of the probing system including sensitivity, resolution and reproducibility are investigated. The experimental result of dimensional measurement of micrometer-scale structure is presented.

  17. Attentional blink in young people with high-functioning autism and Asperger's disorder.

    PubMed

    Rinehart, Nicole; Tonge, Bruce; Brereton, Avril; Bradshaw, John

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the temporal characteristics of information processing in individuals with high-functioning autism and Asperger's disorder using a rapid serial visual presentation paradigm. The results clearly showed that such people demonstrate an attentional blink of similar magnitude to comparison groups. This supports the proposition that the social processing difficulties experienced by these individuals are not underpinned by a basic temporal-cognitive processing deficit, which is consistent with Minshew's complex information processing theory. This is the second study to show that automatic inhibitory processes are intact in both autism and Asperger's disorder, which appears to distinguish these disorders from some other frontostriatal disorders. The finding that individuals with autism were generally poorer than the comparison group at detecting black Xs, while being as good in responding to white letters, was accounted for in the context of a potential dual-task processing difficulty or visual search superiority. PMID:19770231

  18. The time course of semantic and associative priming effects is different in an attentional blink task.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Karen; Hunt, Hayley

    2013-08-01

    When two targets are presented using rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) and the interval between the targets is 200-500 ms, report of the second target is impaired, a phenomena known as the attentional blink (AB). This study examined the time course of semantic-only and associate-semantic priming effects during an AB task. Three RSVP experiments were conducted using targets that shared either a semantic-only or an associative-semantic relationship. The results of the three experiments demonstrated semantic-only priming effects at the shortest stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs). Associative-semantic priming was evident at shorter and longer SOAs. This suggests that priming in an AB task is driven by conceptual overlap facilitating lexical access at short SOAs and with longer SOAs lexical access benefits from word associations links between targets. PMID:23589233

  19. Sub- and super-Poissonian photon statistics of single-molecule fluorescence blinking

    SciTech Connect

    Osad'ko, I. S.

    2007-06-15

    An analysis of intermittent fluorescence is presented for a single molecule driven by a continuous-wave laser field. The interruptions of fluorescence are caused by transition of the molecule to a triplet state. A method previously developed to calculate photon distribution for continuous-wave fluorescence is applied to analyze photon statistics of fluorescence blinking. The probability w{sub N}(T) of counting N photons over a time interval T is derived for intermittent fluorescence. The photons counted over relatively short intervals are found to have a sub-Poissonian (narrower than Poisson) distribution. The photon distribution over intervals longer than the mean off time has a complicated form with two maxima; i.e., a super-Poissonian (wider than Poisson) distribution is obtained.

  20. Zolmitriptan reverses blink reflex changes induced during the migraine attack in humans.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, M; Guido, M; Libro, G; Sciruicchio, V; Puca, F

    2000-07-28

    The question about the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)(1B-1D) receptors agonists, if the clinical efficacy in migraine attacks is linked with the action at the central level or at the peripheral one, is still unresolved. We evaluated the effects of zolmitriptan and sumatriptan on blink reflex in thirty migraine without aura patients during the attacks in order to assess the central action on the trigeminal system. Both drugs were effective in reducing headache severity compared to placebo. In the migraine attack an increased area of the R3 component on the pain side was observed; it was suppressed by zolmitriptan, which confirmed its action on the central trigeminal circuits, though the clinical relevance of this effect could be questioned. PMID:10899408

  1. Suppression of quantum dot blinking in DTT-doped polymer films.

    PubMed

    Antelman, Josh; Ebenstein, Yuval; Dertinger, Thomas; Michalet, Xavier; Weiss, Shimon

    2009-03-31

    In this report we evaluate the emission properties of single quantum dots embedded in a thin, thiol containing polymer film. We report the suppression of quantum dot blinking leading to a continuous photon flux from both organic and water soluble quantum dots and demonstrate their application as robust fluorescent point sources for ultrahigh resolution localization. In addition, we apply the polymer coating to cell samples immunostained with antibody conjugated QDs and show that fluorescence intensity from the polymer embedded cells shows no sign of degradation after 67 hours of continuous excitation. The reported thin polymer film coating may prove advantageous for immuno-cyto/histo-chemistry as well as for the fabrication of quantum dot containing devices requiring a reliable and stable photon source (including a single photon source) or stable charge characteristics while maintaining intimate contact between the quantum dot and the surrounding matrix.

  2. Studying quantum dot blinking through the addition of an engineered inorganic hole trap.

    PubMed

    Tenne, Ron; Teitelboim, Ayelet; Rukenstein, Pazit; Dyshel, Maria; Mokari, Taleb; Oron, Dan

    2013-06-25

    An all-inorganic compound colloidal quantum dot incorporating a highly emissive CdSe core, which is linked by a CdS tunneling barrier to an engineered charge carrier trap composed of PbS, is designed, and its optical properties are studied in detail at the single-particle level. Study of this structure enables a deeper understanding of the link between photoinduced charging and surface trapping of charge carriers and the phenomenon of quantum dot blinking. In the presence of the hole trap, a "gray" emissive state appears, associated with charging of the core. Rapid switching is observed between the "on" and the "gray" state, although the switching dynamics in and out of the dark "off" state remain unaffected. This result completes the links in the causality chain connecting charge carrier trapping, charging of QDs, and the appearance of a "gray" emission state.

  3. Coherent magnetic resonance of nanocrystal quantum-dot luminescence as a window to blinking mechanisms.

    PubMed

    van Schooten, Kipp J; Boehme, Christoph; Lupton, John M

    2014-06-23

    Blinking of colloidal nanocrystal quantum dots, random intermittency in the stream of photons emitted by single particles, has long commanded the curiosity of researchers. Why does the particle suddenly shut off, and what are the pathways to quench emission? Single-particle microscopy is not the only way to approach these fundamental questions on the interaction of light and matter: time-domain sub-ensemble spectroscopies can also yield relevant information on microscopic electronic processes. We illustrate recent advances in pulsed optically detected magnetic resonance and highlight the conceptual relevance to unravelling mechanisms controlling intermittency on the single-particle level. Magnetic resonance reveals two distinct luminescence quenching channels, which appear to be related to those previously surmised from single-particle studies: a trapped charge-separated state in which the exciton is quenched by dissociation and the particle remains neutral; and a charged state of the particle in which spin-dependent Auger recombination quenches luminescence.

  4. Zolmitriptan reverses blink reflex changes induced during the migraine attack in humans.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, M; Guido, M; Libro, G; Sciruicchio, V; Puca, F

    2000-07-28

    The question about the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)(1B-1D) receptors agonists, if the clinical efficacy in migraine attacks is linked with the action at the central level or at the peripheral one, is still unresolved. We evaluated the effects of zolmitriptan and sumatriptan on blink reflex in thirty migraine without aura patients during the attacks in order to assess the central action on the trigeminal system. Both drugs were effective in reducing headache severity compared to placebo. In the migraine attack an increased area of the R3 component on the pain side was observed; it was suppressed by zolmitriptan, which confirmed its action on the central trigeminal circuits, though the clinical relevance of this effect could be questioned.

  5. Negative attentional set in the attentional blink: control is not lost.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dexuan; Zhou, Xiaolin; Martens, Sander

    2011-11-01

    The attentional blink (AB) refers to the finding that performance on the second of two targets (T1 and T2) in a rapidly presented stimulus stream is impaired when the targets are presented within 200-500 ms. This study investigates whether a negative attentional set, a form of top-down control, has an additional detrimental effect, and whether its influence is modulated by task demands. A negative attentional set was elicited through presentation of a pre-T1 distractor (D1), which belonged to the same category as T2. The presence of D1 impaired T2 performance, and this negative effect was generally larger inside than outside the AB. Moreover, this D1 effect remained constant or was augmented when the demand on T1 processing was enhanced. These findings demonstrate that a negative attentional set is maintained even though the central system is engaged in the in-depth processing of T1 during the AB.

  6. Too much control can hurt: a threaded cognition model of the attentional blink.

    PubMed

    Taatgen, Niels A; Juvina, Ion; Schipper, Marc; Borst, Jelmer P; Martens, Sander

    2009-08-01

    Explanations for the attentional blink (AB; a deficit in identifying the second of two targets when presented 200-500 ms after the first) have recently shifted from limitations in memory consolidation to disruptions in cognitive control. With a new model based on the threaded cognition theory of multi-tasking we propose a different explanation: the AB is produced by an overexertion of control. This overexertion is produced by a production rule that blocks target detection during memory consolidation. In addition to fitting many known effects in the literature, the model predicts that adding certain secondary tasks will decrease the AB. In Experiment 1, a secondary task is added to the AB task in which participants have to respond to a moving dot. As predicted, AB decreases. Experiment 2 expands this result by controlling for learning, and adds a second variation, rotating the first target. For this variation the model predicts an increase in AB, which is indeed what we found.

  7. The attentional blink: Past, present, and future of a blind spot in perceptual awareness

    PubMed Central

    Martens, Sander; Wyble, Brad

    2010-01-01

    A survey of the attention literature reveals the prominence of the attentional blink (AB)—a deficit in reporting the second of two targets when presented in close temporal succession. For two decades, this robust attentional phenomenon has been a major topic in attention research because it is informative about the rate at which stimuli can be encoded into consciously accessible representations. The pace of discovery and theoretical advancement concerning the AB has increased rapidly in the past few years with emphasis on new neurophysiological evidence and computational accounts of attentional processes. In this review we extract the central questions and the main lessons learnt from the past, and subsequently provide important directions for future research. PMID:20025902

  8. [The attentional blink effect: influence of negative words in an affective valence categorization task].

    PubMed

    Vaquero, Joaquín M M; Frese, Bettina; Lupiáñez, Juan; Megías, Jesús L; Acosta, Alberto

    2006-08-01

    In this study, we explored the emotional modulation of the Attentional Blink effect. In a Rapid Serial Visual Presentation procedure, a word (Target 1), either positive, negative or neutral, was followed by the word "WATER" (Target 2) in one half of the trials. The task included two conditions. In one of them, participants only had to detect the word "WATER". In double-response trials, participants also categorized Target 1's valence. Results showed that the detection of Target 2 was impaired in the double-response condition, this impairment being greater when negative word appeared as Target 1, as compared to positive and neutral words. However, these effects were independent on the Anxiety-Trait levels of participants. Overall, the pattern of data suggests that cognitive resources are focused on negative stimuli when their negative valence is emotionally salient enough.

  9. Utilizing Operational and Improved Remote Sensing Measurements to Assess Air Quality Monitoring Model Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Chuen-Meei

    Air quality model forecasts from Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) and Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) are often used to support air quality applications such as regulatory issues and scientific inquiries on atmospheric science processes. In urban environments, these models become more complex due to the inherent complexity of the land surface coupling and the enhanced pollutants emissions. This makes it very difficult to diagnose the model, if the surface parameter forecasts such as PM2.5 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 microm) are not accurate. For this reason, getting accurate boundary layer dynamic forecasts is as essential as quantifying realistic pollutants emissions. In this thesis, we explore the usefulness of vertical sounding measurements on assessing meteorological and air quality forecast models. In particular, we focus on assessing the WRF model (12km x 12km) coupled with the CMAQ model for the urban New York City (NYC) area using multiple vertical profiling and column integrated remote sensing measurements. This assessment is helpful in probing the root causes for WRF-CMAQ overestimates of surface PM2.5 occurring both predawn and post-sunset in the NYC area during the summer. In particular, we find that the significant underestimates in the WRF PBL height forecast is a key factor in explaining this anomaly. On the other hand, the model predictions of the PBL height during daytime when convective heating dominates were found to be highly correlated to lidar derived PBL height with minimal bias. Additional topics covered in this thesis include mathematical method using direct Mie scattering approach to convert aerosol microphysical properties from CMAQ into optical parameters making direct comparisons with lidar and multispectral radiometers feasible. Finally, we explore some tentative ideas on combining visible (VIS) and mid-infrared (MIR) sensors to better separate aerosols into fine and coarse modes.

  10. Modulation of trigeminal reflex excitability in migraine: effects of attention and habituation on the blink reflex.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, Marina; Murasecco, Donatella; Libro, Giuseppe; Guido, Marco; Sciruicchio, Vittorio; Specchio, Luigi Maria; Gallai, Virgilio; Puca, Francomichele

    2002-06-01

    The modulation of trigeminal reflex excitability in migraine patients was evaluated during the asymptomatic phase by studying the effects of attention, habituation and preconditioning stimulus on the R2 and R3 components of the blink reflex (BR). Fifty patients suffering from migraine without aura, 20 affected by migraine with aura and 35 sex- and age-matched controls were selected. In subgroups of migraine with-aura and without-aura patients, and normal controls, the blink reflex was elicited during different cognitive situations: (a) spontaneous mental activity; (b) stimulus anticipation; (c) recognition of target numbers. In the remaining subjects, R2 and R3 habituation was evaluated by repetitive stimulation at 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 s intervals. The R2 and R3 recovery curves were also computed. A reduced R3 threshold with a normal pain threshold was found in migraine with-aura and without-aura patients; the R3 component was not significantly correlated with the pain thresholds in patients and controls. The R2 and R3 components were less influenced by the warning of the stimulus in migraine without-aura and migraine with-aura patients, in comparison with the control group. A slight increase of both R2 and R3 recovery after preconditioning stimulus was also observed in migraine patients, probably caused by a phenomenon of trigeminal hyperexcitability persisting after the last attack. The abnormal BR modulation by alerting expresses in migraine a dysfunction of adaptation capacity to environmental conditions, probably predisposing to migraine. PMID:12031298

  11. Modulation of trigeminal reflex excitability in migraine: effects of attention and habituation on the blink reflex.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, Marina; Murasecco, Donatella; Libro, Giuseppe; Guido, Marco; Sciruicchio, Vittorio; Specchio, Luigi Maria; Gallai, Virgilio; Puca, Francomichele

    2002-06-01

    The modulation of trigeminal reflex excitability in migraine patients was evaluated during the asymptomatic phase by studying the effects of attention, habituation and preconditioning stimulus on the R2 and R3 components of the blink reflex (BR). Fifty patients suffering from migraine without aura, 20 affected by migraine with aura and 35 sex- and age-matched controls were selected. In subgroups of migraine with-aura and without-aura patients, and normal controls, the blink reflex was elicited during different cognitive situations: (a) spontaneous mental activity; (b) stimulus anticipation; (c) recognition of target numbers. In the remaining subjects, R2 and R3 habituation was evaluated by repetitive stimulation at 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 s intervals. The R2 and R3 recovery curves were also computed. A reduced R3 threshold with a normal pain threshold was found in migraine with-aura and without-aura patients; the R3 component was not significantly correlated with the pain thresholds in patients and controls. The R2 and R3 components were less influenced by the warning of the stimulus in migraine without-aura and migraine with-aura patients, in comparison with the control group. A slight increase of both R2 and R3 recovery after preconditioning stimulus was also observed in migraine patients, probably caused by a phenomenon of trigeminal hyperexcitability persisting after the last attack. The abnormal BR modulation by alerting expresses in migraine a dysfunction of adaptation capacity to environmental conditions, probably predisposing to migraine.

  12. Utility of Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry for Drug-to-Antibody Ratio Measurements in Antibody-Drug Conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Richard Y.-C.; Deyanova, Ekaterina G.; Passmore, David; Rangan, Vangipuram; Deshpande, Shrikant; Tymiak, Adrienne A.; Chen, Guodong

    2015-06-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are emerging modalities in the pharmaceutical industry. Characterization of ADC's drug-to-antibody ratio (DAR) becomes a key assessment because of its importance in ADC efficacy and safety. DAR characterization by conventional intact protein MS analysis, however, is challenging because of high heterogeneity of ADC samples. The analysis often requires protein deglycosylation, disulfide-bond reduction, or partial fragmentation. In this study, we illustrate the practical utility of ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) in a routine LC/MS workflow for DAR measurements. This strategy allows analyte "cleanup" in the gas phase, providing significant improvement of signal-to-noise ratios of ADC intact mass spectra for accurate DAR measurements. In addition, protein drift time analysis offers a new dimension in monitoring the changes of DAR in lot-to-lot analysis.

  13. Urinary Hypoxanthine as a Measure of Increased ATP Utilization in Late Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Megan S.; Hopper, Andrew; Slater, Laurel; Asmerom, Yayesh; Esiaba, Ijeoma; Boskovic, Danilo S.; Angeles, Danilyn M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of neonatal morbidity on ATP breakdown in late preterm infants. Study Design Urinary hypoxanthine concentration, a marker of ATP breakdown, was measured from 82 late preterm infants on days of life (DOL) 3 to 6 using high-performance liquid chromatography. Infants were grouped according to the following diagnoses: poor nippling alone (n = 8), poor nippling plus hyperbilirubinemia (n = 21), poor nippling plus early respiratory disease (n = 26), and respiratory disease alone (n = 27). Results Neonates with respiratory disease alone had significantly higher urinary hypoxanthine over DOL 3 to 6 when compared with neonates with poor nippling (P = .020), poor nippling plus hyperbilirubinemia (P < .001), and poor nippling plus early respiratory disease (P = .017). Neonates with poor nippling who received respiratory support for 2 to 3 days had significantly higher hypoxanthine compared with infants who received respiratory support for 1 day (P = .017) or no days (P = .007). Conclusions These findings suggest that respiratory disorders significantly increase ATP degradation in late premature infants. PMID:26413195

  14. Electrical Maxwell demon and Szilard engine utilizing Johnson noise, measurement, logic and control.

    PubMed

    Kish, Laszlo Bela; Granqvist, Claes-Göran

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a purely electrical version of Maxwell's demon which does not involve mechanically moving parts such as trapdoors, etc. It consists of a capacitor, resistors, amplifiers, logic circuitry and electronically controlled switches and uses thermal noise in resistors (Johnson noise) to pump heat. The only types of energy of importance in this demon are electrical energy and heat. We also demonstrate an entirely electrical version of Szilard's engine, i.e., an information-controlled device that can produce work by employing thermal fluctuations. The only moving part is a piston that executes work, and the engine has purely electronic controls and it is free of the major weakness of the original Szilard engine in not requiring removal and repositioning the piston at the end of the cycle. For both devices, the energy dissipation in the memory and other binary informatics components are insignificant compared to the exponentially large energy dissipation in the analog part responsible for creating new information by measurement and decision. This result contradicts the view that the energy dissipation in the memory during erasure is the most essential dissipation process in a demon. Nevertheless the dissipation in the memory and information processing parts is sufficient to secure the Second Law of Thermodynamics. PMID:23077525

  15. The utility of endometrial thickness measurement in asymptomatic postmenopausal women with endometrial fluid.

    PubMed

    Seckin, B; Ozgu-Erdinc, A S; Dogan, M; Turker, M; Cicek, M N

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical usefulness of sonographic endometrium thickness measurement in asymptomatic postmenopausal women with endometrial fluid collection. Fifty-two asymptomatic postmenopausal women with endometrial fluid, who underwent endometrial sampling were evaluated. Histopathological findings revealed that 25 (48.1%) women had insufficient tissue, 20 (38.4%) had atrophic endometrium and 7 (13.5%) had endometrial polyps. No case of malignancy was found. There was no statistically significant difference between the various histopathological categories (insufficient tissue, atrophic endometrium and polyp) with regard to the mean single-layer endometrial thickness (1.54 ± 0.87, 2.04 ± 1.76 and 1.79 ± 0.69 mm, respectively, p = 0.436). Out of 44 patients with endometrial thickness of less than 3 mm, 38 (86.4%) had atrophic changes or insufficient tissue and 6 (13.6%) had endometrial polyps. In conclusion, if the endometrial thickness is 3 mm or less, endometrial sampling is not necessary in asymptomatic postmenopausal women with endometrial fluid.

  16. Utilizing CAD/CAM to Measure Total Occlusal Convergence of Preclinical Dental Students' Crown Preparations.

    PubMed

    Mays, Keith A; Crisp, H Alex; Vos, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, faculty assessment of preclinical crown preparations occurs by visualizing preparation features. However, contemporary CAD/CAM tools have the ability to more precisely evaluate preparation features, which is beneficial for psychomotor development. Taper is one of the most challenging features to objectively assess. The aim of this study was twofold: first, to validate the software's ability to distinguish differences in taper, and second, to compare traditional faculty assessment with digital assessment of taper. In the study, 30 all-metal crown preparations were created on typodont teeth with varying degrees of axial reduction and placed into three groups based on amount of taper (minimum, moderate, or excessive). Each tooth was scanned with the D4D scanner, and the taper was analyzed using E4D Compare. A second experiment used 50 crown preparations of tooth #19, which were done as a formative exercise. A comparison faculty assessment with CAD/CAM assessments of taper was performed. The results showed that when the taper was varied, E4D Compare was able to distinguish those differences; the Tukey post-hoc test revealed a significant difference (p=0.001). The qualitative analysis comparing faculty grading to CAD/CAM grading demonstrated a trend for CAD/CAM to be more precise. These results suggest that E4D Compare is an effective means of quantitatively measuring the amount of total occlusal convergence or taper on a crown preparation and that digital assessment may be more precise than faculty visual grading. PMID:26729690

  17. Characterization of compounds by time-of-flight measurement utilizing random fast ions

    DOEpatents

    Conzemius, R.J.

