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Sample records for measuring physician contribution

  1. Physician nurse care: A new use of UMLS to measure professional contribution

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Andrew D.; Lopez, Karen Dunn; Lugaresi, Camillo; Macieira, Tamara; Sousa, Vanessa; Acharya, Sabita; Balasubramanian, Abhinaya; Roussi, Khawllah; Keenan, Gail M.; Lussier, Yves A.; ‘John’ Li, Jianrong; Burton, Michel; Di Eugenio, Barbara

    2018-01-01

    nurse and physician care. Conclusion Our hypothesis that physician’s and nurse’s practice domains are markedly different is supported by the preliminary, quantitative evidence we found. Leveraging the UMLS network and graph traversal algorithms, allows us to compare and contrast nursing and physician care on a single patient, enabling a more complete picture of patient care. We can differentiate professional contributions to patient outcomes and related and divergent concepts by each profession. PMID:29602435

  2. Physician nurse care: A new use of UMLS to measure professional contribution: Are we talking about the same patient a new graph matching algorithm?

    PubMed

    Boyd, Andrew D; Dunn Lopez, Karen; Lugaresi, Camillo; Macieira, Tamara; Sousa, Vanessa; Acharya, Sabita; Balasubramanian, Abhinaya; Roussi, Khawllah; Keenan, Gail M; Lussier, Yves A; Li, Jianrong 'John'; Burton, Michel; Di Eugenio, Barbara

    2018-05-01

    's and nurse's practice domains are markedly different is supported by the preliminary, quantitative evidence we found. Leveraging the UMLS network and graph traversal algorithms, allows us to compare and contrast nursing and physician care on a single patient, enabling a more complete picture of patient care. We can differentiate professional contributions to patient outcomes and related and divergent concepts by each profession. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Physician outcome measurement: review and proposed model.

    PubMed

    Siha, S

    1998-01-01

    As health care moves from a free-for-service environment to a capitated arena, outcome measurements must change. ABC Children's Medical Center is challenged with developing comprehensive outcome measures for an employed physician group. An extensive literature review validates that physician outcomes must move beyond revenue production and measure all aspects of care delivery. The proposed measurement model for this physician group is a trilogy model. It includes measures of cost, quality, and service. While these measures can be examined separately, it is imperative to understand their integration in determining an organization's competitive advantage. The recommended measurements for the physician group must be consistent with the overall organizational goals. The long-term impact will be better utilization of resources. This will result in the most cost effective, quality care for the health care consumer.

  4. Measuring Resident Physicians' Performance of Preventive Care

    PubMed Central

    Palonen, Katri P; Allison, Jeroan J; Heudebert, Gustavo R; Willett, Lisa L; Kiefe, Catarina I; Wall, Terry C; Houston, Thomas K

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has suggested various methods for evaluation of practice-based learning and improvement competency, but data on implementation of these methods are limited. OBJECTIVE To compare medical record review and patient surveys on evaluating physician performance in preventive services in an outpatient resident clinic. DESIGN Within an ongoing quality improvement project, we collected baseline performance data on preventive services provided for patients at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) Internal Medicine Residents' ambulatory clinic. PARTICIPANTS Seventy internal medicine and medicine-pediatrics residents from the UAB Internal Medicine Residency program. MEASUREMENTS Resident- and clinic-level comparisons of aggregated patient survey and chart documentation rates of (1) screening for smoking status, (2) advising smokers to quit, (3) cholesterol screening, (4) mammography screening, and (5) pneumonia vaccination. RESULTS Six hundred and fifty-nine patient surveys and 761 charts were abstracted. At the clinic level, rates for screening of smoking status, recommending mammogram, and for cholesterol screening were similar (difference <5%) between the 2 methods. Higher rates for pneumonia vaccination (76% vs 67%) and advice to quit smoking (66% vs 52%) were seen on medical record review versus patient surveys. However, within-resident (N=70) comparison of 2 methods of estimating screening rates contained significant variability. The cost of medical record review was substantially higher ($107 vs $17/physician). CONCLUSIONS Medical record review and patient surveys provided similar rates for selected preventive health measures at the clinic level, with the exception of pneumonia vaccination and advising to quit smoking. A large variation among individual resident providers was noted. PMID:16499544

  5. The contribution of physicians to childhood injury prevention in France.

    PubMed Central

    Lévêque, B.; Baudier, F.; Janvrin, M. P.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to determine what injury control interventions are currently carried out by physicians and to examine how these interventions could be more effective. SETTING: Surveys were conducted among the three main groups of physicians who provide primary care to children in France--private practice pediatricians (PPPs), well-child clinic pediatricians (WCCPs), and general practitioners (GPs). METHOD: A representative sample of each of the three groups of physicians were interviewed by telephone, using a computer assisted telephone interview system, in December 1993 or February 1994. RESULTS: Responses demonstrated that most physicians felt they could play an important part in injury prevention but that many had inadequate knowledge of injury related mortality rates in children. Most PPPs and WCCPs usually provided counseling on safety in relation to developmental changes in children. Few physicians gave recommendations about appropriate first responses to emergencies. Printed material, designed for parent education, was provided by many PPPs and WCCPs, but was usually absent from the offices of GPs. Participation in group education sessions was common among WCCPs but rare among PPPs and GPs. Many physicians expressed skepticism regarding the efficacy of their interventions in injury control. CONCLUSION: A number of recommendations are made to those in government agencies or elsewhere who could help physicians to improve childhood injury prevention, for instance by regular publication of data on childhood injury mortality, counseling about parent education on this subject, and first aid in emergencies. PMID:9346017

  6. Associations Between Physician Empathy, Physician Characteristics, and Standardized Measures of Patient Experience.

    PubMed

    Chaitoff, Alexander; Sun, Bob; Windover, Amy; Bokar, Daniel; Featherall, Joseph; Rothberg, Michael B; Misra-Hebert, Anita D

    2017-10-01

    To identify correlates of physician empathy and determine whether physician empathy is related to standardized measures of patient experience. Demographic, professional, and empathy data were collected during 2013-2015 from Cleveland Clinic Health System physicians prior to participation in mandatory communication skills training. Empathy was assessed using the Jefferson Scale of Empathy. Data were also collected for seven measures (six provider communication items and overall provider rating) from the visit-specific and 12-month Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems Clinician and Group (CG-CAHPS) surveys. Associations between empathy and provider characteristics were assessed by linear regression, ANOVA, or a nonparametric equivalent. Significant predictors were included in a multivariable linear regression model. Correlations between empathy and CG-CAHPS scores were assessed using Spearman rank correlation coefficients. In bivariable analysis (n = 847 physicians), female sex (P < .001), specialty (P < .01), outpatient practice setting (P < .05), and DO degree (P < .05) were associated with higher empathy scores. In multivariable analysis, female sex (P < .001) and four specialties (obstetrics-gynecology, pediatrics, psychiatry, and thoracic surgery; all P < .05) were significantly associated with higher empathy scores. Of the seven CG-CAHPS measures, scores on five for the 583 physicians with visit-specific data and on three for the 277 physicians with 12-month data were positively correlated with empathy. Specialty and sex were independently associated with physician empathy. Empathy was correlated with higher scores on multiple CG-CAHPS items, suggesting improving physician empathy might play a role in improving patient experience.

  7. Next day discharge rate has little use as a quality measure for individual physician performance.

    PubMed

    Inabnit, Christopher; Markwell, Stephen; Gruwell, Jack; Jaeger, Cassie; Millburg, Lance; Griffen, David

    2018-06-18

    Emergency Department (ED) physicians' next day discharge rate (NDDR), the percentage of patients who were admitted from the ED and subsequently discharged within the next calendar day was hypothesized as a potential measure for unnecessary admissions. The objective was to determine if NDDR has validity as a measure for quality of individual ED physician performance. Hospital admission data was obtained for thirty-six ED physicians for calendar year 2015. Funnel plots were used to identify NDDR outliers beyond 95% control limits. A mixed model logistic regression was built to investigate factors contributing to NDDR. To determine yearly variation, data from calendar years 2014 and 2016 were analyzed, again by funnel plots and logistic regression. Intraclass correlation coefficient was used to estimate the percent of total variation in NDDR attributable to individual ED physicians. NDDR varied significantly among ED physicians. Individual ED physician outliers in NDDR varied year to year. Individual ED physician contribution to NDDR variation was minimal, accounting for 1%. Years of experience in Emergency Medicine practice was not correlated with NDDR. NDDR does not appear to be a reliable independent quality measure for individual ED physician performance. The percent of variance attributable to the ED physician was 1%. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Development and validation of EMP-3: an instrument to measure physician's attitudes toward ethnic minority patients.

    PubMed

    De Maesschalck, Stephanie; Willems, Sara; De Maeseneer, Jan; Deveugele, Myriam

    2010-04-01

    The growing diversity of patient populations challenges health care providers. Physicians' attitudes and perceptions toward cultural diversity in health care could be partly contributing to difficulties in communication between physicians and ethnic minority patients. To evaluate these attitudes and perceptions, an instrument was developed and validated. A preliminary version of the instrument was developed through literature research and expert consultation and completed by 112 family physicians. Factor analysis was performed and reliability and construct validity tested. The instrument revealed three factors that were interpreted as: (1) physicians' task perception and ideas on cultural differences in health and health care, (2) physicians' attitudes toward physician-patient communication with minority patients, and (3) physicians' perception of minority patients' needs in communication. Moderate but significant correlations were found between factors of the EMP-3 and practice organization, practice location, and physicians' gender. Several factors of the Jefferson Empathy Scale, the Patient Practitioner Orientation Scale, and the Health Beliefs and Attitude Scale related to the first two factors of the EMP-3. This instrument, designed specifically to measure physicians' attitudes toward cultural diversity, showed moderate validity and reliability results. Further adaptations and evaluation could be useful.

  9. How much do physician-entrepreneurs contribute to new medical devices?

    PubMed

    Smith, Sheryl Winston; Sfekas, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    As recent public and private initiatives have sought to increase the transparency of physician-industry financial relationships (including calls for restricting collaboration), it is important to understand the extent of physicians' contributions to new medical devices. We quantify the contribution of information from physician-founded startup companies to 170 premarket approval (PMA) applications filed by 4 large incumbent medical device manufacturers over the period 1978-2007. We ask: Are incumbents more likely to incorporate information from physician-founded firms than nonphysician-founded firms? We matched the text in 4 incumbent medical device firms' PMAs (Medtronic, Johnson & Johnson, Boston Scientific, and Guidant) to the text in patent applications of 118 startup companies that received investment from these incumbents between 1978 and 2007. We use a text-matching algorithm to quantify the information contribution from physician and nonphysician-founded startups to incumbent firms' PMAs. We analyze correlates of backward citations and degree of overlap between incumbents' PMAs and startups' patents using negative binomial and tobit regressions. On average, physician-founded companies account for 11% of the information in PMAs, compared with 4% from nonphysician-founded companies. Regression results show that incumbents are significantly more likely to cite physician-founded companies' patents and to incorporate them into new devices. Physicians are an important source of medical device innovation. The results suggest that restrictions on financial relationships between providers and industry, while potentially improving patients' trust, may result in reduced medical innovation if physicians found fewer startups or if incumbent firms reduce investments in physician-founded startups.

  10. The impact of outcomes measurement on the hospital-physician relationship.

    PubMed

    Longo, D R

    1994-01-01

    Hospitals and physicians have a mutually dependent relationship. Although both are responsible for patient care, conflicts arise as physicians attempt to maintain professional autonomy and hospitals attempt to maintain organizational stability. In recent years the outcomes measurement movement has influenced this relationship in a variety of ways. This review chapter traces the major sociological, historical, theoretical, and political influences that have contributed to these conflicts. Additionally, based on an analysis of these trends, speculation is offered on the future of the hospital-physician relationship as society increasingly holds both groups responsible for outcomes of care.

  11. The Comprehensive Care Project: Measuring Physician Performance in Ambulatory Practice

    PubMed Central

    Holmboe, Eric S; Weng, Weifeng; Arnold, Gerald K; Kaplan, Sherrie H; Normand, Sharon-Lise; Greenfield, Sheldon; Hood, Sarah; Lipner, Rebecca S

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the feasibility, reliability, and validity of comprehensively assessing physician-level performance in ambulatory practice. Data Sources/Study Setting Ambulatory-based general internists in 13 states participated in the assessment. Study Design We assessed physician-level performance, adjusted for patient factors, on 46 individual measures, an overall composite measure, and composite measures for chronic, acute, and preventive care. Between- versus within-physician variation was quantified by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). External validity was assessed by correlating performance on a certification exam. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Medical records for 236 physicians were audited for seven chronic and four acute care conditions, and six age- and gender-appropriate preventive services. Principal Findings Performance on the individual and composite measures varied substantially within (range 5–86 percent compliance on 46 measures) and between physicians (ICC range 0.12–0.88). Reliabilities for the composite measures were robust: 0.88 for chronic care and 0.87 for preventive services. Higher certification exam scores were associated with better performance on the overall (r = 0.19; p <.01), chronic care (r = 0.14, p = .04), and preventive services composites (r = 0.17, p = .01). Conclusions Our results suggest that reliable and valid comprehensive assessment of the quality of chronic and preventive care can be achieved by creating composite measures and by sampling feasible numbers of patients for each condition. PMID:20819110

  12. The comprehensive care project: measuring physician performance in ambulatory practice.

    PubMed

    Holmboe, Eric S; Weng, Weifeng; Arnold, Gerald K; Kaplan, Sherrie H; Normand, Sharon-Lise; Greenfield, Sheldon; Hood, Sarah; Lipner, Rebecca S

    2010-12-01

    To investigate the feasibility, reliability, and validity of comprehensively assessing physician-level performance in ambulatory practice. Ambulatory-based general internists in 13 states participated in the assessment. We assessed physician-level performance, adjusted for patient factors, on 46 individual measures, an overall composite measure, and composite measures for chronic, acute, and preventive care. Between- versus within-physician variation was quantified by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). External validity was assessed by correlating performance on a certification exam. Medical records for 236 physicians were audited for seven chronic and four acute care conditions, and six age- and gender-appropriate preventive services. Performance on the individual and composite measures varied substantially within (range 5-86 percent compliance on 46 measures) and between physicians (ICC range 0.12-0.88). Reliabilities for the composite measures were robust: 0.88 for chronic care and 0.87 for preventive services. Higher certification exam scores were associated with better performance on the overall (r = 0.19; p<.01), chronic care (r = 0.14, p = .04), and preventive services composites (r = 0.17, p = .01). Our results suggest that reliable and valid comprehensive assessment of the quality of chronic and preventive care can be achieved by creating composite measures and by sampling feasible numbers of patients for each condition. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  13. How the Medical Culture Contributes to Coworker-Perpetrated Harassment and Abuse of Family Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Miedema, Baukje; MacIntyre, Leslie; Tatemichi, Sue; Lambert-Lanning, Anita; Lemire, Francine; Manca, Donna; Ramsden, Vivian

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE Harassment and abuse in the workplace of family physicians has been associated with higher levels of stress, increased consumption of alcohol, and higher risk for developing mental health problems. Few studies have examined issues contributing to abusive encounters in the workplace of family physicians. METHODS For the overall study we used a mixed methods design, which included a cross-sectional survey of a randomly selected sample of active family physicians from the database of the College of Family Physicians of Canada and telephone interviews with those who reported experiencing work related harassment and abuse in the last year. The data presented here arise from the qualitative interviews of the study, which were analyzed thematically. RESULTS The interview arm of the study included 23 female and 14 male participants. The major themes that emerged from the study were (1) modeling of abusive behaviors, (2) status hierarchy among various medical disciplines, (3) shortage of physicians, and (4) lack of transparent policies and follow-up procedures after abusive encounters. The results are discussed using the broken window theory. CONCLUSION Many family physicians experience harassing and abusive encounters during their training or in the workplace. The current medical culture appears to contribute to harassment and abuse in the workplace of family physicians in Canada. We described the components that intentionally or unintentionally facilitate abusive behavior in the medical culture. PMID:22412002

  14. How the medical culture contributes to coworker-perpetrated harassment and abuse of family physicians.

    PubMed

    Miedema, Baukje; MacIntyre, Leslie; Tatemichi, Sue; Lambert-Lanning, Anita; Lemire, Francine; Manca, Donna; Ramsden, Vivian

    2012-01-01

    Harassment and abuse in the workplace of family physicians has been associated with higher levels of stress, increased consumption of alcohol, and higher risk for developing mental health problems. Few studies have examined issues contributing to abusive encounters in the workplace of family physicians. For the overall study we used a mixed methods design, which included a cross-sectional survey of a randomly selected sample of active family physicians from the database of the College of Family Physicians of Canada and telephone interviews with those who reported experiencing work related harassment and abuse in the last year. The data presented here arise from the qualitative interviews of the study, which were analyzed thematically. The interview arm of the study included 23 female and 14 male participants. The major themes that emerged from the study were (1) modeling of abusive behaviors, (2) status hierarchy among various medical disciplines, (3) shortage of physicians, and (4) lack of transparent policies and follow-up procedures after abusive encounters. The results are discussed using the broken window theory. Many family physicians experience harassing and abusive encounters during their training or in the workplace. The current medical culture appears to contribute to harassment and abuse in the workplace of family physicians in Canada. We described the components that intentionally or unintentionally facilitate abusive behavior in the medical culture.

  15. Measuring physicians' productivity in a Veterans' Affairs Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Coleman, David L; Moran, Eileen; Serfilippi, Delchi; Mulinski, Paul; Rosenthal, Ronnie; Gordon, Bruce; Mogielnicki, R Peter

    2003-07-01

    The mission of the Department of Veterans Affairs includes patient care, education, research, and backup to the Department of Defense. Because the measurement of physicians' productivity must reflect both institutional goals and market forces, the authors designed a productivity model that uses measures of clinical workload and academic activities commensurate with the VA's investments in these activities. The productivity model evaluates four domains of physicians' activity: clinical work, education, research, and administration. Examples of the application of the productivity model in the evaluation of VA-paid physician-staff and in the composition of contracts for clinical services are provided. The proposed model is a relatively simple strategy for measuring a broad range of the work of academic physicians in VA medical centers. The model provides incentives for documentation of resident supervision and participation in administrative activities required for effective and efficient clinical care. In addition, the model can aid in determining resource distribution among clinical services and permits comparison with non-VA health care systems. A strategy for modifying the model to incorporate measures of quality of clinical care, research, education, and administration is proposed. The model has been a useful part of the process to ensure the optimum use of resources and to meet clinical and academic institutional goals. The activities and accomplishments used to define physician productivity will have a substantial influence on the character of the medical profession, the vitality of medical education and research, and the cost and quality of health care.

  16. Private sector contributions and their effect on physician emigration in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Loh, Lawrence C; Ugarte-Gil, Cesar; Darko, Kwame

    2013-03-01

    The contribution made by the private sector to health care in a low- or middle-income country may affect levels of physician emigration from that country. The increasing importance of the private sector in health care in the developing world has resulted in newfound academic interest in that sector's influences on many aspects of national health systems. The growth in physician emigration from the developing world has led to several attempts to identify both the factors that cause physicians to emigrate and the effects of physician emigration on primary care and population health in the countries that the physicians leave. When the relevant data on the emerging economies of Ghana, India and Peru were investigated, it appeared that the proportion of physicians participating in private health-care delivery, the percentage of health-care costs financed publicly and the amount of private health-care financing per capita were each inversely related to the level of physician expatriation. It therefore appears that private health-care delivery and financing may decrease physician emigration. There is clearly a need for similar research in other low- and middle-income countries, and for studies to see if, at the country level, temporal trends in the contribution made to health care by the private sector can be related to the corresponding trends in physician emigration. The ways in which private health care may be associated with access problems for the poor and therefore reduced equity also merit further investigation. The results should be of interest to policy-makers who aim to improve health systems worldwide.

  17. Private sector contributions and their effect on physician emigration in the developing world

    PubMed Central

    Ugarte-Gil, Cesar; Darko, Kwame

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The contribution made by the private sector to health care in a low- or middle-income country may affect levels of physician emigration from that country. The increasing importance of the private sector in health care in the developing world has resulted in newfound academic interest in that sector’s influences on many aspects of national health systems. The growth in physician emigration from the developing world has led to several attempts to identify both the factors that cause physicians to emigrate and the effects of physician emigration on primary care and population health in the countries that the physicians leave. When the relevant data on the emerging economies of Ghana, India and Peru were investigated, it appeared that the proportion of physicians participating in private health-care delivery, the percentage of health-care costs financed publicly and the amount of private health-care financing per capita were each inversely related to the level of physician expatriation. It therefore appears that private health-care delivery and financing may decrease physician emigration. There is clearly a need for similar research in other low- and middle-income countries, and for studies to see if, at the country level, temporal trends in the contribution made to health care by the private sector can be related to the corresponding trends in physician emigration. The ways in which private health care may be associated with access problems for the poor and therefore reduced equity also merit further investigation. The results should be of interest to policy-makers who aim to improve health systems worldwide. PMID:23476095

  18. Measuring and Reporting Physician's Performance in a University Medical Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazan-Fishman, Ana Lucia

    This paper describes a Patient Satisfaction survey and database used to measure and report on physician performance at the Ohio State University Health System (OSUHS). The OSUHS averages 6,000 inpatients in any given month, and more than 7,000 emergency patients and 70,000 outpatient encounters. Data from the Patient Satisfaction measures are…

  19. The contribution of medical physics to nuclear medicine: a physician's perspective.

    PubMed

    Ell, Peter J

    2014-12-01

    This paper is the second in a series of invited perspectives by four pioneers of nuclear medicine imaging and physics. A medical physicist and a nuclear medicine clinical specialist each take a backward look and a forward look at the contributions of physics to nuclear medicine. Here is a backward look from a nuclear medicine physician's perspective.

  20. Comparison of Physician-Predicted to Measured Low Vision Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Tiffany L.; Goldstein, Judith E.; Massof, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To compare low vision rehabilitation (LVR) physicians’ predictions of the probability of success of LVR to patients’ self-reported outcomes after provision of usual outpatient LVR services; and to determine if patients’ traits influence physician ratings. Methods The Activity Inventory (AI), a self-report visual function questionnaire, was administered pre and post-LVR to 316 low vision patients served by 28 LVR centers that participated in a collaborative observational study. The physical component of the Short Form-36, Geriatric Depression Scale, and Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status were also administered pre-LVR to measure physical capability, depression and cognitive status. Following patient evaluation, 38 LVR physicians estimated the probability of outcome success (POS), using their own criteria. The POS ratings and change in functional ability were used to assess the effects of patients’ baseline traits on predicted outcomes. Results A regression analysis with a hierarchical random effects model showed no relationship between LVR physician POS estimates and AI-based outcomes. In another analysis, Kappa statistics were calculated to determine the probability of agreement between POS and AI-based outcomes for different outcome criteria. Across all comparisons, none of the kappa values were significantly different from 0, which indicates the rate of agreement is equivalent to chance. In an exploratory analysis, hierarchical mixed effects regression models show that POS ratings are associated with information about the patient’s cognitive functioning and the combination of visual acuity and functional ability, as opposed to visual acuity or functional ability alone. Conclusions Physicians’ predictions of LVR outcomes appear to be influenced by knowledge of patients’ cognitive functioning and the combination of visual acuity and functional ability - information physicians acquire from the patient’s history and examination. However

  1. Blood pressure measurement in an ambulatory setting: concordance between physician and patient self-measurement.

    PubMed

    Vinyoles, E; Blancafort, X; López-Quiñones, C; Arqué, M; Brau, A; Cerdán, N; de la Figuera, M; Díaz, F; Pujol, E

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine concordance between physician and patient blood pressure (BP) measurements in an ambulatory setting. A diagnostic intervention cross-sectional study using a convenience sample was employed. A total of 106 hypertensive patients were included in the study. Patients who were unable to perform their self-measurement or those with cardiac arrhythmia were excluded. BP was determined nine times in each subject in the medical office in a randomised order: BP was taken three times by the physician using a mercury sphygmomanometer (SPH-Hg), three times by the physician using a validated, automated oscillometer (Omron HEM 705 CP), and three times by the patient himself with the same device. The intraclass correlation coefficient was calculated. In all, 59 women and 47 men aged 65.7 (10) years were analysed. Mean BP measurements for the physician using the mercury sphygmomanometer, the physician using the Omron, and the patient using the same device were: 136 (15.8)/80 (11), 137 (17.9)/80 (10), and 139* (17.6)/80 (10) mmHg, respectively. BP control was 48.1, 48.1, and 36.8*% (*P < 0.05), respectively. Intraclass correlation coefficients for systolic/diastolic pressures were: 0.77/0.65 (physician-sphygmomanometer Hg, physician-Omron; P < 0.001), 0.75/0.64 (physician-sphygmomanometer Hg, patient-Omron, P < 0.001), and 0.83/0.83 (physician-Omron, patient-Omron; P < 0.001). In conclusion, the three types of measurement in the medical office were significantly concordant. Patient office self-measurement showed a tendency to increase systolic BP and worsen BP control.

  2. How physicians, patients and observers compare on the use of qualitative and quantitative measures of physician-patient communication

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Howard.S.; Street, Richard.L.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare several different measures of physician-patient communication. We compared data derived from different measures of three communication behaviors: patient participation; physician information-giving; and physician participatory decision making (PDM) style, from 83 outpatient visits to oncology or thoracic surgery clinics for pulmonary nodules or lung cancer. Communication was measured with rating scales completed by patients and physicians after the consultation and by two different groups of external observers who used rating scales or coded the frequency of communication behaviors, respectively, after listening to an audio-recording of the consultation. Measures were compared using Pearson correlations. Correlations of patients’ and physicians’ ratings of patient participation (r=0.04) and physician PDM style (r=0.03) were low and not significant (P>0.0083 Bonferroni-adjusted). Correlations of observers’ ratings with patients’ or physicians’ ratings for patient participation and physician PDM style were moderate or low (r=0.15, 0.27, 0.07, and 0.01, respectively), but were not statistically significant (P>0.0083 Bonferroni-adjusted). Correlations between observers’ ratings and frequency measures were 0.31, 0.52, and 0.63, and were statistically significant with p-values 0.005, <0.0001, and <0.0001; respectively, for PDM style, information-giving, and patient participation. Our findings highlight the potential for using observers’ ratings as an alternate measure of communication to more labor intensive frequency measures. PMID:26755527

  3. The Relationship between Health Plan Performance Measures and Physician Network Overlap: Implications for Measuring Plan Quality

    PubMed Central

    Maeng, Daniel D; Scanlon, Dennis P; Chernew, Michael E; Gronniger, Tim; Wodchis, Walter P; McLaughlin, Catherine G

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine the extent to which health plan quality measures capture physician practice patterns rather than plan characteristics. Data Source We gathered and merged secondary data from the following four sources: a private firm that collected information on individual physicians and their health plan affiliations, The National Committee for Quality Assurance, InterStudy, and the Dartmouth Atlas. Study Design We constructed two measures of physician network overlap for all health plans in our sample and linked them to selected measures of plan performance. Two linear regression models were estimated to assess the relationship between the measures of physician network overlap and the plan performance measures. Principal Findings The results indicate that in the presence of a higher degree of provider network overlap, plan performance measures tend to converge to a lower level of quality. Conclusions Standard health plan performance measures reflect physician practice patterns rather than plans' effort to improve quality. This implies that more provider-oriented measurement, such as would be possible with accountable care organizations or medical homes, may facilitate patient decision making and provide further incentives to improve performance. PMID:20403064

  4. Marginal analysis in assessing factors contributing time to physician in the Emergency Department using operations data.

    PubMed

    Pathan, Sameer A; Bhutta, Zain A; Moinudheen, Jibin; Jenkins, Dominic; Silva, Ashwin D; Sharma, Yogdutt; Saleh, Warda A; Khudabakhsh, Zeenat; Irfan, Furqan B; Thomas, Stephen H

    2016-01-01

    Background: Standard Emergency Department (ED) operations goals include minimization of the time interval (tMD) between patients' initial ED presentation and initial physician evaluation. This study assessed factors known (or suspected) to influence tMD with a two-step goal. The first step was generation of a multivariate model identifying parameters associated with prolongation of tMD at a single study center. The second step was the use of a study center-specific multivariate tMD model as a basis for predictive marginal probability analysis; the marginal model allowed for prediction of the degree of ED operations benefit that would be affected with specific ED operations improvements. Methods: The study was conducted using one month (May 2015) of data obtained from an ED administrative database (EDAD) in an urban academic tertiary ED with an annual census of approximately 500,000; during the study month, the ED saw 39,593 cases. The EDAD data were used to generate a multivariate linear regression model assessing the various demographic and operational covariates' effects on the dependent variable tMD. Predictive marginal probability analysis was used to calculate the relative contributions of key covariates as well as demonstrate the likely tMD impact on modifying those covariates with operational improvements. Analyses were conducted with Stata 14MP, with significance defined at p  < 0.05 and confidence intervals (CIs) reported at the 95% level. Results: In an acceptable linear regression model that accounted for just over half of the overall variance in tMD (adjusted r 2 0.51), important contributors to tMD included shift census ( p  = 0.008), shift time of day ( p  = 0.002), and physician coverage n ( p  = 0.004). These strong associations remained even after adjusting for each other and other covariates. Marginal predictive probability analysis was used to predict the overall tMD impact (improvement from 50 to 43 minutes, p  < 0.001) of consistent

  5. The Relationships among Physician Nonverbal Immediacy and Measures of Patient Satisfaction with Physician Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conlee, Connie J.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examines the relationship among four dimensions of patient satisfaction with physician care and nonverbal immediacy. Finds a significant positive correlation between nonverbal immediacy and overall patient satisfaction, with the strongest correlation to the attention/respect factor. (SR)

  6. Understanding a Nonlinear Causal Relationship Between Rewards and Physicians' Contributions in Online Health Care Communities: Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jying-Nan; Chiu, Ya-Ling; Yu, Haiyan; Hsu, Yuan-Teng

    2017-12-21

    The online health care community is not just a place for the public to share physician reviews or medical knowledge, but also a physician-patient communication platform. The medical resources of developing countries are relatively inadequate, and the online health care community is a potential solution to alleviate the phenomenon of long hospital queues and the lack of medical resources in rural areas. However, the success of the online health care community depends on online contributions by physicians. The aim of this study is to examine the effect of incentive mechanisms on physician's online contribution behavior in the online health community. We addressed the following questions: (1) from which specialty area are physicians more likely to participate in online health care community activities, (2) what are the factors affecting physician online contributions, and (3) do incentive mechanisms, including psychological and material rewards, result in differences of physician online contributions? We designed a longitudinal study involving a data sample in three waves. All data were collected from the Good Doctor website, which is the largest online health care community in China. We first used descriptive statistics to investigate the physician online contribution behavior in its entirety. Then multiple linear and quadratic regression models were applied to verify the causal relationship between rewards and physician online contribution. Our sample included 40,300 physicians from 3607 different hospitals, 10 different major specialty areas, and 31 different provinces or municipalities. Based on the multiple quadratic regression model, we found that the coefficients of the control variables, past physician online contributions, doctor review rating, clinic title, hospital level, and city level, were .415, .189, -.099, -.106, and -.143, respectively. For the psychological (or material) rewards, the standardized coefficient of the main effect was 0.261 (or 0

  7. What does physicians' clinical expertise contribute to oncologic decision-making? A qualitative interview study.

    PubMed

    Salloch, Sabine; Otte, Ina; Reinacher-Schick, Anke; Vollmann, Jochen

    2018-02-01

    Physicians' clinical expertise forms an exclusive body of competences, which helps them to find the appropriate diagnostics and treatment for each individual patient. Empirical evidence, however, suggests that there is an inverse relationship between the number of years in practice and the quality of care provided by a physician. Knowledge and adherence to professional standards (such as clinical guidelines) are often used as indicators in previous research. Semistructured interviews and the Q method were used for an explorative study on oncologists' views on the interplay between their own clinical expertise, intuition, and the external evidence incorporated in clinical guidelines. The interviews were audio recorded, transcribed ad verbatim, and analysed using qualitative content analysis. Data analysis shows the complex character of clinical expertise with respect to experience, professional development, and intuition. An irreplaceable role is attributed to personal and bodily experience during the providing of care for a patient. Professional experience becomes important, particularly in those situations that lie out of the focus of "guideline medicine." Intuition is regarded as having a strong emotional component and helps for deciding which therapeutic option the patient can deal with. Using measurable knowledge and adherence to standards as indicators does not account for the complexity of clinical expertise. Other factors, such as the importance of bodily experience and physicians' intuitive knowledge, must be considered, also with respect to the occurrence of treatment biases. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. How do family physicians measure blood pressure in routine clinical practice? National survey of Canadian family physicians.

    PubMed

    Kaczorowski, Janusz; Myers, Martin G; Gelfer, Mark; Dawes, Martin; Mang, Eric J; Berg, Angelique; Grande, Claudio Del; Kljujic, Dragan

    2017-03-01

    To describe the techniques currently used by family physicians in Canada to measure blood pressure (BP) for screening for, diagnosing, and treating hypertension. A Web-based cross-sectional survey distributed by e-mail. Stratified random sample of family physicians in Canada. Family physician members of the College of Family Physicians of Canada with valid e-mail addresses. Physicians' self-reported routine methods for recording BP in their practices to screen for, diagnose, and manage hypertension. A total of 774 valid responses were received, for a response rate of 16.2%. Respondents were similar to nonrespondents except for underrepresentation of male physicians. Of 769 respondents, 417 (54.2%) indicated that they used manual office BP measurement with a mercury or aneroid device and stethoscope as the routine method to screen patients for high BP, while 42.9% (330 of 769) reported using automated office BP (AOBP) measurement. The method most frequently used to make a diagnosis of hypertension was AOBP measurement (31.1%, 240 of 771), followed by home BP measurement (22.4%, 173 of 771) and manual office BP measurement (21.4%, 165 of 771). Ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) was used for diagnosis by 14.4% (111 of 771) of respondents. The most frequently reported method for ongoing management was home BP monitoring (68.7%, 528 of 769), followed by manual office BP measurement (63.6%, 489 of 769) and AOBP measurement (59.2%, 455 of 769). More than three-quarters (77.8%, 598 of 769) of respondents indicated that ABPM was readily available for their patients. Canadian family physicians exhibit overall high use of electronic devices for BP measurement, However, more efforts are needed to encourage practitioners to follow current Canadian guidelines, which advocate the use of AOBP measurement for hypertension screening, ABPM and home BP measurement for making a diagnosis, and both AOBP and home BP monitoring for ongoing management. Copyright© the College of Family

  9. Do physician outcome judgments and judgment biases contribute to inappropriate use of treatments? Study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Brehaut, Jamie C; Poses, Roy; Shojania, Kaveh G; Lott, Alison; Man-Son-Hing, Malcolm; Bassin, Elise; Grimshaw, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Background There are many examples of physicians using treatments inappropriately, despite clear evidence about the circumstances under which the benefits of such treatments outweigh their harms. When such over- or under- use of treatments occurs for common diseases, the burden to the healthcare system and risks to patients can be substantial. We propose that a major contributor to inappropriate treatment may be how clinicians judge the likelihood of important treatment outcomes, and how these judgments influence their treatment decisions. The current study will examine the role of judged outcome probabilities and other cognitive factors in the context of two clinical treatment decisions: 1) prescription of antibiotics for sore throat, where we hypothesize overestimation of benefit and underestimation of harm leads to over-prescription of antibiotics; and 2) initiation of anticoagulation for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), where we hypothesize that underestimation of benefit and overestimation of harm leads to under-prescription of warfarin. Methods For each of the two conditions, we will administer surveys of two types (Type 1 and Type 2) to different samples of Canadian physicians. The primary goal of the Type 1 survey is to assess physicians' perceived outcome probabilities (both good and bad outcomes) for the target treatment. Type 1 surveys will assess judged outcome probabilities in the context of a representative patient, and include questions about how physicians currently treat such cases, the recollection of rare or vivid outcomes, as well as practice and demographic details. The primary goal of the Type 2 surveys is to measure the specific factors that drive individual clinical judgments and treatment decisions, using a 'clinical judgment analysis' or 'lens modeling' approach. This survey will manipulate eight clinical variables across a series of sixteen realistic case vignettes. Based on the survey responses, we will be able to identify which

  10. Measuring inequalities in the demographical and geographical distribution of physicians in China: Generalist versus specialist.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jingxian

    2018-05-20

    The equitable distribution of both generalist and specialist physicians is vital in establishing a fair and efficient health care system. The presents study aims at comparatively measuring the demographical and geographical distribution of generalist and specialist physicians in China from 2012 to 2016. The data were obtained from China Health and Family Planning Statistics and China Statistical Yearbooks 2013 to 2017. Descriptive statistical methods were used to address the quantity and density of physicians, and Gini coefficient was adopted as inequality indicator to trace their distribution inequalities. The quantity and density of total physicians, generalist, and specialist physicians increased during the last 5 years. The demographic distribution inequalities of total physicians, generalist, and specialist physicians are decent with Gini coefficients of approximately 0.3, whereas the corresponding geographical distribution inequalities are severe with Gini coefficients higher than 0.6. Compared with generalist physicians, specialist physicians not only had a higher geographical and geographical density but also maintained a more equitable distribution. The present study compares the distribution inequalities between generalist and specialist physicians in China for the first time. Despite the rapid increase in quantity and density of these physicians, the whole nation faces a severe shortage and maldistribution of generalist physicians. The increase in the number of physicians has not necessarily eliminated the geographical distribution inequalities. The government should consider all influencing factors when allocating health workers and continue promoting the development of primary health care to alleviate these inequalities in physician distribution. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Influence of Judaism and Jewish physicians on Greek and Byzantine medicine and their contribution to nephrology.

    PubMed

    Massry, S G; Smogorzewski, M; Hazani, E; Shasha, S M

    1997-01-01

    Both the Old Testament and the Talmud contain a great deal of information on medicine, nephrology, health and disease. The basic premise of early Jewish medicine is based on the notion that disease is due to structural changes in internal organs. This is in contrast to the mythical dogma of humoralism as the basis of health and disease espoused by Hippocrates and Galen. The Old Testament and the Mosaic Codes provided the basis for modern public health and for the hygienic rules practised in our times. The Talmudists laid the foundations for the science of pathology as we know it today. These issues are discussed in detail and the contributions of three prominent medieval physicians (Asaph Judaeus, Isaac Judaeus and Maimonides) are presented.

  12. Measuring input prices for physicians: The revised Medicare Economic Index

    PubMed Central

    Freeland, Mark S.; Chulis, George S.; Arnett, Ross H.; Brown, Aaron P.

    1991-01-01

    Medicare payments for physician services under Part B were historically restrained by capping prevailing charges using the Medicare Economic Index (MEI). The MEI, an input price index for physician services that incorporates an adjustment for economywide labor productivity, has not undergone a major revision since 1975. The MEI is an important determinant of the annual volume performance standard that will be used to set aggregate increases in the revised system for paying physicians under Medicare beginning in 1992. The MEI will also be used in establishing the annual changes to the payment conversion factors under the new payment system. PMID:10170807

  13. The contribution of Physician Assistants in primary care: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Primary care provision is important in the delivery of health care but many countries face primary care workforce challenges. Increasing demand, enlarged workloads, and current and anticipated physician shortages in many countries have led to the introduction of mid-level professionals, such as Physician Assistants (PAs). Objective: This systematic review aimed to appraise the evidence of the contribution of PAs within primary care, defined for this study as general practice, relevant to the UK or similar systems. Methods Medline, CINAHL, PsycINFO, BNI, SSCI and SCOPUS databases were searched from 1950 to 2010. Eligibility criteria: PAs with a recognised PA qualification, general practice/family medicine included and the findings relevant to it presented separately and an English language journal publication. Two reviewers independently identified relevant publications, assessed quality using Critical Appraisal Skills Programme tools and extracted findings. Findings were classified and synthesised narratively as factors related to structure, process or outcome of care. Results 2167 publications were identified, of which 49 met our inclusion criteria, with 46 from the United States of America (USA). Structure: approximately half of PAs are reported to work in primary care in the USA with good support and a willingness to employ amongst doctors. Process: the majority of PAs’ workload is the management of patients with acute presentations. PAs tend to see younger patients and a different caseload to doctors, and require supervision. Studies of costs provide mixed results. Outcomes: acceptability to patients and potential patients is consistently found to be high, and studies of appropriateness report positively. Overall the evidence was appraised as of weak to moderate quality, with little comparative data presented and little change in research questions over time. Limitations: identification of a broad range of studies examining ‘contribution’ made

  14. Organizational and Market Influences on Physician Performance on Patient Experience Measures

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Hector P; von Glahn, Ted; Rogers, William H; Safran, Dana Gelb

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine the extent to which medical group and market factors are related to individual primary care physician (PCP) performance on patient experience measures. Data Sources This study employs Clinician and Group CAHPS survey data (n=105,663) from 2,099 adult PCPs belonging to 34 diverse medical groups across California. Medical group directors were interviewed to assess the magnitude and nature of financial incentives directed at individual physicians and the adoption of patient experience improvement strategies. Primary care services area (PCSA) data were used to characterize the market environment of physician practices. Study Design We used multilevel models to estimate the relationship between medical group and market factors and physician performance on each Clinician and Group CAHPS measure. Models statistically controlled for respondent characteristics and accounted for the clustering of respondents within physicians, physicians within medical groups, and medical groups within PCSAs using random effects. Principal Findings Compared with physicians belonging to independent practice associations, physicians belonging to integrated medical groups had better performance on the communication (p=.007) and care coordination (p=.03) measures. Physicians belonging to medical groups with greater numbers of PCPs had better performance on all measures. The use of patient experience improvement strategies was not associated with performance. Greater emphasis on productivity and efficiency criteria in individual physician financial incentive formulae was associated with worse access to care (p=.04). Physicians located in PCSAs with higher area-level deprivation had worse performance on the access to care (p=.04) and care coordination (p<.001) measures. Conclusions Physicians from integrated medical groups and groups with greater numbers of PCPs performed better on several patient experience measures, suggesting that organized care processes adopted by these

  15. Organizational and market influences on physician performance on patient experience measures.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Hector P; von Glahn, Ted; Rogers, William H; Safran, Dana Gelb

    2009-06-01

    To examine the extent to which medical group and market factors are related to individual primary care physician (PCP) performance on patient experience measures. This study employs Clinician and Group CAHPS survey data (n=105,663) from 2,099 adult PCPs belonging to 34 diverse medical groups across California. Medical group directors were interviewed to assess the magnitude and nature of financial incentives directed at individual physicians and the adoption of patient experience improvement strategies. Primary care services area (PCSA) data were used to characterize the market environment of physician practices. We used multilevel models to estimate the relationship between medical group and market factors and physician performance on each Clinician and Group CAHPS measure. Models statistically controlled for respondent characteristics and accounted for the clustering of respondents within physicians, physicians within medical groups, and medical groups within PCSAs using random effects. Compared with physicians belonging to independent practice associations, physicians belonging to integrated medical groups had better performance on the communication ( p=.007) and care coordination ( p=.03) measures. Physicians belonging to medical groups with greater numbers of PCPs had better performance on all measures. The use of patient experience improvement strategies was not associated with performance. Greater emphasis on productivity and efficiency criteria in individual physician financial incentive formulae was associated with worse access to care ( p=.04). Physicians located in PCSAs with higher area-level deprivation had worse performance on the access to care ( p=.04) and care coordination ( p<.001) measures. Physicians from integrated medical groups and groups with greater numbers of PCPs performed better on several patient experience measures, suggesting that organized care processes adopted by these groups may enhance patients' experiences. Physicians practicing

  16. What Do We Mean by Physician Wellness? A Systematic Review of Its Definition and Measurement.

    PubMed

    Brady, Keri J S; Trockel, Mickey T; Khan, Christina T; Raj, Kristin S; Murphy, Mary Lou; Bohman, Bryan; Frank, Erica; Louie, Alan K; Roberts, Laura Weiss

    2018-02-01

    Physician wellness (well-being) is recognized for its intrinsic importance and impact on patient care, but it is a construct that lacks conceptual clarity. The authors conducted a systematic review to characterize the conceptualization of physician wellness in the literature by synthesizing definitions and measures used to operationalize the construct. A total of 3057 references identified from PubMed, Web of Science, and a manual reference check were reviewed for studies that quantitatively assessed the "wellness" or "well-being" of physicians. Definitions of physician wellness were thematically synthesized. Measures of physician wellness were classified based on their dimensional, contextual, and valence attributes, and changes in the operationalization of physician wellness were assessed over time (1989-2015). Only 14% of included papers (11/78) explicitly defined physician wellness. At least one measure of mental, social, physical, and integrated well-being was present in 89, 50, 49, and 37% of papers, respectively. The number of papers operationalizing physician wellness using integrated, general-life well-being measures (e.g., meaning in life) increased [X 2  = 5.08, p = 0.02] over time. Changes in measurement across mental, physical, and social domains remained stable over time. Conceptualizations of physician wellness varied widely, with greatest emphasis on negative moods/emotions (e.g., burnout). Clarity and consensus regarding the conceptual definition of physician wellness is needed to advance the development of valid and reliable physician wellness measures, improve the consistency by which the construct is operationalized, and increase comparability of findings across studies. To guide future physician wellness assessments and interventions, the authors propose a holistic definition.

