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Sample records for measuring body composition

  1. Current body composition measurement techniques.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Thaisa; Gallagher, Dympna

    2017-10-01

    The current article reviews the most innovative and precise, available methods for quantification of in-vivo human body composition. Body composition measurement methods are continuously being perfected. Ongoing efforts involve multisegmental and multifrequency bioelectrical impedance analysis, quantitative magnetic resonance for total body water, fat, and lean tissue measurements, imaging to further define ectopic fat depots. Available techniques allow for the measurement of fat, fat-free mass, bone mineral content, total body water, extracellular water, total adipose tissue and its subdepots (visceral, subcutaneous, and intermuscular), skeletal muscle, select organs, and ectopic fat depots. There is an ongoing need for methods that yield information on metabolic and biological functions. Based on the wide range of measurable properties, analytical methods and known body composition models, clinicians, and scientists can quantify a number of body components and with longitudinal assessment, can track changes in health and disease with implications for understanding efficacy of nutritional and clinical interventions, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment in clinical settings. With the greater need to understand precursors of health risk beginning prior to conception, a gap exists in appropriate in-vivo measurement methods with application beginning during gestation, that is, fetal development.

  2. Nutritional assessment with body composition measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Shizgal, H.M.

    1987-09-01

    The measurement of body composition by multiple isotope dilution provides an accurate and precise measure of both the nutritional state and the response to nutritional support. A multiple isotope dilution technique has been developed that permits measurement of the three major components of body composition: body fat, extracellular mass (ECM), and body cell mass (BCM). Normal body composition was defined by data obtained in 25 healthy volunteers. Malnutrition is characterized by a loss of BCM and an expansion of the ECM, and as a result the lean body mass is not significantly different from normal. The loss of body weight with malnutrition therefore often reflects the loss of body fat. The utility of body composition measurements was demonstrated by determining the effect of total parenteral nutrition on body composition to determine the relationship between caloric intake and the change in the BCM. A statistically significant relationship was developed which demonstrated that a caloric intake in the range of 30-40 cal/kg/day is required for maintenance. To restore a depleted or malnourished BCM requires a caloric intake in excess of that required for maintenance. The measurement of body composition by multiple isotope dilution is complex and time consuming, and requires specialized laboratory facilities and specially trained personnel. As a result, these measurements are not suited for routine patient management, but should rather be reserved for research purposes.

  3. Measurement of Body Composition in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohman, T. G.

    1982-01-01

    Identification and treatment of obesity in children is believed to be an important factor in its control during the adult years. Laboratory and field methods for body composition measurement are described along with estimates of body fat content from anthropometric dimensions. (CJ)

  4. Methods for nurses to measure body composition.

    PubMed

    Moran, Jose Maria; Lavado-Garcia, Jesus Maria; Pedrera-Zamorano, Juan Diego

    2011-01-01

    Among the methods available for assessing body composition, traditional methods like hydrodensitometry and skin-fold measurements are well known. In this review, we focus on the impedance and interactance methods, which use systems that are usually inexpensive, easily transportable and simple to operate. We also discuss the usefulness of dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, particularly for the measurement of fat distribution. Nurses need to be skilled in the use of the equipment and familiar with the techniques.

  5. Accurate body composition measures from whole-body silhouettes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bowen; Avila, Jesus I; Ng, Bennett K; Fan, Bo; Loo, Victoria; Gilsanz, Vicente; Hangartner, Thomas; Kalkwarf, Heidi J; Lappe, Joan; Oberfield, Sharon; Winer, Karen; Zemel, Babette; Shepherd, John A

    2015-08-01

    Obesity and its consequences, such as diabetes, are global health issues that burden about 171 × 10(6) adult individuals worldwide. Fat mass index (FMI, kg/m(2)), fat-free mass index (FFMI, kg/m(2)), and percent fat mass may be useful to evaluate under- and overnutrition and muscle development in a clinical or research environment. This proof-of-concept study tested whether frontal whole-body silhouettes could be used to accurately measure body composition parameters using active shape modeling (ASM) techniques. Binary shape images (silhouettes) were generated from the skin outline of dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) whole-body scans of 200 healthy children of ages from 6 to 16 yr. The silhouette shape variation from the average was described using an ASM, which computed principal components for unique modes of shape. Predictive models were derived from the modes for FMI, FFMI, and percent fat using stepwise linear regression. The models were compared to simple models using demographics alone [age, sex, height, weight, and body mass index z-scores (BMIZ)]. The authors found that 95% of the shape variation of the sampled population could be explained using 26 modes. In most cases, the body composition variables could be predicted similarly between demographics-only and shape-only models. However, the combination of shape with demographics improved all estimates of boys and girls compared to the demographics-only model. The best prediction models for FMI, FFMI, and percent fat agreed with the actual measures with R(2) adj. (the coefficient of determination adjusted for the number of parameters used in the model equation) values of 0.86, 0.95, and 0.75 for boys and 0.90, 0.89, and 0.69 for girls, respectively. Whole-body silhouettes in children may be useful to derive estimates of body composition including FMI, FFMI, and percent fat. These results support the feasibility of measuring body composition variables from simple cameras such as those found in cell

  6. Accurate body composition measures from whole-body silhouettes

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Bowen; Avila, Jesus I.; Ng, Bennett K.; Fan, Bo; Loo, Victoria; Gilsanz, Vicente; Hangartner, Thomas; Kalkwarf, Heidi J.; Lappe, Joan; Oberfield, Sharon; Winer, Karen; Zemel, Babette; Shepherd, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Obesity and its consequences, such as diabetes, are global health issues that burden about 171 × 106 adult individuals worldwide. Fat mass index (FMI, kg/m2), fat-free mass index (FFMI, kg/m2), and percent fat mass may be useful to evaluate under- and overnutrition and muscle development in a clinical or research environment. This proof-of-concept study tested whether frontal whole-body silhouettes could be used to accurately measure body composition parameters using active shape modeling (ASM) techniques. Methods: Binary shape images (silhouettes) were generated from the skin outline of dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) whole-body scans of 200 healthy children of ages from 6 to 16 yr. The silhouette shape variation from the average was described using an ASM, which computed principal components for unique modes of shape. Predictive models were derived from the modes for FMI, FFMI, and percent fat using stepwise linear regression. The models were compared to simple models using demographics alone [age, sex, height, weight, and body mass index z-scores (BMIZ)]. Results: The authors found that 95% of the shape variation of the sampled population could be explained using 26 modes. In most cases, the body composition variables could be predicted similarly between demographics-only and shape-only models. However, the combination of shape with demographics improved all estimates of boys and girls compared to the demographics-only model. The best prediction models for FMI, FFMI, and percent fat agreed with the actual measures with R2 adj. (the coefficient of determination adjusted for the number of parameters used in the model equation) values of 0.86, 0.95, and 0.75 for boys and 0.90, 0.89, and 0.69 for girls, respectively. Conclusions: Whole-body silhouettes in children may be useful to derive estimates of body composition including FMI, FFMI, and percent fat. These results support the feasibility of measuring body composition variables from simple

  7. Body Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayhew, Jerry L.

    1981-01-01

    Body composition refers to the types and amounts of tissues which make up the body. The most acceptable method for assessing body composition is underwater weighing. A subcutaneous skinfold provides a quantitative measurement of fat below the skin. The skinfold technique permits a valid estimate of the body's total fat content. (JN)

  8. Body Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayhew, Jerry L.

    1981-01-01

    Body composition refers to the types and amounts of tissues which make up the body. The most acceptable method for assessing body composition is underwater weighing. A subcutaneous skinfold provides a quantitative measurement of fat below the skin. The skinfold technique permits a valid estimate of the body's total fat content. (JN)

  9. Body Composition Measurements of 161-km Ultramarathon Participants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study compares body composition characteristics with performance among participants in a 161-km trail ultramarathon. Height, mass, and percent body fat from bioimpedence spectroscopy were measured on 72 starters. Correlation analyses were used to compare body characteristics with finish time, ...

  10. In vivo measurement of human body composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, N.; Grunbaum, B. W.; Kodama, A. M.; Price, D. C.

    1974-01-01

    The female bed rest study has shown that, the response of women to prolonged recumbency of 2 to 3 weeks duration is very similar to that displayed by men. Some of the key findings in the women after 17 days of continuous recumbency are: (1) a decrease in plasma volume of 12-13 per cent; (2) a small decrease in total body water; (3) a decrease in total body potassium of 3 to 4 per cent; (4) a decrease in plasma potassium concentration of 4 to 5 per cent; (5) a decrease in total circulating plasma protein of 11 to 12 per cent; (6) a decrease in urinary norepinephrine excretion rate of 27 to 28 per cent; (7) a possible increase in urinary magnesium, calcium, and phosphate excretion rates; and (8) a possible increase in urinary citrate excretion rate.

  11. Body composition changes in pregnancy: measurement, predictors and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Widen, EM; Gallagher, D

    2014-01-01

    Prevalence of overweight and obesity has risen in the United States over the past few decades. Concurrent with this rise in obesity has been an increase in pregravid body mass index and gestational weight gain affecting maternal body composition changes in pregnancy. During pregnancy, many of the assumptions inherent in body composition estimation are violated, particularly the hydration of fat-free mass, and available methods are unable to disentangle maternal composition from fetus and supporting tissues; therefore, estimates of maternal body composition during pregnancy are prone to error. Here we review commonly used and available methods for assessing body composition changes in pregnancy, including: (1) anthropometry, (2) total body water, (3) densitometry, (4) imaging, (5) dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, (6) bioelectrical impedance and (7) ultrasound. Several of these methods can measure regional changes in adipose tissue; however, most of these methods provide only whole-body estimates of fat and fat-free mass. Consideration is given to factors that may influence changes in maternal body composition, as well as long-term maternal and offspring outcomes. Finally, we provide recommendations for future research in this area. PMID:24667754

  12. Reference Values for Body Composition and Anthropometric Measurements in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Diana A.; Dawson, John A.; Matias, Catarina N.; Rocha, Paulo M.; Minderico, Cláudia S.; Allison, David B.; Sardinha, Luís B.; Silva, Analiza M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the importance of body composition in athletes, reference sex- and sport-specific body composition data are lacking. We aim to develop reference values for body composition and anthropometric measurements in athletes. Methods Body weight and height were measured in 898 athletes (264 female, 634 male), anthropometric variables were assessed in 798 athletes (240 female and 558 male), and in 481 athletes (142 female and 339 male) with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). A total of 21 different sports were represented. Reference percentiles (5th, 25th, 50th, 75th, and 95th) were calculated for each measured value, stratified by sex and sport. Because sample sizes within a sport were often very low for some outcomes, the percentiles were estimated using a parametric, empirical Bayesian framework that allowed sharing information across sports. Results We derived sex- and sport-specific reference percentiles for the following DXA outcomes: total (whole body scan) and regional (subtotal, trunk, and appendicular) bone mineral content, bone mineral density, absolute and percentage fat mass, fat-free mass, and lean soft tissue. Additionally, we derived reference percentiles for height-normalized indexes by dividing fat mass, fat-free mass, and appendicular lean soft tissue by height squared. We also derived sex- and sport-specific reference percentiles for the following anthropometry outcomes: weight, height, body mass index, sum of skinfold thicknesses (7 skinfolds, appendicular skinfolds, trunk skinfolds, arm skinfolds, and leg skinfolds), circumferences (hip, arm, midthigh, calf, and abdominal circumferences), and muscle circumferences (arm, thigh, and calf muscle circumferences). Conclusions These reference percentiles will be a helpful tool for sports professionals, in both clinical and field settings, for body composition assessment in athletes. PMID:24830292

  13. [An instrument for estimating human body composition using impedance measurement].

    PubMed

    Yin, J; Peng, C

    1997-03-01

    According to the impedance feature of biological tissue, the instrument was designed at 1, 5, 10, 50, 100kHz to measure human impedance, and then to calculate human FAT, FFM, FAT%, TBW, ECW, ICW and so on. A 8031 singlechip microprocessor contacuting used as a control center in the instrument. The part of electric circuit contacuting human body in the instrument was unreally earthing. The instrument was safty, effective, repeatable, and easily manpulative. Prelimintary clinical experiment showed the results measured with the instrument could effectively reflect practical, status of human composition.

  14. Familial resemblance for body composition measures: the HERITAGE Family Study.

    PubMed

    Rice, T; Daw, E W; Gagnon, J; Bouchard, C; Leon, A S; Skinner, J S; Wilmore, J H; Rao, D C

    1997-11-01

    A sex-specific familial correlation model was used to assess the heritable contributions to several measures of body composition in 86 sedentary white families participating in the HERITAGE Family Study. For this study, sedentary families were recruited, tested for a battery of measures, endurance exercise trained for 20 weeks, and remeasured. This sample is unique in that activity level was controlled for in these families at baseline measurement. In this report, three body composition variables measured at baseline were analyzed, two indexing adiposity (total subcutaneous fat based on eight skinfold measurements [SF8] and percent body fat measured by underwater weighing techniques [%BF]) and one assessing fat free mass ([FFM] derived from underwater weighing). The maximal heritabilities for SF8 (34%) and %BF (62%) were consistent with those reported in previous studies. There were no sex nor generation differences in the familial correlations, and the spouse correlation was significant, consistent with the hypothesis that the familial aggregation reflects genetic and familial environmental factors. However, the results for FFM were very different. The most parsimonious pattern of familial resemblance was consistent with mitochondrial inheritance (i.e., mother-offspring and sibling correlations were equal and were larger than those for spouse and father-offspring pairs). Under the mitochondrial hypothesis, 39% of the variance was accounted for by familial/genetic effects. However, under a nonmitochondrial hypothesis, which could not be ruled out, 65% of the FFM phenotypic variance was accounted for by familial/genetic factors. This high heritability level, as compared with results from previous studies, is consistent with the hypothesis that activity may constitute an important environmental determinant of FFM. These alternative hypotheses for FFM warrant further investigation using complex multilocus-multitrait segregation models, which allow for major genetic

  15. Determination of carcass and body fat compositions of grazing crossbred bulls using body measurements.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, H J; Tedeschi, L O; Paulino, M F; Paiva, L M

    2010-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to analyze body measurements of 40 crossbred bulls grazing low quality forage with different supplementation strategies, to estimate interrelationships among those measurements and carcass and body compositions, and to develop systems of equations to predict body fat using body and carcass measurements. Eight animals were slaughtered at the beginning of the experiment, and the remaining animals were slaughtered at 90 or 220 d. The biometric measures (BM) were obtained the day before the slaughter and included hook width, pin width, pelvic girdle length, rump depth, rump height, abdomen width, body length, height at withers, rib depth, girth, and body diagonal length. Other measurements included full, shrunk, and empty BW; internal physical and chemical fats; body volume; body area; carcass weight; 9th- to 11th-rib section weight and composition; fat thickness; subcutaneous fat; intermuscular fat; carcass chemical fat; and empty body physical and chemical fats. The relationships between BM and body components were evaluated, and equations to predict body area, body volume, subcutaneous fat, and carcass and body physical and chemical fat were developed. Biological interpretations of the parameter estimates of equations were similar to those found in the literature such as a ratio of 1 kg of subcutaneous fat to 1.6 kg of intermuscular fat and a deposit of 72 to 76% of body fat in the carcass. The first system used to predict carcass and empty body physical and chemical fat was devised using in vivo information, whereas the second system used BW and the 9th- to 11th-rib fat weight. Our results indicated the combination of BW, carcass traits, and BM was precise and accurate in estimating carcass and body fat composition of backgrounding bulls. The second system had better adequacy statistics [r(2) > 0.92, concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) > 0.957, and root mean square error (RMSE) < 14.4% of the average observed value] compared

  16. Measurement of Body Composition: is there a Gold Standard?

    PubMed Central

    Branski, Ludwik K; Norbury, William B; Herndon, David N; Chinkes, David L; Cochran, Amalia; Suman, Oscar; Benjamin, Deb; Jeschke, Marc G

    2015-01-01

    Background Maintaining lean body mass (LBM) after a severe burn is an essential goal of modern burn treatment. An accurate determination of LBM is necessary for short- and longterm therapeutic decisions. The aim of this study was to compare 2 measurement methods for body composition, wholebody potassium counting (K count) and dual x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), in a large prospective clinical trial in severely burned pediatric patients. Methods Two-hundred seventy-nine patients admitted with burns covering 40% of total body surface area (TBSA) were enrolled in the study. Patients enrolled were controls or received long-term treatment with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH). Near-simultaneous measurements of LBM with DEXA and fat-free mass (FFM) with K count were performed at hospital discharge and at 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 months post injury. Results were correlated using Pearson’s regression analysis. Agreement between the 2 methods was analyzed with the Bland-Altman method. Results Age, gender distribution, weight, burn size, and admission time from injury were not significantly different between control and treatment groups. rhGH and control patients at all time points postburn showed a good correlation between LBM and FFM measurements (R2 between 0.9 and 0.95). Bland-Altman revealed that the mean bias and 95% limits of agreement depended only on patient weight and not on treatment or time postburn. The 95% limits ranged from 0.1 ± 2.9 kg for LBM or FFM in 7- to 18-kg patients to 16.3 ± 17.8 kg for LBM or FFM in patients >60 kg. Conclusions DEXA can provide a sufficiently accurate determination of LBM and changes in body composition, but a correction factor must be included for older children and adolescents with more LBM. DEXA scans are easier, cheaper, and less stressful for the patient, and this method should be used rather than the K count. PMID:19884353

  17. Measurement and Predition Errors in Body Composition Assessment and the Search for the Perfect Prediction Equation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katch, Frank I.; Katch, Victor L.

    1980-01-01

    Sources of error in body composition assessment by laboratory and field methods can be found in hydrostatic weighing, residual air volume, skinfolds, and circumferences. Statistical analysis can and should be used in the measurement of body composition. (CJ)

  18. Effects of caloric restriction on body composition and total body nitrogen as measured by neutron activation.

    PubMed

    Vaswani, A N; Vartsky, D; Ellis, K J; Yasumura, S; Cohn, S H

    1983-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of two isocaloric diets (800 Kcals) on the changes in body composition during weight reduction. While the protein content of both diets was 70 g, the carbohydrate content of diet A was 10 g and that of diet B was 70 g. The various parameters of body composition were determined as follows: Total body potassium (TBK) by 40K counting, total body water (TBW) by the tritiated water technique, total body nitrogen (TBN) by prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) and total body fat was estimated by measuring the skinfold thickness. Routine serum chemistries were performed every 2 wk and serum insulin and triiodothyronine by radioimmunoassay were done at 4-wk intervals. Seventeen obese women who were at least 30% above ideal body weight volunteered for the outpatient study, (group A--10 subjects, group B--7 subjects). At the end of the 12 wk study, the percent changes in the above parameters of body composition were not significantly different for the two groups. The biochemical changes were consistent with the degree of caloric restriction. We conclude that: (1) the technique of prompt gamma neutron activation analysis can be used effectively to determine long term changes in total body nitrogen during weight reduction, (2) loss of lean tissue (water, potassium and nitrogen) as well as fat tissue occurred during weight reduction. The loss of TBN in absolute quantities was less for diet A compared to diet B; however, there was no significant difference between the two diets when the data was expressed as a percent change from the baseline values, and (3) TBK determination probably provides the best estimate of total body fat.

  19. Marine Corps Body Composition Program: The Flawed Measurement System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-07

    fitness expert and writer for ABC Bodybuilding , an error of 3% in a body fat evaluation is extreme and methods that have this margin of error should not...most other methods. In fact, bodybuilders use a seven to nine point skin fold measurement weekly during their training to monitor body fat...19.95 and recommended and endorsed by “Body-For-Life” and the World Natural Bodybuilding Federation. The caliper comes with detailed instructions

  20. Measures of cardiorespiratory fitness in relation to measures of body size and composition among children.

    PubMed

    Tompuri, Tuomo; Lintu, Niina; Savonen, Kai; Laitinen, Tomi; Laaksonen, David; Jääskeläinen, Jarmo; Lakka, Timo A

    2015-11-01

    In the exercise testing measures of cardiorespiratory fitness need to be scaled by body size or composition to enable comparison between individuals. Traditionally used weight-proportional measures are potentially confounded by body adiposity that hampers their interpretation and applicability in the clinical assessment of cardiorespiratory fitness. We aimed to find the most appropriate measure of body size or composition for scaling of measures of cardiorespiratory fitness among children. We assessed body weight and height, maximal workload (W MAX ) and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 MAX ) using cycle ergometer exercise test with respiratory gas analysis and body lean mass (LM) and fat mass (FM) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and by bioimpedance analysis among 38 children. The data were analysed using Pearson's coefficients for correlation and stepwise linear regression models. Lean mass (r > 0.54) and height (r > 0.51) had stronger positive correlations with absolute W MAX and VO2 MAX than weight (r > 0.30) in girls and boys. None of the measures of body size or composition correlated with LM-proportional W MAX or VO2 MAX in girls or boys. Only LM correlated positively with height-proportional W MAX (r = 0.65) and VO2 MAX (r = 0.71) in boys. FM correlated negatively with weight-proportional W MAX (r < -0.58) and VO2 MAX (r < -0.64) in girls and boys. FM was even stronger determinant of weight-proportional W MAX (β = -0.68) and VO2 MAX (β = -0.61) than exercise performance in multivariate linear regression models. While assessing cardiorespiratory fitness, LM is the most appropriate measure of body size or composition for scaling of W MAX and VO2 MAX, because scaling by body weight introduces confounding by body adiposity. © 2014 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Bioimpedance measurements of human body composition: critical analysis and outlook.

    PubMed

    Matthie, James R

    2008-03-01

    Bioimpedance spectroscopy represents one of the largest emerging medical device technologies. The method is generally known as impedance spectroscopy and is an inexpensive, yet extremely powerful, analytical technique for studying the electrical properties of materials. Much of what we know about biological cells and tissues comes from use of this technique in vitro. Due to the high impedance of the cell membrane, current flow through the cell is frequency dependent and this allows the fluid volume inside versus outside the body's cells to be determined. The fluid outside the cells is primarily related to fluid volume status while the intracellular fluid also relates to the body's cellular mass. Technical advances have removed much of the method's basic complexities. The first commercial bioimpedance spectroscopy device for in vivo human body composition studies was introduced in 1990. Major strides have been made and the method is now poised to enter mainstream clinical medicine but the field is only in its infancy. This paper attempts to fully describe the current use of impedance in the body composition field.

  2. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry–based body volume measurement for 4-compartment body composition123

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Joseph P; Mulligan, Kathleen; Fan, Bo; Sherman, Jennifer L; Murphy, Elizabeth J; Tai, Viva W; Powers, Cassidy L; Marquez, Lorena; Ruiz-Barros, Viviana

    2012-01-01

    Background: Total body volume (TBV), with the exclusion of internal air voids, is necessary to quantify body composition in Lohman's 4-compartment (4C) model. Objective: This investigation sought to derive a novel, TBV measure with the use of only dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) attenuation values for use in Lohman's 4C body composition model. Design: Pixel-specific masses and volumes were calculated from low- and high-energy attenuation values with the use of first principle conversions of mass attenuation coefficients. Pixel masses and volumes were summed to derive body mass and total body volume. As proof of concept, 11 participants were recruited to have 4C measures taken: DXA, air-displacement plethysmography (ADP), and total body water (TBW). TBV measures with the use of only DXA (DXA-volume) and ADP-volume measures were compared for each participant. To see how body composition estimates were affected by these 2 methods, we used Lohman's 4C model to quantify percentage fat measures for each participant and compared them with conventional DXA measures. Results: DXA-volume and ADP-volume measures were highly correlated (R2 = 0.99) and showed no statistically significant bias. Percentage fat by DXA volume was highly correlated with ADP-volume percentage fat measures and DXA software-reported percentage fat measures (R2 = 0.96 and R2 = 0.98, respectively) but were slightly biased. Conclusions: A novel method to calculate TBV with the use of a clinical DXA system was developed, compared against ADP as proof of principle, and used in Lohman's 4C body composition model. The DXA-volume approach eliminates many of the inherent inaccuracies associated with displacement measures for volume and, if validated in larger groups of participants, would simplify the acquisition of 4C body composition to a single DXA scan and TBW measure. PMID:22134952

  3. Validation of bioelectrical-impedance analysis as a measurement of change in body composition in obesity

    SciTech Connect

    Kushner, R.F.; Kunigk, A.; Alspaugh, M.; Andronis, P.T.; Leitch, C.A.; Schoeller, D.A. )

    1990-08-01

    The bioelectrical-impedance-analysis (BIA) method accurately measures body composition in weight-stable subjects. This study validates the use of BIA to measure change in body composition. Twelve obese females underwent weight loss at a mean rate of 1.16 kg/wk. Body composition was measured by deuterium oxide dilution (D2O), BIA, and skinfold anthropometry (SFA) at baseline and at 5% decrements in weight. Highly significant correlations were obtained between D2O and BIA (r = 0.971) and between D2O and SFA (r = 0.932). Overall, BIA predicted change in fat-free mass with greater accuracy (to 0.4 kg) and precision (+/- 1.28 kg) than did anthropometry (to 0.8 kg and +/- 2.58 kg, respectively). We conclude that BIA is a useful clinical method for measuring change in body composition.

  4. In vivo measurement of body composition of chickens using quantitative magnetic resonance (QMR)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    QMR is a nuclear magnetic resonance based method for measuring the fat, lean and water content of the total body of the live animal. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of QMR for measuring the body composition of chickens while comparing QMR results to those obtained by dual X-ray ab...

  5. State-of-the-art measurements in human body composition: A moving frontier of clinical importance.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, D; Shaheen, I; Zafar, K

    2008-01-01

    The measurement of human body composition allows for the estimation of body tissues, organs, and their distributions in living persons without inflicting harm. From a nutritional perspective, the interest in body composition has increased multi-fold with the global increase in the prevalence of obesity and its complications. The latter has driven in part the need for improved measurement methods with greater sensitivity and precision. There is no single gold standard for body-composition measurements in-vivo. All methods incorporate assumptions that do not apply in all individuals and the more accurate models are derived by using a combination of measurements, thereby reducing the importance of each assumption. This review will discuss why the measurement of body composition or human phenotyping is important; discuss new areas where the measurement of body composition (human phenotyping) is recognized as having important application; and will summarize recent advances made in new methodology. Reference will also be made to areas we cannot yet measure due to the lack of appropriate measurement methodologies, most especially measurements methods that provide information on kinetic states (not just static state) and metabolic function.

  6. State-of-the-art measurements in human body composition: A moving frontier of clinical importance

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, D.; Shaheen, I.; Zafar, K.

    2010-01-01

    The measurement of human body composition allows for the estimation of body tissues, organs, and their distributions in living persons without inflicting harm. From a nutritional perspective, the interest in body composition has increased multi-fold with the global increase in the prevalence of obesity and its complications. The latter has driven in part the need for improved measurement methods with greater sensitivity and precision. There is no single gold standard for body-composition measurements in-vivo. All methods incorporate assumptions that do not apply in all individuals and the more accurate models are derived by using a combination of measurements, thereby reducing the importance of each assumption. This review will discuss why the measurement of body composition or human phenotyping is important; discuss new areas where the measurement of body composition (human phenotyping) is recognized as having important application; and will summarize recent advances made in new methodology. Reference will also be made to areas we cannot yet measure due to the lack of appropriate measurement methodologies, most especially measurements methods that provide information on kinetic states (not just static state) and metabolic function. PMID:21234275

  7. Body Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neufeld, K. Allen

    1989-01-01

    Described are activities for measuring the human body. The activities include measurements and calculations, calculating volume and density, problems related to body measurement, and using a nomogram. Several charts, illustrations, and a nomogram are provided. (YP)

  8. Body Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neufeld, K. Allen

    1989-01-01

    Described are activities for measuring the human body. The activities include measurements and calculations, calculating volume and density, problems related to body measurement, and using a nomogram. Several charts, illustrations, and a nomogram are provided. (YP)

  9. Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance to measure body composition in infants and children

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Quantitative Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (QMR) is being used in human adults to obtain measures of total body fat (FM) with high precision. The current study assessed a device specially designed to accommodate infants and children between 3 and 50 kg (EchoMRI-AH™). Body composition of 113 infants and...

  10. The Relationship Between Nephrolithiasis Risk with Body Fat Measured by Body Composition Analyzer in Obese People.

    PubMed

    Bartani, Zohreh; Heydarpour, Behzad; Alijani, Ahmad; Sadeghi, Masoud

    2017-06-01

    Nephrolithiasis (kidney stones) continues to be a major cause of morbidity and healthcare spending that visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue may associate with kidney stone formation. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between nephrolithiasis with visceral fat scale in obese people in Western Iran for the first time. In 2017, 103 participants with BMI≥30 kg/m(2) were selected for the present study. The participants were divided into two groups, 52 as case group (having the kidney stone) and 58 as healthy control group (no kidney stone or history of the kidney stone or any other disease). The levels of body composition were checked by body composition analyzer (BoCA x1) based on Bio Impedance mechanism. Two groups were matched in terms of sex and BMI. There was a significant difference between two groups for the visceral fat to subcutaneous fat ratio (VSR) that accordingly, the mean VSR in the case group was higher than the control group. The difference for other variables between two groups was not significant. The results showed that visceral and subcutaneous fat and VSR were important risk factors for kidney stone formation (nephrolithiasis). Evaluating these fats in stone formers may facilitate a tailored metabolic evaluation and treatment plan.

  11. Feasibility and Reliability of Body Composition Measurements in Adults with Severe Intellectual and Sensory Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waninge, A.; van der Weide, W.; Evenhuis, I. J.; van Wijck, R.; van der Schans, C. P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Anthropometric measurements are widely used to reliably quantify body composition and to estimate risks of overweight in healthy subjects and in patients. However, information about the reliability of anthropometric measurements in subjects with severe intellectual and sensory disabilities is lacking. Objective: The purpose of this…

  12. Feasibility and Reliability of Body Composition Measurements in Adults with Severe Intellectual and Sensory Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waninge, A.; van der Weide, W.; Evenhuis, I. J.; van Wijck, R.; van der Schans, C. P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Anthropometric measurements are widely used to reliably quantify body composition and to estimate risks of overweight in healthy subjects and in patients. However, information about the reliability of anthropometric measurements in subjects with severe intellectual and sensory disabilities is lacking. Objective: The purpose of this…

  13. Neonatal Body Composition: Measuring Lean Mass as a Tool to Guide Nutrition Management in the Neonate.

    PubMed

    Rice, Melissa S; Valentine, Christina J

    2015-10-01

    Neonatal nutrition adequacy is often determined by infant weight gain. The aim of this review is to summarize what is currently known about neonatal body composition and the use of body composition as a measure for adequate neonatal nutrition. Unlike traditional anthropometric measures of height and weight, body composition measurements account for fat vs nonfat mass gains. This provides a more accurate picture of neonatal composition of weight gain. Providing adequate neonatal nutrition in the form of quantity and composition can be a challenge, especially when considering the delicate balance of providing adequate nutrition to preterm infants for catch-up growth. Monitoring weight gain as fat mass and nonfat mass while documenting dietary intake of fat, protein, and carbohydrate in formulas may help provide the medical community the tools to provide optimal nutrition for catch-up growth and for improved neurodevelopmental outcomes. Tracking body composition in term and preterm infants may also provide critical future information concerning the nutritional state of infants who go on to develop future disease such as obesity, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia as adolescents or adults. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  14. Measurement precision of body composition variables using the lunar DPX-L densitometer.

    PubMed

    Kiebzak, G M; Leamy, L J; Pierson, L M; Nord, R H; Zhang, Z Y

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the precision of total- and regional-body composition measurements from a total-body scan using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). This is critical information necessary to determine the smallest change from baseline that could be detected with statistical significance when conducting longitudinal measurements of body composition variables in an individual. Twenty volunteers were scanned once each day for 4 consecutive days using a Lunar DPX-L densitometer and manufacturer-supplied software (version 1.3z). Coefficients of variation (CV, %) derived from data using the (preferred) extended research mode of analysis were 0.62, 1.89, 0.63, 2.0, 1.11, 1.10, and 1.09% for total-body bone mineral density (BMD), total percentage fat, total body tissue mass, fat mass, lean mass, bone mineral content (BMC), and total bone calcium, respectively. Regional measurements (arm, leg, trunk, pelvis, and spine) were less precise than total body measurements, with CVs in the range of 1% to 3% (but fat mass for arms was 4.26%, trunk 3.08%, BMC 3.65%). Small but statistically significant differences in mean values for most body composition variables were found when data were compared between extended and standard modes of analysis. Inconsistent use of analysis mode in a cohort or when following a patient longitudinally may negatively affect precision. We conclude that the measurement precision of total and regional body composition variables was generally comparable to the precision limits typically associated with lumbar spine and proximal femur BMD data.

  15. Impact of eating and drinking on body composition measurements by bioelectrical impedance.

    PubMed

    Androutsos, O; Gerasimidis, K; Karanikolou, A; Reilly, J J; Edwards, C A

    2015-04-01

    Bioelectrical impedance analysis would be a more practical tool to measure body composition in clinical settings, dietetic practice and epidemiological studies if patients/subjects did not have to fast before measurements. The present study assessed whether the ingestion of food or drink had any biologically significant effect on bioimpedance measurements and body composition by the foot-to-foot method. Fifty-five healthy adults [30 males and 25 females; mean (SD) age 27.7 (7.1) years; mean (SD)body mass index 24 (3.8) kg m(-2)] were randomly assigned to a 2-day food trial (high-fat meal or high-carbohydrate meal) or a 2-day drink trial (water or high electrolyte drink). Body composition measurements were carried out in the fasting state, immediately after meal consumption and every 30 min for 2 h by the foot-to-foot single frequency bioimpedance technique. Bioimpedance increased significantly after the ingestion of food and fluid, although the changes were small. The electrolyte drink, high-fat and high-carbohydrate meals significantly increased the percentage body fat and fat mass. In all cases, the median percentage changes from baseline were approximately 1% in body fat percentage units. Although there were statistically significant changes in body composition estimates after food or drink consumption, these were small and within the imprecision of the impedance technique, and so are unlikely to be of clinical significance. The present study suggests that impedance measures of body fatness in clinical settings do not require strict adherence to fasting, and this should increase the opportunities for clinical application. © 2014 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  16. On the use of The Bio-Impedance technique for Body Composition Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta-Franco, R.; Vargas-Luna, M.; González-Solís, J. L.; Gutiérrez-Juárez, G.

    2003-09-01

    Reviewing the methods and physical principles used in body composition measurements (BCM), it is evident that more accurate, reliable, and easily handled methods are required. The use of bio-impedance analysis (BIA) has been very useful in BCM. This technique, in the single frequency mode, has some commercial versions to perform BCM. However these apparatus have significant variability in the BCM values. The multi-frequency option of the bio-impedance technique has still a lot of challenges to overcome. We studied the variability of the body impedance spectrum (from 1 Hz to 1 MHz) in a group of subjects compared to the values obtained from commercial apparatus. We compared different anatomical body regions, some of them with less subcutaneous body fat (frontal, anterior tibial, knee, and frontal regions); others with more subcutaneous body fat (pectoral, abdominal, and internal calf regions). In order to model the bio-impedance spectrum, we analyzed layered samples with different thickness and material composition.

  17. Relationship between domain-specific physical activity and different body composition measures in a working population.

    PubMed

    Zogg, Stefanie; Dürr, Selina; Maier, Sabrina; Tomatis, Laura; Uehli, Katrin; Miedinger, David; Leuppi, Jörg Daniel

    2014-10-01

    With respect to the overweight epidemic, this study aimed to investigate the association between domain-specific physical activity and body composition measures in Swiss male employees. A total of 192 healthy male adults in full-time employment were investigated. Height, weight, and waist circumference were measured and body mass index was calculated. Relative fat mass and relative muscle mass were determined by bioelectric impedance analysis. Physical activity was assessed by the validated International Physical Activity Questionnaire. In multiple linear regressions, leisure-time activity showed an inverse association with waist circumference and relative fat mass and a positive correlation with relative muscle mass. Work activity was positively related to waist circumference and body mass index. This study shows that leisure-time activity may be the most effective physical activity domain for body composition. Work activity does not seem to be protective against overweight.

  18. Evaluation of factors determining the precision of body composition measurements by air displacement plethysmography.

    PubMed

    Collins, A L; McCarthy, H D

    2003-06-01

    To investigate methodological precision of air displacement plethysmography for assessment of body composition in a heterogenous sample of adults. Accuracy of volume measurements by air displacement plethysmography (ADP) for a range of known volumes was ascertained. Repeated measurements of body volume, lung volume, and derived body composition using the BODPOD measurement system were performed. Influence of surface area estimation on ADP measurement was investigated as a possible source of variation. Clinical Nutrition Laboratory, School of Health & Sports Science, University of North London, London, UK. One hundred and two healthy subjects (57 women, 45 men) who ranged in age between 16 and 55 y and in BMI (kg/m(2)) between 17.8 and 41.9. Cross-sectional study of healthy adults for comparison with previous studies. Repeat measurements of raw body volume, lung volume and % body fat (BF) by ADP were all performed on the same day. From the range of known volumes a marked increase in the CV and a significantly greater measurement error were found at volumes below 40 l (P=0.04). Repeat measurements of raw body volume in human subjects resulted in a technical error equivalent to 0.8% BF. There was no significant difference found between measured and predicted lung volume and the 95% confidence interval for difference was only 0.3% BF. Repeat measurements of lung volume in our subset resulted in a technical error equivalent to 0.5% BF. Although body surface area estimation only accounted for variation in % BF of 0.1%, the extent of variation appeared to be governed by leanness (P<0.001). Although ADP retains excellent precision, in practice, repeat measurements of ADP should be performed whenever possible to allow for erroneous volume measurement within one procedure. Protocols for ADP measurement should be created with an awareness of those factors, which may affect measurements. This study was supported by the University of North London Diversity & Development Fund.

  19. Assessment tools in obesity- psychological measures, diet, activity, and body composition

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The global increase in the prevalence of obesity has led to an increased need for measurement tools for research, management and treatment of the obese person. The physical size limitations imposed by obesity, variations in body composition from that of normal weight, and a complex psychopathology a...

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance for measurement of body composition in infants and children

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Measurement of body composition in infants and children is currently challenging. Air Displacement Plethysmography (ADP) has not been validated between ages 6 mo and 6 y and the requirement for stillness of the Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA) technique limits its use. Quantitative Nuclear Ma...

  1. Measurement of body composition in cats using computed tomography and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry.

    PubMed

    Buelund, Lene E; Nielsen, Dorte H; McEvoy, Fintan J; Svalastoga, Eiliv L; Bjornvad, Charlotte R

    2011-01-01

    Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) is a reference method for assessing body composition but is seldom `accessible in veterinary settings. Computed tomography (CT) can provide similar body composition estimates and we propose that it can be used in body composition studies in animals. We compared CT and DEXA data from 73 healthy adult neutered domestic cats. Three approaches for measuring adipose tissue percentage from full-body CT scans were explored. By examining the frequency distribution of voxels by Hounsfield unit (HU) value, it is possible to calculate a fat index (Fat%) that is in close agreement with the fat percentages obtained from DEXA scans. Fat% values obtained by the best of the methods had a mean difference of 0.96% (95% confidence interval 0.33-1.59%) from the DEXA results. Fat% obtained by the other two methods were characterized by good correlation but poor agreement and in one of the methods, the difference between the values from the two modalities was proportional to their mean. By using CT, it is possible to obtain body composition estimates that are in close agreement with those available using DEXA. While the significance of individual Fat% measurements obtained from CT can be difficult to interpret and to compare between centers, CT can contribute to research studies concerned either with nutrition or with obesity-related disorders.

  2. Validation of expedient methods for measuring body composition in Indian adults.

    PubMed

    Kuriyan, R; Petracchi, C; Ferro-Luzzi, A; Shetty, P S; Kurpad, A V

    1998-01-01

    The body composition of 99 men and 89 women from south India was estimated using hydrodensitometry, bioelectrical impedance and skinfold thickness. Comparisons of the hydrodensitometry (reference method) and skinfold methods showed that there were no significant differences between the methods, for estimates of fat free mass (FFM) and per cent fat. The mean difference between the estimates FFM (bias), from skinfold measurement and hydrodensitometry was small for both groups (+0.16 +/- 1.09 kg in men and +0.67 +/- 0.9 kg in women). The same trend was observed in per cent fat estimates (-0.37 +/- 2.04 in men and -1.49 +/- 2.28 in women), showing that the skinfold method can be used as an accurate and expedient method to determine body composition. The bioelectrical impedance method obtained a significantly lower FFM and higher body fat than the reference (hydrodensitometry) method. This could have been due to the use of an inappropriate equation derived from Western population studies. Hence, a new predictive equation, for the measurement of FFM by the bioelectrical impedance method was derived for this population, using the variables of height2/impedance and FFM measured by underwater weighing. The new equation for the bioelectrical impedance method then gave values of body composition which compared well (0.26 +/- 2.32 kg) in men and (0.36 +/- 2.49 kg) in women with the hydrodensitometry method.

  3. Evaluation of DXA versus MRI for Body Composition Measures in One-Month Olds

    PubMed Central

    Fields, David A.; Teague, April M.; Short, Kevin R.; Chernausek, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Detailed measures of infant body composition are needed for understanding the impact of genes and environment on growth early in life. The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy and bias of body composition in infants from dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) using MRI as the criterion method. The depots measured were total fat mass (FM), total fat-free mass (FFM) and trunk FM and FFM using DXA and MRI in 14 infants. None of the regression lines between DXA and MRI significantly deviate from the line of identity for any of the depots studied. However, Bland-Altman analyses revealed bias for trunk FM and trunk FFM. Our data showed DXA to be accurate (regression not significantly deviating from the line of identity), with high agreement (indicated by high R2) and without bias (non-significant Bland-Altman) when estimating total FM and FFM. This could not be said for trunk estimates. PMID:25820269

  4. Measurement of the body composition of living gray seals by hydrogen isotope dilution

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, J.J.; Fedak, M.A. )

    1990-09-01

    The body composition of living gray seals (Halichoerus grypus) can be accurately predicted from a two-step model that involves measurement of total body water (TBW) by {sup 2}H or {sup 3}H dilution and application of predictive relationships between body components and TBW that were derived empirically by slaughter chemical analysis. TBW was overestimated by both {sup 2}HHO and {sup 3}HHO dilution; mean overestimates were 2.8 +/- 0.9% (SE) with 2H and 4.0 +/- 0.6% with {sup 3}H. The relationships for prediction of total body fat (TBF), protein (TBP), gross energy (TBGE), and ash (TBA) were as follows: %TBF = 105.1 - 1.47 (%TBW); %TBP = 0.42 (%TBW) - 4.75; TBGE (MJ) = 40.8 (mass in kg) - 48.5 (TBW in kg) - 0.4; and TBA (kg) = 0.1 - 0.008 (mass in kg) + 0.05 (TBW in kg). These relationships are applicable to gray seals of both sexes over a wide range of age and body conditions, and they predict the body composition of gray seals more accurately than the predictive equations derived from ringed seals (Pusa hispida) and from the equation of Pace and Rathbun, which has been reported to be generally applicable to mammals.

  5. Spectral composition of a measuring signal during measurements of vibration rates of a moving body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daynauskas, I. A. I.; Slepov, N. N.

    1973-01-01

    Cybernetics diagnostics of machines and mechanisms using the spectral approach is discussed. The problem of establishing the accuracy of determination of the spectral composition is investigated. In systems with rectilinear or rotary movement, the vibrations appear in the form of movement rate vibrations, which are equivalent to frequency modulation of the signal, in proportion to the mean movement rate of the body. The case of a harmonic signal which reproduces and analyzes the characteristics of the frequency modulated signal is discussed. Mathematical models are developed to show the relationships of the parameters.

  6. Reliability and validity of the lung volume measurement made by the BOD POD body composition system.

    PubMed

    Davis, James A; Dorado, Silvia; Keays, Kathleen A; Reigel, Kimberly A; Valencia, Kristoffer S; Pham, Patrick H

    2007-01-01

    The BOD POD Body Composition System uses air-displacement plethysmography to measure body volume. To correct the body volume measurement for the subject's lung volume, the BOD POD utilizes pulmonary plethysmography to measure functional residual capacity (FRC) at mid-exhalation as that is the subject's lung volume during the body volume measurement. Normally, FRC is measured at end-exhalation. The BOD POD FRC measurement can be corrected to an end-exhalation volume by subtracting approximately one-half of the measured tidal volume. Our purpose was to determine the reliability and validity of the BOD POD FRC measurement at end-exhalation. Ninety-two healthy adults (half female) underwent duplicate FRC measurements by the BOD POD and one FRC measurement by a traditional gas dilution technique. The latter method was used as the reference method for the validity component of the study. The order of the FRC measurements by the two methods was randomized. The test-retest correlation coefficients for the duplicate BOD POD FRC measurements for the male and female subjects were 0.966 and 0.948, respectively. The mean differences between the BOD POD FRC trial #1 measurement and gas dilution FRC measurement for the male and female subjects were -32 and -23 ml, respectively. Neither difference was statistically significant. The correlation coefficients for these two measurements in the male and female subjects were 0.925 and 0.917, respectively. Based on these results, we conclude that the BOD POD FRC measurement in healthy males and females is both reliable and valid.

  7. The effects of polyethylene glycosylated creatine supplementation on anaerobic performance measures and body composition.

    PubMed

    Camic, Clayton L; Housh, Terry J; Zuniga, Jorge M; Traylor, Daniel A; Bergstrom, Haley C; Schmidt, Richard J; Johnson, Glen O; Housh, Dona J

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of 28 days of polyethylene glycosylated creatine (PEG-creatine) supplementation (1.25 and 2.50 g·d) on anaerobic performance measures (vertical and broad jumps, 40-yard dash, 20-yard shuttle run, and 3-cone drill), upper- and lower-body muscular strength and endurance (bench press and leg extension), and body composition. This study used a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel design. Seventy-seven adult men (mean age ± SD, 22.1 ± 2.5 years; body mass, 81.7 ± 10.8 kg) volunteered to participate and were randomly assigned to a placebo (n = 23), 1.25 g·d of PEG-creatine (n = 27), or 2.50 g·d of PEG-creatine (n = 27) group. The subjects performed anaerobic performance measures, muscular strength (one-repetition maximum [1RM]), and endurance (80% 1RM) tests for bench press and leg extension, and underwater weighing for the determination of body composition at day 0 (baseline), day 14, and day 28. The results indicated that there were improvements (p < 0.0167) in vertical jump, 20-yard shuttle run, 3-cone drill, muscular endurance for bench press, and body mass for at least one of the PEG-creatine groups without changes for the placebo group. Thus, the present results demonstrated that PEG-creatine supplementation at 1.25 or 2.50 g·d had an ergogenic effect on lower-body vertical power, agility, change-of-direction ability, upper-body muscular endurance, and body mass.

  8. Predicting carcass and body fat composition using biometric measurements of grazing beef cattle.

    PubMed

    De Paula, N F; Tedeschi, L O; Paulino, M F; Fernandes, H J; Fonseca, M A

    2013-07-01

    This study was conducted to develop equations to predict carcass and body fat compositions using biometric measures (BM) and body postmortem measurements and to determine the relationships between BM and carcass fat and empty body fat compositions of 44 crossbred bulls under tropical grazing conditions. The bulls were serially slaughtered in 4 groups at approximately 0 d (n = 4), 84 d (n = 4), 168 d (n = 8), 235 d (n = 8), and 310 d (n = 20) of growth. The day before each slaughter, bulls were weighed, and BM were taken, including hook bone width, pin bone width, abdomen width, body length, rump height, height at withers, pelvic girdle length, rib depth, girth circumference, rump depth, body diagonal length, and thorax width. Others measurements included were total body surface (TBS), body volume (BV), subcutaneous fat (SF), internal fat (InF), intermuscular fat, carcass physical fat (CFp), empty body physical fat (EBFp), carcass chemical fat (CFch), empty body chemical fat (EBFch), fat thickness in the 12th rib (FT), and 9th- to 11th-rib section fat (HHF). The stepwise procedure was used to select the variables included in the model. The r(2) and the root-mean-square error (RMSE) were used to account for precision and variability. Our results indicated that lower rates of fat deposition can be attributed to young cattle and low concentration of dietary energy under grazing conditions. The BM improved estimates of TBS (r(2) = 0.999) and BV (r(2) = 0.997). The adequacy evaluation of the models developed to predict TBS and BV using theoretical equations indicated precision, but lower and intermediate accuracy (bias correction = 0.138 and 0.79), respectively, were observed. The data indicated that BM in association with shrunk BW (SBW) were precise in accounting for variability of SF (r(2) = 0.967 and RMSE = 0.94 kg), InF (r(2) = 0.984 and RMSE = 1.26 kg), CFp (r(2) = 0.981 and RMSE = 2.98 kg), EBFp (r(2) = 0.985 and RMSE = 3.99 kg), CFch (r(2) = 0.940 and RMSE = 2

  9. Effects of β-Alanine on Body Composition and Performance Measures in Collegiate Women.

    PubMed

    Outlaw, Jordan J; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E; Buckley, Amanda L; Urbina, Stacie L; Hayward, Sara; Wingfield, Hailee L; Campbell, Bill; Foster, Cliffa; Taylor, Lem W; Wilborn, Colin D

    2016-09-01

    Outlaw, JJ, Smith-Ryan, AE, Buckley, AL, Urbina, SL, Hayward, S, Wingfield, HL, Campbell, B, Foster, C, Taylor, LW, and Wilborn, CD. Effects of β-alanine on body composition and performance measures in collegiate women. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2627-2637, 2016-The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of β-alanine (BA) supplementation and resistance training on body composition and performance. In a double-blind placebo-controlled design, 16 untrained collegiate females (mean ± SD: 21.0 ± 2.2 years; 64.8 ± 8.5 kg; 164.5 ± 7.0 cm; 30.1 ± 5.1 percent body fat [%BF]) completed 8 weeks of resistance training while consuming either 3.4 g BA or placebo (PL; 5 g maltodextrin) before training sessions. Training consisted of 4 days per week upper- and lower-body exercises. Lean body mass (LBM), fat mass (FM), and %BF were assessed using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Maximal oxygen consumption (V[Combining Dot Above]O2max), aerobic time to exhaustion, Wingate peak power, bench press and leg press 1RM (BPmax; LPmax), and repetitions at 65% (BPreps; LPreps), vertical jump (VJ), and standing broad jump were assessed using standard National Strength and Conditioning Association guidelines. All measurements were taken at baseline (T1), 4 weeks (T2), and 8 weeks (T3). Repeated-measures analysis of variance and 95% confidence intervals were used to determine significance. Body composition (LBM, FM, and %BF) improved over time (p < 0.01) for both groups. Maximal strength and VJ increased significantly from baseline to T3 (p ≤ 0.05). There was a significant interaction for LPreps (p = 0.040), with only BA group resulting in significantly greater LPreps (p = 0.041) at T2 and T3. Results from this study suggest that 8 weeks, 4 days per week progressive resistance training and BA supplementation may be effective for improving lower-body muscular endurance. β-alanine had no additive effects on body composition or maximal strength in collegiate women.

  10. Effect of short schemes on body composition measurements using Air-Displacement Plethysmography

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Holly R; Fields, David A

    2005-01-01

    Background Air-displacement plethysmography (ADP) is becoming a popular method to assess body composition. Several studies have shown certain types of clothing can affect measurements of body density, however no study has specifically investigated the effect of cotton gym shorts and spandex bicycle shorts on body density. Methods Thirty-seven males (23.0 ± 3.2 yr., 177.3 ± 5.4 cm., 74.8 ± 7.5 kg.) and thirty-eight females (23.7 ± 5.3 yr., 163.6 ± 8.4 cm., 57.1 ± 7.0 kg.) had their body density measured by ADP in three clothing schemes: 1) a tight fitting Speedo® swim suit (criterion measure), 2) cotton gym shorts, and 3) spandex bicycle shorts. The clothing was provided by the University of Oklahoma Body Composition Laboratory and the testing schemes were performed in random order. Results The regression of body density by the criterion measure against body density while wearing cotton gym shorts for the entire group (y = 0.001 + 0.991x, SEE = 0.003 g/cm3) and the females (y = 0.059 + 0.934x, SEE = 0.003 g/cm3) did not significantly deviate from the line of identity. However in males the regression significantly deviated from the line of identity (y = 0.052 + 0.944x, SEE = 0.002 g/cm3). Body density by the criterion measure and body density while wearing spandex bicycle shorts did not significantly differ from the line of identity for the entire group (y = -0.018 + 1.013x SEE = 0.003 g/cm3), in males (y = -0.002 + 1.001x, SEE = 0.003 g/cm3), or females (y = 0.073 + 0.925x, SEE = 0.003 g/cm3). Residual plot analysis revealed no group or gender bias in either the cotton gym shorts or in the spandex bicycle shorts. Conclusion It would appear bicycle spandex shorts are an acceptable alternative to a Speedo® like swim suit, however we advise that subjects adhere to the strict clothing protocol that is recommended by the manufacturer. PMID:16045792

  11. Association of ultrasound-based measures of fetal body composition with newborn adiposity.

    PubMed

    Ikenoue, S; Waffarn, F; Sumiyoshi, K; Ohashi, M; Ikenoue, C; Buss, C; Gillen, D L; Simhan, H N; Entringer, S; Wadhwa, P D

    2017-08-01

    Newborns exhibit substantial variation in gestational age-adjusted and sex-adjusted fat mass proportion. The antecedent characteristics of fetal body composition that are associated with newborn fat mass proportion are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to determine whether a composite measure of fetal fat mass is prospectively associated with newborn adiposity. In a longitudinal study of 109 low-risk pregnancies, fetal ultrasonography was performed at approximately 12, 20 and 30 weeks gestation. Estimated fetal adiposity (EFA) was derived by integrating cross-sectional arm and thigh per cent fat area and anterior abdominal wall thickness. Newborn per cent body fat was quantified by Dual Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry. The association between EFA and newborn per cent body fat was determined by multiple linear regression. After controlling for confounding factors, EFA at 30 weeks was significantly associated with newborn per cent body fat (standardized β = 0.41, p < 0.001) and explained 24.0% of its variance, which was substantially higher than that explained by estimated fetal weight (8.1%). The observed effect was driven primarily by arm per cent fat area. A composite measure of fetal adiposity at 30 weeks gestation may constitute a better predictor of newborn per cent body fat than estimated fetal weight by conventional fetal biometry. Fetal arm fat deposition may represent an early indicator of newborn adiposity. After replication, these findings may provide a basis for an improved understanding of the ontogeny of fetal fat deposition, thereby contributing to a better understanding of its intrauterine determinants and the development of potential interventions. © 2016 World Obesity Federation.

  12. Associations of Body Composition Measurements with Serum Lipid, Glucose and Insulin Profile: A Chinese Twin Study

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chunxiao; Gao, Wenjing; Cao, Weihua; Lv, Jun; Yu, Canqing; Wang, Shengfeng; Zhou, Bin; Pang, Zengchang; Cong, Liming; Wang, Hua; Wu, Xianping; Li, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To quantitate and compare the associations of various body composition measurements with serum metabolites and to what degree genetic or environmental factors affect obesity-metabolite relation. Methods Body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), lean body mass (LBM), percent body fat (PBF), fasting serum high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), glucose, insulin and lifestyle factors were assessed in 903 twins from Chinese National Twin Registry (CNTR). Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated from fasting serum glucose and insulin. Linear regression models and bivariate structural equation models were used to examine the relation of various body composition measurements with serum metabolite levels and genetic/environmental influences on these associations, respectively. Results At individual level, adiposity measurements (BMI, WC and PBF) showed significant associations with serum metabolite concentrations in both sexes and the associations still existed in male twins when using within-MZ twin pair comparison analyses. Associations of BMI with TG, insulin and HOMA-IR were significantly stronger in male twins compared to female twins (BMI-by-sex interaction p = 0.043, 0.020 and 0.019, respectively). Comparison of various adiposity measurements with levels of serum metabolites revealed that WC explained the largest fraction of variance in serum LDL-C, TG, TC and glucose concentrations while BMI performed best in explaining variance in serum HDL-C, insulin and HOMA-IR levels. Of these phenotypic correlations, 64–81% were attributed to genetic factors, whereas 19–36% were attributed to unique environmental factors. Conclusions We observed different associations between adiposity and serum metabolite profile and demonstrated that WC and BMI explained the largest fraction of variance in serum lipid profile and insulin

  13. Do anthropometric indices accurately reflect directly measured body composition in men and women with chronic heart failure?

    PubMed

    Oreopoulos, Antigone; Fonarow, Gregg C; Ezekowitz, Justin A; McAlister, Finlay A; Sharma, Arya M; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Norris, Colleen M; Johnson, Jeffery A; Padwal, Raj S

    2011-01-01

    How well anthropometric indices such as body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, waist-stature ratio, and waist index correlate with direct measures of body composition (lean body mass, body fat) in men and women with chronic heart failure (CHF) has not been reported. Body composition was assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry in 140 patients with CHF. Age-adjusted Pearson correlations between each index and measures of body composition for men and women were calculated. Diagnostic accuracy of detecting obesity or high central fat was also examined. In men, all of the anthropometric indices except waist index were just as strongly correlated with lean body mass (correlation coefficients varied between 0.56 for waist-stature ratio to 0.74 for BMI) as with percentage of body fat (correlation coefficients varied between 0.72 for BMI to 0.79 for waist circumference). In women, all 4 anthropometric measures were unable to significantly differentiate between body fat and lean body mass. The positive likelihood ratios for the detection of obesity varied between 2.26 for waist circumference and 3.42 for BMI, waist-stature ratio, and waist index. Anthropometric indices do not accurately reflect body composition in patients with CHF, especially in women. When accurate assessment of body composition is required, direct measurements should be obtained.

  14. Non-invasive techniques for measuring body composition: state of the art and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    In the past 20 years, in vivo analysis of body elements by neutron activation has become an important tool in medical research. In particular, it provides a much needed means to make quantitative assessments of body composition of human beings in vivo. The data are useful both for basic physiological understanding and for diagnosis and management of a variety of diseases and disorders. This paper traces the development of the in vivo neutron activation technique from basic systems to the present state of the art facilities. A scan of some of the numerous clinical applications that have been made with this technique, reveals the broad potentialities of in vivo neutron activation. The paper also considers alternative routes of future development and raises some of the questions now faced in making the techniques more widely available to both medical practitioners and medical investigators. In vivo neutron activation has opened a new era of both clinical diagnosis and therapy evaluation, and investigation into the modelling of body composition. The techniques are new, but it is already clear that considerable strides can be made in increasing accuracy and precision, increasing the number of elements susceptible to measurement, and reducing the dose required for the measurement. 18 refs., 7 figs.

  15. [Measurement of human body composition: in vivo techniques and related evaluation].

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiangpu; Fu, Tingliang; Ou, Kun; Shi, Qizhi

    2007-08-01

    The in vivo techniques for studying human body composition have built up an important field and are continuing to be developed. This review provides an overview of the present status of this field and describes the in vivo techniques used in mearsuring human body composition such as anthropometry, metabolites method, densitometry, dilution method, total body potassium, neutron activation analysis, bioelectrical impedance analysis, dual energy X ray absorptiometry and imaging method. The review also introduces the principle, method and value of these techniques.

  16. Assessment tools in obesity - psychological measures, diet, activity, and body composition.

    PubMed

    Beechy, Laura; Galpern, Jennie; Petrone, Andrew; Das, Sai Krupa

    2012-08-20

    The global increase in the prevalence of obesity has led to an increased need for measurement tools for research, management and treatment of the obese person. The physical size limitations imposed by obesity, variations in body composition from that of normal weight, and a complex psychopathology all pose tremendous challenges to the assessment of an obese person. There is little published research regarding what tools can be used with confidence. This review is designed to provide researchers and clinicians with a guide to the current and emerging measurement tools specifically associated with obesity research and practice. Section 1 addresses psychological measures of well being. Sections 2, 3, and 4 focus on the assessment of food intake, activity, and body composition. All sections address basic challenges involved in the study and management of obesity, and highlight methodological issues associated with the use of common assessment tools. The best available methods for use in the obese both in research and clinical practice are recommended. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Beyond Body Mass Index: Using Anthropometric Measures and Body Composition Indicators to Assess Odds of an Endometriosis Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Backonja, Uba; Hediger, Mary L; Chen, Zhen; Lauver, Diane R; Sun, Liping; Peterson, C Matthew; Buck Louis, Germaine M

    2017-05-24

    Body mass index (BMI) and endometriosis have been inversely associated. To address gaps in this research, we examined associations among body composition, endometriosis, and physical activity. Women from 14 clinical sites in the Salt Lake City, Utah and San Francisco, California areas and scheduled for laparoscopy/laparotomy were recruited during 2007-2009. Participants (N = 473) underwent standardized anthropometric assessments to estimate body composition before surgery. Using a cross-sectional design, odds of an endometriosis diagnosis (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]; 95% confidence interval [CI]) were calculated for anthropometric and body composition measures (weight in kg; height in cm; mid upper arm, waist, hip, and chest circumferences in cm; subscapular, suprailiac, and triceps skinfold thicknesses in mm; arm muscle and fat areas in cm(2); centripetal fat, chest-to-waist, chest-to-hip, waist-to-hip, and waist-to-height ratios; arm fat index; and BMI in kg/m(2)). Physical activity (metabolic equivalent of task-minutes/week) and sedentariness (average minutes sitting on a weekday) were assessed using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire-Short Form. Measures were modeled continuously and in quartiles based on sample estimates. Adjusted models were controlled for age (years, continuous), site (Utah/California), smoking history (never, former, or current smoker), and income (below, within 180%, and above of the poverty line). Findings were standardized by dividing variables by their respective standard deviations. We used adjusted models to examine whether odds of an endometriosis diagnosis were moderated by physical activity or sedentariness. Inverse relationships were observed between endometriosis and standardized: weight (aOR = 0.71, 95% CI 0.57-0.88); subscapular skinfold thickness (aOR = 0.79, 95% CI 0.65-0.98); waist and hip circumferences (aOR = 0.79, 95% CI 0.64-0.98 and aOR = 0.76, 95% CI 0.61-0.94, respectively); total

  18. Validation of a quantitative magnetic resonance method for measuring human body composition.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Antonella; Miller, Sam R; Murgatroyd, Peter R; Coward, W Andrew; Wright, Antony; Finer, Nick; De Bruin, Tjerk W; Bullmore, Edward T; Nunez, Derek J

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate a novel quantitative magnetic resonance (QMR) methodology (EchoMRI-AH, Echo Medical Systems) for measurement of whole-body fat and lean mass in humans. We have studied (i) the in vitro accuracy and precision by measuring 18 kg Canola oil with and without 9 kg water (ii) the accuracy and precision of measures of simulated fat mass changes in human subjects (n = 10) and (iii) QMR fat and lean mass measurements compared to those obtained using the established 4-compartment (4-C) model method (n = 30). (i) QMR represented 18 kg of oil at 40 degrees C as 17.1 kg fat and 1 kg lean while at 30 degrees C 15.8 kg fat and 4.7 kg lean were reported. The s.d. of repeated estimates was 0.13 kg for fat and 0.23 kg for lean mass. Adding 9 kg of water reduced the fat estimates, increased misrepresentation of fat as lean, and degraded the precision. (ii) the simulated change in the fat mass of human volunteers was accurately represented, independently of added water. (iii) compared to the 4-C model, QMR underestimated fat and over-estimated lean mass. The extent of difference increased with body mass. The s.d. of repeated measurements increased with adiposity, from 0.25 kg (fat) and 0.51 kg (lean) with BMI <25 kg/m(2) to 0.43 kg and 0.81 kg respectively with BMI >30 kg/m(2). EchoMRI-AH prototype showed shortcomings in absolute accuracy and specificity of fat mass measures, but detected simulated body composition change accurately and with precision roughly three times better than current best measures. This methodology should reduce the study duration and cohort number needed to evaluate anti-obesity interventions.

  19. Predicting Football Players' Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry Body Composition Using Standard Anthropometric Measures

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Jonathan M.; Lambert, Brad S.; Martin, Steven E.; Green, John S.; Crouse, Stephen F.

    2012-01-01

    Context: The recent increase in athlete size, particularly in football athletes of all levels, coupled with the increased health risk associated with obesity warrants continued monitoring of body composition from a health perspective in this population. Equations developed to predict percentage of body fat (%Fat) have been shown to be population specific and might not be accurate for football athletes. Objective: To develop multiple regression equations using standard anthropometric measurements to estimate dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry %Fat (DEXA%Fat) in collegiate football players. Design: Controlled laboratory study. Patients and Other Participants: One hundred fifty-seven National Collegiate Athletic Association Division IA football athletes (age  =  20 ± 1 years, height  =  185.6 ± 6.5 cm, mass  =  103.1 ± 20.4 kg, DEXA%Fat  =  19.5 ± 9.1%) participated. Main Outcome Measure(s): Participants had the following measures: (1) body composition testing with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry; (2) skinfold measurements in millimeters, including chest, triceps, subscapular, midaxillary, suprailiac, abdominal (SFAB), and thigh; and (3) standard circumference measurements in centimeters, including ankle, calf, thigh, hip (AHIP), waist, umbilical (AUMB), chest, wrist, forearm, arm, and neck. Regression analysis and fit statistics were used to determine the relationship between DEXA%Fat and each skinfold thickness, sum of all skinfold measures (SFSUM), and individual circumference measures. Results: Statistical analysis resulted in the development of 3 equations to predict DEXA%Fat: model 1, (0.178 • AHIP) + (0.097 • AUMB) + (0.089 • SFSUM) − 19.641; model 2, (0.193 • AHIP) + (0.133 • AUMB) + (0.371 • SFAB) − 23.0523; and model 3, (0.132 • SFSUM) + 3.530. The R2 values were 0.94 for model 1, 0.93 for model 2, and 0.91 for model 3 (for all, P < .001). Conclusions: The equations developed provide an accurate way to assess DEXA

  20. Vitamin D status, body composition, and fitness measures in college-aged students.

    PubMed

    Forney, Laura A; Earnest, Conrad P; Henagan, Tara M; Johnson, Loren E; Castleberry, Todd J; Stewart, Laura K

    2014-03-01

    Low vitamin D, commonly assessed as serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD), is associated with the development of many age-related chronic diseases. A positive relationship exists between elevated 25OHD and muscle synthesis, strength, power, and decreased body fat in elderly individuals. However, these findings have not been consistently reported in younger healthy populations. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between 25OHD and measures of body size, composition, metabolism, and physical fitness in a young physically active population. Thirty-nine subjects (20 men, 19 women; aged 23 ± 0.7 years) reported 6 times for testing. Blood was collected to determine 25OHD. Primary outcomes included the following: body mass index (BMI) and percent body fat (dual x-ray absorptiometry); resting metabolic rate; maximal oxygen uptake (V[Combining Dot Above]O2max); power output (Wingate); and muscular strength (8 repetition maximum for bench press, upright row, and leg extension and flexion exercises). Our analysis included all participants, and subgroup analyses for individuals with suboptimal 25OHD concentration below 35 ng·mL ("low"; n = 20, 25.97 ± 1.97 ng·mL) or equal to and above 35 ng·mL ("high"; n = 19, 44.15 ± 2.17 ng·mL). Twenty subjects in this study had serum levels of 25OHD below 35 ng·mL. There was a significant positive relationship between V[Combining Dot Above]O2max and serum 25OHD and a negative relationship between BMI and serum 25OHD. These data suggest that vitamin D deficiency is prevalent even in a young physically active population in the southern United States and that there was a positive relationship between a measure of cardiovascular fitness and serum 25OHD, and a negative relationship between serum 25OHD and BMI.