    1989-04-04

    An apparatus is described for characterizing the mass of sample and daughter particles, comprising a source for providing sample ions; a fragmentation region wherein a fraction of the sample ions may fragment to produce daughter ion particles; an electrostatic field region held at a voltage level sufficient to effect ion-neutral separation and ion-ion separation of fragments from the same sample ion and to separate ions of different kinetic energy; a detector system for measuring the relative arrival times of particles; and processing means operatively connected to the detector system to receive and store the relative arrival times and operable to compare the arrival times with times detected at the detector when the electrostatic field region is held at a different voltage level and to thereafter characterize the particles. Sample and daughter particles are characterized with respect to mass and other characteristics by detecting at a particle detector the relative time of arrival for fragments of a sample ion at two different electrostatic voltage levels. The two sets of particle arrival times are used in conjunction with the known altered voltage levels to mathematically characterize the sample and daughter fragments. In an alternative embodiment the present invention may be used as a detector for a conventional mass spectrometer. In this embodiment, conventional mass spectrometry analysis is enhanced due to further mass resolving of the detected ions. 8 figs.

  18. Characterization of compounds by time-of-flight measurement utilizing random fast ions

    DOEpatents

    Conzemius, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus for characterizing the mass of sample and daughter particles, comprising a source for providing sample ions; a fragmentation region wherein a fraction of the sample ions may fragment to produce daughter ion particles; an electrostatic field region held at a voltage level sufficient to effect ion-neutral separation and ion-ion separation of fragments from the same sample ion and to separate ions of different kinetic energy; a detector system for measuring the relative arrival times of particles; and processing means operatively connected to the detector system to receive and store the relative arrival times and operable to compare the arrival times with times detected at the detector when the electrostatic field region is held at a different voltage level and to thereafter characterize the particles. Sample and daughter particles are characterized with respect to mass and other characteristics by detecting at a particle detector the relative time of arrival for fragments of a sample ion at two different electrostatic voltage levels. The two sets of particle arrival times are used in conjunction with the known altered voltage levels to mathematically characterize the sample and daughter fragments. In an alternative embodiment the present invention may be used as a detector for a conventional mass spectrometer. In this embodiment, conventional mass spectrometry analysis is enhanced due to further mass resolving of the detected ions.

  19. Correction: Charge-tunnelling and self-trapping: common origins for blinking, grey-state emission and photoluminescence enhancement in semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, M. A.; Fisher, A. A. E.

    2016-07-01

    Correction for `Charge-tunnelling and self-trapping: common origins for blinking, grey-state emission and photoluminescence enhancement in semiconductor quantum dots' by M. A. Osborne, et al., Nanoscale, 2016, 8, 9272-9283.

  20. Di-jet Measurements at Forward Rapidity Utilizing the Endcap Electromagnetic Calorimeter (EEMC) at the STAR Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Brian

    2012-10-01

    One of the main goals of the STAR spin program is to determine the spin-dependent gluon distribution, δg(x), of the proton. To date, the most stringent constraints on δg(x) from STAR have come from inclusive jet measurements, which access a partonic Bjorken-x range of 0.05measurements, the low x region and the shape of δg(x) are still poorly constrained. In contrast to inclusive jets, di-jet correlation measurements provide access to leading order partonic kinematics, and thus give better constraints on the x dependence of δg(x). Furthermore, di-jet measurements at forward rapidity sample lower x gluons. Although electromagnetic calorimetry is provided by the EEMC in the forward region (1<η<2), jet reconstruction is complicated by the falling charged particle tracking efficiency of the Time Projection Chamber for |η|>1. Methods to address this issue, as well as the overall status of the forward di-jet measurement utilizing the 200 GeV polarized p-p data from 2009, will be presented.

  1. The comparison of environmental effects on michelson and fabry-perot interferometers utilized for the displacement measurement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yung-Cheng; Shyu, Lih-Horng; Chang, Chung-Ping

    2010-01-01

    The optical structure of general commercial interferometers, e.g., the Michelson interferometers, is based on a non-common optical path. Such interferometers suffer from environmental effects because of the different phase changes induced in different optical paths and consequently the measurement precision will be significantly influenced by tiny variations of the environmental conditions. Fabry-Perot interferometers, which feature common optical paths, are insensitive to environmental disturbances. That would be advantageous for precision displacement measurements under ordinary environmental conditions. To verify and analyze this influence, displacement measurements with the two types of interferometers, i.e., a self-fabricated Fabry-Perot interferometer and a commercial Michelson interferometer, have been performed and compared under various environmental disturbance scenarios. Under several test conditions, the self-fabricated Fabry-Perot interferometer was obviously less sensitive to environmental disturbances than a commercial Michelson interferometer. Experimental results have shown that induced errors from environmental disturbances in a Fabry-Perot interferometer are one fifth of those in a Michelson interferometer. This has proved that an interferometer with the common optical path structure will be much more independent of environmental disturbances than those with a non-common optical path structure. It would be beneficial for the solution of interferometers utilized for precision displacement measurements in ordinary measurement environments.

  2. Material need insecurities, diabetes control, and care utilization: Results from the Measuring Economic iNsecurity in Diabetes (MEND) study

    PubMed Central

    Berkowitz, Seth A.; Meigs, James B.; DeWalt, Darren; Seligman, Hilary K.; Barnard, Lily S.; Bright, Oliver-John M.; Schow, Marie; Atlas, Steven J.; Wexler, Deborah J.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Increasing access to care may be insufficient to improve health for diabetes patients with unmet basic needs. However, how specific material need insecurities relate to clinical outcomes and care utilization in a setting of near-universal care access is unclear. Objective To determine the association of food insecurity, cost-related medication underuse, housing instability, and energy insecurity with diabetes control and healthcare utilization. Design Cross-sectional(data collected June 2012 -- October 2013). Setting One academic primary care clinic, two community health centers and one specialty diabetes center in Massachusetts. Participants Random sample, stratified by clinic, of adult(age >20 years) diabetes patients. 411 patients were included(response rate: 62.3%). Main Outcome(s) and Measure(s) The pre-specified primary outcome was a composite indicator of poor diabetes control(Hemoglobin A1c >9.0%, LDL cholesterol >100mg/dL, or blood pressure >140/90mm/Hg). Pre-specified secondary outcomes included outpatient visits and emergency department visits/acute care hospitalizations (ED/inpatient). Results Overall, 19% of respondents reported food insecurity, 28% cost-related medication underuse, 11% housing instability, and 14% energy insecurity; 40% reported at least one material need insecurity. Forty-two percent of respondents had poor diabetes control. In multivariable models, food insecurity was associated with greater odds of poor diabetes control(adjusted Odds Ratio[OR] 1.97, 95% confidence interval[95%CI]1.58 – 2.47) and increased outpatient visits(adjusted Incident Rate Ratio[IRR] 1.19 95%CI 1.05 – 1.36), but not increased ED/inpatient visits(IRR 1.00 95%CI 0.51 – 1.97). Cost-related medication underuse was associated with poor diabetes control(OR 1.91 95%CI 1.35 – 2.70) and greater ED/inpatient utilization(IRR 1.68 95%CI 1.21 – 2.34), but not outpatient visits(IRR 1.07 95%CI 0.95 – 1.21). Housing instability(IRR 1.31 95%CI 1.14– 1

  3. Measurements and properties of ice particles and carbon dioxide bubbles in aqueous mixture utilizing optical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diallo, Amadou O.

    Optical techniques are used to determine the size, shape and many other properties of particles ranging from the micro to a nano-level. These techniques have endless applications. This research is based on a project assigned by a "Vendor" that wants anonymity. The Leica optical microscope and the Dark Field Polarizing Metallurgical Microscope is used to determine the size and count of ice crystals (Vendors products) in multiple time frames. Since the ice temperature influences, its symmetry and the shape is subject to changes at room temperature (300 K) and the atmospheric pressure that is exerted on the ice crystals varies. The ice crystals are in a mixture of water, electrolytes and carbon dioxide with the optical spectroscopy (Qpod2) and Spectra suite, the optical density of the ice crystals is established from the absorbance and transmission measurements. The optical density in this case is also referred to as absorption; it is plotted with respect to a frequency (GHz), wavelength (nm) or Raman shift (1/cm) which shows the light colliding with the ice particles and CO2. Depending on the peaks positions, it is possible to profile the ice crystal sizes using a mean distribution plots. The region of absorbency wavelength expected for the ice is in the visible range; the water molecules in the (UV) Ultra-violet range and the CO2 in the (IR) infrared region. It is also possible to obtain the reflection and transmission output as a percentage change with the wavelengths ranging from 200 to 1100 nm. The refractive index of the ice can be correlated to the density based on the optical acoustic theorem, or Mie Scattering Theory. The viscosity of the ice crystals and the solutions from which the ice crystals are made of as well are recorded with the SV-10 viscometer. The baseline viscosity is used as reference and set lower than that of the ice crystals. The Zeta potential of the particles present in the mixture are approximated by first finding the viscosity of the

  4. Using the Near-Field Coupling of a Sharp Tip to Tune Fluorescence-Emission Fluctuations during Quantum-Dot Blinking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafran, Eyal; Mangum, Benjamin D.; Gerton, Jordan M.

    2011-07-01

    We demonstrate that the cycling between internal states of quantum dots during fluorescence blinking can be used to tune the near-field coupling with a sharp tip. In particular, the fluorescence emission from states with high quantum yield is quenched due to energy transfer, while that from low-yield states is elevated due to field enhancement. Thus, as a quantum dot blinks, its emission fluctuations are progressively suppressed upon approach of a tip.

  5. Using the near-field coupling of a sharp tip to tune fluorescence-emission fluctuations during quantum-dot blinking.

    PubMed

    Shafran, Eyal; Mangum, Benjamin D; Gerton, Jordan M

    2011-07-15

    We demonstrate that the cycling between internal states of quantum dots during fluorescence blinking can be used to tune the near-field coupling with a sharp tip. In particular, the fluorescence emission from states with high quantum yield is quenched due to energy transfer, while that from low-yield states is elevated due to field enhancement. Thus, as a quantum dot blinks, its emission fluctuations are progressively suppressed upon approach of a tip.

  6. Cross-sectional study of ethnic differences in the utility of area deprivation measures to target socioeconomically deprived individuals.

    PubMed

    Baker, Jessica; Mitchell, Richard; Pell, Jill

    2013-05-01

    Area deprivation measures provide a pragmatic tool for targeting public health interventions at socioeconomically deprived individuals. Ethnic minority groups in the UK experience higher levels of socioeconomic deprivation and certain associated diseases than the White population. The aim of this study was to explore ethnic differences in the utility of area deprivation measures as a tool for targeting socioeconomically deprived individuals. We carried out a cross-sectional study using the Health Survey for England 2004. 7208 participants aged 16-64 years from the four largest ethnic groups in England (White, Indian, Pakistani and Black Caribbean) were included. The main outcome measures were percentage agreement, sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV) of area deprivation, measured using Index of Multiple Deprivation 2004, in relation to individual socioeconomic position (measured by education, occupation, income, housing tenure and car access). We found that levels of both area and individual deprivation were higher in the Pakistani and Black Caribbean groups compared to the White group. Across all measures, agreement was lower in the Pakistani (50.9-63.4%) and Black Caribbean (61.0-70.1%) groups than the White (67.2-82.4%) group. However, sensitivity was higher in the Pakistani (0.56-0.64) and Black Caribbean (0.59-0.66) groups compared to the White group (0.24-0.38) and PPV was at least as high. The results for the Indian group were intermediate. We conclude that, in spite of lower agreement, area deprivation is better at identifying individual deprivation in ethnic minority groups. There was no evidence that area based targeting of public health interventions will disadvantage ethnic minority groups.

  7. Charge-tunnelling and self-trapping: common origins for blinking, grey-state emission and photoluminescence enhancement in semiconductor quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Osborne, M A; Fisher, A A E

    2016-04-28

    Understanding instabilities in the photoluminescence (PL) from light emitting materials is crucial to optimizing their performance for different applications. Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) offer bright, size tunable emission, properties that are now being exploited in a broad range of developing technologies from displays and solar cells to biomaging and optical storage. However, instabilities such as photoluminescence intermittency, enhancement and bleaching of emission in these materials can be detrimental to their utility. Here, we report dielectric dependent blinking, intensity-"spikes" and low-level, "grey"-state emission, as well as PL enhancement in ZnS capped CdSe QDs; observations that we found consistent with a charge-tunnelling and self-trapping (CTST) description of exciton-dynamics on the QD-host system. In particular, modulation of PL in grey-states and PL enhancement are found to have a common origin in the equilibrium between exciton charge carrier core and surface-states within the CTST framework. Parameterized in terms of size and electrostatic properties of the QD and its nanoenvironment, the CTST offers predictive insight into exciton-dynamics in these nanomaterials. PMID:27088542

  8. Blinking suppression of CdTe quantum dots on epitaxial graphene and the analysis with Marcus electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Hirose, Takuya; Tamai, Naoto; Kutsuma, Yasunori; Kurita, Atsusi; Kaneko, Tadaaki

    2014-08-25

    We have prepared epitaxial graphene by a Si sublimation method from 4H-SiC. Single-particle spectroscopy of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) on epitaxial graphene covered with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) or polyethylene glycol (PEG) showed the suppression of luminescence blinking and ∼10 times decreased luminescence intensity as compared with those on a glass. The electronic coupling constant, H{sub 01}, between CdTe QDs and graphene was calculated to be (3.3 ± 0.4) × 10{sup 2 }cm{sup −1} in PVP and (3.7 ± 0.8) × 10{sup 2 }cm{sup −1} in PEG based on Marcus theory of electron transfer and Tang-Marcus model of blinking with statistical distribution.

  9. Unintended embodiment of concepts into percepts: sensory activation boosts attention for same-modality concepts in the attentional blink paradigm.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, Nicolas; Mermillod, Martial; Godefroid, Jimmy; Corneille, Olivier

    2009-09-01

    This study shows that sensory priming facilitates reports of same-modality concepts in an attentional blink paradigm. Participants had to detect and report two target words (T1 and T2) presented for 53 ms each among a series of nonwords distractors at a frequency of up to 19 items per second. SOA between target words was set to 53 ms or 213 ms, with reduced attention expected for T2 under the longer SOA (attentional blink) and for T1 under the shorter SOA (lag-1 sparing). These effects were found but reduced when the sensory modality of the concepts matched that of a sensory stimulation occurring prior to the detection trial. Hence, sensory activation increased report for same-modality concepts. This finding reveals that grounded cognition effects (1) are involved in conceptual processing as soon as a word has reached the point of lexical identification and (2) occur independent of intentional access to sensory properties of concepts. PMID:19576578

  10. Blinking suppression of CdTe quantum dots on epitaxial graphene and the analysis with Marcus electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Takuya; Kutsuma, Yasunori; Kurita, Atsusi; Kaneko, Tadaaki; Tamai, Naoto

    2014-08-01

    We have prepared epitaxial graphene by a Si sublimation method from 4H-SiC. Single-particle spectroscopy of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) on epitaxial graphene covered with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) or polyethylene glycol (PEG) showed the suppression of luminescence blinking and ˜10 times decreased luminescence intensity as compared with those on a glass. The electronic coupling constant, H01, between CdTe QDs and graphene was calculated to be (3.3 ± 0.4) × 102 cm-1 in PVP and (3.7 ± 0.8) × 102 cm-1 in PEG based on Marcus theory of electron transfer and Tang-Marcus model of blinking with statistical distribution.

  11. Challenge to the Charging Model of Semiconductor-Nanocrystal Fluorescence Intermittency from Off-State Quantum Yields and Multiexciton Blinking

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jing; Nair, Gautham; Fisher, Brent R.; Bawendi, Moungi G.

    2010-04-16

    Semiconductor nanocrystals emit light intermittently; i.e., they “blink,” under steady illumination. The dark periods have been widely assumed to be due to photoluminescence (PL) quenching by an Auger-like process involving a single additional charge present in the nanocrystal. Our results challenge this long-standing assumption. Close examination of exciton PL intensity time traces of single CdSe(CdZnS) core(shell) nanocrystals reveals that the dark state PL quantum yield can be 10 times less than the biexciton PL quantum yield. In addition, we observe spectrally resolved multiexciton emission and find that it also blinks with an on/off ratio greater than 10:1 . These results directly contradict the predictions of the charging model.

  12. Human-Computer Interface Controlled by Horizontal Directional Eye Movements and Voluntary Blinks Using AC EOG Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajiwara, Yusuke; Murata, Hiroaki; Kimura, Haruhiko; Abe, Koji

    As a communication support tool for cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), researches on eye gaze human-computer interfaces have been active. However, since voluntary and involuntary eye movements cannot be distinguished in the interfaces, their performance is still not sufficient for practical use. This paper presents a high performance human-computer interface system which unites high quality recognitions of horizontal directional eye movements and voluntary blinks. The experimental results have shown that the number of incorrect inputs is decreased by 35.1% in an existing system which equips recognitions of horizontal and vertical directional eye movements in addition to voluntary blinks and character inputs are speeded up by 17.4% from the existing system.

  13. Measuring an antibody affinity distribution molecule by molecule.

    PubMed

    Temirov, Jamshid P; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Werner, James H

    2008-11-15

    Single molecule fluorescence microscopy was used to observe the binding and unbinding of hapten decorated quantum dots to individual surface immobilized antibodies. The fluorescence time history from an individual antibody site can be used to calculate its binding affinity. While quantum dot blinking occurs during these measurements, we describe a simple empirical method to correct the apparent/observed affinity to account for the blinking contribution. The combination of many single molecule affinity measurements from different antibodies yields not only the average affinity, it directly measures the full shape and character of the surface affinity distribution function.

  14. Measuring an antibody affinity distribution molecule by molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, Andrew M; Werner, James H; Temirov, Jamshid

    2008-01-01

    Single molecule fluorescence mIcroscopy was used to observe the binding and unbinding of hapten decorated quantum dots with individual surface immobilized antibodies. The fluorescence time history from an individual antibody site can be used to calculate its binding affinity. While quantum dot blinking occurs during these measurements, we describe a simple empirical method to correct the apparent/observed affinity to account for the blinking contribution. The combination of many single molecule affinity measurements from different antibodies yields not only the average affinity, it directly measures the full shape and character of the surface affinity distribution function.

  15. Unintended Embodiment of Concepts into Percepts: Sensory Activation Boosts Attention for Same-Modality Concepts in the Attentional Blink Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermeulen, Nicolas; Mermillod, Martial; Godefroid, Jimmy; Corneille, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    This study shows that sensory priming facilitates reports of same-modality concepts in an attentional blink paradigm. Participants had to detect and report two target words (T1 and T2) presented for 53 ms each among a series of nonwords distractors at a frequency of up to 19 items per second. SOA between target words was set to 53 ms or 213 ms,…

  16. The Observed Variance Between Predicted and Measured Radiation Dose in Breast and Prostate Patients Utilizing an in-vivo Dosimeter

    PubMed Central

    Scarantino, Charles W.; Prestidge, Bradley R.; Anscher, Mitchel S.; Ferree, Carolyn R.; Kearns, William T.; Black, Robert D.; Bolick, Natasha G.; Beyer, Gloria P.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Report the results of using a permanently implantable dosimeter in radiation therapy: determine specific adverse events, degree of migration, and acquire dose measurements during treatment to determine difference between expected and measured dose. Methods and Materials DVS (Dose Verification System) is a wireless, permanently implantable MOSFET dosimeter using a bidirectional antenna for power and data transfer. The study cohort includes 36 breast (33 received 2 devices) and 29 prostate (21 received 2 devices) cancer patients. A total of 1783 and 1749 daily dose measurements were obtained on breast and prostate patients, respectively. The measurements were compared to the planned expected dose. Bi-weekly CT scans were obtained to evaluate migration and NCI CTCv3 used to evaluate adverse events. Results Only grade I/II adverse events of pain and bleeding were noted. There were only four instances of dosimeter migration of >5mm due to known factors. A deviation of ≥7% in cumulative dose was noted in 7 of 36 (19%) for breast cancer patients. In prostate cancer patients, a ≥7% deviation was noted in 6 of 29 (21%) and 8 of 19 (42%) during initial and boost irradiation, respectively. The two patterns of dose deviation were random and systematic. Some causes for these differences could involve organ movement, patient movement and/or treatment plan considerations. Conclusions The DVS was not associated with significant adverse events or migration. The dosimeter can measure dose in situ on a daily basis. The accuracy and utility of the DVS complements current IGRT and IMRT techniques. PMID:18793963

  17. Compact high-quality CdSe-CdS core-shell nanocrystals with narrow emission linewidths and suppressed blinking.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ou; Zhao, Jing; Chauhan, Vikash P; Cui, Jian; Wong, Cliff; Harris, Daniel K; Wei, He; Han, Hee-Sun; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K; Bawendi, Moungi G

    2013-05-01

    High particle uniformity, high photoluminescence quantum yields, narrow and symmetric emission spectral lineshapes and minimal single-dot emission intermittency (known as blinking) have been recognized as universal requirements for the successful use of colloidal quantum dots in nearly all optical applications. However, synthesizing samples that simultaneously meet all these four criteria has proven challenging. Here, we report the synthesis of such high-quality CdSe-CdS core-shell quantum dots in an optimized process that maintains a slow growth rate of the shell through the use of octanethiol and cadmium oleate as precursors. In contrast with previous observations, single-dot blinking is significantly suppressed with only a relatively thin shell. Furthermore, we demonstrate the elimination of the ensemble luminescence photodarkening that is an intrinsic consequence of quantum dot blinking statistical ageing. Furthermore, the small size and high photoluminescence quantum yields of these novel quantum dots render them superior in vivo imaging agents compared with conventional quantum dots. We anticipate these quantum dots will also result in significant improvement in the performance of quantum dots in other applications such as solid-state lighting and illumination.

