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Sample records for measuring energy deposition

  1. Calorimetric sensors for energy deposition measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Langenbrunner, J.; Cooper, R.; Morgan, G.

    1998-12-31

    A calorimetric sensor with several novel design features has been developed. These sensors will provide an accurate sampling of thermal power density and energy deposition from proton beams incident on target components of accelerator-based systems, such as the Accelerator Production of Tritium Project (APT) and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). A small, solid slug (volume = 0.347 cc) of target material is suspended by kevlar fibers and surrounded by an adiabatic enclosure in an insulating vacuum canister of stainless steel construction. The slug is in thermal contact with a low-mass, calibrated, 100-k{Omega} thermistor. Power deposition caused by the passage of radiation through the slug is calculated from the rate of temperature rise of the slug. The authors have chosen slugs composed of Pb, Al, and LiAl.

  2. Local Measurement of Fuel Energy Deposition and Heat Transfer Environment During Fuel Lifetime Using Controlled Calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Don W. Miller; Andrew Kauffmann; Eric Kreidler; Dongxu Li; Hanying Liu; Daniel Mills; Thomas D. Radcliff; Joseph Talnagi

    2001-12-31

    A comprehensive description of the accomplishments of the DOE grant titled, ''Local Measurement of Fuel Energy Deposition and Heat Transfer Environment During Fuel Lifetime using Controlled Calorimetry''.

  3. Energy deposition rates by charged particles measured during the energy budget campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, A.; Torkar, K. M.; Bjordal, J.; Lundblad, J. A.; Soraas, F.; Grandal, B.; Smith, L. G.; Ulwick, J. C.; Vancour, R. P.

    1982-01-01

    Measurements of the precipitation of electrons and positive ions (in the keV to MeV range) detected aboard eight rockets launched from Northern Scandinavia are reported together with corresponding satellite data. The downgoing integral fluxes indicate the temporal fluctuations during each flight. Height profiles of the energy deposition into the atmosphere at different levels of geomagnetic disturbance are given.

  4. Monte Carlo calculation of energy deposition in ionization chambers for tritium measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhilin, Chen; Shuming, Peng; Dan, Meng; Yuehong, He; Heyi, Wang

    2014-10-01

    Energy deposition in ionization chambers for tritium measurements has been theoretically studied using Monte Carlo code MCNP 5. The influence of many factors, including carrier gas, chamber size, wall materials and gas pressure, has been evaluated in the simulations. It is found that β rays emitted by tritium deposit much more energy into chambers flowing through with argon than with deuterium in them, as much as 2.7 times higher at pressure 100 Pa. As chamber size gets smaller, energy deposition decreases sharply. For an ionization chamber of 1 mL, β rays deposit less than 1% of their energy at pressure 100 Pa and only 84% even if gas pressure is as high as 100 kPa. It also indicates that gold plated ionization chamber results in the highest deposition ratio while aluminum one leads to the lowest. In addition, simulations were validated by comparison with experimental data. Results show that simulations agree well with experimental data.

  5. Quantitation of absorbed or deposited materials on a substrate that measures energy deposition

    DOEpatents

    Grant, Patrick G.; Bakajin, Olgica; Vogel, John S.; Bench, Graham

    2005-01-18

    This invention provides a system and method for measuring an energy differential that correlates to quantitative measurement of an amount mass of an applied localized material. Such a system and method remains compatible with other methods of analysis, such as, for example, quantitating the elemental or isotopic content, identifying the material, or using the material in biochemical analysis.

  6. Measuring the energy flux at the substrate position during magnetron sputter deposition processes

    SciTech Connect

    Cormier, P.-A.; Thomann, A.-L.; Dussart, R.; Semmar, N.; Mathias, J.; Balhamri, A.; Snyders, R.; Konstantinidis, S.

    2013-01-07

    In this work, the energetic conditions at the substrate were investigated in dc magnetron sputtering (DCMS), pulsed dc magnetron sputtering (pDCMS), and high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharges by means of an energy flux diagnostic based on a thermopile sensor, the probe being set at the substrate position. Measurements were performed in front of a titanium target for a highly unbalanced magnetic field configuration. The average power was always kept to 400 W and the probe was at the floating potential. Variation of the energy flux against the pulse peak power in HiPIMS was first investigated. It was demonstrated that the energy per deposited titanium atom is the highest for short pulses (5 {mu}s) high pulse peak power (39 kW), as in this case, the ion production is efficient and the deposition rate is reduced by self-sputtering. As the argon pressure is increased, the energy deposition is reduced as the probability of scattering in the gas phase is increased. In the case of the HiPIMS discharge run at moderate peak power density (10 kW), the energy per deposited atom was found to be lower than the one measured for DCMS and pDCMS discharges. In these conditions, the HiPIMS discharge could be characterized as soft and close to a pulsed DCMS discharge run at very low duty cycle. For the sake of comparison, measurements were also carried out in DCMS mode with a balanced magnetron cathode, in the same working conditions of pressure and power. The energy flux at the substrate is significantly increased as the discharge is generated in an unbalanced field.

  7. Measuring internal energy deposition in collisional activation using hydrated ion nanocalorimetry to obtain peptide dissociation energies and entropies.

    PubMed

    Demireva, Maria; Williams, Evan R

    2010-07-01

    The internal energy deposited in both on- and off-resonance collisional activation in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry is measured with ion nanocalorimetry and is used to obtain information about the dissociation energy and entropy of a protonated peptide. Activation of Na(+)(H(2)O)(30) results in sequential loss of water molecules, and the internal energy of the activated ion can be obtained from the abundances of the product ions. Information about internal energy deposition in on-resonance collisional activation of protonated peptides is inferred from dissociation data obtained under identical conditions for hydrated ions that have similar m/z and degrees-of-freedom. From experimental internal energy deposition curves and Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) theory, dissociation data as a function of collision energy for protonated leucine enkephalin, which has a comparable m/z and degrees-of-freedom as Na(+)(H(2)O)(30), are modeled. The threshold dissociation energies and entropies are correlated for data acquired at a single time point, resulting in a relatively wide range of threshold dissociation energies (1.1 to 1.7 eV) that can fit these data. However, this range of values could be significantly reduced by fitting data acquired at different dissociation times. By measuring the internal energy of an activated ion, the number of fitting parameters necessary to obtain information about the dissociation parameters by modeling these data is reduced and could result in improved accuracy for such methods.

  8. Estimating regional auroral electron energy deposition using ground-based optical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampton, D. L.; Conde, M.; Ahrns, M. J.; Bristow, W.; Lynch, K. A.; Zettergren, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    Two key parameters for understanding the coupling between the magnetosphere and the thermosphere/ionosphere in polar regions are the characteristic energy and the total energy flux of precipitating auroral electrons. Ionization due to precipitating electrons modifies the ionospheric electron density profile and thereby the height-dependent conductivity in a complex manner in both time and space. Global or regional thermospheric dynamics models typically rely on empirical models (Ovation) or low-resolution global EUV imagery (POLAR) for electron precipitation input which smear out the mesoscale detail of the location and timing of auroral arcs. We have developed a method for measuring the time-dependent auroral electron energy deposition over a several-hundred km range with 25 km resolution using a combination of two ground-based optical instruments - a scanning-doppler imager observing green-line temperatures and a filtered all-sky imager measuring the N2+ first negative emission at 427.8 nm. We will discuss the details of the method, and show several examples including those from the MICA sounding rocket experiment as well as several events from the AMISR PINOT campaign. We will also show comparisons with alternate optical and radar techniques, compare our estimated energy flux to those from Ovation, and discuss limitations and advantages of the technique when examining mesoscale dynamics in the auroral zone.

  9. Solar Energy Deposition Rates in the Mesosphere Derived from Airglow Measurements: Implications for the Ozone Model Deficit Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Garcia, Rolando R.; Roble, Raymond G.; Hagan, Maura

    2000-01-01

    We derive rates of energy deposition in the mesosphere due to the absorption of solar ultraviolet radiation by ozone. The rates are derived directly from measurements of the 1.27-microns oxygen dayglow emission, independent of knowledge of the ozone abundance, the ozone absorption cross sections, and the ultraviolet solar irradiance in the ozone Hartley band. Fifty-six months of airglow data taken between 1982 and 1986 by the near-infrared spectrometer on the Solar-Mesosphere Explorer satellite are analyzed. The energy deposition rates exhibit altitude-dependent annual and semi-annual variations. We also find a positive correlation between temperatures and energy deposition rates near 90 km at low latitudes. This correlation is largely due to the semiannual oscillation in temperature and ozone and is consistent with model calculations. There is also a suggestion of possible tidal enhancement of this correlation based on recent theoretical and observational analyses. The airglow-derived rates of energy deposition are then compared with those computed by multidimensional numerical models. The observed and modeled deposition rates typically agree to within 20%. This agreement in energy deposition rates implies the same agreement exists between measured and modeled ozone volume mixing ratios in the mesosphere. Only in the upper mesosphere at midlatitudes during winter do we derive energy deposition rates (and hence ozone mixing ratios) consistently and significantly larger than the model calculations. This result is contrary to previous studies that have shown a large model deficit in the ozone abundance throughout the mesosphere. The climatology of solar energy deposition and heating presented in this paper is available to the community at the Middle Atmosphere Energy Budget Project web site at http://heat-budget.gats-inc.com.

  10. A Template-Matching Method For Measuring Energy Depositions In TES Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shank, Benjamin; Yen, Jeffrey; Cabrera, Blas; Kreikebaum, John Mark; Moffatt, Robert; Redl, Peter; Young, Betty; Brink, Paul; Cherry, Matthew; Tomada, Astrid

    2014-03-01

    Transition edge sensors (TES) have a wide variety of applications in particle ∖astrophysics for detecting incoming particles with high energy resolution. In TES design, the need for sufficient heat capacity to avoid saturation limits the ultimate energy resolution. Building on the TES model developed for SuperCDMS by Yen et al. for tungsten TESs deposited next to aluminum collection fins, we outline a time-domain non-linear optimal filter method for reconstructing energy depositions in TES films. This allows us to operate devices into their saturation region while taking into account changing noise performance and loss of energy collection. We show how this method has improved our understanding of quasiparticle diffusion and energy collection in our superconducting sensors.

  11. Time-specific measurements of energy deposition from radiation fields in simulated sub-micron tissue volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Famiano, M.A.

    1997-07-07

    A tissue-equivalent spherical proportional counter is used with a modified amplifier system to measure specific energy deposited from a uniform radiation field for short periods of time ({approximately}1 {micro}s to seconds) in order to extrapolate to dose in sub-micron tissue volumes. The energy deposited during these time intervals is compared to biological repair processes occurring within the same intervals after the initial energy deposition. The signal is integrated over a variable collection time which is adjusted with a square-wave pulse. Charge from particle passages is collected on the anode during the period in which the integrator is triggered, and the signal decays quickly to zero after the integrator feedback switch resets; the process repeats for every triggering pulse. Measurements of energy deposited from x rays, {sup 137}Cs gamma rays, and electrons from a {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y source for various time intervals are taken. Spectral characteristics as a function of charge collection time are observed and frequency plots of specific energy and collection time-interval are presented. In addition, a threshold energy flux is selected for each radiation type at which the formation of radicals (based on current measurements) in mammalian cells equals the rate at which radicals are repaired.

  12. Track based software package for measurement of the energy deposited by muons in the calorimeters of the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachas, K.; Hassani, S.

    2008-07-01

    The measurement of the muon energy deposition in the calorimeters is an integral part of muon identification, track isolation and correction for catastrophic muon energy losses, which are the prerequisites to the ultimate goal of refitting the muon track using calorimeter information as well. To this end, an accurate energy loss measurement method in the calorimeters is developed which uses only Event Data Model tools and is used by the muon isolation tool in the official ATLAS software, in order to provide isolation related variables at the Event Summary Data level. The strategy of the energy deposition measurement by the track in the calorimeters is described. Inner Detector, or Muon Spectrometer tracks are extrapolated to each calorimeter compartment using existing tools, which take into account multiple scattering and bending due to the magnetic field. The energy deposited in each compartment is measured by summing-up cells, corrected for noise, inside a cone of desired size around the track. The results of the measured energy loss in the calorimeters with this method are validated with Monte Carlo single muon samples.

  13. Intercomparison measurements with energy deposition spectrometer Liulin and TEPC Hawk at HIMAC, and related calculations with PHITS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploc, Ondrej; Uchihori, Yukio; Kitamura, H.; Kodaira, S.; Dachev, Tsvetan; Spurny, Frantisek; Jadrnickova, Iva; Mrazova, Zlata; Kubancak, Jan

    Liulin type detectors are recently used in a wide range of cosmic radiation measurements, e.g. at alpine observatories, onboard aircrafts and spacecrafts. They provide energy deposition spectra up to 21 MeV, higher energy deposition events are stored in the last (overflow) channel. Their main advantages are portability (about the same size as a pack of cigarettes) and ability to record spectra as a function of time, so they can be used as personal dosimeters. Their well-known limitations are: (i) the fact that they are not tissue equivalent, (ii) they can be used as LET spectrometer only under specific conditions (e.g. broad parallel beam), and (iii) that the energy deposition event from particles of LETH20¿35 keV/µm is stored in the overflow bin only so the spectral information is missing. Tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) Hawk has no of these limitations but on the other hand, it cannot be used as personal dosimeter because of its big size (cylinder of 16 cm diameter and 34 cm long). An important fraction of dose equivalent onboard spacecrafts is caused by heavy ions. This contribution presents results from intercomparison measurements with Liulin and Hawk at Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) and cyclotron beams, and related calculations with PHITS (Particle and Heavy-ion Transport code System). Following particles/ions and energies were used: protons 70 MeV, He 150 MeV, Ne 400 MeV, C 135 MeV, C 290 MeV, and Fe 500 MeV. Calculations of LET spectra by PHITS were performed for both, Liulin and Hawk. In case of Liulin, the dose equivalent was calculated using simulations in which several tissue equivalent materials were used as active volume instead of the silicon diode. Dose equivalents calculated in such way was compared with that measured with Hawk. LET spectra measured with Liulin and Hawk were compared for each ion at several points behind binary filters along the Brag curve. Good agreement was observed for some configurations; for

  14. Preliminary measurements of auroral energy deposition and middle atmosphere electrodynamic response during MAC/Epsilon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, R. A.

    1989-01-01

    On the nights of October 21 and 28, 1987 (UT), two Nike Orion payloads (NASA 31.066 and 31.067) were launched from Andoya, Norway, as part of the MAC/Epsilon campaign, to study auroral energetics and their effect on the middle atmosphere. Each payload carried instrumentation to measure relativistic electrons from 0.1 to 1.0 MeV in 12 differential channels, and Bremsstrahlung X-rays from greater than 5 to greater than 80 KeV in 5 integral channels. In addition, instrumentation to measure ion densities and electric fields were also included on these and, in the case of 31.066, on other near simultaneous payloads. The first flight, 31.066, was launched under pre-magnetic midnight conditions during relatively stable auroral conditions. Flight 31.067 was launched during post-breakup conditions at which time pulsations of approx. 100 seconds duration were evident. The measured radiations including their spectral characteristics are compared for these two events, to appraise their effect on the electrodynamic properties of the middle atmosphere as determined by other rocket-borne measurements.

  15. CAN THE DIFFERENTIAL EMISSION MEASURE CONSTRAIN THE TIMESCALE OF ENERGY DEPOSITION IN THE CORONA?

    SciTech Connect

    Guennou, C.; Auchere, F.; Bocchialini, K.; Parenti, S.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, the ability of the Hinode/EIS instrument to detect radiative signatures of coronal heating is investigated. Recent observational studies of active region cores suggest that both the low and high frequency heating mechanisms are consistent with observations. Distinguishing between these possibilities is important for identifying the physical mechanism(s) of the heating. The differential emission measure (DEM) tool is one diagnostic that allows us to make this distinction, through the amplitude of the DEM slope coolward of the coronal peak. It is therefore crucial to understand the uncertainties associated with these measurements. Using proper estimations of the uncertainties involved in the problem of DEM inversion, we derive confidence levels on the observed DEM slope. Results show that the uncertainty in the slope reconstruction strongly depends on the number of lines constraining the slope. Typical uncertainty is estimated to be about {+-}1.0 in the more favorable cases.

  16. Monte Carlo investigations of distance-dependent effects on energy deposition in K-shell x-ray fluorescence bone lead measurement.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Naseer; Fleming, David E B; O'Meara, Joanne M

    2004-09-01

    Radiation energy deposition results are presented from a Monte Carlo code simulating the lower part of a leg during an in vivo 109Cd K-shell x-ray fluorescence (KXRF) bone lead measurement. The simulations were run for a leg phantom model representing an adult subject, assuming concentrations of 10 microg Pb per gram bone mineral and tracing 500 million photons in each simulation. Trials were performed over a range (0.5-6.0 cm) of source-to-sample (S-S) distances. Energies deposited due to Compton and photoelectric processes occurring in the bone and the soft tissue were obtained. The data show an increase in the amount of energy deposited in the bone as the sample is moved closer to the source (from 2.0 cm to 0.5 cm). However, there is a decrease in the amount of energy deposited in the soft tissue as the sample is moved closer to the source over the same distance interval. In decreasing the S-S distance from 2.0 cm to 0.5 cm, the amount of energy deposited in the sample as a whole was found to increase by 11%. By calculating the energy deposition in the bone and in the soft tissue as a fraction of the total energy deposited in the sample, the corresponding changes are quantified as a function of S-S distance. Similarly, the proportions of energy deposited via the photoelectric effect and Compton scattering are presented as a function of S-S distance.

  17. Measurement and Simulation of the Variation in Proton-Induced Energy Deposition in Large Silicon Diode Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, Christina L.; Weller, Robert A.; Reed, Robert A.; Sierawski, Brian D.; Marshall, Paul W.; Marshall, Cheryl J.; Mendenhall, Marcus H.; Schrimpf, Ronald D.

    2007-01-01

    The proton induced charge deposition in a well characterized silicon P-i-N focal plane array is analyzed with Monte Carlo based simulations. These simulations include all physical processes, together with pile up, to accurately describe the experimental data. Simulation results reveal important high energy events not easily detected through experiment due to low statistics. The effects of each physical mechanism on the device response is shown for a single proton energy as well as a full proton space flux.

  18. Parametric study of the energy deposition inside the calorimeter measuring the nuclear heating in Material Testing Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amharrak, H.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Lyoussi, A.; Carette, M.; Brun, J.; De Vita, C.; Fourmentel, D.; Villard, J.-F.

    2015-11-01

    The nuclear heating measurements in Material Testing Reactors (MTRs) are crucial for the study of nuclear materials and fuels under irradiation. The reference measurements of this nuclear heating are especially performed by a differential calorimeter including a graphite sample material and two calorimetric cells. Then these measurements are used for other experimental conditions in order to predict the nuclear heating and thermal conditions induced in the irradiation devices. This paper will present simulations with MCNP5 Monte-Carlo transport code (using ENDF/B-VI nuclear data library) to evaluate the nuclear heating inside the calorimeter during irradiation campaigns of the CARMEN-1P mock-up inside OSIRIS reactor periphery (MTR based on Saclay, France). The whole complete geometry of the sensor has been considered. The calculation method corresponds to a calculation in two steps. Consequently, we used as an input source in the model, the neutron and photon spectra calculated in various experimental locations tested during the irradiation campaign (H9, H10, H11, D9). After a description of the differential calorimeter sensor, the MCNP5 model used for the calculations of nuclear heating inside the calorimeter elements is introduced by two quantities: KERMA and energy deposition rate per mass unit. The Charged Particle Equilibrium (CPE) inside the calorimeter elements is studied. The contribution of prompt gamma and neutron is determined. A comparison between this total nuclear heating calculation and the experimental results in a graphite sample will be made. Then parametric studies performed on the influence of the various calorimeter components on the nuclear heating are presented and discussed. The studies of the influence of the nature of materials, the sensor jacket, the source type and the comparison of the results obtained for the two calorimetric cells leads to some proposals for the sensor improvement.

  19. Energy deposition of thermal tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, E.

    2015-12-01

    The main role of vertically propagating waves in the general circulation is to transfer pseudo momentum from the region of generation to the region of wave breaking. The most prominent examples in atmospheric dynamics are planetary Rossby waves forced in the troposphere, which drive a poleward residual circulation in the winter stratosphere, and mesoscale gravity waves with tropospheric origin, which drive a summer-to-winter-pole circulation in the mesopasue region. In addition, the role of energy deposition by gravity waves has long been recognized to contribute substantially to the energy budget above the stratopause. In atmospheric circulation models, gravity waves are usually parameterized. Their energy deposition can be computed along with the momentum deposition and the turbulent diffusivity associated with wave breaking. In particular, the energy deposition is expressed in terms of secondary moments of the parameterized waves. Therefore, one is tempted to assume that the energy deposition of waves that are resolved in circulation models, e.g., Rossby waves and thermal tides, is automatically taken into account. This assumption is, however, flawed. We show that the energy deposition by resolved waves corresponds to the shear production (frictional heating) of the subgrid-scale turbulence model by which these waves are damped. Computational results from an atmospheric circulation model with energetically consistent treatment of momentum diffusion and frictional heating show that the energy deposition of thermal tides is substantial above the mesopause. This effect is either incomplete or even ignored in conventional atmospheric models that resolve the mesopause region. An idealized sensitivity experiment furthermore shows that thermal tides lead to a significant downward shift of gravity-wave breaking in the upper mesosphere.

  20. Measurement of deposition rate and ion energy distribution in a pulsed dc magnetron sputtering system using a retarding field analyzer with embedded quartz crystal microbalance.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shailesh; Gahan, David; Scullin, Paul; Doyle, James; Lennon, Jj; Vijayaraghavan, Rajani K; Daniels, Stephen; Hopkins, M B

    2016-04-01

    A compact retarding field analyzer with embedded quartz crystal microbalance has been developed to measure deposition rate, ionized flux fraction, and ion energy distribution arriving at the substrate location. The sensor can be placed on grounded, electrically floating, or radio frequency (rf) biased electrodes. A calibration method is presented to compensate for temperature effects in the quartz crystal. The metal deposition rate, metal ionization fraction, and energy distribution of the ions arriving at the substrate location are investigated in an asymmetric bipolar pulsed dc magnetron sputtering reactor under grounded, floating, and rf biased conditions. The diagnostic presented in this research work does not suffer from complications caused by water cooling arrangements to maintain constant temperature and is an attractive technique for characterizing a thin film deposition system.

  1. Measurement of deposition rate and ion energy distribution in a pulsed dc magnetron sputtering system using a retarding field analyzer with embedded quartz crystal microbalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Shailesh; Gahan, David; Scullin, Paul; Doyle, James; Lennon, Jj; Vijayaraghavan, Rajani K.; Daniels, Stephen; Hopkins, M. B.

    2016-04-01

    A compact retarding field analyzer with embedded quartz crystal microbalance has been developed to measure deposition rate, ionized flux fraction, and ion energy distribution arriving at the substrate location. The sensor can be placed on grounded, electrically floating, or radio frequency (rf) biased electrodes. A calibration method is presented to compensate for temperature effects in the quartz crystal. The metal deposition rate, metal ionization fraction, and energy distribution of the ions arriving at the substrate location are investigated in an asymmetric bipolar pulsed dc magnetron sputtering reactor under grounded, floating, and rf biased conditions. The diagnostic presented in this research work does not suffer from complications caused by water cooling arrangements to maintain constant temperature and is an attractive technique for characterizing a thin film deposition system.

  2. Localized flow control with energy deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelgren, Russell Gene

    A series of experiments with energy deposition via laser-induced optical breakdown of air, i.e., a laser spark, have been performed. These experiments have demonstrated the possibility of using a laser spark for supersonic flow control. In the first of these experiments, Rayleigh scattering flow visualization was taken for energy deposition into quiescent air. A time sequence of images showed the post breakdown fluid motion created by the laser spark for different laser energy levels. Blast wave radius and wave speed measurements were made and correlated to five different laser energy deposition levels. Laser energy was deposited upstream of a sphere in Mach 3.45 flow. The energy was deposited one sphere diameter and 0.6 diameters upstream of the front of the sphere. The frontal surface pressure on the sphere was recorded as the laser spark perturbed region interacted with the flow about the sphere. Tests for three different energy levels and two different incident laser beam diameters were completed. It has been demonstrated that the peak surface pressure associated with the Edney IV interaction can be momentarily reduced by 30% by the interaction with the thermal spot created by the laser spark. The effects of laser energy deposition on another shock interaction phenomena were studied. Laser energy deposition was used to modify the shock structure formed by symmetric wedges at Mach 3.45 within the dual solution domain. It was demonstrated experimentally that the Mach reflection could be reduced by 80% momentarily. The numerical simulations show a transition from the stable Mach reflection to a stable regular reflection. Two energy deposition methods (electric arcing and laser energy deposition) were used to force and control compressible mixing layers of axisymmetric jets. The energy deposition forcing methods have been experimentally investigated with the schlieren technique, particle image velocimetry, Mie scattering, and static pressure probe diagnostic

  3. Time Resolved Deposition Measurements in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    C.H. Skinner; H. Kugel; A.L. Roquemore; J. Hogan; W.R. Wampler; the NSTX team

    2004-08-03

    Time-resolved measurements of deposition in current tokamaks are crucial to gain a predictive understanding of deposition with a view to mitigating tritium retention and deposition on diagnostic mirrors expected in next-step devices. Two quartz crystal microbalances have been installed on NSTX at a location 0.77m outside the last closed flux surface. This configuration mimics a typical diagnostic window or mirror. The deposits were analyzed ex-situ and found to be dominantly carbon, oxygen, and deuterium. A rear facing quartz crystal recorded deposition of lower sticking probability molecules at 10% of the rate of the front facing one. Time resolved measurements over a 4-week period with 497 discharges, recorded 29.2 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} of deposition, however surprisingly, 15.9 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} of material loss occurred at 7 discharges. The net deposited mass of 13.3 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} matched the mass of 13.5 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} measured independently by ion beam analysis. Monte Carlo modeling suggests that transient processes are likely to dominate the deposition.

  4. Energy deposition of single femtosecond filaments in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, E W; Jhajj, N; Larkin, I; Zahedpour, S; Wahlstrand, J K; Milchberg, H M

    2016-08-15

    We present spatially resolved measurements of energy deposition into atmospheric air by femtosecond laser filaments. Single filaments formed with varying laser pulse energy and pulsewidth were examined using longitudinal interferometry, sonographic probing, and direct energy loss measurements. We measure peak and average energy absorption of ∼4  μJ/cm and ∼1  μJ/cm for input pulse powers up to ∼6 times the critical power for self-focusing. PMID:27519120

  5. Global Auroral Energy Deposition Derived from Polar UVI Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fillingim, M. O.; Brittnacher, M. J.; Elsen, R.; Parks, G. K.; Spann, J. F., Jr.; Germany, G. A.

    1997-01-01

    Quantitative measurement of the transfer of energy and momentum to the ionosphere from the solar wind is one of the main objectives of the ISTP program. Global measurement of auroral energy deposition derived from observations of the longer wavelength LBH band emissions made by the Ultraviolet Imager on the Polar spacecraft is one of the key elements in this satellite and ground-based instrument campaign. These "measurements" are inferred by combining information from consecutive images using different filters and have a time resolution on the average of three minutes and are made continuously over a 5 to 8 hour period during each 18 hour orbit of the Polar spacecraft. The energy deposition in the ionosphere from auroral electron precipitation augments are due to Joule heating associated with field aligned currents. Assuming conjugacy of energy deposition between the two hemispheres the total energy input to the ionosphere through electron precipitation can be determined at high time resolution. Previously, precipitating particle measurements along the tracks of low altitude satellites provided only local measurements and the global energy precipitation could be inferred through models but not directly measured. We use the UVI images for the entire month of January 1997 to estimate the global energy deposition at high time resolution. We also sort the energy deposition into sectors to find possible trends, for example, on the dayside and nightside, or the dawn and dusk sides.

  6. Global Auroral Energy Deposition Compared with Magnetic Indices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brittnacher, M. J.; Fillingim, M. O.; Elsen, R.; Parks, G. K.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, J. F., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Measurement of the global rate of energy deposition in the ionosphere via auroral particle precipitation is one of the primary goals of the Polar UVI program and is an important component of the ISTP program. The instantaneous rate of energy deposition for the entire month of January 1997 has been calculated by applying models to the UVI images and is presented by Fillingim et al. in this session. Magnetic indices, such as Kp, AE, and Dst, which are sensitive to variations in magnetospheric current systems have been constructed from ground magnetometer measurements and employed as measures of activity. The systematic study of global energy deposition raises the possibility of constructing a global magnetospheric activity index explicitly based on particle precipitation to supplement magnetic indices derived from ground magnetometer measurements. The relationship between global magnetic activity as measured by these indices and the rate of total global energy loss due to precipitation is not known at present. We study the correlation of the traditional magnetic index of Kp for the month of January 1997 with the energy deposition derived from the UVI images. We address the question of whether the energy deposition through particle precipitation generally matches the Kp and AE indices, or the more exciting, but distinct, possibility that this particle-derived index may provide an somewhat independent measure of global magnetospheric activity that could supplement traditional magnetically-based activity indices.

  7. Tokomak disruption runaway electron beam energy deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yian

    2012-10-01

    Disruption is one of the major concerns in magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) research. People believe the energetic runaway electron beam can damage the first wall by depositing most of its energy to certain region as heat, melting the wall. However, as the energy of the beam electron is very high (up to 50 MeV), most of the beam energy should be converted as gamma radiation and escape, and the fraction of thermal energy deposition is relatively small. We will calculate the runaway electron energy deposition in typical first wall configurations in ITER disruption scenario, and give the temperature profile of the wall. We will also calculate the bremsstrahlung gamma ray spectra of the beam and discuss the consequences.

  8. Energy deposition in STARFIRE reactor components

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.; Brooks, J.N.

    1985-04-01

    The energy deposition in the STARFIRE commercial tokamak reactor was calculated based on detailed models for the different reactor components. The heat deposition and the 14 MeV neutron flux poloidal distributions in the first wall were obtained. The poloidal surface heat load distribution in the first wall was calculated from the plasma radiation. The Monte Carlo method was used for the calculation to allow an accurate modeling for the reactor geometry.

  9. Simple Approaches for Measuring Dry Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition to Watersheds

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessing the effects of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition on surface water quality requires accurate accounts of total N deposition (wet, dry, and cloud vapor); however, dry deposition is difficult to measure and is often spatially variable. Affordable passive sampling methods...

  10. Calculation of energy deposition distributions for simple geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, J. W., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    When high-energy charged particles pass through a thin detector, the ionization energy loss in that detector is subject to fluctuations or straggling which must be considered in interpreting the data. Under many conditions, which depend upon the charge and energy of the incident particle and the detector geometry, the ionization energy lost by the particle is significantly different from the energy deposited in the detector. This problem divides naturally into a calculation of the energy loss that results in excitation and low-energy secondary electrons which do not travel far from their production points, and a calculation of energy loss that results in high-energy secondary electrons which can escape from the detector. The first calculation is performed using a modification of the Vavilov energy loss distribution. A cutoff energy is introduced above which all electrons are ignored and energy transferred to low energy particles is assumed to be equivalent to the energy deposited by them. For the second calculation, the trajectory of the primary particle is considered as a source of secondary high-energy electrons. The electrons from this source are transported using Monte Carlo techniques and multiple scattering theory, and the energy deposited by them in the detector is calculated. The results of the two calculations are then combined to predict the energy deposition distribution. The results of these calculations are used to predict the charge resolution of parallel-plate pulse ionization chambers that are being designed to measure the charge spectrum of heavy nuclei in the galactic cosmic-ray flux.

  11. In-situ measurements of the radioactive fallout deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korun, M.; Martinčič, R.; Pucelj, B.

    1991-02-01

    An improved method to determine radionuclide concentrations in soil and the radioactive fallout deposit is presented. The approach is based on in-situ gamma-ray spectrometric measurements performed with a portable high resolution gamma spectrometer and on calculations of the depth distribution based on the energy dependence of the attenuation of gamma rays in soil. The results are compared with laboratory analysis of collected soil samples.

  12. Verifying eddy-correlation measurements of dry deposition: A study of the energy-balance components of the Pawnee grasslands. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Massman, W.J.; Fox, D.G.; Zeller, K.F.; Lukens, D.

    1990-02-01

    At the Central Plains Experimental Range/Long-Term Ecological Research (CPER/LTER) site at the Pawnee National Grasslands, scientists from both the Rocky Mountain Station and the Natural Resources Ecology Laboratory of Colorado State University are independently attempting to measure several major components of the surface energy balance. The report describes how well independent measurements of radiation and the transport of heat and water vapor achieve closure of the surface energy balance and, thereby, account for the gross energy available to and processed by an ecosystem. The motivation behind the study is to evaluate the eddy correlation technology which the authors have been using to measure the exchange of gaseous pollutants (NO{sub 2}, NOx, and O{sub 3}) between the atmosphere and the grassland ecosystem.

  13. Surface free energy and microarray deposition technology.

    PubMed

    McHale, Glen

    2007-03-01

    Microarray techniques use a combinatorial approach to assess complex biochemical interactions. The fundamental goal is simultaneous, large-scale experimentation analogous to the automation achieved in the semiconductor industry. However, microarray deposition inherently involves liquids contacting solid substrates. Liquid droplet shapes are determined by surface and interfacial tension forces, and flows during drying. This article looks at how surface free energy and wetting considerations may influence the accuracy and reliability of spotted microarray experiments.

  14. Abnormal energy deposition on the wall through plasma disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, K.; Schmidt, G. L.

    1984-12-01

    The dissipation of plasma kinetic and magnetic energy during sawtooth oscillations and disruptions in tokamaks is analyzed using Kadomtsev's disruption model and the plasma-circuit equations. New simple scalings of several characteristic times are obtained for sawteeth and for thermal and magnetic energy quenches of disruptions. The abnormal energy deposition on the wall during major or minor disruptions, estimated from this analysis, is compared with bolometric measurements in the PDX tokamak. Especially, magnetic energy dissipation during the current termination period is shown to be reduced by the strong coupling of the plasma current with external circuits. These analyses are found to be useful to predict the phenomenological behavior of plasma disruptions in large future tokamaks, and to estimate abnormal heat deposition on the wall during plasma disruptions.

  15. Abnormal energy deposition on the wall through plasma disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, K.; Schmidt, G. L.

    1984-06-01

    The dissipation of plasma kinetic and magnetic energy during sawtooth oscillations and disruptions in Tokamaks is analyzed using Kadomtsev's disruption model and the plasma-circuit equations. New simple scalings of several characteristic times are obtained for sawteeth and for thermal and magnetic energy quenches of disruptions. The abnormal energy deposition on the wall during major or minor disruptions, estimated from this analysis, is compared with bolometric measurements in the PDX Tokamak. Especially, magnetic energy dissipation during the current termination period is shown to be reduced by the strong coupling of the plasma current with external circuits. These analyses are found to be useful to predict the phenomenological behavior of plasma disruptions in large future Tokamaks, and to estimate abnormal heat deposition on the wall during plasma disruptions.

  16. Temporal and spatial characteristics of auroral energy deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampton, D. L.; Conde, M.

    2015-12-01

    Auroral electron precipitation forms a complex and dynamic energy input into the high-latitude ionosphere and thermopshere. Rapid changes in plasma density due to electron impact ionization create correspondingly rapid changes in conductivity which in turn change the magnitude and altitude profile of magnetospheric current closure in the E- and F-region. Modeling these changes in the ionosphere and their effects on the local or regional upper atmosphere requires detailed input over wide regions. In support of the AMISR PINOT campaign and several rocket campaigns (CASCADES-2, MICA, ASSP) we have developed and tested a method to determine the characteristics of auroral energy input using purely ground-based optical measurements in geometries away from magnetic zenith. Using the N2+ first negative emissions at 427.8 nm reproduces the total energy flux over a wide region, but alone does not indicate the altitude profile of this energy deposition. Using temperature maps of the E-region collected by a Scanning Doppler Imager (SDI) observing the auroral green-line emission is a proxy for the characteristic energy of the precipitating electrons. While in some cases the energy determination underestimates the average energy it still is a good proxy for understanding when the electron distribution changes. We examine two seasons worth of auroral observations and determine the spatial and temporal variability of auroral energy deposition in comparison to solar wind and geophysical activity parameters. We also compare the results with well-known empirical models of electron energy deposition and show that they underestimate the peak local energy deposition rates by as much as a factor of 30.

  17. DepositScan, a Scanning Program to Measure Spray Deposition Distributions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DepositScan, a scanning program was developed to quickly measure spray deposit distributions on water sensitive papers or Kromekote cards which are widely used for determinations of pesticide spray deposition quality on target areas. The program is installed in a portable computer and works with a ...

  18. Energy Deposition and Redistribution in the Magnetosphere-Ionosphere System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fok, M. H.; Khazanov, G. V.; Glocer, A.; Buzulukova, N.; Chen, S.

    2013-12-01

    The closed magnetic field region of the magnetosphere is extremely complicated and dynamic. The constituent populations of this region comprise a tightly coupled and interconnected system that must be considered in concert rather than independently. The major plasma components in this coupled system are: plasmasphere, superthermal electrons, ring current, and radiation belts. These components are moreover tightly tied to the ionosphere both through electrodynamic coupling and particle coupling. Each of these populations has distinctive features and contributes in a different way to the dynamic and energetic processes in the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. Energy from the Sun is deposited in these plasmas directly or indirectly through energy coupling mechanisms with surrounding plasma and electromagnetic fields. Our paper will focus on simulating energy deposition and redistribution in the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. Extensive data analysis and data-model comparison will be carried out to reconcile theory with measurements.

  19. Energy deposition calculated by PHITS code in Pb spallation target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Quanzhi

    2016-01-01

    Energy deposition in a Pb spallation target irradiated by high energetic protons was calculated by PHITS2.52 code. The validation of the energy deposition and neutron production calculated by PHITS code was performed. Results show good agreements between the simulation results and the experimental data. Detailed comparison shows that for the total energy deposition, PHITS simulation result was about 15% overestimation than that of the experimental data. For the energy deposition along the length of the Pb target, the discrepancy mainly presented at the front part of the Pb target. Calculation indicates that most of the energy deposition comes from the ionizations of the primary protons and the produced secondary particles. With the event generator mode of PHITS, the deposit energy distribution for the particles and the light nulclei is presented for the first time. It indicates that the primary protons with energy more than 100 MeV are the most contributors to the total energy deposition. The energy depositions peaking at 10 MeV and 0.1 MeV, are mainly caused by the electrons, pions, d, t, 3He and also α particles during the cascade process and the evaporation process, respectively. The energy deposition density caused by different proton beam profiles are also calculated and compared. Such calculation and analyses are much helpful for better understanding the physical mechanism of energy deposition in the spallation target, and greatly useful for the thermal hydraulic design of the spallation target.

  20. Measuring Energy Sustainability

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, David L

    2009-01-01

    For the purpose of measurement, energy sustainability is defined as ensuring that future generations have energy resources that enable them to achieve a level of well-being at least as good as that of the current generation. It is recognized that there are valid, more comprehensive understandings of sustainability and that energy sustainability as defined here is only meaningful when placed in a broader context. Still, measuring energy sustainability is important to society because the rates of consumption of some fossil resources are now substantial in relation to measures of ultimate resources, and because conflicts between fossil energy use and environmental sustainability are intensifying. Starting from the definition, an equation for energy sustainability is derived that reconciles renewable fl ows and nonrenewable stocks, includes the transformation of energy into energy services, incorporates technological change and, at least notionally, allows for changes in the relationship between energy services and societal well-being. Energy sustainability must be measured retrospectively as well as prospectively, and methods for doing each are discussed. Connections to the sustainability of other resources are also critical. The framework presented is merely a starting point; much remains to be done to make it operational.

  1. Measuring Thicknesses Of Vacuum-Deposited Organic Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    David, Carey E.

    1996-01-01

    Method of measuring thickness of thin organic liquid film deposited in vacuum involves use of quartz-crystal monitor (QCM) calibrated by use of witness plate that has, in turn, calibrated by measurement of absorption of infrared light in deposited material. Present procedure somewhat tedious, but once calibration accomplished, thicknesses of organic liquid deposits monitored in real time and in situ by use of QCM.

  2. Modeling Atmospheric Energy Deposition (by energetic ions)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, C. D.; Brain, D. A.; Lillis, R. J.; Liemohn, M. W.; Bougher, S. W.

    2011-12-01

    deposition is conducted including a comparison of the influence relative to other energy sources (namely EUV photons) and previous efforts using the guiding center approximation.

  3. Energy deposition rates by charged particles. [in upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torkar, K. M.; Urban, A.; Bjordal, J.; Lundblad, J. A.; Soraas, F.; Smith, L. G.; Dumbs, A.; Grandal, B.; Ulwick, J. C.; Vancour, R. P.

    1985-01-01

    A summary of measurements of the precipitation of electrons and positive ions (in the keV-MeV range) detected aboard eight rockets launched within the Energy Budget Campaign from Northern Scandinavia is given, together with corresponding satellite data. In some cases strong temporal variations of the downgoing integral fluxes were observed. The fluxes provide the background for the calculated ion production rates and altitude profiles of the energy deposition into the atmosphere at different levels of geomagnetic disturbance and cosmic noise absorption. The derived ion production rates by eneretic particles are compared to other night-time ionisation sources.

  4. Physical deposit measures and commercial potential: The case of titanium-bearing heavy-mineral deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Attanasi, E.D.; DeYoung, J.H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Physical measures of mineral deposit characteristics, such as grade and tonnage, long have been used in both subjective and analytic models to predict favorability of areas for the occurrence of mineral deposits of particular types. After a deposit has been identified, however, the explorationist must decide whether to continue data collection, begin an economic feasibility study, or abandon the prospect. The decision maker can estimate the probability that a deposit will be commercial by examining physical measures. The amount of sampling data required before such a probability estimate can be considered reliable can be determined. A logit probability model estimated from onshore titanium-bearing heavy-mineral deposit data identifies and quantifies the relative influence of a deposit's physical measures on the chances of the deposit becoming commercial. A principal conclusion that can be drawn from the analysis is that, along with a measure of deposit size, the characteristics most important in predicting commercial potential are grades of the constituent minerals. Total heavy-mineral-bearing sand grade or even total titanium grade (without data on constituent mineral grades) are poor predictors of the deposit's commercial potential. ?? 1988 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  5. A nuclear fragmentation energy deposition model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngo, D. M.; Wilson, J. W.; Fogarty, T. N.; Buck, W. W.; Townsend, L. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    A formalism for target fragment transport is presented with application to energy loss spectra in thin silicon devices. A nuclear data base is recommended that agrees well with the measurements of McNulty et al. using surface barrier detectors. High-energy events observed by McNulty et al., which are not predicted by intranuclear cascade models, are well represented by the present work.

  6. Motor Energy Conservation Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Metzger, Jesse Dean

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple motor inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: High Efficiency Motor retrofit and Cogged V-belts retrofit. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, and building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.

  7. X-ray amplifier energy deposition scaling with channeled propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, K.; Luk, T.S.; McPherson, A.

    1991-12-31

    The spatial control of the energy deposited for excitation of an x-ray amplifier plays an important role in the fundamental scaling relationship between the required energy, the gain and the wavelength. New results concerning the ability to establish confined modes of propagation of sort pulse radiation of sufficiently high intensity in plasmas lead to a sharply reduced need for the total energy deposited, since the concentration of deposited power can be very efficiently organized.

  8. Energy Deposition Processes in Titan's Upper Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sittler, Edward C., Jr.; Bertucci, Cesar; Coates, Andrew; Cravens, Tom; Dandouras, Iannis; Shemansky, Don

    2008-01-01

    Most of Titan's atmospheric organic and nitrogen chemistry, aerosol formation, and atmospheric loss are driven from external energy sources such as Solar UV, Saturn's magnetosphere, solar wind and galactic cosmic rays. The Solar UV tends to dominate the energy input at lower altitudes of approximately 1100 km but which can extend down to approximately 400 km, while the plasma interaction from Saturn's magnetosphere, Saturn's magnetosheath or solar wind are more important at higher altitudes of approximately 1400 km, but the heavy ion plasma [O(+)] of approximately 2 keV and energetic ions [H(+)] of approximately 30 keV or higher from Saturn's magnetosphere can penetrate below 950km. Cosmic rays with energies of greater than 1 GeV can penetrate much deeper into Titan's atmosphere with most of its energy deposited at approximately 100 km altitude. The haze layer tends to dominate between 100 km and 300 km. The induced magnetic field from Titan's interaction with the external plasma can be very complex and will tend to channel the flow of energy into Titan's upper atmosphere. Cassini observations combined with advanced hybrid simulations of the plasma interaction with Titan's upper atmosphere show significant changes in the character of the interaction with Saturn local time at Titan's orbit where the magnetosphere displays large and systematic changes with local time. The external solar wind can also drive sub-storms within the magnetosphere which can then modify the magnetospheric interaction with Titan. Another important parameter is solar zenith angle (SZA) with respect to the co-rotation direction of the magnetospheric flow. Titan's interaction can contribute to atmospheric loss via pickup ion loss, scavenging of Titan's ionospheric plasma, loss of ionospheric plasma down its induced magnetotail via an ionospheric wind, and non-thermal loss of the atmosphere via heating and sputtering induced by the bombardment of magnetospheric keV ions and electrons. This

  9. Energy deposition and microstructural modification in dynamically consolidated metal powders

    SciTech Connect

    Gourdin, W.H.

    1984-01-01

    A model is presented for the deposition of energy at powder particle surfaces during dynamic consolidation. The average energy flux incident on the surface of a powder particle is estimated to be E/tauA where E is the specific energy deposited by the shock, tau is the shock rise time, and A the measured powder specific surface area. This flux is assumed to be constant over the rise time of the shock, falling abruptly to zero for times longer than tau. Solution of the thermal transport equation subject to this boundary condition yields the thermal history within a powder particle having the area-equivalent diameter D = 6/rho/sub 0/A, where rho/sub 0/ is the solid density. The magnitude of the temperatures and the heating and cooling rates indicate likely material transformations. The penetration of a given isotherm provides an estimate of the volume fraction of material transformed. Good agreement is found between model calculations and measurements of the extent of local martensite formation in consolidated 4330V steel powder and of local melting in consolidated aluminum-6% silicon and copper powders. The general implications of the model are discussed.

  10. ANL Micrometeorological Measurements of Particle Sulfur Deposition at the 1981 Dry Deposition Intercomparison Experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    M. L. Wesely, D. R. Cook, R. L. Hart

    1982-06-30

    The Dry Deposition Intercomparison Experiment conducted in September, 1981, was designed by the Illinois State Water Survey as a pilot effort to evaluate various methods of measuring pollutant dry deposition. A more extensive experiment was planned for June, 1982, when additional and improved techniques were to be implemented. The 1981 study focused on sulfate aerosol, while the 1982 experiment will consider a wider range of particulate substances and some gases. At issue is whether traditional monitoring methods using surrogate surfaces to collect dry deposition can routinely provide estimates in agreement with results from applications of intensive micrometeorological techniques. This report summarizes the micrometeorological data gathered in 1981 by Argonne National Laboratory.

  11. Deposition measurement of particulate matter in connection with corrosion studies.

    PubMed

    Ferm, Martin; Watt, John; O'Hanlon, Samantha; De Santis, Franco; Varotsos, Costas

    2006-03-01

    A new passive particle collector (inert surrogate surface) that collects particles from all directions has been developed. It was used to measure particle deposition at 35 test sites as part of a project that examined corrosion of materials in order that variation in particulate material could be used in development of dose-response functions in a modern multi-pollutant environment. The project, MULTI-ASSESS, was funded by the EU to examine the effects of air pollution on cultural heritage. Passive samplers were mounted rain-protected, and both in wind-protected and wind-exposed positions, to match the exposure of the samples for corrosion studies. The particle mass and its chemical content (nitrate, ammonium, sulfate, calcium, sodium, chloride, magnesium and potassium) were analysed. The loss of light reflectance on the surrogate surface was also measured. Very little ammonium and potassium was found, and one or more anions are missing in the ion balance. There were many strong correlations between the analysed species. The mass of analysed water-soluble ions was fairly constant at 24% of the total mass. The particle mass deposited to the samplers in the wind-protected position was about 25% of the particles deposited to an openly exposed sampler. The Cl-/Na+ ratios indicate a reaction between HNO(3) and NaCl. The deposited nitrate flux corresponds to the missing chloride. The Ca2+ deposition equals the SO4(2-) deposition and the anion deficiency. The SO4(2-) deposition most likely originates from SO2 that has reacted with basic calcium-containing particles either before or after they were deposited. The particle depositions at the urban sites were much higher than in nearby rural sites. The deposited mass correlated surprisingly well with the PM(10) concentration, except at sites very close to traffic.

  12. Atomic Layer Deposition of Bismuth Vanadates for Solar Energy Materials.

    PubMed

    Stefik, Morgan

    2016-07-01

    The fabrication of porous nanocomposites is key to the advancement of energy conversion and storage devices that interface with electrolytes. Bismuth vanadate, BiVO4 , is a promising oxide for solar water splitting where the controlled fabrication of BiVO4 layers within porous, conducting scaffolds has remained a challenge. Here, the atomic layer deposition of bismuth vanadates is reported from BiPh3 , vanadium(V) oxytriisopropoxide, and water. The resulting films have tunable stoichiometry and may be crystallized to form the photoactive scheelite structure of BiVO4 . A selective etching process was used with vanadium-rich depositions to enable the synthesis of phase-pure BiVO4 after spinodal decomposition. BiVO4 thin films were measured for photoelectrochemical performance under AM 1.5 illumination. The average photocurrents were 1.17 mA cm(-2) at 1.23 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode using a hole-scavenging sulfite electrolyte. The capability to deposit conformal bismuth vanadates will enable a new generation of nanocomposite architectures for solar water splitting.

  13. MEASUREMENT AND MODELING OF THE DRY DEPOSITION OF PEROXIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements of the dry deposition velocity (Vd) of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and total organic peroxides (ROOH) were made during four experiments at three forested sites. Details and uncertainties associated with the measurement of peroxide...

  14. Energy deposition characteristics of nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators: Influence of dielectric material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correale, G.; Winkel, R.; Kotsonis, M.

    2015-08-01

    An experimental study aimed at the characterization of energy deposition of nanosecond Dielectric Barrier Discharge (ns-DBD) plasma actuators was carried out. Special attention was given on the effect of the thickness and material used for dielectric barrier. The selected materials for this study were polyimide film (Kapton), polyamide based nylon (PA2200), and silicone rubber. Schlieren measurements were carried out in quiescent air conditions in order to observe density gradients induced by energy deposited. Size of heated area was used to qualify the energy deposition coupled with electrical power measurements performed using the back-current shunt technique. Additionally, light intensity measurements showed a different nature of discharge based upon the material used for barrier, for a fixed thickness and frequency of discharge. Finally, a characterisation study was performed for the three tested materials. Dielectric constant, volume resistivity, and thermal conductivity were measured. Strong trends between the control parameters and the energy deposited into the fluid during the discharge were observed. Results indicate that efficiency of energy deposition mechanism relative to the thickness of the barrier strongly depends upon the material used for the dielectric barrier itself. In general, a high dielectric strength and a low volumetric resistivity are preferred for a barrier, together with a high heat capacitance and a low thermal conductivity coefficient in order to maximize the efficiency of the thermal energy deposition induced by an ns-DBD plasma actuator.

  15. Estimated variability of National Atmospheric Deposition Program/Mercury Deposition Network measurements using collocated samplers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wetherbee, G.A.; Gay, D.A.; Brunette, R.C.; Sweet, C.W.

    2007-01-01

    The National Atmospheric Deposition Program/Mercury Deposition Network (MDN) provides long-term, quality-assured records of mercury in wet deposition in the USA and Canada. Interpretation of spatial and temporal trends in the MDN data requires quantification of the variability of the MDN measurements. Variability is quantified for MDN data from collocated samplers at MDN sites in two states, one in Illinois and one in Washington. Median absolute differences in the collocated sampler data for total mercury concentration are approximately 11% of the median mercury concentration for all valid 1999-2004 MDN data. Median absolute differences are between 3.0% and 14% of the median MDN value for collector catch (sample volume) and between 6.0% and 15% of the median MDN value for mercury wet deposition. The overall measurement errors are sufficiently low to resolve between NADP/MDN measurements by ??2 ng??l-1 and ??2 ????m-2?? year-1, which are the contour intervals used to display the data on NADP isopleths maps for concentration and deposition, respectively. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007.

  16. Rapid Ammonia Deposition Measured Near Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanton, L. G.; Pan, D.; Sun, K.; Golston, L.; Tao, L.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) emit massive amounts of ammonia (NH3) to the atmosphere. Current measurements of NH3 are generally conducted far away from the sources (satellites, airplanes, etc.). There is insufficient knowledge about the dry deposition rate of NH3 near the sources, which might contribute to the large discrepancies between measured concentrations at CAFOs and those from models. During the 2014 NASA DISCOVER-AQ campaign, we designed a series of tests to measure the deposition rate of NH3 by utilizing a suite of sensors, including a LICOR LI-7700 methane sensor and Princeton University's custom open path NH3 sensor, which was mounted on top of a small SUV. Our mobile sampling technique enables us to follow feedlot emission plumes to see how ambient NH3 concentration decays as gases moves away from the CAFO. The mobile platform is used to perform upwind and downwind sampling to characterize the NH3 emission source. We tracked the change of the enhancement of NH3 concentration relative to the enhancement of CH4 concentration (ΔNH3:ΔCH4), while transecting the plume of individual cattle feedlots. Measured data shows that the high concentration of NH3 seen at the source decreases quickly as one moves further downwind from it. A time constant of approximately ten minutes has been calculated from the decay of the ΔNH3:ΔCH4 ratios while moving away from the sources. We also will compare our measurements with those of NASA's P-3B aerosol measurements to show that the majority must be lost to dry deposition. This rapid deposition suggests that large amounts of NH3 are being deposited in very close proximity to these CAFOs, which is consistent with previous findings of locally high soil pH near NH3 sources. Our results will be used to better characterize nitrogen deposition from cattle feedlots and estimate NH3 lifetime.

  17. Global Auroral Energy Deposition during Substorm Onset Compared with Local Time and Solar Wind IMF Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, J. F.; Brittnacher, M.; Fillingim, M. O.; Germany, G. A.; Parks, G. K.

    1998-01-01

    The global images made by the Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) aboard the IASTP/Polar Satellite are used to derive the global auroral energy deposited in the ionosphere resulting from electron precipitation. During a substorm onset, the energy deposited and its location in local time are compared to the solar wind IMF conditions. Previously, insitu measurements of low orbiting satellites have made precipitating particle measurements along the spacecraft track and global images of the auroral zone, without the ability to quantify energy parameters, have been available. However, usage of the high temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution of consecutive UVI images enables quantitative measurement of the energy deposited in the ionosphere not previously available on a global scale. Data over an extended period beginning in January 1997 will be presented.

  18. X-ray reflectivity measurements of vacuum deposited thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Chason, M.; Chason, E.

    1992-12-31

    X-ray reflectivity using energy dispersive X-ray detection, a nondestructive probe of surface roughness over the region of {approximately} 1--50 {Angstrom}, has been used to investigate the characteristicsof vacuum deposited thin films. With a surface roughness sensitivity better than 1 {Angstrom} X-ray reflectivity is sensitive to interfaces between different materials for sample thicknesses up to approximately2000 {Angstrom} (depending on material density). We have investigated discrete Cr/Al deposits on quartz substrates and determined the surface roughness at the interfaces. We have also monitored the evolution ofthe Cr/Al interface following annealing. The experimental data is presented and discussed. The use of the technique for studying thin film deposits is addressed.

  19. X-ray reflectivity measurements of vacuum deposited thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Chason, M. ); Chason, E. )

    1992-01-01

    X-ray reflectivity using energy dispersive X-ray detection, a nondestructive probe of surface roughness over the region of [approximately] 1--50 [Angstrom], has been used to investigate the characteristicsof vacuum deposited thin films. With a surface roughness sensitivity better than 1 [Angstrom] X-ray reflectivity is sensitive to interfaces between different materials for sample thicknesses up to approximately2000 [Angstrom] (depending on material density). We have investigated discrete Cr/Al deposits on quartz substrates and determined the surface roughness at the interfaces. We have also monitored the evolution ofthe Cr/Al interface following annealing. The experimental data is presented and discussed. The use of the technique for studying thin film deposits is addressed.

  20. Experimental measurements of the thermal conductivity of ash deposits: Part 2. Effects of sintering and deposit microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    A. L. Robinson; S. G. Buckley; N. Yang; L. L. Baxter

    2000-04-01

    The authors report results from an experimental study that examines the influence of sintering and microstructure on ash deposit thermal conductivity. The measurements are made using a technique developed to make in situ, time-resolved measurements of the effective thermal conductivity of ash deposits formed under conditions that closely replicate those found in the convective pass of a commercial boiler. The technique is designed to minimize the disturbance of the natural deposit microstructure. The initial stages of sintering and densification are accompanied by an increase in deposit thermal conductivity. Subsequent sintering continues to densify the deposit, but has little effect on deposit thermal conductivity. SEM analyses indicates that sintering creates a layered deposit structure with a relatively unsintered innermost layer. They hypothesize that this unsintered layer largely determines the overall deposit thermal conductivity. A theoretical model that treats a deposit as a two-layered material predicts the observed trends in thermal conductivity.

  1. Simulation of proton-induced energy deposition in integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernald, Kenneth W.; Kerns, Sherra E.

    1988-01-01

    A time-efficient simulation technique was developed for modeling the energy deposition by incident protons in modern integrated circuits. To avoid the excessive computer time required by many proton-effects simulators, a stochastic method was chosen to model the various physical effects responsible for energy deposition by incident protons. Using probability density functions to describe the nuclear reactions responsible for most proton-induced memory upsets, the simulator determines the probability of a proton hit depositing the energy necessary for circuit destabilization. This factor is combined with various circuit parameters to determine the expected error-rate in a given proton environment. An analysis of transient or dose-rate effects is also performed. A comparison to experimental energy-disposition data proves the simulator to be quite accurate for predicting the expected number of events in certain integrated circuits.

  2. Anode power deposition in quasi-steady MPD arcs. [accelerator anode heat flux measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saber, A. J.; Jahn, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    The power deposited in the anode of a quasi-steady MPD accelerator has been measured directly by thermocouples attached to the inside surface of a shell anode which provide a local measurement of anode heat flux. The results over a range of arc currents from 5.5 to 44 kiloamperes and argon mass flows from 1 g/sec to 48 g/sec show that the fraction of the total input power deposited in the anode decreases drastically from 50% at an arc power of 200 kW to 10% at 20 MW, and that anode power is not uniformly deposited in the anode. A theoretical model of the anode heat transfer, including effects of anode work function, electron thermal energy, and anode sheath, can be brought into reasonable agreement with the measurements, provided the effective range of the conduction electrons from within the discharge plasma to the anode surface is properly acknowledged.

  3. Single crystal chemical vapor deposit diamond detector for energetic plasma measurement in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogasawara, K.; Broiles, T. W.; Coulter, K. E.; Dayeh, M. A.; Desai, M. I.; Livi, S. A.; McComas, D. J.; Walther, B. C.

    2015-03-01

    This study reports the performance of single crystal chemical vapor deposit diamond detectors for measuring space plasma and energetic particles: ~7 keV energy resolution for protons with a 14 keV threshold level, and good response linearity for ions and electrons as expected from Monte-Carlo calculations of primary particle energy loss. We investigated that these diamond detectors are able to operate at high temperature (> 70 ° C) and have fast response times (< 1 ns rise time). While silicon detectors have proven capability over this energy range for space plasma measurements, diamond detectors offer a faster response, higher temperature operation, greater radiation tolerance, and immunity to light.

  4. ENERGY DEPOSITION PROFILES AND ENTROPY IN GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Anya; Majumdar, Subhabrata; Nath, Biman B. E-mail: subha@tifr.res.in

    2012-11-10

    We report the results of our study of fractional entropy enhancement in the intracluster medium (ICM) of the clusters from the representative XMM-Newton cluster structure survey. We compare the observed entropy profile of these clusters with that expected for the ICM without any feedback, as well as with the introduction of preheating and cooling. We make the first estimate of the total, as well as radial, non-gravitational energy deposition up to r {sub 500} for this large, nearly flux-limited, sample of clusters. We find that the total energy deposition corresponding to the entropy enhancement is proportional to the cluster temperature (and hence cluster mass). The energy deposition per particle scaled by T {sub sp}, {Delta}E/T {sub sp} has a similar profile in all clusters, and is more pronounced in the central regions. Our results support models of entropy enhancement through active galactic nucleus feedback.

  5. In situ measurement of conductivity during nanocomposite film deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blattmann, Christoph O.; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.

    2016-05-01

    Flexible and electrically conductive nanocomposite films are essential for small, portable and even implantable electronic devices. Typically, such film synthesis and conductivity measurement are carried out sequentially. As a result, optimization of filler loading and size/morphology characteristics with respect to film conductivity is rather tedious and costly. Here, freshly-made Ag nanoparticles (nanosilver) are made by scalable flame aerosol technology and directly deposited onto polymeric (polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate)) films during which the resistance of the resulting nanocomposite is measured in situ. The formation and gas-phase growth of such flame-made nanosilver, just before incorporation onto the polymer film, is measured by thermophoretic sampling and microscopy. Monitoring the nanocomposite resistance in situ reveals the onset of conductive network formation by the deposited nanosilver growth and sinternecking. The in situ measurement is much faster and more accurate than conventional ex situ four-point resistance measurements since an electrically percolating network is detected upon its formation by the in situ technique. Nevertheless, general resistance trends with respect to filler loading and host polymer composition are consistent for both in situ and ex situ measurements. The time lag for the onset of a conductive network (i.e., percolation) depends linearly on the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the host polymer. This is attributed to the increased nanoparticle-polymer interaction with decreasing Tg. Proper selection of the host polymer in combination with in situ resistance monitoring therefore enable the optimal preparation of conductive nanocomposite films.

  6. Measurements of Metal Depositions in the Archimedes Demonstration Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiping; Agnew, Steve; Lee, Davis; Livak, Andrei; McCartney, Sean; Umstadter, Karl; Winslow, Dave; Yung, Shui-Chow

    2004-11-01

    The Archimedes Demonstration Unit (ADU) is a device built to demonstrate Plasma Mass Filter operation. A coupon measurement technique has been developed to evaluate separation of elements by atomic mass. Coupons are installed in the heavy element collection region and light element collection region. Metal depositions are determined with X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry and SEM/EDX. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) measurement results are used to calibrate the XRF and SEM/EDX and get quantitative coating thickness information. An x-ray mass attenuation technique has been developed to measure light element coatings on copper coupons utilizing the x-ray intensity change as coating thickness increases. Cotton swab and tape adhesion techniques are used to measure coating thickness of the ADU inner wall surface. Tube shaped and box coupons have been designed to accommodate re-sputtering effects. Coupon measurements from several ADU operation regimes will be presented.

  7. Collisional energy deposition threshold for extended damage depths in ion-implanted silicates

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, G.W.; Battaglin, G.; Boscolo-Boscoletto, A.; Caccavalle, F.; De Marchi, G.; Mazzoldi, P.; Miotello, A.

    1991-12-31

    Many properties of implanted fused silica (e.g., surface stress, hardness) exhibit maximum implantation-induced changes for collisional energy deposition values of {approximately}10{sup 20} keV/cm{sup 3}. We have observed a second critical energy deposition threshold value of about 10{sup 22} keV/cm{sup 3} in stress and hardness measurements as well as in many other experiments on silicate glasses (leaching, alkali depletion, etching rate, gaseous implant redistribution). The latter show evidence for damage depths exceeding TRIM ranges by about a factor of 2. For crystalline quartz, a similar threshold value has been found for extended damage depths (greater than TRIM) for 250 kev ions (H-Au) as measured by RBS and interference fringes. This phenomenon at high damage deposition energy may involve the large stress gradients between damaged and undamaged regions and the much increased diffusion coefficient for defect transport. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Collisional energy deposition threshold for extended damage depths in ion-implanted silicates

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, G.W. ); Battaglin, G. ); Boscolo-Boscoletto, A. ); Caccavalle, F.; De Marchi, G.; Mazzoldi, P. ); Miotello, A. (Consorzio INFM, Dipartiment

    1991-01-01

    Many properties of implanted fused silica (e.g., surface stress, hardness) exhibit maximum implantation-induced changes for collisional energy deposition values of {approximately}10{sup 20} keV/cm{sup 3}. We have observed a second critical energy deposition threshold value of about 10{sup 22} keV/cm{sup 3} in stress and hardness measurements as well as in many other experiments on silicate glasses (leaching, alkali depletion, etching rate, gaseous implant redistribution). The latter show evidence for damage depths exceeding TRIM ranges by about a factor of 2. For crystalline quartz, a similar threshold value has been found for extended damage depths (greater than TRIM) for 250 kev ions (H-Au) as measured by RBS and interference fringes. This phenomenon at high damage deposition energy may involve the large stress gradients between damaged and undamaged regions and the much increased diffusion coefficient for defect transport. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Flux and energy analysis of species in hollow cathode magnetron ionized physical vapor deposition of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, L.; Ko, E.; Dulkin, A.; Park, K. J.; Fields, S.; Leeser, K.; Meng, L.; Ruzic, D. N.

    2010-12-01

    To meet the stringent requirements of interconnect metallization for sub-32 nm technologies, an unprecedented level of flux and energy control of film forming species has become necessary to further advance ionized physical vapor deposition technology. Such technology development mandates improvements in methods to quantify the metal ion fraction, the gas/metal ion ratio, and the associated ion energies in the total ion flux to the substrate. In this work, a novel method combining planar Langmuir probes, quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), and gridded energy analyzer (GEA) custom instrumentation is developed to estimate the plasma density and temperature as well as to measure the metal ion fraction and ion energy. The measurements were conducted in a Novellus Systems, Inc. Hollow Cathode Magnetron (HCMTM) physical vapor deposition source used for deposition of Cu seed layer for 65-130 nm technology nodes. The gridded energy analyzer was employed to measure ion flux and ion energy, which was compared to the collocated planar Langmuir probe data. The total ion-to-metal neutral ratio was determined by the QCM combined with GEA. The data collection technique and the corresponding analysis are discussed. The effect of concurrent resputtering during the deposition process on film thickness profile is also discussed.

  10. Flux and energy analysis of species in hollow cathode magnetron ionized physical vapor deposition of copper

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, L.; Ko, E.; Dulkin, A.; Park, K. J.; Fields, S.; Leeser, K.; Meng, L.; Ruzic, D. N.

    2010-12-15

    To meet the stringent requirements of interconnect metallization for sub-32 nm technologies, an unprecedented level of flux and energy control of film forming species has become necessary to further advance ionized physical vapor deposition technology. Such technology development mandates improvements in methods to quantify the metal ion fraction, the gas/metal ion ratio, and the associated ion energies in the total ion flux to the substrate. In this work, a novel method combining planar Langmuir probes, quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), and gridded energy analyzer (GEA) custom instrumentation is developed to estimate the plasma density and temperature as well as to measure the metal ion fraction and ion energy. The measurements were conducted in a Novellus Systems, Inc. Hollow Cathode Magnetron (HCM{sup TM}) physical vapor deposition source used for deposition of Cu seed layer for 65-130 nm technology nodes. The gridded energy analyzer was employed to measure ion flux and ion energy, which was compared to the collocated planar Langmuir probe data. The total ion-to-metal neutral ratio was determined by the QCM combined with GEA. The data collection technique and the corresponding analysis are discussed. The effect of concurrent resputtering during the deposition process on film thickness profile is also discussed.

  11. Gamma-ray transfer and energy deposition in supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, Douglas A.; Sutherland, Peter G.; Harkness, Robert P.