  17. Identifying Physician-Recognized Depression from Administrative Data: Consequences for Quality Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Spettell, Claire M; Wall, Terry C; Allison, Jeroan; Calhoun, Jaimee; Kobylinski, Richard; Fargason, Rachel; Kiefe, Catarina I

    2003-01-01

    Background Multiple factors limit identification of patients with depression from administrative data. However, administrative data drives many quality measurement systems, including the Health Plan Employer Data and Information Set (HEDIS®). Methods We investigated two algorithms for identification of physician-recognized depression. The study sample was drawn from primary care physician member panels of a large managed care organization. All members were continuously enrolled between January 1 and December 31, 1997. Algorithm 1 required at least two criteria in any combination: (1) an outpatient diagnosis of depression or (2) a pharmacy claim for an antidepressant. Algorithm 2 included the same criteria as algorithm 1, but required a diagnosis of depression for all patients. With algorithm 1, we identified the medical records of a stratified, random subset of patients with and without depression (n=465). We also identified patients of primary care physicians with a minimum of 10 depressed members by algorithm 1 (n=32,819) and algorithm 2 (n=6,837). Results The sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive values were: Algorithm 1: 95 percent, 65 percent, 49 percent; Algorithm 2: 52 percent, 88 percent, 60 percent. Compared to algorithm 1, profiles from algorithm 2 revealed higher rates of follow-up visits (43 percent, 55 percent) and appropriate antidepressant dosage acutely (82 percent, 90 percent) and chronically (83 percent, 91 percent) (p<0.05 for all). Conclusions Both algorithms had high false positive rates. Denominator construction (algorithm 1 versus 2) contributed significantly to variability in measured quality. Our findings raise concern about interpreting depression quality reports based upon administrative data. PMID:12968818

  18. [Influence of pharmaceutical advertising on the physician. A contribution to ethics in medicine].

    PubMed

    Kalb, Stefanie

    2004-01-01

    Physicians who prescribe medicaments to patients are the preferred target group of sales promotion by pharmaceutical industry. As studies show, pharmaceutical advertising actually exerts some influence on a physician's knowledge and habit of prescribing medicine, to the point of even inducing him to give preference to a special drug. Information on pharmaceuticals given by advertisements may contain some potential of bias, instead of offering the physician a chance of objectives additional training. Free gifts from the pharmaceutical industry may easily plunge a physician into a conflict of interest while giving therapy with drugs. The gift relationship established between him and pharmaceutical enterprises is apt to mutate to some sort of commitment he owes to the givers. Favouring a drug which has come about through he influence of advertising, can thus violate the principles of "good prescribing". For a treatment which contains potential for bias and a conflict of interest cannot possibly match the profession's principles of responsibility, fostering informed choice (autonomy), protecting the patient from harm (nonmaleficence), acting in a patient's best interest (beneficence), and promoting equity in health care (justice). Each physician should therefore be aware of possibly belonging to a preferred target group pharmaceutical sales promotion is aiming at. He should take an independent attitude while acquiring knowledge, and critically view the adequateness of free gifts he is offered. Even students of medicine should be encouraged to critically reflect on the necessary and essential relationship to pharmaceutical industries so that it may be moulded according to the benefit of the patients.

  19. Online physician ratings fail to predict actual performance on measures of quality, value, and peer review.

    PubMed

    Daskivich, Timothy J; Houman, Justin; Fuller, Garth; Black, Jeanne T; Kim, Hyung L; Spiegel, Brennan

    2018-04-01

    Patients use online consumer ratings to identify high-performing physicians, but it is unclear if ratings are valid measures of clinical performance. We sought to determine whether online ratings of specialist physicians from 5 platforms predict quality of care, value of care, and peer-assessed physician performance. We conducted an observational study of 78 physicians representing 8 medical and surgical specialties. We assessed the association of consumer ratings with specialty-specific performance scores (metrics including adherence to Choosing Wisely measures, 30-day readmissions, length of stay, and adjusted cost of care), primary care physician peer-review scores, and administrator peer-review scores. Across ratings platforms, multivariable models showed no significant association between mean consumer ratings and specialty-specific performance scores (β-coefficient range, -0.04, 0.04), primary care physician scores (β-coefficient range, -0.01, 0.3), and administrator scores (β-coefficient range, -0.2, 0.1). There was no association between ratings and score subdomains addressing quality or value-based care. Among physicians in the lowest quartile of specialty-specific performance scores, only 5%-32% had consumer ratings in the lowest quartile across platforms. Ratings were consistent across platforms; a physician's score on one platform significantly predicted his/her score on another in 5 of 10 comparisons. Online ratings of specialist physicians do not predict objective measures of quality of care or peer assessment of clinical performance. Scores are consistent across platforms, suggesting that they jointly measure a latent construct that is unrelated to performance. Online consumer ratings should not be used in isolation to select physicians, given their poor association with clinical performance.

  20. Assessing the limitations of the existing physician directory for measuring electronic health record (EHR) adoption rates among physicians in Connecticut, USA: cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Tikoo, Minakshi

    2012-01-01

    To assess the limitations of the existing physician directory in measuring electronic health record adoption rates among a cohort of Connecticut physicians. A population-based mailing assessed the number of physicians practising in Connecticut. Information about practice site, practises pertaining to storing of patient information, sources of revenue and preferred method for receiving survey. Practice status in Connecticut, measured by yes and no. Demographic information was collected on gender, year of birth, race and ethnicity. The response rate for the postcard mailing was 19% (3105/16 462). Of the 16 462 unduplicated consumers, 233 (1%) were retired and 5828 (35%) did not practise in Connecticut. Of the 3105 valid postcard responses we received, 2159 were for physicians practising in Connecticut. Nine (0.4%) of these responses did not specify a preferred method for receiving the full physician survey; 91 physicians refused to participate in the survey; 2159 surveys were sent out using each physician's requested method for receiving the survey, that is, web-based, regular mail or telephone. As of August 2012, 898 physicians had returned surveys, resulting in a response rate of 42%. The postcard response rate based on the unduplicated lists adjusted for exclusions, such as death, retired and do not practise in Connecticut, is 30%, which is low. We may be missing physicians' population which could greatly affect the indicators being used to measure change in electronic health record adoption rates. It is difficult to obtain an accurate physician count of practising physicians in Connecticut from the existing lists. States that are participating in the projects funded under various Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) initiatives must focus on getting an accurate count of the physicians practising in their state, since their progress is being measured based on this key number.

  1. [Communication training MultiTANDEMplus – A contribution to improve communication between professional caregivers and physicians].

    PubMed

    Meyer-Kühling, Inga; Wendelstein, Britta; Pantel, Johannes; Specht-Leible, Norbert; Zenthöfer, Andreas; Schröder, Johannes

    2015-10-01

    Failures of communication between professional caregivers and physicians affect the quality of supply of nursing home residents. As part of a model project it was aimed to develop a training for caregivers to improve communication and promote cooperation with physicians. For the needs assessment as a basis to develop the training 56 professional caregivers and 40 physicians engaged in nursing home care answered questionnaires regarding their cooperation. Based on these results a module for communication between professional caregivers and physicians was developed and adapted the TANDEM communication training for caregivers by Haberstroh and Pantel (2011). 25 professional caregivers in leading positions have been trained as multipliers in order to provide their colleagues the communication training with the additional element (TANDEMplus). TANDEMplus was evaluated in forms of reflection rounds and feedback questionnaires. 254 professional caregivers, housekeeping staff and daytime companions participated in a complete TANDEMplus training by the multipliers until July 2014. The implementation of their developed communication strategies into practice was experienced positively by the participants. The module “communication with physicians” is relevant for professional caregivers to raise awareness of their own competence and facilitate a structured information exchange at eye level. The training of multipliers was executed in order to ensure transfer effects and sustainability.

  2. [Maimonides, a physician in the 12 century. Contribution to the history of medical ethics and deontology].

    PubMed

    Pavlović, B

    2000-01-01

    Maimonides, Moses ben Maimon (1135-1204), Jewish physician, philosopher and scholar was the first after Hippocrates to write a text of a "prayer" he spoke out at the beginning of his medical profession, e. i. when he took oath. The text of "Maimonides's prayer" is today obligatory in some schools of medicine in the United States of America.

  3. [Odontological contribution to the identification of concentration camp physician Josef Mengele].

    PubMed

    Endris, R

    1985-01-01

    The body which had been exhumed from a graveyard in Embú (Brazil) on June 6th was investigated by forensic experts. The comparison of the post-mortem dental findings and jaw bones with ante-mortem data of Josef Mengele, physician of the concentration camp of Auschwitz, makes evident, that there is positive identity by high probability.

  4. Publicly reported quality-of-care measures influenced Wisconsin physician groups to improve performance

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Geoffrey C.; Smith, Maureen; Weeks, William B.; Queram, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Public reporting of performance on quality measures is increasingly common but little is known about the impact, especially among physician groups. The Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality (Collaborative) is a voluntary consortium of physician groups which has publicly reported quality measures since 2004, providing an opportunity to study the effect of this effort on participating groups. Analyses included member performance on 14 ambulatory measures from 2004–2009, a survey regarding reporting and its relationship to improvement efforts, and use of Medicare billing data to independently compare Collaborative members to the rest of Wisconsin, neighboring states and the rest of the United States. Faced with limited resources, groups prioritized their efforts based on the nature of the measure and their performance compared to others. The outcomes demonstrated that public reporting was associated with improvement in health quality and that large physician group practices will engage in improvement efforts in response. PMID:23459733

  5. Using standardised patients to measure physicians' practice: validation study using audio recordings

    PubMed Central

    Luck, Jeff; Peabody, John W

    2002-01-01

    Objective To assess the validity of standardised patients to measure the quality of physicians' practice. Design Validation study of standardised patients' assessments. Physicians saw unannounced standardised patients presenting with common outpatient conditions. The standardised patients covertly tape recorded their visit and completed a checklist of quality criteria immediately afterwards. Their assessments were compared against independent assessments of the recordings by a trained medical records abstractor. Setting Four general internal medicine primary care clinics in California. Participants 144 randomly selected consenting physicians. Main outcome measures Rates of agreement between the patients' assessments and independent assessment. Results 40 visits, one per standardised patient, were recorded. The overall rate of agreement between the standardised patients' checklists and the independent assessment of the audio transcripts was 91% (κ=0.81). Disaggregating the data by medical condition, site, level of physicians' training, and domain (stage of the consultation) gave similar rates of agreement. Sensitivity of the standardised patients' assessments was 95%, and specificity was 85%. The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve was 90%. Conclusions Standardised patients' assessments seem to be a valid measure of the quality of physicians' care for a variety of common medical conditions in actual outpatient settings. Properly trained standardised patients compare well with independent assessment of recordings of the consultations and may justify their use as a “gold standard” in comparing the quality of care across sites or evaluating data obtained from other sources, such as medical records and clinical vignettes. What is already known on this topicStandardised patients are valid and reliable reporters of physicians' practice in the medical education settingHowever, validating standardised patients' measurements of quality of care in

  6. Measuring physicians' trust: A scoping review with implications for public policy.

    PubMed

    Wilk, Adam S; Platt, Jodyn E

    2016-09-01

    Increasingly, physicians are expected to work in productive, trusting relationships with other health system stakeholders to improve patient and system outcomes. A better understanding of physicians' trust is greatly needed. This study assesses the state of the literature on physicians' trust in patients, other health care providers, institutions, and data systems or technology, and identifies key themes, dimensions of trust considered, quantitative measures used, and opportunities for further development via a scoping review. Peer-reviewed, English-language research articles were identified for inclusion in this study based on systematic searches of the Ovid/Medline, Pubmed, Proquest, Scopus, Elsevier, and Web of Science databases. Search terms included "trust" along with "physician," "doctor," "primary care provider," "family practitioner," "family practice," "generalist," "general practitioner," "general practice," "internist," "internal medicine," or "health professional," and plausible variants. Among the relevant articles identified (n = 446), the vast majority focused on patient trust in physicians (81.2%). Among articles examining physicians' trust, rigorous investigations of trust are rare, narrowly focused, and imprecise in their discussion of trust. Robust investigations of the effects of trust or distrust-as opposed to trust's determinants-and studies using validated quantitative trust measures are particularly rare. Studies typically measured trust using the language of confidence, effective communication, or cooperation, rarely or never capturing other important dimensions of trust, such as fidelity, the trustee's reputation, social capital, vulnerability, and acceptance. Research employing new, validated measures of physicians' trust, especially trust in institutions, may be highly informative to health system leaders and policymakers seeking to hone and enhance tools for improving the effectiveness and efficiency of the health care system

  7. Development and Validation of a Measure of Intention to Stay in Academia for Physician Assistant Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Karen

    2012-01-01

    This study attempted development and validation of a measure of "intention to stay in academia" for physician assistant (PA) faculty in order to determine if the construct could be measured in way that had both quantitative and qualitative meaning. Adopting both the methodologic framework of the Rasch model and the theoretical framework…

  8. The PMA Scale: A Measure of Physicians' Motivation to Adopt Medical Devices.

    PubMed

    Hatz, Maximilian H M; Sonnenschein, Tim; Blankart, Carl Rudolf

    2017-04-01

    Studies have often stated that individual-level determinants are important drivers for the adoption of medical devices. Empirical evidence supporting this claim is, however, scarce. At the individual level, physicians' adoption motivation was often considered important in the context of adoption decisions, but a clear notion of its dimensions and corresponding measurement scales is not available. To develop and subsequently validate a scale to measure the motivation to adopt medical devices of hospital-based physicians. The development and validation of the physician-motivation-adoption (PMA) scale were based on a literature search, internal expert meetings, a pilot study with physicians, and a three-stage online survey. The data collected in the online survey were analyzed using exploratory factor analysis (EFA), and the PMA scale was revised according to the results. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted to test the results from the EFA in the third stage. Reliability and validity tests and subgroup analyses were also conducted. Overall, 457 questionnaires were completed by medical personnel of the National Health Service England. The EFA favored a six-factor solution to appropriately describe physicians' motivation. The CFA confirmed the results from the EFA. Our tests indicated good reliability and validity of the PMA scale. This is the first reliable and valid scale to measure physicians' adoption motivation. Future adoption studies assessing the individual level should include the PMA scale to obtain more information about the role of physicians' motivation in the broader adoption context. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Giving Back: A mixed methods study of the contributions of US-Based Nigerian physicians to home country health systems.

    PubMed

    Nwadiuko, Joseph; James, Keyonie; Switzer, Galen E; Stern, Jamie

    2016-06-14

    There is increased interest in the capacity of US immigrants to contribute to their homelands via entrepreneurship and philanthropy. However, there has been little research examining how immigrant physicians may support health systems and what factors facilitate or raise barriers to increased support. This study used an observational design with paper questionnaire and interview components. Our sample was drawn from attendees of a 2011 conference for US Based Nigerian physicians; respondents who were not US residents, physicians, and of Nigerian birth or parentage were excluded from further analysis. Respondents were randomly selected to complete a follow-up interview with separate scripts for those having made past financial contributions or medical service trips to support Nigerian healthcare (Group A) and those who had done neither (Group B). Survey results were analyzed using Fischer exact tests and interviews were coded in pairs using thematic content analysis. Seventy-five of 156 (48 %) individuals who attended the conference met inclusion criteria and completed the survey, and 13 follow-up interviews were completed. In surveys, 65 % percent of respondents indicated a donation to an agency providing healthcare in Nigeria the previous year, 57 % indicated having gone on medical service trips in the prior 10 years and 45 % indicated it was "very likely" or "likely" that they would return to Nigeria to practice medicine. In interviews, respondents tended to favor gifts in kind and financial gifts as modes of contribution, with medical education facilities as the most popular target. Personal connections, often forged in medical school, tended to facilitate contributions. Individuals desiring to return permanently focused on their potential impact and worried about health system under-preparedness; those not desiring permanent return centered on how safety, financial security and health systems issues presented barriers. This study demonstrates several

  10. Evaluation of Ventricle Size Measurements in Infants by Pediatric Emergency Medicine Physicians.

    PubMed

    Halm, Brunhild M; Leone, Tina A; Chaudoin, Lindsey T; McKinley, Kenneth W; Ruzal-Shapiro, Carrie; Franke, Adrian A; Tsze, Daniel S

    2018-06-05

    The identification of hydrocephalus in infants by pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) physicians using cranial point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) has not been evaluated. We aimed to conduct a pilot/proof-of-concept study to evaluate whether PEM physicians can identify hydrocephalus (anterior horn width >5 mm) in 15 infants (mean 69 ± 42 days old) from the neonatal intensive care unit using POCUS. Our exploratory aims were to determine the test characteristics of cranial POCUS performed by PEM physicians for diagnosing hydrocephalus and the interrater reliability between measurements made by the PEM physicians and the radiologist. Depending on the availability, 1 or 2 PEM physicians performed a cranial POCUS through the open anterior fontanel for each infant after a 30-minute didactic lecture to determine the size of the left and right ventricles by measuring the anterior horn width at the foramen of Monroe in coronal view. Within 1 week, an ultrasound (US) technologist performed a cranial US and a radiologist determined the ventricle sizes from the US images; these measurements were the criterion standard. A radiologist determined 12 of the 30 ventricles as hydrocephalic. The sensitivity and specificity of the PEM physicians performed cranial POCUS was 66.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 34.9%-90.1%) and 94.4% (95% CI, 72.7%-99.9%), whereas the positive and negative predictive values were 88.9% (95% CI, 53.3%-98.2%) and 81.0% (95% CI, 65.5%-90.5%), respectively. The interrater reliability between the PEM physician's and radiologist's measurements was r = 0.91. The entire POCUS examinations performed by the PEM physicians took an average of 1.5 minutes. The time between the cranial POCUS and the radiology US was, on average, 4 days. While the PEM physicians in our study were able to determine the absence of hydrocephalus in infants with high specificity using cranial POCUS, there was insufficient evidence to support the use of this modality for identifying

  11. The effect of physician feedback and an action checklist on diabetes care measures.

    PubMed

    Schectman, Joel M; Schorling, John B; Nadkarni, Mohan M; Lyman, Jason A; Siadaty, Mir S; Voss, John D

    2004-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate whether physician feedback accompanied by an action checklist improved diabetes care process measures. Eighty-three physicians in an academic general medicine clinic were provided a single feedback report on the most recent date and result of diabetes care measures (glycosylated hemoglobin [A1c], urine microalbumin, serum creatinine, lipid levels, retinal examination) as well as recent diabetes medication refills with calculated dosing and adherence on 789 patients. An educational session regarding the feedback and adherence information was provided. The physicians were asked to complete a checklist accompanying the feedback on each of their patients, indicating requested actions with respect to follow-up, testing, and counseling. The physicians completed 82% of patient checklists, requesting actions consistent with patient needs on the basis of the feedback. Of the physicians, 93% felt the patient information and intervention format to be useful. The odds of urine microalbumin testing, serum creatinine, lipid profile, A1c, and retinal examination increased in the 6 months after the feedback. The increase was sustained at 1 year only for microalbumin and retinal exams. There was no significant change in refill adherence for the group overall after the feedback, although adherence did improve among patients of physicians attending the educational session. No significant change was noted in lipid or A1c levels during the study period. In conclusion, a simple physician feedback tool with action checklist can be both helpful and popular for improving rates of diabetes care guideline adherence. More complex interventions are likely required to improve diabetes outcomes.

  12. Measurement equivalence of patient safety climate in Chinese hospitals: can we compare across physicians and nurses?

    PubMed

    Zhu, Junya

    2018-06-11

    Self-report instruments have been widely used to better understand variations in patient safety climate between physicians and nurses. Research is needed to determine whether differences in patient safety climate reflect true differences in the underlying concepts. This is known as measurement equivalence, which is a prerequisite for meaningful group comparisons. This study aims to examine the degree of measurement equivalence of the responses to a patient safety climate survey of Chinese hospitals and to demonstrate how the measurement equivalence method can be applied to self-report climate surveys for patient safety research. Using data from the Chinese Hospital Survey of Patient Safety Climate from six Chinese hospitals in 2011, we constructed two groups: physicians and nurses (346 per group). We used multiple-group confirmatory factor analyses to examine progressively more stringent restrictions for measurement equivalence. We identified weak factorial equivalence across the two groups. Strong factorial equivalence was found for Organizational Learning, Unit Management Support for Safety, Adequacy of Safety Arrangements, Institutional Commitment to Safety, Error Reporting and Teamwork. Strong factorial equivalence, however, was not found for Safety System, Communication and Peer Support and Staffing. Nevertheless, further analyses suggested that nonequivalence did not meaningfully affect the conclusions regarding physician-nurse differences in patient safety climate. Our results provide evidence of at least partial equivalence of the survey responses between nurses and physicians, supporting mean comparisons of its constructs between the two groups. The measurement equivalence approach is essential to ensure that conclusions about group differences are valid.

  13. Accuracy of physician self-assessment compared with observed measures of competence: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Davis, David A; Mazmanian, Paul E; Fordis, Michael; Van Harrison, R; Thorpe, Kevin E; Perrier, Laure

    2006-09-06

    Core physician activities of lifelong learning, continuing medical education credit, relicensure, specialty recertification, and clinical competence are linked to the abilities of physicians to assess their own learning needs and choose educational activities that meet these needs. To determine how accurately physicians self-assess compared with external observations of their competence. The electronic databases MEDLINE (1966-July 2006), EMBASE (1980-July 2006), CINAHL (1982-July 2006), PsycINFO (1967-July 2006), the Research and Development Resource Base in CME (1978-July 2006), and proprietary search engines were searched using terms related to self-directed learning, self-assessment, and self-reflection. Studies were included if they compared physicians' self-rated assessments with external observations, used quantifiable and replicable measures, included a study population of at least 50% practicing physicians, residents, or similar health professionals, and were conducted in the United Kingdom, Canada, United States, Australia, or New Zealand. Studies were excluded if they were comparisons of self-reports, studies of medical students, assessed physician beliefs about patient status, described the development of self-assessment measures, or were self-assessment programs of specialty societies. Studies conducted in the context of an educational or quality improvement intervention were included only if comparative data were obtained before the intervention. Study population, content area and self-assessment domain of the study, methods used to measure the self-assessment of study participants and those used to measure their competence or performance, existence and use of statistical tests, study outcomes, and explanatory comparative data were extracted. The search yielded 725 articles, of which 17 met all inclusion criteria. The studies included a wide range of domains, comparisons, measures, and methodological rigor. Of the 20 comparisons between self- and

  14. [The formation of medical knowledges in Russia before 1800: contributions of German speaking physicians].

    PubMed

    Henning, Aloys

    2004-01-01

    Under the Moscovian grand duke VASILIJ III (1505-1533) the physician NICOLAUS BüLOW from Lübeck translated into Russian "Gaerde der Suntheit" (The garden of health), printed at Lübeck in 1492. Many German oral and literal medical transfers to Russia are documented since, amongst those from whole Europe, which SABINE DUMSCHAT has actually investigates (1998; 2003). At the end of the 16th century the German translation fo JOHANN REMMELINS (1583-1632) "catoptron microcosmicum" (1661) was translated into Russian for teaching the first Russian military surgeons (fel'dshery). JOSIAS WEITBRECHT (1702-1747) from Württemberg, member of the Imperial Academy of Science at St Petersburg since 1725, created a catalog of the anatomical preparations in the Petersburg Chamber of Arts, which Peter I let buy from FREDERIK RUYSCH in 1717 at Amersterdamn. WEITBRECHT lectured on anatomy and physiology at the Academy since 1730, what DANIEL BERNOULLI (1700-1782) had done there before. JOHANN BLATHASAR HANHART (1704-1739) from Winterthur, surgeon since 1733 at the new Petersburg Admiralty's hospital was ordered to create the Latin terminology for the first anatomical atlas, ever printed in Russia (1744). When HANHART had died, the surgeon from Petersburg Army's hospital CHRISTOPH JAKOB VON MELLEN (1705-1765) from Lübeck finished his work. In 1757 and 1761 the chief-surgeon at the Admiralty's hospital MARTIN SHEIN (1712-1762) published the first textbooks on anatomy and surgery in Russian, having translated JOHANN ZACHARIAS PLATNERS 'Institutiones chirurgicae", Lipsiae 1745. In 1764 the accoucheur-surgeon JOHANN PAGENKAMPF, Personal surgeon of EKATERINA II, translated and published a German textbook from JOHANN HORN for accoucheuses into Russian for teaching at the Moscow school for accoucheuses under JOHANN FRIEDRICH ERASMUS from Strasburg, founded in 1757.

  15. Contribution of physician assistants/associates to secondary care: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Halter, Mary; Wheeler, Carly; Pelone, Ferruccio; Gage, Heather; de Lusignan, Simon; Parle, Jim; Grant, Robert; Gabe, Jonathan; Nice, Laura; Drennan, Vari M

    2018-06-19

    To appraise and synthesise research on the impact of physician assistants/associates (PA) in secondary care, specifically acute internal medicine, care of the elderly, emergency medicine, trauma and orthopaedics, and mental health. Systematic review. Electronic databases (Medline, Embase, ASSIA, CINAHL, SCOPUS, PsycINFO, Social Policy and Practice, EconLit and Cochrane), reference lists and related articles. Peer-reviewed articles of any study design, published in English, 1995-2017. Blinded parallel processes were used to screen abstracts and full text, data extractions and quality assessments against published guidelines. A narrative synthesis was undertaken. Impact on: patients' experiences and outcomes, service organisation, working practices, other professional groups and costs. 5472 references were identified and 161 read in full; 16 were included-emergency medicine (7), trauma and orthopaedics (6), acute internal medicine (2), mental health (1) and care of the elderly (0). All studies were observational, with variable methodological quality. In emergency medicine and in trauma and orthopaedics, when PAs are added to teams, reduced waiting and process times, lower charges, equivalent readmission rate and good acceptability to staff and patients are reported. Analgesia prescribing, operative complications and mortality outcomes were variable. In internal medicine outcomes of care provided by PAs and doctors were equivalent. PAs have been deployed to increase the capacity of a team, enabling gains in waiting time, throughput, continuity and medical cover. When PAs were compared with medical staff, reassuringly there was little or no negative effect on health outcomes or cost. The difficulty of attributing cause and effect in complex systems where work is organised in teams is highlighted. Further rigorous evaluation is required to address the complexity of the PA role, reporting on more than one setting, and including comparison between PAs and roles for which

  16. Physician trust in the patient: development and validation of a new measure.

    PubMed

    Thom, David H; Wong, Sabrina T; Guzman, David; Wu, Amery; Penko, Joanne; Miaskowski, Christine; Kushel, Margot

    2011-01-01

    Mutual trust is an important aspect of the patient-physician relationship with positive consequences for both parties. Previous measures have been limited to patient trust in the physician. We set out to develop and validate a measure of physician trust in the patient. We identified candidate items for the scale by content analysis of a previous qualitative study of patient-physician trust and developed and validated a scale among 61 primary care clinicians (50 physicians and 11 nonphysicians) with respect to 168 patients as part of a community-based study of prescription opioid use for chronic, nonmalignant pain in HIV-positive adults. Polychoric factor structure analysis using the Pratt D matrix was used to reduce the number of items and describe the factor structure. Construct validity was tested by comparing mean clinician trust scores for patients by clinician and patient behaviors expected to be associated with clinician trust using a generalized linear mixed model. The final 12-item scale had high internal reliability (Cronbach α =.93) and a distinct 2-factor pattern with the Pratt matrix D. Construct validity was demonstrated with respect to clinician-reported self-behaviors including toxicology screening (P <.001), and refusal to prescribe opioids (P <.001) and with patient behaviors including reporting opioids lost or stolen (P=.008), taking opioids to get high (P <.001), and selling opioids (P<.001). If validated in other populations, this measure of physician trust in the patient will be useful in investigating the antecedents and consequences of mutual trust, and the relationship between mutual trust and processes of care, which can help improve the delivery of clinical care.

  17. 42 CFR 414.1230 - Additional measures for groups of physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... for all groups of physicians subject to the value-based payment modifier: (a) A composite of rates of potentially preventable hospital admissions for heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and diabetes. The rate of potentially preventable hospital admissions for diabetes is a composite measure of...

  18. 42 CFR 414.1230 - Additional measures for groups of physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... for all groups of physicians subject to the value-based payment modifier: (a) A composite of rates of potentially preventable hospital admissions for heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and diabetes. The rate of potentially preventable hospital admissions for diabetes is a composite measure of...

  19. Using the theory of reasoned action to determine physicians' intention to measure body mass index in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Rahul; Kavookjian, Jan; Scott, Virginia Ginger; Kamal, Khalid M; Miller, Lesley-Ann N; Neal, William A

    2009-06-01

    Over the past few decades, childhood obesity has become a major public health issue in the United States. Numerous public and professional organizations recommend that physicians periodically screen for obesity in children and adolescents using the body mass index (BMI). However, studies have shown that physicians infrequently measure BMI in children and adolescents. The purpose of this study was to use the theory of reasoned action (TRA) to explain physicians' intentions to measure BMI in children and adolescents. The study objectives were to (1) determine if attitude and subjective norm predict physicians' intention to measure BMI in children and adolescents; (2) determine if family physicians and pediatricians differ in terms of theoretical factors; and (3) assess differences in behavioral beliefs, outcome evaluations, normative beliefs, and motivation to comply among physicians based on their level of intention to measure BMI. A cross-sectional mailed survey of 2590 physicians (family physicians and pediatricians) practicing in 4 states was conducted. A self-administered questionnaire was designed that included items related to the TRA constructs. The association between the theoretical constructs was examined using correlation and regression analyses. Student's t test was used to determine differences between family physicians and pediatricians on theoretical constructs and to compare the underlying beliefs of nonintenders with intenders. The usable response rate was 22.8%. Less than half (44%) of the physicians strongly intended to measure BMI in children and adolescents. Together, the TRA constructs attitude and subjective norm explained up to 49.9% of the variance in intention. Pediatricians had a significantly (P<.01) higher intention to measure BMI as compared to family physicians. There were significant (P<.01) behavioral and normative belief differences between physicians who intend and those who do not intend to measure BMI. The TRA is a useful model

  20. How do family physicians measure blood pressure in routine clinical practice?

    PubMed Central

    Kaczorowski, Janusz; Myers, Martin G.; Gelfer, Mark; Dawes, Martin; Mang, Eric J.; Berg, Angelique; Grande, Claudio Del; Kljujic, Dragan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe the techniques currently used by family physicians in Canada to measure blood pressure (BP) for screening for, diagnosing, and treating hypertension. Design A Web-based cross-sectional survey distributed by e-mail. Setting Stratified random sample of family physicians in Canada. Participants Family physician members of the College of Family Physicians of Canada with valid e-mail addresses. Main outcome measures Physicians’ self-reported routine methods for recording BP in their practices to screen for, diagnose, and manage hypertension. Results A total of 774 valid responses were received, for a response rate of 16.2%. Respondents were similar to nonrespondents except for underrepresentation of male physicians. Of 769 respondents, 417 (54.2%) indicated that they used manual office BP measurement with a mercury or aneroid device and stethoscope as the routine method to screen patients for high BP, while 42.9% (330 of 769) reported using automated office BP (AOBP) measurement. The method most frequently used to make a diagnosis of hypertension was AOBP measurement (31.1%, 240 of 771), followed by home BP measurement (22.4%, 173 of 771) and manual office BP measurement (21.4%, 165 of 771). Ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) was used for diagnosis by 14.4% (111 of 771) of respondents. The most frequently reported method for ongoing management was home BP monitoring (68.7%, 528 of 769), followed by manual office BP measurement (63.6%, 489 of 769) and AOBP measurement (59.2%, 455 of 769). More than three-quarters (77.8%, 598 of 769) of respondents indicated that ABPM was readily available for their patients. Conclusion Canadian family physicians exhibit overall high use of electronic devices for BP measurement, However, more efforts are needed to encourage practitioners to follow current Canadian guidelines, which advocate the use of AOBP measurement for hypertension screening, ABPM and home BP measurement for making a diagnosis, and both

  1. Measuring clinical management by physicians and nurses in European hospitals: development and validation of two scales.

    PubMed

    Plochg, Thomas; Arah, Onyebuchi A; Botje, Daan; Thompson, Caroline A; Klazinga, Niek S; Wagner, Cordula; Mannion, Russell; Lombarts, Kiki

    2014-04-01

    Clinical management is hypothesized to be critical for hospital management and hospital performance. The aims of this study were to develop and validate professional involvement scales for measuring the level of clinical management by physicians and nurses in European hospitals. Testing of validity and reliability of scales derived from a questionnaire of 21 items was developed on the basis of a previous study and expert opinion and administered in a cross-sectional seven-country research project 'Deepening our Understanding of Quality improvement in Europe' (DUQuE). A sample of 3386 leading physicians and nurses working in 188 hospitals located in Czech Republic, France, Germany, Poland, Portugal, Spain and Turkey. Validity and reliability of professional involvement scales and subscales. Psychometric analysis yielded four subscales for leading physicians: (i) Administration and budgeting, (ii) Managing medical practice, (iii) Strategic management and (iv) Managing nursing practice. Only the first three factors applied well to the nurses. Cronbach's alpha for internal consistency ranged from 0.74 to 0.86 for the physicians, and from 0.61 to 0.81 for the nurses. Except for the 0.74 correlation between 'Administration and budgeting' and 'Managing medical practice' among physicians, all inter-scale correlations were <0.70 (range 0.43-0.61). Under testing for construct validity, the subscales were positively correlated with 'formal management roles' of physicians and nurses. The professional involvement scales appear to yield reliable and valid data in European hospital settings, but the scale 'Managing medical practice' for nurses needs further exploration. The measurement instrument can be used for international research on clinical management.

  2. [Perceptions of primary care physicians in Madrid on the austerity measures in the health care system].

    PubMed

    Heras-Mosteiro, Julio; Otero-García, Laura; Sanz-Barbero, Belén; Aranaz-Andrés, Jesús María

    2016-01-01

    To address the current economic crisis, governments have promoted austerity measures that have affected the taxpayer-funded health system. We report the findings of a study exploring the perceptions of primary care physicians in Madrid (Spain) on measures implemented in the Spanish health system. We carried out a qualitative study in two primary health care centres located in two neighbourhoods with unemployment and migrant population rates above the average of those in Madrid. Interviews were conducted with 12 primary health care physicians. Interview data were analysed by using thematic analysis and by adopting some elements of the grounded theory approach. Two categories were identified: evaluation of austerity measures and evaluation of decision-making in this process. Respondents believed there was a need to promote measures to improve the taxpayer-funded health system, but expressed their disagreement with the measures implemented. They considered that the measures were not evidence-based and responded to the need to decrease public health care expenditure in the short term. Respondents believed that they had not been properly informed about the measures and that there was adequate professional participation in the prioritization, selection and implementation of measures. They considered physician participation to be essential in the decision-making process because physicians have a more patient-centred view and have first-hand knowledge of areas requiring improvement in the system. It is essential that public authorities actively involve health care professionals in decision-making processes to ensure the implementation of evidence-based measures with strong professional support, thus maintaining the quality of care. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Family physicians' beliefs about genetic contributions to racial/ethnic and gender differences in health and clinical decision-making.

    PubMed

    Warshauer-Baker, Esther; Bonham, Vence L; Jenkins, Jean; Stevens, Nancy; Page, Zintesia; Odunlami, Adebola; McBride, Colleen M

    2008-01-01

    Greater attention towards genetics as a contributor to group health differences may lead to inappropriate use of race/ethnicity and gender as genetic heuristics and exacerbate health disparities. As part of a web-based survey, 1,035 family physicians (FPs) rated the contribution of genetics and environment to racial/ethnic and gender differences in health outcomes, and the importance of race/ethnicity and gender in their clinical decision-making. FPs attributed racial/ethnic and gender differences in health outcomes equally to environment and genetics. These beliefs were not associated with rated importance of race/ethnicity or gender in clinical decision-making. FPs appreciate the complexity of genetic and environmental influences on health differences by race/ethnicity and gender. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. The development of instruments to measure the work disability assessment behaviour of insurance physicians

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Variation in assessments is a universal given, and work disability assessments by insurance physicians are no exception. Little is known about the considerations and views of insurance physicians that may partly explain such variation. On the basis of the Attitude - Social norm - self Efficacy (ASE) model, we have developed measurement instruments for assessment behaviour and its determinants. Methods Based on theory and interviews with insurance physicians the questionnaire included blocks of items concerning background variables, intentions, attitudes, social norms, self-efficacy, knowledge, barriers and behaviour of the insurance physicians in relation to work disability assessment issues. The responses of 231 insurance physicians were suitable for further analysis. Factor analysis and reliability analysis were used to form scale variables and homogeneity analysis was used to form dimension variables. Thus, we included 169 of the 177 original items. Results Factor analysis and reliability analysis yielded 29 scales with sufficient reliability. Homogeneity analysis yielded 19 dimensions. Scales and dimensions fitted with the concepts of the ASE model. We slightly modified the ASE model by dividing behaviour into two blocks: behaviour that reflects the assessment process and behaviour that reflects assessment behaviour. The picture that emerged from the descriptive results was of a group of physicians who were motivated in their job and positive about the Dutch social security system in general. However, only half of them had a positive opinion about the Dutch Work and Income (Capacity for Work) Act (WIA). They also reported serious barriers, the most common of which was work pressure. Finally, 73% of the insurance physicians described the majority of their cases as 'difficult'. Conclusions The scales and dimensions developed appear to be valid and offer a promising basis for future research. The results suggest that the underlying ASE model, in

  5. Foreign scientists on the contribution of Serbian physician and scientist Dr. Lazar K. Lazarević to medical science.

    PubMed

    Draca, Sanja

    2016-01-01

    Dr. Lazar K. Lazarević (1851-1890, Julian calendar/1891, Gregorian calendar) was an exceptional Serbian physician, scientist, writer and translator. During his short life and his close to 11-year-long professional career (1879-1890), Dr. Lazarević authored 78 scientific papers and presentations in various branches of medicine. His greatest contribution to the field of neurology and to medical science in general is his description of the straight leg raising test.The article titled"Ischiac postica Cotunnii--One contribution to its differential diagnosis"was published in the Serbian language (in Cyrillic alphabet) in the Serbian Archives of Medicine in 1880.The article was translated to German and republished in Vienna in 1884 in Allgemeine Wiener medizinische Zeitung. The straight leg raising test is usually called Lasegue's test/sign, after the French clinician Charles Lasègue, although he never described it. However, there are numerous authors who admit that Lasègue never published the description of the straight leg raising test, and instead give full credits for its discovery to Dr. Lazarević. Our objective in this article is to highlight the major literature written by foreign scientists who give credit to Dr. Lazarević for his contribution to medical science.

  6. Interprofessional Education: What Measurable Learning Outcomes Are Realistic for the Physician Assistant Profession?

    PubMed

    Lohenry, Kevin; Lie, Désirée; Fung, Cha-Chi; Crandall, Sonia; Bushardt, Reamer L

    2016-06-01

    To compare physician assistant (PA) students' attitudes regarding interprofessional education by students' seniority, gender, age, and previous experience with interprofessional education. The validated 19-item Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale and the 12-item Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale were administered to matriculating and graduating PA students from 2 US institutions (N = 186). Primary outcomes were score differences by subgroup and institution using independent sample t-tests. We also examined scale validity measured by Cronbach's alpha (internal consistency) and Pearson correlation coefficients (concurrent validity). Student demographics at both institutions were similar. Initial comparisons did not demonstrate significant institutional differences. Consequently, data were combined for subsequent analyses. Matriculating students had significantly higher mean Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale scores than did graduating students. No significant differences were found by gender, age, or previous interprofessional education exposure for either scale. Both scales demonstrated high internal consistency (Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale α = 0.93; Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale α = 0.84). Physician assistant student attitudes regarding interprofessional education are very positive at matriculation and are less positive at graduation. Physician assistant student attitudes do not vary by gender, age, or previous interprofessional education exposure. Physician assistant educators should ensure that students' interprofessional education exposure makes full use of the students' initial positive attitudes and focuses on skill development for interprofessional education competencies.

  7. The contribution of physics to Nuclear Medicine: physicians' perspective on future directions.

    PubMed

    Mankoff, David A; Pryma, Daniel A

    2014-12-01

    Advances in Nuclear Medicine physics enabled the specialty of Nuclear Medicine and directed research in other aspects of radiotracer imaging, ultimately leading to Nuclear Medicine's emergence as an important component of current medical practice. Nuclear Medicine's unique ability to characterize in vivo biology without perturbing it will assure its ongoing role in a practice of medicine increasingly driven by molecular biology. However, in the future, it is likely that advances in molecular biology and radiopharmaceutical chemistry will increasingly direct future developments in Nuclear Medicine physics, rather than relying on physics as the primary driver of advances in Nuclear Medicine. Working hand-in-hand with clinicians, chemists, and biologists, Nuclear Medicine physicists can greatly enhance the specialty by creating more sensitive and robust imaging devices, by enabling more facile and sophisticated image analysis to yield quantitative measures of regional in vivo biology, and by combining the strengths of radiotracer imaging with other imaging modalities in hybrid devices, with the overall goal to enhance Nuclear Medicine's ability to characterize regional in vivo biology.

  8. Financial incentives and measurement improved physicians' quality of care in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Peabody, John; Shimkhada, Riti; Quimbo, Stella; Florentino, Jhiedon; Bacate, Marife; McCulloch, Charles E; Solon, Orville

    2011-04-01

    The merits of using financial incentives to improve clinical quality have much appeal, yet few studies have rigorously assessed the potential benefits. The uncertainty surrounding assessments of quality can lead to poor policy decisions, possibly resulting in increased cost with little or no quality improvement, or missed opportunities to improve care. We conducted an experiment involving physicians in thirty Philippine hospitals that overcomes many of the limitations of previous studies. We measured clinical performance and then examined whether modest bonuses equal to about 5 percent of a physician's salary, as well as system-level incentives that increased compensation to hospitals and across groups of physicians, led to improvements in the quality of care. We found that both the bonus and system-level incentives improved scores in a quality measurement system used in our study by ten percentage points. Our findings suggest that when careful measurement is combined with the types of incentives we studied, there may be a larger impact on quality than previously recognized.