  18. Compact high-quality CdSe-CdS core-shell nanocrystals with narrow emission linewidths and suppressed blinking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ou; Zhao, Jing; Chauhan, Vikash P.; Cui, Jian; Wong, Cliff; Harris, Daniel K.; Wei, He; Han, Hee-Sun; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K.; Bawendi, Moungi G.

    2013-05-01

    High particle uniformity, high photoluminescence quantum yields, narrow and symmetric emission spectral lineshapes and minimal single-dot emission intermittency (known as blinking) have been recognized as universal requirements for the successful use of colloidal quantum dots in nearly all optical applications. However, synthesizing samples that simultaneously meet all these four criteria has proven challenging. Here, we report the synthesis of such high-quality CdSe-CdS core-shell quantum dots in an optimized process that maintains a slow growth rate of the shell through the use of octanethiol and cadmium oleate as precursors. In contrast with previous observations, single-dot blinking is significantly suppressed with only a relatively thin shell. Furthermore, we demonstrate the elimination of the ensemble luminescence photodarkening that is an intrinsic consequence of quantum dot blinking statistical ageing. Furthermore, the small size and high photoluminescence quantum yields of these novel quantum dots render them superior in vivo imaging agents compared with conventional quantum dots. We anticipate these quantum dots will also result in significant improvement in the performance of quantum dots in other applications such as solid-state lighting and illumination.

  19. Oxygen Reduction Reaction Measurements on Platinum Electrocatalysts Utilizing Rotating Disk Electrode Technique: I. Impact of Impurities, Measurement Protocols and Applied Corrections

    DOE PAGES

    Shinozaki, Kazuma; Zack, Jason W.; Richards, Ryan M.; Pivovar, Bryan S.; Kocha, Shyam S.

    2015-07-22

    The rotating disk electrode (RDE) technique is being extensively used as a screening tool to estimate the activity of novel PEMFC electrocatalysts synthesized in lab-scale (mg) quantities. Discrepancies in measured activity attributable to glassware and electrolyte impurity levels, as well as conditioning, protocols and corrections are prevalent in the literature. Moreover, the electrochemical response to a broad spectrum of commercially sourced perchloric acid and the effect of acid molarity on impurity levels and solution resistance were also assessed. Our findings reveal that an area specific activity (SA) exceeding 2.0 mA/cm2 (20 mV/s, 25°C, 100 kPa, 0.1 M HClO4) for polishedmore » poly-Pt is an indicator of impurity levels that do not impede the accurate measurement of the ORR activity of Pt based catalysts. After exploring various conditioning protocols to approach maximum utilization of the electrochemical area (ECA) and peak ORR activity without introducing catalyst degradation, an investigation of measurement protocols for ECA and ORR activity was conducted. Down-selected protocols were based on the criteria of reproducibility, duration of experiments, impurity effects and magnitude of pseudo-capacitive background correction. In sum, statistical reproducibility of ORR activity for poly-Pt and Pt supported on high surface area carbon was demonstrated.« less

  20. Oxygen Reduction Reaction Measurements on Platinum Electrocatalysts Utilizing Rotating Disk Electrode Technique: I. Impact of Impurities, Measurement Protocols and Applied Corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Shinozaki, Kazuma; Zack, Jason W.; Richards, Ryan M.; Pivovar, Bryan S.; Kocha, Shyam S.

    2015-07-22

    The rotating disk electrode (RDE) technique is being extensively used as a screening tool to estimate the activity of novel PEMFC electrocatalysts synthesized in lab-scale (mg) quantities. Discrepancies in measured activity attributable to glassware and electrolyte impurity levels, as well as conditioning, protocols and corrections are prevalent in the literature. Moreover, the electrochemical response to a broad spectrum of commercially sourced perchloric acid and the effect of acid molarity on impurity levels and solution resistance were also assessed. Our findings reveal that an area specific activity (SA) exceeding 2.0 mA/cm2 (20 mV/s, 25°C, 100 kPa, 0.1 M HClO4) for polished poly-Pt is an indicator of impurity levels that do not impede the accurate measurement of the ORR activity of Pt based catalysts. After exploring various conditioning protocols to approach maximum utilization of the electrochemical area (ECA) and peak ORR activity without introducing catalyst degradation, an investigation of measurement protocols for ECA and ORR activity was conducted. Down-selected protocols were based on the criteria of reproducibility, duration of experiments, impurity effects and magnitude of pseudo-capacitive background correction. In sum, statistical reproducibility of ORR activity for poly-Pt and Pt supported on high surface area carbon was demonstrated.

  1. A Theoretical Framework for Utilizing Long-Term Measurements of Radiation and Clouds for Solar Energy Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Xie, Y.

    2015-12-01

    One of the greatest challenges facing solar energy research is accurately predicting global horizontal irradiance (GHI) for photovoltaic (PV) modules and direct normal irradiance (DNI) for concentrated solar power (CSP) plants at the surface with a high temporal resolution. Addressing this solar energy challenge is tied ultimately to the quantitative relationship between the direct, diffuse and total radiation reaching the surface and clouds in the atmosphere, which remains elusive. Here we will first introduce a theoretical framework that relates DNI and GHI to cloud fraction and cloud albedo through two dimensionless numbers: the relative cloud radiative forcing for the direct radiation (defined as the difference between the clear sky and all sky direct downwelling radiative fluxes normalized by the clear sky direct downwelling radiative fluxes) is primarily determined by cloud fraction; the ratio of the relative cloud radiative forcing for the total downwelling radiation to the relative cloud radiative forcing for the direct radiation is primarily determined by cloud albedo. We then use decade-long measurements of partitioned radiation and cloud properties at the ARM sites to validate the theoretical relationships between the two dimensionless radiation-based parameters and cloud properties. We will also explore the potentials and challenges of using the relationships between cloud properties and radiation partition at the surface for solar energy research, opening new avenues to utilizing ARM measurements.

  2. Optical 3D Deformation Measurement Utilizing Non-planar Surface for the Development of an “Intelligent Tire”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzaki, Ryosuke; Hiraoka, Naoki; Todoroki, Akira; Mizutani, Yoshihiro

    Intelligent tires, also known as smart tires, are equipped with sensors to monitor the strain of the interior surface and the rolling radius of tire, and are expected to improve the reliability of tires and tire control systems such as anti-lock braking systems (ABS). However, the high stiffness of an attached sensor like a strain gauge causes sensors to debond from the tire rubber. In the present study, a novel optical method is used for the concurrent monitoring of in-plane strain and out-of-plane displacement (rolling radius) utilizing the non-planar surface of the monitoring object. The optical method enables noncontact measurement of strain distribution. The in-plane strain and out-of-plane displacement are calculated by using image processing with an image of the interior surface of a tire that is taken with a single CCD camera fixed on the wheel rim. This new monitoring system is applied to an aluminum beam and a commercially available radial tire. As a result, the monitoring system provides concurrent measurement of in-plane strain, out-of-plane displacement and tire pressure, and is shown to be an effective monitoring system for intelligent tires.

  3. Methane emissions measurements of natural gas components using a utility terrain vehicle and portable methane quantification system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Derek; Heltzel, Robert

    2016-11-01

    Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions are a growing problem in the United States (US). Methane (CH4) is a potent GHG produced by several stages of the natural gas sector. Current scrutiny focuses on the natural gas boom associated with unconventional shale gas; however, focus should still be given to conventional wells and outdated equipment. In an attempt to quantify these emissions, researchers modified an off-road utility terrain vehicle (UTV) to include a Full Flow Sampling system (FFS) for methane quantification. GHG emissions were measured from non-producing and remote low throughput natural gas components in the Marcellus region. Site audits were conducted at eleven locations and leaks were identified and quantified at seven locations including at a low throughput conventional gas and oil well, two out-of-service gathering compressors, a conventional natural gas well, a coalbed methane well, and two conventional and operating gathering compressors. No leaks were detected at the four remaining sites, all of which were coal bed methane wells. The total methane emissions rate from all sources measured was 5.3 ± 0.23 kg/hr, at a minimum.

  4. Quantifying the effect of health status on health care utilization using a preference-based health measure.

    PubMed

    Lima, Viviane Dias; Kopec, Jacek A

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the effect of health status on current and future payments and number of visits to health professionals in a large, representative community sample in British Columbia, Canada. The study population was comprised of all respondents to the 1994/5 cycle of the Canadian National Population Health Survey (NPHS) who were 12 years of age or older and residing in the province of British Columbia (N = 2084). Health status was measured with the Health Utilities Index (HUI). Two outcomes were defined for each subject: (a) the sum of all healthcare costs covered by the Medical Services Plan, incurred during a given fiscal year, and (b) the total number of visits to all health practitioners during the same year. Outcome data were obtained for a period 1994-1998. We examined the relationship between the HUI and healthcare use in a multivariate log-linear model. In the full sample, better health in 1994-1995 was associated with lower healthcare cost and lower number of visits from 1994 through 1998. The overall adjusted cost ratio was 0.89 (99% CI = 0.85, 0.94) and the overall adjusted visit ratio was 0.91 (99% CI + 0.87, 0.95). The effect of health status on the costs of care and on the number of visits was similar in men and women, was stronger in persons less than 45 years of age compared to those 45+, and was not different according to place of residence. We conclude that the HUI is a strong predictor of health services use over 5 years. A 0.1 improvement in health utility is associated with a 10% reduction in the costs of care and number of visits to health professionals. PMID:15550300

  5. CO{sub 2}-mitigation measures through reduction of fossil fuel burning in power utilities. Which road to go?

    SciTech Connect

    Kaupp, A.

    1996-12-31

    Five conditions, at minimum, should be examined in the comparative analysis of CO{sub 2}-mitigation options for the power sector. Under the continuing constraint of scarce financial resources for any private or public investment in the power sector, the following combination of requirements characterise a successful CO{sub 2}-mitigation project: (1) Financial attractiveness for private or public investors. (2) Low, or even negative, long range marginal costs per ton of `CO{sub 2} saved`. (3) High impact on CO{sub 2}-mitigation, which indicates a large market potential for the measure. (4) The number of individual investments required to achieve the impact is relatively small. In other words, logistical difficulties in project implementation are minimised. (5) The projects are `socially fair` and have minimal negative impact on any segment of the society. This paper deals with options to reduce carbonaceous fuel burning in the power sector. Part I explains how projects should be selected and classified. Part II describes the technical options. Since reduction of carbonaceous fuel burning may be achieved through Demand Side Management (DSM) and Supply Side Management (SSM) both are treated. Within the context of this paper SSM does not mean to expand power supply as demand grows. It means to economically generate and distribute power as efficiently as possible. In too many instances DSM has degenerated into efficient lighting programs and utility managed incentives and rebate programs. To what extent this is a desirable situation for utilities in Developing Countries that face totally different problems as their counterparts in highly industrialised countries remains to be seen. Which road to go is the topic of this paper.

  6. Which health-related quality of life score? A comparison of alternative utility measures in patients with Type 2 diabetes in the ADVANCE trial

    PubMed Central

    Glasziou, Paul; Alexander, Jan; Beller, Elaine; Clarke, Philip

    2007-01-01

    Background Diabetes has a high burden of illness both in life years lost and in disability through related co-morbidities. Accurate assessment of the non-mortality burden requires appropriate health-related quality of life and summary utility measures of which there are several contenders. The study aimed to measure the impact of diabetes on various health-related quality of life domains, and compare several summary utility measures. Methods In the ADVANCE (Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease: Preterax and Diamicron MR Controlled Evaluation) study, 978 Australian patients with Type 2 diabetes completed two health-related quality of life questionnaires at baseline: the EQ-5D and the SF-36v2, from which nine summary utility measures were calculated, and compared. The algorithms were grouped into four classes: (i) based on the EQ-5D; (ii) using fewer items than those in the SF-12 (iii) using the items in the SF-12; and (iv) using all items of the SF-36. Results Overall health-related quality of life of the subjects was good (mean utility ranged from 0.68 (±0.08) to 0.85(±0.14) over the nine utility measures) and comparable to patients without diabetes. Summary indices were well correlated with each other (r = 0.76 to 0.99), and showed lower health-related quality of life in patients with major diabetes-related events such as stroke or myocardial infarction. Despite the smaller number of items used in the scoring of the EQ-5D, it generally performed at least as well as SF-36 based methods. However, all utility measures had some limitation such as limited range or ceiling effects. Conclusion The summary utility measures showed good agreement, and showed good discrimination between major and minor health state changes. However, EQ-5D based measures performed as well and are generally simpler to use. PMID:17462100

  7. Reducing Blinking in Small Core-Multishell Quantum Dots by Carefully Balancing Confinement Potential and Induced Lattice Strain: The "Goldilocks" Effect.

    PubMed

    Omogo, Benard; Gao, Feng; Bajwa, Pooja; Kaneko, Mizuho; Heyes, Colin D

    2016-04-26

    Currently, the most common way to reduce blinking in quantum dots (QDs) is accomplished by using very thick and/or perfectly crystalline CdS shells on CdSe cores. Ideally, a nontoxic material such as ZnS is preferred to be the outer material in order to reduce environmental and cytotoxic effects. Blinking suppression with multishell configurations of CdS and ZnS has been reported only for "giant" QDs of 15 nm or more. One of the main reasons for the limited progress is that the role that interfacial trap states play in blinking in these systems is not very well understood. Here, we show a "Goldilocks" effect to reduce blinking in small (∼7 nm) QDs by carefully controlling the thicknesses of the shells in multishell QDs. Furthermore, by correlating the fluorescence lifetime components with the fraction of time that a QD spends in the on-state, both with and without applying a threshold, we found evidence for two types of blinking that separately affect the average fluorescence lifetime of a single QD. A thorough characterization of the time-resolved fluorescence at the ensemble and single-particle level allowed us to propose a detailed physical model involving both short-lived interfacial trap states and long-lived surface trap states that are coupled. This model highlights a strategy of reducing QD blinking in small QDs by balancing the magnitude of the induced lattice strain, which results in the formation of interfacial trap states between the inner shell and the outer shell, and the confinement potential that determines how accessible the interfacial trap states are. The combination of reducing blinking while maintaining a small overall QD size and using a Cd-free outer shell of ZnS will be useful in a wide array of applications, particularly for advanced bioimaging. PMID:27058120

  8. The Utility of in situ X-ray Standing Wave Measurements to Help Constrain Surface Complexation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machesky, M. L.; Ridley, M. K.; Wesolowski, D. J.; Palmer, D. A.; Zhang, Z.; Fenter, P. A.; Sturchio, N. C.

    2002-12-01

    Macroscopic ion adsorption data are typically rationalized with the aid of various Surface Complexation Models in which ion binding to surface functional groups is combined with various Electrical Double Layer (EDL) Models. However, model results are very loosely constrained with macroscopic data alone since many combinations of model parameters can adequately fit experimental data. X-ray standing wave (XSW) measurements help to greatly constrain possible model parameters since the location and bonding geometry of ions within the compact layer of the EDL can be precisely determined. The utility of XSW in constraining Surface Complexation Models will be illustrated for the adsorption of Sr2+ on rutile. Macroscopic ion adsorption data are available for rutile powders (with the (110) crystal face dominant) from 25 to 250oC, and in 0.03 and 0.30m NaCl and RbCl media. Corresponding XSW measurements are available for single crystals of rutile terminated by the (110) crystal plane at 25oC. These XSW measurements indicate that Sr2+ is bound to 2 singly coordinated and 2 bridged surface hydroxyl groups in a tetradentate configuration, with the average distance from these groups being about 1.4 angstroms. These XSW data can be accommodated by a MUSIC Model description of the rutile (110) surface combined with Stern based representation of EDL structure with the result that model fitting parameters for the rutile powder data are tightly constrained. Consequently, a major advantage of this combination of results is a more realistic description of EDL structure for the rutile (110) surface.

  9. Painful faces-induced attentional blink modulated by top-down and bottom-up mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chun; Wang, Jin-Yan; Luo, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Pain-related stimuli can capture attention in an automatic (bottom-up) or intentional (top-down) fashion. Previous studies have examined attentional capture by pain-related information using spatial attention paradigms that involve mainly a bottom-up mechanism. In the current study, we investigated the pain information-induced attentional blink (AB) using a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) task, and compared the effects of task-irrelevant and task-relevant pain distractors. Relationships between accuracy of target identification and individual traits (i.e., empathy and catastrophizing thinking about pain) were also examined. The results demonstrated that task-relevant painful faces had a significant pain information-induced AB effect, whereas task-irrelevant faces showed a near-significant trend of this effect, supporting the notion that pain-related stimuli can influence the temporal dynamics of attention. Furthermore, we found a significant negative correlation between response accuracy and pain catastrophizing score in task-relevant trials. These findings suggest that active scanning of environmental information related to pain produces greater deficits in cognition than does unintentional attention toward pain, which may represent the different ways in which healthy individuals and patients with chronic pain process pain-relevant information. These results may provide insight into the understanding of maladaptive attentional processing in patients with chronic pain. PMID:26082731

  10. Attentional blink is hierarchically modulated by phonological, morphological, semantic and lexical connections between two Chinese characters.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hong-Wen; Jin, Kai-Bin; Li, Chao-Yi; Yan, Hong-Mei

    2014-01-01

    The ability to identify the second of two targets (T2) is impaired if that target is presented less than ∼500 ms after the first (T1). This transient deficit is known as attentional blink (AB). Previous studies have suggested that the magnitude of the AB effect can be modulated by manipulating the allocation of attentional resources to T1 or T2. However, few experiments have used Chinese characters and words to explore this phenomenon. The existence of lexical, semantic, phonological and morphological connections between Chinese characters has been well established, and understanding these connections may improve our knowledge of reading Chinese. In this study, we employed varying connections between T1 and T2 and examined how these connections modulate the AB effect. We found that the strongest AB was observed when the two Chinese characters were completely unrelated, while the AB was reduced when T1 and T2 were phonologically, orthographically or semantically related and was almost completely eliminated when T1 and T2 were united in a lexical phrase. The order of activation between Chinese characters was identified as follows: (a) lexical phrases, (b) semantic connection, (c) morphological connection, (d) phonological connection and (e) unrelated words.

  11. A new look at lubrication of the ocular surface: fluid mechanics behind the blinking eyelids.

    PubMed

    Cher, Ivan

    2008-04-01

    The concept of the dacruon was presented by the author in this journal in July 2007. Dacruon, defined as "the body of unshed fluid, constantly occupying the ocular surface sac [OSS], comprising the mucoaqueous pool [MAP] and its covering lipid sealant," prompts a fresh consideration of OSS lubrication. The author notes scientific agreement that in the preocular, interpalpebral OSS (the menisco-optical domain), the mucous gel of the MAP adheres to subjacent bulbar epithelium. In the retropalpebral recesses (the "lubrication domain"), lid and globe epithelia are juxtaposed. The author proposes that microvilli and glycocalyx "grasp" the bases of dacruon mucous gels, enabling lid and globe to "drive" fluid movement. The adherent gels and associated low viscosity mucous modules mitigate friction. There is no substantive lipid layer. The modules abut, "mirror-image" fashion, forming an interface concentric with the eyeball surface about midway between the palpebral and bulbar mucosae. Here, kinetic energy originating from both lid and globe has been progressively dissipated by fluid friction, residual movement reduced to creeping flow. Shear stress is displaced from the rapidly moving epithelia, to occur between the more remote, slow-moving midzone fluids, minimizing frictional blink-related microtrauma. The midway interface serves as a "slip interface," crucial to the mucoaqueous lubrication of the OSS. Concomitantly, the OSS also forms the anterior lubricating compartment of the "ball and socket" ocular joint.

  12. The emotional blink: adult age differences in visual attention to emotional information.

    PubMed

    Langley, Linda K; Rokke, Paul D; Stark, Atiana C; Saville, Alyson L; Allen, Jaryn L; Bagne, Angela G

    2008-12-01

    To assess age differences in attention-emotion interactions, the authors asked young adults (ages 18-33 years) and older adults (ages 60-80 years) to identify target words in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) task. The second of two target words was neutral or emotional in content (positive in Experiment 1, negative in Experiment 2). In general, the ability to identify targets from a word stream declined with age. Age differences specific to the attentional blink were greatly reduced when baseline detection accuracy was equated between groups. With regard to emotion effects, older adults showed enhanced identification of both positive and negative words relative to neutral words, whereas young adults showed enhanced identification of positive words and reduced identification of negative words. Together these findings suggest that the nature of attention-emotion interactions changes with age, but there was little support for a motivational shift consistent with emotional regulation goals at an early stage of cognitive processing. PMID:19140657

  13. The influence of training on the attentional blink and psychological refractory period.

    PubMed

    Garner, K G; Tombu, M N; Dux, P E

    2014-05-01

    A growing body of research suggests that dual-task interference in sensory consolidation (e.g., the attentional blink, AB) and response selection (e.g., the psychological refractory period, PRP) stems from a common central bottleneck of information processing. With regard to response selection, it is well known that training reduces dual-task interference. We tested whether training that is known to be effective for response selection can also reduce dual-task interference in sensory consolidation. Over two experiments, performance on a PRP paradigm (Exp. 1) and on AB paradigms (differing in their stimuli and task demands, Exps. 1 and 2) was examined after participants had completed a relevant training regimen (T1 practice for both paradigms), an irrelevant training regimen (comparable sensorimotor training, not related to T1 for both tasks), a visual-search training regimen (Exp. 2 only), or after participants had been allocated to a no-training control group. Training that had shown to be effective for reducing dual-task interference in response selection was also found to be effective for reducing interference in sensory consolidation. In addition, we found some evidence that training benefits transferred to the sensory consolidation of untrained stimuli. Collectively, these findings show that training benefits can transfer across cognitive operations that draw on the central bottleneck in information processing. These findings have implications for theories of the AB and for the design of cognitive-training regimens that aim to produce transferable training benefits.