    1995-01-01

    Solutions to the energy-independent (gray) radiative transfer equations are compared to results of Monte Carlo simulations of the Ni-56 and Co-56 decay gamma-ray energy deposition in supernovae. The comparison shows that an effective, purely absorptive, gray opacity, kappa(sub gamma) approximately (0. 06 +/- 0.01)Y(sub e) sq cm/g, where Y is the total number of electrons per baryon, accurately describes the interaction of gamma-rays with the cool supernova gas and the local gamma-ray energy deposition within the gas. The nature of the gamma-ray interaction process (dominated by Compton scattering in the relativistic regime) creates a weak dependence of kappa(sub gamma) on the optical thickness of the (spherically symmetric) supernova atmosphere: The maximum value of kappa(sub gamma) applies during optically thick conditions when individual gamma-rays undergo multiple scattering encounters and the lower bound is reached at the phase characterized by a total Thomson optical depth to the center of the atmosphere tau(sub e) approximately less than 1. Gamma-ray deposition for Type Ia supernova models to within 10% for the epoch from maximum light to t = 1200 days. Our results quantitatively confirm that the quick and efficient solution to the gray transfer problem provides an accurate representation of gamma-ray energy deposition for a broad range of supernova conditions.

  12. Energy deposition via magnetoplasmadynamic acceleration: I. Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilland, James; Mikellides, Pavlos; Marriott, Darin

    2009-02-01

    The expansion of a high-temperature fusion plasma through an expanding magnetic field is a process common to most fusion propulsion concepts. The propulsive efficiency of this process has a strong bearing on the overall performance of fusion propulsion. In order to simulate the expansion of a fusion plasma, a concept has been developed in which a high velocity plasma is first stagnated in a converging magnetic field to high (100s of eV) temperatures, then expanded though a converging/diverging magnetic nozzle. As a first step in constructing this experiment, a gigawatt magnetoplasmadynamic plasma accelerator was constructed to generate the initial high velocity plasma and has been characterized. The source is powered by a 1.6 MJ, 1.6 ms pulse forming network. The device has been operated with currents up to 300 kA and power levels up to 200 MWe. These values are among the highest levels reached in an magnetoplasmadynamic thruster. The device operation has been characterized by quasi-steady voltage and current measurements for helium mass flow rates from 0.5 to 27 g s-1. Probe results for downstream plasma density and electron temperature are also presented. The source behavior is examined in terms of current theories for magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters.

  13. System to quantify gamma-ray radial energy deposition in semiconductor detectors

    DOEpatents

    Kammeraad, Judith E.; Blair, Jerome J.

    2001-01-01

    A system for measuring gamma-ray radial energy deposition is provided for use in conjunction with a semiconductor detector. The detector comprises two electrodes and a detector material, and defines a plurality of zones within the detecting material in parallel with the two electrodes. The detector produces a charge signal E(t) when a gamma-ray interacts with the detector. Digitizing means are provided for converting the charge signal E(t) into a digitized signal. A computational means receives the digitized signal and calculates in which of the plurality of zones the gamma-ray deposited energy when interacting with the detector. The computational means produces an output indicating the amount of energy deposited by the gamma-ray in each of the plurality of zones.

  14. Laboratory measurements of parameters affecting wet deposition of methyl iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Maeck, W.J.; Honkus, R.J.; Keller, J.H.; Voilleque, P.G.

    1984-09-01

    The transfer of gaseous methyl iodide (CH/sub 3/I) to raindrops and the initial retention by vegetation of CH/sub 3/I in raindrops have been studied in a laboratory experimental program. The measured air-to-drop transfer parameters and initial retention factors both affect the wet deposition of methyl iodide onto vegetation. No large effects on the air-to-drop transfer due to methyl iodide concentration, temperature, acidity, or rain type were observed. Differences between laboratory measurements and theoretical values of the mass transfer coefficient were found. Pasture grass, lettuce, and alfalfa were used to study the initial retention of methyl iodide by vegetation. Only a small fraction of the incident CH/sub 3/I in raindrops was held by any of the three vegetation types.

  15. Steam System Energy Conservation Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Metzger, Jesse Dean

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple system inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: fixing steam leaks. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, and building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.

  16. Monte Carlo simulation of energy deposition by low-energy electrons in molecular hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, M. G.; Furman, D. R.; Green, A. E. S.

    1975-01-01

    A set of detailed atomic cross sections has been used to obtain the spatial deposition of energy by 1-20-eV electrons in molecular hydrogen by a Monte Carlo simulation of the actual trajectories. The energy deposition curve (energy per distance traversed) is quite peaked in the forward direction about the entry point for electrons with energies above the threshold of the electronic states, but the peak decreases and broadens noticeably as the electron energy decreases below 10 eV (threshold for the lowest excitable electronic state of H2). The curve also assumes a very symmetrical shape for energies below 10 eV, indicating the increasing importance of elastic collisions in determining the shape of the curve, although not the mode of energy deposition.

  17. Effect of energy deposition rate on plasma expansion characteristics and nanoparticle generation by electrical explosion of conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Somanand; Saxena, Alok K.; Kaushik, Trilok C.; Gupta, Satish C.

    2015-12-01

    The process of electrical explosion of metal conductors has been used to produce nano particles under normal atmospheric conditions. The impact of average rate of energy deposition, overheat factor on size distribution of particles and expansion characteristics of plasma generated from exploding conductors have been experimentally investigated. The particle size was characterized by TEM and XRD while expansion rate was measured using streak photography.The geometric mean diameter of size distribution was found to be influenced by rate of energy deposition in the conductors. It is observed that higher the rate of energy deposition, higher will be the expansion velocity, and smaller will be the size of particles formed.

  18. Cost effective energy conservation measures

    SciTech Connect

    Mashburn, W.H.

    1997-06-01

    Determining the cost effectiveness of energy conservation measures (ECM`s) consists of more than determining simple payback or life cycle costing. If strategic energy planning is involved, then establishment of an energy management program is of major importance. Training incorporated into the energy auditing process enhances the audit by involving knowledgeable employees, as well an increasing the chance of implementation of measures identified and reported. Involving employees in the process gives them ownership, and greatly improves the implementation rate. Once a company gets turned on to saving energy, it spreads like wildfire through the plant. Consultants who incorporate training as part of their audit will enhance their marketability. This paper discusses training techniques as a part of the auditing process, and lists major potential ECM`s that the author has found to have a high priority.

  19. Estimating the energy deposition in the mesosphere from anisotropic electron fluxes during REP events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadsnes, Johan; Sandanger, Marit; Nesse Tyssoy, Hilde; Odegaard, Linn-Kristine; Asnes, Arne

    Data from the MEPED particle spectrometers on the Polar Orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) are often used for estimating the energy deposition in the upper atmosphere from electrons in the energy range 30 keV - 2.5 MeV. MEPED includes two collimated electron detectors, which are pointing approximately towards zenith (0 degree detector) and in the horizontal plane (90 degree detector). At medium and high geomagnetic latitudes the 0 degree detector measures particles within a limited part of the bounce loss cone and the 90 degree detector measures particles outside or near the edge of the loss cone. The electron fluxes often show strong pitch angle anisotropy which causes large uncertainty in the estimate of energy deposition based on these measurements. An upper estimate is derived from the 90 degree detector and a lower estimate from the 0 degree detector. The electron anisotropy is to a large extent determined by wave-particle interactions causing pitch angle diffusion driving electrons into the bounce loss cone. The pitch angle anisotropy is dependent on the strength of the diffusion. We are developing a method for calculating the flux versus pitch angle in the loss cone based on the measured electron fluxes and modeled flux profiles from pitch angle scattering by whistler mode waves. We will present results from calculation of the energy deposition using the derived anisotropic flux distribution during a REP event in 2008.

  20. Energy-measuring resistor bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Anthony M.; Kelley, Paul R.; Jones, William K.; Fuk, Masatoshi

    1994-08-01

    A resistor bank consisting of a group of resistors formed on the surface of a die, all electrically connected together in parallel. All of the resistors have identical individual resistances, but each has a unique energy dissipating capacity. When an event subjects the resistor bank to a surge of current, some of the resistors blow out, thereby changing the resistance of the bank. By measuring the resistance of the bank before and after an event the energy of the surge can be determined.

  1. Evaluation of eruptive energy of a pyroclastic deposit applying fractal geometry to fragment size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes Marino, Joali; Morgavi, Daniele; Di Vito, Mauro; de Vita, Sandro; Sansivero, Fabio; Perugini, Diego

    2016-04-01

    Fractal fragmentation theory has been applied to characterize the particle size distribution of pyroclastic deposits generated by volcanic explosions. Recent works have demonstrated that fractal dimension on grain size distributions can be used as a proxy for estimating the energy associated with volcanic eruptions. In this work we seek to establish a preliminary analytical protocol that can be applied to better characterize volcanic fall deposits and derive the potential energy for fragmentation that was stored in the magma prior/during an explosive eruption. The methodology is based on two different techniques for determining the grain-size distribution of the pyroclastic samples: 1) dry manual sieving (particles larger than 297μm), and 2) automatic grain size analysis via a CamSizer-P4®device, the latter measure the distribution of projected area, obtaining a cumulative distribution based on volume fraction for particles up to 30mm. Size distribution data have been analyzed by applying the fractal fragmentation theory estimating the value of Df, i.e. the fractal dimension of fragmentation. In order to test our protocol we studied the Cretaio eruption, Ischia island, Italy. Results indicate that size distributions of pyroclastic fall deposits follow a fractal law, indicating that the fragmentation process of these deposits reflects a scale-invariant fragmentation mechanism. Matching the results from manual and automated techniques allows us to obtain a value of the "fragmentation energy" from the explosive eruptive events that generate the Cretaio deposits. We highlight the importance of these results, based on fractal statistics, as an additional volcanological tool for addressing volcanic risk based on the analyses of grain size distributions of natural pyroclastic deposits. Keywords: eruptive energy, fractal dimension of fragmentation, pyroclastic fallout.

  2. Energy Deposition and Radiological Studies for the LBNF Hadron Absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhno, I. L.; Mokhov, N. V.; Tropin, I. S.; Eidelman, Y. I.

    2015-06-25

    Results of detailed Monte Carlo energy deposition and radiological studies performed for the LBNF hadron absorber with the MARS15 code are described. The model of the entire facility, that includes a pion-production target, focusing horns, target chase, decay channel, hadron absorber system – all with corresponding radiation shielding – was developed using the recently implemented ROOT-based geometry option in the MARS15 code. Both normal operation and accidental conditions were studied. Results of detailed thermal calculations with the ANSYS code helped to select the most viable design options.

  3. Energy deposition and primary chemical products in Titan’s upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavvas, P.; Galand, M.; Yelle, R. V.; Heays, A. N.; Lewis, B. R.; Lewis, G. R.; Coates, A. J.

    2011-05-01

    Cassini results indicate that solar photons dominate energy deposition in Titan's upper atmosphere. These dissociate and ionize nitrogen and methane and drive the subsequent complex organic chemistry. The improved constraints on the atmospheric composition from Cassini measurements demand greater precision in the photochemical modeling. Therefore, in order to quantify the role of solar radiation in the primary chemical production, we have performed detailed calculations for the energy deposition of photons and photoelectrons in the atmosphere of Titan and we validate our results with the Cassini measurements for the electron fluxes and the EUV/FUV emissions. We use high-resolution cross sections for the neutral photodissociation of N 2, which we present here, and show that they provide a different picture of energy deposition compared to results based on low-resolution cross sections. Furthermore, we introduce a simple model for the energy degradation of photoelectrons based on the local deposition approximation and show that our results are in agreement with detailed calculations including transport, in the altitude region below 1200 km, where the effects of transport are negligible. Our calculated, daytime, electron fluxes are in good agreement with the measured fluxes by the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS), and the same holds for the measured FUV emissions by the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (UVIS). Finally, we present the vertical production profiles of radicals and ions originating from the interaction of photons and electrons with the main components of Titan's atmosphere, along with the column integrated production rates at different solar zenith angles. These can be used as basis for any further photochemical calculations.

  4. Fossil fuel energy resources of Ethiopia: Oil shale deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolela, Ahmed

    2006-10-01

    The energy crisis affects all countries in the world. Considering the price scenarios, many countries in Africa have begun to explore various energy resources. Ethiopia is one of the countries that depend upon imported petroleum products. To overcome this problem, geological studies suggest a significant occurrence of oil shale deposits in Ethiopia. The Inter-Trappean oil shale-bearing sediments are widely distributed on the South-Western Plateau of Ethiopia in the Delbi-Moye, Lalo-Sapo, Sola, Gojeb-Chida and Yayu Basins. The oil shale-bearing sediments were deposited in fluviatile and lacustrine environments. The oil shales contain mixtures of algal, herbaceous and higher plant taxa. They are dominated by algal-derived liptinite with minor amounts of vitrinite and inertinite. The algal remains belong to Botryococcus and Pediastrum. Laboratory results confirm that the Ethiopian oil shales are dominated by long-chain aliphatic hydrocarbons and have a low sulphur content. Type-II and Type-I kerogen dominated the studied oil shales. Type-II and Type-I are good source rocks for oil and gas generation. Hydrogen index versus Tmax value plots indicated that most of the oil shale samples fall within the immature-early mature stage for hydrocarbon generation, consistent with the Ro values that range from 0.3% to 0.64%. Pyrolysis data of the oil shales sensu stricto indicate excellent source rocks with up to 61.2% TOC values. Calorific value ranges from 400 to 6165 cal/g. Palynological studies confirmed that the oil shale-bearing sediments of Ethiopia range from Eocene to Miocene in age. A total of about 253,000,000 ton of oil shale is registered in the country. Oil shale deposits in Ethiopia can be used for production of oil and gas.

  5. Measuring Dark Energy with CHIME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newburgh, Laura; Chime Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) is a new radio transit interferometer currently being built at the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory (DRAO) in Penticton, BC, Canada. We will use the 21 cm emission line of neutral hydrogen to map baryon acoustic oscillations between 400-800 MHz across 3/4 of the sky. These measurements will yield sensitive constraints on the dark energy equation of state between redshifts 0.8 - 2.5, a fascinating but poorly probed era corresponding to when dark energy began to impact the expansion history of the Universe. I will describe theCHIME instrument, the analysis challenges, the calibration requirements, and current status.

  6. Effect of Energy Input on the Characteristic of AISI H13 and D2 Tool Steels Deposited by a Directed Energy Deposition Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jun Seok; Park, Joo Hyun; Lee, Min-Gyu; Sung, Ji Hyun; Cha, Kyoung Je; Kim, Da Hye

    2016-05-01

    Among the many additive manufacturing technologies, the directed energy deposition (DED) process has attracted significant attention because of the application of metal products. Metal deposited by the DED process has different properties than wrought metal because of the rapid solidification rate, the high thermal gradient between the deposited metal and substrate, etc. Additionally, many operating parameters, such as laser power, beam diameter, traverse speed, and powder mass flow rate, must be considered since the characteristics of the deposited metal are affected by the operating parameters. In the present study, the effect of energy input on the characteristics of H13 and D2 steels deposited by a direct metal tooling process based on the DED process was investigated. In particular, we report that the hardness of the deposited H13 and D2 steels decreased with increasing energy input, which we discuss by considering microstructural observations and thermodynamics.

  7. Power deposition measurements at 800 MeV-direct proton beam heating of target materials

    SciTech Connect

    Quintana, D.L.; Langenbrunner, J.; Morgan, G.

    1999-07-01

    A slug calorimetric sensor with several novel design features was developed to measure the power deposition in a cylindrical test article with lead, aluminum, polyethylene and tungsten components. A small, solid slug (volume = 347.5 mm{sup 3}) was suspended by Kevlar fibers and surrounded by an adiabatic enclosure in an insulating vacuum canister of stainless steel construction. A small, calibrated, 100-kOhm thermistor was placed in the slug to monitor the temperature. Power deposition caused by the passage of radiation through the slug was measured from the rate of temperature rise. Lead, tungsten, and Inconel-718 slugs were placed on the beam axis of the test article and were irradiated with an 800 MeV proton beam. The data from these sensors will provide an accurate determination of thermal power density and energy deposition from proton beams incident on target/blanket components of accelerator-based systems, such as the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS).

  8. Scaling of energy deposition in fast ignition targets.

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, Dale R.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Campbell, Robert B.

    2005-07-01

    We examine the scaling to ignition of the energy deposition of laser generated electrons in compressed fast ignition cores. Relevant cores have densities of several hundred g/cm{sup 3}, with a few keV initial temperature. As the laser intensities increase approaching ignition systems, on the order of a few 10{sup 21}W/cm{sup 2}, the hot electron energies expected to approach 100MeV. Most certainly anomalous processes must play a role in the energy transfer, but the exact nature of these processes, as well as a practical way to model them, remain open issues. Traditional PIC explicit methods are limited to low densities on current and anticipated computing platforms, so the study of relevant parameter ranges has received so far little attention. We use LSP to examine a relativistic electron beam (presumed generated from a laser plasma interaction) of legislated energy and angular distribution is injected into a 3D block of compressed DT. Collective effects will determine the stopping, most likely driven by magnetic field filamentation. The scaling of the stopping as a function of block density and temperature, as well as hot electron current and laser intensity is presented. Sub-grid models may be profitably used and degenerate effects included in the solution of this problem.

  9. Modeling Atmospheric Energy Deposition (by energetic ions): New Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, C.; Brain, D. A.; Lillis, R. J.; Liemohn, M. W.; Bougher, S. W.

    2012-12-01

    deposition is conducted including a comparison of the influence relative to other energy sources (namely EUV photons) and previous efforts using the guiding center approximation.

  10. Modeling Planetary Atmospheric Energy Deposition By Energetic Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, Christopher; Bougher, Stephen; Gronoff, Guillaume; Barthelemy, Mathieu

    2016-07-01

    The structure, dynamics, chemistry, and evolution of planetary upper atmospheres are in large part determined by the available sources of energy. In addition to the solar EUV flux, the solar wind and solar energetic particle (SEP) events are also important sources. Both of these particle populations can significantly affect an atmosphere, causing atmospheric loss and driving chemical reactions. Attention has been paid to these sources from the standpoint of the radiation environment for humans and electronics, but little work has been done to evaluate their impact on planetary atmospheres. At unmagnetized planets or those with crustal field anomalies, in particular, the solar wind and SEPs of all energies have direct access to the atmosphere and so provide a more substantial energy source than at planets having protective global magnetic fields. Additionally, solar wind and energetic particle fluxes should be more significant for planets orbiting more active stars, such as is the case in the early history of the solar system for paleo-Venus and Mars. Therefore quantification of the atmospheric energy input from the solar wind and SEP events is an important component of our understanding of the processes that control their state and evolution. We have applied a full Lorentz motion particle transport model to study the effects of particle precipitation in the upper atmospheres of Mars and Venus. Such modeling has been previously done for Earth and Mars using a guiding center precipitation model. Currently, this code is only valid for particles with small gyroradii in strong uniform magnetic fields. There is a clear necessity for a Lorentz formulation, hence, a systematic study of the ionization, excitation, and energy deposition has been conducted, including a comparison of the influence relative to other energy sources (namely EUV photons). The result is a robust examination of the influence of energetic ion transport on the Venus and Mars upper atmosphere which

  11. Changes in the frequency distribution of energy deposited in short pathlengths as a function of energy degradation of the primary beam.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baily, N. A.; Steigerwalt, J. E.; Hilbert, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    The frequency distributions of event size in the deposition of energy over small pathlengths have been measured after penetration of 44.3 MeV protons through various thicknesses of tissue-equivalent material. Results show that particle energy straggling of an initially monoenergetic proton beam after passage through an absorber causes the frequency distributions of energy deposited in short pathlengths of low atomic number materials to remain broad. In all cases investigated, the ratio of the most probable to the average energy losses has been significantly less than unity.

  12. Distributions of deposited energy and ionization clusters around ion tracks studied with Geant4 toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burigo, Lucas; Pshenichnov, Igor; Mishustin, Igor; Hilgers, Gerhard; Bleicher, Marcus

    2016-05-01

    The Geant4-based Monte Carlo model for Heavy-Ion Therapy (MCHIT) was extended to study the patterns of energy deposition at sub-micrometer distance from individual ion tracks. Dose distributions for low-energy 1H, 4He, 12C and 16O ions measured in several experiments are well described by the model in a broad range of radial distances, from 0.5 to 3000 nm. Despite the fact that such distributions are characterized by long tails, a dominant fraction of deposited energy (∼80%) is confined within a radius of about 10 nm. The probability distributions of clustered ionization events in nanoscale volumes of water traversed by 1H, 2H, 4He, 6Li, 7Li, and 12C ions are also calculated. A good agreement of calculated ionization cluster-size distributions with the corresponding experimental data suggests that the extended MCHIT can be used to characterize stochastic processes of energy deposition to sensitive cellular structures.

  13. Energetic particle energy deposition in Titan's upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westlake, J. H.; Smith, H. T.; Mitchell, D. G.; Paranicas, C. P.; Rymer, A. M.; Bell, J. M.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Mandt, K. E.

    2012-04-01

    Titan’s upper atmosphere has been observed to be variable on a pass-by-pass basis. During the nominal mission where the Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) only sampled the northern hemisphere this variability was initially believed to be tied to solar drivers manifest in latitudinal variations in the thermal structure of the upper atmosphere. However, when Cassini delved into the southern hemisphere the latitudinal dependence was not present in the data. Recently, Westlake et al. (2011) showed that the pass-by-pass variability is correlated with the deviations in the plasma environment as identified by Rymer et al. (2009) and Simon et al. (2010). Furthermore, the studies of Westlake et al. (2011) and Bell et al. (2011) showed that Titan’s upper atmosphere responds to changes in the ambient magnetospheric plasma on timescales of roughly one Titan day (16 Earth days). We report on recent studies of energy deposition in Titan’s upper atmosphere. Previous studies by Smith et al. (2009), Cravens et al. (2008), Tseng et al. (2008), and Shah et al. (2009) reported on energetic proton and oxygen ion precipitation. Back of the envelope calculations by Sittler et al. (2009) showed that magnetospheric energy inputs are expected to be of the order of or greater than the solar processes. We report on further analysis of the plasma environment around Titan during the flybys that the INMS has good data. We utilize data from the Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument to determine how the magnetospheric particle population varies from pass to pass and how this influences the net magnetospheric energy input prior to the flyby. We also report on enhanced energetic neutral atom emissions during select highly energetic passes. References: Bell, J., et al.: “Simulating the time-dependent response of Titan's upper atmosphere to periods of magnetospheric forcing”. Geophys. Res. Lett., Vol. 38, L06202, 2011. Rymer, A. M., et al.: “Discrete classification and electron

  14. Energy deposition studies for the LBNE beam absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhno, Igor L.; Mokhov, Nikolai V.; Tropin, Igor S.

    2015-01-29

    Results of detailed Monte Carlo energy deposition studies performed for the LBNE absorber core and the surrounding shielding with the MARS15 code are described. The model of the entire facility, that includes a pion-production target, focusing horns, target chase, decay channel, hadron absorber system – all with corresponding radiation shielding – was developed using the recently implemented ROOT-based geometry option in the MARS15 code. This option provides substantial flexibility and automation when developing complex geometry models. Both normal operation and accidental conditions were studied. Various design options were considered, in particular the following: (i) filling the decay pipe with air or helium; (ii) the absorber mask material and shape; (iii) the beam spoiler material and size. Results of detailed thermal calculations with the ANSYS code helped to select the most viable absorber design options.

  15. Energy level alignment in polymer organic solar cells at donor-acceptor planar junction formed by electrospray vacuum deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ji-Hoon; Hong, Jong-Am; Kwon, Dae-Gyeon; Seo, Jaewon; Park, Yongsup

    2014-04-21

    Using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), we have measured the energy level offset at the planar interface between poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and C{sub 61}-butyric acid methylester (PCBM). Gradual deposition of PCBM onto spin-coated P3HT in high vacuum was made possible by using electrospray vacuum deposition (EVD). The UPS measurement of EVD-prepared planar interface resulted in the energy level offset of 0.91 eV between P3HT HOMO and PCBM LUMO, which is considered as the upper limit of V{sub oc} of the organic photovoltaic cells.

  16. Direct evidence of strongly inhomogeneous energy deposition in target heating with laser-produced ion beams.

    PubMed

    Brambrink, E; Schlegel, T; Malka, G; Amthor, K U; Aléonard, M M; Claverie, G; Gerbaux, M; Gobet, F; Hannachi, F; Méot, V; Morel, P; Nicolai, P; Scheurer, J N; Tarisien, M; Tikhonchuk, V; Audebert, P

    2007-06-01

    We report on strong nonuniformities in target heating with intense, laser-produced proton beams. The observed inhomogeneity in energy deposition can strongly perturb equation of state (EOS) measurements with laser-accelerated ions which are planned in several laboratories. Interferometric measurements of the target expansion show different expansion velocities on the front and rear surfaces, indicating a strong difference in local temperature. The nonuniformity indicates at an additional heating mechanism, which seems to originate from electrons in the keV range. PMID:17677318

  17. Energy deposition in parallel-plate plasma accelerators. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicapua, M. S.

    1971-01-01

    To appraise the ratio of energy deposition into kinetic and thermal modes in plasma accelerators, a parallel-plate plasma accelerator has been operated in the quasi-steady mode with current pulses in the range of 10 to 100 kilo-amperes (kA), durations of the order of one millisecond, and argon mass flows up to 100 grams/sec. From photographic observations, spectroscopic measurements of velocity and electron density, and pressure measurements with a fast-rise piezoelectric transducer it is found that, for currents between 50 and 90 kA, the accelerated argon plasma is supersonic with ion velocities of 5 to 6 kilometers/sec.

  18. Low cost measurements of nitrogen and sulphur dry deposition velocities at a semi-alpine site: gradient measurements and a comparison with deposition model estimates.

    PubMed

    Hole, Lars R; Brunner, Sibyl H; Hanssen, Jan Erik; Zhang, Leiming

    2008-08-01

    The conditional time averaged gradient method was used to measure air-surface exchange of nitrogen and sulphur compounds at a semi-alpine site in Southern Norway. Dry deposition velocities were then obtained from the bi-weekly concentration gradient measurements. Annual deposition velocities were found to be 1.4, 11.8 and 4.0 mm s(-1) for NH3, HNO3 and SO2, respectively, if all data were included, and to be 10.8, 11.8 and 13.0 mm s(-1), respectively, if only positive values were included. Measured deposition velocities were compared to two sets of values estimated from a big-leaf dry deposition module applying to two different land types (short grass and forbs, and tundra), driven by measured micrometeorological parameters. The deposition module gives reasonable values for this site throughout the year, but does not reproduce the large variability as shown in the measured data. No apparent seasonal variations were found from either measurements or module estimates due to the very low productivity of the studied area.

  19. Energy dependence of island nucleation density during ion beam deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomeroy, Joshua M.; Brock, Joel D.

    2002-03-01

    Thin copper films were grown on single crystal copper substrates using highly collimated copper ion beams with precisely controlled incidence energies. The energetic collisions between the copper ions and the surface can form adatom-vacancy pairs or sputter eject atoms into the vaccuum. Island nucleation densities are affected by these atomistic mechanisms, which increase surface adatom densities and surface defect densities. This paper reports STM measurements of the island nucleation density for films grown both thermally and at energies between 10-150 eV. The measured island nucleation density systematically deviates with increasing energy from the density predicted by mean field nucleation theory (J.A. Venables, et.al., Rep. Prog. Phys. 47 (1984) p. 399-459). This deviation can be understood using a phenomenological extension of mean field nucleation theory that includes the effects of adatom-vacancy pair production and sputter ejection on the effective flux.

  20. Directed energy deflection laboratory measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brashears, Travis; Lubin, Phillip; Hughes, Gary B.; Meinhold, Peter; Suen, Jonathan; Batliner, Payton; Motta, Caio; Griswold, Janelle; Kangas, Miikka; Johansson, Isbella; Alnawakhtha, Yusuf; Prater, Kenyon; Lang, Alex; Madajian, Jonathan

    2015-09-01

    We report on laboratory studies of the effectiveness of directed energy planetary defense as a part of the DESTAR (Directed Energy System for Targeting of Asteroids and exploRation) program. DE-STAR [1][5][6] and DE-STARLITE [2][5][6] are directed energy "stand-off" and "stand-on" programs, respectively. These systems consist of a modular array of kilowatt-class lasers powered by photovoltaics, and are capable of heating a spot on the surface of an asteroid to the point of vaporization. Mass ejection, as a plume of evaporated material, creates a reactionary thrust capable of diverting the asteroid's orbit. In a series of papers, we have developed a theoretical basis and described numerical simulations for determining the thrust produced by material evaporating from the surface of an asteroid [1][2][3][4][5][6]. In the DE-STAR concept, the asteroid itself is used as the deflection "propellant". This study presents results of experiments designed to measure the thrust created by evaporation from a laser directed energy spot. We constructed a vacuum chamber to simulate space conditions, and installed a torsion balance that holds an "asteroid" sample. The sample is illuminated with a fiber array laser with flux levels up to 60 MW/m2 which allows us to simulate a mission level flux but on a small scale. We use a separate laser as well as a position sensitive centroid detector to readout the angular motion of the torsion balance and can thus determine the thrust. We compare the measured thrust to the models. Our theoretical models indicate a coupling coefficient well in excess of 100 μN/Woptical, though we assume a more conservative value of 80 μN/Woptical and then degrade this with an optical "encircled energy" efficiency of 0.75 to 60 μN/Woptical in our deflection modeling. Our measurements discussed here yield about 45 μN/Wabsorbed as a reasonable lower limit to the thrust per optical watt absorbed.

  1. An analysis of energy deposition in a tissue equivalent proportional counter onboard the space shuttle.

    PubMed

    Shinn, J L; Badhwar, G D; Xapsos, M A; Cucinotta, F A; Wilson, J W

    1999-02-01

    An improved prediction for space radiations in the lower earth orbits measured by the shuttle TEPC is obtained when energy loss straggling and chord length distribution of the detector are considered. A generalized analytic model is used to describe the energy deposition of direct ion interaction events in a micron-size detector. The transport calculation accounting for the shuttle configuration is accomplished by using a new version of HZETRN that has been extensively verified with laboratory and flight data. The agreement of predicted and measured lineal energy spectra is within 70% for the region above 2 keV/micrometer but within a factor of 2.3 underpredicted for the region below this value. The inclusion of indirect delta ray events in the model is needed before possible causes for the underprediction below 2 keV/micrometer can be assessed.

  2. Vapor-deposited porous films for energy conversion

    DOEpatents

    Jankowski, Alan F.; Hayes, Jeffrey P.; Morse, Jeffrey D.

    2005-07-05

    Metallic films are grown with a "spongelike" morphology in the as-deposited condition using planar magnetron sputtering. The morphology of the deposit is characterized by metallic continuity in three dimensions with continuous and open porosity on the submicron scale. The stabilization of the spongelike morphology is found over a limited range of the sputter deposition parameters, that is, of working gas pressure and substrate temperature. This spongelike morphology is an extension of the features as generally represented in the classic zone models of growth for physical vapor deposits. Nickel coatings were deposited with working gas pressures up 4 Pa and for substrate temperatures up to 1000 K. The morphology of the deposits is examined in plan and in cross section views with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The parametric range of gas pressure and substrate temperature (relative to absolute melt point) under which the spongelike metal deposits are produced appear universal for other metals including gold, silver, and aluminum.

  3. Comparisons of Solar Wind Coupling Parameters with Auroral Energy Deposition Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsen, R.; Brittnacher, M. J.; Fillingim, M. O.; Parks, G. K.; Germany G. A.; Spann, J. F., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Measurement of the global rate of energy deposition in the ionosphere via auroral particle precipitation is one of the primary goals of the Polar UVI program and is an important component of the ISTP program. The instantaneous rate of energy deposition for the entire month of January 1997 has been calculated by applying models to the UVI images and is presented by Fillingim et al. In this session. A number of parameters that predict the rate of coupling of solar wind energy into the magnetosphere have been proposed in the last few decades. Some of these parameters, such as the epsilon parameter of Perrault and Akasofu, depend on the instantaneous values in the solar wind. Other parameters depend on the integrated values of solar wind parameters, especially IMF Bz, e.g. applied flux which predicts the net transfer of magnetic flux to the tail. While these parameters have often been used successfully with substorm studies, their validity in terms of global energy input has not yet been ascertained, largely because data such as that supplied by the ISTP program was lacking. We have calculated these and other energy coupling parameters for January 1997 using solar wind data provided by WIND and other solar wind monitors. The rates of energy input predicted by these parameters are compared to those measured through UVI data and correlations are sought. Whether these parameters are better at providing an instantaneous rate of energy input or an average input over some time period is addressed. We also study if either type of parameter may provide better correlations if a time delay is introduced; if so, this time delay may provide a characteristic time for energy transport in the coupled solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere system.

  4. Athermal Energy Loss from X-rays Deposited in Thin Superconducting Films on Solid Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozorezov, Alexander G.; Lambert, Colin J.; Bandler, Simon R.; Balvin, Manuel A.; Busch, Sarah E.; Sagler, Peter N.; Porst, Jan-Patrick; Smith, Stephen J.; Stevenson, Thomas R.; Sadleir, John E.

    2013-01-01

    When energy is deposited in a thin-film cryogenic detector, such as from the absorption of an X-ray, an important feature that determines the energy resolution is the amount of athermal energy that can be lost to the heat bath prior to the elementary excitation systems coming into thermal equilibrium. This form of energy loss will be position-dependent and therefore can limit the detector energy resolution. An understanding of the physical processes that occur when elementary excitations are generated in metal films on dielectric substrates is important for the design and optimization of a number of different types of low temperature detector. We have measured the total energy loss in one relatively simple geometry that allows us to study these processes and compare measurements with calculation based upon a model for the various di.erent processes. We have modeled the athermal phonon energy loss in this device by finding an evolving phonon distribution function that solves the system of kinetic equations for the interacting system of electrons and phonons. Using measurements of device parameters such as the Debye energy and the thermal di.usivity we have calculated the expected energy loss from this detector geometry, and also the position-dependent variation of this loss. We have also calculated the predicted impact on measured spectral line-shapes, and shown that they agree well with measurements. In addition, we have tested this model by using it to predict the performance of a number of other types of detector with di.erent geometries, where good agreement is also found.

  5. Unloading Versus Driven Processes Derived from Auroral Energy Deposition and Polar Cap Size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brittnacher, M. J.; Parks, G. K.; Fillingim, M. O.; Elsen, R.; Chua, D.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, J. F., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The intensity of far ultraviolet auroral emissions at all local times during the three substorm phases has been monitored by the Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) on the Polar spacecraft for many substorms. Changes in the energy flux and characteristic energy of the precipitating electrons can be derived from these observations by modeling of the spectral emission processes. The global and local energy deposition is a new parameter that can be used in substorm studies since it provides a measure of energy transfer from the tail to the ionosphere due to precipitating electrons at a time resolution of three minutes. The polar cap area and area of auroral emissions can also be determined at high time resolution during substorms from the UVI images. An example of a substorm that appears to be driven by solar wind dynamic pressure alone will be presented. The polar cap area and other parameters do not indicate a growth phase prior to substorm onset. In another example, the slow growth phase followed by a very rapid increase in energy deposition during the expansion phase will be shown. This substorm was preceded by a southward IMF orientation. In these two examples, the role the solar wind in determining polar cap area is discussed. The time development of the area of auroral emissions is also discussed in relation to substorm phase and energy deposition. If the auroral emissions occur on closed field lines then the area of auroral emissions may provide an indication of changes in the thickness of the plasma sheet during each substorm phase.

  6. Halite depositional facies in a solar salt pond: A key to interpreting physical energy and water depth in ancient deposits?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson Handford, C.

    1990-08-01

    Subaqueous deposits of aragonite, gypsum, and halite are accumulating in shallow solar salt ponds constructed in the Pekelmeer, a sea-level sauna on Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles. Several halite facies are deposited in the crystallizer ponds in response to differences in water depth and wave energy. Cumulate halite, which originates as floating rafts, is present only along the protected, upwind margins of ponds where low-energy conditions foster their formation and preservation. Cornet crystals with peculiar mushroom- and mortarboard-shaped caps precipitate in centimetre-deep brine sheets within a couple of metres of the upwind or low-energy margins. Downwind from these margins, cornet and chevron halite precipitate on the pond floors in water depths ranging from a few centimetres to ˜60 cm. Halite pisoids with radial-concentric structure are precipitated in the swash zone along downwind high-energy shorelines where they form pebbly beaches. This study suggests that primary halite facies are energy and/or depth dependent and that some primary features, if preserved in ancient halite deposits, can be used to infer physical energy conditions, subenvironments such as low- to high-energy shorelines, and extremely shallow water depths in ancient evaporite basins.

  7. Determination of dry deposition of ozone: Comparison of different measuring techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colbeck, I.; Simmons, A.

    1994-01-01

    Five methods were used to investigate the deposition of ozone. The measurements of the eddy diffusivity of heat using the Bowen ratio technique were slightly higher than but closely matched the measurements made for the momentum eddy diffusivity, measured simultaneously, using the profile technique. Similar flux values were obtained by the profile and eddy correlation method. Deposition velocities determined using the box method were higher than those calculated using an open top chamber.

  8. Field measurement of critical shear stress for erosion and deposition of fine muddy sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, M.; Strom, K. B.; Field Study

    2010-12-01

    The movement of muddy sediment from one region to another is linked to the fate and transport of pollutants that can be attached to this sediment. Important in understanding this movement is the need to know the critical conditions for erosion and deposition of the fine muddy sediment. For non-cohesion sediment, such as sands and gravels, reasonable estimates for the critical conditions can often be made theoretically without in situ measurements of the critical fluid condition or sediment transport rate. However, the shear stress needed for the incipient motion of the mud (cohesive sediments) is inherently difficult to calculate theoretically or in research flumes due to the influence of (1) flow history; (2) local sediment composition; (3) biological activity within the bed; (4) water content of the bed; and (5) salinity of the water column. The complexity of the combination of these factors makes the field measurement necessary. A field experiment was conducted under tidal flow in the region surrounding the Houston Ship Channel (near Houston, TX) to determine these conditions. Observations were made using single point, simultaneous, in situ measurement of turbulent flow and suspended sediment concentration within bottom boundary layer. Measurements were primarily made with a 6 MHz Nortek Vector velocimeter (ADV). The ADV was programmed to record 3-minute turbulent velocity with 32 Hz frequency every 10 minute. The suspended sediment concentration (SSC) was measured using the calibration of acoustic backscatter recorded by ADV against sample derived SSC. Different methods such as turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), TKEw and direct covariance method (COV) are compared together. TKE showed much more reasonable estimation on bed shear stress. Combination of time varying SSC, distance from the bed to the sampling volume recorded by ADV and calculation of shear stress made the determination of critical conditions for erosion and deposition possible.

  9. Deposition of dopant impurities and pulsed energy drive-in

    DOEpatents

    Wickboldt, P.; Carey, P.G.; Smith, P.M.; Ellingboe, A.R.

    1999-06-29

    A semiconductor doping process which enhances the dopant incorporation achievable using the Gas Immersion Laser Doping (GILD) technique is disclosed. The enhanced doping is achieved by first depositing a thin layer of dopant atoms on a semiconductor surface followed by exposure to one or more pulses from either a laser or an ion-beam which melt a portion of the semiconductor to a desired depth, thus causing the dopant atoms to be incorporated into the molten region. After the molten region recrystallizes the dopant atoms are electrically active. The dopant atoms are deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) or other known deposition techniques. 2 figs.

  10. Deposition of dopant impurities and pulsed energy drive-in

    DOEpatents

    Wickboldt, Paul; Carey, Paul G.; Smith, Patrick M.; Ellingboe, Albert R.

    2008-01-01

    A semiconductor doping process which enhances the dopant incorporation achievable using the Gas Immersion Laser Doping (GILD) technique. The enhanced doping is achieved by first depositing a thin layer of dopant atoms on a semiconductor surface followed by exposure to one or more pulses from either a laser or an ion-beam which melt a portion of the semiconductor to a desired depth, thus causing the dopant atoms to be incorporated into the molten region. After the molten region recrystallizes the dopant atoms are electrically active. The dopant atoms are deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) or other known deposition techniques.

  11. Deposition of dopant impurities and pulsed energy drive-in

    DOEpatents

    Wickboldt, Paul; Carey, Paul G.; Smith, Patrick M.; Ellingboe, Albert R.

    1999-01-01

    A semiconductor doping process which enhances the dopant incorporation achievable using the Gas Immersion Laser Doping (GILD) technique. The enhanced doping is achieved by first depositing a thin layer of dopant atoms on a semiconductor surface followed by exposure to one or more pulses from either a laser or an ion-beam which melt a portion of the semiconductor to a desired depth, thus causing the dopant atoms to be incorporated into the molten region. After the molten region recrystallizes the dopant atoms are electrically active. The dopant atoms are deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) or other known deposition techniques.

  12. THE DRY DEPOSITION OF SPECIATED MERCURY TO THE FLORIDA EVERGLADES: MEASUREMENTS AND MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Florida Everglades Dry-Deposition Study (FEDDS) was designed to test the viability of using new and existing measurement techniques in the estimation of the dry-depositional loading of speciated mercury (elemental gaseous, reactive gaseous and particulate) to a mixed sawgrass...

  13. A calorimetric measurement of the heat deposition in the vicinity of a spallation neutron target

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.E.; Moritz, L.; Spitzer, H.; Thorson, I.M.

    1986-07-01

    An experiment to measure the heat deposition in various materials in the vicinity of a spallation neuron target is described. This experiment has been performed at the Thermal Neutron Facility, TRIUMF. In the analysis of the data, the contributions to the heat deposition from (n,..gamma..) capture processes, fast neutron, and prompt gamma-ray scattering are separated.

  14. RF energy deposition in a heterogeneous model of man: near-field exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Stuchly, M.A.; Kraszewski, A.; Stuchly, S.S.; Hartsgrove, G.W.; Spiegel, R.J.

    1987-12-01

    The electric field strength was measured in a full-scale heterogeneous model of man exposed in the near field of resonant dipoles. The model was comprised of skull, spinal cord, rib cage, all other major bones, brain, lung, and muscle tissue. Electrical properties of these simulated tissues were the same as respective live tissue properties at test frequencies of 160, 350, and 915 MHz. The rates of energy absorption were calculated on the basis of the measured field strengths and tissue conductivities. Patterns of the energy deposition are compared for two orientations of the antennas with respect to the body. Also the results for the heterogeneous model are compared to data for homogeneous model having average tissue electrical properties.

  15. Transmission of electrons through insulating PET foils: Dependence on charge deposition, tilt angle and incident energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keerthisinghe, D.; Dassanayake, B. S.; Wickramarachchi, S. J.; Stolterfoht, N.; Tanis, J. A.

    2016-09-01

    Transmission of electrons through insulating polyethylene terephthalate (PET) nanocapillaries was observed as a function of charge deposition, angular and energy dependence. Two samples with capillary diameters 100 and 200 nm and pore densities 5 × 108/cm2 and 5 × 107/cm2, respectively, were studied for incident electron energies of 300, 500 and 800 eV. Transmission and steady state of the electrons were attained after a time delay during which only a few electron counts were observed. The transmission through the capillaries depended on the tilt angle with both elastic and inelastic electrons going through. The guiding ability of electrons was found to increase with the incident energy in contrast to previous measurements in our laboratory for a similar PET foil.

  16. The activation energy for nanocrystalline diamond films deposited from an Ar/H2/CH4 hot-filament reactor.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, D C; Melo, L L; Trava-Airoldi, V J; Corat, E J

    2009-06-01

    In this work we have investigated the effect of substrate temperature on the growth rate and properties of nanocrystalline diamond thin films deposited by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD). Mixtures of 0.5 vol% CH4 and 25 vol% H2 balanced with Ar at a pressure of 50 Torr and typical deposition time of 12 h. We present the measurement of the activation energy by accurately controlling the substrate temperature independently of other CVD parameters. Growth rates have been measured in the temperature range from 550 to 800 degrees C. Characterization techniques have involved Raman spectroscopy, high resolution X-ray difractometry and scanning electron microscopy. We also present a comparison with most activation energy for micro and nanocrystalline diamond determinations in the literature and propose that there is a common trend in most observations. The result obtained can be an evidence that the growth mechanism of NCD in HFCVD reactors is very similar to MCD growth. PMID:19504946

  17. The activation energy for nanocrystalline diamond films deposited from an Ar/H2/CH4 hot-filament reactor.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, D C; Melo, L L; Trava-Airoldi, V J; Corat, E J

    2009-06-01

    In this work we have investigated the effect of substrate temperature on the growth rate and properties of nanocrystalline diamond thin films deposited by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD). Mixtures of 0.5 vol% CH4 and 25 vol% H2 balanced with Ar at a pressure of 50 Torr and typical deposition time of 12 h. We present the measurement of the activation energy by accurately controlling the substrate temperature independently of other CVD parameters. Growth rates have been measured in the temperature range from 550 to 800 degrees C. Characterization techniques have involved Raman spectroscopy, high resolution X-ray difractometry and scanning electron microscopy. We also present a comparison with most activation energy for micro and nanocrystalline diamond determinations in the literature and propose that there is a common trend in most observations. The result obtained can be an evidence that the growth mechanism of NCD in HFCVD reactors is very similar to MCD growth.

  18. Direct Measurement of EGR Cooler Deposit Thermal Properties for Improved Understanding of Cooler Fouling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hsin; Sluder, Scott; Storey, John Morse

    2009-01-01

    Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) cooler fouling has become a significant issue for compliance with NOX emissions standards. This paper reports results of a study of fundamental aspects of EGR cooler fouling. An apparatus and procedure were developed to allow surrogate EGR cooler tubes to be exposed to diesel engine exhaust under controlled conditions. The resulting fouled tubes were removed and analyzed. Volatile and non-volatile deposit mass was measured for each tube. Thermal diffusivity of the deposited soot cake was measured by milling a window into the tube and using the Xenon flash lamp method. The heat capacity of the deposit was measured at temperatures up to 430 C and was slightly higher than graphite, presumably due to the presence of hydrocarbons. These measurements were combined to allow calculation of the deposit thermal conductivity, which was determined to be 0.041 W/mK, only ~1.5 times that of air and much lower than the 304 stainless steel tube (14.7 W/mK). The main determinant of the deposit thermal conductivity is density, which was measured to be just 2% that of the density of the primary soot particles (or 98% porous). The deposit layer thermal resistance was calculated and compared with estimates of the thermal resistance calculated from gas temperature data during the experiment. The deposit properties were also used to further analyze the temperature data collected during the experiment.

  19. Direct measurements of atmospheric iron, cobalt, and aluminum-derived dust deposition at Kerguelen Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimburger, A.; Losno, R.; Triquet, S.; Dulac, F.; Mahowald, N.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition is one of the major sources of nutrients bringing trace metals to remote marine biota. In this study, total atmospheric deposition and crustal aerosol concentrations were monitored at Kerguelen Islands (49°18'S; 70°07'E) in the Southern Ocean during a short campaign in early 2005 and then continuously for about 2 years (2009-2010). Results show very low levels of atmospheric dust and trace metals concentrations but higher deposition fluxes than expected. The averaged total dust deposition flux as derived from Al deposition measurements is 659 μg m-2 d-1. Simultaneously measured Fe and Co deposition fluxes are respectively 29 μg m-2 d-1 (520 nmol m-2 d-1) and 0.014 μg m-2 d-1 (0.24 nmol m-2 d-1), giving typically crustal elemental ratios to Al of 0.54 and 2.6 10-4. Measured dust deposition is in relatively good agreement with those simulated by current atmospheric models, but suggest that previous indirect calculations from field experiments are too low by a factor of 20. Observations and model results show that dust is transported above the marine atmospheric boundary layer to Kerguelen Islands, and thus that surface concentrations are not representative of the total dust column. Indeed, using surface concentrations leads to very large computed wet scavenging ratios, and to the conclusion that it is not appropriate to derive deposition fluxes from surface concentrations at remote ocean sites.

  20. Dry deposition of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN): Determination of its deposition velocity at night from measurements of the atmospheric PAN and 222Radon concentration gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrimpf, Wolfram; Lienaerts, Karlheinz; Müller, Klaus Peter; Rudolph, Jochen; Neubert, Rolf; Schüßler, Wolfram; Levin, Ingeborg

    During the field campaign POPCORN (Photooxidant Formation by Plant Emitted Compounds and OH-Radicals in North-Eastern Germany) in August 1994 we measured the nighttime deposition velocities of PAN above a corn field. These are the first absolute measurements of PAN deposition velocities in the field. The deposition velocities were derived using a novel method, which uses measurements of the gradients of PAN and 222Rn and of the emission rates of 222Rn from the soil. A unique data set of about 250 field measurements of the PAN deposition velocity at night was thus obtained. The deposition velocity at night proved to be highly variable with an average of 0.54 cm/s and a standard deviation of 0.94 cm/s. Recent presumptions by Shepson et al. [1992] that the PAN deposition velocity is strongly reduced with increasing relative humidity could not be confirmed by our measurements.

  1. Insitu Measurements and Modeling of Carbon Nanotube Array Growth Kinetics during Chemical Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Puretzky, Alexander A; Geohegan, David B; Jesse, Stephen; Ivanov, Ilia N; Eres, Gyula

    2005-01-01

    Direct measurements of carbon nanotube growth kinetics are described based upon time-resolved reflectivity (TRR) of a HeNe laser beam from vertically aligned nanotube arrays (VANTAs) as they grow during chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Growth rates and terminal lengths were measured in situ for VANTAs growing during CVD between 535 C and 900 C on Si substrates with evaporated Al/Fe/Mo multi-layered catalysts and acetylene feedstock at different feedstock partial pressures. Methods of analysis of the TRR signals are presented to interpret catalyst particle formation and oxidation, as well as the porosity of the VANTAs. A rate-equation model is developed to describe the measured kinetics in terms of activation energies and rate constants for surface carbon formation and diffusion on the catalyst nanoparticle, nanotube growth, and catalyst over-coating. Taken together with the TRR data, this model enables basic understanding and optimization of growth conditions for any catalyst/feedstock combination. The model lends insight into the main processes responsible for the growth of VANTAs, the measured number of walls in the nanotubes at different temperatures, conditions for growth of single-wall carbon nanotube arrays, and likely catalyst poisoning mechanisms responsible for the sharp decline in growth rates observed at high temperatures.

  2. Elevated temperature dependence of energy band gap of ZnO thin films grown by e-beam deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, R. C.; Guminiak, M.; Wilser, S.; Cai, B.; Nakarmi, M. L.

    2012-04-01

    We report the surface, structural, electronic, and optical properties of the epitaxial ZnO thin films grown on (0001) sapphire substrate at 600 deg. C by an electron-beam deposition technique. ZnO thin films have been deposited in an oxygen environment and post-deposition annealed to improve the stoichiometry and the crystal quality. In order to investigate the free exciton binding energy and the temperature dependence of the energy bandgap, we carried out variable temperature (78-450 K) transmittance measurements on ZnO thin films. The absorption data below the energy bandgap have been modeled with the Urbach tail and a free exciton, while the data above the gap have been modeled with the charge transfer excitations. The exciton binding energy is measured to be E{sub 0}= 64 {+-} 7 meV, and the energy band gaps of the ZnO film are measured to be E{sub g}-tilde 3.51 and 3.48 eV at 78 and 300 K, respectively. The temperature dependence of the energy gap has been fitted with the Varshni model to extract the fitting parameters {alpha}= 0.00020 {+-} 0.00002 eV/K, {beta}= 325 {+-} 20 K, and E{sub g} (T = 0 K) = 3.516 {+-} 0.0002 eV.

  3. Fissible Deposit Characterization at the Former Oak Ridge K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant by {sup 252}CF-Source-Driven Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hannon, T.F.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Mullens, J.A.; Uckan, T.; Valentine, T.E.; Wyatt, M.S.

    1998-05-01

    The Deposit Removal Project was undertaken with the support of the U. S. Department of Energy at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) formerly the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. The project team performed the safe removal of the hydrated uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) deposits from the K-29 Building of the former Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The deposits had developed as a result of air leakage into UF{sub 6} gas process pipes; UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} became hydrated by moisture from the air and deposited inside the pipes. The mass, its distribution, and the hydrogen content [that is, the ratio of H to U (H/U)], were the key parameters that controlled the nuclear criticality safety of the deposits. Earlier gamma-ray spectrometry measurements in K-29 had identified the largest deposits in the building. The first and third largest deposits in the building were measured in this program. The first deposit, found in the Unit 2, Cell 7, B-Line Outlet process pipe (called the ''Hockey Stick'') was about 1,300 kg ({+-} 50% uncertainty) at 3.34 wt% {sup 235}U enrichment ({+-}50% uncertainty) and according to the gamma-ray spectroscopy was uniformly distributed. The second deposit (the third-largest deposit in the building), found in the Unit 2, Cell 6, A-Line Outlet process pipe (called the ''Tee-Pipe''), had a uranium deposit estimated to be about 240 kg ({+-} 50% uncertainty) at 3.4 wt % {sup 235}U enrichment ({+-} 20% uncertainty). Before deposit removal activities began, the Deposit Removal Project team needed to survey the inside of the pipes intrusively to assess the nuclear criticality safety of the deposits. Therefore, the spatial distribution of the deposits, the total uranium deposit mass, and the moderation level resulting from hydration of the deposits, all of which affect nuclear criticality safety were required. To perform the task safely and effectively, the Deposit Removal Project team requested that Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) characterize the two

  4. Energy Deposition onto an Asteroid or Comet Nucleus from a Nuclear Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesko, C. S.; Weaver, R.; Huebner, W. F.

    2010-12-01

    There is substantial controversy about the potential use and efficacy of a nuclear burst for the prevention of an impact of an asteroid or cometary nucleus on the Earth. Previous papers (e.g. Holsapple 2004) have called for a more careful analysis of the physics of this process, specifically energy deposition and internal shock processes. We begin to explore this question quantitatively by modeling the deposition of energy onto materials relevant to cosmic objects from a simulated nuclear burst. We use Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) particle transport codes and cross-section libraries to explore the deposition of neutrons and gamma rays onto various targets. We also use LANL radiation hydrocodes, tabular equations of state and opacities to study the deposition of x-ray energy within the material. We will report the amount and spatial distribution of energy deposition and the effects of burst height, target material variation, and mesh resolution on the simulation results.

  5. Global inorganic nitrogen dry deposition inferred from ground- and space-based measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yanlong; Yu, Guirui; Gao, Yanni; He, Nianpeng; Wang, Qiufeng; Jiao, Cuicui; Zuo, Yao

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N) dry deposition is an important component in total N deposition. However, uncertainty exists in the assessment of global dry deposition. Here, we develop empirical models for estimating ground N concentrations using NO2 satellite measurements from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and ground measurements from 555 monitoring sites. Global patterns and trends in the fluxes of NO2, HNO3, NH4+, and NO3- were assessed for 2005-2014. Moreover, we estimated global NH3 dry deposition directly using data from 267 monitoring sites. Our results showed that East Asia, the United States, and Europe were important regions of N deposition, and the total annual amount of global inorganic N deposition was 34.26 Tg N. The dry deposition fluxes were low in Africa and South America, but because of their large area, the total amounts in these regions were comparable to those in Europe and North America. In the past decade, the western United States and Eurasia, particularly eastern China, experienced the largest increases in dry deposition, whereas the eastern United States, Western Europe, and Japan experienced clear decreases through control of NOx and NH3 emissions. These findings provide a scientific background for policy-makers and future research into global changes.

  6. Global inorganic nitrogen dry deposition inferred from ground- and space-based measurements

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yanlong; Yu, Guirui; Gao, Yanni; He, Nianpeng; Wang, Qiufeng; Jiao, Cuicui; Zuo, Yao

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N) dry deposition is an important component in total N deposition. However, uncertainty exists in the assessment of global dry deposition. Here, we develop empirical models for estimating ground N concentrations using NO2 satellite measurements from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and ground measurements from 555 monitoring sites. Global patterns and trends in the fluxes of NO2, HNO3, NH4+, and NO3− were assessed for 2005–2014. Moreover, we estimated global NH3 dry deposition directly using data from 267 monitoring sites. Our results showed that East Asia, the United States, and Europe were important regions of N deposition, and the total annual amount of global inorganic N deposition was 34.26 Tg N. The dry deposition fluxes were low in Africa and South America, but because of their large area, the total amounts in these regions were comparable to those in Europe and North America. In the past decade, the western United States and Eurasia, particularly eastern China, experienced the largest increases in dry deposition, whereas the eastern United States, Western Europe, and Japan experienced clear decreases through control of NOx and NH3 emissions. These findings provide a scientific background for policy-makers and future research into global changes. PMID:26813440

  7. Global inorganic nitrogen dry deposition inferred from ground- and space-based measurements.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yanlong; Yu, Guirui; Gao, Yanni; He, Nianpeng; Wang, Qiufeng; Jiao, Cuicui; Zuo, Yao

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N) dry deposition is an important component in total N deposition. However, uncertainty exists in the assessment of global dry deposition. Here, we develop empirical models for estimating ground N concentrations using NO2 satellite measurements from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and ground measurements from 555 monitoring sites. Global patterns and trends in the fluxes of NO2, HNO3, NH4(+), and NO3(-) were assessed for 2005-2014. Moreover, we estimated global NH3 dry deposition directly using data from 267 monitoring sites. Our results showed that East Asia, the United States, and Europe were important regions of N deposition, and the total annual amount of global inorganic N deposition was 34.26 Tg N. The dry deposition fluxes were low in Africa and South America, but because of their large area, the total amounts in these regions were comparable to those in Europe and North America. In the past decade, the western United States and Eurasia, particularly eastern China, experienced the largest increases in dry deposition, whereas the eastern United States, Western Europe, and Japan experienced clear decreases through control of NOx and NH3 emissions. These findings provide a scientific background for policy-makers and future research into global changes. PMID:26813440

  8. Nuclear data processing for energy release and deposition calculations in the MC21 Monte Carlo code

    SciTech Connect

    Trumbull, T. H.

    2013-07-01

    With the recent emphasis in performing multiphysics calculations using Monte Carlo transport codes such as MC21, the need for accurate estimates of the energy deposition-and the subsequent heating - has increased. However, the availability and quality of data necessary to enable accurate neutron and photon energy deposition calculations can be an issue. A comprehensive method for handling the nuclear data required for energy deposition calculations in MC21 has been developed using the NDEX nuclear data processing system and leveraging the capabilities of NJOY. The method provides a collection of data to the MC21 Monte Carlo code supporting the computation of a wide variety of energy release and deposition tallies while also allowing calculations with different levels of fidelity to be performed. Detailed discussions on the usage of the various components of the energy release data are provided to demonstrate novel methods in borrowing photon production data, correcting for negative energy release quantities, and adjusting Q values when necessary to preserve energy balance. Since energy deposition within a reactor is a result of both neutron and photon interactions with materials, a discussion on the photon energy deposition data processing is also provided. (authors)

  9. Long-term elemental dry deposition fluxes measured around Lake Michigan with an automated dry deposition sampler

    SciTech Connect

    Shahin, U. Yi, S.M.; Paode, R.D.; Holsen, T.M.

    2000-05-15

    Long-term measurements of mass and elemental dry deposition (MG, Al, V, Cr, Mn, Ni, Co, Cu, Zn, As, Sr, Mo, Cd, Sb, Ba, and Pb) were made with an automated dry deposition sampler (Eagle II) containing knife-edge surrogate surfaces during the Lake Michigan Mass Balance/Mass Budget Study. Measurements were made over a roughly 700-day period in Chicago, IL; in South Haven and Sleeping Bear Dunes, MI; and over Lake Michigan on the 68th Street drinking water intake cribs from December 1993 to October 1995. Average mass fluxes in Chicago, South Haven, Sleeping Bear Dunes, and the 68th Street crib were 65, 10, 3.6, and 12 mg m{sup {minus}2} day{sup {minus}1}, respectively. Primarily crustal elemental fluxes were significantly smaller than the mass fluxes but higher than primarily anthropogenic elemental fluxes. For example, the average elemental flux of Al in Chicago, South Haven, Sleeping Bear Dunes, and the 68th Street crib were 1.0, 0.34, 0.074, and 0.34 mg m{sup {minus}2}day{sup {minus}1}, respectively. The average Pb fluxes in Chicago, South Haven, Sleeping Bear Dunes, and the 68th Street crib were 0.038, 0.023, 0.035, and 0.032 mg m{sup {minus}2}day{sup {minus}1}, respectively. The measured fluxes at the various sites were used to calculate the dry deposition loadings to the lake. These estimated fluxes were highest for Mg and lowest for Cd.

  10. Low energy cluster beam deposited BN films as the cascade for field emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhu, L.; Ge, J.; Wang, G.

    2005-07-01

    The atomic deposited BN films with the thickness of nanometers (ABN) were prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering method and the nanostructured BN films (CBN) were prepared by Low Energy Cluster Beam Deposition. UV-Vis Absorption measurement proves the band gap of 4.27 eV and field emission of the BN films were carried out. F-N plots of all the samples give a good fitting and demonstrate the F-N tunneling of the emission process. The emission of ABN begins at the electric field of 14.6 V/μ m while that of CBN starts at 5.10 V/μ m. Emission current density of 1 mA/cm2 for ABN needs the field of 20 V/μ m while that of CBN needs only 12.1 V/μ m. The cluster-deposited BN on n-type Silicon substrate proves a good performance in terms of the lower gauge voltage, more emission sites and higher electron intensity and seems a promising substitute for the cascade of field emission.

  11. Heat deposition in thick targets due to interaction of high energy protons and thermal hydraulics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumawat, H.; Dutta, D.; Mantha, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Satyamurthy, P.; Choudhury, R. K.; Kailas, S.

    2008-02-01

    Heat deposition inside thick targets due to interaction of high energy protons (Ep ∼ GeV) has been estimated using an improved version of the Monte Carlo simulation code CASCADE.04.h. The results are compared with the available experimental data for thick targets of Be, Al, Fe, Cu, Pb and Bi at proton energies of 0.8 GeV, 1.0 GeV and 1.2 GeV. A more continuous heat deposition approach which has been adopted in CASCADE.04.h yields results which are in better agreement with the experimental data as compared to the ones from the earlier version of CASCADE.04. The results are also compared with the predictions of the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. Both CASCADE.04.h and FLUKA predictions are nearly similar for heavy targets and both agree with the experimental measurements. However, they do have differences in predictions for lighter targets where measurements also differ from the predictions. It is observed that the maximum heat loss in thick targets occurs at the beginning of the target due to increasing nuclear reaction contributions. This aspect is crucial in designing the window of a spallation neutron target employed in an accelerator driven sub-critical system (ADS) as this is the first material to be traversed by the proton beam and is subjected to the maximum temperature gradient. Optimization of the target-window parameters requires a careful estimation of heat deposition in the window region and this has been demonstrated through thermal hydraulic studies related to the design of a realistic lead bismuth eutectic (LBE) spallation neutron target for an ADS system.

  12. Deposition of Chromium Thin Films on Stainless Steel-304 Substrates Using a Low Energy Plasma Focus Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javadi, S.; Ghoranneviss, M.; Hojabri, A.; Habibi, M.; Hosseinnejad, M. T.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we study thin films of chromium deposited on stainless steel-304 substrates using a low energy (1.6 kJ) plasma focus device. The films of chromium are likewise deposited with 25 focus shots each at various axial distances from the top of the anode (3, 5, 7, 9 and 11 cm). We also consider different angular positions with respect to the anode axis (0°, 15° and 30°) at a distance of 5 cm from the anode tip to deposit the chromium films on the stainless steel substrates. To characterize the structural properties of the films, we benefit from X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are applied as well to study the surface morphology of these deposited films. Furthermore, we make use of Vicker's micro-hardness measurements to investigate the mechanical properties of chromium thin films. The XRD results show that the degree of crystallinity of chromium thin films depends on the substrate axial and angular positions. The AFM images illustrate that the film deposited at the distance of 5 cm and the angular position of 0° has quite a uniform surface with homogeneous distribution of grains on the film surface. From the hardness results, we observe that the sample deposited at the axial distance of 5 cm from the anode tip and at the angle of 0° with respect to the anode axis, is harder than the other deposited films.

  13. Monte Carlo approach to the spatial deposition of energy by electrons in molecular hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, M. G.; Green, A. E. S.

    1974-01-01

    The Monte Carlo (MC) and continuous slowdown approximation (CSDA) approaches to the spatial deposition of energy by electrons are compared using the same detailed atomic cross section (DACS). It is found that the CSDA method overestimates the amount of energy that is deposited near the end of the path for electrons above a few hundred electron volts. The MC results are in approximate agreement with experimental data in such a way as to be relatively independent of the actual gas used. Our MC results are extended to obtain the three-dimensional deposition of energy by sub-keV electrons in molecular hydrogen.

  14. The Effect of the Incident Collision Energy on the Porosity of Vapor Deposited Amorphous Solid Water Films

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. Scott; Zubkov, Tykhon; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Kay, Bruce D.

    2009-02-02

    Molecular beam techniques are used to grow water films on Pt(111) with various incident angles and collision energies from 5 to 205 kJ/mole. The effect of the incident angle and collision energy on the porosity and surface area of the vapor deposited water films was studied using nitrogen physisorption and infrared spectroscopy. At low incident energy (5 kJ/mole), the infrared spectra, which provide a direct measure of the surface area, show that the surface area increases with incident angle and levels-off at angles > 65°. This is in contrast to the nitrogen uptake data which display a maximum near 70° due to the decrease in nitrogen condensation in the larger pores that develop at high incident angles. Both techniques show that the morphology of vapor deposited water films depends strongly on the incident kinetic energy. These observations are consistent with a ballistic deposition-shadowing model used to describe the growth of highly porous materials at glancing angle. The dependence of film morphology on incident energy may have important implications for the growth of porous materials via glancing angle deposition and for the structure of interstellar ices.

  15. Energy deposition evaluation for ultra-low energy electron beam irradiation systems using calibrated thin radiochromic film and Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Matsui, S; Mori, Y; Nonaka, T; Hattori, T; Kasamatsu, Y; Haraguchi, D; Watanabe, Y; Uchiyama, K; Ishikawa, M

    2016-05-01

    For evaluation of on-site dosimetry and process design in industrial use of ultra-low energy electron beam (ULEB) processes, we evaluate the energy deposition using a thin radiochromic film and a Monte Carlo simulation. The response of film dosimeter was calibrated using a high energy electron beam with an acceleration voltage of 2 MV and alanine dosimeters with uncertainty of 11% at coverage factor 2. Using this response function, the results of absorbed dose measurements for ULEB were evaluated from 10 kGy to 100 kGy as a relative dose. The deviation between the responses of deposit energy on the films and Monte Carlo simulations was within 15%. As far as this limitation, relative dose estimation using thin film dosimeters with response function obtained by high energy electron irradiation and simulation results is effective for ULEB irradiation processes management. PMID:27250416

  16. Energy deposition and middle atmosphere electrodynamic response to a highly relativistic electron precipitation event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, R. A.; Baker, D. N.; Herrero, F. A.; Mccarthy, S. P.; Twigg, P. A.; Croskey, C. L.; Hale, L. C.