  9. Factors that contribute to physician variability in decisions to limit life support in the ICU: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Michael E; Rhudy, Lori M; Ballinger, Beth A; Tescher, Ann N; Pickering, Brian W; Gajic, Ognjen

    2013-06-01

    Our aim was to explore reasons for physician variability in decisions to limit life support in the intensive care unit (ICU) utilizing qualitative methodology. Single center study consisting of semi-structured interviews with experienced physicians and nurses. Seventeen intensivists from medical (n = 7), surgical (n = 5), and anesthesia (n = 5) critical care backgrounds, and ten nurses from medical (n = 5) and surgical (n = 5) ICU backgrounds were interviewed. Principles of grounded theory were used to analyze the interview transcripts. Eleven factors within four categories were identified that influenced physician variability in decisions to limit life support: (1) physician work environment-workload and competing priorities, shift changes and handoffs, and incorporation of nursing input; (2) physician experiences-of unexpected patient survival, and of limiting life support in physician's family; (3) physician attitudes-investment in a good surgical outcome, specialty perspective, values and beliefs; and (4) physician relationship with patient and family-hearing the patient's wishes firsthand, engagement in family communication, and family negotiation. We identified several factors which physicians and nurses perceived were important sources of physician variability in decisions to limit life support. Ways to raise awareness and ameliorate the potentially adverse effects of factors such as workload, competing priorities, shift changes, and handoffs should be explored. Exposing intensivists to long term patient outcomes, formalizing nursing input, providing additional training, and emphasizing firsthand knowledge of patient wishes may improve decision making.

  10. Physician empathy: definition, outcome-relevance and its measurement in patient care and medical education.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Melanie; Scheffer, Christian; Tauschel, Diethard; Lutz, Gabriele; Wirtz, Markus; Edelhäuser, Friedrich

    2012-01-01

    The present study gives a brief introduction into 1. the definition of physician empathy (PE) and 2. its influence on patients' health outcomes. Furthermore 3. we present assessment instruments to measure PE from the perspective of the patient and medical student. The latter topic will be explored in detail as we conducted a pilot study on the German versions of two self-assessment instruments of empathy, which are mostly used in medical education research, namely the "Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy, Student Version" (JSPE-S) and the "Interpersonal Reactivity Index" (IRI). We first present an overview of the current empirical and theoretical literature on the definition and outcome-relevance of PE. Additionally, we conducted basic psychometric analyses of the German versions of the JSPE-S and the IRI. Data for this analyses is based on a cross-sectional pilot-survey in N=44 medical students and N=63 students of other disciplines from the University of Cologne. PE includes the understanding of the patient as well as verbal and non-verbal communication, which should result in a helpful therapeutic action of the physician. Patients' health outcomes in different healthcare settings can be improved considerably from a high quality empathic encounter with their clinician. Basic psychometric results of the German JSPE-S and IRI measures show first promising results. PE as an essential and outcome-relevant element in the patient-physician relationship requires more consideration in the education of medical students and, thus, in medical education research. The German versions of the JSPE-S and IRI measures seem to be promising means to evaluate these education aims and to conduct medical education research on empathy.

  11. Initial testing of an instrument to measure teacher identity in physicians.

    PubMed

    Starr, Susan; Haley, Heather-Lyn; Mazor, Kathleen M; Ferguson, Warren; Philbin, Mary; Quirk, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A previous study described 7 elements of teacher identity: intrinsic satisfaction from teaching, knowledge and skill about teaching, belonging to a community of teachers, receiving rewards for teaching, believing that being a doctor means being a teacher, feeling a responsibility to teach, and sharing clinical expertise. To conduct the initial testing of an instrument to measure the 7 elements of teacher identity in clinical educators and to consider the potential applications of such an instrument. A 37-item questionnaire was mailed to 153 preceptors of preclinical students. Categories reflected the elements of teacher identity listed here. Demographic data were collected. Means, alphas, ANOVAs, and paired t tests were calculated. Of 153 preceptors, 127 (83%) completed the questionnaire. Cronbach's alpha for the overall scale and several subscales were high. Salaried physicians and those who had completed a faculty development program scored significantly higher on several subscales than physicians who volunteered to teach or who did not have faculty development. This study provides preliminary evidence that teacher identity can be measured and that preceptors do not respond as a homogeneous group. Assessing teacher identity may be helpful to medical schools looking to identify and support physicians who teach.

  12. Electronic medical record features and seven quality of care measures in physician offices.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Chun-Ju; Marsteller, Jill A; Simon, Alan E

    2014-01-01

    The effect of electronic medical records (EMRs) on quality of care in physicians' offices is uncertain. This study used the 2008-2009 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey to examine the relationship between EMRs features and quality in physician offices. The relationship between selected EMRs features and 7 quality measures was evaluated by testing 25 associations in multivariate models. Significant relationships include reminders for guideline-based interventions or screening tests associated with lower odds of inappropriate urinalysis and prescription of antibiotics for upper respiratory infection (URI), prescription order entry associated with lower odds of prescription of antibiotics for URI, and patient problem list associated with higher odds of inappropriate prescribing for elderly patients. EMRs system level was associated with lower odds of blood pressure check, inappropriate urinalysis, and prescription of antibiotics for URI compared with no EMRs. The results show both positive and inverse relationships between EMRs features and quality of care.

  13. Percentage-based Author Contribution Index: a universal measure of author contribution to scientific articles.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Stéphane; Ikeda, Takayoshi; Lefort, Marie-Caroline; Malumbres-Olarte, Jagoba; Schmidt, Jason M

    2017-01-01

    Deciphering the amount of work provided by different co-authors of a scientific paper has been a recurrent problem in science. Despite the myriad of metrics available, the scientific community still largely relies on the position in the list of authors to evaluate contributions, a metric that attributes subjective and unfounded credit to co-authors. We propose an easy to apply, universally comparable and fair metric to measure and report co-authors contribution in the scientific literature. The proposed Author Contribution Index (ACI) is based on contribution percentages provided by the authors, preferably at the time of submission. Researchers can use ACI to compare the contributions of different authors, describe the contribution profile of a particular researcher or analyse how contribution changes through time. We provide such an analysis based on contribution percentages provided by 97 scientists from the field of ecology who voluntarily responded to an online anonymous survey. ACI is simple to understand and to implement because it is based solely on percentage contributions and the number of co-authors. It provides a continuous score that reflects the contribution of one author as compared to the average contribution of all other authors. For example, ACI(i) = 3, means that author i contributed three times more than what the other authors contributed on average. Our analysis comprised 836 papers published in 2014-2016 and revealed patterns of ACI values that relate to career advancement. There are many examples of author contribution indices that have been proposed but none has really been adopted by scientific journals. Many of the proposed solutions are either too complicated, not accurate enough or not comparable across articles, authors and disciplines. The author contribution index presented here addresses these three major issues and has the potential to contribute to more transparency in the science literature. If adopted by scientific journals, it

  14. Measuring deception: test-retest reliability of physicians' self-reported manipulation of reimbursement rules for patients.

    PubMed

    VanGeest, Jonathan B; Wynia, Matthew K; Cummins, Deborah S; Wilson, Ira B

    2002-06-01

    This study examined the test-retest reliability of physicians' self-reported manipulation of reimbursement rules for patients. The test-retest reliability of self-report of three specific tactics were examined: (1) exaggerating the severity of patients' conditions, (2) changing a patient's official (billing) diagnosis, and (3) reporting signs or symptoms that patients did not have. The reliability of a scaled summary measure of physicians' manipulation of reimbursement rules was also assessed. Overall, the authors found high levels of test-retest agreement across all three items and the summary measure. These findings suggest that self-report can be used to produce reliable data on this controversial issue. Specifically, the three items reported here can be used to produce a reliable summary measure of physicians' manipulation of reimbursement rules to help patients obtain care that physicians perceive as necessary.

  15. Contribution of patient, physician, and environmental factors to demographic and health variation in colonoscopy follow-up for abnormal colorectal cancer screening test results.

    PubMed

    Partin, Melissa R; Gravely, Amy A; Burgess, James F; Haggstrom, David A; Lillie, Sarah E; Nelson, David B; Nugent, Sean M; Shaukat, Aasma; Sultan, Shahnaz; Walter, Louise C; Burgess, Diana J

    2017-09-15

    Patient, physician, and environmental factors were identified, and the authors examined the contribution of these factors to demographic and health variation in colonoscopy follow-up after a positive fecal occult blood test/fecal immunochemical test (FOBT/FIT) screening. In total, 76,243 FOBT/FIT-positive patients were identified from 120 Veterans Health Administration (VHA) facilities between August 16, 2009 and March 20, 2011 and were followed for 6 months. Patient demographic (race/ethnicity, sex, age, marital status) and health characteristics (comorbidities), physician characteristics (training level, whether primary care provider) and behaviors (inappropriate FOBT/FIT screening), and environmental factors (geographic access, facility type) were identified from VHA administrative records. Patient behaviors (refusal, private sector colonoscopy use) were estimated with statistical text mining conducted on clinic notes, and follow-up predictors and adjusted rates were estimated using hierarchical logistic regression. Roughly 50% of individuals completed a colonoscopy at a VHA facility within 6 months. Age and comorbidity score were negatively associated with follow-up. Blacks were more likely to receive follow-up than whites. Environmental factors attenuated but did not fully account for these differences. Patient behaviors (refusal, private sector colonoscopy use) and physician behaviors (inappropriate screening) fully accounted for the small reverse race disparity and attenuated variation by age and comorbidity score. Patient behaviors (refusal and private sector colonoscopy use) contributed more to variation in follow-up rates than physician behaviors (inappropriate screening). In the VHA, blacks are more likely to receive colonoscopy follow-up for positive FOBT/FIT results than whites, and follow-up rates markedly decline with advancing age and comorbidity burden. Patient and physician behaviors explain race variation in follow-up rates and contribute to

  16. How can patients and their physicians contribute to an outbreak investigation? Experiences from a nationwide listeriosis outbreak in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Sabine; Kling, Kerstin; Stephan, Roger; Bratschi, Martin W; Jost, Marianne; Bless, Philipp Justus; Schmutz, Claudia; Mäusezahl, Daniel; Wyss, Kaspar; Mäusezahl-Feuz, Mirjam; Hatz, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Gathering patient information to contain an outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes is difficult because of the patients' severe illness or death. Extending the range of interviewees to acquire epidemiological data can thus be important to maximise information. We built the current analysis on a case-case outbreak investigation conducted during a Swiss listeriosis outbreak between 30 January and 11 May 2014, including 31 patients with confirmed L. monocytogenes infection. We interviewed treating physicians and patients or their next of kin to gather information on clinical aspects, eating habits and food consumption. We compared the different information sources with regards to their potential to provide specific, complete and rapid information on the affected population and their food consumption history. We obtained a 100% response rate among physicians, providing detailed information on the affected population by describing health status, underlying conditions, and signs and symptoms. Detailed information on food history could not be obtained from physicians, making the information vague and unspecific. Less than 50% of patients could be interviewed, limiting our information base. Nevertheless, patient information on the food history was sufficiently detailed and helped to identify the outbreak source CONCLUSIONS: Outbreak investigation teams confronted with limited information from patients and with small numbers of cases can enhance information on the affected population and the outbreak source by combining information from physicians and patients. Physicians provided comprehensive information on signs and symptoms, underlying conditions and the general health status. Patients remain vital to provide detailed information on the food consumption history.

  17. Measuring the Contribution of Atmospheric Scatter to Laser Eye Dazzle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    alignment of the detector was then fine tuned to ensure that the reflected beam traveled perfectly back through the aperture, thus indicating normal...spanning June and July 2014. A narrow acceptance angle detector was used to measure scattered laser radiation within the laser beam at different... scatter does not make a significant contribution to laser eye dazzle for short-range laser engagements in atmospheres of good to moderate air quality

  18. Physician communication in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Kirschbaum, Kristin A; Rask, John P; Fortner, Sally A; Kulesher, Robert; Nelson, Michael T; Yen, Tony; Brennan, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    In this study, communication research was conducted with multidisciplinary groups of operating-room physicians. Theoretical frameworks from intercultural communication and rhetoric were used to (a) measure latent cultural communication variables and (b) conduct communication training with the physicians. A six-step protocol guided the research with teams of physicians from different surgical specialties: anesthesiologists, general surgeons, and obstetrician-gynecologists (n = 85). Latent cultural communication variables were measured by surveys administered to physicians before and after completion of the protocol. The centerpiece of the 2-hour research protocol was an instructional session that informed the surgical physicians about rhetorical choices that support participatory communication. Post-training results demonstrated scores increased on communication variables that contribute to collaborative communication and teamwork among the physicians. This study expands health communication research through application of combined intercultural and rhetorical frameworks, and establishes new ways communication theory can contribute to medical education.

  19. Accounting for graduate medical education production of primary care physicians and general surgeons: timing of measurement matters.

    PubMed

    Petterson, Stephen; Burke, Matthew; Phillips, Robert; Teevan, Bridget

    2011-05-01

    Legislation proposed in 2009 to expand GME set institutional primary care and general surgery production eligibility thresholds at 25% at entry into training. The authors measured institutions' production of primary care physicians and general surgeons on completion of first residency versus two to four years after graduation to inform debate and explore residency expansion and physician workforce implications. Production of primary care physicians and general surgeons was assessed by retrospective analysis of the 2009 American Medical Association Masterfile, which includes physicians' training institution, residency specialty, and year of completion for up to six training experiences. The authors measured production rates for each institution based on physicians completing their first residency during 2005-2007 in family or internal medicine, pediatrics, or general surgery. They then reassessed rates to account for those who completed additional training. They compared these rates with proposed expansion eligibility thresholds and current workforce needs. Of 116,004 physicians completing their first residency, 54,245 (46.8%) were in primary care and general surgery. Of 683 training institutions, 586 met the 25% threshold for expansion eligibility. At two to four years out, only 29,963 physicians (25.8%) remained in primary care or general surgery, and 135 institutions lost eligibility. A 35% threshold eliminated 314 institutions collectively training 93,774 residents (80.8%). Residency expansion thresholds that do not account for production at least two to four years after completion of first residency overestimate eligibility. The overall primary care production rate from GME will not sustain the current physician workforce composition. Copyright © by the Association of American medical Colleges.

  20. Job satisfaction among obstetrician-gynecologists: a comparison between private practice physicians and academic physicians.

    PubMed

    Bell, Darrel J; Bringman, Jay; Bush, Andrew; Phillips, Owen P

    2006-11-01

    Physician job satisfaction has been the subject of much research. However, no studies have been conducted comparing academic and private practice physician satisfaction in obstetrics and gynecology. This study was undertaken to measure satisfaction levels for academic and private practice obstetrician-gynecologists and compare different aspects of their practice that contributed to their satisfaction. A survey was mailed to randomly selected obstetrician-gynecologists in Memphis, TN; Birmingham, AL; Little Rock, AR; and Jackson, MS. Physicians were asked to respond to questions concerning demographics and career satisfaction. They were also asked to assess the contribution of 13 different aspects of their practice in contributing to their job selection and satisfaction using a Likert scale. A score of 1 meant the physician completely disagreed with a statement regarding a factor's contribution or was completely dissatisfied; a score of 5 meant the physician completely agreed with a factor's contribution or was completely satisfied. Simple descriptive statistics, as well as the 2-sample t test, were used. Likert scale values were assumed to be interval measurements. Of the 297 questionnaires mailed, 129 (43%) physicians responded. Ninety-five (74%) respondents rated their overall satisfaction as 4 or 5. No significant difference was found between academic and private physicians when comparing overall job satisfaction (P = .25). When compared to private practice physicians, the aspects most likely contributing to overall job satisfaction for academic physicians were the ability to teach, conduct research, and practice variety (P = .0001, P = .0001, and P = .007, respectively). When compared with academic physicians, the aspects most likely contributing to job satisfaction for private practice physicians were autonomy, physician-patient relationship, and insurance reimbursement (P = .0058, P = .0001, and P = .0098, respectively). When choosing a practice setting

  1. Quality measurement in physician-staffed emergency medical services: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Haugland, Helge; Uleberg, Oddvar; Klepstad, Pål; Krüger, Andreas; Rehn, Marius

    2018-05-15

    Quality measurement of physician-staffed emergency medical services (P-EMS) is necessary to improve service quality. Knowledge and consensus on this topic are scarce, making quality measurement of P-EMS a high-priority research area. The aim of this review was to identify, describe and evaluate studies of quality measurement in P-EMS. The databases of MEDLINE and Embase were searched initially, followed by a search for included article citations in Scopus. The study eligibility criteria were: (1) articles describing the use of one quality indicator (QI) or more in P-EMS, (2) original manuscripts, (3) articles published from 1 January 1968 until 5 October 2016. The literature search identified 4699 records. 4543 were excluded after reviewing title and abstract. An additional 129 were excluded based on a full-text review. The remaining 27 papers were included in the analysis. Methodological quality was assessed using an adapted critical appraisal tool. The description of used QIs and methods of quality measurement was extracted. Variables describing the involved P-EMSs were extracted as well. In the included papers, a common understanding of which QIs to use in P-EMS did not exist. Fifteen papers used only a single QI. The most widely used QIs were 'Adherence to medical protocols', 'Provision of advanced interventions', 'Response time' and 'Adverse events'. The review demonstrated a lack of shared understanding of which QIs to use in P-EMS. Moreover, papers using only one QI dominated the literature, thus increasing the risk of a narrow perspective in quality measurement. Future quality measurement in P-EMS should rely on a set of consensus-based QIs, ensuring a comprehensive approach to quality measurement.

  2. Comparative evaluation of different medication safety measures for the emergency department: physicians' usage and acceptance of training, poster, checklist and computerized decision support.

    PubMed

    Sedlmayr, Brita; Patapovas, Andrius; Kirchner, Melanie; Sonst, Anja; Müller, Fabian; Pfistermeister, Barbara; Plank-Kiegele, Bettina; Vogler, Renate; Criegee-Rieck, Manfred; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich; Dormann, Harald; Maas, Renke; Bürkle, Thomas

    2013-07-29

    Although usage and acceptance are important factors for a successful implementation of clinical decision support systems for medication, most studies only concentrate on their design and outcome. Our objective was to comparatively investigate a set of traditional medication safety measures such as medication safety training for physicians, paper-based posters and checklists concerning potential medication problems versus the additional benefit of a computer-assisted medication check. We concentrated on usage, acceptance and suitability of such interventions in a busy emergency department (ED) of a 749 bed acute tertiary care hospital. A retrospective, qualitative evaluation study was conducted using a field observation and a questionnaire-based survey. Six physicians were observed while treating 20 patient cases; the questionnaire, based on the Technology Acceptance Model 2 (TAM2), has been answered by nine ED physicians. During field observations, we did not observe direct use of any of the implemented interventions for medication safety (paper-based and electronic). Questionnaire results indicated that the electronic medication safety check was the most frequently used intervention, followed by checklist and posters. However, despite their positive attitude, physicians most often stated that they use the interventions in only up to ten percent for subjectively "critical" orders. Main reasons behind the low usage were deficits in ease-of-use and fit to the workflow. The intention to use the interventions was rather high after overcoming these barriers. Methodologically, the study contributes to Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) research in an ED setting and confirms TAM2 as a helpful diagnostic tool in identifying barriers for a successful implementation of medication safety interventions. In our case, identified barriers explaining the low utilization of the implemented medication safety interventions - despite their positive reception - include deficits in

  3. Physician-industry cooperation in the medical device industry.

    PubMed

    Chatterji, Aaron K; Fabrizio, Kira R; Mitchell, Will; Schulman, Kevin A

    2008-01-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests that innovative medical devices often arise from physicians' inventive activity, but no studies have documented the extent of such physician-engaged innovation. This paper uses patent data and the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile to provide evidence that physicians contribute to medical device innovation, accounting for almost 20 percent of approximately 26,000 medical device patents filed in the United States during 1990-1996. Moreover, two measures indicate that physician patents had more influence on subsequent inventive activity than nonphysician patents. This finding supports the maintenance of an open environment for physician-industry collaboration in the medical device discovery process.

  4. Physicians involved in the care of patients with high risk of skin cancer should be trained regarding sun protection measures: evidence from a cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Thomas, M; Rioual, E; Adamski, H; Roguedas, A-M; Misery, L; Michel, M; Chastel, F; Schmutz, J-L; Aubin, F; Marguery, M-C; Meyer, N

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge, regarding sun protection, is essential to change behaviour and to reduce sun exposure of patients at risk for skin cancer. Patient education regarding appropriate or sun protection measures, is a priority to reduce skin cancer incidence. The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge about sun protection and the recommendations given in a population of non-dermatologists physicians involved in the care of patients at high risk of skin cancer. This study is a cross-sectional study. Physicians were e-mailed an anonymous questionnaire evaluating the knowledge about risk factors for skin cancer, sun protection and about the role of the physician in providing sun protection recommendations. Of the responders, 71.4% considered that the risk of skin cancer of their patients was increased when compared with the general population. All the responders knew that UV-radiations can contribute to induce skin cancers and 71.4% of them declared having adequate knowledge about sun protection measures. A proportion of 64.2% of them declared that they were able to give sun protection advices: using sunscreens (97.8%), wearing covering clothes (95.5%), performing regular medical skin examination (91.1%), to avoid direct sunlight exposure (77.8%), avoiding outdoor activities in the hottest midday hours (73.3%) and practising progressive exposure (44.4%). Non-dermatologist physicians reported a correct knowledge of UV-induced skin cancer risk factors. The majority of responders displayed adequate knowledge of sun protection measures and declared providing patients with sun protection recommendation on a regular basis. Several errors persisted. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2010 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  5. Let physicians be physicians.

    PubMed

    Nicoletti, Betsy

    2008-01-01

    On a recent visit to his physician, a friend reported that the physician spent 95% of the visit hunched over a laptop computer, leaving it only for a quick listen to his heart and lungs. The remarkable thing is, in medical circles the story is unremarkable. Many consider it the norm now. Who thought it was a good idea to turn physicians into typists? Does it make sense that the most highly educated person in the building is doing data entry? How is patient care improved if the physician is hunched over a laptop computer in the exam room?

  6. Surgeon leadership in the coding, billing, and contractual negotiations for fenestrated endovascular aortic aneurysm repair increases medical center contribution margin and physician reimbursement.

    PubMed

    Aiello, Francesco; Durgin, Jonathan; Daniel, Vijaya; Messina, Louis; Doucet, Danielle; Simons, Jessica; Jenkins, James; Schanzer, Andres

    2017-10-01

    Fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair (FEVAR) allows endovascular treatment of thoracoabdominal and juxtarenal aneurysms previously outside the indications of use for standard devices. However, because of considerable device costs and increased procedure time, FEVAR is thought to result in financial losses for medical centers and physicians. We hypothesized that surgeon leadership in the coding, billing, and contractual negotiations for FEVAR procedures will increase medical center contribution margin (CM) and physician reimbursement. At the UMass Memorial Center for Complex Aortic Disease, a vascular surgeon with experience in medical finances is supported to manage the billing and coding of FEVAR procedures for medical center and physician reimbursement. A comprehensive financial analysis was performed for all FEVAR procedures (2011-2015), independent of insurance status, patient presentation, or type of device used. Medical center CM (actual reimbursement minus direct costs) was determined for each index FEVAR procedure and for all related subsequent procedures, inpatient or outpatient, 3 months before and 1 year subsequent to the index FEVAR procedure. Medical center CM for outpatient clinic visits, radiology examinations, vascular laboratory studies, and cardiology and pulmonary evaluations related to FEVAR were also determined. Surgeon reimbursement for index FEVAR procedure, related adjunct procedures, and assistant surgeon reimbursement were also calculated. All financial analyses were performed and adjudicated by the UMass Department of Finance. The index hospitalization for 63 FEVAR procedures incurred $2,776,726 of direct costs and generated $3,027,887 in reimbursement, resulting in a positive CM of $251,160. Subsequent related hospital procedures (n = 26) generated a CM of $144,473. Outpatient clinic visits, radiologic examinations, and vascular laboratory studies generated an additional CM of $96,888. Direct cost analysis revealed that grafts

  7. The Opioid Crisis and the Physician's Role in Contributing to its Resolution: Step One--Prevention of Overdoses.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Susan; Bouffard, Dennis L; Modesto-Lowe, Vania

    2016-01-01

    The escalation of opioid prescriptions, associated misuse, and related mortality continues to pose public health challenges in the United States. Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) indicates that opioid overdose death rates remain high, suggesting the need for improved access to, and use of naloxone to save lives. In this context, community-based overdose initiatives have trained laypersons to identify overdose and administer naloxone for reversal. Although there have been efforts to encourage physicians to prescribe naloxone to patients at-risk for opioid overdose, the rate of prescribing remains suboptimal. This article outlines the epidemiology of overdoses, discusses naloxone distribution programs and myths surrounding its use, and reviews relevant legislative developments in Connecticut and proper counseling of patients and families to encourage broader education and prescribing of naloxone.

  8. Do hospitalist physicians improve the quality of inpatient care delivery? A systematic review of process, efficiency and outcome measures

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite more than a decade of research on hospitalists and their performance, disagreement still exists regarding whether and how hospital-based physicians improve the quality of inpatient care delivery. This systematic review summarizes the findings from 65 comparative evaluations to determine whether hospitalists provide a higher quality of inpatient care relative to traditional inpatient physicians who maintain hospital privileges with concurrent outpatient practices. Methods Articles on hospitalist performance published between January 1996 and December 2010 were identified through MEDLINE, Embase, Science Citation Index, CINAHL, NHS Economic Evaluation Database and a hand-search of reference lists, key journals and editorials. Comparative evaluations presenting original, quantitative data on processes, efficiency or clinical outcome measures of care between hospitalists, community-based physicians and traditional academic attending physicians were included (n = 65). After proposing a conceptual framework for evaluating inpatient physician performance, major findings on quality are summarized according to their percentage change, direction and statistical significance. Results The majority of reviewed articles demonstrated that hospitalists are efficient providers of inpatient care on the basis of reductions in their patients' average length of stay (69%) and total hospital costs (70%); however, the clinical quality of hospitalist care appears to be comparable to that provided by their colleagues. The methodological quality of hospitalist evaluations remains a concern and has not improved over time. Persistent issues include insufficient reporting of source or sample populations (n = 30), patients lost to follow-up (n = 42) and estimates of effect or random variability (n = 35); inappropriate use of statistical tests (n = 55); and failure to adjust for established confounders (n = 37). Conclusions Future research should include an expanded focus on

  9. Studying physician effects on patient outcomes: physician interactional style and performance on quality of care indicators.

    PubMed

    Franks, Peter; Jerant, Anthony F; Fiscella, Kevin; Shields, Cleveland G; Tancredi, Daniel J; Epstein, Ronald M

    2006-01-01

    Many prior studies which suggest a relationship between physician interactional style and patient outcomes may have been confounded by relying solely on patient reports, examining very few patients per physician, or not demonstrating evidence of a physician effect on the outcomes. We examined whether physician interactional style, measured both by patient report and objective encounter ratings, is related to performance on quality of care indicators. We also tested for the presence of physician effects on the performance indicators. Using data on 100 US primary care physician (PCP) claims data on 1,21,606 of their managed care patients, survey data on 4746 of their visiting patients, and audiotaped encounters of 2 standardized patients with each physician, we examined the relationships between claims-based quality of care indicators and both survey-derived patient perceptions of their physicians and objective ratings of interactional style in the audiotaped standardized patient encounters. Multi-level models examined whether physician effects (variance components) on care indicators were mediated by patient perceptions or objective ratings of interactional style. We found significant physician effects associated with glycohemoglobin and cholesterol testing. There was also a clinically significant association between better patient perceptions of their physicians and more glycohemoglobin testing. Multi-level analyses revealed, however, that the physician effect on glycohemoglobin testing was not mediated by patient perceived physician interaction style. In conclusion, similar to prior studies, we found evidence of an apparent relationship between patient perceptions of their physician and patient outcomes. However, the apparent relationships found in this study between patient perceptions of their physicians and patient care processes do not reflect physician style, but presumably reflect unmeasured patient confounding. Multi-level modeling may contribute to better

  10. Measures of emergency preparedness contributing to nursing home resilience.

    PubMed

    Lane, Sandi J; McGrady, Elizabeth

    2017-12-13

    Resilience approaches have been successfully applied in crisis management, disaster response, and high reliability organizations and have the potential to enhance existing systems of nursing home disaster preparedness. This study's purpose was to determine how the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) "Emergency Preparedness Checklist Recommended Tool for Effective Health Care Facility Planning" contributes to organizational resilience by identifying the benchmark resilience items addressed by the CMS Emergency Preparedness Checklist and items not addressed by the CMS Emergency Preparedness Checklist, and to recommend tools and processes to improve resilience for nursing homes. The CMS Emergency Preparedness Checklist items were compared to the Resilience Benchmark Tool items; similar items were considered matches. Resilience Benchmark Tool items with no CMS Emergency Preparedness Checklist item matches were considered breaches in nursing home resilience. The findings suggest that the CMS Emergency Preparedness Checklist can be used to measure some aspects of resilience, however, there were many resilience factors not addressed. For nursing homes to prepare and respond to crisis situations, organizations need to embrace a culture that promotes individual resilience-related competencies that when aggregated enable the organization to improve its resiliency. Social workers have the skills and experience to facilitate this change.

  11. A contribution to the calculation of measurement uncertainty and optimization of measuring strategies in coordinate measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waeldele, F.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of sample shape deviations on the measurement uncertainties and the optimization of computer aided coordinate measurement were investigated for a circle and a cylinder. Using the complete error propagation law in matrix form the parameter uncertainties are calculated, taking the correlation between the measurement points into account. Theoretical investigations show that the measuring points have to be equidistantly distributed and that for a cylindrical body a measuring point distribution along a cross section is better than along a helical line. The theoretically obtained expressions to calculate the uncertainties prove to be a good estimation basis. The simple error theory is not satisfactory for estimation. The complete statistical data analysis theory helps to avoid aggravating measurement errors and to adjust the number of measuring points to the required measuring uncertainty.

  12. Comparison of Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI) Measure Adherence Between Oncology Fellows, Advanced Practice Providers, and Attending Physicians.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jason; Zhang, Tian; Shah, Radhika; Kamal, Arif H; Kelley, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Quality improvement measures are uniformly applied to all oncology providers, regardless of their roles. Little is known about differences in adherence to these measures between oncology fellows, advance practice providers (APP), and attending physicians. We investigated conformance across Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI) measures for oncology fellows, advance practice providers, and attending physicians at the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center (DVAMC). Using data collected from the Spring 2012 and 2013 QOPI cycles, we abstracted charts of patients and separated them based on their primary provider. Descriptive statistics and the chi-square test were calculated for each QOPI measure between fellows, advanced practice providers (APPs), and attending physicians. A total of 169 patients were reviewed. Of these, 31 patients had a fellow, 39 had an APP, and 99 had an attending as their primary oncology provider. Fellows and attending physicians performed similarly on 90 of 94 QOPI metrics. High-performing metrics included several core QOPI measures including documenting consent for chemotherapy, recommending adjuvant chemotherapy when appropriate, and prescribing serotonin antagonists when prescribing emetogenic chemotherapies. Low-performing metrics included documentation of treatment summary and taking action to address problems with emotional well-being by the second office visit. Attendings documented the plan for oral chemotherapy more often (92 vs. 63%, P=0.049). However, after the chart audit, we found that fellows actually documented the plan for oral chemotherapy 88% of the time (p=0.73). APPs and attendings performed similarly on 88 of 90 QOPI measures. The quality of oncology care tends to be similar between attendings and fellows overall; some of the significant differences do not remain significant after a second manual chart review, highlighting that the use of manual data collection for QOPI analysis is an imperfect system, and there may

  13. [A contribution to the needs assessment of faculty development measures in medical schools].

    PubMed

    Raupach, Tobias; Spering, Christopher; Bäumler, Christine; Burckhardt, Gerhard; Trümper, Lorenz; Pukrop, Tobias

    2009-11-15

    In addition to patient care and research activity, physicians working in medical school hospitals serve as teachers in undergraduate medical education. However, teaching qualifications of German university hospital physicians have not been studied in great detail. In January 2009, medical students as well as physicians involved in medical teaching at Göttingen Medical School, Germany, were invited to complete an online survey addressing their views on clinical teachers' educational skills. In addition, physicians' motivation to engage in pedagogical training was assessed. During a 12-day period, 359 students and 126 physicians involved in undergraduate medical education completed the survey. The latter did not feel well prepared for their teaching activities. At the same time, they expressed the willingness to improve their teaching skills. Students felt that, across all instructional methods, teachers would benefit from teacher training programs. In order to improve undergraduate education for future physicians, politicians and local representatives alike must set the scene for the implementation of faculty development measures in German medical schools.

  14. A physician-led initiative to improve clinical documentation results in improved health care documentation, case mix index, and increased contribution margin.

    PubMed

    Aiello, Francesco A; Judelson, Dejah R; Durgin, Jonathan M; Doucet, Danielle R; Simons, Jessica P; Durocher, Dawn M; Flahive, Julie M; Schanzer, Andres

    2018-05-04

    Clinical documentation is the key determinant of inpatient acuity of illness and payer reimbursement. Every inpatient hospitalization is placed into a diagnosis related group with a relative value based on documented procedures, conditions, comorbidities and complications. The Case Mix Index (CMI) is an average of these diagnosis related groups and directly impacts physician profiling, medical center profiling, reimbursement, and quality reporting. We hypothesize that a focused, physician-led initiative to improve clinical documentation of vascular surgery inpatients results in increased CMI and contribution margin. A physician-led coding initiative to educate physicians on the documentation of comorbidities and conditions was initiated with concurrent chart review sessions with coding specialists for 3 months, and then as needed, after the creation of a vascular surgery documentation guide. Clinical documentation and billing for all carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and open infrainguinal procedures (OIPs) performed between January 2013 and July 2016 were stratified into precoding and postcoding initiative groups. Age, duration of stay, direct costs, actual reimbursements, contribution margin (CM), CMI, rate of complication or comorbidity, major complication or comorbidity, severity of illness, and risk of mortality assigned to each discharge were abstracted. Data were compared over time by standardizing Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) values for each diagnosis related group and using a CMS base rate reimbursement. Among 458 CEA admissions, postcoding initiative CEA patients (n = 253) had a significantly higher CMI (1.36 vs 1.25; P = .03), CM ($7859 vs $6650; P = .048), and CMS base rate reimbursement ($8955 vs $8258; P = .03) than precoding initiative CEA patients (n = 205). The proportion of admissions with a documented major complication or comorbidity and complication or comorbidity was significantly higher after the coding initiative (43% vs

  15. The palliative care knowledge questionnaire for PEACE: reliability and validity of an instrument to measure palliative care knowledge among physicians.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Ryo; Kizawa, Yoshiyuki; Nakazawa, Yoko; Morita, Tatsuya

    2013-11-01

    In Japan, a nationwide palliative care education program for primary palliative care (the Palliative care Emphasis program on symptom management and Assessment for Continuous medical Education: PEACE) was established in 2008. Effective delivery of such programs relies on adequate evaluations of program efficacy; however, such an instrument does not exist. This study aimed to develop and validate a measurement tool to quantify knowledge level of physicians about broader areas of palliative care, by which the effect of an education program could be measured. We conducted a cross-sectional, anonymous, self-administered questionnaire survey with a group of 801 conveniently sampled physicians in October 2010. To examine the test-retest reliability of items and domains, the questionnaire was reissued two weeks after the first survey was completed. This study used psychometric methods, including item response theory, intraclass correlation coefficients, and known-group validity. The response rate was 54% (n=434). We included 33 items across the following 9 domains: (1) philosophy of palliative care, (2) cancer pain, (3) side effects of opioids, (4) dyspnea, (5) nausea and vomiting, (6) psychological distress, (7) delirium, (8) communication regarding palliative care, and (9) community-based palliative care. For these items, the intraclass correlation was 0.84 and the Kuder-Richardson Formula 20 (KR-20) test of internal consistency was 0.87. There was a significant difference in the scores between palliative care specialists and other physicians. We successfully validated a newly developed palliative care knowledge questionnaire to evaluate PEACE effectiveness (PEACE-Q). The PEACE-Q could be useful for evaluating both palliative care knowledge among physicians and education programs in primary palliative care.

  16. Does blood pressure change in treated hypertensive patients depending on whether it is measured by a physician or a nurse?

    PubMed

    Coll De Tuero, Gabriel; Sanmartin Albertos, Maria; Vargas Vila, Susanna; Trèmols Iglesias, Susanna; Saez Zafra, Marc; Barceló Rado, Antonia

    2004-01-01

    To determine whether there are differences between blood pressure (BP) measured by the nurse (NBP), BP measured by the physician (PBP) and self-measured BP in treated hypertensive patients and, if found, to evaluate their clinical importance. An observational study is carried out with hypertensive patients recruited from two village-based community health centres in Catalonia (Spain) serving an area with a total population of 2800 inhabitants. All patients treated for hypertension visiting the health centre on a specific day of the week and during the same timetable between October 2000 and May 2001 were included. The difference between physician-systolic BP and nurse-systolic BP was 5.16 mmHg (95% CI 2.62-7.7; p<0.001). The difference between physician-systolic BP and self-measured systolic BP was 4.67 mmHg (95% CI 0.89-8.44; p=0.016). The differences between nurse-systolic BP and self-measured systolic BP were not significant (0.49 mmHg; 95% CI 3.71-2.71; p=0.758). With regards to diastolic BP, no significant differences were found between the different ways of measurement. NBP gave the following values: sensitivity (Sn) of 92% and specificity (Sp) of 60%; positive predictive value (PPV) of 65.7% and negative predictive value (NPV) of 90% with a positive coefficient of probability (CP+) of 2.3 and a negative coefficient of probability (CP-) of 0.133. PBP gave the following results: Sn=72%; Sp=66.7%; PPV=64.3%; NPV=74.1%; CP+=2.16 and CP- = 0.420. Systolic BP measured by the nurse in treated hypertensive patients is significantly lower than the readings obtained by the physician, and are almost identical to ambulatory BP monitoring. Blood pressure determination by the nurse is desirable not only for diagnosis but also to evaluate the level of control of blood pressure during the follow-up of treated hypertensive patients.

  17. Contributions to Objective Measurement and Evaluation of Trainee Competency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moonan, William J.

    The purpose of this paper is to lay a basis for and discuss the components of a system, called COMET, designed to objectively measure and evaluate the competency of trainees in military training enterprises. COMET is an acronym for "Computerized Objective Measurement and Evaluation of Trainees." These goals will be accomplished by: (a)…

  18. Low frequency wind noise contributions in measurement microphones.

    PubMed

    Raspet, Richard; Yu, Jiao; Webster, Jeremy

    2008-03-01

    In a previous paper [R. Raspet, et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 119, 834-843 (2006)], a method was introduced to predict upper and lower bounds for wind noise measured in spherical wind-screens from the measured incident velocity spectra. That paper was restricted in that the predictions were only valid within the inertial range of the incident turbulence, and the data were from a measurement not specifically designed to test the predictions. This paper extends the previous predictions into the source region of the atmospheric wind turbulence, and compares the predictions to measurements made with a large range of wind-screen sizes. Predictions for the turbulence-turbulence interaction pressure spectrum as well as the stagnation pressure fluctuation spectrum are calculated from a form fit to the velocity fluctuation spectrum. While the predictions for turbulence-turbulence interaction agree well with measurements made within large (1.0 m) wind-screens, and the stagnation pressure predictions agree well with unscreened gridded microphone measurements, the mean shear-turbulence interaction spectra do not consistently appear in measurements.

  19. Development and validation of an instrument to measure family physicians' clinical aptitude in metabolic syndrome in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Pivaral, Carlos E; Gutiérrez-Ruvalcaba, Clara Luz; Peralta-Heredia, Irma Concepción; Alonso-Reynoso, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to measure family physicians' clinical aptitude for the diagnosis and treatment of metabolic syndrome in a representative sample from six Family Medicine Units (UMF) at the Mexican Institute for Social Security (IMSS), in Guadalajara, Jalisco, México. This is a cross-sectional study. A validated and structured instrument was used, with a confidence coefficient (Kuder-Richardson) of 0.95, that was applied to a representative sample of 90 family physicians throughout six UMFs in Guadalajara, between 2003 and 2004. Mann-Whitney's U and Kruskal-Wallis' tests were used to compare two or more groups, and the Perez-Viniegra Test was used to define aptitude development levels. No statistically significant differences were found in aptitude development between the six family medicine units groups and other comparative groups. The generally low level of clinical aptitude, and its indicators, reflects limitations on the part of family physicians at the IMSS in Jalisco to identify and manage metabolic syndrome.

  20. Health Care Austerity Measures in Times of Crisis: The Perspectives of Primary Health Care Physicians in Madrid, Spain.

    PubMed

    Heras-Mosteiro, Julio; Sanz-Barbero, Belén; Otero-Garcia, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The current financial crisis has seen severe austerity measures imposed on the Spanish health care system, including reduced public spending, copayments, salary reductions, and reduced services for undocumented migrants. However, the impacts have not been well-documented. We present findings from a qualitative study that explores the perceptions of primary health care physicians in Madrid, Spain. This article discusses the effects of austerity measures implemented in the public health care system and their potential impacts on access and utilization of primary health care services. This is the first study, to our knowledge, exploring the health care experiences during the financial crisis of general practitioners in Madrid, Spain. The majority of participating physicians disapproved of austerity measures implemented in Spain. The findings of this study suggest that undocumented migrants should regain access to health care services; copayments should be minimized and removed for patients with low incomes; and health care professionals should receive additional help to avoid burnout. Failure to implement these measures could result in the quality of health care further deteriorating and could potentially have long-term negative consequences on population health. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Dietary patterns, metabolic markers and subjective sleep measures in resident physicians.

    PubMed

    Mota, Maria Carliana; De-Souza, Daurea Abadia; Rossato, Luana Thomazetto; Silva, Catarina Mendes; Araújo, Maria Bernadete Jeha; Tufik, Sérgio; de Mello, Marco Túlio; Crispim, Cibele Aparecida

    2013-10-01

    Shiftwork is common in medical training and is necessary for 24-h hospital coverage. Shiftwork poses difficulties not only because of the loss of actual sleep hours but also because it can affect other factors related to lifestyle, such as food intake, physical activity level, and, therefore, metabolic patterns. However, few studies have investigated the nutritional and metabolic profiles of medical personnel receiving training who are participating in shiftwork. The aim of the present study was to identify the possible negative effects of food intake, anthropometric variables, and metabolic and sleep patterns of resident physicians and establish the differences between genders. The study included 72 resident physicians (52 women and 20 men) who underwent the following assessments: nutritional assessment (3-day dietary recall evaluated by the Adapted Healthy Eating Index), anthropometric variables (height, weight, body mass index, and waist circumference), fasting metabolism (lipids, cortisol, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein [hs-CRP], glucose, and insulin), physical activity level (Baecke questionnaire), sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index; PSQI), and sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale; ESS). We observed a high frequency of residents who were overweight or obese (65% for men and 21% for women; p = 0.004). Men displayed significantly greater body mass index (BMI) values (p = 0.002) and self-reported weight gain after the beginning of residency (p = 0.008) than women. Poor diet was observed for both genders, including the low intake of vegetables and fruits and the high intake of sweets, saturated fat, cholesterol, and caffeine. The PSQI global scores indicated significant differences between genders (5.9 vs. 7.5 for women and men, respectively; p = 0.01). Women had significantly higher mean high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C; p < 0.005), hs-CRP (p = 0.04), and cortisol (p = 0.009) values than men. The elevated prevalence of

  2. Difficulties facing physician mothers in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yuka; Kozono, Yuki; Mori, Ryo; Marui, Eiji

    2011-11-01

    Despite recent increases in the number of female physicians graduating in Japan, their premature resignations after childbirth are contributing to the acute shortage of physicians. Previous Japanese studies have explored supportive measures in the workplace, but have rarely focused on the specific problems or concerns of physician-mothers. Therefore, this study explored the challenges facing Japanese physician-mothers in efforts to identify solutions for their retention. Open-ended questionnaires were mailed to 646 alumnae of Juntendo University School of Medicine. We asked subjects to describe their opinions about 'The challenges related to female physicians' resignations'. Comments gathered from alumnae who graduated between 6 and 30 years ago and have children were analyzed qualitatively. Overall, 249 physicians returned the questionnaire (response rate 38.5%), and 73 alumnae with children who graduated in the stated time period provided comments. The challenges facing physician-mothers mainly consisted of factors associated with Japanese society, family responsibilities, and work environment. Japanese society epitomized by traditional gender roles heightened stress related to family responsibilities and promoted gender discrimination at work environment. Additionally, changing Japanese society positively influenced working atmosphere and husband's support. Moreover, the introduction of educational curriculums that alleviated traditional gender role was proposed for pre- and post- medical students. Traditional gender roles encourage discrimination by male physicians or work-family conflicts. The problems facing female physicians involve more than just family responsibilities: diminishing the notion of gender role is key to helping retain them in the workforce. © 2011 Tohoku University Medical Press

  3. Does objective quality of physicians correlate with patient satisfaction measured by Hospital Compare metrics in New York State?