  1. Quantitative magnetic resonance (QMR) measurement of changes in body composition of neonatal pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The survival of low birth weight pigs in particular may depend on energy stores in the body. QMR is an NMR approach to measuring total body fat, lean and water. These measurements are based on quantifying protons associated with lipid and water molecules in the body. Since QMR is very rapid and do...

  2. Quantitative magnetic resonance (QMR) measurement of changes in body composition of neonatal pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The survival of low birth weight pigs in particular may depend on energy stores in the body. QMR (quantitative magnetic resonance) is a new approach to measuring total body fat, lean and water. These measurements are based on quantifying protons associated with lipid and water molecules in the body...

  3. Longitudinal measurements of total body water and body composition in healthy volunteers by online breath deuterium measurement and other near-subject methods.

    PubMed

    Engel, Barbara; Spanel, Patrik; Smith, David; Diskin, Ann; Davies, Simon J

    2004-01-01

    Rapid quantification of breath deuterium abundance by flowing afterglow mass spectrometry (FA-MS) enables accurate measurement of total body water (TBW), which combined with other techniques such as bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) and anthropometrics enables near-subject assessment of body composition. This study assessed the comparative reproducibility and inter-relationship of these methods in healthy subjects over 12 months. Detailed bedside composition was performed in 22 subjects, (10 male) aged 28-79 with body mass index (BMI) ranging from 21-38 at baseline and again at one year. Techniques included FA-MS deuterium dilution, BIA, skin-fold thickness (SFT) and soft tissue ultrasound measurement of fat and muscle depth. Short-term reproducibility for each method was established. Within and between technique comparisons of measurement were made from Pearson's linear regression, coefficient of variation (CV) and Bland-Altman analysis. Weight and TBW estimated by FA-MS, BIA and SFT at baseline and one year later were highly correlated (R(2) = 0.96-0.98), slope 1.02-1.03, CV = 4.5-11.6%. Systematic errors between the different methods in determining TBW were effectively identical at baseline and after one year. There was a tendency for subjects to gain weight during the study period, due to an increase, predominantly in younger women, of body water (FA-MS and SFT) and loss of upper body fat (ultrasound). BIA was relatively insensitive to these changes. It is concluded that over a 12-month period, TBW determined by FA-MS deuterium breath analysis has reproducibility similar to conventional weighing. The stability of between method errors would suggest that these techniques might be used in conjunction with each other in the longitudinal determination of body composition and so detect relatively subtle changes. The value of including an absolute determinant of TBW by FA-MS that is independent of the need to employ population derived equations, appears to be of

  4. Measurement of changes in body composition of piglets from birth to 4 kg using quantitative magnetic resonance (QMR)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    During studies of the growth of neonatal piglets it is important to be able to accurately assess changes in body composition. Previous studies have demonstrated that QMR provides accurate measurements of total body fat, lean, and water in non-anesthetized piglets. The purpose of this study was to us...

  5. RMR Estimation Model Accuracy Using Air Displacement Plethysmography-Derived Body Composition Measures in Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Otterstetter, Ronald; Miller, Brian; Fridline, Mark; Boltz, Michelle; Faciana, Chris; Scanlon, Kelsey; Mendel, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Predictive equations derived from regression techniques based on large samples are extensively utilized in estimating resting metabolic rate (RMR). Body composition assessments utilize model equations to estimate RMR. However, the agreement of these predictive models with indirect calorimetery (IC) has come into question. Our aim is to investigate the agreement of RMR estimation models using air displacement plethysmography (ADP) measures against a gas exchange IC system (RMR-C). Sixty-six participants (25 men, 41 women) completed the study. RMR measurements were obtained from IC and ADP within 10 minutes of one another. IC RMR estimates were tested against 9 other validated models using ADP measures via analysis of variance (ANOVA) techniques with multiple comparisons testing and Bland-Altman analysis. Based on the ANOVA, the Nelson (1992) model underpredicted RMR compared to IC (p < 0.001). The Doré et al. (1982) model was the best predictor of RMR compared to the IC measures (p = 0.907). The current RMR estimation model using ADP measures underpredicts total caloric needs. The Doré et al. (1982) model more accurately predicted RMR in the entire sample.

  6. Comparison of bioelectrical impedance and DXA for measuring body composition among adults with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Esco, Michael R; Nickerson, Brett S; Russell, Angela R

    2017-03-22

    Individuals with Down syndrome (DS) have been shown to display high levels of adiposity and a unique body shape. Laboratory methods used to evaluate body composition might be too cumbersome for this special population. Therefore, field methods are desired due to their non-invasive nature. to determine the agreement between dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) for measuring body fat percentage BF% and fat-free mass (FFM) among adults with DS. Twenty-one adults (male: n = 10; female: n = 11) with DS participated in this study. BF% and FFM were determined by DXA and BIA. There was a significant mean difference between DXA and BIA for BF% (41.33 ± 8.98% and 34.23 ± 9.22%, respectively) and FFM (41.80 ± 8.74 kg and 46.95 ± 9.92 kg, respectively). The correlation between the two devices for BF% and FFM were significant (r = 0.89 and r = 0.94, respectively, p < 0.001 for both). The standard error of estimate and total error values were 4.38% and 8.27%, respectively, for BF% and 3.04 kg and 6.13 kg, respectively, for FFM. The 95% limits of agreement ranged from -15.64% below to 1.46% above the constant error (CE) of -7.09% for BF% and from -1.52 kg below to 11.83 kg above the CE of 5.15 kg for FFM. The significant mean differences and large amount of individual error suggest that BIA may not be an appropriate surrogate body composition measure compared to DXA in adults with DS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Precision Error in Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry Body Composition Measurements in Elite Male Rugby League Players.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Matthew J; Oldroyd, Brian; Smith, Debbie; Lees, Matthew J; Brightmore, Amy; Till, Kevin; Jones, Benjamin; Hind, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Body composition analysis using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is becoming increasingly popular in both clinical and sports science settings. Obesity, characterized by high fat mass (FM), is associated with larger precision errors; however, precision error for athletic groups with high levels of lean mass (LM) are unclear. Total (TB) and regional (limbs and trunk) body composition were determined from 2 consecutive total body scans (GE Lunar iDXA) with re-positioning in 45 elite male rugby league players (age: 21.8 ± 5.4 yr; body mass index: 27.8 ± 2.5 kg m(-1)). The root mean squared standard deviation (percentage co-efficient of variation) were TB bone mineral content: 24g (1.7%), TB LM: 321 g (1.6%), and TB FM: 280 g (2.3%). Regional precision values were superior for measurements of bone mineral content: 4.7-16.3 g (1.7-2.1%) and LM: 137-402 g (2.0-2.4%), than for FM: 63-299 g (3.1-4.1%). Precision error of DXA body composition measurements in elite male rugby players is higher than those reported elsewhere for normal adult populations and similar to those reported in those who are obese. It is advised that caution is applied when interpreting longitudinal DXA-derived body composition measurements in male rugby players and population-specific least significant change should be adopted.

  8. COMBINED GAMMA-RAY AND NEUTRON DETECTOR FOR MEASURING THE CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF AIRLESS PLANETARY BODIES.

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, David J. ,; Barraclough, B. L.; Feldman, W. C.; Prettyman, T. H.; Wiens, R. C.

    2001-01-01

    Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) constant1,y itnpinge all planetary bodies and produce characteristic gamma-ray lines and leakage neutrons as reaction products. Together with gamma-ray lines produced by radioactive decay, these nuclear emissions provide a powerful technique for remotely measuring the chemical composition of airless planetary surfaces. While lunar gamma-ray spectroscopy was first demonstrated with Apollo Gamma-Ray measurements, the full value of combined gamma-ray and neutron spectroscopy was shown for the first time with the Lunar Prospector Gamma-Ray (LP-GRS) and Neutron Spectrometers (LP-NS). Any new planetary mission will likely have the requirement that instrument mass and power be kept to a minimum. To satisfy such requirements, we have been designing a GR/NS instrument which combines all the functionality of the LP-GRS and LP-NS for a fraction of the mass and power. Specifically, our design uses a BGO scintillator crystal to measure gamma-rays from 0.5-10 MeV. A borated plastic scintillator and a lithium gliiss scintillator are used to separately measure thermal, epithermal, and fast neutrons as well as serve as an anticoincidence shield for the BGO. All three scintillators are packaged together in a compact phoswich design. Modifications to this design could include a CdZnTe gamma-ray detector for enhanced energy resolution at low energies (0.5-3 MeV). While care needs to be taken to ensure that an adequate count rate is achieved for specific mission designs, previous mission successes demonstrate that a cornbined GR/NS provides essential information about planetary surfaces.

  9. Body composition and clinical outcome measures in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    PubMed

    Sedehizadeh, Saam; Brook, J David; Maddison, Paul

    2017-03-01

    Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is the most common form of adult onset muscular dystrophy. In this study we compared body composition in DM1 and matched controls and evaluated the relationship between these parameters and clinical outcome measures in DM1 patients. In addition we established the sensitivity to change of these measures in a prospective 18 month longitudinal study of the DM1 patient cohort. Clinical data, manual muscle testing (MMT), quantitative muscle testing (QMT) of ankle dorsiflexion, bilateral grip dynamometry, 6 minute walk test and a DM1 functional rating scale (DM1-Activ) were collected at baseline (n = 38) and 18 month follow-up (n = 36). The case-control analysis was performed comparing baseline data with 31 anthropometrically matched controls. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) was used to obtain regional measurements of fat-free mass index (FFMI) and fat mass index (FMI) and demonstrated significant reduction of FFMI in the legs (left p = 0.004; right p = 0.017) and trunk (p < 0.0001) and increased FMI localised to the trunk (p < 0.0001) in DM1 patients compared to controls. Regional left and right arm FFMI and FMI significantly positively and negatively correlated with grip strength and both total FFMI (p = 0.0009) and FMI (p = 0.02) decreased and increased by 0.38 kg/m(2) and 0.31 kg/m(2) respectively after 18 month follow-up. DEXA is likely to provide a useful secondary outcome measurement of disease progression in addition to muscle strength and timed functional tasks in clinical trials.

  10. Body composition measurement: a review of hydrodensitometry, anthropometry, and impedance methods.

    PubMed

    Brodie, D; Moscrip, V; Hutcheon, R

    1998-03-01

    Human body composition is an expression of genetic and nutritional factors. It can change as a consequence of exogenous influences such as training, disease, or diet and is therefore of particular interest to nutrition professionals. Two of the main methods of estimating body composition in this review (hydrodensitometry and anthropometry) have been in use for decades, but the third method (bioelectrical impedance) is more recent. The procedure, theoretical basis, assumptions, standard error of estimates, and comparisons with other techniques are presented for each of the three methods. References to general and specific populations are presented that illustrate regression equations for different ages, ethnic groups, and gender. The advantages and disadvantages of the three methods are reviewed with reference made to the alternative compartment models. Other methods (DEXA, infrared interactance) are briefly reviewed.

  11. Measurement precision of body composition variables in elite wheelchair athletes, using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.

    PubMed

    Keil, Mhairi; Totosy de Zepetnek, Julia O; Brooke-Wavell, Katherine; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the reproducibility of body composition measurements by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in 12 elite male wheelchair basketball players (age 31 ± 7 years, BMI 21 ± 2 kg/m(2) and onset of disability 25 ± 9 years). Two whole body scans were performed on each participant in the supine position on the same day, using Lunar Prodigy Advance DXA (GE Lunar, Madison, WI, USA). Participants dismounted from the scanning table and were repositioned in-between the first and second scan. Whole body coefficient of variation (CV) values for bone mineral content (BMC), fat mass (FM) and soft tissue lean mass (LTM) were all <2.0%. With the exclusion of arm FM (CV = 7.8%), CV values ranged from 0.1 to 3.7% for all total body and segmental measurements of BMC, FM and LTM. The least significant change that can be attributed to the effect of treatment intervention in an individual is 1.0 kg, 1.1 kg, 0.12 kg for FM, LTM, and BMC, respectively. This information can be used to determine meaningful changes in body composition when assessed using the same methods longitudinally. Whilst there may be challenges in the correct positioning of an individual with disability that can introduce greater measurement error, DXA is a highly reproducible technique in the estimation of total and regional body composition of elite wheelchair basketball athletes.

  12. Body Composition. A Round Table.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physician and Sportsmedicine, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Four experts discuss body composition, what it is, why it is assessed, how it is measured, and how to measure it in children and the aged. Standards of fatness, both overfat and underfat, and bone and muscle assessment are covered in the discussion. (MT)

  13. Body composition analysis of inter-county Gaelic athletic association players measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry.

    PubMed

    Davies, Robert W; Toomey, Clodagh; McCormack, William; Hughes, Katie; Cremona, Alexandra; Jakeman, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Gaelic Football and Hurling are two sporting codes within the Gaelic Athletic Association. The purpose of this study was to report the body composition phenotype of inter-county Gaelic athletic association players, comparing groups by code and field position. 190 senior, male, outfield inter-county players (144 hurlers and 46 Gaelic footballers) were recruited. Stature and body mass was measured, estimates of three components of body composition, i.e., lean mass, fat mass and bone mineral content was obtained by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and normative data for Gaelic athletic association athletes by code and position was compared. Other than in the midfield, there was limited difference in body composition between codes or playing position. Stature-corrected indices nullified any existing group differences between midfielders for both codes. Further comparisons with a non-athletic control group (n = 431) showed no difference for body mass index (BMI); however, the athletic group has a lower fat mass index, with a greater lean mass in accounting for the matched BMI between groups. In addition to providing previously unknown normative data for the Gaelic athletic association athlete, a proportional and independent tissue evaluation of body composition is given.

  14. Body composition in full-term healthy infants measured with air displacement plethysmography at 1 and 12 weeks of age.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Britt; Löf, Marie; Forsum, Elisabet

    2010-04-01

    To use Pea Pod, a device based on air displacement plethysmography, to study body composition of healthy, full-term infants born to well-nourished women with a western life-style. Body composition was assessed in 53 girls and 55 boys at 1 week (before 10 days of age) and at 12 weeks (between 77 and 91 days of age). At 1 week girls contained 13.4 +/- 3.7% body fat and boys 12.5 +/- 4.0%. At 12 weeks, these figures were 26.3 +/- 4.2% (girls) and 26.4 +/- 5.1% (boys). Body fat (%) did not differ significantly between the genders. Body fat (%) at the two measurements was not correlated. At 1 week, the weight (r = 0.20, p = 0.044) and BMI (r = 0.26, p = 0.007) of the infants, but not their body fat (g, %) or fat free mass (g), correlated with BMI before pregnancy in their mothers. Pea Pod has potential for use in studies investigating the effect of external (i.e. nutritional status) and internal (i.e. age, gender, gestational age at birth) factors on infant body composition. This may be of value when studying relationships between the nutritional situation during early life and adult health.

  15. Measured body composition and geometrical data of four "virtual family" members for thermoregulatory modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaojiang; Rioux, Timothy P.; MacLeod, Tynan; Patel, Tejash; Rome, Maxwell N.; Potter, Adam W.

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a database of tissue composition, distribution, volume, surface area, and skin thickness from anatomically correct human models, the virtual family. These models were based on high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of human volunteers, including two adults (male and female) and two children (boy and girl). In the segmented image dataset, each voxel is associated with a label which refers to a tissue type that occupies up that specific cubic millimeter of the body. The tissue volume was calculated from the number of the voxels with the same label. Volumes of 24 organs in body and volumes of 7 tissues in 10 specific body regions were calculated. Surface area was calculated from the collection of voxels that are touching the exterior air. Skin thicknesses were estimated from its volume and surface area. The differences between the calculated and original masses were about 3 % or less for tissues or organs that are important to thermoregulatory modeling, e.g., muscle, skin, and fat. This accurate database of body tissue distributions and geometry is essential for the development of human thermoregulatory models. Data derived from medical imaging provide new effective tools to enhance thermal physiology research and gain deeper insight into the mechanisms of how the human body maintains heat balance.

  16. Measured body composition and geometrical data of four "virtual family" members for thermoregulatory modeling.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaojiang; Rioux, Timothy P; MacLeod, Tynan; Patel, Tejash; Rome, Maxwell N; Potter, Adam W

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a database of tissue composition, distribution, volume, surface area, and skin thickness from anatomically correct human models, the virtual family. These models were based on high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of human volunteers, including two adults (male and female) and two children (boy and girl). In the segmented image dataset, each voxel is associated with a label which refers to a tissue type that occupies up that specific cubic millimeter of the body. The tissue volume was calculated from the number of the voxels with the same label. Volumes of 24 organs in body and volumes of 7 tissues in 10 specific body regions were calculated. Surface area was calculated from the collection of voxels that are touching the exterior air. Skin thicknesses were estimated from its volume and surface area. The differences between the calculated and original masses were about 3 % or less for tissues or organs that are important to thermoregulatory modeling, e.g., muscle, skin, and fat. This accurate database of body tissue distributions and geometry is essential for the development of human thermoregulatory models. Data derived from medical imaging provide new effective tools to enhance thermal physiology research and gain deeper insight into the mechanisms of how the human body maintains heat balance.

  17. Measured body composition and geometrical data of four ``virtual family'' members for thermoregulatory modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaojiang; Rioux, Timothy P.; MacLeod, Tynan; Patel, Tejash; Rome, Maxwell N.; Potter, Adam W.

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a database of tissue composition, distribution, volume, surface area, and skin thickness from anatomically correct human models, the virtual family. These models were based on high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of human volunteers, including two adults (male and female) and two children (boy and girl). In the segmented image dataset, each voxel is associated with a label which refers to a tissue type that occupies up that specific cubic millimeter of the body. The tissue volume was calculated from the number of the voxels with the same label. Volumes of 24 organs in body and volumes of 7 tissues in 10 specific body regions were calculated. Surface area was calculated from the collection of voxels that are touching the exterior air. Skin thicknesses were estimated from its volume and surface area. The differences between the calculated and original masses were about 3 % or less for tissues or organs that are important to thermoregulatory modeling, e.g., muscle, skin, and fat. This accurate database of body tissue distributions and geometry is essential for the development of human thermoregulatory models. Data derived from medical imaging provide new effective tools to enhance thermal physiology research and gain deeper insight into the mechanisms of how the human body maintains heat balance.

  18. Comparison of body composition measurement with whole body multifrequency bioelectrical impedance and air displacement plethysmography in healthy middle-aged women.

    PubMed

    Benton, Melissa J; Swan, Pamela D; Schlairet, Maura C; Sanderson, Sonya

    2011-12-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate accuracy of multifrequency bioelectrical impedance analysis (MFBIA) using air displacement plethysmography (ADP) as the criterion measure. Body composition of 27 women was assessed by ADP followed immediately by MFBIA. There was a strong relationship (p = .01) between ADP and MFBIA in absolute lean mass (r = 0.80), absolute fat mass (r = 0.99), percent lean mass (r = 0.91), and percent fat mass (r = 0.91). Although MFBIA consistently overestimated lean mass and underestimated fat mass compared with ADP, agreement between measurements was within 2%-3% body fat. An accurate assessment tool, MFBIA can be useful in clinical settings.

  19. A new model for the determination of fluid status and body composition from bioimpedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, M

    2006-09-01

    In patients with end stage renal failure, control of the fluid status of the body is lost and fluid accumulates continuously. By dialysis therapy, excess fluid can be removed, but there are no reliable methods to establish the amount of excess fluid to be removed. Severe and even lethal complications may be the consequence of longer term deviations from a normal fluid status in dialysis patients, but also in other patient groups. Therefore, a large medical need exists for a precise and pragmatic method to determine fluid status. Bioimpedance measurement, today mainly used for nutrition status assessment, is regarded as an interesting candidate method for fluid status determination. This paper presents a four-compartment model of the human body, developed to derive information on fluid status from extra- and intracellular volumes measured by bioimpedance spectroscopy. The model allows us to determine weights of each of four compartments (overhydration, fat, muscle and remaining 'basic' components) by analyzing extra- and intracellular water volumes in different tissues of the body. Thereby fluid status (overhydration volume, normohydrated weight of the patient) as well as nutrition and fitness status (lean body, fat and muscle mass) can be determined quantitatively from a single measurement. A preliminary evaluation of the performance of a system consisting of a bioimpedance spectrum analyzer and the four-compartment model is also provided.

  20. Repeatability of Volume and Regional Body Composition Measurements of the Lower Limb Using Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry.

    PubMed

    Gjorup, Caroline A; Zerahn, Bo; Juul, Sarah; Hendel, Helle W; Christensen, Karl Bang; Hölmich, Lisbet R

    Lower limb lymphedema is a dynamic condition in which tissue composition and volume measurements are affected. Various definitions of lower limb lymphedema exist but volume differences between the limbs are widely used. It is therefore necessary to have a readily available noninvasive measurement technique allowing multiple measurements of the lower limbs. This study investigated the repeatability of duplicate volume and regional body composition measurements of the lower limb using the GE Lunar Prodigy dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scanner Prodigy (GE Medical Systems, Madison, WI). Twenty-seven participants (54 limbs), 14 women and 13 men aged 33-71 years with body mass index ranging from 14 to 32 kg/m(2) were recruited. Duplicate whole-body DXA scans were performed with repositioning between examinations. Regions of interest were manually drawn for the thigh, lower leg, and foot, and total volume was calculated using the density of bone mineral content, fat, and lean mass. The repeatability of the volume of the lower limb and regional thigh and lower leg tissue composition (bone mineral content, fat, and lean mass) was good with intraclass correlation coefficient values of 0.97 to 0.99, and narrow limits of agreement on the Bland-Altman plots. These results confirm DXA to be a highly repeatable method for volume and tissue composition measurements of the lower limb. In a population at risk of lymphedema, DXA offers a clinically readily available noninvasive method allowing multiple measurements of volume and tissue composition on a routine basis, important for diagnosing, monitoring, managing, and researching lymphedema.

  1. Relationships among dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), bioelectrical impedance (BIA), and ultrasound measurements of body composition of swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In three separate studies (156 pigs total), DXA, BIA, and ultrasound were compared as methods for measuring live body composition of pigs at 60 and 100-110 kg BWt. DXA measured total body fat and lean content, BIA measurements of resistance (Rs) and reactance (Xc) were used to calculate total body l...

  2. Measurement of changes in body composition of piglets from birth to 4 kg using quantitative magnetic resonance (QMR)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The purpose of this study was to use quantitative magnetic resonance (QMR) to measure changes in the body composition of piglets during growth from birth to 4 kg BW. Using QMR, 60 pigs were scanned an average of 5 times starting at 2.7±1.3 d of age (1.95 kg) and finally at 13.1±4.3 d (4.14 kg). Regr...

  3. Anthropometric, body composition, and blood pressure measures among rural elderly adults of Asian Indian origin: the Santiniketan aging study.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arnab; Bala, Sanjib Kumar

    2011-01-01

    The number of older adults is increasing in industrialized and in developing countries. The present community-based cross sectional work was undertaken to study the anthropometric, body composition, and blood pressure characteristics of rural-dwelling elderly adults of Asian Indian origin. A total of 300 individuals (Male = 157 and Female = 143) from the Bolpur-Sriniketan area of West Bengal, India, took part in the study. Participants were divided into four age-groups: Group I, 55-59 years (Male:Female = 55:61); Group II, 60-64 years (Male:Female = 41:33); Group III, 65-69 years (Male:Female = 27:21); Group IV, 70 years and older (Male:Female = 34:28). Anthropometric measures were taken using standard techniques. Body mass index, waist-hip ratio, and the sum of four skin folds were subsequently computed. Body composition measures, namely percentage of body fat, fat mass, fat free mass, arm muscle circumference, arm muscle area, and arm fat area, were calculated accordingly. Left-arm systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressures (DBP) were also measured, and mean arterial pressure was subsequently calculated. Overall observations in the study population indicate a predominance of body weights below the normal body mass index of 25 kg/m(2). More than half the subjects reported the lack of adequate sanitation facilities and education levels were generally low. Rates of smoking (65.6%) and habitual consumption of alcohol (38.9%) were high in male participants. Upon comparison across the four age groups, results revealed decreases in percent body fat, fat mass, and mid upper arm muscle circumference for Groups III and IV versus Group I for men and for Group IV versus I for women. The overall trend for both SBP and DBP was for small increases with age in men in contrast to slight decreases with age in women. Our findings of generally low body weights, detrimental age-related changes in body composition, and a number of other health-related concerns highlight

  4. Body composition of anorexia nervosa patients assessed by underwater weighing and skinfold-thickness measurements before and after weight gain.

    PubMed

    Probst, M; Goris, M; Vandereycken, W; Van Coppenolle, H

    2001-02-01

    Weight restoration is a crucial element in the treatment of patients with anorexia nervosa. Therefore, the validity of different methods for measuring body composition is important. We tested the concurrent validity of hydrodensitometry (underwater weighing) and anthropometry (12 skinfold thicknesses) and assessed body composition and subcutaneous fat before and after a refeeding program and a multifaceted program of therapy in a specialized inpatient unit for eating disorders. The body composition of a large sample of anorexia nervosa patients (97 restricting type, 33 binging-purging type) was studied by using 2 methods both before and after weight gain. We applied a behavioral contract for weight restoration with a minimum weekly gain of 700 g and a maximum of 3 kg. Bland-Altman analysis of agreement, Pearson correlation analysis, t tests, and analysis of covariance were used. There was good agreement between the results obtained by underwater weighing and by skinfold-thickness measurement (r = 0.76, P < 0.001); the results produced by the 2 methods did not differ significantly. On average, a significant weight gain (11.9 kg) was observed, composed of 6.6 kg fat and 5.3 kg fat-free mass. Body fat estimation by skinfold-thickness equation appeared to be as accurate as underwater weighing. The refeeding program led to a significant increase in body weight, of which 55.5% was body fat. The mean ratio of fat-free mass to fat mass at the end of the treatment was 3.4:1.

  5. Objectively measured night-to-night sleep variations are associated with body composition in very elderly women.

    PubMed

    Kim, Miji; Sasai, Hiroyuki; Kojima, Narumi; Kim, Hunkyung

    2015-12-01

    This cross-sectional study examined the association between objectively measured sleep patterns and body composition in very elderly community-dwelling women. Participants included 191 community-dwelling adults aged ≥ 80 years (mean age: 83.4 ± 2.6 years; age range: 80-92 years). Sleep and physical activity were monitored via accelerometer (ActiGraph GT3X+) during at least five consecutive 24-h periods. Night-to-night sleep pattern variability across all nights of recording was assessed using standard deviations (SDs). Body composition was assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Simple and multivariable linear regression analyses were performed. The mean number of nights with usable actigraphy data was 7.3 ± 1.3. On average, participants went to bed at 22:57 hours (SD: 1.11 h) and rose from bed at 6:27 hours (SD: 1.01 h). Night-to-night bedtime, sleep duration and sleep timing mid-point variations correlated slightly with the percentage body fat and percentage lean mass (P < 0.05). Multiple linear regression analysis revealed significant associations of night-to-night bedtime variations and inconsistent sleep-wake patterns with all body composition indices after adjusting for potential confounding factors, including mean nightly sleep duration, self-reported nap duration and daily physical activity. After further adjusting for night-to-night wake time, sleep timing mid-point and sleep duration variations, greater bedtime variability remained associated significantly with all body composition indices except lean/fat mass ratio. Inconsistent sleep-wake patterns were associated independently with an increased fat mass and decreased lean mass among very elderly women. These findings suggest that in most elderly individuals, sleep patterns might be an important modifiable factor associated with obesity and sarcopenia development.

  6. Within- and between-laboratory precision in the measurement of body volume using air displacement plethysmography and its effect on body composition assessment.

    PubMed

    Collins, A L; Saunders, S; McCarthy, H D; Williams, J E; Fuller, N J

    2004-01-01

    To determine and compare the extent of within- and between-laboratory precision in body volume (BV) measurements using air displacement plethysmography (ADP), the BOD POD body composition system, and to interpret any such variability in terms of body composition estimates. Repeated test procedures of BV assessment using the BOD POD ADP were reproduced at two laboratories for the estimation of precision, both within and between laboratories. In total, 30 healthy adult volunteers, 14 men (age, 19-48 y; body mass index (BMI), 19.7-30.3 kg/m2) and 16 women (age, 19-40 y; BMI, 16.3-35.7 kg/m2), were each subjected to two test procedures at both laboratories. Two additional volunteers were independently subjected to 10 repeated test procedures at both laboratories. Repeated measurements of BV, uncorrected for the effects of isothermal air in the lungs and the surface area artifact, were obtained using the BOD POD ADP, with the identical protocol being faithfully applied at both laboratories. Uncorrected BV measurements were adjusted to give estimates of actual BV that were used to calculate body density (body weight (BWt)/actual BV) from which estimates of body composition were derived. The differences between repeated BV measurements or body composition estimates were used to assess within-laboratory precision (repeatability), as standard deviation (SD) and coefficient of variation; the differences between measurements reproduced at each laboratory were used to determine between-laboratory precision (reproducibility), as bias and 95% limits of agreement (from SD of the differences between laboratories). The extent of within-laboratory methodological precision for BV (uncorrected and actual) was variable according to subject, sample group and laboratory conditions (range of SD, 0.04-0.13 l), and was mostly due to within-individual biological variability (typically 78-99%) rather than to technical imprecision. There was a significant (P<0.05) bias between laboratories for

  7. Use of hand-to-hand impedancemetry to predict body composition of African women as measured by air displacement plethysmography.

    PubMed

    Gartner, A; Dioum, A; Delpeuch, F; Maire, B; Schutz, Y

    2004-03-01

    To test the validity of a simple, rapid, field-adapted, portable hand-held impedancemeter (HHI) for the estimation of lean body mass (LBM) and percentage body fat (%BF) in African women, and to develop specific predictive equations. Cross-sectional observational study. Dakar, the capital city of Senegal, West Africa. A total sample of 146 women volunteered. Their mean age was of 31.0 y (s.d. 9.1), weight 60.9 kg (s.d. 13.1) and BMI 22.6 kg/m(2) (s.d. 4.5). Body composition values estimated by HHI were compared to those measured by whole body densitometry performed by air displacement plethysmography (ADP). The specific density of LBM in black subjects was taken into account for the calculation of %BF from body density. : Estimations from HHI showed a large bias (mean difference) of 5.6 kg LBM (P<10(-4)) and -8.8 %BF (P<10(-4)) and errors (s.d. of the bias) of 2.6 kg LBM and 3.7 %BF. In order to correct for the bias, specific predictive equations were developed. With the HHI result as a single predictor, error values were of 1.9 kg LBM and 3.7 %BF in the prediction group (n=100), and of 2.2 kg LBM and 3.6 %BF in the cross-validation group (n=46). Addition of anthropometrical predictors was not necessary. The HHI analyser significantly overestimated LBM and underestimated %BF in African women. After correction for the bias, the body compartments could easily be estimated in African women by using the HHI result in an appropriate prediction equation with a good precision. It remains to be seen whether a combination of arm and leg impedancemetry in order to take into account lower limbs would further improve the prediction of body composition in Africans.

  8. Measurement of the body composition of small piglets by quantitative magnetic resonance (QMR) and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    During studies of the growth of neonatal piglets it is important to be able to accurately assess changes in body composition. The purpose of this study was to compare the in vivo measurements of body composition of small piglets using QMR and DXA and to validate those results by chemical analysis. A...

  9. Gravitational effects on body composition in birds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. H.; Sanchez P., O.; Burton, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    Gallinaceous birds, presenting a wide range of body size, were adapted physiologically to hyperdynamic environments, provided by chronic centrifugation. Chemical composition was measured directly on prepared carcasses, which were anatomically comparable, and more amenable to analysis than the intact body. Body mass and body fat decreased arithmetically with increasing field strength and also with increasing body mass. Water content of lean tissue increased in hyperdynamic environments, but irrespectively of body size.

  10. Assessment of EchoMRI-AH versus dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry to measure human body composition.

    PubMed

    Galgani, J E; Smith, S R; Ravussin, E

    2011-09-01

    The sensitivity to detect small changes in body composition (fat mass and fat-free mass) largely depends on the precision of the instrument. We compared EchoMRI-AH and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) (Hologic QDR-4500A) for estimating fat mass in 301 volunteers. Body composition was evaluated in 136 males and 165 females with a large range of body mass index (BMI) (19-49 kg m(-2)) and age (19-91 years old) using DXA and EchoMRI-AH. In a subsample of 13 lean (BMI=19-25 kg m(-2)) and 21 overweight/obese (BMI>25 kg m(-2)) individuals, within-subject precision was evaluated from repeated measurements taken within 1 h (n=3) and 1 week apart (mean of three measurements taken on each day). Using Bland-Altman analysis, we compared the mean of the fat mass measurements versus the difference in fat mass measured by both instruments. We found that EchoMRI-AH quantified larger amount of fat versus DXA in non-obese (BMI<30 kg m(-2) (1.1 kg, 95% confidence interval (CI(95)):-3.7 to 6.0)) and obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg m(-2) (4.2 kg, CI(95):-1.4 to 9.8)) participants. Within-subject precision (coefficient of variation, %) in fat mass measured within 1 h was remarkably better when measured by EchoMRI-AH than DXA (<0.5 versus <1.5%, respectively; P<0.001). However, 1-week apart within-subject variability showed similar values for both instruments (<2.2%; P=0.15). EchoMRI-AH yielded greater fat mass values when compared with DXA (Hologic QDR-4500A), particularly in fatter subjects. EchoMRI-AH and DXA showed similar 1-week apart precision when fat mass was measured both in lean and overweight/obese individuals.

  11. Comparison of different techniques to measure body composition in moderately active adolescents.

    PubMed

    De Lorenzo, A; Bertini, I; Candeloro, N; Iacopino, L; Andreoli, A; Van Loan, M D

    1998-09-01

    To evaluate the differences in the estimate of body fat percentage (%FM) and the amount (kg) of fat free mass (FFM) by different methods in 26 moderately active adolescents very similar in age, body fatness, and training status. Mean (SD) age was 16.7 (0.9) years, height was 177.0 (5.1) cm, and weight 68.0 (5.2) kg. %FM was assessed using dual-energy x ray absorptiometry (DXA) and two skinfold prediction equations: that of Slaughter et al (%FM Sla) and that of Deurenberg et al (%FM Deu). In the same way, FFM was measured using DXA and different impedance equations: those of Suprasongsin et al (FFM Sup), Schaefer et al (FFM Sch), Houtkooper et al (FFM Hou), and Deurenberg et al (FFM Deu). To determine the interchangeability of the different methods of measuring %FM and FFM, one way analysis of variance, standard error (SE), and coefficient of variation (CV%) ((SD/mean) x 100) were used. On average, no significant statistical differences were observed between the values determined for %FM: DXA value, 11.7 (5.4%); %FM Sla, 10.9 (4.0)%; %FM Deu, 11.5 (2.3)%. On the other hand, SE and CV% between each pair of the three methods used showed very large variability. With regard to the measurement or prediction of FFM, the mean value measured by DXA was significantly higher than that predicted by the equation of Sch (+7.2 kg, p < 0.001), Deu (+3.2 kg, p < 0.001), and Hou (+2.6 kg, p < 0.001), whereas it was lower than that predicted by the equation of Sup (-1.6 kg, p < 0.05). The Hou and Deu values were the only two that, on average, did not differ in a statistically significant way, although they showed the highest CV%. In our sample of moderately active adolescents the estimated values for %FM and FFM appear to be highly dependent on method.

  12. Comparison of different techniques to measure body composition in moderately active adolescents

    PubMed Central

    De Lorenzo, A.; Bertini, I.; Candeloro, N.; Iacopino, L.; Andreoli, A.; Van Loan, M. D.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the differences in the estimate of body fat percentage (%FM) and the amount (kg) of fat free mass (FFM) by different methods in 26 moderately active adolescents very similar in age, body fatness, and training status. METHODS: Mean (SD) age was 16.7 (0.9) years, height was 177.0 (5.1) cm, and weight 68.0 (5.2) kg. %FM was assessed using dual-energy x ray absorptiometry (DXA) and two skinfold prediction equations: that of Slaughter et al (%FM Sla) and that of Deurenberg et al (%FM Deu). In the same way, FFM was measured using DXA and different impedance equations: those of Suprasongsin et al (FFM Sup), Schaefer et al (FFM Sch), Houtkooper et al (FFM Hou), and Deurenberg et al (FFM Deu). To determine the interchangeability of the different methods of measuring %FM and FFM, one way analysis of variance, standard error (SE), and coefficient of variation (CV%) ((SD/mean) x 100) were used. RESULTS: On average, no significant statistical differences were observed between the values determined for %FM: DXA value, 11.7 (5.4%); %FM Sla, 10.9 (4.0)%; %FM Deu, 11.5 (2.3)%. On the other hand, SE and CV% between each pair of the three methods used showed very large variability. With regard to the measurement or prediction of FFM, the mean value measured by DXA was significantly higher than that predicted by the equation of Sch (+7.2 kg, p < 0.001), Deu (+3.2 kg, p < 0.001), and Hou (+2.6 kg, p < 0.001), whereas it was lower than that predicted by the equation of Sup (-1.6 kg, p < 0.05). The Hou and Deu values were the only two that, on average, did not differ in a statistically significant way, although they showed the highest CV%. CONCLUSIONS: In our sample of moderately active adolescents the estimated values for %FM and FFM appear to be highly dependent on method. 


 PMID:9773169

  13. Evaluation of electrical broad bandwidth impedance spectroscopy as a tool for body composition measurement in cows in comparison with body measurements and the deuterium oxide dilution method.

    PubMed

    Schäff, C T; Pliquett, U; Tuchscherer, A; Pfuhl, R; Görs, S; Metges, C C; Hammon, H M; Kröger-Koch, C

    2017-05-01

    Body fatness and degree of body fat mobilization in cows vary enormously during their reproduction cycle and influence energy partitioning and metabolic adaptation. The objective of the study was to test bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy (BIS) as a method for predicting fat depot mass (FDM), in living cows. The FDM is defined as the sum of subcutaneous, omental, mesenteric, retroperitoneal, and carcass fat mass. Bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy is compared with the prediction of FDM from the deuterium oxide (DO) dilution method and from body conformation measurements. Charolais × Holstein Friesian (HF; = 18; 30 d in milk) crossbred cows and 2 HF (lactating and nonlactating) cows were assessed by body conformation measurements, BIS, and the DO dilution method. The BCS of cows was a mean of 3.68 (SE 0.64). For the DO dilution method, a bolus of 0.23 g/kg BW DO (60 atom%) was intravenously injected and deuterium (D) enrichment was analyzed in plasma and whey by stabile isotope mass spectrometry, and total body water content was calculated. Impedance measurement was performed using a 4-electrode interface and time domain-based measurement system consisting of a voltage/current converter for applying current stimulus and an amplifier for monitoring voltage across the sensor electrodes. For the BIS, we used complex impedances over three frequency decades that delivers information on intra- and extracellular water and capacity of cell membranes. Impedance data (resistance of extra- and intracellular space, cell membrane capacity, and phase angle) were extracted 1) by simple curve fit to extract the resistance at direct current and high frequency and 2) by using an electrical equivalent circuit. Cows were slaughtered 7 d after BIS and D enrichment measurements and dissected for the measurement of FDM. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed to predict FDM based on data obtained from body conformation measurements, BIS, and D enrichment, and applied

  14. Walnut ingestion in adults at risk for diabetes: effects on body composition, diet quality, and cardiac risk measures

    PubMed Central

    Njike, Valentine Yanchou; Ayettey, Rockiy; Petraro, Paul; Treu, Judith A; Katz, David L

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite their energy density, walnuts can be included in the diet without adverse effects on weight or body composition. The effect of habitual walnut intake on total calorie intake is not well studied. Effects on overall diet quality have not been reported. Methods Randomized, controlled, modified Latin square parallel design study with 2 treatment arms. The 112 participants were randomly assigned to a diet with or without dietary counseling to adjust calorie intake. Within each treatment arm, participants were further randomized to 1 of the 2 possible sequence permutations to receive a walnut-included diet with 56 g (providing 366 kcal) of walnuts per day and a walnut-excluded diet. Participants were assessed for diet quality, body composition, and cardiac risk measures. Results When compared with a walnut-excluded diet, a walnut-included diet for 6 months, with or without dietary counseling to adjust caloric intake, significantly improved diet quality as measured by the Healthy Eating Index 2010 (9.14±17.71 vs 0.40±15.13; p=0.02 and 7.02±15.89 vs -5.92±21.84; p=0.001, respectively). Endothelial function, total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol improved significantly from baseline in the walnut-included diet. Body mass index, percent body fat, visceral fat, fasting glucose, glycated hemoglobin, and blood pressure did not change significantly. Conclusions The inclusion of walnuts in an ad libitum diet for 6 months, with or without dietary counseling to adjust calorie intake, significantly improved diet quality, endothelial function, total and LDL cholesterol, but had no effects on anthropometric measures, blood glucose level, and blood pressure. Trial registration number: NCT02330848 PMID:26688734

  15. Quantitative Comparison of 2 Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry Systems in Assessing Body Composition and Bone Mineral Measurements.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenhua; Chafi, Hatim; Guo, Beibei; Heymsfield, Steven B; Murray, Kori B; Zheng, Jolene; Jia, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is widely used in body composition measurement and evaluation. Because of its numerous applications, the probability of instrument discrepancies has increased dramatically. This study quantitatively compares 2 different DXA systems. In this study, 96 subjects (60 female and 36 male, aged 19-82 years) were recruited and scanned using a General Electric Lunar iDXA and a Hologic Discovery scanner. Four measurements (percent fat, total mass, bone mineral density [BMD], and bone mineral content [BMC]) were quantitatively compared in the whole body and in specific anatomic regions (arms, legs, trunk, android, gynoid, head, ribs, and pelvis). A simple linear regression of each measurement was performed to examine the correlation between the 2 systems. Percent fat, total mass, BMC, and BMD were highly correlated between the 2 DXA systems, with correlation r values greater than 0.854 for both the whole body and the individual anatomic regions except for BMC and BMD in ribs. The high correlation between the 2 DXA systems with systematic differences enabled development of calibration equations for extending the multisystem measurements to advanced quantitative analyses.

  16. Long-term precision of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry body composition measurements and association with their covariates.

    PubMed

    Powers, Cassidy; Fan, Bo; Borrud, Lori G; Looker, Anne C; Shepherd, John A

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have described the long-term repeatability of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans. Even fewer studies have been performed with enough participants to identify possible precision covariates such as sex, age, and body mass index (BMI). Our objective was to investigate the long-term repeatability of both total and subregional body composition measurements and their associations with covariates in a large sample. Two valid whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans were available for 609 participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2000-2002. Participants with scan-quality issues were excluded. Participants varied in race and ethnicity, sex, age (mean 38.8±17.5; range 16-69 yr), and BMI (mean, 26.9±5.2; range 14.1-43.5 kg/m2). The length of time between scans ranged from 3 to 51 days (mean, 18.7±8.4). Precision error estimates for total body measures (bone mineral density, bone mineral content, lean mass, total mass, fat mass, and percent body fat) were calculated as root mean square percent coefficients of variation and standard deviations. The average root mean square percent coefficients of variation and root mean square standard deviations of the precision error for total body variables were 1.12 and 0.01 g/cm2 for bone mineral density, 1.14 and 27.3 g for bone mineral content, 1.97 and 505 g for fat mass, 1.46 and 760 g for lean mass, 1.10 and 858 g for total mass, and 1.80 and 0.59 for percent body fat. In general, only fat and lean masses were impacted by participant and scan qualities (obesity category, sex, the magnitude of the body composition variables, and time between scans). We conclude that long-term precision error values are impacted by BMI, and sex. Our long-term precision error estimates may be more suitable than short-term precision for calculating least significant change and monitoring time intervals.

  17. [Variability in bioelectrical impedance assessment of body composition depending on measurement conditions: influence of fast and rest].

    PubMed

    Cáceres, Diana Isabel; Sartor-Messagi, Monique; Rodríguez, Diego Agustín; Escalada, Ferran; Gea, Joaquim; Orozco-Levi, Mauricio; Marco, Ester

    2014-12-01

    Bioelectrical Impedance Assessment (BIA) is one of the main tools to measure body composition. BIA is recommended in fasting and after 60 minutes of rest; however, this cannot always be guaranteed in healthcare practice. To establish the reliability of the body composition parameters assessed with BIA under different physiological conditions: fast + rest, fast + no-rest and no-fast + no-rest in healthy volunteers. Transversal study including 25 healthy volunteers aged 18-34 (12 men, 13 women). A BIA was performed under three different conditions: 1) fast + 60 minute rest in cubito supino (gold standard), 2) fast + no rest and 3) no fast + no rest. The collected parameters were: lean mass and fat mass (Kg) and body water (in liters and as body weight percentage). The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was applied for the assessment of concordance within the different measurements. Compared to the gold standard, the difference in lean mass means in the condition of fast + no-rest, was -0.15 (DE 1.44) in men and 0.98 (DE 1.36) in women; fat mass decreased in 0.06 (DE 1.55) in men and 0.82 (DE 1.5) in women; ICC ranged between 0.826-0.995 in all comparisons. In the condition of no-fast + no rest, lean mass decreased an average of 0.05 (DE 0.33) in men and it increased 0.62 (DE 0.46) in women; fat mass decreased 0.57 (DE 0.82) in men and 0.46 (DE 0.60) in women; ad ICC ranged between 0.942 and 0.999, except in body water in men, where it was 0.340. Although relevant, the differences observed in parameters from BIA when comparing the gold standard condition (fast + rest) with the other conditions (fast + no-rest and no-fast + no-rest) are of little magnitude. In clinical practice, the assessment of body composition allows to take decisions when planning treatment for patients with a poor physical condition. The reliability of the parameters acquired via BIA within different physiological conditions of fast and rest is excellent (CCI >0.75) in healthy adults aged 19

  18. Body composition of adult cystic fibrosis patients and control subjects as determined by densitometry, bioelectrical impedance, total-body electrical conductivity, skinfold measurements, and deuterium oxide dilution

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, M.J.; Keim, N.L.; Brown, D.L. )

    1990-08-01

    This study contrasts body compositions (by six methods) of eight cystic fibrosis (CF) subjects with those of eight control subjects matched for age, height, and sex. CF subjects weighed 84% as much as control subjects. Densitometry and two bioelectrical impedance-analysis methods suggested that reduced CF weights were due to less lean tissue (10.7, 9.5, and 10.4 kg). Total-body electrical conductivity (TOBEC) and skinfold-thickness measurements indicated that CF subjects were leaner than control subjects and had less fat (5.4 and 3.6 kg) and less lean (5.2 and 7 kg) tissue. D2O dilution showed a pattern similar to TOBEC (8.3 kg less lean, 2.7 kg less fat tissue). Densitometry estimates of fat (mass and percent) were not correlated (r less than 0.74, p greater than 0.05) with any other method for CF subjects but were correlated with all other methods for control subjects. CF subjects contained less fat and lean tissue than did control subjects. Densitometry by underwater weighing is unsuitable for assessing body composition of CF patients.

  19. In vivo measurement of body composition of chickens using quantitative magnetic resonance (QMR)and dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    QMR is a nuclear magnetic resonance based method for measuring the fat, lean and water content of the total body of the live animal. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of QMR for measuring the body composition of chickens while comparing QMR results to those obtained by dual X-ray ab...

  20. Measures of methane production and their phenotypic relationships with dry matter intake, growth, and body composition traits in beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Herd, R M; Arthur, P F; Donoghue, K A; Bird, S H; Bird-Gardiner, T; Hegarty, R S

    2014-11-01

    Ruminants contribute up to 80% of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from livestock, and enteric methane production by ruminants is the main source of these GHG emissions. Hence, reducing enteric methane production is essential in any GHG emissions reduction strategy in livestock. Data from 2 performance-recording research herds of Angus cattle were used to evaluate a number of methane measures that target methane production (MPR) independent of feed intake and to examine their phenotypic relationships with growth and body composition. The data comprised 777 young bulls and heifers that were fed a roughage diet (ME of 9 MJ/kg DM) at 1.2 times their maintenance energy requirements and measured for MP in open circuit respiration chambers for 48 h. Methane traits evaluated included DMI during the methane measurement period, MPR, and methane yield (MY; MPR/DMI), with means (± SD) of 6.2 ± 1.4 kg/d, 187 ± 38 L/d, and 30.4 ± 3.5 L/kg, respectively. Four forms of residual MPR (RMP), which is a measure of actual minus predicted MPR, were evaluated. For the first 3 forms, predicted MPR was calculated using published equations. For the fourth (RMPR), predicted MPR was obtained by regression of MPR on DMI. Growth traits evaluated were BW at birth, weaning (200 d of age), yearling age (400 d of age), and 600 d of age, with means (± SD) of 34 ± 4.6, 238 ± 37, 357 ± 45, and 471 ± 53 kg, respectively. Body composition traits included ultrasound measures (600 d of age) of rib fat, rump fat, and eye muscle area, with means (± SD) of 3.8 ± 2.6 mm, 5.4 ± 3.8 mm, and 61 ± 7.7 cm(2), respectively. Methane production was positively correlated (r ± SE) with DMI (0.65 ± 0.02), MY (0.72 ± 0.02), the RMP traits (r from 0.65 to 0.79), the growth traits (r from 0.19 to 0.57), and the body composition traits (r from 0.13 to 0.29). Methane yield was, however, not correlated (r ± SE) with DMI (-0.02 ± 0.04) as well as the growth (r from -0.03 to 0.11) and body composition (r from 0

  1. Evaluation of Body Composition: Why and How?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Evaluation of human body composition in vivo remains a critical component in the assessment of nutritional status of an individual.Whereas traditional measurements of standing height and body weight provide information on body mass index and, hence, the risk of some chronic diseases, advanced techno...

  2. The influence of anthropometric factors on postural balance: the relationship between body composition and posturographic measurements in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Angélica Castilho; Luna, Natália Mariana S; Mochizuki, Luis; Barbieri, Fábio; Santos, Sileno; Greve, Julia Maria D'Andréia

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of anthropometric characteristics and gender on postural balance in adults. One hundred individuals were examined (50 males, 50 females; age range 20-40 years). METHODS: The following body composition measurements were collected (using bone densitometry measurements): fat percentage (% fat), tissue (g), fat (g), lean mass (g), bone mineral content (g), and bone mineral density (g/cm2). In addition, the following anthropometric measurements were collected: body mass (kg), height (cm), length of the trunk-cephalic region (cm), length of the lower limbs (cm) and length of the upper limbs (cm). The following indices were calculated: body mass index (kg/m2), waist-hip ratio and the support base (cm2). Also, a postural balance test was performed using posturography variables with open and closed eyes. RESULTS: The analysis revealed poor correlations between postural balance and the anthropometric variables. A multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated that the whole group (female and male) height explained 12% of the medial-lateral displacement, 10% of the speed of oscillation, and 11% of the displacement area. The length of the trunk-cephalic length explained 6% of the displacement in the anteroposterior direction. With eyes closed, the support base and height explained 18% of the medial displacement, and the lateral height explained 10% of the displacement speed and 5% of the scroll area. CONCLUSION: Measured using posturography, the postural balance was only slightly influenced by the anthropometric variables, both with open and closed eyes. Height was the anthropometric variable that most influenced postural balance, both in the whole group and separately for each gender. Postural balance was more influenced by anthropometric factors in males than females. PMID:23295598

  3. Assessing body composition in infants and toddlers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to compare different body composition techniques in infants and toddlers. Anthropometric measures including mid-upper arm circumference (MAC), triceps skinfold thickness (TSF), and weight-for-height or -length Z-scores (WHZ), and measures of body fat mass assessed wit...

  4. Fundamental Movement Skill Proficiency and Body Composition Measured by Dual Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry in Eight-Year-Old Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slotte, Sari; Sääkslahti, Arja; Metsämuuronen, Jari; Rintala, Pauli

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The main aim was to examine the association between fundamental movement skills (FMS) and objectively measured body composition using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Methods: A study of 304 eight-year-old children in Finland. FMS were assessed with the "Test of gross motor development," 2nd ed. Total body fat…

  5. Relationship of Blood Cholesterol to Body Composition, Physical Fitness, and Dietary Intake Measures in Third-Grade Children and Their Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopper, Chris A.; Gruber, Mary B.; Munoz, Kathy D.; MacConnie, Susan E.; Pfingston, Yvonne M.; Nguyen, Kim

    2001-01-01

    Investigated interrelationships between blood cholesterol levels, body composition, diet, and physical fitness among third graders and their parents. Data from blood and body measurements, children's physical fitness tests, parents' physical activity surveys, and children's and parents' dietary recalls highlighted significant mild-to-moderate…

  6. Relationship of Blood Cholesterol to Body Composition, Physical Fitness, and Dietary Intake Measures in Third-Grade Children and Their Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopper, Chris A.; Gruber, Mary B.; Munoz, Kathy D.; MacConnie, Susan E.; Pfingston, Yvonne M.; Nguyen, Kim

    2001-01-01

    Investigated interrelationships between blood cholesterol levels, body composition, diet, and physical fitness among third graders and their parents. Data from blood and body measurements, children's physical fitness tests, parents' physical activity surveys, and children's and parents' dietary recalls highlighted significant mild-to-moderate…

  7. Fundamental Movement Skill Proficiency and Body Composition Measured by Dual Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry in Eight-Year-Old Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slotte, Sari; Sääkslahti, Arja; Metsämuuronen, Jari; Rintala, Pauli

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The main aim was to examine the association between fundamental movement skills (FMS) and objectively measured body composition using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Methods: A study of 304 eight-year-old children in Finland. FMS were assessed with the "Test of gross motor development," 2nd ed. Total body fat…

  8. Gonadotropin excretion and body composition.

    PubMed

    Penny, R; Goldstein, I P; Frasier, S D

    1978-02-01

    Urinary follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) excretion was correlated with calculated total body water (TBW) and body fat (BF) in 140 normal girls and 142 normal boys, ages 3 to 16 years. In girls, there was a significant increase in gonadotropin excretion at the time of a significant increase in BF as a percent of body weight and decrease in TBW as a percent of body weight. Pubertal changes in body composition were seen in girls at the same chronological age and stage of puberty as increased gonadotropin excretion. Similar findings were observed in boys. Pubertal changes in body composition (an increase in TBW as a percent of body weight and decrease of BF as a percent of body weight) accompanied significantly increased gonadotropin excretion. Both developmental changes were seen at the same chronological age and stage of puberty. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that characteristic changes in body composition as well as the other hallmarks of puberty, including menarche in girls, result from increased gonadotropin and gonadal steroid secretion. They do not support the hypothesis that changes of body composition trigger increased hypothalamic function and hormone secretion leading to the subsequent events of puberty.

  9. Measuring body composition using the bioelectrical impedance method can predict the outcomes of gemcitabine-based chemotherapy in patients with pancreatobiliary tract cancer

    PubMed Central

    MURAMATSU, MAMI; TSUCHIYA, AYA; OHTA, SEIKO; IIJIMA, YUKIE; MARUYAMA, MIYUKI; ONODERA, YOSHIKO; HAGIHARA, MEGUMI; NAKAYA, NAOKI; SATO, ITARU; OMURA, KENJI; UENO, SOICHIRO; NAKAJIMA, HIDEO

    2015-01-01

    In order to examine the effect on body composition of anticancer drug treatments, the body composition rate in patients being treated with gemcitabine (GEM)-based chemotherapy was measured over time on an outpatient basis with a simple body composition monitor using the bioelectrical impedance (BI) method. The results revealed a significant reduction in the body fat rate (P=0.01) over the course of treatment in patients with pancreatobiliary tract cancer who became unable to continue GEM-based chemotherapy due to progressive disease or a decreased performance status. Meanwhile, no changes were observed in the body composition of control patients with urothelial carcinoma receiving GEM-based chemotherapy. In association with the adverse reactions to GEM and the hematotoxicity profile, a decreased white blood cell count was more likely to occur in body fat-dominant patients (mean fat rate, 25.8%; mean muscle rate, 26.2%), whereas a decreased blood platelet count was more likely to occur in skeletal muscle-dominant patients (mean fat rate, 23.3%; mean muscle rates, 28.7%). The correlation between body composition parameters and the relative dose intensity (RDI) associated with GEM administration was also analyzed. The results revealed a positive correlation between the RDI and basal metabolism amount (P=0.03); however, the RDI did not correlate with the body fat rate, skeletal muscle rate or body mass index (P=0.61, P=0.14 and P=0.20, respectively). In conclusion, the body composition rate measurement using the BI method over time may be useful for predicting the outcome of GEM-based chemotherapy and adverse events in patients with pancreatobiliary tract cancer. In particular, the present findings indicate that the changes in body fat rate may be helpful as an adjunct index for assessing potential continuation of chemotherapy and changes in physical conditions. PMID:26788165

  10. Impact of food and fluid intake on technical and biological measurement error in body composition assessment methods in athletes.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Ava; Slater, Gary J; Byrne, Nuala

    2017-02-01

    Two, three and four compartment (2C, 3C and 4C) models of body composition are popular methods to measure fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM) in athletes. However, the impact of food and fluid intake on measurement error has not been established. The purpose of this study was to evaluate standardised (overnight fasted, rested and hydrated) v. non-standardised (afternoon and non-fasted) presentation on technical and biological error on surface anthropometry (SA), 2C, 3C and 4C models. In thirty-two athletic males, measures of SA, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy (BIS) and air displacement plethysmography (BOD POD) were taken to establish 2C, 3C and 4C models. Tests were conducted after an overnight fast (duplicate), about 7 h later after ad libitum food and fluid intake, and repeated 24 h later before and after ingestion of a specified meal. Magnitudes of changes in the mean and typical errors of measurement were determined. Mean change scores for non-standardised presentation and post meal tests for FM were substantially large in BIS, SA, 3C and 4C models. For FFM, mean change scores for non-standardised conditions produced large changes for BIS, 3C and 4C models, small for DXA, trivial for BOD POD and SA. Models that included a total body water (TBW) value from BIS (3C and 4C) were more sensitive to TBW changes in non-standardised conditions than 2C models. Biological error is minimised in all models with standardised presentation but DXA and BOD POD are acceptable if acute food and fluid intake remains below 500 g.

  11. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry measured regional body composition least significant change: effect of region of interest and gender in athletes.

    PubMed

    Buehring, Bjoern; Krueger, Diane; Libber, Jessie; Heiderscheit, Bryan; Sanfilippo, Jennifer; Johnson, Brian; Haller, Irina; Binkley, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is widely used to evaluate body composition in athletes. Knowledge of measurement precision is essential for monitoring body composition changes over time. This study begins characterizing DXA body composition precision in 60 (30 males and 30 females) Division 1 athletes focusing on gender, regional, and tissue type differences. Two total body scans with repositioning between were performed on the same day. Least significant change (LSC) for the root-mean-square deviation (LSCRMSD) and the percent coefficient of variation (LSC%CV) for total, lean, and fat mass was calculated for 6 regions of interest. The effect of gender, region, tissue type, and mass on the standard deviation (SD) and percent coefficient of variation (%CV) between the 2 scans was evaluated using repeated measures regression analysis. Statistically significant effects of gender, region, tissue type, and mass on SD and %CV were noted. To generalize, a nonlinear positive relationship between LSCRMSD and mass and a nonlinear negative relationship between LSC%CV and mass were observed. In conclusion, DXA body composition LSC varies among genders, regions, tissues, and mass. As such, when evaluating serial body composition in athletes, especially if assessing regional change, knowledge of precision in individuals of similar body size and gender to the population of interest is needed.

  12. Effect of ¹⁸F-FDG administration on measurements of bone mineral density and body composition by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Weung; Kim, Woo Hyoung; Kim, Myoung Hyoun; Kim, Seong Su; Mo, Eun Hee; Lee, Chun Ho; Kim, Chang Guhn

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether antecedent administration of ¹⁸F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) used in positron emission tomography (PET) scanning results in corruption of bone mineral density (BMD) and body composition measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) system. DXA measurements of BMD and body composition had been performed twice, before and after ¹⁸F-FDG PET scan in 30 patients. The comparison of pre-values and post-values of all BMD values showed a decrease after the injection. However, only the decrease of whole-body BMD (WB-BMD) was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Whole-body fat mass had increased and whole-body lean body mass had decreased after the injection of ¹⁸F-FDG, and these were statistically significant (p < 0.05). There is statistically significant correlation between the injected ¹⁸F-FDG dose and a decrease of WB-BMD (r = -0.405; p < 0.05). The findings of this study suggest that when both ¹⁸F-FDG PET and DXA measurements for whole-body composition are performed in close-time proximity, ¹⁸F-FDG PET scans should follow the DXA measurement. Otherwise, BMD measurements of total femur or lumbar spine could be followed by ¹⁸F-FDG PET in close-time proximity.

  13. Body composition in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Dionyssiotis, Y

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis affects central nervous system leading to disability. Among other complications the deterioration of body composition is usually neglected and increases the risk for diseases such as coronary heart disease, non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, lipid abnormalities and bone loss leading to fractures in this population. Body mass index values, the effect of spasticity, the increased number of drugs used and the relationship between skeletal muscle and bone which interacts with impaired motor function leading to body composition alterations in multiple sclerosis are reviewed. PMID:23935336

  14. Body composition in sport: a comparison of a novel ultrasound imaging technique to measure subcutaneous fat tissue compared with skinfold measurement.

    PubMed

    Müller, Wolfram; Horn, Martin; Fürhapter-Rieger, Alfred; Kainz, Philipp; Kröpfl, Julia M; Maughan, Ronald J; Ahammer, Helmut

    2013-11-01

    Extremely low weight and rapid changes in weight and body composition have become major concerns in many sports, but sufficiently accurate field methods for body composition assessment in athletes are missing. This study aimed to explore the use of ultrasound methods for assessment of body fat content in athletes. 19 female athletes (stature: 1.67(± 0.06) m, weight: 59.6(± 7.6) kg; age: 19.5(± 3.3) years) were investigated by three observers using a novel ultrasound method for thickness measurement of uncompressed subcutaneous adipose tissue and of embedded structures. Two observers also measured skinfold thickness at eight International Society for the Advancement of Kinanthrometry (ISAK) sites; mean skinfold values were compared to mean subcutaneous adipose tissue thicknesses measured by ultrasound. Interobserver reliability of imaging and evaluation obtained by this ultrasound technique: intraclass correlation coefficient ICC=0.968 (95% CI 0.957 to 0.977); evaluation of given images: ICC=0.997 (0.993 to 0.999). Skinfold compared to ultrasound thickness showed that compressibility of subcutaneous adipose tissue depends largely on the site and the person: regression slopes ranged from 0.61 (biceps) to 1.59 (thigh) and CIs were large. Limits of agreement ranged from 2.6 to 8.6 mm. Regression lines did not intercept the skinfold axis at zero because of the skin thickness being included in the skinfold. The four ISAK trunk sites caused ultrasound imaging problems in 13 of 152 sites (8 ISAK sites, 19 athletes). The ultrasound method allows measurement of uncompressed subcutaneous adipose tissue thickness with an accuracy of 0.1-0.5 mm, depending on the probe frequency. Compressibility of the skinfold depends on the anatomical site, and skin thickness varies by a factor of two. This inevitably limits the skinfold methods for body fat estimation. Ultrasound accuracy for subcutaneous adipose tissue measurement is limited by the plasticity of fat and furrowed tissue

  15. Effects of the amount of exercise on body weight, body composition, and measures of central obesity: STRRIDE--a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Slentz, Cris A; Duscha, Brian D; Johnson, Johanna L; Ketchum, Kevin; Aiken, Lori B; Samsa, Gregory P; Houmard, Joseph A; Bales, Connie W; Kraus, William E

    2004-01-12

    Obesity is a major health problem due, in part, to physical inactivity. The amount of activity needed to prevent weight gain is unknown. To determine the effects of different amounts and intensities of exercise training. Randomized controlled trial (February 1999-July 2002). Sedentary, overweight men and women (aged 40-65 years) with mild to moderate dyslipidemia were recruited from Durham, NC, and surrounding communities. Eight-month exercise program with 3 groups: (1) high amount/vigorous intensity (calorically equivalent to approximately 20 miles [32.0 km] of jogging per week at 65%-80% peak oxygen consumption); (2) low amount/vigorous intensity (equivalent to approximately 12 miles [19.2 km] of jogging per week at 65%-80%), and (3) low amount/moderate intensity (equivalent to approximately 12 miles [19.2 km] of walking per week at 40%-55%). Subjects were counseled not to change their diet and were encouraged to maintain body weight. Body weight, body composition (via skinfolds), and waist circumference. Of 302 subjects screened, 182 met criteria and were randomized and 120 completed the study. There was a significant (P<.05) dose-response relationship between amount of exercise and amount of weight loss and fat mass loss. The high-amount/vigorous-intensity group lost significantly more body mass (in mean [SD] kilograms) and fat mass (in mean [SD] kilograms) (-2.9 [2.8] and -4.8 [3.0], respectively) than the low-amount/moderate-intensity group (-0.9 [1.8] and -2.0 [2.6], respectively), the low-amount/vigorous-intensity group (-0.6 [2.0] and -2.5 [3.4], respectively), and the controls (+1.0 [2.1] and +0.4 [3.0], respectively). Both low-amount groups had significantly greater improvements than controls but were not different from each other. Compared with controls, all exercise groups significantly decreased abdominal, minimal waist, and hip circumference measurements. There were no significant changes in dietary intake for any group. In nondieting, overweight

  16. Assessment of body composition in ballett dancers: correlation among anthropometric measurements, bio-electrical impedance analysis, and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.