    1994-01-01

    Rocket data have been used to evaluate the characteristics of precipitating relativistic electrons and their effects on the electrodynamic structure of the middle atmosphere. These data were obtained at Poker Flat, Alaska, on May 13 and 14, 1990, during a midday, highly relativistic electron (HRE) precipitation event. Solid state detectors were used to measure the electron fluxes and their energy spectra. An X ray scintillator was included on each flight to measure bremsstrahlung X rays produced by energetic electrons impacting on the upper atmosphere. However, these were found the be of negligible importance for this particular event. The energy deposition by the electrons has been determined from the flux measurements and compared with in situ measurements of the atmospheric electrical response. The electrodynamic measurements were obtained by the same rockets and additionally on May 13, with an accompanying rocket. The impact flux was highly irregular, containing short-lived bursts of relativistic electrons, mainly with energies below 0.5 MeV and with fluxes most enhanced between pitch angles of 0 deg - 20 deg. Although the geostationary counterpart of this measured event was considered to be of relatively low intensity and hardness, energy deposition peaked near 75 km with fluxes approaching an ion pair production rate in excess of 100/cu cm s. This exceeds peak fluxes in relativistic electron precipitation (REP) events as observed by us in numerous rocket soundings since 1976. Conductivity measurements from a blunt probe showed that negative electrical conductivities exceeded positive conductivities down to 50 km or lower, consistent with steady ionization by precipitating electrons above 1 MeV. These findings imply that the electrons from the outer radiation zone can modulate the electrical properties of the middle atmosphere to altitudes below 50 km. During the decline and activity minimum of the current solar cycle, we anticipate the occurence of similar

  17. Experiments measuring particle deposition from fully developed turbulent flow in ventilation ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2003-08-01

    Particle deposition in ventilation ducts influences particle exposures of building occupants and may lead to a variety of indoor air quality concerns. Experiments have been performed in a laboratory to study the effects of particle size and air speed on deposition rates of particles from turbulent air flows in galvanized steel and internally insulated ducts with hydraulic diameters of 15.2 cm. The duct systems were constructed of materials typically found in commercial heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. In the steel duct system, experiments with nominal particle sizes of 1, 3, 5, 9 and 16 {micro}m were conducted at each of three nominal air speeds: 2.2, 5.3 and 9.0 m/s. In the insulated duct system, deposition rates of particles with nominal sizes of 1, 3, 5, 8 and 13 {micro}m were measured at nominal air speeds of 2.2, 5.3 and 8.8 m/s. Fluorescent techniques were used to directly measure the deposition velocities of monodisperse fluorescent particles to duct surfaces (floor, wall and ceiling) at two straight duct sections where the turbulent flow profile was fully developed. In steel ducts, deposition rates were higher to the duct floor than to the wall, which were, in turn, greater than to the ceiling. In insulated ducts, deposition was nearly the same to the duct floor, wall and ceiling for a given particle size and air speed. Deposition to duct walls and ceilings was greatly enhanced in insulated ducts compared to steel ducts. Deposition velocities to each of the three duct surface orientations in both systems were found to increase with increasing particle size or air velocity over the ranges studied. Deposition rates measured in the current experiments were in general agreement with the limited observations of similar systems by previous researchers.

  18. An automatic sampler for measurement of dust-deposition rates around fugitive sources.

    PubMed

    Fuglsang, Karsten

    2002-07-01

    A wind-directional sampler for determination of dust-deposition rates has been developed, enabling the measurement of dust-deposition caused by a specific source and, at the same time, providing information on the dust-deposition rate for the background area. The sampler is called METDUST. This paper describes the results of a field evaluation of the METDUST sampler. The field evaluation was performed in a village in Southern Jutland, Denmark, where complaints of dust-deposition had occurred close to a power plant with large stockpiles of coal. The results showed that, out of a 9-month period, increased dust-deposition occurred downwind from the stockpiles during 4 months. Episodes were identified by comparison with the background deposition rate. The METDUST sampler offers an opportunity to measure the dust-deposition rate contributed by the source and the background simultaneously. It can, therefore, be used by environmental authorities to identify the "likelihood of complaint" and to define a suitable guideline for the case in question.

  19. An automatic sampler for measurement of dust-deposition rates around fugitive sources.

    PubMed

    Fuglsang, Karsten

    2002-07-01

    A wind-directional sampler for determination of dust-deposition rates has been developed, enabling the measurement of dust-deposition caused by a specific source and, at the same time, providing information on the dust-deposition rate for the background area. The sampler is called METDUST. This paper describes the results of a field evaluation of the METDUST sampler. The field evaluation was performed in a village in Southern Jutland, Denmark, where complaints of dust-deposition had occurred close to a power plant with large stockpiles of coal. The results showed that, out of a 9-month period, increased dust-deposition occurred downwind from the stockpiles during 4 months. Episodes were identified by comparison with the background deposition rate. The METDUST sampler offers an opportunity to measure the dust-deposition rate contributed by the source and the background simultaneously. It can, therefore, be used by environmental authorities to identify the "likelihood of complaint" and to define a suitable guideline for the case in question. PMID:12139343

  20. In-Situ Silver Acetylide Silver Nitrate Explosive Deposition Measurements Using X-Ray Fluorescence.

    SciTech Connect

    Covert, Timothy Todd

    2014-09-01

    The Light Initiated High Explosive facility utilized a spray deposited coating of silver acetylide - silver nitrate explosive to impart a mechanical shock into targets of interest. A diagnostic was required to measure the explosive deposition in - situ. An X - ray fluorescence spectrometer was deployed at the facility. A measurement methodology was developed to measure the explosive quantity with sufficient accuracy. Through the use of a tin reference material under the silver based explosive, a field calibration relationship has been developed with a standard deviation of 3.2 % . The effect of the inserted tin material into the experiment configuration has been explored.

  1. Measurement Techniques for Respiratory Tract Deposition of Airborne Nanoparticles: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Möller, Winfried; Pagels, Joakim H.; Kreyling, Wolfgang G.; Swietlicki, Erik; Schmid, Otmar

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Determination of the respiratory tract deposition of airborne particles is critical for risk assessment of air pollution, inhaled drug delivery, and understanding of respiratory disease. With the advent of nanotechnology, there has been an increasing interest in the measurement of pulmonary deposition of nanoparticles because of their unique properties in inhalation toxicology and medicine. Over the last century, around 50 studies have presented experimental data on lung deposition of nanoparticles (typical diameter≤100 nm, but here≤300 nm). These data show a considerable variability, partly due to differences in the applied methodologies. In this study, we review the experimental techniques for measuring respiratory tract deposition of nano-sized particles, analyze critical experimental design aspects causing measurement uncertainties, and suggest methodologies for future studies. It is shown that, although particle detection techniques have developed with time, the overall methodology in respiratory tract deposition experiments has not seen similar progress. Available experience from previous research has often not been incorporated, and some methodological design aspects that were overlooked in 30–70% of all studies may have biased the experimental data. This has contributed to a significant uncertainty on the absolute value of the lung deposition fraction of nanoparticles. We estimate the impact of the design aspects on obtained data, discuss solutions to minimize errors, and highlight gaps in the available experimental set of data. PMID:24151837

  2. Overall dry deposition velocities of trace elements measured at harbor and traffic site in central Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Fang, Guor-Cheng; Wu, Yuh-Shen; Chang, Shih-Yu; Lin, Jum-Bo; Lin, Jhih-Guang

    2007-03-01

    For reasonable and convenient assessments of the characteristics of the dry deposition velocities between Taichung harbor site and Wuchi town site in central Taiwan, the overall dry deposition velocities of several metallic elements were calculated as the particulate diameter (D(p)) distributions of large particles (D(p) > 10 microm), coarse particles (10 microm < D(p) < 2.5 microm), and fine particles (D(p) < 2.5 microm) based on the ambient measurements during March-December of 2004. In this work, the dry deposition fluxes showed the higher correlation with coarse particle concentrations than large particle concentrations; however, the least well correlation was observed between the dry deposition fluxes and the fine particle concentrations. The calculated best-fit overall dry deposition velocities obtained using coarse particle concentrations varied from approximately 0.2 cm s(-1) for Cr to 1.5 cm s(-1) for Pb and 0.2 cm s(-1) for Fe to 2.6 cm s(-1) for Pb at Taichung harbor and Wuchi town site, respectively. In general, the crustal elements had higher deposition velocities than anthropogenic elements. In addition, overall dry deposition velocities for crustal elements were higher in Wuchi town site than in Taichung harbor site. The results identified the dry deposition flux was mainly contributed from large and coarse particles due to their high deposition velocities. The results also indicated that the best approach to estimate overall dry deposition was by depending on the characteristics of particles with diameters larger than 2.5 microm. PMID:17166552

  3. The role of Energy Deposition in the Epitaxial Layer in Triggering SEGR in Power MOSFETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selva, L.; Swift, G.; Taylor, W.; Edmonds, L.

    1999-01-01

    In these SEGR experiments, three identical-oxide MOSFET types were irradiated with six ions of significantly different ranges. Results show the prime importance of the total energy deposited in the epitaxial layer.

  4. Suprathermal electron energy deposition in plasmas with the Fokker-Planck method

    SciTech Connect

    Wienke, B.R.

    1983-08-01

    A one-dimensional, multigroup, discrete-ordinates technique for computing electron energy deposition in plasmas is detailed. The Fokker-Planck collision operator is employed in the continuous approximation and electric fields (considered external) are included in the equation. Bremsstrahlung processes are not treated. Comparisons with analytic and Monte Carlo results are given. Fits to deposition and energy scaling are proposed and discussed for monoenergetic and Maxwellian sources in the rnge 0--150 keV, with and without uniform fields.

  5. Breath-by-breath measurement of particle deposition in the lung of spontaneously breathing rats.

    PubMed

    Karrasch, S; Eder, G; Bolle, I; Tsuda, A; Schulz, H

    2009-10-01

    A number of deposition models for humans, as well as experimental animals, have been described. However, no breath-by-breath deposition measurement in rats has been reported to date. The objective of this study is to determine lung deposition of micrometer-sized particles as a function of breathing parameters in the adult rat lung. A new aerosol photometry system was designed to measure deposition of nonhygroscopic, 2-mum sebacate particles in anesthetized, intubated, and spontaneously breathing 90-day-old Wistar-Kyoto rats placed in a size-adjusted body plethysmograph box. Instrumental dead space of the system was minimized down to 310 microl (i.e., approximately 20% of respiratory dead space). The system allows continuous monitoring of particle concentration in the respired volume. Breathing parameters, such as respiratory rate (f), tidal volume (Vt), as well as inspiration/expiration times, were also monitored at different levels of anesthesia. The results showed that Vt typically varied between 1.5 and 4.0 ml for regular breathing and between 4.0 and 10.0 ml for single-sigh breaths; f ranged from 40 to 200 breaths/min. Corresponding deposition values varied between 5 and 50%, depending on breath-by-breath breathing patterns. The best fit of deposition (D) was achieved by a bilinear function of Vt and f and found to be D = 11.0 - 0.09.f + 3.75.Vt. We conclude that our approach provides more realistic conditions for the measurement of deposition than conventional models using ventilated animals and allows us to analyze the correlation between breath-specific deposition and spontaneous breathing patterns.

  6. Activation energy measurements of cheese

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Temperature sweeps of cheeses using small amplitude oscillatory shear tests produced values for activation energy of flow (Ea) between 30 and 44 deg C. Soft goat cheese and Queso Fresco, which are high-moisture cheeses and do not flow when heated, exhibited Ea values between 30 and 60 kJ/mol. The ...

  7. Laser energy deposition and its dynamic uniformity for direct-drive capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yan; Wu, SiZhong; Zheng, WuDi

    2015-04-15

    The total laser energy deposition of multi-laser-beam irradiation is not only associated with the dynamic behavior of capsule but also the time-dependent angular distribution of the energy deposition of each beam around its axis. The dynamic behavior of laser energy deposition does not linearly respond to the dynamic behavior of laser irradiation. The laser energy deposition uniformity determines the symmetry of implosion. The dynamic behavior of laser energy deposition non-uniformity in OMEGA for laser with square beam shape intensity profile is investigated. In the case of smaller laser spot, the initial non-uniformity caused by laser beam overlap is very high. The shell asymmetry caused by the high initial laser irradiation non-uniformity is estimated by the extent of distortion of shock front which is not as severe as expected before the shock driven by main pulse arrives. This suggests that the large initial non-uniformity due to smaller laser spot is one of the elements that seed disturbance before the main pulse. The rms of laser energy deposition during the main pulse remains above 2%. Since the intensity of main driving pulse usually is several times higher than that of picket pulses, the non-uniformity in main pulse period may jeopardize the symmetrical implosion. When dynamic behavior of capsule is considered, the influence of beam pointing error, the target positioning error, and beam-to-beam power unbalance is quite different for the case of static capsule.

  8. Different collector types for sampling deposition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons--comparison of measurement results and their uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Gladtke, Dieter; Bakker, Frits; Biaudet, Hugues; Brennfleck, Alexandra; Coleman, Peter; Creutznacher, Harald; Van Egmond, Ben F; Hafkenscheid, Theo; Hahne, Frank; Houtzager, Marc M; Leoz-Garziandia, Eva; Menichini, Edoardo; Olschewski, Anja; Remesch, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    Different collector types, sample workup procedures and analysis methods to measure the deposition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were tested and compared. Whilst sample workup and analysis methods did not influence the results of PAH deposition measurements, using different collector types changed the measured deposition rates of PAH significantly. The results obtained with a funnel-bottle collector showed the highest deposition rates and a low measurement uncertainty. The deposition rates obtained with the wet-only collectors were the lowest at industrial sites and under dry weather conditions. For the open-jar collectors the measurement uncertainty was high. Only at an industrial site with extremely high PAH deposition rates the results of open-jar collectors were comparable to those obtained with funnel-bottle collectors. Thus, if bulk deposition of PAH has to be measured, funnel-bottle combinations are proved to be the collectors of choice. These collectors were the only ones always fulfilling the requirements of European legislation.

  9. Stabilizing laser energy density on a target during pulsed laser deposition of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Dowden, Paul C.; Jia, Quanxi

    2016-05-31

    A process for stabilizing laser energy density on a target surface during pulsed laser deposition of thin films controls the focused laser spot on the target. The process involves imaging an image-aperture positioned in the beamline. This eliminates changes in the beam dimensions of the laser. A continuously variable attenuator located in between the output of the laser and the imaged image-aperture adjusts the energy to a desired level by running the laser in a "constant voltage" mode. The process provides reproducibility and controllability for deposition of electronic thin films by pulsed laser deposition.

  10. Laboratory and field measurements of dry deposition of sulfur dioxide onto Chinese loess surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Sakamoto, Kazuhiko; Sakai, Mio; Ishihara, Hidekazu; Fukuyama, Tsutomu; Utiyama, Masahiro; Liu, Hongjie; Wang, Wei; Tang, Dagang; Dong, Xuhui; Quan, Hao

    2004-06-15

    Laboratory and field measurements were conducted to examine dry deposition of SO2 onto Chinese loess surfaces using native soil sampled in the loess plateau, China. The field tests were employed in Beijing and Lanzhou, China, by directly measuring the dry deposition of SO2 on soil, which uses soil put on a collector as an SO2 passive sampling medium. In the laboratory, a high rate of uptake to SO2 deposition for Chinese soil surfaces due to the highly alkalinity was found. The uptake of SO2 deposition was dependent on the pH soil and relative humidity. Furthermore, we evaluated some factors that affect the measurement precision: response of SO2 uptake, repeatability, recovery factor, and variability associated with the weight and the surface coverage on the collectors. As a result, it was shown that the measurement precision was primarily related to the ratio of the SO2 deposition amount relative to the sulfur content of the original soil. This result was consistent with the field observations. The laboratory and field results indicated an excellent agreement on the SO2 uptake inherent in the results from the soil surfaces in different regions.

  11. Validation of model calculation of ammonia deposition in the neighbourhood of a poultry farm using measured NH 3 concentrations and N deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, S. G.; Østergård, H. S.; Løfstrøm, P.; Andersen, H. V.; Jensen, L. S.

    Substantial emission of ammonia (NH 3) from animal houses and the related high local deposition of NH 3-N are a threat to semi-natural nitrogen-deficient ecosystems situated near the NH 3 source. In Denmark, there are regulations limiting the level of NH 3 emission from livestock houses near N-deficient ecosystems that are likely to change due to nitrogen (N) enrichment caused by NH 3 deposition. The models used for assessing NH 3 emission from livestock production, therefore, need to be precise, as the regulation will affect both the nature of the ecosystem and the economy of the farmer. Therefore a study was carried out with the objective of validating the Danish model used to monitor NH 3 transport, dispersion and deposition from and in the neighbourhood of a chicken farm. In the study we measured NH 3 emission with standard flux measuring methods, NH 3 concentrations at increasing distances from the chicken houses using passive diffusion samplers and deposition using 15N-enriched biomonitors and field plot studies. The dispersion and deposition of NH 3 were modelled using the Danish OML-DEP model. It was also shown that model calculations clearly reflect the measured NH 3 concentration and N deposition. Deposition of N measured by biomonitors clearly reflected the variation in NH 3 concentrations and showed that deposition was not significantly different from zero ( P < 0.05) at distances greater than 150-200 m from these chicken houses. Calculations confirmed this, as calculated N deposition 320 m away from the chicken farm was only marginally affected by the NH 3 emission from the farm. There was agreement between calculated and measured deposition showing that the model gives true estimates of the deposition in the neighbourhood of a livestock house emitting NH 3.

  12. Beryllium-7 and (210)Pb atmospheric deposition measured in moss and dependence on cumulative precipitation.

    PubMed

    Krmar, M; Mihailović, D T; Arsenić, I; Radnović, D; Pap, I

    2016-01-15

    This paper focuses on analysis of the time series of (7)Be and (210)Pb activity measured in moss, and the amount, as well as duration of precipitation, to gain a better understanding of the possible relationships between airborne radionuclide deposition and precipitation. Here we consider whether the amount of these airborne radionuclides in moss samples is a cumulative measure of radionuclide deposition and decay, and a new approach for analyses of the relationships between precipitation and moss activity concentrations is suggested. Through these analyses it was shown that comparison of cumulative activity measured at one location using moss, normalized by values of cumulative amount or duration of precipitation, showed different regimes of airborne radionuclide deposition. PMID:26461139

  13. Beryllium-7 and (210)Pb atmospheric deposition measured in moss and dependence on cumulative precipitation.

    PubMed

    Krmar, M; Mihailović, D T; Arsenić, I; Radnović, D; Pap, I

    2016-01-15

    This paper focuses on analysis of the time series of (7)Be and (210)Pb activity measured in moss, and the amount, as well as duration of precipitation, to gain a better understanding of the possible relationships between airborne radionuclide deposition and precipitation. Here we consider whether the amount of these airborne radionuclides in moss samples is a cumulative measure of radionuclide deposition and decay, and a new approach for analyses of the relationships between precipitation and moss activity concentrations is suggested. Through these analyses it was shown that comparison of cumulative activity measured at one location using moss, normalized by values of cumulative amount or duration of precipitation, showed different regimes of airborne radionuclide deposition.

  14. Biological characterization of low-energy ions with high-energy deposition on human cells.

    PubMed

    Saha, Janapriya; Wilson, Paul; Thieberger, Peter; Lowenstein, Derek; Wang, Minli; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2014-09-01

    During space travel, astronauts are exposed to cosmic radiation that is comprised of high-energy nuclear particles. Cancer patients are also exposed to high-energy nuclear particles when treated with proton and carbon beams. Nuclear interactions from high-energy particles traversing shielding materials and tissue produce low-energy (<10 MeV/n) secondary particles of high-LET that contribute significantly to overall radiation exposures. Track structure theories suggest that high charge and energy (HZE) particles and low-energy secondary ions of similar LET will have distinct biological effects for cellular and tissue damage endpoints. We investigated the biological effects of low-energy ions of high LET utilizing the Tandem Van de Graaff accelerator at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), and compared these to experiments with HZE particles, that mimic the space environment produced at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL. Immunostaining for DNA damage response proteins was carried out after irradiation with 5.6 MeV/n boron (LET 205 keV/μm), 5.3 MeV/n silicon (LET 1241 keV/μm), 600 MeV/n Fe (LET 180 keV/μm) and 77 MeV/n oxygen (LET 58 keV/μm) particles. Low-energy ions caused more persistent DNA damage response (DDR) protein foci in irradiated human fibroblasts and esophageal epithelial cells compared to HZE particles. More detailed studies comparing boron ions to Fe particles, showed that boron-ion radiation resulted in a stronger G2 delay compared to Fe-particle exposure, and boron ions also showed an early recruitment of Rad51 at double-strand break (DSB) sites, which suggests a preference of homologous recombination for DSB repair in low-energy albeit high-LET particles. Our experiments suggest that the very high-energy radiation deposition by low-energy ions, representative of galactic cosmic radiation and solar particle event secondary radiation, generates massive but localized DNA damage leading to delayed DSB repair, and distinct cellular

  15. Biological characterization of low-energy ions with high-energy deposition on human cells.

    PubMed

    Saha, Janapriya; Wilson, Paul; Thieberger, Peter; Lowenstein, Derek; Wang, Minli; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2014-09-01

    During space travel, astronauts are exposed to cosmic radiation that is comprised of high-energy nuclear particles. Cancer patients are also exposed to high-energy nuclear particles when treated with proton and carbon beams. Nuclear interactions from high-energy particles traversing shielding materials and tissue produce low-energy (<10 MeV/n) secondary particles of high-LET that contribute significantly to overall radiation exposures. Track structure theories suggest that high charge and energy (HZE) particles and low-energy secondary ions of similar LET will have distinct biological effects for cellular and tissue damage endpoints. We investigated the biological effects of low-energy ions of high LET utilizing the Tandem Van de Graaff accelerator at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), and compared these to experiments with HZE particles, that mimic the space environment produced at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL. Immunostaining for DNA damage response proteins was carried out after irradiation with 5.6 MeV/n boron (LET 205 keV/μm), 5.3 MeV/n silicon (LET 1241 keV/μm), 600 MeV/n Fe (LET 180 keV/μm) and 77 MeV/n oxygen (LET 58 keV/μm) particles. Low-energy ions caused more persistent DNA damage response (DDR) protein foci in irradiated human fibroblasts and esophageal epithelial cells compared to HZE particles. More detailed studies comparing boron ions to Fe particles, showed that boron-ion radiation resulted in a stronger G2 delay compared to Fe-particle exposure, and boron ions also showed an early recruitment of Rad51 at double-strand break (DSB) sites, which suggests a preference of homologous recombination for DSB repair in low-energy albeit high-LET particles. Our experiments suggest that the very high-energy radiation deposition by low-energy ions, representative of galactic cosmic radiation and solar particle event secondary radiation, generates massive but localized DNA damage leading to delayed DSB repair, and distinct cellular

  16. Atmospheric dry deposition fluxes of trace elements measured in Bursa, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Tasdemir, Yücel; Kural, Can

    2005-12-01

    Trace element dry deposition fluxes were measured using a smooth, greased, knife-edge surrogate surface (KSS) holding greased Mylar strips in Bursa, Turkey. Sampling program was conducted between October 2002 and June 2003 and 46 dry deposition samples were collected. The average fluxes of crustal metals (Mg, Ca, and Fe) were one to four orders of magnitude higher than the fluxes of anthropogenic metals. Trace element fluxes ranged from 3 (Cd) to 24,230 (Ca) microg m(-2) d(-1). The average trace element dry deposition fluxes measured in this study were similar to those measured in other urban areas. In addition, ambient air samples were also collected simultaneously with flux samples and concentrations of trace elements, collected with a TSP sampler, were between 0.7 and 4900 ng m(-3) for Cd and Ca, respectively. The overall trace element dry deposition velocities, calculated by dividing the fluxes to the particle phase concentrations ranged from 2.3+/-1.7 cm s(-1) (Pb) to 11.1+/-6.4 cm s(-1) (Ni). These values are in good agreement with the values calculated using similar techniques. The anthropogenic and crustal contributions were estimated by employing enrichment factors (EFs) calculated relative to the average crustal composition. Low EFs for dry deposition samples were calculated. This is probably due to contamination of local dust and its important contribution to the collected samples.

  17. Quantum cascade laser-based measurement of metal alkylamide density during atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Maslar, James E; Kimes, William A; Sperling, Brent A

    2012-03-01

    An in situ gas-phase diagnostic for the metal alkylamide compound tetrakis(ethylmethylamido) hafnium (TEMAH), Hf[N(C(2)H(5))(CH(3))](4), was demonstrated. This diagnostic is based on direct absorption measurement of TEMAH vapor using an external cavity quantum cascade laser emitting at 979 cm(-1), coinciding with the most intense TEMAH absorption in the mid-infrared spectral region, and employing 50 kHz amplitude modulation with synchronous detection. Measurements were performed in a single-pass configuration in a research-grade atomic layer deposition (ALD) chamber. To examine the detection limit of this technique for use as a TEMAH delivery monitor, this technique was demonstrated in the absence of any other deposition reactants or products, and to examine the selectivity of this technique in the presence of deposition products that potentially interfere with detection of TEMAH vapor, it was demonstrated during ALD of hafnium oxide using TEMAH and water. This technique successfully detected TEMAH at molecular densities present during simulated industrial ALD conditions. During hafnium oxide ALD using TEMAH and water, absorbance from gas-phase reaction products did not interfere with TEMAH measurements while absorption by reaction products deposited on the optical windows did interfere, although interfering absorption by deposited reaction products corresponded to only ≈4% of the total derived TEMAH density. With short measurement times and appropriate signal averaging, estimated TEMAH minimum detectable densities as low as ≈2 × 10(12) molecules/cm(3) could be obtained. While this technique was demonstrated specifically for TEMAH delivery and hafnium oxide ALD using TEMAH and water, it should be readily applicable to other metal alkylamide compounds and associated metal oxide and nitride deposition chemistries, assuming similar metal alkylamide molar absorptivity and molecular density in the measurement chamber.

  18. Investigations for an alternative to contact angle measurement after Hexamethyldisilazane deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aßmann, H.; Krause, A.; Maurer, R.; Dankelmann, M.; Specht, M.; Usry, W.; Newcomb, R.

    2015-09-01

    The adhesion promoter Hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) plays a crucial role in i-line lithography. According to HMDS deposition forms, a hydrophobic surface defines upwardly directed, non-polar trimethysilyl groups. This condition is of particular importance for wet chemical development and subsequent wet chemical etching processes, because the defined hydrophobic surface prevents water from creeping beneath the resist mask. Undesirable effects, such as (partial) loss of the resist structure or under etching can be prevented. Currently, a common and suitable method to control the success of HMDS deposition is the contact angle measurement. There, a drop of water is applied to the substrate and the contact angle / wetting angle is measured. As a result, conclusions can be drawn about the HMDS process. Unfortunately, however, this simple to implement measurement method raises some problems. The measurement is extremely dependent on the substrate, wherein the measurement results vary greatly. A possible reason for this is the different surface properties of the wafers which are due to adsorbate films. Typically, a contact angle measurement is performed just after the HMDS deposition. A difference between pre- and post-measurement cannot be determined. A deviation of the contact angle can be caused by either an insufficient HMDS seeding, or just as well by other, unknown surface properties. The studies presented here were performed with the measuring system ChemetriQ 5000 from Qcept Technologies. This measurement system was originally developed for Inspection on non-visible defects on the wafer level. It is able to detect differences of work functions as a result of surface coverage by thin film / adsorbate, materials or residues. The change in the surface work function due to the generated adsorbate layer during the HMDS deposition is determined by the measuring system by means of a difference between pre- and post-measurement.

  19. Ultrafast triggered transient energy storage by atomic layer deposition into porous silicon for integrated transient electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Anna; Muralidharan, Nitin; Carter, Rachel; Share, Keith; Pint, Cary L.

    2016-03-01

    Here we demonstrate the first on-chip silicon-integrated rechargeable transient power source based on atomic layer deposition (ALD) coating of vanadium oxide (VOx) into porous silicon. A stable specific capacitance above 20 F g-1 is achieved until the device is triggered with alkaline solutions. Due to the rational design of the active VOx coating enabled by ALD, transience occurs through a rapid disabling step that occurs within seconds, followed by full dissolution of all active materials within 30 minutes of the initial trigger. This work demonstrates how engineered materials for energy storage can provide a basis for next-generation transient systems and highlights porous silicon as a versatile scaffold to integrate transient energy storage into transient electronics.Here we demonstrate the first on-chip silicon-integrated rechargeable transient power source based on atomic layer deposition (ALD) coating of vanadium oxide (VOx) into porous silicon. A stable specific capacitance above 20 F g-1 is achieved until the device is triggered with alkaline solutions. Due to the rational design of the active VOx coating enabled by ALD, transience occurs through a rapid disabling step that occurs within seconds, followed by full dissolution of all active materials within 30 minutes of the initial trigger. This work demonstrates how engineered materials for energy storage can provide a basis for next-generation transient systems and highlights porous silicon as a versatile scaffold to integrate transient energy storage into transient electronics. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: (i) Experimental details for ALD and material fabrication, ellipsometry film thickness, preparation of gel electrolyte and separator, details for electrochemical measurements, HRTEM image of VOx coated porous silicon, Raman spectroscopy for VOx as-deposited as well as annealed in air for 1 hour at 450 °C, SEM and transient behavior dissolution tests of uniformly coated VOx on

  20. Comprehensive Energy Balance Measurements in Mice.

    PubMed

    Moir, Lee; Bentley, Liz; Cox, Roger D

    2016-01-01

    In mice with altered body composition, establishing whether it is food intake or energy expenditure, or both, that is the major determinant resulting in changed energy balance is important. In order to ascertain where the imbalance is, the acquisition of reproducible data is critical. Therefore, here we provide detailed descriptions of how to determine energy balance in mice. This encompasses protocols for establishing energy intake from home cage measurement of food intake, determining energy lost in feces using bomb calorimetry, and using equations to calculate parameters such as energy intake (EI), digested energy intake (DEI), and metabolisable energy intake (MEI) to determine overall energy balance. We also discuss considerations that should be taken into account when planning these experiments, including diet and sample sizes. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27584551

  1. Comprehensive Energy Balance Measurements in Mice.

    PubMed

    Moir, Lee; Bentley, Liz; Cox, Roger D

    2016-09-01

    In mice with altered body composition, establishing whether it is food intake or energy expenditure, or both, that is the major determinant resulting in changed energy balance is important. In order to ascertain where the imbalance is, the acquisition of reproducible data is critical. Therefore, here we provide detailed descriptions of how to determine energy balance in mice. This encompasses protocols for establishing energy intake from home cage measurement of food intake, determining energy lost in feces using bomb calorimetry, and using equations to calculate parameters such as energy intake (EI), digested energy intake (DEI), and metabolisable energy intake (MEI) to determine overall energy balance. We also discuss considerations that should be taken into account when planning these experiments, including diet and sample sizes. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  2. Assessment of the local role of a steel making plant by POPs deposition measurements.

    PubMed

    Rada, E C; Ragazzi, M; Schiavon, M

    2014-09-01

    Atmospheric depositions of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were monitored at three sites in the vicinity of a steel making plant, located in an Italian alpine valley. A high variability in the deposition of PCDD/Fs was observed. The influence of the plant was noticeable at two of the sampling sites. However, as the congener profiles demonstrated, wood burning for domestic heating is an additional source of PCDD/Fs for the area under investigation, and this interferes with the characterization of the emissions from the steel plant. The influence of the plant, in terms of PCDD/F deposition, was not noticeable at the most distant site (2km), where an extremely high peak of PCDD/F deposition was measured during the period from 12 January-22 February 2012. The comparison between the congener distribution of PCDD/Fs observed in this sample and the fingerprints of different sources could justify the attribution of this anomalous peak to a possible episode of domestic waste combustion. In order to find a better correlation between the deposition to soil and emissions from the plant, the congener distribution of PCBs was studied. The PCB profiles observed at the three sites well reproduced the average profile found in samples of ash retained by the bag filter of the plant. Thus the monitoring of PCB deposition is an interesting starting point to calibrate dispersion models to assess the impact of steel making activities.

  3. Assessment of the local role of a steel making plant by POPs deposition measurements.

    PubMed

    Rada, E C; Ragazzi, M; Schiavon, M

    2014-09-01

    Atmospheric depositions of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were monitored at three sites in the vicinity of a steel making plant, located in an Italian alpine valley. A high variability in the deposition of PCDD/Fs was observed. The influence of the plant was noticeable at two of the sampling sites. However, as the congener profiles demonstrated, wood burning for domestic heating is an additional source of PCDD/Fs for the area under investigation, and this interferes with the characterization of the emissions from the steel plant. The influence of the plant, in terms of PCDD/F deposition, was not noticeable at the most distant site (2km), where an extremely high peak of PCDD/F deposition was measured during the period from 12 January-22 February 2012. The comparison between the congener distribution of PCDD/Fs observed in this sample and the fingerprints of different sources could justify the attribution of this anomalous peak to a possible episode of domestic waste combustion. In order to find a better correlation between the deposition to soil and emissions from the plant, the congener distribution of PCBs was studied. The PCB profiles observed at the three sites well reproduced the average profile found in samples of ash retained by the bag filter of the plant. Thus the monitoring of PCB deposition is an interesting starting point to calibrate dispersion models to assess the impact of steel making activities. PMID:24880599

  4. Labor and energy impacts of energy-conservation measures

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Three papers are presented discussing the labor and energy impacts of energy-conservation measures, namely: Generation of the Industry/Occupation Wage Matrix and Related Matters, by Carole Green; Job Shifts from Energy Conservation (Salary Distribution Effects), by Robert A. Herendeen; and Energy and Labor Implication of Improving Thermal Integrity of New Houses, by John Joseph Nangle. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper.

  5. Energy deposition in the breast during CT scanning: quantification and implications for dose reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupcich, Franco; Kyprianou, Iacovos; Badal, Andreu; Schmidt, Taly G.

    2011-03-01

    Studies suggest that dose to the breast leads to a higher lifetime attributable cancer incidence risk from a chest CT scan for women compared to men. Numerous methods have been proposed for reducing dose to the breast during CT scanning, including bismuth shielding, tube current modulation, partial-angular scanning, and reduced kVp. These methods differ in how they alter the spectrum and fluence across projection angle. This study used Monte Carlo CT simulations of a voxelized female phantom to investigate the energy (dose) deposition in the breast as a function of both photon energy and projection angle. The resulting dose deposition matrix was then used to investigate several questions regarding dose reduction to the breast: (1) Which photon energies deposit the most dose in the breast, (2) How does increased filtration compare to tube current reduction in reducing breast dose, and (3) Do reduced kVp scans reduce dose to breast, and if so, by what mechanism? The results demonstrate that while high-energy photons deposit more dose per emitted photon, the low-energy photons deposit more dose to the breast for a 120 kVp acquisition. The results also demonstrate that decreasing the tube current for the AP views to match the fluence exiting a shield deposits nearly the same dose to the breast as when using a shield (within ~1%). Finally, results suggest that the dose reduction observed during lower kVp scans is caused by reduced photon fluence rather than the elimination of high-energy photons from the beam. Overall, understanding the mechanisms of dose deposition in the breast as a function of photon energy and projection angle enables comparisons of dose reduction methods and facilitates further development of optimized dose reduction schemes.

  6. Three methods to measure RH bond energies

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, J.; Ellison, G.B.; Gutman, D.

    1993-03-21

    In this paper the authors compare and contrast three powerful methods for experimentally measuring bond energies in polyatomic molecules. The methods are: radical kinetics; gas phase acidity cycles; and photoionization mass spectroscopy. The knowledge of the values of bond energies are a basic piece of information to a chemist. Chemical reactions involve the making and breaking of chemical bonds. It has been shown that comparable bonds in polyatomic molecules, compared to the same bonds in radicals, can be significantly different. These bond energies can be measured in terms of bond dissociation energies.

  7. A "TEST OF CONCEPT" COMPARISON OF AERODYNAMIC AND MECHANICAL RESUSPENSION MECHANISMS FOR PARTICLES DEPOSITED ON FIELD RYE GRASS (SECALS CERCELE). PART 2. THRESHOLD MECHANICAL ENERGIES FOR RESUSPENSION PARTICLE FLUXES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Kinetic energy from the oscillatory impacts of the grass stalk against a stationary object was measured with a kinetic energy measuring device. These energy inputs were measured as part of a resuspension experiment of uniform latex microspheres deposited on a single rye grass see...

  8. Four studies on effects of environmental factors on the quality of National Atmospheric Deposition Program measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wetherbee, Gregory A.; Latysh, Natalie E.; Lehmann, Christopher M.B.; Rhodes, Mark F.

    2011-01-01

    Selected aspects of National Atmospheric Deposition Program / National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) protocols are evaluated in four studies. Meteorological conditions have minor impacts on the error in NADP/NTN sampling. Efficiency of frozen precipitation sample collection is lower than for liquid precipitation samples. Variability of NTN measurements is higher for relatively low-intensity deposition of frozen precipitation than for higher-intensity deposition of liquid precipitation. Urbanization of the landscape surrounding NADP/NTN sites is not affecting trends in wet-deposition chemistry data to a measureable degree. Five NADP siting criteria intended to preserve wet-deposition sample integrity have varying degrees of effectiveness. NADP siting criteria for objects within the 90 degrees cones and trees within the 120 degrees cones projected from the collector bucket to sky are important for protecting sample integrity. Tall vegetation, fences, and other objects located within 5 meters of the collectors are related to the frequency of visible sample contamination, indicating the importance of these factors in NADP siting criteria.

  9. On the Total Energy Deposition Between Periodically Occurring Activations of the Aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James F., Jr.; Germany, G. A.; Parks, G. K.; Brittnacher, M. J.; Winglee, R. W.

    1998-01-01

    Total energy deposition in the northern latitudes is used in models to determine the state of the magnetosphere. It is known that on occasion, a series of intensifications of the aurora occur that are regularly spaced. The energy profile of the total energy deposited reflects this occurance. What can be said of the state of the magnetosphere based on these profiles. We present the result of a study which looks at several of these periods when a series of intensifications occur. Conclusions as to what the magnetosphere may be doing are presented.

  10. Large Storm Energy Deposition and Solar Wind Drivers: A Study of Geoeffectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, N. E.; Lopez, R. E.

    2004-12-01

    We examine the role of solar wind driving conditions in the deposition of large amounts of energy in the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. Our database consists of eight storms ranging in size, including especially the October and November 2003 superstorms. We estimate energy deposition into the ring current, ionospheric Joule heating, and auroral precipitation for each event and compare with relevant solar wind data. Results suggest that the magnetosonic Mach number of the solar wind may be a useful parameter in identifying the potential for large amounts of energy deposition, possibly because of the role of the bow shock in modulating the magnetosheath field, and therefore its influence of reconnection rates. We use Dst, ionospheric indices, and MHD simulation results where available to investigate the magnetospheric response to different types of solar wind energy input. Our results are examined with a focus on superstorms and the driving conditions observed in connection with them.

  11. Numerical Laser Energy Deposition on Supersonic Cavity Flow and Sensor Placement Strategies to Control the Flow

    PubMed Central

    Aradag, Selin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the impact of laser energy deposition on pressure oscillations and relative sound pressure levels (SPL) in an open supersonic cavity flow is investigated. Laser energy with a magnitude of 100 mJ is deposited on the flow just above the cavity leading edge and up to 7 dB of reduction is obtained in the SPL values along the cavity back wall. Additionally, proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) method is applied to the x-velocity data obtained as a result of computational fluid dynamics simulations of the flow with laser energy deposition. Laser is numerically modeled using a spherically symmetric temperature distribution. By using the POD results, the effects of laser energy on the flow mechanism are presented. A one-dimensional POD methodology is applied to the surface pressure data to obtain critical locations for the placement of sensors for real time flow control applications. PMID:24363612

  12. Numerical laser energy deposition on supersonic cavity flow and sensor placement strategies to control the flow.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Ibrahim; Aradag, Selin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the impact of laser energy deposition on pressure oscillations and relative sound pressure levels (SPL) in an open supersonic cavity flow is investigated. Laser energy with a magnitude of 100 mJ is deposited on the flow just above the cavity leading edge and up to 7 dB of reduction is obtained in the SPL values along the cavity back wall. Additionally, proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) method is applied to the x-velocity data obtained as a result of computational fluid dynamics simulations of the flow with laser energy deposition. Laser is numerically modeled using a spherically symmetric temperature distribution. By using the POD results, the effects of laser energy on the flow mechanism are presented. A one-dimensional POD methodology is applied to the surface pressure data to obtain critical locations for the placement of sensors for real time flow control applications. PMID:24363612

  13. Experiment of Flow Control Using Laser Energy Deposition Around High Speed Propulsion System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, HyoungJin; Jeung, InSeuck; Lee, SangHun; Kim, Seihwan

    2011-11-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to examine the effect of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser energy deposition on the shock structures in supersonic/hypersonic flow and quiescent air. The effect of the laser energy and pressure in the blast wave generation were also investigated. As a result, the strength of plasma and blast wave becomes stronger as pressure or laser energy increase. And the breakdown threshold of air by laser energy deposition is 0.015 bar at 508 mJ laser energy, the blast wave threshold generation in air by laser energy deposition is 0.100 bar at same laser energy. As qualitative analysis, schlieren images are also obtained. After the series of experiments, the effect of laser energy deposition (LED) on high speed flow around the shock—shock interaction created by a wedge and blunt body. By LED, the structure of shock—shock interaction was collapsed momentary and the pressure of the stagnation point was fluctuated while interference of wave.

  14. Development of a microbalance suitable for space application. [mass measurement device for particulate and vapor deposition measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patashnick, H.; Rupprecht, G.

    1977-01-01

    The tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM), an ultrasensitive mass measurement device which is suitable for both particulate and vapor deposition measurements is described. The device can be used in contamination measurements, surface reaction studies, particulate monitoring systems or any microweighing activity where either laboratory or field monitoring capability is desired. The active element of the TEOM consists of a tube or reed constructed of a material with high mechanical quality factor and having a special taper. The element is firmly mounted at the wide end while the other end supports a substrate surface which can be composed of virtually any material. The tapered element with the substrate at the free (narrow) end is set into oscillation in a clamped free mode. A feedback system maintains the oscillation whose natural frequency will change in relation to the mass deposited on the substrate.

  15. Procedure to Measure Indoor Lighting Energy Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Deru, M.; Blair, N.; Torcellini, P.

    2005-10-01

    This document provides standard definitions of performance metrics and methods to determine them for the energy performance of building interior lighting systems. It can be used for existing buildings and for proposed buildings. The primary users for whom these documents are intended are building energy analysts and technicians who design, install, and operate data acquisition systems, and who analyze and report building energy performance data. Typical results from the use of this procedure are the monthly and annual energy used for lighting, energy savings from occupancy or daylighting controls, and the percent of the total building energy use that is used by the lighting system. The document is not specifically intended for retrofit applications. However, it does complement Measurement and Verification protocols that do not provide detailed performance metrics or measurement procedures.

  16. Characterization of low frequency plasma waves and their energy deposition in the Martian magnetosphere with MAVEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhunusiri, S.; Halekas, J. S.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J. R.; McFadden, J. P.; Larson, D. E.; Mitchell, D. L.; Mazelle, C. X.; Jakosky, B. M.; Brain, D. A.; Harada, Y.; Livi, R.

    2015-12-01

    Mars has one of the unique environments in the solar system for the exploration of plasma waves. Mars does not have an intrinsic magnetosphere, but it has an induced magnetosphere due to the interaction of the solar wind with its ionosphere. Mars also possesses an extended exosphere, which spans beyond its bow shock. The interaction of the solar wind with the magnetosphere and the exosphere leads to excitation of low frequency waves that have frequencies near or below the proton gyro-frequency. MAVEN has been orbiting Mars since the late September of 2014, traversing through various regions of the Martian magnetosphere and the upstream region. MAVEN has a number of particle and field instruments for performing plasma diagnostics. Thus, for the first time at Mars, we have a complete set of plasma instruments for characterizing these low frequency plasma waves. The goal of this work is to distinguish the observed waves as one of the four low frequency wave modes (Alfven, fast, slow, and mirror) and to characterize their occurrence ratios and energy deposition in the various regions of the Martian magnetosphere and in the upstream region. To identify these waves, we use ratios and phase differences among the ion moment fluctuations and magnetic field fluctuations. To measure the ion moment fluctuations, in particular, we use two of the MAVEN ion instruments, solar wind ion analyzer (SWIA) and suprathermal and thermal ion composition instrument (STATIC). We use the MAVEN magnetometer for obtaining the magnetic field fluctuations. SWIA and STATIC have sampling cadence of 4s, much higher than that of their predecessors flown to Mars, and this is often adequate to detect the low frequency waves at Mars. We find that the Alfven waves are the most dominant waves in the upstream region and in the Martian magnetosphere. Fast waves, on the other hand, have the second highest occurrence ratio and they are found frequently near the bow shock and near the magnetic pileup boundary

  17. In vivo measurement of 241Am in the lungs confounded by activity deposited in other organs.

    PubMed

    Lobaugh, Megan L; Spitz, Henry B; Glover, Samuel E

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive material deposited in multiple organs of the body is likely to confound a result of an in vivo measurement performed over the lungs, the most frequently monitored organ for occupational exposure. The significance of this interference was evaluated by measuring anthropometric torso phantoms containing lungs, liver, skeleton, and axillary lymph nodes, each with a precisely known quantity of 241Am uniformly distributed in the organs. Arrays of multiple high-resolution germanium detectors were positioned over organs within the torso phantom containing 241Am or over proximal organs without activity to determine the degree of measurement confounding due to photons emitted from other source organs. A set of four mathematical response functions describes the measured count rate with detectors positioned over each of the relevant organs and 241Am contained in the measured organ or one of the other organs selected as a confounder. Simultaneous solution of these equations by matrix algebra, where the diagonal terms of the matrix are calibration factors for a direct measurement of activity in an organ and the off-diagonal terms reflect the contribution (i.e., interference or cross-talk) produced by 241Am in a confounding organ, yields the activity deposited in each of the relevant organs. The matrix solution described in this paper represents a method for adjusting a result of 241Am measured directly in one organ for interferences that may arise from 241Am deposited elsewhere and represents a technically valid procedure to aid in evaluating internal dose based upon in vivo measurements for those radioactive materials known to deposit in multiple organs.

  18. In vivo measurement of 241Am in the lungs confounded by activity deposited in other organs.

    PubMed

    Lobaugh, Megan L; Spitz, Henry B; Glover, Samuel E

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive material deposited in multiple organs of the body is likely to confound a result of an in vivo measurement performed over the lungs, the most frequently monitored organ for occupational exposure. The significance of this interference was evaluated by measuring anthropometric torso phantoms containing lungs, liver, skeleton, and axillary lymph nodes, each with a precisely known quantity of 241Am uniformly distributed in the organs. Arrays of multiple high-resolution germanium detectors were positioned over organs within the torso phantom containing 241Am or over proximal organs without activity to determine the degree of measurement confounding due to photons emitted from other source organs. A set of four mathematical response functions describes the measured count rate with detectors positioned over each of the relevant organs and 241Am contained in the measured organ or one of the other organs selected as a confounder. Simultaneous solution of these equations by matrix algebra, where the diagonal terms of the matrix are calibration factors for a direct measurement of activity in an organ and the off-diagonal terms reflect the contribution (i.e., interference or cross-talk) produced by 241Am in a confounding organ, yields the activity deposited in each of the relevant organs. The matrix solution described in this paper represents a method for adjusting a result of 241Am measured directly in one organ for interferences that may arise from 241Am deposited elsewhere and represents a technically valid procedure to aid in evaluating internal dose based upon in vivo measurements for those radioactive materials known to deposit in multiple organs. PMID:25437522

  19. Effect of Low-Energy Ions on Plasma-Enhanced Deposition of Cubic Boron Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torigoe, M.; Fukui, S.; Teii, K.; Matsumoto, S.

    2015-09-01

    The effect of low-energy ions on deposition of cubic boron nitride (cBN) films in an inductively coupled plasma with the chemistry of fluorine is studied in terms of ion energy, ion flux, and ion to boron flux ratio onto the substrate. The ion energy and the ion to boron flux ratio are determined from the sheath potential and the ratio of incident ion flux to net deposited boron flux, respectively. For negative substrate biases where sp2-bonded BN phase only or no deposit is formed, both the ion energy and the ion to boron flux ratio are high. For positive substrate biases where cBN phase is formed, the ion energy and the ion to boron flux ratio are estimated in the range of a few eV to 35 eV and 100 to 130, respectively. The impact of negative ions is presumed to be negligible due to their low kinetic energy relative to the sheath potential over the substrate surface. The impact of positive ions with high ion to boron flux ratios is primarily responsible for reduction of the ion energy for cBN film deposition. Work supported in part by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (B), a Funding Program for Next Generation World-Leading Researchers, and an Industrial Technology Research Grant Program 2008.

  20. A concentration rebound method for measuring particle penetrationand deposition in the indoor environment

    SciTech Connect

    tlthatcher@lbl.gov

    2002-09-01

    Continuous, size resolved particle measurements were performed in two houses in order to determine size-dependent particle penetration and deposition in the indoor environment. The experiments consisted of three parts: (1) measurement of the particle loss rate following artificial elevation of indoor particle concentrations, (2) rapid reduction in particle concentration through induced ventilation by pressurization of the houses with HEPA-filtered air, and (3) measurement of the particle concentration rebound after house pressurization stopped. During the particle concentration decay period, when indoor concentrations are very high, losses due to deposition are large compared to gains due to particle infiltration. During the concentration rebound period, the opposite is true. The large variation in indoor concentration allows the effects of penetration and deposition losses to be separated by the transient, two-parameter model we employed to analyze the data. We found penetration factors between 0.3 and 1 and deposition loss rates between 0.1 and 5 h{sup -1}, for particles between 0.1 and 10 {micro}m.

  1. Measurements and modeling of deposited particle transport by foot traffic indoors.

    PubMed

    Sippola, Mark R; Sextro, Richard G; Thatcher, Tracy L

    2014-04-01

    Deposited particles are transported into and within buildings by adhering to and releasing from people's shoes. To better understand transport of deposited particulate contaminants and exposures to these materials, experimental data on tracking by foot traffic are needed. Laboratory experiments measured uptake and downlay mass transfer efficiencies of particles between shoes and floors in a step-simulation chamber. Equilibrium uptake transfer fractions, the net mass fraction transferred from floors to shoes after several steps, were also measured. Single-step uptake and downlay transfer efficiencies ranged from 0.02 to 0.22 and equilibrium uptake transfer fractions were 0.10-0.40. Particle size, particle loading, shoe type, floor type, step pressure, and step sequence were all investigated. Experiments demonstrated that single-step downlay transfer efficiencies decrease with each successive step onto clean floors. A simple empirical model is proposed to estimate these transfers as a function of step number. Simulations using the transfer efficiency values measured here illustrate the spread of deposited particles by people walking in a hypothetical hallway. These simulations show that in locations where a few people walk over the same area each minute, tracking can spread deposited material over length scales comparable to building dimensions in just a few hours.

  2. Moderation of near-field pressure over a supersonic flight model using laser-pulse energy deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, D.; Aoki, Y.; Iwakawa, A.; Sasoh, A.

    2016-05-01

    The impact of a thermal bubble produced by energy deposition on the near-field pressure over a Mach 1.7 free-flight model was experimentally investigated using an aeroballistic range. A laser pulse from a transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO2 laser was sent into a test chamber with 68 kPa ambient pressure, focused 10 mm below the flight path of a conically nosed cylinder with a diameter of 10 mm. The pressure history, which was measured 150 mm below the flight path along the acoustic ray past the bubble, exhibited precursory pressure rise and round-off peak pressure, thereby demonstrating the proof-of-concept of sonic boom alleviation using energy deposition.

  3. Energy deposition dynamics of femtosecond pulses in water

    SciTech Connect

    Minardi, Stefano Pertsch, Thomas; Milián, Carles; Couairon, Arnaud; Majus, Donatas; Tamošauskas, Gintaras; Dubietis, Audrius; Gopal, Amrutha

    2014-12-01

    We exploit inverse Raman scattering and solvated electron absorption to perform a quantitative characterization of the energy loss and ionization dynamics in water with tightly focused near-infrared femtosecond pulses. A comparison between experimental data and numerical simulations suggests that the ionization energy of water is 8 eV, rather than the commonly used value of 6.5 eV. We also introduce an equation for the Raman gain valid for ultra-short pulses that validates our experimental procedure.

  4. Photon Energy Deposition in Strong-Field Single Ionization of Multielectron Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenbin; Li, Zhichao; Lu, Peifen; Gong, Xiaochun; Song, Qiying; Ji, Qinying; Lin, Kang; Ma, Junyang; He, Feng; Zeng, Heping; Wu, Jian

    2016-09-01

    Molecules exposed to strong laser fields may coherently absorb multiple photons and deposit the energy into electrons and nuclei, triggering the succeeding dynamics as the primary stage of the light-molecule interaction. We experimentally explore the electron-nuclear sharing of the absorbed photon energy in above-threshold multiphoton single ionization of multielectron molecules. Using CO as a prototype, vibrational and orbital resolved electron-nuclear sharing of the photon energy is observed. Different from the simplest one- or two-electron systems, the participation of the multiple orbitals and the coupling of various electronic states in the strong-field ionization and dissociation processes alter the photon energy deposition dynamics of the multielectron molecule. The population of numerous vibrational states of the molecular cation as the energy reservoir in the ionization process plays an important role in photon energy sharing between the emitted electron and the nuclear fragments.

  5. Photon Energy Deposition in Strong-Field Single Ionization of Multielectron Molecules.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenbin; Li, Zhichao; Lu, Peifen; Gong, Xiaochun; Song, Qiying; Ji, Qinying; Lin, Kang; Ma, Junyang; He, Feng; Zeng, Heping; Wu, Jian

    2016-09-01

    Molecules exposed to strong laser fields may coherently absorb multiple photons and deposit the energy into electrons and nuclei, triggering the succeeding dynamics as the primary stage of the light-molecule interaction. We experimentally explore the electron-nuclear sharing of the absorbed photon energy in above-threshold multiphoton single ionization of multielectron molecules. Using CO as a prototype, vibrational and orbital resolved electron-nuclear sharing of the photon energy is observed. Different from the simplest one- or two-electron systems, the participation of the multiple orbitals and the coupling of various electronic states in the strong-field ionization and dissociation processes alter the photon energy deposition dynamics of the multielectron molecule. The population of numerous vibrational states of the molecular cation as the energy reservoir in the ionization process plays an important role in photon energy sharing between the emitted electron and the nuclear fragments. PMID:27636472

  6. Photon Energy Deposition in Strong-Field Single Ionization of Multielectron Molecules.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenbin; Li, Zhichao; Lu, Peifen; Gong, Xiaochun; Song, Qiying; Ji, Qinying; Lin, Kang; Ma, Junyang; He, Feng; Zeng, Heping; Wu, Jian

    2016-09-01

    Molecules exposed to strong laser fields may coherently absorb multiple photons and deposit the energy into electrons and nuclei, triggering the succeeding dynamics as the primary stage of the light-molecule interaction. We experimentally explore the electron-nuclear sharing of the absorbed photon energy in above-threshold multiphoton single ionization of multielectron molecules. Using CO as a prototype, vibrational and orbital resolved electron-nuclear sharing of the photon energy is observed. Different from the simplest one- or two-electron systems, the participation of the multiple orbitals and the coupling of various electronic states in the strong-field ionization and dissociation processes alter the photon energy deposition dynamics of the multielectron molecule. The population of numerous vibrational states of the molecular cation as the energy reservoir in the ionization process plays an important role in photon energy sharing between the emitted electron and the nuclear fragments.

  7. An experimental approach to measure particle deposition in large circular ventilation ducts.

    PubMed

    Da, Guillaume; Géhin, Evelyne; Ben-Othmane, Mourad; Havet, Michel; Solliec, Camille; Motzkus, Charles

    2015-04-01

    The topic of this study is related to airborne particle dynamics in indoor environments. Lab-scale experiments have been performed to investigate particle deposition velocity to six different surfaces orientations (with respect to gravity) for fully developed turbulent flow in horizontal large circular ventilation ducts. Monodispersed aerosol particles (1-6 μm) were used in the deposition experiments. A very low particle mass (40 ng) was measured reliably above background level on duct surfaces by a means of a nondestructive stencil technique associated with fluorescence analysis. For 2-6 μm particles (diffusion and impaction regime), deposition rates to floors were much greater than rates to the ceiling and greater than rates to the wall. For 1-μm particles, the effect of surface orientation to particle deposition was not significant. Results were compared to the very few similar and published studies. This work was conducted in the frame of the CleanAirNet project which aimed at producing new knowledge, models, and techniques to help controlling the safety food stuffs, through a better control of aerosol particle (bioaerosols) transport and deposition in the ventilation networks of the food industry. PMID:24756675

  8. Measurement on physical parameters of raindrop energy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Minghang; Jian, Jinshi; Zhao, Zhun; Jiao, Juying

    2013-01-01

    Rainfall erosivity factor (R) is one of the most commonly used factors in soil erosion models. While rainfall energy (E) is the most elementary physical parameter to predict R. Based on comparative analysis of previous soil erosion models and rainfall erosivity factor measuring methods, integrated application of modern photogrammetric techniques, image analytic methods and automatic control theories, this paper provided a new method based on image analytic to calculate the rainfall energy and R factor, which obtains raindrop's volume and velocity by means of modern photogrammetric technique. Results show that this method can improve both efficiency and accuracy of rainfall energy calculation and other rainfall physical parameters measurement.

  9. Particle production and energy deposition studies for the neutrino factory target station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, John J.; Densham, Chris; Edgecock, Rob; Prior, Gersende

    2013-02-01

    We present FLUKA and MARS simulation studies of the pion production and energy deposition in the Neutrino Factory baseline target station, which consists of a 4 MW proton beam interacting with a liquid mercury jet target within a 20 T solenoidal magnetic field. We show that a substantial increase in the shielding is needed to protect the superconducting coils from too much energy deposition. Investigations reveal that it is possible to reduce the magnetic field in the solenoid capture system without adversely affecting the pion production efficiency. We show estimates of the amount of concrete shielding that will be required to protect the environment from the high radiation doses generated by the target station facility. We also present yield and energy deposition results for alternative targets: gallium liquid jet, tungsten powder jet, and solid tungsten bars.

  10. Energy deposition at the bone-tissue interface from nuclear fragments produced by high-energy nucleons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Hajnal, Ferenc; Wilson, John W.

    1990-01-01

    The transport of nuclear fragmentation recoils produced by high-energy nucleons in the region of the bone-tissue interface is considered. Results for the different flux and absorbed dose for recoils produced by 1 GeV protons are presented in a bidirectional transport model. The energy deposition in marrow cavities is seen to be enhanced by recoils produced in bone. Approximate analytic formulae for absorbed dose near the interface region are also presented for a simplified range-energy model.

  11. Identification of cost effective energy conservation measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bierenbaum, H. S.; Boggs, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    In addition to a successful program of readily implemented conservation actions for reducing building energy consumption at Kennedy Space Center, recent detailed analyses have identified further substantial savings for buildings representative of technical facilities designed when energy costs were low. The techniques employed for determination of these energy savings consisted of facility configuration analysis, power and lighting measurements, detailed computer simulations and simulation verifications. Use of these methods resulted in identification of projected energy savings as large as $330,000 a year (approximately two year break-even period) in a single building. Application of these techniques to other commercial buildings is discussed

  12. Void formation in amorphous germanium due to high electronic energy deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Gaertner, K.; Joehrens, J.; Steinbach, T.; Schnohr, C. S.; Wesch, W.; Ridgway, M. C.

    2011-06-01

    The effect of high electronic energy deposition in amorphous germanium has been studied experimentally by Au irradiation with ion energies of up to 185 MeV and different angles of incidence and by molecular dynamics computer simulations. In both cases, the energy deposition leads to void formation accompanied by strong swelling of the amorphous germanium. The simulation results prove that the formation of the voids is mainly based on a shock wave mechanism and the swelling is determined by the competing processes of the formation and growth of voids on the one hand and the shrinking and annihilation of voids on the other hand. In full agreement between experiment and simulation, the amount of the swelling is a linear function of the total energy deposited into electronic processes and there exists a threshold value of the electronic energy loss per ion and depth for swelling. A comparison of the threshold values obtained by the experiment and the simulation suggests that approximately 20% of the energy deposited into electronic processes is converted into atomic motion.

  13. Fogwater deposition modeling for terrestrial ecosystems: A review of developments and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katata, Genki

    2014-07-01

    Recent progress in modeling fogwater (and low cloud water) deposition over terrestrial ecosystems during fogwater droplet interception by vegetative surfaces is reviewed. Several types of models and parameterizations for fogwater deposition are discussed with comparing assumptions, input parameter requirements, and modeled processes. The relationships among deposition velocity of fogwater (Vd) in model results, wind speed, and plant species structures associated with literature values are gathered for model validation. Quantitative comparisons between model results and observations in forest environments revealed differences as large as 2 orders of magnitude, which are likely caused by uncertainties in measurement techniques over heterogeneous landscapes. Results from the literature review show that Vd values ranged from 2.1 to 8.0 cm s-1 for short vegetation, whereas Vd = 7.7-92 cm s-1 and 0-20 cm s-1 for forests measured by throughfall-based methods and the eddy covariance method, respectively. This review also discusses the current understanding of the impacts of fogwater deposition on atmosphere-land interactions and over complex terrain based on results from numerical studies. Lastly, future research priorities in innovative modeling and observational approaches for model validation are outlined.

  14. Energy deposition in the earth's atmosphere due to impact of solar activity-generated disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Kan, L. C.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Dryer, M.

    1979-01-01

    Energy deposition in and dynamic responses of the terrestrial atmosphere to solar flare-generated shocks and other physical processes - such as particle precipitation and local heating - are investigated self-consistently in the context of hydrodynamics, the problem being treated as an initial boundary-value problem. It is extremely difficult to construct a general model for the line solar activity-magnetosphere-atmosphere; however, a limited model for this link is possible. The paper describes such a model, and presents some results on energy deposition into the earth's atmosphere due to solar activity-generated disturbances. Results from the present calculations are presented and discussed.

  15. Investigation of Mn-implanted n-Si by low-energy ion beam deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lifeng; Chen, Nuofu; Song, Shulin; Yin, Zhigang; Yang, Fei; Chai, Chunlin; Yang, Shaoyan; Liu, Zhikai

    2005-01-01

    Mn ions were implanted to n-type Si(0 0 1) single crystal by low-energy ion beam deposition technique with an energy of 1000 eV and a dose of 7.5×10 17 cm -2. The samples were held at room temperature and at 300 °C during implantation. Auger electron spectroscopy depth profiles of samples indicate that the Mn ions reach deeper in the sample implanted at 300 °C than in the sample implanted at room temperature. X-ray diffraction measurements show that the structure of the sample implanted at room temperature is amorphous while that of the sample implanted at 300 °C is crystallized. There are no new phases found except silicon both in the two samples. Atomic force microscopy images of samples indicate that the sample implanted at 300 °C has island-like humps that cover the sample surface while there is no such kind of characteristic in the sample implanted at room temperature. The magnetic properties of samples were investigated by alternating gradient magnetometer (AGM). The sample implanted at 300 °C shows ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature.

  16. Incident energy and charge deposition dependences of electron transmission through a microsized tapered glass capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramarachchi, S. J.; Ikeda, T.; Dassanayake, B. S.; Keerthisinghe, D.; Tanis, J. A.

    2016-09-01

    An experimental study of electron transmission and guiding through a tapered glass capillary has been performed. Electrons were transmitted for tilt angles up to ∼6.5° and ∼9.5° (laboratory angles) for incident energies of 500 and 1000 eV, respectively. It is found that elastic and inelastic contributions give rise to distinguishable peaks in the transmitted profile. For 500 eV elastic transmission dominates the profile, while for 1000 eV both elastic and inelastic contributions are present. The transmission for both energies was studied as a function of the charge (time) deposition and found to be strongly dependent. Results suggest fundamental differences between 500 and 1000 eV incident electrons. For 500 eV the transmission slowly increases suggesting charge up of the capillary wall, reaching relative stability with infrequent breakdowns for all angles investigated. For 1000 eV for tilt angles near zero degrees the time dependent profile shows oscillations in the transmission, which never reached a stable condition, while for the larger angle investigated the transmission reached near equilibrium. Inelastic processes dominated the transmission for 1000 eV even at very small tilt angles, but was generally elastic (due to Coulomb deflection) for 500 eV even for the largest tilt angle measured.

  17. Measuring Income and Projecting Energy Use

    SciTech Connect

    Pitcher, Hugh M.

    2009-11-01

    Abstract: Energy is a key requirement for a healthy, productive life and a major driver of the emissions leading to an increasingly warm planet. The implications of a doubling and redoubling of per capita incomes over the remainder of this century for energy use are a critical input into understanding the magnitude of the carbon management problem. A substantial controversy about how the Special Report on Emssions Scenarios (SRES) measured income and the potential implications of how income was measured for long term levels of energy use is revisited again in the McKibbin, Pearce and Stegman article appearing elsewhere in this issue. The recent release of a new set of purchasing power estimates of national income, and the preparations for creating new scenarios to support the IPCC’s fifth assessment highlight the importance of the issues which have arisen surrounding income and energy use. Comparing the 1993 and 2005 ICP results on Purchasing Power Parity (PPP) based measures of income reveals that not only do the 2005 ICP estimates share the same issue of common growth rates for real income as measured by PPP and US $, but the lack of coherence in the estimates of PPP incomes, especially for developing countries raises yet another obstacle to resolving the best way to measure income. Further, the common use of an income term to mediate energy demand (as in the Kaya identity) obscures an underlying reality about per capita energy demands, leading to unreasonable estimates of the impact of changing income measures and of the recent high GDP growth rates in India and China. Significant new research is required to create both a reasonable set of GDP growth rates and long term levels of energy use.

  18. Deposition and removal of fugitive dust in the arid southwestern United States: measurements and model results.

    PubMed

    Etyemezian, Vic; Ahonen, Sean; Nikolic, Djordje; Gillies, John; Kuhns, Hampden; Gillette, Dale; Veranth, John

    2004-09-01

    This work was motivated by the need to better reconcile emission factors for fugitive dust with the amount of geologic material found on ambient filter samples. The deposition of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 10 microm (PM10), generated by travel over an unpaved road, over the first 100 m of transport downwind of the road was examined at Ft. Bliss, near El Paso, TX. The field conditions, typical for warm days in the arid southwestern United States, represented sparsely vegetated terrain under neutral to unstable atmospheric conditions. Emission fluxes of PM10 dust were obtained from towers downwind of the unpaved road at 7, 50, and 100 m. The horizontal flux measurements at the 7 m and 100 m towers indicated that PM10 deposition to the vegetation and ground was too small to measure. The data indicated, with 95% confidence, that the loss of PM10 between the source of emission at the unpaved road, represented by the 7 m tower, and a point 100 m downwind was less than 9.5%. A Gaussian model was used to simulate the plume. Values of the vertical standard deviation sigma(z) and the deposition velocity Vd were similar to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ISC3 model. For the field conditions, the model predicted that removal of PM10 unpaved road dust by deposition over the distance between the point of emission and 100 m downwind would be less than 5%. However, the model results also indicated that particles larger than 10 microm (aerodynamic diameter) would deposit more appreciably. The model was consistent with changes observed in size distributions between 7 m and 100 m downwind, which were measured with optical particle counters. The Gaussian model predictions were also compared with another study conducted over rough terrain and stable atmospheric conditions. Under such conditions, measured PM10 removal rates over 95 m of downwind transport were reported to be between 86% and 89%, whereas the Gaussian model predicted

  19. Long period gratings coated with hafnium oxide by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition for refractive index measurements.

    PubMed

    Melo, Luis; Burton, Geoff; Kubik, Philip; Wild, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Long period gratings (LPGs) are coated with hafnium oxide using plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) to increase the sensitivity of these devices to the refractive index of the surrounding medium. PEALD allows deposition at low temperatures which reduces thermal degradation of UV-written LPGs. Depositions targeting three different coating thicknesses are investigated: 30 nm, 50 nm and 70 nm. Coating thickness measurements taken by scanning electron microscopy of the optical fibers confirm deposition of uniform coatings. The performance of the coated LPGs shows that deposition of hafnium oxide on LPGs induces two-step transition behavior of the cladding modes.