    PubMed Central

    Bekelis, Kimon; Missios, Symeon; MacKenzie, Todd A.; O’Shaughnessy, Patrick M.

    2017-01-01

    Background It is unclear whether publicly reported benchmarks correlate with the quality of physicians and institutions. We investigated the association of patient satisfaction measures from a public reporting platform with the performance of neurosurgeons in New York State. Methods We performed a cohort study involving patients undergoing neurosurgical operations from 2009–2013, who were registered in the Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System (SPARCS) database. This cohort was merged with publicly available data from the CMS Hospital Compare website. A propensity adjusted regression analysis was used to investigate the association of patient satisfaction metrics with neurosurgeon quality, as measured by their individual rate of mortality and average length-of-stay (LOS). Results Overall, 166,365 patients underwent neurosurgical procedures during the study. Using a propensity adjusted multivariable regression analysis we demonstrated that undergoing neurosurgical operations in hospitals with a greater percentage of patient-assigned “high” score were associated with higher chance of being treated by a physician with superior performance in terms of mortality (OR 1.90; 95% CI, 1.86 to 1.95), and a higher chance of being treated by a physician with superior performance in terms of length-of-stay (LOS) (OR 1.24; 95% CI, 1.21 to 1.27). Similar associations were identified for hospitals with a higher percentage of patients, who claimed they would recommend these institutions to others. Conclusions Merging a comprehensive all-payer cohort of neurosurgery patients in New York State with data from the CMS Hospital Compare website, we observed an association of superior hospital-level patient satisfaction measures with the objective performance of individual neurosurgeons in the corresponding hospitals. PMID:28456743

  4. Do physician organizations located in lower socioeconomic status areas score lower on pay-for-performance measures?

    PubMed

    Chien, Alyna T; Wroblewski, Kristen; Damberg, Cheryl; Williams, Thomas R; Yanagihara, Dolores; Yakunina, Yelena; Casalino, Lawrence P

    2012-05-01

    Physician organizations (POs)--independent practice associations and medical groups--located in lower socioeconomic status (SES) areas may score poorly in pay-for-performance (P4P) programs. To examine the association between PO location and P4P performance. Cross-sectional study; Integrated Healthcare Association's (IHA's) P4P Program, the largest non-governmental, multi-payer program for POs in the U.S. 160 POs participating in 2009. We measured PO SES using established methods that involved geo-coding 11,718 practice sites within 160 POs to their respective census tracts and weighting tract-specific SES according to the number of primary care physicians at each site. P4P performance was defined by IHA's program and was a composite mainly representing clinical quality, but also including measures of patient experience, information technology and registry use. The area-based PO SES measure ranged from -11 to +11 (mean 0, SD 5), and the IHA P4P performance score ranged from 23 to 86 (mean 69, SD 15). In bivariate analysis, there was a significant positive relationship between PO SES and P4P performance (p < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, a one standard deviation increase in PO SES was associated with a 44% increase (relative risk 1.44, 95%CI, 1.22-1.71) in the likelihood of a PO being ranked in the top two quintiles of performance (p < 0.001). Physician organizations' performance scores in a major P4P program vary by the SES of the areas in which their practice sites are located. P4P programs that do not account for this are likely to pay higher bonuses to POs in higher SES areas, thus increasing the resource gap between these POs and POs in lower SES areas, which may increase disparities in the care they provide.

  5. Measuring ICT Use and Contributing Conditions in Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderlinde, Ruben; Aesaert, Koen; van Braak, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) use became of major importance for primary schools across the world as ICT has the potential to foster teaching and learning processes. ICT use is therefore a central measurement concept (dependent variable) in many ICT integration studies. This data paper presents two datasets (2008 and 2011) that…

  6. Remembering More Jewish Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Weisz, George M.; Grzybowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The history of medicine has been an intriguing topic for both authors. The modern relevance of past discoveries led both authors to take a closer look at the lives and contributions of persecuted physicians. The Jewish physicians who died in the Holocaust stand out as a stark example of those who merit being remembered. Many made important contributions to medicine which remain relevant to this day. Hence, this paper reviews the lives and important contributions of two persecuted Jewish physicians: Arthur Kessler (1903–2000) and Bronislawa Fejgin (1883–1943). PMID:27487308

  7. Determinants of Rural Physicians' Life and Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavanchy, Marcel; Connelly, Ian; Grzybowski, Stefan; Michalos, Alex C.; Berkowitz, Jonathan; Thommasen, Harvey V.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To identify and quantify factors that contribute to rural physicians' satisfaction with their jobs and life as a whole. Design: Cross-sectional, mailed survey. Study population: Family physicians practicing in rural communities eligible for British Columbia's Northern and Isolation Allowance. Main measures: Demographics, Domain…

  8. Kentucky physicians and politics.

    PubMed

    VonderHaar, W P; Monnig, W B

    1998-09-01

    Approximately 19% of Kentucky Physicians are KEMPAC members or contribute to state legislative and Gubernatorial candidates. This limited study of political activity indicates that a small percentage of physicians participate in the political process. Despite the small number of contributors to state legislative candidates, KMA's legislative and lobbying effort is highly effective and members receive high quality service and representation in the political arena.

  9. Anorexia nervosa and nutritional assessment: contribution of body composition measurements.

    PubMed

    Mattar, Lama; Godart, Nathalie; Melchior, Jean Claude; Pichard, Claude

    2011-06-01

    The psychiatric condition of patients suffering from anorexia nervosa (AN) is affected by their nutritional status. An optimal assessment of the nutritional status of patients is fundamental in understanding the relationship between malnutrition and the psychological symptoms. The present review evaluates some of the available methods for measuring body composition in patients with AN. We searched literature in Medline using several key terms relevant to the present review in order to identify papers. Only articles in English or French were reviewed. A brief description is provided for each body composition technique, with its applicability in AN as well as its limitation. All methods of measuring body composition are not yet validated and/or feasible in patients with AN. The present review article proposes a practical approach for selecting the most appropriate methods depending on the setting, (i.e. clinical v. research) and the goal of the assessment (initial v. follow-up) in order to have a more personalised treatment for patients suffering from AN.

  10. The Measurement and modeling of the contribution of ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In North America, ammonia (NH3) is increasingly being recognized not only for its role in atmospheric aerosol formation but also as an important component of atmospheric nitrogen deposition. This has been driven by the evolution of policies to protect ecosystems from nitrogen over-enrichment, an expansion of research underpinning these policy efforts, and technological advances in measurement and modeling tools applied to these research needs. Ammonia measurements from satellites, nitrogen focused field campaigns, and the National Atmospheric Deposition Program’s Ammonia Monitoring Network (AMoN) have advanced understanding of the processes controlling NH3 air-surface exchange and the spatio-temporal behavior of NH3 in the atmosphere. These datasets have subsequently lead to improvements in NH3 air-surface exchange models and therefore more accurate estimates of NH3 deposition. From a process standpoint, NH3 differs from other nitrogen compounds such as nitric acid in that NH3 is exchanged bi-directionally between the surface and atmosphere as regulated by a “compensation point”. Because natural surfaces may be sources or sinks of atmospheric NH3, and may alternate between emission and deposition on a timescale as short as hours, the deposition velocity concept does not accurately describe NH3 air surface exchange. Instead, a more mechanistic treatment of the nitrogen status and acidity of the surface must be employed, typically as a bi-directional fr

  11. Physician migration at its roots: a study on the factors contributing towards a career choice abroad among students at a medical school in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Asfandyar; Naqvi, Syed Hassan Abbas; Sheikh, Kainat; Naqvi, Syed Hassan Shiraz; Bandukda, Muhammad Yasin

    2012-12-15

    were also planning of gaining clinical experience in their desired country of interest. Physician migration is a serious condition that requires timely intervention from the concerned authorities. If considerable measures are not taken, serious consequences may follow, which may pose a threat to the healthcare system of the country.

  12. Physician migration at its roots: a study on the factors contributing towards a career choice abroad among students at a medical school in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    for licensing examinations, and were also planning of gaining clinical experience in their desired country of interest. Conclusion Physician migration is a serious condition that requires timely intervention from the concerned authorities. If considerable measures are not taken, serious consequences may follow, which may pose a threat to the healthcare system of the country. PMID:23241435

  13. Diagnosis of complicated parapneumonic effusion by pleural pH measurement is jeopardized by inadequate physician knowledge and guideline-discordant laboratory practice.

    PubMed

    Ng, Lauren; Dabscheck, Eli; Hew, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Pleural fluid pH is a crucial determinant of complicated parapneumonic effusion diagnosis and the need for drainage. It is best measured by blood gas analyzer. We examined whether physicians were aware of this, and whether their laboratories measured pleural pH according to their expectations. Only 53% of physicians understood the need for blood gas analyzer measurements, only 50% of laboratories used blood gas analyzers, and only 35% of physicians correctly identified the method performed in their laboratory. Diagnosis of complicated parapneumonic effusion is jeopardized by inadequate physician knowledge and guideline-discordant laboratory practice. We recommend cooperation between thoracic and biochemistry specialty societies to rectify this issue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Multispectral imaging contributions to global land ice measurements from space

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kargel, J.S.; Abrams, M.J.; Bishop, M.P.; Bush, A.; Hamilton, G.; Jiskoot, H.; Kääb, Andreas; Kieffer, H.H.; Lee, E.M.; Paul, F.; Rau, F.; Raup, B.; Shroder, J.F.; Soltesz, D.; Stainforth, D.; Stearns, L.; Wessels, R.

    2005-01-01

    Global Land Ice Measurements from Space (GLIMS) is an international consortium established to acquire satellite images of the world's glaciers, analyse them for glacier extent and changes, and assess change data for causes and implications for people and the environment. Although GLIMS is making use of multiple remote-sensing systems, ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and reflection Radiometer) is optimized for many needed observations, including mapping of glacier boundaries and material facies, and tracking of surface dynamics, such as flow vector fields and supraglacial lake development. Software development by GLIMS is geared toward mapping clean-ice and debris-covered glaciers; terrain classification emphasizing snow, ice, water, and admixtures of ice with rock debris; multitemporal change analysis; visualization of images and derived data; and interpretation and archiving of derived data. A global glacier database has been designed at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC, Boulder, Colorado); parameters are compatible with and expanded from those of the World Glacier Inventory (WGI). These technology efforts are summarized here, but will be presented in detail elsewhere. Our presentation here pertains to one broad question: How can ASTER and other satellite multispectral data be used to map, monitor, and characterize the state and dynamics of glaciers and to understand their responses to 20th and 21st century climate change? Our sampled results are not yet glaciologically or climatically representative. Our early results, while indicating complexity, are generally consistent with the glaciology community's conclusion that climate change is spurring glacier responses around the world (mainly retreat). Whether individual glaciers are advancing or retreating, the aggregate average of glacier change must be climatic in origin, as nonclimatic variations average out. We have discerned regional spatial patterns in glaciological response behavior

  15. Development of a Questionnaire to Measure the Attitudes of Laypeople, Physicians, and Psychotherapists Toward Telemedicine in Mental Health.

    PubMed

    Tonn, Peter; Reuter, Silja Christin; Kuchler, Isabelle; Reinke, Britta; Hinkelmann, Lena; Stöckigt, Saskia; Siemoneit, Hanna; Schulze, Nina

    2017-10-03

    In the field of psychiatry and psychotherapy, there are now a growing number of Web-based interventions, mobile phone apps, or treatments that are available via remote transmission screen worldwide. Many of these interventions have been shown to be effective in studies but still find little use in everyday therapeutic work. However, it is important that attitude and expectation toward this treatment are generally examined, because these factors have an important effect on the efficacy of the treatment. To measure the general attitude of the users and prescribers toward telemedicine, which may include, for instance, Web-based interventions or interventions through mobile phone apps, there are a small number of extensive tests. The results of studies based on small groups of patients have been published too, but there is no useful short screening tool to give an insight into the general population's attitude. We have developed a screening instrument that examines such attitude through a few graded questions. This study aimed to explore the Attitude toward Telemedicine in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy (ATiPP) and to evaluate the results of general population and some subgroups. In a three-step process, the questionnaire, which is available in three versions (laypeople, physicians, and psychologists), was developed. Afterwards, it was evaluated by four groups: population-representative laypeople, outpatients in different faculties, physicians, and psychotherapists. The results were evaluated from a total of 1554 questionnaires. The sample population included 1000 laypeople, 455 outpatients, 62 physicians, and 37 psychotherapists. The reliability of all three versions of the questionnaire seemed good, as indicated by the Cronbach alpha values of .849 (the laypeople group), .80 (the outpatients' group), .827 (the physicians' group), and .855 (the psychotherapists' group). The ATiPP was found to be useful and reliable for measuring the attitudes toward the Web

  16. Development and Initial Validation of an Instrument to Measure Physicians' Use of, Knowledge about, and Attitudes Toward Computers

    PubMed Central

    Cork, Randy D.; Detmer, William M.; Friedman, Charles P.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes details of four scales of a questionnaire—“Computers in Medical Care”—measuring attributes of computer use, self-reported computer knowledge, computer feature demand, and computer optimism of academic physicians. The reliability (i.e., precision, or degree to which the scale's result is reproducible) and validity (i.e., accuracy, or degree to which the scale actually measures what it is supposed to measure) of each scale were examined by analysis of the responses of 771 full-time academic physicians across four departments at five academic medical centers in the United States. The objectives of this paper were to define the psychometric properties of the scales as the basis for a future demonstration study and, pending the results of further validity studies, to provide the questionnaire and scales to the medical informatics community as a tool for measuring the attitudes of health care providers. Methodology: The dimensionality of each scale and degree of association of each item with the attribute of interest were determined by principal components factor analysis with othogonal varimax rotation. Weakly associated items (factor loading <.40) were deleted. The reliability of each resultant scale was computed using Cronbach's alpha coefficient. Content validity was addressed during scale construction; construct validity was examined through factor analysis and by correlational analyses. Results: Attributes of computer use, computer knowledge, and computer optimism were unidimensional, with the corresponding scales having reliabilities of.79,.91, and.86, respectively. The computer-feature demand attribute differentiated into two dimensions: the first reflecting demand for high-level functionality with reliability of.81 and the second demand for usability with reliability of.69. There were significant positive correlations between computer use, computer knowledge, and computer optimism scale scores and respondents' hands-on computer use

  17. Contribution of posture to anorectal manometric measurements: are the measurements in left-lateral position physiologic?

    PubMed

    Thekkinkattil, Dinesh K; Lim, Michael K; Nicholls, Marcus J; Sagar, Peter M; Finan, Paul J; Burke, Dermot A

    2007-12-01

    Anorectal manometry is commonly used to investigate fecal incontinence. Traditional practice dictates that measurements are performed with the patient in the left-lateral position however, episodes of fecal incontinence usually occur in the erect position. The influence of erect posture on anorectal manometry has not been studied. We examined the contribution of posture to commonly measured variables during manometry by performing assessment in the left-lateral position and the erect posture. Maximum mean resting pressure, vector volumes, and resting pressure gradient were compared. Complete data were available for 172 patients. Median age was 55 (interquartile range, 44-65) years. Thirty-seven (22 percent) patients were continent, and 135 (78 percent) were incontinent. Both resting pressure and vector volume increased significantly in the erect position for both continent (P = 0.008 and 0.001, respectively) and incontinent (P = 0.001 for both) patients. A significant negative correlation was seen between severity of incontinence and resting pressure in the erect posture and amount of change in maximum mean resting pressure from left-lateral to erect posture (Spearman coefficients = -0.203, -0.211, and P = 0.013, 0.017, respectively) but not with maximum mean resting pressure in the left-lateral position (Spearman coefficient = -0.119; P = 0.164). Our study shows significant increase in measurements of manometric variables in the erect position. The increase may be related to anal cushions, which have a significant role in this position. The measurements in erect posture are better correlated with severity of incontinence and may be a more physiologic method of performing anorectal manometry.

  18. An enhanced two-step floating catchment area (E2SFCA) method for measuring spatial accessibility to primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei; Qi, Yi

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents an enhancement of the two-step floating catchment area (2SFCA) method for measuring spatial accessibility, addressing the problem of uniform access within the catchment by applying weights to different travel time zones to account for distance decay. The enhancement is proved to be another special case of the gravity model. When applying this enhanced 2SFCA (E2SFCA) to measure the spatial access to primary care physicians in a study area in northern Illinois, we find that it reveals spatial accessibility pattern that is more consistent with intuition and delineates more spatially explicit health professional shortage areas. It is easy to implement in GIS and straightforward to interpret.

  19. "Righteous minds" in health care: measurement and explanatory value of social intuitionism in accounting for the moral judgments in a sample of U.S. physicians.

    PubMed

    Tilburt, Jon C; James, Katherine M; Jenkins, Sarah M; Antiel, Ryan M; Curlin, Farr A; Rasinski, Kenneth A

    2013-01-01

    The broad diversity in physicians' judgments on controversial health care topics may reflect differences in religious characteristics, political ideologies, and moral intuitions. We tested an existing measure of moral intuitions in a new population (U.S. physicians) to assess its validity and to determine whether physicians' moral intuitions correlate with their views on controversial health care topics as well as other known predictors of these intuitions such as political affiliation and religiosity. In 2009, we mailed an 8-page questionnaire to a random sample of 2000 practicing U.S. physicians from all specialties. The survey included the Moral Foundations Questionnaire (MFQ30), along with questions on physicians' judgments about controversial health care topics including abortion and euthanasia (no moral objection, some moral objection, strong moral objection). A total of 1032 of 1895 (54%) physicians responded. Physicians' overall mean moral foundations scores were 3.5 for harm, 3.3 for fairness, 2.8 for loyalty, 3.2 for authority, and 2.7 for sanctity on a 0-5 scale. Increasing levels of religious service attendance, having a more conservative political ideology, and higher sanctity scores remained the greatest positive predictors of respondents objecting to abortion (β = 0.12, 0.23, 0.14, respectively, each p<0.001) as well as euthanasia (β = 0.08, 0.17, and 0.17, respectively, each p<0.001), even after adjusting for demographics. Higher authority scores were also significantly negatively associated with objection to abortion (β = -0.12, p<0.01), but not euthanasia. These data suggest that the relative importance physicians place on the different categories of moral intuitions may predict differences in physicians' judgments about morally controversial topics and may interrelate with ideology and religiosity. Further examination of the diversity in physicians' moral intuitions may prove illustrative in describing and addressing moral differences that

  20. Measuring Physician Cognitive Load: Validity Evidence for a Physiologic and a Psychometric Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szulewski, Adam; Gegenfurtner, Andreas; Howes, Daniel W.; Sivilotti, Marco L. A.; van Merriënboer, Jeroen J. G.

    2017-01-01

    In general, researchers attempt to quantify cognitive load using physiologic and psychometric measures. Although the construct measured by both of these metrics is thought to represent overall cognitive load, there is a paucity of studies that compares these techniques to one another. The authors compared data obtained from one physiologic tool…

  1. The impact of statistical adjustment on conditional standard errors of measurement in the assessment of physician communication skills.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Mark R; Clauser, Brian E; Furman, Gail E

    2010-10-01

    The use of standardized patients to assess communication skills is now an essential part of assessing a physician's readiness for practice. To improve the reliability of communication scores, it has become increasingly common in recent years to use statistical models to adjust ratings provided by standardized patients. This study employed ordinary least squares regression to adjust ratings, and then used generalizability theory to evaluate the impact of these adjustments on score reliability and the overall standard error of measurement. In addition, conditional standard errors of measurement were computed for both observed and adjusted scores to determine whether the improvements in measurement precision were uniform across the score distribution. Results indicated that measurement was generally less precise for communication ratings toward the lower end of the score distribution; and the improvement in measurement precision afforded by statistical modeling varied slightly across the score distribution such that the most improvement occurred in the upper-middle range of the score scale. Possible reasons for these patterns in measurement precision are discussed, as are the limitations of the statistical models used for adjusting performance ratings.

  2. Physicians as parents

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Wanda L.; Duke, Pauline S.; Snow, Pamela; Edwards, Alison

    2009-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To investigate the experiences of physicians as parents and to see if there were any differences in the parenting challenges perceived by male and female physicians. DESIGN Mailed survey. SETTING Newfoundland and Labrador. PARTICIPANTS The survey was mailed to 180 male and 180 female licensed physicians, with a response rate of 60% (N = 216). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Self-reported experiences of being a parent and a physician. RESULTS Female physicians reported spending significantly more time on child care activities and domestic activities than their male counterparts did (P < .001). There was no significant difference in the number of professional hours between the 2 sexes, but income was significantly lower for female physicians (P < .001). More women than men had positive physician-parent role models, although very few physicians of either sex had such role models. Female physicians reported bearing the most responsibility for the day-to-day functioning of the family; male physicians relied on their female partners to carry out the main family responsibilities. Women reported feeling guilty about their performance as mothers and as doctors. Male physicians reported regrets about the lack of time with family. CONCLUSION Although women make up an increasing percentage of the physician work force in Canada, they still face challenges as they continue to take primary responsibility for child care and domestic activities. Women are torn between their careers and their families and sometimes feel inadequate in both roles. Male physicians regret having a lack of time with family. Strategies need to be employed in both the workplace and at home to achieve an acceptable balance between being a physician and being a parent. PMID:19675267

  3. The development of a successful physician compensation plan.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, Steven M

    2002-10-01

    Physician compensation plans are critical to the success of a physician group or may lead to the demise of the group. Essential components of the development and implementation of a successful physician compensation plan include: strategic planning, physician understanding and buy-in, appropriate incentives, objective performance measurement, and a specific funding source or mechanism. There are two basic philosophies to consider for use: the market-based model and the net economic contribution model. Advantages and disadvantages of each are discussed. Methods of incorporating these multiple aspects into a single plan are described.

  4. Measuring physician cognitive load: validity evidence for a physiologic and a psychometric tool.

    PubMed

    Szulewski, Adam; Gegenfurtner, Andreas; Howes, Daniel W; Sivilotti, Marco L A; van Merriënboer, Jeroen J G

    2017-10-01

    In general, researchers attempt to quantify cognitive load using physiologic and psychometric measures. Although the construct measured by both of these metrics is thought to represent overall cognitive load, there is a paucity of studies that compares these techniques to one another. The authors compared data obtained from one physiologic tool (pupillometry) to one psychometric tool (Paas scale) to explore whether they actually measured the construct of cognitive load as purported. Thirty-two participants with a range of resuscitation medicine experience and expertise completed resuscitation-medicine based multiple-choice-questions as well as arithmetic questions. Cognitive load, as measured by both tools, was found to be higher for the more difficult questions as well as for questions that were answered incorrectly (p < 0.001). The group with the least medical experience had higher cognitive load than both the intermediate and experienced groups when answering domain-specific questions (p = 0.023 and p = 0.003 respectively for the physiologic tool; p = 0.006 and p < 0.001 respectively for the psychometric tool). There was a strong positive correlation (Spearman's ρ = 0.827, p < 0.001 for arithmetic questions; Spearman's ρ = 0.606, p < 0.001 for medical questions) between the two cognitive load measurement tools. These findings support the validity argument that both physiologic and psychometric metrics measure the construct of cognitive load.

  5. [Despite corrective measures, will there still be a lack of anaesthetists and intensive care physicians in France by 2020?].

    PubMed

    Pontone, S; Brouard, N

    2010-12-01

    the demographic decline in the Anaesthesia and Intensive Care practitioners predicted for 2020 may bring into question the speciality's vocation, and indeed peri-operative care as a whole in France. The objective of this study is to assess the French Anaesthetist and Intensive Care physicians' demographics in 2010, and predicted numbers for 2020 taking into account recently initiated corrective measures. data originating from the CFAR-SFAR-INED French medical demographics survey(1), the French General Medical Council, and various studies and projections published by the INED and the DREES(2) were collected and analysed. Factors were then identified that were likely to affect personnel numbers, speciality training requirements and the demand for patient care. french General Medical Council data is the most reliable and reports 9692 Anaesthetists and Intensive Care physicians practising regularly in France on the 1(st) of January 2009. Of those, 9,391 (96.9 %) were practising on the mainland. Personnel growth reduced due to the effect of specialist training selection procedures: the percentage of doctors entering Anaesthesia and Intensive Care training dropped from 12.7 % per year in 1960 to 1.5 % in 1990. Since 2002, personnel in regular practice dropped by 1.1 % per year. Relatively few doctors were leaving the profession, the decrease was due to the reduction in the numbers entering practice: 222 per year on average from 1988 through 2004, compared to 355 per year for the two preceding decades (1971 to 1987). Anaesthetists and Intensive Care physicians are growing older; the average age increased from 42.8 years of age in 1989 to 51 on the 1(st) of January 2009. Further evidence of this trend is that the number of practitioners less than fifty years of age continues to decrease; just 47.5 % in 2005 compared with 80 % in 1989. 5,139 anaesthetists between 50 and 64 years of age will leave the profession before 2020, over half (52.3 %) of the total practising in 2005

  6. Cancer Incidence in Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu-Sung; Hsu, Chien-Chin; Weng, Shih-Feng; Lin, Hung-Jung; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Su, Shih-Bin; Huang, Chien-Cheng; Guo, How-Ran

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cancer has been the leading cause of death in Taiwan since 1982. Physicians have many health-related risk factors which may contribute to cancer, such as rotating night shift, radiation, poor lifestyle, and higher exposure risk to infection and potential carcinogenic drugs. However, the cancer risk in physicians is not clear. In Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database, we identified 14,889 physicians as the study cohort and randomly selected 29,778 nonmedical staff patients as the comparison cohort for this national population-based cohort study. Cox proportional-hazard regression was used to compare the cancer risk between physicians and comparisons. Physician subgroups were also analyzed. Physicians had a lower all-cancer risk than did the comparisons (hazard ratio [HR] 0.86, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.76–0.97). In the sex-based analysis, male physicians had a lower all-cancer risk than did male comparisons (HR 0.82, 95% CI 0.73–0.94); and female physicians did not (HR 1.29, 95% CI 0.88–1.91). In the cancer-type analysis, male physicians had a higher risk of prostate cancer (HR 1.72, 95% CI 1.12–2.65) and female physicians had twice the risk of breast cancer (HR 2.00, 95% CI 1.11–3.62) than did comparisons. Cancer risk was not significantly associated with physician specialties. Physicians in Taiwan had a lower all-cancer risk but higher risks for prostate and breast cancer than did the general population. These new epidemiological findings require additional study to clarify possible mechanisms. PMID:26632715

  7. [Nusing-sensitive indicadors: an opportunity for measuring the nurse contribution].

    PubMed

    Planas-Campmany, Carme; Icart-Isern, M Teresa

    2014-01-01

    The measures directed at improving the management and funding of health services that justify the measurement of performance and the purchase of services based on results, have a direct influence on nursing. In this context, concerns about the value and contribution of nursing have been demonstrated worldwide over the last decades. Therefore efforts are being made to ensure that nurses contribute to promote the transformation of health systems. This requires identifying their contribution to the health system and, specifically, in relation to health outcomes. In recent decades, there has been a growing demand to achieve measures which allow nurses to demonstrate and assume responsibility for their contribution. The research and development of nursing-sensitive indicators and results, and its application, provide an opportunity to measure the contribution and professional performance in achieving these set objectives, in order to improve population health. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. Automated, computer-guided PASI measurements by digital image analysis versus conventional physicians' PASI calculations: study protocol for a comparative, single-centre, observational study.

    PubMed

    Fink, Christine; Uhlmann, Lorenz; Klose, Christina; Haenssle, Holger A

    2018-05-17

    Reliable and accurate assessment of severity in psoriasis is very important in order to meet indication criteria for initiation of systemic treatment or to evaluate treatment efficacy. The most acknowledged tool for measuring the extent of psoriatic skin changes is the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI). However, the calculation of PASI can be tedious and subjective and high intraobserver and interobserver variability is an important concern. Therefore, there is a great need for a standardised and objective method that guarantees a reproducible PASI calculation. Within this study we will investigate the precision and reproducibility of automated, computer-guided PASI measurements in comparison to trained physicians to address these limitations. Non-interventional analyses of PASI calculations by either physicians in a prospective versus retrospective setting or an automated computer-guided algorithm in 120 patients with plaque psoriasis. All retrospective PASI calculations by physicians or by the computer algorithm are based on total body digital images. The primary objective of this study is comparison of automated computer-guided PASI measurements by means of digital image analysis versus conventional, prospective or retrospective physicians' PASI assessments. Secondary endpoints include (1) the assessment of physicians' interobserver variance in PASI calculations, (2) the assessment of physicians' intraobserver variance in PASI assessments of the same patients' images after a time interval of at least 4 weeks, (3) the assessment of the deviation between physicians' prospective versus retrospective PASI calculations, and (4) the reproducibility of automated computer-guided PASI measurements by assessment of two sets of total body digital images of the same patients taken at one time point. Ethical approval was provided by the Ethics Committee of the Medical Faculty of the University of Heidelberg (ethics approval number S-379/2016). DRKS00011818; Results.

  9. Measuring Provider Performance for Physicians Participating in the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System.

    PubMed

    Squitieri, Lee; Chung, Kevin C

    2017-07-01

    In 2017, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services began requiring all eligible providers to participate in the Quality Payment Program or face financial reimbursement penalty. The Quality Payment Program outlines two paths for provider participation: the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System and Advanced Alternative Payment Models. For the first performance period beginning in January of 2017, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services estimates that approximately 83 to 90 percent of eligible providers will not qualify for participation in an Advanced Alternative Payment Model and therefore must participate in the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System program. The Merit-Based Incentive Payment System path replaces existing quality-reporting programs and adds several new measures to evaluate providers using four categories of data: (1) quality, (2) cost/resource use, (3) improvement activities, and (4) advancing care information. These categories will be combined to calculate a weighted composite score for each provider or provider group. Composite Merit-Based Incentive Payment System scores based on 2017 performance data will be used to adjust reimbursed payment in 2019. In this article, the authors provide relevant background for understanding value-based provider performance measurement. The authors also discuss Merit-Based Incentive Payment System reporting requirements and scoring methodology to provide plastic surgeons with the necessary information to critically evaluate their own practice capabilities in the context of current performance metrics under the Quality Payment Program.

  10. The ties that bind: interorganizational linkages and physician-system alignment.

    PubMed

    Alexander, J A; Waters, T M; Burns, L R; Shortell, S M; Gillies, R R; Budetti, P P; Zuckerman, H S

    2001-07-01

    To examine the association between the degree of alignment between physicians and health care systems, and interorganizational linkages between physician groups and health care systems. The study used a cross sectional, comparative analysis using a sample of 1,279 physicians practicing in loosely affiliated arrangements and 1,781 physicians in 61 groups closely affiliated with 14 vertically integrated health systems. Measures of physician alignment were based on multiitem scales validated in previous studies and derived from surveys sent to individual physicians. Measures of interorganizational linkages were specified at the institutional, administrative, and technical core levels of the physician group and were developed from surveys sent to the administrator of each of the 61 physician groups in the sample. Two stage Heckman models with fixed effects adjustments in the second stage were used to correct for sample selection and clustering respectively. After accounting for sample selection, fixed effects, and group and individual controls, physicians in groups with more valued practice service linkages display consistently higher alignment with systems than physicians in groups that have fewer such linkages. Results also suggest that centralized administrative control lowers physician-system alignment for selected measures of alignment. Governance interlocks exhibited only weak associations with alignment. Our findings suggest that alignment generally follows resource exchanges that promote value-added contributions to physicians and physician groups while preserving control and authority within the group.

  11. BIOGENIC CONTRIBUTION TO PM-2.5 AMBIENT AEROSOL FROM RADIOCARBON MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Knowledge of the relative contributions of biogenic versus anthropogenic sources to ambient aerosol is of great interest in the formulation of strategies to achieve nationally mandated air quality standards. Radiocarbon (Carbon-14) measurements provide a means to quantify the ...

  12. Measuring the economic contribution of the freight industry to the Maryland economy : [research summary].

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-05-01

    The primary objective was to measure the economic contributions of the freight : industry to the Maryland economy and to develop a freight economic output (FECO) : index that tracks the economic performance of the freight industry over time.

  13. A cross-sectional study assessing the association between online ratings and structural and quality of care measures: results from two German physician rating websites.

    PubMed

    Emmert, Martin; Adelhardt, Thomas; Sander, Uwe; Wambach, Veit; Lindenthal, Jörg

    2015-09-24

    Even though physician rating websites (PRWs) have been gaining in importance in both practice and research, little evidence is available on the association of patients' online ratings with the quality of care of physicians. It thus remains unclear whether patients should rely on these ratings when selecting a physician. The objective of this study was to measure the association between online ratings and structural and quality of care measures for 65 physician practices from the German Integrated Health Care Network "Quality and Efficiency" (QuE). Online reviews from two German PRWs were included which covered a three-year period (2011 to 2013) and included 1179 and 991 ratings, respectively. Information for 65 QuE practices was obtained for the year 2012 and included 21 measures related to structural information (N = 6), process quality (N = 10), intermediate outcomes (N = 2), patient satisfaction (N = 1), and costs (N = 2). The Spearman rank coefficient of correlation was applied to measure the association between ratings and practice-related information. Patient satisfaction results from offline surveys and the patients per doctor ratio in a practice were shown to be significantly associated with online ratings on both PRWs. For one PRW, additional significant associations could be shown between online ratings and cost-related measures for medication, preventative examinations, and one diabetes type 2-related intermediate outcome measure. There again, results from the second PRW showed significant associations with the age of the physicians and the number of patients per practice, four process-related quality measures for diabetes type 2 and asthma, and one cost-related measure for medication. Several significant associations were found which varied between the PRWs. Patients interested in the satisfaction of other patients with a physician might select a physician on the basis of online ratings. Even though our results indicate associations

  14. Measuring Prevalence of Other-Oriented Transactive Contributions Using an Automated Measure of Speech Style Accommodation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gweon, Gahgene; Jain, Mahaveer; McDonough, John; Raj, Bhiksha; Rose, Carolyn P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper contributes to a theory-grounded methodological foundation for automatic collaborative learning process analysis. It does this by illustrating how insights from the social psychology and sociolinguistics of speech style provide a theoretical framework to inform the design of a computational model. The purpose of that model is to detect…

  15. Physician-perceived contradictions in end-of-life communication: toward a self-report measurement scale.

    PubMed

    Amati, Rebecca; Hannawa, Annegret F

    2015-01-01

    Communication is undoubtedly a critical element of competent end-of-life care. However, physicians commonly lack communication skills in this particular care context. Theoretically grounded, evidence-based guidelines are needed to enhance physicians' communication with patients and their families in this important time of their lives. To address this need, this study tests and validates a Contradictions in End-of-Life Communication (CEOLC) scale, which disentangles the relational contradictions physicians commonly experience when communicating with end-of-life patients. Exploratory factors analysis confirmed the presence of eight physician-perceived dialectical tensions, reflecting three latent factors of (1) integration, (2) expression, and (3) dominance. Furthermore, a number of significant intercultural differences were found in cross-cultural comparisons of the scale in U.S., Swiss, and Italian physician samples. Thus, this investigation introduces a heuristic assessment tool that aids a better understanding of the dialectical contradictions physicians experience in their interactions with end-of-life patients. The CEOLC scale can be used to gather empirical evidence that may eventually support the development of evidence-based guidelines and skills training toward improved end-of-life care.

  16. Exploring the impact of different multi-level measures of physician communities in patient-centric care networks on healthcare outcomes: A multi-level regression approach.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Shahadat

    2016-02-04

    A patient-centric care network can be defined as a network among a group of healthcare professionals who provide treatments to common patients. Various multi-level attributes of the members of this network have substantial influence to its perceived level of performance. In order to assess the impact different multi-level attributes of patient-centric care networks on healthcare outcomes, this study first captured patient-centric care networks for 85 hospitals using health insurance claim dataset. From these networks, this study then constructed physician collaboration networks based on the concept of patient-sharing network among physicians. A multi-level regression model was then developed to explore the impact of different attributes that are organised at two levels on hospitalisation cost and hospital length of stay. For Level-1 model, the average visit per physician significantly predicted both hospitalisation cost and hospital length of stay. The number of different physicians significantly predicted only the hospitalisation cost, which has significantly been moderated by age, gender and Comorbidity score of patients. All Level-1 findings showed significance variance across physician collaboration networks having different community structure and density. These findings could be utilised as a reflective measure by healthcare decision makers. Moreover, healthcare managers could consider them in developing effective healthcare environments.

  17. The Improvement of Measurement in Education and Psychology: Contributions of Latent Trait Theories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spearritt, Donald, Ed.

    Educational and psychological measurement has been a main area of work for the Australian Council for Educational (ACER) since its inception. The theoretical and practical contributions of latent trait measurement and commentary on the relatively recent use of these models in Australia were the focus of a seminar celebrating the 50th anniversary…

  18. Contribution of BeiDou satellite system for long baseline GNSS measurement in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumilar, I.; Bramanto, B.; Kuntjoro, W.; Abidin, H. Z.; Trihantoro, N. F.

    2018-05-01

    The demand for more precise positioning method using GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) in Indonesia continue to rise. The accuracy of GNSS positioning depends on the length of baseline and the distribution of observed satellites. BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) is a positioning system owned by China that operating in Asia-Pacific region, including Indonesia. This research aims to find out the contribution of BDS in increasing the accuracy of long baseline static positioning in Indonesia. The contributions are assessed by comparing the accuracy of measurement using only GPS (Global Positioning System) and measurement using the combination of GPS and BDS. The data used is 5 days of GPS and BDS measurement data for baseline with 120 km in length. The software used is open-source RTKLIB and commercial software Compass Solution. This research will explain in detail the contribution of BDS to the accuracy of position in long baseline static GNSS measurement.

  19. Of blind men and elephants: suggesting SDM-MASS as a compound measure for shared decision making integrating patient, physician and observer views.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Friedemann; Kasper, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Shared decision making (SDM) between patient and physician is an interpersonal process. Most SDM measures use the view of one party (patient, physician or observer) as a proxy to capture this process although these views typically diverge. This study suggests the compound measure SDM(MASS) (SDM Meeting its concept's ASSumptions) integrating these three perspectives in one single index. SDM(MASS) was derived theoretically and compared empirically to unilateral perspectives of patients, physicians and observers by application to a data set of 10 physicians (40 consultations) receiving an SDM training. The constituting parts of SDM(MASS) were highly reliable (Cronbach's alpha .94; interrater reliability .74-.87). Unilateral appraisal of training effects was divergent. SDM(MASS) revealed no effect. SDM(MASS) combines noteworthy information about SDM processes from different viewpoints and thereby delivers plausible assessments. It could overcome immanent shortcomings of unilateral approaches. However, it is a complex measure needing further validation. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  20. Measuring charitable contributions: implications for the nonprofit hospital's tax-exempt status.

    PubMed

    Sanders, S M

    1993-01-01

    Since 1985, some nonprofit hospitals have tried to measure the magnitude of their charitable contributions in order to protect themselves from challenges to their nonprofit tax-exempt status. Using a sample of 562 Catholic nonprofit hospitals, this research shows that these charitable contributions may be defined and measured in several different ways, each having methodological advantages and disadvantages. The data indicate that charity care contributions vary widely, are unequally distributed across the sample of hospitals, and are influenced by the characteristics of the people in the local community and not by the characteristics of the health care delivery system. These findings suggest that legislators may be correct when questioning the rationale for the tax-exemption accorded to virtually all nonprofit hospitals. Further, it suggests that nonprofit hospital administrators can protect the tax-exempt status of their hospital by emphasizing the charitable contributions it makes by absorbing the unreimbursed costs from Medicare and Medicaid.

  1. Benchmarking physician performance, part 2.

    PubMed

    Collier, David A; Collier, Cindy Eddins; Kelly, Thomas M

    2006-01-01

    Part 1 of this article (January-February 2006) reviewed ways of measuring the work of physicians through methods such as data envelopment analysis (DEA) and relative value units (RVUs). These techniques provide insights into: 1. Who are the best-performing physicians? 2. Who are the underperforming physicians? 3. How can underperforming physicians improve? 4. What are the underperformers' performance targets? 5. How do you deal with full- and part-time physicians in a university setting? Part 2 compares the performance of 16 primary care physicians in the same medical specialty using DEA efficiency scores. DEA is capable of modeling multiple criteria and automatically determines the relative weights of each performance measure. This research also provides a preliminary framework for how work measurement and DEA can be used as a basis for a medical team or physician compensation system.

  2. Disenfranchised Grief and Physician Burnout.

    PubMed

    Lathrop, Deborah

    2017-07-01

    Over the span of their career, physicians experience changes to their professional role and professional identity. The process of continual adaptation in their work setting incurs losses. These losses can be ambiguous, cumulative, and may require grieving. Grief in the workplace is unsanctioned, and may contribute to physicians' experience of burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, low sense of achievement). Acknowledging loss, validating grief, and being prescient in dealing with physician burnout is essential. © 2017 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  3. German physicians "on strike"--shedding light on the roots of physician dissatisfaction.

    PubMed

    Janus, Katharina; Amelung, Volker Eric; Gaitanides, Michael; Schwartz, Friedrich Wilhelm

    2007-08-01

    Over the past few years, students in Germany have been dropping out of medical school at increasing rates, and the number of physicians choosing to work abroad or in non-medical professions has been growing. A recent study (the "Ramboll Study") commissioned by the Health Ministry concluded that German physicians' dissatisfaction with existing monetary and non-monetary incentive systems during training and subsequent practice was the main reason for these trends. Among those physicians who have remained in the workforce, there is a similar dissatisfaction, reflected in part by a general strike in 2006 by German physicians in favour of higher wages and better working conditions. To better understand the decision-making process of physicians which is highly determined by the satisfaction they experience in their work life and to extract the factors that contribute to their satisfaction. We surveyed all physicians who spent more than 50% of their time in patient care (and less than 50% in research) at the teaching hospital of the Hannover Medical School (839, after exclusion of pre-test participants). Based on existing satisfaction studies, we designed a self-administered questionnaire that contained 28 items, including items measuring several dimensions of physician job satisfaction; the monetary and non-monetary incentives the physicians experienced in the recent past; other job-related potential confounding factors and socio-demographic questions. Respondents were asked to rate each job satisfaction item on five-point Likert scales regarding both satisfaction with and importance of the item. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, factor and correlation analyses. Our data suggest that non-monetary factors are important determinants of physician job satisfaction, perhaps more important than monetary incentives that may augment or reduce physicians' base incomes. Factor analysis revealed seven principal factors of which decision-making and recognition

  4. The Impact of Statistical Adjustment on Conditional Standard Errors of Measurement in the Assessment of Physician Communication Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raymond, Mark R.; Clauser, Brian E.; Furman, Gail E.