  14. Fearful, but not Angry, Expressions Diffuse Attention to Peripheral Targets in an Attentional Blink Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, James M.; Whalen, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that, within a passive viewing task, fearful facial expressions implicitly facilitate memory for contextual events, while angry facial expressions do not (Davis et al., 2011). The current study sought to more directly address the implicit effect of fearful expressions on attention for contextual events within a classic attentional paradigm (i.e., the attentional blink) where memory is tested on a trial-by-trial basis, thereby providing subjects with a clear explicit attentional strategy. Neutral faces of a single gender were presented via rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) while bordered by four gray pound signs. Participants were told to watch for a gender change within the sequence (T1). Critically, the T1 face displayed either a neutral, fearful, or angry expression. Subjects were also told to detect a color change (i.e., gray to green; T2) at one of the four pound sign locations appearing after T1. This T2 color change could appear at one of six temporal positions. Participants were told to respond via button press immediately when a T2 target was presented. We found that fearful, compared to the neutral T1 faces, significantly increased target detection ability at four of the six temporal locations (all p’s < .05) while angry expressions showed no such effects. The results of this study suggest that fearful facial expressions can uniquely and implicitly enhance environmental monitoring above and beyond explicit attentional effects related to task instructions. PMID:24708498

  15. Dissociable Mechanisms Supporting Awareness: The P300 and Gamma in a Linguistic Attentional Blink Task

    PubMed Central

    Karns, Christina M.; Neville, Helen

    2012-01-01

    As demonstrated by the attentional blink (AB) phenomenon, awareness for attended stimuli is governed by sharp capacity limits. We used a linguistic AB task to investigate the neural mechanisms that underlie failures of awareness, examining both event-related potentials and oscillatory brain activity to correctly reported and missed second targets (T2s) presented after a correctly reported first target (T1) in a rapid visual stream of distractors. Correctly reported targets occurring at a short lag (250 ms) after T1—within the classic AB period—elicited enhanced late gamma activity relative to incorrectly reported targets but showed no P300 modulation relative to missed targets. In contrast, correctly reported targets presented at a long lag (830 ms)—outside the classic AB period—elicited a greater P300 component but did not significantly modulate oscillatory activity. This double dissociation suggests that there are multiple neural mechanisms supporting awareness that may operate in parallel. Either the P300 or the gamma can index impairment in the cascade of processing leading to a target's entry into awareness. We conclude that the P300 and gamma activity reflect functionally distinct neural mechanisms, each of which plays an independent role in awareness. PMID:22166765

  16. The three responses of the blink reflex in adult and juvenile migraine.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, M; Guido, M; Libro, G; Sciruicchio, V; Puca, F

    2000-06-01

    Recent theories about migraine pathogenesis have emphasized the role of the trigeminal system in the pathogenesis of migraine attacks (Moskowitz, 1997). The blink reflex (BR) could be a suitable method to evaluate the trigeminal system in migraine, as it is generally elicited by stimulation of the trigeminal ophthalmic division (Kimura et al., 1967), involved in migraine attacks. Sixty one adult and 15 juvenile migraine without aura subjects were selected, in order to evaluate the BR features, including the subjective perceptive and pain thresholds and the R1, R2 and R3 components intensity thresholds and amplitudes. The electrophysiological procedure was carried out during the pain free phase. The findings were compared with those of 28 healthy controls, 18 adults and 10 children. In both adult and juvenile migraine sufferers an early appearance of the R3 response at almost the R2 threshold was observed in comparison with age-matched controls. Unfortunately, the anatomic and physiologic organization of the R3 component is uncertain: its early onset could suggest a dysfunction of the inhibitory control system on the trigeminal networks, which may predispose to migraine attacks. PMID:10934561

  17. The interplay of attention and consciousness in visual search, attentional blink and working memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Raffone, Antonino; Srinivasan, Narayanan; van Leeuwen, Cees

    2014-05-01

    Despite the acknowledged relationship between consciousness and attention, theories of the two have mostly been developed separately. Moreover, these theories have independently attempted to explain phenomena in which both are likely to interact, such as the attentional blink (AB) and working memory (WM) consolidation. Here, we make an effort to bridge the gap between, on the one hand, a theory of consciousness based on the notion of global workspace (GW) and, on the other, a synthesis of theories of visual attention. We offer a theory of attention and consciousness (TAC) that provides a unified neurocognitive account of several phenomena associated with visual search, AB and WM consolidation. TAC assumes multiple processing stages between early visual representation and conscious access, and extends the dynamics of the global neuronal workspace model to a visual attentional workspace (VAW). The VAW is controlled by executive routers, higher-order representations of executive operations in the GW, without the need for explicit saliency or priority maps. TAC leads to newly proposed mechanisms for illusory conjunctions, AB, inattentional blindness and WM capacity, and suggests neural correlates of phenomenal consciousness. Finally, the theory reconciles the all-or-none and graded perspectives on conscious representation.

  18. Attentional blink and impulsiveness: evidence for higher functional impulsivity in non-blinkers compared to blinkers.

    PubMed

    Troche, Stefan J; Rammsayer, Thomas H

    2013-08-01

    The attentional blink (AB) represents a fundamental limit of information processing. About 5-10 % of all subjects, however, do not show the AB. Because of the low base rate of these so-called non-blinkers, studies on mechanisms underlying non-blinkers' absent AB are extremely scant. The few existent studies found non-blinkers to be faster and more efficient in information processing compared to blinkers. A personality trait that has been linked previously to speed and efficiency of information processing as well as to the magnitude of the AB is impulsivity. Therefore, the present study investigated whether 15 non-blinkers and 15 blinkers differed from each other in functional and/or dysfunctional impulsivity. To obtain a better understanding of the underlying processing mechanisms, the P300 component in the event-related potential was recorded during performance on the AB task. Our results indicated higher functional impulsivity in non-blinkers compared to blinkers but no differences between the two groups in dysfunctional impulsivity. As indicated by shorter P300 latency, non-blinkers processed information faster than blinkers after the AB period but slower during the AB period. These speed effects, however, were not associated with functional impulsivity. Thus, impulsivity and speed of information processing appear to represent two rather independent sources for non-blinkers' absent AB.

  19. The three responses of the blink reflex in adult and juvenile migraine.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, M; Guido, M; Libro, G; Sciruicchio, V; Puca, F

    2000-06-01

    Recent theories about migraine pathogenesis have emphasized the role of the trigeminal system in the pathogenesis of migraine attacks (Moskowitz, 1997). The blink reflex (BR) could be a suitable method to evaluate the trigeminal system in migraine, as it is generally elicited by stimulation of the trigeminal ophthalmic division (Kimura et al., 1967), involved in migraine attacks. Sixty one adult and 15 juvenile migraine without aura subjects were selected, in order to evaluate the BR features, including the subjective perceptive and pain thresholds and the R1, R2 and R3 components intensity thresholds and amplitudes. The electrophysiological procedure was carried out during the pain free phase. The findings were compared with those of 28 healthy controls, 18 adults and 10 children. In both adult and juvenile migraine sufferers an early appearance of the R3 response at almost the R2 threshold was observed in comparison with age-matched controls. Unfortunately, the anatomic and physiologic organization of the R3 component is uncertain: its early onset could suggest a dysfunction of the inhibitory control system on the trigeminal networks, which may predispose to migraine attacks.

  20. The interplay of attention and consciousness in visual search, attentional blink and working memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Raffone, Antonino; Srinivasan, Narayanan; van Leeuwen, Cees

    2014-05-01

    Despite the acknowledged relationship between consciousness and attention, theories of the two have mostly been developed separately. Moreover, these theories have independently attempted to explain phenomena in which both are likely to interact, such as the attentional blink (AB) and working memory (WM) consolidation. Here, we make an effort to bridge the gap between, on the one hand, a theory of consciousness based on the notion of global workspace (GW) and, on the other, a synthesis of theories of visual attention. We offer a theory of attention and consciousness (TAC) that provides a unified neurocognitive account of several phenomena associated with visual search, AB and WM consolidation. TAC assumes multiple processing stages between early visual representation and conscious access, and extends the dynamics of the global neuronal workspace model to a visual attentional workspace (VAW). The VAW is controlled by executive routers, higher-order representations of executive operations in the GW, without the need for explicit saliency or priority maps. TAC leads to newly proposed mechanisms for illusory conjunctions, AB, inattentional blindness and WM capacity, and suggests neural correlates of phenomenal consciousness. Finally, the theory reconciles the all-or-none and graded perspectives on conscious representation. PMID:24639586

  1. Can attenuation of attentional blink also evoke removal of repetition blindness?

    PubMed

    Choi, Hoon; Watanabe, Takeo

    2014-06-01

    A recent study showed that attentional blink (AB), which has been considered to reflect the capacity limitation of visual temporal attention, can be attenuated after a short period of the color-salient training, in which the second target (T2) within the AB period is given a salient color (Choi et al., 2012). The current study explored whether the effect of the color-salient training could be transferred to another phenomenon. In addition to AB, repetition blindness (RB) was employed, which is phenomenologically similar to, but fundamentally different from AB. After completion of the color-salient training with a nonrepeated T2 (corresponding to AB), RB was still observed, whereas AB was completely removed. However, the color-salient training with a repeated T2 (similar to RB) induced not only a significant reduction of RB but also an attenuation of AB. This result provides further evidence for dissociation between AB and RB. In addition, it implies that the color-salient training improves the attentional control mechanism related to target-distractor discrimination rather than to the perceptual system.

  2. Painful faces-induced attentional blink modulated by top–down and bottom–up mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Chun; Wang, Jin-Yan; Luo, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Pain-related stimuli can capture attention in an automatic (bottom–up) or intentional (top–down) fashion. Previous studies have examined attentional capture by pain-related information using spatial attention paradigms that involve mainly a bottom–up mechanism. In the current study, we investigated the pain information-induced attentional blink (AB) using a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) task, and compared the effects of task-irrelevant and task-relevant pain distractors. Relationships between accuracy of target identification and individual traits (i.e., empathy and catastrophizing thinking about pain) were also examined. The results demonstrated that task-relevant painful faces had a significant pain information-induced AB effect, whereas task-irrelevant faces showed a near-significant trend of this effect, supporting the notion that pain-related stimuli can influence the temporal dynamics of attention. Furthermore, we found a significant negative correlation between response accuracy and pain catastrophizing score in task-relevant trials. These findings suggest that active scanning of environmental information related to pain produces greater deficits in cognition than does unintentional attention toward pain, which may represent the different ways in which healthy individuals and patients with chronic pain process pain-relevant information. These results may provide insight into the understanding of maladaptive attentional processing in patients with chronic pain. PMID:26082731

  3. The attentional blink is not affected by backward masking of T2, T2-mask SOA, or level of T2 impoverishment.

    PubMed

    Jannati, Ali; Spalek, Thomas M; Lagroix, Hayley E P; Di Lollo, Vincent

    2012-02-01

    Identification of the second of two targets (T2) is impaired when presented shortly after the first (T1). This attentional blink (AB) is thought to arise from a delay in T2 processing during which T2 is vulnerable to masking. Conventional studies have measured T2 accuracy which is constrained by the 100% ceiling. We avoided this problem by using a dynamic threshold-tracking procedure that is inherently free from ceiling constraints. In two experiments we examined how AB magnitude is affected by three masking-related factors: (a) presence/absence of T2 mask, (b) T2-mask stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA), and (c) level of T2 impoverishment (signal-to-noise ratio [SNR]). In Experiment 1, overall accuracy decreased with T2-mask SOA. The magnitude of the AB, however, was invariant with SOA and with mask presence/absence. Experiment 2 further showed that the AB was invariant with T2 SNR. The relationship among mask presence/absence, SOA, and T2 SNR and the AB is encompassed in a qualitative model. PMID:22060143

  4. Sensing device and method for measuring emission time delay during irradiation of targeted samples utilizing variable phase tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, J. D. Sheldon (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring emission time delay during irradiation of targeted samples by utilizing digital signal processing to determine the emission phase shift caused by the sample is disclosed. The apparatus includes a source of electromagnetic radiation adapted to irradiate a target sample. A mechanism generates first and second digital input signals of known frequencies with a known phase relationship, and a device then converts the first and second digital input signals to analog sinusoidal signals. An element is provided to direct the first input signal to the electromagnetic radiation source to modulate the source by the frequency thereof to irradiate the target sample and generate a target sample emission. A device detects the target sample emission and produces a corresponding first output signal having a phase shift relative to the phase of the first input signal, the phase shift being caused by the irradiation time delay in the sample. A member produces a known phase shift in the second input signal to create a second output signal. A mechanism is then provided for converting each of the first and second analog output signals to digital signals. A mixer receives the first and second digital output signals and compares the signal phase relationship therebetween to produce a signal indicative of the change in phase relationship between the first and second output signals caused by the target sample emission. Finally, a feedback arrangement alters the phase of the second input signal based on the mixer signal to ultimately place the first and second output signals in quadrature. Mechanisms for enhancing this phase comparison and adjustment technique are also disclosed.

  5. About the effect of eye blinking on drug release from pHEMA-based hydrogels: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Galante, R; Paradiso, P; Moutinho, M G; Fernandes, A I; Mata, J L G; Matos, A P A; Colaço, R; Saramago, B; Serro, A P

    2015-01-01

    The development of new ophthalmic drug delivery systems capable of increasing the residence time of drugs in the eye and improve its bioavailability relatively to eyedrops has been object of intense research in recent years. Several studies have shown that drug-loaded therapeutic soft contact lenses (SCLs) constitute a promising approach, with several potential advantages as compared with collyria. The main objective of this work is to study the effect of repetitive load and friction cycles caused by the eye blinking, on the drug release from hydrogels used in SCLs which, as far as we know, was never investigated before. Two poly-2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate-based hydrogels, pHEMA-T and pHEMA-UV, were used as model materials. Levofloxaxin was chosen as model drug. The hydrogels were fully characterized in what concerns structural and physicochemical properties. pHEMA-UV revealed some superficial porosity and a lower short-range order than pHEMA-T. We observe that the load and friction cycles enhanced the drug release from pHEMA-UV hydrogels. The application of a simple mathematical model, which takes into account the drug dilution caused by the tear flow, showed that the enhancement of the drug release caused by blinking on this hydrogel may be relevant in in vivo conditions. Conversely, the more sustained drug release from pHEMA-T is not affected by load and friction cycles. The conclusion is that, depending on the physicochemical and microstructural characteristics of the hydrogels, blinking is a factor that may affect the amount of drug delivered to the eye by SCLs and should thus be considered.

  6. Distraction by emotion in early adolescence: affective facilitation and interference during the attentional blink

    PubMed Central

    Heim, Sabine; Benasich, April A.; Keil, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which early adolescents (aged 10–13 years) differ from adults in their sensitivity to attention capture by affective stimuli during rapid processing. A rapid serial visual presentation paradigm (RSVP) was implemented as a dual task, requiring the report of two green target stimuli embedded in a stream of distractors. Known as the “attentional blink” (AB), task performance is typically impaired when the first and second targets (T1 and T2, respectively) are separated by at least one distractor and about 200 ms of time. Here we used written verbs of pleasant, neutral, and unpleasant content as T1 items, while affectively neutral exemplars served as T2 and distractor events. The temporal distance between T1 and T2 was manipulated to contain either one distractor (intertarget interval 232 ms) or five distractors (intertarget interval 696 ms). Students reported pleasant T1 words more accurately, compared to neutral and unpleasant words, indicating facilitation of appetitive content on performance during RSVP. Emotional relevance of T1 was at the expense of T2 accuracy: at an intertarget interval of 232 ms (i.e., during the AB period), identification of (neutral) T2 words was impaired when preceded by pleasant and unpleasant T1s. No interference across targets was observed, however, beyond the blink period, in which T1 and T2 were separated by 696 ms. Thus, emotionally relevant events capture and hold attentional resources, at the cost of attentive processing in subsequent episodes. Contrary to our findings in adults, these capture effects were most obvious when the available capacity was limited, i.e., during the critical interval of the AB. The findings are discussed in light of the use of alternative cognitive strategies as development proceeds beyond early adolescence into adulthood. PMID:24027547

  7. Dynamics of a pre-lens tear film after a blink: Model, evolution, and rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usha, R.; Anjalaiah, Sanyasiraju, Y. V. S. S.

    2013-11-01

    A mathematical model is developed to investigate the dynamics and rupture of a pre-lens tear film on a contact lens. The contact lens is modeled as a saturated porous medium of constant, finite thickness and is described by the Darcy-Brinkman equations with stress-jump condition at the interface. The model incorporates the influence of capillarity, gravitational drainage, contact lens properties such as the permeability, the porosity, and the thickness of the contact lens on the evolution and rupture of a pre-lens tear film, when the eyelid has opened after a blink. Two models are derived for the evolution of a pre-lens tear film thickness using lubrication theory and are solved numerically; the first uses shear-free surface condition and the second, the tangentially immobile free surface condition. The results reveal that life span of a pre-lens tear film is longer on a thinner contact lens for all values of permeability and porosity parameter considered. An increase in permeability of contact lens, porosity or stress-jump parameter increases the rate of thinning of the film and advances the rupture time. The viscous-viscous interaction between the porous contact lens and the pre-lens tear film increases the resistance offered by the frictional forces to the rate of thinning of pre-lens tear film. This slows down the thinning process and hence delays the rupture of the film as compared to that predicted by the models of Nong and Anderson [SIAM. J. Appl. Math. 70, 2771-2795 (2010)] derived in the framework of Darcy model.

  8. Character Decomposition and Transposition Processes in Chinese Compound Words Modulates Attentional Blink

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hongwen; Gao, Min; Yan, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    The attentional blink (AB) is the phenomenon in which the identification of the second of two targets (T2) is attenuated if it is presented less than 500 ms after the first target (T1). Although the AB is eliminated in canonical word conditions, it remains unclear whether the character order in compound words affects the magnitude of the AB. Morpheme decomposition and transposition of Chinese two-character compound words can provide an effective means to examine AB priming and to assess combinations of the component representations inherent to visual word identification. In the present study, we examined the processing of consecutive targets in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) paradigm using Chinese two-character compound words in which the two characters were transposed to form meaningful words or meaningless combinations (reversible, transposed, or canonical words). We found that when two Chinese characters that form a compound word, regardless of their order, are presented in an RSVP sequence, the likelihood of an AB for the second character is greatly reduced or eliminated compared to when the two characters constitute separate words rather than a compound word. Moreover, the order of the report for the two characters is more likely to be reversed when the normal order of the two characters in a compound word is reversed, especially when the interval between the presentation of the two characters is extremely short. These findings are more consistent with the cognitive strategy hypothesis than the resource-limited hypothesis during character decomposition and transposition of Chinese two-character compound words. These results suggest that compound characters are perceived as a unit, rather than two separate words. The data further suggest that readers could easily understand the text with character transpositions in compound words during Chinese reading. PMID:27379003

  9. Tracking the attentional blink profile: a cross-sectional study from childhood to adolescence.

    PubMed

    Heim, Sabine; Benasich, April A; Wirth, Nadine; Keil, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    This cross-sectional study is the first to examine the developmental trajectory of temporal attention control from childhood to adolescence. We used a rapid serial visual presentation paradigm, calling for the identification of two targets (T1 and T2) embedded in a distractor stream. In adults, manipulating the lag time within the target doublet typically leads to pronounced impairment in report for T2, when it follows T1 after approximately 200 ms, with one intervening distractor (lag 2); this is referred to as the attentional blink (AB). Participants, however, tend to identify T2 more often when the targets have occurred in a row ("lag-1 sparing"), or are separated by larger lag times, resulting in a hook-shaped accuracy profile. Here, we investigated the extent to which this AB profile undergoes systematic developmental changes in 204 students aged between 6 and 16 years (grades 1-10). T1-T2 lags varied from zero up to seven intervening distractors. Behavioral accuracy in younger children (grades 1-2) was found to follow a linear path, having its minimum at the earliest lag. Lag-1 sparing, accompanied by a relative accuracy loss in the AB interval, first appeared in grade 3, and became more robust in grade 4. From grades 5-6, the hook-shaped profile remained stable, with steady increases in overall performance up through the highest grades. This suggests that younger children's performance is limited by processing speed, while from preadolescence onwards, children are increasingly able to identify rapid target sequences at the cost of an interference sensitive, higher control system. PMID:24337973

  10. A Method for Utilizing Bivariate Efficacy Outcome Measures to Screen Regimens for Activity in 2-Stage Phase II Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Larry; Litwin, Samuel; Yothers, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Background Most phase II clinical trials utilize a single primary endpoint to determine the promise of a regimen for future study. However, many disorders manifest themselves in complex ways. For example, migraine headaches can cause pain, auras, photophobia, and emesis. Investigators may believe a drug is effective at reducing migraine pain and the severity of emesis during an attack. Nevertheless, they could still be interested in proceeding with development of the drug if it is effective against only one of these symptoms. Such a study would be a candidate for a clinical trial with co-primary endpoints. Purpose The purpose of the article is to provide a method for designing a 2-stage clinical trial with dichotomous co-primary endpoints of efficacy that has the ability to detect activity on either response measure with high probability when the drug is active on one or both measures, while at the same time rejecting the drug with high probability when there is little activity on both dimensions. The design enables early closure for futility and is flexible with regard to attained accrual. Methods The design is proposed in the context of cancer clinical trials where tumor response is used to assess a drug's ability to kill tumor cells and progression-free survival (PFS) status after a certain period is used to evaluate the drug's ability to stabilize tumor growth. Both endpoints are assumed to be distributed as binomial random variables, and uninteresting probabilities of success are determined from historical controls. Given the necessity of accrual flexibility, exhaustive searching algorithms to find optimum designs do not seem feasible at this time. Instead, critical values are determined for realized sample sizes using specific procedures. Then accrual windows are found to achieve a design's desired level of significance, probability of early termination (PET), and power. Results The design is illustrated with a clinical trial that examined bevacizumab in

  11. Two blinking mechanisms in highly confined AgInS2 and AgInS2/ZnS quantum dots evaluated by single particle spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cichy, B.; Rich, R.; Olejniczak, A.; Gryczynski, Z.; Strek, W.