    PubMed

    Eliakim, A; Ish-Shalom, S; Giladi, A; Falk, B; Constantini, N

    2000-11-01

    Ballet dancers tend to restrict caloric intake and/or to use inappropriate compensatory behavior (e.g. self-induced vomiting, use of laxatives) in order to maintain a low body weight. Therefore careful assessment of body composition and determination of minimal body weight for maintenance of a desirable percent fat may reduce unnecessary weight loss and decrease the use of a potentially dangerous weight-control behavior. The purpose of this study was to determine body fat in a homogenous group of 59 adolescent, female ballet dancers (age range 14-17 y). Body composition was assessed using three different techniques: skinfold thickness measurements, bio-electrical impedance analysis (BIA), and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Percent body fat and the sum of skinfold thickness were calculated from measurements of four sites (i.e. triceps, biceps, subscapular, and suprailiac). All eumenorrheic dancers were examined in the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle whereas amenorrheic dancers (or pre-menarcheal) at random. Significant positive correlations were found between skinfold measurements and assessments of body fat by BIA (r=0.48, p<0.001); and between skinfold measurements and assessments of body fat by DXA (r=0.80, p<0.00001). Assessment of body fat by BIA was significantly correlated with assessment of body fat by DXA (r=0.63, p<0.001). The correlation coefficient of percent body fat by skinfolds with DXA (r=0.8, p<0.00001) was significantly higher than the correlation coefficient of body fat by BIA with body fat DXA (p<0.01). In addition the agreement between measurements of body fat by DXA and skinfolds was higher than measurements of body fat by DXA and BIA. This study demonstrates that a simple, inexpensive, field-based method such as skinfold measurements can be successfully used to determine body fat in a homogeneous group of female ballet dancers. This may help to determine a minimal body weight of female dancers based on their percent body

  17. Comparison of Some Secondary Body Composition Algorithms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Robert A.; Miller, Carolyn

    2006-01-01

    Body composition measurements vary greatly in degree of measurement difficulty and accuracy. Hydrostatic weighing, chemical dilution or their equivalents were the accepted "gold" standards for assessing fat mass. Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DEXA) is fast replacing these techniques as the preferred standard. However, these direct measurement…

  18. Comparison of Some Secondary Body Composition Algorithms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Robert A.; Miller, Carolyn

    2006-01-01

    Body composition measurements vary greatly in degree of measurement difficulty and accuracy. Hydrostatic weighing, chemical dilution or their equivalents were the accepted "gold" standards for assessing fat mass. Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DEXA) is fast replacing these techniques as the preferred standard. However, these direct measurement…

  19. Heat Production and Storage Are Positively Correlated with Measures of Body Size/Composition and Heart Rate Drift during Vigorous Running

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buresh, Robert; Berg, Kris; Noble, John

    2005-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine the relationships between: (a) measures of body size/composition and heat production/storage, and (b) heat production/storage and heart rate (HR) drift during running at 95 % of the velocity that elicited lactate threshold, which was determined for 20 healthy recreational male runners. Subsequently,…

  20. Heat Production and Storage Are Positively Correlated with Measures of Body Size/Composition and Heart Rate Drift during Vigorous Running

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buresh, Robert; Berg, Kris; Noble, John

    2005-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine the relationships between: (a) measures of body size/composition and heat production/storage, and (b) heat production/storage and heart rate (HR) drift during running at 95 % of the velocity that elicited lactate threshold, which was determined for 20 healthy recreational male runners. Subsequently,…

  1. Body composition measures from underwater weighing and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry in black and white girls: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Morrison, John A; Khoury, Philip R; Campaigne, Barbara N; Chumlea, W M Cameron; Specker, Bonny; Campaign, Barbara N; Guo, Shumei S

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare estimates of body composition in two ethnic groups, 31 black and 38 white girls 10 through 16 years of age, to establish accurate and precise laboratory standards for field measures of body composition in the NHLBI Growth and Health Study HC 55025. The dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) measures of fat free mass (FFM) and % body fat (%BF) were made using Hologic QDR-1000/W. Corresponding values of FFM and %BF from underwater weighing (UWW) were determined using the two-component model of Siri, and these were corrected using the model of Lohman for white girls only. In the comparison of the different models and methods, the two-component model overestimated FFM compared to estimates from DXA for black girls, as did the corrected Lohman model for white girls. The two-component model significantly overestimated %BF in both white and black girls compared to corresponding estimates from DXA. The ratio of bone mineral content (BMC)/FFM affected the degree of %BF differences in black girls but not in white girls. Also, as the density of FFM increased or approached adult status in black girls (BMC/FFM increased), differences between the two-component model and estimates from DXA decreased. In both groups of girls, the relationship of %BF from UWW and DXA are a function of the level of body fatness. DXA values of %BF are greater than those from UWW under about 24% body fat, but the converse occurs above 25% body fat. The inability of UWW using the two-component model to account for the body composition in these girls can be corrected in part by measuring the variables for a multicomponent model or more easily by using DXA estimates of body composition. © 1994 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Copyright © 1994 Wiley-Liss, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  2. Measuring body temperature.

    PubMed

    McCallum, Louise; Higgins, Dan

    Body temperature is one of the four main vital signs that must be monitored to ensure safe and effective care. Temperature measurement is recommended by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence a part of the initial assessment in acute illness in adults (NICE, 2007) and by the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network guidelines for post-operative management in adults (SIGN, 2004). Despite applying in all healthcare environments, wide variations exist on the methods and techniques used to measure body temperature. It is essential to use the most appropriate technique to ensure that temperature is measured accurately. Inaccurate results may influence diagnosis and treatment, lead to a failure to identify patient deterioration and compromise patient safety. This article explains the importance of temperature regulation and compares methods of its measurement.

  3. Assessment methods in human body composition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seon Yeong; Gallagher, Dympna

    2008-09-01

    The present study reviews the most recently developed and commonly used methods for the determination of human body composition in vivo with relevance for nutritional assessment. Body composition measurement methods are continuously being perfected with the most commonly used methods being bioelectrical impedance analysis, dilution techniques, air displacement plethysmography, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, and MRI or magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Recent developments include three-dimensional photonic scanning and quantitative magnetic resonance. Collectively, these techniques allow for the measurement of fat, fat-free mass, bone mineral content, total body water, extracellular water, total adipose tissue and its subdepots (visceral, subcutaneous, and intermuscular), skeletal muscle, select organs, and ectopic fat depots. There is an ongoing need to perfect methods that provide information beyond mass and structure (static measures) to kinetic measures that yield information on metabolic and biological functions. On the basis of the wide range of measurable properties, analytical methods and known body composition models, clinicians and scientists can quantify a number of body components and with longitudinal assessment, can track changes in health and disease with implications for understanding efficacy of nutritional and clinical interventions, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment in clinical settings. With the greater need to understand precursors of health risk beginning in childhood, a gap exists in appropriate in-vivo measurement methods beginning at birth.

  4. Assessment methods in human body composition

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seon Yeong; Gallagher, Dympna

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review The present study reviews the most recently developed and commonly used methods for the determination of human body composition in vivo with relevance for nutritional assessment. Recent findings Body composition measurement methods are continuously being perfected with the most commonly used methods being bioelectrical impedance analysis, dilution techniques, air displacement plethysmography, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, and MRI or magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Recent developments include three-dimensional photonic scanning and quantitative magnetic resonance. Collectively, these techniques allow for the measurement of fat, fat-free mass, bone mineral content, total body water, extracellular water, total adipose tissue and its subdepots (visceral, subcutaneous, and intermuscular), skeletal muscle, select organs, and ectopic fat depots. Summary There is an ongoing need to perfect methods that provide information beyond mass and structure (static measures) to kinetic measures that yield information on metabolic and biological functions. On the basis of the wide range of measurable properties, analytical methods and known body composition models, clinicians and scientists can quantify a number of body components and with longitudinal assessment, can track changes in health and disease with implications for understanding efficacy of nutritional and clinical interventions, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment in clinical settings. With the greater need to understand precursors of health risk beginning in childhood, a gap exists in appropriate in-vivo measurement methods beginning at birth. PMID:18685451

  5. Precision errors, least significant change, and monitoring time interval in pediatric measurements of bone mineral density, body composition, and mechanostat parameters by GE lunar prodigy.

    PubMed

    Jaworski, Maciej; Pludowski, Pawel

    2013-01-01

    Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) method is widely used in pediatrics in the study of bone density and body composition. However, there is a limit to how precise DXA can estimate bone and body composition measures in children. The study was aimed to (1) evaluate precision errors for bone mineral density, bone mass and bone area, body composition, and mechanostat parameters, (2) assess the relationships between precision errors and anthropometric parameters, and (3) calculate a "least significant change" and "monitoring time interval" values for DXA measures in children of wide age range (5-18yr) using GE Lunar Prodigy densitometer. It is observed that absolute precision error values were different for thin and standard technical modes of DXA measures and depended on age, body weight, and height. In contrast, relative precision error values expressed in percentages were similar for thin and standard modes (except total body bone mineral density [TBBMD]) and were not related to anthropometric variables (except TBBMD). Concluding, due to stability of percentage coefficient of variation values in wide range of age, the use of precision error expressed in percentages, instead of absolute error, appeared as convenient in pediatric population.

  6. Body Composition and Somatotype of Male and Female Nordic Skiers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinning, Wayne E.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Anthropometric measurements (body composition and somatotype characteristics) for male and female Nordic skiers showed small values for measures of variance, suggesting that the subjects represented a select body type for the sport. (Author/MJB)

  7. Evaluation of body composition. Current issues.

    PubMed

    Heyward, V H

    1996-09-01

    In the selection of body composition field methods and prediction equations, exercise and health practitioners must consider their clients' demographics. Factors, such as age, gender, level of adiposity, physical activity and ethnicity influence the choice of method and equation. Also, it is important to evaluate the relative worth of prediction equations in terms of the criterion method used to derive reference measures of body composition for equation development. Given that hydrodensitometry, hydrometry and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry are subject to measurement error and violation of basic assumptions underlying their use, none of these should be considered as a 'gold standard' method for in vivo body composition assessment. Reference methods, based on whole-body, 2-component body composition models, are limited, particularly for individuals whose fat-free body (FFB) density and hydration differ from values assumed for 2-component models. Use of field method prediction equations developed from 2-component model (Siri equation) reference measures of body composition will systematically underestimate relative body fatness of American Indian women, Black men and women, and Hispanic women because the average FFB density of these ethnic groups exceeds the assumed value (1.1 g/ml). Thus, some researchers have developed prediction equations based on multicomponent model estimates of body composition that take into account interindividual variability in the water, mineral, and protein content of the FFB. One multicomponent model approach adjusts body density (measured via hydrodensitometry) for total body water (measured by hydrometry) and/or total body mineral estimated from bone mineral (measured via dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry). Skinfold (SKF), bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), and near-infrared interactance (NIR) are 3 body composition methods used in clinical settings. Unfortunately, the overwhelming majority of field method prediction equations

  8. Measurement of body composition changes during weight loss in obese men using multi-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis and multi-compartment models.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Alexandra M; Faber, Peter; Gibney, Eileen R; Lobley, Gerald E; Stubbs, R James; Siervo, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The accurate measurement of changes in body composition is important to assess the contribution of fat and fat free mass to total body mass change as a measure of the effectiveness of weight loss programmes. Bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy (BIS) is a rapid and non-invasive technique which could be applied to assess body composition changes. The aim of the study was to evaluate the accuracy of the BIS for the measurement of fat mass (FM), total body water (TBW) and extracellular water (ECW) changes induced by different degrees of caloric deficit in obese men. Three groups of six, obese men participated in either (i) a total fast (for 6 days); (ii) a VLCD (2.5 MJ/day for 3 weeks); or (iii) LCD (5.2 MJ/day for 6 weeks). FM was measured using a 4-compartment (4-C) model. TBW and ECW were determined by dilution methods, respectively. TBW, ECW and FM were also assessed with BIS. Body weight loss in the fasting group was 6.0 ± 1.3 kg over 6 days; the VLCD group lost 9.2 ± 1.2 kg over 21 days and the LCD group lost 12.6 ± 2.4 kg over 42 days. BIS underestimated FM changes (bias = -3.3 ± 3.8 kg) and overestimated changes in TBW and ECW by +1.8 ± 4.8 kg and +2.3 ± 6.4 kg, respectively. The measurement error was consistently larger in the fasting group and the magnitude of the bias interacted significantly with the rate of weight loss. Rapid weight loss affects the accuracy of the BIS in detecting changes in body composition. A careful interpretation of the results is needed when sizable changes in body water compartments occurs. © 2014 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity . Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Reference data and percentile curves of body composition measured with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry in healthy Chinese children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Guo, Bin; Xu, Yi; Gong, Jian; Tang, Yongjin; Shang, Jingjie; Xu, Hao

    2015-09-01

    Measurements of body composition by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) have evident value in evaluating skeletal and muscular status in growing children and adolescents. This study aimed to generate age-related trends for body composition in Chinese children and adolescents, and to establish gender-specific reference percentile curves for the assessment of muscle-bone status. A total of 1541 Chinese children and adolescents aged from 5 to 19 years were recruited from southern China. Bone mineral content (BMC), lean mass (LM) and fat mass (FM) were measured for total body and total body less head (TBLH). After 14 years, total body LM was significantly higher in boys than girls (p < 0.001). However, total body FM was significantly higher in girls than boys in age groups 13-19 years (p < 0.01). Both LM and FM were consistent independent predictors of total body and subcranial bone mass in both sexes, even after adjustment for the well-known predictors of BMC. The results of multiple linear regression identified LM as the stronger predictor of total body and subcranial skeleton BMC while the fat mass contributed less. For all the subjects, significant positive correlations were observed between total body LM, height, total body BMC and subcranial BMC (p < 0.01). Subcranial BMC had a better correlation with LM than total body BMC. We have also presented gender-specific percentile curves for LM-for-height and BMC-for-LM which could be used to evaluate and follow various pediatric disorders with skeletal manifestations in this population.

  10. Body composition of female wheelchair athletes.

    PubMed

    Sutton, L; Wallace, J; Goosey-Tolfrey, V; Scott, M; Reilly, T

    2009-04-01

    Wheelchair users undergo changes in body composition as a result of disability. In this study the distribution of bone mineral, lean and fat mass was assessed in highly-trained female wheelchair athletes and a reference group by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). The transferability of anthropometric equations commonly used in female groups was examined in order to establish a suitable field method of body composition assessment. The DXA total-body results indicated no difference between groups, but segmental analyses uncovered regional differences. The wheelchair athletes had greater BMD (p=0.088), more lean mass (p<0.001) and a lower percent fat (p=0.050) in their arms. The reverse was true of the legs (p< or =0.001). The trunk as a whole did not differ between groups. In general, the anthropometric equations showed a lack of transferability to the wheelchair group and tended to underestimate total percent body fat. Anthropometric measures such as body mass index (BMI) and waist girth showed strong correlations with body fat in the wheelchair group (BMI: r=0.90, p=0.001; waist: r=0.83, p=0.001), but weaker results in the reference group. It is recommended that specific anthropometric equations be developed for use in the absence of a 'gold standard' measure of body composition such as DXA.

  11. Women gaze behaviour in assessing female bodies: the effects of clothing, body size, own body composition and body satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Cundall, Amelia; Guo, Kun

    2017-01-01

    Often with minimally clothed figures depicting extreme body sizes, previous studies have shown women tend to gaze at evolutionary determinants of attractiveness when viewing female bodies, possibly for self-evaluation purposes, and their gaze distribution is modulated by own body dissatisfaction level. To explore to what extent women's body-viewing gaze behaviour is affected by clothing type, dress size, subjective measurements of regional body satisfaction and objective measurements of own body composition (e.g., chest size, body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio), in this self-paced body attractiveness and body size judgement experiment, we compared healthy, young women's gaze distributions when viewing female bodies in tight and loose clothing of different dress sizes. In contrast to tight clothing, loose clothing biased gaze away from the waist-hip to the leg region, and subsequently led to enhanced body attractiveness ratings and body size underestimation for larger female bodies, indicating the important role of clothing in mediating women's body perception. When viewing preferred female bodies, women's higher satisfaction of a specific body region was associated with an increased gaze towards neighbouring body areas, implying satisfaction might reduce the need for comparison of confident body parts; furthermore undesirable body composition measurements were correlated with a gaze avoidance process if the construct was less changeable (i.e. chest size) but a gaze comparison process if the region was more changeable (i.e. body mass index, dress size). Clearly, own body satisfaction and body composition measurements had an evident impact on women's body-viewing gaze allocation, possibly through different cognitive processes.

  12. Reliability of 2 Different Positioning Protocols for Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry Measurement of Body Composition in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Ava; Slater, Gary J; Byrne, Nuala; Nana, Alisa

    2016-01-01

    Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is an accepted time-efficient method of body composition assessment for total body and regional fat mass (FM), lean mass (LM), and bone mineral content (BMC), but for longitudinal monitoring the measurements must be sufficiently reliable. The aim of this study was to compare the reliability of a new positioning protocol (Nana et al) with the current reference (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey [NHANES]) protocol and investigate their within-protocol precision. Thirty healthy adults (16 females and 14 males) underwent 4 whole-body DXA scans in succession with full repositioning between scans. The scan order was randomized, with 2 scans undertaken in accordance with the current NHANES protocol and 2 using the Nana et al protocol. Magnitudes of typical errors of measurement and changes in the mean of DXA body composition estimates were assessed as standardized effect sizes. The Nana et al protocol repositioning produced trivial typical errors for total body across all LM estimates except for FM in the arms and trunk which were moderately substantial. The NHANES protocol produced similar typical errors for all measurements in LM except for FM and BMC in the trunk and arms which were substantially larger than the smallest worthwhile effect. The difference between protocols produced substantially large typical errors in estimations of both total body FM and regional FM and BMC, but differences in LM were all less than the smallest worthwhile effect. Although both protocols demonstrated acceptable intratest reliability, the Nana et al protocol produced enhanced precision in regional (arms and trunk) FM and BMC. The protocols were substantially different in body composition assessment especially for FM and thus should not to be interchanged. Anecdotally, subjects felt more comfortable and supported during the scan with the Nana et al protocol.

  13. A comparison of dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and bioelectrical impedance analysis to measure total and segmental body composition in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Leahy, Siobhan; O'Neill, Cian; Sohun, Rhoda; Jakeman, Philip

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of BIA in the measurement of total body composition and regional fat and the fat free mass in the healthy young adults. Four hundred and three healthy young adults (167 women and 236 men) aged 18-29 years were recruited from the Mid-West region of Ireland. Multi frequency, eight-polar bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) were used to measure the total body and segmental (arm, leg and trunk) fat mass and the fat free mass. BIA was found to underestimate the percentage total body fat in men and women (p < 0.001). This underestimate increased in men with >24.6% body fat and women with >32% body fat (p < 0.001). Fat tissue mass in the trunk segment was overestimated by 2.1 kg (p < 0.001) in men and underestimated by 0.4 kg (p < 0.001) in women. BIA was also found to underestimate the fat free mass in the appendages by 1.0 kg (p < 0.001) in men and 0.9 kg (p < 0.001) in women. Compared to dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, bioelectrical impedance analysis underestimates the total body fat mass and overestimates fat free mass in healthy young adults. BIA should, therefore, be used with caution in the measurement of total body composition in women and men with >25% total body fat. Though statistically significant, the small difference (~ 4%) between the methods indicates that the BIA may be used interchangeably with DXA in the measurement of appendicular fat free mass in healthy young adults.

  14. Body Composition Methods: Comparisons and Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Duren, Dana L.; Sherwood, Richard J.; Czerwinski, Stefan A.; Lee, Miryoung; Choh, Audrey C.; Siervogel, Roger M.; Cameron Chumlea, Wm.

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of obesity in the United States and other developed countries is epidemic. Because the prevalence of comorbidities to obesity, such as type 2 diabetes, has also increased, it is clear there is a great need to monitor and treat obesity and its comorbidities. Body composition assessments vary in precision and in the target tissue of interest. The most common assessments are anthropometric and include weight, stature, abdominal circumference, and skinfold measurements. More complex methods include bioelectrical impedance, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, body density, and total body water estimates. There is no single universally recommended method for body composition assessment in the obese, but each modality has benefits and drawbacks. We present here the most common methods and provide guidelines by way of examples to assist the clinician/researcher in choosing methods appropriate to their situation. PMID:19885303

  15. Higher dietary flavonoid intakes are associated with lower objectively measured body composition in women: evidence from discordant monozygotic twins.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Amy; MacGregor, Alex; Spector, Tim; Cassidy, Aedín

    2017-03-01

    proanthocyanidins, are associated with lower fat mass independent of shared genetic and common environmental factors. Intervention trials are needed to further examine the effect of flavonoid-rich foods on body composition.

  16. Reproducibility and Validity of A-Mode Ultrasound for Body Composition Measurement and Classification in Overweight and Obese Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Smith-Ryan, Abbie E.; Fultz, Sarah N.; Melvin, Malia N.; Wingfield, Hailee L.; Woessner, Mary N.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying portable methods to measure body composition may be more advantageous than using body mass index (BMI) to categorize associated health consequences. Purpose: To compare the validity and reliability of a portable A-mode ultrasound (US) to a criterion three compartment model (3C) for the measurement of body composition. Methods: Forty-seven overweight and obese subjects participated in this study. Body composition was measured once via air displacement plethysmography for body density (Bd) and bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy for total body water (TBW) for the 3C calculations. Ultrasound measurements (BodyMetrix, Intelametrix) were made using an A mode, 2.5- MHz transmitter. All measurements were made on the right side of the body at 7 skinfold sites. The US software calculated percent body fat (%BF), fat mass (FM) and fat free mass (FFM) from the 7-site Jackson and Pollock equation. Results: %BF and FM, respectively, measured by the US (29.1±6.5%; 27.4±8.1 kg) was significantly lower compared to the 3C model (33.7±7.6%; 31.8±9.8 kg; p<0.0005). Fat free mass was significantly higher for the US (66.7±13.0 kg) compared to the 3C model (62.3±12.6; p = 0.001). The US demonstrated respectable reliability for %BF, FM, and FFM with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) ranging from 0.84–0.98 and standard error of the measurement (SEM) values and 2.2%BF, 1.9 kg, 1.9 kg, respectively. Discussion: The US was found to under predict %BF and FM with large deviations from the criterion (n = 10>4%BF error). While the US was not valid in this population, it was reliable producing results with minimal error, suggesting this technique may be effective for tracking changes in a weight loss or clinical setting. PMID:24618841

  17. Intake of ruminant trans-fatty acids, assessed by diet history interview, and changes in measured body size, shape and composition.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Camilla P; Heitmann, Berit L; Sørensen, Thorkild Ia; Overvad, Kim; Jakobsen, Marianne U

    2016-02-01

    Studies have suggested that total intake of trans-fatty acids (TFA) is positively associated with changes in body weight and waist circumference, whereas intake of TFA from ruminant dairy and meat products (R-TFA) has not been associated with weight gain. However, these previous studies are limited by self-reported measures of body weight and waist circumference or by a cross-sectional design. The objective of the present study was to investigate if R-TFA intake was associated with subsequent changes in anthropometry (body weight, waist and hip circumference) measured by technicians and body composition (body fat percentage). A 6-year follow-up study. Information on dietary intake was collected through diet history interviews, and anthropometric and bioelectrical impedance measurements were obtained by trained technicians at baseline (1987-1988) and at follow-up (1993-1994). Multiple regression with cubic spline modelling was used to analyse the data. Copenhagen County, Denmark. Two hundred and sixty-seven men and women aged 35-65 years from the Danish MONICA (MONItoring of trends and determinants in CArdiovascular diseases) cohort. The median R-TFA intake was 1.3 g/d (5th, 95th percentile: 0.4, 2.7 g/d) or 0.6% of the total energy intake (5th, 95th percentile: 0.2, 1.1%). No significant associations were observed between R-TFA intake and changes in body weight, waist and hip circumference or body fat percentage. R-TFA intake within the range present in the Danish population was not significantly associated with subsequent changes in body size, shape or composition and the 95% confidence intervals indicate that any relevant associations are unlikely to have produced these observations.

  18. Validity of anthropometric measurements to assess body composition, including muscle mass, in 3-year-old children from the SKOT cohort.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Signe M; Mølgaard, Christian; Ejlerskov, Katrine T; Christensen, Line B; Michaelsen, Kim F; Briend, André

    2015-07-01

    Nutritional status of children is commonly assessed by anthropometry both in under and overnutrition. The link between anthropometry and body fat, the body compartment most affected by overnutrition, is well known, but the link with muscle mass, the body compartment most depleted in undernutrition, associated with infections, remains unknown. In this study, we examined the relationship between common anthropometric indices and body composition measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) in a sample of 121 healthy 3-year-old Danish children. Appendicular (arms and legs) lean mass was used to estimate muscle mass. Overall, anthropometric measures were more effective to measure absolute size of fat, lean and muscle mass than their relative sizes. Proportion of the variance explained by anthropometry was 79% for lean mass, 76% for fat mass and 74% for muscle mass. For fat mass and lean mass expressed as percentage of total body mass, this proportion was 51% and 66%, respectively; and for muscle mass as percentage of lean mass it was 34%. All the best reduced multivariate models included weight, skinfold and gender except the model estimating the proportion of muscle mass in lean body mass, which included only mid-upper arm circumference and subscapular skinfold. The power of height in the weight-to-height ratio to determine fat mass proportion was 1.71 with a 95% confidence interval (0.83-2.60) including the value of 2 used in body mass index (BMI). Limitations of anthropometry to assess body composition, and especially for muscle mass as a proportion of lean mass, should be acknowledged.

  19. DXA performance in a pediatric population: precision of body composition measurements in healthy term-born infants using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.

    PubMed

    de Knegt, Victoria Elizabeth; Carlsen, Emma Malchau; Bech Jensen, Jens-Erik; Lade Rasmussen, Anne Mette; Pryds, Ole

    2015-01-01

    Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) has been hailed as a golden standard for measuring body composition in adults but remains to be fully assessed for the infant population. A total of 64 newborn infants were allocated to 1 of 3 groups. All underwent 2 Hologic Discovery A DXA scans. Suboptimal scans were reconstructed, and an investigation into the success of adjustment was carried out. Depending on group, the factors of weight change and repositioning were investigated. Test-retest variation and coefficients of variation for DXA body composition estimates were calculated. Furthermore, the effects of flannel sheets and breast milk were investigated using a pediatric phantom. Reconstruction of suboptimal scans resulted in more accurate body weight estimates. Moderate weight change and repositioning had no significant effect on the variation between scans. No significant body composition changes occurred between scans. The test-retest variation varied between 6.3% and 11.8%. Flannel sheets and breast milk affected DXA results significantly. High precision of DXA measurements was obtained in our newborn population. Reconstructing scans is a viable way of correcting minor movement artifacts. Moderate weight changes and repositioning have no significant effect on DXA results, whereas flannel sheets and milk do.

  20. Comparison of bioelectrical impedance with skinfold thickness and X-ray absorptiometry to measure body composition in HIV-infected with lipodistrophy.

    PubMed

    Siqueira Vassimon, H; Siqueira Vasimon, H; Jordao, A A; Albuquerque de Paula, F J; Artioli Machado, A; Pontes Monteiro, J

    2011-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency vírus (HIV)-associated lipodystrophy syndrome (LS) includes body composition and metabolic alterations. Lack of validated criteria and tools make difficult to evaluate body composition in this group. The aim of the study was to compare different methods to evaluate body composition between Brazilians HIV subjects with (HIV+LIPO+) or without LS (HIV+LIPO-) and healthy subjects (Control). in a cross-sectional analyses, body composition was measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), skinfold thickness (SF) and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in 10 subjects from HIV+LIPO+ group; 22 subjects from HIV+LIPO- group and 12 from Control group. There were no differences in age and body mass index (BMI) between groups. The fat mass (FM) (%) estimated by SF did not correlate with DXA in HIV+LIPO+ group (r = 0,46/ p > 0,05) and had fair agreement in both HIV groups (HIV+LIPO+ =0,35/ HIV+ LIPO- = 0,40). BIA had significant correlation in all groups (p < 0,05) and strong agreement, meanly in HIV groups, for FM (HIV+LIPO+ = 0,79/ HIV+LIPO- = 0,85 / Control = 0,60) and for fat free mass (FFM) (HIV+LIPO+ = 0,93 / HIV+LIPO- = 0,92 / Control = 0,73). Total fat mass can be measured by BIA with good precision, but not by SF in HIV-infected patients with LS. Segmental BIA, triciptal SF, circumferences of arms, waist and legs maybe alternatives that need more studies.

  1. [Body composition analysis in patients with cystic fibrosis. Comparison of 3 methods: dual energy x-ray absorptiometry, bioelectrical impedance analysis, and skinfold measurements].

    PubMed

    Beaumesnil, M; Chaillou, E; Wagner, A-C; Rouquette, A; Audran, M; Giniès, J-L

    2011-04-01

    Nutritional status must be closely monitored in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. This study compared three methods of measuring body composition in CF patients and then examined the relationships between two simple anthropometric markers of nutritional status - tricipital skinfold thickness (TSK) and arm muscular circumference (AMC) - and the results given by each method. Fifty-five patients with CF, 27 females and 28 males, participated in this study. The mean age at the time of the study was 14 ± 5 years, ranging from 4 to 29 years. The four skinfolds (SK) and arm circumference were measured in all patients and fat mass (FM) and AMC were calculated. Fifty patients underwent dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) and 38 underwent bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA). The values for FM as calculated by the three methods were highly correlated, as were the values for lean body mass (LM) (p<0.001). The LM assessed by anthropometry was overestimated by 8 ± 4% compared with DEXA and by 6 ± 7% compared with BIA. BIA overestimated LM by 4 ± 6% compared with DEXA (p<0.001). The LM values measured by SK, DEXA, and BIA were highly correlated with AMC (p<0.001) and FM calculated using these three techniques were highly correlated with TSK (p<0.001). The measurement of TSK and AMC are simple and rapid ways to evaluate body composition. The excellent correlation between the three methods used to measure body composition suggests that they are valid for use in patients with CF, but the results were not identical. The measurement from each technique must be interpreted according to its own norms and comparisons can only be made if the same technique is used in the same patient.

  2. Childhood body composition in relation to body mass index.

    PubMed

    Maynard, L M; Wisemandle, W; Roche, A F; Chumlea, W C; Guo, S S; Siervogel, R M

    2001-02-01

    The aim is to describe body composition in relation to body mass index (BMI; body weight/stature(2)) to provide health care professionals insight into the meaning, significance, and limitations of BMI as an index of adiposity during childhood. Data from 387 healthy, white children 8 to 18 years of age from the Fels Longitudinal Study were analyzed. Measurements were scheduled annually and each child was examined 1 to 11 times, totaling 1748 observations. Total body fat (TBF) and fat-free mass (FFM) were determined from hydrodensitometry. Stature and weight were measured using standard methods and BMI and the components of BMI, TBF/stature(2), and FFM/stature(2) were calculated. Analyses included correlations between BMI and body composition variables; age-related patterns of BMI, TBF/stature(2), and FFM/stature(2); and annual changes in BMI, TBF/stature(2), and FFM/stature(2). Generally, correlations between BMI and body composition variables were strong and significantly different from zero. Means for BMI throughout childhood were similar for boys and girls, although significantly larger values were observed for girls at ages 12 to 13 years. Age-related patterns of TBF/stature(2) and FFM/stature(2) differed between sexes. In each sex, annual increases in BMI were driven primarily by increases in FFM/stature(2) until late adolescence, with increases in TBF/stature(2) contributing to a larger proportion of the BMI increases in girls than in boys. Unlike adults, annual increases in BMI during childhood are generally attributed to the lean rather than to the fat component of BMI. Because the properties of BMI vary during childhood, health care professionals must consider factors such as age and sex when interpreting BMI.

  3. Obesity, body composition, and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Fowke, Jay H; Motley, Saundra S; Concepcion, Raoul S; Penson, David F; Barocas, Daniel A

    2012-01-18

    Established risk factors for prostate cancer have not translated to effective prevention or adjuvant care strategies. Several epidemiologic studies suggest greater body adiposity may be a modifiable risk factor for high-grade (Gleason 7, Gleason 8-10) prostate cancer and prostate cancer mortality. However, BMI only approximates body adiposity, and may be confounded by centralized fat deposition or lean body mass in older men. Our objective was to use bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA) to measure body composition and determine the association between prostate cancer and total body fat mass (FM) fat-free mass (FFM), and percent body fat (%BF), and which body composition measure mediated the association between BMI or waist circumference (WC) with prostate cancer. The study used a multi-centered recruitment protocol targeting men scheduled for prostate biopsy. Men without prostate cancer at biopsy served as controls (n = 1057). Prostate cancer cases were classified as having Gleason 6 (n = 402), Gleason 7 (n = 272), or Gleason 8-10 (n = 135) cancer. BIA and body size measures were ascertained by trained staff prior to diagnosis, and clinical and comorbidity status were determined by chart review. Analyses utilized multivariable linear and logistic regression. Body size and composition measures were not significantly associated with low-grade (Gleason 6) prostate cancer. In contrast, BMI, WC, FM, and FFM were associated with an increased risk of Gleason 7 and Gleason 8-10 prostate cancer. Furthermore, BMI and WC were no longer associated with Gleason 8-10 (OR(BMI) = 1.039 (1.000, 1.081), OR(WC) = 1.016 (0.999, 1.033), continuous scales) with control for total body FFM (OR(BMI) = 0.998 (0.946, 1.052), OR(WC) = 0.995 (0.974, 1.017)). Furthermore, increasing FFM remained significantly associated with Gleason 7 (OR(FFM) = 1.030 (1.008, 1.052)) and Gleason 8-10 (OR(FFM) = 1.044 (1.014, 1.074)) after controlling for FM. Our results suggest that associations between BMI and

  4. Effects of Whole Body Vibration Training on Body Composition in Adolescents with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Aguero, Alejandro; Matute-Llorente, Angel; Gomez-Cabello, Alba; Casajus, Jose A.; Vicente-Rodriguez, German

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the effect of 20 weeks of whole body vibration (WBV) on the body composition of adolescents with Down syndrome (DS). Thirty adolescent with DS were divided into two groups: control and WBV. Whole body, upper and lower limbs body fat and lean body mass were measured with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)…

  5. Effects of Whole Body Vibration Training on Body Composition in Adolescents with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Aguero, Alejandro; Matute-Llorente, Angel; Gomez-Cabello, Alba; Casajus, Jose A.; Vicente-Rodriguez, German

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the effect of 20 weeks of whole body vibration (WBV) on the body composition of adolescents with Down syndrome (DS). Thirty adolescent with DS were divided into two groups: control and WBV. Whole body, upper and lower limbs body fat and lean body mass were measured with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)…

  6. Associations between anthropometrical measurements, body composition, single-nucleotide polymorphisms of the hypothalamus/pituitary/adrenal (HPA) axis and HPA axis functioning.

    PubMed

    Rutters, Femke; Nieuwenhuizen, Arie G; Lemmens, Sofie G T; Bouwman, Freek; Mariman, Edwin; Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet S

    2011-06-01

    The relationship between hypothalamus/pituitary/adrenal (HPA) axis functioning and (visceral) obesity may be explained by single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the HPA axis. Objective  To investigate the relationship between the HPA axis SNP's 'BclI' in the glucocorticoid receptor gene and C8246T in the POMC gene and anthropometric measurements, body composition, 5-h cortisol concentrations, HPA axis feedback sensitivity, as well as HPA axis feedback sensitivity under stress in men and women. DESIGN/SUBJECTS/MEASUREMENTS: We assessed in 92 men and 102 women (18-55 years, BMI 19-41 kg/m(2) ) anthropometry, body composition using hydrodensitometry and deuterium dilution method, cortisol variability by measuring 5-h cortisol concentrations, HPA axis feedback functioning using a dexamethasone suppression test and HPA axis functioning under a challenged condition consisting of a standardized high intensity test with ingestion of 4 mg dexamethasone. In female participants, the 8246C allele carriers compared to the 8246T allele carries were associated with a higher 5-h cortisol exposure (1·52 × 10(5) ± 0·8 vs 1·18 × 10(5) ± 0·6 nm·min, P < 0·05) and higher baseline postdexamethasone cortisol concentrations (54·5 ± 35·6 vs 37·4 ± 18·5 nm, P < 0·05). In male participants regarding the C8246T allele carriers and in both male and female participants regarding the BclI genotypes, no significant differences in anthropometric measurements, body composition and HPA axis functioning were observed. Multiple regression analysis showed that only increased 5-h cortisol exposure significantly related to changes in anthropometric measurements and body composition; the BclI and C8246T genotypes were not associated. Our preliminary data show that in both men and women (18-55 years, BMI 19-41 kg/m(2) ), the SNP's BclI and C8246T of the HPA axis were primarily related to altered HPA axis functioning, rather than to altered anthropometric measurements and body

  7. Comparison of resting and total energy expenditure in peritoneal dialysis patients and body composition measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.

    PubMed

    El-Kateb, S; Sridharan, S; Farrington, K; Davenport, A

    2016-11-01

    Under basal resting conditions muscle metabolism is reduced, whereas metabolism increases with physical activity. We wished to determine whether there was an association between resting energy expenditure (REE) and total energy expenditure (TEE) in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients and lean body mass (LBM). We determined REE and TEE by recently validated equations, using doubly labelled isotopic water, and LBM by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scanning. We studied 87 patients, 50 male (57.4%), 25 diabetic (28.7%), mean age 60.3±17.6 years, with a median PD treatment of 11.4 (4.7-29.5) months. The mean weight was 70.1±17.7 kg with a REE of 1509±245 kcal/day and TEE 1947±378 kcal/day. REE was associated with body size (weight r=0.78 and body mass index (BMI) r=0.72) and body composition (LBM r=0.77, lean body mass index (LBMI) r=0.76, r=0.62), all P<0.001). For TEE, there was an association with weight r=0.58, BMI r=0.49 and body composition (LBM r=0.64, LBMI (r=0.54), all P<0.001). We compared LBMI measured by DXA and that estimated by the Boer equation using anthropomorphic measurements, which overestimated and underestimated LBM for smaller patients and heavier patients, respectively. Muscle metabolism is reduced at rest and increases with physical activity. Whereas previous reports based on REE did not show any association with LBM, we found an association between both REE and TEE, using a recently validated equation derived from dialysis patients, and LBM measured by DXA scanning. Estimation of muscle mass from anthropomorphic measurements systematically overestimated LBM for small patients and conversely underestimated for heavier patients.

  8. Body composition phenotypes and obesity paradox.

    PubMed

    Prado, Carla M; Gonzalez, M Cristina; Heymsfield, Steven B

    2015-11-01

    The obesity paradox is a highly controversial concept that may be attributed to methodological limitations related to its identification. One of the primary concerns is the use of BMI to define obesity. This index does not differentiate lean versus adipose tissue compartments (i.e. body composition) confounding health consequences for morbidity and mortality, especially in clinical populations. This review will describe the past year's evidence on the obesity paradox phenomenon, primarily focusing on the role of abnormal body composition phenotypes in explaining the controversies observed in the literature. In spite of the substantial number of articles investigating the obesity paradox phenomenon, less than 10% used a direct measure of body composition and when included, it was not fully explored (only adipose tissue compartment evaluated). When lean tissue or muscle mass is taken into account, the general finding is that a high BMI has no protective effect in the presence of low muscle mass and that it is the latter that associates with poor prognosis. In view of the body composition variability of patients with identical BMI, it is unreasonable to rely solely on this index to identify obesity. The consequences of a potential insubstantial obesity paradox are mixed messages related to patient-related prognostication.

  9. Stereometric body volume measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herron, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The following studies are reported: (1) effects of extended space flight on body form of Skylab astronauts using biostereometrics; (2) comparison of body volume determinations using hydrostatic weighing and biostereometrics; and (3) training of technicians in biostereometric principles and procedures.

  10. Comparison of circumference measures and height-weight tables with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry assessment of body composition in r.o.t.c. Cadets.

    PubMed

    Pritchett, Kelly L; Mitchell, Katherine M; Pritchett, Robert C; Gee, David L

    2017-03-13

    Height-weight tables and circumference measures are used by the U.S. Army to predict body composition because they require little equipment/expertise. However, agreement between the Army's new 2002 circumference equation and an established laboratory technique has not been determined. The purpose of this study was to quantify agreement in body fat percentages between the Army's circumference measures (taping) and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA); second to determine categorical agreement between height-weight tables and DXA. Male Reserve Officer Training Corps (R.O.T.C.) cadets (N=23; 20.6 ± 1.6 years, 179.1 ± 6.6 cm; 81.4 ± 10.3 kg) were taped according to Army protocol to predict body fat. % body fat prediction was compared to DXA via a Bland-Altman Plot with ±2-4% body fat established as a zone of agreement (ZOA). 13/23 cadets fell outside the ZOA. No cadet was over the compliance threshold (20-22% fat) using the tape method, however with DXA, 7/23 cadets were non-compliant. Height-weight tables provided a moderate level of categorical agreement with DXA. The results depict poor agreement between taping and DXA, as taping generally underestimated % body fat. Compared to taping, heightweight tables were better able to identify excess fat weight.

  11. Human body composition: advances in models and methods.

    PubMed

    Heymsfield, S B; Wang, Z; Baumgartner, R N; Ross, R

    1997-01-01

    The field of human body composition research is reaching a mature stage in its development: The three interconnected areas that define body composition research--models and their rules, methodology, and biological effects--are well-defined and are actively investigated by scientists in diverse disciplines from many different nations; and methods are available for measuring all major atomic, molecular, cellular, and tissue-system level body composition components in research, clinical, and epidemiological settings. This review summarizes main body composition research concepts, examines new component-measurement methodologies, and identifies potential areas of future research.

  12. The Body Composition of a College Football Team.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wickkiser, John D.; Kelly, John M.

    This study focuses on the body composition and anthropometric measurements of 65 college football players. Body composition was determined by underwater weighing with an accurate assessment of residual volume. The anthropometric measurements included height, weight, seven skinfolds, waist circumference, and wrist diameter. A step-wise multiple…

  13. Serial measurements of body composition in obese subjects during a very-low-energy diet (VLED) comparing bioelectrical impedance with hydrodensitometry.

    PubMed

    Carella, M J; Rodgers, C D; Anderson, D; Gossain, V V

    1997-05-01

    Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) is a convenient, inexpensive, and noninvasive technique for measuring body composition. BIA has been strongly correlated with total body water (TBW) and also has been validated against hydrodensitometry (HD). The accuracy and clinical utility of BIA and HD during periods of substantial weight loss remain controversial. We measured body composition in moderately and severely obese patients serially using both methods during a very-low-energy diet (VLED). Mean initial weight in these patients was 116 (+/-30) kg (range, 74-196 kg). Mean weight loss was 24 (+/-13) kg with a decrease in fat mass (FM) by HD of kg (p < 0.001) and a decrease in fat-free mass (FFM) of 3.6 kg (p < 0.05). Loss of FFM is best predicted by the rate (kg/wk) of weight loss (r2 = 0.86, p < 0.0001). FFM, as predicted from BIA equations, was highly correlated with FFM as estimated by HD during all testing sessions (r = 0.92-0.98). Although highly correlated, BIA overestimated FFM relative to HD and this difference appeared to be more pronounced for taller patients with greater truncal obesity. Although the discrepancy was no greater during weight-loss treatment, the level of disagreement was considerable. Therefore, the two methods cannot be used interchangeably to monitor relative changes in body composition in patients with obesity during treatment with VLED. The discrepancy between BIA and HD may be caused by body mass distribution considerations and by perturbations in TBW which affect the hydration quotient for FFM (BIA) and/or which affect the density constants for FFM and FM (HD).

  14. Measures of Body Size and Composition and Risk of Incident Atrial Fibrillation in Older People: The Cardiovascular Health Study.

    PubMed

    Karas, Maria G; Yee, Laura M; Biggs, Mary L; Djoussé, Luc; Mukamal, Kenneth J; Ix, Joachim H; Zieman, Susan J; Siscovick, David S; Gottdiener, John S; Rosenberg, Michael A; Kronmal, Richard A; Heckbert, Susan R; Kizer, Jorge R

    2016-06-01

    Various anthropometric measures, including height, have been associated with atrial fibrillation (AF). This raises questions about the appropriateness of using ratio measures such as body mass index (BMI), which contains height squared in its denominator, in the evaluation of AF risk. Among older adults, the optimal anthropometric approach to risk stratification of AF remains uncertain. Anthropometric and bioelectrical impedance measures were obtained from 4,276 participants (mean age = 72.4 years) free of cardiovascular disease in the Cardiovascular Health Study. During follow-up (1989-2008), 1,050 cases of AF occurred. BMI showed a U-shaped association, whereas height, weight, waist circumference, hip circumference, fat mass, and fat-free mass were linearly related to incident AF. The strongest adjusted association occurred for height (per each 1-standard-deviation increment, hazard ratio = 1.38, 95% confidence interval: 1.25, 1.51), which exceeded all other measures, including weight (hazard ratio = 1.21, 95% confidence interval: 1.13, 1.29). Combined assessment of log-transformed weight and height showed regression coefficients that departed from the 1 to -2 ratio inherent in BMI, indicating a loss of predictive information. Risk estimates for AF tended to be stronger for hip circumference than for waist circumference and for fat-free mass than for fat mass, which was explained largely by height. These findings highlight the prominent role of body size and the inadequacy of BMI as determinants of AF in older adults. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Air-displacement plethysmography for the measurement of body composition in children aged 6-48 months.

    PubMed

    Rosendale, Ryan P; Bartok, Cynthia J

    2012-03-01

    Air-displacement plethysmography (ADP) is an age-appropriate method for measuring relative fat mass (%FM) in children; however, the accuracy of this method has not been evaluated in children aged 5 y or younger. Mean %FM values measured by ADP (17.9 ± 8.0%) and by total body water (TBW) (23.7 ± 6.3%) were significantly different (P < 0.001). Regression analysis of %FM by ADP vs. TBW provided a line of best fit with a slope of 0.089, r(2) = 0.013, and standard error of the estimate (SEE) = 6.3% FM (P = 0.40). The error was related to child weight and %FM, but not to behaviors (movement or vocalizations) occurring during the test sequence. A large portion of the error was attributable to imprecision in measuring small volumes. As currently designed, ADP is not an accurate method for measuring %FM in young children. Further investigation of the sources of variability will provide insight into ways of improving the accuracy of this technology for this population. This study examined the accuracy of an ADP system modified for young children (BOD POD; Life Measurement, Concord, CA) by comparing %FM results from ADP with those obtained from TBW by deuterium (D(2)O) dilution (reference method) in 72 children aged 6-48 mo.

  16. The computation of body composition data using a programmable calculator.

    PubMed

    Withers, R T

    1986-01-01

    A body composition programme has been developed for the Texas Instruments TI 59 programmable calculator and printer. The methodology involves the determination of body density by underwater weighing with the ventilated residual volume being measured by helium dilution. Some of the labelled output variables included on the printout are: body density, percent body fat, fat mass and fat free mass.

  17. The effect of 99mTc on dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry measurement of body composition and bone mineral density.

    PubMed

    Fosbøl, Marie Øbro; Dupont, Anders; Alslev, Louise; Zerahn, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Whether the γ-emission by radioisotopes influences the outcome of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) measurements is not fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of antecedent administration of 99mTc on DXA measurements regarding body composition and bone mineral density (BMD) using a K-edge filter scanner. The phantom measurements were performed by placing a urinary bladder phantom containing 40 mL of radioisotope solution on the pelvic region of a whole-body phantom. Twenty-seven patients attending our department for a routine examination involving the administration of a tracer marked with 99mTc were included. The patients underwent a whole-body DXA scan before and within 2 h after tracer injection using a GE/Lunar Prodigy scanner. Control scans were performed on 40 volunteers, who had not received any radioactive tracer. In both phantom and patient measurements, we found a significant dose-related decrease in fat mass and BMD and a corresponding increase in fat-free mass (p < 0.001). Based on the linear regression analysis, we suggest upper dose limits for the measurement of BMD at 0.77 μSv/h and body composition at 0.21 μSv/h (dose rate measured at a distance of 1m from the patient). Caution should be taken when interpreting the results of DXA scans performed in close temporal proximity to procedures involving the administration of 99mTc.

  18. REVIEW: Development of methods for body composition studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, Sören; Thomas, Brian J.

    2006-07-01

    This review is focused on experimental methods for determination of the composition of the human body, its organs and tissues. It summarizes the development and current status of fat determinations from body density, total body water determinations through the dilution technique, whole and partial body potassium measurements for body cell mass estimates, in vivo neutron activation analysis for body protein measurements, dual-energy absorptiometry (DEXA), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, fMRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) for body composition studies on tissue and organ levels, as well as single- and multiple-frequency bioimpedance (BIA) and anthropometry as simple easily available methods. Methods for trace element analysis in vivo are also described. Using this wide range of measurement methods, together with gradually improved body composition models, it is now possible to quantify a number of body components and follow their changes in health and disease.

  19. Skeletal and body composition evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazess, R. B.

    1983-01-01

    Research on radiation detectors for absorptiometry; analysis of errors affective single photon absorptiometry and development of instrumentation; analysis of errors affecting dual photon absorptiometry and development of instrumentation; comparison of skeletal measurements with other techniques; cooperation with NASA projects for skeletal evaluation in spaceflight (Experiment MO-78) and in laboratory studies with immobilized animals; studies of postmenopausal osteoporosis; organization of scientific meetings and workshops on absorptiometric measurement; and development of instrumentation for measurement of fluid shifts in the human body were performed. Instrumentation was developed that allows accurate and precise (2% error) measurements of mineral content in compact and trabecular bone and of the total skeleton. Instrumentation was also developed to measure fluid shifts in the extremities. Radiation exposure with those procedures is low (2-10 MREM). One hundred seventy three technical reports and one hundred and four published papers of studies from the University of Wisconsin Bone Mineral Lab are listed.

  20. Muscle fibre type composition and body composition in hammer throwers.

    PubMed

    Terzis, Gerasimos; Spengos, Konstantinos; Kavouras, Stavros; Manta, Panagiota; Georgiadis, Giorgos

    2010-01-01

    Aim of the present study was to describe the muscle fibre type composition and body composition of well-trained hammer throwers. Six experienced hammer throwers underwent the following measurements: one repetition maximum in squat, snatch, and clean, standing broad jump, backward overhead shot throw and the hammer throw. Dual x-ray absorptiometry was used for body composition analysis. Fibre type composition and cross sectional area was determined in muscle biopsy samples of the right vastus lateralis. Eight physical education students served as a control group. One repetition maximum in squat, snatch and clean for the hammer throwers was 245 ± 21, 132 ± 13 and 165 ± 12kg, respectively. Lean body mass was higher in hammer throwers (85.9 ± 3. 9kg vs. 62.7 ± 5.1kg (p < 0.01). The percentage area of type II muscle fibres was 66.1 ± 4% in hammer throwers and 51 ± 8% in the control group (p < 0.05). Hammer throwers had significantly larger type IIA fibres (7703 ± 1171 vs. 5676 ± 1270μm(2), p < 0.01). Hammer throwing performance correlated significantly with lean body mass (r = 0.81, p < 0.05). These data indicate that hammer throwers have larger lean body mass and larger muscular areas occupied by type II fibres, compared with relatively untrained subjects. Moreover, it seems that the enlarged muscle mass of the hammer throwers contributes significantly to the hammer throwing performance. Key pointsWell-trained hammer throwers had increased lean body mass, higher type IIA muscle fibres cross sectional areas, as well as higher bone mineral density, compared to controls.Increased lean body mass was closely related with hammer throwing performance.The relative high percentage of type IIX muscle fibres in vastus lateralis in hammer throwers warrants further investigation.

  1. Muscle Fibre Type Composition and Body Composition in Hammer Throwers

    PubMed Central

    Terzis, Gerasimos; Spengos, Konstantinos; Kavouras, Stavros; Manta, Panagiota; Georgiadis, Giorgos

    2010-01-01

    Aim of the present study was to describe the muscle fibre type composition and body composition of well-trained hammer throwers. Six experienced hammer throwers underwent the following measurements: one repetition maximum in squat, snatch, and clean, standing broad jump, backward overhead shot throw and the hammer throw. Dual x-ray absorptiometry was used for body composition analysis. Fibre type composition and cross sectional area was determined in muscle biopsy samples of the right vastus lateralis. Eight physical education students served as a control group. One repetition maximum in squat, snatch and clean for the hammer throwers was 245 ± 21, 132 ± 13 and 165 ± 12kg, respectively. Lean body mass was higher in hammer throwers (85.9 ± 3. 9kg vs. 62.7 ± 5.1kg (p < 0.01). The percentage area of type II muscle fibres was 66.1 ± 4% in hammer throwers and 51 ± 8% in the control group (p < 0.05). Hammer throwers had significantly larger type IIA fibres (7703 ± 1171 vs. 5676 ± 1270μm2, p < 0.01). Hammer throwing performance correlated significantly with lean body mass (r = 0.81, p < 0.05). These data indicate that hammer throwers have larger lean body mass and larger muscular areas occupied by type II fibres, compared with relatively untrained subjects. Moreover, it seems that the enlarged muscle mass of the hammer throwers contributes significantly to the hammer throwing performance. Key points Well-trained hammer throwers had increased lean body mass, higher type IIA muscle fibres cross sectional areas, as well as higher bone mineral density, compared to controls. Increased lean body mass was closely related with hammer throwing performance. The relative high percentage of type IIX muscle fibres in vastus lateralis in hammer throwers warrants further investigation. PMID:24149393

  2. Measuring body composition in dogs using multifrequency bioelectrical impedance analysis and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry.

    PubMed

    Rae, L S; Vankan, D M; Rand, J S; Flickinger, E A; Ward, L C

    2016-06-01

    Thirty-five healthy, neutered, mixed breed dogs were used to determine the ability of multifrequency bioelectrical impedance analysis (MFBIA) to predict accurately fat-free mass (FFM) in dogs using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)-measured FFM as reference. A second aim was to compare MFBIA predictions with morphometric predictions. MFBIA-based predictors provided an accurate measure of FFM, within 1.5% when compared to DXA-derived FFM, in normal weight dogs. FFM estimates were most highly correlated with DXA-measured FFM when the prediction equation included resistance quotient, bodyweight, and body condition score. At the population level, the inclusion of impedance as a predictor variable did not add substantially to the predictive power achieved with morphometric variables alone; in individual dogs, impedance predictors were more valuable than morphometric predictors. These results indicate that, following further validation, MFBIA could provide a useful tool in clinical practice to objectively measure FFM in canine patients and help improve compliance with prevention and treatment programs for obesity in dogs.

  3. Use of a high repetition rate neutron generator for in vivo body composition measurements via neutron inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kehayias, J.J.; Ellis, K.J.; Cohn, S.H.; Weinlein, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    A small D-T neutron generator with a high pulse rate is used for the in vivo measurement of body carbon, oxygen and hydrogen. The core of the neutron generator is a 13 cm-long Zetatron tube pulsed at a rate of 10 kHz delivering 10/sup 3/ to 10/sup 4/ neutrons per pulse. A target-current feedback system regulates the source of the accelerator to assure constant neutron output. Carbon is measured by detecting the 4.44 MeV ..gamma..-rays from inelastic scattering. The short half-life of the 4.44 MeV state of carbon requires detection of the ..gamma..-rays during the 10 ..mu..s neutron pulse. Generators with low pulsing rate were found inappropriate for carbon measurements because of their low duty-cycle (high neutron output during the pulse). In vivo measurements were performed with normal volunteers using a scanning bed facility for a dose less than 25 mrem. This technique offers medical as well as general bulk analysis applications. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Comparison of different body composition models in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Brummer, R J; Lönn, L; Bengtsson, B A; Kvist, H; Bosaeus, I; Sjöström, L

    1996-12-01

    The aberrant body composition of 10 patients with active acromegaly was used to evaluate the validity and limitations of several models and methods to assess body composition. Body composition was determined using either a two-compartment model, dividing the body in a body fat (BF) compartment and a fat-free mass (FFM) compartment, or a four-compartment model in which the FFM compartment comprises the three following components: body cell mass, extracellular water and the fat-free extracellular solids. The measurement techniques consisted of anthropometry, bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA)-applying various established regression equations-tritiated water dilution, whole body 40K-counting, and whole body computed tomography (CT). This latter method was used as the reference technique. Assessment of total body water using BIA - applying the RJL or Kushner equation-correlated significantly with the assessment using tritiated water dilution (P < 0.01). Body fat assessment using the two-compartment model based on either tritiated water dilution or BIA-applying the RJL or Lukaski equation-as well as body fat assessment using the four-compartment model based on tritiated water dilution and whole body 40K-counting were significantly correlated with body fat assessment using CT (P < 0.01) and resulted in good agreement with each other with respect to the absolute values of the body fat determination. BIA using other regression equations overestimated body fat by 7.2-13.7 kg. Whole body 40K-counting was significantly correlated with CT-determined muscle plus skin volume (P < 0.001). CT-calibrated anthropometric predictions significantly overestimated body fat. It is concluded that in patients with active acromegaly, the determination of body composition using either certain two-compartment models based on measurement of total body water or bioelectrical impedance, or a four-compartment model based on total body water and total body potassium measurements show good

  5. Physical working capacity at fatigue threshold (PWCFT) is associated with sarcopenia-related body composition and measures of functionality in older adults.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Nadia S; Fukuda, David H; Stout, Jeffrey R; Robinson, Edward H; McCormack, William P; Scanlon, Tyler C; Warren, Ashlee M; Wells, Adam J; Gonzalez, Adam M; Mangine, Gerald T; Fragala, Maren S; Hoffman, Jay R

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between PWCFT and common measures used to assess sarcopenia in older adults were examined. Fifty-eight older adults [age: 71.1 ± 6.2 years; body mass index (BMI): 28.0 ± 5.4 kg/m(2)] completed the testing procedures. Sarcopenia-related body composition was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and participants performed a discontinuous cycle ergometry test to determine PWCFT. Functionality assessments included maximal isometric grip strength (GRIP) and sit-to-stand (STS) repetitions in 30s. Muscle quality (MQ) was defined as GRIP relative to appendicular lean soft tissue (ALM), while skeletal muscle index (SMI) was defined as ALM/height(2). Pearson correlations were used to examine the relationships among dependent variables. PWCFT showed significant relationships with ALM (r=0.57), SMI (r=0.47), body fat percentage (BF%) (r=-0.50), GRIP (r=0.49), and STS (r=0.44). For follow-up analyses, study participants were categorized into low sarcopenia risk (n=31) or high sarcopenia risk (n=27) groups by SMI. Sarcopenia risk was associated with PWCFT [odds ratio (OR): 1.051, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.016-1.087] and STS (OR: 1.305, CI: 1.060-1.607), but not GRIP (OR: 1.098, CI: 0.989-1.218). Using receiver-operator characteristic curve analysis, both PWCFT [area under the curve (AUC): 0.737, CI: 0.608-0.866, optimal cutoff: 37.5 W] and STS (AUC: 0.749, CI: 0.623-0.874, optimal cutoff: 12.5 repetitions) showed discriminative ability with regard to sarcopenia risk. The current data suggest that the neuromuscular fatigue threshold, as measured by PWCFT, is related to measures of body composition and function in older adults. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Precision and reliability of strength (Jamar vs. Biodex handgrip) and body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry vs. bioimpedance analysis) measurements in advanced cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Trutschnigg, Barbara; Kilgour, Robert D; Reinglas, Jason; Rosenthall, Leonard; Hornby, Laura; Morais, José A; Vigano, Antonio

    2008-12-01

    Important deteriorations in body composition and strength occur and need to be accurately measured in advanced cancer patients (ACPs). The aim of this study was to establish the relationship between a single-frequency bioimpedance analyzer (BIA) and the dual-energy X-ray absorptiometer (DXA), as well as the Jamar handgrip dynometer and the Biodex handgrip attachment, and to determine the precision of each of these instruments in ACPs. Eighty-one ACPs with non-small-cell lung cancer and gastrointestinal cancer were recruited from the McGill University Health Centre (Montreal, Que.). Consecutive paired measurements, with repositioning between measurements, were obtained for total-body DXA, BIA, Biodex handgrip, and BIA plus Jamar handgrip. The total-body percent coefficient of variation (%CV) for the BIA and DXA were 1.34 and 1.56 for fat mass (FM), respectively, and 0.42 and 0.72 for fat free mass (FFM), respectively. The %CV for the Jamar and Biodex handgrips were 6.3 and 16.7, respectively. Bland-Altman plots were used to characterize the limits of agreement between DXA and BIA for FM (4.60 +/- 7.80 (-3.19 to 12.39) kg) and FFM (-1.87 +/- 7.16 (-9.03 to 5.29) kg). Both DXA and BIA demonstrate good short-term precision in ACPs. However, given its poor accuracy, it remains to be determined if BIA can be used to monitor ACPs for changes in total-body tissue composition as a function of time, whether for observation or response to treatment. Furthermore, because of wide limits of agreement, the DXA and BIA cannot be used interchangeably in research or clinical settings. The Jamar handgrip dynamometer shows more consistency than the Biodex handgrip attachment in ACPs, and should therefore be the preferred measure of changes in strength over time.

  7. Validity of body impedance analysis for evaluating body composition in patients undergoing long-term hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Masahiro; Yamaguchi, Shinichi; Koshino, Yoshitaka; Kimura, Akira; Miyagi, Shigeji

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] This study assessed changes in body composition before and after dialysis in chronic hemodialysis patients and determined the relationships between various body composition parameters and blood lipid levels in these patients. [Subjects] The cross-sectional study included 19 dialysis outpatients (17 men and 2 women, aged 35-82 years). [Methods] Body mass index, body weight, percent body fat, and percent skeletal muscle were measured before and after dialysis by using body impedance analysis. Blood lipid levels were obtained from patients' clinical records. The body composition parameters before and after dialysis were compared using paired t-tests. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients were calculated to determine relationships between the body composition parameters, before and after dialysis, and the blood lipid levels. [Results] All body composition parameters differed significantly before and after dialysis. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol level significantly correlated with all the body composition parameters, whereas total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride levels significantly correlated with some of these parameters. The correlation coefficients revealed no major differences in the relationships between blood lipid parameters and body compositions before and after dialysis. [Conclusion] Our findings suggest that body composition parameters, whether measured before or after dialysis, can be used to evaluate obesity in longitudinal studies.

  8. Low INSL3 in Klinefelter syndrome is related to osteocalcin, testosterone treatment and body composition, as well as measures of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

    PubMed

    Overvad, S; Bay, K; Bojesen, A; Gravholt, C H

    2014-05-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is characterized by infertility and hypogonadism associated with increased prevalence of osteoporosis, diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Insulin-like factor 3 (INSL3) is produced in the Leydig cells. INSL3 has been suggested to play a role in bone health. Here, we studied INSL3 in relation to bone markers, body composition, the metabolic syndrome and diabetes. This was a case-control study. Sex hormones, anthropometric measures, vitamin D metabolites, parathyroid hormone, growth factors, muscle strength, maximal oxygen consumption and BMD were measured. We included 70 adult KS patients and 71 age-matched controls. INSL3 was lower in testosterone-treated KS compared with untreated KS. Correlation analyses showed a positive correlation between INSL3 and osteocalcin among KS, but not in controls; a significant positive correlation between INSL3 and testosterone in controls and in untreated KS, but not in treated KS men. Among controls a negative correlation was found between INSL3 and lipids, and glucose, but not in KS. HOMA2-B and impaired fasting glycaemia was positively correlated with INSL3 in controls. Among KS males we found a negative correlation between INSL3 and BMI, weight and waist/hip ratio, as well as positive correlations between INSL3 and FSH, LH, SHBG and testis volume. Multivariate analyses showed that age, testosterone and HDL cholesterol were the principal independent variables among healthy controls, whereas the determinants of INSL3 concentration among KS were age, LH, current testosterone treatment and testicular volume. INSL3 in KS is influenced by testosterone treatment and INSL3 is correlated with measures of bone metabolism, body composition and the metabolic syndrome. This may suggest that low INSL3 concentration is related to the pathogenesis behind an unfavourable change in body composition and bone metabolism among KS patients.

  9. Body Composition Assessment--Some Practical Answers to Teachers' Questions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, David Q.; Whitehead, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Presents information about body composition assessment, including how useful the measurement is, how to conduct assessment, accurate skinfold measurement, body mass index versus skinfold results, interpreting results, standards for score interpretation, other types of measurement, how to approach skinfold assessment, and handling sensitivity and…

  10. Assessment of analytical methods used to measure changes in body composition in the elderly and recommendations for their use in phase II clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Lustgarten, M S; Fielding, R A

    2011-05-01

    It is estimated that in the next 20 years, the amount of people greater than 65 years of age will rise from 40 to 70 million, and will account for 19% of the total population. Age-related decreases in muscle mass and function, known as sarcopenia, have been shown to be related to functional limitation, frailty and an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Therefore, with an increasing elderly population, interventions that can improve muscle mass content and/or function are essential. However, analytical techniques used for measurement of muscle mass in young subjects may not be valid for use in the elderly. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to examine the applied specificity and accuracy of methods that are commonly used for measurement of muscle mass in aged subjects, and, to propose specific recommendations for the use of body composition measures in phase II clinical trials of function-promoting anabolic therapies.