    2010-01-01

    The use of standardized patients to assess communication skills is now an essential part of assessing a physician's readiness for practice. To improve the reliability of communication scores, it has become increasingly common in recent years to use statistical models to adjust ratings provided by standardized patients. This study employed ordinary…

  5. Tracking contributions to human body burden of environmental chemicals by correlating environmental measurements with biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyeong-Moo; McKone, Thomas E; Sohn, Michael D; Bennett, Deborah H

    2014-01-01

    The work addresses current knowledge gaps regarding causes for correlations between environmental and biomarker measurements and explores the underappreciated role of variability in disaggregating exposure attributes that contribute to biomarker levels. Our simulation-based study considers variability in environmental and food measurements, the relative contribution of various exposure sources (indoors and food), and the biological half-life of a compound, on the resulting correlations between biomarker and environmental measurements. For two hypothetical compounds whose half-lives are on the order of days for one and years for the other, we generate synthetic daily environmental concentrations and food exposures with different day-to-day and population variability as well as different amounts of home- and food-based exposure. Assuming that the total intake results only from home-based exposure and food ingestion, we estimate time-dependent biomarker concentrations using a one-compartment pharmacokinetic model. Box plots of modeled R2 values indicate that although the R2 correlation between wipe and biological (e.g., serum) measurements is within the same range for the two compounds, the relative contribution of the home exposure to the total exposure could differ by up to 20%, thus providing the relative indication of their contribution to body burden. The novel method introduced in this paper provides insights for evaluating scenarios or experiments where sample, exposure, and compound variability must be weighed in order to interpret associations between exposure data.

  6. Measuring Teachers' Contributions to Student Learning Growth for Nontested Grades and Subjects. Research & Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goe, Laura; Holdheide, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    The growing need for more information about measuring teachers' contributions to student learning growth, particularly in nontested subjects and grades, is the impetus for this Research & Policy Brief. Although the research base in this area is disappointingly limited, the brief includes considerations and suggestions based on current models…

  7. Impact of socioeconomic adjustment on physicians' relative cost of care.

    PubMed

    Timbie, Justin W; Hussey, Peter S; Adams, John L; Ruder, Teague W; Mehrotra, Ateev

    2013-05-01

    Ongoing efforts to profile physicians on their relative cost of care have been criticized because they do not account for differences in patients' socioeconomic status (SES). The importance of SES adjustment has not been explored in cost-profiling applications that measure costs using an episode of care framework. We assessed the relationship between SES and episode costs and the impact of adjusting for SES on physicians' relative cost rankings. We analyzed claims submitted to 3 Massachusetts commercial health plans during calendar years 2004 and 2005. We grouped patients' care into episodes, attributed episodes to individual physicians, and standardized costs for price differences across plans. We accounted for differences in physicians' case mix using indicators for episode type and a patient's severity of illness. A patient's SES was measured using an index of 6 indicators based on the zip code in which the patient lived. We estimated each physician's case mix-adjusted average episode cost and percentile rankings with and without adjustment for SES. Patients in the lowest SES quintile had $80 higher unadjusted episode costs, on average, than patients in the highest quintile. Nearly 70% of the variation in a physician's average episode cost was explained by case mix of their patients, whereas the contribution of SES was negligible. After adjustment for SES, only 1.1% of physicians changed relative cost rankings >2 percentiles. Accounting for patients' SES has little impact on physicians' relative cost rankings within an episode cost framework.

  8. Physician suicide.

    PubMed

    Preven, D W

    1981-01-01

    The topic of physician suicide has been viewed from several perspectives. The recent studies which suggest that the problem may be less dramatic statistically, do not lessen the emotional trauma that all experience when their lives are touched by the grim event. Keeping in mind that much remains to be learned about suicides in general, and physician suicide specifically, a few suggestions have been offered. As one approach to primary prevention, medical school curriculum should include programs that promote more self-awareness in doctors of their emotional needs. If the physician cannot heal himself, perhaps he can learn to recognize the need for assistance. Intervention (secondary prevention) requires that doctors have the capacity to believe that anyone, regardless of status, can be suicidal. Professional roles should not prevent colleague and friend from identifying prodromal clues. Finally, "postvention" (tertiary prevention) offers the survivors, be they family, colleagues or patients, the opportunity to deal with the searing loss in a therapeutic way.

  9. The Measures Contribution Researches on Renewable Energy Accommodation Based on Production Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhe, MI; Jinfang, Zhang; Jun, Liu

    2018-06-01

    This paper presents the impacts of load, source and grid factors on renewable energy accommodation in the northern region of China. Renewable energy curtailment reasons and key measures to improve accommodations are also discussed. The production simulation method is utilized to analysis renewable energy accommodation and the Shapely value method is introduced to calculate the accommodation contribution rate of different factors. The result shows that the amount of renewable energy accommodation is 389 TWh in northern region of China by the year 2020. The contribution rate of load, source and grid factors to renewable energy accommodation are 39%, 35.8% and 25.1%, respectively.

  10. The self-efficacy in patient-centeredness questionnaire - a new measure of medical student and physician confidence in exhibiting patient-centered behaviors.

    PubMed

    Zachariae, Robert; O'Connor, Maja; Lassesen, Berit; Olesen, Martin; Kjær, Louise Binow; Thygesen, Marianne; Mørcke, Anne Mette

    2015-09-15

    Patient-centered communication is a core competency in modern health care and associated with higher levels of patient satisfaction, improved patient health outcomes, and lower levels of burnout among physicians. The objective of the present study was to develop a questionnaire assessing medical student and physician self-efficacy in patient-centeredness (SEPCQ) and explore its psychometric properties. A preliminary 88-item questionnaire (SEPCQ-88) was developed based on a review of the literature and medical student portfolios and completed by 448 medical students from Aarhus University. Exploratory Principal Component analysis resulted in a 27-item version (SEPCQ-27) with three underlying self-efficacy factors: 1) Exploring the patient perspective, 2) Sharing information and power, and 3) Dealing with communicative challenges. The SEPCQ-27 was completed by an independent sample of 291 medical students from 2 medical schools and 101 hospital physicians. Internal consistencies of total and subscales were acceptable for both students and physicians (Cronbach's alpha (range): 0.74-0.95). There were no overall indications of gender-related differential item function (DIF), and a Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) indicated good fit (CFI = 0.98; NNFI = 0.98; RMSEA = 0.05; SRMR = 0.07). Responsiveness was indicated by increases in SEPCQ scores after a course in communication and peer-supervision (Cohen's d (range): 0.21 to 0.73; p: 0.053 to 0.001). Furthermore, positive associations were found between increases in SEPCQ-scores and course-related motivation to learn (medical students) and between SEPCQ scores and years of clinical experience (physicians). The final SEPCQ-27 showed satisfactory psychometric properties, and preliminary support was found for its construct validity, indicating that the SEPCQ-27 may be a valuable measure in future patient centered communication training and research.

  11. A Study to Develop a Uniform Measure of Clinical Productivity among Family Practice Physicians from Selected Army Community Hospitals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-01

    civilian sector, the physician plays a key role in health care for he is both the customer and the person by which revenue is produced. An economic view of... health care predicts that the more patients that can be seen In a given amount of time, the greater the revenue produced, considering the resources...with the patient . Assumption 1. T’he quality of health care provided by all physiciarns under the study will be equivalent, similar and satisiactory

  12. Physician volunteers.

    PubMed

    Milles, G A

    1999-01-01

    There is an increasing population of working poor in our community. They earn too little to afford health insurance, yet they don't qualify for government assistance. Physician volunteers Howard County have joined together and developed a free clinic to meet this challenge.

  13. Measuring changes in perception using the Student Perceptions of Physician-Pharmacist Interprofessional Clinical Education (SPICE) instrument.

    PubMed

    Zorek, Joseph A; MacLaughlin, Eric J; Fike, David S; MacLaughlin, Anitra A; Samiuddin, Mohammed; Young, Rodney B

    2014-05-20

    The Student Perceptions of Physician-Pharmacist Interprofessional Clinical Education (SPICE) instrument contains 10 items, 3 factors (interprofessional teamwork and team-based practice, roles/responsibilities for collaborative practice, and patient outcomes from collaborative practice), and utilizes a five-point response scale (1 = strongly disagree, 5 = strongly agree). Given the SPICE instrument's demonstrated validity and reliability, the objective of this study was to evaluate whether it was capable of measuring changes in medical (MS) and pharmacy students' (PS) perceptions following an interprofessional education (IPE) experience. In this prospective cohort study, MS and PS completed the SPICE instrument before and after participation in a predefined IPE experience. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize students and pre-post responses. Independent samples t tests and Fisher's Exact tests were used to assess group difference in demographic variables. Mann Whitney U tests were used to assess between-group differences in item scores. Wilcoxon Signed-Rank tests were used to evaluate post-participation changes in item scores. Spearman correlations were calculated to assess associations between ordinal demographic variables and item scores, and whether the number of clinic visits completed was associated with post-test responses. Paired samples t tests were used to calculate mean score changes for each of the factors. Thirty-four MS and 15 PS were enroled. Baseline differences included age (25.3. ± 1.3 MS vs. 28.7 ± 4.4 PS; p = 0.013), years full-time employment (0.71 ± 0.97 MS vs. 4.60 ± 4.55 PS; p < 0.001), and number of prior IPE rotations (1.41 ± 1.74 MS vs. 3.13 ± 2.1 PS; p < 0.001). Two items generated baseline differences; 1 persisted post-participation: whether MS/PS should be involved in teamwork (3.91 MS vs. 4.60 PS; p < 0.001). For all students, significant mean score increases were

  14. Physician Order Entry Clerical Support Improves Physician Satisfaction and Productivity.

    PubMed

    Contratto, Erin; Romp, Katherine; Estrada, Carlos A; Agne, April; Willett, Lisa L

    2017-05-01

    To examine the impact of clerical support personnel for physician order entry on physician satisfaction, productivity, timeliness with electronic health record (EHR) documentation, and physician attitudes. All seven part-time physicians at an academic general internal medicine practice were included in this quasi-experimental (single group, pre- and postintervention) mixed-methods study. One full-time clerical support staff member was trained and hired to enter physician orders in the EHR and conduct previsit planning. Physician satisfaction, productivity, timeliness with EHR documentation, and physician attitudes toward the intervention were measured. Four months after the intervention, physicians reported improvements in overall quality of life (good quality, 71%-100%), personal balance (43%-71%), and burnout (weekly, 43%-14%; callousness, 14%-0%). Matched for quarter, productivity increased: work relative value unit (wRVU) per session increased by 20.5% (before, April-June 2014; after, April-June 2015; range -9.2% to 27.5%). Physicians reported feeling more supported, more focused on patient care, and less stressed and fatigued after the intervention. This study supports the use of physician order entry clerical personnel as a simple, cost-effective intervention to improve the work lives of primary care physicians.

  15. 100% citrus juice: Nutritional contribution, dietary benefits, and association with anthropometric measures.

    PubMed

    Rampersaud, Gail C; Valim, M Filomena

    2017-01-02

    Citrus juices such as 100% orange (OJ) and grapefruit juice (GJ) are commonly consumed throughout the world. This review examines the contributions of OJ and GJ to nutrient intake, diet quality, and fruit intake, and supports citrus juices as nutrient-dense beverages. This review also explores the research examining associations between OJ and GJ intake and anthropometric measures. Citrus juices are excellent sources of vitamin C and contribute other key nutrients such as potassium, folate, magnesium, and vitamin A. OJ intake has been associated with better diet quality in children and adults. OJ intake has not been associated with adverse effects on weight or other body measures in observational studies in children and adults. In adults, some observational studies report more favorable body mass index or body measure parameters in OJ consumers compared to nonconsumers. Intervention studies in adults report no negative impacts of OJ or GJ consumption on anthropometric measures, although these measures were typically not the primary outcomes examined in the studies. Moderate consumption of citrus juices may provide meaningful nutritional and dietary benefits and do not appear to negatively impact body weight, body composition, or other anthropometric measures in children and adults.

  16. Short chain aliphatic acid anions in oil field waters and their contribution to the measured alkalinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Willey, L.M.; Kharaka, Y.K.; Presser, T.S.; Rapp, J.B.; Barnes, I.

    1975-01-01

    High alkalinity values found in some formation waters from Kettleman North Dome oil field are due chiefly to acetate and propionate ions, with some contribution from higher molecular weight organic acid ions. Some of these waters contain no detectable bicarbonate alkalinity. For waters such as these, high supersaturation with respect to calcite will be incorrectly indicated by thermodynamic calculations based upon carbonate concentrations inferred from traditional alkalinity measurements. ?? 1975.

  17. An Absolute Index (Ab-index) to Measure a Researcher’s Useful Contributions and Productivity

    PubMed Central

    Biswal, Akshaya Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Bibliographic analysis has been a very powerful tool in evaluating the effective contributions of a researcher and determining his/her future research potential. The lack of an absolute quantification of the author’s scientific contributions by the existing measurement system hampers the decision-making process. In this paper, a new metric system, Absolute index (Ab-index), has been proposed that allows a more objective comparison of the contributions of a researcher. The Ab-index takes into account the impact of research findings while keeping in mind the physical and intellectual contributions of the author(s) in accomplishing the task. The Ab-index and h-index were calculated for 10 highly cited geneticists and molecular biologist and 10 young researchers of biological sciences and compared for their relationship to the researchers input as a primary author. This is the first report of a measuring method clarifying the contributions of the first author, corresponding author, and other co-authors and the sharing of credit in a logical ratio. A java application has been developed for the easy calculation of the Ab-index. It can be used as a yardstick for comparing the credibility of different scientists competing for the same resources while the Productivity index (Pr-index), which is the rate of change in the Ab-index per year, can be used for comparing scientists of different age groups. The Ab-index has clear advantage over other popular metric systems in comparing scientific credibility of young scientists. The sum of the Ab-indices earned by individual researchers of an institute per year can be referred to as Pr-index of the institute. PMID:24391941

  18. Assessing physician job satisfaction and mental workload.

    PubMed

    Boultinghouse, Oscar W; Hammack, Glenn G; Vo, Alexander H; Dittmar, Mary Lynne

    2007-12-01

    Physician job satisfaction and mental workload were evaluated in a pilot study of five physicians engaged in a telemedicine practice at The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston Electronic Health Network. Several previous studies have examined physician satisfaction with specific telemedicine applications; however, few have attempted to identify the underlying factors that contribute to physician satisfaction or lack thereof. One factor that has been found to affect well-being and functionality in the workplace-particularly with regard to human interaction with complex systems and tasks as seen in telemedicine-is mental workload. Workload is generally defined as the "cost" to a person for performing a complex task or tasks; however, prior to this study, it was unexplored as a variable that influences physician satisfaction. Two measures of job satisfaction were used: The Job Descriptive Index and the Job In General scales. Mental workload was evaluated by means of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index. The measures were administered by means of Web-based surveys and were given twice over a 6-month period. Nonparametric statistical analyses revealed that physician job satisfaction was generally high relative to that of the general population and other professionals. Mental workload scores associated with the practice of telemedicine in this environment are also high, and appeared stable over time. In addition, they are commensurate with scores found in individuals practicing tasks with elevated information-processing demands, such as quality control engineers and air traffic controllers. No relationship was found between the measures of job satisfaction and mental workload.

  19. Physician, heal thyself

    PubMed Central

    Blais, Régis; Safianyk, Catherine; Magnan, Anne; Lapierre, André

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To document the opinions of the users of the Quebec Physicians Health Program (QPHP) about the services they received. DESIGN Mailed questionnaire. SETTING Quebec. PARTICIPANTS A total of 126 physicians who used QPHP services between 1999 and 2004. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Users’ overall rating of the QPHP services, their opinions about the program, and whether their situations improved as a result of accessing QPHP services. RESULTS Ninety-two of the 126 physicians surveyed returned their completed questionnaires, providing a response rate of 73%. Most respondents thought that the QPHP services were good or excellent (90%), most would use the program again (86%) or recommend it (96%), and most thought the Quebec physician associations and the Collège des médecins du Québec should continue funding the QPHP (97%). Most respondents thought the service confidentiality was excellent (84%), as was staff professionalism (82%), and 62% thought the quality of the services they were referred to was excellent. However, only 57% believed their situations had improved with the help of the QPHP. CONCLUSION The QPHP received good marks from its users. Given the effects of physician burnout on patients and on the health care system, it is not only a personal problem, but also a collective problem. Thus, actions are needed not only to set up programs like the QPHP for those suffering from burnout, but also to prevent these types of problems. Because family physicians are likely to be the first ones consulted by their physician patients in distress, they play a key role in acknowledging these problems and referring those colleagues to the appropriate help programs when needed. PMID:20944027

  20. The effects of austerity measures on quality of healthcare services: a national survey of physicians in the public and private sectors in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Correia, Tiago; Carapinheiro, Graça; Carvalho, Helena; Silva, José Manuel; Dussault, Gilles

    2017-12-12

    The European Union member countries reacted differently to the 2008 economic and financial crisis. However, few countries have monitored the outcomes of their policy responses, and there is therefore little evidence as to whether or not savings undermined the performance of health systems. We discuss the situation in Portugal, where a financial adjustment program was implemented between 2011 and 2014, and explore the views of health workers on the effects of austerity measures on quality of care delivery. A nationwide survey of physicians' experiences was conducted in 2013-2014 (n = 3442). We used a two-step model to compare public and private services and look at the possible moderating effects of the physicians' specialty and years of practice. Our data analysis included descriptive statistics, the independent t test, analysis of variance (ANOVA), multivariate logistic regression, General Linear Model Univariate Analysis, non-parametric methods (bootstrap), and post hoc probing. Mainly in the public sector, the policy goal of maintaining quality of care was undermined by a lack of resources, the deterioration in medical residency conditions, and to a lesser extent, greater administrative interference in clinical decision-making. Differences in public and private services showed that the effects of the austerity measures were not the same throughout the health system. Our results also showed that physicians with similar years of practice and in the same medical specialty did not necessarily experience the same pressures. The debate on the effects of austerity measures should focus more closely on health workers' concrete experiences, as they demonstrate the non-linearity between policy setting and expected outcomes. We also suggest that it is necessary to explore the interplay between lower quality and the undermining of trust relationships in health.

  1. Biogenic contribution to PM-2.5 ambient aerosol from radiocarbon measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, C.; Klouda, G.; Ellenson, W.

    2003-04-01

    Knowledge of the relative contributions of biogenic versus anthropogenic sources to ambient aerosol is of great interest in the formulation of strategies to achieve nationally mandated air quality standards. Radiocarbon (14C) measurements provide a means to quantify the biogenic fraction of any carbon-containing sample of ambient aerosol. In the absence of an impact from biomass burning (e.g., during summertime) such measurements can provide an estimate of the contribution of biogenic secondary organic aerosol, from biogenic volatile organic compound precursors. Radiocarbon results for 11.5-h PM-2.5 samples collected near Nashville, Tennessee, USA, during summer 1999 will be presented. On average the measured biogenic fraction was surprisingly large (more than half), with the average biogenic fraction for night samples being only slightly smaller than for day samples. Discussion will include (a) description of the radiocarbon methodology, (b) use of radiocarbon measurements on local vegetation and fuel samples as calibration data, (c) concurrent measurements of organic carbon and elemental carbon ambient concentrations, (d) assessment of organic aerosol sampling artifact through use of organic vapor denuders, variable face velocities, and filter extraction, and (e) comparison with published radiocarbon results obtained in Houston, Texas in a similar study. Disclaimer: This work has been funded wholly or in part by the United States Environmental Protection Agency under Interagency Agreement No. 13937923 to the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and Contract No. 68-D5-0049 to ManTech Environmental Tecnology, Inc. It has been subjected to Agency review and approved for publication.

  2. Measuring the frequency of functional gastrointestinal disorders in rural Crete: a need for improving primary care physicians' diagnostic skills.

    PubMed

    Lionis, Christos; Olsen-Faresjo, Ashild; Anastasiou, Foteini; Wallander, Mari-Ann; Johansson, Saga; Faresjo, Tomas

    2005-01-01

    Studies of the frequency and aetiology of functional gastrointestinal disorders in the general population have received increasing interest over the past few years; the field seems to be neglected in Southern Europe. The aim of this study was to report on the frequency of functional dyspepsia (FD), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and gastroenteritis within the primary care setting, to provide some information on the extent to which the recorded diagnoses in the physicians' notes fulfil existing diagnostic criteria. A retrospective study was used, where all new cases of these diseases at five primary health care centres in three rural and two semi-rural areas of Crete were identified by scrutinizing medical records from 280,000 consecutive visits during a 4 year period. The occurrence rate per 1000 person-years were calculated for the three conditions. We also checked the extent to which the Talley's criteria for FD and Rome II diagnostic criteria for IBS were followed. Gastroenteritis was revealed to be a quite frequent health problem among the rural population on Crete, while the occurrence rates for other problems, such as dyspepsia and IBS, were found to be lower than expected. IBS was over-represented among women compared with men, OR 2.04 (CI 1.39-3.00). In many cases a diagnosis of FD, IBS or gastroenteritis was evident to the research team on the basis of findings recorded in the notes, but the diagnosis was not recorded by the clinician at the time of consultation. This study yielded two key messages: the first that gastroenteritis is still a frequent health problem, and the second that primary care physicians in rural Crete seem to fail in adequately diagnosing FD and IBS and need further training.

  3. High contributions of vehicular emissions to ammonia in three European cities derived from mobile measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elser, Miriam; El-Haddad, Imad; Maasikmets, Marek; Bozzetti, Carlo; Wolf, Robert; Ciarelli, Giancarlo; Slowik, Jay G.; Richter, Rene; Teinemaa, Erik; Hüglin, Christoph; Baltensperger, Urs; Prévôt, André S. H.

    2018-02-01

    Ambient ammonia (NH3) measurements were performed with a mobile platform in three European cities: Zurich (Switzerland), Tartu (Estonia) and Tallinn (Estonia) deploying an NH3 analyzer based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy. A heated inlet line along with an auxiliary flow was used to minimize NH3 adsorption onto the inlet walls. In addition, a detailed characterization of the response and recovery times of the measurement system was used to deconvolve the true NH3 signal from the remaining adsorption-induced hysteresis. Parallel measurements with an aerosol mass spectrometer were used to correct the observed NH3 for the contribution of ammonium nitrate, which completely evaporated in the heated line at the chosen temperature, in contrast to ammonium sulfate. In this way a quantitative measurement of ambient gaseous NH3 was achieved with sufficient time resolution to enable measurement of NH3 point sources with a mobile sampling platform. The NH3 analyzer and the aerosol mass spectrometer were complemented by an aethalometer and various gas-phase analyzers to enable a complete characterization of the sources of air pollution, including the spatial distributions and the regional background concentrations and urban increments of all measured components. Although at all three locations similar increment levels of organic aerosols were attributed to biomass burning and traffic, traffic emissions clearly dominated the city enhancements of NH3, equivalent black carbon (eBC) and carbon dioxide (CO2). Urban increments of 3.4, 1.8 and 3.0 ppb of NH3 were measured in the traffic areas in Zurich, Tartu and Tallinn, respectively, representing an enhancement of 36.6, 38.3 and 93.8% over the average background concentrations. Measurements in areas strongly influenced by traffic emissions (including tunnel drives) were used to estimate emission factors (EF) for the traffic-related pollutants. The obtained median EFs range between 136.8-415.1 mg kg-1 fuel for NH3, 157.1-734.8 mg

  4. Social inequalities in health: measuring the contribution of housing deprivation and social interactions for Spain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Social factors have been proved to be main determinants of individuals’ health. Recent studies have also analyzed the contribution of some of those factors, such as education and job status, to socioeconomic inequalities in health. The aim of this paper is to provide new evidence about the factors driving socioeconomic inequalities in health for the Spanish population by including housing deprivation and social interactions as health determinants. Methods Cross-sectional study based on the Spanish sample of European Statistics on Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC) for 2006. The concentration index measuring income-related inequality in health is decomposed into the contribution of each determinant. Several models are estimated to test the influence of different regressors for three proxies of ill-health. Results Health inequality favouring the better-off is observed in the distribution of self-assessed health, presence of chronic diseases and presence of limiting conditions. Inequality is mainly explained, besides age, by social factors such as labour status and financial deprivation. Housing deprivation contributes to pro-rich inequality in a percentage ranging from 7.17% to 13.85%, and social interactions from 6.16% to 10.19%. The contribution of some groups of determinants significantly differs depending on the ill-health variable used. Conclusions Health inequalities can be mostly reduced or shaped by policy, as they are mainly explained by social determinants such as labour status, education and other socioeconomic conditions. The major role played on health inequality by variables taking part in social exclusion points to the need to focus on the most vulnerable groups. JEL Codes H51, I14, I18 PMID:23241384

  5. Measured Environmental Contributions to Cannabis Abuse/Dependence in an Offspring of Twins Design

    PubMed Central

    Scherrer, Jeffrey F.; Grant, Julia D.; Duncan, Alexis E.; Pan, Hui; Waterman, Brian; Jacob, Theodore; Haber, Jon Randolph; True, William R.; Heath, Andrew C.; Bucholz, Kathleen Keenan

    2008-01-01

    Genetic and environmental factors are known to contribute to cannabis abuse/dependence (CAD). We sought to determine the magnitude of the contribution from measured environmental variables to offspring cannabis dependence in a design that controls for familial vulnerability. Data come from a study of 725 twin members of the Vietnam Era Twin Registry, 720 of their biological offspring (age 18–32 years) and 427 mothers. Data were obtained on offspring perception of family and peer support and substance use behaviors and offspring CAD. After adjusting for familial risk, and environmental covariates, CAD was significantly more likely among male offspring (OR=2.73; 95% CI: 1.69–4.41). Offspring CAD was associated with reporting: siblings used illicit drugs (OR=3.40; 95%CI:1.81–6.38), a few friends used drugs (OR=2.72; 95%CI: 1.04–7.09), a quarter or more friends used drugs (OR=8.30; 95% CI:3.09–22.33) and one-half or more 12th grade peers used drugs (OR=3.17; 95%CI: 1.42–7.08). Perceived sibling, friend and school peer substance use are strongly associated with CAD in young adults even after accounting for latent familial risk and for multiple measured intra-family and extra-family environmental influences. PMID:18583065

  6. Measurement invariance of the Short Wake Forest Physician Trust Scale and of the Health Empowerment Scale in German and French women.

    PubMed

    Petrocchi, Serena; Labrie, Nanon H M; Schulz, Peter J

    2017-08-01

    Measurement invariance is a crucial prerequisite to carry out cross-cultural research and to provide knowledge that enables culturally diverse patients to feel comfortable with their health providers. Although trust in doctors and health empowerment are widely studied, no previous research has examined their measurement invariance. The Short Wake Forest Physician Trust scale and the Health Empowerment scale were administered online. Participants were 217 German-speaking women ( M = 39.07, standard deviation = 5.71) and 217 French-speaking women ( M = 39.11, standard deviation = 5.82). Demonstration of partial scalar invariance was met and reasons for non-invariant items are discussed. The study was evaluated applying COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health status Measurement INstruments checklist.

  7. Measuring the leading hadronic contribution to the muon g-2 via μ e scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbiendi, G.; Calame, C. M. Carloni; Marconi, U.; Matteuzzi, C.; Montagna, G.; Nicrosini, O.; Passera, M.; Piccinini, F.; Tenchini, R.; Trentadue, L.; Venanzoni, G.

    2017-03-01

    We propose a new experiment to measure the running of the electromagnetic coupling constant in the space-like region by scattering high-energy muons on atomic electrons of a low- Z target through the elastic process μ e → μ e. The differential cross section of this process, measured as a function of the squared momentum transfer t=q^2<0, provides direct sensitivity to the leading-order hadronic contribution to the muon anomaly a^{HLO}_{μ }. By using a muon beam of 150 GeV, with an average rate of ˜ 1.3 × 10^7 muon/s, currently available at the CERN North Area, a statistical uncertainty of ˜ 0.3% can be achieved on a^{HLO}_{μ } after two years of data taking. The direct measurement of a^{HLO}_{μ } via μ e scattering will provide an independent determination, competitive with the time-like dispersive approach, and consolidate the theoretical prediction for the muon g-2 in the Standard Model. It will allow therefore a firmer interpretation of the measurements of the future muon g-2 experiments at Fermilab and J-PARC.

  8. Understanding African Americans' Views of the Trustworthiness of Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Elizabeth A; Rolle, Italia; Ferrans, Carol Estwing; Whitaker, Eric E; Warnecke, Richard B

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Many scholars have written about the historical underpinnings and likely consequences of African Americans distrust in health care, yet little research has been done to understand if and how this distrust affects African Americans' current views of the trustworthiness of physicians. OBJECTIVE To better understand what trust and distrust in physicians means to African Americans. DESIGN Focus-group study, using an open-ended discussion guide. SETTING Large public hospital and community organization in Chicago, IL. PATIENTS Convenience sample of African-American adult men and women. MEASUREMENTS Each focus group was systematically coded using grounded theory analysis. The research team then identified themes that commonly arose across the 9 focus groups. RESULTS Participants indicated that trust is determined by the interpersonal and technical competence of physicians. Contributing factors to distrust in physicians include a lack of interpersonal and technical competence, perceived quest for profit and expectations of racism and experimentation during routine provision of health care. Trust appears to facilitate care-seeking behavior and promotes patient honesty and adherence. Distrust inhibits care-seeking, can result in a change in physician and may lead to nonadherence. CONCLUSIONS Unique factors contribute to trust and distrust in physicians among African-American patients. These factors should be considered in clinical practice to facilitate trust building and improve health care provided to African Americans. PMID:16808750

  9. Access to Care Under Physician Payment Reform: A Physician-Based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Meadow, Ann

    1995-01-01

    This article reports physician-based measures of access to care during the 3 years surrounding the 1989 physician payment reforms. Analysis was facilitated by a new system of physician identifiers in Medicare claims. Access measures include caseload per physician and related measures of the demographic composition of physicians' clientele, the proportion of physicians performing surgical and other procedures, and the assignment rate. The caseload and assignment measures were stable or improving over time, suggesting that reforms did not harm access. Procedure performance rates tended to decline between 1992 and 1993, but reductions were inversely related to the estimated fee changes, and several may be explainable by other factors. PMID:10172615

  10. To belong, contribute, and hope: first stage development of a measure of social recovery.

    PubMed

    Marino, Casadi Khaki

    2015-04-01

    Recovery from mental health challenges is beginning to be explored as an inherently social process. There is a need to measure social recovery. Targeted measures would be utilized in needs assessment, service delivery, and program evaluation. This paper reports on the first stage of development of a social recovery measure. Explore the social aspects of recovery as reported by individuals with lived experience. A qualitative study using thematic analysis of data from focus groups with 41 individuals in recovery. Three meta-themes of social recovery emerged: community, self-concept, and capacities. Each theme contained a number of sub-themes concerned with a sense of belonging, inherent acceptability of the self, and ability to cope with mental distress and engage socially. Study participants clearly spoke to common human needs to belong, contribute, and have hope for one's future. Findings converged with results of consumer-led research that emphasize the importance of overcoming the impact of illness on the self and social context.

  11. The measured contribution of whipping and springing on the fatigue and extreme loading of container vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storhaug, Gaute

    2014-12-01

    Whipping/springing research started in the 50'ies. In the 60'ies inland water vessels design rules became stricter due to whipping/springing. The research during the 70-90'ies may be regarded as academic. In 2000 a large ore carrier was strengthened due to severe cracking from North Atlantic operation, and whipping/springing contributed to half of the fatigue damage. Measurement campaigns on blunt and slender vessels were initiated. A few blunt ships were designed to account for whipping/springing. Based on the measurements, the focus shifted from fatigue to extreme loading. In 2005 model tests of a 4,400 TEU container vessel included extreme whipping scenarios. In 2007 the 4400 TEU vessel MSC Napoli broke in two under similar conditions. In 2009 model tests of an 8,600 TEU container vessel container vessel included extreme whipping scenarios. In 2013 the 8,100 TEU vessel MOL COMFORT broke in two under similar conditions. Several classification societies have published voluntary guidelines, which have been used to include whipping/springing in the design of several container vessels. This paper covers results from model tests and full scale measurements used as background for the DNV Legacy guideline. Uncertainties are discussed and recommendations are given in order to obtain useful data. Whipping/springing is no longer academic.

  12. Sense of meaning as a predictor of burnout in emergency physicians in Israel: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Ben-Itzhak, Shulamit; Dvash, Jonathan; Maor, Maya; Rosenberg, Noa; Halpern, Pinchas

    2015-12-01

    Burnout is common in physicians and particularly acute in emergency physicians. Physician burnout may adversely affect physicians' lives and the quality of care they provide, but much remains unknown about its main contributing factors. The present study evaluated burnout rates and contributing factors in emergency physicians in Israel, specifically focusing on the role of a sense of meaning, which has received little attention in the literature concerning burnout in emergency physicians. A multicenter study, involving a convenience sample of physicians working full-time in the emergency departments of 16 general hospitals in Israel, was conducted. Questionnaires were used to assess burnout, demographic characteristics, professional stress, emotional distress, satisfaction, and quality of professional life, and open-ended questions were used to evaluate subjective perception of job satisfaction. Seventy physicians completed the questionnaires; 71.4% reported significant burnout levels in at least one of the burnout measures, while 82% also reported medium or high levels of competency. Burnout levels were associated with work-life balance, work satisfaction, social support, depressive symptoms, stress, and preoccupying thoughts. Regression analysis yielded two significant factors associated with burnout: worry and a sense of existential meaning derived from work. In addition, 61%, 51%, and 17% of participants exhibited high emotional exhaustion, high depersonalization, and a low sense of personal accomplishment, respectively. These results indicate a high burnout rate in emergency physicians in Israel and highlight relevant positive and negative factors including the importance of addressing existential meaning in designing specific intervention programs to counter burnout.

  13. “Righteous Minds” in Health Care: Measurement and Explanatory Value of Social Intuitionism in Accounting for the Moral Judgments in a Sample of U.S. Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Tilburt, Jon C.; James, Katherine M.; Jenkins, Sarah M.; Antiel, Ryan M.; Curlin, Farr A.; Rasinski, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    The broad diversity in physicians’ judgments on controversial health care topics may reflect differences in religious characteristics, political ideologies, and moral intuitions. We tested an existing measure of moral intuitions in a new population (U.S. physicians) to assess its validity and to determine whether physicians’ moral intuitions correlate with their views on controversial health care topics as well as other known predictors of these intuitions such as political affiliation and religiosity. In 2009, we mailed an 8-page questionnaire to a random sample of 2000 practicing U.S. physicians from all specialties. The survey included the Moral Foundations Questionnaire (MFQ30), along with questions on physicians’ judgments about controversial health care topics including abortion and euthanasia (no moral objection, some moral objection, strong moral objection). A total of 1032 of 1895 (54%) physicians responded. Physicians’ overall mean moral foundations scores were 3.5 for harm, 3.3 for fairness, 2.8 for loyalty, 3.2 for authority, and 2.7 for sanctity on a 0–5 scale. Increasing levels of religious service attendance, having a more conservative political ideology, and higher sanctity scores remained the greatest positive predictors of respondents objecting to abortion (β = 0.12, 0.23, 0.14, respectively, each p<0.001) as well as euthanasia (β = 0.08, 0.17, and 0.17, respectively, each p<0.001), even after adjusting for demographics. Higher authority scores were also significantly negatively associated with objection to abortion (β = −0.12, p<0.01), but not euthanasia. These data suggest that the relative importance physicians place on the different categories of moral intuitions may predict differences in physicians’ judgments about morally controversial topics and may interrelate with ideology and religiosity. Further examination of the diversity in physicians’ moral intuitions may prove illustrative in describing and

  14. Relation Between Physicians' Work Lives and Happiness.

    PubMed

    Eckleberry-Hunt, Jodie; Kirkpatrick, Heather; Taku, Kanako; Hunt, Ronald; Vasappa, Rashmi

    2016-04-01

    Although we know much about work-related physician burnout and the subsequent negative effects, we do not fully understand work-related physician wellness. Likewise, the relation of wellness and burnout to physician happiness is unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine how physician burnout and wellness contribute to happiness. We sampled 2000 full-time physician members of the American Academy of Family Physicians. Respondents completed a demographics questionnaire, questions about workload, the Physician Wellness Inventory, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, and the Subjective Happiness Scale. We performed a hierarchical regression analysis with the burnout and wellness subscales as predictor variables and physician happiness as the outcome variable. Our response rate was 22%. Career purpose, personal accomplishment, and perception of workload manageability had significant positive correlations with physician happiness. Distress had a significant negative correlation with physician happiness. A sense of career meaning and accomplishment, along with a lack of distress, are important factors in determining physician happiness. The number of hours a physician works is not related to happiness, but the perceived ability to manage workload was significantly related to happiness. Wellness-promotion efforts could focus on assisting physicians with skills to manage the workload by eliminating unnecessary tasks or sharing workload among team members, improving feelings of work accomplishment, improving career satisfaction and meaning, and managing distress related to patient care.

  15. Measuring emergency physicians' work: factoring in clinical hours, patients seen, and relative value units into 1 metric.

    PubMed

    Silich, Bert A; Yang, James J

    2012-05-01

    Measuring workplace performance is important to emergency department management. If an unreliable model is used, the results will be inaccurate. Use of inaccurate results to make decisions, such as how to distribute the incentive pay, will lead to rewarding the wrong people and will potentially demoralize top performers. This article demonstrates a statistical model to reliably measure the work accomplished, which can then be used as a performance measurement.

  16. Perceived barriers among physicians for stopping non-cost-effective blood-saving measures in total hip and total knee arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Voorn, Veronique M A; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J; Wentink, Manon M; Kaptein, Ad A; Koopman-van Gemert, Ankie W M M; So-Osman, Cynthia; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M; Nelissen, Rob G H H; van Bodegom-Vos, Leti

    2014-10-01

    Despite evidence that the blood-saving measures (BSMs) erythropoietin (EPO) and intra- and postoperative blood salvage are not (cost-)effective in primary elective total hip and knee arthroplasties, they are used frequently in Dutch hospitals. This study aims to assess the impact of barriers associated with the intention of physicians to stop BSMs. A survey among 400 orthopedic surgeons and 400 anesthesiologists within the Netherlands was performed. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify barriers associated with intention to stop BSMs. A total of 153 (40%) orthopedic surgeons and 100 (27%) anesthesiologists responded. Of all responders 67% used EPO, perioperative blood salvage, or a combination. After reading the evidence on non-cost-effective BSMs, 50% of respondents intended to stop EPO and 53% to stop perioperative blood salvage. In general, barriers perceived most frequently were lack of attention for blood management (90% of respondents), department priority to prevent transfusions (88%), and patient characteristics such as comorbidity (81%). Barriers significantly associated with intention to stop EPO were lack of interest to save money and the impact of other involved parties. Barriers significantly associated with intention to stop perioperative blood salvage were concerns about patient safety, lack of alternatives, losing experience with the technique, and lack of interest to save money. Physicians experience barriers to stop using BSMs, related to their own technical skills, patient safety, current blood management policy, and lack of interest to save money. These barriers should be targeted in strategies to make BSM use cost-effective. © 2014 AABB.

  17. Charge Exchange Contribution to the Decay of the Ring Current, Measured by Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, A. M.; Henderson, M. G.; Roelof, E. C.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we calculate the contribution of charge exchange to the decay of the ring current. Past works have suggested that charge exchange of ring current protons is primarily responsible for the decay of the ring current during the late recovery phase, but there is still much debate about the fast decay of the early recovery phase. We use energetic neutral atom (ENA) measurements from Polar to calculate the total ENA energy escape. To get the total ENA escape we apply a forward modeling technique, and to estimate the total ring current energy escape we use the Dessler-Parker-Sckopke relationship. We find that during the late recovery phase of the March 10, 1998 storm ENAs with energies greater than 17.5 keV can account for 75% of the estimated energy loss from the ring current. During the fast recovery the measured ENAs can only account for a small portion of the total energy loss. We also find that the lifetime of the trapped ions is significantly shorter during the fast recovery phase than during the late recovery phase, suggesting that different processes are operating during the two phases.

  18. Reducing background contributions in fluorescence fluctuation time-traces for single-molecule measurements in solution.

    PubMed

    Földes-Papp, Zeno; Liao, Shih-Chu Jeff; You, Tiefeng; Barbieri, Beniamino

    2009-08-01

    We first report on the development of new microscope means that reduce background contributions in fluorescence fluctuation methods: i) excitation shutter, ii) electronic switches, and iii) early and late time-gating. The elements allow for measuring molecules at low analyte concentrations. We first found conditions of early and late time-gating with time-correlated single-photon counting that made the fluorescence signal as bright as possible compared with the fluctuations in the background count rate in a diffraction-limited optical set-up. We measured about a 140-fold increase in the amplitude of autocorrelated fluorescence fluctuations at the lowest analyte concentration of about 15 pM, which gave a signal-to-background advantage of more than two-orders of magnitude. The results of this original article pave the way for single-molecule detection in solution and in live cells without immobilization or hydrodynamic/electrokinetic focusing at longer observation times than are currently available.

  19. Development of scales to assess patients' perception of physicians' cultural competence in health care interactions.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Rukhsana; Bates, Benjamin R

    2012-07-01

    This study describes the development of scales to measure patients' perception of physicians' cultural competence in health care interactions and thus contributes to promoting awareness of physician-patient intercultural interaction processes. Surveys were administrated to a total of 682 participants. Exploratory factor analyses were employed to assess emergent scales and subscales to develop reliable instruments. The first two phases were devoted to formative research and pilot study. The third phase was devoted to scale development, which resulted in a five-factor solution to measure patient perception of physicians' cultural competence for patient satisfaction.

  20. Should Physicians Have Facial Piercings?

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Alison W; Wright, Seth W; Wrenn, Keith D; Bernard, Aline

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to assess attitudes of patrons and medical school faculty about physicians with nontraditional facial piercings. We also examined whether a piercing affected the perceived competency and trustworthiness of physicians. DESIGN Survey. SETTING Teaching hospital in the southeastern United States. PARTICIPANTS Emergency department patrons and medical school faculty physicians. INTERVENTIONS First, patrons were shown photographs of models with a nontraditional piercing and asked about the appropriateness for a physician or medical student. In the second phase, patrons blinded to the purpose of the study were shown identical photographs of physician models with or without piercings and asked about competency and trustworthiness. The third phase was an assessment of attitudes of faculty regarding piercings. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Nose and lip piercings were felt to be appropriate for a physician by 24% and 22% of patrons, respectively. Perceived competency and trustworthiness of models with these types of piercings were also negatively affected. An earring in a male was felt to be appropriate by 35% of patrons, but an earring on male models did not negatively affect perceived competency or trustworthiness. Nose and eyebrow piercings were felt to be appropriate by only 7% and 5% of faculty physicians and working with a physician or student with a nose or eyebrow piercing would bother 58% and 59% of faculty, respectively. An ear piercing in a male was felt to be appropriate by 20% of faculty, and 25% stated it would bother them to work with a male physician or student with an ear piercing. CONCLUSIONS Many patrons and physicians feel that some types of nontraditional piercings are inappropriate attire for physicians, and some piercings negatively affect perceived competency and trustworthiness. Health care providers should understand that attire may affect a patient's opinion about their abilities and possibly erode confidence

  1. Physician flight accidents.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1966-09-01

    An analysis of physician flight accidents during the period 1964-1965 is presented. More than thirty physicians sustained fatal injuries while piloting light aircraft: a fatality record four times the ratio of physician pilots in the general aviation...

  2. Practice enhancement strengthens hospital-physician ties.

    PubMed

    Pivnicny, V

    1992-12-01

    In the increasingly competitive U.S. healthcare environment, hospitals must be concerned with maintaining and increasing the number of patients admitted. A key strategy for hospitals is to fortify relationships with physicians who admit and refer patients. Practice enhancement services designed to improve the strategic, financial, and administrative operation of physicians' practices can contribute significantly to the development of positive hospital-physician relationships.

  3. HF Channel Availability under Ionospheric Disturbances: Model, Method and Measurements as Contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulunay, E.; Senalp, E. T.; Tulunay, Y.; Warrington, E. M.; Sari, M. O.