  20. Energy Balance, Evapo-transpiration and Dew deposition in the Dead Sea Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Jutta; Corsmeier, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    The Dead Sea is a unique place on earth. It is a terminal hypersaline lake, located at the lowest point on earth with a lake level of currently -429 m above mean sea level (amsl). It is located in a transition zone of semiarid to arid climate conditions, which makes it highly sensible to climate change (Alpert1997, Smiatek2011). The Virtual Institute DEad SEa Research Venue (DESERVE) is an international project funded by the German Helmholtz Association and was established to study coupled atmospheric hydrological, and lithospheric processes in the changing environment of the Dead Sea. At the moment the most prominent environmental change is the lake level decline of approximately 1 m / year due to anthropogenic interferences (Gertman, 2002). This leads to noticeable changes in the fractions of the existing terrestrial surfaces - water, bare soil and vegetated areas - in the valley. Thus, the partitioning of the net radiation in the valley changes as well. To thoroughly study the atmospheric and hydrological processes in the Dead Sea valley, which are driven by the energy balance components, sound data of the energy fluxes of the different surfaces are necessary. Before DESERVE no long-term monitoring network simultaneously measuring the energy balance components of the different surfaces in the Dead Sea valley was available. Therefore, three energy balance stations were installed at three characteristic sites at the coast-line, over bare soil, and within vegetation, measuring all energy balance components by using the eddy covariance method. The results show, that the partitioning of the energy into sensible and latent heat flux on a diurnal scale is totally different at the three sites. This results in gradients between the sites, which are e.g. responsible for the typical diurnal wind systems at the Dead Sea. Furthermore, driving forces of evapo-transpiration at the sites were identified and a detailed analysis of the daily evaporation and dew deposition rates

  1. Experimental investigation on the energy deposition and expansion rate under the electrical explosion of aluminum wire in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Zongqian; Wang, Kun; Shi, Yuanjie; Wu, Jian; Han, Ruoyu

    2015-12-28

    Experimental investigations on the electrical explosion of aluminum wire using negative polarity current in vacuum are presented. Current pulses with rise rates of 40 A/ns, 80 A/ns, and 120 A/ns are generated for investigating the influence of current rise rate on energy deposition. Experimental results show a significant increase of energy deposition into the wire before the voltage breakdown with the increase of current rise rate. The influence of wire dimension on energy deposition is investigated as well. Decreasing the wire length allows more energy to be deposited into the wire. The energy deposition of a 0.5 cm-long wire explosion is ∼2.5 times higher than the energy deposition of a 2 cm-long wire explosion. The dependence of the energy deposition on wire diameter demonstrates a maximum energy deposition of 2.7 eV/atom with a diameter of ∼18 μm. Substantial increase in energy deposition is observed in the electrical explosion of aluminum wire with polyimide coating. A laser probe is applied to construct the shadowgraphy, schlieren, and interferometry diagnostics. The morphology and expansion trajectory of exploding products are analyzed based on the shadowgram. The interference phase shift is reconstructed from the interferogram. Parallel dual wires are exploded to estimate the expansion velocity of the plasma shell.

  2. Strain and Cohesive Energy of TiN Deposit on Al(001) Surface: Density Functional Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yuan; Liu, Xuejie

    2016-07-01

    To apply the high hardness of TiN film to soft and hard multilayer composite sheets, we constructed a new type of composite structural material with ultra-high strength. The strain of crystal and cohesive energy between the atoms in the eight structures of N atom, Ti atom, 2N2Ti island and TiN rock salt deposited on the Al(001) surface were calculated with the first-principle ultra-soft pseudopotential approach of the plane wave based on the density functional theory. The calculations of the cohesive energy showed that N atoms could be deposited in the face-centered-cubic vacancy position of the Al(001) surface and results in a cubic structure AlN surface. The TiN film could be deposited on the interface of β-AlN. The calculations of the strains showed that the strain in the TiN film deposited on the Al(001) surface was less than that in the 2N2Ti island deposited on the Al(001) surface. The diffusion behavior of interface atom N was investigated by a nudged elastic band method. Diffusion energy calculation showed that the N atom hardly diffused to the substrate Al layer.

  3. Measurement of the Critical Deposition Velocity in Slurry Transport through a Horizontal Pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Erian, Fadel F.; Furfari, Daniel J.; Kellogg, Michael I.; Park, Walter R.

    2001-03-01

    Critical Deposition Velocity (CDV) is an important design and operational parameter in slurry transport. Almost all existing correlations that are used to predict this parameter have been obtained experimentally from slurry transport tests featuring single solid species in the slurry mixture. No correlations have been obtained to describe this parameter when the slurry mixture contains more than one solid species having a wide range of specific gravities, particle size distributions, and volume concentrations within the overall slurry mixture. There are no physical or empirical bases that can justify the extrapolation or modification of the existing single species correlations to include all these effects. New experiments must be carried out to obtain new correlations that would be suited for these types of slurries, and that would clarify the mechanics of solids deposition as a function of the properties of the various solid species. Our goal in this paper is to describe a robust experimental technique for the accurate determination of the critical deposition velocity associated with the transport of slurries in horizontal or slightly inclined pipes. Because of the relative difficulty encountered during the precise determination of this useful operational parameter, it has been the practice to connect it with some transitional behavior of more easily measurable flow parameters such as the pressure drop along the slurry pipeline. In doing so, the critical deposition velocity loses its unique and precise definition due to the multitude of factors that influence such transitional behaviors. Here, data has been obtained for single species slurries made up of washed garnet and water and flowing through a 1- inch clear pipe. The selected garnet had a narrow particle size distribution with a mean diameter of 100 mm, approximately. The critical deposition velocity was measured for garnet/water slurries of 10, 20, and 30 percent solids concentration by volume.

  4. Predicting wetland contamination from atmospheric deposition measurements of pesticides in the Canadian Prairie Pothole region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messing, Paul G.; Farenhorst, Annemieke; Waite, Don T.; McQueen, D. A. Ross; Sproull, James F.; Humphries, David A.; Thompson, Laura L.

    2011-12-01

    Although it has been suggested that atmospheric deposition alone can result in detectable levels of pesticides in wetlands of the Pairie Pothole Region of Canada, this is the first field study to compare the masses of pesticides entering wetlands by atmospheric deposition with those concentrations of pesticides detected in the water-column of prairie wetlands. Weekly air and bulk deposition samples were collected from May 26th to Sept. 15th, 2008 at the Manitoba Zero Tillage Research Association (MZTRA) Farm, Brandon, Manitoba, with four on-site wetlands (approximate sizes 0.15-0.45 ha) monitored every second week. Twelve pesticides were detected in the air, with MCPA (one of the three pesticides applied on the farm in 2008 in addition to clopyralid and glyphosate), triallate, and γ-HCH being detected every week. Calculations were performed to predict wetland pesticide concentrations based on bulk deposits alone for those pesticides that had detectable concentrations in the bulk deposition samples (in order of the highest total seasonal deposition mass to the lowest): MCPA, glyphosate, 2,4-D, clopyralid, bromoxynil, atrazine, dicamba, metolachlor, and mecoprop. The estimated concentrations were closest to actual concentrations for MCPA (Pearson correlation coefficient's = 0.91 to 0.98; p-values < 0.001) and predictions were also reasonable for a range of other herbicides, but a source other than atmospheric deposition was clearly relevant to detections of clopyralid in the wetland water-column. Although the types and levels of pesticides detected in the wetlands of the current study suggest that regional pesticide applications can contribute to pesticide surface water contamination following atmospheric transport and deposition, the greater frequency and concentrations of clopyralid, MCPA, and glyphosate detections in wetlands confirm that on-farm pesticide applications have a greater impact on on-site water quality. Beneficial management practices that reduce

  5. The fractal energy measurement and the singularity energy spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Gang; Zhang, Shuning; Yang, Xiaoniu

    2012-12-01

    The singularity exponent (SE) is the characteristic parameter of fractal and multifractal signals. Based on SE, the fractal dimension reflecting the global self-similar character, the instantaneous SE reflecting the local self-similar character, the multifractal spectrum (MFS) reflecting the distribution of SE, and the time-varying MFS reflecting pointwise multifractal spectrum were proposed. However, all the studies were based on the depiction of spatial or differentiability characters of fractal signals. Taking the SE as the independent dimension, this paper investigates the fractal energy measurement (FEM) and the singularity energy spectrum (SES) theory. Firstly, we study the energy measurement and the energy spectrum of a fractal signal in the singularity domain, propose the conception of FEM and SES of multifractal signals, and investigate the Hausdorff measure and the local direction angle of the fractal energy element. Then, we prove the compatibility between FEM and traditional energy, and point out that SES can be measured in the fractal space. Finally, we study the algorithm of SES under the condition of a continuous signal and a discrete signal, and give the approximation algorithm of the latter, and the estimations of FEM and SES of the Gaussian white noise, Fractal Brownian motion and the multifractal Brownian motion show the theoretical significance and application value of FEM and SES.

  6. Chemical vapour deposition of thermochromic vanadium dioxide thin films for energy efficient glazing

    SciTech Connect

    Warwick, Michael E.A.; Binions, Russell

    2014-06-01

    Vanadium dioxide is a thermochromic material that undergoes a semiconductor to metal transitions at a critical temperature of 68 °C. This phase change from a low temperature monoclinic structure to a higher temperature rutile structure is accompanied by a marked change in infrared reflectivity and change in resistivity. This ability to have a temperature-modulated film that can limit solar heat gain makes vanadium dioxide an ideal candidate for thermochromic energy efficient glazing. In this review we detail the current challenges to such glazing becoming a commercial reality and describe the key chemical vapour deposition technologies being employed in the latest research. - Graphical abstract: Schematic demonstration of the effect of thermochromic glazing on solar radiation (red arrow represents IR radiation, black arrow represents all other solar radiation). - Highlights: • Vanadium dioxide thin films for energy efficient glazing. • Reviews chemical vapour deposition techniques. • Latest results for thin film deposition for vanadium dioxide.

  7. Measured Black Carbon Deposition on the Sierra Nevada Snow Pack and Implication for Snow Pack Retreat

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, O.L.; Corrigan, C.E.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Cliff, S.S.; Ramanathan, V.

    2010-01-12

    Modeling studies show that the darkening of snow and ice by black carbon deposition is a major factor for the rapid disappearance of arctic sea ice, mountain glaciers and snow packs. This study provides one of the first direct measurements for the efficient removal of black carbon from the atmosphere by snow and its subsequent deposition to the snow packs of California. The early melting of the snow packs in the Sierras is one of the contributing factors to the severe water problems in California. BC concentrations in falling snow were measured at two mountain locations and in rain at a coastal site. All three stations reveal large BC concentrations in precipitation, ranging from 1.7 ng/g to 12.9 ng/g. The BC concentrations in the air after the snow fall were negligible suggesting an extremely efficient removal of BC by snow. The data suggest that below cloud scavenging, rather than ice nuclei, was the dominant source of BC in the snow. A five-year comparison of BC, dust, and total fine aerosol mass concentrations at multiple sites reveals that the measurements made at the sampling sites were representative of large scale deposition in the Sierra Nevada. The relative concentration of iron and calcium in the mountain aerosol indicates that one-quarter to one-third of the BC may have been transported from Asia.

  8. Trends in emissions and acid deposition over the northeastern US: Measurements and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stehr, J. W.; Allen, D. J.; Dickerson, R. R.; Loughner, C.; Piety, C. A.

    2006-05-01

    In recent years, two large emissions reduction programs have taken place in and upwind of the Northeastern United States: the Acid Rain Program and the NOx SIP (State Implementation Plan) call. Other programs have been directed toward reducing emissions from mobile sources, and new programs such as the CAIR rule (Clean Air Interstate Rule) are coming on line, pushing emissions down even further. Trends in the emissions data to date suggest that the benefits of these programs should already be measurable using existing monitoring data. A brief analysis of acid deposition data from several sites around the region indicates that the trends in sulfate are all downward, while the trends in nitrate deposition are less dramatic, with a promising recent downward trend. The CMAQ (Community Multiscale Air Quality) model - a one-atmosphere urban/regional smog, aerosol, and deposition model - has been used to estimate future trends in deposition with the implementation of new programs expected to come on line in the next several years.

  9. Energy deposition by heavy ions: additivity of kinetic and potential energy contributions in hillock formation on CaF2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y Y; Grygiel, C; Dufour, C; Sun, J R; Wang, Z G; Zhao, Y T; Xiao, G Q; Cheng, R; Zhou, X M; Ren, J R; Liu, S D; Lei, Y; Sun, Y B; Ritter, R; Gruber, E; Cassimi, A; Monnet, I; Bouffard, S; Aumayr, F; Toulemonde, M

    2014-07-18

    Modification of surface and bulk properties of solids by irradiation with ion beams is a widely used technique with many applications in material science. In this study, we show that nano-hillocks on CaF2 crystal surfaces can be formed by individual impact of medium energy (3 and 5 MeV) highly charged ions (Xe(22+) to Xe(30+)) as well as swift (kinetic energies between 12 and 58 MeV) heavy xenon ions. For very slow highly charged ions the appearance of hillocks is known to be linked to a threshold in potential energy (Ep) while for swift heavy ions a minimum electronic energy loss per unit length (Se) is necessary. With our results we bridge the gap between these two extreme cases and demonstrate, that with increasing energy deposition via Se the Ep-threshold for hillock production can be lowered substantially. Surprisingly, both mechanisms of energy deposition in the target surface seem to contribute in an additive way, which can be visualized in a phase diagram. We show that the inelastic thermal spike model, originally developed to describe such material modifications for swift heavy ions, can be extended to the case where both kinetic and potential energies are deposited into the surface.

  10. Energy deposition by heavy ions: additivity of kinetic and potential energy contributions in hillock formation on CaF2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y Y; Grygiel, C; Dufour, C; Sun, J R; Wang, Z G; Zhao, Y T; Xiao, G Q; Cheng, R; Zhou, X M; Ren, J R; Liu, S D; Lei, Y; Sun, Y B; Ritter, R; Gruber, E; Cassimi, A; Monnet, I; Bouffard, S; Aumayr, F; Toulemonde, M

    2014-01-01

    Modification of surface and bulk properties of solids by irradiation with ion beams is a widely used technique with many applications in material science. In this study, we show that nano-hillocks on CaF2 crystal surfaces can be formed by individual impact of medium energy (3 and 5 MeV) highly charged ions (Xe(22+) to Xe(30+)) as well as swift (kinetic energies between 12 and 58 MeV) heavy xenon ions. For very slow highly charged ions the appearance of hillocks is known to be linked to a threshold in potential energy (Ep) while for swift heavy ions a minimum electronic energy loss per unit length (Se) is necessary. With our results we bridge the gap between these two extreme cases and demonstrate, that with increasing energy deposition via Se the Ep-threshold for hillock production can be lowered substantially. Surprisingly, both mechanisms of energy deposition in the target surface seem to contribute in an additive way, which can be visualized in a phase diagram. We show that the inelastic thermal spike model, originally developed to describe such material modifications for swift heavy ions, can be extended to the case where both kinetic and potential energies are deposited into the surface. PMID:25034006

  11. Low-bay Lighting Energy Conservation Measures

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple low-bay lighting system inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: Low-wattage T8 lighting retrofit, T12 to T8 lighting retrofit, LED Exit signs retrofit, Occupancy sensors, Screw-in lighting retrofit, and central lighting controls. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cooling load reduction, heating load increases, cost savings, building life cycle costs including: Simple payback, discounted payback,more » net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.« less

  12. Energy Savings Measure Packages: Existing Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, S.; Booten, C.

    2011-11-01

    This document presents the most cost effective Energy Savings Measure Packages (ESMP) for existing mixed-fuel and all electric homes to achieve 15% and 30% savings for each BetterBuildings grantee location across the US. These packages are optimized for minimum cost to homeowners for given source energy savings given the local climate and prevalent building characteristics (i.e. foundation types). Maximum cost savings are typically found between 30% and 50% energy savings over the reference home. The dollar value of the maximum annual savings varies significantly by location but typically amounts to $300 - $700/year.

  13. Energy Savings Measure Packages. Existing Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, Sean; Booten, Chuck

    2011-11-01

    This document presents the most cost effective Energy Savings Measure Packages (ESMP) for existing mixed-fuel and all electric homes to achieve 15% and 30% savings for each BetterBuildings grantee location across the United States. These packages are optimized for minimum cost to homeowners for source energy savings given the local climate and prevalent building characteristics (i.e. foundation types). Maximum cost savings are typically found between 30% and 50% energy savings over the reference home; this typically amounts to $300 - $700/year.

  14. A generalized framework for in-line energy deposition during steady-state Monte Carlo radiation transport

    SciTech Connect

    Griesheimer, D. P.; Stedry, M. H.

    2013-07-01

    A rigorous treatment of energy deposition in a Monte Carlo transport calculation, including coupled transport of all secondary and tertiary radiations, increases the computational cost of a simulation dramatically, making fully-coupled heating impractical for many large calculations, such as 3-D analysis of nuclear reactor cores. However, in some cases, the added benefit from a full-fidelity energy-deposition treatment is negligible, especially considering the increased simulation run time. In this paper we present a generalized framework for the in-line calculation of energy deposition during steady-state Monte Carlo transport simulations. This framework gives users the ability to select among several energy-deposition approximations with varying levels of fidelity. The paper describes the computational framework, along with derivations of four energy-deposition treatments. Each treatment uses a unique set of self-consistent approximations, which ensure that energy balance is preserved over the entire problem. By providing several energy-deposition treatments, each with different approximations for neglecting the energy transport of certain secondary radiations, the proposed framework provides users the flexibility to choose between accuracy and computational efficiency. Numerical results are presented, comparing heating results among the four energy-deposition treatments for a simple reactor/compound shielding problem. The results illustrate the limitations and computational expense of each of the four energy-deposition treatments. (authors)

  15. Analysis of CRRES PHA Data for Low-Energy-Deposition Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNulty, P. J.; Hardage, Donna

    2004-01-01

    This effort analyzed the low-energy deposition Pulse Height Analyzer (PHA) data from the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES). The high-energy deposition data had been previously analyzed and shown to be in agreement with spallation reactions predicted by the Clemson University Proton Interactions in Devices (CUPID) simulation model and existing environmental and orbit positioning models (AP-8 with USAF B-L coordinates). The scope of this project was to develop and improve the CUPID model by increasing its range to lower incident particle energies, and to expand the modeling to include contributions from elastic interactions. Before making changes, it was necessary to identify experimental data suitable for benchmarking the codes; then, the models to the CRRES PHA data could be applied. It was also planned to test the model against available low-energy proton or neutron SEU data obtained with mono-energetic beams.

  16. Energy Deposition and Shielding Study of the Front End for the Neutrino Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Snopok, Pavel; Neuffer, David; Rogers, Chris

    2013-06-01

    In the Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider muons are produced by firing high energy protons onto a target to produce pions. The pions decay to muons which are then accelerated. This method of pion production results in significant background from protons and electrons, which may result in heat deposition on superconducting materials and activation of the machine preventing manual handling. In this paper we discuss the design of a secondary particle handling system. The system comprises a solenoidal chicane that filters high momentum particles, followed by a proton absorber that reduces the energy of all particles, resulting in the rejection of low energy protons that pass through the solenoid chicane. We detail the design and optimization of the system and energy deposition and shielding analysis in MARS15.

  17. Effect of forage energy intake and supplementation on marbling deposition in growing beef cattle.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucose is the primary carbon source for fatty acid synthesis in intramuscular fat, whereas, acetate is primarily utilized by subcutaneous fat. Our objective was to examine the effect of forage energy intake and type of fermentation on marbling deposition by stocker cattle grazing dormant native ra...

  18. Low energy, low latitude wave-dominated shallow marine depositional systems: examples from northern Borneo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambiase, Joseph J.; Suraya Tulot

    2013-12-01

    The depositional environments of the wave-dominant successions in the middle to late Miocene Belait and Sandakan Formations in northwestern and northern Borneo, respectively, were determined based on grain size distributions, sedimentary structures and facies successions, as well as trace and microfossil assemblages. Generally, progradational shoreface successions in the Belait Formation were deposited in very low wave energy environments where longshore currents were too weak to generate trough cross-bedding. Shoreface sands are laterally continuous for several km and follow the basin contours, suggesting attached beaches similar to the modern Brunei coastline. In contrast, trough cross-bedding is common in the coarser Sandakan Formation and back-barrier mangrove swamp deposits cap the progradational succession as on the modern northern Dent Peninsula coastline, indicating barrier development and higher wave energy conditions than in the Belait Formation. The Borneo examples indicate that barrier systems that include significant tidal facies form under higher wave energy conditions than attached beaches with virtually no tidal facies. Also, Borneo's low latitude climate promotes back-barrier mangrove which reduces tidal exchange and reduces tidal influence relative to comparable temperate climate systems. The results of the study indicate that depositional systems on low energy, wave-dominated coasts are highly variable, as are the sand bodies and facies associations they generate.

  19. Power Measurement Methods for Energy Efficient Applications

    PubMed Central

    Calandrini, Guilherme; Gardel, Alfredo; Bravo, Ignacio; Revenga, Pedro; Lázaro, José L.; Toledo-Moreo, F. Javier

    2013-01-01

    Energy consumption constraints on computing systems are more important than ever. Maintenance costs for high performance systems are limiting the applicability of processing devices with large dissipation power. New solutions are needed to increase both the computation capability and the power efficiency. Moreover, energy efficient applications should balance performance vs. consumption. Therefore power data of components are important. This work presents the most remarkable alternatives to measure the power consumption of different types of computing systems, describing the advantages and limitations of available power measurement systems. Finally, a methodology is proposed to select the right power consumption measurement system taking into account precision of the measure, scalability and controllability of the acquisition system. PMID:23778191

  20. Influence of normal daytime fat deposition on laboratory measurements of torpor use in territorial versus nonterritorial hummingbirds.

    PubMed

    Powers, Donald R; Brown, Alison R; Van Hook, Jessamyn A

    2003-01-01

    Fat deposition and torpor use in hummingbirds exhibiting distinct foraging styles should vary. We predicted that dominant territorial hummingbirds will use torpor less than subordinate nonterritorial species because unrestricted access to energy by territory owners allows for fat storage. Entry into torpor was monitored using open-flow respirometry on hummingbirds allowed to accumulate fat normally during the day. Fat accumulation was measured by solvent fat extraction. Territorial blue-throated hummingbirds (Lampornis clemenciae) had the highest fat accumulation and used torpor only 17% of the time. Fat storage by L. clemenciae averaged 26% of lean dry mass (LDM) in 1995 and 18% in 1996, similar to that measured for other nonmigratory birds. Fat storage by magnificent hummingbirds (Eugenes fulgens; trapliner) and black-chinned hummingbirds (Archilochus alexandri; nectar robber) averaged 19% and 16% of LDM, respectively, and they used torpor frequently (64% and 92% of the time, respectively). All species initiated torpor if total body fat dropped below 10% of LDM, indicating the existence of a torpor threshold. The ability of L. clemenciae to store enough fat to support nighttime metabolism is likely an important benefit of territoriality. Likewise, frequent torpor use by subordinates suggests that natural restrictions to energy intake can impact their energy budget, necessitating energy conservation by use of torpor.

  1. Effects of acidic deposition and other energy emissions on wildlife: a compendium

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, J.R.; Schreiber, R.K.

    1985-10-01

    Energy emissions, including acidic depositions, pose potential problems for wildlife populations. Historical and recent events show both direct, acute effects and indirect, chronic effects from a variety of airborne pollutants. Information on effects of selected gaseous and particulate energy emissions on domestic animals and livestock and on wildlife is compared. Our understanding of wildlife effects can be improved by the evaluation of veterinary toxicological information and research on the ecological equivalents of domestic and laboratory animals. 42 references.

  2. Comparing i-Tree modeled ozone deposition with field measurements in a periurban Mediterranean forest.

    PubMed

    Morani, A; Nowak, D; Hirabayashi, S; Guidolotti, G; Medori, M; Muzzini, V; Fares, S; Mugnozza, G Scarascia; Calfapietra, C

    2014-12-01

    Ozone flux estimates from the i-Tree model were compared with ozone flux measurements using the Eddy Covariance technique in a periurban Mediterranean forest near Rome (Castelporziano). For the first time i-Tree model outputs were compared with field measurements in relation to dry deposition estimates. Results showed generally a good agreement between predicted and measured ozone fluxes (least sum square=5.6 e(-4)) especially when cumulative values over the whole measurement campaign are considered. However at daily and hourly time-step some overestimations were observed in estimated values especially in hot dry periods. The use of different m values in the Ball-Berry formula in the different periods, produced the best fit between predicted and measured ozone fluxes. This suggests that a variable value for the coefficient m accounting for water availability may be appropriate to improve model estimates for Mediterranean and drought prone regions.

  3. Precision timing measurements for high energy photons

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Dustin; Apreysan, Artur; Bornheim, Adi; Duarte, Javier; Newman, Harvey; Pena, Cristian; Ronzhin, Anatoly; Spiropulu, Maria; Trevor, Jason; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan

    2014-11-21

    Particle colliders operating at high luminosities present challenging environments for high energy physics event reconstruction and analysis. We discuss how timing information, with a precision on the order of 10 ps, can aid in the reconstruction of physics events under such conditions. We present calorimeter based timing measurements from test beam experiments in which we explore the ultimate timing precision achievable for high energy photons or electrons of 10 GeV and above. Using a prototype calorimeter consisting of a 1.7×1.7×1.7 cm3 lutetium–yttrium oxyortho-silicate (LYSO) crystal cube, read out by micro-channel plate photomultipliers, we demonstrate a time resolution of 33.5±2.1 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV. In a second measurement, using a 2.5×2.5×20 cm3 LYSO crystal placed perpendicularly to the electron beam, we achieve a time resolution of 59±11 ps using a beam energy of 4 GeV. We also present timing measurements made using a shashlik-style calorimeter cell made of LYSO and tungsten plates, and demonstrate that the apparatus achieves a time resolution of 54±5 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV.

  4. Field comparison of methods for the measurement of gaseous and particulate contributors to acidic dry deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Sickles, J.E.; Hodson, L.L.; McClenny, W.A.; Paur, R.J.; Ellestad, T.G.

    1990-01-01

    A field study was conducted to compare methods for sampling and analysis of atmospheric constituents that are important contributors to acidic dry deposition. Three multicomponent samplers were used: the Canadian filter pack (FP), the annular denuder system (ADS), and the transition flow reactor (TFR). A tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS) provided continuous reference measurements of NO2 and HNO3. Nitrogen dioxide was also monitored with continuous luminol-based chemiluminescence monitors and with passive sampling devices (PSDs). The study was designed to provide a database for statistical comparison of the various methods with emphasis on the multicomponent samplers under consideration for use in a national dry deposition network. The study was conducted at the EPA dry deposition station in Research Triangle Park, NC between 29 September and 12 October, 1986. Daily averaging and/or sampling times were employed for the 13-day study; weekly samples were also collected, but results from these samples are not compared in the paper. Different measurements of ambient concentrations of the following constituents are compared: total particulate and gaseous NO3(-), HNO3, NO2, total particulate NH4(-), NH3, total particulate SO4(-), and SO2.

  5. Measurements and modeling of emissions, dispersion and dry deposition of ammonia from swine facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajwa, Kanwardeep Singh

    Ammonia has recently gained importance for its increasing atmospheric concentrations and its role in the formation of aerosols. Studies have shown increasing atmospheric concentration levels of NH3 and NH 4+, especially in the regions of concentrated animal feeding operations. Atmospheric inputs of reduced nitrogen as ammonia and ammonium by dry and wet deposition may represent a substantial contribution to the acidification of semi natural ecosystems and could also affect sensitive coastal ecosystems and estuaries. The anaerobic lagoon and spray method, commonly used for waste storage and disposal in confined animal feeding operations (CAFO), is a significant source of ammonia emissions. An accurate emission model for ammonia from aqueous surfaces can help in the development of emission factors. Study of dispersion and dry deposition patterns of ammonia downwind of a hog farm will help us to understand how much ammonia gets dry deposited near the farm, and how remaining ammonia gets transported farther away. An experimental and modeling study is conducted of emissions, dispersion and dry deposition of ammonia taking one swine farm as a unit. Measurements of ammonia flux were made at 11 swine facilities in North Carolina using dynamic flow-through chamber system over the anaerobic waste treatment lagoons. Continuous measurements of ammonia flux, meteorological and lagoon parameters were made for 8-10 days at each farm during each of the warm and cold seasons. Ammonia concentrations were continuously measured in the chamber placed over the lagoon using a Thermo Environmental Instrument Incorporated (TECO) Model 17c chemiluminescnce ammonia analyzer. A similar ammonia analyzer was used to measure ammonia concentrations at selected locations on the farm. Barn emissions were measured using open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectroscopy. A 10 m meteorological tower was erected at each site to measure wind speed and direction, temperature, relative humidity

  6. Extracellular Matrix Deposition in Engineered Micromass Cartilage Pellet Cultures: Measurements and Modelling.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Miranda C; MacArthur, Ben D; Tare, Rahul S; Oreffo, Richard O C; Please, Colin P

    2016-01-01

    This article explores possible mechanisms governing extracellular matrix deposition in engineered cartilaginous cell pellets. A theoretical investigation is carried out alongside an experimental study measuring proteoglycan and collagen volume fractions within murine chondrogenic (ATDC-5) cell pellets. The simple mathematical model, which adopts a nutrient-dependent proteoglycan production rate, successfully reproduces the periphery-dominated proteoglycan deposition, characteristic of the growth pattern observed experimentally within pellets after 21 days of culture. The results suggest that this inhomogeneous proteoglycan production is due to nutrient deficiencies at the pellet centre. Our model analysis further indicates that a spatially uniform distribution of proteoglycan matrix could be maintained by initiating the culture process with a smaller-sized pellet. Finally, possible extensions are put forward with an aim to improve the model predictions for the early behaviour, where different mechanisms appear to dominate the matrix production within the pellets.

  7. SPECTRAL REFLECTANCE METHOD TO MEASURE ACID DEPOSITION EFFECTS ON BUILDING STONE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kingston, Marguerite J.; Ager, Cathy M.

    1985-01-01

    As part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP), the U. S. Geological Survey is cooperating with other agencies to test the effects of acid deposition on building stone. A 10-year test-site study has been organized for the purpose of correlating possible stone deterioration with environmental factors. In Summer 1984, slabs of building stone, 3 by 2 by 2 inches, were exposed to the atmosphere at four test sites where the pH of precipitation and other meteorological variables are continuously monitored. This paper examines the development of one experimental technique used in this study - the application of diffuse spectral reflectance methods for laboratory and in situ measurement of those properties of stone which may be affected by acid deposition.

  8. Extracellular Matrix Deposition in Engineered Micromass Cartilage Pellet Cultures: Measurements and Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Miranda C.; MacArthur, Ben D.; Tare, Rahul S.; Oreffo, Richard O. C.; Please, Colin P.

    2016-01-01

    This article explores possible mechanisms governing extracellular matrix deposition in engineered cartilaginous cell pellets. A theoretical investigation is carried out alongside an experimental study measuring proteoglycan and collagen volume fractions within murine chondrogenic (ATDC-5) cell pellets. The simple mathematical model, which adopts a nutrient-dependent proteoglycan production rate, successfully reproduces the periphery-dominated proteoglycan deposition, characteristic of the growth pattern observed experimentally within pellets after 21 days of culture. The results suggest that this inhomogeneous proteoglycan production is due to nutrient deficiencies at the pellet centre. Our model analysis further indicates that a spatially uniform distribution of proteoglycan matrix could be maintained by initiating the culture process with a smaller-sized pellet. Finally, possible extensions are put forward with an aim to improve the model predictions for the early behaviour, where different mechanisms appear to dominate the matrix production within the pellets. PMID:26889833

  9. Lime-mud layers in high-energy tidal channels: a record of hurricane deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shinn, E.A.; Steinen, R.P.; Dill, R.F.; Major, R.

    1993-01-01

    During or immediately following the transit of Hurricane Andrew (August 23-24, 1992) across the northern part of the Great Bahama Bank, thin laminated beds of carbonate mud were deposited in high-energy subtidal channels (4 m depth) through the ooid shoals of south Cat Cay and Joulters Cays. Thicker, more cohesive (and therefore older) mud beds and angular mud fragments associated with ooids from Joulters Cays have similar characteristics but lack fresh plant fragments. We infer that these older beds were similarly deposited and thus record the passage of previous hurricanes or tropical storms. -from Authors

  10. Measurements of low energy auroral ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, A.

    1981-12-01

    Ion measurements in the energy range 0.1-30 keV observed during the 'Substorm Phenomena' and 'Porcupine' campaigns are summarized. Acceleration of the ions by an electrostatic field aligned parallel to the magnetic field is identified and found to be accompanied by intense electron precipitation. On the other hand, deceleration of the ions is observed in other field-aligned current sheets which are indicated by the electron and magnetic field measurements. Temporal successive monoenergetic ion variations suggest energy dispersion and a location of the source region at 9 earth radii. What is more, ion fluxes higher than those of the electrons are measured at pitch angles parallel to the magnetic field. It is noted that each of the examples was observed during different flights.

  11. Pulse energy measurement at the SXR instrument

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, Stefan; Brown, Garth; Dakovski, Georgi; Hill, Bruce; Holmes, Michael; Loos, Jennifer; Maida, Ricardo; Paiser, Ernesto; Schlotter, William; Turner, Joshua J.; Wallace, Alex; Jastrow, Ulf; Kreis, Svea; Sorokin, Andrey A.; Tiedtke, Kai

    2015-01-01

    A gas monitor detector was implemented and characterized at the Soft X-ray Research (SXR) instrument to measure the average, absolute and pulse-resolved photon flux of the LCLS beam in the energy range between 280 and 2000 eV. The detector is placed after the monochromator and addresses the need to provide reliable absolute pulse energy as well as pulse-resolved measurements for the various experiments at this instrument. This detector provides a reliable non-invasive measurement for determining flux levels on the samples in the downstream experimental chamber and for optimizing signal levels of secondary detectors and for the essential need of data normalization. The design, integration into the instrument and operation are described, and examples of its performance are given. PMID:25931075

  12. Pulse energy measurement at the SXR instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, Stefan; Brown, Garth; Dakovski, Georgi; Hill, Bruce; Holmes, Michael; Loos, Jennifer; Maida, Ricardo; Paiser, Ernesto; Schlotter, William; Turner, Joshua J.; Wallace, Alex; Jastrow, Ulf; Kreis, Svea; Sorokin, Andrey A.; Tiedtke, Kai

    2015-04-14

    A gas monitor detector was implemented and characterized at the Soft X-ray Research (SXR) instrument to measure the average, absolute and pulse-resolved photon flux of the LCLS beam in the energy range between 280 and 2000 eV. The detector is placed after the monochromator and addresses the need to provide reliable absolute pulse energy as well as pulse-resolved measurements for the various experiments at this instrument. This detector provides a reliable non-invasive measurement for determining flux levels on the samples in the downstream experimental chamber and for optimizing signal levels of secondary detectors and for the essential need of data normalization. The design, integration into the instrument and operation are described, and examples of its performance are given.

  13. Pulse energy measurement at the SXR instrument

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Moeller, Stefan; Brown, Garth; Dakovski, Georgi; Hill, Bruce; Holmes, Michael; Loos, Jennifer; Maida, Ricardo; Paiser, Ernesto; Schlotter, William; Turner, Joshua J.; et al

    2015-04-14

    A gas monitor detector was implemented and characterized at the Soft X-ray Research (SXR) instrument to measure the average, absolute and pulse-resolved photon flux of the LCLS beam in the energy range between 280 and 2000 eV. The detector is placed after the monochromator and addresses the need to provide reliable absolute pulse energy as well as pulse-resolved measurements for the various experiments at this instrument. This detector provides a reliable non-invasive measurement for determining flux levels on the samples in the downstream experimental chamber and for optimizing signal levels of secondary detectors and for the essential need of datamore » normalization. The design, integration into the instrument and operation are described, and examples of its performance are given.« less

  14. NEMVP: North American energy measurement and verification protocol

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    This measurement and verification protocol discusses procedures that,when implemented, allow buyers, sellers, and financiers of energy projects to quantify energy conservation measure performance and savings.

  15. Productivity benefits of industrial energy efficiency measures

    SciTech Connect

    Worrell, Ernst; Laitner, John A.; Michael, Ruth; Finman, Hodayah

    2004-08-30

    We review the relationship between energy efficiency improvement measures and productivity in industry. We review over 70 industrial case studies from widely available published databases, followed by an analysis of the representation of productivity benefits in energy modeling. We propose a method to include productivity benefits in the economic assessment of the potential for energy efficiency improvement. The case-study review suggests that energy efficiency investments can provide a significant boost to overall productivity within industry. If this relationship holds, the description of energy-efficient technologies as opportunities for larger productivity improvements has significant implications for conventional economic assessments. The paper explores the implications this change in perspective on the evaluation of energy-efficient technologies for a study of the iron and steel industry in the US. This examination shows that including productivity benefits explicitly in the modeling parameters would double the cost-effective potential for energy efficiency improvement, compared to an analysis excluding those benefits. We provide suggestions for future research in this important area.

  16. Mechanical properties improvement of pulsed laser-deposited hydroxyapatite thin films by high energy ion-beam implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelea, V.; Pelletier, H.; Müller, D.; Broll, N.; Mille, P.; Ristoscu, C.; Mihailescu, I. N.

    2002-01-01

    Major problems in the hydroxyapatite (HA), Ca 5(PO 4) 3OH, thin films processing still keep the poor mechanical properties and the lack in density. We present a study on the feasibility of high energy ion-beam implantation technique to densify HA bioceramic films. Crystalline HA films were grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method using an excimer KrF ∗ laser ( λ=248 nm, τ FWHM≥20 ns). The films were deposited on Ti-5Al-2.5Fe alloys substrates previously coated with a ceramic TiN buffer layer. After deposition the films were implanted with Ar + ions at high energy. Optical microscopy (OM), white light confocal microscopy (WLCM), grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and Berkovich nanoindentation in normal and scratch options have been applied for the characterization of the obtained structures. We put into evidence an enhancement of the mechanical characteristics after implantation, while GIXRD measurements confirm that the crystalline structure of HA phase is preserved. The improvement in mechanical properties is an effect of a densification after ion treatment as a result of pores elimination and grains regrowth.

  17. Fast electron energy deposition in a magnetized plasma: Kinetic theory and particle-in-cell simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Robiche, J.; Rax, J.-M.; Bonnaud, G.; Gremillet, L.

    2010-03-15

    The collisional dynamics of a relativistic electron jet in a magnetized plasma are investigated within the framework of kinetic theory. The relativistic Fokker-Planck equation describing slowing down, pitch angle scattering, and cyclotron rotation is derived and solved. Based on the solution of this Fokker-Planck equation, an analytical formula for the root mean square spot size transverse to the magnetic field is derived and this result predicts a reduction in radial transport. Some comparisons with particle-in-cell simulation are made and confirm striking agreement between the theory and the simulation. For fast electron with 1 MeV typical kinetic energy interacting with a solid density hydrogen plasma, the energy deposition density in the transverse direction increases by a factor 2 for magnetic field of the order of 1 T. Along the magnetic field, the energy deposition profile is unaltered compared with the field-free case.

  18. Method for controlling energy density for reliable pulsed laser deposition of thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Dowden, P. C. E-mail: qxjia@lanl.gov; Bi, Z.; Jia, Q. X. E-mail: qxjia@lanl.gov

    2014-02-15

    We have established a methodology to stabilize the laser energy density on a target surface in pulsed laser deposition of thin films. To control the focused laser spot on a target, we have imaged a defined aperture in the beamline (so called image-focus) instead of focusing the beam on a target based on a simple “lens-focus.” To control the laser energy density on a target, we have introduced a continuously variable attenuator between the output of the laser and the imaged aperture to manipulate the energy to a desired level by running the laser in a “constant voltage” mode to eliminate changes in the lasers’ beam dimensions. This methodology leads to much better controllability/reproducibility for reliable pulsed laser deposition of high performance electronic thin films.

  19. Calculations of heat deposition in a target system bombarded by high energy charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Takahiko; Nakahara, Yasuaki

    1984-09-01

    At the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), with the use of the Monte Carlo code NMTC/JAERI and the analysis code NMTA, studies have been performed of the feasibility of an emerging new technology such as an accelerator nuclear fuel producer or a radioactive waste transmuter, which utilizes abundant neutrons emitted by the spallation and fission reactions in a proton accelerator target. New subroutines were added to the NMTA code calculating the total heat deposition and the spatial distribution of heat deposition density in a target. A new subroutine is provided also for estimating the mean excitation energy of recoiling residual nuclei after the particle evaporation ceased to occur. The NMTC/JAERI flow for a fission event was also modified. The processes that account for the heat producing energy in the range greater than 15 MeV are mainly (a) ionization loss by charged particles through transport and (b) the kinetic energy of recoil nuclei after intranuclear cascades and fissions. Preliminary calculations of the heat deposition are carried out for small bare targets of Pb, Nat. U and molten salts for some combinations of incident particle energy, beam radius, target material and size. The new computational routines are explained in detail and discussions are done on the calculated results.

  20. 10 CFR 436.104 - Energy conservation measures and standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Energy conservation measures and standards. 436.104 Section 436.104 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING PROGRAMS Guidelines for General Operations Plans § 436.104 Energy conservation measures and standards....

  1. 10 CFR 436.104 - Energy conservation measures and standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Energy conservation measures and standards. 436.104 Section 436.104 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING PROGRAMS Guidelines for General Operations Plans § 436.104 Energy conservation measures and standards....

  2. 10 CFR 436.104 - Energy conservation measures and standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Energy conservation measures and standards. 436.104 Section 436.104 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING PROGRAMS Guidelines for General Operations Plans § 436.104 Energy conservation measures and standards....

  3. 10 CFR 436.104 - Energy conservation measures and standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Energy conservation measures and standards. 436.104 Section 436.104 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING PROGRAMS Guidelines for General Operations Plans § 436.104 Energy conservation measures and standards....

  4. 10 CFR 436.104 - Energy conservation measures and standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Energy conservation measures and standards. 436.104 Section 436.104 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING PROGRAMS Guidelines for General Operations Plans § 436.104 Energy conservation measures and standards....

  5. Cell to Cell Variability of Radiation-Induced Foci: Relation between Observed Damage and Energy Deposition.

    PubMed

    Gruel, Gaëtan; Villagrasa, Carmen; Voisin, Pascale; Clairand, Isabelle; Benderitter, Marc; Bottollier-Depois, Jean-François; Barquinero, Joan Francesc

    2016-01-01

    Most studies that aim to understand the interactions between different types of photon radiation and cellular DNA assume homogeneous cell irradiation, with all cells receiving the same amount of energy. The level of DNA damage is therefore generally determined by averaging it over the entire population of exposed cells. However, evaluating the molecular consequences of a stochastic phenomenon such as energy deposition of ionizing radiation by measuring only an average effect may not be sufficient for understanding some aspects of the cellular response to this radiation. The variance among the cells associated with this average effect may also be important for the behaviour of irradiated tissue. In this study, we accurately estimated the distribution of the number of radiation-induced γH2AX foci (RIF) per cell nucleus in a large population of endothelial cells exposed to 3 macroscopic doses of gamma rays from 60Co. The number of RIF varied significantly and reproducibly from cell to cell, with its relative standard deviation ranging from 36% to 18% depending on the macroscopic dose delivered. Interestingly, this relative cell-to-cell variability increased as the dose decreased, contrary to the mean RIF count per cell. This result shows that the dose effect, in terms of the number of DNA lesions indicated by RIF is not as simple as a purely proportional relation in which relative SD is constant with dose. To analyse the origins of this observed variability, we calculated the spread of the specific energy distribution for the different target volumes and subvolumes in which RIF can be generated. Variances, standard deviations and relative standard deviations all changed similarly from dose to dose for biological and calculated microdosimetric values. This similarity is an important argument that supports the hypothesis of the conservation of the association between the number of RIF per nucleus and the specific energy per DNA molecule. This comparison allowed us to

  6. Charge deposition dependence and energy loss of electrons transmitted through insulating PET nanocapillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keerthisinghe, D.; Dassanayake, B. S.; Wickramarachchi, S. J.; Stolterfoht, N.; Tanis, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    The charge deposition dependence and energy loss in the transmission of electrons through insulating polyethylene terephthalate (PET) were studied for incident energies of 500 and 800 eV. Charge evolution at the sample tilt angles ψ = 0.0° and -1.7° was investigated. After an initial quiescent period transmission was observed and found to reach equilibrium rather quickly. Inelastic behavior of the transmitted electrons was observed during the initial transmission as well as after reaching equilibrium for ψ = -1.7° for both incident energies.

  7. Diffusion enhancement due to low-energy ion bombardment during sputter etching and deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Eltoukhy, A.H.; Greene, J.E.

    1980-08-01

    The effects of low-energy ion bombardment on enhancing elemental diffusion rates at both heterojunction interfaces during film deposition and over the compositionally altered layer created during sputter etching alloy targets have been considered. Depth dependent enhanced interdiffusion coefficients, expressed as D*(x)=D*(0) exp(-x/L/sub d/), where D*(0) is more than five orders of magnitude greater than thermal diffusion values, were measured in InSb/GaSb multilayer structures deposited by multitarget bias sputering. D*(0) was determined from the amplitude u of the compositional modulation in the multilayered films (layer thicknesses between 20 and 45 A) as measured by superlattice x-ray diffraction techniques. The value of D*(0) was found to increase from 3 x 10/sup -17/ to 1 x 10/sup -16/ cm/sup 2//sec as the applied substrate bias was increased from 0 to -75 V. However even at V/sub a/=0, the diffusion coefficient was enhanced owing to an induced substrate potential with respect to the positive space-charge region in the Ar discharge. The diffusion length of L/sub d/ of the ion bombardment created defects was approx.1000 A. Enhanced diffusion also has a significiant effect on the altered layer thickness x/sub e/ and the total sputtering time t/sub e/ (or ion dose) required to reach steady state during ion etching of multielement targets. The effects of using an exponentially depth dependent versus a constant value of the enhanced diffusion coefficient on calculated values of x/sub e/ and t/sub e/ in single-phase binary alloys were considered. The results show that both x/sub e/ and t/sub e/ are considerably larger using a depth dependent D*(x), when L/sub d/D*(0)/v, the usual case for most sputtering applications, the two solutions approach each other.

  8. Energy fluxes in a radio-frequency magnetron discharge for the deposition of superhard cubic boron nitride coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Bornholdt, S.; Kersten, H.; Ye, J.; Ulrich, S.

    2012-12-15

    Energy flux measurements by a calorimetric probe in a rf-magnetron plasma used for the deposition of super-hard c-BN coatings are presented and discussed. Argon as working gas is used for sputtering a h-BN target. Adding a certain amount of N{sub 2} is essential for the formation of stoichiometric BN films, since a lack of nitrogen will lead to boron rich films. Subsequently, the contributions of different plasma species, surface reactions, and film growth to the resulting variation of the substrate temperature in dependence on nitrogen admixture are estimated and discussed. In addition, SRIM simulations are performed to estimate the energy influx by sputtered neutral atoms. The influence of magnetron target power and oxygen admixture (for comparison with nitrogen) to the process gas on the total energy flux is determined and discussed qualitatively, too. The results indicate that variation of the energy influx due to additional nitrogen flow, which causes a decrease of electron and ion densities, electron temperature and plasma potential, is negligible, while the admixture of oxygen leads to a drastic increase of the energy influx. The typical hysteresis effect which can be observed during magnetron sputtering in oxygen containing gas mixtures has also been confirmed in the energy influx measurements for the investigated system. However, the underlying mechanism is not understood yet, and will be addressed in further investigations.

  9. Deposition of carbonate mud beds within high-energy subtidal sand Dunes, Bahamas

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, R.F.; Steinen, R.P.

    1988-01-01

    Laminated, carbonate mud beds are being deposited in the interisland channels of the Exuma Cays in the Bahamas. They are associated with stromatolites and interbedded with ooid sands that form large migrating subtidal dunes on flood tidal deltas and bars. Currents up to 3 knots sweep in and out of the 4-8 m deep channels 3 hours out of every 6 hours, creating a high-energy bank margin environment not usually considered to be the site of mud-sized particle deposition. Mud deposits reach thicknesses of 1 m and have individual beds 2-5 cm thick. When exposed to flowing seawater, bed surfaces become encrusted with carbonate cement and algal mats. The white interior of mud beds between the crusts appears homogeneous, is soft, and has the consistency of ''tooth paste.'' Loose uncemented ooid sand is found above and below the mud beds, showing that both are occupying the same depositional environment. Rip-up clasts of the crusted mud beds, formed by scour of underlying sands, are carried throughout the channels and accumulate as a lag deposit within the troughs of migrating dunes. Some clasts are colonized by algal mats that trap ooid and skeletal sands forming stromatolite structures that can grow up to 2 m high.

  10. Thermal Conductivity Measurement of an Electron-Beam Physical-Vapor-Deposition Coating

    PubMed Central

    Slifka, A. J.; Filla, B. J.

    2003-01-01

    An industrial ceramic thermal-barrier coating designated PWA 266, processed by electron-beam physical-vapor deposition, was measured using a steady-state thermal conductivity technique. The thermal conductivity of the mass fraction 7 % yttria-stabilized zirconia coating was measured from 100 °C to 900 °C. Measurements on three thicknesses of coatings, 170 μm, 350 μm, and 510 μm resulted in thermal conductivity in the range from 1.5 W/(m·K) to 1.7 W/(m·K) with a combined relative standard uncertainty of 20 %. The thermal conductivity is not significantly dependent on temperature. PMID:27413601

  11. Measurement of LHCD edge power deposition through modulation techniques on Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Faust, I. C.; Brunner, D.; LaBombard, B.; Parker, R. R.; Baek, S. G.; Chilenksi, M. A.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J. W.; Terry, J. L.; Shiraiwa, S.; Walk, J. R.; Wallace, G. M.; Whyte, D. G.; Edlund, E.

    2015-12-10

    The efficiency of LHCD on Alcator C-Mod drops exponentially with line average density. At reactor relevant densities (> 1 · 1020 [m{sup −3}]) no measurable current is driven. While a number of causes have been suggested, no specific mechanism has been shown to be responsible for the loss of current drive at high density. Fast modulation of the LH power was used to isolate and quantify the LHCD deposition within the plasma. Measurements from these plasmas provide unique evidence for determining a root cause. Modulation of LH power in steady plasmas exhibited no correlated change in the core temperature. A correlated, prompt response in the edge suggests that the loss in efficiency is related to a edge absorption mechanism. This follows previous results which found the generation of n{sub ||}-independent SOL currents. Multiple Langmuir probe array measurements of the conducted heat conclude that the lost power is deposited near the last closed flux surface. The heat flux induced by LH waves onto the outer divertor is calculated. Changes in the neutral pressure, ionization and hard X-ray emission at high density highlight the importance of the active divertor in the loss of efficiency. Results of this study implicate a mechanism which may occur over multiple passes, leading to power absorption near the LCFS.

  12. Measurement of LHCD edge power deposition through modulation techniques on Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faust, I. C.; Brunner, D.; LaBombard, B.; Parker, R. R.; Baek, S. G.; Chilenksi, M. A.; Edlund, E.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J. W.; Terry, J. L.; Shiraiwa, S.; Walk, J. R.; Wallace, G. M.; Whyte, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    The efficiency of LHCD on Alcator C-Mod drops exponentially with line average density. At reactor relevant densities (> 1 . 1020 [m-3]) no measurable current is driven. While a number of causes have been suggested, no specific mechanism has been shown to be responsible for the loss of current drive at high density. Fast modulation of the LH power was used to isolate and quantify the LHCD deposition within the plasma. Measurements from these plasmas provide unique evidence for determining a root cause. Modulation of LH power in steady plasmas exhibited no correlated change in the core temperature. A correlated, prompt response in the edge suggests that the loss in efficiency is related to a edge absorption mechanism. This follows previous results which found the generation of n||-independent SOL currents. Multiple Langmuir probe array measurements of the conducted heat conclude that the lost power is deposited near the last closed flux surface. The heat flux induced by LH waves onto the outer divertor is calculated. Changes in the neutral pressure, ionization and hard X-ray emission at high density highlight the importance of the active divertor in the loss of efficiency. Results of this study implicate a mechanism which may occur over multiple passes, leading to power absorption near the LCFS.

  13. HETDEX: Measuring Dark Energy at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, Karl; Hill, G.; Komatsu, E.; Drory, N.; DePoy, D.; Ciardullo, R.; Gronwall, C.; Fabricius, M.; Wisotzki, L.; HETDEX Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX) is a blind spectroscopic survey to map the evolution of dark energy using Lyman-alpha emitting galaxies as tracers. The survey instrument, VIRUS, consists of 75 IFUs distributed across the 22-arcmin field of the upgraded 9.2-m HET. Each 50x50 sq. arcsec IFU is made up of 448 1.5-arcsec fibers, and feeds a pair of spectrographs with a fixed bandpass of 350-550 nm and resolving power R 700. Each exposure gathers 33,600 spectra. The baseline survey will deliver spectra of 0.8M LAEs in a 9 cubic Gpc volume with 1.9 < z < 3.5, and 1M [OII] emitters with z < 0.48. We expect to measure both the Hubble parameter and angular diameter distance to better than 1%. HETDEX will provide a unique window on the evolution of dark energy.

  14. High-bay Lighting Energy Conservation Measures

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple high-bay lighting system inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: 1000 Watt to 750 Watt High-pressure Sodium lighting retrofit, 400 Watt to 360 Watt High Pressure Sodium lighting retrofit, High Intensity Discharge to T5 lighting retrofit, High Intensity Discharge to T8 lighting retrofit, and Daylighting. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, building lifemore » cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.« less

  15. Energy harvesting in high voltage measuring techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żyłka, Pawel; Doliński, Marcin

    2016-02-01

    The paper discusses selected problems related to application of energy harvesting (that is, generating electricity from surplus energy present in the environment) to supply autonomous ultra-low-power measurement systems applicable in high voltage engineering. As a practical example of such implementation a laboratory model of a remote temperature sensor is presented, which is self-powered by heat generated in a current-carrying busbar in HV- switchgear. Presented system exploits a thermoelectric harvester based on a passively cooled Peltier module supplying micro-power low-voltage dc-dc converter driving energy-efficient temperature sensor, microcontroller and a fibre-optic transmitter. Performance of the model in laboratory simulated conditions are presented and discussed.

  16. Low energy neutron measurements aboard encounter missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilmer, N.; Maksimovic, M.; Trottet, G.

    Neutrons in the MeV to GeV range are produced by interaction of flare accelerated ions with the solar atmosphere. Because of their lifetime, only high energy neutrons (> 100 MeV) have a high probability to be detected at earth's orbit. So far, around fifteen solar neutron events have been observed either by high energy detectors aboard spacecrafts at 1 AU or by ground based neutron monitors. Neutrons between 10 and 100 MeV have also been detected for a few events through their proton decay. Measurements of solar neutrons closer to the Sun aboard encounter missions will allow to probe for the first time the MeV neutrons which are produced by the nuclear reactions of energetic ions with thresholds around 1 MeV/nuc and will provide information on the accelerated ion spectrum in the energy range between ˜ 1 MeV and 100 MeV/nuc in complementarity with what can be deduced from γ -ray line emission. The close proximity of the Sun would allow to measure neutron events for many more flares opening a new field of solar physics. Combined with near in-situ ion measurements and γ -ray observations, neutrons will bring information on the link between interacting and escaping ions while getting rid of most of the transport effects.

  17. Neutron energy measurements in emergency response applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Guss, Paul; Hornish, Michael; Wilde, Scott; Stampahar, Tom; Reed, Michael

    2009-08-01

    We present significant results in recent advances in the measurement of neutron energy. Neutron energy measurements are a small but significant part of radiological emergency response applications. Mission critical information can be obtained by analyzing the neutron energy given off from radioactive materials. In the case of searching for special nuclear materials, neutron energy information from an unknown source can be of importance. At the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) of National Security Technologies, LLC, a series of materials, viz., liquid organic scintillator (LOS), Lithium Gadolinium Borate (LGB) or Li6Gd(BO3)3 in a plastic matrix, a recently developed crystal of Cesium Lithium Yttrium Chloride, Cs2LiYCl6: Ce (called CLYC)[1], and normal plastic scintillator (BC-408) with 3He tubes have been used to study their effectiveness as a portable neutron energy spectrometer. Comparisons illustrating the strengths of the various materials will be provided. Of these materials, LGB offers the ability to tailor its response to the neutron spectrum by varying the isotopic composition of the key constituents (Lithium, Gadolinium [Yttrium], and Boron). All three of the constituent elements possess large neutron capture cross section isotopes for highly exothermic reactions. These compounds of composition Li6Gd(Y)(BO3)3 can be activated by Cerium ions Ce3+. CLYC, on the other hand, has a remarkable gamma response in addition to superb neutron discrimination, comparable to that of Europium-doped Lithium Iodide (6LiI: Eu). Comparing these two materials, CLYC has higher light output (4500 phe/MeV) than that from 6LiI: Eu and shows better energy resolution for both gamma and neutron pulse heights. Using CLYC, gamma energy pulses can be discriminated from the neutron signals by simple pulse height separation. For the cases of both LGB and LOS, careful pulse shape discrimination is needed to separate the gamma energy signals from neutron pulses. Both analog and digital

  18. 1-D Van der Waals Foams Heated by Ion Beam Energy Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Zylstra, A. B.; Barnard, J. J.; More, R. M.

    2009-12-23

    One dimensional simulations of various initial average density aluminum foams (modeled as slabs of solid metal separated by low density regions) heated by volumetric energy deposition are conducted with a Lagrangian hydrodynamics code using a van der Waals equation of tate (EOS). The resulting behavior is studied to facilitate the design of future warm dense matter (WDM) experiments at LBNL. In the simulations the energy deposition ranges from 10 to 30 kJ/g and from 0.075 to 4.0 ns total pulse length, resulting in temperatures from approximately 1 o 4 eV. We study peak pressures and temperatures in the foams, expansion velocity, and the phase evolution. Five relevant time scales in the problem are identified. Additionally, we present a method for characterizing the level of inhomogeneity in a foam target as it is heated and the time it takes for a foam to homogenize.

  19. 1-D Van der Waals Foams Heated by Ion Beam Energy Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Zylstra, A; Barnard, J J; More, R M

    2010-03-19

    One dimensional simulations of various initial average density aluminum foams (modeled as slabs of solid metal separated by low density regions) heated by volumetric energy deposition are conducted with a Lagrangian hydrodynamics code using a van der Waals equation of state (EOS). The resulting behavior is studied to facilitate the design of future warm dense matter (WDM) experiments at LBNL. In the simulations the energy deposition ranges from 10 to 30 kJ/g and from 0.075 to 4.0 ns total pulse length, resulting in temperatures from approximately 1 to 4 eV. We study peak pressures and temperatures in the foams, expansion velocity, and the phase evolution. Five relevant time scales in the problem are identified. Additionally, we present a method for characterizing the level of inhomogeneity in a foam target as it is heated and the time it takes for a foam to homogenize.

  20. Energy deposited in the high luminosity inner triplets of the LHC by collision debris

    SciTech Connect

    Wildner, E.; Broggi, F.; Cerutti, F.; Ferrari, A.; Hoa, C.; Koutchouk, J.-P.; Mokhov, N.V.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    The 14 TeV center of mass proton-proton collisions in the LHC produce not only debris interesting for physics but also showers of particles ending up in the accelerator equipment, in particular in the superconducting magnet coils. Evaluations of this contribution to the heat, that has to be transported by the cryogenic system, have been made to guarantee that the energy deposition in the superconducting magnets does not exceed limits for magnet quenching and the capacity of the cryogenic system. The models of the LHC base-line are detailed and include description of, for energy deposition, essential elements like beam-pipes and corrector magnets. The evaluations made using the Monte-Carlo code FLUKA are compared to previous studies using MARS. For the consolidation of the calculations, a dedicated comparative study of these two codes was performed for a reduced setup.

  1. Effect of tubing deposition, breathing pattern, and temperature on aerosol mass distribution measured by cascade impactor.

    PubMed

    Gurses, Burak K; Smaldone, Gerald C

    2003-01-01

    Aerosols produced by nebulizers are often characterized on the bench using cascade impactors. We studied the effects of connecting tubing, breathing pattern, and temperature on mass-weighted aerodynamic particle size aerosol distributions (APSD) measured by cascade impaction. Our experimental setup consisted of a piston ventilator, low-flow (1.0 L/min) cascade impactor, two commercially available nebulizers that produced large and small particles, and two "T"-shaped tubes called "Tconnector(cascade)" and "Tconnector(nebulizer)" placed above the impactor and the nebulizer, respectively. Radiolabeled normal saline was nebulized using an airtank at 50 PSIG; APSD, mass balance, and Tconnector(cascade) deposition were measured with a gamma camera and radioisotope calibrator. Flow through the circuit was defined by the air tank (standing cloud, 10 L/min) with or without a piston pump, which superimposed a sinusoidal flow on the flow from the air tank (tidal volume and frequency of breathing). Experiments were performed at room temperature and in a cooled environment. With increasing tidal volume and frequency, smaller particles entered the cascade impactor (decreasing MMAD; e.g., Misty-Neb, 4.2 +/- 0.9 microm at lowest ventilation and 2.7 +/- 0.1 microm at highest, p = 0.042). These effects were reduced in magnitude for the nebulizer that produced smaller particles (AeroTech II, MMAD 1.8 +/- 0.1 to 1.3 +/- 0.1 microm; p = 0.0044). Deposition on Tconnector(cascade) increased with ventilation but was independent of cascade impactor flow. Imaging of the Tconnector(cascade) revealed a pattern of deposition unaffected by cascade impactor flow. These measurements suggest that changes in MMAD with ventilation were not artifacts of tubing deposition in the Tconnector(cascade). At lower temperatures, APSD distributions were more polydisperse. Our data suggest that, during patient inhalation, changes in particle distribution occur that are related to conditions in the tubing and

  2. Gaseous Oxidized Mercury Dry Deposition Measurements in Southwestern USA: Comparison between texas, Eastern Oklahoma, and the Four Corners Area

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) dry deposition measurements using aerodynamic surrogate surface passive samplers were collected in central and eastern Texas and eastern Oklahoma, from September 2011 to September 2012.The purpose of this study was to provide an initial characteriza...

  3. Role of geometric parameters in electrical measurements of insulating thin films deposited on a conductive substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Gerhardt, R. A.

    2012-03-01

    The effects of film thickness, electrode size and substrate thickness on the impedance parameters of alternating frequency dielectric measurements of insulating thin films deposited on conductive substrates were studied through parametric finite-element simulations. The quasi-static forms of Maxwell's electromagnetic equations in a time harmonic mode were solved using COMSOL Multiphysics® for several types of 2D models (linear and axisymmetric). The full 2D model deals with a configuration in which the impedance is measured between two surface electrodes on top of a film deposited on a conductive substrate. For the simplified 2D models, the conductive substrate is ignored and the two electrodes are placed on the top and bottom of the film. By comparing the full model and the simplified models, approximations and generalizations are deduced. For highly insulating films, such as the case of insulating SiO2 films on a conducting Si substrate, even the simplified models predict accurate capacitance values at all frequencies. However, the edge effects on the capacitance are found to be significant when the film thickness increases and/or the top electrode contact size decreases. The thickness of the substrate affects predominantly the resistive components of the dielectric response while having no significant effect on the capacitive components. Changing the electrode contact size or the film thickness determines the specific values of the measured resistance or capacitance while the material time constant remains the same, and thus this affects the frequency dependence that is able to be detected. This work highlights the importance of keeping in mind the film thickness and electrode contact size for the correct interpretation of the measured dielectric properties of micro/nanoscale structures that are often investigated using nanoscale capacitance measurements.

  4. Energy Deposition in Magnetic Cloud and High Speed Stream Driven Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, E. J.; Turner, N. E.

    2004-12-01

    The solar wind couples a large amount of energy into the magnetosphere-ionosphere system; this energy is released in the form of geomagnetic storms. While the precise mechanism for this coupling and release is yet unclear, it is well established that different solar wind conditions create different responses within the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. We are examining the impact of high speed stream-driven and magnetic cloud-driven storms on the global redistribution of energy throughout the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. Data are used from ACE, WIND, and ground magnetometers. We estimate the energy input and output for multiple geomagnetic storms spanning from1995 to 1998. The comparison of storms reveals high speed stream-driven storms deposit less energy per second, but over longer durations. The comparison further reveals magnetic cloud-driven storms have deeper Dst* depressions but with shorter durations. Our results suggest magnetic cloud-driven storms with similar input parameters as high speed stream-driven storms produce an overall lower energy deposition.

  5. Characteristic properties of the Casimir free energy for metal films deposited on metallic plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2016-04-01

    The Casimir free energy and pressure of thin metal films deposited on metallic plates are considered using the Lifshitz theory and the Drude and plasma model approaches to the role of conduction electrons. The bound electrons are taken into account by using the complete optical data of film and plate metals. It is shown that for films of several tens of nanometers thickness the Casimir free energy and pressure calculated using these approaches differ by hundreds and thousands percent and can be easily discriminated experimentally. According to our results, the free energy of a metal film does not vanish in the limiting case of ideal metal if the Drude model approach is used in contradiction with the fact that the fluctuating field cannot penetrate in its interior. Numerical computations of the Casimir free energy and pressure of Ag and Au films deposited on Cu and Al plates have been performed using both theoretical approaches. It is shown that the free energy of a film can be both negative and positive depending on the metals used. For a Au film on a Ag plate and vice versa the Casimir energy of a film changes its sign with increasing film thickness. Applications of the obtained results for resolving the Casimir puzzle and the problem of stability of thin films are discussed.

  6. Calcite precipitation rates in the field: Measurement and prediction for a travertine-depositing stream

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, J.S.; Lorah, M.M. )

    1988-10-01

    Rates of calcite precipitation from a travertine-depositing stream were determined from changes in stream composition between consecutive sampling points and were compared with rates predicted from a laboratory-derived rate law. The agreement in rates was generally within an order of magnitude and routinely within a factor of 3. Least agreement between measured and predicted rates was obtained for sections of flowpath where relatively little change in bulk chemical composition occurred, which were the sections with the greatest mass transfer calculation error, and for the stream segment including a waterfall, which was the section with the greatest error in estimated surface area. Reaction rate obtained from the mass of calcite precipitated onto seed crystals placed in the stream significantly underestimated the mass transfer rate. For the travertine-depositing stream of Warm River Cave and Falling Spring Creek, Virginia, the coupling of equilibrium speciation models with mass balance calculations and simple field measurements allowed successful field-based quantification of reaction rates.

  7. Comparison of energy deposition calculations by the LAHET Code System with experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, C.A.; Lisowski, P.W.; Russell, G.J.; Waters, L.S.

    1993-08-01

    A comparison was performed between the energy deposition predicted by the LAHET Code System (LCS) with experimental values determined by Belyakov-Bodin et al. for 800, 1000, and 1200 MeV protons on targets composed of lead, bismuth, beryllium, carbon, and aluminum. The lead and bismuth showed agreement within approximately 10% at locations throughout the targets, and the agreement of the total energy deposited over the axial length of the targets ranged from 1% to 25%. For the lead and bismuth cases, the LCS predictions were always greater than the experimental results. For the lighter materials, the agreement at locations throughout the target only agreed within approximately 20%. No definable trend could be determined for the lighter materials since some LCS predictions were greater than the experimental results, some were less than the experimental results, and some showed very good agreement. The total energy deposited over the axial length of the targets was not compared for the lighter materials since it was not explicitly given with the experimental data.

  8. Determination of Electron and Ion Energy Distribution Functions in a Plasma Ion Assisted Deposition (PIAD) Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harhausen, J.; Foest, R.; Ohl, A.