  11. ASSESSMENT OF ANALYTICAL METHODS USED TO MEASURE CHANGES IN BODY COMPOSITION IN THE ELDERLY AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THEIR USE IN PHASE II CLINICAL TRIALS

    PubMed Central

    Lustgarten, M.S.; Fielding, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    It is estimated that in the next 20 years, the amount of people greater than 65 years of age will rise from 40 to 70 million, and will account for 19% of the total population. Age-related decreases in muscle mass and function, known as sarcopenia, have been shown to be related to functional limitation, frailty and an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Therefore, with an increasing elderly population, interventions that can improve muscle mass content and/or function are essential. However, analytical techniques used for measurement of muscle mass in young subjects may not be valid for use in the elderly. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to examine the applied specificity and accuracy of methods that are commonly used for measurement of muscle mass in aged subjects, and, to propose specific recommendations for the use of body composition measures in phase II clinical trials of function-promoting anabolic therapies. PMID:21528163

  12. A miniaturized laser-ablation mass spectrometer for in-situ measurements of isotope composition on solar body surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedo, A.; Meyer, S.; Tulej, M.; Neuland, M.; Bieler, A.; Iakovleva, M.; Wurz, P.

    2012-04-01

    space instrument would have a cylindrical shape with a length of 120 mm, and a diameter of 60 mm, and a weight of about 1.5 kg (all electronics included). The mass analyzer supports high dynamic range of about 107 and a typical mass resolution of m/Δm~700. A computer-controlled optimizer controls the reproducibility of the performance of the mass analyzer, the laser fluence and the positioning of the sample. The system supports highly sensitive studies of elemental composition with sub-ppm detection limits. Our studies show that high accuracy and precision measurements can also be achieved in the investigations of isotopic patterns. Our initial studies of lead isotopic pattern indicated an accuracy and precision in the per mile range, which are comparable to that achieved by other - well known in isotopic analysis - mass spectrometric techniques, i.e., TIMS, SIMS, LA-ICP-MS used in the laboratory. The initial studies were conducted with Galena minerals and NIST standards. Hence, the miniaturized laser ablation time-of-flight mass spectrometer is a powerful instrument for in-situ measurements for the further investigation in surface characterization.

  13. Changes in body composition of neonatal piglets during growth

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    During studies of neonatal piglet growth it is important to be able to accurately assess changes in body composition. Previous studies have demonstrated that quantitative magnetic resonance (QMR) provides precise and accurate measurements of total body fat mass, lean mass and total body water in non...

  14. Assessment of EchoMRI-AH versus dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry by iDXA to measure human body composition.

    PubMed

    Marlatt, K L; Greenway, F L; Ravussin, E

    2017-04-01

    Comparison of percent fat mass across different body composition analysis devices is important given variation in technology accuracy and precision, as well as the growing need for cross-validation of devices often applied across longitudinal studies. We compared EchoMRI-AH and Lunar iDXA quantification of percent body fat (PBF) in 84 adults (43M, 41F), with the mean age 39.7±15.9 years and body mass index (BMI) 26.2±5.3 kg/m(2). PBF correlated strongly between devices (r>0.95, P<0.0001). A prediction equation was derived in half of the subjects, and the other half were used to cross-validate the proposed equation (EchoMRI-AH PBF=[(0.94 × iDXA PBF)+(0.14 × Age)+(3.3 × Female)-8.83). The mean PBF difference (predicted-measured) in the validation group was not different from 0 (diff=0.27%, 95% confidence interval: -0.42-0.96, P=0.430). Bland-Altman plots showed a bias with higher measured PBF on EchoMRI-AH versus iDXA in all 84 subjects (β=0.13, P<0.0001). The proposed prediction equation was valid in our cross-validation sample, and it has the potential to be applied across multicenter studies.

  15. Precursors to overnutrition: the effects of household market food expenditures on measures of body composition among Tsimane' adults in lowland Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Rosinger, Asher; Tanner, Susan; Leonard, William R

    2013-09-01

    Nutrition transitions are characterized by shifts in diet and activity levels that lead to changes in weight and body fatness over a relatively short time. Research has linked these nutritional shifts to socio-economic factors, including wealth and income. However, few studies have examined household spending patterns on market foods among subsistence populations, which may reveal food access, choice, and indicate household nutritional environment. This paper examines the relation between household monetary expenditures on "market" foods and measures of body composition among Tsimane', a forager-horticulturalist indigenous group in the Bolivian Amazon. Economic and anthropometric surveys were conducted for adults (n = 1199) 16 years or older in 563 households in 40 Tsimane' villages in 2008. Results indicate that overweight status (19% of men and 24% of women) is more common than obesity (1% of men and 4% of women). Sixty-one percent (61%) of households reported purchasing market foods during the previous week. Multiple linear and logistic regressions suggest that men living in households in the top third of monetary expenditures on market foods had significantly higher BMI (0.69 kg/m(2); p = 0.027), weight (1.80 kg; p = 0.048), percent body fat (1.06%; p = 0.025), and probability of being overweight/obese (Odds ratio = 1.83; p = 0.042) than men in households that reported not spending money on market foods in the previous week. We discuss the possibility that the division of labor may help explain the differences between men and women in this sample. This research suggests household expenditures on market foods may mediate the relation between wealth and body composition. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Total body potassium measurement method

    SciTech Connect

    Tomlinson, F.K.

    1985-09-01

    The body counter facility at Mound was used to measure the total body potassium (TBK) in hypertensive patients. Radioactive /sup 40/K accounts for 0.0118% of natural potassium and can be readily measured in vivo. The normal adult human generally has 80 to 185 g of TBK depending on sex, age, height, etc. 10 refs., 1 tab.

  17. DEXA body composition changes among 140 conscripts.

    PubMed

    Mattila, V M; Tallroth, K; Marttinen, M; Ohrankammen, O; Pihlajamaki, H

    2009-05-01

    The aim of the study was to determine changes in body composition and physical fitness during military service. A prospective cohort study of 140 healthy male conscripts was conducted. We examined subject characteristics, aerobic performance and muscle strength, and assessed body composition using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) three times. Conscripts' mean baseline weight (79.5 kg) decreased by 2 kg during the first 3 months, but increased by 0.9 kg during the second 3-month period (p<0.001). Fat mass measured by DEXA decreased by 3.2 kg during the first but increased by 0.8 kg during the second 3-month period (p<0.001). Throughout the 6-month study, an increase was seen in distance of 12-min run test (from 2 380 m to 2 530 m; p<0.001), and muscle strength score (from 6.5 to 9.5 p<0.001). Finnish military training seems to have beneficial effects on physical fitness. However, considering the relatively modest changes in body fat and physical fitness seen in conscripts with average BMIs at baseline, design of diverse training programmes for the varying baseline BMI levels are warranted to improve the physical fitness results.

  18. Non-invasive techniques for determining musculoskeleton body composition

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, S.H.

    1984-01-01

    In vivo neutron activation analysis, combined with gamma spectrometry, has ushered in a new era of clinical diagnosis and evaluation of therapies, as well as investigation into and modelling of body composition in both normal individuals and patients suffering from various diseases and dysfunctions. Body composition studies have provided baseline data on such vital constituents as nitrogen, potassium and calcium. The non-invasive measurement techniques are particularly suitable for study of the musculo-skeletal changes in body composition. Of particular relevance here is the measurement of calcium loss in astronauts during prolonged space flights.

  19. Which anthropometric measurements including visceral fat, subcutaneous fat, body mass index, and waist circumference could predict the urinary stone composition most?

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Heon; Doo, Seung Whan; Cho, Kang Su; Yang, Won Jae; Song, Yun Seob; Hwang, Jiyoung; Hong, Seong Sook; Kwon, Soon-Sun

    2015-03-14

    Although there is growing evidence of relationship between obesity and some specific stone compositions, results were inconsistent. Due to a greater relationship between metabolic syndrome and some specific stone type, obesity measured by body mass index (BMI) has limitation in determining relationship between obesity and stone compositions. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship among BMI, visceral fat, and stone compositions. We retrospectively reviewed data of patients with urinary stone removed over a 5 year period (2011-2014). Data on patient age, gender, BMI, urinary pH, stone composition, fat volumes (including visceral fat, subcutaneous fat, total fat, waist circumference), and ratio for visceral to total fat using computed tomography based delineation were collected. To figure out the predicting factor while adjusting other confounding factors, discriminant analysis was used. Among 262 cases, average age was 52.21 years. Average BMI and visceral fat were 25.03 cm(2) and 124.75 cm(2), respectively. By chi square test, there was significant (p < 0.001) difference in stone types according to sex. By ANOVA test, BMI, visceral fat, visceral to subcutaneous fat ratio, the percentage of visceral fat and total fat showed significant association with stone types. By discriminant analysis, visceral fat was proved to be a powerful factor to predict stone composition (structure matrix of visceral fat = -0.735) with 42.0% of predictive value. Visceral fat adiposity strongly related with uric acid stone and has better predictive value than BMI or urinary pH to classify the types of stone.

  20. Bone and body composition measurements of small subjects: discrepancies from software for fan-beam dual energy X-ray absorptiometry.

    PubMed

    Koo, Winston W K; Hammami, Mouhanad; Shypailo, Roman J; Ellis, Kenneth J

    2004-12-01

    A piglet model was used to determine the variations in measurements from different software algorithms used in the same type of dual energy X ray absorptiometry (DXA) instruments from the same manufacturer. Forty-one piglets (6190 +/- 5856g, mean +/- SD) were scanned in duplicate with a fan-beam densitometer (Hologic QDR4500A, Hologic Inc, Bedford, MA) in the infant whole body scan mode. The same scans were analyzed with two software versions: vKH6 (validated with carcass chemical measurement) and v11.2 (commercial software from the same densitometer manufacturer). All analysis values were highly correlated (r = 0.90 to 1.00) and DXA values for total weights were almost identical. However, v11.2 results consistently overestimated bone mineral content (49.3 +/- 23.4%, mean +/- SD), bone area (21.1 +/- 8.2%), bone mineral density (24.1 +/- 22.2%), and fat mass (160.9 +/- 71.7%) but underestimated lean mass (-14.3 +/- 5.5%) when compared to the values from vKH6. Differences between software versions increased with heavier piglets. The commercial software for fan-beam DXA measurement of piglets, matched for the size of human infants and young children, has major inaccuracies for bone mineral and body composition that become further exaggerated with increasing weight of the subject.

  1. Body image, body mass index, and body composition in young adults.

    PubMed

    Streeter, Veronica M; Milhausen, Robin R; Buchholz, Andrea C

    2012-01-01

    Associations were examined between body image and body mass index (BMI) in comparison with body composition in healthy weight, overweight, and obese young adults. Weight and height were determined, and the percentage of fat mass (%FM) and percentage of fat-free mass (%FFM) were measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry in 75 male and 87 female young adults (21.1 ± 1.9 years; 25.2 ± 4.4 kg/m² [mean ± standard deviation]). Body image was measured using the three subscales Weight Esteem, Appearance Esteem, and External Attribution of the Body-Esteem Scale for Adolescents and Adults (BESAA). Body mass index and %FM were highly correlated (r for males = 0.74, r for females = 0.82; both p<0.001), and were inversely associated with body image, particularly Weight Esteem. After adjustment for physical activity, BMI and %FM (and %FFM, although in the opposite direction) were associated with each BESAA subscale: %FM, %FFM, and BMI explained 12% to 14% of the variance in Appearance Esteem for both sexes, 33% to 41% in Weight Esteem in women and 16% to 18% in men, and 8% to 10% in External Attribution in women (all p<0.05) and <5% for men (NS). Clinicians should be aware that as their clients' BMI and %FM increase, body image decreases, particularly in women.

  2. Assessment of EchoMRI-AH versus dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry by iDXA to measure human body composition

    PubMed Central

    Marlatt, Kara L.; Greenway, Frank; Ravussin, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Background Comparison of percent fat mass across different body composition analysis devices is important given variation in technology accuracy and precision, as well as the growing need for cross-validation of devices often applied across longitudinal studies. Subjects/Methods We compared EchoMRI-AH and Lunar iDXA quantification of percent body fat (PBF) in 84 adults (43M, 41F) with mean age 39.7±15.9 y and BMI 26.2±5.3 kg/m2. Results PBF correlated strongly between devices (r>0.95, p<0.0001). A prediction equation was derived in half of the subjects, and the other half were used to cross-validate the proposed equation (EchoMRI-AH PBF=[0.94*iDXA PBF]+[0.14*Age]+[3.3*Female]−8.83). Mean PBF difference (predicted–measured) in the validation group was not different from 0 (diff=0.27%, 95%CI: −0.42–0.96, p=0.430). Bland-Altman plots showed a bias with higher measured PBF on EchoMRI-AH versus iDXA in all 84 subjects (β=0.13, p<0.0001). Conclusions The proposed prediction equation was valid in our cross-validation sample, and has the potential to be applied across multicenter studies. PMID:27901030

  3. Body Composition and Inflammation in Hemodialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Mandic, Ante; Cavar, Ivan; Skoro, Ivana; Tomic, Ivan; Ljubic, Kristina; Coric, Slavica; Mikulic, Ivanka; Azinovic, Igor; Pravdic, Danijel

    2017-09-22

    The volume state of dialysis patients is important in guiding the dialysis process. Volume overload in these patients is associated with inflammation. The objectives of the present study were to assess the body composition of patients on hemodialysis; to determine the concentrations of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) in plasma and evaluate the association of BNP concentrations with volume overload; to determine the concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP), albumin and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities as indicators of inflammatory or antioxidant processes. The study included 79 maintenance hemodialysis patients. Assessment of body compartments was carried out using a body composition monitor (BCM). After BCM measurements, blood samples were taken from the patients for laboratory tests. There were 40 (50.6%) volume-overloaded patients (relative overhydration >15%). These patients had a higher prevalence of arterial hypertension (P < 0.05), significantly higher concentrations of BNP (P = 0.01), lower body mass index (P < 0.05) and lower fat tissue index (P < 0.05). There was a positive correlation between plasma BNP and CRP concentrations (ρ = 0.231; P < 0.05), and a negative correlation between (log) BNP and albumin (r = -0.021; P < 0.05), as well as (log) CRP and albumin concentrations (r = -3; P < 0.01). SOD activity was positively correlated with albumin concentrations (r = 0.254; P < 0.05). The concentrations of BNP in this study were associated with volume overload and inflammatory markers. Patients with a higher albumin concentration had higher SOD activity. © 2017 International Society for Apheresis, Japanese Society for Apheresis, and Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy.

  4. Associations between body composition measurements of obesity and radiographic osteoarthritis in older adults: Data from the Dong-gu Study.

    PubMed

    Wen, Lihui; Kang, Ji-Hyoun; Yim, Yi-Rang; Kim, Ji-Eun; Lee, Jeong-Won; Lee, Kyung-Eun; Park, Dong-Jin; Kim, Tae-Jong; Park, Yong-Wook; Kweon, Sun-Seog; Lee, Young-Hoon; Yun, Yong-Woon; Shin, Min-Ho; Lee, Shin-Seok

    2016-04-29

    We examined the effects of fat deposition on radiographic osteoarthritis (OA) to determine the role of obesity in the pathogenesis of radiographic OA. Data were taken from the Dong-gu cohort, a cross-sectional study of 2,367 subjects. Baseline characteristics, waist circumference (WC), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), fat mass, and fat percentage were collected, along with X-rays of the knees and hands. Total knee and hand radiographic OA scores were summed using a semi-quantitative grading system, and then stratified by gender using a multiple linear regression model. After adjusting for confounders, weight was the only factor significantly associated with knee radiographic OA, regardless of gender (all p < 0.01). Regarding the hand, fat percentage had the largest effect on radiographic OA in males (p = 0.008), while WHR was the most significant factor in females (p = 0.001). For the knee, fat mass was the most important factor for radiographic OA in males (p = 0.001), while in females, body mass index was the most important factor (p < 0.001). Among the variables, only fat percentage was significantly related to both hand and knee radiographic OA in both genders (all p < 0.01). Regardless of gender, weight was significantly associated with knee radiographic OA. Otherwise, fat deposition correlated with hand and knee radiographic OA in both genders, while the distribution of fat tissue was significantly associated with hand and knee radiographic OA only in females.

  5. Ultrasound: Which role in body composition?

    PubMed

    Bazzocchi, Alberto; Filonzi, Giacomo; Ponti, Federico; Albisinni, Ugo; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Battista, Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound is a non-invasive, fast, relatively inexpensive and available tool for estimating adiposity in clinical practice, and in several research settings. It does not expose patients to ionizing radiation risks, making the method ideal for the evaluation, and for follow-up studies. Several parameters and indexes based on adipose tissue thickness have been introduced and tested, and these have been correlated with clinical and laboratoristic parameters. Moreover, ultrasound can also be directed to the estimation of adipose tissue and intracellular fat indirectly, at cellular-molecular level: an opportunity for many radiologists who already and sometimes unconsciously perform "body composition" assessment when looking at the liver, at muscle as well as at other organs. However, standardized procedure and parameters are needing to improve accuracy and reproducibility. The purposes of this review are: 1) to provide a complete overview of the most used and shared measurements of adiposity; 2) to analyze technical conditions, accuracy, and clinical meaning of ultrasound in the study of body composition; 3) to provide some elements for the use of ultrasound in the evaluation of intra-cellular lipids accumulation, in two hot spots: liver and skeletal muscle.

  6. Effect of intense military training on body composition.

    PubMed

    Malavolti, Marcella; Battistini, Nino C; Dugoni, Manfredo; Bagni, Bruno; Bagni, Ilaria; Pietrobelli, Angelo

    2008-03-01

    Individuals in a structural physical training program can show beneficial changes in body composition, such as body fat reduction and muscle mass increase. This study measured body composition changes by using 3 different techniques-skinfold thickness (SF) measurements, air displacement plethysmography (BOD-POD), and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA)-during 9 months of intense training in healthy young men engaged in military training. Twenty-seven young men were recruited from a special faction of the Italian Navy. The program previewed three phases: ground combat, sea combat, and amphibious combat. Body composition was estimated at the beginning, in the middle, and at the end of the training. After the subjects performed the ground combat phase, body composition variables significantly decreased: body weight (P < 0.05), fat-free mass (FFM) (P < 0.001), and fat mass (FM) (P < 0.03). During the amphibious combat phase, body weight increased significantly (P < 0.01), mainly because of an increase in FFM (P < 0.001) and a smaller mean decrease in FM. There was a significant difference (P < 0.05) in circumferences and SF at various sites after starting the training course. Bland-Altman analysis did not show any systematic difference between FM and FFM measured with the 3 different techniques on any occasion. On any visit, FFM and FM correlation measured by BOD-POD (P = 0.90) and DXA was significantly greater than measured by SF. A significant difference was found in body mass index (BMI) measured during the study. BOD-POD and SF, compared with DXA, provide valid and reliable measurement of changes in body composition in healthy young men engaged in military training. In conclusion, the findings suggest that for young men of normal weight, changes in body weight alone and in BMI are not a good measure to assess the effectiveness of intense physical training programs, because lean mass gain can masquerade fat weight loss.

  7. Measuring atmospheric composition change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laj, P.; Klausen, J.; Bilde, M.; Plaß-Duelmer, C.; Pappalardo, G.; Clerbaux, C.; Baltensperger, U.; Hjorth, J.; Simpson, D.; Reimann, S.; Coheur, P.-F.; Richter, A.; De Mazière, M.; Rudich, Y.; McFiggans, G.; Torseth, K.; Wiedensohler, A.; Morin, S.; Schulz, M.; Allan, J. D.; Attié, J.-L.; Barnes, I.; Birmili, W.; Cammas, J. P.; Dommen, J.; Dorn, H.-P.; Fowler, D.; Fuzzi, S.; Glasius, M.; Granier, C.; Hermann, M.; Isaksen, I. S. A.; Kinne, S.; Koren, I.; Madonna, F.; Maione, M.; Massling, A.; Moehler, O.; Mona, L.; Monks, P. S.; Müller, D.; Müller, T.; Orphal, J.; Peuch, V.-H.; Stratmann, F.; Tanré, D.; Tyndall, G.; Abo Riziq, A.; Van Roozendael, M.; Villani, P.; Wehner, B.; Wex, H.; Zardini, A. A.

    Scientific findings from the last decades have clearly highlighted the need for a more comprehensive approach to atmospheric change processes. In fact, observation of atmospheric composition variables has been an important activity of atmospheric research that has developed instrumental tools (advanced analytical techniques) and platforms (instrumented passenger aircrafts, ground-based in situ and remote sensing stations, earth observation satellite instruments) providing essential information on the composition of the atmosphere. The variability of the atmospheric system and the extreme complexity of the atmospheric cycles for short-lived gaseous and aerosol species have led to the development of complex models to interpret observations, test our theoretical understanding of atmospheric chemistry and predict future atmospheric composition. The validation of numerical models requires accurate information concerning the variability of atmospheric composition for targeted species via comparison with observations and measurements. In this paper, we provide an overview of recent advances in instrumentation and methodologies for measuring atmospheric composition changes from space, aircraft and the surface as well as recent improvements in laboratory techniques that permitted scientific advance in the field of atmospheric chemistry. Emphasis is given to the most promising and innovative technologies that will become operational in the near future to improve knowledge of atmospheric composition. Our current observation capacity, however, is not satisfactory to understand and predict future atmospheric composition changes, in relation to predicted climate warming. Based on the limitation of the current European observing system, we address the major gaps in a second part of the paper to explain why further developments in current observation strategies are still needed to strengthen and optimise an observing system not only capable of responding to the requirements of

  8. Applications of the direct photon absorption technique for measuring bone mineral content in vivo. Determination of body composition in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    The bone mineral content, BMC, determined by monoenergetic photon absorption technique, of 29 different locations on the long bones and vertebral columns of 24 skeletons was measured. Compressive tests were made on bone from these locations in which the maximum load and maximum stress were measured. Also the ultimate strain, modulus of elasticity and energy absorbed to failure were determined for compact bone from the femoral diaphysis and cancellous bone from the eighth through eleventh thoracic vertebrae. Correlations and predictive relationships between these parameters were examined to investigate the applicability of using the BMC at sites normally measured in vivo, i.e. radius and ulna in estimating the BMC and/or strength of the spine or femoral neck. It was found that the BMC at sites on the same bone were highly correlated r = 0.95 or better; the BMC at sites on different bones were also highly interrelated, r = 0.85. The BMC at various sites on the long bones could be estimated to between 10 and 15 per cent from the BMC of sites on the radius or ulna.

  9. Determination of Cutoff Values for DEXA-Based Body Composition Measurements for Determining Metabolic and Cardiovascular Health.

    PubMed

    Lang, Pierre-Olivier; Trivalle, Christophe; Vogel, Thomas; Proust, Jacques; Papazyan, Jean-Pierre; Dramé, Moustapha

    2015-01-01

    The two components of the body weight (i.e., fat mass and muscle mass) appeared to be of high interest to consider in predicting metabolic health related risks. We aimed to determine cutoff values for fat mass index (FMI) and muscle mass index (MMI), FM/MM, and BMI for metabolic and cardiovascular health. This study was a cross-sectional analysis study conducted in a center of preventive medicine. It included 616 consecutive outpatients: mean age was 56.0±10.0 years (74.6% aged ≥50), and 61.4% were female. Fat and muscle mass were obtained with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry scan analyses. Metabolically unhealthy individuals were defined as people with biological features of dyslipidemia, hyperuricemia, diabetes, and/or hepatitis steatosis. Documented hypertension and/or atherosclerosis of at least one major artery defined individuals with cardiovascular complications. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that the cutoff values for MMI, FMI, and FM/MM were respectively 18.8kg/m(2) (sensitivity [Se]=58%; specificity [Sp]=59%), 5.5kg/m(2) (Se=61%; Sp=62%), and 0.31 (Se=62%; Sp=62%) in men; and 14.1kg/m(2) (Se=52%; Sp=54%), 5.5kg/m(2) (Se=65%; Sp=67%), 0.39 (Se=73%; Sp=73%) in women for predicting metabolic health. Values were 19.3kg/m(2) (Se=58%; Sp=59%), 7.0kg/m(2) (Se=61%; Sp=62%) and 0.49 (Se=62%; Sp=62%) in men; and 15.7kg/m(2) (Se=58%; Sp=59%), 6.4kg/m(2) (Se=61%; Sp=62%) and 0.35 (Se=62%; Sp=62%) in women for cardiovascular complications. Whatever the outcomes considered, the Youden indexes for BMI values were systematically below 25 kg/m(2), except for cardiovascular complications in men, where the threshold for the best Se/Sp was 25.7 kg/m(2). These cutoff values for FMI, MMI, and FM/MM could be of practical value for the clinical evaluation of a deficit in MM with or without excess of FM. They complement the classical concept of BMI in a more qualitative manner and extend the analysis of its impact on health outcomes to all BMI

  10. Determination of Cutoff Values for DEXA-Based Body Composition Measurements for Determining Metabolic and Cardiovascular Health

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Pierre-Olivier; Trivalle, Christophe; Vogel, Thomas; Proust, Jacques; Papazyan, Jean-Pierre; Dramé, Moustapha

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The two components of the body weight (i.e., fat mass and muscle mass) appeared to be of high interest to consider in predicting metabolic health related risks. We aimed to determine cutoff values for fat mass index (FMI) and muscle mass index (MMI), FM/MM, and BMI for metabolic and cardiovascular health. This study was a cross-sectional analysis study conducted in a center of preventive medicine. It included 616 consecutive outpatients: mean age was 56.0±10.0 years (74.6% aged ≥50), and 61.4% were female. Fat and muscle mass were obtained with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry scan analyses. Metabolically unhealthy individuals were defined as people with biological features of dyslipidemia, hyperuricemia, diabetes, and/or hepatitis steatosis. Documented hypertension and/or atherosclerosis of at least one major artery defined individuals with cardiovascular complications. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that the cutoff values for MMI, FMI, and FM/MM were respectively 18.8kg/m2 (sensitivity [Se]=58%; specificity [Sp]=59%), 5.5kg/m2 (Se=61%; Sp=62%), and 0.31 (Se=62%; Sp=62%) in men; and 14.1kg/m2 (Se=52%; Sp=54%), 5.5kg/m2 (Se=65%; Sp=67%), 0.39 (Se=73%; Sp=73%) in women for predicting metabolic health. Values were 19.3kg/m2 (Se=58%; Sp=59%), 7.0kg/m2 (Se=61%; Sp=62%) and 0.49 (Se=62%; Sp=62%) in men; and 15.7kg/m2 (Se=58%; Sp=59%), 6.4kg/m2 (Se=61%; Sp=62%) and 0.35 (Se=62%; Sp=62%) in women for cardiovascular complications. Whatever the outcomes considered, the Youden indexes for BMI values were systematically below 25 kg/m2, except for cardiovascular complications in men, where the threshold for the best Se/Sp was 25.7 kg/m2. These cutoff values for FMI, MMI, and FM/MM could be of practical value for the clinical evaluation of a deficit in MM with or without excess of FM. They complement the classical concept of BMI in a more qualitative manner and extend the analysis of its impact on health outcomes to all BMI categories

  11. Comparison of energy balance-related behaviours and measures of body composition between Turkish adolescents in Turkey and Turkish immigrant adolescents in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Akbulut, Gamze; Yildirim, Mine; Sanlier, Nevin; van Stralen, Maartje M; Acar-Tek, Nilufer; Bilici, Saniye; Brug, Johannes; de Meij, Judith S B; Gezmen-Karadag, Makbule; Koksal, Eda; Oenema, Anke; Singh, Amika S; te Velde, Saskia J; Yildiran, Hilal; Chinapaw, Mai J M

    2014-12-01

    To explore the influences of migration to a Western country on obesity and related risk factors by comparing measures of body composition and energy balance-related behaviours between Turkish adolescents in Turkey (TR-TR) and adolescents from Turkish immigrant ethnicity in the Netherlands (TR-NL). Cross-sectional survey or baseline intervention data from six Dutch school-based studies and one Turkish study. Primary and secondary schools. A total of 915 (49 % girls; mean age 13·1 (sd 0·8) years) TR-TR adolescents and 433 (51 % girls; mean age 11·7 (sd 1·3) years) TR-NL adolescents were included. Outcome measures were self-reported sugar-containing beverage consumption, fruit and vegetable intake, screen time, physical activity, measured body height and weight, BMI, waist and hip circumferences, and skinfold thicknesses. Our data showed that more TR-NL adolescents were overweight (31 % v. 26 %) and obese (9 % v. 6 %) and had significantly higher mean BMI (21·1 v. 20·0 kg/m2), waist circumference (72·2 v. 71·3 cm) and suprailiac skinfold thickness (19·8 v. 13·1 mm) than TR-TR adolescents. TR-NL adolescents reported significantly higher sugar-containing beverage consumption (1173 v. 115 ml/d), less fruit and vegetable intake (295 v. 647 g/d), less screen time (253 v. 467 min/d) and higher physical activity levels (61 v. 27 min/d) than TR-TR adolescents. Immigrant adolescents in the Netherlands were more often overweight and had a less favourable dietary pattern than their peers in Turkey, while their physical activity and screen time patterns were more favourable. These results suggest that adolescents from Turkish immigrant ethnicity in the Netherlands have adopted lifestyles towards the host culture.

  12. Comparison of PG-SGA, SGA and body-composition measurement in detecting malnutrition among newly diagnosed lung cancer patients in stage IIIB/IV and benign conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong; Wu, Jing; Ma, Meili; Pei, Jun; Song, Yiyi; Zhang, Xueyan; Han, Baohui

    2011-09-01

    Assessment tools and body-composition measurements are useful in diagnosing malnutrition. Which one is better for lung disease patients is unclear. The objectives of the present study are: to assess relationships between different methods of nutritional measurements in lung diseases patients; to determine which one is better in diagnosing malnutrition for lung disease patients; and to determine whether lung cancer patients can be differentiated from benign lung disease patients using different measurements. A total of 96 newly diagnosed primary lung cancer patients in stage IIIB/IV and 52 benign lung disease patients nutritional status were assessed according to the SGA, the scored PG-SGA, and serum albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, hemoglobin, total lymphocyte count, body mass index (BMI), and weight. A total of 40% of lung cancer patients were severely malnourished, with men or elder having a higher rate of malnutrition. Significantly lower values of weight, BMI, total lymphocyte count, transferrin, prealbumin and serum albumin were found for them. Age, sex, weight, weight half year ago and prealbumin are in the regression equation to predict them. For benign lung disease patients, 21.2% were severely malnourished with significantly lower values of weight and transferrin. Age and prealbumin are in the equation to predict severely malnourished benign lung disease patients. The highest receiver operation characteristic area under the curve was found for the PG-SGA score, BMI and weight. PG-SGA global rating, age and iron-transferring protein are in the equation for predicting disease status. The SGA and PG-SGA are appropriate for identifying malnutrition in lung disease patients. Lung cancer patients can be differentiated from benign conditions by PG-SGA.

  13. Infant BMI trajectories are associated with young adult body composition

    PubMed Central

    Slining, M. M.; Herring, A. H.; Popkin, B. M.; Mayer-Davis, E. J.; Adair, L. S.

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic aspect of early life growth is not fully captured by typical analyses, which focus on one specific time period. To better understand how infant and young child growth relate to the development of adult body composition, the authors characterized body mass index (BMI) trajectories using latent class growth analysis (LCGA) and evaluated their association with adult body composition. Data are from the Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Survey, which followed a birth cohort to age 22 years (n=1749). In both males and females, LCGA identified seven subgroups of respondents with similar BMI trajectories from 0 to 24 months (assessed with bimonthly anthropometrics). Trajectory groups were compared with conventional approaches: (1) accelerated growth between two time points (0–4 months), (2) continuous BMI gain between two points (0–4 months and 0–24 months) and (3) BMI measured at one time point (24 months) as predictors of young adult body composition measures. The seven trajectory groups were distinguished by age-specific differences in tempo and timing of BMI gain in infancy. Infant BMI trajectories were better than accelerated BMI gain between 0 and 4 months at predicting young adult body composition. After controlling for BMI at age 2 years, infant BMI trajectories still explained variation in adult body composition. Using unique longitudinal data and methods, we find that distinct infant BMI trajectories have long-term implications for the development of body composition. PMID:24040489

  14. The Effects of Pre- and Post-Exercise Whey vs. Casein Protein Consumption on Body Composition and Performance Measures in Collegiate Female Athletes.

    PubMed

    Wilborn, Colin D; Taylor, Lem W; Outlaw, Jordan; Williams, Laura; Campbell, Bill; Foster, Cliffa A; Smith-Ryan, Abbie; Urbina, Stacie; Hayward, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Two of the most popular forms of protein on the market are whey and casein. Both proteins are derived from milk but each protein differs in absorption rate and bioavailability, thus it is possible that each type of protein may contribute differently to the adaptations elicited through resistance training. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the potential effects of ingestion of two types of protein in conjunction with a controlled resistance training program in collegiate female basketball players. Sixteen NCAA Division III female basketball players were matched according to body mass and randomly assigned in a double-blind manner to consume 24 g whey protein (WP) (N = 8, 20.0 ± 1.9 years, 1.58 ± 0.27 m, 66. 0 ± 4.9 kg, 27.0 ± 4.9 %BF) or 24 g casein protein (CP) (N = 8, 21.0 ± 2.8 years, 1.53 ± 0.29 m, 68.0 ± 2.9 kg, 25.0 ± 5.7 %BF) immediately pre- and post-exercise for eight weeks. Subjects participated in a supervised 4-day per week undulating periodized training program. At 0 and 8 weeks, subjects underwent DXA body composition analysis, and at 0 and 8 weeks underwent one repetition maximum (1RM) strength, muscle endurance, vertical jump, 5-10-5 agility run, and broad jump testing sessions. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA, and presented as mean ± SD changes from baseline after 60 days. No significant group x time interaction effects were observed among groups in changes in any variable (p > 0.05). A significant time effect was observed for body fat (WP: -2.0 ± 1.1 %BF; CP: -1.0 ± 1.6 %BF, p < 0.001), lean mass (WP: 1.5 ± 1.0 kg; CP: 1. 4 ± 1.0 kg, p < 0.001), fat mass (WP: -1.3 ± 1.2 kg; CP: -0.6 ± 1.4 kg, p < 0.001), leg press 1RM (WP: 88.7 ± 43.9 kg; CP: 90.0 ± 48.5 kg, p < 0.001), bench press 1RM (WP: 7.5 ± 4.6 kg; CP: 4.3 ± 4.5 kg, p = 0.01), vertical jump (WP: 4.1 ± 1.8 cm; CP: 3.5 ± 7.6 cm, p < 0.001), 5-10-5 (WP: -0.3 ± 0.2 sec; CP: -0.09 ± 0.42 sec, p < 0.001), and broad jump (WP: 10.4 ± 6

  15. The Effects of Pre- and Post-Exercise Whey vs. Casein Protein Consumption on Body Composition and Performance Measures in Collegiate Female Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Wilborn, Colin D.; Taylor, Lem W.; Outlaw, Jordan; Williams, Laura; Campbell, Bill; Foster, Cliffa A.; Smith-Ryan, Abbie; Urbina, Stacie; Hayward, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Two of the most popular forms of protein on the market are whey and casein. Both proteins are derived from milk but each protein differs in absorption rate and bioavailability, thus it is possible that each type of protein may contribute differently to the adaptations elicited through resistance training. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the potential effects of ingestion of two types of protein in conjunction with a controlled resistance training program in collegiate female basketball players. Sixteen NCAA Division III female basketball players were matched according to body mass and randomly assigned in a double-blind manner to consume 24 g whey protein (WP) (N = 8, 20.0 ± 1.9 years, 1.58 ± 0.27 m, 66. 0 ± 4.9 kg, 27.0 ± 4.9 %BF) or 24 g casein protein (CP) (N = 8, 21.0 ± 2.8 years, 1.53 ± 0.29 m, 68.0 ± 2.9 kg, 25.0 ± 5.7 %BF) immediately pre- and post-exercise for eight weeks. Subjects participated in a supervised 4-day per week undulating periodized training program. At 0 and 8 weeks, subjects underwent DXA body composition analysis, and at 0 and 8 weeks underwent one repetition maximum (1RM) strength, muscle endurance, vertical jump, 5-10-5 agility run, and broad jump testing sessions. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA, and presented as mean ± SD changes from baseline after 60 days. No significant group x time interaction effects were observed among groups in changes in any variable (p > 0.05). A significant time effect was observed for body fat (WP: -2.0 ± 1.1 %BF; CP: -1.0 ± 1.6 %BF, p < 0.001), lean mass (WP: 1.5 ± 1.0 kg; CP: 1. 4 ± 1.0 kg, p < 0.001), fat mass (WP: -1.3 ± 1.2 kg; CP: -0.6 ± 1.4 kg, p < 0.001), leg press 1RM (WP: 88.7 ± 43.9 kg; CP: 90.0 ± 48.5 kg, p < 0.001), bench press 1RM (WP: 7.5 ± 4.6 kg; CP: 4.3 ± 4.5 kg, p = 0.01), vertical jump (WP: 4.1 ± 1.8 cm; CP: 3.5 ± 7.6 cm, p < 0.001), 5-10-5 (WP: -0.3 ± 0.2 sec; CP: -0.09 ± 0.42 sec, p < 0.001), and broad jump (WP: 10.4 ± 6

  16. Body composition analysis for healthy Italian vegetarians.

    PubMed

    Siani, V; Mohamed, E I; Maiolo, C; Di Daniele, N; Ratiu, A; Leonardi, A; De Lorenzo, A

    2003-10-01

    The elementary nutritional needs of vegetarians are totally, or in great part, supplied by vegetarian food; thus the body composition of vegetarians could differ from that of omnivorous persons. The objective of the present study was to compare healthy Italian vegetarians to healthy omnivorous individuals in terms of body composition, determined using dual X-ray absorptiometry. The study population consisted of 20 vegetarians [mean age (+/-SD), 34.78+/-15.07 years; mean BMI, 22.41+/-2.15 kg/m(2)] and 10 omnivorous persons matched for age and BMI. We found no significant differences between the two groups in terms of fat mass, lean body mass, soft tissue, bone mineral content, or bone mineral density. These findings suggest that the vegetarian diet does not induce negative alterations in body composition.

  17. Impact of Body Weight and Body Composition on Ovarian Cancer Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Sarah A; Elliott, Sarah A; Kroenke, Candyce H; Sawyer, Michael B; Prado, Carla M

    2016-02-01

    Measures of body weight and anthropometrics such as body mass index (BMI) are commonly used to assess nutritional status in clinical conditions including cancer. Extensive research has evaluated associations between body weight and prognosis in ovarian cancer patients, yet little is known about the potential impact of body composition (fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM)) in these patients. Thus, the purpose of this publication was to review the literature (using PubMed and EMBASE) evaluating the impact of body weight and particularly body composition on surgical complications, morbidity, chemotherapy dosing and toxicity (as predictors of prognosis), and survival in ovarian cancer patients. Body weight is rarely associated with intra-operative complications, but obesity predicts higher rates of venous thromboembolism and wound complications post-operatively in ovarian cancer patients. Low levels of FM and FFM are superior predictors of length of hospital stay compared to measures of body weight alone, but the role of body composition on other surgical morbidities is unknown. Obesity complicates chemotherapy dosing due to altered pharmacokinetics, imprecise dosing strategies, and wide variability in FM and FFM. Measurement of body composition has the potential to reduce toxicity if the results are incorporated into chemotherapy dosing calculations. Some findings suggest that excess body weight adversely affects survival, while others find no such association. Limited studies indicate that FM is a better predictor of survival than body weight in ovarian cancer patients, but the direction of this relationship has not been determined. In conclusion, body composition as an indicator of nutritional status is a better prognostic tool than body weight or BMI alone in ovarian cancer patients.

  18. Body Composition Changes Associated With Methadone Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sadek, Gamal E.; Chiu, Simon; Cernovsky, Zack Z.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Methadone is associated with a statistically significant increase in BMI in the first 2 years of treatment. Objectives: To evaluate the changes of body composition (bone mass, % fat, % muscle mass, % water, and basal metabolic rate) related to this increase. Patients and Methods: Changes in body composition were monitored, via bioelectrical impedance, in 29 patients in methadone treatment for opiate dependency (age 18 to 44, mean = 29.3, SD = 7.0, 13 men, 16 women). Results: Within one year from admission to treatment, a statistically significant (t-tests, P < 0.05) increase was noted in their body mass index (BMI), % of body fat, average body mass, and average basal metabolic rate, and relative decrease in their % of muscle mass and % of bone mass. Neither absolute bone mass nor muscle mass changed significantly. Conclusions: Physicians involved in care of methadone patients should recommend dietary and lifestyle changes to improve their overall health. PMID:27162765

  19. The effects of symbiotic therapy on anthropometric measures, body composition and blood pressure in patient with metabolic syndrome: a triple blind RCT

    PubMed Central

    Rabiei, Samira; Shakerhosseini, Rahebeh; Saadat, Navid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Increase in prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes which are of the main risk factors of metabolic syndrome, is not only the result of changes in genetic, diet or physical activity, but also an imbalance of micro flora may play an important role. Therefore, alteration of micro flora using pre/probiotic is considered as a new strategy for treatment of metabolic disorders. Methods: The current study is a triple blind randomized controlled trial. 46 patients from both sexes, who fulfilled inclusion criteria, randomly categorized into intervention or placebo group. The intervention and placebo groups consumed 2 probiotic capsules or 2 placebo capsules during 3 months, respectively. Both groups received a weight loss diet, according to their adjusted ideal body weight. Anthropometric, body composition, blood pressure and nutritional measurements were done in the beginning, at 6th week, and at the end of the study. T-test and paired-t test were used for statistical analysis. Results: 40 patients completed the study. BMI, WC, HC, fat mass, lean mass and blood pressure were reduced in all participants (p< 0.05). Systolic blood pressure in symbiotic group was less than placebo group, significantly (p< 0.05). The trend of weight loss in symbiotic group continued at least for 12 weeks while it was stopped at week 6 in placebo group. Conclusion: Symbiotic supplement with the weight loss diet had synergistic effects on improvement in systolic blood pressure and anthropometric measurements. Based on our findings, symbiotic can postpone plateau phase of weight loss and it may prevent resistance to further weight loss. PMID:26478871

  20. Measurements of body composition during late gestation and lactation in first and second parity sows and its relationship to piglet production and post-weaning reproductive performance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to characterize variation of multiple body condition traits in a white crossbred composite population of first- and second-parity sows and determine if these traits relate to litter production and reproductive parameters. As expected, parity 2 dams were heavier (P < 0...

  1. Three-compartment body composition changes in elite rugby league players during a super league season, measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.

    PubMed

    Harley, Jamie A; Hind, Karen; O'hara, John P

    2011-04-01

    This study investigated the acute changes in body composition that occur over the course of a competitive season in elite rugby league players. Twenty elite senior players from an English Super League rugby league team underwent a total-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan at 3 phases of a competitive season: preseason (February), midseason (June), and postseason (September). Body mass (BM), fat mass (FM), lean mass, percentage body fat, and bone mineral content (BMC) were reported at each phase. Between the start and midpoint of the season, BM, lean mass, FM, and body fat percentage showed no significant change (p > 0.05); however, BMC was significantly increased (+0.71%; 30.70 ± 38.00 g; p < 0.05). Between the midseason and postseason phase, BM and BMC showed no significant change (p > 0.05); however, significant changes were observed in lean mass (-1.54%; 1.19 ± 1.43 kg), FM (+4.09%; 0.57 ± 1.10 kg), and body fat percentage (+4.98%; 0.78 ± 1.09%; p < 0.05). The significant changes in body composition seen over the latter stages of the competitive season may have implications for performance capabilities at this important stage of competition. An increase in FM and decrease in lean mass may have a negative effect on the power/BM ratio, and therefore may be a cause for concern for playing, coaching, and medical staff. Coaching and strength and conditioning staff should aim to prescribe appropriate training and nutritional practices with the aim of maintaining the players' optimal body composition until the conclusion of the competitive season, in order that performance capabilities are maximized over the entire competition period.

  2. Association between Human Body Composition and Periodontal Disease.

    PubMed

    Salekzamani, Yagoub; Shirmohammadi, Adileh; Rahbar, Mohammad; Shakouri, Seyed-Kazem; Nayebi, Farough

    2011-01-01

    Obesity in humans might increase the risk of periodontitis. The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between body composition of males and their periodontal status. AS total of 150 males (aged 30-60) were selected: 31 were periodontally healthy, 45 had gingivitis, 39 had initial periodontitis, and 35 suffered from established periodontitis. BMI (body mass index), WC (waist circumference), and body composition parameters (consisting of body water, body fat, and skeletal muscle and bone mass) were measured. After adjusting for age, history of diabetes, smoking, physical activity status, and socioeconomic status, statistically significant correlations were found between periodontitis and BMI, WC, and body composition. There was only a statistically significant difference between the periodontal health and established periodontitis; that is, periodontal disease in mild forms (gingivitis) and initial periodontitis do not influence these variables (BMI, WC, and body composition parameters) and only the severe form of the disease influences the variables. These data suggest that there is a considerable association between severe forms of periodontal disease in males and their body composition, but this preliminary finding needs to be confirmed in more extensive studies.

  3. [BODY COMPOSITION AND SOMATOTYPE IN UNIVERSITY TRIATHLETES].

    PubMed

    Guillén Rivas, Laura; Mielgo-Ayuso, Juan; Norte-Navarro, Aurora; Cejuela, Roberto; Cabañas, María Dolores; Martínez-Sanz, José Miguel

    2015-08-01

    the triathlon is an endurance sport and individual that consists of three different disciplines: swimming, cycling and running. The aim of the study was to describe and analyze the anthropometric characteristics, body composition and somatotype in male college triathletes. observational and descriptive study of anthropometric characteristics, body composition and somatotype of 39 male college athletes from 24 ± 4,5 years, participants in the championship of Spain university triathlon sprint mode (Alicante 2010), from different universities Spanish. According to anthropometric measurement techniques adopted by the International Society for the Advancement of Kinanthropometry (ISAK) and the Spanish Group Cineantropometría (GREC) by an accredited assessor ISAK Level II. we find athletes of stunting, where you destacanvalores below normal in the subscapularis, supraspinatus, triceps and biceps skinfold, percentage of muscle mass (45.27 ± 3.29%) and fat mass (10.22 ± 2.92%) and bone (16.65 ± 1.34%) and where mesomorphy somatotipo predominates. the triathletes and runners have lower size that cyclists and swimmers. Triathletes and cyclists show a similar weight, less than swimmers line, and more than 10km runners. Iliac crest skinfold, abdominal and thigh front cyclists are less than triathletes. The percentage of fat mass of runners triathletes and swimmers are similar, however the muscle mass of athletes usually less than cyclists but similar to other forms. Somatotype resembles triathlete cyclist (mesomorph). The corridor is ectomorph and mesomorph-swimmer can range from a ectomorph mesomorph. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  4. Relationship between Bone-Specific Physical Activity Scores and Measures for Body Composition and Bone Mineral Density in Healthy Young College Women

    PubMed Central

    Kim, SoJung; So, Wi-Young; Kim, Jooyoung; Sung, Dong Jun

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the relationship between bone-specific physical activity (BPAQ) scores, body composition, and bone mineral density (BMD) in healthy young college women. Methods Seventy-three college women (21.7 ± 1.8 years; 162.1 ± 4.6 cm; 53.9 ± 5.8 kg) between the ages of 19 and 26 years were recruited from the universities in Seoul and Gyeonggi province, South Korea. We used dual energy X-ray absorptiometry to measure the lumbar spine (L2-L4) and proximal femur BMD (left side; total hip, femoral neck). The BPAQ scores (past, pBPAQ; current, cBPAQ; total, tBPAQ) were used to obtain a comprehensive account of lifetime physical activity related to bone health. We used X-scan plus II instrumentation to measure height (cm), weight (kg), fat free mass (FFM, kg), percent body fat (%), and body mass index (BMI). Participants were asked to record their 24-hour food intake in a questionnaire. Results There were positive correlations between BPAQ scores and total hip (pBPAQ r = 0.308, p = 0.008; tBPAQ, r = 0.286, p = 0.014) and FN BMD (pBPAQ r = 0.309, p = 0.008; tBPAQ, r = 0.311, p = 0.007), while no significant relationships were found in cBPAQ (p > 0.05). When FFM, Vitamin D intake, cBPAQ, pBPAQ, and tBPAQ were included in a stepwise multiple linear regression analysis, FFM and pBPAQ were predictors of total hip, accounting for 16% (p = 0.024), while FFM and tBPAQ predicted 14% of the variance in FN (p = 0.015). Only FFM predicted 15% of the variance in L2-L4 (p = 0.004). There was a positive correlation between Vitamin D intake and L2-L4 (p = 0.025), but other dietary intakes variables were not significant (p > 0.05). Conclusions BPAQ-derived physical activity scores and FFM were positively associated with total hip and FN BMD in healthy young college women. Our study suggests that osteoporosis awareness and effective bone healthy behaviors for college women are required to prevent serious bone diseases later in

  5. The Official Positions of the International Society for Clinical Densitometry: acquisition of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry body composition and considerations regarding analysis and repeatability of measures.

    PubMed

    Hangartner, Thomas N; Warner, Sarah; Braillon, Pierre; Jankowski, Larry; Shepherd, John

    2013-01-01

    In preparation for the International Society for Clinical Densitometry Position Development Conference of 2013 in Tampa, Florida, Task Force 2 was created as 1 of 3 task forces in the area of body composition assessment by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). The assignment was to review the literature, summarize the relevant findings, and formulate positions covering (1) accuracy and precision assessment, (2) acquisition of DXA body composition measures in patients, and (3) considerations regarding analysis and repeatability of measures. There were 6 primary questions proposed to the task force by the International Society for Clinical Densitometry board and expert panel. Based on a series of systematic reviews, 14 new positions were developed, which are intended to augment and define good clinical practice in quantitative assessment of body composition by DXA.

  6. Body composition assessment in horses using bioimpedance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ward, L C; White, K J; van der Aa Kuhle, K; Cawdell-Smith, J; Bryden, W L

    2016-02-01

    Assessment of equine body composition using objective measurements is difficult owing to the large size of the animals and the costs involved. Bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy (BIS), a technique widely used for the assessment of body composition in humans, was investigated for practicality of use in horses. BIS uses algorithms that require values for the apparent resistivities of body fluids and body proportion factors (Kb), currently not available for horses. Aims of the present study were to derive resistivity coefficients and body proportion factors and to validate their use for prediction of body composition horses. Validation of coefficients and predictive power using a split-sample agreement study design using correlation and limits of agreement analysis. Whole body impedance measurements were performed on 35 standardbred horses, yearlings to 14 yr, concurrently with determination of total body water volume (TBW) by deuterium dilution and extracellular water volume (ECW) by bromide dilution. Kb was determined in an independent group of 38 mixed-breed, age, and sex horses. Mean apparent resistivity coefficients were 511.4 and 1415.9 ohm.cm for intracellular water and TBW, respectively. Mean Kb was 1.52 ± 0.1. Using these coefficients, TBW and fat-free mass could be predicted with limits of agreement (2SD) of ± 11.6%; mean fat-free mass and fat mass were under- and overestimated by 3.1% and 14.1%, respectively, compared to measured reference values although these differences were not statistically significant. BIS is a practical technique for the assessment of body composition in equids, but the relatively wide limits of agreement, particularly for fat mass, may limit its usefulness for predicting body composition in individual horses.

  7. The influence of body composition on youth throwing kinetics.

    PubMed

    Garner, John C; MacDonald, Chris; Wade, Chip; Johnson, Andrea; Ford, M Allison

    2011-08-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate the influence of segmental mass and body composition on the upper extremity biomechanics of overweight youth participating in baseball activities. The study used a regression framework to investigate the relationship between whole body, throwing arm segmental mass and body composition measures to kinetic variables about the shoulder and elbow. The multivariate regression results indicated a strong positive significant relationship between each of the mass variables to that of the moment variables about the shoulder and elbow. Participants who had a greater percentage of fat mass produced greater injury correlated moments about the shoulder and elbow.

  8. Estimation of body composition of pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, C.L.; Cornelius, S.G.

    1984-04-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the use of deuterium oxide (D2O) for in vivo estimation of body composition of diverse types of pigs. Obese (Ob, 30) and contemporary Hampshire X Yorkshire (C, 30) types of pigs used in the study were managed and fed under typical management regimens. Indwelling catheters were placed in a jugular vein of 6 Ob and 6 C pigs at 4, 8, 12, 18 and 24 wk of age. The D2O was infused (.5 g/kg body weight) as a .9% NaCl solution into the jugular catheter. Blood samples were taken immediately before and at .25, 1, 4, 8, 12, 24 and 48 h after the D2O infusion and D2O concentration in blood water was determined. Pigs were subsequently killed by euthanasia injection. Contents of the gastrointestinal tract were removed and the empty body was then frozen and later ground and sampled for subsequent analyses. Ground body tissue samples were analyzed for water, fat, N, fat-free organic matter and ash. Pig type, age and the type X age interaction were significant sources of variation in live weight, D2O pool size and all empty body components, as well as all fat-free empty body components. Relationships between age and live weight or weight of empty body components, and between live weight, empty body weight, empty body water or D2O space and weight of empty components were highly significant but influenced, in most cases, by pig type. The results of this study suggested that, although relationships between D2O space and body component weights were highly significant, they were influenced by pig type and were little better than live weight for the estimation of body composition.

  9. Top 10 Research Questions Related to Body Composition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Going, Scott; Lee, Vinson; Blew, Rob; Laddu, Deepika; Hetherington-Rauth, Megan

    2014-01-01

    An understanding of body composition is crucial to understanding human health, disease, and function. Research in body composition has focused on the development of assessment methods, description of normal changes in body composition with growth and development and aging, and the changes that occur in body composition in response to challenges…

  10. Top 10 Research Questions Related to Body Composition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Going, Scott; Lee, Vinson; Blew, Rob; Laddu, Deepika; Hetherington-Rauth, Megan

    2014-01-01

    An understanding of body composition is crucial to understanding human health, disease, and function. Research in body composition has focused on the development of assessment methods, description of normal changes in body composition with growth and development and aging, and the changes that occur in body composition in response to challenges…

  11. Assessing body composition: the skinfold method.

    PubMed

    Talbot, L A; Lister, Z

    1995-12-01

    1. Excess body fat contributes to many chronic diseases. Using a case scenario, an initial screening assessment is performed on two clients. The occupational health nurse provides feedback on current lifestyle behaviors and educates the clients about relevant lifestyle changes. 2. Tables illustrate the step by step procedures for measuring body fat using the skinfold thickness method. Photographs show the multiple body sites used in the skinfold analysis. 3. Commonly asked client questions related to body fat are discussed in detail, and the use of body fat assessment as a screening method for the health promotion professional is described.

  12. Writing Bodies: Somatic Mind in Composition Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleckenstein, Kristie S.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the somatic mind, a permeable materiality in which mind and body resolve into a single entity which is (re)formed by the constantly shifting boundaries of discursive and corporeal intertextualities. Addresses its importance in composition studies. Critiques the poststructuralist disregard of corporeality. (CR)

  13. Relationships Between Body Image, Body Composition, Sexual Functioning, and Sexual Satisfaction Among Heterosexual Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Milhausen, Robin R; Buchholz, Andrea C; Opperman, Emily A; Benson, Lindsay E

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated the association between body image and body-image self-consciousness on sexual satisfaction, accounting for relationships between body fat and body image, and between sexual functioning and sexual satisfaction, while controlling for relationship satisfaction. Participants were 143, 18-25 year-old Caucasian men and women in heterosexual monogamous relationships, recruited from the University of Guelph and surrounding community in Ontario, Canada. Various domains of body image, body-image self-consciousness, sexual satisfaction and functioning, and relationship satisfaction data were collected by questionnaires. Body fat was measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Among men, body image was positively associated with sexual satisfaction, after controlling for relationship satisfaction. Men with greater body fat were more likely to have poorer behavioral and affective body image. Only body image specific to the sexual encounter influenced sexual functioning. Among women, no domain of body image was associated with sexual satisfaction, after controlling for relationship satisfaction. Women with greater body fat were more likely to have poorer affective and sexual-encounter-specific body image. As percent total fat increased, sexual functioning decreased. Our results suggest a complex pattern of relationships exists among body image and body composition constructs and sexual and relationship variable; and that these relationships are not the same for men and women.

  14. Influence of increased body mass and body composition on cycling anaerobic power.

    PubMed

    Maciejczyk, Marcin; Wiecek, Magdalena; Szymura, Jadwiga; Szygula, Zbigniew; Brown, Lee E

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that not only body fat (BF) but high lean body mass (HLBM) adversely affects aerobic performance and may reduce aerobic endurance performance as well. However, the influence of body composition on anaerobic performance remains controversial. This study aimed to examine the effects of increased body mass (BM) and body composition on cycling anaerobic power. Peak power (PP) and mean power (MP) measurements were conducted in 2 groups of men with similar total BM but different body compositions resulting from (a) high level of BF [HBF group] or (b) high level of lean body mass [HLBM group] and in a control group. Peak power and MP were calculated in absolute values, relative to BM and lean body mass (LBM), and using allometric scaling. Absolute PP and MP were significantly higher in the HLBM group compared with the control and HBF groups. However, PP and MP relative to BM and using allometric scaling were similar in the HLBM and control groups, yet significantly higher than in the HBF group. There were no significant differences between groups in PP and MP when presented relative to LBM. Therefore, it seems that it is not BM but rather body composition that affects PP. Increased BM, resulting from increased LBM, does not adversely affect cycling anaerobic power, but a BM increase resulting from an increase in BF may adversely affect PP. Therefore, coaches and athletes should avoid excess BF to maximize cycling anaerobic power.

  15. Effect of physical activity on body composition

    SciTech Connect

    Zanzi, I; Ellis, K J; Aloia, J; Cohn, S H

    1980-01-01

    It has been noted that the deleterious effects on bone calcium of prolonged periods of inactivity, such as bed rest, are halted following resumption of activity. It would seem possible in light of the observations that have been made, that exercise may stimulate bone formation and perhaps counter, to some extent, bone loss as observed in the osteoporosis of aging. The present study was designed to determine the relation between total body calcium, total body potassium and bone mineral content of the radius to the degree of physical activity in a population of normal subjects. Measurement of the calcium was made by in-vivo total body neutron activation analysis. Bone mineral content of the radius and total body potassium, (an index of lean body mass) were measured by photon absorptiometry and the whole body counter, respectively.

  16. Body composition estimations by BIA versus anthropometric equations in body builders and other power athletes.

    PubMed

    Huygens, W; Claessens, A L; Thomis, M; Loos, R; Van Langendonck, L; Peeters, M; Philippaerts, R; Meynaerts, E; Vlietinck, R; Beunen, G

    2002-03-01

    Two main questions are stated: 1) are BIA and anthropometric equations accurate in estimating body composition in male power athletes and more specifically in body builders and 2) is there a difference in body composition when body builders are compared to weight and power lifters? this is a descriptive, comparative study on a selected sample of power athletes. 49 Belgian elite and sub-top male power athletes (34 body builders and 15 weight and power lifters) were included in this sample. More than 70% was in preparation of competition at time of data collection. an extended set of anthropometric measures was taken. Body composition was estimated by BIA (Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis) and by regression equations of skinfolds. Somatotype and muscle+bone areas were calculated. Factor analysis on all anthropometric measures was carried out to determine the body structure of the athletes. Compared to external visual criteria, the equations of Durnin and Womersley and Lohman (skinfolds) and the Guo-equation (BIA) were the only equations that could accurately estimate the body composition for this specific group of athletes. However, the sum of skinfolds attains the most accurate estimate of subcutaneous fatness. Body builders have significantly (p<0.01) larger arm and thigh circumferences and are more mesomorfic than the other power athletes (5.9 vs 3.8). This study shows that to estimate body composition in extreme power athletes BIA is not as accurate as compared to anthropometric equations. Moreover, the sum of a larger set of skinfolds is preferred to anthropometric prediction equations. In addition, body builders are more muscular and leaner than other power athletes.

  17. Validation and calibration of DEXA body composition in mice.

    PubMed

    Brommage, Robert

    2003-09-01

    Validated methods of determining murine body composition are required for studies of obesity in mice. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) provides a noninvasive approach to assess body fat and lean tissue contents. Similar to DEXA analyses in other species, body fat measurements in mice show acceptable precision but suffer from poor accuracy. Because fat and lean tissues each contain various components, these inaccuracies likely result from selection of inappropriate calibration standards. Analysis of solvents showed that the PIXImus2 DEXA gave results consistent with theoretical calculations. Male mice weighing 26-60 g and having body fat percentages ranging from 3 to 49% were analyzed by both PIXImus2 DEXA and chemical carcass analysis. DEXA overestimated mouse fat content by an average of 3.3 g, and algorithms were generated to calculate body fat from both measured body fat values and the measured ratio of high- to low-energy X-ray attenuations. With calibration to mouse body fat content measured by carcass analysis, the PIXImus2 DEXA gives accurate body composition values in mice.

  18. Growth hormone signaling in muscle and adipose tissue of obese human subjects: associations with measures of body composition and interaction with resveratrol treatment.

    PubMed

    Clasen, Berthil F; Poulsen, Morten M; Escande, Carlos; Pedersen, Steen B; Møller, Niels; Chini, Eduardo N; Jessen, Niels; Jørgensen, Jens O L

    2014-12-01

    Growth hormone (GH) secretion is reduced in obesity, despite normal serum insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1) levels, but the association between obesity and the GH signaling is unknown. Furthermore, SIRT1, an nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent protein deacetylase, reduces hepatic IGF-1 production in mice via blunting of GH-induced STAT5 signaling. To study GH signaling in muscle and fat in obese subjects and the interaction with concomitant administration of the putative SIRT1 activator resveratrol, and to assess the effects of inhibiting or knocking down SIRT1 on GH regulated genes in vitro. Twenty-four obese males were examined in a randomized, double blinded, parallel-group study with resveratrol or placebo treatment for 5 weeks followed by a GH bolus. Muscle and fat biopsies were collected before and after GH. Body composition was assessed by DEXA and MRI. (1) Effect of body composition and age on GH-stimulated STAT5b phosphorylation and IGF-1, SOCS2, and CISH mRNA in muscle and fat. (2) The impact of resveratrol treatment on GH activity. (3) Impact of inhibiting or knocking down SIRT1 on effects of GH in vitro. Significant GH-induced STAT5b phosphorylation in muscle and fat in obese subjects was recorded together with increased CISH and SOCS2 mRNA. GH-induced STAT5b phosphorylation in muscle correlated positively with age [r = 0.53, p < 0.01], but not with body composition. Resveratrol administration had no impact on body composition, serum IGF-1, or GH signaling in vivo, and SIRT1 knock down or inhibition did not affect GH signaling in vitro. (1) GH induced STAT5b phosphorylation is detectable in muscle and fat in adult males with simple obesity, but is not determined by body composition. (2) Resveratrol supplementation does not impact circulating IGF-1 levels or GH signaling in human muscle and fat. (3) Our data speak against a major impact of SIRT1on GH action in human subjects.

  19. Determination of body composition from skinfold thickness: a validation study.

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, J J; Wilson, J; Durnin, J V

    1995-01-01

    Measurement of body composition is proving increasingly important in clinical nutrition and research. Skinfold thickness is a simple means of estimating body composition which is widely used in children, but there is little information on its validity. There has been a proliferation of equations for estimation of body composition from skinfolds, but some doubt as to their general applicability. The aim of the present study was to validate five currently used equations for this purpose in a sample of 98 healthy prepubertal children (64 boys, 34 girls), mean (SD) age 9.1 (1.7) years by comparison of estimates from each equation with measurements of fatness derived from hydrodensitometry. Differences between methods were determined by calculation of biases and limits of agreement. Limits of agreement between predicted and measured fatness were wide, particularly in the girls, and some distinct biases were apparent. Choice of prediction equation therefore has a substantial influence on the estimate of fatness obtained when using skinfolds in children. The existing published equations are associated with large random errors or significant systematic errors. For the time being skinfolds might best be regarded as indices (rather than measures) of body fatness in individuals, or means of estimating body fatness of groups. Estimating the total body fatness of individual prepubertal children using skinfolds, on the basis of this evidence, is not advisable at present. PMID:7492193

  20. Optimum Anthropometric Criteria for Ideal Body Composition Related Fitness

    PubMed Central

    Kilani, Hashem; Abu-Eisheh, Asem

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The three aims of this study were to establish equations for ideal body composition related fitness to be used by adults willing to gain optimum body composition related fitness; to predict the possible symmetrical major muscle circumference, and to compute the ideal body fat percentage (BFP) with ideal body weight (IBW) based on the body mass index (BMI). Methods Twenty-four athletes were intentionally selected, with heights of 166–190 cm and aged 20–42 years, according to a judging committee that used modified International Fitness Federation criteria for the Mr. Fitness competition “super body category”. Common anthropometric and body composition measurements were taken for the following independent variables: body height, upper limb length, lower limb length, thigh length, arm length, shoulder width, forearm length, shank length, and wrist girth; and for the following dependent variables: circumferences of shoulder, thigh, waist, hip, chest, biceps, forearm, shank, and neck. Skin fold thickness was measured at three sites by a Harpenden caliper to calculate BFP. Results The findings indicate that there was a predictive correlation between major independent variables and body circumferences. The mean range used to find out the ideal BFP percentage which was 5.6–6.7 %. The BMI equation used to find the IBW was H2 × 23.77 ± 2 SE. Stepwise multiple regressions were also used to derive predictive equations. The most predictive independent variables were wrist girth and height. Conclusion It is suggested that the above equations, the ideal BFP percentage and the IBW be used as criteria in training sessions to achieve ideal body composition related fitness. PMID:21509084

  1. Comparison of resting energy equations and total energy expenditure in haemodialysis patients and body composition measured by multi-frequency bioimpedance.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Ben; Sridharan, Sivakumar; Farrington, Ken; Davenport, Andrew

    2017-07-13

    Waste products of metabolism are retained in haemodialysis (HD) patients. Cellular metabolism generates energy, and patients with greater energy expenditure may therefore require more dialysis. To determine the amount of dialysis required, equations estimating resting and total energy expenditure (REE,TEE) are required. We compared estimates of REE in HD patients using established equations with a novel equation recently validated in HD patients (HD equation). TEE was derived from REE (HD equation) and estimates of physical activity obtained by questionnaire. REE and TEE relationships with bioimpedance measured body composition were then determined. We studied 317 HD patients; 195 males (61.5%), 123 diabetic (38.9%), mean age 65.0 ± 15.3 and weight 73.1 ± 16.8 kg. REE from HD Equation was 1509 ± 241 kcal/day, which was greater than for Mifflin St Joer 1384 ± 259, Harris-Benedict 1437 ± 244, Katch-McArdle 1345 ± 232 (all p < 0.05 vs HD Equation), but less than Cunningham 1557 ± 236 kcal/day. Bland Altman mean bias ranged from -263 to 55 kcal/day. TEE was 1727 (1558-1976) kcal/day, and on multi-variable analysis was positively associated with skeletal muscle mass (β 23.3, p < 0.001), employment (β 406.5, p < 0.001), low co-morbidity (β 105.1, p = 0.006), and protein nitrogen appearance (β 2.7, p = 0.015), and negatively with age (β -7.9, p < 0.001), and dialysis vintage (β -121.2, p = 0.002). Most standard equations underestimate REE in HD patients compared to the HD Equation. TEE was greater in those with higher skeletal muscle mass and protein nitrogen appearance, lower co-morbidity, age, and dialysis vintage, and the employed. More metabolically active patients may require greater dialytic clearances. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Body composition in MesoAmerica.