    2009-04-01

    A small group at METU has been developing data driven models in order to forecast some critical parameters, which affect the communication and navigation systems, since 1990. The background on the subjects supports new achievements in terms of theoretical and experimental basis contributing the COST 296 WG2 activities. This work mentions the representative contributions. (i) A method has been proposed for the assessment of HF Channel Availability under ionospheric disturbances. Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR), Doppler Spread and Modified Power Delay Spread were considered. The study relates the modem performance to ionospheric disturbances. Ionospheric disturbance was characterised by Disturbance Storm Type (DST) index. Radar data including Effective Multipath Spread, Composite Doppler Spread and SNR values were obtained from the experiment conducted between Leicester UK (52.63° N; 1.08° W) and Uppsala, Sweden (59.92° N; 17.63° E) in the year 2001. First, joint probability density function (PDF) of SNR, Doppler Spread, and Effective Multipath Spread versus DST were considered. It was demonstrated by determining the conditional PDFs, and by using Bayes' Theorem, that there were dependencies between DST and the above mentioned parameters [Sari, 2006]. Thus, it is concluded that the availability of the HF channel is a function of DST. As examples of modem characterizations, Military Standards were considered. Given a magnetic condition, the modem availability was calculated. The model developed represents the ionospheric HF channel, and it is based on a stochastic approach. Depending on the new experimental data, the conditional PDFs could be updated continuously. The HF channel availability under various ionospheric Space Weather (SW) conditions can be determined using the model. The proposed method is general and can include other indices as well. The method can also be applied to a variety of other processes. (ii) The effects of space weather conditions on the

  4. Effect of communication style and physician-family relationships on satisfaction with pediatric chronic disease care.

    PubMed

    Swedlund, Matthew P; Schumacher, Jayna B; Young, Henry N; Cox, Elizabeth D

    2012-01-01

    Over 8% of children have a chronic disease and many are unable to adhere to treatment. Satisfaction with chronic disease care can impact adherence. We examine how visit satisfaction is associated with physician communication style and ongoing physician-family relationships. We collected surveys and visit videos for 75 children ages 9-16 years visiting for asthma, diabetes, or sickle cell disease management. Raters assessed physician communication style (friendliness, interest, responsiveness, and dominance) from visit videos. Quality of the ongoing relationship was measured with four survey items (parent-physician relationship, child-physician relationship, comfort asking questions, and trust in the physician), while a single item assessed satisfaction. Correlations and chi square were used to assess association of satisfaction with communication style or quality of the ongoing relationship. Satisfaction was positively associated with physician to parent (p < 0.05) friendliness. Satisfaction was also associated with the quality of the ongoing parent-physician (p < 0.001) and child-physician relationships (p < 0.05), comfort asking questions (p < 0.001), and trust (p < 0.01). This shows that both the communication style and the quality of the ongoing relationship contribute to pediatric chronic disease visit satisfaction.

  5. Ethical Principles for Physician Rating Sites

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    During the last 5 years, an ethical debate has emerged, often in public media, about the potential positive and negative effects of physician rating sites and whether physician rating sites created by insurance companies or government agencies are ethical in their current states. Due to the lack of direct evidence of physician rating sites’ effects on physicians’ performance, patient outcomes, or the public’s trust in health care, most contributions refer to normative arguments, hypothetical effects, or indirect evidence. This paper aims, first, to structure the ethical debate about the basic concept of physician rating sites: allowing patients to rate, comment, and discuss physicians’ performance, online and visible to everyone. Thus, it provides a more thorough and transparent starting point for further discussion and decision making on physician rating sites: what should physicians and health policy decision makers take into account when discussing the basic concept of physician rating sites and its possible implications on the physician–patient relationship? Second, it discusses where and how the preexisting evidence from the partly related field of public reporting of physician performance can serve as an indicator for specific needs of evaluative research in the field of physician rating sites. This paper defines the ethical principles of patient welfare, patient autonomy, physician welfare, and social justice in the context of physician rating sites. It also outlines basic conditions for a fair decision-making process concerning the implementation and regulation of physician rating sites, namely, transparency, justification, participation, minimization of conflicts of interest, and openness for revision. Besides other issues described in this paper, one trade-off presents a special challenge and will play an important role when deciding about more- or less-restrictive physician rating sites regulations: the potential psychological and financial

  6. Skin elasticity as a measure of radiation fibrosis: is it reproducible and does it correlate with patient and physician-reported measures?

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nhu-Tram A; Roberge, David; Freeman, Carolyn R; Wong, Cindy; Hines, Jerod; Turcotte, Robert E

    2014-10-01

    Current means of measuring RT-induced fibrosis are subjective. We evaluated the DermaLab suction cup system to measure objectively skin deflection as a surrogate for fibrosis. Sixty-nine patients with E-STS were treated with limb-sparing surgery and 50-66 Grays (Gy) of RT. Using a "scleroderma" DermaLab Suction Cup, the skin stiffness was measured by two clinicians. The National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (NCI-CTCAE) scale, the Musculoskeletal Tumor Rating Scale (MSTS) and Toronto Extremity Salvage Score (TESS) questionnaires were completed for each patient. Levels of agreement between measurers were estimated using the Kappa (k) coefficient and the concordance correlation coefficient (CCC). All sixty-nine patients were included. The level of agreement between measurers for NCI-CTCAE grading was moderate (range k = 0.41-0.59). The CCC for the elasticity measurements were higher, with CCC = 0.82 for fibrotic skin and CCC 5 0.84 for normal skin. The elasticity measurements were significantly higher when MSTS scores were <30 and or TESS scores were <90. Suction Cup measurement of skin elasticity is more reproducible than CTCAE grading and shows promise in generating reproducible measurements for radiation-induced skin fibrosis. Furthermore, it correlates well with the MSTS and TESS.

  7. Large-scale soil conservation measures contribute to water insecurity in NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lulu; Feger, Karl-Heinz; Schwärzel, Kai

    2014-05-01

    The Loess Plateau of NW China is one of the most degraded environments worldwide with an annual soil loss rate of ~20,000 t/km². To improve the situation, a national policy against erosion has been implemented in this region since 1950s. This policy includes biological (tree and grass plantation) and engineering (terrace and check-dam construction) measures. However, subject to enormous alteration in land cover / form, an undesired drastic reduction of runoff has appeared hampering economic growth, agricultural production and thus threatening social stability. As a consequence, adaptive innovative management strategies are necessary for mitigating water use conflicts and ensuring regional sustainable development. For successful implementation of such strategies, an improved understanding and quantification of hydrological response to land use and climate change across different scales is essential. For this purpose, the hydrological response to different land cover / form and climate change in the past 50 years was analyzed in small and medium-scale catchments using the upstream of Jing River (Gansu province) as a case. It appears that the driving factors of runoff reduction at different scales are different in terms of land use and climate change. Our study gave evidence that in a small catchment (19 km²), land cover / form change and precipitation variability are the major factors reducing runoff. After separating their contribution, we found that land use change was responsible for 74% of runoff decline while decreased precipitation accounted for 26%. Surprisingly, the annual runoff exhibits a good correlation with precipitation and the percentage area of various land use. Notably, with increasing catchment size the impact of land use on runoff attenuates, while the role of climate ascends. In addition to land use and precipitation, energy supply (evaporative demand of the atmosphere) becomes another dominant climatic factor affecting runoff on the larger

  8. Psychometric validation of a new measurement instrument for time-oriented patient information in electronic medical records: A questionnaire survey of physicians.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Akiko; Misawa, Jimpei; Maeda, Yukihiro; Ichikawa, Rie; Kamata, Michiyo; Inoue, Ryusuke; Morimoto, Tetsuji; Nakayama, Masaharu; Hishiki, Teruyoshi; Kondo, Yoshiaki

    2017-12-01

    Time is an important element in medical data. Physicians record and store information about patients' disease progress and treatment response in electronic medical records (EMRs). Because EMRs use timestamps, physicians can identify patterns over time regarding a patient's disease and treatment (eg, laboratory values and medications). However, analyses of physicians' use and satisfaction with EMRs have focused on functionality, storage, and system operation rather than the use of time-oriented information. This study aimed to understand physicians' needs regarding time-oriented patient information in EMRs in clinical practice. The reliability and validity of the items in the questionnaire were evaluated in 87 physicians at a national university hospital. Internal consistency was satisfactory (Cronbach alpha coefficient, 0.87). Four dimensions were identified in exploratory factor analysis. Correlations between the 4 dimensions supported the construct validity of the items. Scores of time-oriented patients' medical history in the 4 dimensions showed a significant association with physician age. Based on confirmatory factor analysis, associations were significant and positive (P < .001). In terms of the needs of physicians regarding time-oriented patient information in EMRs, both time-oriented treatment results followed by time-oriented team information had significant positive associations. Our study suggests that 4 specific time-oriented patient information factors in EMRs are needed by physicians. Exploring physicians' needs regarding patient-specific time-oriented information may provide a better understanding of the barriers facing the adoption and use of EMRs (eg, decision-making and practice safety concerns) and lead to better acceptance of EMRs in physicians' clinical practices. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Quantification of the cortical contribution to the NIRS signal over the motor cortex using concurrent NIRS-fMRI measurements

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Louis; Yücel, Meryem A.; Dehaes, Mathieu; Cooper, Robert J.; Perdue, Katherine L.; Selb, Juliette; Huppert, Theodore J.; Hoge, Richard D.; Boas, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) measures the functional hemodynamic response occuring at the surface of the cortex. Large pial veins are located above the surface of the cerebral cortex. Following activation, these veins exhibit oxygenation changes but their volume likely stays constant. The back-reflection geometry of the NIRS measurement renders the signal very sensitive to these superficial pial veins. As such, the measured NIRS signal contains contributions from both the cortical region as well as the pial vasculature. In this work, the cortical contribution to the NIRS signal was investigated using (1) Monte Carlo simulations over a realistic geometry constructed from anatomical and vascular MRI and (2) multimodal NIRS-BOLD recordings during motor stimulation. A good agreement was found between the simulations and the modeling analysis of in vivo measurements. Our results suggest that the cortical contribution to the deoxyhemoglobin signal change (ΔHbR) is equal to 16–22% of the cortical contribution to the total hemoglobin signal change (ΔHbT). Similarly, the cortical contribution of the oxyhemoglobin signal change (ΔHbO) is equal to 73–79% of the cortical contribution to the ΔHbT signal. These results suggest that ΔHbT is far less sensitive to pial vein contamination and therefore, it is likely that the ΔHbT signal provides better spatial specificity and should be used instead of ΔHbO or ΔHbR to map cerebral activity with NIRS. While different stimuli will result in different pial vein contributions, our finger tapping results do reveal the importance of considering the pial contribution. PMID:22036999

  10. Ice-tethered measurement platforms in the Arctic Ocean: a contribution by the FRAM infrastructure program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppmann, Mario; Nicolaus, Marcel; Rabe, Benjamin; Wenzhöfer, Frank; Katlein, Christian; Scholz, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The Arctic Ocean has been in the focus of many studies during recent years, investigating the state, the causes and the implications of the observed rapid transition towards a thinner and younger sea-ice cover. However, consistent observational datasets of sea ice, ocean and atmosphere are still sparse due to the limited accessibility and harsh environmental conditions. One important tool to fill this gap has become more and more feasible during recent years: autonomous, ice-tethered measurement platforms (buoys). These drifting instruments independently transmit their data via satellites, and enable observations over larger areas and over longer time periods than manned expeditions, even throughout the winter. One aim of the newly established FRAM (FRontiers in Arctic marine Monitoring) infrastructure program at the Alfred-Wegener-Institute is to realize and maintain an interdisciplinary network of buoys in the Arctic Ocean, contributing to an integrated, Arctic-wide observatory. The additional buoy infrastructure, ship-time, and developments provided by FRAM are critical elements in the ongoing international effort to fill the large data gaps in a rapidly changing Arctic Ocean. Our focus is the particularly underrepresented Eurasian Basin. Types of instruments range from snow depth beacons and ice mass balance buoys for monitoring ice growth and snow accumulation, over radiation and weather stations for energy budget estimates, to ice-tethered profiling systems for upper ocean monitoring. Further, development of new bio-optical and biogeochemical buoys is expected to enhance our understanding of bio-physical processes associated with Arctic sea ice. The first set of FRAM buoys was deployed in September 2015 from RV Polarstern. All datasets are publicly available on dedicated web portals. Near real time data are reported into international initiatives, such as the Global Telecommunication System (GTS) and the International Arctic Buoy Programme (IABP). The

  11. Occupational physicians and environmental medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Ducatman, A.M.

    1993-03-01

    Physicians who practice environmental medicine seek to identify and to prevent patient and population exposures that cause adverse human health outcomes. Epidemiologic, toxicologic, clinical, and public health skills essential to this enterprise are indistinguishable from those of the occupational physician. Several important controversies illustrate the essential role of occupational physicians in environmental health science and policy, including environmental asbestos, dioxin, electromagnetic fields, and carcinogenicity testing. Our continuing involvement in environmental issues is predicted by three conditions, each unlikely to change. The human remains the animal of greatest interest; the natural experiment will have been performed (however unwittingly); and the workmore » site will continue to provide that first and clearest setting for measuring the outcome. Therefore, residency training must be expanded so that future occupational and environmental physicians will recognize their fundamental role in environmental health. The results of our industry cross factory walls with ease. So must our efforts.« less

  12. Implicit bias among physicians and its prediction of thrombolysis decisions for black and white patients.

    PubMed

    Green, Alexander R; Carney, Dana R; Pallin, Daniel J; Ngo, Long H; Raymond, Kristal L; Iezzoni, Lisa I; Banaji, Mahzarin R

    2007-09-01

    Studies documenting racial/ethnic disparities in health care frequently implicate physicians' unconscious biases. No study to date has measured physicians' unconscious racial bias to test whether this predicts physicians' clinical decisions. To test whether physicians show implicit race bias and whether the magnitude of such bias predicts thrombolysis recommendations for black and white patients with acute coronary syndromes. An internet-based tool comprising a clinical vignette of a patient presenting to the emergency department with an acute coronary syndrome, followed by a questionnaire and three Implicit Association Tests (IATs). Study invitations were e-mailed to all internal medicine and emergency medicine residents at four academic medical centers in Atlanta and Boston; 287 completed the study, met inclusion criteria, and were randomized to either a black or white vignette patient. IAT scores (normal continuous variable) measuring physicians' implicit race preference and perceptions of cooperativeness. Physicians' attribution of symptoms to coronary artery disease for vignette patients with randomly assigned race, and their decisions about thrombolysis. Assessment of physicians' explicit racial biases by questionnaire. Physicians reported no explicit preference for white versus black patients or differences in perceived cooperativeness. In contrast, IATs revealed implicit preference favoring white Americans (mean IAT score = 0.36, P < .001, one-sample t test) and implicit stereotypes of black Americans as less cooperative with medical procedures (mean IAT score 0.22, P < .001), and less cooperative generally (mean IAT score 0.30, P < .001). As physicians' prowhite implicit bias increased, so did their likelihood of treating white patients and not treating black patients with thrombolysis (P = .009). This study represents the first evidence of unconscious (implicit) race bias among physicians, its dissociation from conscious (explicit) bias, and its

  13. The effect of physician practice organization on efficient utilization of hospital resources.

    PubMed

    Burns, L R; Chilingerian, J A; Wholey, D R

    1994-12-01

    This study examines variations in the efficient use of hospital resources across individual physicians. The study is conducted over a two-year period (1989-1990) in all short-term general hospitals with 50 or more beds in Arizona. We examine hospital discharge data for 43,625 women undergoing cesarean sections and vaginal deliveries without complications. These data include physician identifiers that permit us to link patient information with information on physicians provided by the state medical association. The study first measures the contribution of physician characteristics to the explanatory power of regression models that predict resource use. It then tests hypothesized effects on resource utilization exerted by two sets of physician level factors: physician background and physician practice organization. The latter includes effects of hospital practice volume, concentration of hospital practice, percent managed care patients in one's hospital practice, and diversity of patients treated. Efficiency (inefficiency) is measured as the degree of variation in patient charges and length of stay below (above) the average of treating all patients with the same condition in the same hospital in the same year with the same severity of illness, controlling for discharge status and the presence of complications. After controlling for patient factors, physician characteristics explain a significant amount of the variability in hospital charges and length of stay in the two maternity conditions. Results also support hypotheses that efficiency is influenced by practice organization factors such as patient volume and managed care load. Physicians with larger practices and a higher share of managed care patients appear to be more efficient. The results suggest that health care reform efforts to develop physician-hospital networks and managed competition may promote greater parsimony in physicians' practice behavior.

  14. The effect of physician practice organization on efficient utilization of hospital resources.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, L R; Chilingerian, J A; Wholey, D R

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study examines variations in the efficient use of hospital resources across individual physicians. DATA SOURCES AND SETTING. The study is conducted over a two-year period (1989-1990) in all short-term general hospitals with 50 or more beds in Arizona. We examine hospital discharge data for 43,625 women undergoing cesarean sections and vaginal deliveries without complications. These data include physician identifiers that permit us to link patient information with information on physicians provided by the state medical association. STUDY DESIGN. The study first measures the contribution of physician characteristics to the explanatory power of regression models that predict resource use. It then tests hypothesized effects on resource utilization exerted by two sets of physician level factors: physician background and physician practice organization. The latter includes effects of hospital practice volume, concentration of hospital practice, percent managed care patients in one's hospital practice, and diversity of patients treated. Efficiency (inefficiency) is measured as the degree of variation in patient charges and length of stay below (above) the average of treating all patients with the same condition in the same hospital in the same year with the same severity of illness, controlling for discharge status and the presence of complications. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. After controlling for patient factors, physician characteristics explain a significant amount of the variability in hospital charges and length of stay in the two maternity conditions. Results also support hypotheses that efficiency is influenced by practice organization factors such as patient volume and managed care load. Physicians with larger practices and a higher share of managed care patients appear to be more efficient. CONCLUSIONS. The results suggest that health care reform efforts to develop physician-hospital networks and managed competition may promote greater parsimony in

  15. Measuring the Contribution of Higher Education to Innovation Capacity in the EU. Final Report: Revised Version

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    European Commission, 2017

    2017-01-01

    This current study is part of the actions taken aiming to analyse the links between the operations and effects of higher-education institutions on the capacity to innovate in the economies in Europe. Providing insights into the contribution of higher education to the innovative capacity of the EU economies is crucial for policy making and the…

  16. Measuring Funds of Knowledge: Contributions to Latina/o Students' Academic and Nonacademic Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rios-Aguilar, Cecilia

    2010-01-01

    Background/Context: The educational performance of Latina/o students in the United States is becoming a central concern in education policy and reform. In an attempt to explain variation in the academic achievement of Latina/o students, considerable sociological and economic research has emerged. Even though the contributions of these studies are…

  17. Better Physician's 'Black Bags'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The "black bag" is outgrowth of astronaut monitoring technology from NASA's Johnson Space Center. Technically known as the portable medical status system, a highly advanced physician's "black bag" weighs less than 30 pounds, yet contains equipment for monitoring and recording vital signs, electrocardiograms, and electroencephalograms. Liquid crystal displays are used to present 15 digits of data simultaneously for long periods of time without excessive use of battery power. Single printed circuit card contains all circuitry required to measure and display vital signs such as heart and respiration rate, temperature, and blood pressure.

  18. Attitudes and habits of highly humanistic physicians.

    PubMed

    Chou, Carol M; Kellom, Katherine; Shea, Judy A

    2014-09-01

    Humanism is fundamental to excellent patient care and is therefore an essential concept for physicians to teach to learners. However, the factors that help attending physicians to maintain their own humanistic attitudes over time are not well understood. The authors attempted to identify attitudes and habits that highly humanistic physicians perceive allow them to sustain their humanistic approach to patient care. In 2011, the authors polled internal medicine residents at the University of Pennsylvania to identify attending physicians who exemplified humanistic patient care. In this cross-sectional, qualitative study, the authors used a semistructured script to interview the identified attending physicians to determine attitudes and habits that they believed contribute to their sustenance of humanistic patient care. Attitudes for sustaining humanism in this cohort of humanistic physicians included humility, curiosity, and a desire to live up to a standard of behavior. Many of the physicians deliberately worked at maintaining their humanistic attitudes. Habits that humanistic physicians engaged in to sustain their humanism included self-reflection, connecting with patients, teaching and role modeling, and achieving work-life balance. Physicians believed that treating their patients humanistically serves to prevent burnout in themselves. Identification of factors that highly humanistic attending physicians perceive help them to sustain a humanistic outlook over time may inform the design of programs to develop and sustain humanism in teaching faculty.

  19. The Geographic Distribution of Physicians Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Meredith B; Zaslavsky, Alan; Newhouse, Joseph P

    2005-01-01

    Context While there is debate over whether the U.S. is training too many physicians, many seem to agree that physicians are geographically maldistributed, with too few in rural areas. Objective Official definitions of shortage areas assume the market for physician services is based on county boundaries. We wished to ascertain how the picture of a possible shortage changes using alternative measures of geographic access. We measure geographic access by the number of full-time equivalent physicians serving a community divided by the expected number of patients (possibly both from within the community and outside) receiving care from those physicians. Moreover, we wished to determine how the geographic distribution of physicians had changed since previous studies, in light of the large increase in physician numbers. Design Cross-sectional data analyses of alternative measures of geographic access to physicians in 23 states with low physician–population ratios. Results Between 1979 and 1999, the number of physicians doubled in the sample states. Although most specialties experienced greater diffusion everywhere, smaller specialties had not yet diffused to the smallest towns. Multiple measures of geographic access, including physician-to-population ratios, average distance traveled to the nearest physician, and projected average caseload per physician, confirm that residents of metropolitan areas have better geographic access to physicians. Physician-to-population ratios exhibit the largest degree of geographic disparity, but ratios in rural counties adjacent to metropolitan areas are smaller than in those not adjacent to metropolitan areas. Distance-traveled and caseload models that allow patients to cross county lines show less disparity and indicate that residents of isolated rural counties have less access than those living in counties adjacent to metropolitan areas. Conclusion Geographic access to physicians has continued to improve over the past two decades

  20. Emergency Physicians at War.

    PubMed

    Muck, Andrew E; Givens, Melissa; Bebarta, Vikhyat S; Mason, Phillip E; Goolsby, Craig

    2018-05-01

    Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF-A) in Afghanistan and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) represent the first major, sustained wars in which emergency physicians (EPs) fully participated as an integrated part of the military's health system. EPs proved invaluable in the deployments, and they frequently used the full spectrum of trauma and medical care skills. The roles EPs served expanded over the years of the conflicts and demonstrated the unique skill set of emergency medicine (EM) training. EPs supported elite special operations units, served in medical command positions, and developed and staffed flying intensive care units. EPs have brought their combat experience home to civilian practice. This narrative review summarizes the history, contributions, and lessons learned by EPs during OEF-A/OIF and describes changes to daily clinical practice of EM derived from the combat environment.

  1. Product of the Physician Global Assessment and body surface area: a simple static measure of psoriasis severity in a longitudinal cohort.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Jessica A; McFadden, Molly; Woodcock, Jamie; Clegg, Daniel O; Helliwell, Philip; Dommasch, Erica; Gelfand, Joel M; Krueger, Gerald G; Duffin, Kristina Callis

    2013-12-01

    The Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) is considered the gold standard assessment tool for psoriasis severity, but PASI is limited by its complexity and insensitivity in people with mild psoriasis. We sought to evaluate the product of a Physician Global Assessment (PGA) and Body Surface Area (BSA) (PGAxBSA) as an alternative to PASI. Psoriasis severity was evaluated at 6-month intervals in participants of the Utah Psoriasis Initiative registry. Correlation coefficients were used to compare PGAxBSA with PASI and the Simplified PASI (SPASI). Between August 2008 and November 2010, 435 assessments were completed in 226 participants. The median PASI score was 3.2 (interquartile range 1.8-5.4) and the median BSA was 3.0% (interquartile range 1.0%-5.0%). PGAxBSA had higher correlations with PASI than SPASI (0.87 vs 0.76, P < .001). PGAxBSA also had higher correlations with a Global Patient Assessment of psoriasis severity (0.65) than both PASI (0.59, P < .001) and SPASI (0.51, P < .001). The use of PGAxBSA for measuring severe psoriasis and response to therapy is unclear, because most participants had mild to moderate psoriasis and data were not collected at predefined intervals in relation to therapy initiation. Interrater reliability was not assessed. PGAxBSA is a simple and sensitive instrument for measuring psoriasis severity. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Measuring Implicit and Explicit Linguistic Knowledge: What Can Heritage Language Learners Contribute?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowles, Melissa A.

    2011-01-01

    Although claims about explicit and implicit language knowledge are central to many debates in SLA, little research has been dedicated to measuring the two knowledge types (R. Ellis, 2004, 2005). The purpose of this study was to validate the use of the battery of tests reported in Ellis (2005) to measure implicit and explicit language knowledge.…

  3. How International Studies Contributed to Educational Theory and Methods through Measurement of Opportunity to Learn Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suter, Larry E.

    2017-01-01

    The international comparative studies in 1959 were conducted by International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA) researchers who recognized that differences in student achievement measures in mathematics across countries could be caused by differences in curricula. The measurements of opportunity to learn (OTL) grew…

  4. NASA's Potential Contributions to Avalanche Forecasting Using Active and Passive Microwave Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blonski, Slawomir

    2007-01-01

    This Candidate Solution is based on using active and passive microwave measurements acquired from NASA satellites to improve USDA (U.S. Department of Agriculture) Forest Service forecasting of avalanche danger. Regional Avalanche Centers prepare avalanche forecasts using ground measurements of snowpack and mountain weather conditions. In this Solution, range of the in situ observations is extended by adding remote sensing measurements of snow depth, snow water equivalent, and snowfall rate acquired by satellite missions that include Aqua, CloudSat, future GPM (Global Precipitation Measurement), and the proposed SCLP (Snow and Cold Land Processes). Measurements of snowpack conditions and time evolution are improved by combining the in situ and satellite observations with a snow model. Recurring snow observations from NASA satellites increase accuracy of avalanche forecasting, which helps the public and the managers of public facilities make better avalanche safety decisions.

  5. Quality of work life, burnout, and stress in emergency department physicians: a qualitative review.

    PubMed

    Bragard, Isabelle; Dupuis, Gilles; Fleet, Richard

    2015-08-01

    A 2006 literature review reported that emergency department (ED) physicians showed elevated burnout levels and highlighted several environment and personal issues contributing toward burnout. Research on burnout in EDs is limited. We propose an updated qualitative review on the relationships between work stress, burnout, and quality of work life in ED physicians. We searched MEDLINE, PsycInfo, and Science Direct for studies published since 2005. Of 491 papers, 10 papers were retained, using validated measures and having a minimum of 75 participants. Data extraction was performed manually by the first author and was reviewed by the second author. The majority of the studies used large samples, cross-sectional designs, random, and/or stratified assignment. ED physicians showed moderate to high levels of burnout with difficult work conditions including significant psychological demands, lack of resources, and poor support. Nonetheless, physicians reported high job satisfaction. Further studies should focus on the implementation of measures designed to prevent burnout.

  6. The relationship between physician empathy and disease complications: an empirical study of primary care physicians and their diabetic patients in Parma, Italy.

    PubMed

    Del Canale, Stefano; Louis, Daniel Z; Maio, Vittorio; Wang, Xiaohong; Rossi, Giuseppina; Hojat, Mohammadreza; Gonnella, Joseph S

    2012-09-01

    To test the hypothesis that scores of a validated measure of physician empathy are associated with clinical outcomes for patients with diabetes mellitus. This retrospective correlational study included 20,961 patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus from a population of 284,298 adult patients in the Local Health Authority, Parma, Italy, enrolled with one of 242 primary care physicians for the entire year of 2009. Participating physicians' Jefferson Scale of Empathy scores were compared with occurrence of acute metabolic complications (hyperosmolar state, diabetic ketoacidosis, coma) in diabetes patients hospitalized in 2009. Patients of physicians with high empathy scores, compared with patients of physicians with moderate and low empathy scores, had a significantly lower rate of acute metabolic complications (4.0, 7.1, and 6.5 per 1,000 patients, respectively, P < .05). Logistic regression analysis showed physicians' empathy scores were associated with acute metabolic complications: odds ratio (OR) = 0.59 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.37-0.95, contrasting physicians with high and low empathy scores). Patients' age (≥69 years) also contributed to the prediction of acute metabolic complications: OR = 1.7 (95% CI, 1.2-1.4). Physicians' gender and age, patients' gender, type of practice (solo, association), geographical location of practice (mountain, hills, plain), and length of time the patient had been enrolled with the physician were not associated with acute metabolic complications. These results suggest that physician empathy is significantly associated with clinical outcome for patients with diabetes mellitus and should be considered an important component of clinical competence.

  7. [Sleep disorders among physicians on shift work].

    PubMed

    Schlafer, O; Wenzel, V; Högl, B

    2014-11-01

    Sleep disorders in physicians who perform shift work can result in increased risks of health problems that negatively impact performance and patient safety. Even those who cope well with shift work are likely to suffer from sleep disorders. The aim of this manuscript is to discuss possible causes, contributing factors and consequences of sleep disorders in physicians and to identify measures that can improve adaptation to shift work and treatment strategies for shift work-associated sleep disorders. The risk factors that influence the development of sleep disorders in physicians are numerous and include genetic factors (15 % of the population), age (> 50 years), undiagnosed sleep apnea,, alcohol abuse as well as multiple stress factors inherent in clinical duties (including shift work), research, teaching and family obligations. Several studies have reported an increased risk for medical errors in sleep-deprived physicians. Shift workers have an increased risk for psychiatric and cardiovascular diseases and shift work may also be a contributing factor to cancer. A relationship has been reported not only with sleep deprivation and changes in food intake but also with diabetes mellitus, obesity, hypertension and coronary heart disease. Nicotine and alcohol consumption are more frequent among shift workers. Increased sickness and accident rates among physicians when commuting (especially after night shifts) have a socioeconomic impact. In order to reduce fatigue and to improve performance, short naps during shiftwork or naps plus caffeine, have been proposed as coping strategies; however, napping during adverse circadian phases is less effective, if not impossible when unable to fall asleep. Bright and blue light supports alertness during a night shift. After shiftwork, direct sunlight exposure to the retina can be avoided by using dark sunglasses or glasses with orange lenses for commuting home. The home environment for daytime sleeping after a night shift should be

  8. Trends in physician referrals in the United States, 1999-2009.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Michael L; Song, Zirui; Landon, Bruce E

    2012-01-23

    Physician referrals play a central role in ambulatory care in the United States; however, little is known about national trends in physician referrals over time. The objective of this study was to assess changes in the annual rate of referrals to other physicians from physician office visits in the United States from 1999 to 2009. We analyzed nationally representative cross-sections of ambulatory patient visits in the United States, using a sample of 845 243 visits from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey from 1993 to 2009, focusing on the decade from 1999 to 2009. The main outcome measures were survey-weighted estimates of the total number and percentage of visits resulting in a referral to another physician across several patient and physician characteristics. From 1999 to 2009, the probability that an ambulatory visit to a physician resulted in a referral to another physician increased from 4.8% to 9.3% (P < .001), a 94% increase. The absolute number of visits resulting in a physician referral increased 159% nationally during this time, from 41 million to 105 million. This trend was consistent across all subgroups examined, except for slower growth among physicians with ownership stakes in their practice (P = .02) or those with the majority of income from managed care contracts (P = .007). Changes in referral rates varied according to the principal symptoms accounting for patients' visits, with significant increases noted for visits to primary care physicians from patients with cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, orthopedic, dermatologic, and ear/nose/throat symptoms. The percentage and absolute number of ambulatory visits resulting in a referral in the United States grew substantially from 1999 to 2009. More research is necessary to understand the contribution of rising referral rates to costs of care.

  9. Contribution of titin and extracellular matrix to passive pressure and measurement of sarcomere length in the mouse left ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Charles S; Granzier, Henk L

    2011-01-01

    It remains to be established to what degree titin and the extracellular matrix (ECM) contribute to passive pressure in the left ventricle (LV). Thus, we aimed to elucidate the contribution of major molecular determinants of passive pressure in the normal mouse LV. Furthermore, we determined the working sarcomere length (SL) range of the LV to bridge our findings to earlier work in skinned muscle fibers. We utilized Frank-Starling type protocols to obtain diastolic pressure-volume relationships (PVR) in Langendorff perfused isolated LVs. To quantify the molecular contribution of titin and ECM, we innovated on methods of fiber mechanics to chemically permeabilize intact LVs and measure a fully passive PVR. To differentially dissect the contributions of the ECM and titin, we utilized myofilament extraction techniques in permeabilized LVs, measuring passive PVRs at each stage in the protocol. Myofilament extraction suggests that titin contributes ~80% of passive pressures in the heart. Langendorff perfusion was also used to chemically fix passive and BaCl2 activated hearts at specific volumes to determine that the maximal working SL range of the midwall LV fibers is approximately 1.8-2.2 μm. A model of the passive SL-Volume relationship was then used to estimate the pressure-SL relationships, indicating that the ECM contribution does not exceed titin's contribution until large volumes with SLs>~2.2μm. In conclusion, within physiological volumes titin is the dominant contributor to LV passive pressure, and ECM-based pressures dominates at larger volumes. PMID:21255582

  10. American College of Physicians

    MedlinePlus

    ... Journals & Publications Clinical Resources & Products High Value Care Ethics & Professionalism Practice Resources Physician and Practice Timeline Upcoming ... Journals & Publications Clinical Resources & Products High Value Care Ethics & Professionalism Practice Resources Physician and Practice Timeline Upcoming ...

  11. Binding of volatile anesthetics to serum albumin: measurements of enthalpy and solvent contributions.

    PubMed

    Sawas, Abdul H; Pentyala, Srinivas N; Rebecchi, Mario J

    2004-10-05

    This study directly examines the enthalpic contributions to binding in aqueous solution of closely related anesthetic haloethers (desflurane, isoflurane, enflurane, and sevoflurane), a haloalkane (halothane), and an intravenous anesthetic (propofol) to bovine and human serum albumin (BSA and HSA) using isothermal titration calorimetry. Binding to serum albumin is exothermic, yielding enthalpies (DeltaH(obs)) of -3 to -6 kcal/mol for BSA with a rank order of apparent equilibrium association constants (K(a) values): desflurane > isoflurane approximately enflurane > halothane >or= sevoflurane, with the differences being largely ascribed to entropic contributions. Competition experiments indicate that volatile anesthetics, at low concentrations, share the same sites in albumin previously identified in crystallographic and photo-cross-linking studies. The magnitude of the observed DeltaH increased linearly with increased reaction temperature, reflecting negative changes in heat capacities (DeltaC(p)). These -DeltaC(p) values significantly exceed those calculated for burial of each anesthetic in a hydrophobic pocket. The enhanced stabilities of the albumin/anesthetic complexes and -DeltaC(p) are consistent with favorable solvent rearrangements that promote binding. This idea is supported by substitution of D(2)O for H(2)O that significantly reduces the favorable binding enthalpy observed for desflurane and isoflurane, with an opposing increase of DeltaS(obs). From these results, we infer that solvent restructuring, resulting from release of water weakly bound to anesthetic and anesthetic-binding sites, is a dominant and favorable contributor to the enthalpy and entropy of binding to proteins.

  12. Evaluation of Physicians' Cognitive Styles.

    PubMed

    Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Beckstead, Jason W; Elqayam, Shira; Reljic, Tea; Hozo, Iztok; Kumar, Ambuj; Cannon-Bowers, Janis; Taylor, Stephanie; Tsalatsanis, Athanasios; Turner, Brandon; Paidas, Charles

    2014-07-01

    Patient outcomes critically depend on accuracy of physicians' judgment, yet little is known about individual differences in cognitive styles that underlie physicians' judgments. The objective of this study was to assess physicians' individual differences in cognitive styles relative to age, experience, and degree and type of training. Physicians at different levels of training and career completed a web-based survey of 6 scales measuring individual differences in cognitive styles (maximizing v. satisficing, analytical v. intuitive reasoning, need for cognition, intolerance toward ambiguity, objectivism, and cognitive reflection). We measured psychometric properties (Cronbach's α) of scales; relationship of age, experience, degree, and type of training; responses to scales; and accuracy on conditional inference task. The study included 165 trainees and 56 attending physicians (median age 31 years; range 25-69 years). All 6 constructs showed acceptable psychometric properties. Surprisingly, we found significant negative correlation between age and satisficing (r = -0.239; P = 0.017). Maximizing (willingness to engage in alternative search strategy) also decreased with age (r = -0.220; P = 0.047). Number of incorrect inferences negatively correlated with satisficing (r = -0.246; P = 0.014). Disposition to suppress intuitive responses was associated with correct responses on 3 of 4 inferential tasks. Trainees showed a tendency to engage in analytical thinking (r = 0.265; P = 0.025), while attendings displayed inclination toward intuitive-experiential thinking (r = 0.427; P = 0.046). However, trainees performed worse on conditional inference task. Physicians capable of suppressing an immediate intuitive response to questions and those scoring higher on rational thinking made fewer inferential mistakes. We found a negative correlation between age and maximizing: Physicians who were more advanced in their careers were less willing to spend time and effort in an

  13. The Value of Measurement for Development of Nursing Knowledge:Underlying Philosophy, Contributions and Critiques.

    PubMed

    Durepos, Pamela; Orr, Elizabeth; Ploeg, Jenny; Kaasalainen, Sharon

    2018-06-26

    A philosophical discussion of constructive realism and measurement in the development of nursing knowledge is presented. Through Carper's four patterns of knowing, nurses come to know a person holistically. However, measurement as a source for nursing knowledge has been criticized for underlying positivism and reductionist approach to exploring reality. Which seems mal-alignment with person-centered care. Discussion paper. Constructive realism bridges positivism and constructivism, facilitating the measurement of physical and psychological phenomena. Reduction of complex phenomena and theoretical constructs into measurable properties is essential to building nursing's empiric knowledge and facilitates (rather than inhibits) person-knowing. Nurses should consider constructive realism as a philosophy to underpin their practice. This philosophy supports measurement as a primary method of inquiry in nursing research and clinical practice. Nurses can carefully select, and purposefully integrate, measurement tools with other methods of inquiry (such as qualitative research methods) to demonstrate the usefulness of nursing interventions and highlight nursing as a science. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Web-Based Physician Ratings for California Physicians on Probation

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    . Despite these statistical findings, the absolute difference was quite small. Physician rating websites have utility but are imperfect proxies for competence. Further research on physician Web-based ratings is warranted to understand what they measure and how they are associated with quality. PMID:28830852

  15. Web-Based Physician Ratings for California Physicians on Probation.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Gregory P; Awad, Mohannad A; Osterberg, E Charles; Gaither, Thomas W; Chumnarnsongkhroh, Thanabhudee; Washington, Samuel L; Breyer, Benjamin N

    2017-08-22

    difference was quite small. Physician rating websites have utility but are imperfect proxies for competence. Further research on physician Web-based ratings is warranted to understand what they measure and how they are associated with quality. ©Gregory P Murphy, Mohannad A Awad, E Charles Osterberg, Thomas W Gaither, Thanabhudee Chumnarnsongkhroh, Samuel L Washington, Benjamin N Breyer. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 22.08.2017.

  16. Correlates of midlife career achievement among women physicians.

    PubMed

    Graves, P L; Thomas, C B

    1985-08-09

    In the context of a longitudinal study, we explored factors contributing to midlife career achievement among 108 women physicians. Three groups were formed, based on medical specialty, specialty board certification, and professorial appointment. Using analysis of variance procedures, the career groups were compared on measures obtained during medical school and on marital status, family size, and three health measures in midlife. Of the youthful measures, academic standing, father's socioeconomic status, and early family (specifically father-daughter) relationships were found to be associated with midlife achievement. Furthermore, a clear association was observed between success and good health in midlife. Married women formed the majority in all groups; no differences in family size were found. We conclude that career achievement among women physicians is influenced less by marriage and family size than by motivational and personality factors shaped in early life.

  17. Measuring the leading hadronic contribution to the muon g-2 via the -e elastic scattering.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marconi, Umberto; Piccinini, Fulvio

    2018-05-01

    The precision measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment g-2 of the muon presently exhibits a 3.5 σ deviation between theory and experiments. In the next few years the anomalous magnetic moment will be measured to higher precisions at Fermilab and J-PARC. The theoretical prediction can be improved by reducing the uncertainty on the leading hadronic correction HLO μ to the g-2. Here we present a novel approach to determine aHLO μ with space-like data, by means of precise measurement of the hadronic shift of the effective electromagnetic coupling α exploiting the elastic scattering of 150 GeV muons (currently available at CERN North area) on atomic electrons of a low-Z target. The direct measurement of aHLO μ in the space-like region will provide a new independent determination competitive with the time-like dispersive approach, and will consolidate the theoretical prediction of the muon g-2 in the Standard Model. It will allow therefore a firmer interpretation of the measurements of the future muon g-2 experiments at Fermilab and J-PARC

  18. Aligning with physicians to regionalize services.

    PubMed

    Fink, John

    2014-11-01

    When effectively designed and implemented, regionalization allows a health system to coordinate care, eliminate redundancies, reduce costs, optimize resource utilization, and improve outcomes. The preferred model to manage service lines regionally will depend on each facility's capabilities and the willingness of physicians to accept changes in clinical delivery. Health systems can overcome physicians' objections to regionalization by implementing a hospital-physician alignment structure that gives a measure of shared control in the management of the organization.

  19. Contribution of correlated noise and selective decoding to choice probability measurements in extrastriate visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yong; Angelaki, Dora E; DeAngelis, Gregory C

    2014-07-01

    Trial by trial covariations between neural activity and perceptual decisions (quantified by choice Probability, CP) have been used to probe the contribution of sensory neurons to perceptual decisions. CPs are thought to be determined by both selective decoding of neural activity and by the structure of correlated noise among neurons, but the respective roles of these factors in creating CPs have been controversial. We used biologically-constrained simulations to explore this issue, taking advantage of a peculiar pattern of CPs exhibited by multisensory neurons in area MSTd that represent self-motion. Although models that relied on correlated noise or selective decoding could both account for the peculiar pattern of CPs, predictions of the selective decoding model were substantially more consistent with various features of the neural and behavioral data. While correlated noise is essential to observe CPs, our findings suggest that selective decoding of neuronal signals also plays important roles.

  20. In situ measurements of contributions to the global electrical circuit by a thunderstorm in southeastern Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, J.N.; Holzworth, R.H.; McCarthy, M.P.

    2009-01-01

    The global electrical circuit, which maintains a potential of about 280??kV between the earth and the ionosphere, is thought to be driven mainly by thunderstorms and lightning. However, very few in situ measurements of electrical current above thunderstorms have been successfully obtained. In this paper, we present dc to very low frequency electric fields and atmospheric conductivity measured in the stratosphere (30-35??km altitude) above an active thunderstorm in southeastern Brazil. From these measurements, we estimate the mean quasi-static conduction current during the storm period to be 2.5 ?? 1.25??A. Additionally, we examine the transient conduction currents following a large positive cloud-to-ground (+ CG) lightning flash and typical - CG flashes. We find that the majority of the total current is attributed to the quasi-static thundercloud charge, rather than lightning, which supports the classical Wilson model for the global electrical circuit.

  1. Measuring the emergence of tobacco dependence: the contribution of negative reinforcement models.

    PubMed

    Eissenberg, Thomas

    2004-06-01

    This review of negative reinforcement models of drug dependence is part of a series that takes the position that a complete understanding of current concepts of dependence will facilitate the development of reliable and valid measures of the emergence of tobacco dependence. Other reviews within the series consider models that emphasize positive reinforcement and social learning/cognitive models. This review summarizes negative reinforcement in general and then presents four current negative reinforcement models that emphasize withdrawal, classical conditioning, self-medication and opponent-processes. For each model, the paper outlines central aspects of dependence, conceptualization of dependence development and influences that the model might have on current and future measures of dependence. Understanding how drug dependence develops will be an important part of future successful tobacco dependence measurement, prevention and treatment strategies.