    2011-10-01

    High performance optical coatings are commonly produced by PIAD in order to achieve comparably high deposition rates. Here, the plasma source is a hot cathode direct current discharge with an auxiliary magnetic field (APS). Its design is such to generate a population of fast ions to be released into the deposition chamber. A detailed understanding of the plasma properties in the chamber is mandatory to increase the level of uniformity and reproducibility of the deposition process. In order to determine the electron and ion energy distribution functions (EEDF, IEDF) the concepts of the Langmuir probe, the retarding field energy analyzer and optical emission spectroscopy are employed. Fundamental findings are that the EEDF can be described in the framework of the non-local approximation and that the degree of ionization inside the APS is close to unity. The shape of the IEDF and its evolution along the beam path can be described consistently by considering charge exchange reactions with the background neutral gas and the profile of the plasma potential. High performance optical coatings are commonly produced by PIAD in order to achieve comparably high deposition rates. Here, the plasma source is a hot cathode direct current discharge with an auxiliary magnetic field (APS). Its design is such to generate a population of fast ions to be released into the deposition chamber. A detailed understanding of the plasma properties in the chamber is mandatory to increase the level of uniformity and reproducibility of the deposition process. In order to determine the electron and ion energy distribution functions (EEDF, IEDF) the concepts of the Langmuir probe, the retarding field energy analyzer and optical emission spectroscopy are employed. Fundamental findings are that the EEDF can be described in the framework of the non-local approximation and that the degree of ionization inside the APS is close to unity. The shape of the IEDF and its evolution along the beam path can be

  9. Simulation of submarine gas hydrate deposits as a sustainable energy source and CO2 storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicki, G.; Hennig, T.; Schlüter, S.; Deerberg, G.

    2012-04-01

    Being aware that conventionally exploitable natural gas resources are limited, research concentrates on the development of new technologies for the extraction of methane from gas hydrate deposits in subsea sediments. The quantity of methane stored in hydrate form is considered to be a promising means to overcome future shortages in energy resources. In combination with storing carbon dioxide (CO2) as hydrates in the deposits chances for sustainable energy supply systems are given. The combustion of hydrate-based natural gas can contribute to the energy supply, but the coupled CO2 emissions cause climate change effects. At present, the possible options to capture and subsequently store CO2 (CCS-Technology) become of particular interest. To develop a sustainable hydrate-based energy supply system, the production of natural gas from hydrate deposits has to be coupled with the storage of CO2. Hence, the simultaneous storage of CO2 in hydrate deposits has to be developed. Decomposition of methane hydrate in combination with CO2 sequestration appears to be promising because CO2 hydrate is stable within a wider range of pressure and temperature than methane hydrate. As methane hydrate provides structural integrity and stability in its natural formation, incorporating CO2 hydrate as substitute for methane hydrate will help to preserve the natural sediments' stability. Regarding the technological implementation, many problems have to be overcome. Especially heat and mass transfer in the deposits are limiting factors causing very long process times. Within the scope of the German research project »SUGAR«, different technological approaches are evaluated and compared by means of dynamic system simulations and analysis. Detailed mathematical models for the most relevant chemical and physical effects are developed. The basic mechanisms of gas hydrate formation/dissociation and heat and mass transport in porous media are considered and implemented into simulation programs like

  10. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory?s Book of Minimum Detectable Activity for Direct Measurement of Internally Deposited Radionuclides in Radiation Workers

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, D P

    2008-10-08

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory maintains an in vivo measurement program designed to identify and evaluate the activity of radionuclides deposited in the body. Two types of systems are primarily used for the routine monitoring of radiation workers, the lung counting system and the scanning bed whole body counting system. The lung counting system is comprised of two Canberra ACTII detector sets. Each ACTII set contains two planar germanium detectors with carbon composite end windows optimized to measure low energy photon emitting radionuclides. The ACTII detectors are placed on the upper torso over the lungs for the direct measurement of internally deposited radionuclides in the lungs that emit low energy photons. A correction for the thickness of the chest wall is applied to the efficiency. Because the thickness of the chest wall is a key factor in the measurement of low energy photon emitting radionuclides in the lung, the minimum detectable activity is a function of the chest wall thickness. The scanning bed whole body counting system is comprised of a thin air mattress on top of a carbon fiber bed that slowly scans over four high purity germanium detectors. The scanning system is designed to minimize variations in detected activity due to radionuclide distribution in the body. The scanning bed detection system is typically used for the measurement of internally deposited radionuclides that emit photons above 100 to 200 keV. MDAs have been generated for radionuclides that provide energies above 80 keV since the lowest calibration energy for the system is approximately 86 keV. The following charts and table provide best determination of minimum detectable activity using human subjects as controls for the background contributions. A wide variety of radionuclides are used throughout the laboratory and the following pages represent several of the radionuclides that have been encountered at the Whole Body and Spectroscopy Laboratories within Hazards Control.

  11. Time Dependent DD Neutrons Measurement Using a Single Crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamond Detector on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Tengfei; Peng, Xingyu; Chen, Zhongjing; Hu, Zhimeng; Ge, Lijian; Hu, Liqun; Zhong, Guoqiang; Pu, Neng; Chen, Jinxiang; Fan, Tieshuan

    2016-09-01

    A single crystal chemical vapor deposition (scCVD) diamond detector has been successfully employed for neutron measurements in the EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) plasmas. The scCVD diamond detector coated with a 5 μm 6LiF (95% 6Li enriched) layer was placed inside a polyethylene moderator to enhance the detection efficiency. The time-dependent neutron emission from deuteron plasmas during neutral beam injection (NBI) heating was obtained. The measured results are compared with that of fission chamber detectors, which always act as standard neutron flux monitors. The scCVD diamond detector exhibits good reliability, stability and the capability to withstand harsh radiation environments despite its low detection efficiency due to the small active volume. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB106004 and 2012GB101003) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 91226102)

  12. Atmospheric dry deposition in the vicinity of the Salton Sea, California - II: Measurement and effects of an enhanced evaporation system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alonso, R.; Bytnerowicz, A.; Yee, J.L.; Boarman, W.I.

    2005-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of salt spray drift from pilot technologies employed by the US Bureau of Reclamation on deposition rates of various air-born ions. An enhanced evaporation system (EES) was tested in the field at the Salton Sea, California. Dry deposition of NO3-, NH4+, SO42-, Cl-, Ca2+, Na+, K+ and Se was assessed by using nylon filters and branches of natural vegetation exposed for one-week long periods. The simultaneous exposure of both lyophilized branches and branches of live plants offered important information highlighting the dynamics of deposited ions on vegetation. The EES significantly increased the deposition rates of Cl-, SO42- and Na+ in an area of about 639-1062 m surrounding the sprayers. Similarly, higher deposition of Ca 2+ and K+ caused by the EES was detected only when deposition was assessed using nylon filters or lyophilized branches. Deposition fluxes of NO3-, NH4+ and Se were not affected by the spraying system. Techniques for measuring dry deposition and calculating landscape-level depositional loads in non-forested systems need further development. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Energy deposition of heavy ions in the regime of strong beam-plasma correlations.

    PubMed

    Gericke, D O; Schlanges, M

    2003-03-01

    The energy loss of highly charged ions in dense plasmas is investigated. The applied model includes strong beam-plasma correlation via a quantum T-matrix treatment of the cross sections. Dynamic screening effects are modeled by using a Debye-like potential with a velocity dependent screening length that guarantees the known low and high beam velocity limits. It is shown that this phenomenological model is in good agreement with simulation data up to very high beam-plasma coupling. An analysis of the stopping process shows considerably longer ranges and a less localized energy deposition if strong coupling is treated properly.

  14. Front end energy deposition and collimation studies for IDS-NF

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C.; Neuffer, D.; Snopok, P.; /IIT, Chicago /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The function of the Neutrino Factory front end is to reduce the energy spread and size of the muon beam to a manageable level that will allow reasonable throughput to subsequent system components. Since the Neutrino Factory is a tertiary machine (protons to pions to muons), there is an issue of large background from the pion-producing target. The implications of energy deposition in the front end lattice for the Neutrino Factory are addressed. Several approaches to mitigating the effect are proposed and discussed, including proton absorbers, chicanes, beam collimation, and shielding.

  15. Energy deposition of heavy ions in the regime of strong beam-plasma correlations.

    PubMed

    Gericke, D O; Schlanges, M

    2003-03-01

    The energy loss of highly charged ions in dense plasmas is investigated. The applied model includes strong beam-plasma correlation via a quantum T-matrix treatment of the cross sections. Dynamic screening effects are modeled by using a Debye-like potential with a velocity dependent screening length that guarantees the known low and high beam velocity limits. It is shown that this phenomenological model is in good agreement with simulation data up to very high beam-plasma coupling. An analysis of the stopping process shows considerably longer ranges and a less localized energy deposition if strong coupling is treated properly. PMID:12689203

  16. Effect of magnetic field strength on deposition rate and energy flux in a dc magnetron sputtering system

    SciTech Connect

    Ekpe, Samuel D.; Jimenez, Francisco J.; Field, David J.; Davis, Martin J.; Dew, Steven K.

    2009-11-15

    Variations in the magnetic field strongly affect the plasma parameters in a magnetron sputtering system. This in turn affects the throughput as well as the energy flux to the substrate. The variation in the magnetic field in this study, for a dc magnetron process, is achieved by shifting the magnet assembly slightly away from the target. Measurements of the plasma parameters show that while the electron density at the substrate increases with decrease in magnetic field, the electron temperature decreases. The cooling of the electron temperature is consistent with results reported elsewhere. The deposition rate per input magnetron power is found to increase slightly with the decrease in magnetic field for the process conditions considered in this study. Results suggest that the energy flux to the substrate tends to show a general decrease with the shift in the magnet assembly.

  17. Monte Carlo calculations of energy deposition distributions of electrons below 20 keV in protein.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhenyu; Liu, Wei

    2014-05-01

    The distributions of energy depositions of electrons in semi-infinite bulk protein and the radial dose distributions of point-isotropic mono-energetic electron sources [i.e., the so-called dose point kernel (DPK)] in protein have been systematically calculated in the energy range below 20 keV, based on Monte Carlo methods. The ranges of electrons have been evaluated by extrapolating two calculated distributions, respectively, and the evaluated ranges of electrons are compared with the electron mean path length in protein which has been calculated by using electron inelastic cross sections described in this work in the continuous-slowing-down approximation. It has been found that for a given energy, the electron mean path length is smaller than the electron range evaluated from DPK, but it is large compared to the electron range obtained from the energy deposition distributions of electrons in semi-infinite bulk protein. The energy dependences of the extrapolated electron ranges based on the two investigated distributions are given, respectively, in a power-law form. In addition, the DPK in protein has also been compared with that in liquid water. An evident difference between the two DPKs is observed. The calculations presented in this work may be useful in studies of radiation effects on proteins.

  18. Low-Energy Plasma Spray (LEPS) Deposition of Hydroxyapatite/Poly-ɛ-Caprolactone Biocomposite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Alonso, Diana; Parco, Maria; Stokes, Joseph; Looney, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Thermal spraying is widely employed to deposit hydroxyapatite (HA) and HA-based biocomposites on hip and dental implants. For thick HA coatings (>150 μm), problems are generally associated with the build-up of residual stresses and lack of control of coating crystallinity. HA/polymer composite coatings are especially interesting to improve the pure HA coatings' mechanical properties. For instance, the polymer may help in releasing the residual stresses in the thick HA coatings. In addition, the selection of a bioresorbable polymer may enhance the coatings' biological behavior. However, there are major challenges associated with spraying ceramic and polymeric materials together because of their very different thermal properties. In this study, pure HA and HA/poly-ɛ-caprolactone (PCL) thick coatings were deposited without significant thermal degradation by low-energy plasma spraying (LEPS). PCL has never been processed by thermal spraying, and its processing is a major achievement of this study. The influence of selected process parameters on microstructure, composition, and mechanical properties of HA and HA/PCL coatings was studied using statistical design of experiments (DOE). The HA deposition rate was significantly increased by the addition of PCL. The average porosity of biocomposite coatings was slightly increased, while retaining or even improving in some cases their fracture toughness and microhardness. Surface roughness of biocomposites was enhanced compared with HA pure coatings. Cell culture experiments showed that murine osteoblast-like cells attach and proliferate well on HA/PCL biocomposite deposits.

  19. Dayside pickup oxygen ion precipitation at Venus and Mars - Spatial distributions, energy deposition and consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Kozyra, J. U.

    1991-04-01

    The fluxes and energy spectra of picked-up planetary O(+) ions incident on the dayside atmospheres of Venus and Mars are calculated. Maps of precipitating ion number flux and energy flux are presented which show the asymmetrical distribution of dayside energy deposition expected from this source. Although the associated heating of the atmosphere and ionosphere is found to be negligible compared to that from the usual sources, backscattered or sputtered neutral oxygen atoms are produced at energies which exceed that needed for escape from the gravitational fields of both planets. These neutral 'winds', driven by pickup ion precipitation, represent a possibly significant loss of atmospheric constituents over the age of the solar system.

  20. Atmospheric deposition of inorganic nitrogen in Spanish forests of Quercus ilex measured with ion-exchange resins and conventional collectors.

    PubMed

    García-Gomez, Héctor; Izquieta-Rojano, Sheila; Aguillaume, Laura; González-Fernández, Ignacio; Valiño, Fernando; Elustondo, David; Santamaría, Jesús M; Àvila, Anna; Fenn, Mark E; Alonso, Rocío

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen deposition is one of the main threats for biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Measurement techniques like ion-exchange resin collectors (IECs), which are less expensive and time-consuming than conventional methods, are gaining relevance in the study of atmospheric deposition and are recommended to expand monitoring networks. In the present work, bulk and throughfall deposition of inorganic nitrogen were monitored in three different holm oak forests in Spain during two years. The results obtained with IECs were contrasted with a conventional technique using bottle collectors and with a literature review of similar studies. The performance of IECs in comparison with the conventional method was good for measuring bulk deposition of nitrate and acceptable for ammonium and total dissolved inorganic nitrogen. Mean annual bulk deposition of inorganic nitrogen ranged 3.09-5.43 kg N ha(-1) according to IEC methodology, and 2.42-6.83 kg N ha(-1) y(-1) using the conventional method. Intra-annual variability of the net throughfall deposition of nitrogen measured with the conventional method revealed the existence of input pulses of nitrogen into the forest soil after dry periods, presumably originated from the washing of dry deposition accumulated in the canopy. Important methodological recommendations on the IEC method and discussed, compiled and summarized.

  1. Pressure distribution evaluation of different filling methods for deposition of powders in dies: Measurement and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayyar Roudsari, Saed

    The aim of this research was to measure, analyze, and model the pressure distribution characteristics of powder deposition into rectangular and circular shallow dies using four filling methods. The feed shoe, the rotational rainy, the point feed, and the pneumatic filling methods were used to investigate the deposition characteristics into shallow dies. In order to evaluate the pressure distribution during filling of shallow dies, factors influencing powder deposition were studied. The factors included particle size and shape, particle size distribution, feed shoe speed, and tube cross-section (in case of feed shoe filling) and deposition rates (in case of rotational rainy, point feed, and pneumatic filling). A battery powder mixture (BPM) and microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel PH102) with median size of 84 and 600mum, respectively, were used to fill a shallow rectangular die 32x30 mm and 6.5 mm deep and a shallow circular die 35 mm in diameter and 6.5 mm deep. The second generation of pressure deposition tester (PDT-II) with circular and square feed shoe tube cross-sections was used to measure the two powders' pressure distribution characteristics. An innovative rotational rainy filling device was designed and fabricated. This versatile device can be used to measure filling characteristics at different rotational speeds (1-10 rpm) for various powders. The point feed (funnel fill) method with a funnel of 30 mm inlet diameter and 4.2 mm outlet diameter opening was used to fill the rectangular and circular shallow dies. The pneumatic filling method was designed and fabricated to fill the die using air as the conveying medium in a rectangular cross-section tube. The pneumatic filling device was limited to using only the BPM powder, since the Avicel powder generated substantial quantity of airborne dust during the test. Symmetry analysis, variance metrics, and uniformity analysis were used to quantify the deposition characteristics. The results showed that: (1) filled

  2. Glasses and Liquids Low on the Energy Landscape Prepared by Physical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalal, Shakeel; Fakhraai, Zahra; Ediger, Mark

    2014-03-01

    The lower portions of the potential energy landscape for glass-forming materials such as polymers and small molecules were historically inaccessible by experiments. Physical vapor deposition is uniquely able to prepare materials in this portion of the energy landscape, with the properties of the deposited material primarily modulated by the substrate temperature. Here we report on high-throughput experiments which utilize a temperature gradient stage to enable rapid screening of vapor-deposited organic glasses. Using ellipsometry, we characterize a 100 K range of substrate temperatures in a single experiment, allowing us to rapidly determine the density, kinetic stability, fictive temperature and molecular orientation of these glasses. Their properties fall into three temperature regimes. At substrate temperatures as low as 0.97Tg, we prepare materials which are equivalent to the supercooled liquid produced by cooling the melt. Below 0.9Tg (1.16TK) the properties of materials are kinetically controlled and highly tunable. At intermediate substrate temperatures we are able to produce materials whose bulk properties match those expected for the equilibrium supercooled liquid, down to 1.16TK, but are structurally anisotropic.

  3. Measuring sediment deposition and accretion on anthropogenic marshland - Part I: Methodical evaluation and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Malte; Karius, Volker; Deicke, Matthias; von Eynatten, Hilmar

    2014-12-01

    The North Frisian Halligen (Northern Germany) are inhabited and highly anthropogenic modified coastal marshlands. Today a lack of knowledge about sedimentological parameters prevent for a predicated discussion on their adaptation capacity to recent and future sea-level changes. A combined field and laboratory method to calculate marshland accretion rates based on short-term (2010-2013) measurements of sediment depositions was developed. All studies were carried out at the marshlands of the Halligen Hooge, Langeness and Nordstrandischmoor. One litre LDPE bottles and small synthetic turf mats were used as simple but coast, time and quantity efficient sediment trap devices. Up to a deposition rate, of ≈ 2.0 kg/m2, both devices gained comparable results. Above this threshold the retention efficiency of the turf mats is decreasing compared to the LDPD bottles. The combined use of bottles and mats, especially when deposition rates are not exceeding the threshold, allows to (1) checking internal consistency of the data, (2) detecting outliers with respect to cattle- or man-made damage, and (3) estimating possible effects of post-storm sediment remobilization. To transfer sediment depositions into rates of vertical accretion, the bulk dry density as well as the organic matter concentration of the correspondent marsh soil was considered using data from shallow percussion cores. These parameters are different among all Halligen. Higher inundation frequencies cause lower soil organic matter concentrations, resulting in higher bulk dry densities (BDD) of the soil (Hooge 0.64 g/cm3, Langeness 0.67 g/cm3, Nordstrandischmoor 0.83 g/cm3). Autochthonous organic material (by source of the marshland vegetation) contributes by 9.0 ± 1.4 % (Hooge) to 21.4 ± 6.6 % (Nordstrandischmoor) to marshland accretion, for a correspondent time scale of 1915-2011. Average accretion rates (2010-2013) were calculated with 1.2 ± 0.8 mm/a for Langeness, 1.5 ± 0.9 mm/a for Hooge and 2.6 ± 0.9 mm

  4. Measurement of uranium series radionuclides in rock and groundwater at the Koongarra ore deposit, Australia, by gamma spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Yanase, Nobuyuki; Sekine, Keiichi

    1995-12-31

    Gamma spectrometry without any self-absorption correction was developed to measure low energy gamma rays emitted by uranium and actinium series radionuclides in rock samples and groundwater residues collected at the Koongarra ore deposit, Australia. Thin samples were prepared to minimize the self-absorption by uranium in the samples. The present method gave standard deviations of 0.9 to 18% for the measurements of concentrations of uranium and actinium series radionuclides. The concentrations of {sup 238}U, {sup 230}Th and {sup 235}U measured by gamma spectrometry were compared with those by alpha spectrometry that requires a complicated chemical separation procedure. The results obtained by both methods were in fairly good agreement, and it was found that the gamma spectrometry is applicable to rock and groundwater samples having uranium content sup to 8.1% (10{sup 3} B1/g) and 3 Bq/l of {sup 238}U, respectively. The detection limits were calculated to be of the order of 10{sup {minus}2} Bq/g for rock samples and 10{sup {minus}1} Bq/l for groundwater samples. The concentrations of uranium and actinium series radionuclides can be determined precisely in these samples using gamma spectrometry without any self-absorption correction.

  5. A comparison of dry deposition modeled from size distribution data and measured with a knife-edge surrogate surface

    SciTech Connect

    Seung-Muk Yi; Sofuoglu, S.C.; Holsen, T.M.

    1996-12-31

    This study, which was part of a multi-university AEOLOS investigation, involved an assessment of the spatial and temporal variations in the dry deposition fluxes and mass size distributions (MSDs) of total mass, crustal (aluminum and magnesium), and anthropogenic (lead and copper) metals over the southern basin of Lake Michigan. In general the average measured fluxes in Chicago were higher and more variable than fluxes measured away from Chicago. A multi-step modeling procedure that used measured atmospheric mass size distributions and modeled deposition velocities was used to calculate the dry deposition flux for comparison to the measured flux data. In general calculated fluxes were in good agreement with measured fluxes. Modeling results indicate that the majority of the flux (>98 %) was due to particles >6.5 {mu}m in size. 3 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Measurement of the cleavage energy of graphite

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen; Dai, Shuyang; Li, Xide; Yang, Jiarui; Srolovitz, David J.; Zheng, Quanshui

    2015-01-01

    The basal plane cleavage energy (CE) of graphite is a key material parameter for understanding many of the unusual properties of graphite, graphene and carbon nanotubes. Nonetheless, a wide range of values for the CE has been reported and no consensus has yet emerged. Here we report the first direct, accurate experimental measurement of the CE of graphite using a novel method based on the self-retraction phenomenon in graphite. The measured value, 0.37±0.01 J m−2 for the incommensurate state of bicrystal graphite, is nearly invariant with respect to temperature (22 °C≤T≤198 °C) and bicrystal twist angle, and insensitive to impurities from the atmosphere. The CE for the ideal ABAB graphite stacking, 0.39±0.02 J m−2, is calculated based on a combination of the measured CE and a theoretical calculation. These experimental measurements are also ideal for use in evaluating the efficacy of competing theoretical approaches. PMID:26314373

  7. In situ measurement of fixed charge evolution at silicon surfaces during atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Ling; Watt, Morgan R.; Strandwitz, Nicholas C.

    2015-02-09

    Interfacial fixed charge or interfacial dipoles are present at many semiconductor-dielectric interfaces and have important effects upon device behavior, yet the chemical origins of these electrostatic phenomena are not fully understood. We report the measurement of changes in Si channel conduction in situ during atomic layer deposition (ALD) of aluminum oxide using trimethylaluminum and water to probe changes in surface electrostatics. Current-voltage data were acquired continually before, during, and after the self-limiting chemical reactions that result in film growth. Our measurements indicated an increase in conductance on p-type samples with p{sup +} ohmic contacts and a decrease in conductance on analogous n-type samples. Further, p{sup +} contacted samples with n-type channels exhibited an increase in measured current and n{sup +} contacted p-type samples exhibited a decrease in current under applied voltage. Device physics simulations, where a fixed surface charge was parameterized on the channel surface, connect the surface charge to changes in current-voltage behavior. The simulations and analogous analytical relationships for near-surface conductance were used to explain the experimental results. Specifically, the changes in current-voltage behavior can be attributed to the formation of a fixed negative charge or the modification of a surface dipole upon chemisorption of trimethylaluminum. These measurements allow for the observation of fixed charge or dipole formation during ALD and provide further insight into the electrostatic behavior at semiconductor-dielectric interfaces during film nucleation.

  8. Calculation of the Frequency Distribution of the Energy Deposition in DNA Volumes by Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Cicinotta, Francis A.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation quality effects are largely determined by energy deposition in small volumes of characteristic sizes less than 10 nm representative of short-segments of DNA, the DNA nucleosome, or molecules initiating oxidative stress in the nucleus, mitochondria, or extra-cellular matrix. On this scale, qualitatively distinct types of molecular damage are possible for high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation such as heavy ions compared to low LET radiation. Unique types of DNA lesions or oxidative damages are the likely outcome of the energy deposition. The frequency distribution for energy imparted to 1-20 nm targets per unit dose or particle fluence is a useful descriptor and can be evaluated as a function of impact parameter from an ions track. In this work, the simulation of 1-Gy irradiation of a cubic volume of 5 micron by: 1) 450 (1)H(+) ions, 300 MeV; 2) 10 (12)C(6+) ions, 290 MeV/amu and 3) (56)Fe(26+) ions, 1000 MeV/amu was done with the Monte-Carlo simulation code RITRACKS. Cylindrical targets are generated in the irradiated volume, with random orientation. The frequency distribution curves of the energy deposited in the targets is obtained. For small targets (i.e. <25 nm size), the probability of an ion to hit a target is very small; therefore a large number of tracks and targets as well as a large number of histories are necessary to obtain statistically significant results. This simulation is very time-consuming and is difficult to perform by using the original version of RITRACKS. Consequently, the code RITRACKS was adapted to use multiple CPU on a workstation or on a computer cluster. To validate the simulation results, similar calculations were performed using targets with fixed position and orientation, for which experimental data are available [5]. Since the probability of single- and double-strand breaks in DNA as function of energy deposited is well know, the results that were obtained can be used to estimate the yield of DSB, and can be extended

  9. Differential heating: A versatile method for thermal conductivity measurements in high-energy-density matter

    SciTech Connect

    Ping, Y.; Fernandez-Panella, A.; Correa, A.; Shepherd, R.; Landen, O.; London, R. A.; Sterne, P. A.; Whitley, H. D.; Fratanduono, D.; Collins, G. W.; Sio, H.; Boehly, T. R.

    2015-09-15

    We propose a method for thermal conductivity measurements of high energy density matter based on differential heating. A temperature gradient is created either by surface heating of one material or at an interface between two materials by different energy deposition. The subsequent heat conduction across the temperature gradient is observed by various time-resolved probing techniques. Conceptual designs of such measurements using laser heating, proton heating, and x-ray heating are presented. The sensitivity of the measurements to thermal conductivity is confirmed by simulations.

  10. Differential heating: A versatile method for thermal conductivity measurements in high-energy-density matter

    SciTech Connect

    Ping, Y.; Fernandez-Panella, A.; Sio, H.; Correa, A.; Shepherd, R.; Landen, O.; London, R. A.; Sterne, P. A.; Whitley, H. D.; Fratanduono, D.; Boehly, T. R.; Collins, G. W.

    2015-09-04

    We propose a method for thermal conductivity measurements of high energy density matter based on differential heating. A temperature gradient is created either by surface heating of one material or at an interface between two materials by different energy deposition. The subsequent heat conduction across the temperature gradient is observed by various time-resolved probing techniques. Conceptual designs of such measurements using laser heating, proton heating, and x-ray heating are presented. As a result, the sensitivity of the measurements to thermal conductivity is confirmed by simulations.

  11. Magnetic field effects on the energy deposition spectra of MV photon radiation.

    PubMed

    Kirkby, C; Stanescu, T; Fallone, B G

    2009-01-21

    Several groups worldwide have proposed various concepts for improving megavoltage (MV) radiotherapy that involve irradiating patients in the presence of a magnetic field-either for image guidance in the case of hybrid radiotherapy-MRI machines or for purposes of introducing tighter control over dose distributions. The presence of a magnetic field alters the trajectory of charged particles between interactions with the medium and thus has the potential to alter energy deposition patterns within a sub-cellular target volume. In this work, we use the MC radiation transport code PENELOPE with appropriate algorithms invoked to incorporate magnetic field deflections to investigate electron energy fluence in the presence of a uniform magnetic field and the energy deposition spectra within a 10 microm water sphere as a function of magnetic field strength. The simulations suggest only very minor changes to the electron fluence even for extremely strong magnetic fields. Further, calculations of the dose-averaged lineal energy indicate that a magnetic field strength of at least 70 T is required before beam quality will change by more than 2%.

  12. Ablation of atheroma by laser energy: a comparative study of the efficacy of different temporal rates of energy deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsay, Donald J.; Walker, Philip J.; Dadswell, Nicola G.; May, James; Piper, James A.; Wacher, Christine

    1990-06-01

    Laser angioplasty continues to attract interest as a potential method for treating atherosclerotic arterial disease. Current efforts are aimed at finding the most effective combination of laser and delivery system. High energy pulsed ultraviolet or infrared lasers demonstrate good photoablative properties but there remain practical difficulties with the optical fibre delivery. Continuous wave lasers are widely used in conjunction with "hot-tip" fibres for thermal ablation but their direct (optical) ablation efficiency is low, causing significant surrounding thermal damage in soft tissue. While considerable attention has been directed previously at the ablative effects for different laser wavelengths, little systematic study has been made of the efficacy for different temporal rates of energy deposition. We have compared the efficacy for tissue ablation in cadaveric human aorta of three different laser systems with similar wavelengths in the visible (green) but different temporal rates of energy deposition. The laser sources were the continuous wave argon ion laser (514.5 nm), the high pulse energy, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) and the copper vapour laser. The copper vapour laser is a high repetition rate, high average power, pulsed laser emitting in the green (511 nm) and yellow (578 nm) which has temporal characteristics intermediate between those of the Nd:YAG laser and the argon ion laser, and has the potential to be effective both for direct optical ablation and hot-tip thermal ablation.

  13. Measurements of Dry Deposition of S and N Compounds on Natural Surfaces (leaves)and Their Parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, A.; Kumari, K. M.; Srivastava, S. S.

    2001-12-01

    "Measurement of Dry Deposition of S and N Compounds on Natural Surfaces (leaves) and Their Parameterization" Ranjit Kumar, Abha Rani, K. Maharaj Kumari and S.S. Srivasta* Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Dayalbagh Educational Institute, Daylabgh, Agra-282005 (INDIA), E-mail: sssdei@yahoo.com ABSTRACT Promotion of rapid economic growth and urbanization have led to the increasing emissions of acidifying sulphur and nitrogen compounds in the atmosphere which are most potent for injury to vegetation, deterioration of monuments and acidifications of lakes, soils. Dry deposition appears to be an important process by which, air pollutants can be delivered to sensitive surfaces in the form of gases or particulates from the atmosphere as dry conditions prevail for maximum period in this geographical region. The studies reported for deposition of acidifying sulphur and nitrogen compounds on natural surfaces are limited and none from India. Direct measurement of dry deposition on natural surfaces is lacking. This paper deals with measurements of rate of dry deposition of S as sulphate and N as nitrate on natural surfaces (Ashok and Cassia leaves) at Dayalbagh, Agra in India and estimate the total input of S and N compounds. The mean annual dry deposition rate of SO4 and NO3 on Ashok leaf was found to be 1.07± 0.64 mg m-2 d-1 and 0.76± 0.58 mg m-2 d-1 while on Cassia leaf values were found to be 1.11 ±0.75 and 0.81 ± 0.56 mg m-2 d-1. The deposition of SO4 includes both the deposition due to gaseous SO2 and particulate SO42- while deposition of NO3 include deposition contributed by HNO3 vapor and particulate NO3-. The high deposition rates on Cassia leaf may be due to large number of leaf hairs and stomatal pores on leaf surface as compared to Ashok leaf as observed by Scanning Electron Microscopic photographs. The dry deposition rates for SO4 and NO3 were highest during the monsoon followed by winter and summer. The annual input of S was found to be 3.89 kg

  14. Correlation between energy deposition and molecular damage from Auger electrons: A case study of ultra-low energy (5–18 eV) electron interactions with DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Rezaee, Mohammad Hunting, Darel J.; Sanche, Léon

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The present study introduces a new method to establish a direct correlation between biologically related physical parameters (i.e., stopping and damaging cross sections, respectively) for an Auger-electron emitting radionuclide decaying within a target molecule (e.g., DNA), so as to evaluate the efficacy of the radionuclide at the molecular level. These parameters can be applied to the dosimetry of Auger electrons and the quantification of their biological effects, which are the main criteria to assess the therapeutic efficacy of Auger-electron emitting radionuclides. Methods: Absorbed dose and stopping cross section for the Auger electrons of 5–18 eV emitted by{sup 125}I within DNA were determined by developing a nanodosimetric model. The molecular damages induced by these Auger electrons were investigated by measuring damaging cross section, including that for the formation of DNA single- and double-strand breaks. Nanoscale films of pure plasmid DNA were prepared via the freeze-drying technique and subsequently irradiated with low-energy electrons at various fluences. The damaging cross sections were determined by employing a molecular survival model to the measured exposure–response curves for induction of DNA strand breaks. Results: For a single decay of{sup 125}I within DNA, the Auger electrons of 5–18 eV deposit the energies of 12.1 and 9.1 eV within a 4.2-nm{sup 3} volume of a hydrated or dry DNA, which results in the absorbed doses of 270 and 210 kGy, respectively. DNA bases have a major contribution to the deposited energies. Ten-electronvolt and high linear energy transfer 100-eV electrons have a similar cross section for the formation of DNA double-strand break, while 100-eV electrons are twice as efficient as 10 eV in the induction of single-strand break. Conclusions: Ultra-low-energy electrons (<18 eV) substantially contribute to the absorbed dose and to the molecular damage from Auger-electron emitting radionuclides; hence, they should

  15. Studies of Niobium Thin Film Produced by Energetic Vacuum Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Genfa Wu; Anne-Marie Valente; H. Phillips; Haipeng Wang; Andy Wu; T. J. Renk; P Provencio

    2004-05-01

    An energetic vacuum deposition system has been used to study deposition energy effects on the properties of niobium thin films on copper and sapphire substrates. The absence of working gas avoids the gaseous inclusions commonly seen with sputtering deposition. A biased substrate holder controls the deposition energy. Transition temperature and residual resistivity ratio of the niobium thin films at several deposition energies are obtained together with surface morphology and crystal orientation measurements by AFM inspection, XRD and TEM analysis. The results show that niobium thin films on sapphire substrate exhibit the best cryogenic properties at deposition energy around 123 eV. The TEM analysis revealed that epitaxial growth of film was evident when deposition energy reaches 163 eV for sapphire substrate. Similarly, niobium thin film on copper substrate shows that film grows more oriented with higher deposition energy and grain size reaches the scale of the film thickness at the deposition energy around 153 eV.

  16. Interpretation of thermoreflectance measurements with a two-temperature model including non-surface heat deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regner, K. T.; Wei, L. C.; Malen, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    We develop a solution to the two-temperature diffusion equation in axisymmetric cylindrical coordinates to model heat transport in thermoreflectance experiments. Our solution builds upon prior solutions that account for two-channel diffusion in each layer of an N-layered geometry, but adds the ability to deposit heat at any location within each layer. We use this solution to account for non-surface heating in the transducer layer of thermoreflectance experiments that challenge the timescales of electron-phonon coupling. A sensitivity analysis is performed to identify important parameters in the solution and to establish a guideline for when to use the two-temperature model to interpret thermoreflectance data. We then fit broadband frequency domain thermoreflectance (BB-FDTR) measurements of SiO2 and platinum at a temperature of 300 K with our two-temperature solution to parameterize the gold/chromium transducer layer. We then refit BB-FDTR measurements of silicon and find that accounting for non-equilibrium between electrons and phonons in the gold layer does lessen the previously observed heating frequency dependence reported in Regner et al. [Nat. Commun. 4, 1640 (2013)] but does not completely eliminate it. We perform BB-FDTR experiments on silicon with an aluminum transducer and find limited heating frequency dependence, in agreement with time domain thermoreflectance results. We hypothesize that the discrepancy between thermoreflectance measurements with different transducers results in part from spectrally dependent phonon transmission at the transducer/silicon interface.

  17. Interpretation of thermoreflectance measurements with a two-temperature model including non-surface heat deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Regner, K. T.; Wei, L. C.; Malen, J. A.

    2015-12-21

    We develop a solution to the two-temperature diffusion equation in axisymmetric cylindrical coordinates to model heat transport in thermoreflectance experiments. Our solution builds upon prior solutions that account for two-channel diffusion in each layer of an N-layered geometry, but adds the ability to deposit heat at any location within each layer. We use this solution to account for non-surface heating in the transducer layer of thermoreflectance experiments that challenge the timescales of electron-phonon coupling. A sensitivity analysis is performed to identify important parameters in the solution and to establish a guideline for when to use the two-temperature model to interpret thermoreflectance data. We then fit broadband frequency domain thermoreflectance (BB-FDTR) measurements of SiO{sub 2} and platinum at a temperature of 300 K with our two-temperature solution to parameterize the gold/chromium transducer layer. We then refit BB-FDTR measurements of silicon and find that accounting for non-equilibrium between electrons and phonons in the gold layer does lessen the previously observed heating frequency dependence reported in Regner et al. [Nat. Commun. 4, 1640 (2013)] but does not completely eliminate it. We perform BB-FDTR experiments on silicon with an aluminum transducer and find limited heating frequency dependence, in agreement with time domain thermoreflectance results. We hypothesize that the discrepancy between thermoreflectance measurements with different transducers results in part from spectrally dependent phonon transmission at the transducer/silicon interface.

  18. Hydrodynamic planetary thermosphere model: 2. Coupling of an electron transport/energy deposition model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Feng; Solomon, Stanley C.; Qian, Liying; Lei, Jiuhou; Roble, Raymond G.

    2008-07-01

    An electron transport/energy deposition model is expanded to include atomic nitrogen and is coupled with a 1-D hydrodynamic thermosphere model. The coupled model is used to investigate the response of the Earth's thermosphere under extreme solar EUV conditions and is compared with previous studies. It is found that (1) the parameterization of Swartz and Nisbet (1972) underestimates the ambient electron heating by photoelectrons significantly in the upper thermosphere of the Earth under conditions with greater than 3 times the present solar EUV irradiance; (2) the transition of the Earth's thermosphere from a hydrostatic equilibrium regime to a hydrodynamic regime occurs at a smaller solar EUV flux condition when enhanced, more realistic, and self-consistent, ambient electron heating by photoelectrons is accounted for; (3) atomic nitrogen becomes the dominant neutral species in the upper thermosphere (competing against atomic oxygen) under extreme solar EUV conditions, and the electron impact processes of atomic nitrogen are important for both the chemistry and energetics in the corresponding thermosphere/ionosphere; (4) N+ remains a minor ion compared to O+, even when atomic nitrogen dominates the exobase; and (5) adiabatic cooling does not play an important role in electron gas energy budget. These findings highlight the importance of an electron transport/energy deposition model when investigating the thermosphere and ionosphere of terrestrial planets in their early evolutionary stages.

  19. Laboratory Measurements and Model Sensitivity Studies of Dust Deposition Ice Nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Fan, Jiwen; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Liu, Xiaohong; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail

    2012-08-16

    We investigated the ice nucleating properties of mineral dust particles to understand the sensitivity of simulated cloud properties to two different representations of contact angle in the Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT). These contact angle representations are based on two sets of laboratory deposition ice nucleation measurements: Arizona Test Dust (ATD) particles of 100, 300 and 500 nm sizes were tested at three different temperatures (-25, -30 and -35 C), and 400 nm ATD and kaolinite dust species were tested at two different temperatures (-30 and -35 C). These measurements were used to derive the onset relative humidity with respect to ice (RH{sub ice}) required to activate 1% of dust particles as ice nuclei, from which the onset single contact angles were then calculated based on CNT. For the probability density function (PDF) representation, parameters of the log-normal contact angle distribution were determined by fitting CNT-predicted activated fraction to the measurements at different RH{sub ice}. Results show that onset single contact angles vary from {approx}18 to 24 degrees, while the PDF parameters are sensitive to the measurement conditions (i.e. temperature and dust size). Cloud modeling simulations were performed to understand the sensitivity of cloud properties (i.e. ice number concentration, ice water content, and cloud initiation times) to the representation of contact angle and PDF distribution parameters. The model simulations show that cloud properties are sensitive to onset single contact angles and PDF distribution parameters. The comparison of our experimental results with other studies shows that under similar measurement conditions the onset single contact angles are consistent within {+-}2.0 degrees, while our derived PDF parameters have larger discrepancies.

  20. Which measurement strategies to improve spatial erosion and deposition patterns modelling?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineux, Nathalie; Maugnard, Alexandre; Swerts, Gilles; Bielders, Charles; Degré, Aurore

    2014-05-01

    Validation of the erosion models requires field data. To date, many authors continue to highlight the paucity of accurate field observations and long-term enough studies. The fields observations are often put aside because these measures are difficult to obtain: weighty experimental devices, climatic dependence, … Hence the models are evolving and propose refined calculation procedures including for instance the calculation of landscape evolution. The need of field data therefore increases and new measuring strategies should arise. In the centre of Belgium we choose an agricultural watershed quite representative of the local context. It covers 124 ha of loamy soil with more than 90% of arable land and a weak proportion of forest and artificial lands. The slope ranges between 0 and 9%. Instrumentation on the watershed includes meteorological observations and discharge measurement coupled with water sampling at different outlets. The weather data (radiation, temperature, wind velocity, relative humidity and rainfall) and discharge measurement (comparison between Doppler and pressure sensors) will allow us to model the hydrological behaviour of the catchment. Rainfall readings (tipping buckets) are completed with erosivity readings (disdrometer). Erosivity, together with soil data, land use and agricultural practices observations on field, will be used as entry in the Landsoil model. The sediment samplings at 3 points in the catchment will give an insight of the sediment delivery of 3 subcatchments. The Landsoil model calculates the evolution of the DTM through time. This cannot be compared to measurements at the outlet and requires further data collection. Older elevation data and/or archaeological data are a possible source of information even if their precision remains scarce in our context. 1950's soil surveys are on the contrary really informative since they detail the horizons depth in a spatial way and can be compared to new observation across the watershed

  1. Role of suprathermal electrons during nanosecond laser energy deposit in fused silica

    SciTech Connect

    Grua, P.; Hébert, D.; Lamaignère, L.; Rullier, J.-L.

    2014-08-25

    An accurate description of interaction between a nanosecond laser pulse and a wide band gap dielectric, such as fused silica, requires the understanding of energy deposit induced by temperature changes occurring in the material. In order to identify the fundamental processes involved in laser-matter interaction, we have used a 1D computational model that allows us to describe a wide set of physical mechanisms and intended for comparison with specially designed “1D experiments.” We have pointed out that suprathermal electrons are very likely implicated in heat conduction, and this assumption has allowed the model to reproduce the experiments.

  2. PIV analysis of the homogeneity of energy deposition during development of a plasma actuator channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazyrin, F. N.; Znamenskaya, I. A.; Mursenkova, I. V.; Naumov, D. S.; Sysoev, N. N.

    2016-01-01

    Nonstationary velocity fields that arise during the development of flows behind shock (blast) waves initiated by pulsed surface sliding discharge in air at a pressure of (2-4) × 104 Pa have been experimentally studied by the particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique. Plasma sheets (nanosecond discharges slipping over a dielectric surface) were initiated on walls of a rectangular chamber. Spatial analysis of the shape of shock-wave fronts and the distribution of flow velocities behind these waves showed that the pulsed energy deposition is homogeneous along discharge channels of a plasma sheet, while the integral visible plasma glow intensity decreases in the direction of channel propagation.

  3. HUBBLE PARAMETER MEASUREMENT CONSTRAINTS ON DARK ENERGY

    SciTech Connect

    Farooq, Omer; Mania, Data; Ratra, Bharat E-mail: mania@phys.ksu.edu

    2013-02-20

    We use 21 Hubble parameter versus redshift data points from Simon et al., Gaztanaga et al., Stern et al., and Moresco et al. to place constraints on model parameters of constant and time-evolving dark energy cosmologies. The inclusion of the eight new measurements results in H(z) constraints more restrictive than those derived by Chen and Ratra. These constraints are now almost as restrictive as those that follow from current Type Ia supernova (SNIa) apparent magnitude versus redshift data, which now more carefully account for systematic uncertainties. This is a remarkable result. We emphasize, however, that SNIa data have been studied for a longer time than the H(z) data, possibly resulting in a better estimate of potential systematic errors in the SNIa case. A joint analysis of the H(z), baryon acoustic oscillation peak length scale, and SNIa data favors a spatially flat cosmological model currently dominated by a time-independent cosmological constant but does not exclude slowly evolving dark energy.

  4. Sensing for directed energy deposition and powder bed fusion additive manufacturing at Penn State University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassar, Abdalla R.; Reutzel, Edward W.; Brown, Stephen W.; Morgan, John P.; Morgan, Jacob P.; Natale, Donald J.; Tutwiler, Rick L.; Feck, David P.; Banks, Jeffery C.

    2016-04-01

    Additive manufacturing of metal components through directed energy deposition or powder bed fusion is a complex undertaking, often involving hundreds or thousands of individual laser deposits. During processing, conditions may fluctuate, e.g. material feed rate, beam power, surrounding gas composition, local and global temperature, build geometry, etc., leading to unintended variations in final part geometry, microstructure and properties. To assess or control as-deposited quality, researchers have used a variety of methods, including those based on sensing of melt pool and plume emission characteristics, characteristics of powder application, and layer-wise imaging. Here, a summary of ongoing process monitoring activities at Penn State is provided, along with a discussion of recent advancements in the area of layer-wise image acquisition and analysis during powder bed fusion processing. Specifically, methods that enable direct comparisons of CAD model, build images, and 3D micro-tomographic scan data will be covered, along with thoughts on how such analyses can be related to overall process quality.

  5. Evaluation of the mean energy deposit during the impact of charged particles on liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, M. A.

    2012-04-01

    The DNA strand break yield due to the impact of ionizing particles on living beings is closely related to the number of inelastic events per unit absorbed dose produced by these particles. The higher this number, the higher the probability of causing DNA strand breaks per unit absorbed dose. In a previous work, it was found that the total number of events produced by primary particles and the secondary electrons is almost independent of the type and energy of the incident particle (or LET). This finding could be supported by a quasi-constant mean energy deposit by inelastic event (\\bar{\\varepsilon }). In this work, \\bar{\\varepsilon } was defined and determined for electrons and the non-negative charge states of hydrogen (H0, +) and helium (He0, +, 2 +) species impacting on liquid water. Ionization, excitation and charge transfer (up to two-electron transfers) processes have been included in present calculations. We found that, for liquid water, \\bar{\\varepsilon } is within 13.7 ± 4.1 eV, 14.2 ± 1.7 eV and 13.8 ± 1.4 eV for electrons, hydrogen and helium species, respectively, with impact energies changing over three orders of magnitude. Unlike the mean excitation energy, the mean energy deposit per inelastic event depends not only on the target molecule but also on the projectile features. However, this dependence is relatively weak. This fact supports the quasi-independent number of inelastic events per unit absorbed dose found previously when charged particles impact on matter.

  6. High voltage electrophoretic deposition for electrochemical energy storage and other applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhanagopalan, Sunand

    High voltage electrophoretic deposition (HVEPD) has been developed as a novel technique to obtain vertically aligned forests of one-dimensional nanomaterials for efficient energy storage. The ability to control and manipulate nanomaterials is critical for their effective usage in a variety of applications. Oriented structures of one-dimensional nanomaterials provide a unique opportunity to take full advantage of their excellent mechanical and electrochemical properties. However, it is still a significant challenge to obtain such oriented structures with great process flexibility, ease of processing under mild conditions and the capability to scale up, especially in context of efficient device fabrication and system packaging. This work presents HVEPD as a simple, versatile and generic technique to obtain vertically aligned forests of different one-dimensional nanomaterials on flexible, transparent and scalable substrates. Improvements on material chemistry and reduction of contact resistance have enabled the fabrication of high power supercapacitor electrodes using the HVEPD method. The investigations have also paved the way for further enhancements of performance by employing hybrid material systems and AC/DC pulsed deposition. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were used as the starting material to demonstrate the HVEPD technique. A comprehensive study of the key parameters was conducted to better understand the working mechanism of the HVEPD process. It has been confirmed that HVEPD was enabled by three key factors: high deposition voltage for alignment, low dispersion concentration to avoid aggregation and simultaneous formation of holding layer by electrodeposition for reinforcement of nanoforests. A set of suitable parameters were found to obtain vertically aligned forests of MWCNTs. Compared with their randomly oriented counterparts, the aligned MWCNT forests showed better electrochemical performance, lower electrical resistance and a capability to

  7. Reactive ballistic deposition of nanostructured model materials for electrochemical energy conversion and storage.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, David W; Hahn, Nathan T; May, R Alan; Berglund, Sean P; Lin, Yong-Mao; Stevenson, Keith J; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Kay, Bruce D; Mullins, C Buddie

    2012-03-20

    Porous, high surface area materials have critical roles in applications including catalysis, photochemistry, and energy storage. In these fields, researchers have demonstrated that the nanometer-scale structure modifies mechanical, optical, and electrical properties of the material, greatly influencing its behavior and performance. Such complex chemical systems can involve several distinct processes occurring in series or parallel. Understanding the influence of size and structure on the properties of these materials requires techniques for producing clean, simple model systems. In the fields of photoelectrochemistry and lithium storage, for example, researchers need to evaluate the effects of changing the electrode structure of a single material or producing electrodes of many different candidate materials while maintaining a distinctly favorable morphology. In this Account, we introduce our studies of the formation and characterization of high surface area, porous thin films synthesized by a process called reactive ballistic deposition (RBD). RBD is a simple method that provides control of the morphology, porosity, and surface area of thin films by manipulating the angle at which a metal-vapor flux impinges on the substrate during deposition. This approach is largely independent of the identity of the deposited material and relies upon limited surface diffusion during synthesis, which enables the formation of kinetically trapped structures. Here, we review our results for the deposition of films from a number of semiconductive materials that are important for applications such as photoelectrochemical water oxidation and lithium ion storage. The use of RBD has enabled us to systematically control individual aspects of both the structure and composition of thin film electrodes in order to probe the effects of each on the performance of the material. We have evaluated the performance of several materials for potential use in these applications and have identified

  8. Reactive ballistic deposition of nanostructured model materials for electrochemical energy conversion and storage.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, David W; Hahn, Nathan T; May, R Alan; Berglund, Sean P; Lin, Yong-Mao; Stevenson, Keith J; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Kay, Bruce D; Mullins, C Buddie

    2012-03-20

    Porous, high surface area materials have critical roles in applications including catalysis, photochemistry, and energy storage. In these fields, researchers have demonstrated that the nanometer-scale structure modifies mechanical, optical, and electrical properties of the material, greatly influencing its behavior and performance. Such complex chemical systems can involve several distinct processes occurring in series or parallel. Understanding the influence of size and structure on the properties of these materials requires techniques for producing clean, simple model systems. In the fields of photoelectrochemistry and lithium storage, for example, researchers need to evaluate the effects of changing the electrode structure of a single material or producing electrodes of many different candidate materials while maintaining a distinctly favorable morphology. In this Account, we introduce our studies of the formation and characterization of high surface area, porous thin films synthesized by a process called reactive ballistic deposition (RBD). RBD is a simple method that provides control of the morphology, porosity, and surface area of thin films by manipulating the angle at which a metal-vapor flux impinges on the substrate during deposition. This approach is largely independent of the identity of the deposited material and relies upon limited surface diffusion during synthesis, which enables the formation of kinetically trapped structures. Here, we review our results for the deposition of films from a number of semiconductive materials that are important for applications such as photoelectrochemical water oxidation and lithium ion storage. The use of RBD has enabled us to systematically control individual aspects of both the structure and composition of thin film electrodes in order to probe the effects of each on the performance of the material. We have evaluated the performance of several materials for potential use in these applications and have identified

  9. Monte Carlo simulation of energy-deposit clustering for ions of the same LET in liquid water.

    PubMed

    Francis, Z; Incerti, S; Ivanchenko, V; Champion, C; Karamitros, M; Bernal, M A; El Bitar, Z

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a Monte Carlo study of energy depositions due to protons, alpha particles and carbon ions of the same linear-energy-transfer (LET) in liquid water. The corresponding track structures were generated using the Geant4-DNA toolkit, and the energy deposition spatial distributions were analyzed using an adapted version of the DBSCAN clustering algorithm. Combining the Geant4 simulations and the clustering algorithm it was possible to compare the quality of the different radiation types. The ratios of clustered and single energy depositions are shown versus particle LET and frequency-mean lineal energies. The estimated effect of these types of radiation on biological tissues is then discussed by comparing the results obtained for different particles with the same LET.

  10. REFLEX: An energy deposition code that models the effects of electron reflection during electron beam heating tests

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, C.A. IV; Croessmann, C.D.; Whitley, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes an energy coupling model that considers electron reflection losses during electron beam heating experiments. This model is embodied on the REFLEX computer code, written in standard FORTRAN 77. REFLEX currently models energy deposition phenomena in three different sample geometries. These configurations include flat, cylindrical shell, and hemispherical shell surfaces. Given the electron beam operating parameters, REFLEX calculates the heat flux profile over a sample's surface, the total amount of energy deposited into a sample, and the percentage of the electron beam energy that is transferred to a sample. This document describes the energy deposition equations used in the REFLEX code; the program is described and detailed instructions are given regarding the input. Results are given for each geometry and possible experimental applications are presented. 3 refs., 20 figs., 11 tabs.

  11. REFLEX: An energy deposition code that models the effects of electron reflection during electron beam heating tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, C. A., IV; Croessmann, C. D.; Whitley, J. B.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes an energy coupling model that considers electron reflection losses during electron beam heating experiments. This model is embodied on the REFLEX computer code, written in standard FORTRAN 77. REFLEX currently models energy deposition phenomena in three different sample geometries. These configurations include flat, cylindrical shell, and hemispherical shell surfaces. Given the electron beam operating parameters, REFLEX calculates the heat flux profile over a sample's surface, the total amount of energy deposited into a sample, and the percentage of the electron beam energy that is transferred to a sample. This document describes the energy deposition equations used in the REFLEX code; the program is described and detailed instructions are given regarding the input. Results are given for each geometry and possible experimental applications are presented.

  12. Measuring energy efficiency in economics: Shadow value approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khademvatani, Asgar

    For decades, academic scholars and policy makers have commonly applied a simple average measure, energy intensity, for studying energy efficiency. In contrast, we introduce a distinctive marginal measure called energy shadow value (SV) for modeling energy efficiency drawn on economic theory. This thesis demonstrates energy SV advantages, conceptually and empirically, over the average measure recognizing marginal technical energy efficiency and unveiling allocative energy efficiency (energy SV to energy price). Using a dual profit function, the study illustrates how treating energy as quasi-fixed factor called quasi-fixed approach offers modeling advantages and is appropriate in developing an explicit model for energy efficiency. We address fallacies and misleading results using average measure and demonstrate energy SV advantage in inter- and intra-country energy efficiency comparison. Energy efficiency dynamics and determination of efficient allocation of energy use are shown through factors impacting energy SV: capital, technology, and environmental obligations. To validate the energy SV, we applied a dual restricted cost model using KLEM dataset for the 35 US sectors stretching from 1958 to 2000 and selected a sample of the four sectors. Following the empirical results, predicted wedges between energy price and the SV growth indicate a misallocation of energy use in stone, clay and glass (SCG) and communications (Com) sectors with more evidence in the SCG compared to the Com sector, showing overshoot in energy use relative to optimal paths and cost increases from sub-optimal energy use. The results show that energy productivity is a measure of technical efficiency and is void of information on the economic efficiency of energy use. Decomposing energy SV reveals that energy, capital and technology played key roles in energy SV increases helping to consider and analyze policy implications of energy efficiency improvement. Applying the marginal measure, we also

  13. Automated video-microscopic imaging and data acquisition system for colloid deposition measurements

    DOEpatents

    Abdel-Fattah, Amr I.; Reimus, Paul W.

    2004-12-28

    A video microscopic visualization system and image processing and data extraction and processing method for in situ detailed quantification of the deposition of sub-micrometer particles onto an arbitrary surface and determination of their concentration across the bulk suspension. The extracted data includes (a) surface concentration and flux of deposited, attached and detached colloids, (b) surface concentration and flux of arriving and departing colloids, (c) distribution of colloids in the bulk suspension in the direction perpendicular to the deposition surface, and (d) spatial and temporal distributions of deposited colloids.

  14. Continuous measurements of H2 and CO deposition onto soil: a laboratory soil chamber experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, P.; Eiler, J.; Smith, N. V.; Thrift-Viveros, D. L.

    2004-12-01

    Hydrogen uptake in soil is the largest single component of the global budget of atmospheric H2, and is the most important parameter for predicting changes in atmospheric concentration with future changing sources (anthropogenic and otherwise). The rate of hydrogen uptake rate by soil is highly uncertain [1]. As a component of the global budget, it is simply estimated as the difference among estimates for other recognized sources and sinks, assuming the atmosphere is presently in steady state. Previous field chamber experiments [2] show that H2 deposition velocity varies complexly with soil moisture level, and possibly with soil organic content and temperature. We present here results of controlled soil chamber experiments on 3 different soil blocks (each ~20 x ~20 x ~21 cm) with a controlled range of moisture contents. All three soils are arid to semi arid, fine grained, and have organic contents of 10-15%. A positive air pressure (slightly higher than atmospheric pressure) and constant temperature and relative humidity was maintained inside the 10.7 liter, leak-tight plexiglass chamber, and a stream of synthetic air with known H2 concentration was continuously bled into the chamber through a needle valve and mass flow meter. H2, CO and CO2 concentrations were continuously analyzed in the stream of gas exiting the chamber, using a TA 3000 automated Hg-HgO reduced gas analyzer and a LI-820 CO2 gas analyzer. Our experimental protocol involved waiting until concentrations of analyte gases in the exiting gas stream reached a steady state, and documenting how that steady state varied with various soil properties and the rate at which gases were delivered to the chamber. The rate constants for H2 and CO consumption in the chamber were measured at several soil moisture contents. The calculated deposition velocities of H2 and CO into the soil are positively correlated with steady-state concentrations, with slopes and curvatures that vary with soil type and moisture level

  15. Deposition of mass-selected clusters studied by thermal energy atom scattering and low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy: An experimental setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jödicke, Harald; Schaub, Renald; Bhowmick, Ashok; Monot, René; Buttet, Jean; Harbich, Wolfgang

    2000-07-01

    We present an experimental setup for the investigation of the processes occurring during the deposition of mass-selected clusters on a well-defined surface. The sample is analyzed in situ by two complementary methods: thermal energy atom scattering (TEAS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). TEAS is used to study the dynamical processes during the deposition and to gather statistical information about the resulting structures on the surface. Subsequent STM measurements allow us to investigate the collision outcome on an atomic scale. The setup is highly versatile and guarantees ultra-high-vacuum conditions and cryogenic temperatures (≈30 K) of the sample at all times even during sample transfer. Clusters are produced in a CORDIS-type cluster source. A new compact multichannel effusive He source in combination with a new Wien-filter-based He detector are used for TEAS measurements. The new low-temperature STM allows measurements in a temperature range between 8 and 450 K. Atomic resolution on the Pt(111) surface is regularly observed at Tsample=8 K. The performances of the setup are illustrated by STM images obtained after the deposition of Ag7+ clusters with Ekin=95 and 1000 eV on bare Pt(111) and by measurements made of the deposition of Ag7+ clusters with Ekin=20 eV in a Xe-rare-gas matrix adsorbed on Pt(111).

  16. Ultrafast triggered transient energy storage by atomic layer deposition into porous silicon for integrated transient electronics.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Anna; Muralidharan, Nitin; Carter, Rachel; Share, Keith; Pint, Cary L

    2016-04-14

    Here we demonstrate the first on-chip silicon-integrated rechargeable transient power source based on atomic layer deposition (ALD) coating of vanadium oxide (VOx) into porous silicon. A stable specific capacitance above 20 F g(-1) is achieved until the device is triggered with alkaline solutions. Due to the rational design of the active VOx coating enabled by ALD, transience occurs through a rapid disabling step that occurs within seconds, followed by full dissolution of all active materials within 30 minutes of the initial trigger. This work demonstrates how engineered materials for energy storage can provide a basis for next-generation transient systems and highlights porous silicon as a versatile scaffold to integrate transient energy storage into transient electronics. PMID:26984120

  17. Energy deposition and radiation quality of radon and radon daughters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karam, L.R.; Caswell, R.S.

    1996-09-09

    This program was aimed at creating a quantitative physical description, at the micrometer and nanometer levels, of the physical interactions of the alpha particles from radon and its daughters with cells at risk in the bronchial epithelium. The authors calculated alpha-particle energy spectra incident upon the cells and also energy deposition spectra in micrometer- and nanometer-sized sites as a function of cell depth, site size, airway diameter, activities of {sup 218}Po and {sup 214}Po, and other parameters. These data are now being applied, using biophysical models of radiation effects, to predict cell killing, mutations, and cell transformation. The model predictions are then compared to experimental biophysical, biochemical, and biological information. These studies contribute to a detailed understanding of the mechanisms of the biological effectiveness of the radiations emitted by radon and its progeny.

  18. Effects of particle optical properties on grain size measurements of aeolian dust deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, György; Újvári, Gábor; Kovács, János; Szalai, Zoltán

    2015-04-01

    Particle size data are holding crucial information on the sedimentary environment at the time the aeolian dust deposits were accumulated. Various aspects of aeolian sedimentation (wind strength, distance to source(s), possible secondary source regions and modes of sedimentation and transport) can be reconstructed from proper grain size distribution data. Laser diffraction methods provide much more accurate and reliable information on the major granulometric properties of wind-blown sediments compared to the sieve and pipette methods. The Fraunhofer and Mie scattering theories are generally used for laser diffraction grain size measurements. () The two different approaches need different 'background' information on the medium measured. During measurements following the Fraunhofer theory, the basic assumption is that parcticles are relatively large (over 25-30 µm) and opaque. The Mie theory could offer more accurate data on smaller fractions (clay and fine silt), assuming that a proper, a'priori knowledge on refraction and absorption indices exists, which is rarely the case for polymineral samples. This study is aimed at determining the effects of different optical parameters on grain size distributions (e.g. clay-content, median, mode). Multiple samples collected from Hungarian red clay and loess-paleosol records have been analysed using a Malvern Mastersizer 3000 laser diffraction particle sizer (with a Hydro LV unit). Additional grain size measurements have been made on a Fritsch Analysette 22 Microtec and a Horiba Partica La-950 v2 instrument to investigate possible effects of the used laser sources with different wavelengths. XRF and XRD measurements have also been undertaken to gain insight into the geochemical/mineralogical compositions of the samples studied. Major findings include that measurements using the Mie theory provide more accurate data on the grain size distribution of aeolian dust deposits, when we use a proper optical setting. Significant

  19. Studies on high electronic energy deposition in transparent conducting indium tin oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, N. G.; Gudage, Y. G.; Ghosh, A.; Vyas, J. C.; Singh, F.; Tripathi, A.; Sharma, Ramphal

    2008-02-01

    We have examined the effect of swift heavy ions using 100 MeV Au8+ ions on the electrical properties of transparent, conducting indium tin oxide polycrystalline films with resistivity of 0.58 × 10-4 Ω cm and optical transmission greater than 78% (pristine). We report on the modifications occurring after high electronic energy deposition. With the increase in fluency, x-ray line intensity of the peaks corresponding to the planes (1 1 0), (4 0 0), (4 4 1) increased, while (3 3 1) remained constant. Surface morphological studies showed a pomegranate structure of pristine samples, which was highly disturbed with a high dose of irradiation. For the high dose, there was a formation of small spherical domes uniformly distributed over the entire surface. The transmittance was seen to be decreasing with the increase in ion fluency. At higher doses, the resistivity and photoluminescence intensity was seen to be decreased. In addition, the carrier concentration was seen to be increased, which was in accordance with the decrease in resistivity. The observed modifications after high electronic energy deposition in these films may lead to fruitful device applications.

  20. Initial studies of Bremsstrahlung energy deposition in small-bore superconducting undulator structures in linac environments

    SciTech Connect

    Cremer, T.; Tatchyn, R.

    1995-12-31

    One of the more promising technologies for developing minimal-length insertion devices for linac-driven, single-pass Free Electron Lasers (FELs) operating in the x-ray range is based on the use of superconducting (SC) materials. In recent FEL simulations, for example, a bifilar helical SC device with a 2 cm period and 1.8 T field was found to require a 30 m saturation length for operation at 1.5{Angstrom} on a 15 GeV linac, more than 40% shorter than an alternative hybrid/permanent magnet (hybrid/PM) undulator. AT the same time, however, SC technology is known to present characteristic difficulties for insertion device design, both in engineering detail and in operation. Perhaps the most critical problem, as observed, e.g., by Madey and co-workers in their initial FEL experiments, was the frequent quenching induced by scattered electrons upstream of their (bifilar) device. Postulating that this quenching was precipitated by directly-scattered or bremsstrahlung-induced particle energy deposited into the SC material or into material contiguous with it, the importance of numerical and experimental characterizations of this phenomenon for linac-based, user-facility SC undulator design becomes evident. In this paper we discuss selected prior experimental results and report on initial EGS4 code studies of scattered and bremsstrahlung induced particle energy deposition into SC structures with geometries comparable to a small-bore bifilar helical undulator.

  1. Atomic-layer-deposition-assisted formation of carbon nanoflakes on metal oxides and energy storage application.

    PubMed

    Guan, Cao; Zeng, Zhiyuan; Li, Xianglin; Cao, Xiehong; Fan, Yu; Xia, Xinhui; Pan, Guoxiang; Zhang, Hua; Fan, Hong Jin

    2014-01-29

    Nanostructured carbon is widely used in energy storage devices (e.g., Li-ion and Li-air batteries and supercapacitors). A new method is developed for the generation of carbon nanoflakes on various metal oxide nanostructures by combining atomic layer deposition (ALD) and glucose carbonization. Various metal oxide@nanoflake carbon (MO@f-C) core-branch nanostructures are obtained. For the mechanism, it is proposed that the ALD Al2 O3 and glucose form a composite layer. Upon thermal annealing, the composite layer becomes fragmented and moves outward, accompanied by carbon deposition on the alumina skeleton. When tested as electrochemical supercapacitor electrode, the hierarchical MO@f-C nanostructures exhibit better properties compared with the pristine metal oxides or the carbon coating without ALD. The enhancement can be ascribed to increased specific surface areas and electric conductivity due to the carbon flake coating. This peculiar carbon coating method with the unique hierarchical nanostructure may provide a new insight into the preparation of 'oxides + carbon' hybrid electrode materials for energy storage applications.

  2. Improvement of Energy Deposition in Absorber-free Laser Welding through Quasi-simultaneous Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamuschkin, Viktor; Engelmann, Christoph; Olowinsky, Alexander

    Laser transmission welding is usually known to put little thermal stress on the joining partners, indicated by a small heat affected zone (HAZ). However, this only applies when the joining partners have adapted optical properties. When it comes to welding of optically equal thermoplastics without absorbers, the main issue is the HAZ extending far from the interface. To enable welding without absorbers, lasers emitting within the polymer's intrinsic absorption bands are used. So far, different beam shaping approaches have already been investigated to achieve a selective energy deposition at the interface but, with little success to date. The approach presented in this paper is irradiating the welding path quasi-simultaneously to exploit the poor heat conductivity of polymers. Therefore, the influence of the irradiation regime on the seam formation is considered in detail. Another aspect investigated is the length of the irradiated contour which is a crucial factor in quasi-simultaneous welding. The results show that the energy deposition can be significantly improved when the welding contour length does not exceed a critical length determined by the capability of the welding system. However, by welding in segments the approach can also be applied to longer contours without any noticeable loss in welding time. The ideal irradiation regime obtained in the trials corresponds to an effective welding speed of 37mm/s and reduces the vertical extent of the HAZ by 30%.

  3. Optimization of the LHC interaction region with respect to beam-induced energy deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N.V.; Strait, J.B.

    1996-06-01

    Energy deposition in the superconducting magnets by particles from p- p collisions is a significant challenge for the design of the LHC high luminosity insertions. We have studies the dependence of the energy deposition on the apertures and strengths of insertion magnets and on the placement of absorbers in front of and within the quadrupoles. Monte Carlo simulations were made using the code DTUJET to generate 7{times}7 TeV p-p events and the code MARS to follow hadronic and electromagnetic cascades induced in the insertion components. The 3D geometry and magnetic field descriptions of the LHC-4.1 lattice were used. With a quadrupole coil aperture {ge}70 mm, absorbers can be placed within the magnet bore which reduce the peak power density, at full luminosity, below 0.5 mW/g, a level that should allow the magnets to operate at their design field. The total heat load can be removed by a cooling system similar to that used in the main magnets.