    PubMed

    Solomons, N W; Mazariegos, M

    1995-03-01

    The fundamental paradigm for the region is short stature. Adult height is on the order of 160 cm for men and 140 cm for women. The timing of this delayed growth has been fixed to the first two years of life, when as much as 2 Z-scores of stature may be loss to the median of the NCHS reference. In the elderly of the region, we have the issue of being initially short and then suffering further loss of stature with age. The height/armspan ratio has proven instructive for exploring that change in height with age. It appears to be less than in Europeans. Demands of a rigorous agricultural lifestyle, the energy content and density of the diet, and the ravages of recurrent infection and parasitism comprise the environmental determinants of body composition in poor MesoAmerican population. They are conducive to a low storage of fat, with lean body mass being subject to response to infections. Because of the basic short stature but muscular maturity of children and adults, one questions whether the assumptions of proportionality of weight for height from the NCHS reference data apply, or whether MesoAmericans should be normally greater in weight for height than a comparably short North American. For some at the lower end of the stature scale, no international reference standards actually exist for adults. All than can be measured with microtoise, calliper, flexible tape and balance has long been recorded in MesoAmerican populations. Certain high-cost and facility- dependent technologies, such as nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and whole-body neutron activation analysis, are beyond the scientific economies of any part of the region. Dual energy x-ray absorbitometry instruments are available for clinical diagnosis in Mexico, Guatemala and Costa Rica, and could be turned to research ends. Underwater weighing has been practiced variously in MesoAmerica. Researchers in Guatemala have pioneered in the investigative use of bioelectrical impedance analysis to all ages from low

  3. Comparison of the effectiveness of body mass index and body fat percentage in defining body composition.

    PubMed

    Goonasegaran, Arvin Raj; Nabila, Fatin Nabila; Shuhada, Nurul Shuhada

    2012-06-01

    Body mass index (BMI) has limited diagnostic performance due to its inability to discriminate between fat and lean mass. This study was conducted to compare the effectiveness of body fat percentage (BFP) against BMI in defining body composition. A cross-sectional study was conducted on students aged 17-30 years in Melaka, Malaysia. Basic anthropometric measurements were acquired using a manual weighing scale, measuring tape and a fixed stadiometer. BFP was calculated using the United States Navy formula. Data was tabulated and analysed using Epi Info and Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software. Pearson's correlation coefficient and Kappa values were used. A p-value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Out of the 490 subjects recruited, 43% of males and 24.6% of females were found to be overweight, while 14.3% of males and 7.8% of females were obese, when calculated using BMI. However, 8.9% of males and 22.8% of females were considered obese based on the BFP. BFP plays a more important role in distinguishing between healthy and obese individuals, as it has a greater ability to differentiate between lean mass and fat mass compared to BMI.

  4. In vivo animal models of body composition in aging

    SciTech Connect

    Yasumura, S. |; Jones, K.; Spanne, P.; Schidlovsky, G.; Wielopolski, L.; Ren, X.; Glaros, D.; Xatzikonstantinou, Y. |

    1992-12-31

    We developed several techniques that provide data on body elemental composition from in vivo measurements in rats. These methods include total body potassium by whole-body counting of endogenous {sup 40}K; total body calcium (TBCa), sodium and chloride by in vivo neutron activation analysis and total body phosphorus (TBP) and nitrogen (TBN) by photon activation analysis. These elements provide information on total body fat, total body protein and skeletal mass. Measurements were made in 6-, 12- and 24-month-old rats. TBN Increased slightly between 6 and 12 months but was significantly lower by 24 months, indicating a substantial loss in total body protein. Working at the National Synchrotron light Source, we studied rat femurs by computed microtomography (CMT), and the elemental profile of the femur cortex by synchrotron-radiation induced X-ray emission (SRIXE). Although there were no significant changes in TBCA and TBP, indices of skeletal mass, CMT revealed a marked increase in the size and number of cavities in the endosteal region of the femur cortex with increasing age. The SRIXE analysis of this cortical bone revealed a parallel decrease in the endosteal Ca/P ratio. Thus, there are major alterations in bone morphology and regional elemental composition despite only modest changes in total skeletal mass.

  5. Somatotype and Body Composition of Normal and Dysphonic Adult Speakers.

    PubMed

    Franco, Débora; Fragoso, Isabel; Andrea, Mário; Teles, Júlia; Martins, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Voice quality provides information about the anatomical characteristics of the speaker. The patterns of somatotype and body composition can provide essential knowledge to characterize the individuality of voice quality. The aim of this study was to verify if there were significant differences in somatotype and body composition between normal and dysphonic speakers. Cross-sectional study. Anthropometric measurements were taken of a sample of 72 adult participants (40 normal speakers and 32 dysphonic speakers) according to International Society for the Advancement of Kinanthropometry standards, which allowed the calculation of endomorphism, mesomorphism, ectomorphism components, body density, body mass index, fat mass, percentage fat, and fat-free mass. Perception and acoustic evaluations as well as nasoendoscopy were used to assign speakers into normal or dysphonic groups. There were no significant differences between normal and dysphonic speakers in the mean somatotype attitudinal distance and somatotype dispersion distance (in spite of marginally significant differences [P < 0.10] in somatotype attitudinal distance and somatotype dispersion distance between groups) and in the mean vector of the somatotype components. Furthermore, no significant differences were found between groups concerning the mean of percentage fat, fat mass, fat-free mass, body density, and body mass index after controlling by sex. The findings suggested no significant differences in the somatotype and body composition variables, between normal and dysphonic speakers. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Bioelectrical Impedance and Body Composition Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martino, Mike

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses field tests that can be used in physical education programs. The most common field tests are anthropometric measurements, which include body mass index (BMI), girth measurements, and skinfold testing. Another field test that is gaining popularity is bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA). Each method has particular strengths…

  7. Bioelectrical Impedance and Body Composition Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martino, Mike

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses field tests that can be used in physical education programs. The most common field tests are anthropometric measurements, which include body mass index (BMI), girth measurements, and skinfold testing. Another field test that is gaining popularity is bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA). Each method has particular strengths…

  8. Anthropometry and body composition of south Indian babies at birth.

    PubMed

    Muthayya, S; Dwarkanath, P; Thomas, T; Vaz, M; Mhaskar, A; Mhaskar, R; Thomas, A; Bhat, S; Kurpad, Av

    2006-10-01

    To assess the consequences on body composition of increasing birth weight in Indian babies in relation to reported values in Western babies, and to assess the relationship between maternal and neonatal anthropometry and body composition. Prospective observational study. Bangalore City, India. A total of 712 women were recruited at 12.5+/-3.1 weeks of gestation (mean+/-standard deviation, SD) and followed up until delivery; 14.5% were lost to follow-up. Maternal body weight, height, mid upper-arm circumference and skinfold thicknesses were measured at recruitment. Weight and body composition of the baby (skinfold thicknesses, mid upper-arm circumference, derived arm fat index and arm muscle index; AFI and AMI, respectively) were measured at birth in hospital. The mean+/-SD birth weight of all newborns was 2.80+/-0.44 kg. Birth weight was significantly related to the triceps and subscapular skinfold thickness of the baby. In a small number of babies with large birth weight for gestational age, there was a relatively higher normalised AFI relative to AMI than for babies with lower or appropriate birth weight for gestational age. Maternal height and fat-free mass were significantly associated with the baby's length at birth. Skinfold thicknesses in Indian babies were similar to those reported in a Western population with comparable birth weights, and the relationship of AFI to birth weight appeared to be steeper in Indian babies. Thus, measures to increase birth weight in Indian babies should take into account possible adverse consequences on body composition. There were no significant relationships between maternal anthropometry and body composition at birth on multivariate analysis, except for sum of the baby's skinfold thicknesses and maternal fat-free mass (P<0.02).

  9. Insulin resistance in pregnant women with and without polycystic ovary syndrome, and measures of body composition in offspring at birth and three years of age.

    PubMed

    Finnbogadóttir, Sara K; Glintborg, Dorte; Jensen, Tina K; Kyhl, Henriette B; Nohr, Ellen A; Andersen, Marianne

    2017-08-14

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is associated with obesity and insulin resistance in the non-pregnant state, but little is known about insulin sensitivity in the pregnant state. Our objective was to compare insulin resistance in pregnant women with and without polycystic ovary syndrome and explore the impact of polycystic ovary syndrome on body composition in offspring at birth and at three years of age. A prospective cohort study including 2548 live-born singleton mother-child pairs residing in Odense municipality, Denmark, during 2010-2013. Of the 2548 women, 241 (9.4%) had polycystic ovary syndrome. Homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance assessments were comparable in women with and without polycystic ovary syndrome. However, the subgroup of overweight women with polycystic ovary syndrome had significantly higher levels of homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance than overweight women without polycystic ovary syndrome (mean ± 2 SD): 4.4 (3.1) vs. 3.6 (3.4), p = 0.004. Maternal polycystic ovary syndrome did not affect offspring birthweight after accounting for age. However, polycystic ovary syndrome, adjusted for maternal body mass index, was associated with increased body mass index at three years of age (mean ± 2 SD): 16.0 (2.2) vs. 15.7 (2.1) kg/m(2) , p = 0.04. In our cohort, maternal polycystic ovary syndrome was not associated with insulin resistance after correcting for body mass index and was not an independent predictor of offspring birthweight. However, both polycystic ovary syndrome and high maternal body mass index may increase risk of childhood obesity at three years of age. © 2017 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  10. Changes in anthropometric measurements, body composition, blood pressure, lipid profile, and testosterone in patients participating in a low-energy dietary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Balliett, Mary; Burke, Jeanmarie R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to describe changes in anthropometric measurements, body composition, blood pressure, lipid profile, and testosterone following a low–energy-density dietary intervention plus regimented supplementation program. Methods The study design was a pre-post intervention design without a control group. Normal participants were recruited from the faculty, staff, students, and community members from a chiropractic college to participate in a 21-day weight loss program. All participants (n = 49; 36 women, 13 men; 31 ± 10.3 years of age) received freshly prepared mostly vegan meals (breakfast, lunch, and dinner) that included 1200 to 1400 daily calories (5020.8 to 5857.6 J) for the women and 1600 to 1800 (6694.4 to 7531.2 J) daily calories for the men. Nutritional supplements containing enzymes that were intended to facilitate digestion, reduce cholesterol levels, increase metabolic rate, and mediate inflammatory processes were consumed 30 minutes before each meal. The regimented supplementation program included once-daily supplementation with a green drink that contained alfalfa, wheatgrass, apple cider vinegar, and fulvic acid throughout the study period. A cleanse supplementation containing magnesium, chia, flaxseed, lemon, camu camu, cat's claw, bentonite clay, tumeric, pau d'arco, chanca piedra, stevia, zeolite clay, slippery elm, garlic, ginger, peppermint, aloe, citrus bioflavonoids, and fulvic acid was added before each meal during week 2. During week 3, the cleanse supplementation was replaced with probiotic and prebiotic supplementation. Results Multiple paired t tests detected clinically meaningful reductions in weight (− 8.7 ± 5.54 lb) (− 3.9 ± 2.5 kg), total cholesterol (− 30.0 ± 29.77 mg/dL), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (− 21.0 ± 25.20 mg/dL) (P < .05). There was a pre-post intervention increase in testosterone for men (111.0 ± 121.13 ng/dL, P < .05). Conclusions Weight loss and improvements

  11. Changes in anthropometric measurements, body composition, blood pressure, lipid profile, and testosterone in patients participating in a low-energy dietary intervention.

    PubMed

    Balliett, Mary; Burke, Jeanmarie R

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe changes in anthropometric measurements, body composition, blood pressure, lipid profile, and testosterone following a low-energy-density dietary intervention plus regimented supplementation program. The study design was a pre-post intervention design without a control group. Normal participants were recruited from the faculty, staff, students, and community members from a chiropractic college to participate in a 21-day weight loss program. All participants (n = 49; 36 women, 13 men; 31 ± 10.3 years of age) received freshly prepared mostly vegan meals (breakfast, lunch, and dinner) that included 1200 to 1400 daily calories (5020.8 to 5857.6 J) for the women and 1600 to 1800 (6694.4 to 7531.2 J) daily calories for the men. Nutritional supplements containing enzymes that were intended to facilitate digestion, reduce cholesterol levels, increase metabolic rate, and mediate inflammatory processes were consumed 30 minutes before each meal. The regimented supplementation program included once-daily supplementation with a green drink that contained alfalfa, wheatgrass, apple cider vinegar, and fulvic acid throughout the study period. A cleanse supplementation containing magnesium, chia, flaxseed, lemon, camu camu, cat's claw, bentonite clay, tumeric, pau d'arco, chanca piedra, stevia, zeolite clay, slippery elm, garlic, ginger, peppermint, aloe, citrus bioflavonoids, and fulvic acid was added before each meal during week 2. During week 3, the cleanse supplementation was replaced with probiotic and prebiotic supplementation. Multiple paired t tests detected clinically meaningful reductions in weight (- 8.7 ± 5.54 lb) (- 3.9 ± 2.5 kg), total cholesterol (- 30.0 ± 29.77 mg/dL), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (- 21.0 ± 25.20 mg/dL) (P < .05). There was a pre-post intervention increase in testosterone for men (111.0 ± 121.13 ng/dL, P < .05). Weight loss and improvements in total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein

  12. Body composition assessment in Taiwanese individuals with poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kwang-Hwa; Lai, Chien-Hung; Chen, Shih-Ching; Hsiao, Wen-Tien; Liou, Tsan-Hon; Lee, Chi-Ming

    2011-07-01

    To measure the changes in the total and regional body fat mass, and assess the clinical usefulness of the body mass index (BMI) in detecting overweight subjects with sequelae of poliomyelitis. Prospective, cross-sectional study. General community. Subjects with poliomyelitis (n=17; age range, 42-57y; mean, 47y; 12 men, 5 women) and able-bodied people (n=17) matched by sex, age, body weight, and body height participated in the study. Not applicable. Total and regional body composition was measured with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Clinical characteristics such as blood pressure, serum biochemical studies, and habitual behaviors (daily cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, and exercise regimen) of all participants were evaluated. Compared with able-bodied controls, subjects with poliomyelitis had a 50% greater total body fat mass, significant increases in the regional fat mass in every part of the body, and had the greatest increase of fat mass in the thorax. Nearly all the subjects (94%) with poliomyelitis were obese according to standards of body composition. However, one third of them had a BMI value of less than 25.0kg/m(2). People with poliomyelitis have a higher prevalence of obesity and a significant increase in total and regional fat mass. Current BMI underestimates the total body fat mass percentage compared with the control; therefore, a population-specific BMI should be used to address the prevalence of obesity in postpolio survivors. Copyright © 2011 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Asymmetry in body composition in female hockey players.

    PubMed

    Krzykała, M; Leszczyński, P

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study was to determine if a sport in which one side of the body is dominant, like field hockey, influences regional body composition and bone mineral density (BMD) distribution in particular body segments, and whether the sporting level is a determining factor. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) method (Lunar Prodigy Advance; General Electric, Madison, USA) with the whole body scan was used to measure bone mineral density, fat mass and lean mass in 31 female field hockey players divided according to their sporting level. The morphological asymmetry level was assessed between two body sides and body segments in athletes from the National Team (n=17) and from the Youth Team (n=14) separately and between groups. Bone mineral density in the lower extremity and of the trunk was significantly asymmetric in favor of the left side in the National Team. In the case of the Youth Team, only the trunk BMD indicated clear left-right difference with left side dominance. Both the lean mass and fat mass values were relatively higher on the left side of all body segments and it related to both analyzed groups of athletes. The present study shows that playing field hockey contributes to laterality in body composition and BMD and that the sporting level is a determining factor. In most cases the left side dominated. A greater asymmetry level was observed in more experienced female field hockey players.

  14. Validation of Body Condition Indices and Quantitative Magnetic Resonance in Estimating Body Composition in a Small Lizard

    PubMed Central

    WARNER, DANIEL A.; JOHNSON, MARIA S.; NAGY, TIM R.

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of body condition are typically used to assess an individual’s quality, health, or energetic state. Most indices of body condition are based on linear relationships between body length and mass. Although these indices are simple to obtain, nonlethal, and useful indications of energetic state, their accuracy at predicting constituents of body condition (e.g., fat and lean mass) are often unknown. The objectives of this research were to (1) validate the accuracy of another simple and noninvasive method, quantitative magnetic resonance (QMR), at estimating body composition in a small-bodied lizard, Anolis sagrei, and (2) evaluate the accuracy of two indices of body condition (based on length–mass relationships) at predicting body fat, lean, and water mass. Comparisons of results from QMR scans to those from chemical carcass analysis reveal that QMR measures body fat, lean, and water mass with excellent accuracy in male and female lizards. With minor calibration from regression equations, QMR will be a reliable method of estimating body composition of A. sagrei. Body condition indices were positively related to absolute estimates of each constituent of body composition, but these relationships showed considerable variation around regression lines. In addition, condition indices did not predict fat, lean, or water mass when adjusted for body mass. Thus, our results emphasize the need for caution when interpreting body condition based upon linear measurements of animals. Overall, QMR provides an alternative noninvasive method for accurately measuring fat, lean, and water mass in these small-bodied animals. PMID:28035770

  15. Body size and composition of National Football League players.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, William J; Torine, Jon C; Silvestre, Ricardo; French, Duncan N; Ratamess, Nicholas A; Spiering, Barry A; Hatfield, Disa L; Vingren, Jakob L; Volek, Jeff S

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to present a profile of body size and composition of National Football League (NFL) players prior to the start of the regular season. Fifty-three members of the Indianapolis Colts professional football team were measured for height, body mass, and percentage body fat using the BOD POD air-displacement plethysmography system during summer camp of the 2003 football season. These data were categorized by position for comparison with previous studies of NFL football players. The relationships observed were as follows (= represents nonsignificant; > represents p < or = 0.05): Height: Offensive Line = Defensive Line = Quarterbacks/Kickers/Punters = Tight Ends > Linebackers > Running Backs = Wide Receivers = Defensive Backs. Body Mass: Offensive Line = Defensive Line > Tight Ends = Linebackers > Running Backs = Quarterbacks/ Kickers/Punters > Wide Receivers = Defensive Backs. Percentage Body Fat: Offensive Line > Defensive Line > Quarterbacks/ Kickers/Punters = Linebackers = Tight Ends > Running Backs = Wide Receivers = Defensive Backs. Comparisons to teams in the 1970s indicate that body mass has increased only for offensive and defensive linemen; however, height and body fat among player positions have not dramatically changed. Furthermore, the body mass index is not an accurate measure or representation of body fat or obesity in NFL players. These data provide a basic template for size profiles and differences among various positions and allow comparisons with other studies for changes in the NFL over the past 3 decades.

  16. The Body and the Beautiful: Health, Attractiveness and Body Composition in Men's and Women's Bodies.

    PubMed

    Brierley, Mary-Ellen; Brooks, Kevin R; Mond, Jonathan; Stevenson, Richard J; Stephen, Ian D

    2016-01-01

    The dominant evolutionary theory of physical attraction posits that attractiveness reflects physiological health, and attraction is a mechanism for identifying a healthy mate. Previous studies have found that perceptions of the healthiest body mass index (weight scaled for height; BMI) for women are close to healthy BMI guidelines, while the most attractive BMI is significantly lower, possibly pointing to an influence of sociocultural factors in determining attractive BMI. However, less is known about ideal body size for men. Further, research has not addressed the role of body fat and muscle, which have distinct relationships with health and are conflated in BMI, in determining perceived health and attractiveness. Here, we hypothesised that, if attractiveness reflects physiological health, the most attractive and healthy appearing body composition should be in line with physiologically healthy body composition. Thirty female and 33 male observers were instructed to manipulate 15 female and 15 male body images in terms of their fat and muscle to optimise perceived health and, separately, attractiveness. Observers were unaware that they were manipulating the muscle and fat content of bodies. The most attractive apparent fat mass for female bodies was significantly lower than the healthiest appearing fat mass (and was lower than the physiologically healthy range), with no significant difference for muscle mass. The optimal fat and muscle mass for men's bodies was in line with the healthy range. Male observers preferred a significantly lower overall male body mass than did female observers. While the body fat and muscle associated with healthy and attractive appearance is broadly in line with physiologically healthy values, deviations from this pattern suggest that future research should examine a possible role for internalization of body ideals in influencing perceptions of attractive body composition, particularly in women.

  17. [Analysis of the body composition of Spanish women with fibromyalgia].

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Virginia A; Ortega, Francisco B; Heredia, José M; Carbonell-Baeza, Ana; Delgado-Fernández, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    To describe the anthropometric profile and body composition of women from Southern Spain diagnosed with fibromyalgia (FM) and to compare the observed values with values from other studies conducted on FM patients and with national reference values. The body composition of 104 women diagnosed with FM was assessed using an eight-electrode impedance meter. The reliability of the body composition measurement was tested in a randomly selected sub-sample (n=28). The reliability study showed a test-retest systematic error close to zero in most of the parameters studied. The women with FM who were studied had a mean weight of 71.3±13.4 kg, height of 158±6 cm, body mass index of 28.6±5.1 kg/m(2), body fat mass of 38.6±7.6%, total body water of 31.6±3.8 l and muscle mass of 23.4±3.0 kg. In general, there were no substantial differences in weight and body mass index between women with FM and those analyzed in other Spanish and European studies involving FM patients, nor when they were compared with regional or national reference values. However, the prevalence of obesity in the women with FM under study was 33.7%, a higher figure than that from the national reference data for obesity in similarly aged women (i.e. 26,4%). The results suggest that obesity is a common condition in women diagnosed with FM, its prevalence in this population being higher than the national reference values. This study provides detailed information about the body composition characteristics of women with FM. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of chronic acceleration on body composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, G. C.

    1982-01-01

    Studies of the centrifugation of adult rats showed an unexpected decrease in the mass of fat-free muscle and bone, in spite of the added load induced by centrifugation. It is suggested that the lower but constant fat-free body mass was probably regulated during centrifugation. Rats placed in weightless conditions for 18.5 days gave indirect but strong evidence that the muscle had increased in mass. Other changes in the rats placed in weightless conditions included a smaller fraction of skeletal mineral, a smaller fraction of water in the total fat-free body, and a net shift of fluid from skin to viscera. Adult rats centrifuged throughout the post-weaning growth period exhibited smaller masses of bone and central nervous system (probably attributable to slower growth of the total body), and a larger mass of skin than controls at 1 G. Efforts at simulating the effects of weightlessness or centrifugation on the body composition of rats by regimens at terrestrial gravity were inconclusive.

  19. Effects of chronic acceleration on body composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, G. C.

    1982-01-01

    Studies of the centrifugation of adult rats showed an unexpected decrease in the mass of fat-free muscle and bone, in spite of the added load induced by centrifugation. It is suggested that the lower but constant fat-free body mass was probably regulated during centrifugation. Rats placed in weightless conditions for 18.5 days gave indirect but strong evidence that the muscle had increased in mass. Other changes in the rats placed in weightless conditions included a smaller fraction of skeletal mineral, a smaller fraction of water in the total fat-free body, and a net shift of fluid from skin to viscera. Adult rats centrifuged throughout the post-weaning growth period exhibited smaller masses of bone and central nervous system (probably attributable to slower growth of the total body), and a larger mass of skin than controls at 1 G. Efforts at simulating the effects of weightlessness or centrifugation on the body composition of rats by regimens at terrestrial gravity were inconclusive.

  20. [Body composition and polycystic ovary syndrome].

    PubMed

    Zabuliene, Lina; Tutkuviene, Janina

    2010-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrine metabolic disorders of reproductive age women. The main signs of PCOS are as follows: androgen excess, menstrual dysfunction, infertility, obesity, and other numerous health problems. By different authors, the disorder affects 2-28% of reproductive age women. Polycystic ovary syndrome is characterized by presence of hyperandrogenism, anovulation, menstrual cycle disturbances, also by the other metabolic changes. The lack of well-defined and universally accepted diagnostic criteria makes identification of this syndrome confusing to many clinicians. There are only few studies concerning the correlations between phenotypic expression, body composition and PCOS, and relationship with the processes of growth and sexual maturation and various environmental factors (nutrition, physical activity, stress, and other factors). There is a lack of knowledge about further PCOS development and prognosis, considering the individual and environmental factors. Variation in human body composition and shape ranges considerably: many body size and shape indices (height, weight, body composition, and proportions) are the result of long evolution process and adaptation to environment. Obviously, the morphological body parameters, physiological and biochemical indices are complex and compound the interdependent system. By current literature, more than 50% of women are overweight or obese. If waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio of women with PCOS increase, reproductive function and metabolic state of a woman is altered more than in cases when there are no changes in these parameters. The investigations of the strongest sexual dimorphism sign--the subcutaneous and visceral fat topography--showed that women with PCOS have greater adipose tissue mass in the areas of the abdomen, waist, and upper arms than control women. It is known that some indices of sexual dimorphism may be considered as the morphological signs of

  1. Body composition: A predictive factor of cycle fecundity

    PubMed Central

    Kayatas, Semra; Api, Murat; Kurt, Didar; Eroglu, Mustafa; Arınkan, Sevcan Arzu

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of body composition on reproduction in women with unexplained infertility treated with a controlled ovarian hyperstimulation and intrauterine insemination programme. Methods This prospective observational study was conducted on 308 unexplained infertile women who were scheduled for a controlled ovarian hyperstimulation and intrauterine insemination programme and were grouped as pregnant and non-pregnant. Anthropometric measurements were performed using TANITA-420MA before the treatment cycle. Body composition was determined using a bioelectrical impedance analysis system. Results Body fat mass was significantly lower in pregnant women than in non-pregnant women (15.61±3.65 vs.18.78±5.97, respectively) (p=0.01). In a multiple regression analysis, body fat mass proved to have a stronger association with fecundity than the percentage of body fat, body mass index, or the waist/hip ratio (standardized regression coefficient≥0.277, t-value≥2.537; p<0.05). The cut-off value of fat mass, which was evaluated using the receiver operating characteristics curve, was 16.65 with a sensitivity of 61.8% and a specificity of 70.2%. Below this cut-off value, the odds of the pregnancy occurrence was found to be 2.5 times more likely. Conclusion Body fat mass can be predictive for pregnancy in patients with unexplained infertility scheduled for a controlled ovarian hyperstimulation and intrauterine insemination programme. PMID:25045631

  2. Scaling of adult regional body mass and body composition as a whole to height: Relevance to body shape and body mass index.

    PubMed

    Schuna, John M; Peterson, Courtney M; Thomas, Diana M; Heo, Moonseong; Hong, Sangmo; Choi, Woong; Heymsfield, Steven B

    2015-01-01

    Adult body mass (MB) empirically scales as height (Ht) squared (MB ∝ Ht(2) ), but does regional body mass and body composition as a whole also scale as Ht(2) ? This question is relevant to a wide range of biological topics, including interpretation of body mass index (BMI). Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was used to quantify regional body mass [head (MH), trunk, arms, and legs] and whole-body composition [fat, lean soft tissue (LST), and bone mineral content (BMC)] in non-Hispanic (NH) white, NH black, Mexican American, and Korean adults participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES; n = 17,126) and Korean NHANES (n = 8,942). Regression models were developed to establish Ht scaling powers for each measured component with adjustments for age and adiposity. Exploratory analyses revealed a consistent scaling pattern across men and women of the four population groups: regional mass powers, head (∼0.8-1) < arms and trunk (∼1.8-2.3) < legs (∼2.3-2.6); and body composition, LST (∼2.0-2.3) < BMC (∼2.1-2.4). Small sex and population differences in scaling powers were also observed. As body mass scaled uniformly across the eight sex and population groups as Ht(∼2) , tall and short subjects differed in body shape (e.g., MH/MB ∝ Ht(-∼1) ) and composition. Adult human body shape and relative composition are a function of body size as represented by stature, a finding that reveals a previously unrecognized phenotypic heterogeneity as defined by BMI. These observations provide new pathways for exploring mechanisms governing the interrelations between adult stature, body morphology, biomechanics, and metabolism. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Body composition and calcium metabolism in adult treated coeliac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Bodé, S; Hassager, C; Gudmand-Høyer, E; Christiansen, C

    1991-01-01

    Twenty two treated adult patients with coeliac disease (aged 20-70 years) were examined. Body composition was assessed from anthropometry and directly measured by dual photon absorptiometry. Bone mineral content was measured in the spine (dual photon absorptiometry) and at two forearm sites (single photon absorptiometry). Compared with age matched healthy subjects, treated coeliac patients had lower body mass index (-5%, p less than 0.05) and lower directly measured total body fat mass (-30%, p less than 0.001). They also had decreased bone mineral content (-9 to -13%, p less than 0.01) in the spine and in the forearms. The serum concentrations of albumin, D vitamin binding protein, and iron were reduced (-6 to -22%, p less than 0.01), but otherwise blood and urine analyses were normal. We conclude that this group of treated adult coeliac patients had a reduced fat mass and bone mineral content compared with the general population. PMID:1752465

  4. Effect of chronic centrifugation on body composition in the rat.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, G. C.; Bull, L. S.; Oyama, J.

    1972-01-01

    Two groups of adult female rats were chronically centrifuged for 60 days (2.76 G, 4.15 G, controls at 1.00 G). Live weights of centrifugal rats decreased about 20 g (6%) per Delta 1 G above control. This weight loss comprised reductions in both body fat and fat-free body weight (FFBW) as determined by body-composition studies on eight rats per group killed at the end of centrifugation. Of nine components constituting the FFBW, only skeletal muscle, liver, and heart changed significantly in weight. Chemical composition showed reductions (compared with controls) in the fat fraction of most components and increases in the water fraction of liver and gut. Identical measurements were made on the remaining eight rats per group killed 43 days after return to 1 G. Neither centrifuged group had reached the control body-weight level at this time. No statistically significant effect of previous G level was found in any of the body-composition parameters. The possible involvment of physiological regulation was considered.

  5. Body composition and nutritional parameters in HIV and AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Jérôme; de Truchis, Pierre; Melchior, Jean-Claude

    2002-12-01

    Undernutrition is a frequent complication of evolutive and chronic HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) infection characterized by bodyweight loss and changes in body composition. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention define AIDS wasting as involuntary loss of more than 10% of body weight, plus more than 30 days of either diarrhea, or weakness and fever. Wasting syndrome has been considered as a case definition of the AIDS disease since 1987. Wasting syndrome is clearly linked to disease progression and death. Despite the progress under the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), wasting is still a problem for people with AIDS. A small part of the weight lost is fat. More important is the loss of "lean body mass", which is mostly muscle. Body composition changes during HIV infection are different from those observed in food deprivation. Under the era of HAART, a HIV-associated adipose redistribution syndrome (HARS) was described that associates subcutaneous lipoatrophy and abdominal obesity linked to various metabolic disorders. Several factors contribute to wasting syndrome. Not only low food intake and poor nutrient absorption, but mainly altered metabolism (increased resting energy expenditure) and specific disturbances in protein turnover, which is also increased. Nutritional evaluation of HIV-infected patients should include the measurement of body composition and analysis of nutritional parameters, including albumin, transthyretin and C-reactive protein. Transthyretin seems to be particularly useful to follow the recovery period of malnutrition.

  6. Effect of chronic centrifugation on body composition in the rat.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, G. C.; Bull, L. S.; Oyama, J.

    1972-01-01

    Two groups of adult female rats were chronically centrifuged for 60 days (2.76 G, 4.15 G, controls at 1.00 G). Live weights of centrifugal rats decreased about 20 g (6%) per Delta 1 G above control. This weight loss comprised reductions in both body fat and fat-free body weight (FFBW) as determined by body-composition studies on eight rats per group killed at the end of centrifugation. Of nine components constituting the FFBW, only skeletal muscle, liver, and heart changed significantly in weight. Chemical composition showed reductions (compared with controls) in the fat fraction of most components and increases in the water fraction of liver and gut. Identical measurements were made on the remaining eight rats per group killed 43 days after return to 1 G. Neither centrifuged group had reached the control body-weight level at this time. No statistically significant effect of previous G level was found in any of the body-composition parameters. The possible involvment of physiological regulation was considered.

  7. Do Lower-Body Dimensions and Body Composition Explain Vertical Jump Ability?

    PubMed

    Caia, Johnpaul; Weiss, Lawrence W; Chiu, Loren Z F; Schilling, Brian K; Paquette, Max R; Relyea, George E

    2016-11-01

    Caia, J, Weiss, LW, Chiu, LZF, Schilling, BK, Paquette, MR, and Relyea, GE. Do lower-body dimensions and body composition explain vertical jump ability? J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 3073-3083, 2016-Vertical jump (VJ) capability is integral to the level of success attained by individuals participating in numerous sport and physical activities. Knowledge of factors related to jump performance may help with talent identification and/or optimizing training prescription. Although myriad variables are likely related to VJ, this study focused on determining if various lower-body dimensions and/or body composition would explain some of the variability in performance. Selected anthropometric dimensions were obtained from 50 university students (25 men and 25 women) on 2 occasions separated by 48 or 72 hours. Estimated body fat percentage (BF%), height, body weight, hip width, pelvic width, bilateral quadriceps angle (Q-angle), and bilateral longitudinal dimensions of the feet, leg, thigh, and lower limb were obtained. Additionally, participants completed countermovement VJs. Analysis showed BF% to have the highest correlation with countermovement VJ displacement (r = -0.76, p < 0.001). When examining lower-body dimensions, right-side Q-angle displayed the strongest association with countermovement VJ displacement (r = -0.58, p < 0.001). Regression analysis revealed that 2 different pairs of variables accounted for the greatest variation (66%) in VJ: (a) BF% and sex and (b) BF% and body weight. Regression models involving BF% and lower-body dimensions explained up to 61% of the variance observed in VJ. Although the variance explained by BF% may be increased by using several lower-body dimensions, either sex identification or body weight explains comparatively more. Therefore, these data suggest that the lower-body dimensions measured herein have limited utility in explaining VJ performance.

  8. Body composition in remission of childhood cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseytlin, G. Ja; Anisimova, A. V.; Godina, E. Z.; Khomyakova, I. A.; Konovalova, M. V.; Nikolaev, D. V.; Rudnev, S. G.; Starunova, O. A.; Vashura, A. Yu

    2012-12-01

    Here, we describe the results of a cross-sectional bioimpedance study of body composition in 552 Russian children and adolescents aged 7-17 years in remission of various types of cancer (remission time 0-15 years, median 4 years). A sample of 1500 apparently healthy individuals of the same age interval was used for comparison. Our data show high frequency of malnutrition in total cancer patients group depending on type of cancer. 52.7% of patients were malnourished according to phase angle and percentage fat mass z-score with the range between 42.2% in children with solid tumors located outside CNS and 76.8% in children with CNS tumors. The body mass index failed to identify the proportion of patients with malnutrition and showed diagnostic sensitivity 50.6% for obesity on the basis of high percentage body fat and even much less so for undernutrition - 13.4% as judged by low phase angle. Our results suggest an advantage of using phase angle as the most sensitive bioimpedance indicator for the assessment of metabolic alterations, associated risks, and the effectiveness of rehabilitation strategies in childhood cancer patients.

  9. Body composition of women and men with complete motor paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Beck, Lisa A; Lamb, Jeffry L; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Wuermser, Lisa-Ann; Amin, Shreyasee

    2014-07-01

    To examine body composition, including the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and total body fat, in women and men with complete motor paraplegia and to make comparisons with able-bodied controls. In 13 subjects with traumatic, complete motor paraplegia (six women, seven men) and 39 sex-, age-, and BMI-matched controls from the community (18 women, 21 men), we measured total and regional (upper extremities, trunk, and lower extremities) lean and fat mass using total body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Both women and men with paraplegia had significantly lower lean mass in their lower extremities, as would be expected, and in their total body when compared with controls. However, they had significantly greater lean mass in their upper extremities than controls (4.4 kg vs. 3.6 kg, P = 0.004 and 8.6 kg vs. 6.7 kg, P < 0.001 in women and men, respectively); all subjects with paraplegia studied used manual wheelchairs. Although total body fat mass was significantly greater in women (P = 0.010) and men (P = <0.001) with paraplegia compared with controls, for the equivalent total body fat mass, BMI was actually lower in women and men with paraplegia than controls (e.g. 20.2 kg/m² vs. 25.0 kg/m², respectively). We report on body composition in persons with complete motor paraplegia, including women on whom limited information is currently available. Our results support the need to define better assessments of obesity in both women and men following spinal cord injury, particularly of central body fat distribution, as BMI underestimates adiposity in this population.

  10. Body Composition After Bone Marrow Transplantation in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Ruble, Kathy; Hayat, Matthew; Stewart, Kerry J.; Chen, Allen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To describe the body composition and fat distribution of childhood bone marrow transplantation (BMT) survivors at least one year post-transplantation and examine the ability of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria to identify survivors with elevated body fat percentage. Design Cross-sectional, descriptive. Setting Pediatric oncology program at a National Cancer Institute–designated comprehensive cancer center. Sample 48 childhood BMT survivors (27 males and 21 females). Methods Measurements included dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scan, height, weight, and physical activity. Descriptive statistics were reported and mixed-model linear regression models were used to describe findings and associations. Main Research Variables Total body fat percentage and central obesity (defined as a ratio of central to peripheral fat of 1 or greater). Findings Fifty-four percent of survivors had body fat percentages that exceeded recommendations for healthy body composition and 31% qualified as having central obesity. Previous treatment with total body irradiation was associated with higher body fat percentage and central obesity, and graft-versus-host disease was associated with lower body fat percentage. The body mass index (BMI) criteria did not correctly identify the BMT survivors who had elevated body fat percentage. Conclusions Survivors of childhood BMT are at risk for obesity and central obesity that is not readily identified with standard BMI criteria. Implications for Nursing Nurses caring for BMT survivors should include evaluation of general and central obesity in their assessments. Patient education materials and resources for healthy weight and muscle building should be made available to survivors. Research is needed to develop appropriate interventions. PMID:22374492

  11. Body composition of women and men with complete motor paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Lisa A.; Lamb, Jeffry L.; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Wuermser, Lisa-Ann; Amin, Shreyasee

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine body composition, including the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and total body fat, in women and men with complete motor paraplegia and to make comparisons with able-bodied controls. Methods In 13 subjects with traumatic, complete motor paraplegia (six women, seven men) and 39 sex-, age-, and BMI-matched controls from the community (18 women, 21 men), we measured total and regional (upper extremities, trunk, and lower extremities) lean and fat mass using total body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Results Both women and men with paraplegia had significantly lower lean mass in their lower extremities, as would be expected, and in their total body when compared with controls. However, they had significantly greater lean mass in their upper extremities than controls (4.4 kg vs. 3.6 kg, P = 0.004 and 8.6 kg vs. 6.7 kg, P < 0.001 in women and men, respectively); all subjects with paraplegia studied used manual wheelchairs. Although total body fat mass was significantly greater in women (P = 0.010) and men (P = <0.001) with paraplegia compared with controls, for the equivalent total body fat mass, BMI was actually lower in women and men with paraplegia than controls (e.g. 20.2 kg/m2 vs. 25.0 kg/m2, respectively). Conclusion We report on body composition in persons with complete motor paraplegia, including women on whom limited information is currently available. Our results support the need to define better assessments of obesity in both women and men following spinal cord injury, particularly of central body fat distribution, as BMI underestimates adiposity in this population. PMID:24090208

  12. Sire carcass breeding values affect body composition in lambs--2. Effects on fat and bone weight and their distribution within the carcass as measured by computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Anderson, F; Williams, A; Pannier, L; Pethick, D W; Gardner, G E

    2016-06-01

    This study assessed the effect of paternal Australian Sheep Breeding Values for post weaning c-site eye muscle depth (PEMD) and fat depth (PFAT), and post weaning weight (PWWT) on the composition of lamb carcasses. Composition was measured using computed tomography scans of 1665 lambs which were progeny of 85 Maternal, 115 Merino and 155 Terminal sires. Reducing sire PFAT decreased carcass fat weight by 4.8% and increased carcass bone by 1.3% per unit of PFAT (range 5.1 mm). Increasing sire PEMD reduced carcass fat weight by 3.8% in Maternal and 2% in Terminal sired lambs per unit of PEMD (range 4.3 and 7.8 mm), with no impact on bone. Increasing sire PWWT reduced carcass fat weight, but only at some experimental locations. Differences in composition varied between sire types with Maternal sired lambs having the most fat and Merino sired lambs the greatest bone weight. Genetic effects on fatness were greater than the environmental or production factor effects, with the converse true of bone.

  13. Latino Mothers' Cumulative Food Insecurity Exposure and Child Body Composition.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Daphne C

    2016-01-01

    To document whether an intergenerational transmission of food insecurity is occurring by assessing low-income foreign-born Latino mothers' experiences with food insecurity as none, once (either childhood or adulthood) or twice (during both childhood and adulthood). Also the association between maternal cumulative food insecurity and children's body composition was examined. Maternal self-reported surveys on retrospective measures of food insecurity during childhood, current measures of food insecurity, and demographics were collected from Houston-area community centers (N = 96). Children's body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) were directly assessed. Covariate-adjusted logistic regression models analyzed the association between cumulative food insecurity experiences and children's body composition. Fifty-eight percent of mothers experienced food insecurity both as a child and as an adult and 31% of the mothers experienced food insecurity either as a child or adult. Maternal cumulative exposure to food insecurity was unrelated to BMI but was negatively related to elevated WC. Although an intergenerational transmission of food insecurity does exist, maternal cumulative exposure to food insecurity does not impact children's body composition negatively in the short term. Studying the long-term effects of cumulative food insecurity exposure can provide information for the development and timing of obesity interventions.

  14. Ultrasound use for body composition and carcass quality assessment in cattle and lambs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genetic evaluation for carcass quality traits has evolved over time, in large part due to introduction of new technology such as ultrasound measures of body composition. Ultrasound measured body composition traits emulate important carcass traits, are very informative for selection purposes, are ac...

  15. Validity of body composition methods across ethnic population groups.

    PubMed

    Deurenberg, P; Deurenberg-Yap, M

    2003-10-01

    Most in vivo body composition methods rely on assumptions that may vary among different population groups as well as within the same population group. The assumptions are based on in vitro body composition (carcass) analyses. The majority of body composition studies were performed on Caucasians and much of the information on validity methods and assumptions were available only for this ethnic group. It is assumed that these assumptions are also valid for other ethnic groups. However, if apparent differences across ethnic groups in body composition 'constants' and body composition 'rules' are not taken into account, biased information on body composition will be the result. This in turn may lead to misclassification of obesity or underweight at an individual as well as a population level. There is a need for more cross-ethnic population studies on body composition. Those studies should be carried out carefully, with adequate methodology and standardization for the obtained information to be valuable.

  16. Association between actigraphic sleep metrics and body composition

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Michael D.; Hébert, James R.; Hand, Gregory A.; Youngstedt, Shawn D.; Hurley, Thomas G.; Shook, Robin P.; Paluch, Amanda E.; Sui, Xuemei; James, Shelli L.; Blair, Steven N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Determine if individuals with poor sleep characteristics (i.e., late sleep onset or wake times, short sleep duration, long sleep latency, low sleep efficiency, high wake-after-sleep-onset [WASO]) have greater body mass index (BMI=kg/m2) or body fat. Methods Data for these cross-sectional analyses were from the Energy Balance Study (University of South Carolina). Participants were between 21 and 35 years of age and had a BMI of 20–35 kg/m2. Body fat percent was measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry. Sleep and physical activity were measured by actigraphy (BodyMedia’s SenseWear® physical activity armband). General linear models were used to estimate mean BMI and body fat percent by sleep metric categories. Results Greater BMI and body fat percent were associated with low sleep efficiency (BMI=25.5 vs. 24.8kg/m2, p<0.01; body fat=27.7 vs. 26.5%, p=0.04) and high WASO (BMI=25.6 vs. 25.0 kg/m2, p=0.02; body fat=28.0 vs. 26.7%, p=0.03). Elevated BMI or body fat percent also were observed for later wake times, shorter sleep duration, and longer sleep latency. Sex modified the association between wake times and body composition. Conclusions Understanding the complex relationships between sleep and health outcomes could help reduce chronic disease burden by incorporating sleep components, measured through novel non-invasive techniques (SenseWear® armband), into weight loss interventions. PMID:26071309

  17. Measurement of longitudinal changes in body composition during weight loss and maintenance in overweight and obese subjects using air-displacement plethysmography in comparison with the deuterium dilution technique.

    PubMed

    Plasqui, G; Soenen, S; Westerterp-Plantenga, M S; Westerterp, K R

    2011-08-01

    Air-displacement plethysmography (ADP) may be a valid and practical technique to assess body composition in a clinical setting. This study aimed to assess longitudinal changes in body composition using ADP and to compare it with the deuterium dilution technique. The study was a 6-months dietary intervention, consisting of four phases. The first month, subjects were fed in energy balance (phase I). This was followed by 1 month with an energy intake of 33% of energy requirements (phase II), followed by 2 months at 67% of energy requirements (phase III) and 2 months of ad libitum intake (phase IV). Body composition was assessed using ADP (Bod Pod) and deuterium dilution at baseline and at the end of each phase. The baseline analysis included 111 subjects (88 female). Sixty-one subjects (50 female) completed all measurements and were included in the longitudinal analysis. At baseline, the fat mass (FM) as assessed with the Bod Pod was on average 2.3 ± 4.2 kg (mean ± 2 s.d.) higher than that assessed with deuterium dilution. The difference in FM between techniques increased significantly with increasing FM (R(2)=0.23; P<0.001). Both techniques showed significant changes in FM over time P<0.001). On average, FM as assessed with the Bod Pod was 2.0 kg higher than with deuterium dilution (P<0.001). During phase II, there was a significant interaction between time and method, meaning that the Bod Pod showed a larger decrease in FM than deuterium dilution. The Bod Pod was able to detect all changes in the body composition, but consistently measured a higher FM than deuterium dilution.

  18. Body composition comparison in two elite female wheelchair athletes.

    PubMed

    Lussier, L; Knight, J; Bell, G; Lohman, T; Morris, A F

    1983-02-01

    It was the purpose of this study to determine body composition by two methods in two excellent female athletes. One sportswoman (SRH) was national wheelchair marathon champion in 1977 in 3 hours, 40 minutes on the Boston course. She still competes internationally and has won three gold medals and set three world records in the last Olympiad for the handicapped in 1980. The second woman athlete (LSJ) competes in wheelchair basketball and track on a national level. Body density was determined by the standard underwater weighing procedure and residual volume determination. A second method to calculate cellular body mass was the measure of potassium 40 (40K) activity by whole body scintillation counter. The characteristics of these athletes are listed as follows: (formula; see text) The results show that both methods of determining adiposity produce results differing by only one percentage point. It is important to determine body composition in these wheelchair athletes since their cellular body mass is decreased because of their disability.

  19. Skeletal and body composition evaluation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mazess, R.B.

    1983-03-01

    Research on radiation detectors for absorptiometry analysis of errors affecting single photon absorptiometry and development of instrumentation, analysis of errors affecting dual photon absorptiometry and development of instrumentation, comparison of skeletal measurements with other techniques, cooperation with NASA projects for skeletal evaluation in spaceflight (Experiment MO-78) and in laboratory studies with immobilized animals, studies of postmenopausal osteoporosis, organization of scientific meetings and workshops on absorptiometric measurement, and development of instrumentation for measurement of fluid shifts in the human body were performed. Instrumentation was developed that allows accurate and precise (2% error) measurements of mineral content in compact and trabecular bone and of the total skeleton. Instrumentation was also developed to measure fluid shifts in the extremities. Radiation exposure with those procedures is low (2-10 MREM). One hundred seventy three technical reports and one hundred and four published papers of studies from the University of Wisconsin Bone Mineral Lab are listed.

  20. Scaling of Adult Regional Body Mass and Body Composition as a Whole to Height: Relevance to Body Shape and Body Mass Index

    PubMed Central

    Schuna, John M.; Peterson, Courtney M.; Thomas, Diana M.; Heo, Moonseong; Hong, Sangmo; Choi, Woong; Heymsfield, Steven B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Adult body mass (MB) empirically scales as height (Ht) squared (MB ∝ Ht2), but does regional body mass and body composition as a whole also scale as Ht2? This question is relevant to a wide range of biological topics, including interpretation of body mass index. Methods Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was used to quantify regional body mass (head [MH], trunk, arms, legs) and whole-body composition (fat, lean soft tissue [LST], and bone mineral content [BMC]) in non-Hispanic (NH) white, NH black, Mexican American, and Korean adults participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES; n=17,126) and Korean NHANES (n=8,942). Regression models were developed to establish Ht scaling powers for each measured component with adjustments for age and adiposity. Results Exploratory analyses revealed a consistent scaling pattern across men and women of the four race/ethnic groups: regional mass powers, head (~0.8-1) < arms and trunk (~1.8-2.3) < legs (~2.3-2.6); and body composition, LST (~2.0-2.3) < BMC (~2.1-2.4). Small sex and race/ethnic differences in scaling powers were also observed. As body mass scaled uniformly across the eight sex and race/ethnic groups as Ht~2, tall and short subjects differed in body shape (e.g., Mh/Mb ∝ Ht−~1) and composition. Conclusions Adult human body shape and relative composition are a function of body size as defined by stature, a finding that has important implications in multiple areas of biological research. PMID:25381999

  1. Changes in body composition in triathletes during an Ironman race.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Sandro Manuel; Anliker, Elmar; Knechtle, Patrizia; Knechtle, Beat; Toigo, Marco

    2013-09-01

    Triathletes lose body mass during an Ironman triathlon. However, the associated body composition changes remain enigmatic. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate Ironman-induced changes in segmental body composition, using for the first time dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). Before and after an Ironman triathlon, segmental body composition and lower leg tissue mass, areas and densities were assessed using DXA and pQCT, respectively, in eight non-professional male triathletes. In addition, blood and urine samples were collected for the determination of hydration status. Body mass decreased by 1.9 ± 0.8 kg. This loss was due to 0.4 ± 0.3 and 1.4 ± 0.8 kg decrease in fat and lean mass, respectively (P < 0.01). Calf muscle density was reduced by 1.93 ± 1.04 % (P < 0.01). Hemoglobin, hematocrit, and plasma [K(+)] remained unchanged, while plasma [Na(+)] (P < 0.05), urine specific gravity and plasma and urine osmolality increased (P < 0.01). The loss in lean mass was explained by a decrease in muscle density, as an indicator of glycogen loss, and increases in several indicators for dehydration. The measurement of body composition with DXA and pQCT before and after an Ironman triathlon provided exact values for the loss in fat and lean mass. Consequently, these results yielded more detailed insights into tissue catabolism during ultra-endurance exercise.

  2. Effect of body composition methodology on heritability estimation of body fatness

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Heritability estimates of human body fatness vary widely and the contribution of body composition methodology to this variability is unknown. The effect of body composition methodology on estimations of genetic and environmental contributions to body fatness variation was examined in 78 adult male ...

  3. Handgrip strength as a predictor for post bariatric body composition.

    PubMed

    Otto, Mirko; Kautt, Sandra; Kremer, Melanie; Kienle, Peter; Post, Stefan; Hasenberg, Till

    2014-12-01

    After bariatric surgery, the postoperative quality of weight loss is variable. The aim of weight loss treatment is to reduce fat mass while keeping fat free mass, in particular body cell mass (BCM), constant. Detection of low BCM is an important aspect of surgical follow up. Handgrip dynamometry is a rapid and inexpensive test to measure static muscle strength, which is an independent outcome indicator of various medical conditions. The objective of this study is to examine the change in handgrip strength after bariatric surgery and its predictive value for postoperative body composition. Furthermore, this study was carried out at the University Hospital, Germany. Twenty-five patients who underwent a bariatric procedure (laparoskopic Roux-Y gastric bypass n=16 or sleeve resection n=9) were included in this study. Bioelectrical impedance analysis and hand-grip strength were measured preoperatively and repeated every 6 weeks for 4 months. An analysis of variance was performed to observe the changes in these individual parameters. Postoperatively, all patients showed a significant decrease in the body mass index and body fat. The extracellular mass, BCM, and the lean mass of the patients remained constant. Handgrip strength showed no significant changes during the postoperative course. Nevertheless, the preoperative hand-grip strength showed a strong positive correlation with the postoperative body composition. This study showed no changes in the static muscle force after bariatric surgery. The preoperative handgrip strength was strongly correlated with postoperative body composition and may be used to identify patients who need more attention before surgery and in the early postoperative phase.

  4. Anthropometry and body composition analysis in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Tomoum, Hoda Y; Badawy, Nagia B; Hassan, Nayera E; Alian, Khadija M

    2010-08-01

    This study was undertaken to describe anthropometry, body composition parameters and assess serum levels of leptin and other biochemical markers of the nutritional status in a sample of Egyptian children with cerebral palsy(CP). Anthropometric measurements (body weight, knee height, head, mid-upper arm, waist and hip circumferences, triceps and subscapular skin-fold thickness) were taken. Using the bioelectrical impedance technique, total body water(TBW), fat-free mass, fat mass, fat percentage and basal metabolic rate(BMR) were calculated. Serum levels of total proteins, albumin, ferritin and leptin were measured. Results were compared to that of healthy controls. Patients had significantly lower anthropometric measurements than controls, except for mid-upper arm and hip circumferences, and subscapular skin-fold thickness which were not different in both groups. Fat mass, fat free mass, fat percentage, TBW and BMR were lower in the patients. Serum protein and leptin levels were not different in patients and controls, though other biochemical markers were reduced in the patients. Patients with more severe motor handicap had lower skin-fold thickness, fat percentage and serum ferritin than those with milder affection. Parameters of growth, body composition analysis and nutritional status are significantly altered in CP patients especially those with severe motor handicap and oromotor dysfunction. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  5. Body Mass Measurement Chair - Experiment M172

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Skylab's Body Mass Measurement chair, the facility of the Body Mass Measurement experiment (M172), is shown here in this 1970 photograph. The M172 experiment determined the body mass of each crew member and observed changes in body masses during flight. Knowledge of exact body mass variations throughout the flight in significantly aided in the correlation of other medical data obtained during the flight. Mass measurements under zero-gravity conditions were achieved by the application of Newton's second law (force equals mass times acceleration). The Marshall Space Flight Center had program management responsibility for the development of Skylab hardware and experiments.

  6. Body Mass Measurement Chair - Experiment M172

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Skylab's Body Mass Measurement chair, the facility of the Body Mass Measurement experiment (M172), is shown here in this 1970 photograph. The M172 experiment determined the body mass of each crew member and observed changes in body masses during flight. Knowledge of exact body mass variations throughout the flight in significantly aided in the correlation of other medical data obtained during the flight. Mass measurements under zero-gravity conditions were achieved by the application of Newton's second law (force equals mass times acceleration). The Marshall Space Flight Center had program management responsibility for the development of Skylab hardware and experiments.

  7. New reusable elastomer electrodes for assessing body composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, M.-V.; Chaset, L.; Bittner, P. A.; Barthod, C.; Passard, M.

    2013-04-01

    The development of telemedicine requires finding solutions of reusable electrodes for use in patients' homes. The objective of this study is to evaluate the relevance of reusable elastomer electrodes for measuring body composition. We measured a population of healthy Caucasian (n = 17). A measurement was made with a reference device, the Xitron®, associated with AgCl Gel electrodes (Gel) and another measurement with a multifrequency impedancemeter Z-Metrix® associated with reusable elastomer electrodes (Elast). We obtained a low variability with an average error of repeatability of 0.39% for Re and 0.32% for Rinf. There is a non significantly difference (P T-test > 0.1) about 200 ml between extracellular water Ve measured with Gel and Elast in supine and in standing position. For total body water Vt, we note a non significantly difference (P T-test > 0.1) about 100 ml and 2.2 1 respectively in supine and standing position. The results give low dispersion, with R2 superior to 0.90, with a 1.5% maximal error between Gel and Elast on Ve in standing position. It looks possible, taking a few precautions, using elastomer electrodes for assessing body composition.

  8. [Measurement and management of body temperature].

    PubMed

    Iwashita, Hironobu; Matsukawa, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Body temperature regulation is at the basis of life maintenance and for humans to maintain the central body temperature within the range of 37 +/- 0.2 degrees Celsius. In the case of anesthesia, a patient would have a high possibility of lower body temperature and also could have more complications with low body temperature. In addition, it would generate more complications and extend a period of hospitalization. For that reason, anesthetists must pay full attention to body temperature management during surgery. Measurement for central body temperature is necessary as a monitor for body temperature measurement and the measurement for nasopharyngeal temperature, tympanic temperature, and lung artery temperature is effective for this purpose. Therapeutic hypothermia for brain injury is receiving attention recently as a preventive method for brain disorder and the method is utilized in hospital facilities. In future, it is expected to attain the most suitable treatment method by clinical studies on low body temperature.

  9. Health and Job-Specific Body Composition Standards for the US Air Force. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-18

    include standards for muscle strength and endurance, cardiovascular fitness, and body composition. Body composition is an important fitness parameter...program guidance requires that all service members possess the cardiovascular endurance, muscle strength and endurance, and whole-body flexibility...someone who is overweight due to excess body fat and someone who has greater than normal muscle mass. Some of these assessments include measurements of

  10. In vivo determination of body fat by measuring total body carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Kehayias, J.J.; Heymsfield, S.B.; LoMonte, A.F.; Wang, J.; Pierson, R.N. Jr. )

    1991-06-01

    Total body carbon (TBC) is measured in vivo by neutron inelastic scattering. The fast neutrons needed for the irradiation are produced by a miniature deuterium-tritium (D-T) neutron generator. Body fat and protein are the main contributors to TBC. Bone ash and carbohydrates contribute less than 3%. Fat is calculated from TBC after the subtraction of the carbon contributions from protein, bone, and glycogen. The technique was applied to 14 normal volunteers (8 females, 6 males) aged 24-94 y who underwent neutron inelastic scattering and neutron activation measurements for body carbon, nitrogen, and calcium. The initial results agree with other techniques. Unlike models that evaluate body fat by subtracting lean body mass from body weight, the TBC technique is not sensitive to assumptions on the composition of lean body; therefore, it is appropriate for studies of adults of any age and health condition.

  11. Body composition in patients with classical homocystinuria: body mass relates to homocysteine and choline metabolism.

    PubMed

    Poloni, Soraia; Leistner-Segal, Sandra; Bandeira, Isabel Cristina; D'Almeida, Vânia; de Souza, Carolina Fischinger Moura; Spritzer, Poli Mara; Castro, Kamila; Tonon, Tássia; Nalin, Tatiéle; Imbard, Apolline; Blom, Henk J; Schwartz, Ida V D

    2014-08-10

    Classical homocystinuria is a rare genetic disease caused by cystathionine β-synthase deficiency, resulting in homocysteine accumulation. Growing evidence suggests that reduced fat mass in patients with classical homocystinuria may be associated with alterations in choline and homocysteine pathways. This study aimed to evaluate the body composition of patients with classical homocystinuria, identifying changes in body fat percentage and correlating findings with biochemical markers of homocysteine and choline pathways, lipoprotein levels and bone mineral density (BMD) T-scores. Nine patients with classical homocystinuria were included in the study. Levels of homocysteine, methionine, cysteine, choline, betaine, dimethylglycine and ethanolamine were determined. Body composition was assessed by bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) in patients and in 18 controls. Data on the last BMD measurement and lipoprotein profile were obtained from medical records. Of 9 patients, 4 (44%) had a low body fat percentage, but no statistically significant differences were found between patients and controls. Homocysteine and methionine levels were negatively correlated with body mass index (BMI), while cysteine showed a positive correlation with BMI (p<0.05). There was a trend between total choline levels and body fat percentage (r=0.439, p=0.07). HDL cholesterol correlated with choline and ethanolamine levels (r=0.757, p=0.049; r=0.847, p=0.016, respectively), and total cholesterol also correlated with choline levels (r=0.775, p=0.041). There was no association between BMD T-scores and body composition. These results suggest that reduced fat mass is common in patients with classical homocystinuria, and that alterations in homocysteine and choline pathways affect body mass and lipid metabolism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Nutrition, endocrinology, and body composition during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, H. W.; Gretebeck, R. J.; Smith, S. M.

    1998-01-01

    Space flight induces endocrine changes that perturb metabolism. This altered metabolism affects both the astronauts' body composition and the nutritional requirements necessary to maintain their health. During the last 25 years, a combination of studies conducted on Skylab (the first U.S. space laboratory), U.S. Shuttle flights, and Soviet and Russian flights provides a range of data from which general conclusions about energy and protein requirements can be drawn. We have reviewed the endocrine data from those studies and related it to changes in body composition. From these data it appears that protein and energy intake of astronauts are similar to those on Earth. However, a combination of measures, including exercise, appropriate diet, and, potentially, drugs, is required to provide the muscle health needed for long duration space flight.

  13. Nutrition, endocrinology, and body composition during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, H. W.; Gretebeck, R. J.; Smith, S. M.

    1998-01-01

    Space flight induces endocrine changes that perturb metabolism. This altered metabolism affects both the astronauts' body composition and the nutritional requirements necessary to maintain their health. During the last 25 years, a combination of studies conducted on Skylab (the first U.S. space laboratory), U.S. Shuttle flights, and Soviet and Russian flights provides a range of data from which general conclusions about energy and protein requirements can be drawn. We have reviewed the endocrine data from those studies and related it to changes in body composition. From these data it appears that protein and energy intake of astronauts are similar to those on Earth. However, a combination of measures, including exercise, appropriate diet, and, potentially, drugs, is required to provide the muscle health needed for long duration space flight.

  14. Total body composition by dual-photon (153Gd) absorptiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mazess, R.B.; Peppler, W.W.; Gibbons, M.

    1984-10-01

    The lean-fat composition (%FATR) of soft tissue and the mineral mass of the skeleton were determined in vivo using dual-photon (153Gd) absorptiometry (dose under 2 mrem). A rectilinear raster scan was made over the entire body in 18 subjects (14 female, 4 male). Single-photon absorptiometry (125I) measured bone mineral content on the radius. Percentage fat (%FATD) was determined in the same subjects using body density (from underwater weighing with correction for residual lung volume). Lean body mass (LBM) was determined using both %FATR and %FATD. Percentage fat from absorptiometry and from underwater density were correlated (r . 0.87). The deviation of %FATD from %FATR was due to the amount of skeletal mineral as a percentage of the LBM (r . 0.90). Therefore, skeletal variability, even in normal subjects, where mineral ranges only from 4 to 8% of the LBM, essentially precludes use of body density as a composition indicator unless skeletal mass is measured. Anthropometry (fatfolds and weight) predicted %FATR and LBM at least as well as did underwater density. The predictive error of %FATR from fatfolds was 5% while the predictive error in predicting LBM from anthropometry was 2 to 3 kg (3%).