  2. Organizational commitment of military physicians.

    PubMed

    Demir, Cesim; Sahin, Bayram; Teke, Kadir; Ucar, Muharrem; Kursun, Olcay

    2009-09-01

    An individual's loyalty or bond to his or her employing organization, referred to as organizational commitment, influences various organizational outcomes such as employee motivation, job satisfaction, performance, accomplishment of organizational goals, employee turnover, and absenteeism. Therefore, as in other sectors, employee commitment is crucial also in the healthcare market. This study investigates the effects of organizational factors and personal characteristics on organizational commitment of military physicians using structural equation modeling (SEM) on a self-report, cross-sectional survey that consisted of 635 physicians working in the 2 biggest military hospitals in Turkey. The results of this study indicate that professional commitment and organizational incentives contribute positively to organizational commitment, whereas conflict with organizational goals makes a significantly negative contribution to it. These results might help develop strategies to increase employee commitment, especially in healthcare organizations, because job-related factors have been found to possess greater impact on organizational commitment than personal characteristics.

  3. Triangulating Measures of Awareness: A Contribution to the Debate on Learning without Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebuschat, Patrick; Hamrick, Phillip; Riestenberg, Kate; Sachs, Rebecca; Ziegler, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Williams's (2005) study on "learning without awareness" and three subsequent extensions (Faretta-Stutenberg & Morgan-Short, 2011; Hama & Leow, 2010; Rebuschat, Hamrick, Sachs, Riestenberg, & Ziegler, 2013) have reported conflicting results, perhaps in part due to differences in how awareness has been measured. The present…

  4. Contributions to the study of inductive transducers for measuring the amplitude of vibrations in solid media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dragan, O.; Galan, N.; Sirbu, A.; Ghita, C.

    1974-01-01

    The design and construction of inductive transducers for measuring the vibrations in metal bars at ultrasonic frequencies are discussed. Illustrations of the inductive transducers are provided. The quantitative relations that are useful in designing the transducers are analyzed. Mathematical models are developed to substantiate the theoretical considerations. Results obtained with laboratory equipment in testing specified metal samples are included.

  5. Contribution of Isoprene Epoxydiol to Urban Organic Aerosol: Evidence from Modeling and Measurements

    EPA Science Inventory

    In a region heavily influenced by anthropogenic and biogenic atmospheric emissions, recent field measurements have attributed one third of urban organic aerosol by mass to isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX). These aerosols arise from the gas phase oxidation of isoprene, the formation of...

  6. Contributions to the revision of the 'Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyriazis, G. A.

    2015-01-01

    Some inconsistencies of the current version of the 'Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement' are discussed and suggestions to make this document consistent are commented. The paper is written taking into account the terminology of the third version of the 'International vocabulary of metrology'.

  7. Contribution of SELENE-2 geodetic measurements to constrain the lunar internal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, K.; Kikuchi, F.; Yamada, R.; Iwata, T.; Kono, Y.; Tsuruta, S.; Hanada, H.; Goossens, S. J.; Ishihara, Y.; Kamata, S.; Sasaki, S.

    2012-12-01

    Internal structure and composition of the Moon provide important clue and constraints on theories for how the Moon formed and evolved. The Apollo seismic network has contributed to the internal structure modeling. Efforts have been made to detect the lunar core from the noisy Apollo data (e.g., [1], [2]), but there is scant information about the structure below the deepest moonquakes at about 1000 km depth. On the other hand, there have been geodetic studies to infer the deep structure of the Moon. For example, LLR (Lunar Laser Ranging) data analyses detected a displacement of the lunar pole of rotation, indicating that dissipation is acting on the rotation arising from a fluid core [3]. Bayesian inversion using geodetic data (such as mass, moments of inertia, tidal Love numbers k2 and h2, and quality factor Q) also suggests a fluid core and partial melt in the lower mantle region [4]. Further improvements in determining the second-degree gravity coefficients (which will lead to better estimates of moments of inertia) and the Love number k2 will help us to better constrain the lunar internal structure. Differential VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometry) technique, which was used in the Japanese lunar exploration mission SELENE (Sept. 2007 - June 2009), is expected to contribute to better determining the second-degree potential Love number k2 and low-degree gravity coefficients. SELENE will be followed by the future lunar mission SELENE-2 which will carry both a lander and an orbiter. We propose to put the SELENE-type radio sources on these spacecraft in order to accurately estimate k2 and the low-degree gravity coefficients. By using the same-beam VLBI tracking technique, these parameters will be retrieved through precision orbit determination of the orbiter with respect to the lander which serves as a reference. The VLBI mission with the radio sources is currently one of the mission candidates for SELENE-2. We have conducted a preliminary simulation study on the

  8. Si Lattice, Avogadro Constant, and X- and Gamma-Ray Measurements: Contributions by R.D. Deslattes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, Jr.

    2002-04-01

    The achievement of x-ray interferometry in 1965 opened the possibility of more accurately measuring the lattice spacing of a diffraction crystal on a scale directly tied to the SI system of units. The road from the possible to reality required moving objects and measuring translations with sub-atomic accuracy. The improved crystal lattice spacing determinations had a significant impact on two fundamental measurement areas: 1) the amount of substance (the mole and the associated Avogadro Constant), and 2) short wavelengths (the x- and gamma-ray regions). Progress in both areas required additional metrological advances: density and isotopic abundance measurements are needed for the Avogadro constant and small angle measurements are required for the determination of short wavelengths. The x- and gamma-ray measurements have led to more accurate wavelength standards and neutron binding energy measurements that connect gamma-ray measurements to precision atomic mass measurements, particularly the neutron mass. Richard D. Deslattes devoted much of his scientific career to this measurement program. His outstanding contributions and insights will be reviewed.

  9. Measuring progress from nationally determined contributions to mid-century strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Gokul; Ledna, Catherine; Clarke, Leon; Edmonds, James; McJeon, Haewon; Kyle, Page; Williams, James H.

    2017-12-01

    The Paris Agreement requires countries to articulate near-term emissions reduction strategies through to 2025 or 2030 by communicating nationally determined contributions (NDCs), as well as encouraging the formulation of long-term low-emission development strategies (Article 4.19)1. In response, many countries have either submitted or are preparing mid-century strategies2. Most NDCs set high-level near-term goals—such as limits on emissions or emissions intensity3—which do not provide information about the extent to which they lay the foundations of technology, infrastructure and institutions for deeper reductions in the future, which is a key question for decision makers. Here, using a state-level model of the US embedded within a global integrated assessment model4,5, we demonstrate that although the US NDC lies on a straight-line emissions pathway towards its mid-century strategy, the resulting energy system transitions involve nonlinear transformations. The rates of capacity additions and capital investments in electricity generation beyond 2025 are more than three times the rates during the next decade. Our results demonstrate the need for global stocktaking exercises to evaluate the NDCs using metrics broader than emissions to better illuminate their effectiveness in addressing the Paris Agreement's long-term goals6,7.

  10. Contribution of correlated noise and selective decoding to choice probability measurements in extrastriate visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yong; Angelaki, Dora E; DeAngelis, Gregory C

    2014-01-01

    Trial by trial covariations between neural activity and perceptual decisions (quantified by choice Probability, CP) have been used to probe the contribution of sensory neurons to perceptual decisions. CPs are thought to be determined by both selective decoding of neural activity and by the structure of correlated noise among neurons, but the respective roles of these factors in creating CPs have been controversial. We used biologically-constrained simulations to explore this issue, taking advantage of a peculiar pattern of CPs exhibited by multisensory neurons in area MSTd that represent self-motion. Although models that relied on correlated noise or selective decoding could both account for the peculiar pattern of CPs, predictions of the selective decoding model were substantially more consistent with various features of the neural and behavioral data. While correlated noise is essential to observe CPs, our findings suggest that selective decoding of neuronal signals also plays important roles. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02670.001 PMID:24986734

  11. Health practices of Canadian physicians.

    PubMed

    Frank, Erica; Segura, Carolina

    2009-08-01

    To study the health and health practices of Canadian physicians, which can often influence patient health. Mailed survey. Canada. A random sample of 8100 Canadian physicians; 7934 were found to be eligible and 3213 responded (40.5% response rate). Factors that influence health, such as consumption of fruits and vegetables, amount of exercise and alcohol consumption, smoking status, body mass idex, and participation in preventive health screening measures, as well as work-life balance and emotional stability. Canadian physicians are healthy. More than 90% reported being in good to excellent health, and only 5% reported that poor physical or mental health made it difficult to handle their workload more than half the time in the previous month (although a quarter had reduced work activity because of long-term health conditions). Eight percent were obese, 3% currently smoked cigarettes, and 1% typically consumed 5 drinks or more on days when they drank alcohol. Physicians averaged 4.7 hours of exercise per week and ate fruits and vegetables 4.8 times a day. Their personal screening practices were largely compliant with Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care recommendations. They averaged 38 hours per week on patient care and 11 hours on other professional activities. Fifty-seven percent agreed that they had a good work-life balance, and 11% disagreed with the statement "If I can, I work when I am ill." Compared with self-reports from the general Canadian population, Canadian physicians, like American physicians, seem to be healthy and to have generally healthy behaviour. There is, however, room for improvement in physicians' personal and professional well-being, and improving their personal health practices could be an efficient and beneficent way to improve the health of all Canadians.

  12. A Measurement of the Parity-Violating Asymmetry in Aluminum and its Contribution to a Measurement of the Proton's Weak Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, Joshua Allen

    2016-05-01

    The Q_weak experiment, which ran at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, made a precision measurement of the proton's weak charge, Q^p_W. The weak charge is extracted via a measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic electron-proton scattering from hydrogen at low momentum transfer (Q^2=0.025 GeV^2). This result is directly related to the electroweak mixing angle, sin^2(Theta_W), a fundamental parameter in the Standard Model of particle physics. This provides a precision test sensitive to new, as yet unknown, fundamental physics. This dissertation focuses on two central corrections to the Q_weak measurement: the target window contribution and sub-percent determination of themore » electron beam polarization. The aluminum target windows contribute approximately 30% of the measured asymmetry. Removal of this background requires precise measurements of both the elastic electron-aluminum scattering rate and its parity-violating asymmetry. The results reported here are the most precise measurement of the Q_weak target dilution and asymmetry to date. The parity-violating asymmetry for the aluminum alloy was found to be 1.6174 +/- 0.0704 (stat.) +/- 0.0113 (sys.) parts-per-million. The first sub-percent precision polarization measurements made from the Hall C Moller polarimeter are also reported, with systematic uncertainties of 0.84%.« less

  13. [Instrument to measure adherence in hypertensive patients: contribution of Item Response Theory].

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Malvina Thaís Pacheco; Moreira, Thereza Maria Magalhaes; Vasconcelos, Alexandre Meira de; Andrade, Dalton Francisco de; Silva, Daniele Braz da; Barbetta, Pedro Alberto

    2013-06-01

    To analyze, by means of "Item Response Theory", an instrument to measure adherence to t treatment for hypertension. Analytical study with 406 hypertensive patients with associated complications seen in primary care in Fortaleza, CE, Northeastern Brazil, 2011 using "Item Response Theory". The stages were: dimensionality test, calibrating the items, processing data and creating a scale, analyzed using the gradual response model. A study of the dimensionality of the instrument was conducted by analyzing the polychoric correlation matrix and factor analysis of complete information. Multilog software was used to calibrate items and estimate the scores. Items relating to drug therapy are the most directly related to adherence while those relating to drug-free therapy need to be reworked because they have less psychometric information and low discrimination. The independence of items, the small number of levels in the scale and low explained variance in the adjustment of the models show the main weaknesses of the instrument analyzed. The "Item Response Theory" proved to be a relevant analysis technique because it evaluated respondents for adherence to treatment for hypertension, the level of difficulty of the items and their ability to discriminate between individuals with different levels of adherence, which generates a greater amount of information. The instrument analyzed is limited in measuring adherence to hypertension treatment, by analyzing the "Item Response Theory" of the item, and needs adjustment. The proper formulation of the items is important in order to accurately measure the desired latent trait.

  14. Investigation of the scatter contribution in single photon transmission measurements by means of Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegmann, K.; Adam, L.-E.; Livieratos, L.; Zaers, J.; Bailey, D. L.; Brix, G.

    1999-08-01

    The fraction of detected scattered radiation in transmission measurements with a single photon transmission (SPT) source of Cesium-137 was investigated by means of Monte Carlo (MC) techniques. The scatter contamination was determined for different energy thresholds and the use of interplane septa. The simulations were validated with measurements performed at the whole-body 3D PET scanner ECAT EXACT 3D (CTI/Siemens, Knoxville, TN), which uses a SPT source. The comparison of the results from the simulations and the measurements shows good agreement. Transmission through a water-filled cylinder (o=20 cm) gave values of the scatter fraction SF of about 27% at a lower level discriminator (LLD) value of 500 keV in the center of the projection. A reduction to 17% was achieved by an increase of the LLD to 600 keV; a relative decrease of 37%. But a corresponding loss of counts by a factor of 1.5 was observed. Furthermore, simulations of the ECAT EXACT HR/sup +/ have been performed, a whale-body PET scanner which can be operated in 2D and 3D mode, but has no SPT mode yet. At a value of the LLD of 500 keV, the simulations showed a decrease of the SF in the 2D mode of 45% relative to the 3D mode for the transmission of the water-filled cylinder.

  15. The extent of physician participation in Medicaid: a comparison of physician estimates and aggregated patient records.

    PubMed Central

    Kletke, P R; Davidson, S M; Perloff, J D; Schiff, D W; Connelly, J P

    1985-01-01

    This article compares two measures of the extent of physician participation in Medicaid programs. The first, which has been used in most research to date on the subject, is based on physician estimates of the proportion of their patients who are Medicaid patients. The second derives from encounter forms for a sample of visits to the interviewed physicians. The comparison shows that physicians in the sample tended to overestimate by 40 percent the extent of their Medicaid participation. Because the two measures are highly correlated, the analysis of the determinants of Medicaid participation was not affected by the measure used. However, since physicians tended to overstate the proportion of Medicaid patients in their practices, interview data should not be used to measure the amount of physician participation or to calculate elasticities for the effects of policy changes on the extent of participation. PMID:3910615

  16. New Measurement of the 1 S -3 S Transition Frequency of Hydrogen: Contribution to the Proton Charge Radius Puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleurbaey, Hélène; Galtier, Sandrine; Thomas, Simon; Bonnaud, Marie; Julien, Lucile; Biraben, François; Nez, François; Abgrall, Michel; Guéna, Jocelyne

    2018-05-01

    We present a new measurement of the 1 S -3 S two-photon transition frequency of hydrogen, realized with a continuous-wave excitation laser at 205 nm on a room-temperature atomic beam, with a relative uncertainty of 9 ×10-13. The proton charge radius deduced from this measurement, rp=0.877 (13 ) fm , is in very good agreement with the current CODATA-recommended value. This result contributes to the ongoing search to solve the proton charge radius puzzle, which arose from a discrepancy between the CODATA value and a more precise determination of rp from muonic hydrogen spectroscopy.

  17. Geographic distribution of physicians in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Isabel, Correia; Paula, Veiga

    2010-08-01

    The main goals of this paper are to (1) analyse the inequality in geographic distribution of physicians and its evolution, (2) estimate the determinants of physician density, and (3) assess the importance of competitive and agglomerative forces in location decisions. The analysis of the geographic distribution of physicians is based on the ratio of general practitioners (GPs) and specialists to 1,000 inhabitants. The inequality is measured using Gini indices, coefficients of variation, and physician-to-population ratios. The econometric models were estimated by ordinary least squares. The data used refer to 1996 and 2007. The impact of the growing number of physicians, and therefore potential increased competition, on geographic distribution during the period studied was small. Nonetheless, there is evidence of competitive forces acting on the dynamics of doctor localisation. Geographic disparities in physician density are still high, and appear to be due mainly to geographic income inequality.

  18. The passive cable properties of hair cell stereocilia and their contribution to somatic capacitance measurements.

    PubMed

    Breneman, Kathryn D; Highstein, Stephen M; Boyle, Richard D; Rabbitt, Richard D

    2009-01-01

    Somatic measurements of whole-cell capacitance are routinely used to understand physiologic events occurring in remote portions of cells. These studies often assume the intracellular space is voltage-clamped. We questioned this assumption in auditory and vestibular hair cells with respect to their stereocilia based on earlier studies showing that neurons, with radial dimensions similar to stereocilia, are not always isopotential under voltage-clamp. To explore this, we modeled the stereocilia as passive cables with transduction channels located at their tips. We found that the input capacitance measured at the soma changes when the transduction channels at the tips of the stereocilia are open compared to when the channels are closed. The maximum capacitance is felt with the transducer closed but will decrease as the transducer opens due to a length-dependent voltage drop along the stereocilium length. This potential drop is proportional to the intracellular resistance and stereocilium tip conductance and can produce a maximum capacitance error on the order of fF for single stereocilia and pF for the bundle.

  19. The contribution of the hydrogen bond acidity on the lipophilicity of drugs estimated from chromatographic measurements.

    PubMed

    Pallicer, Juan M; Pascual, Rosalia; Port, Adriana; Rosés, Martí; Ràfols, Clara; Bosch, Elisabeth

    2013-02-14

    The influence of the hydrogen bond acidity when the 1-octanol/water partition coefficient (log P(o/w)) of drugs is determined from chromatographic measurements was studied in this work. This influence was firstly evaluated by means of the comparison between the Abraham solvation parameter model when it is applied to express the 1-octanol/water partitioning and the chromatographic retention, expressed as the solute polarity p. Then, several hydrogen bond acidity descriptors were compared in order to determine properly the log P(o/w) of drugs. These descriptors were obtained from different software and comprise two-dimensional parameters such as the calculated Abraham hydrogen bond acidity A and three-dimensional descriptors like HDCA-2 from CODESSA program or WO1 and DRDODO descriptors calculated from Volsurf+software. The additional HOMO-LUMO polarizability descriptor should be added when the three-dimensional descriptors are used to complement the chromatographic retention. The models generated using these descriptors were compared studying the correlations between the determined log P(o/w) values and the reference ones. The comparison showed that there was no significant difference between the tested models and any of them was able to determine the log P(o/w) of drugs from a single chromatographic measurement and the correspondent molecular descriptors terms. However, the model that involved the calculated A descriptor was simpler and it is thus recommended for practical uses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Unique contributions of dynamic versus global measures of parent-child interaction quality in predicting school adjustment.

    PubMed

    Bardack, Sarah; Herbers, Janette E; Obradović, Jelena

    2017-09-01

    This study investigates the unique contribution of microsocial and global measures of parent-child positive coregulation (PCR) in predicting children's behavioral and social adjustment in school. Using a community sample of 102 children, ages 4-6, and their parents, we conducted nested path analytic models to identify the unique effects of 2 measures of PCR on school outcomes. Microsocial PCR independently predicted fewer externalizing and inattention/impulsive behaviors in school. Global PCR did not uniquely relate to children's behavioral and social adjustment outcomes. Household socioeconomic status was related to both microsocial and global measures of PCR, but not directly associated with school outcomes. Findings illustrate the importance of using dynamic measures of PCR based on microsocial coding to further understand how the quality of parent-child interaction is related to children's self-regulatory and social development during school transition. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. New GOES High-Resolution Magnetic Measurements and their Contribution to Understanding Magnetospheric Particle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redmon, R. J.; Loto'aniu, P. T. M.; Boudouridis, A.; Chi, P. J.; Singer, H. J.; Kress, B. T.; Rodriguez, J. V.; Abdelqader, A.; Tilton, M.

    2017-12-01

    The era of NOAA observations of the geomagnetic field started with SMS-1 in May 1974 and continues to this day with GOES-13-16 (on-orbit). We describe the development of a new 20+ year archive of science-quality, high-cadence geostationary measurements of the magnetic field from eight NOAA spacecraft (GOES-8 through GOES-15), the status of GOES-16 and new scientific results using these data. GOES magnetic observations provide an early warning of impending space weather, are the core geostationary data set used for the construction of magnetospheric magnetic models, and can be used to estimate electromagnetic wave power in frequency bands important for plasma processes. Many science grade improvements are being made across the GOES archive to unify the format and content from GOES-8 through the new GOES-R series (with the first of that series launched on November 19, 2016). A majority of the 2-Hz magnetic observations from GOES-8-12 have never before been publicly accessible due to processing constraints. Now, a NOAA Big Earth Data Initiative project is underway to process these measurements starting from original telemetry records. Overall the new archive will include vector measurements in geophysically relevant coordinates (EPN, GSM, and VDH), comprehensive documentation, highest temporal cadence, best calibration parameters, recomputed means, updated quality flagging, full spacecraft ephemeris information, a unified standard format and public access. We are also developing spectral characterization tools for estimating power in standard frequency bands (up to 1 Hz for G8-15), and detecting ULF waves related to field-line resonances. We present the project status and findings, including in-situ statistical and extreme ULF event properties, and case studies where the ULF oscillations along the same field line were observed simultaneously by GOES near the equator in the magnetosphere, the ST-5 satellites at low altitudes, and ground magnetometer stations. For event

  2. Do resource utilization and clinical measures still vary across dialysis chains after controlling for the local practices of facilities and physicians?

    PubMed

    Hirth, Richard A; Turenne, Marc N; Wheeler, John R C; Ma, Yu; Messana, Joseph M

    2010-08-01

    Because of adverse survival effects, anemia management and financial incentives to increase doses of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) have been controversial. Prior studies showed more aggressive anemia management in dialysis facilities owned by for-profit chains, but have been criticized for not accounting for practices of individual physicians and facilities. To improve understanding of how dialysis practices and resource utilization are influenced by physicians, facilities, and chains. Mixed models with chain fixed effects and facility and physician random effects. Medicare hemodialysis patients in 2004. A total of 234,158 patients, 3995 facilities, 4838 physicians, and 7 chain classifications were included. Spending per session for dialysis-related services billed separately from the dialysis treatment and for ESAs. Achievement of hematocrit (HCT) and urea reduction ratio (URR) targets. Of the 4 largest for-profit chains, 3 had higher resource use than independents, with differences up to $17.92 higher ESA/session. Utilization was positively associated with achieving target HCT. Despite incurring lower costs, patients treated by a large nonprofit chain were as likely as patients of independents to achieve the HCT target. The largest chains were more likely than independents to achieve the URR target. Substantial variation occurred across physicians and facilities, and adjustment for chain only modestly decreased this variation. Chains' methods of influencing practices were not directly observed. Chains appear to have the ability to implement protocols that shift practices, but not the ability to substantially reduce local variation. Assertions that chain effects found by earlier studies were spurious are not supported.

  3. Physicians' Internet Information-Seeking Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Nancy L.; Casebeer, Linda L.; Kristofco, Robert E.; Strasser, Sheryl M.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Our understanding about the role of the Internet as a resource for physicians has improved in the past several years with reports of patterns for use and measures of impact on medical practice. The purpose of this study was to begin to shape a theory base for more fully describing physicians' information-seeking behaviors as they…

  4. Focused physician-performed echocardiography in sports medicine: a potential screening tool for detecting aortic root dilatation in athletes.

    PubMed

    Yim, Eugene S; Kao, Daniel; Gillis, Edward F; Basilico, Frederick C; Corrado, Gianmichael D

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether sports medicine physicians can obtain accurate measurements of the aortic root in young athletes. Twenty male collegiate athletes, aged 18 to 21 years, were prospectively enrolled. Focused echocardiography was performed by a board-certified sports medicine physician and a medical student, followed by comprehensive echocardiography within 2 weeks by a cardiac sonographer. A left parasternal long-axis view was acquired to measure the aortic root diameter at the sinuses of Valsalva. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were used to assess inter-rater reliability compared to a reference standard and intra-rater reliability of repeated measurements obtained by the sports medicine physician and medical student. The ICCs between the sports medicine physician and cardiac sonographer and between the medical student and cardiac sonographer were strong: 0.80 and 0.76, respectively. Across all 3 readers, the ICC was 0.89, indicating strong inter-rater reliability and concordance. The ICC for the 2 measurements taken by the sports medicine physician for each athlete was 0.75, indicating strong intra-rater reliability. The medical student had moderate intra-rater reliability, with an ICC of 0.59. Sports medicine physicians are able to obtain measurements of the aortic root by focused echocardiography that are consistent with those obtained by a cardiac sonographer. Focused physician-performed echocardiography may serve as a promising technique for detecting aortic root dilatation and may contribute in this manner to preparticipation cardiovascular screening for athletes.

  5. Physician health and wellness.

    PubMed

    Taub, Sara; Morin, Karine; Goldrich, Michael S; Ray, Priscilla; Benjamin, Regina

    2006-03-01

    Impaired physician health can have a direct impact on patient health care and safety. In the past, problems of alcoholism and substance abuse among physicians have received more attention than other conditions-usually in the form of discipline. While patient safety is paramount, the medical profession may be more successful in achieving the required standards by fostering a culture committed to health and wellness as well as supporting impaired physicians. To develop ethical guidelines regarding physician health and wellness. The American Medical Association's (AMA's) Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs developed recommendations based on the AMA's Code of Medical Ethics, an analysis of relevant Medline-indexed articles, and comments from experts. The report's recommendations were adopted as policy of the Association in December 2003. Individually, physicians can promote their personal health and wellness through healthy living habits, including having a personal physician. The medical profession can foster health and wellness if its members are taught to identify colleagues in need of assistance and initiate appropriate methods of intervention, including referrals to physician health programs. Physicians whose health or wellness is compromised should seek appropriate help and engage in honest self-assessment of their ability to practice. The medical profession should provide an environment that helps to maintain and restore health and wellness. Physicians need to ensure that impaired colleagues promptly modify or cease practice until they can resume professional patient care. In addition, physicians may be required to report impaired colleagues who continue to practice despite reasonable offers of assistance.

  6. Specialties differ in which aspects of doctor communication predict overall physician ratings.

    PubMed

    Quigley, Denise D; Elliott, Marc N; Farley, Donna O; Burkhart, Q; Skootsky, Samuel A; Hays, Ron D

    2014-03-01

    Effective doctor communication is critical to positive doctor-patient relationships and predicts better health outcomes. Doctor communication is the strongest predictor of patient ratings of doctors, but the most important aspects of communication may vary by specialty. To determine the importance of five aspects of doctor communication to overall physician ratings by specialty. For each of 28 specialties, we calculated partial correlations of five communication items with a 0-10 overall physician rating, controlling for patient demographics. Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems Clinician and Group (CG-CAHPS®) 12-month Survey data collected 2005-2009 from 58,251 adults at a 534-physician medical group. CG-CAHPS includes a 0 ("Worst physician possible") to 10 ("Best physician possible") overall physician rating. Five doctor communication items assess how often the physician: explains things; listens carefully; gives easy-to-understand instructions; shows respect; and spends enough time. Physician showing respect was the most important aspect of communication for 23/28 specialties, with a mean partial correlation (0.27, ranging from 0.07 to 0.44 across specialties) that accounted for more than four times as much variance in the overall physician rating as any other communication item. Three of five communication items varied significantly across specialties in their associations with the overall rating (p < 0.05). All patients valued respectful treatment; the importance of other aspects of communication varied significantly by specialty. Quality improvement efforts by all specialties should emphasize physicians showing respect to patients, and each specialty should also target other aspects of communication that matter most to their patients. The results have implications for improving provider quality improvement and incentive programs and the reporting of CAHPS data to patients. Specialists make important contributions to coordinated patient

  7. Pathology in the Medical Profession?: Taking the Pulse of Physician Wellness and Burnout.

    PubMed

    Schrijver, Iris

    2016-09-01

    -In the past decades, physician wellness has diminished in every aspect of professional life. Burnout symptoms in the United States affect 30% to 68% of physicians overall-exceeding the levels of any other professional group. The ramifications of burnout present an underrecognized crisis in the health care system that carries the consequences of personal, professional, institutional, and societal costs. -To bring to light the elements of current medical practice that contribute to physician professional fulfillment and burnout. Intervention measures, steps toward burnout prevention, and the present limitations thereof are also addressed. -This narrative literature review was performed by using studies in PubMed (National Center for Biotechnology Information) and large online physician surveys, published through December 2015. Because of geographic differences, the review is primarily concentrated on physicians across specialties in the United States. Small studies and those of single disciplines were excluded. -Many physicians learn to tolerate burnout symptoms despite negative personal consequences. Long-term work-related stress, however, may lead to the potential for negative effects on the quality of patient care, and to attrition. Interestingly, the factors that enhance physician fulfillment and those that may precipitate burnout symptoms are distinct. Optimization of physician well-being, therefore, requires tailored approaches in each of these 2 dimensions and is most likely to succeed if it includes approaches that are customized to career phase, physician specialty, and practice setting. Importantly, organization leaders must prioritize this issue and provide sustained support for wellness initiatives, to foster a culture that is conducive to physician well-being.

  8. Job satisfaction of primary care physicians in Switzerland: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Katja; Jossen, Marianne; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Rosemann, Thomas; Hahn, Karolin; Hess, Sigrid

    2016-10-01

    Job satisfaction of physicians is an important issue for performance of a health care system. The aim of the study was to evaluate the job satisfaction of primary care physicians in Switzerland and to explore associations between overall job satisfaction, individual characteristics and satisfaction with aspects of work within the practice separated by gender. This cross-sectional study was based on a job satisfaction survey. Data were collected from 176 primary care physicians working in 91 primary care practices. Job satisfaction was measured with the 10-item Warr-Cook-Wall job satisfaction scale. Stepwise linear regression analysis was performed for physicians separated by gender. The response rate was 92.6%. Primary care physicians reported the highest level of satisfaction with 'freedom of working method' (mean = 6.45) and the lowest satisfaction for 'hours of work' (mean = 5.38) and 'income' (mean = 5.49). Moreover, some aspects of job satisfaction were rated higher by female physicians than male physicians. Within the stepwise regression analysis, the aspect 'opportunity to use abilities' (β = 0.644) showed the highest association to overall job satisfaction for male physicians while for female physicians it was income (β = 0.733). The presented results contribute to an understanding of factors that influence levels of satisfaction of female and male physicians. Therefore, research and intervention about job satisfaction should consider gender as well as the stereotypes that come along with these social roles. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. The Localized Scleroderma Skin Severity Index and Physician Global Assessment of Disease Activity: A Work in Progress Toward Development of Localized Scleroderma Outcome Measures

    PubMed Central

    ARKACHAISRI, THASCHAWEE; VILAIYUK, SOAMARAT; LI, SUZANNE; O’NEIL, KATHLEEN M.; POPE, ELENA; HIGGINS, GLORIA C.; PUNARO, MARILYNN; RABINOVICH, EGLA C.; ROSENKRANZ, MARGALIT; KIETZ, DANIEL A.; ROSEN, PAUL; SPALDING, STEVEN J.; HENNON, TERESA R.; TOROK, KATHRYN S.; CASSIDY, ELAINE; MEDSGER, THOMAS A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To develop and evaluate a Localized Scleroderma (LS) Skin Severity Index (LoSSI) and global assessments’ clinimetric property and effect on quality of life (QOL). Methods A 3-phase study was conducted. The first phase involved 15 patients with LS and 14 examiners who assessed LoSSI [surface area (SA), erythema (ER), skin thickness (ST), and new lesion/extension (N/E)] twice for inter/intrarater reliability. Patient global assessment of disease severity (PtGA-S) and Children’s Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI) were collected for intrarater reliability evaluation. The second phase was aimed to develop clinical determinants for physician global assessment of disease activity (PhysGA-A) and to assess its content validity. The third phase involved 2 examiners assessing LoSSI and PhysGA-A on 27 patients. Effect of training on improving reliability/validity and sensitivity to change of the LoSSI and PhysGA-A was determined. Results Interrater reliability was excellent for ER [intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) 0.71], ST (ICC 0.70), LoSSI (ICC 0.80), and PhysGA-A (ICC 0.90) but poor for SA (ICC 0.35); thus, LoSSI was modified to mLoSSI. Examiners’ experience did not affect the scores, but training/practice improved reliability. Intrarater reliability was excellent for ER, ST, and LoSSI (Spearman’s rho = 0.71–0.89) and moderate for SA. PtGA-S and CDLQI showed good intrarater agreement (ICC 0.63 and 0.80). mLoSSI correlated moderately with PhysGA-A and PtGA-S. Both mLoSSI and PhysGA-A were sensitive to change following therapy. Conclusion mLoSSI and PhysGA-A are reliable and valid tools for assessing LS disease severity and show high sensitivity to detect change over time. These tools are feasible for use in routine clinical practice. They should be considered for inclusion in a core set of LS outcome measures for clinical trials. PMID:19833758

  10. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission contributions to hydrology and societal applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschbaum, D.; Huffman, G. J.; Skofronick Jackson, G.

    2016-12-01

    Too much or too little rain can serve as a tipping point for triggering catastrophic flooding and landslides or widespread drought. Knowing when, where and how much rain is falling globally is vital to understanding how vulnerable areas may be more or less impacted by these disasters. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission provides near real-time precipitation data worldwide that is used by a broad range of end users, from tropical cyclone forecasters to agricultural modelers to researchers evaluating the spread of diseases. The GPM constellation provides merged, multi-satellite data products at three latencies that are critical for research and societal applications around the world. This presentation will outline current capabilities in using accurate and timely information of precipitation to directly benefit society, including examples of end user applications within the tropical cyclone forecasting, disasters response, agricultural forecasting, and disease tracking communities, among others. The presentation will also introduce some of the new visualization and access tools developed by the GPM team.

  11. Cognitive performance in multiple sclerosis: the contribution of intellectual enrichment and brain MRI measures.

    PubMed

    Santangelo, Gabriella; Bisecco, Alvino; Trojano, Luigi; Sacco, Rosaria; Siciliano, Mattia; d'Ambrosio, Alessandro; Della Corte, Marida; Lavorgna, Luigi; Bonavita, Simona; Tedeschi, Gioacchino; Gallo, Antonio

    2018-05-26

    Cognitive reserve (CR) is a construct that originates from the observation of poor correspondence between brain damage and clinical symptoms. The aim of the study was to investigate the association between cognitive reserve (CR), brain reserve (BR) and cognitive functions and to evaluate whether CR might attenuate/moderate the negative impact of brain atrophy and lesion load on cognitive functions in multiple sclerosis (MS). To achieve these aims, ninety-eight relapsing-remitting MS patients underwent the brief repeatable battery of neuropsychological tests and Stroop test (ST). CR was assessed by vocabulary-based estimate of lifetime intellectual enrichment. All patients underwent a 3T MRI to assess T2-lesion load and atrophy measures, including normalized gray matter and white matter (nWMV) volumes. The BR was evaluated by maximal lifetime brain volume expressed by intracranial volume (ICV). Hierarchical regressions were used to investigate whether higher BR and/or CR is related to better cognitive performances after controlling for potentially confounding factors. The ICV was not associated with any cognitive tests. Intellectual enrichment was positively associated with performance on tests assessing memory, attention and information processing speed, verbal fluency and inhibitory control. Significant relationship between nWMV and ST was moderated by intellectual enrichment. In conclusion, the findings suggested that CR seems to mitigate cognitive dysfunction in MS patients and can reduce the negative impact of brain atrophy on inhibitory control, relevant for integrity of instrumental activities of daily living.

  12. Anders Celsius' Contributions to Meridian Arc Measurements and the Establishment of an Astronomical Observatory in Uppsala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stempels, H. C.

    Astronomy has been on the curriculum of Uppsala University from at least the middle of the 15th century. However, since Uppsala also was the ecclesiastical centre of Sweden, the acceptance of new ideas, such as the Copernican heliocentric system, was slow. At the same time, more peripheral universities in the Swedish empire, including Dorpat/Tartu, enjoyed a larger freedom. It was not until the early 18th century that a `modern' astronomy emerged in Uppsala. This effort was to a large extent led by Anders Celsius (1701--1744), who was able to establish good international contacts with astronomers in continental Europe. Celsius participated in De Maupertuis' expedition to the far north of Sweden, in order to measure the meridian arc and determine the shape of the Earth. This paper explores how Celsius became involved in De Maupertuis' expedition, and how this effort paved the way to the establishment of a fully equipped astronomical observatory, including an extensive collection of books and instruments, most of which survives up to this day.

  13. Urban and industrial contribution to trace elements in the atmosphere as measured in holm oak bark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drava, Giuliana; Brignole, Daniele; Giordani, Paolo; Minganti, Vincenzo

    2016-11-01

    The concentrations of As, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, V and Zn were measured by ICP-OES in samples of bark of the holm oak (Quercus ilex L.) collected from trees in different urban environments (residential and mixed residential/industrial). The use of tree bark as a bioindicator makes it easy to create maps that can provide detailed data on the levels and on the spatial distribution of each trace element. For most of the elements considered (As, Co, Fe, Mn, Ni, V and Zn), the concentrations in the industrial sites are about twice (from 1.9 to 2.8 times higher) of those in the residential area. Arsenic, Fe and Zn show the highest concentrations near a steel plant (operational until 2005), but for the other elements it is not possible to identify any localized source, as evident from the maps. In areas where urban pollution is summed up by the impact of industrial activities, the population is exposed to significantly higher amounts of some metals than people living in residential areas.

  14. Description of Various Factors Contributing to Traffic Accidents in Youth and Measures Proposed to Alleviate Recurrence.

    PubMed

    Gicquel, Ludovic; Ordonneau, Pauline; Blot, Emilie; Toillon, Charlotte; Ingrand, Pierre; Romo, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    Traffic accidents are the leading cause of hospitalization in adolescence, with the 18-24-year-old age group accounting for 23% of deaths by traffic accidents. Recurrence rate is also high. One in four teenagers will have a relapse within the year following the first accident. Cognitive impairments known in adolescence could cause risky behaviors, defined as repetitive engagement in dangerous situations such as road accidents. Two categories of factors seem to be associated with traffic accidents: (1) factors specific to the traffic environment and (2) "human" factors, which seem to be the most influential. Moreover, the establishment of a stronger relation to high speed driving increases traffic accident risks and can also be intensified by sensation seeking. Other factors such as substance use (alcohol, drugs, and "binge drinking") are also identified as risk factors. Furthermore, cell phone use while driving and attention deficit disorder with or without hyperactivity also seem to be important risk factors for car accidents. The family environment strongly influences a young person's driving behavior. Some interventional driving strategies and preventive measures have reduced the risk of traffic accidents among young people, such as the graduated driver licensing program and advertising campaigns. So far, few therapeutic approaches have been implemented. Reason why, we decided to set up an innovative strategy consisting of a therapeutic postaccident group intervention, entitled the ECARR2 protocol, to prevent recurrence among adolescents and young adults identified at risk, taking into account the multiple risk factors.

  15. Contributions of numerical simulation data bases to the physics, modeling and measurement of turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moin, Parviz; Spalart, Philippe R.

    1987-01-01

    The use of simulation data bases for the examination of turbulent flows is an effective research tool. Studies of the structure of turbulence have been hampered by the limited number of probes and the impossibility of measuring all desired quantities. Also, flow visualization is confined to the observation of passive markers with limited field of view and contamination caused by time-history effects. Computer flow fields are a new resource for turbulence research, providing all the instantaneous flow variables in three-dimensional space. Simulation data bases also provide much-needed information for phenomenological turbulence modeling. Three dimensional velocity and pressure fields from direct simulations can be used to compute all the terms in the transport equations for the Reynolds stresses and the dissipation rate. However, only a few, geometrically simple flows have been computed by direct numerical simulation, and the inventory of simulation does not fully address the current modeling needs in complex turbulent flows. The availability of three-dimensional flow fields also poses challenges in developing new techniques for their analysis, techniques based on experimental methods, some of which are used here for the analysis of direct-simulation data bases in studies of the mechanics of turbulent flows.

  16. Description of Various Factors Contributing to Traffic Accidents in Youth and Measures Proposed to Alleviate Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Gicquel, Ludovic; Ordonneau, Pauline; Blot, Emilie; Toillon, Charlotte; Ingrand, Pierre; Romo, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    Traffic accidents are the leading cause of hospitalization in adolescence, with the 18–24-year-old age group accounting for 23% of deaths by traffic accidents. Recurrence rate is also high. One in four teenagers will have a relapse within the year following the first accident. Cognitive impairments known in adolescence could cause risky behaviors, defined as repetitive engagement in dangerous situations such as road accidents. Two categories of factors seem to be associated with traffic accidents: (1) factors specific to the traffic environment and (2) “human” factors, which seem to be the most influential. Moreover, the establishment of a stronger relation to high speed driving increases traffic accident risks and can also be intensified by sensation seeking. Other factors such as substance use (alcohol, drugs, and “binge drinking”) are also identified as risk factors. Furthermore, cell phone use while driving and attention deficit disorder with or without hyperactivity also seem to be important risk factors for car accidents. The family environment strongly influences a young person’s driving behavior. Some interventional driving strategies and preventive measures have reduced the risk of traffic accidents among young people, such as the graduated driver licensing program and advertising campaigns. So far, few therapeutic approaches have been implemented. Reason why, we decided to set up an innovative strategy consisting of a therapeutic postaccident group intervention, entitled the ECARR2 protocol, to prevent recurrence among adolescents and young adults identified at risk, taking into account the multiple risk factors. PMID:28620324

  17. Pharmaceutical industry gifts to physicians: patient beliefs and trust in physicians and the health care system.

    PubMed

    Grande, David; Shea, Judy A; Armstrong, Katrina

    2012-03-01

    Pharmaceutical industry gifts to physicians are common and influence physician behavior. Little is known about patient beliefs about the prevalence of these gifts and how these beliefs may influence trust in physicians and the health care system. To measure patient perceptions about the prevalence of industry gifts and their relationship to trust in doctors and the health care system. Cross sectional random digit dial telephone survey. African-American and White adults in 40 large metropolitan areas. Respondents' beliefs about whether their physician and physicians in general receive industry gifts, physician trust, and health care system distrust. Overall, 55% of respondents believe their physician receives gifts, and 34% believe almost all doctors receive gifts. Respondents of higher socioeconomic status (income, education) and younger age were more likely to believe their physician receives gifts. In multivariate analyses, those that believe their personal physician receives gifts were more likely to report low physician trust (OR 2.26, 95% CI 1.56-3.30) and high health care system distrust (OR 2.03, 95% CI 1.49-2.77). Similarly, those that believe almost all doctors accept gifts were more likely to report low physician trust (OR 1.69, 95% CI 1.25-2.29) and high health care system distrust (OR 2.57, 95% CI 1.82-3.62). Patients perceive physician-industry gift relationships as common. Patients that believe gift relationships exist report lower levels of physician trust and higher rates of health care system distrust. Greater efforts to limit industry-physician gifts could have positive effects beyond reducing influences on physician behavior.