    2016-02-01

    Ternary AgInS2 quantum dots (QDs) have been found as promising cadmium-free, red-shifted, and tunable luminescent bio-probes with efficient Stokes and anti-Stokes excitations and luminescence lifetimes (ca. 100 ns) convenient for time resolved techniques like fluorescence life-time imaging. Although the spectral properties of the AgInS2 QDs are encouraging, the complex recombination kinetics in the QDs being still far from understood, limits their full utility. In this paper we report on a model describing the recombination pathways responsible for large deviations from the first-order decay law observed commonly in the ternary chalcogenides. The presented results were evaluated by means of individual AgInS2 QD spectroscopy aided by first principles calculations including the electronic structure and structural reconstruction of the QDs. Special attention was devoted to study the impact of the surface charge state on the excited state relaxation and effect of its passivation by Zn2+ ion alloying. Two different blinking mechanisms related to defect-assisted charge imbalance in the QD responsible for fast non-radiative relaxation of the excited states as well as surface recharging of the QD were found as the major causes of deviations from the first-order decay law. Careful optimization of the AgInS2 QDs would help to fabricate new red-shifted and tunable fluorescent bio-probes characterized by low-toxicity, high quantum yield, long luminescence lifetime, and time stability, leading to many novel in vitro and in vivo applications based on fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) and time-gated detection.Ternary AgInS2 quantum dots (QDs) have been found as promising cadmium-free, red-shifted, and tunable luminescent bio-probes with efficient Stokes and anti-Stokes excitations and luminescence lifetimes (ca. 100 ns) convenient for time resolved techniques like fluorescence life-time imaging. Although the spectral properties of the AgInS2 QDs are encouraging, the complex

  12. Two blinking mechanisms in highly confined AgInS2 and AgInS2/ZnS quantum dots evaluated by single particle spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cichy, B; Rich, R; Olejniczak, A; Gryczynski, Z; Strek, W

    2016-02-21

    Ternary AgInS2 quantum dots (QDs) have been found as promising cadmium-free, red-shifted, and tunable luminescent bio-probes with efficient Stokes and anti-Stokes excitations and luminescence lifetimes (ca. 100 ns) convenient for time resolved techniques like fluorescence life-time imaging. Although the spectral properties of the AgInS2 QDs are encouraging, the complex recombination kinetics in the QDs being still far from understood, limits their full utility. In this paper we report on a model describing the recombination pathways responsible for large deviations from the first-order decay law observed commonly in the ternary chalcogenides. The presented results were evaluated by means of individual AgInS2 QD spectroscopy aided by first principles calculations including the electronic structure and structural reconstruction of the QDs. Special attention was devoted to study the impact of the surface charge state on the excited state relaxation and effect of its passivation by Zn(2+) ion alloying. Two different blinking mechanisms related to defect-assisted charge imbalance in the QD responsible for fast non-radiative relaxation of the excited states as well as surface recharging of the QD were found as the major causes of deviations from the first-order decay law. Careful optimization of the AgInS2 QDs would help to fabricate new red-shifted and tunable fluorescent bio-probes characterized by low-toxicity, high quantum yield, long luminescence lifetime, and time stability, leading to many novel in vitro and in vivo applications based on fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) and time-gated detection.

  13. ViSA: a neurodynamic model for visuo-spatial working memory, attentional blink, and conscious access.

    PubMed

    Simione, Luca; Raffone, Antonino; Wolters, Gezinus; Salmas, Paola; Nakatani, Chie; Belardinelli, Marta Olivetti; van Leeuwen, Cees

    2012-10-01

    Two separate lines of study have clarified the role of selectivity in conscious access to visual information. Both involve presenting multiple targets and distracters: one simultaneously in a spatially distributed fashion, the other sequentially at a single location. To understand their findings in a unified framework, we propose a neurodynamic model for Visual Selection and Awareness (ViSA). ViSA supports the view that neural representations for conscious access and visuo-spatial working memory are globally distributed and are based on recurrent interactions between perceptual and access control processors. Its flexible global workspace mechanisms enable a unitary account of a broad range of effects: It accounts for the limited storage capacity of visuo-spatial working memory, attentional cueing, and efficient selection with multi-object displays, as well as for the attentional blink and associated sparing and masking effects. In particular, the speed of consolidation for storage in visuo-spatial working memory in ViSA is not fixed but depends adaptively on the input and recurrent signaling. Slowing down of consolidation due to weak bottom-up and recurrent input as a result of brief presentation and masking leads to the attentional blink. Thus, ViSA goes beyond earlier 2-stage and neuronal global workspace accounts of conscious processing limitations.

  14. How humans search for targets through time: A review of data and theory from the attentional blink

    PubMed Central

    Dux, Paul E.; Marois, Réne

    2009-01-01

    Under conditions of rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP), subjects display a reduced ability to report the second of two targets (Target 2; T2) in a stream of distractors if it appears within 200–500 ms of Target 1 (T1). This effect, known as the attentional blink (AB), has been central in characterizing the limits of humans’ ability to consciously perceive stimuli distributed across time. Here we review theoretical accounts of the AB and examine how they explain key findings in the literature. We conclude that the AB arises from attentional demands of T1 for selection, working memory encoding, episodic registration and response selection, which prevents this high-level central resource from being applied to T2 at short T1–T2 lags. T1 processing also transiently impairs the re-deployment of these attentional resources to subsequent targets, and the inhibition of distractors that appear in close temporal proximity to T2. While these findings are consistent with a multi-factorial account of the AB, they can also be largely explained by assuming that the activation of these multiple processes depend on a common capacity-limited attentional process to select behaviorally relevant events presented amongst temporally distributed distractors. Thus, at its core, the attentional blink may ultimately reveal the temporal limits of the deployment of selective attention. PMID:19933555

  15. Autocorrelation analysis for the unbiased determination of power-law exponents in single-quantum-dot blinking.

    PubMed

    Houel, Julien; Doan, Quang T; Cajgfinger, Thomas; Ledoux, Gilles; Amans, David; Aubret, Antoine; Dominjon, Agnès; Ferriol, Sylvain; Barbier, Rémi; Nasilowski, Michel; Lhuillier, Emmanuel; Dubertret, Benoît; Dujardin, Christophe; Kulzer, Florian

    2015-01-27

    We present an unbiased and robust analysis method for power-law blinking statistics in the photoluminescence of single nanoemitters, allowing us to extract both the bright- and dark-state power-law exponents from the emitters' intensity autocorrelation functions. As opposed to the widely used threshold method, our technique therefore does not require discriminating the emission levels of bright and dark states in the experimental intensity timetraces. We rely on the simultaneous recording of 450 emission timetraces of single CdSe/CdS core/shell quantum dots at a frame rate of 250 Hz with single photon sensitivity. Under these conditions, our approach can determine ON and OFF power-law exponents with a precision of 3% from a comparison to numerical simulations, even for shot-noise-dominated emission signals with an average intensity below 1 photon per frame and per quantum dot. These capabilities pave the way for the unbiased, threshold-free determination of blinking power-law exponents at the microsecond time scale.

  16. Hybrid EEG—Eye Tracker: Automatic Identification and Removal of Eye Movement and Blink Artifacts from Electroencephalographic Signal

    PubMed Central

    Mannan, Malik M. Naeem; Kim, Shinjung; Jeong, Myung Yung; Kamran, M. Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Contamination of eye movement and blink artifacts in Electroencephalogram (EEG) recording makes the analysis of EEG data more difficult and could result in mislead findings. Efficient removal of these artifacts from EEG data is an essential step in improving classification accuracy to develop the brain-computer interface (BCI). In this paper, we proposed an automatic framework based on independent component analysis (ICA) and system identification to identify and remove ocular artifacts from EEG data by using hybrid EEG and eye tracker system. The performance of the proposed algorithm is illustrated using experimental and standard EEG datasets. The proposed algorithm not only removes the ocular artifacts from artifactual zone but also preserves the neuronal activity related EEG signals in non-artifactual zone. The comparison with the two state-of-the-art techniques namely ADJUST based ICA and REGICA reveals the significant improved performance of the proposed algorithm for removing eye movement and blink artifacts from EEG data. Additionally, results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can achieve lower relative error and higher mutual information values between corrected EEG and artifact-free EEG data. PMID:26907276

  17. An assessment of the relationship between clinical utility and predictive ability measures and the impact of mean risk in the population

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Measures of clinical utility (net benefit and event free life years) have been recommended in the assessment of a new predictor in a risk prediction model. However, it is not clear how they relate to the measures of predictive ability and reclassification, such as the c-statistic and Net Reclassification Improvement (NRI), or how these measures are affected by differences in mean risk between populations when a fixed cutpoint to define high risk is assumed. Methods We examined the relationship between measures of clinical utility (net benefit, event free life years) and predictive ability (c-statistic, binary c-statistic, continuous NRI(0), NRI with two cutpoints, binary NRI) using simulated data and the Framingham dataset. Results In the analysis of simulated data, the addition of a new predictor tended to result in more people being treated when the mean risk was less than the cutpoint, and fewer people being treated for mean risks beyond the cutpoint. The reclassification and clinical utility measures showed similar relationships with mean risk when the mean risk was less than the cutpoint and the baseline model was not strong. However, when the mean risk was greater than the cutpoint, or the baseline model was strong, the reclassification and clinical utility measures diverged in their relationship with mean risk. Although the risk of CVD was lower for women compared to men in the Framingham dataset, the measures of predictive ability, reclassification and clinical utility were both larger for women. The difference in these results was, in part, due to the larger hazard ratio associated with the additional risk predictor (systolic blood pressure) for women. Conclusion Measures such as the c-statistic and the measures of reclassification do not capture the consequences of implementing different prediction models. We do not recommend their use in evaluating which new predictors may be clinically useful in a particular population. We recommend that a

  18. Measuring Growth in Bilingual and Monolingual Children's English Productive Vocabulary Development: The Utility of Combining Parent and Teacher Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vagh, Shaher Banu; Pan, Barbara Alexander; Mancilla-Martinez, Jeannette

    2009-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined growth in the English productive vocabularies of bilingual and monolingual children between ages 24 and 36 months and explored the utility and validity of supplementing parent reports with teacher reports to improve the estimation of children's vocabulary. Low-income, English-speaking and English/Spanish-speaking…

  19. Program Measurement and Evaluation; The Utilization of Data and Its Relationship to Program Planning and Implementation Within Library Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, Thomas C.

    The data gathering forms and activities developed during the planning and implementation of an adult independent study and guidance program at the Salt Lake City Public Library are described. The need for a utilization of this data is outlined, and the study's goals and objectives are stated. Appendixes contain flow charts of the Salt Lake City…

  20. Electrically elicited blink reflex and early acoustic evoked potentials in circumscribed and diffuse brain stem lesions.

    PubMed

    Klug, N; Csécsei, G

    1987-01-01

    In the present paper, the function of the brain stem in patients with brain stem lesions of various aetiology is investigated with electrophysiological methods. The clinical observations are supplemented by experimental investigations on cats, in which the blink reflex and the early acoustic evoked potentials were registered during the acute elevation of intracranial pressure. The findings in patients with circumscribed space-occupying lesions in the posterior fossa document that the registration of the BR and the BAEP have a functional diagnostic significance above and beyond the neurological and radiological investigation. In the case of the cerebellar space occupations, specific alterations could not be observed. On the contrary, the alterations of BR and BAEP indicate a general disturbance of brain stem function, possibly as a result of a general increase of intracranial pressure. In cerebellopontine angle tumours, both BR and BAEP showed specific alterations which were usually asymmetrical. The BR changes ipsilateral to the tumour are of major topodiagnostic significance, whereas the alterations of the contralateral potential are especially informative in the registration of BAEP. The alterations of BR and BAEP also allow an appraisal of the localization and extent of the lesion in primary space occupations in the brain stem: A pathological R1 indicates a pontine lesion, whereas pathological R2 responses are found in medullary and in oral pontine and mesencephalic lesions. In contrast to cerebellopontine angle tumours, the BAEP tends to show symmetrical alterations in primary brain stem lesions. The prolongations of interpeak latencies correspond to the brain stem segment concerned, and the same also applies to pathological amplitude reduction and deformations of individual potentials. In patients with localized brain stem damage, the reflex pathway of R2 is discussed on the basis of the BR findings. In contrast to the view held up to now that only structures

  1. Dopamine and the Management of Attentional Resources: Genetic Markers of Striatal D2 Dopamine Predict Individual Differences in the Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colzato, Lorenza S.; Slagter, Heleen A.; de Rover, Mischa; Hommel, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    The attentional blink (AB)--a deficit in reporting the second of two target stimuli presented in close succession in a rapid sequence of distracters--has been related to processing limitations in working memory. Given that dopamine (DA) plays a crucial role working memory, the present study tested whether individual differences in the size of the…

  2. Making Meaningful Measurement in Survey Research: A Demonstration of the Utility of the Rasch Model. IR Applications. Volume 28

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royal, Kenneth D.

    2010-01-01

    Quality measurement is essential in every form of research, including institutional research and assessment. This paper addresses the erroneous assumptions institutional researchers often make with regard to survey research and provides an alternative method to producing more valid and reliable measures. Rasch measurement models are discussed and…

  3. Quantitative measurements of regional glucose utilization and rate of valine incorporation into proteins by double-tracer autoradiography in the rat brain tumor model

    SciTech Connect

    Kirikae, M.; Diksic, M.; Yamamoto, Y.L.

    1989-02-01

    We examined the rate of glucose utilization and the rate of valine incorporation into proteins using 2-(/sup 18/F)fluoro-2-deoxyglucose and L-(1-14C)-valine in a rat brain tumor model by quantitative double-tracer autoradiography. We found that in the implanted tumor the rate of valine incorporation into proteins was about 22 times and the rate of glucose utilization was about 1.5 times that in the contralateral cortex. (In the ipsilateral cortex, the tumor had a profound effect on glucose utilization but no effect on the rate of valine incorporation into proteins.) Our findings suggest that it is more useful to measure protein synthesis than glucose utilization to assess the effectiveness of antitumor agents and their toxicity to normal brain tissue. We compared two methods to estimate the rate of valine incorporation: kinetic (quantitation done using an operational equation and the average brain rate coefficients) and washed slices (unbound labeled valine removed by washing brain slices in 10% trichloroacetic acid). The results were the same using either method. It would seem that the kinetic method can thus be used for quantitative measurement of protein synthesis in brain tumors and normal brain tissue using (/sup 11/C)-valine with positron emission tomography.

  4. Non-streaming high-efficiency perforated semiconductor neutron detectors, methods of making same and measuring wand and detector modules utilizing same

    DOEpatents

    McGregor, Douglas S.; Shultis, John K.; Rice, Blake B.; McNeil, Walter J.; Solomon, Clell J.; Patterson, Eric L.; Bellinger, Steven L.

    2010-12-21

    Non-streaming high-efficiency perforated semiconductor neutron detectors, method of making same and measuring wands and detector modules utilizing same are disclosed. The detectors have improved mechanical structure, flattened angular detector responses, and reduced leakage current. A plurality of such detectors can be assembled into imaging arrays, and can be used for neutron radiography, remote neutron sensing, cold neutron imaging, SNM monitoring, and various other applications.

  5. Linear Acceleration Measurement Utilizing Inter-Instrument Synchronization: A Comparison between Accelerometers and Motion-Based Tracking Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callaway, Andrew J.; Cobb, Jon E.

    2012-01-01

    Where as video cameras are a reliable and established technology for the measurement of kinematic parameters, accelerometers are increasingly being employed for this type of measurement due to their ease of use, performance, and comparatively low cost. However, the majority of accelerometer-based studies involve a single channel due to the…

  6. Oxygen consumption rate v. rate of energy utilization of fishes: a comparison and brief history of the two measurements.

    PubMed

    Nelson, J A

    2016-01-01

    Accounting for energy use by fishes has been taking place for over 200 years. The original, and continuing gold standard for measuring energy use in terrestrial animals, is to account for the waste heat produced by all reactions of metabolism, a process referred to as direct calorimetry. Direct calorimetry is not easy or convenient in terrestrial animals and is extremely difficult in aquatic animals. Thus, the original and most subsequent measurements of metabolic activity in fishes have been measured via indirect calorimetry. Indirect calorimetry takes advantage of the fact that oxygen is consumed and carbon dioxide is produced during the catabolic conversion of foodstuffs or energy reserves to useful ATP energy. As measuring [CO2 ] in water is more challenging than measuring [O2 ], most indirect calorimetric studies on fishes have used the rate of O2 consumption. To relate measurements of O2 consumption back to actual energy usage requires knowledge of the substrate being oxidized. Many contemporary studies of O2 consumption by fishes do not attempt to relate this measurement back to actual energy usage. Thus, the rate of oxygen consumption (M˙O2 ) has become a measurement in its own right that is not necessarily synonymous with metabolic rate. Because all extant fishes are obligate aerobes (many fishes engage in substantial net anaerobiosis, but all require oxygen to complete their life cycle), this discrepancy does not appear to be of great concern to the fish biology community, and reports of fish oxygen consumption, without being related to energy, have proliferated. Unfortunately, under some circumstances, these measures can be quite different from one another. A review of the methodological history of the two measurements and a look towards the future are included.

  7. Correlation between photon-emission intervals in blinking luminescence of single CdSe/CdS nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitukhnovskii, A. G.; Pereverzev, A. Yu.; Fedyanin, V. V.; Ambrozevich, S. A.; Vasiliev, R. B.; Dirin, D. N.

    2012-09-01

    The statistics of luminescence from single CdSe/CdS core/shell semiconductor nanocrystals under CW laser excitation at room temperature is experimentally investigated by recording sequences of absolute arrival times of the emitted photons. It is shown that the correlation coefficient for consecutive intervals between the photon-arrival times differs from zero. The correlation persists for photon-arrival intervals separated by two or more photon-detection events, until the time between the two intervals becomes, on average, as long as 180 ms, which corresponds to about 103 detected photons. A simulation of the luminescence process supports the conclusion that this correlation is linked to the blinking character of the quantum-dot luminescence.

  8. Single Cesium Lead Halide Perovskite Nanocrystals at Low Temperature: Fast Single-Photon Emission, Reduced Blinking, and Exciton Fine Structure

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Metal-halide semiconductors with perovskite crystal structure are attractive due to their facile solution processability, and have recently been harnessed very successfully for high-efficiency photovoltaics and bright light sources. Here, we show that at low temperature single colloidal cesium lead halide (CsPbX3, where X = Cl/Br) nanocrystals exhibit stable, narrow-band emission with suppressed blinking and small spectral diffusion. Photon antibunching demonstrates unambiguously nonclassical single-photon emission with radiative decay on the order of 250 ps, representing a significant acceleration compared to other common quantum emitters. High-resolution spectroscopy provides insight into the complex nature of the emission process such as the fine structure and charged exciton dynamics. PMID:26771336

  9. Utilizing Longitudinal Measures of Fetal Growth to Create a Standard Method to Assess the Impacts of Maternal Disease and Environmental Exposure.