  4. Use of energy deposition spectrometer Liulin for individual monitoring of aircrew.

    PubMed

    Ploc, O; Pachnerová Brabcová, K; Spurny, F; Malušek, A; Dachev, T

    2011-03-01

    Silicon energy deposition spectrometer Liulin was primarily developed for cosmic radiation monitoring onboard spacecrafts. Nowadays, Liulin type detectors are also used to characterise radiation field on board aircraft, at alpine observatories and behind the shielding of heavy ion accelerators. In this work, experiments and calibrations performed in these radiation fields are presented and the method developed for calculation of ambient dose equivalent H*(10) on board aircraft is described. Since 2001, a simple method employing the energy deposition spectra had been used to determine H*(10) on board aircraft but, in 2004, it became clear that the resulting values were strongly biased at locations close to Earth's equator. An improved method for the determination of H*(10) on board aircraft using the Liulin detector was developed. It took into account the composition of the radiation field via the ratio of absorbed doses D(low) and D(neut) reflecting the contributions from low-LET particles and neutrons, respectively. It resulted in much better agreement with the EPCARD computer code for all aircraft locations; relative differences were within 11 % for low-LET and 20 % for neutron components of H*(10).

  5. Development and deposition of resilin in energy stores for locust jumping.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Malcolm

    2016-08-15

    Locusts jump by using a catapult mechanism in which energy produced by slow contractions of the extensor tibiae muscles of the hind legs is stored in distortions of the exoskeleton, most notably (1) the two semi-lunar processes at each knee joint and (2) the tendons of the extensor muscles themselves. The energy is then suddenly released from these stores to power the rapid, propulsive movements of the hind legs. The reliance on the mechanical storage of energy is likely to impact on jumping because growth occurs by a series of five moults, at each of which the exoskeleton is replaced by a new one. All developmental stages (instars) nevertheless jump as a means of forward locomotion, or as an escape movement. Here, I show that in each instar, resilin is added to the semi-lunar processes and to the core of the extensor tendons so that their thickness increases. As the next moult approaches, a new exoskeleton forms within the old one, with resilin already present in the new semi-lunar processes. The old exoskeleton, the tendons and their resilin are discarded at moulting. The resilin of the semi-lunar processes and tendons of the new instar is initially thin, but a similar pattern of deposition results in an increase of their thickness. In adults, resilin continues to be deposited so that at 4 weeks old the thickness in the semi-lunar processes has increased fourfold. These changes in the energy stores accompany changes in jumping ability and performance during each moulting cycle. PMID:27259374

  6. Development and deposition of resilin in energy stores for locust jumping.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Malcolm

    2016-08-15

    Locusts jump by using a catapult mechanism in which energy produced by slow contractions of the extensor tibiae muscles of the hind legs is stored in distortions of the exoskeleton, most notably (1) the two semi-lunar processes at each knee joint and (2) the tendons of the extensor muscles themselves. The energy is then suddenly released from these stores to power the rapid, propulsive movements of the hind legs. The reliance on the mechanical storage of energy is likely to impact on jumping because growth occurs by a series of five moults, at each of which the exoskeleton is replaced by a new one. All developmental stages (instars) nevertheless jump as a means of forward locomotion, or as an escape movement. Here, I show that in each instar, resilin is added to the semi-lunar processes and to the core of the extensor tendons so that their thickness increases. As the next moult approaches, a new exoskeleton forms within the old one, with resilin already present in the new semi-lunar processes. The old exoskeleton, the tendons and their resilin are discarded at moulting. The resilin of the semi-lunar processes and tendons of the new instar is initially thin, but a similar pattern of deposition results in an increase of their thickness. In adults, resilin continues to be deposited so that at 4 weeks old the thickness in the semi-lunar processes has increased fourfold. These changes in the energy stores accompany changes in jumping ability and performance during each moulting cycle.

  7. Fluvial sediments a summary of source, transportation, deposition, and measurement of sediment discharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colby, B.R.

    1963-01-01

    continuously at about the velocity of the flow, and even low flows can transport large amounts of fine sediment. Hence, the discharge of fine sediments, being largely dependent on the availability of fine sediment upstream rather than on the properties of the sediment and of the flow at a cross section, can seldom be computed from properties, other than concentrations based directly on samples, that can be observed at the cross section. Sediment particles continually change their positions in the flow; some fall to the streambed, and others are removed from the bed. Sediment deposits form locally or over large areas if the volume rate at which particles settle to the bed exceeds the volume rate at which particles are removed from the bed. In general, large particles are deposited more readily than small particles, whether the point of deposition is behind a rock, on a flood plain, within a stream channel, or at the entrance to a reservoir, a lake, or the ocean. Most samplers used for sediment observations collect a water-sediment mixture from the water surface to within a few tenths of a foot of the streambed. They thus sample most of the suspended sediment, especially if the flow is deep or if the sediment is mostly fine; but they exclude the bedload and some of the suspended sediment in a layer near the streambed where the suspended-sediment concentrations are highest. Measured sediment discharges are usually based on concentrations that are averages of several individual sediment samples for a cross section. If enough average concentrations for a cross section have been determined, the measured sediment discharge can be computed by interpolating sediment concentrations between sampling times. If only occasional samples were collected, an average relation between sediment discharge and flow can be used with a flow-duration curve to compute roughly the average or the total sediment discharges for any periods of time for which the flow-duration c

  8. Implementation and Rejection of Industrial Steam System Energy Efficiency Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Therkelesen, Peter; McKane, Aimee

    2013-05-01

    Steam systems consume approximately one third of energy applied at U.S. industrial facilities. To reduce energy consumption, steam system energy assessments have been conducted on a wide range of industry types over the course of five years through the Energy Savings Assessment (ESA) program administered by the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE). ESA energy assessments result in energy efficiency measure recommendations that are given potential energy and energy cost savings and potential implementation cost values. Saving and cost metrics that measure the impact recommended measures will have at facilities, described as percentages of facility baseline energy and energy cost, are developed from ESA data and used in analyses. Developed savings and cost metrics are examined along with implementation and rejection rates of recommended steam system energy efficiency measures. Based on analyses, implementation of steam system energy efficiency measures is driven primarily by cost metrics: payback period and measure implementation cost as a percentage of facility baseline energy cost (implementation cost percentage). Stated reasons for rejecting recommended measures are primarily based upon economic concerns. Additionally, implementation rates of measures are not only functions of savings and cost metrics, but time as well.

  9. Deposition of aerosol particles in human lungs: in vivo measurements and modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    The deposition dose and site of inhaled particles within the lung are the key determinants in health risk assessment of particulate pollutants. Accurate dose estimation, however, is a formidable task because aerosol transport and deposition in the lung are governed by many factor...

  10. The Measurement of Atmospheric Concentrations and Deposition of Semi-Volatile Organic Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, David S.; Nicholson, Ken W.

    1994-01-01

    Provides a physical description of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), both in terms of their characteristic nature in the atmosphere and the processes which control their deposition. Contains a summary of the requirements for a full assessment of atmospheric SVOCs and their deposition. (LZ)

  11. Adsorption calorimetry during metal vapor deposition on single crystal surfaces: Increased flux, reduced optical radiation, and real-time flux and reflectivity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, Jason R. V.; James, Trevor E.; Hemmingson, Stephanie L.; Farmer, Jason A.; Campbell, Charles T.

    2013-12-15

    Thin films of metals and other materials are often grown by physical vapor deposition. To understand such processes, it is desirable to measure the adsorption energy of the deposited species as the film grows, especially when grown on single crystal substrates where the structure of the adsorbed species, evolving interface, and thin film are more homogeneous and well-defined in structure. Our group previously described in this journal an adsorption calorimeter capable of such measurements on single-crystal surfaces under the clean conditions of ultrahigh vacuum [J. T. Stuckless, N. A. Frei, and C. T. Campbell, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 69, 2427 (1998)]. Here we describe several improvements to that original design that allow for heat measurements with ∼18-fold smaller standard deviation, greater absolute accuracy in energy calibration, and, most importantly, measurements of the adsorption of lower vapor-pressure materials which would have previously been impossible. These improvements are accomplished by: (1) using an electron beam evaporator instead of a Knudsen cell to generate the metal vapor at the source of the pulsed atomic beam, (2) changing the atomic beam design to decrease the relative amount of optical radiation that accompanies evaporation, (3) adding an off-axis quartz crystal microbalance for real-time measurement of the flux of the atomic beam during calorimetry experiments, and (4) adding capabilities for in situ relative diffuse optical reflectivity determinations (necessary for heat signal calibration). These improvements are not limited to adsorption calorimetry during metal deposition, but also could be applied to better study film growth of other elements and even molecular adsorbates.

  12. Adsorption calorimetry during metal vapor deposition on single crystal surfaces: Increased flux, reduced optical radiation, and real-time flux and reflectivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellers, Jason R. V.; James, Trevor E.; Hemmingson, Stephanie L.; Farmer, Jason A.; Campbell, Charles T.

    2013-12-01

    Thin films of metals and other materials are often grown by physical vapor deposition. To understand such processes, it is desirable to measure the adsorption energy of the deposited species as the film grows, especially when grown on single crystal substrates where the structure of the adsorbed species, evolving interface, and thin film are more homogeneous and well-defined in structure. Our group previously described in this journal an adsorption calorimeter capable of such measurements on single-crystal surfaces under the clean conditions of ultrahigh vacuum [J. T. Stuckless, N. A. Frei, and C. T. Campbell, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 69, 2427 (1998)]. Here we describe several improvements to that original design that allow for heat measurements with ˜18-fold smaller standard deviation, greater absolute accuracy in energy calibration, and, most importantly, measurements of the adsorption of lower vapor-pressure materials which would have previously been impossible. These improvements are accomplished by: (1) using an electron beam evaporator instead of a Knudsen cell to generate the metal vapor at the source of the pulsed atomic beam, (2) changing the atomic beam design to decrease the relative amount of optical radiation that accompanies evaporation, (3) adding an off-axis quartz crystal microbalance for real-time measurement of the flux of the atomic beam during calorimetry experiments, and (4) adding capabilities for in situ relative diffuse optical reflectivity determinations (necessary for heat signal calibration). These improvements are not limited to adsorption calorimetry during metal deposition, but also could be applied to better study film growth of other elements and even molecular adsorbates.

  13. Deposition of corrosion products from dowels on human dental root surfaces measured with proton microprobe technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, D.; Brunell, G.; Lindh, U.

    1982-06-01

    Distribution of copper, mercury and zinc on human teeth root surfaces adjacent to dowels of gold alloy or brass as well as dowels of brass in conjunction with an amalgam crown has been measured with a proton microprobe using PIXE techniques. Upper limits of the contents of gold and silver on the root surfaces were established. Pronounced concentration profiles of copper and zinc were observed on the root surfaces of teeth prepared with dowels of brass. The dowel of gold alloy revealed only zinc deposition. The major part of copper on the root surfaces is assumed to arise from corrosion of the dowels, and has been transported to the surface by diffusion through the dential tubuli. Zinc in the volume analysed is a constituent of dentin tissue as well as a corrosion product of the brass dowel. Part of the zinc level could also be ascribed to erosion of the zinc phosphate cement matrix. The volumes analysed were (25×25×25)μm 3. The levels of copper, mercury and zinc on the tooth root surfaces attained values up to about 200, 20 and 600 ppm, respectively.

  14. A New Method for in Situ Measurement of Bt-Maize Pollen Deposition on Host-Plant Leaves.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Frieder; Otto, Mathias; Kuhn, Ulrike; Ober, Steffi; Schlechtriemen, Ulrich; Vögel, Rudolph

    2011-01-01

    Maize is wind pollinated and produces huge amounts of pollen. In consequence, the Cry toxins expressed in the pollen of Bt maize will be dispersed by wind in the surrounding vegetation leading to exposure of non-target organisms (NTO). NTO like lepidopteran larvae may be affected by the uptake of Bt-pollen deposited on their host plants. Although some information is available to estimate pollen deposition on host plants, recorded data are based on indirect measurements such as shaking or washing off pollen, or removing pollen with adhesive tapes. These methods often lack precision and they do not include the necessary information such as the spatial and temporal variation of pollen deposition on the leaves. Here, we present a new method for recording in situ the amount and the distribution of Bt-maize pollen deposited on host plant leaves. The method is based on the use of a mobile digital microscope (Dino-Lite Pro, including DinoCapture software), which can be used in combination with a notebook in the field. The method was evaluated during experiments in 2008 to 2010. Maize pollen could be correctly identified and pollen deposition as well as the spatial heterogeneity of maize pollen deposition was recorded on maize and different lepidopteran host plants (Centaurea scabiosa, Chenopodium album, Rumex spp., Succina pratensis and Urtica dioica) growing adjacent to maize fields.

  15. Dayside pickup oxygen ion precipitation at Venus and Mars: Spatial distributions, energy deposition and consequences

    SciTech Connect

    Luhmann, J.G. ); Kozyra, J.U. )

    1991-04-01

    The fluxes and energy spectra of picked-up planetary O{sup +} ions incident on the dayside atmospheres of Venus and Mars are calculated using the neutral exposure models of Nagy and Cravens (1988) and the Spreiter and Stahara (1980) gasdynamic model of the magnetosheath electric and magnetic field. Cold ({approximately}10 eV) O{sup +} ions are launched from hemispherical grids of starting points covering the daysides of the planets and their trajectories are followed until they either impact the dayside obstacle or cross the terminator plane. The impacting, or precipitating, ion fluxes are weighted according to the altitude of the hemispherical starting point grid in a manner consistent with the exosphere density models and the local photoion production rate. Maps of precipitating ion number flux and energy flux show the asymmetrical distribution of dayside energy deposition expected from this source which is unique to the weakly magnetized planets. Although the associated heating of the atmosphere and ionsphere is found to be negligible compared to that from the usual sources, backscattered or sputtered neutral oxygen atoms are produced at energies exceeding that needed for escape from the gravitational fields of both planets. These neutral winds, driven by pickup ion precipitation, represent a possibly significant loss of atmospheric constituents over the age of the solar system.

  16. Lightning driven inner radiation belt energy deposition into the atmosphere: regional and global estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodger, C. J.; Clilverd, M. A.; Thomson, N. R.; Nunn, D.; Lichtenberger, J.

    2005-12-01

    In this study we examine energetic electron precipitation fluxes driven by lightning, in order to determine the global distribution of energy deposited into the middle atmosphere. Previous studies using lightning-driven precipitation burst rates have estimated losses from the inner radiation belts. In order to confirm the reliability of those rates and the validity of the conclusions drawn from those studies, we have analyzed New Zealand data to test our global understanding of troposphere to magnetosphere coupling. We examine about 10000h of AbsPAL recordings made from 17 April 2003 through to 26 June 2004, and analyze subionospheric very-low frequency (VLF) perturbations observed on transmissions from VLF transmitters in Hawaii (NPM) and western Australia (NWC). These observations are compared with those previously reported from the Antarctic Peninsula. The perturbation rates observed in the New Zealand data are consistent with those predicted from the global distribution of the lightning sources, once the different experimental configurations are taken into account. Using lightning current distributions rather than VLF perturbation observations we revise previous estimates of typical precipitation bursts at L~2.3 to a mean precipitation energy flux of ~1×10-3 ergs cm-2s-1. The precipitation of energetic electrons by these bursts in the range L=1.9-3.5 will lead to a mean rate of energy deposited into the atmosphere of 3×10-4 ergs cm-2min-1, spatially varying from a low of zero above some ocean regions to highs of ~3-6×10-3 ergs cm-2min-1 above North America and its conjugate region.

  17. Volatile-rich Crater Interior Deposits on Mars: An Energy Balance Model of Modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Patrick S.; Head, James W.; Hecht, Michael H.

    2003-01-01

    Several craters on Mars are partially filled by material emplaced by post-impact processes. Populations of such craters include those in the circumsouth polar cap region, in Arabia Terra, associated with the Medusae Fossae Formation, and in the northern lowlands proximal to the north polar cap. In this study, crater fill material refers to an interior mound, generally separated from the interior walls of the crater by a trough that may be continuous along the crater s circumference (i.e. a ring-shaped trough), or may only partially contact the crater walls (i.e. a crescent-shaped trough). The fill deposit is frequently off-center from the crater center and may be asymmetric, (i.e. not circular) in plan view shape. Here we test the hypothesis that asymmetries in volatile fill shape, profile, and center-location within a crater result from asymmetries in local energy balance within the crater due mainly to variation of solar insolation and radiative effects of the crater walls over the crater interior. We first focus on Korolev crater in the northern lowlands. We can then apply this model to other craters in different regions. If asymmetry in morphology and location of crater fill are consistent with radiative-dominated asymmetries in energy budget within the crater, then 1) the volatile-rich composition of the fill is supported (this process should not be effective at shaping volcanic or sedimentary deposits), and 2) the dominant factor determining the observed shape of volatile-rich crater fill is the local radiative energy budget within the crater (and erosive processes such as eolian deflation are not necessary).

  18. Is it Possible that the Solar Corona Temperature Profile Does Not Require Mechanical Deposition of Energy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scudder, J. D.; Roytershteyn, V.; Karimabadi, H.; Daughton, W. S.

    2012-12-01

    The solar corona, like other main sequence stars, has a non-monotonic temperature inversion. Prevailing ideas have suggested that the inversion is the result of deposition of mechanical energy near the temperature maximum, possibly afforded by the damping of wave trains. The adequacy of ones quantitative description of heat flow in the corona plays a central role in the association of non-monotonic profile and a heating requirement. Using first principles calculations we demonstrate that neither the size nor the direction of the heat flow in the corona is implied by knowing the temperature profile. The usually used Spitzer-Braginskii transport is not appropriate for the solar corona, but has until now been used to infer the sign of the heat flow divergence at the temperature maximum. By vacating the certainty of heat flow diverging from the coronal temperature maximum there is no immediate connection between the non-monotonic temperature profile and the need for energy or momentum addition to the corona at the temperature maximum. Thus the coronal problem is to explain the temperature profile, not necessarily produce an energy deposition, predicted by a broken transport description. The same argument that shows that Spitzer-Braginskii transport is inadequate also implies that the underlying kinetic state of the plasma is non-local and will be permeated by non-thermal distributions. Such non-thermal distributions are a necessary prerequisite for the alternate velocity filtration model that explains the non-monotonic temperature profile of the solar corona as well as all stars on the zero age main sequence.

  19. Chemical composition, morphology and optical properties of zinc sulfide coatings deposited by low-energy electron beam evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragachev, A. V.; Yarmolenko, M. A.; Rogachev, A. A.; Gorbachev, D. L.; Zhou, Bing

    2014-06-01

    The research determines the features of formation, morphology, chemical composition and optical properties of the coatings deposited by the method, proposed for the first time, of the exposure of mechanical mixture of zinc and sulfur powders to low-energy electron beam evaporation. The findings show that the deposited coatings are characterized by high chemical and structural homogeneity in thickness. The study considers the influence of substrate temperature and thickness of the deposited layer on the morphology and the width of the formed ZnS thin layers band gap. Also was shown the possibility to form ZnS coatings with this method using the mixture of zinc and copper sulfide powders.

  20. Surface free energy of non-stick coatings deposited using closed field unbalanced magnetron sputter ion plating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chen-Cheng; Lee, Shih-Chin; Dai, Shyue-Bin; Tien, Shein-Long; Chang, Chung-Chih; Fu, Yaw-Shyan

    2007-02-01

    Semiconductor IC packaging molding dies require wear resistance, corrosion resistance and non-sticking (with a low surface free energy). The molding releasing capability and performance are directly associated with the surface free energy between the coating and product material. The serious sticking problem reduces productivity and reliability. Depositing TiN, TiMoS, ZrN, CrC, CrN, NiCr, NiCrN, CrTiAlN and CrNiTiAlN coatings using closed field unbalanced magnetron sputter ion plating, and characterizing their surface free energy are the main object in developing a non-stick coating system for semiconductor IC molding tools. The contact angle of water, diiodomethane and ethylene glycol on the coated surfaces were measured at temperature in 20 °C using a Dataphysics OCA-20 contact angle analyzer. The surface free energy of the coatings and their components (dispersion and polar) were calculated using the Owens-Wendt geometric mean approach. The surface roughness was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The adhesion force of these coatings was measured using direct tensile pull-off test apparatus. The experimental results showed that NiCrN, CrN and NiCrTiAlN coatings outperformed TiN, ZrN, NiCr, CiTiAlN, CrC and TiMoS coatings in terms of non-sticking, and thus have the potential as working layers for injection molding industrial equipment, especially in semiconductor IC packaging molding applications.

  1. Chemically deposited thin films of sulfides and selenides of antimony and bismuth as solar energy materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, M. T.; Nair, Padmanabhan K.; Garcia, V. M.; Pena, Y.; Arenas, O. L.; Garcia, J. C.; Gomez-Daza, O.

    1997-10-01

    Chemical bath deposition techniques for bismuth sulfide, bismuth selenide, antimony sulfide, and antimony selenide thin films of about 0.20 - 0.25 micrometer thickness are reported. All these materials may be considered as solar absorber films: strong optical absorption edges, with absorption coefficient, (alpha) , greater than 104 cm-1, are located at 1.31 eV for Bi2Se3, 1.33 eV for Bi2S3, 1.8 eV for Sb2S3, and 1.35 eV for Sb2Se3. As deposited, all the films are nearly amorphous. However, well defined crystalline peaks matching bismuthinite (JCPDS 17- 0320), paraguanajuatite (JCPDS 33-0214), and stibnite (JCPDS 6-0474) and antimony selenide (JCPDS 15-0861) for Bi2S3, Bi2Se3, Sb2S3 and Sb2Se3 respectively, are observed when the films are annealed in nitrogen at 300 degrees Celsius. This is accompanied by a substantial modification of the electrical conductivity in the films: from 10-7 (Omega) -1 cm-1 (in as prepared films) to 10 (Omega) -1 cm-1 in the case of bismuth sulfide and selenide films, and enhancement of photosensitivity in the case of antimony sulfide films. The chemical deposition of a CuS/CuxSe film on these Vx- VIy films and subsequent annealing at 300 degrees Celsius for 1 h at 1 torr of nitrogen leads to the formation of p-type films (conductivity of 1 - 100 (Omega) -1 cm-1) of multinary composition. Among these, the formation of Cu3BiS3 (JCPDS 9-0488) and Cu3SbS4 (JCPDS 35- 0581), CuSbS2 (JCPDS 35-0413) have been clearly detected. Solar energy applications of these films are suggested.

  2. Gaseous Oxidized Mercury Dry Deposition Measurements in the FourCorners Area and Eastern Oklahoma, U.S.A.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) dry deposition measurements using surrogate surface passive samplers were collected in the Four Corners area and eastern Oklahoma from August, 2009–August, 2011. Using data from a six site area network, a characterization of the magnitude and spatia...

  3. Measurements of metal alkylamide density during atomic layer deposition using a mid-infrared light-emitting diode (LED) source.

    PubMed

    Maslar, James E; Hoang, John; Kimes, William A; Sperling, Brent A

    2015-03-01

    A nondispersive infrared (NDIR) gas analyzer that utilizes a mid-infrared light emitting diode (LED) source was demonstrated for monitoring the metal alkylamide compound tetrakis(dimethylamido) titanium (TDMAT), Ti[N(CH3)2]4. This NDIR gas analyzer was based on direct absorption measurement of TDMAT vapor in the C-H stretching spectral region, a spectral region accessed using a LED with a nominal emission center wavelength of 3.65 μm. The sensitivity of this technique to TDMAT was determined by comparing the absorbance measured using this technique to the TDMAT density as determined using in situ Fourier transform IR (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Fourier transform IR spectroscopy was employed because this technique could be used to (1) quantify TDMAT density in the presence of a carrier gas (the presence of which precludes the use of a capacitance manometer to establish TDMAT density) and (2) distinguish between TDMAT and other gas-phase species containing IR-active C-H stretching modes (allowing separation of the signal from the LED-based optical system into fractions due to TDMAT and other species, when necessary). During TDMAT-only delivery, i.e., in the absence of co-reactants and deposition products, TDMAT minimum detectable molecular densities as low as ≈4 × 10(12) cm(-3) were demonstrated, with short measurement times and appropriate signal averaging. Reactions involving TDMAT often result in the evolution of the reaction product dimethylamine (DMA), both as a thermal decomposition product in a TDMAT ampoule and as a deposition reaction product in the deposition chamber. Hence, the presence of DMA represents a significant potential interference for this technique, and therefore, the sensitivity of this technique to DMA was also determined by measuring DMA absorbance as a function of pressure. The ratio of the TDMAT sensitivity to the DMA sensitivity was determined to be ≈6.0. To further examine the selectivity of this technique, measurements were also

  4. Pulsed laser deposition and refractive index measurement of fully substituted bismuth iron garnet films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepper, T.; Ross, C. A.

    2003-08-01

    A systematic study of the pulsed-laser deposition of fully substituted bismuth iron garnet (BIG, or Bi 3Fe 5O 12) has been carried out. Garnet-structure BIG films grow epitaxially onto gallium gadolinium garnet substrates under deposition conditions that lead to a stoichiometric film. The variation of stoichiometry with deposition conditions is discussed. The refractive index, n, of BIG decreases from 2.819 at 633 nm to 2.584 at 1550 nm, with an imaginary part, k, less than 0.05.

  5. Observation of enhanced thermal lensing due to near-Gaussian pump energy deposition in a laser-diode side-pumped Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welford, David; Rines, David M.; Dinerman, Bradley J.; Martinsen, Robert

    1992-01-01

    The authors report operation of a laser-diode side-pumped Nd:YAG laser with a novel pumping geometry that ensures efficient conversion of pump energy into the TEM00 mode. Significant enhancement of thermally induced lensing due to the near-Gaussian energy deposition profile of the pump radiation was observed. An induced lens of approximately 3.2-m focal length was measured at average incident pump powers of only 3.2 W (corresponding to a 0.6 W heat load).

  6. Atmospheric bulk deposition measurements of organochlorine pesticides at three alpine summits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobi, Gert; Kirchner, Manfred; Henkelmann, Bernhard; Körner, Wolfgang; Offenthaler, Ivo; Moche, Wolfgang; Weiss, Peter; Schaub, Marcus; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    2015-01-01

    Bulk deposition samples were collected at three elevated summits in different parts of the Alps from 2005 to 2010. Deposition samples were analyzed for a wide range of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs). HCHs, DDT, DDD, DDE, chlordanes, cis-heptachlor, HCB, dieldrin and endrin were found in all samples, only aldrin was found less frequently. Differences in the mean deposition rates between the three sites reflect the different amounts of precipitation at these sites. At the northern edge of the Alps with the highest annual total precipitations, mean annual deposition rates were at least twice those at the Swiss site for most of the investigated OCP. Average annual deposition of α-HCH amounted to 602, 461 and 216 ng m-2 year-1, the sum of DDT, DDD and DDE to 579, 210 and 144 ng m-2 year-1 and the sum of trans- and cis-chlordane to 35, 47, 16 ng m-2 year-1 at Zugspitze, Sonnblick, and Weissfluhjoch, respectively. A quite distinct seasonal pattern of OPC deposition was observed at all three locations. For most of the HCH isomers, higher deposition rates were observed in summer than in winter at all three sites, which may be caused by enhanced re-volatilization due to higher summer temperatures and the ongoing application of HCH-containing products in some regions as well. For the other investigated OCPs, higher summer deposition rates were found only at Weissfluhjoch. This site is more often affected by air masses crossing the river Po basin than the other two sites, an area exhibiting higher summer temperatures compared to other regions adjacent to the Alps.

  7. Procedure for Measuring and Reporting Commercial Building Energy Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Barley, D.; Deru, M.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

    2005-10-01

    This procedure is intended to provide a standard method for measuring and characterizing the energy performance of commercial buildings. The procedure determines the energy consumption, electrical energy demand, and on-site energy production in existing commercial buildings of all types. The performance metrics determined here may be compared against benchmarks to evaluate performance and verify that performance targets have been achieved.

  8. Comparison of MCNPX and Geant4 proton energy deposition predictions for clinical use

    PubMed Central

    Titt, U.; Bednarz, B.; Paganetti, H.

    2012-01-01

    Several different Monte Carlo codes are currently being used at proton therapy centers to improve upon dose predictions over standard methods using analytical or semi-empirical dose algorithms. There is a need to better ascertain the differences between proton dose predictions from different available Monte Carlo codes. In this investigation Geant4 and MCNPX, the two most-utilized Monte Carlo codes for proton therapy applications, were used to predict energy deposition distributions in a variety of geometries, comprising simple water phantoms, water phantoms with complex inserts and in a voxelized geometry based on clinical CT data. The gamma analysis was used to evaluate the differences of the predictions between the codes. The results show that in the all cases the agreement was better than clinical acceptance criteria. PMID:22996039

  9. Benchmark study for charge deposition by high energy electrons in thick slabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jun, I.

    2002-01-01

    The charge deposition profiles created when highenergy (1, 10, and 100 MeV) electrons impinge ona thick slab of elemental aluminum, copper, andtungsten are presented in this paper. The chargedeposition profiles were computed using existing representative Monte Carlo codes: TIGER3.0 (1D module of ITS3.0) and MCNP version 4B. The results showed that TIGER3.0 and MCNP4B agree very well (within 20% of each other) in the majority of the problem geometry. The TIGER results were considered to be accurate based on previous studies. Thus, it was demonstrated that MCNP, with its powerful geometry capability and flexible source and tally options, could be used in calculations of electron charging in high energy electron-rich space radiation environments.

  10. High energy density amorphous silicon anodes for lithium ion batteries deposited by DC sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmakis, Filippos; Elmasides, Costas; Fanz, Patrik; Hagen, Markus; Georgoulas, Nikolaos

    2015-10-01

    As more and more applications require high energy density electrochemical storage systems that deliver more than 200 Wh/kg, Lithium-ion batteries with silicon-based anodes provide promising electrochemical properties especially high specific capacity. In this paper, we present micro-grain structured silicon deposited by DC sputtering on special copper foil that serves as current collector. It is demonstrated that high-density silicon anodes are obtained with more than 2000 mAh g-1 and 2.0 mAh cm-2 that can be considered as a commercial value. In addition, irreversible capacity during the first galvanostatic cycle can be lower than 20% for such anodes. Finally, it is found that there exists a clear correlation between the grain-size and the texture of the amorphous silicon to the electrochemical performance of half-cells.

  11. Evaluation of candidate rain gages for upgrading precipitation measurement tools for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, John D.

    2003-01-01

    The National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) was established in 1977 to investigate atmospheric deposition and its effects on the environment. Since its establishment, precipitation records have been obtained at all NADP sites using a gage developed approximately 50 years ago-the Belfort 5-780 mechanical rain gage. In 1998 and 1999, a study was done by the U.S. Geological Survey to evaluate four recently developed, technologically advanced rain gages as possible replacement candidates for the mechanical gage currently (2002) in use by the NADP. The gage types evaluated were the Belfort 3200, Geonor T-200, ETI Noah II, and the OTT PLUVIO. The Belfort 5-780 was included in the study to compare the performance of the rain gage currently (2002) used by NADP to the performance of the more recently developed gages. As a reference gage, the NovaLynx Model 260-2510 National Weather Service type stick gage also was included in the study. Two individual gages of each type were included in the study to evaluate precision between gages of the same type. A two-phase evaluation was completed. Phase I consisted of indoor bench tests with known amounts of simulated rainfall applied in 20 individual tests. Phase II consisted of outdoor testing by collecting precipitation during a 26-week period near Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. The ETI Noah II, OTT PLUVIO, and NovaLynx stick gages consistently recorded depths more commensurate with the amounts of applied simulated rainfall in Phase I testing than the Geonor T-200, Belfort 5-780, and Belfort 3200 gages. Gages where both the median difference between the measured and applied simulated rainfall and the interquartile range of all of their measured minus applied simulated rainfall differences were small (less than or equal to 0.01 inch) were judged to have performed very well in Phase I testing. The median and interquartile-range values were 0.01 inch or less for each of the ETI Noah II gages, OTT PLUVIO gages, and NovaLynx stick

  12. Characterization of gas-expanded liquid-deposited gold nanoparticle films on substrates of varying surface energy.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Kendall M; Roberts, Christopher B; Ashurst, W Robert

    2011-01-18

    Dodecanethiol-stabilized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were deposited via a gas-expanded liquid (GXL) technique utilizing CO(2)-expanded hexane onto substrates of different surface energy. The different surface energies were achieved by coating silicon (100) substrates with various organic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). Following the deposition of AuNP films, the films were characterized to determine the effect of substrate surface energy on nanoparticle film deposition and growth. Interestingly, the critical surface tension of a given substrate does not directly describe nanoparticle film morphology. However, the results in this study indicate a shift between layer-by-layer and island film growth based on the critical surface tension of the capping ligand. Additionally, the fraction of surface area covered by the AuNP film decreases as the oleophobic nature of the surfaces increases. On the basis of this information, the potential exists to engineer nanoparticle films with desired morphologies and characteristics. PMID:21174390

  13. Characterization of gas-expanded liquid-deposited gold nanoparticle films on substrates of varying surface energy.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Kendall M; Roberts, Christopher B; Ashurst, W Robert

    2011-01-18

    Dodecanethiol-stabilized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were deposited via a gas-expanded liquid (GXL) technique utilizing CO(2)-expanded hexane onto substrates of different surface energy. The different surface energies were achieved by coating silicon (100) substrates with various organic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). Following the deposition of AuNP films, the films were characterized to determine the effect of substrate surface energy on nanoparticle film deposition and growth. Interestingly, the critical surface tension of a given substrate does not directly describe nanoparticle film morphology. However, the results in this study indicate a shift between layer-by-layer and island film growth based on the critical surface tension of the capping ligand. Additionally, the fraction of surface area covered by the AuNP film decreases as the oleophobic nature of the surfaces increases. On the basis of this information, the potential exists to engineer nanoparticle films with desired morphologies and characteristics.

  14. Energy deposition of H and He ion beams in hydroxyapatite films: A study with implications for ion-beam cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limandri, Silvina; de Vera, Pablo; Fadanelli, Raul C.; Nagamine, Luiz C. C. M.; Mello, Alexandre; Garcia-Molina, Rafael; Behar, Moni; Abril, Isabel

    2014-02-01

    Ion-beam cancer therapy is a promising technique to treat deep-seated tumors; however, for an accurate treatment planning, the energy deposition by the ions must be well known both in soft and hard human tissues. Although the energy loss of ions in water and other organic and biological materials is fairly well known, scarce information is available for the hard tissues (i.e., bone), for which the current stopping power information relies on the application of simple additivity rules to atomic data. Especially, more knowledge is needed for the main constituent of human bone, calcium hydroxyapatite (HAp), which constitutes 58% of its mass composition. In this work the energy loss of H and He ion beams in HAp films has been obtained experimentally. The experiments have been performed using the Rutherford backscattering technique in an energy range of 450-2000 keV for H and 400-5000 keV for He ions. These measurements are used as a benchmark for theoretical calculations (stopping power and mean excitation energy) based on the dielectric formalism together with the MELF-GOS (Mermin energy loss function-generalized oscillator strength) method to describe the electronic excitation spectrum of HAp. The stopping power calculations are in good agreement with the experiments. Even though these experimental data are obtained for low projectile energies compared with the ones used in hadron therapy, they validate the mean excitation energy obtained theoretically, which is the fundamental quantity to accurately assess energy deposition and depth-dose curves of ion beams at clinically relevant high energies. The effect of the mean excitation energy choice on the depth-dose profile is discussed on the basis of detailed simulations. Finally, implications of the present work on the energy loss of charged particles in human cortical bone are remarked.

  15. Does overfeeding enhance genotype effects on energy metabolism and lipid deposition in breast muscle of ducks?

    PubMed

    Chartrin, Pascal; Bernadet, Marie-Dominique; Guy, Gérard; Mourot, Jacques; Hocquette, Jean-François; Rideau, Nicole; Duclos, Michel Jacques; Baéza, Elisabeth

    2006-12-01

    We evaluated the effects of genotype (Muscovy, Pekin and their crossbreed hinny and mule ducks) and feeding levels (overfeeding between 12 and 14 weeks of age vs ad libitum feeding) on energy metabolism and lipid deposition in breast muscle of ducks. Samples of breast muscle (Pectoralis major) were collected at 14 weeks of age from 8 birds per group. Overfeeding induced an accumulation of lipids in breast muscle (1.5- to 1.7-fold, depending on genotype) mainly induced by triglyceride deposition. It also induced a considerable increase in the amounts (expressed as g/100 g of tissue) of saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids (SFA, MUFA), while the amounts of poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) remained unchanged in hinny and Muscovy ducks or slightly increased in Pekin and mule ducks. In breast muscle, overfeeding decreased the activity of the main enzymes involved in lipogenesis from glucose (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, G6PDH, malic enzyme, ME, acetyl CoA carboxylase, ACX). Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity in Pectoralis major muscle was also significantly decreased (-21%). The ability of muscle tissues to catabolize long-chain fatty acids, as assessed by beta-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase (HAD) activity, was increased in Pectoralis major muscle, as was cytochrome-c oxidase (COX) activity. Hybrid and Pekin ducks exhibited higher levels of ACX and LPL activity in Pectoralis major muscle than Muscovy ducks, suggesting a greater ability to synthesise lipids in situ, and to take up circulating lipids. Total lipid content in breast muscle of hybrid and Pekin ducks was higher than in that of Muscovy ducks. In hybrid and Pekin ducks, lipid composition of breast muscle was characterized by higher amounts of triglycerides, SFA and MUFA than in Muscovy ducks. Finally, oxidative metabolism was greater in Pectoralis major muscles of hybrid and Pekin ducks than in Muscovy ducks, suggesting an adaptative strategy of muscle energy metabolism according to lipid level.

  16. Energy deposition and non-equilibrium infared radiation of energetic auroral electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yadong; Gao, Bo; Zhu, Guangsheng; Li, Ziguang

    2016-07-01

    Infrared radiation caused by energetic auroral electrons plays an important role in the thermospheric hear budget, and may be seen as background by infrared surveillance sensors. The auroral electron deposition leads to the ionization, excitation, and dissociation of neutral species(N2,O2,and O), and initiates a series of chemical reaction in the upper atmosphere, finally causes the optical emission of infared excited emitters. In this study, the whole progress from the initial auroral electrons energy deposition to the final infrared emissions has been modeled, which including space plasma, atmospheric physical chemistry, and radiative transfer. The initial atmosphere parameters before auroral disturbing are given by MSIS00 model. The primary electron flux at the top of atmosphere is given by a statistical fitting with the sum of three distribution terms, a power law, a Maxwellian and a Guassian. A semi-emprical model is used in the calculation of energy depositon of single primary electron. The total integral ion pairs production rate is obtained after combining with the initial primary electron flux. The production rate and flux of secondary electrons are modeled with a continuous slow down approximation, using different excitation, ionization, dissociation cross sections of N2, O2, and O to electrons. The photochemical reactions with auroral disturbance is analysed, and its calculation model is established. A "three-step" calculation method is created to obtain number densities of eleven species in the hight between 90-160 km, which containing N2+, O2+, O+, O2+(a4Π), O+(2D), O+(2P), N2(A3Σ), N(2D), N(4S), NO+, and N+. Number densities of different vibraional levels of NO and NO+ are got with steady state assumption, considering 1-12 vibrational levels of NO and 1-14 vibrational levels of NO+. The infared emissions and the spectral lines of the two radiating bodies are calculated with a fuzzy model of spectral band.

  17. Assessing the feasibility of hydrate deposition on pipeline walls--adhesion force measurements of clathrate hydrate particles on carbon steel.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Joseph W; Dieker, Laura E; Sloan, E Dendy; Koh, Carolyn A

    2009-03-15

    Adhesive forces between cyclopentane (CyC5) hydrates and carbon steel (CS) were measured. These forces were found to be substantially lower than CyC5 hydrate-CyC5 hydrate particle measurements and were also lower than ice-CS measurements. The measured adhesive forces were used in a force balance to predict particle removal from the pipeline wall, assuming no free water was present. The force balance predicted entrained hydrate particles of 3 microns and larger diameter would be removed at typical operating flow rates in offshore oil and gas pipelines. These predictions also suggest that hydrate deposition will not occur in stabilized (cold) flow practices.

  18. A non-destructive method for measuring the mechanical properties of ultrathin films prepared by atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qinglin; Xiao, Xingcheng Verbrugge, Mark W.; Cheng, Yang-Tse

    2014-08-11

    The mechanical properties of ultrathin films synthesized by atomic layer deposition (ALD) are critical for the liability of their coated devices. However, it has been a challenge to reliably measure critical properties of ALD films due to the influence from the substrate. In this work, we use the laser acoustic wave (LAW) technique, a non-destructive method, to measure the elastic properties of ultrathin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films by ALD. The measured properties are consistent with previous work using other approaches. The LAW method can be easily applied to measure the mechanical properties of various ALD thin films for multiple applications.

  19. Improving Correlated SERS Measurements with Scanning Electron Microscopy: An Assessment of the Problem Arising from the Deposition of Amorphous Carbon

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Christine H.; Xia, Xiaohu; Xia, Younan

    2013-01-01

    For surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates with nonspherical symmetry, it is critical to correlate spectroscopy measurements with imaging by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). However, the deposition of carbon resulting from e-beam exposure during SEM imaging contaminates the surface of nanoparticles, potentially preventing their further functionalization with Raman probe molecules. In addition, the deposited carbon leads to unwanted background SERS signals. In this study, we systematically investigated the deposition of carbon during SEM imaging and examined how it affects the functionalization of nanoparticles with probe molecules and impacts the detection of SERS signals. Significantly, we found that the carbon could be removed or replaced from the surface of Ag nanoparticles through a chemical or physical means, rendering the nanoparticles the capability for correlated SEM/SERS studies. PMID:23416796

  20. Real-time mass measurement of dust particles deposited on vessel wall in a divertor simulator using quartz crystal microbalances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tateishi, Mizuki; Koga, Kazunori; Katayama, Ryu; Yamashita, Daisuke; Kamataki, Kunihiro; Seo, Hyunwoong; Itagaki, Naho; Shiratani, Masaharu; Ashikawa, Naoko; Masuzaki, Suguru; Nishimura, Kiyohiko; Sagara, Akio

    2015-08-01

    We are developing a dust monitoring method using quartz crystal microbalances (QCMs) equipped with a dust eliminating filter. Here we report a dust eliminating ratio of the filter and first measurement results of the QCMs in a divertor simulator. The volume of spherical dust in unit area on the filter and QCM under the filter were 2.09 × 10-9 and 1.22 × 10-10 m3 m-2, respectively. Thus, the dust eliminating ratio of the filter is 94.2%. The QCM without the filter gives deposition rate due to radicals and dust particles, whereas the QCM with the filter gives deposition rate predominantly due to radicals. From the results, we deduce information of mass fraction of dust particles in deposits.

  1. Field measurements of dry deposition to spruce foliage and petri dishes in the black forest, F.R.G.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanley, James B.

    Dry deposition fluxes of Ca 2+, Mg 2+ , K +, Mn 2+, Pb 2+ and SO 2-4 to spruce foliage and petri dishes were measured in two high-elevation sites ( > 900 m) in the southern Black Forest, F.R.G., during 12 periods (2-7 days, each) from mid-September to mid-November, 1983, In situ extraction of deposited material from small spruce branches allowed repeated use of the same foliar collecting surfaces for a direct comparison of deposition between periods. Fluxes were corrected for leaching of internally cycled constituents using factors determined from serial extraction experiments. The ratio of flux to petri dishes vs foliage ( P/F) was > 1.0 for Ca 2+, Pb 2+ and SO 2-4, and somewhat < 1.0 but more constant for Mg 2+ . Temporal variations in dry deposition fluxes at an exposed site near the industrialized Rhine Valley correlated with variations in total air particulate concentrations at a nearby air quality station. Deposition rates were comparable in magnitude but different in temporal pattern at a remote site in the Black Forest interior. Fluxes at each site reached a minimum during the period of 4-9 November when a regional air inversion confined pollutants to the Rhine Valley below the study sites. High fluxes accompanied the inversion break-up.

  2. Uncertainty Estimation Improves Energy Measurement and Verification Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, Travis; Price, Phillip N.; Sohn, Michael D.

    2014-05-14

    Implementing energy conservation measures in buildings can reduce energy costs and environmental impacts, but such measures cost money to implement so intelligent investment strategies require the ability to quantify the energy savings by comparing actual energy used to how much energy would have been used in absence of the conservation measures (known as the baseline energy use). Methods exist for predicting baseline energy use, but a limitation of most statistical methods reported in the literature is inadequate quantification of the uncertainty in baseline energy use predictions. However, estimation of uncertainty is essential for weighing the risks of investing in retrofits. Most commercial buildings have, or soon will have, electricity meters capable of providing data at short time intervals. These data provide new opportunities to quantify uncertainty in baseline predictions, and to do so after shorter measurement durations than are traditionally used. In this paper, we show that uncertainty estimation provides greater measurement and verification (M&V) information and helps to overcome some of the difficulties with deciding how much data is needed to develop baseline models and to confirm energy savings. We also show that cross-validation is an effective method for computing uncertainty. In so doing, we extend a simple regression-based method of predicting energy use using short-interval meter data. We demonstrate the methods by predicting energy use in 17 real commercial buildings. We discuss the benefits of uncertainty estimates which can provide actionable decision making information for investing in energy conservation measures.

  3. Cantilever stress measurements for pulsed laser deposition of perovskite oxides at 1000 K in an oxygen partial pressure of 10{sup −4} millibars

    SciTech Connect

    Premper, J.; Sander, D.; Kirschner, J.

    2015-03-15

    An in situ stress measurement setup using an optical 2-beam curvature technique is described which is compatible with the stringent growth conditions of pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of perovskite oxides, which involves high substrate temperatures of 1000 K and oxygen partial pressures of up to 1 × 10{sup −4} millibars. The stress measurements are complemented by medium energy electron diffraction (MEED), Auger electron spectroscopy, and additional growth rate monitoring by a quartz microbalance. A shielded filament is used to allow for simultaneous stress and MEED measurements at high substrate temperatures. A computer-controlled mirror scans an excimer laser beam over a stationary PLD target. This avoids mechanical noise originating from rotating PLD targets, and the setup does not suffer from limited lifetime issues of ultra high vacuum (UHV) rotary feedthroughs.

  4. Calorimetric measurement of energy of ultrasonic cleaners

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, W.B.

    1994-11-01

    The development of a calorimeter that measured the power within an ultrasonic cleaning tank is presented. The principle involved is explained. Several types of calorimeter that were tested are described. Measurement of the power in an ultrasonic cleaner permits: (1) comparing different ultrasonic cleaners; (2) monitoring the performance of a specific cleaner; (3) measuring the distribution of power in a cleaning tank, and (4) evaluating the effects of process variables on the power.

  5. Precipitation-chemistry measurements from the California Acid Deposition Monitoring Program, 1985-1990

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanchard, Charles L.; Tonnessen, Kathy A.

    1993-01-01

    The configuration of the California Acid Deposition Monitoring Program (CADMP) precipitation network is described and quality assurance results summarized. Comparison of CADMP and the National Acid Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) data at four parallel sites indicated that mean depth-weighted differences were less than 3 μeq ℓ−1 for all ions, being statistically significant for ammonium, sulfate and hydrogen ion. These apparently small differences were 15–30% of the mean concentrations of ammonium, sulfate and hydrogen ion. Mean depth-weighted concentrations and mass deposition rates for the period 1985–1990 are summarized; the latter were highest either where concentrations or precipitation depths were relatively high.

  6. Depositional controls on coal distribution and quality in the Eocene Brunner Coal Measures, Buller Coalfield, South Island, New Zealand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flores, R.M.; Sykes, R.

    1996-01-01

    The Buller Coalfield on the West Coast of the South Island, New Zealand, contains the Eocene Brunner Coal Measures. The coal measures unconformably overlie Paleozoic-Cretaceous basement rocks and are conformably overlain by, and laterally interfinger with, the Eocene marine Kaiata Formation. This study examines the lithofacies frameworks of the coal measures in order to interpret their depositional environments. The lower part of the coal measures is dominated by conglomeratic lithofacies that rest on a basal erosional surface and thicken in paleovalleys incised into an undulating peneplain surface. These lithofacies are overlain by sandstone, mudstone and organic-rich lithofacies of the upper part of the coal measures. The main coal seam of the organic-rich lithofacies is thick (10-20 m), extensive, locally split, and locally absent. This seam and associated coal seams in the Buller Coalfield are of low- to high-volatile bituminous rank (vitrinite reflectance between 0.65% and 1.75%). The main seam contains a variable percentage of ash and sulphur. These values are related to the thickening and areal distribution of the seam, which in turn, were controlled by the nature of clastic deposition and peat-forming mire systems, marine transgression and local tidal incursion. The conglomeratic lithofacies represent deposits of trunk and tributary braided streams that rapidly aggraded incised paleovalleys during sea-level stillstands. The main seam represents a deposit of raised mires that initially developed as topogenous mires on abandoned margins of inactive braidbelts. Peat accumulated in mires as a response to a rise in the water table, probably initially due to gradual sea-level rise and climate, and the resulting raised topography served as protection from floods. The upper part of the coal measures consists of sandstone lithofacies of flu vial origin and bioturbated sandstone, mudstone and organic-rich lithofacies, which represent deposits of paralic (deltaic

  7. Investigation of various energy deposition kernel refinements for the convolution/superposition method

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jessie Y.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Mirkovic, Dragan; Followill, David S.; Kry, Stephen F.; Eklund, David; Childress, Nathan L.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Several simplifications used in clinical implementations of the convolution/superposition (C/S) method, specifically, density scaling of water kernels for heterogeneous media and use of a single polyenergetic kernel, lead to dose calculation inaccuracies. Although these weaknesses of the C/S method are known, it is not well known which of these simplifications has the largest effect on dose calculation accuracy in clinical situations. The purpose of this study was to generate and characterize high-resolution, polyenergetic, and material-specific energy deposition kernels (EDKs), as well as to investigate the dosimetric impact of implementing spatially variant polyenergetic and material-specific kernels in a collapsed cone C/S algorithm.Methods: High-resolution, monoenergetic water EDKs and various material-specific EDKs were simulated using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code. Polyenergetic kernels, reflecting the primary spectrum of a clinical 6 MV photon beam at different locations in a water phantom, were calculated for different depths, field sizes, and off-axis distances. To investigate the dosimetric impact of implementing spatially variant polyenergetic kernels, depth dose curves in water were calculated using two different implementations of the collapsed cone C/S method. The first method uses a single polyenergetic kernel, while the second method fully takes into account spectral changes in the convolution calculation. To investigate the dosimetric impact of implementing material-specific kernels, depth dose curves were calculated for a simplified titanium implant geometry using both a traditional C/S implementation that performs density scaling of water kernels and a novel implementation using material-specific kernels.Results: For our high-resolution kernels, we found good agreement with the Mackie et al. kernels, with some differences near the interaction site for low photon energies (<500 keV). For our spatially variant polyenergetic kernels, we found

  8. Direct temperature measurements of deposits, Mount St. Helens, Washington, 1980-1981

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banks, N.G.; Hoblitt, R.P.

    1996-01-01

    A program of temperature studies of the eruptive products of Mount St. Helens was established May 20, 1980, just 2 days after the catastrophic eruption of May 18. In general, the more recent deposits were emplaced at higher temperatures than the earlier ones. Emplacement temperatures of deposits of the debris avalanche of May 18 ranged from about 70 to 100 deg C, of the directed blast of May 18 from about 100 to 325 deg C (depending on azimuth from the vent), and of the subsequent pumiceous pyroclastic flows from about 300 to 850 deg C. Temperatures of the summit domes were as high as 897 deg C.

  9. A mechanism of wave drag reduction in the thermal energy deposition experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markhotok, A.

    2015-06-01

    Many experimental studies report reduced wave drag when thermal energy is deposited in the supersonic flow upstream of a body. Though a large amount of research on this topic has been accumulated, the exact mechanism of the drag reduction is still unknown. This paper is to fill the gap in the understanding connecting multiple stages of the observed phenomena with a single mechanism. The proposed model provides an insight on the origin of the chain of subsequent transformations in the flow leading to the reduction in wave drag, such as typical deformations of the front, changes in the gas pressure and density in front of the body, the odd shapes of the deflection signals, and the shock wave extinction in the plasma area. The results of numerical simulation based on the model are presented for three types of plasma parameter distribution. The spherical and cylindrical geometry has been used to match the data with the experimental observations. The results demonstrate full ability of the model to exactly explain all the features observed in the drag reduction experiments. Analytical expressions used in the model allow separating out a number of adjustment parameters that can be used to optimize thermal energy input and thus achieve fundamentally lower drag values than that of conventional approaches.

  10. A mechanism of wave drag reduction in the thermal energy deposition experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Markhotok, A.

    2015-06-15

    Many experimental studies report reduced wave drag when thermal energy is deposited in the supersonic flow upstream of a body. Though a large amount of research on this topic has been accumulated, the exact mechanism of the drag reduction is still unknown. This paper is to fill the gap in the understanding connecting multiple stages of the observed phenomena with a single mechanism. The proposed model provides an insight on the origin of the chain of subsequent transformations in the flow leading to the reduction in wave drag, such as typical deformations of the front, changes in the gas pressure and density in front of the body, the odd shapes of the deflection signals, and the shock wave extinction in the plasma area. The results of numerical simulation based on the model are presented for three types of plasma parameter distribution. The spherical and cylindrical geometry has been used to match the data with the experimental observations. The results demonstrate full ability of the model to exactly explain all the features observed in the drag reduction experiments. Analytical expressions used in the model allow separating out a number of adjustment parameters that can be used to optimize thermal energy input and thus achieve fundamentally lower drag values than that of conventional approaches.

  11. Atmospheric Deposition of Metals and Organics onto Massachusetts and Cape COD Bays: a Comparison of Measurement Techniques and Source Apportionment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underhill, Jeffrey T.

    Toxic materials enter Massachusetts and Cape Cod Bays in many different ways. While most pollutants enter the Bay area by means of direct source outfalls, river outflow and storm water runoff, a significant amount of certain materials come from the atmosphere. Pollutants in the atmosphere, both gaseous and particles eventually settle to the ground or are washed out of the air by precipitation. In many locations atmospheric deposition provides a significant contribution to surface water contamination. The deposition of atmospheric pollutants onto Massachusetts Bay and Cape Cod Bay was measured using wet/dry collection buckets at two locations along the shores of the Bay area: Nahant, 16 km northeast of Boston, and Truro, Cape Cod, 100 km southeast of Boston. A dichotomous sampler was also used at Nahant to collect atmospheric aerosols. Collected samples were analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) and Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) for select toxic metals. Analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was performed by Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS). Dry deposition of most toxic metals were found to be higher at Nahant compared to Truro. Conversely, wet deposition rates were generally higher at Truro most likely due to transport from regional sources. Altogether, regional sources are believed to be the primary contributors of metals to the Bays. PAH deposition rates were higher at Nahant. Local sources are believed to be the primary contributors of PAH deposition. Metals and their compounds appear to have a longer residence time in the atmosphere than the organic PAH. Estimated deposition to Massachusetts and Cape Cod Bays compares favorably to the results presented in a 1991 study by Menzie-Cura Associates. Current estimates of total deposition of cadmium, cobalt, copper, nickel and lead to the surface waters of the Bay region are lower than the Menzie-Cura study. Chromium, antimony, manganese, selenium

  12. High Energy Measurement of the Deuteron Photodisintegration Differential Cross Section

    SciTech Connect

    Elaine Schulte

    2002-05-01

    New measurements of the high energy deuteron photodisintegration differential cross section were made at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, Virginia. Two experiments were performed. Experiment E96-003 was performed in experimental Hall C. The measurements were designed to extend the highest energy differential cross section values to 5.5 GeV incident photon energy at forward angles. This builds upon previous high energy measurements in which scaling consistent with the pQCD constituent counting rules was observed at 90 degrees and 70 degrees in the center of mass. From the new measurements, a threshold for the onset of constituent counting rule scaling seems present at transverse momentum approximately 1.3 GeV/c. The second experiment, E99-008, was performed in experimental Hall A. The measurements were designed to explore the angular distribution of the differential cross section at constant energy. The measurements were made symmetric about 90 degrees

  13. Evaluation of energy deposition and secondary particle production in proton therapy of brain using a slab head phantom

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Sayyed Bijan; Hadizadeh, Mohammad Hadi; Mowlavi, Ali Asghar; Loushab, Mahdy Ebrahimi

    2014-01-01

    Aim Evaluation of energy deposition of protons in human brain and calculation of the secondary neutrons and photons produced by protons in proton therapy. Background Radiation therapy is one of the main methods of treating localized cancer tumors. The use of high energy proton beam in radiotherapy was proposed almost 60 years ago. In recent years, there has been a revival of interest in this subject in the context of radiation therapy. High energy protons suffer little angular deflection and have a well-defined penetration range, with a sharp increase in the energy loss at the end of their trajectories, namely the Bragg peak. Materials and methods A slab head phantom was used for the purpose of simulating proton therapy in brain tissue. In this study simulation was carried out using the Monte Carlo MCNPX code. Results By using mono energetic proton pencil beams, energy depositions in tissues, especially inside the brain, as well as estimating the neutron and photon production as a result of proton interactions in the body, together with their energy spectra, were calculated or obtained. The amount of energy escaped from the head by secondary neutrons and photons was determined. Conclusions It was found that for high energy proton beams the amount of escaped energy by neutrons is almost 10 times larger than that by photons. We estimated that at 110 MeV beam energy, the overall proton energy “leaked” from the head by secondary photons and neutrons to be around 1%. PMID:25337410

  14. Measuring industrial energy efficiency: Physical volume versus economic value

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, S.L.; Niefer, M.J.; Roop, J.M.

    1996-12-01

    This report examines several different measures of industrial output for use in constructing estimates of industrial energy efficiency and discusses some reasons for differences between the measures. Estimates of volume-based measures of output, as well as 3 value-based measures of output (value of production, value of shipments, and value added), are evaluated for 15 separate 4-digit industries. Volatility, simple growth rate, and trend growth rate estimates are made for each industry and each measure of output. Correlations are made between the volume- and value-based measures of output. Historical energy use data are collected for 5 of the industries for making energy- intensity estimates. Growth rates in energy use, energy intensity, and correlations between volume- and value-based measures of energy intensity are computed. There is large variability in growth trend estimates both long term and from year to year. While there is a high correlation between volume- and value-based measures of output for a few industries, typically the correlation is low, and this is exacerbated for estimates of energy intensity. Analysis revealed reasons for these low correlations. It appears that substantial work must be done before reliable measures of trends in the energy efficiency of industry can be accurately characterized.

  15. Solar energy control system. [temperature measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, J. R. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A solar energy control system for a hot air type solar energy heating system wherein thermocouples are arranged to sense the temperature of a solar collector, a space to be heated, and a top and bottom of a heat storage unit is disclosed. Pertinent thermocouples are differentially connected together, and these are employed to effect the operation of dampers, a fan, and an auxiliary heat source. In accomplishing this, the differential outputs from the thermocouples are amplified by a single amplifier by multiplexing techniques. Additionally, the amplifier is corrected as to offset by including as one multiplex channel a common reference signal.

  16. Effect of the interplanetary magnetic field orientation and intensity in the mass and energy deposition on the Hermean surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, J.; Pantellini, F.; Moncuquet, M.

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study is to simulate the interaction between the solar wind and the Hermean magnetosphere. We use the MHD code PLUTO in spherical coordinates with an axisymmetric multipolar expansion of the Hermean magnetic field, to perform a set of simulations with different interplanetary magnetic field orientations and intensities. We fix the hydrodynamic parameters of the solar wind to study the distortions driven by the interplanetary magnetic field in the topology of the Hermean magnetosphere, leading to variations of the mass and energy deposition distributions, the integrated mass deposition, the oval aperture, the area covered by open magnetic field lines and the regions of efficient particle sputtering on the planet surface. The simulations show a correlation between the reconnection regions and the local maxima of plasma inflow and energy deposition on the planet surface.

  17. Public Schools Energy Conservation Measures: Management Summaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of School Administrators, Washington, DC.

    This report is a summary of the first of five phases of a demonstration project of energy conservation school building modifications. The ten schools studied in this phase were selected as typical of the variations of building design, construction, and location for schools in this country. Given in this report are: (1) descriptions of the schools…

  18. Instrumentation for measuring energy inputs to implements

    SciTech Connect

    Tompkins, F.D.; Wilhelm, L.R.

    1981-01-01

    A microcomputer-based instrumentation system for monitoring tractor operating parameters and energy inputs to implements was developed and mounted on a 75-power-takeoff-KW tractor. The instrumentation system, including sensors and data handling equipment, is discussed. 10 refs.

  19. On the high energy proton spectrum measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellsworth, R. W.; Ito, A.; Macfall, J.; Siohan, F.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Tonwar, S. C.; Vishwanath, P. R.; Yodh, G. B.; Balasubrahmanyan, V. K.

    1977-01-01

    The steepening of the proton spectrum beyond 1000 GeV and the rise in inelastic cross sections between 20 and 600 GeV observed by the PROTON-1-2-3 satellite experiments were explained by systematic effects of energy dependent albedo (backscatter) from the calorimeter.

  20. DEPOSITION AND REMOVAL OF FUGITIVE DUST IN THE ARID SOUTHWESTERN UNITED STATES: MEASUREMENTS AND MODEL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This work was motivated by the need to better reconcile emission factors for fugitive dust with the amount of geologic material found on ambient filter samples. The deposition of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 10 µm (PM10), generated...

  1. Measuring fracture energy under coseismic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Stefan; Spagnuolo, Elena; Violay, Marie; Smith, Steven; Scarlato, Pier-Giorgio; Romeo, Gianni; Di Felice, Fabio; Di Toro, Giulio

    2013-04-01

    Experiments performed on rocks at deformation conditions typical of seismic slip, show an extremely low friction coefficient, the activation of lubrication processes and a power-law strength decay from a peak value to a residual, steady-state value. The weakening curve has an initially very abrupt decay which can be approximated by a power-law. The resulting experimental fracture energy (defined, for a given slip amount u, as the integral between the frictional curve and the minimum frictional level reached ?f(u)) scales on most of the slip range as G ? uα, a power-law in some aspects in agreement with the seismological estimates of G'? u1.28 proposed by Abercrombie and Rice (2005). The values of G and G' are comparable for slips of about u = 1cm (G ? 104 J/m2). Both gradually increase with slip up to about 106 J/m2, however, it appears that fracture energy G' is slightly larger than G in the range of slip 0.1 < u < 10. The effective G' observed at the seismological scale should implicitly incorporate energy sinks other than frictional dissipation alone, which we discuss (anelastic damage due to high off-fault dynamic stress close to the rupture tip; dissipation during slip-localizing process within fault gouge of finite thickness; strain accomodating fault roughness at different scales). Since G' is obtained by estimating the amount of dissipation with respect to strain energy and radiated energy, it will implicitly incorporate the sum of all dissipative processes due to rupture propagation and fault slip. From the comparison of G obtained in the lab and in earthquakes, it appears that friction alone explains most of the dissipation, except maybe at the larger magnitudes.

  2. Mass and energy deposition effects of implanted ions on solid sodium formate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiangqin; Shao, Chunlin; Yao, Jianming; Yu, Zengliang

    2000-07-01

    Solid sodium formate was implanted by low energy N +, H +, and Ar + ions. Measured with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR), it was observed that new CH 2, CH 3 groups and COO - radical ion were produced in the implanted sodium formate. Analyzing with the highly sensitive ninhydrin reaction, it was found that a new NH 2 functional group was formed upon N + ion implantation, and its yield increased along with implantation dose but decreased with the ion's energy.

  3. Down to Earth Solar Energy Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oppegard, Milo

    1975-01-01

    Describes the construction of a calorimeter to be used in an experiment which consists of measuring the rate at which ground level solar radiation raises the temperature of the metal in the calorimeter. (GS)

  4. Super-Eddington stellar winds driven by near-surface energy deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quataert, Eliot; Fernández, Rodrigo; Kasen, Daniel; Klion, Hannah; Paxton, Bill

    2016-05-01

    We develop analytic and numerical models of the properties of super-Eddington stellar winds, motivated by phases in stellar evolution when super-Eddington energy deposition (via, e.g. unstable fusion, wave heating, or a binary companion) heats a region near the stellar surface. This appears to occur in the giant eruptions of luminous blue variables (LBVs), Type IIn supernovae progenitors, classical novae, and X-ray bursts. We show that when the wind kinetic power exceeds Eddington, the photons are trapped and behave like a fluid. Convection does not play a significant role in the wind energy transport. The wind properties depend on the ratio of a characteristic speed in the problem v_crit˜ (dot{E} G)^{1/5} (where dot{E} is the heating rate) to the stellar escape speed near the heating region vesc(rh). For vcrit ≳ vesc(rh), the wind kinetic power at large radii dot{E}_w ˜ dot{E}. For vcrit ≲ vesc(rh), most of the energy is used to unbind the wind material and thus dot{E}_w ≲ dot{E}. Multidimensional hydrodynamic simulations without radiation diffusion using FLASH and one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations with radiation diffusion using MESA are in good agreement with the analytic predictions. The photon luminosity from the wind is itself super-Eddington but in many cases the photon luminosity is likely dominated by `internal shocks' in the wind. We discuss the application of our models to eruptive mass-loss from massive stars and argue that the wind models described here can account for the broad properties of LBV outflows and the enhanced mass-loss in the years prior to Type IIn core-collapse supernovae.

  5. In situ growth rate measurements during plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition of vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotube films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jönsson, M.; Nerushev, O. A.; Campbell, E. E. B.

    2007-08-01

    In situ laser reflectivity measurements are used to monitor the growth of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) films grown by DC plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) from an iron catalyst film deposited on a silicon wafer. In contrast to thermal CVD growth, there is no initial increase in the growth rate; instead, the initial growth rate is high (as much as 10 µm min-1) and then drops off rapidly to reach a steady level (2 µm min-1) for times beyond 1 min. We show that a limiting factor for growing thick films of multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs) using PECVD can be the formation of an amorphous carbon layer at the top of the growing nanotubes. In situ reflectivity measurements provide a convenient technique for detecting the onset of the growth of this layer.

  6. Measuring energy efficiency in the United States` economy: A beginning

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    Energy efficiency is a vital component of the Nation`s energy strategy. One of the Department of Energy`s missions are to promote energy efficiency to help the Nation manage its energy resources. The ability to define and measure energy efficiency is essential to this objective. In the absence of consistent defensible measures, energy efficiency is a vague, subjective concept that engenders directionless speculation and confusion rather than insightful analysis. The task of defining and measuring energy efficiency and creating statistical measures as descriptors is a daunting one. This publication is not a final product, but is EIA`s first attempt to define and measure energy efficiency in a systematic and robust manner for each of the sectors and the United States economy as a whole. In this process, EIA has relied on discussions, customer reviews, in-house reviews, and seminars that have focused on energy efficiency in each of the sectors. EIA solicits the continued participation of its customers in further refining this work.