  15. Composition of intraocular foreign bodies: experimental study of ultrasonographic presentation.

    PubMed

    Costa, Márcio Augusto Nogueira; Garcia, Patrícia Novita; Barroso, Letícia Fernandes; Ferreira, Marco Antonio; Okuda, Érika Araki; Allemann, Norma

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the reliability of ultrasound in determining the size and identify the sonographic features and artifacts generated by intraocular foreign bodies of different materials. Experimental study using 36 enucleated porcine eyes. Fragments of nine different compositions (wood, glass, plastic, cardboard, iron, aluminum, lead, powder and concrete) and similar dimensions (4 mm) were implanted via scleral incision into the vitreous cavity of 36 porcine eyes, four eyes were used for each material. Ultrasound examination was performed in all eyes using the contact technique, conductive gel and 10-MHz transducer (EZScan, Sonomed). Considering the material fragments of gunpowder, lead, concrete, aluminum, wood and glass, the size determined by ultrasound was considered statistically similar to the actual size. The material iron presented ultrasound-determined dimension statistically smaller than its actual size. Cardboard and plastic materials showed ultrasound-determined measurements far greater than the actual. All fragments of intraocular foreign bodies demonstrated hyper-reflective interfaces, irrespective of their composition. Whereas the artifacts generated by different materials, it was found that the materials iron, aluminum and lead showed reverberation of great extent. The material wood showed no reverberation. The length of the reverberation artifact for the materials iron, glass, aluminum and cardboard was lower when compared to other materials. All materials presented posterior shadowing artifact, with the exception of aluminum. Ultrasonography was considered a reliable technique to determine the size of intraocular foreign bodies in pigs, with little influence caused by its composition. Ultrasound artifacts generated were considered material-dependent and can assist the examiner to identify the nature of a foreign body of unknown etiology. Ultrasonography aided the surgeon to identify, locate and measure the intraocular foreign body, directing

  16. New techniques in nutritional assessment: body composition methods.

    PubMed

    Elia, M; Ward, L C

    1999-02-01

    New techniques in air-displacement plethysmography seem to have overcome many of the previous problems of poor reproducibility and validity. These have made body-density measurements available to a larger range of individuals, including children, elderly and sick patients who often have difficulties in being submerged underwater in hydrodensitometry systems. The BOD POD air-displacement system (BOD POD body composition system; Life Measurement Instruments, Concord, CA, USA) is more precise than hydrodensitometry, is simple and rapid to operate (approximately 1 min measurements) and the results agree closely with those of hydrodensitometry (e.g. +/- 3.4% for estimation of body fat). Body line scanners employing the principles of three-dimensional photography are potentially able to measure the surface area and volume of the body and its segments even more rapidly (approximately 10 s), but the validity of the measurements needs to be established. Advances in i.r. spectroscopy and mathematical modelling for calculating the area under the curve have improved precision for measuring enrichment of 2H2O in studies of water dilution (CV 0.1-0.9% within the range of 400-1000 microliters/l) in saliva, plasma and urine. The technique is rapid and compares closely with mass spectrometry (bias 1 (SD 2) %). Advances in bedside bioelectrical-impedance techniques are making possible potential measurements of skinfold thicknesses and limb muscle mass electronically. Preliminary results suggest that the electronic method is more reproducible (intra- and inter-individual reproducibility for measuring skinfold thicknesses) and associated with less bias (+12%), than anthropometry (+40%). In addition to these selected examples, the 'mobility' or transfer of reference methods between centres has made the distinction between reference and bedside or field techniques less distinct than in the past.

  17. Regional measurement of body nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, H. E.

    1976-01-01

    Studies of methods for determining changes in the muscle mass of arms and legs are described. N-13 measurements were made in phantom and cadaver parts after neutron irradiation. The reproducibility in these measurements was found to be excellent and the radiation dose required to provide sufficient activation was determined. Potassium-40 measurements were made on persons who lost muscle mass due to leg injuries. It appears that K-40 measurements may provide the most accurate and convenient method for determining muscle mass changes.

  18. Comparison of Methods for Assessing Body Composition Changes during Weight Loss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weyers, Anna M.; Mazzetti, Scott A.; Love, Dawn M.; Gomez, Ana L.; Kraemer, William J.; Volek, Jeff S.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated whether dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and air displacement plethysmography (ADP) would detect similar changes in body composition after moderate weight loss. Twenty adults had their body composition measured using DXA and ADP before and after an 8-week weight loss program. Overall, both DXA and ADP detected similar changes in…

  19. Comparison of Methods for Assessing Body Composition Changes during Weight Loss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weyers, Anna M.; Mazzetti, Scott A.; Love, Dawn M.; Gomez, Ana L.; Kraemer, William J.; Volek, Jeff S.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated whether dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and air displacement plethysmography (ADP) would detect similar changes in body composition after moderate weight loss. Twenty adults had their body composition measured using DXA and ADP before and after an 8-week weight loss program. Overall, both DXA and ADP detected similar changes in…

  20. Physical Best--Body Composition in the Assessment of Youth Fitness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Going, Scott

    1988-01-01

    The article explains why body composition measurements are considered a necessary and important part of the "physical best" concept in the assessment of health-related physical fitness and presents evidence that the skinfold technique is both reliable and valid for estimating body composition in both children and youth. (CB)

  1. Rat body size, composition and growth at hypo- and hypergravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, G. C.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of hypergravity (centrifugation) on body composition were investigated. Hypogravitational and hypergravitational aspects were reflected in the research effort. A list of publications is provided.

  2. Changes in body composition of cancer patients following combined nutritional support

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, S.H.; Vartsky, D.; Vaswani, A.N.; Sawitsky, A.; Rai, K.; Gartenhaus, W.; Yasumura, S.; Ellis, K.J.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of combined nutritional support (parenteral, enteral, and oral) were measured in cancer patients unable to maintain normal alimentation.Changes in body composition were quantified by measurement of total body levels of nitrogen, potassium, water, and fat. The protein-calorie intake of the patients was also evaluated by dietary survey (4-day recall). Standard anthropometric and biochemical measurements for nutritional assessment were obtained for comparison. The dietary evaluation indicated that the dietary supplementation for all patients was more than adequate to meet their energy requirements. Determination of body composition indicated that change in body weight was equal to the sum of the changes in body protein, total body water, and total body fat. Information on the nature of the tissue gained was obtained by comparison of body composition data with the ratio of protein:water:lean body mass for normal tissue. The mean gain of protein in the cancer patients was quite small (0.3-0.6 kg). The main change in body weight appeared to be the result of gains in body water and body fat. The total body nitrogen to potassium ratio served to define the extent of tissue anabolism following hyperalimentation. The ratio dropped in the cancer patients following hyperalimentation toward the value of the control subjects on ad libitum diets. Total body nitrogen was determined by prompt gamma neutron activation analysis, total body potassium by whole-body counting. (JMT)

  3. Comparison of equations of resting and total energy expenditure in peritoneal dialysis patients using body composition measurements determined by multi-frequency bioimpedance.

    PubMed

    El-Kateb, Sally; Sridharan, Sivakumar; Farrington, Ken; Fan, Stanley; Davenport, Andrew

    2017-02-17

    Waste products of metabolism accumulate in patients with kidney failure and it has been proposed that the amount of dialysis treatment patients require be adjusted for energy expenditure. This requires validation of methods to estimate energy expenditure in dialysis patients. We compared values of resting energy expenditure (REE) estimated in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients using a selection of available equations with estimates derived using a novel equation recently validated in chronic kidney disease patients (CKD equation). We also determined the relationship of these estimates of REE and of total energy expenditure (TEE - which is REE plus physical activity associated energy expenditure (PAEE) estimated using the Recent Physical Activity Questionnaire) - to bioimpedance-derived parameters of body composition. We studied 118 adult PD patients; 75 male (63.6%), 33 diabetic (28.5%), Caucasoid (42.4%), mean age 59.3 ± 18.2 years and weight 73.1 ± 16.6 kg. REE with the CKD equation was 1532 ± 237 kcal/day, which was more than that for Mifflin-St. Joer 1425 ± 254, Harris-Benedict 1489 ± 267, Katch-McArdle 1492 ± 243, but less than Cunningham 1648 ± 248 kcal/day. Bland Altman mean bias ranged from -107 to 111 kcal/day. TEE was 1924 (1700-2262) kcal/day, and on multi-variate analysis was associated with appendicular muscle mass and nitrogen appearance rate (β 34.3, p < 0.001 and β 5.6, p = 0.002, respectively). With reference to the CKD equation, the majority of standard equations underestimate REE in PD patients. Whereas the Cunningham equation overestimates REE. TEE was associated with appendicular muscle mass and estimated dietary protein intake. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  4. Computer technology to evaluate body composition, nutrition, and exercise.

    PubMed

    Katch, F I; Katch, V L

    1983-09-01

    The use of computer technology has made it possible to make accurate determinations of body composition, nutrition, and exercise. With the FITCOMP computer assessment system, detailed measurements of physique status have been made on a variety of world-class athletes, including professional football and baseball players, as well as on diverse groups of young and older men and women throughout the United States. The FITCOMP measurement system allows the user a choice of measurement techniques: fatfolds, girths, bone diameters, and hydrostatic weighing. Combined with body composition assessment is a nutrition and exercise plan. The nutrition plan is based on guidelines formulated by the American Dietetic Association. This application of computer technology is unique, because individuals can select the foods they will eat from a list of preferred choices from the basic food groups. Individual menu plans for breakfast, lunch, and dinner are generated to provide an optimal blend of nutrients aimed at achieving ideal body mass and fat percentage. This is coupled with an aerobic exercise program that is selected by the individual from nine different forms, including walking, jogging, running, swimming, cycling, and various sport activities. The caloric output is designed to reduce total body fat through reductions in body weight of 1.4 to 2.5 pounds per week, depending on the exercise selected and total weight loss necessary to achieve a weight goal (and ideal fat percentage). The aerobic exercise plan is based on the method of overload, where intensity and duration are periodically increased dependent on individual capabilities. The use of fitness-oriented computer technology makes it possible to prepare detailed reports about current status and progress as well as to systematize record keeping.

  5. Determining seabird body condition using nonlethal measures.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Shoshanah R; Elliott, Kyle; Guigueno, Mélanie F; Gaston, Anthony J; Redman, Paula; Speakman, John R; Weber, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-01

    Energy stores are critical for successful breeding, and longitudinal studies require nonlethal methods to measure energy stores ("body condition"). Nonlethal techniques for measuring energy reserves are seldom verified independently. We compare body mass, size-corrected mass (SCM), plasma lipids, and isotopic dilution with extracted total body lipid content in three seabird species (thick-billed murres Uria lomvia, all four measures; northern fulmars Fulmarus glacialis, three measures; and black-legged kittiwakes Rissa tridactyla, two measures). SCM and body mass were better predictors of total body lipids for the species with high percent lipids (fulmars; R2 = 0.5-0.6) than for the species with low percent lipids (murres and kittiwakes; R2 = 0.2-0.4). The relationship between SCM and percent body lipids, which we argue is often a better measure of condition, was also poor (R2 < 0.2) for species with low lipids. In a literature comparison of 17 bird species, percent lipids was the only predictor of the strength of the relationship between mass and total body lipids; we suggest that SCM be used as an index of energy stores only when lipids exceed 15% of body mass. Across all three species we measured, SCM based on the ordinary least squares regression of mass on the first principal component outperformed other measures. Isotopic dilution was a better predictor of both total body lipids and percent body lipids than were mass, SCM, or plasma lipids in murres. Total body lipids decreased through the breeding season at both sites, while total and neutral plasma lipid concentrations increased at one site but not another, suggesting mobilization of lipid stores for breeding. A literature review showed substantial variation in the reliability of plasma markers, and we recommend isotopic dilution (oxygen-18, plateau) for determination of energy reserves in birds where lipid content is below 15%.

  6. Impact of research with cattle, pigs, and sheep on nutritional concepts: body composition and growth.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, A D

    2007-03-01

    Studies with pigs, cattle, and sheep have provided a wealth of information regarding growth and body composition. Most of this information has been obtained using the standard methods for measuring the body composition of meat animals, which consist of dissection and chemical analysis. These methods have been used with meat animals to validate a variety of in vivo techniques that are used in both animal and human body composition studies. Research on the growth and body composition of meat animals has provided important concepts regarding the relation between growth and composition, including chemical maturity, the effects of severe undernutrition, partitioning of nutrients under various physiological conditions, the efficiency of nutrient utilization, and compensatory growth following a period of undernutrition. In addition, several genetic and physiological conditions affecting growth and body composition have been identified in meat animals that serve as important models for both animal and human growth.

  7. Body Mass Measurement - Skylab Experiment M172

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This chart provides details on Skylab's Body Mass Measurement experiment (M172). The M172 experiment was a medical study to determine the body mass of each crew member and observe changes in body masses during flight. Knowledge of exact body mass variations throughout the flight aided significantly in the correlation of other medical data obtained during the flight. Mass measurements under zero-gravity conditions were achieved by the application of Newton's second law (force equals mass times acceleration). The Marshall Space Flight Center had program management responsibility for the development of Skylab hardware and experiments.

  8. Body Mass Measurement - Skylab Experiment M172

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This chart provides details on Skylab's Body Mass Measurement experiment (M172). The M172 experiment was a medical study to determine the body mass of each crew member and observe changes in body masses during flight. Knowledge of exact body mass variations throughout the flight aided significantly in the correlation of other medical data obtained during the flight. Mass measurements under zero-gravity conditions were achieved by the application of Newton's second law (force equals mass times acceleration). The Marshall Space Flight Center had program management responsibility for the development of Skylab hardware and experiments.

  9. Evaluation of morphological indices and total body electrical conductivity to assess body composition in big brown bats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearce, R.D.; O'Shea, T.J.; Wunder, B.A.

    2008-01-01

    Bat researchers have used both morphological indices and total body electric conductivity (TOBEC) as proxies for body condition in a variety of studies, but have typically not validated these indices against direct measurement of body composition. We quantified body composition (total carcass lipids) to determine if morphological indices were useful predictors of body condition in big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus). We also evaluated body composition indirectly by TOBEC using EM-SCAN?? technology. The most important predictors of body composition in multiple regression analysis were body mass-to-forearm ratio (partial r2 = 0.82, P < 0.001) followed by TOBEC measurement (partial r2 = 0.08, P < 0.001) and to a minor extent head length (partial r2 = 0.02, P < 0.05). Morphological condition indices alone may be adequate for some studies because of lower cost and effort. Marking bats with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags affected TOBEC measurements. ?? Museum and Institute of Zoology PAS.

  10. Measurement of body fat using leg to leg bioimpedance

    PubMed Central

    Sung, R; Lau, P; Yu, C; Lam, P; Nelson, E

    2001-01-01

    AIMS—(1) To validate a leg to leg bioimpedance analysis (BIA) device in the measurement of body composition in children by assessment of its agreement with dual energy x ray absorptiometry (DXA) and its repeatability. (2) To establish a reference range of percentage body fat in Hong Kong Chinese children.
METHODS—Sequential BIA and DXA methods were used to determine body composition in 49 children aged 7-18 years; agreement between the two methods was calculated. Repeatability for the BIA method was established from duplicate measurements. Body composition was then determined by BIA in 1139 girls and 1243 boys aged 7-16 years, who were randomly sampled in eight local primary and secondary schools to establish reference ranges.
RESULTS—The 95% limits of agreement between BIA and DXA methods were considered acceptable (−3.3 kg to −0.5 kg fat mass and −3.9 to 0.6% body fat). The percentage body fat increased with increasing age. Compared to the 1993 Hong Kong growth survey, these children had higher body mass index. Mean (SD) percentage body fat at 7years of age was 17.2% (4.4%) and 14.0% (3.4%) respectively for boys and girls, which increased to 19.3% (4.8%) and 27.8% (6.3%) at age 16.
CONCLUSION—Leg to leg BIA is a valid alternative method to DXA for the measurement of body fat. Provisional reference ranges for percentage body fat for Hong Kong Chinese children aged 7-16 years are provided.

 PMID:11517118

  11. Body composition among Sri Lankan infants by 18*O dilution method and the validity of anthropometric equations to predict body fat against 18*O dilution

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Body composition indicators provide a better guidance for growth and nutritional status of the infants. This study was designed to (1) measure the body composition of the Sri Lankan infants using a reference method, the 18*O dilution method; (2) calculate the body fat content of the infants using pu...

  12. Evaluation of body composition and nitrogen content of renal patients on chronic dialysis as determined by total body neutron activation

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, S.H.; Brennan, B.L.; Yasumura, S.; Vartsky, D.; Vaswani, A.N.; Ellis, K.J.

    1983-07-01

    Total body protein (nitrogen), body cell mass (potassium), fat, and water were measured in 15 renal patients on maintenance hemodialysis (MHD). Total body nitrogen was measured by means of prompt ..gamma.. neutron activation analysis; total body water was determined with tritium labeled water; total body potassium was measured by whole body counting. The extracellular water was determined by a technique utilizing the measurement of total body chloride and plasma chloride. When compared with corresponding values of a control group of the same age, sex, and height, the protein content, body cell mass, and total body fat of the MHD patients were within the normal range. The only significant change was an increase in the extracellular water/body cell mass ratio in the male MHD patients compared to the control. The lack of significant difference of the nitrogen values of the MHD patients compared to matched controls suggests that dialysis minimizes any residual effects of uremic toxicity or protein-calorie malnutrition. These findings further suggest that there is a need to reevaluate the traditional anthropometric and biochemical standards of nutritional status for MHD patients. It was concluded that it is particularly important to measure protein stores of MHD patients with low protein intake to ascertain nutritional status. Finally, in vivo measurement of total body nitrogen and potassium for determination of body composition provides a simple, direct, and accurate assessment of the nutritional status of MHD patients.

  13. Technical note: Estimating body weight and body composition of beef cattle trough digital image analysis.

    PubMed

    Gomes, R A; Monteiro, G R; Assis, G J F; Busato, K C; Ladeira, M M; Chizzotti, M L

    2016-12-01

    The use of digital images could be a faster and cheaper alternative technique to assess BW, HCW, and body composition of beef cattle. The objective of this study was to develop equations to predict body and carcass weight and body fat content of young bulls using digital images obtained through a Microsoft Kinect device. Thirty-five bulls with an initial BW of 383 (±5.38) kg (20 Black Angus, 390 [±7.48] kg initial BW, and 15 Nellore, 377 [±8.66] kg initial BW) were used. The Kinect sensor, installed on the top of a cattle chute, was used to take infrared light-based depth videos, recorded before the slaughter. For each animal, a quality control was made, running and pausing the video at the moment that the animal was standing with its body and head in line. One frame from recorded videos was selected and used to analyze the following body measurements: chest width, thorax width, abdomen width, body length, dorsal height, and dorsal area. From these body measurements, 23 indexes were generated and tested as potential predictors. The BW and HCW were assessed with a digital scale, whereas empty body fat (EBF) was estimated through ground samples of all tissues. To better understand the relationship among the measurements, the correlations between final BW (488 [±10.4] kg), HCW (287 [±12.5] kg), EBF (14 [±0.610] % empty BW) content, body measurements (taken through digital images), and developed indexes were evaluated. The REG procedure was used to develop the regressions, and the important independent variables were identified using the options STEPWISE and Mallow's Cp in the SELECTION statement. Chest width was the trait most related to weights and the correlations between this measurement and BW and HCW were above 0.85. The analysis of linear regressions between observed and predicted values showed that all models pass through the origin and have a slope of unity (null hypothesis [H]: = 0 and = 1; ≥ 0.993). The models to estimate BW and HCW of Angus and

  14. Childhood thyroid function, body composition and cardiovascular function.

    PubMed

    Barjaktarovic, Mirjana; Korevaar, Tim I M; Gaillard, Romy; de Rijke, Yolanda B; Visser, Theo J; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Peeters, Robin P

    2017-10-01

    The cardiovascular system is a known target for thyroid hormone. Early-life cardiovascular alterations may lead to a higher risk of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Little is known about the effects of thyroid hormone on cardiovascular function during childhood, including the role of body composition in this association. Population-based prospective cohort of children (n = 4251, median age 6 years, 95% range: 5.7-8.0 years). Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and free thyroxine (FT4) concentrations were measured to assess thyroid function. Left ventricular (LV) mass was assessed with echocardiography. Arterial stiffness was assessed with carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (CFPWV). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) was measured. Body composition was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan. FT4 was inversely associated with LV mass (P = 0.002), and with lean body mass (P < 0.0001). The association of FT4 with LV mass was partially mediated through variability in lean body mass (55% mediated effect). TSH was inversely associated with LV mass (P = 0.010), predominantly in boys. TSH was positively associated with systolic and diastolic BP (both P < 0.001). FT4 was positively associated with CFPWV and diastolic BP (P < 0.0001, P = 0.008, respectively), and the latter association attenuated after adjustment for CFPWV. At the age of 6 years, higher FT4 is associated with lower LV mass (partially through effects on lean body mass) and with higher arterial stiffness, which may lead to higher BP. Our data also suggest different mechanisms via which TSH and FT4 are associated with cardiovascular function during early childhood. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  15. Complete Subsurface Elemental Composition Measurements With PING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    The Probing In situ with Neutrons and Gamma rays (PING) instrument will measure the complete bulk elemental composition of the subsurface of Mars as well as any other solid planetary body. PING can thus be a highly effective tool for both detailed local geochemistry science investigations and precision measurements of Mars subsurface reSOurces in preparation for future human exploration. As such, PING is thus fully capable of meeting a majority of both ncar and far term elements in Challenge #1 presented for this conference. Measuring the ncar subsurface composition of Mars will enable many of the MEPAG science goals and will be key to filling an important Strategic Knowledge Gap with regard to In situ Resources Utilization (ISRU) needs for human exploration. [1, 2] PING will thus fill an important niche in the Mars Exploration Program.

  16. Peer Victimisation and Its Relationships with Perceptions of Body Composition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisen, Ann; Lunde, Carolina; Hwang, Philip

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined the links between children's exposure to peer victimisation, in terms of type and frequency, their body composition and subjective perceptions of body composition. A total of 960 Swedish 10-year-olds (515 girls and 445 boys) completed questionnaires about their peer victimisation experiences, weight and height, and…

  17. Peer Victimisation and Its Relationships with Perceptions of Body Composition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisen, Ann; Lunde, Carolina; Hwang, Philip

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined the links between children's exposure to peer victimisation, in terms of type and frequency, their body composition and subjective perceptions of body composition. A total of 960 Swedish 10-year-olds (515 girls and 445 boys) completed questionnaires about their peer victimisation experiences, weight and height, and…

  18. Gravity, Body Mass and Composition, and Metabolic Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, N.; Smith, A. H.

    1985-01-01

    Metabolic rate and body composition as a function of sex and age were defined in 5 species of common laboratory mammals, the mouse, hamster, rat, guinea pig and rabbit. Oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production rates were measured individually in 6 male and 6 female animals for each of 8 age cohorts ranging from 1 month to 2 years, and for each of the species. From the results it is evident that among these small mammals there is no indication of scaling of muscularity to body size, despite the 100-fold difference in body mass represented by the skeletal musculature seems to reach a pronounced peak value at age 2 to 3 months and then declines, the fraction of the fat-free body represented by other body components in older animals must increase complementarily. Under normal gravity conditions muscularity in small laboratory mammals displays large, systematic variation as a function both of species and age. This variation must be considered when such animals are subjects of experiments to study the effects of altered gravitational loading on the skeletal musculature of the mammal.

  19. Gravity, Body Mass and Composition, and Metabolic Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, N.; Smith, A. H.

    1985-01-01

    Metabolic rate and body composition as a function of sex and age were defined in 5 species of common laboratory mammals, the mouse, hamster, rat, guinea pig and rabbit. Oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production rates were measured individually in 6 male and 6 female animals for each of 8 age cohorts ranging from 1 month to 2 years, and for each of the species. From the results it is evident that among these small mammals there is no indication of scaling of muscularity to body size, despite the 100-fold difference in body mass represented by the skeletal musculature seems to reach a pronounced peak value at age 2 to 3 months and then declines, the fraction of the fat-free body represented by other body components in older animals must increase complementarily. Under normal gravity conditions muscularity in small laboratory mammals displays large, systematic variation as a function both of species and age. This variation must be considered when such animals are subjects of experiments to study the effects of altered gravitational loading on the skeletal musculature of the mammal.

  20. New way of body composition analysis using total body electrical conductivity method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecki, Wojciech; Koteja, Pawel; Weiner, January; Froncisz, Wojciech

    1995-04-01

    Traditional methods of measuring total body water and fat content of animals that require sacrificing specimens are generally unacceptable when endangered species, or large animal sizes, or humans are involved. These methods are also unsuitable for following changes of fat and water content in individuals. An alternative method, based on the nonresonant absorption of a rf electromagnetic field has been used for constructing a new body composition analyzer. As the electrical conductivity of lipids is approximately 20 times lower than that of lean tissues, the rf power absorbed by the animal provides information which enables one to calculate the lean body mass and total body water. The new instrument measures rf power absorbed by an animal by measuring the quality factor (Q) of the resonant circuit with an animal placed inside the coil. Numerical calculations of the rf power absorbed by a cylindrical object containing 0.9% NaCl aqueous solution have also been performed. Experimental values confirmed the calculated dependence of the absorbed power on the cylinder radius. The device built has been calibrated on 9 males and 11 females of laboratory mice. The amount of lipids was then measured by ether extraction. The relation between instrument reading, which is proportional to the power absorption, and lean body mass (LBM) or water mass (WM) was linear and highly significant: the simple regression coefficients of determination were 0.983 for LBM, and 0.990 for WM (p<0.001). It has been found that for an individual animal with a body mass ranging from 15.9 to 40.7 g, the accuracy of measurement was ±1.6 g for LBM and ±1 g for WM.

  1. Body composition and dietary intake in neoplasic disease

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, S.H.; Gartenhaus, W.; Vartsky, D.; Sawitsky, A.; Zanzi, I.; Vaswani, A. Yasummure, S.; Rai, K.; Cartes, E.; Ellis, K.J.

    1981-10-01

    Changes in body composition in 37 cancer patients were studied over a period of 6 months. Initially, the patients were divided into two groups: those who lost body weight (over 10%) and those who maintained or gained body weight before the study. Analysis of body composition indicated that patients who lost body weight has caloric and protein intakes markedly below ''normal'' levels at the beginning of the study. There also appears to be a direct relationship between the protein intake and the total body potassium/total body water ratio in the cancer patients. At the end of the 6-month study, the patients were again placed into two groups on the basis of weight loss or gain (and maintenance). Changes in body composition over the period were analyzed in terms of lean body mass, its protein constituent, water, and fat. Weight loss was found to reflect primarily the loss of fat, water, lean body mass (potassium), and only to a minor extent the protein component of lean body mass (nitrogen). Further, on the basis of the values of the ratios of total body nitrogen/total body potassium/total body water, it was possible to ascertain the relative normalcy of the body tissue gained or lost in the 6-month period. The results of the study suggest that the ratio total body nitrogen/total body potassium may serve as the best indicator of recent or ongoing catabolism or anabolism of the neoplastic process. By means of the application of the techniques used for the determination of body composition, it should be possible to assess regimes of hyperalimentation of cancer patients who lose body weight. (JMT)

  2. Unacylated ghrelin is associated with changes in body composition and body fat distribution during long-term exercise intervention.

    PubMed

    Cederberg, Henna; Rajala, Ulla; Koivisto, Vesa-Matti; Jokelainen, Jari; Surcel, Heljä-Marja; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Laakso, Markku

    2011-08-01

    Ghrelin, a gut-brain peptide involved in energy homeostasis, circulates predominantly (>90%) in unacylated form. Previous studies, however, have focused on total and acylated ghrelin, and the role of unacylated ghrelin (UAG) is not well understood. Particularly, the association of UAG with weight loss and changes in body composition in adults remains unclear. We hypothesized that exercise-associated increase in UAG level is associated with weight loss, favorable changes in body composition, and body fat distribution. A prospective study of 552 young men (mean age 19.3 and range 19-28 years) undergoing military service with structured 6-month exercise training program. Exercise performance, body composition, and biochemical measurements were obtained at baseline and follow-up. Association between changes in UAG levels and body composition and body fat distribution were evaluated. An increase in UAG level during the exercise intervention was associated with reduced weight, fat mass (FM), fat percentage (fat %), and waist circumference, but not with fat-free mass. Inverse associations of changes in UAG level with changes in waist circumference and fat % were independent of weight at baseline, and changes in weight and exercise performance. Associations of changes in UAG level with waist circumference were significantly stronger than with fat % after the adjustment for confounding variables. UAG is associated with changes in body weight and body composition during an intensive long-term exercise intervention in young men. The association of UAG levels with changes in central obesity was stronger than with total FM.

  3. Body size, body composition, and metabolic profile explain higher energy expenditure in overweight children.

    PubMed

    Butte, Nancy F; Puyau, Maurice R; Vohra, Firoz A; Adolph, Anne L; Mehta, Nitesh R; Zakeri, Issa

    2007-12-01

    Lower relative rates of energy expenditure (EE), increased energetic efficiency, and altered fuel utilization purportedly associated with obesity have not been demonstrated indisputably in overweight children. We hypothesized that differences in energy metabolism between nonoverweight and overweight children are attributable to differences in body size and composition, circulating thyroid hormones, sympathetic nervous system, and adrenomedullary activity. A total of 836 Hispanic children, 5-19 y old, participated in 24-h calorimetry, anthropometric, and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry measurements. Biochemistries were determined by standard techniques. Absolute total EE (TEE) and its components (sleep EE, basal EE, sedentary EE, cycling EE, walking EE, activity EE, nonexercising activity thermogenesis) were higher in overweight children (P = 0.001). Net mechanical energetic efficiency of cycling was lower in overweight children (P = 0.001). Adjusting for body size and composition accounted for differences in TEE, its components, and energetic efficiency. Net carbohydrate and fat utilization did not differ between groups. TEE was independently influenced by sex, Tanner stage, fat free mass, fat mass (FM), fasting serum nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), leptin, free thyroxine, triiodothyronine, and 24-h urinary norepinephrine and epinephrine. Fat utilization was independently associated with age2, sex, FM, fasting serum NEFA, triacylglycerol, adiponectin, leptin, total thyroxine, and free triiodothyronine. Higher EE in overweight children was largely explained by differences in body size and composition, with minor contributions of thyroid and sympathoadrenal systems. Alterations in EE, energetic efficiency, and substrate utilization were not evident in the overweight children.

  4. Body mass index and body composition among rescue firefighters personnel in Selangor, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Nor Atiqah; Sedek, Razalee; Teh, Arnida Hani

    2016-11-01

    Obesity is a major public health problem in general population and there is no exception for firefighters. This disorder is definitely a burden for firefighters as they needed to be physically fit in order to work in dangerous situation and extinguishing fires. The purposes of this study were to determine physical characteristics and body composition among Malaysian Firefighters (MF) and to explore their association. This cross-sectional study involved 330 rescue firefighters aged between 20-50 years old from nine different districts in Selangor conducted between August and November 2015. Anthropometric measurements included height, weight and waist circumference (WC). Body composition was measured using bioelectrical impedance. The mean height, weight, body mass index (BMI), WC and body fat percentage were 169.4±5.3 cm, 74.5±12.2 kg, 25.9±3.82 kg/m2, 90.7±48.3 cm and 25.8±6.2 % respectively. The results also showed that 0.6% of them were underweight, 41.5% were normal, 44.8% were overweight and 13% were obese. The percentage of 34.8% firefighters with WC values of more than 90 cm means that they were at greater risk to have cardiovascular and diabetes disease. Body composition analysis showed that 75.5% of the subjects have high body fat level, 19.7% subjects were in healthy range but only 4.8% were considered as lean subjects. BMI was highly correlated with weight (r=0.917, p<0.01), WC (r=0.858, p<0.01) and body fat percentage (r=0.757, <0.01). Body fat percentage also showed to have a high correlation with BMI (r=0.757, p<0.01) and WC (r=0.693, p<0.01). Furthermore, overweight and obesity were found to be more prevalent among firefighters personnel of older age, married, less educated and have longer duration of services. It can be concluded that more than half of the firefighter personnel were either overweight or obese and 35% of them were at greater risk of having non-communicable diseases. This study provides useful information and serves as a source of

  5. Body Composition Trajectories From Infancy to Preschool in Children Born Premature Versus Full-term.

    PubMed

    Scheurer, Johannah M; Zhang, Lei; Gray, Heather L; Weir, Katherine; Demerath, Ellen W; Ramel, Sara E

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the study was to longitudinally characterize infancy to preschool body composition trajectories and the association of early fat and fat-free mass gains with preschool age body composition in children born premature versus full-term. A cohort of appropriate-for-gestational age preterm (n = 20) and term (n = 51) infants were followed at 3 visits: "neonatal" visit 1 at 2 weeks of age for term and near term corrected age for preterm; "infancy" visit 2 at 3 to 4 months (preterm corrected age); "preschool" visit 3 at 4 years. Body composition via air displacement plethysmography and anthropometrics were measured at all visits. Tracking of infancy weight and body composition with preschool measurements was tested using Pearson partial correlation coefficients. Associations between serial body composition measurements were assessed using multiple linear regression. Early differences in body composition between premature (mean gestational age 31.9 weeks, mean birth weight 1843 g) and full-term (mean gestational age 39.8 weeks) infants were not present at preschool age. Visit 1 body composition was not correlated with preschool measurements in the preterm infants. Visit 2 measurements were correlated with preschool measures. Fat-free mass accretion from visit 1 to visit 2 was positively associated with preschool lean mass (β = 0.038, P = 0.049) in preterm children, whereas fat accretion was not associated with preschool body composition. Children born prematurely and full-term have similar body composition at preschool age. For preterms infancy fat-free mass gains, and not adiposity gains, are positively associated with preschool fat-free mass; this may be associated with lower risk of later obesity and adverse metabolic outcomes.

  6. Determination of body composition in growing rats by total body electrical conductivity.

    PubMed

    Morbach, C A; Brans, Y W

    1992-04-01

    Total body electrical conductivity (TOBEC), measured with an Em-Scan SA-1 analyzer, was evaluated as a means of estimating fat-free mass and total body water content noninvasively in small laboratory animals. Ninety-four rats whose weight ranged from 5.53 to 170.84 g at 0-50 days of age were studied. The animals were killed by intraperitoneal injection of a pentobarbital overdose. After weight, crown-rump length (CRL) and TOBEC were measured, and the animals were minced with scissors and desiccated to constant weight in a convection oven. Fat was extracted by multiple bathings in petroleum ether followed by Soxhlet extraction. Fifty-four rats were used to determine the relation between fat-free mass (FFM), total body water (TBW), and TOBEC# (E) by regression analysis. The best correlations were observed between FFM and (E x CRL)1/2 (r = 0.995, p less than 0.0001). Forty rats were used to determine the predictive value of TOBEC estimates. With this instrument, TOBEC tended to underestimate FFM by an average of 3.9% and TBW by 5.3%. Accuracy was questionable for animals smaller than 13 g and TOBEC did not provide useful estimates of total body fat. Subject to these limitations, TOBEC instruments should prove to be useful for sequential in vivo estimations of body composition during growth and development of small animals.

  7. Body composition of piglets exhibiting different growth rates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The growth and composition of the neonatal pig is of interest because of potential impact on subsequent growth and finally, composition at market weight. The purpose of this study was to compare at weaning the growth and body composition of the largest and smallest pigs (excluding runts) from each o...

  8. The Official Positions of the International Society for Clinical Densitometry: body composition analysis reporting.

    PubMed

    Petak, Steven; Barbu, Carmen G; Yu, Elaine W; Fielding, Roger; Mulligan, Kathleen; Sabowitz, Brian; Wu, Chih-Hsing; Shepherd, John A

    2013-01-01

    Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) measurements of body composition increasingly are used in the evaluation of clinical disorders, but there has been little guidance on how to effectively report these measures. Uniformity in reporting of body composition measures will aid in the diagnosis of clinical disorders such as obesity, sarcopenia, and lipodystrophy. At the 2013 International Society for Clinical Densitometry Position Development Conference on body composition, the reporting section recommended that all DXA body composition reports should contain parameters of body mass index, bone mineral density, BMC, total mass, total lean mass, total fat mass, and percent fat mass. The inclusion of additional measures of adiposity and lean mass are optional, including visceral adipose tissue, appendicular lean mass index, android/gynoid percent fat ratio, trunk to leg fat mass ratio, lean mass index, and fat mass index. Within the United States, we recommend the use of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004 body composition dataset as an age-, gender-, and race-specific reference and to calibrate BMC in 4-compartment models. Z-scores and percentiles of body composition measures may be useful for clinical interpretation if methods are used to adjust for non-normality. In particular, DXA body composition measures may be useful for risk-stratification of obese and sarcopenic patients, but there needs to be validation of thresholds to define obesity and sarcopenia. To summarize, these guidelines provide evidence-based standards for the reporting and clinical application of DXA-based measures of body composition.

  9. Modeling the influence of body position in bioimpedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Medrano, G; Leonhardt, S; Zhang, P

    2007-01-01

    Bioimpedance Spectroscopy (BIS) enables the determination of the human body composition (e.g. fat content, water content). From this data, it is possible to draw conclusions about the person's health state. This technology can be easily implemented combined with low costs, which could be used for an easy use at home with a reliable accuracy. Nevertheless, external factors such as body position influence the measurements, limiting their accuracy and use. The use of modeling of these external factors and their influence on the body could be used to improve the accuracy of the bioimpedance spectroscopy and to extend it for a continuous monitoring. In this paper the results of the modeling of the body position for a localized bioimpedance measurement (thigh) and a comparison with measurements on 5 subjects lying down for 40 minutes are shown and discussed.

  10. The Relationship between Selected Body Composition Variables and Muscular Endurance in Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esco, Michael R.; Olson, Michele S.; Williford, Henry N.

    2010-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine if muscular endurance is affected by referenced waist circumference groupings, independent of body mass and subcutaneous abdominal fat, in women. This study also explored whether selected body composition measures were associated with muscular endurance. Eighty-four women were measured for height,…

  11. The Relationship between Selected Body Composition Variables and Muscular Endurance in Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esco, Michael R.; Olson, Michele S.; Williford, Henry N.

    2010-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine if muscular endurance is affected by referenced waist circumference groupings, independent of body mass and subcutaneous abdominal fat, in women. This study also explored whether selected body composition measures were associated with muscular endurance. Eighty-four women were measured for height,…

  12. Measuring Dimensions of Body Connection: Body Awareness and Bodily Dissociation

    PubMed Central

    PRICE, CYNTHIA J.; THOMPSON, ELAINE ADAMS

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to test the preliminary psychometric properties of the Scale of Body Connection (SBC), a 20-item self-report measure, designed to assess body awareness and bodily dissociation in mind–body intervention research. Methods The SBC items were based on common expressions of awareness in body therapy. Content validity was established by a panel of experts. The validity and reliability of the scale was examined with an undergraduate sample. To assess the scale’s discriminant validity, the respondents were asked to indicate exposure to specific traumas. Results Confirmatory factor analysis, used to examine the scale’s construct validity, indicated acceptable goodness-of-fit indices, and revealed uncorrelated subscales, reflecting independent dimensions. Cronbach’s alpha revealed equal internal consistency reliability for each subscale for both men and women. Body awareness scores did not differ between individuals with and without reported trauma exposure. Bodily dissociation scores differed between individuals with and without past experience with physical trauma, suggesting the applicability of this subscale for use with populations with trauma histories. Conclusions The results provide preliminary evidence of the construct validity and internal consistency reliability of the SBC. PMID:18047441

  13. Association between body composition and body mass index in young Japanese women.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Hiroyuki; Kitano, Takao; Kuchiki, Tsutomu; Okazaki, Hideki; Shibata, Shigeo

    2002-06-01

    The National Nutrition Survey of Japan indicated a trend toward a decreasing body mass index (BMI; kg/m2) among young Japanese women. Current studies suggest that not-high BMI often does not correlate with not-high body fat percentage. Recently, the classification of BMI in adult Asians was proposed by the International Obesity Task Force. The addition of an "at risk of overweight" category, BMI as 23.0-24.9, was intended to prevent chronic diseases. We investigated the association between body fat percentage (BF%) and BMI to evaluate the screening performance of BMI focused on individual preventive medicine. The subjects consisted of 605 female college students. The subjects' ages (y), heights (cm), body weights (kg), BMIs, and BF percents with underwater weighing expressed as the means +/- SD were 19.6 +/- 0.5, 158.7 +/- 5.6, 53.8 +/- 7.2, 21.3 +/- 2.4, and 24.9 +/- 4.9, respectively. We defined high BF% as +/- 85th percentile of BF% (29.8%). High-BF% individuals are often not classified into BMI > or = 23.0 because their BMI readings are very broad (18.4-31.7). In comparison to the screening performances (specificity and sensitivity), BMI > or = 23.0 (85.3% and 52.1%, respectively), rather than BMI > or = 25.0 (96.7% and 29.8%, respectively), is recommended for the mass evaluation of fatness. For this reason, the BMI "at risk of overweight" category is characterized as the threshold of increasing the appearance ratio of high-BF% individuals. In conclusion, the BMI > or = 25.0 kg/m2 category is determined as high BF%, regardless of body composition measurement for mass evaluation as a result of quite high specificity. Even so, body composition measurement is necessitated by the individual evaluation of fatness focused on preventive medicine because BMI performed a poor representation of body composition, especially BMI < 25.0 kg/m2 individuals.

  14. Body composition in healthy older persons: role of the ratio of extracellular/total body water.

    PubMed

    Malczyk, E; Dzięgielewska-Gęsiak, S; Fatyga, E; Ziółko, E; Kokot, T; Muc-Wierzgon, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the best prognostic parameters for quickly assessing fluid volume status in the context of nutritional status and water balance in older persons and to facilitate decision-making of the general practitioner (GP). This pilot study was conducted with 142 volunteers aged 60 years or older who were Polish students of the University of the Third Age. Inclusion and exclusion criteria for the study were defined. Assessment tools included: the Mini Nutritional Assessment questionnaire (MNA®) and the anthropometric measurements. Weight and body composition analysis were determined by Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA) using the Tanita MC-780 multi frequency segmental Body Composition Analyzer. According to the MNA scale, 89.2% of the sample was wellnourished and 10.8% were at risk of malnutrition. A total of 47.1% participants had normal body mass index, 20.6% were overweight, and 32.3% were obese. The BIA showed that females had more fat mass (FM) compared to males (35.84% vs 23.90%), while men had more free fat mass (FFM) and total body water (TBW; 61.16% vs 45.22% and 53.31% vs 45.22%respectively). There were no statistically significant differences in FM, FFM, and TBW by age. The ratio of Extracellular to Total Body Water (ECW/TBW) was higher in women than in men (46.76% vs 43.66%). Of all measures, only ECW/TBW increased significantly with age and sex, especially after 65 years. We propose that ECW/TBW may be used as the first, simple, and fast indicator of water volume status in the context of nutritional status and water balance in older subjects. Systematic control of the ECW/TBW by GP or nurse may increase senior independence, resulting in longer self-maintenance at home and reduced hospital admissions.

  15. Effects of betaine on body composition, performance, and homocysteine thiolactone

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study investigated the effects of long term betaine supplementation on body composition, performance, and homocysteine thiolactone (HCTL) in experienced strength trained men. Methods Twenty-three subjects were matched for training experience (4.8 ± 2.3 years) and body fat percentage (BF%: 16.9 ± 8.0%), randomly assigned to either a placebo (PL; n = 12) or betaine group (BET; n = 11; 2.5 g/day), and completed a 6 week periodized training program consisting of 3 two-week micro-cycles. Bench press and back squat training volumes were recorded and changes in training volume were assessed at each micro-cycle. Fasting urine was collected at baseline (BL), weeks 2, 4 and 6, and assayed for HCTL. Subjects were tested prior to and following 6 weeks of treatment. Arm and thigh cross sectional area (CSA) was estimated via girth and skin fold measurements. Body density was estimated via skin fold calipers and used to estimate BF%, fat mass (FM), and lean body mass (LBM). Performance was assessed via vertical jump (VJ), bench press 1 RM (BP), and back squat 1 RM (BS). Results Arm CSA increased significantly (p < .05) in BET but not PL. No differences existed between group and time for changes in thigh CSA. Back squat training volume increased significantly (p < .05) for both groups throughout training. Bench press training volume was significantly (p < .05) improved for BET compared to PL at microcycles one and three. Body composition (BF%, FM, LBM) improved significantly (p < .05) in BET but not PL. No differences were found in performance variables (BP, BS, VJ) between groups, except there was a trend (p = .07) for increased VJ power in BET versus PL. A significant interaction (p < .05) existed for HCTL, with increases from BL to week 2 in PL, but not BET. Additionally, HCTL remained elevated at week 4 in PL, but not BET. Conclusion Six-weeks of betaine supplementation improved body composition, arm size, bench press

  16. Youth substance use and body composition: does risk in one area predict risk in the other?

    PubMed

    Pasch, Keryn E; Velazquez, Cayley E; Cance, Jessica Duncan; Moe, Stacey G; Lytle, Leslie A

    2012-01-01

    Both substance use and obesity are prevalent among youth. As youth age, substance use rates increase and over the past three decades, obesity rates among youth have tripled. While these two factors have both short- and long-term health impacts, little research has explored how substance use and obesity among youth may be related. This study explores the bi-directional longitudinal relationships between substance use and body composition. Participants (N = 704; 50.7% female) were mostly white (86.4%) with a baseline mean age of 14.7 years. Objectively measured body composition was used to calculate body mass index z-scores (BMI z-score) and percent body fat. Cross-lagged structural equation models, accounting for clustering at the school level, were run to determine the longitudinal association between body composition and self-reported substance use (alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana), adjusting for socio-demographic characteristics, pubertal status, and weight satisfaction. Baseline alcohol use predicted decreased BMI z-score at follow-up and a similar association with percent body fat approached significance. Baseline cigarette use predicted increased percent body fat. No longitudinal associations were seen between baseline body composition and future substance use. Our results suggest that substance use contributes to subsequent body composition; however, body composition does not contribute to subsequent substance use. Continued research that explores these relationships longitudinally is greatly needed.

  17. A body composition model to estimate mammalian energy stores and metabolic rates from body mass and body length, with application to polar bears.

    PubMed

    Molnár, Péter K; Klanjscek, Tin; Derocher, Andrew E; Obbard, Martyn E; Lewis, Mark A

    2009-08-01

    Many species experience large fluctuations in food availability and depend on energy from fat and protein stores for survival, reproduction and growth. Body condition and, more specifically, energy stores thus constitute key variables in the life history of many species. Several indices exist to quantify body condition but none can provide the amount of stored energy. To estimate energy stores in mammals, we propose a body composition model that differentiates between structure and storage of an animal. We develop and parameterize the model specifically for polar bears (Ursus maritimus Phipps) but all concepts are general and the model could be easily adapted to other mammals. The model provides predictive equations to estimate structural mass, storage mass and storage energy from an appropriately chosen measure of body length and total body mass. The model also provides a means to estimate basal metabolic rates from body length and consecutive measurements of total body mass. Model estimates of body composition, structural mass, storage mass and energy density of 970 polar bears from Hudson Bay were consistent with the life history and physiology of polar bears. Metabolic rate estimates of fasting adult males derived from the body composition model corresponded closely to theoretically expected and experimentally measured metabolic rates. Our method is simple, non-invasive and provides considerably more information on the energetic status of individuals than currently available methods.

  18. Techniques for undertaking dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry whole-body scans to estimate body composition in tall and/or broad subjects.

    PubMed

    Nana, Alisa; Slater, Gary J; Hopkins, Will G; Burke, Louise M

    2012-10-01

    Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is becoming a popular tool to measure body composition, owing to its ease of operation and comprehensive analysis. However, some people, especially athletes, are taller and/or broader than the active scanning area of the DXA bed and must be scanned in sections. The aim of this study was to investigate the reliability of DXA measures of whole-body composition summed from 2 or 3 partial scans. Physically active young adults (15 women, 15 men) underwent 1 whole-body and 4 partial DXA scans in a single testing session under standardized conditions. The partial scanning areas were head, whole body from the bottom of the chin down, and right and left sides of the body. Body-composition estimates from whole body were compared with estimates from summed partial scans to simulate different techniques to accommodate tall and/or broad subjects relative to the whole-body scan. Magnitudes of differences in the estimates were assessed by standardization. In simulating tall subjects, summation of partial scans that included the head scan overestimated whole-body composition by ~3 kg of lean mass and ~1 kg of fat mass, with substantial technical error of measurement. In simulating broad subjects, summation of right and left body scans produced no substantial differences in body composition than those of the whole-body scan. Summing partial DXA scans provides accurate body-composition estimates for broad subjects, but other strategies are needed to accommodate tall subjects.

  19. Abdominal body composition differences in NFL football players.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Tyler A; Burruss, T Pepper; Weir, Nate L; Fielding, Kurt A; Engel, Bryan E; Weston, Todd D; Dengel, Donald R

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine visceral fat mass as well as other measures abdominal body composition in National Football League (NFL) players before the start of the season. Three hundred and seventy NFL football players were measured before the start of the season using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Regional fat and lean mass was measured for each player. Players were categorized into 3 groups based on positions that mirror each other: linemen; linebackers/tight ends/running backs and wide receivers/defensive backs. Significant differences were observed between the position groups for both lean and fat regional measurements. However, the magnitude of difference was much greater for fat measures than lean measures. Additionally, a threshold was observed (∼114 kg) at which there is a greater increase in fat accumulation than lean mass accumulation. The increase in fat accumulation is distributed to the abdominal region where thresholds were observed for subcutaneous abdominal fat accumulation (12.1% body fat) and visceral abdominal fat accumulation (20.1% body fat), which likely explains the regional fat differences between groups. The results of this study suggest that as players get larger, there is more total fat than total lean mass accumulation and more fat is distributed to the abdominal region. This is of importance as increased fat mass may be detrimental to performance at certain positions. The thresholds observed for increased abdominal fat accumulation should be monitored closely given recent research observed that abdominal obesity predicts lower extremity injury risk and visceral adipose tissue's established association with cardiometabolic risk.

  20. [Endocrine obesity: bioelectric profiles (biotypes) detected in the body composition].

    PubMed

    Miggiano, G A D; Petitti, T

    2004-09-01

    136 patients were selected (16 men and 120 women with non-specific menstrual disturbances) with a BMI (Body Mass Index) between 25 and 45 kg/m2, which were diagnosed with "disendocrinia" (GH deficit, hyperadrenocorticism, hypothyroidsm, hyperandrogenism, menstrual cycle disorders). The proposed approach, based on the visualization of the value distribution of the electric measures in different graphics, is able to immediately explain the bioelectric state of the individual's lean-mass. Subjects with hypothyroidism present, along with their overweight, less bio-conducting mass, with an altered fluid intra/extra-cellular distribution. Patients with hyperadrenocorticism show instead an hyperhydratation of the body mass, especially in the extracellular level. Patients with menstrual disorders (amenorrea, polycystic ovary syndrome, anovulatory cycle etc...) present a lean mass reduction (elevated Rs) and an increase of the intra-cellular compartment (elevated-Xc). Patients with hyper-androgenism (and hirsutism) show a characteristic bioelectric "pattern", with low Rs levels and high Xc levels. Subjects with GH deficit (men and women), has a trend of documenting bioelectric measures with lower lean mass and higher fat-mass. Different electric biotypes seem to characterize the body composition in the several endocrine disorders.

  1. PZEh-MO-8/Body Mass Measurement

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-06-30

    ISS020-E-015853 (30 June 2009) --- Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Koichi Wakata, Expedition 20 flight engineer, uses the IM mass measurement device to perform the PZEh-MO-8/Body Mass Measurement Russian biomedical routine assessments in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station.

  2. The effects of different exercise programmes on female body composition.

    PubMed

    de Mendonça, Rosa Maria Soares Costa; de Araújo Júnior, Adenilson Targino; de Sousa, Maria do Socorro Cirilo; Fernandes, Helder Miguel

    2014-09-29

    The purpose of this study was to verify the effects of 16 weeks of practicing different exercise programmes on body composition. This is an exploratory and descriptive study of 89 women aged 25 to 55 years (41.42 ± 9.23 years). The subjects were randomly divided into three experimental groups (EG): practitioners of strength training (SG), dance (DG), hydrogymnastics (HG), and a control group (CG) with sedentary women. Measurements of body mass and height, circumferences of the chest, waist, abdomen, hips, thighs, calves, and skinfolds of the triceps, suprailiac and thigh were registered in three different moments: prior to the commencement of the training program, again after 8 weeks of training, and finally after 16 weeks of training. Body density was estimated by using the trifold protocol by Jackson, Pollock and Ward. The ANOVA and deltas of change (Δ%) were used for data analysis. The level of significance was set at p<0.05. The effects of greater statistical significance on body composition related the variables "time", "group" and the interaction between the two (time × group) were observed for the percentage of fat - F% (F (1.79, 152.52) = 24.59, p <0.001, η (2) = 0.22), fat mass - FM (F (1.75, 149.01) = 12.65, p <0.001, η (2) = 0.13) and lean mass - LM (F (1.77, 150.66) = 47.38, p <0.001, η (2) = 0.36). The HG and SG were more beneficial in reducing F%. It was observed that the EG indicated healthier anthropometric aspects compared to the CG, regardless of the type of exercise programmes practiced. The time factor was more representative over the effects of exercise on anthropometric dimensions.

  3. Muscle strength and body composition in severe obesity.

    PubMed

    Gadducci, Alexandre Vieira; de Cleva, Roberto; de Faria Santarém, Gabriela Correia; Silva, Paulo Roberto Santos; Greve, Julia Maria D'Andréa; Santo, Marco Aurélio

    2017-05-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate associations between maximum voluntary contraction torques of the lower limbs and body composition for subjects with severe obesity. Body composition was evaluated by bioelectrical impedance analysis, and maximum voluntary contraction torques of the lower limbs were measured using an isokinetic dynamometer. One hundred thirty-two patients were enrolled (100 females and 32 males). Eighty-seven patients had a body mass index between 40 and 49.9 kg/m2 (the A group), and 45 patients had a body mass index between 50 and 59.9 kg/m2 (the B group). Absolute extension and flexion torques had weak associations with fat-free mass but a moderate association with absolute extension torque and fat-free mass of the lower limbs. There were no significant differences between the A and B groups with respect to absolute extension and flexion torques. For the A group, absolute extension and flexion torques were moderately associated with fat-free mass and with fat-free mass of the lower limbs. For the B group, there were only moderate associations between absolute extension and flexion torques with fat-free mass of the lower limbs. Our findings demonstrate that both groups exhibited similar absolute torque values. There were weak to moderate associations between absolute extension and flexion torques and fat-free mass but a moderate association with fat-free mass of the lower limbs. Individuals with severe obesity should strive for greater absolute torques, fat-free mass and especially fat-free mass of the lower limbs to prevent functional limitations and physical incapacity.

  4. Changes in body composition in women using long-acting reversible contraception.

    PubMed

    Silva Dos Santos, Priscilla de Nazaré; Madden, Tessa; Omvig, Karen; Peipert, Jeffrey F

    2017-04-01

    Users of hormonal long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) report weight gain as a side effect, but few studies have assessed body composition change among LARC users. We evaluated weight and body composition of healthy women using the levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS), copper intrauterine device (copper IUD) or etonogestrel implant (ENG implant). We hypothesized that weight gain and body composition over 12 months would not differ between copper IUD, LNG-IUS and ENG implant users. We performed a prospective cohort study of a subgroup of women enrolled in the Contraceptive CHOICE Project who initiated the LNG-IUS, copper IUD or ENG implant. Inclusion criteria included lack of metabolic and eating disorders or change in body weight of more than 5% in the 6 months before enrollment. We measured changes in weight and body composition (body fat percentage, total body fat mass, total lean mass and total body mass) in women who continued their method for 12 months. We analyzed data from 149 participants: 85 LNG-IUS users, 31 copper IUD users and 33 ENG implant users. The mean age was 25.9 years, 56.4% were White, 82.5% had some college education and 67.6% were nulliparous. Although lean body mass increased over 12 months in LNG-IUS and copper IUD users but not in ENG implant users, changes in body weight and body composition did not differ between the groups. In the adjusted model, Black race was associated with change in total body mass (p<.05). Among those who continued the method for 12 months, changes in body weight and composition did not differ between copper IUD, LNG-IUS and ENG implant users. Changes in body weight and composition over 12 months did not differ between copper IUD users and LNG-IUS and ENG implant users among those with 12 months of continuous use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Whole-body vibration augments resistance training effects on body composition in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Fjeldstad, Cecilie; Palmer, Ian J; Bemben, Michael G; Bemben, Debra A

    2009-05-20

    Age-related changes in body composition are well-documented with a decrease in lean body mass and a redistribution of body fat generally observed. Resistance training alone has been shown to have positive effects on body composition, however, these benefits may be enhanced by the addition of a vibration stimulus. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of 8 months of resistance training with and without whole-body vibration (WBV) on body composition in sedentary postmenopausal women. Fifty-five women were assigned to resistance only (RG, n=22), vibration plus resistance (VR, n=21) or non-exercising control (CG, n=12) groups. Resistance training (3 sets 10 repetitions 80% strength) was performed using isotonic weight training equipment and whole-body vibration was done with the use of the power plate (Northbrooke, IL) vibration platform for three times per week for 8 months. Total and regional body composition was assessed from the total body DXA scans at baseline (pre) and after 8 months (post) of training. In the VR group, total % body fat decreased from pre- to post-time points (p<0.05), whereas, the CG group had a significant increase in total % body fat (p<0.05). Both training groups exhibited significant increases in bone free lean tissue mass for the total body, arm and trunk regions from pre to post (p<0.05). CG did not show any changes in lean tissue. In older women, resistance training alone and with whole-body vibration resulted in positive body composition changes by increasing lean tissue. However, only the combination of resistance training and whole-body vibration was effective for decreasing percent body fat.

  6. Assessment of body temperature measurement options.

    PubMed

    Sund-Levander, Märtha; Grodzinsky, Ewa

    Assessment of body temperature is important for decisions in nursing care, medical diagnosis, treatment and the need of laboratory tests. The definition of normal body temperature as 37°C was established in the middle of the 19th century. Since then the technical design and the accuracy of thermometers has been much improved. Knowledge of physical influence on the individual body temperature, such as thermoregulation and hormones, are still not taken into consideration in body temperature assessment. It is time for a change; the unadjusted mode should be used, without adjusting to another site and the same site of measurement should be used as far as possible. Peripheral sites, such as the axillary and the forehead site, are not recommended as an assessment of core body temperature in adults. Frail elderly individuals might have a low normal body temperature and therefore be at risk of being assessed as non-febrile. As the ear site is close to the hypothalamus and quickly responds to changes in the set point temperature, it is a preferable and recommendable site for measurement of body temperature.

  7. Whole body measurement systems. [for weightlessness simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogle, J. S. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A system for measuring the volume and volume variations of a human body under zero gravity conditions is disclosed. An enclosed chamber having a defined volume and arranged for receiving a human body is provided with means for infrasonically varying the volume of the chamber. The changes in volume produce resultant changes in pressure, and under substantially isentropic conditions, an isentropic relationship permits a determination of gas volume which, in turn, when related to total chamber volume permits a determination of the body volume. By comparison techniques, volume changes of a human independent of gravity conditions can be determined.

  8. Predicting Percent Body Fat from Circumference Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    A268 695 DTIC ELECTE AUG 3 0 1993 dI I Public . MILITARY MEDICINE, 158, 1:026, 1993 A Predicting Percent Body Fat from Circumference Measurements LT...are required to meet percent Introduction body fat (%BF) standards as a condition of military service. Naval personnel who exceed standards for %BF...or 31-35.9% body fat (%BF), and with 22%BF or greater and women with 30%BF or greater. Val- obese as 26 or 36%BF or greater for men and women, respec

  9. Body composition during fetal development and infancy through the age of 5 years

    PubMed Central

    Toro-Ramos, T; Paley, C; Pi-Sunyer, FX; Gallagher, D

    2015-01-01

    Fetal body composition is an important determinant of body composition at birth, and it is likely to be an important determinant at later stages in life. The purpose of this work is to provide a comprehensive overview by presenting data from previously published studies that report on body composition during fetal development in newborns and the infant/child through 5 years of age. Understanding the changes in body composition that occur both in utero and during infancy and childhood, and how they may be related, may help inform evidence-based practice during pregnancy and childhood. We describe body composition measurement techniques from the in utero period to 5 years of age, and identify gaps in knowledge to direct future research efforts. Available literature on chemical and cadaver analyses of fetal studies during gestation is presented to show the timing and accretion rates of adipose and lean tissues. Quantitative and qualitative aspects of fetal lean and fat mass accretion could be especially useful in the clinical setting for diagnostic purposes. The practicality of different pediatric body composition measurement methods in the clinical setting is discussed by presenting the assumptions and limitations associated with each method that may assist the clinician in characterizing the health and nutritional status of the fetus, infant and child. It is our hope that this review will help guide future research efforts directed at increasing the understanding of how body composition in early development may be associated with chronic diseases in later life. PMID:26242725

  10. Subcutaneous fat patterning in athletes: selection of appropriate sites and standardisation of a novel ultrasound measurement technique: ad hoc working group on body composition, health and performance, under the auspices of the IOC Medical Commission

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Wolfram; Lohman, Timothy G; Stewart, Arthur D; Maughan, Ronald J; Meyer, Nanna L; Sardinha, Luis B; Kirihennedige, Nuwanee; Reguant-Closa, Alba; Risoul-Salas, Vanessa; Sundgot-Borgen, Jorunn; Ahammer, Helmut; Anderhuber, Friedrich; Fürhapter-Rieger, Alfred; Kainz, Philipp; Materna, Wilfried; Pilsl, Ulrike; Pirstinger, Wolfram; Ackland, Timothy R

    2016-01-01

    Background Precise and accurate field methods for body composition analyses in athletes are needed urgently. Aim Standardisation of a novel ultrasound (US) technique for accurate and reliable measurement of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT). Methods Three observers captured US images of uncompressed SAT in 12 athletes and applied a semiautomatic evaluation algorithm for multiple SAT measurements. Results Eight new sites are recommended: upper abdomen, lower abdomen, erector spinae, distal triceps, brachioradialis, lateral thigh, front thigh, medial calf. Obtainable accuracy was 0.2 mm (18 MHz probe; speed of sound: 1450 m/s). Reliability of SAT thickness sums (N=36): R2=0.998, SEE=0.55 mm, ICC (95% CI) 0.998 (0.994 to 0.999); observer differences from their mean: 95% of the SAT thickness sums were within ±1 mm (sums of SAT thicknesses ranged from 10 to 50 mm). Embedded fibrous tissues were also measured. Conclusions A minimum of eight sites is suggested to accommodate inter-individual differences in SAT patterning. All sites overlie muscle with a clearly visible fascia, which eases the acquisition of clear images and the marking of these sites takes only a few minutes. This US method reaches the fundamental accuracy and precision limits for SAT measurements given by tissue plasticity and furrowed borders, provided the measurers are trained appropriately. PMID:26702017

  11. Longitudinal Physical Activity, Body Composition, and Physical Fitness in Preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Leppänen, Marja H; Henriksson, Pontus; Delisle Nyström, Christine; Henriksson, Hanna; Ortega, Francisco B; Pomeroy, Jeremy; Ruiz, Jonatan R; Cadenas-Sanchez, Cristina; Löf, Marie

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate longitudinal associations of objectively measured physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB) with body composition and physical fitness at a 12-month follow-up in healthy Swedish 4-yr-old children. The data from the population-based MINISTOP trial were collected between 2014 and 2016, and this study included the 138 children who were in the control group. PA and SB were assessed using the wrist-worn ActiGraph (wGT3x-BT) accelerometer during seven 24-h periods and, subsequently, defined as SB, light-intensity PA, moderate-intensity PA, vigorous-intensity PA (VPA), and moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA). Body composition was measured using air-displacement plethysmography and physical fitness (cardiorespiratory fitness, lower and upper muscular strength as well as motor fitness) by the PREFIT fitness battery. Linear regression and isotemporal substitution models were applied. Greater VPA and MVPA at the age of 4.5 yr were associated with higher fat-free mass index (FFMI) at 5.5 yr (P < 0.001 and P = 0.044, respectively). Furthermore, greater VPA and MVPA at the age of 4.5 yr were associated with higher scores for cardiorespiratory fitness, lower body muscular strength, and motor fitness at 12-month follow-up (P = 0.001 to P = 0.031). Substituting 5 min·d of SB, light-intensity PA, or moderate-intensity PA for VPA at the age of 4.5 yr were associated with higher FFMI, and with greater upper and lower muscular strength at 12-month follow-up (P < 0.001 to P = 0.046). Higher VPA and MVPA at the age of 4.5 yr were significantly associated with higher FFMI and better physical fitness at 12-month follow-up. Our results indicate that promoting high-intensity PA at young ages may have long-term beneficial effects on childhood body composition and physical fitness, in particular muscular strength.

  12. Association between bone mineralization, body composition, and cardiorespiratory fitness level in young Australian men.

    PubMed

    Liberato, Selma Coelho; Maple-Brown, Louise; Bressan, Josefina

    2015-01-01

    The critical age for attainment of peak bone mineralization is however 20-30 yr, but few studies have investigated bone mineralization and its association with body composition and cardiorespiratory fitness level in young men. This study aimed to investigate relationships between age, bone mineral measurements, body composition measurements, and cardiorespiratory fitness level in a group of young healthy Australian men. Thirty-five healthy men aged 18-25 yr had anthropometric measures, body composition, and cardiorespiratory fitness level assessed. Bone mineral content was significantly associated with height, body mass and lean mass, and bone mineral density positively correlated with lean mass and body mass. Bone mineral measurements did not correlate with fat mass, percentage of fat mass, or cardiorespiratory fitness level. Age was directly correlated with total body mass, body fat, and percentage of fat mass. Body mineral measurements correlated with lean mass but not with fat mass or with cardiorespiratory fitness in this group of young healthy men. Positive association between body fat and age in such young group suggests that more studies with young men are warranted and may help inform strategies to optimize increase in bone mineral measurements.

  13. Beyond the body mass index: tracking body composition in the pathogenesis of obesity and the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Müller, M J; Lagerpusch, M; Enderle, J; Schautz, B; Heller, M; Bosy-Westphal, A

    2012-12-01

    Body composition is related to various physiological and pathological states. Characterization of individual body components adds to understand metabolic, endocrine and genetic data on obesity and obesity-related metabolic risks, e.g. insulin resistance. The obese phenotype is multifaceted and can be characterized by measures of body fat, leg fat, liver fat and skeletal muscle mass rather than by body mass index. The contribution of either whole body fat or fat distribution or individual fat depots to insulin resistance is moderate, but liver fat has a closer association with (hepatic) insulin resistance. Although liver fat is associated with visceral fat, its effect on insulin resistance is independent of visceral adipose tissue. In contrast to abdominal fat, appendicular or leg fat is inversely related to insulin resistance. The association between 'high fat mass + low muscle mass' (i.e. 'sarcopenic adiposity') and insulin resistance deserves further investigation and also attention in daily clinical practice. In addition to cross-sectional data, longitudinal assessment of body composition during controlled under- and overfeeding of normal-weight healthy young men shows that small decreases and increases in fat mass are associated with corresponding decreases and increases in insulin secretion as well as increases and decreases in insulin sensitivity. However, even under controlled conditions, there is a high intra- and inter-individual variance in the changes of (i) body composition; (ii) the 'body composition-glucose metabolism relationship' and (iii) glucose metabolism itself. Combining individual body components with their related functional aspects (e.g. the endocrine, metabolic and inflammatory profiles) will provide a suitable basis for future definitions of a 'metabolically healthy body composition'. © 2012 The Authors. obesity reviews © 2012 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  14. Effect of corn silage and quantitative feed restriction on growth performance, body measurements, and carcass tissue composition in White Kołuda W31 geese.