    PubMed

    Cantonwine, David E; Ferguson, Kelly K; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Chen, Yin-Hsiu; Smith, Nicole A; Robinson, Julian N; Doubilet, Peter M; Meeker, John D; McElrath, Thomas F

    2016-01-01

    Impaired or suboptimal fetal growth is associated with an increased risk of perinatal morbidity and mortality. By utilizing readily available clinical data on the relative size of the fetus at multiple points in pregnancy, including delivery, future epidemiological research can improve our understanding of the impacts of maternal, fetal, and environmental factors on fetal growth at different windows during pregnancy. This study presents mean and standard deviation ultrasound measurements from a clinically representative US population that can be utilized for creating Z-scores to this end. Between 2006 and 2012, 18, 904 non-anomalous pregnancies that received prenatal care, first and second trimester ultrasound evaluations, and ultimately delivered singleton newborns at Brigham and Women's hospital in Boston were used to create the standard population. To illustrate the utility of this standard, we created Z-scores for ultrasound and delivery measurements for a cohort study population and examined associations with factors known to be associated with fetal growth. In addition to cross-sectional regression models, we created linear mixed models and generalized additive mixed models to illustrate how these scores can be utilized longitudinally and for the identification of windows of susceptibility. After adjustment for a priori confounders, maternal BMI was positively associated with increased fetal size beginning in the second trimester in cross-sectional models. Female infants and maternal smoking were associated with consistently reduced fetal size in the longitudinal models. Maternal age had a non-significant association with increased size in the first trimester that was attenuated as gestation progressed. As the growth measurements examined here are widely available in contemporary obstetrical practice, these data may be abstracted from medical records by investigators and standardized with the population means presented here. This will enable easy extension of

  10. Utilizing Longitudinal Measures of Fetal Growth to Create a Standard Method to Assess the Impacts of Maternal Disease and Environmental Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Cantonwine, David E.; Ferguson, Kelly K.; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Chen, Yin-Hsiu; Smith, Nicole A.; Robinson, Julian N.; Doubilet, Peter M.; Meeker, John D.; McElrath, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Impaired or suboptimal fetal growth is associated with an increased risk of perinatal morbidity and mortality. By utilizing readily available clinical data on the relative size of the fetus at multiple points in pregnancy, including delivery, future epidemiological research can improve our understanding of the impacts of maternal, fetal, and environmental factors on fetal growth at different windows during pregnancy. This study presents mean and standard deviation ultrasound measurements from a clinically representative US population that can be utilized for creating Z-scores to this end. Between 2006 and 2012, 18, 904 non-anomalous pregnancies that received prenatal care, first and second trimester ultrasound evaluations, and ultimately delivered singleton newborns at Brigham and Women’s hospital in Boston were used to create the standard population. To illustrate the utility of this standard, we created Z-scores for ultrasound and delivery measurements for a cohort study population and examined associations with factors known to be associated with fetal growth. In addition to cross-sectional regression models, we created linear mixed models and generalized additive mixed models to illustrate how these scores can be utilized longitudinally and for the identification of windows of susceptibility. After adjustment for a priori confounders, maternal BMI was positively associated with increased fetal size beginning in the second trimester in cross-sectional models. Female infants and maternal smoking were associated with consistently reduced fetal size in the longitudinal models. Maternal age had a non-significant association with increased size in the first trimester that was attenuated as gestation progressed. As the growth measurements examined here are widely available in contemporary obstetrical practice, these data may be abstracted from medical records by investigators and standardized with the population means presented here. This will enable easy extension

  11. ADHD subjects fail to suppress eye blinks and microsaccades while anticipating visual stimuli but recover with medication.

    PubMed

    Fried, Moshe; Tsitsiashvili, Eteri; Bonneh, Yoram S; Sterkin, Anna; Wygnanski-Jaffe, Tamara; Epstein, Tamir; Polat, Uri

    2014-08-01

    Oculomotor behavior and parameters are known to be affected by the allocation of attention and could potentially be used to investigate attention disorders. We explored the oculomotor markers of Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) that are involuntary and quantitative and that could be used to reveal the core-affected mechanisms, as well as be used for differential diagnosis. We recorded eye movements in a group of 22 ADHD-diagnosed patients with and without medication (methylphenidate) and in 22 control observers while performing the test of variables of attention (t.o.v.a.). We found that the average microsaccade and blink rates were higher in the ADHD group, especially in the time interval around stimulus onset. These rates increased monotonically over session time for both groups, but with significantly faster increments in the unmedicated ADHD group. With medication, the level and time course of the microsaccade rate were fully normalized to the control level, regardless of the time interval within trials. In contrast, the pupil diameter decreased over time within sessions and significantly increased above the control level with medication. We interpreted the suppression of microsaccades and eye blinks around the stimulus onset as reflecting a temporal anticipation mechanism for the transient allocation of attention, and their overall rates as inversely reflecting the level of arousal. We suggest that ADHD subjects fail to maintain sufficient levels of arousal during a simple and prolonged task, which limits their ability to dynamically allocate attention while anticipating visual stimuli. This impairment normalizes with medication and its oculomotor quantification could potentially be used for differential diagnosis.

  12. Daytime measurements of atmospheric temperature profiles (2-15 km) by lidar utilizing Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering.

    PubMed

    Witschas, Benjamin; Lemmerz, Christian; Reitebuch, Oliver

    2014-04-01

    In this Letter, we report on a novel method for measuring atmospheric temperature profiles by lidar during daytime for heights of 2-15.3 km, with a vertical resolution of 0.3-2.2 km, using Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering. The measurements are performed by scanning a laser (λ=355 nm) over a 12 GHz range and using a Fabry-Pérot interferometer as discriminator. The temperature is derived by using a new analytical line shape model assuming standard atmospheric pressure conditions. Two exemplary temperature profiles resulting from measurements over 14 and 27 min are shown. A comparison with radiosonde temperature measurements shows reasonable agreement. In cloud-free conditions, the temperature difference reaches up to 5 K within the boundary layer, and is smaller than 2.5 K above. The statistical error of the derived temperatures is between 0.15 and 1.5 K. PMID:24686652

  13. Measurement of the intensity of the beam in the abort gap at the Tevatron utilizing synchrotron light

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Lorman, E.; Meyer, T.; Pordes, S.; De Santis, S.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2005-05-01

    This paper discusses the implementation of abort gap beam intensity monitoring at the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. There are two somewhat independent monitors which measure the intensity of the synchrotron light emitted by particles in the abort gaps. One system uses a gated Photomultiplier Tube (PMT) to measure the light intensity, and the other system uses a single lens telescope, gated image intensifier, and Charge Injection Device (CID) camera to image the beam.

  14. Derivation of a new parametric impulse response matrix utilized for nodal wind load identification by response measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi Amiri, A.; Bucher, C.

    2015-05-01

    This paper provides new formulations to derive the impulse response matrix, which is then used in the problem of load identification with application to wind induced vibration. The applied loads are inversely identified based on the measured structural responses by solving the associated discrete ill-posed problem. To this end - based on an existing parametric structural model - the impulse response functions of acceleration, velocity and displacement have been computed. Time discretization of convolution integral has been implemented according to an existing and a newly proposed procedure, which differ in the numerical integration methods. The former was evaluated based on a constant rectangular approximation of the sampled data and impulse response function in a number of steps corresponding to the sampling rate, while the latter interpolates the sampled data in an arbitrary number of sub-steps and then integrates over the sub-steps and steps. The identification procedure was implemented for a simulation example as well as an experimental laboratory case. The ill-conditioning of the impulse response matrix made it necessary to use Tikhonov regularization to recover the applied force from noise polluted measured response. The optimal regularization parameter has been obtained by L-curve and GCV method. The results of simulation represent good agreement between identified and measured force. In the experiments the identification results based on the measured displacement as well as acceleration are provided. Further it is shown that the accuracy of experimentally identified load depends on the sensitivity of measurement instruments over the different frequency ranges.

  15. Method and Apparatus for Determining Changes in Intracranial Pressure Utilizing Measurement of the Circumferential Expansion or Contraction of a Patient's Skull

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yos, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H., Jr. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring changes in intracranial pressure (ICP) utilizing the variation of the surface wave propagation parameters of the patient's skull to determine the change in ICP. In one embodiment, the method comprises the steps of transmitting an ultrasonic bulk compressional wave onto the surface of the skull at a predetermined angle with respect to the skull so as to produce a surface wave, receiving the surface wave at an angle with respect tn the skull which is substantially the same as the predetermined angle and at a location that is a predetermined distance from where the ultrasonic bulk compressional wave was transmitted upon the skull, determining the retardation or advancement in phase of the received surface wave with respect to a reference phase, and processing the determined retardation or advancement in phase to determine circumferential expansion or contraction of the skull and utilizing the determined circumferential change to determine the change in intracranial pressure.

  16. [Measures to prevent patient identification errors in blood collection/physiological function testing utilizing a laboratory information system].

    PubMed

    Shimazu, Chisato; Hoshino, Satoshi; Furukawa, Taiji

    2013-08-01

    We constructed an integrated personal identification workflow chart using both bar code reading and an all in-one laboratory information system. The information system not only handles test data but also the information needed for patient guidance in the laboratory department. The reception terminals at the entrance, displays for patient guidance and patient identification tools at blood-sampling booths are all controlled by the information system. The number of patient identification errors was greatly reduced by the system. However, identification errors have not been abolished in the ultrasound department. After re-evaluation of the patient identification process in this department, we recognized that the major reason for the errors came from excessive identification workflow. Ordinarily, an ultrasound test requires patient identification 3 times, because 3 different systems are required during the entire test process, i.e. ultrasound modality system, laboratory information system and a system for producing reports. We are trying to connect the 3 different systems to develop a one-time identification workflow, but it is not a simple task and has not been completed yet. Utilization of the laboratory information system is effective, but is not yet perfect for patient identification. The most fundamental procedure for patient identification is to ask a person's name even today. Everyday checks in the ordinary workflow and everyone's participation in safety-management activity are important for the prevention of patient identification errors.

  17. A procedural manual for measurement of uranium and thorium isotopes utilizing the USGS-Stanford Finnegan Mat 262

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shamp, Donald D.

    2001-01-01

    Over the past several decades investigators have extensively examined the 238U-234U- 230Th systematics of a variety of geologic materials using alpha spectroscopy. Analytical uncertainty for 230Th by alpha spectroscopy has been limited to about 2% (2σ). The advantage of thermal ionization mass spectroscopy (TIMS), introduced by Edwards and co-workers in the late 1980’s is the increased detectability of these isotopes by a factor of ~200, and decreases in the uncertainty for 230Th to about 5‰ (2σ) error. This report is a procedural manual for using the USGS-Stanford Finnegan-Mat 262 TIMS to collect and isolate Uranium and Thorium isotopic ratio data. Chemical separation of Uranium and Thorium from the sample media is accomplished using acid dissolution and then processed using anion exchange resins. The Finnegan-Mat262 Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TIMS) utilizes a surface ionization technique in which nitrates of Uranium and Thorium are placed on a source filament. Upon heating, positive ion emission occurs. The ions are then accelerated and focused into a beam which passes through a curved magnetic field dispersing the ions by mass. Faraday cups and/or an ion counter capture the ions and allow for quantitative analysis of the various isotopes.

  18. [Measures to prevent patient identification errors in blood collection/physiological function testing utilizing a laboratory information system].

    PubMed

    Shimazu, Chisato; Hoshino, Satoshi; Furukawa, Taiji

    2013-08-01

    We constructed an integrated personal identification workflow chart using both bar code reading and an all in-one laboratory information system. The information system not only handles test data but also the information needed for patient guidance in the laboratory department. The reception terminals at the entrance, displays for patient guidance and patient identification tools at blood-sampling booths are all controlled by the information system. The number of patient identification errors was greatly reduced by the system. However, identification errors have not been abolished in the ultrasound department. After re-evaluation of the patient identification process in this department, we recognized that the major reason for the errors came from excessive identification workflow. Ordinarily, an ultrasound test requires patient identification 3 times, because 3 different systems are required during the entire test process, i.e. ultrasound modality system, laboratory information system and a system for producing reports. We are trying to connect the 3 different systems to develop a one-time identification workflow, but it is not a simple task and has not been completed yet. Utilization of the laboratory information system is effective, but is not yet perfect for patient identification. The most fundamental procedure for patient identification is to ask a person's name even today. Everyday checks in the ordinary workflow and everyone's participation in safety-management activity are important for the prevention of patient identification errors. PMID:24218775

  19. Non-Heme Iron Absorption and Utilization from Typical Whole Chinese Diets in Young Chinese Urban Men Measured by a Double-Labeled Stable Isotope Technique

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lichen; Zhang, Yuhui; Wang, Jun; Huang, Zhengwu; Gou, Lingyan; Wang, Zhilin; Ren, Tongxiang; Piao, Jianhua; Yang, Xiaoguang

    2016-01-01

    Background This study was to observe the non-heme iron absorption and biological utilization from typical whole Chinese diets in young Chinese healthy urban men, and to observe if the iron absorption and utilization could be affected by the staple food patterns of Southern and Northern China. Materials and Methods Twenty-two young urban men aged 18–24 years were recruited and randomly assigned to two groups in which the staple food was rice and steamed buns, respectively. Each subject received 3 meals containing approximately 3.25 mg stable 57FeSO4 (the ratio of 57Fe content in breakfast, lunch and dinner was 1:2:2) daily for 2 consecutive days. In addition, approximately 2.4 mg 58FeSO4 was administered intravenously to each subject at 30–60 min after dinner each day. Blood samples were collected from each subject to measure the enrichment of the 57Fe and 58Fe. Fourteen days after the experimental diet, non-heme iron absorption was assessed by measuring 57Fe incorporation into red blood cells, and absorbed iron utilization was determined according to the red blood cell incorporation of intravenously infused 58Fe SO4. Results Non-heme iron intake values overall, and in the rice and steamed buns groups were 12.8 ±2.1, 11.3±1.3 and 14.3±1.5 mg, respectively; the mean 57Fe absorption rates were 11±7%, 13±7%, and 8±4%, respectively; and the mean infused 58Fe utilization rates were 85±8%, 84±6%, and 85±10%, respectively. There was no significantly difference in the iron intakes, and 57Fe absorption and infused 58Fe utilization rates between rice and steamed buns groups (all P>0.05). Conclusion We present the non-heme iron absorption and utilization rates from typical whole Chinese diets among young Chinese healthy urban men, which was not affected by the representative staple food patterns of Southern and Northern China. This study will provide a basis for the setting of Chinese iron DRIs. PMID:27099954

  20. Outcome Rating Scale and Session Rating Scale in Psychological Practice: Clinical Utility of Ultra-Brief Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Alistair; Hemsley, Samantha

    2009-01-01

    The validity and reliability of the Outcome Rating Scale (ORS) and the Session Rating Scale (SRS) were evaluated against existing longer measures, including the Outcome Questionnaire-45, Working Alliance Inventory, Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21, Quality of Life Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and General Self-efficacy Scale. The measures…

  1. CO{sub 2} laser-based dispersion interferometer utilizing orientation-patterned gallium arsenide for plasma density measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bamford, D. J.; Cummings, E. A.; Panasenko, D.; Fenner, D. B.; Hensley, J. M.; Boivin, R. L.; Carlstrom, T. N.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2013-09-15

    A dispersion interferometer based on the second-harmonic generation of a carbon dioxide laser in orientation-patterned gallium arsenide has been developed for measuring electron density in plasmas. The interferometer includes two nonlinear optical crystals placed on opposite sides of the plasma. This instrument has been used to measure electron line densities in a pulsed radio-frequency generated argon plasma. A simple phase-extraction technique based on combining measurements from two successive pulses of the plasma has been used. The noise-equivalent line density was measured to be 1.7 × 10{sup 17} m{sup −2} in a detection bandwidth of 950 kHz. One of the orientation-patterned crystals produced 13 mW of peak power at the second-harmonic wavelength from a carbon dioxide laser with 13 W of peak power. Two crystals arranged sequentially produced 58 mW of peak power at the second-harmonic wavelength from a carbon dioxide laser with 37 W of peak power.

  2. Locating interfaces in vertically-layered materials and determining concentrations in mixed materials utilizing acoustic impedance measurements

    DOEpatents

    Langlois, G.N.

    1983-09-13

    Measurement of the relative and actual value of acoustic characteristic impedances of an unknown substance, location of the interfaces of vertically-layered materials, and the determination of the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material are disclosed. A highly damped ultrasonic pulse is transmitted into one side of a reference plate, such as a tank wall, where the other side of the reference plate is in physical contact with the medium to be measured. The amplitude of a return signal, which is the reflection of the transmitted pulse from the interface between the other side of the reference plate and the medium, is measured. The amplitude value indicates the acoustic characteristic impedance of the substance relative to that of the reference plate or relative to that of other tested materials. Discontinuities in amplitude with repeated measurements for various heights indicate the location of interfaces in vertically-layered materials. Standardization techniques permit the relative acoustic characteristic impedance of a substance to be converted to an actual value. Calibration techniques for mixtures permit the amplitude to be converted to the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material. 6 figs.

  3. Locating interfaces in vertically-layered materials and determining concentrations in mixed materials utilizing acoustic-impedance measurements. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1981-06-10

    Measurement of the relative and actual value of acoustic characteristic impedances of an unknown substance, location of the interfaces of vertically-layered materials, and the determination of the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material are presented. A highly damped ultrasonic pulse is transmitted into one side of a reference plate, such as a tank wall, where the other side of the reference plate is in physical contact with the medium to be measured. The amplitude of a return signal, which is the reflection of the transmitted pulse from the interface between the other side of the reference plate and the medium, is measured. The amplitude value indicates the acoustic characteristic impedance of the substance relative to that of the reference plate or relative to that of other tested materials. Discontinuities in amplitude with repeated measurements for various heights indicate the location of interfaces in vertically-layered materials. Standardization techniques permit the relative acoustic characteristic impedance of a substance to be converted to an actual value. Calibration techniques for mixtures permit the amplitude to be converted to the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material.

  4. Assessment of near-source air pollution at a fine spatial scale utilizing a mobile measurement platform approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mobile monitoring is an emerging strategy to characterize spatially and temporally variable air pollution in areas near sources. EPA’s Geospatial Monitoring of Air Pollution (GMAP) vehicle, an all-electric vehicle measuring real-time concentrations of particulate and gaseous poll...

  5. CO2 laser-based dispersion interferometer utilizing orientation-patterned gallium arsenide for plasma density measurements.

    PubMed

    Bamford, D J; Cummings, E A; Panasenko, D; Fenner, D B; Hensley, J M; Boivin, R L; Carlstrom, T N; Van Zeeland, M A

    2013-09-01

    A dispersion interferometer based on the second-harmonic generation of a carbon dioxide laser in orientation-patterned gallium arsenide has been developed for measuring electron density in plasmas. The interferometer includes two nonlinear optical crystals placed on opposite sides of the plasma. This instrument has been used to measure electron line densities in a pulsed radio-frequency generated argon plasma. A simple phase-extraction technique based on combining measurements from two successive pulses of the plasma has been used. The noise-equivalent line density was measured to be 1.7 × 10(17) m(-2) in a detection bandwidth of 950 kHz. One of the orientation-patterned crystals produced 13 mW of peak power at the second-harmonic wavelength from a carbon dioxide laser with 13 W of peak power. Two crystals arranged sequentially produced 58 mW of peak power at the second-harmonic wavelength from a carbon dioxide laser with 37 W of peak power.

  6. CO2 laser-based dispersion interferometer utilizing orientation-patterned gallium arsenide for plasma density measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamford, D. J.; Cummings, E. A.; Panasenko, D.; Fenner, D. B.; Hensley, J. M.; Boivin, R. L.; Carlstrom, T. N.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2013-09-01

    A dispersion interferometer based on the second-harmonic generation of a carbon dioxide laser in orientation-patterned gallium arsenide has been developed for measuring electron density in plasmas. The interferometer includes two nonlinear optical crystals placed on opposite sides of the plasma. This instrument has been used to measure electron line densities in a pulsed radio-frequency generated argon plasma. A simple phase-extraction technique based on combining measurements from two successive pulses of the plasma has been used. The noise-equivalent line density was measured to be 1.7 × 1017 m-2 in a detection bandwidth of 950 kHz. One of the orientation-patterned crystals produced 13 mW of peak power at the second-harmonic wavelength from a carbon dioxide laser with 13 W of peak power. Two crystals arranged sequentially produced 58 mW of peak power at the second-harmonic wavelength from a carbon dioxide laser with 37 W of peak power.

  7. Locating interfaces in vertically-layered materials and determining concentrations in mixed materials utilizing acoustic impedance measurements

    DOEpatents

    Langlois, Gary N.

    1983-09-13

    Measurement of the relative and actual value of acoustic characteristic impedances of an unknown substance, location of the interfaces of vertically-layered materials, and the determination of the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material. A highly damped ultrasonic pulse is transmitted into one side of a reference plate, such as a tank wall, where the other side of the reference plate is in physical contact with the medium to be measured. The amplitude of a return signal, which is the reflection of the transmitted pulse from the interface between the other side of the reference plate and the medium, is measured. The amplitude value indicates the acoustic characteristic impedance of the substance relative to that of the reference plate or relative to that of other tested materials. Discontinuities in amplitude with repeated measurements for various heights indicate the location of interfaces in vertically-layered materials. Standardization techniques permit the relative acoustic characteristic impedance of a substance to be converted to an actual value. Calibration techniques for mixtures permit the amplitude to be converted to the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material.

  8. In the blink of an eye: relating positive-feedback sensitivity to striatal dopamine D2-like receptors through blink rate.

    PubMed

    Groman, Stephanie M; James, Alex S; Seu, Emanuele; Tran, Steven; Clark, Taylor A; Harpster, Sandra N; Crawford, Maverick; Burtner, Joanna Lee; Feiler, Karen; Roth, Robert H; Elsworth, John D; London, Edythe D; Jentsch, James David

    2014-10-22

    For >30 years, positron emission tomography (PET) has proven to be a powerful approach for measuring aspects of dopaminergic transmission in the living human brain; this technique has revealed important relationships between dopamine D2-like receptors and dimensions of normal behavior, such as human impulsivity, and psychopathology, particularly behavioral addictions. Nevertheless, PET is an indirect estimate that lacks cellular and functional resolution and, in some cases, is not entirely pharmacologically specific. To identify the relationships between PET estimates of D2-like receptor availability and direct in vitro measures of receptor number, affinity, and function, we conducted neuroimaging and behavioral and molecular pharmacological assessments in a group of adult male vervet monkeys. Data gathered from these studies indicate that variation in D2-like receptor PET measurements is related to reversal-learning performance and sensitivity to positive feedback and is associated with in vitro estimates of the density of functional dopamine D2-like receptors. Furthermore, we report that a simple behavioral measure, eyeblink rate, reveals novel and crucial links between neuroimaging assessments and in vitro measures of dopamine D2 receptors.