  7. Establishing Measurement Criteria for an Energy Literacy Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWaters, Jan; Powers, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Energy literacy is a broad term encompassing content knowledge as well as a citizenship understanding of energy that includes affective and behavioral aspects. This article presents explicit criteria that will serve as a foundation for developing measurable objectives for energy literacy in three dimensions: cognitive (knowledge, cognitive…

  8. ASTM E 1559 method for measuring material outgassing/deposition kinetics has applications to aerospace, electronics, and semiconductor industries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, J. W.; Glassford, A. P. M.; Steakley, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    The American Society for Testing and Materials has published a new standard test method for characterizing time and temperature-dependence of material outgassing kinetics and the deposition kinetics of outgassed species on surfaces at various temperatures. This new ASTM standard, E 1559(1), uses the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) collection measurement approach. The test method was originally developed under a program sponsored by the United States Air Force Materials Laboratory (AFML) to create a standard test method for obtaining outgassing and deposition kinetics data for spacecraft materials. Standardization by ASTM recognizes that the method has applications beyond aerospace. In particular, the method will provide data of use to the electronics, semiconductor, and high vacuum industries. In ASTM E 1559 the material sample is held in vacuum in a temperature-controlled effusion cell, while its outgassing flux impinges on several QCM's which view the orifice of the effusion cell. Sample isothermal total mass loss (TML) is measured as a function of time from the mass collected on one of the QCM's which is cooled by liquid nitrogen, and the view factor from this QCM to the cell. The amount of outgassed volatile condensable material (VCM) on surfaces at higher temperatures is measured as a function of time during the isothermal outgassing test by controlling the temperatures of the remaining QCM's to selected values. The VCM on surfaces at temperatures in between those of the collector QCM's is determined at the end of the isothermal test by heating the QCM's at a controlled rate and measuring the mass loss from the end of the QCM's as a function of time and temperature. This reevaporation of the deposit collected on the QCM's is referred to as QCM thermogravimetric analysis. Isothermal outgassing and deposition rates can be determined by differentiating the isothermal TML and VCM data, respectively, while the evaporation rates of the species can be obtained as a

  9. Measuring phase shifts and energy dissipation with amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Nicolás F; García, Ricardo

    2006-04-14

    By recording the phase angle difference between the excitation force and the tip response in amplitude modulation AFM it is possible to image compositional variations in heterogeneous samples. In this contribution we address some of the experimental issues relevant to perform phase contrast imaging measurements. Specifically, we study the dependence of the phase shift on the tip-surface separation, interaction regime, cantilever parameters, free amplitude and tip-surface dissipative processes. We show that phase shift measurements can be converted into energy dissipation values. Energy dissipation curves show a maximum (∼10 eV/cycle) with the amplitude ratio. Furthermore, energy dissipation maps provide a robust method to image material properties because they do not depend directly on the tip-surface interaction regime. Compositional contrast images are illustrated by imaging conjugated molecular islands deposited on silicon surfaces. PMID:21727409

  10. Measuring phase shifts and energy dissipation with amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Nicolás F; García, Ricardo

    2006-04-14

    By recording the phase angle difference between the excitation force and the tip response in amplitude modulation AFM it is possible to image compositional variations in heterogeneous samples. In this contribution we address some of the experimental issues relevant to perform phase contrast imaging measurements. Specifically, we study the dependence of the phase shift on the tip-surface separation, interaction regime, cantilever parameters, free amplitude and tip-surface dissipative processes. We show that phase shift measurements can be converted into energy dissipation values. Energy dissipation curves show a maximum (∼10 eV/cycle) with the amplitude ratio. Furthermore, energy dissipation maps provide a robust method to image material properties because they do not depend directly on the tip-surface interaction regime. Compositional contrast images are illustrated by imaging conjugated molecular islands deposited on silicon surfaces.

  11. Modeling dose deposition and DNA damage due to low-energy β(-) emitters.

    PubMed

    Alloni, D; Cutaia, C; Mariotti, L; Friedland, W; Ottolenghi, A

    2014-09-01

    One of the main issues of low-energy internal emitters concerns the very short ranges of the beta particles, versus the dimensions of the biological targets. Depending on the chemical form, the radionuclide may be more concentrated either in the cytoplasm or in the nucleus of the target cell. Consequently, since in most cases conventional dosimetry neglects this issue it may overestimate or underestimate the dose to the nucleus and hence the biological effects. To assess the magnitude of these deviations and to provide a realistic evaluation of the localized energy deposition by low-energy internal emitters, the biophysical track-structure code PARTRAC was used to calculate nuclear doses, DNA damage yields and fragmentation patterns for different localizations of radionuclides in human interphase fibroblasts. The nuclides considered in the simulations were tritium and nickel-63, which emit electrons with average energies of 5.7 (range in water of 0.42 μm) and 17 keV (range of 5 μm), respectively, covering both very short and medium ranges of beta-decay products. The simulation results showed that the largest deviations from the conventional dosimetry occur for inhomogeneously distributed short-range emitters. For uniformly distributed radionuclides selectively in the cytoplasm but excluded from the cell nucleus, the dose in the nucleus is 15% of the average dose in the cell in the case of tritium but 64% for nickel-63. Also, the numbers of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and the distributions of DNA fragments depend on subcellular localization of the radionuclides. In the low- and medium-dose regions investigated here, DSB numbers are proportional to the nuclear dose, with about 50 DSB/Gy for both studied nuclides. In addition, DSB numbers on specific chromosomes depend on the radionuclide localization in the cell as well, with chromosomes located more peripherally in the cell nucleus being more damaged by short-ranged emitters in cytoplasm compared with chromosomes

  12. Effect of deposition energy on the microstructure and phase purity of pulsed laser deposited iron fluoride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Ortiz, Reinaldo; Jha, Jitendra Kumar; Rojhirunsakool, Tanaporn; Dendge, Nilesh; Banerjee, Rajarshi; Shepherd, Nigel D.

    2015-09-01

    Conversion material electrodes, such as FeF2, possess the potential to deliver transformative improvements in lithium-ion battery performance because they permit a reversible change of more than one Li-ion per 3d metal cation. Nanostructured thin films provide a model platform for obtaining basic insight to the structural and chemical underpinnings of the phase conversion processes, provided that they can be grown with a high degree of phase purity and the required microstructure. The results from X-ray diffraction and scanning and transmission electron microscopies together with electron energy loss spectroscopy indicate that at low supersaturation and growth rate, porous films and secondary phases are obtained. Good phase purity and dense nanostructured films were obtained at high surface supersaturation. The growth mechanism is three dimensional and is governed by direct supersaturation of the growth surface and the number of stable critical nuclei formed at a given substrate temperature.

  13. Use of Atomic Layer Deposition to Improve the Stability of Silver Substrates for In-Situ, High Temperature SERS Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    John, Joshy; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Dai, Sheng; Sepaniak, Michael

    2010-01-01

    A method to stabilize silver surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrates for in-situ, high temperature applications is demonstrated. Silver island films grown by thermal evaporation were coated with a thin layer (from 2.5nm to 5nm) of alumina by atomic layer deposition (ALD), which protects and stabilizes the SERS-active substrate without eliminating the Raman enhancement. The temporal stability of the alumina-coated silver island films was examined by measurement of the Raman intensity of rhodamine 6G molecules deposited onto bare and alumina-coated silver substrates over the course of thirty-four days. The coated substrates showed almost no change in SERS enhancement while the uncoated substrates exhibited a significant decrease in Raman intensity. To demonstrate the feasibility of the alumina-coated silver substrate as a probe of adsorbates and reactions at elevated temperatures, an in-situ SERS measurement of calcium nitrate tetrahydrate on bare and alumina-coated silver was performed at temperatures ranging from 25 C to 400 C. ALD deposition of an ultrathin alumina layer significantly improved the thermal stability of the SERS substrate thus enabling in-situ detection of the dehydration of the calcium nitrate tetrahydrate at elevated temperature. Despite some loss of Raman signal, the coated substrate exhibited greater thermal stability compared to the uncoated substrate. These experiments show that ALD can be used to synthesize stable SERS substrates capable of measuring adsorbates and processes at high temperature.

  14. The angular dependence of an Si energy deposition spectrometer response at several radiation sources.

    PubMed

    Spurný, Frantisek; Trompier, François; Bottollier-Depois, Jean-François

    2005-06-01

    An MDU-Liulin spectrometer based on an Si-diode was mainly used during the last few years with the goal to use them for measurements onboard aircraft. To investigate its ability to obtain such measurements, the detector was tested in some radiation reference fields, like 60Co and other photon beams, neutrons of an AmBe and 252Cf sources and in high-energy radiation fields at CERN. Due to the high geometrical asymmetry of the Si-diode semiconductor, an angular dependence of the response would be expected. This work presents analyses and discusses the results of angular dependence studies obtained at the different radiation sources mentioned. It was found that these angular dependences vary with the type and energy of radiation. The influence of these variations on the use as a dosimeter onboard aircraft is also studied and discussed.

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of electron depth distribution and backscattering for carbon films deposited on aluminium as a function of incidence angle and primary energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dapor, Maurizio

    2005-01-01

    Carbon films are deposited on various substrates (polymers, polyester fabrics, polyester yarns, metal alloys) both for experimental and technological motivations (medical devices, biocompatible coatings, food package and so on). Computational studies of the penetration of electron beams in supported thin film of carbon are very useful in order to compare the simulated results with analytical techniques data (obtained by scanning electron microscopy and/or Auger electron spectroscopy) and investigate the film characteristics. In the present paper, the few keV electron depth distribution and backscattering coefficient for the special case of film of carbon deposited on aluminium are investigated, by a Monte Carlo simulation, as a function of the incidence angle and primary electron energy. The simulated results can be used as a way to evaluate the carbon film thickness by a set of measurements of the backscattering coefficient.

  16. Neutron Energy Measurements in Radiological Emergency Response Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay, Paul Guss, Michael Hornish, Scott Wilde, Tom Stampahar, Michael Reed

    2009-04-30

    We present significant results in recent advances in the determination of neutron energy. Neutron energy measurements are a small but very significant part of radiological emergency response applications. Mission critical information can be obtained by analyzing the neutron energy given off from radioactive materials. In the case of searching for special nuclear materials, neutron energy information from an unknown source can be of paramount importance.

  17. Effect of wall thickness on measurement of dose for high energy neutrons.

    PubMed

    Perez-Nunez, Delia; Braby, Leslie A

    2010-01-01

    Neutrons produced from the interaction between galactic cosmic rays and spacecraft materials are responsible for a very important portion of the dose received by astronauts. The neutron energy spectrum depends on the incident charged particle spectrum and the scattering environment but generally extends to beyond 100 MeV. Tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPC) are used to measure the dose during the space mission, but their weight and size are very important factors for their design and construction. To achieve ideal neutron dosimetry, the wall thickness should be at least the range of a proton having the maximum energy of the neutrons to be monitored. This proton range is 0.1 cm for 10 MeV neutrons and 7.6 cm for 100 MeV neutrons. A 7.6 cm wall thickness TEPC would provide charged particle equilibrium (CPE) for neutrons up to 100 MeV, but for space applications it would not be reasonable in terms of weight and size. In order to estimate the errors in measured dose due to absence of CPE, MCNPX simulations of energy deposited by 10 MeV and 100 MeV neutrons in sites with wall thickness between 0.1 cm and 8.5 cm were performed. The results for 100 MeV neutrons show that energy deposition per incident neutron approaches a plateau as the wall thickness approaches 7.6 cm. For the 10 MeV neutrons, energy deposition per incident neutron decreases as the wall thickness increases above 0.1 cm due to attenuation. PMID:19959949

  18. Effect of wall thickness on measurement of dose for high energy neutrons.

    PubMed

    Perez-Nunez, Delia; Braby, Leslie A

    2010-01-01

    Neutrons produced from the interaction between galactic cosmic rays and spacecraft materials are responsible for a very important portion of the dose received by astronauts. The neutron energy spectrum depends on the incident charged particle spectrum and the scattering environment but generally extends to beyond 100 MeV. Tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPC) are used to measure the dose during the space mission, but their weight and size are very important factors for their design and construction. To achieve ideal neutron dosimetry, the wall thickness should be at least the range of a proton having the maximum energy of the neutrons to be monitored. This proton range is 0.1 cm for 10 MeV neutrons and 7.6 cm for 100 MeV neutrons. A 7.6 cm wall thickness TEPC would provide charged particle equilibrium (CPE) for neutrons up to 100 MeV, but for space applications it would not be reasonable in terms of weight and size. In order to estimate the errors in measured dose due to absence of CPE, MCNPX simulations of energy deposited by 10 MeV and 100 MeV neutrons in sites with wall thickness between 0.1 cm and 8.5 cm were performed. The results for 100 MeV neutrons show that energy deposition per incident neutron approaches a plateau as the wall thickness approaches 7.6 cm. For the 10 MeV neutrons, energy deposition per incident neutron decreases as the wall thickness increases above 0.1 cm due to attenuation.

  19. Measurement of residual stresses in deposited films of SOFC component materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, T.; Momma, A.; Nagata, S.; Kasuga, Y.

    1996-12-31

    The stress induced in Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC)s has important influence on the lifetime of SOFC. But the data on stress in SOFC and mechanical properties of SOW component materials have not been accumulated enough to manufacture SOFC. Especially, the data of La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} cathode and La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}CrO{sub 3} interconnection have been extremely limited. We have estimated numerically the dependences of residual stress in SOFC on the material properties, the cell structure and the fabrication temperatures of the components, but these unknown factors have caused obstruction to simulate the accurate behavior of residual stress. Therefore, the residual stresses in deposited La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} and La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}CrO{sub 3} films are researched by the observation of the bending behavior of the substrate strips. The films of SOFC component materials were prepared by the RF sputtering method, because: (1) It can fabricate dense films of poor sinterable material such as La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}CrO{sub 3} compared with sintering or plasma spray method. (2) For the complicated material such as perovskite materials, the difference between the composition of a film and that of a target material is generally small. (3) It can fabricate a thick ceramics film by improving of the deposition rate. For example, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thick films of 50{mu}m can be fabricated with the deposition rate of approximately 5{mu}m/h industrially. In this paper, the dependence of residual stress on the deposition conditions is defined and mechanical properties of these materials are estimated from the results of the experiments.

  20. Addressing the ice nucleating abilities of marine aerosol: A combination of deposition mode laboratory and field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladino, L. A.; Yakobi-Hancock, J. D.; Kilthau, W. P.; Mason, R. H.; Si, M.; Li, J.; Miller, L. A.; Schiller, C. L.; Huffman, J. A.; Aller, J. Y.; Knopf, D. A.; Bertram, A. K.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2016-05-01

    This study addresses, through two types of experiments, the potential for the oceans to act as a source of atmospheric ice-nucleating particles (INPs). The INP concentration via deposition mode nucleation was measured in situ at a coastal site in British Columbia in August 2013. The INP concentration at conditions relevant to cirrus clouds (i.e., -40 °C and relative humidity with respect to ice, RHice = 139%) ranged from 0.2 L-1 to 3.3 L-1. Correlations of the INP concentrations with levels of anthropogenic tracers (i.e., CO, SO2, NOx, and black carbon) and numbers of fluorescent particles do not indicate a significant influence from anthropogenic sources or submicron bioaerosols, respectively. Additionally, the INPs measured in the deposition mode showed a poor correlation with the concentration of particles with sizes larger than 500 nm, which is in contrast with observations made in the immersion freezing mode. To investigate the nature of particles that could have acted as deposition INP, laboratory experiments with potential marine aerosol particles were conducted under the ice-nucleating conditions used in the field. At -40 °C, no deposition activity was observed with salt aerosol particles (sodium chloride and two forms of commercial sea salt: Sigma-Aldrich and Instant Ocean), particles composed of a commercial source of natural organic matter (Suwannee River humic material), or particle mixtures of sea salt and humic material. In contrast, exudates from three phytoplankton (Thalassiosira pseudonana, Nanochloris atomus, and Emiliania huxleyi) and one marine bacterium (Vibrio harveyi) exhibited INP activity at low RHice values, down to below 110%. This suggests that the INPs measured at the field site were of marine biological origins, although we cannot rule out other sources, including mineral dust.

  1. Real-time measurement of temperature variation during nanosecond pulsed-laser-induced contamination deposition.

    PubMed

    Kokkinos, Dimitrios; Gailly, Patrick; Georges, Marc P; Tzeremes, Georgios; Rochus, Pierre; Fleury-Frenette, Karl

    2015-12-20

    In this paper, a study of heat generation during UV laser-induced contamination (LIC) and potentially resulting subsequent thermal damage are presented. This becomes increasingly interesting when optics with delicate coatings are involved. During LIC, radiation can interact with outgassing molecules, both in the gas phase and at the surface, thus triggering chemical and photo-fixation reactions. This is a major hazard, in particular for laser units operating under vacuum conditions such as in space applications. The intense photon flux not only affects the contaminant deposition rate but also alters their chemical structure, which can increase their absorption coefficient. Over cumulative irradiation shots, these molecules formed deposits that increasingly absorb photons and produce heat as a by-product of de-excitation, eventually leading to thermal damage. One could better assess the risk of the latter with the knowledge of temperature during the contamination process. For this purpose, a thermoreflectance technique is used here to estimate the temperature variation from pulse to pulse during contamination deposition through the analysis of a temperature-dependent surface reflectance signal.

  2. In vitro Sirius Red collagen assay measures the pattern shift from soluble to deposited collagen.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun; Yang, Shanmin; Zhang, Mei; Zhang, Zhenhuan; Zhang, Bingrong; Han, Deping; Ma, Jun; Wang, Xiaohui; Hong, Jingshen; Guo, Yansong; Okunieff, Paul; Zhang, Lurong

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we compared two in vitro collagen production assays ([(3)H]-proline incorporation and Sirius Red) for their ability to determine the pattern shift from soluble to deposited collagen. The effect of the antifibrotic agent, triptolide (TPL), on collagen production was also studied. The results showed that: (1) 48 h after NIH 3T3 (murine embryo fibroblast) and HFL-1(human fetal lung fibroblast) were exposed to transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β), there was an increase in soluble collagen in the culture medium; (2) on day 4, soluble collagen declined, whereas deposited collagen increased; (3) Sirius Red was easier to use than [(3)H]-proline incorporation and more consistently reflected the collagen pattern shift from soluble to deposited; (4) the in vitro Sirius Red assay took less time than the in vivo assay to determine the effect of TPL. Our results suggest that: (a) the newly synthesized soluble collagen can sensitively evaluate an agent's capacity for collagen production and (b) Sirius Red is more useful than [(3)H]-proline because it is easier to use, more convenient, less time consuming, and does not require radioactive material.

  3. How well do measurements from the IADN Network reflect atmospheric deposition to the Great Lakes?

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, C.W.

    1997-12-31

    Samples of air and precipitation were collected at 9 stations around Lake Michigan during 1994 and 1995 as part of the Lake Michigan Mass Balance Project. The samples were analyzed for PCBs, chlorinated pesticides, PAHs, and trace metals. Concentrations of many of these chemicals in air were 10 to 100 times higher at the stations around southern Lake Michigan compared to those found at remote sites on northern Lake Michigan. Limited shipboard sampling at mid-Lake locations indicates that elevated concentrations of some chemicals can be found in air over wide areas of the lake. In contrast, concentrations of most of the chemicals found in precipitation were very similar at all the stations. It is concluded that use of the results from air sampling at the IADN station on northern Lake Michigan to calculate deposition to the whole lake will underestimate dry deposition in many cases. On the other hand, the IADN data should provide a good estimate of wet deposition to Lake Michigan for most chemicals.

  4. Energy deposition studies for the high-luminosity Large Hadron Collider inner triplet magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhov, N. V.; Rakhno, I. L.; Tropin, I. S.; Cerutti, F.; Esposito, L. S.; Lechner, A.

    2015-05-01

    A detailed model of the high-luminosity LHC inner triplet region with new large-aperture Nb3Sn magnets, field maps, corrector packages, and segmented tungsten inner absorbers was built and implemented into the fluka and mars15 codes. Detailed simulations have been performed coherently with the codes on the impact of particle debris from the 14-TeV center-of-mass pp-collisions on the short- and long-term stability of the inner triplet magnets. After optimizing the absorber configuration, the peak power density averaged over the magnet inner cable width is found to be safely below the quench limit at the luminosity of 5 ×1034 cm-2 s-1 . For the anticipated lifetime integrated luminosity of 3000 fb-1 , the peak dose calculated for the innermost magnet insulator ranges from 20 to 35 MGy, a figure close to the commonly accepted limit. Dynamic heat loads to the triplet magnet cold mass are calculated to evaluate the cryogenic capability. fluka and mars results on energy deposition are in very good agreement.

  5. Influence of the Presence of Tissue Expanders on Energy Deposition for Post-Mastectomy Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Trombetta, Débora M.; Cardoso, Simone C.; Facure, Alessandro; da Silva, Ademir X.; da Rosa, Luiz Antonio R.

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of studies have shown that post-mastectomy radiotherapy presents benefits associated with the patients survival and a significant fraction of the treated patients makes use of tissue expanders for breast reconstruction. Some models of tissue expanders have a magnetic disk on their surface that constitutes heterogeneity in the radiation field, which can affect the dose distribution during the radiotherapy treatment. In this study, the influence of a metallic heterogeneity positioned in a breast tissue expander was evaluated by means of Monte Carlo simulations using the MCNPX code and using Eclipse treatment planning system. Deposited energy values were calculated in structures which have clinical importance for the treatment. Additionally, the effect in the absorbed energy due to backscattering and attenuation of the incident beam caused by the heterogeneity, as well as due to the expansion of the prosthesis, was evaluated in target structures for a 6 MV photon beam by simulations. The dose distributions for a breast treatment were calculated using a convolution/superposition algorithm from the Eclipse treatment planning system. When compared with the smallest breast expander volume, underdosage of 7% was found for the largest volume of breast implant, in the case of frontal irradiation of the chest wall, by Monte Carlo simulations. No significant changes were found in dose distributions for the presence of the heterogeneity during the treatment planning of irradiation with an opposed pair of beams. Even considering the limitation of the treatment planning system, the results obtained with its use confirm those ones found by Monte Carlo simulations for a tangent beam irradiation. The presence of a heterogeneity didńt alters the dose distributions on treatment structures. The underdosage of 7% observed with Monte Carlo simulations were found for irradiation at 0°, not used frequently in a clinical routine. PMID:23405149

  6. Foliar Shielding: How Non-Meteoric Water Deposition Helps Leaves Survive Drought by Reducing Incoming Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlein-Safdi, C.; Sinkler, C. J.; Caylor, K. K.

    2015-12-01

    The uptake of water from the surface of the leaves, called foliar uptake, is common when rainfall is scarce and non-meteoric water (dew or fog) is the only source of water. However, many species have very water repellent leaves. Past studies have not differentiated between the uptake of water and the impact of the droplets on the energy balance of the leaf, which we call 'foliar shielding'. Leaves of the hydrophobic Colocasia esculenta were misted with isotopically enriched water in order to mimic non-meteoric water deposition. The leaf water potential and water isotopes were monitored for different water-stress conditions. A new protocol was developed for the fast analysis of leaf water isotopes using the Picarro induction module coupled to a laser spectrometer. Comparing the isotopic composition of the bulk leaf water at the end of the experiment, the misted leaves exhibit a d-excess higher by c. 63‰ than the control ones (P < 0.001). Low d-excess values are commonly associated with a high transpiration rate. Linking isotopic enrichment with leaf transpiration rate, we find a c. 30% decrease in transpiration rate for the treated leaves compared to the control (P < 0.001). Water-stressed leaves that were misted regularly exhibit a c. 64% smaller decline in water potential than water-stressed leaves that did not get misted (P < 0.05). Three possible mechanisms are proposed for the interaction of water droplets with the leaf energy and water balance. Comparing three previous foliar uptake studies to our results, we conclude that foliar shielding has a comparable yet opposite effect to foliar uptake on leaf water isotopes and that it is necessary to consider both processes when estimating foliar uptake of fog water.

  7. Effects of atmospheric deposition of energy-related pollutants on water quality: a review and assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.J.

    1981-05-01

    The effects on surface-water quality of atmospheric pollutants that are generated during energy production are reviewed and evaluated. Atmospheric inputs from such sources to the aquatic environment may include trace elements, organic compounds, radionuclides, and acids. Combustion is the largest energy-related source of trace-element emissions to the atmosphere. This report reviews the nature of these emissions from coal-fired power plants and discusses their terrestrial and aquatic effects following deposition. Several simple models for lakes and streams are developed and are applied to assess the potential for adverse effects on surface-water quality of trace-element emissions from coal combustion. The probability of acute impacts on the aquatic environment appears to be low; however, more subtle, chronic effects are possible. The character of acid precipitation is reviewed, with emphasis on aquatic effects, and the nature of existing or potential effects on water quality, aquatic biota, and water supply is considered. The response of the aquatic environment to acid precipitation depends on the type of soils and bedrock in a watershed and the chemical characteristics of the water bodies in question. Methods for identifying regions sensitive to acid inputs are reviewed. The observed impact of acid precipitation ranges from no effects to elimination of fish populations. Coal-fired power plants and various stages of the nuclear fuel cycle release radionuclides to the atmosphere. Radioactive releases to the atmosphere from these sources and the possible aquatic effects of such releases are examined. For the nuclear fuel cycle, the major releases are from reactors and reprocessing. Although aquatic effects of atmospheric releases have not been fully quantified, there seems little reason for concern for man or aquatic biota.

  8. Energy and nutrient deposition and excretion in the reproducing sow: model development and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hansen, A V; Strathe, A B; Theil, P K; Kebreab, E

    2014-06-01

    Air and nutrient emissions from swine operations raise environmental concerns. During the reproduction phase, sows consume and excrete large quantities of nutrients. The objective of this study was to develop a mathematical model to describe energy and nutrient partitioning and predict manure excretion and composition and methane emissions on a daily basis. The model was structured to contain gestation and lactation modules, which can be run separately or sequentially, with outputs from the gestation module used as inputs to the lactation module. In the gestating module, energy and protein requirements for maintenance, and fetal and maternal growth were described. In the lactating module, a factorial approach was used to estimate requirements for maintenance, milk production, and maternal growth. The priority for nutrient partitioning was assumed to be in the order of maintenance, milk production, and maternal growth with body tissue losses constrained within biological limits. Global sensitivity analysis showed that nonlinearity in the parameters was small. The model outputs considered were the total protein and fat deposition, average urinary and fecal N excretion, average methane emission, manure carbon excretion, and manure production. The model was evaluated using independent data sets from the literature using root mean square prediction error (RMSPE) and concordance correlation coefficients. The gestation module predicted body fat gain better than body protein gain, which was related to predictions of body fat and protein loss from the lactation model. Nitrogen intake, urine N, fecal N, and milk N were predicted with RMSPE as percentage of observed mean of 9.7, 17.9, 10.0, and 7.7%, respectively. The model provided a framework, but more refinements and improvements in accuracy of prediction (particularly urine N) are required before the model can be used to assess environmental mitigation options from sow operations.

  9. TEM sample preparation using a new nanofabrication technique combining electron-beam-induced deposition and low-energy ion milling.

    PubMed

    Mitsuishi, Kazutaka; Shimojo, Masayuki; Tanaka, Miyoko; Takeguchi, Masaki; Song, Minghui; Furuya, Kazuo

    2006-12-01

    A new TEM sample preparation technique using electron-beam-induced deposition combined with low-energy ion milling was used to fabricate for two different shapes of sample, conical and plate. High-quality HREM images can be obtained from samples prepared by this technique. A desired sample position can be obtained with high accuracy, and the total sample preparation time can be much less than conventional techniques. Because the gas deposition system used can easily be integrated in a conventional SEM, the method can be performed in any laboratory equipped with a SEM and an ion milling machine.

  10. Field measurements of dry deposition to spruce foliage and petri dishes in the Black Forest, F.R.G.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanley, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    Dry deposition fluxes Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, Mn2+, Pb2+ and SO42- to spruce foliage and petri dishes were measured in two high-elevation sites (>900 m) in the southern Black Forest, F.R.G., during 12 periods (2-7 days, each) from mid-September to mid-November, 1983, In situ extraction of deposited material from small spruce branches allowed repeated use of the same foliar collecting surfaces for a direct comparison of deposition between periods. Fluxes were corrected for leaching of internally cycled constituents using factors determined from serial extraction experiments. The ratio of flux to petri dishes vs foliage (P/F) was >1.0 for Ca2+, Pb2+ and SO42-, and somewhat 900 m) in the southern Black Forest, F.R.G., during 12 periods (2-7 days, each) from mid-September to mid-November, 1983. The ratio of flux to petri dishes vs foliage (P/F) was >1.0 for Ca2+, Pb2+, and SO42-, and somewhat <1.0 but more constant for Mg2+. Temporal variations in dry deposition fluxes at an exposed site near the industrialized Rhine Valley correlated with variations in total air particulate concentrations at a nearby air quality station. Deposition rates were comparable in magnitude but different in temporal pattern at a remote site in the Black Forest interior. Fluxes at each site reached a minimum during the period of 4-9 November when a regional air inversion confined pollutants to the Rhine Valley below the study sites. High fluxes accompanied the inversion break-up.

  11. A Framework for Comparative Assessments of Energy Efficiency Policy Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, Helcio; Atkinson, Barbara; Lekov, Alex

    2011-05-24

    When policy makers propose new policies, there is a need to assess the costs and benefits of the proposed policy measures, to compare them to existing and alternative policies, and to rank them according to their effectiveness. In the case of equipment energy efficiency regulations, comparing the effects of a range of alternative policy measures requires evaluating their effects on consumers’ budgets, on national energy consumption and economics, and on the environment. Such an approach should be able to represent in a single framework the particularities of each policy measure and provide comparable results. This report presents an integrated methodological framework to assess prospectively the energy, economic, and environmental impacts of energy efficiency policy measures. The framework builds on the premise that the comparative assessment of energy efficiency policy measures should (a) rely on a common set of primary data and parameters, (b) follow a single functional approach to estimate the energy, economic, and emissions savings resulting from each assessed measure, and (c) present results through a set of comparable indicators. This framework elaborates on models that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has used in support of its rulemakings on mandatory energy efficiency standards. In addition to a rigorous analysis of the impacts of mandatory standards, DOE compares the projected results of alternative policy measures to those projected to be achieved by the standards. The framework extends such an approach to provide a broad, generic methodology, with no geographic or sectoral limitations, that is useful for evaluating any type of equipment energy efficiency market intervention. The report concludes with a demonstration of how to use the framework to compare the impacts estimated for twelve policy measures focusing on increasing the energy efficiency of gas furnaces in the United States.

  12. Computational study of transport and energy deposition of intense laser-accelerated proton beams in solid density matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; McGuffey, C.; Qiao, B.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Grabowski, P. E.

    2015-11-01

    With intense proton beams accelerated by high power short pulse lasers, solid targets are isochorically heated to become partially-ionized warm or hot dense matter. In this regime, the thermodynamic state of the matter significantly changes, varying the proton stopping power where both bound and free electrons contribute. Additionally, collective beam-matter interaction becomes important to the beam transport. We present self-consistent hybrid particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation results of proton beam transport and energy deposition in solid-density matter, where the individual proton stopping and the collective effects are taken into account simultaneously with updates of stopping power in the varying target conditions and kinetic motions of the beam in the driven fields. Broadening of propagation range and self-focusing of the beam led to unexpected target heating by the intense proton beams, with dependence on the beam profiles and target conditions. The behavior is specifically studied for the case of an experimentally measured proton beam from the 1.25 kJ, 10 ps OMEGA EP laser transporting through metal foils. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE under Contracts No. DE-NA0002034 and No. DE-AC52-07NA27344 and by the U.S. AFOSR under Contract FA9550-14-1-0346.

  13. High-energy wave deposits at the eastern shore of Bonaire (Netherlands Antilles)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, M.; Willershäuser, T.; Bolten, A.; Brückner, H.; Daut, G.; Wennrich, V.; Kelletat, D.; Scheffers, A.; Scheffers, S. R.; Schäbitz, F.

    2009-04-01

    The island of Bonaire is part of the Leeward Netherlands Antilles and lies 90 km off the Venezuelan coast. It mainly consists of two upper cretaceous cores of basalt, andesite, and dacite, fringed by a sequence of Quaternary marine limestone terraces. These well-defined platforms formed by in-situ growth of coral reefs and deposition of coral debris during high stands of sea level and subsequent exposure due to slow tectonic uplift. Bonaire has a semi-arid climate with an average annual precipitation of less than 500 mm, though large year-to-year variation occurs. Due to its peripheral position within the Caribbean hurricane belt the island rarely experiences severe storm events. Nevertheless, along the eastern windward coast several high-energy wave impacts of mid- to late Holocene age have created a well-diversified sedimentary record. Broad ramparts of imbricated coral rubble north of Lac Bai are 4 m high, proceed up to 400 m inland, and follow the shore over a distance of 12 km. Reef communities of the island's eastern sublittoral obviously never regenerated after their destruction during extreme wave events. Furthermore, massive boulders of up to 260 tons are distributed over the broad elevated Pleistocene reef platform deriving from the foreshore zone (Scheffers et al., 2008). The windward nearshore morphological depressions provide excellent conditions for preserving sedimentary inputs of exceptionally large wave impacts. We carried out numerous vibracorings and gravity corings inside shallow sinkholes on the Pleistocene terrace north of Lac Bai and the landward floodplain of the Lagun embayment at Washikemba. Several vibracorings of up to 5 m below surface at Lagun show multiple interruptions of continuous sedimentation patterns by poorly-sorted shell hash within a carbonate-rich matrix of marine origin. The lowermost bioclastic unit dates back before 6000 BP. Within a superimposed layer of pure mangrove peat another cluster of shells, partly broken, is

  14. Simulations about self-absorption of tritium in titanium tritide and the energy deposition in a silicon Schottky barrier diode.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Liu, Yebing; Hu, Rui; Yang, Yuqing; Wang, Guanquan; Zhong, Zhengkun; Luo, Shunzhong

    2012-11-01

    Simulations on the self-absorption of tritium electrons in titanium tritide films and the energy deposition in a silicon Schottky barrier diode are carried out using the Geant4 radiation transport toolkit. Energy consumed in each part of the Schottky radiovoltaic battery is simulated to give a clue about how to make the battery work better. The power and energy-conversion efficiency of the tritium silicon Schottky radiovoltaic battery in an optimized design are simulated. Good consistency with experiments is obtained. PMID:22935439

  15. Measurement of bandgap energies in low-k organosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, M. T.; Li, W.; Pei, D.; Shohet, J. L.; Antonelli, G. A.; Lin, Q.; Banna, S.; Nishi, Y.

    2014-03-07

    In this work, experimental measurements of the electronic band gap of low-k organosilicate dielectrics will be presented and discussed. The measurement of bandgap energies of organosilicates will be made by examining the onset of inelastic energy loss in core-level atomic spectra using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This energy serves as a reference point from which many other facets of the material can be understood, such as the location and presence of defect states in the bulk or at the interface. A comparison with other measurement techniques reported in the literature is presented.

  16. The Energy Spectra of Heavy Nuclei Measured by the ATIC Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panov, A. D.; Adams, J. H.; Ahn, H. S.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Batkov, K. E.; Chang, J.; Christl, M.; Fazley, A. R.; Ganel, O.; Gunasingha, R. M.

    2004-01-01

    ATIC (Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter) is a balloon-borne experiment to measure the spectra and composition of primary cosmic rays in the region of total energy from 100 GeV to near 100 TeV for Z from 1 to 26. ATIC consists of a pixelated silicon matrix detector to measure charge plus a fully active BGO calorimeter, to measure energy, located below a carbon target interleaved with three layers of scintillator hodoscope. The ATIC instrument had a second (scientific) flight from McMurdo, Antarctica from 12/29/02 to 1/18/03, yielding 20 days of good data. The GEANT 3.21 Monte Carlo code with the QGSM event generator and the FLUKA code with the DPMJET-II event generator were used to convert energy deposition measurements to primary energy. We present the preliminary energy spectra for the abundant elements C, O, Ne, Mg, Si and Fe and compare them with the results of the first (test) flight of ATIC in 2000-01 and with results from the HEAO-3 and CRN experiments.

  17. The energy spectra of heavy nuclei measured by the ATIC experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, A.; Atic Team

    ATIC (Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter) is a balloon-borne experiment to measure the spectra and composition of primary cosmic rays in the region of total energy from 100 GeV to near 100 TeV for Z from 1 to 26. ATIC consists of a pixelated silicon matrix detector to measure charge plus a fully active BGO calorimeter, to measure energy, located below a carbon target interleaved with three layers of scintillator hodoscope. The ATIC instrument had a second (scientific) flight from McMurdo, Antarctica from 12/29/02 to 1/18/03, yielding 18 days of good data. The GEANT 3.21 Monte Carlo code with the QGSM event generator and the FLUKA code with the DPMJET-II event generator were used to convert energy deposition measurements to primary energy. We present the preliminary energy spectra for the abundant elements C, O, Ne, Mg, Si and Fe and compare them with the results of the first (test) flight of ATIC in 2000-01 and with results from the HEAO-3 and CRN experiments.

  18. Overcoming ash deposition: A case study. Part 1: Measurements and modeling -- The research perspective

    SciTech Connect

    McCollor, D.P.; Gunderson, J.R.; Zygarlicke, C.J.; Backman, B.C.; Blohm, C.L.

    1998-12-31

    Coyote Station of Montana Dakota Utilities was experiencing increasingly severe ash slagging and fouling in its 425-MW cyclone boiler while burning a Beulah lignite coal from three seams of the adjoining Knife River Coal Mining Company Beulah Mine. A dual approach of assessing coal quality and examining plant operating characteristics was implemented to formulate mine-planning, coal-blending, and boiler-operating strategies to mitigate the slagging and fouling. Advanced coal analyses were performed on core samples in advance of the active mining operation for the three mine seams. Concurrently, a boiler inspection protocol was implemented by the plant personnel to quantitatively track the progress of ash deposition. A field test at Coyote Station was conducted to obtain furnace gas temperatures, ash deposit samples, and crucial operating data. Other valuable information was obtained by correlation of day-to-day mining records with plant operating data over a several-month period. Initial examination of coal loadout records prior to fouling-related outages suggested possible mine areas with significant fouling potential. This was supported by PCQUEST fireside performance modeling and by equilibrium thermodynamic calculations of ash viscosity, with sodium calcium silicates and sulfates the main contributors to problematic deposition. Correlations of the PCQUEST slagging and fouling index values were developed for this specific coal and mine to provide indicators of coal quality based on standard American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) analysis parameters. This allowed data from a large number of previous core samples to be used to map coal fouling and slagging potential on a minewide basis. Two areas of high-fouling coal were discovered across the lateral extent of the mine. In the vertical section, the top coal seam revealed much lower fouling propensity than the lower two seams. The same correlations also permitted assessment of the fouling and slagging

  19. Soft x-ray measurements using photoconductive type-IIa and single-crystal chemical vapor deposited diamond detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, A. S.; Bentley, C. D.; Foster, J. M.; Goedhart, G.; Graham, P.; Taylor, M. J.; Hellewell, E.

    2008-10-15

    Photoconductive detectors (PCDs) are routinely used alongside vacuum x-ray diodes (XRDs) to provide an alternative x-ray flux measurement at laser facilities such as HELEN at AWE Aldermaston, UK, and Omega at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics. To evaluate diamond PCDs as an alternative to XRD arrays, calibration measurements made at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory are used to accurately calculate the x-ray flux from a laser-heated target. This is compared to a flux measurement using the Dante XRD diagnostic. Estimates indicate that the photoinduced conductivity from measurements made at Omega are too large, and calculations using the radiometric calibrations made at the NSLS agree with this hypothesis. High-purity, single-crystal, chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond samples are compared to natural type-IIa PCDs and show promising high resistivity effects, the corollary of which preliminary results show is a slower response time.

  20. Mitigation technologies and measures in energy sector of Kazakstan

    SciTech Connect

    Pilifosova, O.; Danchuk, D.; Temertekov, T.

    1996-12-31

    An important commitment in the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change is to conduct mitigation analysis and to communicate climate change measures and policies. In major part reducing CO{sub 2} as well as the other greenhouse gas emissions in Kazakstan, can be a side-product of measures addressed to increasing energy efficiency. Since such measures are very important for the national economy, mitigation strategies in the energy sector of Kazakstan are directly connected with the general national strategy of the energy sector development. This paper outlines the main measures and technologies in energy sector of Kazakstan which can lead to GHG emissions reduction and presents the results of current mitigation assessment. The mitigation analysis is addressed to energy production sector. A baseline and six mitigation scenarios were developed to evaluate the most attractive mitigation options, focusing on specific technologies which have been already included in sustainable energy programs. According to the baseline projection, Kazakstan`s CO{sub 2} emissions will not exceed their 1990 level until 2005. The potential for CO{sub 2} emission reduction is estimated to be about 11 % of the base line emission level by the end of considered period (in 2020). The main mitigation options in the energy production sector in terms of mitigation potential and technical and economical feasibility include rehabilitation of thermal power plants aimed to increasing efficiency, use of nuclear energy and further expansion in the use of hydro energy based on small hydroelectric power plants.

  1. The role of low-energy electrons in focused electron beam induced deposition: four case studies of representative precursors.

    PubMed

    Thorman, Rachel M; Kumar T P, Ragesh; Fairbrother, D Howard; Ingólfsson, Oddur

    2015-01-01

    Focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) is a single-step, direct-write nanofabrication technique capable of writing three-dimensional metal-containing nanoscale structures on surfaces using electron-induced reactions of organometallic precursors. Currently FEBID is, however, limited in resolution due to deposition outside the area of the primary electron beam and in metal purity due to incomplete precursor decomposition. Both limitations are likely in part caused by reactions of precursor molecules with low-energy (<100 eV) secondary electrons generated by interactions of the primary beam with the substrate. These low-energy electrons are abundant both inside and outside the area of the primary electron beam and are associated with reactions causing incomplete ligand dissociation from FEBID precursors. As it is not possible to directly study the effects of secondary electrons in situ in FEBID, other means must be used to elucidate their role. In this context, gas phase studies can obtain well-resolved information on low-energy electron-induced reactions with FEBID precursors by studying isolated molecules interacting with single electrons of well-defined energy. In contrast, ultra-high vacuum surface studies on adsorbed precursor molecules can provide information on surface speciation and identify species desorbing from a substrate during electron irradiation under conditions more representative of FEBID. Comparing gas phase and surface science studies allows for insight into the primary deposition mechanisms for individual precursors; ideally, this information can be used to design future FEBID precursors and optimize deposition conditions. In this review, we give a summary of different low-energy electron-induced fragmentation processes that can be initiated by the secondary electrons generated in FEBID, specifically, dissociative electron attachment, dissociative ionization, neutral dissociation, and dipolar dissociation, emphasizing the different

  2. The role of low-energy electrons in focused electron beam induced deposition: four case studies of representative precursors

    PubMed Central

    Thorman, Rachel M; Kumar T. P., Ragesh; Fairbrother, D Howard

    2015-01-01

    Summary Focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) is a single-step, direct-write nanofabrication technique capable of writing three-dimensional metal-containing nanoscale structures on surfaces using electron-induced reactions of organometallic precursors. Currently FEBID is, however, limited in resolution due to deposition outside the area of the primary electron beam and in metal purity due to incomplete precursor decomposition. Both limitations are likely in part caused by reactions of precursor molecules with low-energy (<100 eV) secondary electrons generated by interactions of the primary beam with the substrate. These low-energy electrons are abundant both inside and outside the area of the primary electron beam and are associated with reactions causing incomplete ligand dissociation from FEBID precursors. As it is not possible to directly study the effects of secondary electrons in situ in FEBID, other means must be used to elucidate their role. In this context, gas phase studies can obtain well-resolved information on low-energy electron-induced reactions with FEBID precursors by studying isolated molecules interacting with single electrons of well-defined energy. In contrast, ultra-high vacuum surface studies on adsorbed precursor molecules can provide information on surface speciation and identify species desorbing from a substrate during electron irradiation under conditions more representative of FEBID. Comparing gas phase and surface science studies allows for insight into the primary deposition mechanisms for individual precursors; ideally, this information can be used to design future FEBID precursors and optimize deposition conditions. In this review, we give a summary of different low-energy electron-induced fragmentation processes that can be initiated by the secondary electrons generated in FEBID, specifically, dissociative electron attachment, dissociative ionization, neutral dissociation, and dipolar dissociation, emphasizing the

  3. Electrostatic quadrupole plasma mass spectrometer measurements during thin film depositions using simultaneous matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation and magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, C. N.; Check, M. H.; Muratore, C.; Voevodin, A. A.

    2010-05-15

    A hybrid plasma deposition process, combining matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) of carbon nanopearls (CNPs) with magnetron sputtering of gold was investigated for growth of composite films, where 100 nm sized CNPs were encapsulated into a gold matrix. Composition and morphology of such composite films was characterized with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. Carbon deposits on a gold magnetron sputter target and carbon impurities in the gold matrices of deposited films were observed while codepositing from gold and frozen toluene-CNP MAPLE targets in pure argon. Electrostatic quadrupole plasma analysis was used to determine that a likely mechanism for generation of carbon impurities was a reaction between toluene vapor generated from the MAPLE target and the argon plasma originating from the magnetron sputtering process. Carbon impurities of codeposited films were significantly reduced by introducing argon-oxygen mixtures into the deposition chamber; reactive oxygen species such as O and O+ effectively removed carbon contamination of gold matrix during the codeposition processes. Increasing the oxygen to argon ratio decreased the magnetron target sputter rate, and hence hybrid process optimization to prevent gold matrix contamination and maintain a high sputter yield is needed. High resolution TEM with energy dispersive spectrometry elemental mapping was used to study carbon distribution throughout the gold matrix as well as embedded CNP clusters. This research has demonstrated that a hybrid MAPLE and magnetron sputtering codeposition process is a viable means for synthesis of composite thin films from premanufactured nanoscale constituents, and that cross-process contaminations can be overcome with understanding of hybrid plasma process interaction mechanisms.

  4. Absolute beam energy measurements in e+e- storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placidi, M.

    1997-01-01

    The CERN Large Electron Positron collider (LEP) was dedicated to the measurement of the mass Mz and the width Γz of the Z0 resonance during the LEP1 phase which terminated in September 1995. The Storage Ring operated in Energy Scan mode during the 1993 and 1995 physics runs by choosing the beam energy Ebeam to correspond to a center-of-mass (CM) energy at the interaction points (IPs) ECMpeak±1762 MeV. After a short review of the techniques usually adopted to set and control the beam energy, this paper describes in more detail two methods adopted at LEP for precise beam energy determination that are essential to reduce the contribution to the systematic error on Mz and Γz. The positron beam momentum was initially determined at the 20-GeV injection energy by measuring the speed of a less relativistic proton beam circulating on the same orbit, taking advantage of the unique opportunity to inject two beams into the LEP at short time intervals. The positron energy at the Z0 peak was in this case derived by extrapolation. Once transverse polarization became reproducible, the Resonant Depolarization (RD) technique was implemented at the Z0 operating energies, providing a ⩽2×10-5 instantaneous accuracy. RD Beam Energy Calibration has been adopted during the LEP Energy Scan campaigns as well as in Accelerator Physics runs for accurate measurement of machine parameters.

  5. Measurements of Deposition, Lung Surface Area and Lung Fluid for Simulation of Inhaled Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Eleonore; Mercuri, Annalisa; Wu, Shengqian; Salar-Behzadi, Sharareh

    2016-01-01

    Modern strategies in drug development employ in silico techniques in the design of compounds as well as estimations of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and toxicity parameters. The quality of the results depends on software algorithm, data library and input data. Compared to simulations of absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity of oral drug compounds, relatively few studies report predictions of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of inhaled substances. For calculation of the drug concentration at the absorption site, the pulmonary epithelium, physiological parameters such as lung surface and distribution volume (lung lining fluid) have to be known. These parameters can only be determined by invasive techniques and by postmortem studies. Very different values have been reported in the literature. This review addresses the state of software programs for simulation of orally inhaled substances and focuses on problems in the determination of particle deposition, lung surface and of lung lining fluid. The different surface areas for deposition and for drug absorption are difficult to include directly into the simulations. As drug levels are influenced by multiple parameters the role of single parameters in the simulations cannot be identified easily. PMID:27445817

  6. A spectrometer on chemical vapour deposition-diamond basis for the measurement of the charge-state distribution of heavy ions in a laser-generated plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Cayzac, Witold; Frank, Alexander; Schumacher, Dennis; Roth, Markus; Blazevic, Abel; Wamers, Felix; Traeger, Michael; Berdermann, Eleni; Voss, Bernd; Hessling, Thomas

    2013-04-15

    This article reports on the development and the first applications of a new spectrometer which enables the precise and time-resolved measurement of both the energy loss and the charge-state distribution of ion beams with 10 < Z < 30 at energies of 4-8 MeV/u after their interaction with a laser-generated plasma. The spectrometer is based on five 20 Multiplication-Sign 7 mm{sup 2} large and 20 {mu}m thick polycrystalline diamond samples produced via the Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) process and was designed with the help of ion-optical simulations. First experiments with the spectrometer were successfully carried out at GSI using {sup 48}Ca ions at an energy of 4.8 MeV/u interacting with a carbon plasma generated by the laser irradiation of a thin foil target. Owing to the high rate capability and the short response time of the spectrometer, pulsed ion beams with 10{sup 3}-10{sup 4} ions per bunch at a bunch frequency of 108 MHz could be detected. The temporal evolution of the five main charge states of the calcium ion beams as well as the corresponding energy loss values could be measured simultaneously. Due to the outstanding properties of diamond as a particle detector, a beam energy resolution ({Delta}E/E) Almost-Equal-To 0.1% could be reached using the presented experimental method, while a precision of 10% in the energy loss and charge-state distribution data was obtained.

  7. Influence of electronic energy deposition on the structural modification of swift heavy-ion-irradiated amorphous germanium layers

    SciTech Connect

    Steinbach, T.; Schnohr, C. S.; Wesch, W.; Kluth, P.; Giulian, R.; Araujo, L. L.; Sprouster, D. J.; Ridgway, M. C.

    2011-02-01

    Swift heavy-ion (SHI) irradiation of amorphous germanium (a-Ge) layers leads to a strong volume expansion accompanied by a nonsaturating irreversible plastic deformation (ion hammering), which are consequences of the high local electronic energy deposition within the region of the a-Ge layer. We present a detailed study of the influence of SHI irradiation parameters on the effect of plastic deformation and structural modification. Specially prepared a-Ge layers were irradiated using two SHI energies and different angles of incidence, thus resulting in a variation of the electronic energy deposition per depth {epsilon}{sub e} between 14.0 and 38.6 keV nm{sup -1}. For all irradiation parameters used a strong swelling of the irradiated material was observed, which is caused by the formation and growth of randomly distributed voids, leading to a gradual transformation of the amorphous layer into a sponge-like porous structure as established by cross-section scanning electron microscopy investigations. The swelling depends linearly on the ion fluence and on the value of {epsilon}{sub e}, thus clearly demonstrating that the structural changes are determined solely by the electronic energy deposited within the amorphous layer. Plastic deformation shows a superlinear dependence on the ion fluence due to the simultaneous volume expansion. This influence of structural modification on plastic deformation is described by a simple approach, thus allowing estimation of the deformation yield. With these results the threshold values of the electronic energy deposition for the onset of both structural modification and plastic deformation due to SHI irradiation are determined. Furthermore, based on these results, the longstanding question concerning the reason for the structural modification observed in SHI-irradiated crystalline Ge is answered.

  8. Negative vacuum energy densities and the causal diamond measure

    SciTech Connect

    Salem, Michael P.

    2009-07-15

    Arguably a major success of the landscape picture is the prediction of a small, nonzero vacuum energy density. The details of this prediction depend in part on how the diverging spacetime volume of the multiverse is regulated, a question that remains unresolved. One proposal, the causal diamond measure, has demonstrated many phenomenological successes, including predicting a distribution of positive vacuum energy densities in good agreement with observation. In the string landscape, however, the vacuum energy density is expected to take positive and negative values. We find the causal diamond measure gives a poor fit to observation in such a landscape - in particular, 99.6% of observers in galaxies seemingly just like ours measure a vacuum energy density smaller than we do, most of them measuring it to be negative.

  9. Energy Efficiency Measures to Incorporate into Remodeling Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Liaukus, C.

    2014-12-01

    Energy improvements in a home are often approached as one concerted effort, beginning with a simple walk-through assessment or more in-depth energy audit and followed by the installation of recommended energy measures. While this approach allows for systems thinking to guide the efforts, comprehensive energy improvements of this nature are undertaken by a relatively small number of the households in our nation compared to more piecemeal remodeling efforts. Even when programs like the Weatherization Assistance Program and Home Performance with ENERGY STAR are considered, homes that have had a comprehensive energy makeover still represent a small fraction of the 111.1 million households. In this report, the U.S Department of Energy Building America Retrofit Alliance research team looks at the improvement of a home's energy performance in an opportunistic way: it examines what can be done to incorporate energy efficiency measures into general remodeling work and home repair projects. This allows for the possibility for people who would not normally pursue energy efficiency but will remodel their kitchen or re-side their home to improve their home's performance at the same time. There are challenges to this approach, not the least of which being that the work will take place over time in potentially many separate projects. The opportunity to improve a home's energy efficiency at one time expands or contracts with the scope of the remodel. As such, guidance on how to do each piece thoughtfully and with consideration for potential future projects, is critical.

  10. Thermal electron energy distribution measurements in the ionosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, P. B.; Nagy, A. F.

    1973-01-01

    A recoverable payload instrumented for twilight airglow studies was launched by an Aerobee 150 from the White Sands Test Range on Feb. 8, 1971 at 13.56 UT. The payload included a low energy electron spectrometer (HARP) and a cylindrical Langmuir probe. The HARP electron spectrometer is a new device designed to make high resolution differential electron flux measurements. Measurements of ionospheric electron energy distribution in the range from about 0.2 to 4.0 eV are presented.

  11. Meters to answer needs for low-cost EFM, energy measurement. [Electronic Flow Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-07

    Research supported by the Gas Research Institute, Chicago, will produce two commercial measurements devices by mid-year. One is a low-cost, compact electronic flow measurement (EFM) system for orifice flow monitoring and custody transfer; the other, an instrument for measuring natural-gas energy and volume flow in pipelines. The paper describes a low-cost EFM, field testing, a total-energy meter, theory of operation, and improvements.

  12. In situ mass measurement of electron-beam-induced nanometer-sized W-related deposits using a carbon nanotube cantilever

    SciTech Connect

    Sawaya, Shintaro; Akita, Seiji; Nakayama, Yoshikazu

    2006-11-06

    Using a carbon nanotube oscillator, the authors performed in situ measurements of densities of electron-beam-induced tungsten compounds with size of less than 100 nm. Total mass of the deposit was proportional to the deposition time. A higher deposition rate was obtained at lower electron-beam acceleration voltage. Density of the deposit decreased from 2.7 to 1.4 g/cm{sup 3} with increasing acceleration voltage from 5 to 15 kV. These results indicate that the increased density with low-acceleration voltage produces effective decomposition of W(CO){sub 6}.

  13. Beam Energy Measurement using the Hall C Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yan; Roger Carlini; David Neuffer

    1993-05-01

    We propose to use the curved transport line into Hall C to measure the beam energy. With only dipoles powered, this transport arc has a dispersion of 12 cm/%. We propose to insert pairs of wire scanners at the entrance and exit of the arc to measure beam position and direction. These measurements, together with a calibrated dipole field, obtain an absolute beam energy measurement with {approx}10{sup -3} accuracy, according to error analyses. In operational mode, arc quads and sextupoles are powered to obtain a second order achromat with a dispersion of 2.1 cm/% at the arc center. A wire scanner at the arc center then obtains a relative energy measurement of {approx}10{sup -4} accuracy.

  14. Comparison of wind tunnel and field experiments to measure potential deposition of fenpropimorph following volatilisation from treated crops.

    PubMed

    Hassink, Jan; Platz, Klaus; Stadler, Reinhold; Zangmeister, Werner; Fent, Gunnar; Möndel, Martin; Kubiak, Roland

    2007-02-01

    The potential for short-range transport via air, i.e. volatilisation from the area of application and subsequent deposition on adjacent non-target areas, was investigated for the fungicide fenpropimorph in a wind tunnel system and under outdoor conditions in a higher-tier field study. Fenpropimorph 750 g L(-1) EC was applied post-emergence to cereal along with a reference standard lindane EC. Stainless steel containers of water were placed at different distances downwind of the application area to trap volatile residues during a study period of 24 h following application. Meteorological conditions in the wind tunnel as well as on the field were constantly monitored during the study period. The wind tunnel system was a partly standardised system on a semi-field scale, i.e. wind direction and wind speed (2 m s(-1)) were constant, but temperature and humidity varied according to the conditions outside. In the field experiment, the average wind speed over the 24 h study period was 3 m s(-1) and no rainfall occurred. Three different measuring lines were installed on the non-target area beside the treated field to cover potential variations in the wind direction. However, no significant differences were observed since the wind direction was generally constant. Fenpropimorph was detected in minor amounts of 0.01-0.05% of the applied material in the wind tunnel experiment. Even at a distance of 1 m beside the treated field, no significant deposition occurred (0.04% of applied material after 24 h). In the field, less than 0.1% of the applied fenpropimorph was detected at 0 m directly beside the treated field. At 5 m distance the deposition values were below 0.04%, and at 20 m distance about 0.01%. In general, the amounts of deposited fenpropimorph detected in the partly standardised wind tunnel system and the higher-tier field study were in good agreement.

  15. BMAP dipole magnetic field analysis and orbit tracking/calculations of energy deposition in GaAs WHEBY detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphries, S., Jr.; Baltrusaitis, R. M.; Ekdahl, C.; Young, C.; Warn, C.

    This report contains two separate papers. The first paper discusses BMAP which is a versatile program for field analysis and orbit tracking in dipole magnets. The program was created to aid the design of charged-particle magnetic spectrometers. BMAP is written in Pascal and runs on any IBM-PC computer or compatible. The second paper covers a study on energy deposition in GaAS WHEBY detectors. The study was done for two purposes: (1) to set up a three-dimensional electron-photon transport problem using the ACCEPT computer code; and (2) to calculate energy deposition in GaAs detectors in the WHEBY for a given flux of electrons.

  16. Thermally induced dispersion mechanisms for aluminum-based plate-type fuels under rapid transient energy deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Georgevich, V.; Taleyarkham, R.P.; Navarro-Valenti, S.; Kim, S.H.

    1995-12-31

    A thermally induced dispersion model was developed to analyze for dispersive potential and determine onset of fuel plate dispersion for Al-based research and test reactor fuels. Effect of rapid energy deposition in a fuel plate was simulated. Several data types for Al-based fuels tested in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor in Japan and in the Transient Reactor Test in Idaho were reviewed. Analyses of experiments show that onset of fuel dispersion is linked to a sharp rise in predicted strain rate, which futher coincides with onset of Al vaporization. Analysis also shows that Al oxidation and exothermal chemical reaction between the fuel and Al can significantly affect the energy deposition characteristics, and therefore dispersion onset connected with Al vaporization, and affect onset of vaporization.

  17. Inductive-Dynamic Simulation on Locations of Energy Input to and Deposition in the Ionosphere-Thermospher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, J.

    2015-12-01

    Recent observations of the net Poynting flux deposition to the ionosphere showed that the strongest energy input from the magnetosphere is in the polar cap where the plasma flow speed is high and not where the flow reverses, implying that the field-aligned current is not the primary agent of the energy transfer and that other physical progresses are at play. In this study we assess locations of the energy transfer and deposition by a simulation conducted with a self-consistent inductive-dynamic (including self-consistent solutions of Faraday's law and retaining inertia terms in the plasma momentum equations) ionosphere-thermosphere model. In a 2-D global geometry (dawn-dusk meridian plane), we solve the multifluid-collisional-Hall MHD equations including photochemistry. The preliminary simulation results demonstrate propagation and evolution of the field-aligned currents and the dynamic processes of the formation of the ionospheric Pedersen currents. By comparing locations of the field-aligned currents and ionosphere/thermosphere heating driven by the magnetospheric convection we show that the energy input to the IT system and the energy dissipation occurs in the polar cap instead of regions where the field-aligned currents reside. The implication of these results is that the field-aligned currents are not the primary agent of the energy transfer from the magnetosphere to the IT system.

  18. Direct measurement meter indicates real-time energy flow

    SciTech Connect

    Heyden, W.H.V. )

    1991-05-01

    The increased activity in transporting gas and the use of natural gas from widely varying sources has created a need to simplify measurement of energy transfers in natural gas operations. The natural gas industry requires an energy measurement device that is simple, cost effective and accurate. Such a device must be a direct measurement meter, easy to install, and one which will measure energy transfers in natural gas regardless of volume, composition, heating value, supercompressibility, inert fractions and temperature. These and other factors that are required for what presently is and remains, a calculation of energy in natural gas. The need then, is for a flow device which will measure and indicate direct, real-time energy flow and perform at pipe line conditions. A flow meter has been under development for seven years and has been in field testing for three years at 4 different sites under a Gas Research Institute (GRI) sponsored program. The field test objective is to measure and verify the meter's technical properties under actual field service conditions. In each field test site, the meter is continuously compared to existing gas flow measurement devices. Eact test site has different meter configurations which allow a broad scope of comparison and testing experience.

  19. Correlation between electrical conductivity—optical band gap energy and precursor molarities ultrasonic spray deposition of ZnO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benramache, Said; Belahssen, Okba; Guettaf, Abderrazak; Arif, Ali

    2013-11-01

    ZnO thin films were deposited using the simple, flexible and cost-effective spray ultrasonic technique at different precursor molarities values. The films were deposited on a glass substrate at 350 °C. This paper is to present a new approach to the description of correlation between electrical conductivity and optical gap energy with precursor molarity of ZnO thin films. The ZnO films exhibit higher electrical n-type semiconductors, whose band gap energy increased from 3.08 to 3.37 eV with an increasing of precursor molarity of 0.05 to 0.1 M. The maximum value of electrical conductivity of the films is 7.96 (ω·cm)-1 obtained in the ZnO thin film for precursor molarity 0.125 M. The correlation between the electrical and the optical properties with the precursor molarity suggests that the electrical conductivity of the films is predominantly influenced by the band gap energy and the precursor molarity. The measurement of the electrical conductivity of the films with correlation is equal to the experimental with the error is about 1% in the higher conductivity.

  20. Gaseous oxidized mercury dry deposition measurements in the southwestern USA: a comparison between Texas, eastern Oklahoma, and the Four Corners area.

    PubMed

    Sather, Mark E; Mukerjee, Shaibal; Allen, Kara L; Smith, Luther; Mathew, Johnson; Jackson, Clarence; Callison, Ryan; Scrapper, Larry; Hathcoat, April; Adam, Jacque; Keese, Danielle; Ketcher, Philip; Brunette, Robert; Karlstrom, Jason; Van der Jagt, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) dry deposition measurements using aerodynamic surrogate surface passive samplers were collected in central and eastern Texas and eastern Oklahoma, from September 2011 to September 2012. The purpose of this study was to provide an initial characterization of the magnitude and spatial extent of ambient GOM dry deposition in central and eastern Texas for a 12-month period which contained statistically average annual results for precipitation totals, temperature, and wind speed. The research objective was to investigate GOM dry deposition in areas of Texas impacted by emissions from coal-fired utility boilers and compare it with GOM dry deposition measurements previously observed in eastern Oklahoma and the Four Corners area. Annual GOM dry deposition rate estimates were relatively low in Texas, ranging from 0.1 to 0.3 ng/m(2)h at the four Texas monitoring sites, similar to the 0.2 ng/m(2)h annual GOM dry deposition rate estimate recorded at the eastern Oklahoma monitoring site. The Texas and eastern Oklahoma annual GOM dry deposition rate estimates were at least four times lower than the highest annual GOM dry deposition rate estimate previously measured in the more arid bordering western states of New Mexico and Colorado in the Four Corners area. PMID:24955412

  1. Gaseous oxidized mercury dry deposition measurements in the southwestern USA: a comparison between Texas, eastern Oklahoma, and the Four Corners area.

    PubMed

    Sather, Mark E; Mukerjee, Shaibal; Allen, Kara L; Smith, Luther; Mathew, Johnson; Jackson, Clarence; Callison, Ryan; Scrapper, Larry; Hathcoat, April; Adam, Jacque; Keese, Danielle; Ketcher, Philip; Brunette, Robert; Karlstrom, Jason; Van der Jagt, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) dry deposition measurements using aerodynamic surrogate surface passive samplers were collected in central and eastern Texas and eastern Oklahoma, from September 2011 to September 2012. The purpose of this study was to provide an initial characterization of the magnitude and spatial extent of ambient GOM dry deposition in central and eastern Texas for a 12-month period which contained statistically average annual results for precipitation totals, temperature, and wind speed. The research objective was to investigate GOM dry deposition in areas of Texas impacted by emissions from coal-fired utility boilers and compare it with GOM dry deposition measurements previously observed in eastern Oklahoma and the Four Corners area. Annual GOM dry deposition rate estimates were relatively low in Texas, ranging from 0.1 to 0.3 ng/m(2)h at the four Texas monitoring sites, similar to the 0.2 ng/m(2)h annual GOM dry deposition rate estimate recorded at the eastern Oklahoma monitoring site. The Texas and eastern Oklahoma annual GOM dry deposition rate estimates were at least four times lower than the highest annual GOM dry deposition rate estimate previously measured in the more arid bordering western states of New Mexico and Colorado in the Four Corners area.

  2. Gaseous Oxidized Mercury Dry Deposition Measurements in the Southwestern USA: A Comparison between Texas, Eastern Oklahoma, and the Four Corners Area

    PubMed Central

    Sather, Mark E.; Allen, Kara L.; Smith, Luther; Mathew, Johnson; Jackson, Clarence; Callison, Ryan; Scrapper, Larry; Hathcoat, April; Adam, Jacque; Keese, Danielle; Brunette, Robert; Karlstrom, Jason; Van der Jagt, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) dry deposition measurements using aerodynamic surrogate surface passive samplers were collected in central and eastern Texas and eastern Oklahoma, from September 2011 to September 2012. The purpose of this study was to provide an initial characterization of the magnitude and spatial extent of ambient GOM dry deposition in central and eastern Texas for a 12-month period which contained statistically average annual results for precipitation totals, temperature, and wind speed. The research objective was to investigate GOM dry deposition in areas of Texas impacted by emissions from coal-fired utility boilers and compare it with GOM dry deposition measurements previously observed in eastern Oklahoma and the Four Corners area. Annual GOM dry deposition rate estimates were relatively low in Texas, ranging from 0.1 to 0.3 ng/m2h at the four Texas monitoring sites, similar to the 0.2 ng/m2h annual GOM dry deposition rate estimate recorded at the eastern Oklahoma monitoring site. The Texas and eastern Oklahoma annual GOM dry deposition rate estimates were at least four times lower than the highest annual GOM dry deposition rate estimate previously measured in the more arid bordering western states of New Mexico and Colorado in the Four Corners area. PMID:24955412

  3. CHANG-ES - VI. Probing Supernova energy deposition in spiral galaxies through multiwavelength relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiang-Tao; Beck, Rainer; Dettmar, Ralf-Jürgen; Heald, George; Irwin, Judith; Johnson, Megan; Kepley, Amanda A.; Krause, Marita; Murphy, E. J.; Orlando, Elena; Rand, Richard J.; Strong, A. W.; Vargas, Carlos J.; Walterbos, Rene; Wang, Q. Daniel; Wiegert, Theresa

    2016-02-01

    How a galaxy regulates its supernovae (SNe) energy into different interstellar/circumgalactic medium components strongly affects galaxy evolution. Based on the JVLA D-configuration C- (6 GHz) and L-band (1.6 GHz) continuum observations, we perform statistical analysis comparing multiwavelength properties of the Continuum Haloes in Nearby Galaxies - an EVLA Survey galaxies. The high-quality JVLA data and edge-on orientation enable us for the first time to include the halo into the energy budget for a complete radio-flux-limited sample. We find tight correlations of Lradio with the mid-IR-based star formation rate (SFR). The normalization of our I1.6 GHz/W Hz-1-SFR relation is ˜2-3times of those obtained for face-on galaxies, probably a result of enhanced IR extinction at high inclination. We also find tight correlations between Lradio and the SNe energy injection rate dot{E}_SN(Ia+CC), indicating the energy loss via synchrotron radio continuum accounts for ˜1 of dot{E}_SN, comparable to the energy contained in cosmic ray electrons. The integrated C-to-L-band spectral index is α ˜ 0.5-1.1 for non-active galactic nucleus galaxies, indicating a dominance by the diffuse synchrotron component. The low-scatter Lradio-SFR/L_radio-dot{E}_{SN (Ia+CC)} relationships have superlinear logarithmic slopes at ˜2σ in L band (1.132 ± 0.067/1.175 ± 0.102) while consistent with linear in C band (1.057 ± 0.075/1.100 ± 0.123). The superlinearity could be naturally reproduced with non-calorimeter models for galaxy discs. Using Chandra halo X-ray measurements, we find sublinear LX-Lradio relations. These results indicate that the observed radio halo of a starburst galaxy is close to electron calorimeter, and a galaxy with higher SFR tends to distribute an increased fraction of SNe energy into radio emission (than X-ray).