    PubMed

    Kokoszyński, D; Bernacki, Z; Grabowicz, M; Stańczak, K

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of corn silage and quantitative feed restriction on BW, ADG, feed conversion, and carcass composition of White Kołuda W31 geese. Two diets were fed during the rearing period from 22 to 98 d of age: 1) a commercial diet ad libitum, and 2) restricted amounts of a commercial diet and corn silage ad libitum. Each treatment had 2 replicates of 16 birds each. From 99 to 119 d of age, all birds were fattened with whole oat grain alone. Incorporation of corn silage reduced weight gains and caused statistically significant differences in BW at the end of the rearing period (14 wk, 6,625.0 vs. 6,050.0 g; P < 0.05). Experimental geese showed compensatory growth during the oat fattening period and the BW of geese from both groups was similar at the end of the study (17 wk, 7,675.1 vs. 7,467.9 g; P > 0.05). Daily weight gains varied with week of growth, being lowest at 12 wk of age. Birds fed the commercial diet and corn silage had a significantly longer trunk (29.2 vs. 31.0 cm, P < 0.05) and shorter shanks (10.0 vs. 9.4 cm, P < 0.05) at 8 wk, and significantly smaller chest circumference (54.7 vs. 51.9 cm, P < 0.05) at the end of 14 wk. At the end of oat feeding (17 wk), geese receiving silage had significantly longer trunk and drumstick compared with geese fed commercial diets alone. The carcasses of 17-wk-old experimental geese contained more breast and leg muscles (%), and less skin with subcutaneous fat from breast and legs compared with control birds. Significant differences were only noted between the groups in dressing percentage (65.0 vs. 74.7%, P < 0.05) and proportion of skin with subcutaneous fat from breast (8.9 vs. 7.8%, P < 0.05). Dilution of the diet for young fattening geese with whole-crop corn silage had a positive effect on production economics and carcass composition. © Poultry Science Association Inc.

  15. Comparison of Body Composition Assessment Methods in Pediatric Intestinal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Nilesh M.; Raphael, Bram; Guteirrez, Ivan; Quinn, Nicolle; Mitchell, Paul D.; Litman, Heather J.; Jaksic, Tom; Duggan, Christopher P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine the agreement of multifrequency bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA) and anthropometry with reference methods for body composition assessment in children with intestinal failure (IF). Methods We conducted a prospective pilot study in children 14 years of age or younger with IF resulting from either short bowel syndrome (SBS) or motility disorders. Bland Altman analysis was used to examine the agreement between BIA and deuterium dilution in measuring total body water (TBW) and lean body mass (LBM); and between BIA and dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) techniques in measuring LBM and FM. Fat mass (FM) and percent body fat (%BF) measurements by BIA and anthropometry, were also compared in relation to those measured by deuterium dilution. Results Fifteen children with IF, median (IQR) age 7.2 (5.0, 10.0) years, 10 (67%) male, were studied. BIA and deuterium dilution were in good agreement with a mean bias (limits of agreement) of 0.9 (-3.2, 5.0) for TBW (L) and 0.1 (-5.4 to 5.6) for LBM (kg) measurements. The mean bias (limits) for FM (kg) and %BF measurements were 0.4 (-3.8, 4.6) kg and 1.7 (-16.9, 20.3)% respectively. The limits of agreement were within 1 SD of the mean bias in 12/14 (86%) subjects for TBW and LBM, and in 11/14 (79%) for FM and %BF measurements. Mean bias (limits) for LBM (kg) and FM (kg) between BIA and DXA were 1.6 (-3.0 to 6.3) kg and -0.1 (-3.2 to 3.1) kg, respectively. Mean bias (limits) for FM (kg) and %BF between anthropometry and deuterium dilution were 0.2 (-4.2, 4.6) and -0.2 (-19.5 to 19.1), respectively. The limits of agreement were within 1 SD of the mean bias in 10/14 (71%) subjects. Conclusions In children with intestinal failure, TBW and LBM measurements by multifrequency BIA method were in agreement with isotope dilution and DXA methods, with small mean bias. In comparison to deuterium dilution, BIA was comparable to anthropometry for FM and %BF assessments with small mean bias. However, the limits of agreement

  16. Sensing Movement: Microsensors for Body Motion Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Hansong; Zhao, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Recognition of body posture and motion is an important physiological function that can keep the body in balance. Man-made motion sensors have also been widely applied for a broad array of biomedical applications including diagnosis of balance disorders and evaluation of energy expenditure. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art sensing components utilized for body motion measurement. The anatomy and working principles of a natural body motion sensor, the human vestibular system, are first described. Various man-made inertial sensors are then elaborated based on their distinctive sensing mechanisms. In particular, both the conventional solid-state motion sensors and the emerging non solid-state motion sensors are depicted. With their lower cost and increased intelligence, man-made motion sensors are expected to play an increasingly important role in biomedical systems for basic research as well as clinical diagnostics. PMID:22346595

  17. Growth and body composition in Brazilian female rhythmic gymnastics athletes.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Cristiane Teixeira Amaral; Gomez-Campos, Rossana Anelice; Cossio-Bolaños, Marco Antonio; Barbeta, Vinicius Justino De Oliveira; Arruda, Miguel; Guerra-Junior, Gil

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to analyse the physical growth and body composition of rhythmic gymnastics athletes relative to their level of somatic maturation. This was a cross-sectional study of 136 athletes on 23 teams from Brazil. Mass, standing height and sitting height were measured. Fat-free and fat masses, body fat percentages and ages of the predicted peak height velocity (PHV) were calculated. The z scores for mass were negative during all ages according to both WHO and Brazilian references, and that for standing height were also negative for all ages according to WHO reference but only until 12 years old according to Brazilian reference. The mean age of the predicted PHV was 12.1 years. The mean mass, standing and sitting heights, body fat percentage, fat-free mass and fat mass increased significantly until 4 to 5 years after the age of the PHV. Menarche was reached in only 26% of these athletes and mean age was 13.2 years. The mass was below the national reference standards, and the standing height was below only for the international reference, but they also had late recovery of mass and standing height during puberty. In conclusion, these athletes had a potential to gain mass and standing height several years after PHV, indicating late maturation.

  18. Gravity, body mass and composition, and metabolic rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, N.; Smith, A. H.

    1984-01-01

    The scale effects of increased gravitational loading by chronic centrifugation on metabolic rate and body composition in metabolically mature mammals were investigated. Individual oxygen consumption rates in groups of 12 each, 8-month-old, hamster, rats, guinea pigs, and rabbits were measured at weekly intervals at 1.0 g, then 2.0 g for 6 weeks. Metabolic rate was increased significantly in all species, and stabilized after 2 weeks at 2.0 g. Statistical analysis of the data revealed that the larger the animal the greater was the increase in mass-specific metabolic rate, or metabolic intensity, over the 1.0 g value for the same animal, with the result that the interspecies allometric scaling relationship between metabolic rate and total body mass is different at 2.0 g compared 10 1.0 g. Analysis of covariance shows that the postioning constant at 2.0 g is increased by 17% at 2.0 g at the P .001 level, and the exponent is increased by 8% at the P = 0.008 level. Thus, the hypothesis that augmented gravitational loading should shift the allometric relationship between metabolic rate and body size by an increase in both parameters is supported.

  19. Gravity, body mass and composition, and metabolic rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, N.; Smith, A. H.

    1984-01-01

    The scale effects of increased gravitational loading by chronic centrifugation on metabolic rate and body composition in metabolically mature mammals were investigated. Individual oxygen consumption rates in groups of 12 each, 8-month-old, hamster, rats, guinea pigs, and rabbits were measured at weekly intervals at 1.0 g, then 2.0 g for 6 weeks. Metabolic rate was increased significantly in all species, and stabilized after 2 weeks at 2.0 g. Statistical analysis of the data revealed that the larger the animal the greater was the increase in mass-specific metabolic rate, or metabolic intensity, over the 1.0 g value for the same animal, with the result that the interspecies allometric scaling relationship between metabolic rate and total body mass is different at 2.0 g compared 10 1.0 g. Analysis of covariance shows that the postioning constant at 2.0 g is increased by 17% at 2.0 g at the P .001 level, and the exponent is increased by 8% at the P = 0.008 level. Thus, the hypothesis that augmented gravitational loading should shift the allometric relationship between metabolic rate and body size by an increase in both parameters is supported.

  20. An evaluation of body temperature measurement.

    PubMed

    Ilsley, A H; Rutten, A J; Runciman, W B

    1983-02-01

    The accuracy of routine body temperature measurements, the suitability of various sites for such measurements, and the performance and practicality of various temperature measuring devices were studied. Oral and axillary temperature measurements made by the nursing staff were within 1 degree C of a reference value (within 0.5 degree C in 67%). Both sites were suitable for routine ward temperature measurement. Mercury-in-glass thermometers are recommended for routine ward use. Electronic and disposable chemical thermometers cost more but the latter are suitable in uncooperative patients and children. Forehead skin temperature measurements using liquid crystal plastic discs were unreliable. Pulmonary artery and rectal temperature measurements were satisfactory in operating theatre and intensive care unit; however, electronic thermometers should be subjected to routine checks. The bladder temperature measuring device proved unsuitable for clinical use. When oesophagus, nasopharynx and tympanum sites are used careful placement is necessary to minimise trauma and obtain reliable measurements.

  1. Accuracy and Precision for EchoMRI-Infants™ Body Composition Analysis in Piglets

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Body Composition Analysis is used to evaluate infant growth patterns, efficacy of nutritional and medical interventions, progression of chronic disease, and recovery from malnutrition. EchoMRI-Infants is a new Quantitative Magnetic Resonance (QMR) method to measure Total Body Fat, Lean Tissue Mass, ...

  2. Body composition predictors of skeletal integrity in obesity.

    PubMed

    Schorr, Melanie; Dichtel, Laura E; Gerweck, Anu V; Torriani, Martin; Miller, Karen K; Bredella, Miriam A

    2016-06-01

    To determine body composition predictors of skeletal integrity in overweight/obese subjects using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). We hypothesized that visceral adiposity would be negatively, and lean mass positively, associated with DXA measures of skeletal integrity in obesity. Our study was institutional review board (IRB)-approved and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)-compliant and written informed consent was obtained. We studied 82 overweight or obese, but otherwise healthy premenopausal women and men of similar age who were part of a clinical trial (mean age: 37 ± 10 years, mean BMI: 34 ± 7 kg/m(2)). All subjects underwent DXA of the spine and hip for assessment of bone mineral density (BMD), trabecular bone score (TBS), and hip structural analysis (HSA), and of the whole body for the assessment of body composition, including estimated visceral adipose tissue (VAT). Sixty-three subjects (77 %) had normal BMD and 19 subjects (23 %) had osteopenia. There were strong age-, sex-, and BMD-independent positive associations between lean mass and HSA parameters (r = 0.50 to r = 0.81, p < 0.0001), whereas there was no association with TBS. There were strong age-, sex- and BMD-independent inverse associations between total fat and VAT mass and TBS (r = -0.60 and r = -0.72, p < 0.0001 for both correlations), whereas there were no associations with HSA parameters. Lean mass is a positive predictor of hip geometry, whereas fat and VAT mass are negative predictors of trabecular microarchitecture in overweight/obese subjects.

  3. Obesity paradox in cancer: new insights provided by body composition.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Maria Cristina; Pastore, Carla A; Orlandi, Silvana P; Heymsfield, Steven B

    2014-05-01

    Obesity, defined by body mass index (BMI), appears to have a paradoxical protective effect in several chronic diseases. We investigated the obesity paradox in cancer patients by using body composition. The study was an observational study of 175 cancer patients assessed before chemotherapy. Obesity was defined as BMI (in kg/m(2)) ≥30 or fat mass index (FMI; fat mass divided by the square of height) ≥5.2 (men) and ≥8.2 (women) measured by using a bioelectrical impedance analysis. Low muscle mass (sarcopenia) was defined as fat-free mass index (fat-free mass divided by the square of height) <17.5 (men) and <15.1 (women). Most patients were women (65.7%) and had a mean (±SD) age of 56.9 ± 12.8 y. According to BMI criteria, 60% of patients were overweight or obese. The median survival time for overweight (2.64 y; range: 0.23-3.16 y) and obese (2.61 y; range: 0.26-3.20 y) patients was significantly higher than for patients with a normal (2.04 y; range: 0.06-3.05 y) or low (0.52 y; range: 0.19-0.98 y) BMI (P < 0.001). Sarcopenic patients had shorter survival, regardless of their FMI. Obesity predicted higher survival rates only when sarcopenia was absent. In a multivariate Cox regression model, sarcopenia was an independent predictor of higher mortality (HR: 5.19; 95% CI: 2.58, 10.43) after we controlled for BMI, age, and tumor stage. The obesity paradox is present in cancer patients only when obesity is defined by BMI. Patients with sarcopenic obesity had the poorest prognosis. Cancer patients with high mortality risk can be identified by a body-composition assessment.

  4. Use of a novel pediatric body composition technique for assessing body fatness and its changes during the first 6 month of life

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    BACKGROUND: Clinical assessment of infant growth and nutritional status is enhanced by accurate measurement of body composition and its changes over time. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the accuracy of an air-displacement plethysmograph, the PEA POD (Registered Trademark) Infant Body Composition System (Lif...

  5. Exercise, weight loss, and changes in body composition in mice: phenotypic relationships and genetic architecture.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Scott A; Nehrenberg, Derrick L; Hua, Kunjie; Garland, Theodore; Pomp, Daniel

    2011-02-24

    The regulation of body weight and composition is complex, simultaneously affected by genetic architecture, the environment, and their interactions. We sought to analyze the complex phenotypic relationships between voluntary exercise, food consumption, and changes in body weight and composition and simultaneously localize quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling these traits. A large (n = 815) murine advanced intercross line (G(4)) was created from a reciprocal cross between a high-running line and the inbred strain C57BL/6J. Body weight and composition (% fat, % lean) were measured at 4, 6, and 8 wk of age. After measurements at 8 wk of age, mice were given access to running wheels, during which food consumption was quantified and after which body weight and composition were assessed to evaluate exercise-induced changes. Phenotypic correlations indicated that the relationship between exercise and overall change in weight and adiposity depended on body composition before the initiation of exercise. Interval mapping revealed QTL for body weight, % fat, and % lean at 4, 6, and 8 wk of age. Furthermore, QTL were observed for food consumption and changes in weight, % fat, and % lean in response to short-term exercise. Here we provide some clarity for the relationship between weight loss, reduction in adiposity, food consumption, and exercise. Simultaneously, we reinforce the genetic basis for body weight and composition with some independent loci controlling growth at different ages. Finally, we present unique QTL providing insight regarding variation in weight loss and reduction in adiposity in response to exercise.

  6. Whole body air displacement plethysmography compared with hydrodensitometry for body composition analysis.

    PubMed

    Dewit, O; Fuller, N J; Fewtrell, M S; Elia, M; Wells, J C

    2000-02-01

    To assess the acceptability and feasibility of whole body air displacement plethysmography in children and to determine its precision and agreement with hydrodensitometry, an appropriate reference method. Age specific two component model equations were used to predict fat mass from body density in 22 children aged 8-12 years and in 10 adults for comparison of methods. Precision for each method was established from duplicate measurements. Plethysmography was accepted more readily than hydrodensitometry (100% v 69% provided duplicate measurements). Precision for fat mass in children was 0.38 kg by plethysmography and 0.68 kg by hydrodensitometry, and results were similar in adults. The mean (SD) fat mass in children was 6.9 kg (4.0) and 6.7 kg (4. 2) by plethysmography and hydrodensitometry, respectively, but 95% limits of agreement between methods were large (-4.1 kg to 3.5 kg fat). Plethysmography was more readily accepted and had better precision than hydrodensitometry. It also provided similar body composition results for the group but not for all individual children.

  7. Whole body air displacement plethysmography compared with hydrodensitometry for body composition analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dewit, O.; Fuller, N; Fewtrell, M.; Elia, M; Wells, J

    2000-01-01

    AIMS—To assess the acceptability and feasibility of whole body air displacement plethysmography in children and to determine its precision and agreement with hydrodensitometry, an appropriate reference method.
METHODS—Age specific two component model equations were used to predict fat mass from body density in 22 children aged 8-12 years and in 10 adults for comparison of methods. Precision for each method was established from duplicate measurements.
RESULTS—Plethysmography was accepted more readily than hydrodensitometry (100% v 69% provided duplicate measurements). Precision for fat mass in children was 0.38 kg by plethysmography and 0.68 kg by hydrodensitometry, and results were similar in adults. The mean (SD) fat mass in children was 6.9 kg (4.0) and 6.7 kg (4.2) by plethysmography and hydrodensitometry, respectively, but 95% limits of agreement between methods were large (−4.1 kg to 3.5 kg fat).
CONCLUSION—Plethysmography was more readily accepted and had better precision than hydrodensitometry. It also provided similar body composition results for the group but not for all individual children.

 PMID:10648375

  8. Impact of Incident Heart Failure on Body Composition Over Time in the Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study Population.

    PubMed

    Forman, Daniel E; Santanasto, Adam J; Boudreau, Robert; Harris, Tamara; Kanaya, Alka M; Satterfield, Suzanne; Simonsick, Eleanor M; Butler, Javed; Kizer, Jorge R; Newman, Anne B

    2017-09-01

    Prevalence of heart failure (HF) increases significantly with age, coinciding with age-related changes in body composition that are common and consequential. Still, body composition is rarely factored in routine HF care. The Health, Aging, and Body Composition study is a prospective cohort study of nondisabled adults. Using yearly dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, body composition was assessed in the Health, Aging, and Body Composition study over 6 years, comparing those who developed incident HF versus those who did not. Among 2815 Health, Aging, and Body Composition participants (48.5% men; 59.6% whites; mean age, 73.6±2.9 years), 111 developed incident HF over the 6-year study period. At entry into the Health, Aging, and Body Composition study, men and women who later developed HF had higher total body mass when compared with those versus those who did not develop HF (men, 80.9±10 versus 78.6±12.9 kg, P=0.05; women, 72.7±15.0 versus 68.2±14.2 kg, P=0.01, respectively). However, after developing HF, loss of total lean body mass was disproportionate; men with HF lost 654.6 versus 391.4 g/y in non-HF participants, P=0.02. Loss of appendicular lean mass was also greater with HF (-419.9 versus -318.2 g/y; P=0.02), even after accounting for total weight change. Among women with HF, loss of total and appendicular lean mass were also greater than in non-HF participants but not to the extent seen among men. Incident HF in older adults was associated with disproportionate loss of lean mass, particularly among men. Prognostic implications are significant, with key sex-specific inferences on physical function, frailty, disability, and pharmacodynamics that all merit further investigation. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Body composition and somatotype of the elite of Polish fencers.

    PubMed

    Sterkowicz-Przybycień, Katarzyna

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine body composition and somatotype of the male fencers who were grouped by different fencing weapons. Analysis of body composition, with untrained men as background, will update the data necessary for the somatic profiles of fencers. Thirty contestants were examined during the Polish Fencing Championships in 2004. They took part in epée (n = 10), foil (n = 10) and sabre (n = 10). They were aged 23.3 +/- 2.9; their length of training was 12.6 +/- 2.5 years, with the frequency of training 15.9 +/- 3.1 hours per week. In each weapon style there were champions and vice-champions of Poland from the year 2004. Twelve of them were classified among the first fifty contestants according to the D'Escrime International Federation (FIE) ranking. An experienced evaluator performed 10 measurements necessary to designate somatotypes by means of Heath-Carter method and to estimate the percentage of body fat and composition. Sabre fencers (weight = 84.4 kg, somatotype = 3.4-5.4-1.8) were heavier than both epée fencers (77.9 kg, 3.6-4.9-2.5) and foil fencers (74.9 kg, 2.9-4.2-2.8). Sabre specialists had higher mesomorphy than foil fencers (ANOVA and Bonferroni's multi comparison test). Sabre fencers were characterized by higher fat free mass and a higher BMI and fat free mass index than fencers of the other two weapons. Discriminant analysis result was significant (p < 0.01) with a relative percentage with a 72.4 and a canonical correlation coefficient 0.692, and Wilks' lambda = 0.385. Amongst the 30 observations used to fit the model, 22 (73.3%) were correctly classified. Against the background of non-training men, fencers were distinguished by a higher body weight (79.0 vs. 72.1 kg, t = 3.97, p < 0.001) and a higher height-weight ratio (43.21 vs. 42.46, t = 2.24, p < 0.05). Fencers' somatotypes differed from the somatotypes of the untrained (3.3-4.8-2.3 vs. 3.7-4.3-3.1). They were characterized by their higher mesomorphy (t = 2.10, p < 0

  10. Application of standards and models in body composition analysis.

    PubMed

    Müller, Manfred J; Braun, Wiebke; Pourhassan, Maryam; Geisler, Corinna; Bosy-Westphal, Anja

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this review is to extend present concepts of body composition and to integrate it into physiology. In vivo body composition analysis (BCA) has a sound theoretical and methodological basis. Present methods used for BCA are reliable and valid. Individual data on body components, organs and tissues are included into different models, e.g. a 2-, 3-, 4- or multi-component model. Today the so-called 4-compartment model as well as whole body MRI (or computed tomography) scans are considered as gold standards of BCA. In practice the use of the appropriate method depends on the question of interest and the accuracy needed to address it. Body composition data are descriptive and used for normative analyses (e.g. generating normal values, centiles and cut offs). Advanced models of BCA go beyond description and normative approaches. The concept of functional body composition (FBC) takes into account the relationships between individual body components, organs and tissues and related metabolic and physical functions. FBC can be further extended to the model of healthy body composition (HBC) based on horizontal (i.e. structural) and vertical (e.g. metabolism and its neuroendocrine control) relationships between individual components as well as between component and body functions using mathematical modelling with a hierarchical multi-level multi-scale approach at the software level. HBC integrates into whole body systems of cardiovascular, respiratory, hepatic and renal functions. To conclude BCA is a prerequisite for detailed phenotyping of individuals providing a sound basis for in depth biomedical research and clinical decision making.

  11. Two- and three-body wear of composite resins.

    PubMed

    Koottathape, Natthavoot; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Iwasaki, Naohiko; Kanehira, Masafumi; Finger, Werner J

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate two- and three-body wear of microfilled, micro-hybrid and nano-hybrid composite resins using a ball-on-disc sliding device. One microfilled (Durafill VS), one micro-hybrid (Filtek Z250), one hybrid (Clearfil AP-X), one nanofilled (Filtek Supreme XT), and two nano-hybrid (MI Flow, Venus Diamond) composite resins were examined. The composites were filled in a cylindrical cavity, and light polymerized. After storage in 37°C distilled water for 7days, all specimens were tested with a custom-made ball-on-disc sliding device with a zirconia ball as antagonist (50N loads, 1.2Hz, 10,000 cycles) immersed in water, poppy seed slurry and polymethyl methacrylate slurry, respectively. Maximum wear depth and volume loss of worn surfaces were quantified by a digital CCD microscope and analyzed with two-way analysis of variance. The interactions between composite resin and condition of their maximum wear depth and volume loss were significant (p<0.01). The abrasive wear produced at three-body loading with poppy seed slurry was very large for the microfilled composite, and small for all other composites tested. In contrast, two-body wear of the microfilled composite, and one nano-hybrid composite was very low. The ball-on-disc sliding device used is considered suitable to simulate sliding of an antagonist cusp on an opposing occlusal composite restoration, either in the two- or the three-body wear mode. All tested materials except for the microfilled composite showed low surface wear when exposed to poppy seed as the third-body medium. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A population-based twin study on sleep duration and body composition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong; Liu, Xin; Arguelles, Lester M; Patwari, Pallavi P; Zee, Phyllis C; Chervin, Ronald D; Ouyang, Fengxiu; Christoffel, Katherine K; Zhang, Shanchun; Hong, Xiumei; Wang, Guoying; Xu, Xiping; Wang, Xiaobin

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between sleep duration and body composition and to estimate the genetic contribution of sleep duration and body composition in a Chinese twin population. This cross-sectional analysis included 738 men and 511 women aged 21-72 year. Anthropometric and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) measures of body composition were used. Sleep duration was obtained from a standard sleep questionnaire. Multiple regression models were used to examine the association between sleep duration and body composition measures. Structural equation modeling was used to assess the heritability of sleep duration and body composition. Compared with individuals in the 2nd and 3rd age-specific quartiles of sleep duration (reference group), shorter (1st quartile) sleep duration among women but not men was associated with higher z-scores (0.248-0.317) for all adiposity measures--BMI, fat mass index (FMI), percent body fat mass (%BF), and percent trunk fat mass (%TF), P < 0.05 for each--and with 0.306 lower z-scores for percent body lean mass (%LM) and 0.353 lower lean/fat mass ratio (LFR), P < 0.01 for each. The heritability of sleep duration was 0.27 in men and 0.29 in women, while the heritability of body composition was as high as 0.56-0.73 after adjustment for age in both genders. Short sleep duration was associated with increased body fat and decreased lean body mass in women but not in men. Sleep duration was largely influenced by environmental factors while adiposity measures were mainly influenced by genetic factors.

  13. Body Mass Index Measurement in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nihiser, Allison J.; Lee, Sarah M.; Wechsler, Howell; McKenna, Mary; Odom, Erica; Reinold, Chris; Thompson, Diane; Grummer-Strawn, Larry

    2007-01-01

    Background: School-based body mass index (BMI) measurement has attracted much attention across the nation from researchers, school officials, legislators, and the media as a potential approach to address obesity among youth. Methods: An expert panel, convened by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in 2005, reviewed and provided…

  14. Body Mass Index Measurement in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nihiser, Allison J.; Lee, Sarah M.; Wechsler, Howell; McKenna, Mary; Odom, Erica; Reinold, Chris; Thompson, Diane; Grummer-Strawn, Larry

    2007-01-01

    Background: School-based body mass index (BMI) measurement has attracted much attention across the nation from researchers, school officials, legislators, and the media as a potential approach to address obesity among youth. Methods: An expert panel, convened by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in 2005, reviewed and provided…

  15. Adult cranberry beverage consumers have healthier macronutrient intakes and measures of body composition compared to non-consumers: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2005-2008.

    PubMed

    Duffey, Kiyah J; Sutherland, Lisa A

    2013-12-04

    Flavonoids, present in high levels in cranberries, are potent bioactives known for their health-promoting benefits, but cranberry beverages (CB) are not typically recommended as part of a healthy diet. We examine the association between CB consumption with macronutrient intake and weight status. Data for US adults (≥19 years, n = 10,891) were taken from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) Survey 2005-2008. Total CB consumption was measured over two non-consecutive 24-h dietary recalls. Linear and logistic regression models adjusting for important covariates were used to examine predicted differences between CB consumers and non-consumers on macronutrient and anthropometric outcomes. Results are weighted to be nationally representative. CB consumers (n = 581) were older (>50 year) non-Hispanic black females. They consumed an average 221 mL (7.5 oz) CB per day. In fully adjusted models CB consumers (vs. non-consumers) had higher carbohydrates and total sugars and lower percent energy from protein and total fat (all p < 0.001), but no difference in total energy. A significantly higher proportion of CB consumers were predicted to be normal weight (BMI < 25 kg/m2; p = 0.001) and had to have lower waist circumferences (p = 0.001). Although there was not a significant trend across level of CB intake, low and middle level CB consumers compared to non-consumers were more likely to be normal weight (p < 0.001) and less likely to be overweight/obese (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2, p < 0.001). Despite having slightly higher daily macronutrient intakes, CB consumers have more desirable anthropometric measures compared to non-consumers.

  16. The Relationship Between Body Composition, Anaerobic Performance and Sprint Ability of Amputee Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Özkan, Ali; Kayıhan, Gürhan; Köklü, Yusuf; Ergun, Nevin; Koz, Mitat; Ersöz, Gülfem; Dellal, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between body composition, anaerobic performance and sprint performance of amputee soccer players. Fifteen amputee soccer players participated in this study voluntarily. Subjects’ height, body weight, body mass index, body fat percentage (Jackson and Pollock formula) and somatotype characteristics (Heath-Carter system) were determined. The sprint performance at 10m, 20m and 30m was evaluated, whereas the counter movement jump (CMJ), relative CMJ (RCMJ), squat jump (SJ) and relative SJ (RSJ) tests were used for the determination of anaerobic performance. The results of the Pearson Product Moment correlation analysis indicated that body composition was significantly correlated with CMJ and SJ (p < 0.01), on the other hand, no measure of body composition was significantly related to the other component (p > 0.05). A significant correlation was found between CMJ, RCMJ, SJ, 10 m, 20 m and 30 m sprint performance (p < 0.05); whereas, in contrast, no measure of body composition was significantly related to the 10 m, 20 m and 30 m sprint performance (p > 0.05). In conclusion, the findings of the present study indicated that sprint performance was described as an essential factor in anaerobic performance whereas body composition and somatotype play a determinant role in anaerobic and sprint performance in amputee soccer players. PMID:23486067

  17. Assessment of nutritional status, body composition, and human immunodeficiency virus-associated morphologic changes.

    PubMed

    Knox, Tamsin A; Zafonte-Sanders, Melissa; Fields-Gardner, Cade; Moen, Karol; Johansen, Diana; Paton, Nicholas

    2003-04-01

    Nutritional status should be assessed at regular intervals as part of management of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The simplest approach to assessment is serial weight measurement. A comprehensive nutritional assessment includes (1) anthropometric measurements of body composition; (2) biochemical measurements of serum protein, micronutrients, and metabolic parameters; (3) clinical assessment of altered nutritional requirements and social or psychological issues that may preclude adequate intake; and (4) measurement of dietary intake. Techniques for measuring body composition of fat and lean body mass include anthropometry and bioelectric impedance analysis. Other techniques, including dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), hydrodensitometry, total body potassium measurement, and cross-sectional computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging are available in research centers. Anthropometry, including waist-hip ratios, regional DXA, and cross-sectional imaging, is best for detecting morphologic changes associated with fat redistribution syndrome. Nutritional assessment and intervention in children with HIV can help to prevent stunted growth and development.

  18. Are immunoglobulin concentrations associated with the body composition of adolescents?

    PubMed

    Zúñiga-Torres, María G; Martínez-Carrillo, Beatriz E; Pardo-Morales, Rosa V; Wärnberg, Julia; Marcos, Ascensión; Benítez-Arciniega, Alejandra D; Valdés-Ramos, Roxana

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the association between serum concentrations of immunoglobulins (Ig) A, G, and M and body composition of adolescents from Mexico. Informed consent was obtained from parents and assent was obtained from the adolescents for the evaluation of 125 adolescents from the Capital city of Toluca and the adjacent semiurban county of Lerma de Villada. Height, weight, waist, and hip circumference were measured by trained personnel. Body mass index and waist:hip ratio were calculated from these measurements, whereas body fat (BF) was calculated from tricipital and subscapular skinfolds and measured by bioelectrical impedance. Serum concentrations of Ig were determined by nephelometry. Data were analyzed by independent samples t test and Pearson correlations. Subjects were mainly females (71.2%), with a mean age of 16.8 years (+/-0.8). No differences were reported in all indicators by weight or BF between gender. Female participants had higher Ig concentrations than males (IgG t = 2.24, p = 0.027; IgA t = 2.05, p = 0.043; IgM t = 4.49, p < 0.001). Positive correlations were reported for IgA and IgM with tricipital skinfold (r = 0.192, p = 0.041; and r = 0.221, p = 0.018, respectively) and for total BF by bioimpedance (r = 0.243, p = 0.009). Ig concentrations do not seem to be affected by overweight, obesity, or excessive or central BF in adolescents.

  19. Longitudinal changes in ultrasonic measurements of body composition during growth in Suffolk ram lambs and evaluation of alternative adjustment strategies for ultrasonic scan data.

    PubMed

    Emenheiser, J C; Greiner, S P; Lewis, R M; Notter, D R

    2010-04-01

    Four equations were used to compare alternative procedures to adjust ultrasonic estimates (y) of backfat thickness (BF) and LM area (LMA) for BW using data from a series of 7 scans on 24 Suffolk ram lambs born in 2007. Equations were linear, linear + quadratic, allometric (y = alphaBW(beta)), and allometric + BW (ABW; y = alphaBW(beta)e(gammaW)). Goodness of fit was very similar between equations over the range of the data. Resulting adjustment equations were tested using 3 serial scans on winter-born Suffolk (n = 150), Hampshire (n = 36), and Dorset (n = 43) rams and 52 fall-born Dorset rams tested at the Virginia Ram Test in 1999 through 2002. Partial correlations (accounting for the effect of year) between predicted and actual measures ranged from 0.78 to 0.87 for BF and 0.66 to 0.93 for LMA in winter-born rams and from 0.70 to 0.71 for BF and 0.72 to 0.78 for LMA in fall-born rams. No significant differences in predictive ability existed between equations for BF or LMA (P > 0.05), and there was no indication that the allometric equation was a better predictor than linear within the range of the data. Adjustment equations were also tested using serial scan data from 37 Suffolk ewe lambs born in the same contemporary group as the rams used to derive the prediction equations but fed for a substantially slower rate of BW gain. Correlations between predicted and actual values of BF and LMA indicated lambs were too young and small at the first scan (77 d, 32.4 kg) to reliably predict carcass measures at typical slaughter weights. For prediction using data from the 2 subsequent scans, at mean ages >96 d and mean BW >39 kg, correlations between predicted and actual values were 0.72 to 0.74 for BF and 0.54 to 0.76 for LMA. Little difference existed between equations for predicting BF. For LMA, the ABW form was a weaker predictor than the others, and the linear equation was slightly superior to allometric. Therefore, it appears the linear and allometric forms are both

  20. The effect of Pilates exercise on body composition in sedentary overweight and obese women.

    PubMed

    Şavkin, Raziye; Aslan, Ummuhan B

    2017-11-01

    Pilates is a popular exercise approach among women. Still there is poor empirical quantitative evidence indicating a positive effect of Pilates exercises on body composition. The aim of our study is to determine the effects of Pilates exercises on body composition in sedentary overweight and obese women. Thirty-seven women, aged between 30 to 50 (43.79±4.88) years, included the study. Subjects are randomly divided into Pilates group (N.=19) and control group (N.=18). Pilates exercises was given for 90 minutes, 3 times/week, for 8 week with a gradual strength increase of 11-17 in the Rating of Perceived Exercise. Control group did not participate in any physical activity program. Bioelectric Impedance Analysis was used for determine the body composition of participants. Weight, Body Mass Index (BMI), body fat mass, lean body mass, waist, abdomen and hip circumference were measured at pre- and post-training period. In Pilates group, weight, BMI, fat percentage, waist, abdomen and hip circumference decreased significantly after training (P<0.05) while no significant difference was observed in lean body mass (P>0.05). In control group, abdomen and hip circumference increased significantly (P<0.05) as the other parameters showed the tendency for an increase, but no significant difference (P<0.05). The results of this study indicate that 8 weeks Pilates exercises have positive effects on body composition in sedentary overweight and obese women. Pilates exercises can be applied for improving body composition.

  1. Method for Forming Fiber Reinforced Composite Bodies with Graded Composition and Stress Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay (Inventor); Levine, Stanley R. (Inventor); Smialek, James A. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A near-net, complex shaped ceramic fiber reinforced silicon carbide based composite bodies with graded compositions and stress zones is disclosed. To provide the composite a fiber preform is first fabricated and an interphase is applied by chemical vapor infiltration, sol-gel or polymer processes. This first body is further infiltrated with a polymer mixture containing carbon, and/or silicon carbide, and additional oxide, carbide, or nitride phases forming a second body. One side of the second body is spray coated or infiltrated with slurries containing high thermal expansion and oxidation resistant. crack sealant phases and the other side of this second body is coated with low expansion phase materials to form a third body. This third body consisting of porous carbonaceous matrix surrounding the previously applied interphase materials, is then infiltrated with molten silicon or molten silicon-refractory metal alloys to form a fourth body. The resulting fourth body comprises dense composites consisting of fibers with the desired interphase which are surrounded by silicon carbide and other second phases materials at the outer and inner surfaces comprising material of silicon, germanium, refractory metal suicides, borides, carbides, oxides, and combinations thereof The resulting composite fourth body has different compositional patterns from one side to the other.

  2. [Body composition analysis in obesity: radionuclide and non radionuclide methods].

    PubMed

    Tzotzas, Themistoklis; Krassas, Gerasimos E; Doumas, Argirios

    2008-01-01

    Body composition (BC) assessment provides important information regarding the absolute or relative amount of bone, lean and fat tissue. Different somatometric techniques have been applied in numerous epidemiological and experimental studies, as well as in every day clinical practice. Traditional techniques for BC analysis include skin fold thickness measurements, radioisotope dilution methods, hydrodensitometry and underwater weighing, while newer techniques include bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), air displacement plethysmography (ADP), dual energy X-rays absorptiometry (DEXA), computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. In addition, positron emission tomography helped to the functional investigation of adipose tissue, in particular of brown tissue. All these techniques have contributed a lot to the understanding of physiological conditions such as exercise training, menopause and ageing, adolescence health parameters, as well as pathological conditions such as disorders of nutrition, cancer, obesity and diabetes mellitus. In obesity, BC contributed to diagnosis and the pathological impact of visceral adipose tissue. In addition, conditions such as pseudo- or hypermuscular obesity and sarcopenia, which are often observed in various endocrine diseases, were investigated in detail by using such methods. During weight loss, some of these methods were quite accurate in measuring changes in fat and lean mass. Apart from anthropometric measurements, a BC measurement if possible should be included in obesity assessment. Measurements of skin fold thickness combined with BIA are quite sufficient for routine clinical practice. However, in specialized clinics and in research, more sophisticated methods like ADP or DEXA are used.

  3. The elite athlete - assessing body shape, size, proportion and composition.

    PubMed

    Kerr, D A; Ackland, T R; Schreiner, A B

    1995-03-01

    In the quest to optimize performance of the elite athlete the sport scientist has sought to determine the ideal physique for a given sport or event. For some sports, specific structural characteristics offer definite performance advantages; for example in rowing, in addition to height, a large arm span has been identified as important. In other sports. such as long distance running, low levels of adiposity or 'fatness' appear to be linked with faster running times. There are four areas where appraisal of the athlete's physique can provide useful information: (1) identification of talented athletes; (2) to assess and monitor the growing athlete; (3) to monitor training and performance; and (4) to determine 'race weight' in weight-category sports. As a research tool a particular method must be reliable and valid. Other considerations include how expensive the method is, if it is suitable for a field situation and if large amounts of data on a number of subjects can be collected quickly. The method should be safe for both the athlete and the tester and provide useful feedback for the athlete or coach. Anthropometry, with training is able to fulfil most of these criteria and is the most widely used method of physique assessment in sports science. Large anthropometric data bases have been collected on elite athletes at Olympic games and world championships according to a standard protocol. Kinanthropometry, which has developed from anthropometry, is concerned with measurement and evaluation of different aspects of human movement and individual variation in body shape, size, proportion and composition. For the assessment of adiposity a sum of skinfolds, usually over six sites, is most commonly used rather than percentage body fat formulae. Muscle mass can be assessed indirectly through girth and corrected girth measurements. Limb lengths and breadths are used to assess skeletal structure and proportional differences in limb size. The anthropometric methods most commonly

  4. Dietary protein source influence on body size and composition in growing zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Smith, Daniel L; Barry, R Jeff; Powell, Mickie L; Nagy, Tim R; D'Abramo, L R; Watts, Stephen A

    2013-09-01

    The importance of nutritional components on growth and body composition outcomes has been demonstrated in multiple model organisms. Although zebrafish (Danio rerio) have an established role in research laboratories for its utility in understanding developmental biology and genetics, the influence of diet composition on basic growth outcomes is less well demonstrated. In the current study, four protein sources were tested in isolation using isonitrogenous diets or combined using a defined lab diet. Fish (n≈60/group) were group housed (n≤10 fish/1.8 L tank) and fed ad libitum three times daily for 12 weeks. Fish were assessed for effects on length, body weight, and body composition (lean and fat mass). Individuals fed wheat gluten protein were significantly shorter in length, with significantly lower body weight and lean mass in both male and female fish, although percent body fat was high compared with other diets. Casein-fed fish similarly had significantly reduced body length, body weight, and lean and fat mass in both male and female fish, with a low percent body fat compared with other diets (leanest). Fish protein hydrolysate-fed fish had significantly lower lean mass and a high percent body fat, whereas soy protein isolate diet performed similarly to a mixed-protein control diet for all measured outcomes. These results suggest that the protein source, with accompanying amino acid ratios or additional protein source differences, has a significant impact on growth and body composition outcomes in zebrafish when fed in a semipurified, defined diet background.

  5. Body composition and age in African-American and Caucasian women: relationship to plasma leptin levels.

    PubMed

    Perry, H M; Morley, J E; Horowitz, M; Kaiser, F E; Miller, D K; Wittert, G

    1997-12-01

    Leptin is a recently isolated peptide hormone released from adipocytes that has been postulated to play a role in appetite regulation and energy metabolism. Aging affects both food intake and body composition. Body composition is also affected by ethnicity. We have evaluated the relationships between serum leptin levels, age, body composition (by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry), and hormonal parameters in a cross-sectional study of 94 women, 53 African-American (AAF) and 41 Caucasian (CF). Our hypotheses were as follows: (1) changes in body composition would be related to age in a sinusoidal pattern, (2) changes in serum leptin would parallel changes in body fat, (3) serum leptin levels would be influenced by body fat distribution, and (4) serum leptin would be related to serum concentrations of sex hormones. Serum leptin paralleled changes in body fat and body mass index (BMI) with age. In the entire group, serum leptin correlated closely with measures of body fat, including BMI and total fat mass, and there was no difference in leptin levels between the two ethnic groups. In simple regression analysis, serum leptin was related to both serum estradiol and testosterone. The relationship between serum leptin and trunk fat was linear in both groups, but significantly different in AAF and CF (P = .014). Serum leptin was associated with the trunk to lower-extremity fat ratio in CF (r = .67, P = .001) but not in AAF. Body fat was increased with advancing age until about 65 years and then declined. Measures of lean body mass declined linearly with age in the entire group, as well as both subgroups. In the entire group, total lean body mass and lean body mass corrected for BMI (lean body mass/BMI) were inversely related to age. In subjects aged less than 60 years AAF were stronger (P < .05) and had both a larger BMI and fat mass (P < .05) than CF. However, the patterns of age-related changes in fat body mass, lean body mass, and BMI were similar in both groups. In the

  6. Body measures: phenomenological considerations of corporeal ethics.

    PubMed

    Fielding, H A

    1998-08-01

    The development of bioethics primarily at the cognitive level further perpetuates the tendency to construe all aspects of our lives, including our bodies, as technical systems. For example, if we consider the moral issue of organ sales without taking our embodiment into account there appear to be no sound arguments for opposing such sales. However, it is important to consider the aspects of the phenomenal body that challenge rational deliberation by exploring an embodied approach to the ethical dilemma produced by a proposed kidney exchange as presented in one of Krzysztof Kieślowski's Dekalog films. What is sought is a description of a body-measure that would serve as a critique of strictly cognitive bioethical deliberations.

  7. Body Composition, Sarcopenia, and Suicidal Ideation in Elderly Koreans: Hallym Aging Study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Hyeon; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Park, Yong Soon

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to assess the relationship between body composition and suicidal ideation among the Korean elderly population (n = 302; ≥ 65 years) who participated in the Hallym Aging Study in 2010. Body composition was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and obesity was measured by the indices of body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), and body fat percentage. Sarcopenia was defined as presence of both low muscle mass and low muscle function. Suicidal ideation was assessed using the Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation. We found no differences in body composition measures between subjects with suicidal ideation and those without. In the logistic regression analyses, there were no significant relationships for suicidal ideation according to body composition measures, including BMI, WC, WHR, WHtR, and body fat percentage in both sexes. After adjusting for age, smoking status, alcohol drinking, regular exercise, medical comorbidities, monthly income, education level, and presence of depressive symptoms, the odds ratio (OR) of suicidal ideation was higher in elderly men with sarcopenia compared to those without, whereas no significant relationships were observed in elderly women (OR 8.28, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.20-61.34 in men; OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.07-8.43 in women). Sarcopenia is closely associated with an increased risk of suicidal ideation in elderly men.

  8. Workshop Proceedings: Health and Job-Specific Body Composition Standards for the U.S. Air Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    This proceedings document summarizes discussions that took place during the Health and Job-Specific Body Composition Workshop, sponsored by the USAF...Analysis, Health and Job-Specific Body Composition Standards for the US Air Force, Volumes I, II, and III This document includes written comments...an age-independent measurement of body composition health screening across all services, b) remedial actions would be determined by the individual

  9. Top 10 research questions related to body composition.

    PubMed

    Going, Scott; Lee, Vinson; Blew, Rob; Laddu, Deepika; Hetherington-Rauth, Megan

    2014-03-01

    An understanding of body composition is crucial to understanding human health, disease, and function. Research in body composition has focused on the development of assessment methods, description of normal changes in body composition with growth and development and aging, and the changes that occur in body composition in response to challenges ranging from illness to planned interventions. Each focus is significant, and in a sense, they are interdependent, because technological advances allow more sophisticated questions to be addressed, which in turn drives the development of better methods. Significant advances have been made in each area, although perhaps surprisingly basic questions remain. For example, growth trajectories are often estimated from cross-sectional data, given the resources needed for long-term observational studies, and thus, longitudinal descriptive data are still needed. Along with advances in laboratory methods, development of field methods remains relevant for screening and clinical practice. Despite recognition of wide interindividual differences in intervention response, average outcomes continue to be emphasized. With technological advances, it is now possible to examine genetic along with nongenetic factors that underlie changes in body composition, and these techniques need to be applied in long-term, well-controlled trials. In this article, we review 10 key questions in related areas in which research is needed to continue to advance the field.

  10. Body Composition Changes Resulting from Fluid Ingestion and Dehydration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girandola, Robert N.

    1977-01-01

    It is recommended that when obtaining measures of body density by hydrostatic weighing, the subjects normal level of hydration be ascertained, since variance in body fat calculation from the hyperhydrated to the hydrated state can amount to twenty percent (two percent in actual body fat). (MB)

  11. Body Composition Changes Resulting from Fluid Ingestion and Dehydration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girandola, Robert N.

    1977-01-01

    It is recommended that when obtaining measures of body density by hydrostatic weighing, the subjects normal level of hydration be ascertained, since variance in body fat calculation from the hyperhydrated to the hydrated state can amount to twenty percent (two percent in actual body fat). (MB)

  12. In vivo measurement of human body composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, N.

    1974-01-01

    The time course of physiological changes that occur during the first 21 days of continuous bed rest was examined. The test involved a total of 14 men in the age range of 25 to 36 years. The subjects were divided into groups and tested on a staggered schedule. Results are presented.

  13. Age-Related Changes in Body Composition of Bovine Growth Hormone Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Amanda J.; Chung, Min-Yu; List, Edward O.; Walker, Jennifer; Okada, Shigeru; Kopchick, John J.; Berryman, Darlene E.

    2009-01-01

    GH has a significant impact on body composition due to distinct anabolic and catabolic effects on lean and fat mass, respectively. Several studies have assessed body composition in mice expressing a GH transgene. Whereas all studies report enhanced growth of transgenic mice as compared with littermate controls, there are inconsistencies in terms of the relative proportion of lean mass to fat mass in these animals. The purpose of this study was to characterize the accumulation of adipose and lean mass with age and according to gender in a bovine (b) GH transgenic mouse line. Weight and body composition measurements were assessed in male and female bGH mice with corresponding littermate controls in the C57BL/6J genetic background. Body composition measurements began at 6 wk and continued through 1 yr of age. At the conclusion of the study, tissue weights were determined and triglyceride content was quantified in liver and kidney. Although body weights for bGH mice were significantly greater than their corresponding littermate controls at all time points, body composition measurements revealed an unexpected transition midway through analyses. That is, younger bGH mice had relatively more fat mass than nontransgenic littermates, whereas bGH mice became significantly leaner than controls by 4 months in males and 6 months in females. These results reveal the importance in timing and gender when conducting studies related to body composition or lean and fat tissue in GH transgenic mice or in other genetically manipulated mouse strains in which body composition may be impacted. PMID:18948397

  14. Measurement of whole body cellular and collagen nitrogen, potassium, and other elements by neutron activation and whole body counting

    SciTech Connect

    James, H.M.; Fabricius, P.J.; Dykes, P.W.

    1987-09-01

    Whole body nitrogen can be measured by neutron activation analysis with an acceptable radiation dose; it is an index of body protein which, in normal subjects, is 65% cellular protein and 35% extracellular connective collagen. Whole body potassium can be measured by whole body counting without irradiating the subject; it is an index of body cell mass. We measured whole body nitrogen, potassium, extracellular water, intracellular water, and fat-folds. The differences between 37 malnourished patients and five normal subjects suggested that the patients had 9 kg less cell mass than normal, but no difference in extracellular mass. Measurements were made on eight patients before and after 14 days of total parenteral nutrition; balance of nitrogen intake and excretion also was measured. The changes were consistent with mean increases of 3 kg of cellular mass and 3 kg of fat with no change of extracellular mass. The accuracy and sensitivity of the whole body measurements need further confirmation for use in patients with changing body composition. Where tissue wasting is largely from the cellular compartment, potassium could be a more sensitive index of wasting than nitrogen. Multielement analysis of nitrogen, potassium, chlorine, and carbon will probably be valuable in elucidating body composition in malnutrition.

  15. Somatic maturation and body composition in female healthy adolescents with or without adjustment for body fat

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Valter Paulo N.; de Faria, Franciane Rocha; de Faria, Eliane Rodrigues; Priore, Silvia Eloiza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the relationship between the stages of somatic maturation and body composition in eutrophic female adolescents with or without excessive body fat. Methods: Cross-sectional study of 118 female adolescents, from 14 to 19 years-old, in Viçosa, Minas Gerais, Southeast Brazil. The adolescents were divided in two groups: Group 1 (G1), eutrophic with adequate body fat percentage, and Group 2 (G2), eutrophic with high body fat percentage. The somatic maturation was assessed by the formula for estimating the Peak Height Velocity (PHV). Results: The PHV had higher average score in G1 adolescents compared to G2 (0.26 versus 0.05; p=0.032). There was an association between G1, G2 and the somatic maturation (p=0.049). The female adolescents before and during PHV presented higher values of fat body BMI (p=0.034) and percentage of central fat (p=0.039) compared to the adolescents after PHV. There was a correspondence between before PHV stage and the excess of body fat (α=0.751). Conclusions: There was an association between somatic maturation and body composition in eutrophic female adolescents. Length, BMI and fat percentage were different among the somatic maturation stages. It is relevant to evaluate the somatic maturation and the changes occurring in the body composition during adolescence in order to better evaluate and manage the nutritional status and the body fat excess. PMID:24676194

  16. Precision of measurement and body size in whole-body air-displacement plethysmography.

    PubMed

    Wells, J C; Fuller, N J

    2001-08-01

    To investigate methodological and biological precision for air-displacement plethysmography (ADP) across a wide range of body size. Repeated measurements of body volume (BV) and body weight (WT), and derived estimates of density (BD) and indices of fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM). Sixteen men, aged 22--48 y; 12 women, aged 24--42 y; 13 boys, aged 5--14 y; 17 girls, aged 5--16 y. BV and WT were measured using the Bodpod ADP system from which estimates of BD, FM and FFM were derived. FM and FFM were further adjusted for height to give fat mass index (FMI) and fat-free mass index (FFMI). ADP is very precise for measuring both BV and BD (between 0.16 and 0.44% of the mean). After removing two outliers from the database, and converting BD to body composition, precision of FMI was <6% in adults and within 8% in children, while precision of FFMI was within 1.5% for both age groups. ADP shows good precision for BV and BD across a wide range of body size, subject to biological artefacts. If aberrant values can be identified and rejected, precision of body composition is also good. Aberrant values can be identified by using pairs of ADP procedures, allowing the rejection of data where successive BD values differed by >0.007 kg/l. Precision of FMI obtained using pairs of procedures improves to <4.5% in adults and <5.5% in children.

  17. Measurement of body fat and hydration of the fat-free body in health and disease

    SciTech Connect

    Streat, S.J.; Beddoe, A.H.; Hill, G.L.

    1985-06-01

    Body fat mass, fat-free body mass and body water are basic components of body composition which are used in nutritional and metabolic studies and in patient care. A method of measuring total body fat (TBF), fat-free mass (FFM) and its hydration (TBW/FFM) involving prompt gamma in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) and tritium dilution has been compared with the more traditional methods of densitometry and skinfold anthropometry in 36 normal volunteers, and with skinfold anthropometry in 56 patients presenting for nutritional support. While the mean values of TBF were in reasonable agreement for the three methods in normals it was founds that skinfold anthropometry underestimated TBF relative to the IVNAA/tritium method by, on average, 3.0 kg (19%) in patients. Furthermore, the ranges of values in normals of the ratio TBW/FFM for the anthropometric (0.62 to 0.80) and densitometric (0.65 to 0.80) methods were much wider than the range for the IVNAA/tritium method (0.69 to 0.76), in which TBW was measured by tritium dilution in all cases. In the patients, the ranges of this ratio were 0.52 to 0.90 for the anthropometric method and 0.67 to 0.82 for the IVNAA/tritium method; clearly anthropometry yields values of TBW/FFM which are outside accepted biological limits. On the basis of these findings, ranges of TBW/FFM are suggested for both normal adults (0.69 to 0.75) and patients requiring nutritional support (0.67 to 0.83). Finally it is concluded that the IVNAA/tritium method is a suitable method for measuring TBF and FFM and particularly so when body composition is abnormal.

  18. Association between Body Composition and Sport Injury in Canadian Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ezzat, Allison M; Schneeberg, Amy; Koehoorn, Mieke; Emery, Carolyn A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the association between overweight or obesity and sport injury in a population-based sample of Canadian adolescents. Methods: Cross-sectional analyses were performed using the Canadian Community Health Survey (2009-2010), a nationally representative sample (n=12,407) of adolescents aged 12-19 years. Body composition was quantified using BMI, grouping participants into healthy weight, overweight, or obese. The outcome of interest was acute or repetitive strain injury sustained during sport in the previous year. We examined the relationship between sport injury and overweight or obesity compared with healthy weight using multivariate logistic regression, controlling for sex, ethnicity, physical activity, and socio-economic status. We also examined the interaction between physical activity and body composition in a secondary analysis with a subset of active adolescents. Results: No significant relationship was found between being overweight and sport injury (odds ratio [OR]=1.04, 95% CI: 0.92, 1.17); however, a protective effect was seen between obesity and sport injury (OR=0.67, 95% CI: 0.53, 0.84). Secondary analysis revealed that overweight youths with the highest activity level (quartile 4) did have increased odds of sport injury (OR=1.38, 95% CI: 1.04, 1.83), yet obese youths with a moderate activity level (quartile 2) were protected compared with healthy-weight youths (OR=0.46, 95% CI: 0.24, 0.91). Conclusions: Further examination of active adolescents is warranted. Studies should consider sport-specific differences and comprehensive measurement of exposure to sport.

  19. Association between Body Composition and Sport Injury in Canadian Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Schneeberg, Amy; Koehoorn, Mieke; Emery, Carolyn A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the association between overweight or obesity and sport injury in a population-based sample of Canadian adolescents. Methods: Cross-sectional analyses were performed using the Canadian Community Health Survey (2009–2010), a nationally representative sample (n=12,407) of adolescents aged 12–19 years. Body composition was quantified using BMI, grouping participants into healthy weight, overweight, or obese. The outcome of interest was acute or repetitive strain injury sustained during sport in the previous year. We examined the relationship between sport injury and overweight or obesity compared with healthy weight using multivariate logistic regression, controlling for sex, ethnicity, physical activity, and socio-economic status. We also examined the interaction between physical activity and body composition in a secondary analysis with a subset of active adolescents. Results: No significant relationship was found between being overweight and sport injury (odds ratio [OR]=1.04, 95% CI: 0.92, 1.17); however, a protective effect was seen between obesity and sport injury (OR=0.67, 95% CI: 0.53, 0.84). Secondary analysis revealed that overweight youths with the highest activity level (quartile 4) did have increased odds of sport injury (OR=1.38, 95% CI: 1.04, 1.83), yet obese youths with a moderate activity level (quartile 2) were protected compared with healthy-weight youths (OR=0.46, 95% CI: 0.24, 0.91). Conclusions: Further examination of active adolescents is warranted. Studies should consider sport-specific differences and comprehensive measurement of exposure to sport. PMID:27909377

  20. Operation Everest II: Nutrition and Body Composition.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-21

    and thigh) using a Harpenden skinfold caliper with a caliper poressure of 10 glm m2. Circumferences of the neck, shoulders, chest, hips, thigh, calf...of all subjects ( Table 5). The sum of all 7 skinfold measurements followed the same trend as hydrostatic weighing with skinfolds decreasing for 4...studies that showed losses in skinfold thickness and 1BF (3,6,9,13,29) however, there was a wide range from the 2 subjects with increases in skinfoll

  1. REGULATION OF BODY COMPOSITION AND BIOENERGETICS BY ESTROGENS

    PubMed Central

    Van Pelt, Rachael E.; Gavin, Kathleen M.; Kohrt, Wendy M.

    2015-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Evidence from basic, preclinical, and clinical research points to an important role of estradiol (E2) in the regulation of body composition and bioenergetics. There is consistent evidence from basic and preclinical research that the disruption of E2 signaling, through either genetic manipulation (e.g., estrogen receptor deletion) or surgical intervention (e.g., ovariectomy), accelerates fat accumulation, with a disproportionate increase in abdominal fat. Clinical evidence for the regulation of body composition and bioenergetics by E2 is less consistent. Evidence exists both for and against menopause as the mediator of changes in body composition. This is likely related to the prolonged nature of the menopause transition in women and the associated complexities of distinguishing effects of the loss of gonadal function from other phenomena of aging. However, a need remains to better understand the metabolic actions of estrogens in women because of the potential impact on health after the menopause. PMID:26316249

  2. Measuring Venus' Bulk Elemental Composition with BECA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, A. M.; Grau, J.; Lawrence, D. J.; Miles, J.; Peplowski, P. N.; Perkins, L.; Schweitzer, J. S.; Starr, R. D.

    2016-10-01

    The Bulk Elemental Composition Analyzer (BECA) instrument uses high energy neutrons and gamma rays to measure the bulk elemental composition of Venus beneath a landed probe. We will present the results of a BECA prototype tested at NASA/GSFC.

  3. Assessment of body composition by air-displacement plethysmography: influence of body temperature and moisture.

    PubMed

    Fields, David A; Higgins, Paul B; Hunter, Gary R

    2004-04-01

    BACKGROUND: To investigate the effect of body temperature and moisture on body fat (%fat), volume and density by air-displacement plethysmography (BOD POD). METHODS: %fat, body volume and density by the BOD POD before (BOD PODBH) and immediately following hydrostatic weighing (BOD PODFH) were performed in 32 healthy females (age (yr) 33 +/- 11, weight (kg) 64 +/- 14, height (cm) 167 +/- 7). Body temperature and moisture were measured prior to BOD PODBH and prior to BOD PODFH with body moisture defined as the difference in body weight (kg) between the BOD PODBH and BOD PODFH measurements. RESULTS: BOD PODFH %fat (27.1%) and body volume (61.5 L) were significantly lower (P body density (1.0379 g/cm3) significantly higher (P body volume (61.7 L), and body density (1.0341 g/cm3). A significant increase in body temperature (~0.6 degrees C; P body moisture (0.08 kg; P Body surface area was positively associated with the difference in %fat independent of changes in body temperature and moisture, r = 0.30, P < 0.05. CONCLUSION: These data demonstrate for the first time that increases in body heat and moisture result in an underestimation of body fat when using the BOD POD, however, the precise mechanism remains unidentified.

  4. The Body and the Beautiful: Health, Attractiveness and Body Composition in Men’s and Women’s Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Brierley, Mary-Ellen; Brooks, Kevin R.; Mond, Jonathan; Stevenson, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    The dominant evolutionary theory of physical attraction posits that attractiveness reflects physiological health, and attraction is a mechanism for identifying a healthy mate. Previous studies have found that perceptions of the healthiest body mass index (weight scaled for height; BMI) for women are close to healthy BMI guidelines, while the most attractive BMI is significantly lower, possibly pointing to an influence of sociocultural factors in determining attractive BMI. However, less is known about ideal body size for men. Further, research has not addressed the role of body fat and muscle, which have distinct relationships with health and are conflated in BMI, in determining perceived health and attractiveness. Here, we hypothesised that, if attractiveness reflects physiological health, the most attractive and healthy appearing body composition should be in line with physiologically healthy body composition. Thirty female and 33 male observers were instructed to manipulate 15 female and 15 male body images in terms of their fat and muscle to optimise perceived health and, separately, attractiveness. Observers were unaware that they were manipulating the muscle and fat content of bodies. The most attractive apparent fat mass for female bodies was significantly lower than the healthiest appearing fat mass (and was lower than the physiologically healthy range), with no significant difference for muscle mass. The optimal fat and muscle mass for men’s bodies was in line with the healthy range. Male observers preferred a significantly lower overall male body mass than did female observers. While the body fat and muscle associated with healthy and attractive appearance is broadly in line with physiologically healthy values, deviations from this pattern suggest that future research should examine a possible role for internalization of body ideals in influencing perceptions of attractive body composition, particularly in women. PMID:27257677

  5. [Association between resistin serum levels and dimension and body composition variables in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Souki, Aida; Arraíz, Nailet; Prieto, Carem; Pérez Jiménez, Francisco; Valero, Paola; Amell, Anilsa; Cano-Ponce, Clímaco

    2016-03-01

    Resistin is an adipokine secreted in adipose tissue that may be associated with the metabolic and endocrine disorders of obesity. To assess the association between serum resistin levels and body composition variables, in children and adolescents. Cross-sectional assessment of 302 subjects, aged 10-16 years. According to body mass index, 124 were classified as eutrophic and 178 as obese. A clinical examination and pubertal assessment were performed. Body weight, height, waist and arm circumferences were measured. Serum resistin levels were measured using an immunoenzymatic assay. Male obese children had significantly higher resistin levels than their eutrophic counterparts. Eutrophic women had higher levels than eutrophic males. No significant association between resistin and pubertal status was observed. In the whole sample and among obese subjects, resistin levels correlated with body mass index, tricipital skinfold, arm circumference, arm fat area and fat mass. There is a significant association between resistin levels and body composition variables, particularly with indicators of fat accretion.

  6. Effects of rapid weight loss and regain on body composition and energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Sagayama, Hiroyuki; Yoshimura, Eiichi; Yamada, Yosuke; Ichikawa, Mamiko; Ebine, Naoyuki; Higaki, Yasuki; Kiyonaga, Akira; Tanaka, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    Weight-classified athletes need an energy intake plan to accomplish target weight reduction. They have to consider body composition and energy metabolism during rapid weight loss followed by rapid weight regain to achieve their energy intake plan. We investigated the effects of rapid weight loss, followed by weight regain, on body composition and energy expenditure. Ten weight-classified athletes were instructed to reduce their body weight by 5% in 7 days. Following the weight loss, they were asked to try to regain all of their lost weight with an ad libitum diet for 12 h. Food intake was recorded during the baseline, weight loss, and regain periods. Fat mass, total body water, and fat-free dry solids were estimated by underwater weighing and stable isotope dilution methods. A three-component model was calculated using Siri's equation. Basal and sleeping metabolic rates were measured by indirect calorimetry. Body composition and energy expenditure were measured before and after weight loss and after weight regain. Body weight, total body water, and fat-free dry solids were decreased after the weight loss period but recovered after weight regain (p < 0.05). Basal metabolic rate did not change throughout the study. Sleeping metabolic rate decreased significantly during weight loss but recovered after weight regain. Changes in total body water greatly affect body weight during rapid weight loss and regain. In addition, rapid weight loss and regain did not greatly affect the basal metabolic rate in weight-classified athletes.

  7. No association between body composition and cognition in ambulatory persons with multiple sclerosis: A brief report.

    PubMed

    Sandroff, Brian M; Hubbard, Elizabeth A; Pilutti, Lara A; Motl, Robert W

    2015-01-01

    There is evidence that body fat is inversely associated with cognitive functioning in adults from the general population, and this has been associated with systemic inflammation. The association between body fat and cognition might further be augmented in the presence of an immune-mediated, inflammatory disease such as multiple sclerosis (MS). This cross-sectional study investigated the associations between objective measures of body composition and cognitive function in 60 persons with MS. Participants underwent a neurological examination for generating Expanded Disability Status Scale scores, followed by the Brief International Cognitive Assessment in Multiple Sclerosis neuropsychological battery for measurement of cognitive processing speed, verbal learning and memory, and visual learning and memory. Whole-body fat mass, percent body fat, lean body mass, and bone mineral density were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Whole-body fat mass and percent body fat were not associated with any cognitive outcome (all p > 0.41). However, lean body mass was associated with cognitive processing speed (p < 0.03), and bone mineral density was associated with cognitive processing speed and verbal learning and memory. Those associations were attenuated and nonsignificant after controlling for age and Expanded Disability Status Scale scores (p > 0.13). Body composition might not represent a target of interventions for improving cognitive processing speed or learning and memory in MS.