  9. Cerebral glucose utilization measured with high resolution positron emission tomography in epileptic Finnish Spitz dogs and healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Viitmaa, Ranno; Haaparanta-Solin, Merja; Snellman, Marjatta; Cizinauskas, Sigitas; Orro, Toomas; Kuusela, Erja; Johansson, Jarkko; Viljanen, Tapio; Jokinen, Tarja S; Bergamasco, Luciana; Metsähonkala, Liisa

    2014-01-01

    In human epileptic patients, changes in cerebral glucose utilization can be detected 2-deoxy-2-[(18) F] fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). The purpose of this prospective study was to determine whether epileptic dogs might show similar findings. Eleven Finnish Spitz dogs with focal idiopathic epilepsy and six healthy dogs were included. Dogs were examined using electroencephalography (EEG) and FDG-PET, with epileptic dogs being evaluated during the interictal period. Visual and semi-quantitative assessment methods of FDG-PET were compared and contrasted with EEG findings. Three independent observers, unaware of dog clinical status, detected FDG-PET uptake abnormalities in 9/11 epileptic (82%), and 4/8 healthy dogs (50%). Occipital cortex findings were significantly associated with epileptic status (P = 0.013). Epileptic dogs had significantly lower standardized uptake values (SUVs) in numerous cortical regions, the cerebellum, and the hippocampus compared to the control dogs. The lowest SUVs were found in the occipital lobe. White matter normalized and left-right asymmetry index values for all pairs of homologous regions did not differ between groups. Visual evaluation of the EEGs was less sensitive (36%) than FDG-PET. Both diagnostic tests were consensual and specific (100%) for occipital findings, but EEG had a lower sensitivity for detecting lateralized foci than FDG-PET. Findings supported the use of FDG-PET as a diagnostic test for dogs with suspected idiopathic epilepsy. Visual and semiquantitative analyses of FDG-PET scans provided complementary information. Findings also supported the theory that epileptogenesis may occur in multiple brain regions in Finnish Spitz dogs with idiopathic epilepsy.

  10. Two-directional skin friction measurement utilizing a compact internally mounted thin-liquid-film skin friction meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seto, Jeffrey A.; Hornung, Hans G.

    1993-01-01

    A new, compact oil film skin friction meter capable of measuring skin friction in two directions has been designed and constructed. The instrument allows the thin liquid film technique to now be applied in flight and in a wider variety of laboratory conditions. The instrument was tested by comparing measurements with those given by a floating element gage in laminar, transitional, and turbulent boundary layers with zero pressure gradient. Both instruments agreed satisfactorily with each other and with the expected curves for the laminar and turbulent boundary layers. Significant differences were at first seen between the oil film meter and two floating element gages in the case of a favorable pressure gradient, but when a correction is applied to account for the normal force acting on the pendulum-type gage, the three instruents are much closer. The directional sensitivity of the oil film gage is also demonstrated.

  11. Utilization of profilometry, SEM, AFM and contact angle measurements in describing surfaces of plastic floor coverings and explaining their cleanability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuisma, R.; Pesonen-Leinonen, E.; Redsven, I.; Kymäläinen, H.-R.; Saarikoski, I.; Sjöberg, A.-M.; Hautala, M.

    2005-06-01

    The tendency to soil and cleanability of ten commercial plastic floor coverings: eight vinyl (PVC) floor coverings, one vinyl composite tile and one plastic composite tile, were examined. Floor coverings were soiled with inorganic, organic and biological soil. The cleanability was measured both by bioluminescence of ATP (adenosine triphosphate) and colorimetrically. The surface topography was studied by AFM, SEM and with a profilometer. From the 2D- and 3D-profilometric measurements several characteristic parameters of the surface profiles were extracted. The tendency to soil and cleanability were compared with the characteristics of the surface. A weak correlation was found between roughness and soilability but no correlation between roughness and cleanability. Roughness had no correlation with contact angle.

  12. Zoometric measures and their utilization in prediction of live weight of local goats in southern México.

    PubMed

    Dorantes-Coronado, E J; Torres-Hernández, Glafiro; Hernández-Mendo, O; Rojo-Rubio, R

    2015-01-01

    Objectives of this study were: (a) to compare live weight (LW) and zoometric measures (ZM) of local goats in two locations, (b) to fit the best regression equation for goat LW prediction using ZM. LW, body length (BL), trunk length (TL), withers height (WH), hearth girth (HG), rump width (RW), rump length (RL), head length (HL), head width (HW), and ear length (EL) were measured in 318 Local does in Amatepec and Tejupilco, State of Mexico. Statistical methods included student's "t" tests for comparison of means, and correlation, principal components (PC), and multiple linear regression analyses. To evaluate the goodness of fit for LW prediction models the R(2) value was used as a criterion. Differences (P ≤ 0.05) were found between does of Amatepec and Tejupilco in LW, BL, TL, HG, RL, HL, HW, and EL. In Amatepec, LW was correlated with HG, BL, and HW (P ≤ 0.01), whereas in Tejupilco LW was correlated with HG, BL, TL, and HW (P ≤ 0.01). From the Amatepec measures 5 PC were extracted, and which in a multiple regression analysis explained 83.3 % of the total variance, whereas from Tejupilco 4 PC were extracted, and which in a multiple regression analysis explained 82.4 % of the total variance. The best regression model to predict doe LW in Amatepec included TL, HG, RW, and HW, whereas for Tejupilco the best model included BL, HG, HW, and EL. It is concluded that: (1) Amatepec does surpass those of Tejupilco in LW and most ZM, (2) there are reliable ZM for predicting LW of local does in both locations, HG, and HW being common measures for both populations.

  13. Utilizing a scope and span of control tool to measure workload and determine supporting resources for nurse managers.

    PubMed

    Jones, Dawndra; McLaughlin, Maribeth; Gebbens, Christopher; Terhorst, Lauren

    2015-05-01

    The scope and span of control of the nurse manager directly impact turnover, succession planning, and satisfaction. Measuring and benchmarking scope and span of control remain a challenge. An interprofessional team across an integrated health delivery system developed and implemented such a tool, which was used to determine the amount of operational and clerical support for managers. Since implementation, there has been a decrease in turnover and time to fill nurse manager positions. PMID:25906131

  14. Utility of the Measurement of Carboxyhemoglobin Level at the Site of Acute Carbon Monoxide Poisoning in Rural Areas

    PubMed Central

    Onodera, Makoto; Fujino, Yasuhisa; Kikuchi, Satoshi; Sato, Masayuki; Mori, Kiyofumi; Beppu, Takaaki; Inoue, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study examined the hypothesis that correlations exist between the carbon monoxide exposure time and the carboxyhemoglobin concentration at the site of carbon monoxide poisoning, using a pulse carbon monoxide oximeter in rural areas or the carboxyhemoglobin concentration measured at a given medical institution. Background. In previous studies, no definitive relationships between the arterial blood carboxyhemoglobin level and the severity of carbon monoxide poisoning have been observed. Method. The subjects included patients treated for acute carbon monoxide poisoning in whom a medical emergency team was able to measure the carboxyhemoglobin level at the site of poisoning. We examined the relationship between the carboxyhemoglobin level at the site of poisoning and carbon monoxide exposure time and the relationships between the arterial blood carboxyhemoglobin level and carbon monoxide exposure time. Results. A total of 10 patients met the above criteria. The carboxyhemoglobin levels at the site of poisoning were significantly and positively correlated with the exposure time (rs = 0.710, p = 0.021), but the arterial blood carboxyhemoglobin levels were not correlated with the exposure time. Conclusion. In rural areas, the carboxyhemoglobin level measured at the site of carbon monoxide poisoning correlated with the exposure time. PMID:27239377

  15. Space environmental effects: Construction and utilization of a system to measure low thermal strain in one meter graphite epoxy tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. H.; Rives, C.

    1982-01-01

    A system for measuring the expansion of low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) materials was constructed around a H.P. 5526-A laser measuring system. The vacuum CTE measurements in the -150 F to +120 F range were made over a 6 month period on a graphite epoxy tube yielding CTE values of 2.5 to one fifty-millionth/F above ambient and 2 + or - one ten-millionth F below ambient temperature. To assure that the below ambient, approximately 10 microns high open loop nature of the delta L/L vs. T curves was not apparatus related, similar size quartz tubes (A and B) were checked and found to have only a 2 micron (negligable for quartz) open loop component. These two quartz tubes, A and B, had ambient CTE values 20% and 45% respectively higher than the average handbook value. The overnight microcreep diminished an order of magnitude during the first several cycles after the system had been reopened.

  16. Measurement of three-dimensional posture and trajectory of lower body during standing long jumping utilizing body-mounted sensors.

    PubMed

    Ibata, Yuki; Kitamura, Seiji; Motoi, Kosuke; Sagawa, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    The measurement method of three-dimensional posture and flying trajectory of lower body during jumping motion using body-mounted wireless inertial measurement units (WIMU) is introduced. The WIMU is composed of three-dimensional (3D) accelerometer and gyroscope of two kinds with different dynamic range and one 3D geomagnetic sensor to adapt to quick movement. Three WIMUs are mounted under the chest, right thigh and right shank. Thin film pressure sensors are connected to the shank WIMU and are installed under right heel and tiptoe to distinguish the state of the body motion between grounding and jumping. Initial and final postures of trunk, thigh and shank at standing-still are obtained using gravitational acceleration and geomagnetism. The posture of body is determined using the 3D direction of each segment updated by the numerical integration of angular velocity. Flying motion is detected from pressure sensors and 3D flying trajectory is derived by the double integration of trunk acceleration applying the 3D velocity of trunk at takeoff. Standing long jump experiments are performed and experimental results show that the joint angle and flying trajectory agree with the actual motion measured by the optical motion capture system. PMID:24110831

  17. Utility of the Measurement of Carboxyhemoglobin Level at the Site of Acute Carbon Monoxide Poisoning in Rural Areas.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Makoto; Fujino, Yasuhisa; Kikuchi, Satoshi; Sato, Masayuki; Mori, Kiyofumi; Beppu, Takaaki; Inoue, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study examined the hypothesis that correlations exist between the carbon monoxide exposure time and the carboxyhemoglobin concentration at the site of carbon monoxide poisoning, using a pulse carbon monoxide oximeter in rural areas or the carboxyhemoglobin concentration measured at a given medical institution. Background. In previous studies, no definitive relationships between the arterial blood carboxyhemoglobin level and the severity of carbon monoxide poisoning have been observed. Method. The subjects included patients treated for acute carbon monoxide poisoning in whom a medical emergency team was able to measure the carboxyhemoglobin level at the site of poisoning. We examined the relationship between the carboxyhemoglobin level at the site of poisoning and carbon monoxide exposure time and the relationships between the arterial blood carboxyhemoglobin level and carbon monoxide exposure time. Results. A total of 10 patients met the above criteria. The carboxyhemoglobin levels at the site of poisoning were significantly and positively correlated with the exposure time (rs = 0.710, p = 0.021), but the arterial blood carboxyhemoglobin levels were not correlated with the exposure time. Conclusion. In rural areas, the carboxyhemoglobin level measured at the site of carbon monoxide poisoning correlated with the exposure time.

  18. Measuring Neutron Spectrum at MIT Research Reactor Utilizing He-3 Bonner Cylinder Approach with an Unfolding Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leder, Alexander; Ricochet Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Ricochet experiment seeks to measure Coherent (neutral-current) Elastic Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering (CENNS) using dark matter style detectors placed near a neutrino source, possibly the MIT research reactor (MITR), which offers a high continuous neutrino flux at high energies. Currently, Ricochet is characterizing the backgrounds at MITR. The main background is the neutrons emitted simultaneously from the core. To characterize this background, we wrapped a Bonner cylinder around a 3He thermal neutron detector, whose data was then unfolded to produce a neutron energy spectrum across several orders of magnitude. We discuss the resulting spectrum as well its implications for deploying Ricochet in the future.

  19. Labview utilities

    2011-09-30

    The software package provides several utilities written in LabView. These utilities don't form independent programs, but rather can be used as a library or controls in other labview programs. The utilities include several new controls (xcontrols), VIs for input and output routines, as well as other 'helper'-functions not provided in the standard LabView environment.

  20. The blink reflex and the corneal reflex are followed by cortical activity resembling the nociceptive potentials induced by trigeminal laser stimulation in man.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, M; Libro, G; Guido, M; Sciruicchio, V; Puca, F

    2001-09-01

    Laser stimulation of the supraorbital regions evokes brain potentials (LEPs) related to trigeminal nociception. The aim of this study was to record the R2 component of the blink reflex and the corneal reflex in 20 normal subjects, comparing the scalp activity following these reflexes with the nociceptive potentials evoked by CO2 laser stimulation of supraorbital regions. Cortical and muscular reflexes evoked by stimulation of the first trigeminal branch were recorded simultaneously. The R2 component of the blink reflex and the corneal reflex were followed by two cortical peaks, which resembled morphologically N-P waves of LEPs. The two peaks demonstrated a difference in latency of approximately 40 ms, which is consistent with activation time of nociception. This finding suggests that these reflexes are induced by activation of small pain-related fibers. PMID:11524152

  1. The blink reflex and the corneal reflex are followed by cortical activity resembling the nociceptive potentials induced by trigeminal laser stimulation in man.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, M; Libro, G; Guido, M; Sciruicchio, V; Puca, F

    2001-09-01

    Laser stimulation of the supraorbital regions evokes brain potentials (LEPs) related to trigeminal nociception. The aim of this study was to record the R2 component of the blink reflex and the corneal reflex in 20 normal subjects, comparing the scalp activity following these reflexes with the nociceptive potentials evoked by CO2 laser stimulation of supraorbital regions. Cortical and muscular reflexes evoked by stimulation of the first trigeminal branch were recorded simultaneously. The R2 component of the blink reflex and the corneal reflex were followed by two cortical peaks, which resembled morphologically N-P waves of LEPs. The two peaks demonstrated a difference in latency of approximately 40 ms, which is consistent with activation time of nociception. This finding suggests that these reflexes are induced by activation of small pain-related fibers.

  2. Pressurized ion chamber monitoring system for environmental radiation measurements utilizing a wide-range temperature-compensated electrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Steveninck, William

    1994-08-01

    The performance of a complete pressurized ion chamber (PIC) radiation monitoring system is described. The design incorporates an improved temperature-compensated electrometer which is stable to +/- 3 center-dot 10(sup - 16) A over the environmental range of temperature (- 40 to + 40 C). Using a single 10(sup 11) Omega feed-back resistor, the electrometer accurately measures currents over a range from 3 center-dot 10(sup - 15) A to 3 center-dot 10(sup - 11) A. While retaining the sensitivity of the original PIC system (the instrument responds readily to small background fluctuations on the order of 0.1 mu R h(sup - 1)), the new system measures radiation levels up to the point where the collection efficiency of the ion chamber begins to drop off, typically approximately 27 pA at 1 mR h(sup - 1). A data recorder and system controller was designed using the Tattletale(sup TM) Model 4A computer. Digital data is stored on removable solid-state, credit-card style memory cards.

  3. Examining the utility of a bite-count-based measure of eating activity in free-living human beings.

    PubMed

    Scisco, Jenna L; Muth, Eric R; Hoover, Adam W

    2014-03-01

    The obesity epidemic has triggered a need for novel methods for measuring eating activity in free-living settings. Here, we introduce a bite-count method that has the potential to be used in long-term investigations of eating activity. The purpose of our observational study was to describe the relationship between bite count and energy intake and determine whether there are sex and body mass index group differences in kilocalories per bite in free-living human beings. From October 2011 to February 2012, 77 participants used a wrist-worn device for 2 weeks to measure bite count during 2,975 eating activities. An automated self-administered 24-hour recall was completed daily to provide kilocalorie estimates for each eating activity. Pearson's correlation indicated a moderate, positive correlation between bite count and kilocalories (r=0.44; P<0.001) across all 2,975 eating activities. The average per-individual correlation was 0.53. A 2 (sex)×3 (body mass index group: normal, overweight, obese) analysis of variance indicated that men consumed 6 kcal more per bite than women on average. However, there were no body mass index group differences in kilocalories per bite. This was the longest study of a body-worn sensor for monitoring eating activity of free-living human beings to date, which highlights the strong potential for this method to be used in future, long-term investigations.

  4. Development of an automated ballast water treatment verification system utilizing fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis as a measure of treatment efficacy.

    PubMed

    Akram, A C; Noman, S; Moniri-Javid, R; Gizicki, J P; Reed, E A; Singh, S B; Basu, A S; Banno, F; Fujimoto, M; Ram, J L

    2015-03-01

    Methods for verifying ballast water treatments in foreign vessels are needed to protect the Great Lakes from the discharge of live non-native organisms or pathogens. A prototype automated viability test system using fluorescein diacetate (FDA), a membrane permeable fluorogen, to differentiate live from dead bacteria and algae is described. The automated fluorescence intensity detection device (AFIDD) captures cultured algae or organisms in Detroit River water (simulated ballast water) on 0.2 μm filters, backwashes them from the filter into a cuvette with buffer and FDA for subsequent fluorescence intensity measurements, and washes the filters with sterile water for serial automated reuse. Preliminary manual versions of these procedures were also tested. Tests of various buffers determined N,N-Bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid, N,N-Bis(2-hydroxyethyl)taurine (BES) and 3-(N-morpholino)propanesulfonic acid (MOPS) at pH 7.0 to be the best buffers, causing the least spontaneous FDA breakdown without inhibiting enzymatic activity. Fluorescence in the presence of live organisms increased linearly over time, and the rate of increase was dependent on the sample concentration. Following simulated ballast water treatments with heat or chlorine, the fluorescence produced by Detroit River samples decreased to near control (sterile water) levels. Automated measurements of FDA hydrolysis with a reusable filter backwash system should be applicable to near real-time remote-controlled monitoring of live organisms in ballast water.

  5. Development of an automated ballast water treatment verification system utilizing fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis as a measure of treatment efficacy.

    PubMed

    Akram, A C; Noman, S; Moniri-Javid, R; Gizicki, J P; Reed, E A; Singh, S B; Basu, A S; Banno, F; Fujimoto, M; Ram, J L

    2015-03-01

    Methods for verifying ballast water treatments in foreign vessels are needed to protect the Great Lakes from the discharge of live non-native organisms or pathogens. A prototype automated viability test system using fluorescein diacetate (FDA), a membrane permeable fluorogen, to differentiate live from dead bacteria and algae is described. The automated fluorescence intensity detection device (AFIDD) captures cultured algae or organisms in Detroit River water (simulated ballast water) on 0.2 μm filters, backwashes them from the filter into a cuvette with buffer and FDA for subsequent fluorescence intensity measurements, and washes the filters with sterile water for serial automated reuse. Preliminary manual versions of these procedures were also tested. Tests of various buffers determined N,N-Bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid, N,N-Bis(2-hydroxyethyl)taurine (BES) and 3-(N-morpholino)propanesulfonic acid (MOPS) at pH 7.0 to be the best buffers, causing the least spontaneous FDA breakdown without inhibiting enzymatic activity. Fluorescence in the presence of live organisms increased linearly over time, and the rate of increase was dependent on the sample concentration. Following simulated ballast water treatments with heat or chlorine, the fluorescence produced by Detroit River samples decreased to near control (sterile water) levels. Automated measurements of FDA hydrolysis with a reusable filter backwash system should be applicable to near real-time remote-controlled monitoring of live organisms in ballast water. PMID:25555225

  6. Utility of Serum Free Light Chain Measurements in Multiple Myeloma Patients Not Achieving Complete Response to Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Muhamad Alhaj; Rajkumar, S. Vincent; Dispenzieri, Angela; Gertz, Morie A.; Lacy, Martha Q.; Buadi, Francis K.; Hwa, Yi Lisa; Dingli, David; Kapoor, Prashant; Hayman, Suzanne R.; Lust, John A.; Kyle, Robert A.; Kumar, Shaji K.