  4. Electron beam energy QA - a note on measurement tolerances.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Juergen; Nyflot, Matthew J; Smith, Wade P; Wottoon, Landon S; Young, Lori; Yang, Fei; Kim, Minsun; Hendrickson, Kristi R G; Ford, Eric; Kalet, Alan M; Cao, Ning; Dempsey, Claire; Sandison, George A

    2016-01-01

    Monthly QA is recommended to verify the constancy of high-energy electron beams generated for clinical use by linear accelerators. The tolerances are defined as 2%/2 mm in beam penetration according to AAPM task group report 142. The practical implementation is typically achieved by measuring the ratio of readings at two different depths, preferably near the depth of maximum dose and at the depth corresponding to half the dose maximum. Based on beam commissioning data, we show that the relationship between the ranges of energy ratios for different electron energies is highly nonlinear. We provide a formalism that translates measurement deviations in the reference ratios into change in beam penetration for electron energies for six Elekta (6-18 MeV) and eight Varian (6-22 MeV) electron beams. Experimental checks were conducted for each Elekta energy to compare calculated values with measurements, and it was shown that they are in agreement. For example, for a 6 MeV beam a deviation in the measured ionization ratio of ± 15% might still be acceptable (i.e., be within ± 2 mm), whereas for an 18 MeV beam the corresponding tolerance might be ± 6%. These values strongly depend on the initial ratio chosen. In summary, the relationship between differences of the ionization ratio and the corresponding beam energy are derived. The findings can be translated into acceptable tolerance values for monthly QA of electron beam energies. PMID:27074488

  5. Reactive magnetron sputter deposition of (Ti,Cu)N nano-crystalline thin films: modeling of particle and energy flux toward the substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmati, A.

    2012-08-01

    Ternary (Ti,Cu)N thin films were deposited by reactive dc magnetron sputtering on Si (111), glass slide, quartz and potassium bromide (KBr) substrates in molecular nitrogen ambient. This work has provided insight into the effects of substrate temperature, nitrogen content and particle and energy flux toward the substrate on the characteristics of (Ti,Cu)N films. Structural analysis of the films was identified by the x-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. Crystalline quality and phase stability are strongly dependent on substrate temperature. Ti-accommodated Cu3N structure results in lattice constant expansion and (100) preferential orientation. The bonding environment in these films was obtained by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The surface morphology and chemical composition of the films were studied by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM)/energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The films were aggregated as spherical grains. The atomic titanium to copper (Ti : Cu) ratio of (Ti,Cu)N films was less than that of the original target. An optical study was performed by vis-near-IR transmittance spectroscopy. The film thickness, refractive index and extinction coefficient were extracted from the measured transmittance. The as-deposited (Ti,Cu)N films are direct semiconductors with bandgap energy in the range of 2.57-3.23 eV. Nitrogen richness acts as an acceptor center and injects holes into the valence band (excited semiconductor). The amount of N attracted by the films was calculated using a model based on chemical bonding and the solubility process. Energy and angular contributions of sputtering yield were extracted from the existing literature to obtain a prediction about the atomic Ti : Cu ratio. By means of transport and range of ions in matter (TRIM.SP) Monte-Carlo simulation, the particle reflection coefficient of reflected N-neutrals was calculated. The initial energy of reflected N-neutrals and the sputtered particle at the

  6. Analysis of Illinois Home Performance with ENERGY STAR® Measure Packages

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.; Yee, S.; Brand, L.

    2013-09-01

    Through the Chicagoland Single Family Housing Characterization and Retrofit Prioritization report, the Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit research team characterized 15 housing types in the Chicagoland region based on assessor data, utility billing history, and available data from prior energy efficiency programs. Within these 15 groups, a subset showed the greatest opportunity for energy savings based on BEopt Version 1.1 modeling of potential energy efficiency package options and the percent of the housing stock represented by each group. In this project, collected field data from a whole-home program in Illinois are utilized to compare marketplace-installed measures to the energy saving optimal packages previously developed for the 15 housing types. Housing type, conditions, energy efficiency measures installed, and retrofit cost information were collected from 19 homes that participated in the Illinois Home Performance with ENERGY STAR program in 2012, representing eight of the characterized housing groups. Two were selected for further case study analysis to provide an illustration of the differences between optimal and actually installed measures. Taken together, these homes are representative of 34.8% of the Chicagoland residential building stock. In one instance, actual installed measures closely matched optimal recommended measures.

  7. Energy and Water Conservation Measures for Hanford (2013)

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Douglas J.; Butner, Ryan S.

    2013-04-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) performed an energy and water evaluation of selected buildings on the Hanford Site during the months of May and June 2012. The audit was performed under the direction of the U.S. Department of Energy, Sustainability Performance Office to identify key energy conservation measures (ECMs) and water conservation measures (WCMs). The evaluations consisted of on-site facility walk-throughs conducted by PNNL staff, interviews with building-operating personnel, and an examination of building designs and layouts. Information on 38 buildings was collected to develop a list of energy and water conservation measures. Table ES.1 is a summary of the ECMs, while table ES.2 is a summary of the WCMs.

  8. On Measuring Cosmic Ray Energy Spectra with the Rapidity Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bashindzhagyan, G.; Adams, J.; Chilingarian, A.; Drury, L.; Egorov, N.; Golubkov, S.; Korotkova, N.; Panasyuk, M.; Podorozhnyi, D.; Procqureur, J.

    2000-01-01

    An important goal of cosmic ray research is to measure the elemental energy spectra of galactic cosmic rays up to 10(exp 16) eV. This goal cannot be achieved with an ionization calorimeter because the required instrument is too massive for space flight. An alternate method will be presented. This method is based on measuring the primary particle energy by determining the angular distribution of secondaries produced in a target layer. The proposed technique can be used over a wide range of energies (10 (exp 11) -10 (exp 16) eV) and gives an energy resolution of 60% or better. Based on this technique, a conceptual design for a new instrument (KLEM) will be presented. Due to its light weight, this instrument can have a large aperture enabling the direct measurement of cosmic rays to 1016 eV.

  9. Near-equilibrium measurements of nonequilibrium free energy

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin

    2012-04-09

    A central endeavor of thermodynamics is the measurement of free energy changes. Regrettably, although we can measure the free energy of a system in thermodynamic equilibrium, typically all we can say about the free energy of a nonequilibrium ensemble is that it is larger than that of the same system at equilibrium. Herein, we derive a formally exact expression for the probability distribution of a driven system, which involves path ensemble averages of the work over trajectories of the time-reversed system. From this we find a simple near-equilibrium approximation for the free energy in terms of an excess mean time-reversed work, which can be experimentally measured on real systems. With analysis and computer simulation, we demonstrate the accuracy of our approximations for several simple models.

  10. In situ and air index measurements: influence of the deposition parameters on the shift of TiO2/SiO2 Fabry-Perot filters.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, B; Borgogno, J P; Albrand, G; Pelletier, E

    1986-11-01

    We measure the refractive index of thin films of TiO2 and SiO2 for given deposition parameters. Two complementary methods are used. The first is a postdeposition technique which uses the measurements of reflectance and transmittance in air. The second, in contrast, makes use of in situ measurements (under vacuum and during the actual deposition of the layer). The differences between the values deduced from the two methods can be explained by the amount of atmospheric moisture adsorbed by films. One tries to minimize these shifts for the two materials by choosing deposition parameters. The difficulties come from the absorption losses which must be as small as possible. We use the measured refractive indices of individual layers to give good numerical prediction of the wavelength shift (observed during the admittance of air after deposition in the vacuum chamber) of the transmittance peak of multidielectric Fabry-Perot filters.

  11. Concept of proton radiography using energy resolved dose measurement.

    PubMed

    Bentefour, El H; Schnuerer, Roland; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2016-08-21

    Energy resolved dosimetry offers a potential path to single detector based proton imaging using scanned proton beams. This is because energy resolved dose functions encrypt the radiological depth at which the measurements are made. When a set of predetermined proton beams 'proton imaging field' are used to deliver a well determined dose distribution in a specific volume, then, at any given depth x of this volume, the behavior of the dose against the energies of the proton imaging field is unique and characterizes the depth x. This concept applies directly to proton therapy scanning delivery methods (pencil beam scanning and uniform scanning) and it can be extended to the proton therapy passive delivery methods (single and double scattering) if the delivery of the irradiation is time-controlled with a known time-energy relationship. To derive the water equivalent path length (WEPL) from the energy resolved dose measurement, one may proceed in two different ways. A first method is by matching the measured energy resolved dose function to a pre-established calibration database of the behavior of the energy resolved dose in water, measured over the entire range of radiological depths with at least 1 mm spatial resolution. This calibration database can also be made specific to the patient if computed using the patient x-CT data. A second method to determine the WEPL is by using the empirical relationships between the WEPL and the integral dose or the depth at 80% of the proximal fall off of the energy resolved dose functions in water. In this note, we establish the evidence of the fundamental relationship between the energy resolved dose and the WEPL at the depth of the measurement. Then, we illustrate this relationship with experimental data and discuss its imaging dynamic range for 230 MeV protons. PMID:27435446

  12. Concept of proton radiography using energy resolved dose measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentefour, El H.; Schnuerer, Roland; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2016-08-01

    Energy resolved dosimetry offers a potential path to single detector based proton imaging using scanned proton beams. This is because energy resolved dose functions encrypt the radiological depth at which the measurements are made. When a set of predetermined proton beams ‘proton imaging field’ are used to deliver a well determined dose distribution in a specific volume, then, at any given depth x of this volume, the behavior of the dose against the energies of the proton imaging field is unique and characterizes the depth x. This concept applies directly to proton therapy scanning delivery methods (pencil beam scanning and uniform scanning) and it can be extended to the proton therapy passive delivery methods (single and double scattering) if the delivery of the irradiation is time-controlled with a known time-energy relationship. To derive the water equivalent path length (WEPL) from the energy resolved dose measurement, one may proceed in two different ways. A first method is by matching the measured energy resolved dose function to a pre-established calibration database of the behavior of the energy resolved dose in water, measured over the entire range of radiological depths with at least 1 mm spatial resolution. This calibration database can also be made specific to the patient if computed using the patient x-CT data. A second method to determine the WEPL is by using the empirical relationships between the WEPL and the integral dose or the depth at 80% of the proximal fall off of the energy resolved dose functions in water. In this note, we establish the evidence of the fundamental relationship between the energy resolved dose and the WEPL at the depth of the measurement. Then, we illustrate this relationship with experimental data and discuss its imaging dynamic range for 230 MeV protons.

  13. Modelling energy deposition in nanoscintillators to predict the efficiency of the X-ray-induced photodynamic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulin, Anne-Laure; Vasil'Ev, Andrey; Belsky, Andrei; Amans, David; Ledoux, Gilles; Dujardin, Christophe

    2015-03-01

    Scintillating nanoparticles (NPs) in combination with X-ray or γ-radiation have a great potential for deep-tissue cancer therapy because they can be used to locally activate photosensitizers and generate singlet oxygen in tumours by means of the photodynamic effect. To understand the complex spatial distribution of energy deposition in a macroscopic volume of water loaded with nanoscintillators, we have developed a GEANT4-based Monte Carlo program. We thus obtain estimates of the maximum expected efficiency of singlet oxygen production for various materials coupled to PS, X-ray energies, NP concentrations and NP sizes. A new parameter, ηnano, is introduced to quantify the fraction of energy that is deposited in the NPs themselves, which is crucial for the efficiency of singlet oxygen production but has not been taken into account adequately so far. We furthermore emphasise the substantial contribution of primary interactions taking place in water, particularly under irradiation with high energy photons. The interplay of all these contributions to the photodynamic effect has to be taken into account in order to optimize nanoscintillators for therapeutic applications.Scintillating nanoparticles (NPs) in combination with X-ray or γ-radiation have a great potential for deep-tissue cancer therapy because they can be used to locally activate photosensitizers and generate singlet oxygen in tumours by means of the photodynamic effect. To understand the complex spatial distribution of energy deposition in a macroscopic volume of water loaded with nanoscintillators, we have developed a GEANT4-based Monte Carlo program. We thus obtain estimates of the maximum expected efficiency of singlet oxygen production for various materials coupled to PS, X-ray energies, NP concentrations and NP sizes. A new parameter, ηnano, is introduced to quantify the fraction of energy that is deposited in the NPs themselves, which is crucial for the efficiency of singlet oxygen production but

  14. High-Energy Neutron Spectra and Flux Measurements Below Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roecker, Caleb; Bernstein, Adam; Marleau, Peter; Vetter, Kai

    2016-03-01

    High-energy neutrons are a ubiquitous and often poorly measured background. Below ground, these neutrons could potentially interfere with antineutrino based reactor monitoring experiments as well as other rare-event neutral particle detectors. We have designed and constructed a transportable fast neutron detection system for measuring neutron energy spectra and flux ranging from tens to hundreds of MeV. The spectrometer uses a multiplicity technique in order to have a higher effective area than traditional transportable high-energy neutron spectrometers. Transportability ensures a common detector-related systematic bias for future measurements. The spectrometer is composed of two Gd containing plastic scintillator detectors arranged around a lead spallation target. A high-energy neutron may interact in the lead producing many secondary neutrons. The detector records the correlated secondary neutron multiplicity. Over many events, the response can be used to infer the incident neutron energy spectrum and flux. As a validation of the detector response, surface measurements have been performed; results confirm agreement with previous experiments. Below ground measurements have been performed at 3 depths (380, 600, and 1450 m.w.e.); results from these measurements will be presented.

  15. The problem of low energy particle measurements in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, E. C., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The accurate measurement of low energy (less than 100 eV) particle properties in the magnetosphere has been difficult, partly because of the low density of such particles, but more particularly because of spacecraft interference effects. Some early examples of how these phenomena have affected particle measurements on an OGO spacecraft are presented. Data obtained with the UCSD particle detectors on ATS-6 are then presented showing how some of these difficulties have been partially overcome. Future measurements of low energy particles in the magnetosphere can be improved by: (1) improving the low energy resolution of detectors; (2) building electrostatically clean spacecraft; (3) controlling spacecraft potential; and (4) using auxiliary measurements, particularly wave data.

  16. Energy Efficiency Measures to Incorporate into Remodeling Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Liaukus, C.

    2014-12-01

    Energy improvements in a home are often approached as one concerted effort, beginning with a simple walk-through assessment or more in-depth energy audit and followed by the installation of recommended energy measures. While this approach allows for systems thinking to guide the efforts, comprehensive energy improvements of this nature are undertaken by a relatively small number of U.S. households compared to piecemeal remodeling efforts. In this report, the U.S Department of Energy Building America Retrofit Alliance research team examines the improvement of a home’s energy performance in an opportunistic way by examining what can be done to incorporate energy efficiency measures into general remodeling work and home repair projects. This allows for energy efficiency upgrades to occur at the same time as remodeling proejcts. There are challenges to this approach, not the least of which being that the work will take place over time in potentially many separate projects. The opportunity to improve a home’s energy efficiency at one time expands or contracts with the scope of the remodel. As such, guidance on how to do each piece thoughtfully and with consideration for potential future projects, is critical.

  17. Auger measurements on T-027 samples exposed during the Skylab 2 mission. [indicating low rate of deposition on nickel and gold surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, P. N.

    1974-01-01

    Auger electron spectroscopy measurements performed on Skylab 2 indicate a low rate of deposition of permanent, continuous film contamination on nickel and gold surfaces positioned on the antisolar side of the spacecraft. These measurements and supportive evidence indicate that for the particular locations and orientations of these samples permanent films of less than 3 nm (30 A) thickness were deposited during an exposure of 40 hours at a temperature of approximately -32 C.

  18. Controlled fabrication of DNA molecular templates for the deposition and electrical measurement of 1D metal nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreda, Jorge; Hu, Longqian; Yu, Liuqi; Wang, Zhibin; Xia, Junfei; Guan, Jingjiao; Xiong, Peng; Guan's Group Team; Xiong's Group Team

    Stretched DNA nanowires (NWs) offer a convenient substrate for the fabrication and measurement of 1D metal NWs of width down to nm.So far the fabrication of the DNA templates has replied on somewhat random self-assembly processes. Here we demonstrate a process with high degree of control over the length, spacing, diameter , and orientation of the metal NWs: A one-step dewetting of a DNA solution on a PDMS stamp with an array of micropillars with well-defined pitch yields DNA NWs suspended across the micropillars along a chosen direction. The DNA NWs are then transferred via micro-contact printing onto a Si/SiO2/SiNx substrate with a lithographically fabricated trench defined by an opening in the SiNx layer and undercut in the SiO2 layer. The template with DNA NWs stretched across the trench is placed in a high-vacuum evaporator for metal deposition, resulting in a metal NW of width defined by the diameter of the DNA template (<10 nm) and length determined by the width of the trench. Quasi-four terminal I-V measurements are performed in situ with incremental metal deposition. Concomitant with a transition from strongly nonlinear IV to Ohmic behavior with increasing thickness, the NW resistance is observed to decrease exponentially.

  19. Measuring the emission rate of an aerosol source placed in a ventilated room using a tracer gas: influence of particle wall deposition.

    PubMed

    Bémer, D; Lecler, M T; Régnier, R; Hecht, G; Gerber, J M

    2002-04-01

    A method to measure the emission rate of an airborne pollutant source using a tracer gas was tested in the case of an aerosol source. The influence of particle deposition on the walls of a test room of 72 m3 was studied. The deposition rate of an aerosol of MgCl2 was determined by means of two methods: one based on measuring the aerosol concentration decay inside the ventilated room, the other based on calculation of the material mass balance. The concentration decay was monitored by optical counting and the aerosol mass concentration determined by means of sampling on a filter and analysis of the mass deposited by atomic absorption spectrometry. Four series of measurements were carried out. The curve giving the deposition rate according to the particle aerodynamic diameter (d(ae)) was established and shows deposition rates higher than those predicted using the model of Corner. The decay method gives the best results. The study carried out has shown that the phenomenon of deposition has little effect on the measurement of the aerosol source emission rate using a tracer gas for particles of aerodynamic diameter < 5 microm (underestimation < 25%). For particles of a greater diameter, wall deposition is an extremely limiting factor for the method, the influence of which can, however, be limited by using a test booth of small volume and keeping the sampling duration as short as possible.

  20. Evaluation and study of advanced optical contamination, deposition, measurement, and removal techniques. [including computer programs and ultraviolet reflection analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linford, R. M. F.; Allen, T. H.; Dillow, C. F.

    1975-01-01

    A program is described to design, fabricate and install an experimental work chamber assembly (WCA) to provide a wide range of experimental capability. The WCA incorporates several techniques for studying the kinetics of contaminant films and their effect on optical surfaces. It incorporates the capability for depositing both optical and contaminant films on temperature-controlled samples, and for in-situ measurements of the vacuum ultraviolet reflectance. Ellipsometer optics are mounted on the chamber for film thickness determinations, and other features include access ports for radiation sources and instrumentation. Several supporting studies were conducted to define specific chamber requirements, to determine the sensitivity of the measurement techniques to be incorporated in the chamber, and to establish procedures for handling samples prior to their installation in the chamber. A bibliography and literature survey of contamination-related articles is included.

  1. Direct measurement technique for determining ventilation rate in the deposit-feeding clam Macoma nasuta (bivalvia, tellinaceae)

    SciTech Connect

    Specht, D.T.; Lee, H.

    1989-01-01

    An exposure chamber, the 'clambox', was developed to measure ventilation rate, sediment processing rate, and efficiency of pollutant uptake by Macoma nasuta, Conrad, a surface-deposit-feeding clam. Clams, collected from Yaquina Bay, Oregon, USA, were cemented into a hole in a piece of rubber dental dam so that the inhalant siphons were separated by a membrane. The dental dam was then clamped between two glass chambers. The inhalant and exhalant siphons were thus diirected into separate chambers of the device so that the amount of water or feces discharged into the exhalant camber provided direct measure ventilation rate and sediment processing rate, respectively. The short-term pattern was for ventilation to be intermittently interrupted, essentially ceasing for 12 to 120 min, followed by a short period of active ventilation and then a resumption of the normal rate.

  2. The influence of petroleum acids and solid surface energy on pipeline wettability in relation to hydrate deposition.

    PubMed

    Aspenes, G; Høiland, S; Barth, T; Askvik, K M

    2009-05-15

    The mechanisms by which hydrates deposit in a petroleum production-line are probably related to pipeline surface properties, e.g. pipeline material, surface energy and roughness. In this work, the wettability alteration of pipeline surfaces from contact with oil, and the adhesion energy between water and solid in the presence of oil is investigated. Contact angles for model systems are determined as a function of solid material and oil composition. Although contact angles in oil/brine/solid systems have previously been extensively reported in the literature, the variety of solids that mimic a pipeline surface is limited. In this study, we include various metal surfaces in addition to glass and epoxy coating. The results show that both the presence of petroleum acids in the oil, and low surface free energy of the pipeline material, lead to more oil-wet systems and consequently reduced adhesion energy between water and solid.

  3. Improving energy efficiency via smart building energy management systems. A comparison with policy measures

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, Paula; Siddiqui, Afzal; Stadler, Michael

    2014-12-09

    In this study, to foster the transition to more sustainable energy systems, policymakers have been approving measures to improve energy efficiency as well as promoting smart grids. In this setting, building managers are encouraged to adapt their energy operations to real-time market and weather conditions. Yet, most fail to do so as they rely on conventional building energy management systems (BEMS) that have static temperature set points for heating and cooling equipment. In this paper, we investigate how effective policy measures are at improving building-level energy efficiency compared to a smart BEMS with dynamic temperature set points. To this end, we present an integrated optimisation model mimicking the smart BEMS that combines decisions on heating and cooling systems operations with decisions on energy sourcing. Using data from an Austrian and a Spanish building, we find that the smart BEMS results in greater reduction in energy consumption than a conventional BEMS with policy measures.

  4. Biological Effects of Particles with Very High Energy Deposition on Mammalian Cells Utilizing the Brookhaven Tandem Van de Graaff Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Janapriya; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wang, Minli

    2013-01-01

    High LET radiation from GCR (Galactic Cosmic Rays) consisting mainly of high charge and energy (HZE) nuclei and secondary protons and neutrons, and secondaries from protons in SPE (Solar Particle Event) pose a major health risk to astronauts due to induction of DNA damage and oxidative stress. Experiments with high energy particles mimicking the space environment for estimation of radiation risk are being performed at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at BNL. Experiments with low energy particles comparing to high energy particles of similar LET are of interest for investigation of the role of track structure on biological effects. For this purpose, we report results utilizing the Tandem Van de Graaff accelerator at BNL. The primary objective of our studies is to elucidate the influence of high vs low energy deposition on track structure, delta ray contribution and resulting biological responses. These low energy ions are of special relevance as these energies may occur following absorption through the spacecraft and shielding materials in human tissues and nuclear fragments produced in tissues by high energy protons and neutrons. This study will help to verify the efficiency of these low energy particles and better understand how various cell types respond to them.

  5. A General Relativistic Ray-tracing Method for Estimating the Energy and Momentum Deposition by Neutrino Pair Annihilation in Collapsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harikae, Seiji; Kotake, Kei; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Sekiguchi, Yu-ichiro

    2010-09-01

    Bearing in mind the application to the collapsar models of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), we develop a numerical scheme and code for estimating the deposition of energy and momentum due to the neutrino pair annihilation (ν + {\\bar{ν}} → e^{-} + e^{+}) in the vicinity of an accretion tori around a Kerr black hole. Our code is designed to solve the general relativistic (GR) neutrino transfer by a ray-tracing method. To solve the collisional Boltzmann equation in curved spacetime, we numerically integrate the so-called rendering equation along the null geodesics. We employ the Fehlberg (4,5) adaptive integrator in the Runge-Kutta method to perform the numerical integration accurately. For the neutrino opacity, the charged-current β-processes, which are dominant in the vicinity of the accretion tori, are taken into account. The numerical accuracy of the developed code is certified by several tests in which we show comparisons with the corresponding analytical solutions. In order to solve the energy-dependent ray-tracing transport, we propose that an adaptive-mesh-refinement approach, which we take for the two radiation angles (θ, phi) and the neutrino energy, is useful in reducing the computational cost significantly. Based on the hydrodynamical data in our collapsar simulation, we estimate the annihilation rates in a post-processing manner. Increasing the Kerr parameter from 0 to 1, it is found that the GR effect can increase the local energy deposition rate by about one order of magnitude, and the net energy deposition rate by several tens of percent. After the accretion disk settles into a stationary state (typically later than ~9 s from the onset of gravitational collapse), we point out that the neutrino-heating timescale in the vicinity of the polar funnel region can be shorter than the dynamical timescale. Our results suggest that the neutrino pair annihilation is potentially as important as the conventional magnetohydrodynamic mechanism for igniting the GRB

  6. Non-linear, non-monotonic effect of nano-scale roughness on particle deposition in absence of an energy barrier: Experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    Jin, Chao; Glawdel, Tomasz; Ren, Carolyn L; Emelko, Monica B

    2015-12-11

    Deposition of colloidal- and nano-scale particles on surfaces is critical to numerous natural and engineered environmental, health, and industrial applications ranging from drinking water treatment to semi-conductor manufacturing. Nano-scale surface roughness-induced hydrodynamic impacts on particle deposition were evaluated in the absence of an energy barrier to deposition in a parallel plate system. A non-linear, non-monotonic relationship between deposition surface roughness and particle deposition flux was observed and a critical roughness size associated with minimum deposition flux or "sag effect" was identified. This effect was more significant for nanoparticles (<1 μm) than for colloids and was numerically simulated using a Convective-Diffusion model and experimentally validated. Inclusion of flow field and hydrodynamic retardation effects explained particle deposition profiles better than when only the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) force was considered. This work provides 1) a first comprehensive framework for describing the hydrodynamic impacts of nano-scale surface roughness on particle deposition by unifying hydrodynamic forces (using the most current approaches for describing flow field profiles and hydrodynamic retardation effects) with appropriately modified expressions for DLVO interaction energies, and gravity forces in one model and 2) a foundation for further describing the impacts of more complicated scales of deposition surface roughness on particle deposition.

  7. Non-linear, non-monotonic effect of nano-scale roughness on particle deposition in absence of an energy barrier: Experiments and modeling

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Chao; Glawdel, Tomasz; Ren, Carolyn L.; Emelko, Monica B.

    2015-01-01

    Deposition of colloidal- and nano-scale particles on surfaces is critical to numerous natural and engineered environmental, health, and industrial applications ranging from drinking water treatment to semi-conductor manufacturing. Nano-scale surface roughness-induced hydrodynamic impacts on particle deposition were evaluated in the absence of an energy barrier to deposition in a parallel plate system. A non-linear, non-monotonic relationship between deposition surface roughness and particle deposition flux was observed and a critical roughness size associated with minimum deposition flux or “sag effect” was identified. This effect was more significant for nanoparticles (<1 μm) than for colloids and was numerically simulated using a Convective-Diffusion model and experimentally validated. Inclusion of flow field and hydrodynamic retardation effects explained particle deposition profiles better than when only the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) force was considered. This work provides 1) a first comprehensive framework for describing the hydrodynamic impacts of nano-scale surface roughness on particle deposition by unifying hydrodynamic forces (using the most current approaches for describing flow field profiles and hydrodynamic retardation effects) with appropriately modified expressions for DLVO interaction energies, and gravity forces in one model and 2) a foundation for further describing the impacts of more complicated scales of deposition surface roughness on particle deposition. PMID:26658159

  8. Non-linear, non-monotonic effect of nano-scale roughness on particle deposition in absence of an energy barrier: Experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chao; Glawdel, Tomasz; Ren, Carolyn L.; Emelko, Monica B.

    2015-12-01

    Deposition of colloidal- and nano-scale particles on surfaces is critical to numerous natural and engineered environmental, health, and industrial applications ranging from drinking water treatment to semi-conductor manufacturing. Nano-scale surface roughness-induced hydrodynamic impacts on particle deposition were evaluated in the absence of an energy barrier to deposition in a parallel plate system. A non-linear, non-monotonic relationship between deposition surface roughness and particle deposition flux was observed and a critical roughness size associated with minimum deposition flux or “sag effect” was identified. This effect was more significant for nanoparticles (<1 μm) than for colloids and was numerically simulated using a Convective-Diffusion model and experimentally validated. Inclusion of flow field and hydrodynamic retardation effects explained particle deposition profiles better than when only the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) force was considered. This work provides 1) a first comprehensive framework for describing the hydrodynamic impacts of nano-scale surface roughness on particle deposition by unifying hydrodynamic forces (using the most current approaches for describing flow field profiles and hydrodynamic retardation effects) with appropriately modified expressions for DLVO interaction energies, and gravity forces in one model and 2) a foundation for further describing the impacts of more complicated scales of deposition surface roughness on particle deposition.

  9. Validation of a dose deposited by low-energy photons using GATE/GEANT4.

    PubMed

    Thiam, C O; Breton, V; Donnarieix, D; Habib, B; Maigne, L

    2008-06-01

    The GATE Monte Carlo simulation platform based on the Geant4 toolkit has now become a diffused tool for simulating PET and SPECT imaging devices. In this paper, we explore its relevance for dosimetry of low-energy 125I photon brachytherapy sources used to treat prostate cancers. To that end, three 125-iodine sources widely used in prostate cancer brachytherapy treatment have been modelled. GATE simulations reproducing dosimetric reference observables such as radial dose function g(r), anisotropy function F(r, theta) and dose-rate constant (Lambda) were performed in liquid water. The calculations were splitted on the EGEE grid infrastructure to reduce the computing time of the simulations. The results were compared to other relevant Monte Carlo results and to measurements published and fixed as recommended values by the AAPM Task Group 43. GATE results agree with consensus values published by AAPM Task Group 43 with an accuracy better than 2%, demonstrating that GATE is a relevant tool for the study of the dose induced by low-energy photons.

  10. Thickness-Dependent Binding Energy Shift in Few-Layer MoS2 Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Kai; Chen, Ruei-San; Chou, Tsu-Chin; Lee, Yi-Hsin; Chen, Yang-Fang; Chen, Kuei-Hsien; Chen, Li-Chyong

    2016-08-31

    The thickness-dependent surface states of MoS2 thin films grown by the chemical vapor deposition process on the SiO2-Si substrates are investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Raman and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy suggest the thicknesses of MoS2 films to be ranging from 3 to 10 layers. Both the core levels and valence band edges of MoS2 shift downward ∼0.2 eV as the film thickness increases, which can be ascribed to the Fermi level variations resulting from the surface states and bulk defects. Grainy features observed from the atomic force microscopy topographies, and sulfur-vacancy-induced defect states illustrated at the valence band spectra imply the generation of surface states that causes the downward band bending at the n-type MoS2 surface. Bulk defects in thick MoS2 may also influence the Fermi level oppositely compared to the surface states. When Au contacts with our MoS2 thin films, the Fermi level downshifts and the binding energy reduces due to the hole-doping characteristics of Au and easy charge transfer from the surface defect sites of MoS2. The shift of the onset potentials in hydrogen evolution reaction and the evolution of charge-transfer resistances extracted from the impedance measurement also indicate the Fermi level varies with MoS2 film thickness. The tunable Fermi level and the high chemical stability make our MoS2 a potential catalyst. The observed thickness-dependent properties can also be applied to other transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), and facilitates the development in the low-dimensional electronic devices and catalysts. PMID:27488185

  11. Thickness-Dependent Binding Energy Shift in Few-Layer MoS2 Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Kai; Chen, Ruei-San; Chou, Tsu-Chin; Lee, Yi-Hsin; Chen, Yang-Fang; Chen, Kuei-Hsien; Chen, Li-Chyong

    2016-08-31

    The thickness-dependent surface states of MoS2 thin films grown by the chemical vapor deposition process on the SiO2-Si substrates are investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Raman and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy suggest the thicknesses of MoS2 films to be ranging from 3 to 10 layers. Both the core levels and valence band edges of MoS2 shift downward ∼0.2 eV as the film thickness increases, which can be ascribed to the Fermi level variations resulting from the surface states and bulk defects. Grainy features observed from the atomic force microscopy topographies, and sulfur-vacancy-induced defect states illustrated at the valence band spectra imply the generation of surface states that causes the downward band bending at the n-type MoS2 surface. Bulk defects in thick MoS2 may also influence the Fermi level oppositely compared to the surface states. When Au contacts with our MoS2 thin films, the Fermi level downshifts and the binding energy reduces due to the hole-doping characteristics of Au and easy charge transfer from the surface defect sites of MoS2. The shift of the onset potentials in hydrogen evolution reaction and the evolution of charge-transfer resistances extracted from the impedance measurement also indicate the Fermi level varies with MoS2 film thickness. The tunable Fermi level and the high chemical stability make our MoS2 a potential catalyst. The observed thickness-dependent properties can also be applied to other transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), and facilitates the development in the low-dimensional electronic devices and catalysts.

  12. Analyzing the Impact of Increasing Mechanical Index and Energy Deposition on Shear Wave Speed Reconstruction in Human Liver.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yufeng; Palmeri, Mark L; Rouze, Ned C; Rosenzweig, Stephen J; Abdelmalek, Manal F; Nightingale, Kathryn R

    2015-07-01

    Shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) has found success in liver fibrosis staging. This work evaluates hepatic SWEI measurement success as a function of push pulse energy using two mechanical index (MI) values (1.6 and 2.2) over a range of pulse durations. Shear wave speed (SWS) was measured in the livers of 26 study subjects with known or potential chronic liver diseases. Each measurement consisted of eight SWEI sequences, each with different push energy configurations. The rate of successful SWS estimation was linearly proportional to the push energy. SWEI measurements with higher push energy were successful in patients for whom standard push energy levels failed. The findings also suggest that liver capsule depth could be used prospectively to identify patients who would benefit from elevated output. We conclude that there is clinical benefit to using elevated acoustic output for hepatic SWS measurement in patients with deeper livers.

  13. Time-resolved measurements of desorbed gas during 1-MeV K+ pulsedbeam deposition in a stainless steel target

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Prost, L.R.; Seidl, P.A.; Molvik, A.W.; KireeffCovo, M.

    2007-01-01

    Measurements were made of the density, species and velocity of the desorbed gas cloud on intense K{sup +} beam bombardment of a stainless steel target. RGA measurements indicate that the gas cloud consists of predominantly H{sub 2}. Energy analyzer measurements of doubly-ionized beam ions show that the ratio of hydrogen gas production to beam density was approximately 3000 at normal incidence. Optical measurements of the evolution of the gas cloud during the beam pulse show a distribution with an average expansion velocity of about 0.5 mm/{micro}s. Comparison is made with a simple model of the gas cloud behavior.

  14. Energy-Time Uncertainty Relations in Quantum Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyadera, Takayuki

    2016-06-01

    Quantum measurement is a physical process. A system and an apparatus interact for a certain time period (measurement time), and during this interaction, information about an observable is transferred from the system to the apparatus. In this study, we quantify the energy fluctuation of the quantum apparatus required for this physical process to occur autonomously. We first examine the so-called standard model of measurement, which is free from any non-trivial energy-time uncertainty relation, to find that it needs an external system that switches on the interaction between the system and the apparatus. In such a sense this model is not closed. Therefore to treat a measurement process in a fully quantum manner we need to consider a "larger" quantum apparatus which works also as a timing device switching on the interaction. In this setting we prove that a trade-off relation (energy-time uncertainty relation), τ \\cdot Δ H_A ≥ π hbar /4 , holds between the energy fluctuation Δ H_A of the quantum apparatus and the measurement time τ . We use this trade-off relation to discuss the spacetime uncertainty relation concerning the operational meaning of the microscopic structure of spacetime. In addition, we derive another trade-off inequality between the measurement time and the strength of interaction between the system and the apparatus.

  15. Energy-Time Uncertainty Relations in Quantum Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyadera, Takayuki

    2016-11-01

    Quantum measurement is a physical process. A system and an apparatus interact for a certain time period (measurement time), and during this interaction, information about an observable is transferred from the system to the apparatus. In this study, we quantify the energy fluctuation of the quantum apparatus required for this physical process to occur autonomously. We first examine the so-called standard model of measurement, which is free from any non-trivial energy-time uncertainty relation, to find that it needs an external system that switches on the interaction between the system and the apparatus. In such a sense this model is not closed. Therefore to treat a measurement process in a fully quantum manner we need to consider a "larger" quantum apparatus which works also as a timing device switching on the interaction. In this setting we prove that a trade-off relation (energy-time uncertainty relation), τ \\cdot Δ H_A ≥ π /4, holds between the energy fluctuation Δ H_A of the quantum apparatus and the measurement time τ . We use this trade-off relation to discuss the spacetime uncertainty relation concerning the operational meaning of the microscopic structure of spacetime. In addition, we derive another trade-off inequality between the measurement time and the strength of interaction between the system and the apparatus.

  16. Measurement and simulation of lineal energy distribution at the CERN high energy facility with a tissue equivalent proportional counter.

    PubMed

    Rollet, S; Autischer, M; Beck, P; Latocha, M

    2007-01-01

    The response of a tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) in a mixed radiation field with a neutron energy distribution similar to the radiation field at commercial flight altitudes has been studied. The measurements have been done at the CERN-EU High-Energy Reference Field (CERF) facility where a well-characterised radiation field is available for intercomparison. The TEPC instrument used by the ARC Seibersdorf Research is filled with pure propane gas at low pressure and can be used to determine the lineal energy distribution of the energy deposition in a mass of gas equivalent to a 2 microm diameter volume of unit density tissue, of similar size to the nuclei of biological cells. The linearity of the detector response was checked both in term of dose and dose rate. The effect of dead-time has been corrected. The influence of the detector exposure location and orientation in the radiation field on the dose distribution was also studied as a function of the total dose. The microdosimetric distribution of the absorbed dose as a function of the lineal energy has been obtained and compared with the same distribution simulated with the FLUKA Monte Carlo transport code. The dose equivalent was calculated by folding this distribution with the quality factor as a function of linear energy transfer. The comparison between the measured and simulated distributions show that they are in good agreement. As a result of this study the detector is well characterised, thanks also to the numerical simulations the instrument response is well understood, and it's currently being used onboard the aircrafts to evaluate the dose to aircraft crew caused by cosmic radiation.

  17. Energy balance in man measured by direct and indirect calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Webb, P; Annis, J F; Troutman, S J

    1980-06-01

    In six 24-hr measurements of energy balance, direct and indirect calorimetry agreed within +/-3%, which is probably the range of experimental error. But in seven other 24-hr periods there was disagreement in the range of 8 to 23%, and these were usually days when the subjects ate much less than they spent metabolically. Our direct calorimeter is an insulated, water cooled suit. Continous measurements of O2 consumption and CO2 production provided data on metabolic expenditure (M) by indirect calorimetry. The 24-hr values for M matched the energy losses within +/-60 kcal (+/-3% of M) in four men who rested all day and lay down to sleep at night. Similar agreement was seen in one of the four who worked on a treadmill for 4 hr and stayed busy all day. but in another energy losses were 342 kcal greater than M (10% of M). When the experiments gave values for M minus the losses greater than +/-60 kcal, this is called "unmeasured energy". In further experiments, two subjects stayed awake for 24 hr, and their unmeasured energies were 279 and 393 kcal. The same two men, eating sparingly, also worked for 24 hr so as to double their resting metabolic expenditures; the unmeasured energies were even larger, 380 and 958 kcal. When they repeated the 24 hr of mild work, but ate nearly as much as they spent metabolically, one man was near energy balance, while the other showed an unmeasured energy of -363 kcal. Little heat storage was evident in these experiments; therefore, heat balance was present and energy balance should have been present. In the group of 13 experiments, it appeared that the greater the food deficit, the larger was the unmeasured energy (excess of metabolic expenditure over loss of energy).

  18. Gamma-ray thermoluminescence measurements: a record of fallout deposition in Hiroshima?

    PubMed

    Egbert, Stephen D; Kerr, George D

    2012-05-01

    In certain Hiroshima neighborhoods, radiation measurements using thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) exceed what can be explained by the initial gamma-ray doses and uncertainties from the Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02). This problem was not previously recognized as being isolated to certain parts of that city. The ratio between TLD measurements and DS02 dose calculations for gamma rays appear to grow larger than unity up to more than three with increasing ground range, but closer examination shows the excess TLD dose (0.1, 0.2, or possibly up to 0.8 Gray) is correlated with certain neighborhoods and could be due to radioactive fallout. At Nagasaki, the TLD measurements do not show this same excess, probably because there were no TLD measurements taken more than 800 m downwind (eastward) from the Nagasaki hypocenter, so that any small excess TLD dose was masked by larger initial gamma-ray doses of 25-80 Gray in the few downwind samples. The DS02 Report had noted many measurements lower than the DS02 calculation for several Nagasaki TLD samples, independent of ground range. This was explained as being the result of previously unaccounted urban shielding which was observed from Nagasaki pre-bomb aerial photos. However, the Hiroshima excess TLD dose issue was not resolved. If the excess TLD doses at Hiroshima are an indication of fallout, it may be possible to use additional TLD studies to make better estimates of the locations and radiation doses to survivors from the fallout after the bombings at both cities.

  19. Measurement of high-energy direct photons in psi decays

    SciTech Connect

    Abrams, G.S.; Alam, M.S.; Blocker, C.A.; Boyarski, A.M.; Briedenbach, M.; Burke, D.L.; Carithers, W.C.; Chinowsky, W.; Coles, W.W.; Cooper, S.; Dieterle, W.E.; Dillon, J.B.; Dorenbosch, J.; Dorfan, J.M.; Eaton, M.W.; Feldman, G.J.; Franklin, M.E.B.; Gidal, G.; Goldhaber, G.; Hanson, G.; Hayes, K.G.; Himel, T.; Hitlin, D.G.; Hollebeek, R.J.; Innes, W.R.; Jaros, J.A.; Jenni, P.; Johnson, A.D.; Kadyk, J.A.; Lankford, A.J.; Larsen, R.R.; Lueth, V.; Millikan, R.E.; Nelson, M.E.; Pang, C.Y.; Patrick, J.F.; Perl, M.L.; Richter, B.; Roussarie, A.; Scharre, D.L.; Schindler, R.H.; Schwitters, R.F.; Siegrist, J.L.; Strait, J.; Taureg, H.; Tonutti, M.; Trilling, G.H.; Vella, E.N.; Vidal, R.A.; Videau, I.; Weiss, J.M.; Zaccone, H.

    1980-01-21

    The inclusive ..gamma.. and ..pi../sup 0/ momentum distributions at the psi have been measured. Using these data and estimates of eta production, it is found that (4.1 +- 0.8) % of psi decays contain a direct photon with energy greater than 60% of the beam energy. The expected momentum distribution for direct photons calculated to lowest order in quantum chromodynamics is qualitatively different from that observed in the data.

  20. Comparison between knife-edge and frisbee-shaped surrogate surfaces for making dry deposition measurements: Wind tunnel experiments and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jiaoyan; Liu, Ying; Holsen, Thomas M.

    2011-08-01

    Dry deposition is a major pathway for atmospheric contaminant movement from the atmosphere to the earth surface. Despite its importance, there is no generally accepted direct method to measure dry deposition. Recently, the interest in using surrogate surfaces to measure dry deposition is growing, primarily because of their ease of use. However, a problem with these surfaces is extrapolating the results obtained to natural surfaces. There are two popular surrogate plates used to measure dry deposition. One had a sharp leading edge (knife-edge) (KSS), and the other has a smooth-edge (frisbee-shaped) (FSS). In this study, the performances of these two surrogate surfaces to directly measure gas dry deposition were explored using wind tunnel experiments and two-dimensional (2D) computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models. Although the fluid fields above these two plates were different, both created laminar boundary layers (distance above the surface where the velocity gradient is constant) with a constant thickness after approximately five cm. In the wind tunnel, gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) deposition to gold-coated filters was used to measure deposition velocities ( Vd) in part because for this combination deposition is air-side controlled. The GEM Vd to both surfaces increased with increasing wind speeds. Based on both measurements and CFD simulations, the Vds to the FSS were approximately 30% higher and more variable than to the KSS when the wind flow was parallel to the surfaces. However, when the angle between the surfaces and the wind was varied the Vds to the FSS were less dependent on the incident angle than to the KSS.

  1. Energy Measurement Studies for CO2 Measurement with a Coherent Doppler Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Koch, Grady J.; Vanvalkenburg, Randal L.; Yu, Jirong; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    The accurate measurement of energy in the application of lidar system for CO2 measurement is critical. Different techniques of energy estimation in the online and offline pulses are investigated for post processing of lidar returns. The cornerstone of the techniques is the accurate estimation of the spectrum of lidar signal and background noise. Since the background noise is not the ideal white Gaussian noise, simple average level estimation of noise level is not well fit in the energy estimation of lidar signal and noise. A brief review of the methods is presented in this paper.

  2. Comparison of energy expenditure measurement techniques in severely burned patients.

    PubMed

    Schane, J; Goede, M; Silverstein, P

    1987-01-01

    The degree of accuracy of existing formulas for calculating energy expenditure can be determined by comparing them to the measured energy expenditure via indirect calorimetry. As a result, one can modify traditional predicted recommendations for nutrition alimentation of the burn patient with real-time data. In this study, 21 sequential adult admissions with second- and third-degree total body surface area (TBSA) burn wounds (range 21%-81% TBSA) underwent serial assessments of energy expenditure by indirect calorimetry. On admission, maximum, and discharge, measured energy expenditure (MEE) was compared with the calculations for predicted energy expenditure by the Curreri (CEE) and modified Harris-Benedict (MBEE) equations. The mean energy expenditure calculated from the Curreri equation on admission (CEEA) overestimated the mean MEE on admission (MEEA) by 25% (P less than 0.001) and on discharge (MEED) by 36% (P less than 0.0005). The mean modified Harris-Benedict equation overestimated the mean MEEA by 32% (P less than 0.0005) and the mean MEED by 39% (P less than 0.0005). No significant difference was noted between the mean MEE at maximum (MEEM) and the mean CEEA or the mean MBEEA. This indicates excessive overfeeding of the burn patient from admission to discharge by both standard formulas. Actual measured data provide a better indicator of varying nutritional needs throughout the hospital course than the standard formulas, and their use would result in significant savings in the expenses of enteral/parenteral nutritional supplements. PMID:3667663

  3. Black hole firewalls require huge energy of measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotta, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Jiro; Funo, Ken

    2014-06-01

    The unitary moving mirror model is one of the best quantum systems for checking the reasoning of the original firewall paradox of Almheiri et al. [J. High Energy Phys. 02 (2013) 062] in quantum black holes. Though the late-time part of radiations emitted from the mirror is fully entangled with the early part, no firewall exists with a deadly, huge average energy flux in this model. This is because the high-energy entanglement structure of the discretized systems in almost maximally entangled states is modified so as to yield the correct description of low-energy effective field theory. Furthermore, the strong subadditivity paradox of firewalls is resolved using nonlocality of general one-particle states and zero-point fluctuation entanglement. Due to the Reeh-Schlieder theorem in quantum field theory, another firewall paradox is inevitably raised with quantum remote measurements in the model. We resolve this paradox from the viewpoint of the energy cost of measurements. No firewall appears, as long as the energy for the measurement is much smaller than the ultraviolet cutoff scale.

  4. Upgrade of beam energy measurement system at BEPC-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian-Yong; Cai, Xiao; Mo, Xiao-Hu; Guo, Di-Zhou; Wang, Jian-Li; Liu, Bai-Qi; Achasov, M. N.; Krasnov, A. A.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Pyata, E. E.; Mamoshkina, E. V.; Harris, F. A.

    2016-07-01

    The beam energy measurement system is of great importance for both BEPC-II accelerator and BES-III detector. The system is based on measuring the energies of Compton back-scattered photons. In order to meet the requirements of data taking and improve the measurement accuracy, the system has continued to be upgraded, which involves the updating of laser and optics subsystems, replacement of a view-port of the laser to the vacuum insertion subsystem, the use of an electric cooling system for a high purity germanium detector, and improvement of the data acquisition and processing subsystem. The upgrade system guarantees the smooth and efficient measurement of beam energy at BEPC-II and enables accurate offline energy values for further physics analysis at BES-III. Supported in part by National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC)(11375206, 10775142, 10825524, 11125525, 11235011), the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (2015CB856700, 2015CB856705), State key laboratory of particle and detection and electronics; and the CAS Center for Excellence in Particle Physics (CCEPP); the RFBR grant(14-02-00129-a), U.S. Department of Energy (DE-FG02-04ER41291, DE-FG02-05ER41374, DE-FG02-94ER40823, DESC0010118), U.S. National Science Foundation, part of this work related to the design of ZnSe viewports is supported by the Russian Science Foundation (14-50-00080)

  5. Magnetospheric Effects on High Energy Solar Particles: PAMELA Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Nolfo, G. A.; Boezio, M.; Ryan, J. M.; Christian, E. R.; Stochaj, S.; Bruno, A.; Mergè, M.; Martucci, M.; Ricci, M.; Mocchiutti, E.; Munini, R.; Bazilevskaya, G.; Bravar, U.

    2015-12-01

    Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) are thought to be accelerated at the Sun by solar flares or by the shocks formed by Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs). Even more elusive is the origin of the highest energy SEPs in so-called Ground Level Enhancements (GLEs). At these energies, the effects of transport are often minimal, providing an opportunity to investigate the problem of particle acceleration. However, the effects of transport en route to Earth often obscure the acceleration process(es). The Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA) instrument provides new data that aid in separating the effects of acceleration and transport. Furthermore, PAMELA bridges a critical gap in energy between the low-energy space-based and highest-energy ground-based measurements. We report on recent PAMELA observations of high-energy SEPs and illustrate some of the governing effects of acceleration and transport with the first GLE of solar cycle 24, i.e., 2012 May 17. The PAMELA data of 2012 May 17 reveal two distinct spectral components, a low-energy SEP component that exhibits significant scattering or redistribution, accompanied by a high-energy component that reaches the Earth relatively unaffected by dispersive transport effects. We postulate that the scattering or redistribution at low energies takes place locally providing one of the first opportunities to witness the effects of SEP transport in the Earth's magnetosheath.

  6. The Hubble constant and dark energy from cosmological distance measures

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, Kazuhide; Takahashi, Tomo E-mail: tomot@cc.saga-u.ac.jp

    2008-04-15

    We study how the determination of the Hubble constant from cosmological distance measures is affected by models of dark energy and vice versa. For this purpose, constraints on the Hubble constant and dark energy are investigated using the cosmological observations of cosmic microwave background, baryon acoustic oscillations and type Ia supernovae. When one investigates dark energy, the Hubble constant is often a nuisance parameter; thus it is usually marginalized over. On the other hand, when one focuses on the Hubble constant, simple dark energy models such as a cosmological constant and a constant equation of state are usually assumed. Since we do not know the nature of dark energy yet, it is interesting to investigate the Hubble constant assuming some types of dark energy and see to what extent the constraint on the Hubble constant is affected by the assumption concerning dark energy. We show that the constraint on the Hubble constant is not affected much by the assumption for dark energy. We furthermore show that this holds true even if we remove the assumption that the universe is flat. We also discuss how the prior on the Hubble constant affects the constraints on dark energy and/or the curvature of the universe.

  7. Particle and Photon Detection: Counting and Energy Measurement.

    PubMed

    Janesick, James; Tower, John

    2016-05-12

    Fundamental limits for photon counting and photon energy measurement are reviewed for CCD and CMOS imagers. The challenges to extend photon counting into the visible/nIR wavelengths and achieve energy measurement in the UV with specific read noise requirements are discussed. Pixel flicker and random telegraph noise sources are highlighted along with various methods used in reducing their contribution on the sensor's read noise floor. Practical requirements for quantum efficiency, charge collection efficiency, and charge transfer efficiency that interfere with photon counting performance are discussed. Lastly we will review current efforts in reducing flicker noise head-on, in hopes to drive read noise substantially below 1 carrier rms.

  8. Particle and Photon Detection: Counting and Energy Measurement.

    PubMed

    Janesick, James; Tower, John

    2016-01-01

    Fundamental limits for photon counting and photon energy measurement are reviewed for CCD and CMOS imagers. The challenges to extend photon counting into the visible/nIR wavelengths and achieve energy measurement in the UV with specific read noise requirements are discussed. Pixel flicker and random telegraph noise sources are highlighted along with various methods used in reducing their contribution on the sensor's read noise floor. Practical requirements for quantum efficiency, charge collection efficiency, and charge transfer efficiency that interfere with photon counting performance are discussed. Lastly we will review current efforts in reducing flicker noise head-on, in hopes to drive read noise substantially below 1 carrier rms. PMID:27187398

  9. Energy Balance Measurement: When Something is Not Better than Nothing

    PubMed Central

    Dhurandhar, Nikhil V.; Schoeller, Dale; Brown, Andrew W.; Heymsfield, Steven B.; Thomas, Diana; Sørensen, Thorkild I.A.; Speakman, John R.; Jeansonne, Madeline; Allison, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Energy intake (EI) and physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) are key modifiable determinants of energy balance, traditionally assessed by self-report despite its repeated demonstration of considerable inaccuracies. We argue here that it is time to move from the common view that self-reports of EI and PAEE are imperfect, but nevertheless deserving of use, to a view commensurate with the evidence that self-reports of EI and PAEE are so poor that they are wholly unacceptable for scientific research on EI and PAEE. While new strategies for objectively determining energy balance are in their infancy, it is unacceptable to use decidedly inaccurate instruments, which may misguide health care policies, future research, and clinical judgment. The scientific and medical communities should discontinue reliance on self-reported EI and PAEE. Researchers and sponsors should develop objective measures of energy balance. PMID:25394308

  10. In-situ erosion and deposition measurements of plasma-facing surfaces in Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, Harold S.

    2014-10-01

    The Accelerator Based In-situ Materials Surveillance (AIMS) diagnostic was recently developed to demonstrate the novel application of ion beam analysis (IBA) to in-vessel studies of plasma materials interactions in Alcator C-Mod. The AIMS diagnostic injects a 900 keV deuterium ion beam into the tokamak's vacuum vessel between plasma discharges while magnetic fields are used to steer the ion beam to plasma facing component (PFC) surfaces. Spectroscopic analysis of neutrons and gamma rays from the induced nuclear reactions provides a quantitative, spatially resolved map of the PFC surface composition that includes boron (B) and deuterium (D) content. Since AIMS is sensitive to low-Z elements and C-Mod regularly boronizes PFCs, the evolution of B and D on PFCs can be used to directly study erosion, deposition, and fuel retention in response to plasma operations and wall conditioning processes. AIMS analysis of 18 lower single null I-mode discharges show a net boron deposition rate of 6 +/- 2 nm/s on the inner wall while subsequent inner wall limited discharges and a disruption did not show significant changes in B. Measurements of D content showed relative changes of >2.5 following a similar trend. This suggests high D retention rates and net B deposition rates of ~18 cm/year of plasma exposure are possible and depend strongly on the plasma conditions. Ex-situ IBA was also performed on the same PFCs after removal from C-Mod, successfully validating the AIMS technique. These IBA measurements also show that the B content on the inner wall varied toroidally and poloidally from 0 to 3000 nm, demonstrating the importance of the spatial resolution provided by AIMS and the sensitivity of PFCs to B-field alignment. AIMS upgrades are underway for operation in 2014 and we anticipate new measurements correlating the evolution of PFC surfaces to plasma configuration, RF heating, and current drive scenarios. This work is supported by U.S. DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-94ER54235 and

  11. Computer simulated building energy consumption for verification of energy conservation measures in network facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plankey, B.

    1981-01-01

    A computer program called ECPVER (Energy Consumption Program - Verification) was developed to simulate all energy loads for any number of buildings. The program computes simulated daily, monthly, and yearly energy consumption which can be compared with actual meter readings for the same time period. Such comparison can lead to validation of the model under a variety of conditions, which allows it to be used to predict future energy saving due to energy conservation measures. Predicted energy saving can then be compared with actual saving to verify the effectiveness of those energy conservation changes. This verification procedure is planned to be an important advancement in the Deep Space Network Energy Project, which seeks to reduce energy cost and consumption at all DSN Deep Space Stations.

  12. Simulation of single-event energy-deposition spreading in a hybrid pixellated detector for γ imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manach, Erwan; Gal, Olivier

    2002-07-01

    In the framework of the Medipix2 Collaboration, a new photon-counting chip is being developed made of a 256×256 array of 55 μm-side square pixels. Although the chip was primarily developed for semiconductor X-ray imagers, we think that this type of device could be used in applications such as decommissioning of nuclear facilities where typical sources have γ-ray energies in the range of a few hundred keV. In order to enhance the detection efficiency in this energy range, we envisage connecting the Medipix2 chip to a CdTe or CdZnTe substrate (at least 1 mm thick). The small pixel size, the thickness of the Cd(Zn)Te substrate and the high photon energy motivate us to estimate first the spatial energy spreading following a photon interaction inside the detector. Estimations were made using the MCNP Monte Carlo package by simulating the individual energy distribution for each primary photon interaction. As an illustration of our results, simulating a 660 keV γ source, we found that there are two pixels on average, for each primary interaction, on which the deposited energy exceeds 50 keV. We have also made more accurate simulations using sub-pixels of side 11 μm, in order to evaluate the distance between the barycentre of the deposited energy and the photon impact point. As an example, with a 660 keV γ source, we found that the average of this distance reaches 67 μm when restricted to the events depositing more than 400 keV. If all events are taken into account, the mean distance is 26 μm, even though there is a small proportion of interactions where the scattered photon interacts somewhere else in the detector. Results are presented for different photon energies (60 keV, 660 keV, 1.25 MeV) and different materials (CdTe, GaAs).

  13. Measurement of post-eruptive volcanic deformation and depositional features using high-resolution remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAlpin, D. B.; Meyer, F. J.

    2011-12-01

    This proposal examines changes in volcanic geomorphology and topography using a new, multi-sensor approach to produce high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) and surface deformation maps that measure post-eruption volcanic changes and depositional features, including lava domes, lahars, and pyroclastic flow deposits. The advantage of this new approach is to exploit available data sets that have not previously been used systematically, or in full coordination. The use of readily available spaceborne remote sensing data is therefore maximized in a manner that is routine in method, but of sufficient quality to answer many important geophysical questions. Finally, this method provides these benefits while reducing expensive and potentially hazardous field campaigns. The multi-sensor approach involves a mix of stereoscopic optical, interferometric radar, and thermal space borne images to generate high-resolution DEMs and multi-sensor analyses of volcanic domes, as well as lower resolution analyses of deposits from other volcanic activity. The terrain of volcanic areas is subject to rapid topographic change. The time and elevation information obtained from DEMs of these areas enable us to perform accurate topographic phase correction of interferograms derived from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) imaging and therefore facilitates the use of InSAR data for monitoring centimeter scale surface motion. It also allows us to determine quantitative volume estimates of dynamically emplaced deposits from lahars, tsunamis, and mud flows, and it provides information for emergency planners to use in risk assessments facing communities in volcanically active areas. A principal test scenario for our method is Redoubt Volcano in South-Central Alaska. During March and April, 2009, Redoubt erupted in a series of explosive eruptions that melted the Drift Glacier on its North flank, and produced lahars that inundated the adjacent Drift River Valley. Quantitative

  14. Optimizing Lidar Scanning Strategies for Wind Energy Measurements (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, J. F.; Bonin, T. A.; Klein, P.; Wharton, S.; Chilson, P. B.

    2013-12-01

    Environmental concerns and rising fossil fuel prices have prompted rapid development in the renewable energy sector. Wind energy, in particular, has become increasingly popular in the United States. However, the intermittency of available wind energy makes it difficult to integrate wind energy into the power grid. Thus, the expansion and successful implementation of wind energy requires accurate wind resource assessments and wind power forecasts. The actual power produced by a turbine is affected by the wind speeds and turbulence levels experienced across the turbine rotor disk. Because of the range of measurement heights required for wind power estimation, remote sensing devices (e.g., lidar) are ideally suited for these purposes. However, the volume averaging inherent in remote sensing technology produces turbulence estimates that are different from those estimated by a sonic anemometer mounted on a standard meteorological tower. In addition, most lidars intended for wind energy purposes utilize a standard Doppler beam-swinging or Velocity-Azimuth Display technique to estimate the three-dimensional wind vector. These scanning strategies are ideal for measuring mean wind speeds but are likely inadequate for measuring turbulence. In order to examine the impact of different lidar scanning strategies on turbulence measurements, a WindCube lidar, a scanning Halo lidar, and a scanning Galion lidar were deployed at the Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in Summer 2013. Existing instrumentation at the ARM site, including a 60-m meteorological tower and an additional scanning Halo lidar, were used in conjunction with the deployed lidars to evaluate several user-defined scanning strategies. For part of the experiment, all three scanning lidars were pointed at approximately the same point in space and a tri-Doppler analysis was completed to calculate the three-dimensional wind vector every 1 second. In another part of the experiment, one of

  15. Multiphase flow measurement using multiple energy gamma ray absorption (MEGRA) composition measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Scheers, A.M.; Slijkerman, W.F.J.

    1996-12-31

    Some multiphase flowmeters use the principle of Dual Energy Gamma Ray Absorption (DEGRA) composition measurement to determine the individual water, oil and gas fractions. Under homogeneous flow conditions the ultimate uncertainty in phase fractions achievable with this technique depends strongly on the choice of hardware. The meter presented in this paper uses unique components that have been optimized for the water, oil and gas fraction measurement with theoretical uncertainties of 2% in the fractions over a 1 second measurement period. Generally, composition meters are sensitive to a change in production water salinity and this will cause significant systematic effort in the fraction and watercut measurements. A new measurement concept is presented that is not sensitive to salinity variations and based on Multiple Energy Gamma Ray Absorption (MEGRA) composition measurement. A multiphase flowmeter equipped with the MEGRA concept does not require field-calibration, a decisive advantage in subsea or marginal field developments.

  16. Cosmic-ray positron energy spectrum measured by PAMELA.

    PubMed

    Adriani, O; Barbarino, G C; Bazilevskaya, G A; Bellotti, R; Bianco, A; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bongi, M; Bonvicini, V; Bottai, S; Bruno, A; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carbone, R; Carlson, P; Casolino, M; Castellini, G; De Donato, C; De Santis, C; De Simone, N; Di Felice, V; Formato, V; Galper, A M; Karelin, A V; Koldashov, S V; Koldobskiy, S A; Krutkov, S Y; Kvashnin, A N; Leonov, A; Malakhov, V; Marcelli, L; Martucci, M; Mayorov, A G; Menn, W; Mergé, M; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Monaco, A; Mori, N; Munini, R; Osteria, G; Palma, F; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Pizzolotto, C; Ricci, M; Ricciarini, S B; Rossetto, L; Sarkar, R; Scotti, V; Simon, M; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stochaj, S J; Stockton, J C; Stozhkov, Y I; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Voronov, S A; Yurkin, Y T; Zampa, G; Zampa, N; Zverev, V G

    2013-08-23

    Precision measurements of the positron component in the cosmic radiation provide important information about the propagation of cosmic rays and the nature of particle sources in our Galaxy. The satellite-borne experiment PAMELA has been used to make a new measurement of the cosmic-ray positron flux and fraction that extends previously published measurements up to 300 GeV in kinetic energy. The combined measurements of the cosmic-ray positron energy spectrum and fraction provide a unique tool to constrain interpretation models. During the recent solar minimum activity period from July 2006 to December 2009, approximately 24,500 positrons were observed. The results cannot be easily reconciled with purely secondary production, and additional sources of either astrophysical or exotic origin may be required.

  17. Biomass measurement from LANDSAT: Drought and energy applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maxwell, E. L.

    1981-01-01

    The theory supporting the use of vegetation indices derived from LANDSAT data for the direct measurement of biomass is reviewed. The use of multispectral data to measure biomass is a natural and viable application since the photosynthetic production of biomass gives vegetation its unique spectral properties. Vegetation indices also perform a normalization function which tends to make them insensitive to atmospheric and soil color variations. Optical and digital LANDSAT products are discussed relative to the use of vegetation indices to monitor drought impact. Based on results obtained in Colorado, operational use of LANDSAT to monitor drought is cost effective, practical and ready for implementation today. The direct measurement of biomass energy resources may also benefit from LANDSAT technology. Measurement of total biomass and annual primary production may be feasible. Identification of that component of biomass resources available for energy use will require other sources of information, however.

  18. Priority mitigation measures in non-energy sector in Kazakstan

    SciTech Connect

    Mizina, S.V.; Pilifosova, O.V.; Gossen, E.F.

    1996-12-31

    Fulfilling the Commitments on UN FCCC through the U.S. Country Studies Program, Kazakstan has developed the national GHG Inventory, vulnerability and adaptation assessment and estimated the possibility of mitigation measures in certain sectors. Next step is developing National Climate Change Action Plan. That process includes such major steps as setting priorities in mitigation measures and technologies, their comprehensive evaluation, preparation implementation strategies, developing the procedure of incorporation of the National Action Plan into other development plans and programs. This paper presents programs and measures that can reduce GHG emissions in non-energy sector. Measures in land-use change and forestry, agriculture and coal mining are considered. Current situation in non-energy sector of Kazakstan is discussed. The amount of GHG emissions reduction and cost analysis presented in this paper was developed with the use of IPCC recommendations.

  19. Orientation-dependence of elastic strain energy in hexagonal and cubic boron nitride layers in energetically deposited BN films

    SciTech Connect

    Cardinale, G.F.; Medlin, D.L.; Mirkarimi, P.B.; McCarty, K.F.; Howitt, D.G.

    1997-01-01

    Using anisotropic elasticity theory, we analyze the relative thermodynamic stabilities of strained graphitic (hexagonal) BN and cubic BN (cBN) single-crystal structures for all orientations of biaxial stress and strain fields relative to the crystallographic directions. In hBN, the most thermodynamically stable orientation has the graphitic basal planes oriented roughly 45{degree} relative to either the plane of stress or strain. For cBN, the lowest-energy configuration differs for the constant stress or constant strain assumptions. Importantly, these most-stable orientations of hBN and cBN differ from those found experimentally for graphitic BN and cBN in polycrystalline BN films produced by energetic deposition processes. Therefore, the observed textures are not those that minimize elastic strain energy. We discuss possible origins other than elastic strain{endash}energy effects for the observed textures. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Vacuum Society.}

  20. Storm-influenced deltaic deposits of the Middle Jurassic Gaikema Sandstone in a measured section on the northern Iniskin Peninsula, Cook Inlet basin, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanley, Richard G.; Helmold, Kenneth P.; LePain, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Middle Jurassic strata of the Gaikema Sandstone were deposited about 170 million years ago on a delta that was located on the western shoreline of the Cook Inlet basin (Detterman and Hartsock, 1966; LePain and others, 2011, 2013). The delta was built by swift, sediment-laden rivers that flowed southeastward from a mountainous volcanic terrane west of the Bruin Bay fault (fig. 6-1). Upon reaching the edge of the Jurassic sea, the rivers dumped abundant sand, gravel, and mud into a depocenter on the northern Iniskin Peninsula, about 240 km southwest of Anchorage (figs. 6-1, 6-2). This report provides a preliminary description and interpretation of a detailed, 34-m-thick measured section in the Gaikema Sandstone on the south shore of Chinitna Bay at latitude 59.816°N, longitude 153.168°W (figs. 6-1–6-3). The sandstone in this measured section exhibits hummocky cross lamination and other features suggestive of storm-influenced deposition on the shallow-marine, seaward margin of the Gaikema delta. Our field studies of the Gaikema Sandstone were conducted during 2013 and 2014 as part of a collaborative effort by the Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys (DGGS), Alaska Division of Oil and Gas (DOG), and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to provide the public with reliable information on the geologic framework and petroleum resource potential of Cook Inlet basin (Gillis, 2013, 2014). Jurassic rocks in Cook Inlet, including the Gaikema Sandstone, are of economic interest because they could contain significant undiscovered petroleum resources (Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, 2011; Stanley and others, 2011a, 2011b, 2013a; LePain and others, 2013).