  8. Specific BIVA recognizes variation of body mass and body composition: Two related but different facets of nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Buffa, Roberto; Mereu, Elena; Succa, Valeria; Latini, Veronica; Marini, Elisabetta

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the different information provided by body mass index (BMI) in combination with specific bioelectrical impedance vector analysis (specific BIVA) in the measure of relative body fat. Anthropometric and bioelectrical values and dual-energy x-ray absorpitometry measurements from a sample of 1590 US adults of both sexes were retrieved from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2004. The sample distribution of the BMI of each sex was divided into deciles. Quartiles were calculated for percent fat mass (FM%) after stratifying by BMI deciles. Body composition and bioelectrical characteristics of groups below the first and above the third quartile were compared using analysis of variance and the Hotelling's T-square test. BMI and specific BIVA showed a different accuracy in detecting body composition variations: BMI showed similar values in groups represented by different FM percentages, whereas the bioelectrical differences were statistically significant. The mean impedance vectors corresponding to cases below the first FM% quartiles were shorter and located on the left side of the ellipses (the region of higher fat-free mass), whereas those above the third FM% quartiles were on the right and toward the upper pole (the region of higher FM%). Specific BIVA is a technique for the evaluation of body composition which can add relevant information regarding BMI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Body composition and risk for metabolic alterations in female adolescents

    PubMed Central

    de Faria, Eliane Rodrigues; Gontijo, Cristiana Araújo; Franceschini, Sylvia do Carmo C.; Peluzio, Maria do Carmo G.; Priore, Silvia Eloiza

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study anthropometrical and body composition variables as predictors of risk for metabolic alterations and metabolic syndrome in female adolescents. METHODS: Biochemical, clinical and corporal composition data of 100 adolescents from 14 to 17 years old, who attended public schools in Viçosa, Southeastern Brazil, were collected. RESULTS: Regarding nutritional status, 83, 11 and 6% showed eutrophia, overweight/obesity and low weight, respectively, and 61% presented high body fat percent. Total cholesterol presented the highest percentage of inadequacy (57%), followed by high-density lipoprotein (HDL - 50%), low-density lipoprotein (LDL - 47%) and triacylglycerol (22%). Inadequacy was observed in 11, 9, 3 and 4% in relation to insulin resistance, fasting insulin, blood pressure and glycemia, respectively. The highest values of the fasting insulin and the Homeostasis Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) were verified at the highest quartiles of body mass index (BMI), waist perimeter, waist-to-height ratio and body fat percent. Body mass index, waist perimeter, and waist-to-height ratio were the better predictors for high levels of HOMA-IR, blood glucose and fasting insulin. Waist-to-hip ratio was associated to arterial hypertension diagnosis. All body composition variables were effective in metabolic syndrome diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: Waist perimeter, BMI and waist-to-height ratio showed to be good predictors for metabolic alterations in female adolescents and then should be used together for the nutritional assessment in this age range. PMID:25119752

  10. Pathways to interleukin-6 in healthy males and serious leisure male athletes: physical activity, body composition and age.

    PubMed

    FitzGerald, Leah; M Macey, Paul; Brecht, Mary-Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) is beneficial to overall health, in part due to physiological changes that lower risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including reduced inflammation. However, the mechanism by which PA reduces inflammation is unclear. One possible pathway is that PA improves body composition which in turn reduces inflammation. To test this hypothesis, we used structural equation modeling (SEM) to assess PA-body composition -inflammation pathways, as well as influences of age. In a sample of 72 healthy males with a range of PA profiles (age 18-65, mean ± sd = ), we measured PA as metabolic equivalent tasks (as per the International PA Questionnaire), body composition as percent body fat, lean mass, and fat mass, and inflammation as plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6). We treated body composition in the SEM analysis as a latent variable indicated by the three measures. We performed statistical corrections for missing values and one outlier. The model demonstrated significant effects of PA on IL-6 both directly and through body composition. Percent body fat, fat mass, and lean mass were significant indicators of the body composition latent variable. Additionally, age showed an indirect effect on IL-6 through body composition, but no direct effect. The findings suggest that PA does improve inflammatory profile through improving body composition, but that other pathways also exist.

  11. Comparison of nutritional intake, body composition, bone mineral density, and isokinetic strength in collegiate female dancers.

    PubMed

    Lim, Se-Na; Chai, Joo-Hee; Song, Jong Kook; Seo, Myong-Won; Kim, Hyun-Bae

    2015-12-01

    This study compared nutritional intake, body composition, bone mineral density, and isokinetic strength by dance type in collegiate female dancers. The study subjects included Korean dancers (n=12), ballet dancers (n=13), contemporary dancers (n=8), and controls (n=12). Nutritional intake was estimated using the Computer Aided Nutritional Analysis Program. Body composition and bone mineral density were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Isokinetic knee joint strength was measured by Cybex 770-NORM. All statistical analyses were performed by SAS 9.2. Means and standard deviations were calculated using descriptive statistics. One-way analysis of variance was applied to evaluate nutritional intake, body composition, bone mineral density, and isokinetic strength differences. Duncan multiple range test was used for post hoc testing. A level of significance was set at P<0.05. The study results indicated no significant differences in nutritional in-take among dancer types. Despite no significant differences in body composition among dancer types, contemporary and ballet dancers had lower body fat percentages than controls (P<0.05). No significant differences were seen in bone mineral density and bone mineral contents among dancer types. No significant differences were found in isokinetic strength in right or left knee flexion and extension at 60°/sec (P<0.05). There were significant differences in body composition and isokinetic strength between dancer groups and the control group. Further studies of different professional dance type and more scientific methods of dance training are needed.

  12. Statistical validation of air-displacement plethysmography for body composition assessment in children.

    PubMed

    Ittenbach, Richard F; Buison, Anne M; Stallings, Virginia A; Zemel, Babette S

    2006-01-01

    Body composition assessment of children has been hindered by the absence of a safe, quick, and easily tolerated gold standard technique. Existing validation studies of air-displacement plethysmography (ADP) have been based on small, narrowly defined samples, using simple linear regression or Bland-Altman analyses. Correlations within a multitrait-multimethod matrix (MTMM) and factor analytic methodologies were used to evaluate ADP as a valid and reliable body composition technique for children. Fat mass (FM), fat-free mass (FFM) and per cent body fat (%BF) were measured in 139 children, 7-10 years old, by ADP, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and anthropometry (ANTH). MTMM and factor analysis were used to compare assessment techniques. Reliability estimates were lower for ADP than for either ANTH or DXA. Convergent and discriminant correlations between ADP and ANTH or DXA were high for identical as well as non-identical measures. Two body composition factors (Fatness, Leanness) and two technique-related factors (Bod Pod, Anthropometry) were identified. ADP offers a valid and reliable means of assessing body composition in children but does not perform as well as ANTH or DXA. MTMM and factor analytic methodologies offer an effective alternative to assessing body composition.

  13. Comparison of nutritional intake, body composition, bone mineral density, and isokinetic strength in collegiate female dancers

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Se-Na; Chai, Joo-Hee; Song, Jong Kook; Seo, Myong-Won; Kim, Hyun-Bae

    2015-01-01

    This study compared nutritional intake, body composition, bone mineral density, and isokinetic strength by dance type in collegiate female dancers. The study subjects included Korean dancers (n=12), ballet dancers (n=13), contemporary dancers (n=8), and controls (n=12). Nutritional intake was estimated using the Computer Aided Nutritional Analysis Program. Body composition and bone mineral density were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Isokinetic knee joint strength was measured by Cybex 770-NORM. All statistical analyses were performed by SAS 9.2. Means and standard deviations were calculated using descriptive statistics. One-way analysis of variance was applied to evaluate nutritional intake, body composition, bone mineral density, and isokinetic strength differences. Duncan multiple range test was used for post hoc testing. A level of significance was set at P<0.05. The study results indicated no significant differences in nutritional in-take among dancer types. Despite no significant differences in body composition among dancer types, contemporary and ballet dancers had lower body fat percentages than controls (P<0.05). No significant differences were seen in bone mineral density and bone mineral contents among dancer types. No significant differences were found in isokinetic strength in right or left knee flexion and extension at 60°/sec (P<0.05). There were significant differences in body composition and isokinetic strength between dancer groups and the control group. Further studies of different professional dance type and more scientific methods of dance training are needed. PMID:26730387

  14. Body composition and bone mineral status in patients with Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Kun; Liu, Li; He, Yao-Juan; Li, Duan; Yuan, Lian-Xiong; Lash, Gendie E.; Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is associated with decreased bone mineral density and increased fracture rate. However, the developmental trajectory of bone density or body composition in patients with TS is still unclear. The present study tested the hypothesis that different karyotypes and/or age contributes to abnormal body composition and decreased bone mineral status parameters in patients with TS. This study included 24 girls with TS, in which 13 girls exhibited X0 karyotype and 11 had mosaicism. Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) assessed the bone mineral status of the calcaneus, including bone mineral density (BMD), amplitude-dependent speed of sound (AD-SOS), broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) and InBody 770 assessed body composition. Pearson’s test was performed to correlate measured parameters with patient age. The body composition and bone mineral status parameters were not significantly influenced by patient karyotype. There was a correlation between patient age and AD-SOS (r = −0.61, P = 0.002) and BUA (r = 0.50, P = 0.013) but not BMD (r = −0.19, P = 0.379). In conclusion, there was no effect of karyotype on body composition or body mineral status. Bone mineral status, as evidenced by changes in AD-SOS and BUA, alters with age regardless of karyotype. The developmental trajectory demonstrated in the current study warrants further validation in a longitudinal study. PMID:27901060

  15. Bodies in flowing plasmas - Spacecraft measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samir, U.

    1981-01-01

    Results are reviewed from in-situ measurements relevant to the interaction of bodies in flowing plasmas. A brief discussion is given of the interaction in the general context of space plasma physics, including possible applications to solar-system plasmas. Attention is given to the mode of experimentation in the Shuttle/Spacelab era. It is noted that the majority of in-situ investigations during the past decade were limited to the very near surface of ionospheric satellites. It is expected that experiments to be carried out on board the Spacelab/Orbiter will make possible well-planned controlled experiments in the area of body-plasma interactions in its widest sense.

  16. Predicting mortality based on body composition analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Tellado, J M; Garcia-Sabrido, J L; Hanley, J A; Shizgal, H M; Christou, N V

    1989-01-01

    The role of the Nae/Ke ratio (the ratio of exchangeable sodium to exchangeable potassium) was examined as a nutritional marker in surgical patients in relation to anthropometrical and biochemical indexes by its ability to identify patients at risk for mortality after hospitalization. In 73 patients with sepsis and malnutrition (Training Group, Madrid) the following were determined: percentage of recent weight loss, triceps skin fold, midarm muscle circumference, serum albumin, serum transferrin, delayed hypersensitivity skin test response, total lymphocytes, and Nae/Ke ratio by multiple isotope dilution. The predictive power of Nae/Ke ratio was so strong (F = 105.1; p less than 0.00001) that it displaced anthropometric, biochemical, and immunologic variables from the linear equation derived from stepwise discriminant analysis using hospital mortality as the dependent variable. A theoretical curve of expected deaths was developed, based on an equation obtained by logistic regression analysis: Pr/death/ = 1/(1 + e[11.8-5.2 Nae/Ke]). Pre- and post-test probabilities on that curve allowed us to determine two cut-off values, Nae/Ke ratios of 1.5 and 2.5, which were markers for nonrisk and mortality, respectively. The model was tested in a heterogeneous data base of surgical patients (n = 417) in another hospital (Validation Group, Montreal). For patients exhibiting an abnormal Nae/Ke ratio (greater than 1.2) and a greater than 10% of probability of death, 54 deaths were expected and 53 observed (X2 = 1.8 NS). Two tests confirmed the basic agreement between the model and its performance, a G statistic of -0.704 and the area beneath the "receiver-operating-characteristic" (ROC) curve (Az = 0.904 + 0.0516 for the Madrid group vs. Az = 0.915 + 0.0349 for the Montreal group, NS). It was concluded from this analysis that, compared with the usual anthropometric measurements, the Nae/Ke ratio, if available, is the best method for identifying malnourished patients at risk of

  17. Eicosapentaenoic acid in cancer improves body composition and modulates metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pappalardo, Giulia; Almeida, Ana; Ravasco, Paula

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this review article is to present the most recent intervention studies with EPA on nutritional outcomes in cancer patients, e.g. nutritional status, weight & lean body mass. For this purpose a PubMed(®) and MedLine(®) search of the published literature up to and including January 2014 that contained the keywords: cancer, sarcopenia, EPA, ω-3 fatty acids, weight, intervention trial, muscle mass was conducted. The collected data was summarized and written in text format and in tables that contained: study design, patient' population, sample size, statistical significance and results of the intervention. The paper will cover malignancy, body composition, intervention with EPA, physiological mechanisms of action of EPA, effect of EPA on weight and body composition, future research. In cancer patients deterioration of muscle mass can be present regardless of body weight or Body Mass Index (BMI). Thus, sarcopenia in cancer patients with excessive fat mass (FM), entitled sarcopenic obesity, has gained greater relevance in clinical practice; it can negatively influence patients' functional status, tolerance to treatments & disease prognosis. The search for an effective nutritional intervention that improves body composition (preservation of muscle mass and muscle quality) is of utmost importance for clinicians and patients. The improvement of muscle quality is an even more recent area of interest because it has probable implications in patients' prognosis. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) has been identified as a promising nutrient with the wide clinical benefits. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain EPA potential benefits on body composition: inhibition of catabolic stimuli by modulating pro-inflammatory cytokines production and enhancing insulin sensitivity that induces protein synthesis; also, EPA may attenuate deterioration of nutritional status resulting from antineoplastic therapies by improving calorie and protein intake as well. Indeed

  18. Body composition analysis in bariatric surgery: use of air displacement plethysmograph.

    PubMed

    Huettner, Franziska; Rammos, Charalambos K; Dynda, Danuta I; Lange, Melinda L; Marshall, J Stephen; Rossi, Thomas R; DeBord, James R

    2012-06-01

    Body weight, body mass index (BMI), and percent excess weight loss are used to assess patient outcomes after bariatric surgery; however, they provide little insight into the true nature of the patient's weight loss. Body composition measurements monitor fat versus lean mass losses to permit interventions to reduce or avoid lean body mass loss after bariatric surgery. A retrospective review of patients who underwent bariatric surgery between 2002 and 2008 was performed. Patients underwent body composition testing via air displacement plethysmography before and after surgery (6 and 12 months). Body composition changes were assessed and compared with the BMI. Results include 330 patients (54 male, 276 female). Average preoperative weight was 139 kg, BMI was 50 kg/m(2), fat percentage was 55 per cent, and lean mass percent was 45 per cent. Twelve months after surgery average weight was 90 kg, mean BMI was 32 kg/m(2), fat percentage was 38 per cent, and lean mass percent was 62 per cent. Body composition measurements help monitor fat losses versus lean mass gains after bariatric surgery. This may give a better assessment of the patient's health and metabolic state than either BMI or excess weight loss and permits intervention if weight loss results in lean mass losses.

  19. Effects of Aerobic Dance on Physical Work Capacity, Cardiovascular Function and Body Composition of Middle-Age Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowdy, Deborah B.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This study proposed to determine the effects of aerobics on physical work capacity, cardiovascular function and body composition of 28 women aged 25 to 44 years. Measurements taken after a conditioning program showed significant changes in work capacity and cardiovascular function for the conditioned group but no change in body composition.…

  20. Effects of Aerobic Dance on Physical Work Capacity, Cardiovascular Function and Body Composition of Middle-Age Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowdy, Deborah B.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This study proposed to determine the effects of aerobics on physical work capacity, cardiovascular function and body composition of 28 women aged 25 to 44 years. Measurements taken after a conditioning program showed significant changes in work capacity and cardiovascular function for the conditioned group but no change in body composition.…

  1. Body composition and nutrient intake of Buddhist vegetarians.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yujin; Krawinkel, Michael

    2009-01-01

    We described the body composition and nutrient intake of Buddhist vegetarians and compared the data with that of omnivores in South Korea. Vegetarian subjects were 54 Buddhist nuns, who adhered to a vegetarian diet in accordance with Buddhist teachings. We compared these finding with a group of 31 omnivore Catholic nuns who shared a similar lifestyle but different dietary pattern than those of the Buddhist nuns. All subjects completed the estimated three-day dietary record. Body composition was determined by a segmental multi-frequency-bioelectrical impedance analysis method. No height difference between the dietary groups existed but the vegetarians had a significantly higher body weight, fat free mass, body fat and body mass index (BMI, kg/m2) than the omnivores. The median BMI of both vegetarians and omnivores fell in the normal range (22.6 vs. 20.7 kg/m2). In vegetarians, body fat was inversely correlated with the duration of vegetarianism (p for trend=0.043). The long duration group of the vegetarians had lower body fat than the short duration group (12.l vs. 15.0 kg, p=0.032). The status of the nutrient intake of Korean Buddhist vegetarians was comparable to that of omnivores, and the intake of some nutrients in vegetarians was more favorable than in the omnivores.

  2. Treatment of severe thyroid function disorders and changes in body composition.

    PubMed

    Stangierski, Adam; Ruchała, Marek; Krauze, Tomasz; Moczko, Jerzy; Guzik, Przemysław

    2016-01-01

    Hyper- and hypothyroidism are accompanied by altered metabolic rate, thermogenesis, and body weight. The aim of this study was to estimate the relation between treatment-induced changes in thyroid function, and the accompanying body composition in patients with either severe hypo- or hyperthyroidism. Body composition analysis and hormonal assessment were measured at the initial diagnosis of thyroid disorder, after three-month treatment, and finally after complete recovery from hyperthyroidism (n = 18) or hypothyroidism (n = 27). Nonparametric Spearman correlation was used to analyse the relation between thyroid hormones and body composition as well as their respective changes. In hypothyroid patients applied treatment significantly reduced (p < 0.05) total body weight, mainly due to a decrease in fat mass, whereas in hyperthyroid patients it caused a weight gain, with a simultaneous increase in muscle, water and fat mass. Total body weight and fat mass were significantly correlated with thyroid hormones' concentrations in all patients. Changes of fat, water, or muscle mass were strongly correlated with the changes in the patients' hormonal status. Body composition is related to the concentration of thyroid hormones in thyroid dysfunction. Treatment-induced changes in thyroid hormones concentrations are correlated with the magnitude of the change of body weight, including muscle, water, and fat amount. (Endokrynol Pol 2016; 67 (4): 359-366).

  3. [Body temperature measurement in daily practice].

    PubMed

    Sermet-Gaudelus, I; Chadelat, I; Lenoir, G

    2005-08-01

    The use of rectal mercury thermometer has long been the standard method for measurement of body temperature. The restriction of mercury use since 1996 has led to development of other devices. The liquid crystal strip thermometer held against the forehead has a low sensitivity. The single-use chemical thermometer measures oral temperature. Its accuracy must be evaluated. Infrared ear thermometers are routinely used because it is convenient and fast to use. However, numerous studies have shown that it does not show sufficient correlation with rectal temperature, leading to the risk to miss cases of true fever. Rectal temperature remains the gold standard in case of fever. Rectal temperature measurement with an electronic device is well correlated with the glass mercury standard. Galistan thermometer accuracy must be evaluated because of sterilization of the whole device, which is not the case for the electronic thermometer. A pediatric study is necessary to evaluate the performance of this device in comparison with the electronic thermometer.

  4. Air displacement plethysmography can detect moderate changes in body composition.

    PubMed

    Secchiutti, A; Fagour, C; Perlemoine, C; Gin, H; Durrieu, J; Rigalleau, V

    2007-01-01

    To determine the sensitivity of air displacement plethysmography (APD) for evaluation of changes in body composition in normal subjects. Comparison of measurements with and without oil or water loads. Ten healthy volunteers were analyzed, without and with 1 l and 2 l of oil or water. The measured and true changes in fat mass and fat-free mass were compared by paired t-tests. A correlation study and a Bland & Altman procedure was performed on the 60 measurements of adiposity changes in 30 subjects carrying 0.5 l (n=8 x 2), 1 l (n=10 x 2) and 2 l (n=12 x 2) oil and water loads. Fat-free mass increased when the 10 subjects were carrying water. When they carried oil, fat mass increased, however, a approximately 0.5 kg increase of fat-free mass was also detected. Two liters loads led to distinct changes: +1.49+/-0.59 kg fat and +0.50+/-0.60 kg fat-free with oil and +0.37+/-0.57 kg fat and +1.70+/-0.56 kg fat-free with water (both P<0.001). Mixed loads (+1 l oil and 1 l water) led to detect +0.85+/-0.48 kg fat and +1.09+/-0.45 kg fat-free (both P<0.005 vs without load). For the 30 subjects analyzed thrice, measured changes in fat and fat-free mass were slightly underestimated (-15%, NS) but correlated with the true changes. Measured changes in adiposity were correlated with the true changes, with no bias as indicated by the Bland & Altman procedure. APD detects approximately 2 kg changes in fat or fat-free mass in small populations.

  5. Effect of Body Composition Methodology on Heritability Estimation of Body Fatness

    PubMed Central

    Elder, Sonya J.; Roberts, Susan B.; McCrory, Megan A.; Das, Sai Krupa; Fuss, Paul J.; Pittas, Anastassios G.; Greenberg, Andrew S.; Heymsfield, Steven B.; Dawson-Hughes, Bess; Bouchard, Thomas J.; Saltzman, Edward; Neale, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Heritability estimates of human body fatness vary widely and the contribution of body composition methodology to this variability is unknown. The effect of body composition methodology on estimations of genetic and environmental contributions to body fatness variation was examined in 78 adult male and female monozygotic twin pairs reared apart or together. Body composition was assessed by six methods – body mass index (BMI), dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), underwater weighing (UWW), total body water (TBW), bioelectric impedance (BIA), and skinfold thickness. Body fatness was expressed as percent body fat, fat mass, and fat mass/height2 to assess the effect of body fatness expression on heritability estimates. Model-fitting multivariate analyses were used to assess the genetic and environmental components of variance. Mean BMI was 24.5 kg/m2 (range of 17.8–43.4 kg/m2). There was a significant effect of body composition methodology (p<0.001) on heritability estimates, with UWW giving the highest estimate (69%) and BIA giving the lowest estimate (47%) for fat mass/height2. Expression of body fatness as percent body fat resulted in significantly higher heritability estimates (on average 10.3% higher) compared to expression as fat mass/height2 (p=0.015). DXA and TBW methods expressing body fatness as fat mass/height2 gave the least biased heritability assessments, based on the small contribution of specific genetic factors to their genetic variance. A model combining DXA and TBW methods resulted in a relatively low FM/ht2 heritability estimate of 60%, and significant contributions of common and unique environmental factors (22% and 18%, respectively). The body fatness heritability estimate of 60% indicates a smaller contribution of genetic variance to total variance than many previous studies using less powerful research designs have indicated. The results also highlight the importance of environmental factors and possibly genotype by environmental

  6. Design for manufacturability evaluation: Composite NIF Pockel Cell body

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, W.A.; Spellman, G.P.

    1994-04-01

    A survey of composite materials and processes for the NIF Optical Switch Body is described. Mechanical and physical criterion set upon the part are used as guidelines for the selection of materials and processes for manufacturing. Benefits, costs, and risks associated with selected processes, as well as a recommendation for prototype fabrication is presented.

  7. Assessment and Interpretation of Body Composition in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vehrs, Pat; Hager, Ron

    2006-01-01

    The physical educator's role is evolving into that of a teacher who is well educated in the areas of teaching, skill acquisition and development, motor learning, exercise physiology, physical conditioning, weight management, health, and lifestyle management. In an era when childhood obesity is at an all-time high, body composition can be one…

  8. Second quantization techniques in the scattering of nonidentical composite bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.; Deutchman, P. A.

    1986-01-01

    Second quantization techniques for describing elastic and inelastic interactions between nonidentical composite bodies are presented and are applied to nucleus-nucleus collisions involving ground-state and one-particle-one-hole excitations. Evaluations of the resultant collision matrix elements are made through use of Wick's theorem.

  9. Student Body Composition and School Performance: Evidence from Norway.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonesronning, Hans

    1996-01-01

    Investigates the relationship between student achievement gains and student body composition in Norwegian uppersecondary schools, using a multilevel model considering assignment of students to departments. Estimates a reference frontier to identify best school practices and efficient and inefficient departments. Student achievement varies…

  10. The Use Of Biostereometric Methods To Study Astronaut Body Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittle, M. W.

    1980-07-01

    Biostereometric analysis of body form was performed preflight and postflight on the 9 Skylab astronauts, using 4-camera stereophotogrammetry. The estimated standard deviation of the measurement of total body volume was 2-3%, but it should be possible to improve this to 1-2%, given some comparative studies with other methods, and some improvements in technique. The accuracy would then be comparable with underwater weighing, which is acknowledged to be the best currently available method for determining body density, and hence calculating body fat. Improvements beyond this accuracy are unlikely to lead to an enhancement in the accuracy of estimating body fat, because of uncertainties in the relationship between body fat and body density. Biostereometric analysis possesses one important advantage over underwater weighing, in that it is able to measure the volume of any chosen region of the body. This ability was used on Skylab to study the changes in leg muscle over the course of the flight, and also to measure the changes in body fat, which were particularly evident in the volume of the abdomen and buttocks. This approach would be greatly enhanced, however, by studies on the effects of diet and exercice on the volume of different body regions.

  11. Supplementation with a fish protein hydrolysate (Micromesistius poutassou): effects on body weight, body composition, and CCK/GLP-1 secretion

    PubMed Central

    Nobile, Vincenzo; Duclos, Elisa; Michelotti, Angela; Bizzaro, Gioia; Negro, Massimo; Soisson, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Background Fish protein hydrolysates (FPHs) have been reported as a suitable source of proteins for human nutrition because of their balanced amino acid composition and positive effect on gastrointestinal absorption. Objective Here, we investigated the effect of a FPH, Slimpro®, obtained from blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) muscle by enzymatic hydrolysis, on body composition and on stimulating cholecystokinin (CCK) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. Design A randomized clinical study was carried out on 120, slightly overweight (25 kg/m2 ≤ BMI<30 kg/m2), male (25%) and female (75%) subjects. FPH was tested in a food supplement at two doses (1.4 and 2.8 g) to establish if a dose–effect relationship exists. Product use was associated with a mild hypocaloric diet (−300 kcal/day). Body composition (body weight; fat mass; extracellular water; and circumference of waist, thighs, and hips) and CCK/GLP-1 blood levels were measured at the beginning of the study and after 45 and 90 days of product use. CCK/GLP-1 levels were measured since they are involved in controlling food intake. Results Treated subjects reported an improvement of body weight composition and an increased blood concentration of both CCK and GLP-1. No differences were found between the 1.4 and 2.8 g FPH doses, indicating a plateau effect starting from 1.4 g FPH. Conclusions Both 1.4 and 2.8 g of FPH were effective in improving body composition and in increasing CCK and GLP-1 blood levels. PMID:26829186

  12. [Body composition investigation of 2321 Shenzhen government and enterprise staffs].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoli; Zhou, Jichang; Sun, Shiqiang; Xu, Jiazhang; Zhou, Xiaoying; Huang, Changhua; He, Shan; Liu, Can; Xu, Jian; Gong, Chunmei

    2016-01-01

    To understand the laws of human body composition change and the status of the overweight and obesity of government and enterprise staffs. In July 2013 - January 2014, 2321 adults more than 20-year-old healthy check-up crowd with complete human body composition and height as well as weight data in a medical center in Shenzhen were collected by convenience sampling method. The overweight rates of male and female were 46.41% and 18.94% respectively (standardized overweight rates were 44.02% and 14.51%, respectively), and the difference between them was statisically significant (Χ2 = 201.01, P = 0. 000). The obesity rates of male and female were 12.13% and 3.57%, respectively (standardized overweight rates were 11.11% (see symbol) 2.63%, respectively), and the difference between them was statisically significant (X2 = 48.45, P = 0.000). The parameters of bone mineral quality, visceral fat area, body fat, body fat percentage, abdominal obesity, body moisture and free fat weight increased with body weight, and there were statistical significance among normal weight, overweight and obesity groups (P = 0.000). Bone mineral quality was highest at the age of 30 to 40 for men and women, and there was the statistical significance. There was statistical significance in visceral fat area between different ages in the same gender. Body fat percentage (34.24 + 5.39)% of all ages 50 to 59 years old and body moisture (28.53 + 3.77)% of age 40 - 49 group were highest in women. Male body fat percentage (27.08 + 5.01)% at the age of 60-age group was the highest. Male and female visceral fat area increasesd with age, but there was no statistical difference between men and women at the same age. The human body composition had not a statistically significant difference among normal weight and overweight groups, but a significant difference between normal weight and obesity groups (P = 0.000). Overweight and obesity rates in Shenzhen government and enterprise staffs increase with age

  13. The Correlates of Body Composition with Heart Rate Recovery after Step Test: An Exploratory Study of Malaysian Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Abu Hanifah, Redzal; Mohamed, Mohd. Nahar Azmi; Jaafar, Zulkarnain; Abdul Mohsein, Nabilla Al-Sadat; Jalaludin, Muhammad Yazid; Abdul Majid, Hazreen; Murray, Liam; Cantwell, Marie; Su, Tin Tin

    2013-01-01

    Background In adults, heart rate recovery is a predictor of mortality, while in adolescents it is associated with cardio-metabolic risk factors. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between body composition measures and heart rate recovery (HRR) after step test in Malaysian secondary school students. Methods In the Malaysian Health and Adolescents Longitudinal Research Team (MyHEART) study, 1071 healthy secondary school students, aged 13 years old, participated in the step test. Parameters for body composition measures were body mass index z-score, body fat percentage, waist circumference, and waist height ratio. The step test was conducted by using a modified Harvard step test. Heart rate recovery of 1 minute (HRR1min) and heart rate recovery of 2 minutes (HRR2min) were calculated by the difference between the peak pulse rate during exercise and the resting pulse rate at 1 and 2 minutes, respectively. Analysis was done separately based on gender. Pearson correlation analysis was used to determine the association between the HRR parameters with body composition measures, while multiple regression analysis was used to determine which body composition measures was the strongest predictor for HRR. Results For both gender groups, all body composition measures were inversely correlated with HRR1min. In girls, all body composition measures were inversely correlated with HRR2min, while in boys all body composition measures, except BMI z-score, were associated with HRR2min. In multiple regression, only waist circumference was inversely associated with HRR2min (p=0.024) in boys, while in girls it was body fat percentage for HRR2min (p=0.008). Conclusion There was an inverse association between body composition measurements and HRR among apparently healthy adolescents. Therefore, it is important to identify cardio-metabolic risk factors in adolescent as an early prevention of consequent adulthood morbidity. This reiterates the importance of healthy living

  14. Voluntary exercise and its effects on body composition depend on genetic selection history.

    PubMed

    Nehrenberg, Derrick L; Hua, Kunjie; Estrada-Smith, Daria; Garland, Theodore; Pomp, Daniel

    2009-07-01

    Little is known about how genetic variation affects the capacity for exercise to change body composition. We examined the extent to which voluntary exercise alters body composition in several lines of selectively bred mice compared to controls. Lines studied included high runner (HR) (selected for high wheel running), M16 (selected for rapid weight gain), Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) (randomly bred as control for M16), M16i (an inbred line derived from M16), HE (selected for high percentage of body fat while holding body weight constant), LF (selected for low percentage of body fat), C57BL/6J (common inbred line), and the F1 between HR and C57BL/6J. Body weight and body fat were recorded before and after 6 days of free access to running wheels in males and females that were individually caged. Total food intake was measured during this 6-day period. All pre- and postexercise measures showed significant strain effects. While HR mice predictably exercised at higher levels, all other selection lines had decreased levels of wheel running relative to ICR. The HR x B6 F1 ran at similar levels to HR demonstrating complete dominance for voluntary exercise. Also, all strains lost body fat after exercise, but the relationships between exercise and changes in percent body were not uniform across genotypes. These results indicate that there is significant genetic variation for voluntary exercise and its effects on body composition. It is important to carefully consider genetic background and/or selection history when using mice to model effects of exercise on body composition, and perhaps, other complex traits as well.

  15. Detecting meaningful body composition changes in athletes using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry.

    PubMed

    Colyer, Steffi L; Roberts, Simon P; Robinson, Jonathan B; Thompson, Dylan; Stokes, Keith A; Bilzon, James L J; Salo, Aki I T

    2016-04-01

    Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) imaging is considered to provide a valid and reliable estimation of body composition when stringent scanning protocols are adopted. However, applied practitioners are not always able to achieve this level of control and the subsequent impact on measurement precision is not always taken into account when evaluating longitudinal body composition changes. The primary aim of this study was to establish the reliability of DXA in an applied elite sport setting to investigate whether real body composition changes can be detected. Additionally, the performance implications of these changes during the training year were investigated. Forty-eight well-trained athletes (from four diverse sports) underwent two DXA scans using a 'real-world' approach (with limited pre-scan controls), typically within 48 h, to quantify typical error of measurement (TEM). Twenty-five athletes underwent further scans, before and after specific training and competition blocks. 'True' body composition changes were evaluated using 2  ×  TEM thresholds. Twelve bob skeleton athletes also performed countermovement jump and leg press tests at each time point. Many 'true' body composition changes were detected and coincided with the primary training emphases (e.g. lean mass gains during hypertrophy-based training). Clear relationships (r  ±  90% CI) were observed between performance changes (countermovement jump and leg press) and changes in lean mass (0.53  ±  0.26 and 0.35  ±  0.28, respectively) and fat mass (-0.44  ±  0.27 and  -0.37  ±  0.28, respectively). DXA was able to detect real body composition changes without the use of stringent scanning controls. Associations between changes in body composition and performance demonstrated the potential influence of these changes on strength and power indices.

  16. Sex-specific genetic effects influence variation in body composition.

    PubMed

    Zillikens, M C; Yazdanpanah, M; Pardo, L M; Rivadeneira, F; Aulchenko, Y S; Oostra, B A; Uitterlinden, A G; Pols, H A P; van Duijn, C M

    2008-12-01

    Despite well-known sex differences in body composition it is not known whether sex-specific genetic or environmental effects contribute to these differences. We assessed body composition in 2,506 individuals, from a young Dutch genetic isolate participating in the Erasmus Rucphen Family study, by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and anthropometry. We used variance decomposition procedures to partition variation of body composition into genetic and environmental components common to both sexes and to men and women separately and calculated the correlation between genetic components in men and women. After accounting for age, sex and inbreeding, heritability ranged from 0.39 for fat mass index to 0.84 for height. We found sex-specific genetic effects for fat percentage (fat%), lean mass, lean mass index (LMI) and fat distribution, but not for BMI and height. Genetic correlations between sexes were significantly different from 1 for fat%, lean mass, LMI, android fat, android:gynoid fat ratio and WHR, indicating that there are sex-specific genes contributing to variation of these traits. Genetic variance was significantly higher in women for the waist, hip and thigh circumference and WHR, implying that genes account for more variance of fat distribution in women than in men. Environmental variance was significantly higher in men for the android:gynoid fat ratio. Sex-specific genetic effects underlie sexual dimorphism in several body composition traits. The findings are relevant for studies on the relationship of body composition with common diseases like cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes and for genetic association studies.

  17. Physical Activity is Associated with Percent Body Fat and Body Composition but not Body Mass Index in White and Black College Students.

    PubMed

    Zanovec, Michael; Lakkakula, Anantha P; Johnson, Lisa G; Turri, Georgianna

    The objective of this study was to examine the association of self-reported physical activity (PA) with body composition in 290 college students (49% male, 60% White) 18-25 years of age. Outcome measures included: self-reported PA levels calculated in MET-hrs·wk(-1) from the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ); body mass index (BMI; in kg·m(-2)); and body composition variables estimated by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Mean activity levels of the sample were 39.8 ± 23.8 MET-hrs·wk(-1). Participants were divided into quartiles of PA levels: ≥0 to <24.0, ≥24.0 to <34.0, ≥34.0 to <51.25, and ≥51.25 MET-hrs ·wk(-1) and body composition variables were compared by group. Chi-square analyses revealed a significant difference for gender by PA quartile [χ(2) (3, N=290) = 32.42, p < 0.0001], and for gender by race by PA quartile [χ(2) (9, N=290) = 37.82, p < 0.0001]. MET-hrs·wk(-1) was inversely correlated with %BF (r = -0.40, p < 0.0001) but not BMI (r = 0.05, p = 0.43). When comparing body composition variables across PA quartiles, no significant differences were observed for BMI; however, subjects in the highest quartile of PA had a lower percent body fat (%BF) and fat mass (FM), and a higher lean-tissue mass (LTM) compared to subjects in the other three groups. In this cohort of young adults, participants in the highest activity group had a more fit body composition profile (e.g., lower %BF, lower FM, and higher LTM) which was not reflected in BMI and was independent of gender and race.

  18. Relationship Between Diet and Body Composition After Biliopancreatic Diversion.

    PubMed

    Calleja-Fernández, Alicia; Pintor-de-la-Maza, Begoña; Diez-Rodríguez, Rubén; Vidal-Casariego, Alfonso; Urioste-Fondo, Ana; Cano-Rodríguez, Isidoro; Ballesteros-Pomar, María D

    2015-11-01

    Biliopancreatic diversion (BPD) has been shown to be one of the most effective techniques for losing weight, although the relationship between body composition and diet after the procedure is not well known. Our aim was to assess dietary changes and their effects on body composition. This longitudinal study included all patients eligible for BPD who had undergone body composition analysis. Two assessments were performed: 6 weeks before and 1 year after surgery. Nutritional education was given after surgery by a registered dietitian, and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry was performed and a 3-day food record was collected for further analysis at both of the visits. Forty-six patients were included. The percentage of excess of weight loss was 61.03 % (SD 14.01 %), which was statistically different by gender (p = 0.045). The percentage of subjects reporting a low daily protein consumption of less than 60 g and 1.2 g/kg of ideal body weight (IBW)/day was 15.2 % before surgery and 19.6 % at 12 months (p = 0.006). The weight loss was mainly of fat mass (FM). There were differences of body composition by gender before and after surgery. A simple correlation analysis showed a significant association between daily energy intake and FM (g) only before surgery (p = 0.030), and also between daily protein intake (expressed as total g) and lean body mass (LBM) 12 months after surgery (p = 0.018), but no association was found with achieved protein goal. BPD enhanced by nutritional education seems to improve its results by achieving an adequate weight loss, preserving LBM, decreasing FM, and guaranteeing an appropriate protein intake.

  19. Relationships between body composition, muscular strength, and bone mineral density in estrogen-deficient postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Sherk, Vanessa D; Palmer, Ian J; Bemben, Michael G; Bemben, Debra A

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between muscular strength, body composition, and bone mineral density (BMD) in untrained postmenopausal women who are not on hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Fifty-five women (age: 63.3+/-0.6yr) completed menstrual history, physical activity, and calcium intake questionnaires. Total and regional body composition and total body, anteroposterior lumbar spine, nondominant forearm, and right proximal femur BMD were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) (GE Lunar Prodigy, Prodigy enCORE software version 10.50.086, Madison, WI). Participants performed strength tests for 3 upper body and 5 lower body resistance exercises. Women with a relative skeletal muscle mass index (RSMI) value less than 5.45 kg/m(2) were defined as a sarcopenia group (SAR). SAR had significantly (p < 0.05) lower total body and forearm BMD compared with those who were not sarcopenic. BMD sites were significantly correlated with upper body strength (UBS) and lower body strength (LBS) (r = 0.28-0.50, p < 0.01), with the strength of relationship being site specific. Strength and fat mass (FM) significantly predicted total body BMD (R(2) = 0.232-0.241, p < 0.05), FM variables predicted spine BMD (R(2) = 0.109-0.140, p < 0.05), and LBS and RSMI predicted hip BMD sites (R(2) = 0.073-0.237, p < 0.05). Body composition variables failed to significantly predict LBS. In conclusion, the contribution of body composition and strength variables to BMD varied by site as FM was more important for total body, forearm and spine BMD, and LBS exerted greater influence on the hip sites.

  20. REVIEW: A review of in vivo experimental methods to determine the composition of the human body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutcliffe, J. F.

    1996-05-01

    This review of experimental methods employed in the measurement of the composition of the human body covers the developments that have occurred over the past 30 years. Early methods such as hydrodensitometry and skinfold anthropometry have been superseded by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy. The measurement of the whole-body abundance of certain elements by isotopic dilution, neutron activation analysis and x-ray fluorescence can give important information of clinical significance, but neutron activation facilities remain available in only a few centres worldwide. The relatively simple, rapid and risk-free electrical methods such as multifrequency bioelectrical impedance analysis, which can be employed at the bedside, have been found to be more complicated in their interpretation. Electromagnetic methods may only measure the composition of the human body at its surface. X-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging have not yet been employed much in body composition measurements. Some models for the composition of the human body are reviewed.

  1. [Changes in body composition during an extreme endurance run].

    PubMed

    Knechtle, B; Bircher, S

    2005-03-09

    We measured before, during and after a six-day-run in one athlete body weight, skinfold thickness, circumference of extremities, energy expenditure and nutritional intake. Despite an increased fat and protein intake during the race we found a significantly decrease in adipose subcutaneous tissue of the whole body and muscle mass in the active limbs whereas body weight remained stable. We presume that during running as eccentric exercise subcutaneous adipose tissue and muscle mass will be oxidised.

  2. Comparison of body composition, heart rate variability, aerobic and anaerobic performance between competitive cyclists and triathletes

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Erşan; Aras, Dicle

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare the body composition, heart rate variability, and aerobic and anaerobic performance between competitive cyclists and triathletes. [Subjects] Six cyclists and eight triathletes with experience in competitions voluntarily participated in this study. [Methods] The subjects’ body composition was measured with an anthropometric tape and skinfold caliper. Maximal oxygen consumption and maximum heart rate were determined using the incremental treadmill test. Heart rate variability was measured by 7 min electrocardiographic recording. The Wingate test was conducted to determine anaerobic physical performance. [Results] There were significant differences in minimum power and relative minimum power between the triathletes and cyclists. Anthropometric characteristics and heart rate variability responses were similar among the triathletes and cyclists. However, triathletes had higher maximal oxygen consumption and lower resting heart rates. This study demonstrated that athletes in both sports have similar body composition and aerobic performance characteristics. PMID:27190476

  3. Weight and Body Composition Changes During Oral Contraceptive Use in Obese and Normal Weight Women

    PubMed Central

    Torgal, Anupama H.; Westhoff, Carolyn L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Oral contraceptive (OC) use seems to have little effect on weight change in normal weight women. Most previous studies have excluded obese women, so the effect of OC use on weight change in obese women is unknown. Methods: This analysis evaluates weight and body composition change with OC use among obese (body mass index [BMI] 30.0–39.9) and normal weight (BMI 19.0–24.9) women who were randomly assigned to two OC doses: 20 μg ethinyl estradiol (EE) and 100 μg levonorgestrel (LNG) OCs or 30 μg EE and 150 μg LNG OCs. Follow-up occurred after three to four OC cycles. Weight and body composition were measured at baseline and at follow-up using a bioelectrical impedance analyzer. Results: Among 150 women (54 obese and 96 normal weight) who used OCs for 3 to 4 months, there were no clinically or statistically significant weight or body composition changes in the overall group or by BMI or OC formulation group. Conclusions: These findings add to evidence that EE/LNG OCs are not associated with short term weight or body composition change for normal weight women and suggest that OCs are also are not associated with short term weight or body composition change in obese women. PMID:24156617

  4. The relationships of irisin with bone mineral density and body composition in PCOS patients.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shanshan; Cheng, Yan; Zhao, Lingling; Chen, Yuxin; Liu, Yu

    2016-05-01

    Our study aims to assay the irisin level and investigate the relationships of irisin level with body mass index (BMI), body composition and bone metabolism in the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and control women. Fifty two PCOS and 39 control women were recruited. Serum sex hormone, fasting insulin and C-peptide were tested. Fasting serum irisin and adiponectin were measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Body composition and bone mineral density were assayed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Polycystic ovary syndrome women showed different body compositions compared with controls. Serum irisin level of PCOS did not show significant difference compared with controls although it was decreased. The level of adiponectin in PCOS patients was significantly reduced. BMI had no correlation with irisin level. It indicated a positive correlation between serum irisin levels and bone mineral density in the control group and a negative correlation in the PCOS group after BMI and age adjusted. Furthermore, total lean mass has a significant effect on irisin concentration in the PCOS group. There are no correlations between adiponection and body compositions and bone mineral density in both groups. The abnormal body composition in PCOS may contribute to the circulation irisin. The crosstalk of irisin in different organs was found and may be related to disease development in PCOS. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Effects of weightlessness on body composition in the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, G. C.; Ushakov, A. S.; Pace, N.; Smith, A. H.; Rahlmann, D. F.; Smirnova, T. A.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of weightlessness on the body composition of rats were investigated using 5 male rats exposed to 18.5 days of weightlessness on the COSMOS 1129 biosatellite and killed after reentry. The animals were immediately dissected and the three major body divisions (musculoskeletal system, skin, and pooled viscera) were analyzed for fat, water, solids, and six elements. These results were determined as percentages of the fat-free body or its components and then compared with two groups of terrestrial controls, one of which was subjected to a flight simulation in a spacecraft mock-up while the other was under standard vivarium conditions. Compared with the control groups, the flight group was found to exhibit a reduced fraction of total body water, a net shift of body water from skin to viscera, a marked diminution in the fraction of extracellular water in the fat-free body, a marked reduction in the fraction of bone mineral, no change in the quantity of stored fat or adrenal masses, and a net increase in total muscle mass as indicated by total body creatine, protein, and body cell mass.

  6. Effects of weightlessness on body composition in the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, G. C.; Ushakov, A. S.; Pace, N.; Smith, A. H.; Rahlmann, D. F.; Smirnova, T. A.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of weightlessness on the body composition of rats were investigated using 5 male rats exposed to 18.5 days of weightlessness on the COSMOS 1129 biosatellite and killed after reentry. The animals were immediately dissected and the three major body divisions (musculoskeletal system, skin, and pooled viscera) were analyzed for fat, water, solids, and six elements. These results were determined as percentages of the fat-free body or its components and then compared with two groups of terrestrial controls, one of which was subjected to a flight simulation in a spacecraft mock-up while the other was under standard vivarium conditions. Compared with the control groups, the flight group was found to exhibit a reduced fraction of total body water, a net shift of body water from skin to viscera, a marked diminution in the fraction of extracellular water in the fat-free body, a marked reduction in the fraction of bone mineral, no change in the quantity of stored fat or adrenal masses, and a net increase in total muscle mass as indicated by total body creatine, protein, and body cell mass.

  7. HiRes and TA Composition measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tameda, Yuichiro

    2013-06-01

    In order to clarify the origin of ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs), it is very important to determine the mass composition. The most effective strategy to determine the mass composition is Xmax technique. Xmax is the atmospheric depth of air shower maximum measured by fluorescence detectors (FDs). HiRes has reported Xmax measurement by FDs which indicated proton dominated mass composition. Now, Telescope Array (TA) experiment has also measured UHECRs with FDs. In this presentation, the detail of mass composition analysis and result of TA experiment will be reported and compared with HiRes experiment.

  8. [Body composition assessment and body image perception in a group of University females of the Basque Country].

    PubMed

    Arroyo, M; Ansotegui, L; Pereira, E; Lacerda, F; Valador, N; Serrano, L; Rocandio, A Ma

    2008-01-01

    [corrected] To assess the body image perception and to compare the results with the true measurements in a group of university students. Participants were 28 volunteer females recruited from the degree in Human Nutrition and Dietetic from the University of the Basque Country (Spain). All participants gave their informed consent. The mean (SD) age of the participants was 22.01 (2.12) years (20,23-28,25). Anthropometric measurement estimated directly and the derived indexes were compared with reference values. The assessment of body image perception was made using a somatomorphic software. The difference between the perceived measurements and the ideals were used as measure of body dissatisfaction. Data were analyzed using SPSS vs 14.0. Prevalence of overweight and obesity was 10.7%, and of under-weight was 70.1%. The body fat perception was well, while the perception of the muscle index was significantly different from the real measure (3.91+/-2.75 kg/m2; P<0.001). The level of body dissatisfaction was higher for the body fat (6.00+/-8.61%; P<0.001) than for the muscle index (1.65+/-2.82 kg/m2; P<0.01). This result can be justified for the present canons of beauty and for the overvaluation of the thinness. Additional research is needed to further know the relation between female body image and true measurements of body composition. Future research will allow to compare the results with other populations.

  9. Effect of 7-minute workout on weight and body composition.

    PubMed

    Mattar, Lama; Farran, Natali; Bakhour, Dalal

    2017-10-01

    The 7-minute workout composed of aerobic and resistance exercises is becoming a very popular workout. It targets individuals with time constrains and low motivation to commit to lengthy and extensive workout programs. The objective of the study is to investigate if the 7-minute workout has a 6 week effect on body weight and composition. The training group (N.=29, age 18-30) did the 7-minute workout 7 days a week during 6 weeks while the control group (N.=29) did not perform the workout. Measurements such as height, weight, body mass index, circumferences (middle upper arm, hip, and waist), blood pressure, heart rate, hand grip, and bioelectrical impedance were collected and recorded at week 1, 3 and 6. Mean BMI was 24.4kg/m2 at week 1, 24.01kg/m2 at week 3 (P=0.003). Waist circumference decreased between week 1 and 3 (P=0.003) and week 6 (P=0.01) by 4 cm on average. Hip circumference followed the same trend between week 1 and week 3 (P=-0.001). There was a decrease in fat mass and % fat mass between week 1, 3, and 6 (P=0.001). No changes were noted for mid-upper arm circumference or hand grip. The findings of this research show that even a very short duration workout affect the nutritional status in normal weight individuals who did not change any of their eating habits. This implies that even in normal weight individuals who perform the 7-minute workout, improvement through a decrease in waist circumference can be achieved thus leading to a better cardio-protective nutritional status. The 7 minutes workout can be a great solution for people to get started and to plan on continuing exercising, as it is simple and of minimal constraints.

  10. Body composition throughout the lifecycle: The role of dairy foods

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There is an ongoing concern about the degree of obesity world-wide and the implications for health outcomes. Body mass index (BMI) is used as the measure for the classification of overweight and obesity. However, this index does not represent actual body fat levels or the amount of active lean bod...

  11. Estimating body composition from skinfold thicknesses and bioelectrical impedance analysis in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Alicandro, Gianfranco; Battezzati, Alberto; Bianchi, Maria Luisa; Loi, Silvana; Speziali, Chiara; Bisogno, Arianna; Colombo, Carla

    2015-11-01

    The accuracy of body composition estimates based on skinfold thickness measurements and bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) is not yet adequately explored in cystic fibrosis (CF). Using DXA as reference method we verified the accuracy of these techniques and identified predictors of body composition specific for CF. One hundred forty-two CF patients (age range: 8-31 years) underwent a DXA scan. Body fat percentage (BF%) was estimated from skinfolds, while fat free mass (FFM) from single-frequency 50 kHz BIA. Bland-Altman analysis showed poor intra-individual agreement between body composition data provided by DXA and BF% estimated from skinfolds or FFM estimated from BIA. The skinfolds of the upper arm were better predictors of BF% than BMI, while compared to other BIA measurements the best predictor of FFM was the R-index (Height(2)/Resistance). Due to poor accuracy at individual level, the estimates of body composition obtained from these techniques cannot be part of the standard nutritional assessment of CF patients until reliable CF-specific equations will become available. BMI has limited value in predicting body fatness in CF patients and should be used in combination with other predictors. Skinfolds of the upper arm and R-index are strongly related to BF% and FFM and should be tested in a large CF population to develop specific predictive equations. Copyright © 2015 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Chromium picolinate supplementation in women: effects on body weight, composition, and iron status.

    PubMed

    Lukaski, Henry C; Siders, William A; Penland, James G

    2007-03-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that supplementation of chromium picolinate (CrPic), 200 microg Cr/d, compared with an equivalent amount of picolinic acid (1720 microg) in CrPic and placebo, decreases body weight, alters body composition, and reduces iron status of women fed diets of constant energy and nutrients. We fed 83 women nutritionally balanced diets, used anthropometry and dual x-ray absorptiometry to assess body composition, and measured serum and urinary Cr and biochemical indicators of iron status before and serially every 4 wk for 12 wk in a double-blind, randomized trial. CrPic supplementation increased (P < 0.0001) serum Cr concentration and urinary Cr excretion compared with picolinic acid and placebo. CrPic did not affect body weight or fat, although all groups lost (P < 0.05) weight and fat; it did not affect fat-free, mineral-free mass or measurements of iron status. Under conditions of controlled energy intake, CrPic supplementation of women did not independently influence body weight or composition or iron status. Thus, claims that supplementation of 200 microg of Cr as CrPic promotes weight loss and body composition changes are not supported.

  13. Controlling parental feeding practices and child body composition in ethnically and economically diverse preschool children.

    PubMed

    Wehrly, Sarah E; Bonilla, Chantal; Perez, Marisol; Liew, Jeffrey

    2014-02-01

    Controlling parental feeding practices may be associated with childhood overweight, because coercive or intrusive feeding practices may negatively impact children's development of self-regulation of eating. This study examined pressuring or forcing a child (healthy or unhealthy foods) and restricting child from unhealthy or snack foods as two types of controlling feeding practices that explain unique variances in measures of child body composition (BMI, percent body fat, and parental perception of child weight). In an ethnically and economically diverse sample of 243 children aged 4-6years old and their biological parents (89% biological mothers, 8% biological fathers, and 3% step or grand-parent), descriptive statistics indicate ethnic and family income differences in measures of feeding practices and child body composition. Additionally, the two "objective" indices of body composition (BMI and percent body fat) were related to low pressure to eat, whereas the "subjective" index (perceived child weight) was related to restriction. Regression analyses accounting for ethnic and family income influences indicate that pressure to eat and restriction both explained unique variances in the two "objective" indices of body composition, whereas only restriction explained variance in perceived child weight. Findings have implications for helping parents learn about feeding practices that promote children's self-regulation of eating that simultaneously serves as an obesity prevention strategy.

  14. Measures of body fat in South Asian adults.

    PubMed

    Kalra, S; Mercuri, M; Anand, S S

    2013-05-27

    South Asian people who originate from the Indian subcontinent have greater percent body fat (%BF) for the same body mass index (BMI) compared with white Caucasians. This has been implicated in their increased risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. There is limited information comparing different measures of body fat in this ethnic group. The objectives of this study were: (1) to investigate the correlation of %BF measured by a foot-to-foot bioelectrical impedance analysis (FF-BIA) against the BOD POD, a method of air-displacement plethysmography, and (2) to determine the correlations of simple anthropometric measures, (that is, BMI, body adiposity index (BAI), waist circumference (WC), hip circumference (HC) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR)) against the BOD POD measure of body fat. Eighty apparently healthy South Asian men and women were recruited from the community, and measurements of height, weight, WC, HC and body composition using Tanita FF-BIA and BOD POD were taken. The mean±s.d. age of participants was 27.78±10.49 years, 42.5% were women, and the mean BMI was 22.68±3.51 kg m(-2). The mean body fat (%BF) calculated by FF-BIA and BOD POD was 21.94±7.88% and 26.20±8.47%, respectively. The %BF calculated by FF-BIA was highly correlated with the BOD POD (Pearson's r=0.83, P<0.001), however, FF-BIA underestimated %BF by 4.3%. When anthropometric measures were compared with % BF by BOD POD, the BAI showed the strongest correlation (r=0.74) and the WHR showed the weakest (r=0.33). BAI generally underestimated %BF by 2.6% in comparison with %BF by BOD POD. The correlations of BOD POD with other measures of %BF were much stronger in subjects with a BMI >21 kg m(-2) than those with a BMI 21 kg m(-2). The FF-BIA and BAI estimates of %BF are highly correlated with that of BOD POD among people of South Asian origin, although both methods somewhat underestimate % BF. Furthermore, their correlations with % BF from BOD POD are significantly

  15. Measures of body fat in South Asian adults

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, S; Mercuri, M; Anand, S S

    2013-01-01

    Background: South Asian people who originate from the Indian subcontinent have greater percent body fat (%BF) for the same body mass index (BMI) compared with white Caucasians. This has been implicated in their increased risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. There is limited information comparing different measures of body fat in this ethnic group. Objectives: The objectives of this study were: (1) to investigate the correlation of %BF measured by a foot-to-foot bioelectrical impedance analysis (FF-BIA) against the BOD POD, a method of air-displacement plethysmography, and (2) to determine the correlations of simple anthropometric measures, (that is, BMI, body adiposity index (BAI), waist circumference (WC), hip circumference (HC) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR)) against the BOD POD measure of body fat. Methods: Eighty apparently healthy South Asian men and women were recruited from the community, and measurements of height, weight, WC, HC and body composition using Tanita FF-BIA and BOD POD were taken. Results: The mean±s.d. age of participants was 27.78±10.49 years, 42.5% were women, and the mean BMI was 22.68±3.51 kg m−2. The mean body fat (%BF) calculated by FF-BIA and BOD POD was 21.94±7.88% and 26.20±8.47%, respectively. The %BF calculated by FF-BIA was highly correlated with the BOD POD (Pearson's r=0.83, P<0.001), however, FF-BIA underestimated %BF by 4.3%. When anthropometric measures were compared with % BF by BOD POD, the BAI showed the strongest correlation (r=0.74) and the WHR showed the weakest (r=0.33). BAI generally underestimated %BF by 2.6% in comparison with %BF by BOD POD. The correlations of BOD POD with other measures of %BF were much stronger in subjects with a BMI >21 kg m−2 than those with a BMI ⩽21 kg m−2. Conclusion: The FF-BIA and BAI estimates of %BF are highly correlated with that of BOD POD among people of South Asian origin, although both methods somewhat underestimate % BF. Furthermore, their

  16. ["In vivo" body composition assessment; part I: a historic overview].

    PubMed

    Carnero, Elvis A; Alvero-Cruz, José Ramón; Giráldez García, Manuel Avelino; Sardinha, Luis B

    2015-05-01

    The study of body composition (BC) has gained in relevance over the last decades, mainly because of its important health- and disease- related applications within both the clinical and the sports setting. It is not a new area, and its especial relevance as an area of biology dates from the second half of the nineteenth century. In this paper, we have reviewed the three historic periods of BC, with special reference to the most important advances in in vivo assessment. Even though the earliest findings about human BC date from antiquity, the first (or 'early') stage of discovery began in 1850. Said early stage was mainly characterized by data obtained from the dissection of cadavers and by the application of biochemical methods in vivo. Longitudinal changes in body composition were also a concern. The second (so called 'recent') stage, in the second half of the twentieth century, was marked by milestones such as the formulation of the first mathematical models for the estimation of body components, and technological advances. Within the third ('contemporary' or 'current') stage of research, several groups have focused on validating the classical BC models in specific populations, on analysis of the genetic determinants (i.e. phenotypes and, more recently genotypes) of body composition, and on re-instigating the study of dynamic BC.

  17. Assessment of body composition by air-displacement plethysmography: influence of body temperature and moisture

    PubMed Central

    Fields, David A; Higgins, Paul B; Hunter, Gary R

    2004-01-01

    Background To investigate the effect of body temperature and moisture on body fat (%fat), volume and density by air-displacement plethysmography (BOD POD). Methods %fat, body volume and density by the BOD POD before (BOD PODBH) and immediately following hydrostatic weighing (BOD PODFH) were performed in 32 healthy females (age (yr) 33 ± 11, weight (kg) 64 ± 14, height (cm) 167 ± 7). Body temperature and moisture were measured prior to BOD PODBH and prior to BOD PODFH with body moisture defined as the difference in body weight (kg) between the BOD PODBH and BOD PODFH measurements. Results BOD PODFH %fat (27.1%) and body volume (61.5 L) were significantly lower (P ≤ 0.001) and body density (1.0379 g/cm3) significantly higher (P ≤ 0.001) than BOD PODBH %fat (28.9%), body volume (61.7 L), and body density (1.0341 g/cm3). A significant increase in body temperature (~0.6°C; P ≤ 0.001) and body moisture (0.08 kg; P ≤ 0.01) were observed between BOD PODBH and BOD PODFH. Body surface area was positively associated with the difference in %fat independent of changes in body temperature and moisture, r = 0.30, P < 0.05. Conclusion These data demonstrate for the first time that increases in body heat and moisture result in an underestimation of body fat when using the BOD POD, however, the precise mechanism remains unidentified. PMID:15059287

  18. [Human body composition during extended stay in microgravity].

    PubMed

    Noskov, V B; Nichiporuk, I A; Vasilieva, G Yu; Smirnov, Yu I

    2015-01-01

    According to the Sprut-2 protocol, bio-impedancemetry of ISS cosmonauts was performed once a month and also before and after mission. Multiple non-invasive body measurements were carried out in 15 cosmonauts in real time. Relocation of extracellular liquid along the body axis led to its reduction in legs and, on the contrary, an increase in the abdomen. Volumes of total body liquid as well as intra- and extracellular liquids decreased in comparison with pre-flight levels. Lean body mass also became less in microgravity, whereas fat mass showed an increase.

  19. Body awareness rating questionnaire: measurement properties.

    PubMed

    Tove, Dragesund; Målfrid, Råheim; Liv Inger, Strand

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of present study was to investigate important measurement properties of the Body Awareness Rating Questionnaire (BARQ) subscales: Function; Mood; Feelings; and Awareness. Samples of 50 patients with prolonged musculoskeletal pain and psychosomatic disorders, and 50 gender and age-matched healthy persons participated in the study. Relative (ICC 2,1) and absolute reliability (S(w)) were calculated. Construct validity was examined by testing hypothesis using Pearson (r) or Spearman rank (r(s)) correlation. Discriminate ability was examined using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, the area under the curve (aROC) being the measure of discriminative validity. All patients reported more or less improvement after treatment, using the Patient Global Impression of Change (PGIC) as an external indicator of important change. Responsiveness to important change was therefore examined by one-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), relating change scores of BARQ subscales to the PGIC categories. Relative and absolute reliability values were within recommended limits for all four subscales. Construct and discriminate validity was indicated for Function, Feelings and Awareness, but not for Mood. Responsiveness was indicated for the subscales Function and Awareness, but not for Feelings and Mood. Further research is needed to complement the subscales of BARQ, found with appropriate measurement properties.

  20. Association between different phases of menstrual cycle and body image measures of perceived size, ideal size, and body dissatisfaction.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, André Luiz S; Dias, Marcelo Ricardo C; Damasceno, Vinícius O; Lamounier, Joel A; Gardner, Rick M

    2013-12-01

    The association between phases of the menstrual cycle and body image was investigated. 44 university women (M age = 23.3 yr., SD = 4.7) judged their perceived and ideal body size, and body dissatisfaction was calculated at each phase of the menstrual cycle, including premenstrual, menstrual, and intermenstrual. Participants selected one of nine figural drawings ranging from very thin to obese that represented their perceived size and ideal size. Body dissatisfaction was measured as the absolute difference between scores on perceived and ideal figural drawings. During each menstrual phase, anthropometric measures of weight, height, body mass index, circumference of waist and abdomen, and body composition were taken. There were no significant differences in any anthropometric measures between the three menstrual cycle phases. Perceived body size and body dissatisfaction were significantly different between menstrual phases, with the largest perceived body size and highest body dissatisfaction occurring during the menstrual phase. Ideal body size did not differ between menstrual phases, although participants desired a significantly smaller ideal size as compared to the perceived size.

  1. Risk of Mortality According to Body Mass Index and Body Composition Among Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Bea, Jennifer W.; Thomson, Cynthia A.; Wertheim, Betsy C.; Nicholas, J. Skye; Ernst, Kacey C.; Hu, Chengcheng; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Cauley, Jane A.; Lewis, Cora E.; Caan, Bette; Roe, Denise J.; Chen, Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Obesity, often defined as a body mass index (BMI; weight (kg)/height (m)2) of 30 or higher, has been associated with mortality, but age-related body composition changes can be masked by stable BMI. A subset of Women's Health Initiative participants (postmenopausal women aged 50–79 years) enrolled between 1993 and 1998 who had received dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scans for estimation of total body fat (TBF) and lean body mass (LBM) (n = 10,525) were followed for 13.6 (standard deviation, 4.6) years to test associations between BMI, body composition, and incident mortality. Overall, BMI ≥35 was associated with increased mortality (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) = 1.45, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.16, 1.82), while TBF and LBM were not. However, an interaction between age and body composition (P < 0.001) necessitated age stratification. Among women aged 50–59 years, higher %TBF increased risk of death (HR = 2.44, 95% CI: 1.38, 4.34) and higher %LBM decreased risk of death (HR = 0.41, 95% CI: 0.23, 0.74), despite broad-ranging BMIs (16.4–69.1). However, the relationships were reversed among women aged 70–79 years (P < 0.05). BMI did not adequately capture mortality risk in this sample of postmenopausal women. Our data suggest the clinical utility of evaluating body composition by age group to more robustly assess mortality risk among postmenopausal women. PMID:26350478

  2. Assessment of body composition using whole body air-displacement plethysmography in children with and without developmental coordination disorder.

    PubMed

    Cairney, John; Hay, John; Veldhuizen, Scott; Faught, Brent

    2011-01-01

    Developmental coordination disorder (DCD) is a neuro-developmental disorder characterized by poor fine and/or gross motor coordination. Children with DCD are hypothesized to be at increased risk for overweight and obesity from inactivity due to their motor coordination problems. Although previous studies have found evidence to support this hypothesis, their reliance on field-based measures, most notably body mass index (BMI), to determine body composition is problematic. Moreover, there has been no research to date that has examined whether THERE ARE differences in lean tissue mass between children with and without coordination. Differences in muscle mass, the main component of lean tissue, may be a contributing factor to both coordination problems and the development of overweight and obesity, but has only been indirectly examined at this time. In this study, whole-body air displacement using a dual chamber plethysmograph was used to estimate fat mass, fat free mass and body fat in children with probable DCD (pDCD) and a group of typically developing children. Consistent with previous research using field-based assessments of relative body weight, the results show that children with pDCD have much higher body fat than their peers, and that this difference increases with the severity of observed motor coordination difficulties. There was no difference in lean tissue mass between groups. The demonstration of an association between pDCD and body fat using a more sensitive measure of body composition, and evidence showing a dose-response in this relationship, further supports the hypothesis that DCD may be a risk factor for obesity in children. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Executive summary of the 2013 International Society for Clinical Densitometry Position Development Conference on Body Composition.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, John A; Baim, Sanford; Bilezikian, John P; Schousboe, John T

    2013-01-01

    There have been many scientific advances in measurement of fat and lean body mass as determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). The International Society for Clinical Densitometry (ISCD) convened a Position Development Conference (PDC) on the use o