    2015-01-01

    Normalization of the serum free light chain ratio (FLCr) with the absence of bone marrow monoclonal plasma cells following achievement of a complete response (CR) to therapy denotes a stringent CR in multiple myeloma (MM), and is associated with improved overall survival (OS). However, its value in patients achieving measurable disease at baseline, who did not achieve a CR with initial therapy. One hundred fifty three patients (34%) had a normal FLCr while 296 (66%) had an abnormal ratio. Patients with a normal FLCr had a longer progression-free survival (PFS) (29 vs. 16 months, P <.001) and OS (91 vs. 58 months, P <.001). Normalization of FLCr retained its prognostic value in a multivariable model. Our results suggest an important role for sFLC measurement in disease monitoring even in patients who achieve only a partial response to therapy. Obtaining a normal FLCr confers a favorable prognosis independent from other factors, supporting the inclusion of sFLC in all levels of response criteria. PMID:25962523

  7. The Utility of Clinical Measures for the Diagnosis of Achilles Tendon Injuries: A Systematic Review With Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Reiman, Michael; Burgi, Ciara; Strube, Eileen; Prue, Kevin; Ray, Keaton; Elliott, Amanda; Goode, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To summarize and evaluate the current diagnostic accuracy of clinical measures used to diagnose Achilles tendon injuries. Data Sources: A literature search of MEDLINE, CINAHL, and EMBASE databases was conducted with key words related to diagnostic accuracy and Achilles tendon injuries. Study Selection: Original research articles investigating Achilles tendon injuries against an acceptable reference standard were included. Data Extraction: Three studies met the inclusion criteria. Quality assessment was conducted using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies-2 tool. DerSimonian-Laird random-effects models were used to pool sensitivity (SN), specificity (SP), and diagnostic odds ratios with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Data Synthesis: The SN and negative likelihood ratio (−LR) values for Achilles tendon rupture measures ranged from 0.73 (95% CI = 0.65, 0.81) and 0.30 (95% CI = 0.23, 0.40) to 0.96 (95% CI = 0.93, 0.99) and 0.04 (95% CI = 0.02, 0.10), respectively, whereas SP and positive likelihood ratio (+LR) values ranged from 0.85 (95% CI = 0.72, 0.98) and 6.29 (95% CI = 2.33, 19.96) to 0.93 (95% CI = 0.84, 1.00) and 13.71 (95% CI = 3.54, 51.24), respectively, with the highest SN and SP both reported in the calf-squeeze test. The SN and −LR values for Achilles tendinopathy measures ranged from 0.03 (95% CI = 0.00, 0.08) and 0.97 (95% CI = not reported) to 0.89 (95% CI = 0.75, 0.98) and 0.19 (95% CI = not reported), whereas SP and +LR values ranged from 0.58 (95% CI = 0.38, 0.77) and 2.12 (95% CI = not reported) to 1.00 (95% CI = 1.00, 1.00) and infinity, respectively, with the highest SN and SP reported for morning stiffness and palpation for crepitus. Pooled analyses demonstrated similar diagnostic properties in all 3 clinical measures (arc sign, palpation, and Royal London Hospital test), with SN and −LR ranging from 0.42 (95% CI = 0.23, 0.62) and 0.68 (95% CI = 0.50, 0.93), respectively, for the arc sign, to 0.64 (95% CI

  8. Vertical profiling of marine aerosol, dust and their mixtures utilizing the synergy of sunphotometer and lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsekeri, Alexandra; Amiridis, Vassilis; Lopatin, Anton; Marinou, Eleni; Engelman, Ronny; Baars, Holger; Wandinger, Ulla; Ansmann, Albert; Solomos, Stavros; Dubovik, Oleg; Schüttemeyer, Dirk

    2015-04-01

    Current and future lidar products from space missions (CALIPSO, ADM-Aeolus, EarthCARE) aim to improve our understanding of atmospheric dynamics and aerosol/cloud interactions on global scale. However, the lidar instruments onboard these three missions (CALIOP, ALADIN, ATLID) are different systems, operating at different wavelengths and providing different sets of measured parameters. In order to spectrally homogenize the datasets, aerosol/cloud-type-dependent spectral conversion factors are needed to be applied to all lidar-related properties (extinction, backscatter and depolarization), based on the aerosol/cloud classification of the space-borne observations. The well-established European Aerosol Research Lidar Network (EARLINET) offers the unique opportunity to support such an effort. However, EARLINET database suffers from lack of information for specific aerosol types such as marine and mixed dust/marine cases. Unfortunately, these types are not observed in EARLINET's core stations, since the stations are mostly located at continental sites and are influenced by urban pollution. Moreover, the lidar systems near the coastlines suffer from the inability to measure at the first few hundred meters (500-1000 m) due to their technical design, which results in an incomplete laser/telescope overlap region. Towards the study of marine and marine-dust aerosol mixtures we organized the experimental campaign of "Characterization of Aerosol mixtures of Dust And Marine origin" (CHARADMexp), on June 20 to July 10, at Finokalia, Grete, Greece. Our aim was to derive optical, microphysical and chemical properties of the marine component and its mixtures with dust, employing sophisticated instrumentation installed on the site of Finokalia ACTRIS station, where only marine and dust particles are present 95% of the time. Specifically, aerosol characterization was established by the "Generalized Aerosol Retrieval from Radiometer and Lidar Combined data" (GARRLiC), a technique that

  9. Utility of a single mid-trimester measurement of plasminogen activator Type 1 and fibronectin to predict preeclampsia in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ajibola, S. O.; Adeyemo, T. A.; Afolabi, B. B.; Akanmu, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Preeclampsia (PE) is the second most common cause of maternal death after obstetric hemorrhage in Africa, a resource-limited region. This study was designed to examine the potential usefulness of a single screening plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and fibronectin (FN) level for the prediction of PE in pregnant women. Materials and Methods: In a cohort of 180 pregnant women who were normotensive at baseline, venous blood samples were obtained before 20 weeks of gestation for the assay of plasma levels of PAI-1 and FN levels measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay technique. Twenty nonpregnant normotensive women were also evaluated as a control group. Outcomes of gestation were evaluated and correlated with the plasma levels of PAI and FN measured at mid-trimester. Mean plasma values of PAI-1 and FN were also compared between the different outcome groups. Results: Plasma PAI-1 level was significantly higher in the pregnant women (8.68 ± 0.56 ng/ml) than in nonpregnant controls (5.55 ± 0.32 ng/ml) (P = 0.01). However, plasma FN did not show any significant difference in pregnant women (2.60 ± 0.37 μg/ml) and nonpregnant controls (2.60 ± 0.23 μg/ml) (P = 0.9). Mid-trimester mean plasma PAI-1 level measured in women who developed PE (7.08 ± 5.49 ng/ml, n = 12) and gestational hypertension (GH) (9.78 ± 6.2 ng/ml, n = 13) was not significantly different in comparison to normotensive pregnant women (8.78 ± 5.63 ng/ml, n = 153) (P = 0.75). Likewise, the mean FN level in women who developed PE was also not significantly different from nonpreeclamptics; however, the FN level in the pregnant women who developed GH was significantly different from women who remained normotensive throughout pregnancy (P = 0.02). Conclusion: Single mid-trimester assessment of PAI-1 and FN levels in maternal plasma was not found to be useful in predicting PE as an outcome of pregnancy in the study population. PMID:27630384

  10. Utility of the Tono-Pen in Measuring Intraocular Pressure in Trinidad: A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Billy, A; David, PE; Mahabir, AK; Seerattan, CP; Street, JM; Walcott, VD; Yarna, RJ; Murray, DC; Maharaj, RG

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: To determine the sensitivity and specificity of the Reichert™ Tono-Pen AVIA® when used by novice medical students in an ethnically diverse population in Trinidad. Subject and Methods: Participants were residents of Trinidad between the ages of 20 and 90 years attending the Ophthalmology Clinic at the Eric Williams Medical Sciences Complex (EWMSC). Intraocular pressure (IOP) was measured using the Goldmann applanation tonometer (the gold standard) for ophthalmology clinic patients as part of their routine care. Intraocular pressure measurements were then taken using the Tono-Pen. Results: One hundred persons participated, consisting of Indo-Trinidadians (55%), Afro-Trinidadians (36%), Mixed (8%) and 1% of Caucasian descent. Fourteen per cent reported a diagnosis of glaucoma with 70.6% of these being of African descent. One hundred and ninety-eight readings of IOP were taken. At a cut-off point of 21 mmHg, there were nine true positives, four false positives, seven false negatives and 178 true negatives. The sensitivity and specificity were found to be 56.3% (95% CI 33.2, 76.9) and 97.8% (95% CI 94.5, 99.1), respectively. The positive predictive value was calculated as 69.2% (95% CI 42.4, 87.3) while the negative predictive value was 96.2% (95% CI 92.4, 98.2). The prevalence of elevated IOP in this population was 8.1% (95% CI 4.8, 13.0). The likelihood ratio of a positive result was calculated to be 25.6 (95% CI 8.6, 73.9). Conclusion: The high specificity and negative predictive value suggests that the Tono-Pen can be used with minimal training, and can prove beneficial at the primary care level in the exclusion of increased IOP in an ethnically diverse high-risk Caribbean population. PMID:26624589

  11. Stereo-particle image velocimetry measurements of a patient-specific Fontan physiology utilizing novel pressure augmentation stents.

    PubMed

    Chopski, Steven G; Rangus, Owen M; Fox, Carson S; Moskowitz, William B; Throckmorton, Amy L

    2015-03-01

    Single ventricle anomalies are a challenging set of congenital heart defects that require lifelong clinical management due to progressive decline of cardiovascular function. Few therapeutic devices are available for these patients, and conventional blood pumps are not designed for the unique anatomy of the single ventricle physiology. To address this unmet need, we are developing an axial flow blood pump with a protective cage or stent for Fontan patients. This study investigates the 3-D particle image velocimetry measurements of two cage designs being deployed in a patient-specific Fontan anatomy. We considered a control case without a pump, impeller placed in the inferior vena cava, and two cases where the impeller has two protective stents with unique geometric characteristics. The experiments were evaluated at a cardiac output of 3 L/min, a fixed vena caval flow split of 40%/60%, a fixed pulmonary arterial flow split of 50%/50%, and for operating speeds of 1000-4000 rpm. The introduction of the cardiovascular stents had a substantial impact on the flow conditions leaving the pump and entering the cavopulmonary circulation. The findings indicated that rotational speeds above 4000 rpm for this pump could result in irregular flows in this specific circulatory condition. Although retrograde flow into the superior vena cava was not measured, the risk of this occurrence increases with higher pump speeds. The against-with stent geometry outperformed the other configurations by generating higher pressures and more energetic flows. These results provide further support for the viability of mechanical cavopulmonary assistance as a therapeutic treatment strategy for Fontan patients.

  12. The utility of using customized heterochromatic flicker photometry (cHFP) to measure macular pigment in patients with age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Stringham, J M; Hammond, B R; Nolan, J M; Wooten, B R; Mammen, A; Smollon, W; Snodderly, D M

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the utility and validity of using customized heterochromatic flicker photometry (cHFP) to measure macular pigment optical density (MPOD) in patients with intermediate stages of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The measurement procedure was optimized to accommodate individual differences in temporal vision related to age, disease, or other factors. The validity criteria were based on the similarity of the spectral absorption curves to ex vivo curves of lutein and zeaxanthin and the similarity of spatial density profiles to those measured in subjects without retinal disease. Macular pigment optical density (MPOD) spatial profiles were measured with an LED-based macular densitometer; spectral absorption curves were measured with a 3-channel Maxwellian view system including a monochromator. All patients were characterized via clinical exams and all but 2 subjects from whom data were obtained had masked grading of color fundus photographs using the Wisconsin Age-Related Maculopathy Grading System. Most of the patients were in AREDS category 2 (27%) or 3 (57%). Patients with visual acuity as poor as 20/80 were included, and could perform the task as long as they could see the stimulus. Eighty-one percent of the patients screened were able to perform the cHFP task, and data were obtained from 30 AMD patients. Spatial profiles of MPOD were measured in 19 subjects who could see the stimulus at all tested loci. These profiles were highly similar to those that have been measured with HFP in subjects without retinal disease. The average shape of the spectral absorption curves for the AMD subjects corresponded well to an ex vivo template. These data support both the utility and validity of the cHFP method for measuring MPOD in subjects with intermediate stages of AMD. The ability to measure the retinal response to nutritional intervention is of practical importance for monitoring patients being supplemented with lutein and

  13. 'Giant' multishell CdSe nanocrystal quantum dots with supporessed blinking: novel fluorescent probes for real-time detection of single-molecule events

    SciTech Connect

    Hollingsworth, Jennifer A; Vela, Javier; Htoon, Han; Klimov, Victor I; Casson, Amy R; Chen, Yongfen

    2009-01-01

    We reported for the first time that key nanocrystal quantum dot (NQD) optical properties-quantum yield, photobleaching and blinking-can be rendered independent ofNQD surface chemistry and environment by growth of a very thick, defect-free inorganic shell. Here, we show the precise shell-thickness dependence of these effects. We demonstrate that 'giant-shell' NQDs can be largely non-blinking for observation times as long as 54 minutes and lhat on-time fractions are independent of experimental time-resolution from 1-200 ms. These effects are primarily demonstrated on (CdSe)CdS (core)shell NQDs, but we also show that alloyed shells comprising Cd.Znl.'S and terminated with a non-cytotoxic ZnS layer exhibit similar properties. The mechanism for suppressed blinking and dramatically enhanced stability is attributed to both effective isolation of the NQD core excitonic wavefunction from the NQD surface, as well as a quasi-Type II electronic structure. The unusual electronic structure provides for effective spatial separation of the electron and hole into the shell and core, respectively, and, thereby, for reduced efficiencies in non-radiative Auger recombination.

  14. 'Giant' multishell CdSe nanocrystal quantum dots with suppressed blinking: Novel fluorescent probes for real-time detection of single-molecule events.

    PubMed

    Hollingsworth, Jennifer A; Vela, Javier; Chen, Yongfen; Htoon, Han; Klimov, Victor I; Casson, Amy R

    2009-03-01

    We reported for the first time that key nanocrystal quantum dot (NQD) optical properties-quantum yield, photobleaching and blinking-can be rendered independent of NQD surface chemistry and environment by growth of a very thick, defect-free inorganic shell (Chen, et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2008). Here, we show the precise shell-thickness dependence of these effects. We demonstrate that 'giant-shell' NQDs can be largely non-blinking for observation times as long as 54 minutes and that on-time fractions are independent of experimental time-resolution from 1-200 ms. These effects are primarily demonstrated on (CdSe)CdS (core)shell NQDs, but we also show that alloyed shells comprising Cd(x)Zn(1-x)S and terminated with a non-cytotoxic ZnS layer exhibit similar properties. The mechanism for suppressed blinking and dramatically enhanced stability is attributed to both effective isolation of the NQD core excitonic wavefunction from the NQD surface, as well as a quasi-Type II electronic structure. The unusual electronic structure provides for effective spatial separation of the electron and hole into the shell and core, respectively, and, thereby, for reduced efficiencies in non-radiative Auger recombination.

  15. Composition-dependent trap distributions in CdSe and InP quantum dots probed using photoluminescence blinking dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Heejae; Cho, Kyung-Sang; Koh, Weon-Kyu; Kim, Dongho; Kim, Jiwon

    2016-07-01

    Although Group II-VI quantum dots (QDs) have attracted much attention due to their wide range of applications in QD-based devices, the presence of toxic ions in II-VI QDs raises environmental concerns. To fulfill the demands of nontoxic QDs, synthetic routes for III-V QDs have been developed. However, only a few comparative analyses on optical properties of III-V QDs have been performed. In this study, the composition-related energetic trap distributions have been explored by using three different types of core/multishell QDs: CdSe-CdS (CdSe/CdS/ZnS), InP-ZnSe (InP/ZnSe/ZnS), and InP-GaP (InP/GaP/ZnS). It was shown that CdSe-CdS QDs have much larger trap densities than InP-shell QDs at higher energy states (at least 1Eg (band gap energy) above the lowest conduction band edge) based on probability density plots and Auger ionization efficiencies which are determined by analyses of photoluminescence blinking dynamics. This result suggests that the composition of encapsulated QDs is closely associated with the charge trapping processes, and also provides an insight into the development of more environmentally friendly QD-based devices.Although Group II-VI quantum dots (QDs) have attracted much attention due to their wide range of applications in QD-based devices, the presence of toxic ions in II-VI QDs raises environmental concerns. To fulfill the demands of nontoxic QDs, synthetic routes for III-V QDs have been developed. However, only a few comparative analyses on optical properties of III-V QDs have been performed. In this study, the composition-related energetic trap distributions have been explored by using three different types of core/multishell QDs: CdSe-CdS (CdSe/CdS/ZnS), InP-ZnSe (InP/ZnSe/ZnS), and InP-GaP (InP/GaP/ZnS). It was shown that CdSe-CdS QDs have much larger trap densities than InP-shell QDs at higher energy states (at least 1Eg (band gap energy) above the lowest conduction band edge) based on probability density plots and Auger ionization

  16. Field measurement of nitrate in marine and estuarine waters with a flow analysis system utilizing on-line zinc reduction.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Peter S; Shabani, Ali Mohammad Haji; Gentle, Brady S; McKelvie, Ian D

    2011-03-15

    A sensitive reagent-injection flow analysis method for the spectrophotometric determination of nitrate in marine, estuarine and fresh water samples is described. The method is based on the reduction of nitrate in a micro column containing zinc granules at pH 6.5. The nitrite formed is reacted with sulfanilamide and N-(1-naphthyl)ethylene diamine (Griess reagent), and the resulting azo compound is quantified spectrophotometrically at 520 nm. Water samples in the range of 3-700 μg L(-1) NO(3)(-)-N can be processed with a throughput of up to 40 samples per hour, a detection limit of 1.3 μg L(-1) and reproducibility of 1.2% RSD (50 μg L(-1) NO(3)(-)-N, n=10). The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of nitrate in estuarine waters and the reliability was assessed by the analyses of certified reference materials and recovery experiments. The method is suitable for waters with a wide range of salinities, and was successfully used for more than 3200 underway nitrate measurements aboard SV Pelican1 in the "Two Bays" cruise in January 2010. PMID:21315904

  17. Methylene chloride intoxication in a furniture refinisher. A comparison of exposure estimates utilizing workplace air sampling and blood carboxyhemoglobin measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Shusterman, D.; Quinlan, P.; Lowengart, R.; Cone, J. )

    1990-05-01

    A 35-year-old furniture refinisher came to the occupational medicine clinic with complaints of upper respiratory irritation, fatigue, and lightheadedness occurring on a daily basis after using a methylene chloride-containing paint stripper. Determinations of blood carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) on three occasions showed an apparently linear elevation of COHb as a function of hours worked on the day of sampling. COHb levels predicted from spot industrial hygiene measurements were in close concordance with those observed in the patient, indicating the potential usefulness of COHb monitoring in estimating airborne exposure levels. Methylene chloride (or dichloromethane) is an organic solvent that has found wide use as a degreaser, paint remover, aerosol propellant, and a blowing agent for polyurethane foams, and as a solvent in food processing, photographic film production, and plastics manufacturing. Discovery of its unusual metabolic fate--conversion to carbon monoxide in vivo--has earned the compound a special place in the solvent toxicology literature. Demonstration of oncogenicity in experimental animals has occasioned a reconsideration of exposure limits, with emphasis upon stricter controls. In some workplaces, conditions prevail in which controls are inadequate to prevent even acute toxicity, much less long-term exposure risks.

  18. Measuring the Safety of Excreta Disposal Behavior in India with the New Safe San Index: Reliability, Validity and Utility

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Marion W.; Freeman, Matthew C.; Routray, Parimita

    2014-01-01

    Methods to assess household excreta disposal practices are critical for informing public health outcomes of efforts to improve sanitation in developing countries. We present a new metric, the Safe San Index (SSI), to quantify the hygienic safety of a household’s defecation and human feces disposal practices in India, where behavioral outcomes from on-going public expenditures to construct household sanitation facilities and eliminate open defecation are poorly measured. We define hygienic safety of feces disposal as capture in a hygienic sanitation facility. The SSI consists of 15 self-report items and two sub-scales, Latrine Use Frequency and Seven-Day Open Defecation Rate. Households are scored on a standardized scale from 0 (no defecation safely captured) to 100 (all defecation safely captured). We present results of a pilot study in Odisha, India to apply the Index to assess excreta disposal behaviors among rural households and evaluate the reliability and validity of the Index for estimating the rate of correct and consistent sanitation facility usage of household with an improved latrine. PMID:25153464

  19. Measuring the safety of excreta disposal behavior in India with the new Safe San Index: reliability, validity and utility.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Marion W; Freeman, Matthew C; Routray, Parimita

    2014-08-01

    Methods to assess household excreta disposal practices are critical for informing public health outcomes of efforts to improve sanitation in developing countries. We present a new metric, the Safe San Index (SSI), to quantify the hygienic safety of a household's defecation and human feces disposal practices in India, where behavioral outcomes from on-going public expenditures to construct household sanitation facilities and eliminate open defecation are poorly measured. We define hygienic safety of feces disposal as capture in a hygienic sanitation facility. The SSI consists of 15 self-report items and two sub-scales, Latrine Use Frequency and Seven-Day Open Defecation Rate. Households are scored on a standardized scale from 0 (no defecation safely captured) to 100 (all defecation safely captured). We present results of a pilot study in Odisha, India to apply the Index to assess excreta disposal behaviors among rural households and evaluate the reliability and validity of the Index for estimating the rate of correct and consistent sanitation facility usage of household with an improved latrine. PMID:25153464

  20. Measuring the safety of excreta disposal behavior in India with the new Safe San Index: reliability, validity and utility.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Marion W; Freeman, Matthew C; Routray, Parimita

    2014-08-01

    Methods to assess household excreta disposal practices are critical for informing public health outcomes of efforts to improve sanitation in developing countries. We present a new metric, the Safe San Index (SSI), to quantify the hygienic safety of a household's defecation and human feces disposal practices in India, where behavioral outcomes from on-going public expenditures to construct household sanitation facilities and eliminate open defecation are poorly measured. We define hygienic safety of feces disposal as capture in a hygienic sanitation facility. The SSI consists of 15 self-report items and two sub-scales, Latrine Use Frequency and Seven-Day Open Defecation Rate. Households are scored on a standardized scale from 0 (no defecation safely captured) to 100 (all defecation safely captured). We present results of a pilot study in Odisha, India to apply the Index to assess excreta disposal behaviors among rural households and evaluate the reliability and validity of the Index for estimating the rate of correct and consistent sanitation facility usage of household with an improved latrine.