  18. How does burnout affect physician productivity? A systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Dewa, Carolyn S; Loong, Desmond; Bonato, Sarah; Thanh, Nguyen Xuan; Jacobs, Philip

    2014-07-28

    Interest in the well-being of physicians has increased because of their contributions to the healthcare system quality. There is growing recognition that physicians are exposed to workplace factors that increase the risk of work stress. Long-term exposure to high work stress can result in burnout. Reports from around the world suggest that about one-third to one-half of physicians experience burnout. Understanding the outcomes associated with burnout is critical to understanding its affects on the healthcare system. Productivity outcomes are among those that could have the most immediate effects on the healthcare system. This systematic literature review is one of the first to explore the evidence for the types of physician productivity outcomes associated with physician burnout. It answers the question, "How does burnout affect physician productivity?" A systematic search was performed of: Medline Current, Medline in process, PsycInfo, Embase and Web of Science. The search period covered 2002 to 2012. The searches identified articles about practicing physicians working in civilian settings. Articles that primarily looked only at residents or medical students were excluded. Productivity was captured by hours worked, patients seen, sick leave, leaving the profession, retirement, workload and presenteeism. Studies also were excluded if: (1) the study sample was not comprised of at least 50% physicians, (2) the study did not examine the relationship between burnout and productivity or (3) a validated measure of burnout was not used. The search identified 870 unique citations; 5 met the inclusion/exclusion criteria. This review indicates that globally there is recognition of the potential impact of physician burnout on productivity. Productivity was examined using: number of sick leave days, work ability, intent to either continue practicing or change jobs. The majority of the studies indicate there is a negative relationship between burnout and productivity. However

  19. How does burnout affect physician productivity? A systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Interest in the well-being of physicians has increased because of their contributions to the healthcare system quality. There is growing recognition that physicians are exposed to workplace factors that increase the risk of work stress. Long-term exposure to high work stress can result in burnout. Reports from around the world suggest that about one-third to one-half of physicians experience burnout. Understanding the outcomes associated with burnout is critical to understanding its affects on the healthcare system. Productivity outcomes are among those that could have the most immediate effects on the healthcare system. This systematic literature review is one of the first to explore the evidence for the types of physician productivity outcomes associated with physician burnout. It answers the question, “How does burnout affect physician productivity?” Methods A systematic search was performed of: Medline Current, Medline in process, PsycInfo, Embase and Web of Science. The search period covered 2002 to 2012. The searches identified articles about practicing physicians working in civilian settings. Articles that primarily looked only at residents or medical students were excluded. Productivity was captured by hours worked, patients seen, sick leave, leaving the profession, retirement, workload and presenteeism. Studies also were excluded if: (1) the study sample was not comprised of at least 50% physicians, (2) the study did not examine the relationship between burnout and productivity or (3) a validated measure of burnout was not used. Results The search identified 870 unique citations; 5 met the inclusion/exclusion criteria. This review indicates that globally there is recognition of the potential impact of physician burnout on productivity. Productivity was examined using: number of sick leave days, work ability, intent to either continue practicing or change jobs. The majority of the studies indicate there is a negative relationship between

  20. The contribution of satellite SAR-derived displacement measurements in landslide risk management practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raspini, Federico; Bardi, Federica; Bianchini, Silvia; Ciampalini, Andrea; Del Ventisette, Chiara; Farina, Paolo; Ferrigno, Federica; Solari, Lorenzo; Casagli, Nicola

    2017-04-01

    Landslides are common phenomena that occur worldwide and are a main cause of loss of life and damage to property. The hazards associated with landslides are a challenging concern in many countries, including Italy. With 13% of the territory prone to landslides, Italy is one of the European countries with the highest landslide hazard, and on a worldwide scale, it is second only to Japan among the technologically advanced countries. Over the last 15 years, an increasing number of applications have aimed to demonstrate the applicability of images captured by space-borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) sensors in slope instability investigations. InSAR (SAR Interferometry) is currently one of the most exploited techniques for the assessment of ground displacements, and it is becoming a consolidated tool for Civil Protection institutions in addressing landslide risk. We present a subset of the results obtained in Italy within the framework of SAR-based programmes and applications intended to test the potential application of C- and X-band satellite interferometry during different Civil Protection activities (namely, prevention, prevision, emergency response and post-emergency phases) performed to manage landslide risk. In all phases, different benefits can be derived from the use of SAR-based measurements, which were demonstrated to be effective in the field of landslide analysis. Analysis of satellite-SAR data is demonstrated to play a major role in the investigation of landslide-related events at different stages, including detection, mapping, monitoring, characterization and prediction. Interferometric approaches are widely consolidated for analysis of slow-moving slope deformations in a variety of environments, and exploitation of the amplitude data in SAR images is a somewhat natural complement for rapid-moving landslides. In addition, we discuss the limitations that still exist and must be overcome in the coming years to manage the transition of satellite SAR

  1. Nurse-physician collaboration in an academic medical centre: The influence of organisational and individual factors.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Darci; McIntosh, Georgia; Hemrajani, Reena; Yen, Miao-Shan; Phillips, Allison; Schwartz, Nathan; Tu, Shin-Ping; Dow, Alan W

    2016-09-01

    Ineffective physician-nurse collaboration has been recognised to adversely impact patient and organisational outcomes, and some studies suggest an underlying factor may be that nurses and physicians have different perceptions of interprofessional collaboration (IPC). The objectives of this study were to evaluate for a difference in the perception of IPC between physicians and nurses and to explore potential contributing factors at the individual and organisational levels to any observed difference. Data including measures of perceptions of IPC were collected from a convenience sample of resident physicians (n = 47), attending physicians (n = 18), and nurses (n = 54) providing care for internal medicine patients in a large tertiary care academic medical centre. Regression analysis revealed significantly lower perceptions of IPC scores for nurses in comparison to the scores of both the resident and attending physician groups (p = .0001 for both). Although demographic and workload factors also differed by profession, only profession and workload remained significant in regression analysis. Given the known relationships between effective physician-nurse collaboration and superior patient and organisational outcomes, better defining the individual and organisational predictors of IPC scores may support development of more effective interventions targeting improvements in IPC.

  2. The education of physicians: a CDC perspective.

    PubMed

    Koo, Denise; Thacker, Stephen B

    2008-04-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) strongly supports integrating population health perspectives into the education of physicians. Physicians with critical-thinking skills, a commitment to the health of a community, and a systems-based approach are critical partners for the agency in its mission to protect and promote the public's health. To cultivate such physicians, integrating population health concepts solely into undergraduate medical education would be inadequate. A multipronged approach that establishes and maintains population health concepts with physicians at all stages of their education is needed: before medical school, during medical school, during residency and fellowship, and in research and practice (particularly for faculty who train the next generation). The authors describe relevant, CDC-conducted or CDC-supported activities that support such physician education during all these stages. Based in part on recent, cutting-edge trends assimilating community health particularly into primary care residencies, the authors also offer ideas for new ways that CDC can participate in the development of physicians who are truly competent at both medicine and population health in an integrated fashion -- physicians who focus on and care for individual patients but who also take a broader population or community perspective and can act effectively in either arena. Physicians who take such a systems approach -- who view and understand medicine and public health as a continuum rather than as distinct arenas -- are sorely needed to help solve the current health system crisis and to contribute to improving health in other ways.

  3. On Retirement of Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Roy

    1986-01-01

    This article takes a look at retirement in general, and the implications for physicians in particular. The recent application of the principles in the Canadian Charter of Rights has raised some unresolved issues for those doctors with contractual employment. They may no longer have mandatory retirement at age 65. Problems can and do arise when self-employed physicians defer retirement from active practice indefinitely. The evaluation of older physicians' competence is explored, and some suggestions offered. PMID:21267269

  4. An intervention to increase patients' trust in their physicians. Stanford Trust Study Physician Group.

    PubMed

    Thom, D H; Bloch, D A; Segal, E S

    1999-02-01

    To investigate the effect of a one-day workshop in which physicians were taught trust-building behaviors on their patients' levels of trust and on outcomes of care. In 1994, the study recruited 20 community-based family physicians and enrolled 412 consecutive adult patients from those physicians' practices. Ten of the physicians (the intervention group) were randomly assigned to receive a one-day training course in building and maintaining patients' trust. Outcomes were patients' trust in their physicians, patients' and physicians' satisfaction with the office visit, continuity in the patient-physician relationship, patients' adherence to their treatment plans, and the numbers of diagnostic tests and referrals. Physicians and patients in the intervention and control groups were similar in demographic and other data. There was no significant difference in any outcome. Although their overall ratings were not statistically significantly different, the patients of physicians in the intervention group reported more positive physician behaviors than did the patients of physicians in the control group. The trust-building workshop had no measurable effect on patients' trust or on outcomes hypothesized to be related to trust.

  5. Delayed Gamma Measurements in Different Nuclear Research Reactors Bringing Out the Importance of the Delayed Contribution in Gamma Flux Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Fourmentel, D.; Radulovic, V.; Barbot, L.

    Neutron and gamma flux levels are key parameters in nuclear research reactors. In Material Testing Reactors, such as the future Jules Horowitz Reactor, under construction at the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA Cadarache, France), the expected gamma flux levels are very high (nuclear heating is of the order of 20 W/g at 100 MWth). As gamma rays deposit their energy in the reactor structures and structural materials it is important to take them into account when designing irradiation devices. There are only a few sensors which allow measurements of the nuclear heating ; a recent development atmore » the CEA Cadarache allows measurements of the gamma flux using a miniature ionization chamber (MIC). The measured MIC response is often compared with calculation using modern Monte Carlo (MC) neutron and photon transport codes, such as TRIPOLI-4 and MCNP6. In these calculations only the production of prompt gamma rays in the reactor is usually modelled thus neglecting the delayed gamma rays. Hence calculations and measurements are usually in better accordance for the neutron flux than for the gamma flux. In this paper we study the contribution of delayed gamma rays to the total MIC signal in order to estimate the systematic error in gamma flux MC calculations. In order to experimentally determine the delayed gamma flux contributions to the MIC response, we performed gamma flux measurements with CEA developed MIC at three different research reactors: the OSIRIS reactor (MTR - 70 MWth at CEA Saclay, France), the TRIGA MARK II reactor (TRIGA - 250 kWth at the Jozef Stefan Institute, Slovenia) and the MARIA reactor (MTR - 30 MWth at the National Center for Nuclear Research, Poland). In order to experimentally assess the delayed gamma flux contribution to the total gamma flux, several reactor shut down (scram) experiments were performed specifically for the purpose of the measurements. Results show that on average about 30 % of the MIC signal is

  6. Physician Assistant profession (PA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... administer a certification program. This program includes an entry-level examination, continuing medical education, and periodic re-examination for recertification. Only physician assistants who are ...

  7. Referral physician marketing.

    PubMed

    Lewis, A

    1993-01-01

    Marketing of specialist services to referring physicians can be highly effective at influencing referral patterns if the referring physician's needs are taken into account. Furthermore, it is possible to generate referrals from nonreferring physicians by approaching them correctly. The ideal approach is for a specialist to treat non-referring physicians as though they referred the patient, even when they didn't. This practice allows the specialist to demonstrate communications service quality in a non-aggressive, non-sales context. The United Weight Control case study summarizes the impact of a referral-generation strategy with "before" and "after" analyses of the strategy's cost and effectiveness.

  8. Military family physician attitudes toward treating obesity.

    PubMed

    Warner, Christopher H; Warner, Carolynn M; Morganstein, Joshua; Appenzeller, George N; Rachal, James; Grieger, Thomas

    2008-10-01

    The goal was to examine current knowledge, attitudes, and treatment practices of family practitioners regarding obesity. A cross-sectional, anonymous, self-report survey of active members of the Uniformed Services Chapter of the American Academy of Family Physicians was performed. Measures included demographic information, attitudes toward obese patients, knowledge of associated health risks, and treatment recommendations, rated on a 5-point Likert scale. Results were compared with previous similar studies, and associations between demographic variables, physician body mass index, and attitudes and behaviors were examined by using multivariate regression analysis. Of the 1,186 members invited to participate, 477 (40.2%) responded. Compared with previous studies, there was increased awareness of obesity-associated health risks and physicians' sense of obligation to counsel patients. There were minimal changes in physician comfort and gratification with obesity counseling. Stereotypical attitudes of physicians toward obese patients were increased. Treatment recommendations were increased in all fields, including exercise, diet/nutrition counseling, and behavioral modification, but the most notable increases were seen in the use of prescription medications, diet center programs, and surgical referrals. Age, physician gender, physician weight status, practice location, and current training status were each associated with some aspect of physician attitudes and treatment practices. Physicians are better able to identify obesity and its associated health risks, but some negative stereotypical attitudes persist. These attitudes affect current treatment practices. Increased awareness, training, and study are required to combat the continuing increase in obesity rates.

  9. Physician communication coaching effects on patient experience.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Adrianne; Knee, Alexander; Shaaban, Reham; Bryson, Christine; Paadam, Jasmine; Harvey, Rohini; Igarashi, Satoko; LaChance, Christopher; Benjamin, Evan; Lagu, Tara

    2017-01-01

    Excellent communication is a necessary component of high-quality health care. We aimed to determine whether a training module could improve patients' perceptions of physician communication behaviors, as measured by change over time in domains of patient experience scores related to physician communication. We designed a comprehensive physician-training module focused on improving specific "etiquette-based" physician communication skills through standardized simulations and physician coaching with structured feedback. We employed a quasi-experimental pre-post design, with an intervention group consisting of internal medicine hospitalists and residents and a control group consisting of surgeons. The outcome was percent "always" scores for questions related to patients' perceptions of physician communication using the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey and a Non-HCAHPS Physician-Specific Patient Experience Survey (NHPPES) administered to patients cared for by hospitalists. A total of 128 physicians participated in the simulation. Responses from 5020 patients were analyzed using HCAHPS survey data and 1990 patients using NHPPES survey data. The intercept shift, or the degree of change from pre-intervention percent "always" responses, for the HCAHPS questions of doctors "treating patients with courtesy" "explaining things in a way patients could understand," and "overall teamwork" showed no significant differences between surgical control and hospitalist intervention patients. Adjusted NHPPES percent excellent survey results increased significantly post-intervention for the questions of specified individual doctors "keeping patient informed" (adjusted intercept shift 9.9% P = 0.019), "overall teamwork" (adjusted intercept shift 11%, P = 0.037), and "using words the patient could understand" (adjusted intercept shift 14.8%, p = 0.001). A simulation based physician communication coaching method focused on specific "etiquette

  10. Vaccines provided by family physicians.

    PubMed

    Campos-Outcalt, Doug; Jeffcott-Pera, Michelle; Carter-Smith, Pamela; Schoof, Bellinda K; Young, Herbert F

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted to document current immunization practices by family physicians. In 2008 the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) conducted a survey among a random sample of 2,000 of its members who reported spending 80% or more of their time in direct patient care. The survey consisted of questions regarding the demographics of the practice, vaccines that are provided at the physicians' clinical site, whether the practice refers patients elsewhere for vaccines, and participation in the Vaccines for Children (VFC) program. The response rate was 38.5%, 31.8% after non-office-based respondents were deleted. A high proportion of respondents (80% or more) reported providing most routinely recommended child, adolescent, and adult vaccines at their practice sites. The exceptions were rotavirus vaccine for children and herpes zoster vaccine for adults., A significant proportion, however, reported referring elsewhere for some vaccines (44.1% for children and adolescent vaccines and 53.5% for adult vaccines), with the most frequent referral location being a public health department. A higher proportion of solo and 2-physician practices than larger practices reported referring patients. A lack of adequate payment was listed as the reason for referring patients elsewhere for vaccines by one-half of those who refer patients. One-half of responders do not participate in the VFC program. Provision of recommended vaccines by most family physicians remains an important service. Smaller practices have more difficulty offering a full array of vaccine products, and lack of adequate payment contributes to referring patients outside the medical home. The reasons behind the lack of participation in the VFC program deserve further study.

  11. Investigating Sources of Ozone over California Using AJAX Airborne Measurements and Models: Assessing the Contribution from Long Range Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryoo, Ju-Mee; Johnson, Matthew S.; Iraci, Laura T.; Yates, Emma L.; Gore, Warren

    2017-01-01

    High ozone (O3) concentrations at low altitudes (1.5e4 km) were detected from airborne Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) measurements on 30 May 2012 off the coast of California (CA). We investigate the causes of those elevated O3 concentrations using airborne measurements and various models. GEOS-Chem simulation shows that the contribution from local sources is likely small. A back trajectory model was used to determine the air mass origins and how much they contributed to the O3 over CA. Low-level potential vorticity (PV) from Modern Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications 2 (MERRA-2) reanalysis data appears to be a result of the diabatic heating and mixing of airs in the lower altitudes, rather than be a result of direct transport from stratospheric intrusion. The Q diagnostic, which is a measure of the mixing of the air masses, indicates that there is sufficient mixing along the trajectory to indicate that O3 from the different origins is mixed and transported to the western U.S.The back-trajectory model simulation demonstrates the air masses of interest came mostly from the mid troposphere (MT, 76), but the contribution of the lower troposphere (LT, 19) is also significant compared to those from the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS, 5). Air coming from the LT appears to be mostly originating over Asia. The possible surface impact of the high O3 transported aloft on the surface O3 concentration through vertical and horizontal transport within a few days is substantiated by the influence maps determined from the Weather Research and Forecasting Stochastic Time Inverted Lagrangian Transport (WRF-STILT) model and the observed increases in surface ozone mixing ratios. Contrasting this complex case with a stratospheric-dominant event emphasizes the contribution of each source to the high O3 concentration in the lower altitudes over CA. Integrated analyses using models, reanalysis, and diagnostic tools, allows high ozone values

  12. Commentary: improving the supply and distribution of primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Dorsey, E Ray; Nicholson, Sean; Frist, William H

    2011-05-01

    The current medical education system and reimbursement policies in the United States have contributed to a maldistribution of physicians by specialty and geography. The causes of this maldistribution include financial barriers that prevent the individuals who would be the most likely to serve in primary care and underserved areas from entering the profession, large taxpayer subsidies to teaching hospitals that provide incentives to act in ways that are not in the best interest of society, and reimbursement policies that discourage physicians from providing primary care. The authors propose that the maldistribution of physicians can be addressed successfully by reducing the financial barriers to becoming a primary care physician, aligning subsidies with societal interests, and providing financial incentives that target primary care. They suggest that the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 takes steps in the right direction but that more financially prudent measures should be taken as politicians revisit health care reform with heightened financial scrutiny. Copyright © by the Association of American medical Colleges.

  13. Development of a comorbidity index using physician claims data.

    PubMed

    Klabunde, C N; Potosky, A L; Legler, J M; Warren, J L

    2000-12-01

    Important comorbidities recorded on outpatient claims in administrative datasets may be missed in analyses when only inpatient care is considered. Using the comorbid conditions identified by Charlson and colleagues, we developed a comorbidity index that incorporates the diagnostic and procedure data contained in Medicare physician (Part B) claims. In the national cohorts of elderly prostate (n = 28,868) and breast cancer (n = 14,943) patients assessed in this study, less than 10% of patients had comorbid conditions identified when only Medicare hospital (Part A) claims were examined. By incorporating physician claims, the proportion of patients with comorbid conditions increased to 25%. The new physician claims comorbidity index significantly contributes to models of 2-year noncancer mortality and treatment received in both patient cohorts. We demonstrate the utility of a disease-specific index using an alternative method of construction employing study-specific weights. The physician claims index can be used in conjunction with a comorbidity index derived from inpatient hospital claims, or employed as a stand-alone measure.

  14. New Measurement of the 1S-3S Transition Frequency of Hydrogen: Contribution to the Proton Charge Radius Puzzle.

    PubMed

    Fleurbaey, Hélène; Galtier, Sandrine; Thomas, Simon; Bonnaud, Marie; Julien, Lucile; Biraben, François; Nez, François; Abgrall, Michel; Guéna, Jocelyne

    2018-05-04

    We present a new measurement of the 1S-3S two-photon transition frequency of hydrogen, realized with a continuous-wave excitation laser at 205 nm on a room-temperature atomic beam, with a relative uncertainty of 9×10^{-13}. The proton charge radius deduced from this measurement, r_{p}=0.877(13)  fm, is in very good agreement with the current CODATA-recommended value. This result contributes to the ongoing search to solve the proton charge radius puzzle, which arose from a discrepancy between the CODATA value and a more precise determination of r_{p} from muonic hydrogen spectroscopy.

  15. Physician-patient communication in HIV disease: the importance of patient, physician, and visit characteristics.

    PubMed

    Wilson, I B; Kaplan, S

    2000-12-15

    Although previous work that considered a variety of chronic conditions has shown that higher quality physician-patient communication care is related to better health outcomes, the quality of physician-patient communication itself for patients with HIV disease has not been well studied. To determine the relationship of patient, visit, physician, and physician practice characteristics to two measures of physician-patient communication for patients with HIV disease. Cross-sectional survey of physicians and patients. Cohort study enrolling patients from throughout eastern Massachusetts. 264 patients with HIV disease and their their primary HIV physicians (n = 69). Two measures of physician-patient communication were used, a five-item general communication measure (Cronbach's alpha = 0.93), and a four-item HIV-specific communication measure that included items about alcohol, drug use, and sexual behaviors (Cronbach's alpha = 0.92). The mean age of patients was 39. 5 years, 24% patients were women, 31.1% were nonwhite, and 52% indicated same-sex contact as their principal HIV risk factor. The mean age of physicians was 39.1 years, 33.3% were female, 39.7% were specialists, and 25.0% self-identified as gay, lesbian, or bisexual. In multivariable models relating patient and visit characteristics to general communication, longer reported visit length (p<.0001), longer duration of the physician-patient relationship (p =.02), and female gender (p =.04) were significantly associated with better communication. The interaction of patient gender and visit length was also significant (p =.02); longer visit length was more strongly associated with better general communication for male than female patients. In similar models relating patient and visit characteristics to HIV-specific communication, longer visit length (p <.0001) and less advanced disease stage (p =.009) were associated with better communication. In multivariable models relating physician and practice characteristics

  16. Negotiation for physicians.

    PubMed

    Hill, Micah J; DeCherney, Alan H

    2013-05-01

    Physicians are involved in negotiations on a daily basis. Interactions with patients, support staff, nurses, fellow physicians, administrators, lawyers, and third parties all can occur within the context of negotiation. This article reviews the basic principles of negotiation and negotiation styles, models, and practical tools. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  17. A daytime measurement of the lunar contribution to the night sky brightness in LSST's ugrizy bands-initial results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, Michael; Stubbs, Christopher; Claver, Chuck

    2016-06-01

    We report measurements from which we determine the spatial structure of the lunar contribution to night sky brightness, taken at the LSST site on Cerro Pachon in Chile. We use an array of six photodiodes with filters that approximate the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope's u, g, r, i, z, and y bands. We use the sun as a proxy for the moon, and measure sky brightness as a function of zenith angle of the point on sky, zenith angle of the sun, and angular distance between the sun and the point on sky. We make a correction for the difference between the illumination spectrum of the sun and the moon. Since scattered sunlight totally dominates the daytime sky brightness, this technique allows us to cleanly determine the contribution to the (cloudless) night sky from backscattered moonlight, without contamination from other sources of night sky brightness. We estimate our uncertainty in the relative lunar night sky brightness vs. zenith and lunar angle to be between 0.3-0.7 mags depending on the passband. This information is useful in planning the optimal execution of the LSST survey, and perhaps for other astronomical observations as well. Although our primary objective is to map out the angular structure and spectrum of the scattered light from the atmosphere and particulates, we also make an estimate of the expected number of scattered lunar photons per pixel per second in LSST, and find values that are in overall agreement with previous estimates.

  18. Ira as a pioneer in audiology: His contributions to the clinical measurement of hearing and hearing impairment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formby, C.; Gagne, J. P.

    2002-05-01

    Ira Hirsh's contributions to clinical science and research are diverse and significant. In fact, approximately one-third of the 100+ publications that Ira lists in his curriculum vitae (CV) are clinical in nature, dealing with various aspects of audiology, deafness, hearing aids, aural rehabilitation, and speech and language pathology. The majority of these citations, fully one-quarter of his publication list, addresses problems specific to the clinical measurement of hearing and hearing impairment. Undoubtedly, the most influential of these published works appears in his CV under the citation ``The Measurement of Hearing.'' The forward for this publication, his only textbook, was penned in June, 1952 (now precisely half a century past at the time of this session). The aims of this presentation are to (1) provide perspective on the fundamental importance of his virtually timeless text in shaping the fledgling discipline of audiology, and (2) celebrate Ira's many contributions to the profession and practice of audiology. [Preparation for this presentation was supported, in part, by a K24 career development award from NIDCD.

  19. Evaluating physician performance at individualizing care: a pilot study tracking contextual errors in medical decision making.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Saul J; Schwartz, Alan; Yudkowsky, Rachel; Schiff, Gordon D; Weaver, Frances M; Goldberg, Julie; Weiss, Kevin B

    2007-01-01

    Clinical decision making requires 2 distinct cognitive skills: the ability to classify patients' conditions into diagnostic and management categories that permit the application of research evidence and the ability to individualize or-more specifically-to contextualize care for patients whose circumstances and needs require variation from the standard approach to care. The purpose of this study was to develop and test a methodology for measuring physicians' performance at contextualizing care and compare it to their performance at planning biomedically appropriate care. First, the authors drafted 3 cases, each with 4 variations, 3 of which are embedded with biomedical and/or contextual information that is essential to planning care. Once the cases were validated as instruments for assessing physician performance, 54 internal medicine residents were then presented with opportunities to make these preidentified biomedical or contextual errors, and data were collected on information elicitation and error making. The case validation process was successful in that, in the final iteration, the physicians who received the contextual variant of cases proposed an alternate plan of care to those who received the baseline variant 100% of the time. The subsequent piloting of these validated cases unmasked previously unmeasured differences in physician performance at contextualizing care. The findings, which reflect the performance characteristics of the study population, are presented. This pilot study demonstrates a methodology for measuring physician performance at contextualizing care and illustrates the contribution of such information to an overall assessment of physician practice.

  20. Building physician resilience.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Phyllis Marie; Trollope-Kumar, Karen; Waters, Heather; Everson, Jennifer

    2008-05-01

    To explore the dimensions of family physician resilience. Qualitative study using in-depth interviews with family physician peers. Hamilton, Ont. Purposive sample of 17 family physicians. An iterative process of face-to-face, in-depth interviews that were audiotaped and transcribed. The research team independently reviewed each interview for emergent themes with consensus reached through discussion and comparison. Themes were grouped into conceptual categories. Four main aspects of physician resilience were identified: 1) attitudes and perspectives, which include valuing the physician role, maintaining interest, developing self-awareness, and accepting personal limitations; 2) balance and prioritization, which include setting limits, taking effective approaches to continuing professional development, and honouring the self;3) practice management style, which includes sound business management, having good staff, and using effective practice arrangements; and 4) supportive relations, which include positive personal relationships, effective professional relationships, and good communication. Resilience is a dynamic, evolving process of positive attitudes and effective strategies.

  1. Sense of meaning as a predictor of burnout in emergency physicians in Israel: a national survey

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Itzhak, Shulamit; Dvash, Jonathan; Maor, Maya; Rosenberg, Noa; Halpern, Pinchas

    2015-01-01

    Objective Burnout is common in physicians and particularly acute in emergency physicians. Physician burnout may adversely affect physicians’ lives and the quality of care they provide, but much remains unknown about its main contributing factors. The present study evaluated burnout rates and contributing factors in emergency physicians in Israel, specifically focusing on the role of a sense of meaning, which has received little attention in the literature concerning burnout in emergency physicians. Methods A multicenter study, involving a convenience sample of physicians working full-time in the emergency departments of 16 general hospitals in Israel, was conducted. Questionnaires were used to assess burnout, demographic characteristics, professional stress, emotional distress, satisfaction, and quality of professional life, and open-ended questions were used to evaluate subjective perception of job satisfaction. Results Seventy physicians completed the questionnaires; 71.4% reported significant burnout levels in at least one of the burnout measures, while 82% also reported medium or high levels of competency. Burnout levels were associated with work-life balance, work satisfaction, social support, depressive symptoms, stress, and preoccupying thoughts. Regression analysis yielded two significant factors associated with burnout: worry and a sense of existential meaning derived from work. In addition, 61%, 51%, and 17% of participants exhibited high emotional exhaustion, high depersonalization, and a low sense of personal accomplishment, respectively. Conclusion These results indicate a high burnout rate in emergency physicians in Israel and highlight relevant positive and negative factors including the importance of addressing existential meaning in designing specific intervention programs to counter burnout. PMID:27752601

  2. Measuring the anti-quark contribution to the proton spin using parity violating W production in polarized proton proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, Ciprian

    Since the 1980s the spin puzzle has been at the heart of many experimental measurements. The initial discovery that only ~30% of the spin of the proton comes from quarks and anti-quarks has been refined and cross checked by several other deep inelastic scattering (DIS) and semi inclusive DIS (SIDIS) experiments. Through measurements of polarized parton distribution functions (PDFs) the individual contributions of the u, d, u, d, quarks have been measured. The flavor separation done in SIDIS experiments requires knowledge of fragmentation functions (FFs). However, due to the higher uncertainty of the anti-quark FFs compared to the quark FFs, the quark polarized PDFs (Deltau(x), Delta d(x)) are significantly better constrained than the anti-quark distributions (Deltau( x), Deltad(x). By accessing the anti-quarks directly through W boson production in polarized proton-proton collisions (ud → W+ → e+/mu+ and du→ W- → e-/mu-), the large FF uncertainties are avoided and a cleaner measurement can be done. The parity violating single spin asymmetry of the W decay leptons can be directly related to the polarized PDFs of the anti-quarks. The W+/- → e+/- measurement has been performed with the PHENIX central arm detectors at √s=510 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and is presented in this thesis. Approximately 40 pb-1 of data from the 2011 and 2012 was analyzed and a large parity violating single spin asymmetry for W+/- has been measured. The combined data for 2011 and 2012 provide a single spin asymmetry for both charges: W+: -0.27 +/- 0.10(stat) +/- 0.01(syst) W -: 0.28 +/- 0.16(stat) +/- 0.02(syst) These results are consistent with the different theoretical predictions at the 1sigma level. The increased statistical precision enabled and required a more careful analysis of the background contamination for the this measurement. A method based on Gaussian Processes for Regression has been employed to determine this background contribution. This

  3. THE HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL TEAM PHYSICIAN

    PubMed Central

    Atsatt, Rodney F.

    1957-01-01

    Mutual confidence is necessary between the football coach and the team physician. The physician's decision in the matter of a boy's condition must always be final. The coach should also consider the physician's advice in shaping his psychological appeals to the players in before-game and between-halves talks. The physician should be on his way to a man injured on the field as soon as the play is ended. It is up to him and not the trainer or coach to make the diagnosis. The physician must have the ability to make an immediate evaluation of the extent of injury and use appropriate measures to get the player off the field. To see a semi-conscious man with dangling head being half dragged off the field is far worse from the patient's standpoint and from the spectator's standpoint than removal by stretcher. PMID:13460745

  4. Examining the influence of family physician supply on district health system performance in South Africa: An ecological analysis of key health indicators.

    PubMed

    Von Pressentin, Klaus B; Mash, Bob J; Esterhuizen, Tonya M

    2017-04-28

    The supply of appropriate health workers is a key building block in the World Health Organization's model of effective health systems. Primary care teams are stronger if they contain doctors with postgraduate training in family medicine. The contribution of such family physicians to the performance of primary care systems has not been evaluated in the African context. Family physicians with postgraduate training entered the South African district health system (DHS) from 2011. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of family physicians within the DHS of South Africa. The objectives were to evaluate the impact of an increase in family physician supply in each district (number per 10 000 population) on key health indicators. All 52 South African health districts were included as units of analysis. An ecological study evaluated the correlations between the supply of family physicians and routinely collected data on district performance for two time periods: 2010/2011 and 2014/2015. Five years after the introduction of the new generation of family physicians, this study showed no demonstrable correlation between family physician supply and improved health indicators from the macro-perspective of the district. The lack of a measurable impact at the level of the district is most likely because of the very low supply of family physicians in the public sector. Studies which evaluate impact closer to the family physician's circle of control may be better positioned to demonstrate a measurable impact in the short term.

  5. Physician Enabling Skills Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Hudon, Catherine; Lambert, Mireille; Almirall, José

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the reliability and validity of the newly developed Physician Enabling Skills Questionnaire (PESQ) by assessing its internal consistency, test-retest reliability, concurrent validity with patient-centred care, and predictive validity with patient activation and patient enablement. Design Validation study. Setting Saguenay, Que. Participants One hundred patients with at least 1 chronic disease who presented in a waiting room of a regional health centre family medicine unit. Main outcome measures Family physicians’ enabling skills, measured with the PESQ at 2 points in time (ie, while in the waiting room at the family medicine unit and 2 weeks later through a mail survey); patient-centred care, assessed with the Patient Perception of Patient-Centredness instrument; patient activation, assessed with the Patient Activation Measure; and patient enablement, assessed with the Patient Enablement Instrument. Results The internal consistency of the 6 subscales of the PESQ was adequate (Cronbach α = .69 to .92). The test-retest reliability was very good (r = 0.90; 95% CI 0.84 to 0.93). Concurrent validity with the Patient Perception of Patient-Centredness instrument was good (r = −0.67; 95% CI −0.78 to −0.53; P < .001). The PESQ accounts for 11% of the total variance with the Patient Activation Measure (r2 = 0.11; P = .002) and 19% of the variance with the Patient Enablement Instrument (r2 = 0.19; P < .001). Conclusion The newly developed PESQ presents good psychometric properties, allowing for its use in practice and research. PMID:26889507

  6. Physician Specialization and Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV

    PubMed Central

    Landon, Bruce E; Wilson, Ira B; Cohn, Susan E; Fichtenbaum, Carl J; Wong, Mitchell D; Wenger, Neil S; Bozzette, Samuel A; Shapiro, Martin F; Cleary, Paul D

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND Since the introduction of the first protease inhibitor in January 1996, there has been a dramatic change in the treatment of persons infected with HIV. The changing nature of HIV care has important implications for the types of physicians that can best care for patients with HIV infection. OBJECTIVE To assess the association of specialty training and experience in the care of HIV disease with the adoption and use of highly active antiretroviral (ARV) therapy (HAART). DESIGN Observational cohort study of patients under care for HIV infection and their physicians. PATIENTS AND SETTING This analysis used data collected from a national probability sample of noninstitutionalized persons with HIV infection participating in the HIV Costs and Service Utilization Study and their primary physicians. We analyzed 1,820 patients being cared for by 374 physicians. MEASUREMENTS Rates of HAART use at 12 months and 18 months after the approval of the first protease inhibitor. RESULTS Forty percent of the physicians were formally trained in infectious diseases (ID), 38% were general medicine physicians with self-reported expertise in the care of HIV, and 22% were general medicine physicians without self-reported expertise in the care of HIV. The majority of physicians (69%) reported a current HIV caseload of 50 patients or more. In multivariable models controlling for patient characteristics, there were no differences between generalist experts and ID physicians in rates of HAART use in December 1996. When compared to ID physicians, however, patients being treated by non-expert general medicine physicians were less likely to be on HAART (odds ratio [OR], 0.32; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.17 to 0.61). Patients being treated by low-volume physicians were also much less likely to be on HAART therapy than those treated by high-volume physicians (OR, 0.26; 95% CI, 0.14 to 0.48). These findings were attenuated by June 1997, suggesting that over time, the broader

  7. Physician Interactions with Electronic Health Records in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Montague, Enid; Asan, Onur

    2013-01-01

    Objective It is essential to design technologies and systems that promote appropriate interactions between physicians and patients. This study explored how physicians interact with Electronic Health Records (EHRs) to understand the qualities of the interaction between the physician and the EHR that may contribute to positive physician-patient interactions. Study Design Video-taped observations of 100 medical consultations were used to evaluate interaction patterns between physicians and EHRs. Quantified observational methods were used to contribute to ecological validity. Methods Ten primary care physicians and 100 patients from five clinics participated in the study. Clinical encounters were recorded with video cameras and coded using a validated objective coding methodology in order to examine how physicians interact with electronic health records. Results Three distinct styles were identified that characterize physician interactions with the EHR: technology-centered, human-centered, and mixed. Physicians who used a technology-centered style spent more time typing and gazing at the computer during the visit. Physicians who used a mixed style shifted their attention and body language between their patients and the technology throughout the visit. Physicians who used the human-centered style spent the least amount of time typing and focused more on the patient. Conclusion A variety of EHR interaction styles may be effective in facilitating patient-centered care. However, potential drawbacks of each style exist and are discussed. Future research on this topic and design strategies for effective health information technology in primary care are also discussed. PMID:24009982

  8. Health care workplace discrimination and physician turnover.

    PubMed

    Nunez-Smith, Marcella; Pilgrim, Nanlesta; Wynia, Matthew; Desai, Mayur M; Bright, Cedric; Krumholz, Harlan M; Bradley, Elizabeth H

    2009-12-01

    To examine the association between physician race/ ethnicity, workplace discrimination, and physician job turnover. Cross-sectional, national survey conducted in 2006-2007 of practicing physicians (n = 529) randomly identified via the American Medical Association Masterfile and the National Medical Association membership roster. We assessed the relationships between career racial/ethnic discrimination at work and several career-related dependent variables, including 2 measures of physician turnover, career satisfaction, and contemplation of career change. We used standard frequency analyses, odds ratios and chi2 statistics, and multivariate logistic regression modeling to evaluate these associations. Physicians who self-identified as nonmajority were significantly more likely to have left at least 1 job because of workplace discrimination (black, 29%; Asian, 24%; other race, 21%; Hispanic/Latino, 20%; white, 9%). In multivariate models, having experienced racial/ethnic discrimination at work was associated with high job turnover (adjusted odds ratio, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.4-4.9). Among physicians who experienced workplace discrimination, only 45% of physicians were satisfied with their careers (vs 88% among those who had not experienced workplace discrimination, p value < .01), and 40% were contemplating a career change (vs 10% among those who had not experienced workplace discrimination, p value < .001). Workplace discrimination is associated with physician job turnover, career dissatisfaction, and contemplation of career change. These findings underscore the importance of monitoring for workplace discrimination and responding when opportunities for intervention and retention still exist.

  9. December financial checkup for physicians.

    PubMed

    Miller, Rita

    2014-01-01

    December is a busy month for holiday fun, but don't neglect your financial health! Physicians should review their business and personal finances at year end to ensure they are on target both for income generated and taxes paid. Preparing for the April 15 tax filing is aided by a thorough review in December. Payroll items such as W2s, 1099s, and employee benefits need to be reviewed. Retirement savings should be analyzed. Make sure to look at your business profit/loss statement and balance sheet. Personal contributions and other tax planning strategies need to be completed by the end of the year. Your CPA can help!

  10. LEGAL DUTIES OF PHYSICIANS

    PubMed Central

    Sandor, Andrew A.

    1951-01-01

    The history of the physician's legal duties has been traced from the first recorded writings of the Babylonian era to the present day. There has been a transition from the days of absolute liability to the modern idea of liability based on culpability. The doctrine of stare decisis developed in early English law forms the very backbone of our own jurisprudence. Broadly, if a physician renders reasonable care and skill, he is absolved from liability. Some of the more important legal duties and proscriptions applying to physicians are discussed in particular in this presentation. PMID:14848696

  11. Patient-physician communication.

    PubMed

    Asnani, M R

    2009-09-01

    Extensive research has shown that no matter how knowledgeable the physician might be, if he/she is not able to open good communication channels with the patient, he/she may be of no help to the latter Despite this known fact and the fact that a patient-physician consultation is the most widely performed 'procedure' in a physician's professional lifetime, effective communication with the patient has been found to be sadly lacking. This review article seeks to discuss 'the what', 'the why' and 'the how' of doctor-patient communication.

  12. Physician medical malpractice

    PubMed Central

    LeMasurier, Jean

    1985-01-01

    Malpractice insurance premiums for physicians have increased at an average rate of over 30 percent per year. This rate is significantly higher than health care cost inflation and the increase in physician costs. Trends indicate that malpractice related costs, both liability insurance and defensive medicine costs, will continue to increase for the near future. Pressures to limit physician costs under Medicare raise a concern about how malpractice costs can be controlled. This paper presents an overview of the problem, reviews options that are available to policymakers, and discusses State and legislative efforts to address the issue. PMID:10311396

  13. Psychiatric illness in physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Shortt, S E

    1979-01-01

    Psychiatric illness and behavioural problems among physicians are reviewed in this paper. Some studies suggest that the medical profession has a high rate of alcoholism, drug abuse and marital discord. As well, physicians appear to commit suicide and to seek admission to psychiatric institutions more frequently than comparable populations. Considered as etiologic factors in psychiatric illness among physicians are the role strain inherent in the profession and the personality development of individual practitioners prior to their entering medical school. The review concludes with suggestions for an improved approach to treatment and prevention. PMID:380794

  14. Physician/Computer Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Dlugacz, Yosef D.; Siegel, Carole; Fischer, Susan

    1981-01-01

    Despite the fact that the physician's involvement with computer operations has dramatically increased with automation in the health care industry, few studies have focused on the physician's experiences with and reactions to computers. This paper reports on these dimensions for physicians and their medical supervisors who have begun to use a computerized drug review system. Their attitudes and opinions are assessed towards this system and more generally towards the use of computers in medicine. Clinicians' attitudes towards computers are related to their clinical role and feelings about the working milieu. This report presents preliminary data of the study in terms of the frequency distribution of responses.

  15. Measuring the leading-order hadronic contribution to the muon g-2 in the space-like region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carloni Calame, Carlo M.

    2017-04-01

    A new experiment is proposed to measure the running of the electromagnetic coupling constant in the space-like region by scattering high-energy muons on atomic electrons of a low-Z target. The differential cross section of the elastic process μe → μe provides direct sensitivity to the leading-order hadronic contribution to the muon anomaly aμHLO. It is argued that by using the 150-GeV muon beam available at the CERN North Area, with an average rate of 1.3 × 107 muon/s, a statistical uncertainty of 0.3% can be achieved on aμHLO after two years of data taking. The direct measurement of aμHLO via μe scattering will provide an independent determination and consolidate the theoretical prediction for the muon g-2 in the Standard Model. It will allow therefore a firmer interpretation of the measurements of the future muon g-2 experiments at Fermilab and JPARC.

  16. Eddy Covariance Measurements Over a Maize Field: The Contribution of Minor Flux Terms to the Energy Balance Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smidt, J.; Ingwersen, J.; Streck, T.

    2015-12-01

    The lack of energy balance closure is a long-standing problem in eddy covariance (EC) measurements. The energy balance equation is defined as Rn - G = H + λE, where Rn is net radiation, G is the ground heat flux, H is the sensible heat flux and λE is the latent heat flux. In most cases of energy imbalance, either Rn is overestimated or the ground heat and turbulent fluxes are underestimated. Multiple studies have shown that calculations, incorrect instrument installation/calibration and measurement errors alone do not entirely account for this imbalance. Rather, research is now focused on previously neglected sources of heat storage in the soil, biomass and air beneath the EC station. This project examined the potential of five "minor flux terms" - soil heat storage, biomass heat storage, energy consumption by photosynthesis, air heat storage and atmospheric moisture change, to further close the energy balance gap. Eddy covariance measurements were conducted at a maize (Zea mays) field in southwest Germany during summer 2014. Soil heat storage was measured for six weeks at 11 sites around the field footprint. Biomass and air heat storage were measured for six subsequent weeks at seven sites around the field footprint. Energy consumption by photosynthesis was calculated using the CO2 flux data. Evapotranspiration was calculated using the water balance method and then compared to the flux data processed with three post-closure methods: the sensible heat flux, the latent heat flux and the Bowen ratio post-closure methods. An energy balance closure of 66% was achieved by the EC station measurements over the entire investigation period. During the soil heat flux campaign, EC station closure was 74.1%, and the field footprint soil heat storage contributed 3.3% additional closure. During the second minor flux term measurement period, closure with the EC station data was 91%. Biomass heat storage resulted in 1.1% additional closure, the photosynthesis flux closed the gap

  17. Hitler's Jewish Physicians.

    PubMed

    Weisz, George M

    2014-07-01

    The mystery behind the behavior of infamous personalities leaves many open questions, particularly when related to the practice of medicine. This paper takes a brief look at two Jewish physicians who played memorable roles in the life of Adolf Hitler.

  18. Mitigation of methane emissions in cities: How new measurements and partnerships can contribute to emissions reduction strategies

    DOE PAGES

    Hopkins, Francesca M.; Ehleringer, James R.; Bush, Susan E.; ...

    2016-09-10

    Cities generate 70% of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions, a fraction that is grow-ing with global urbanization. While cities play an important role in climate change mitigation, there has been little focus on reducing urban methane (CH4) emissions. Here, we develop a conceptual framework for CH 4 mitigation in cities by describing emission processes, the role of measurements, and a need for new institutional partnerships. Urban CH 4 emissions are likely to grow with expanding use of natural gas and organic waste disposal systems in growing population centers; however, we currently lack the ability to quantify this increase. We also lackmore » systematic knowledge of the relative contribution of these distinct source sectors on emissions. We present new observations from four North American cities to demonstrate that CH4 emissions vary in magnitude and sector from city to city and hence require different mitigation strategies. Detections of fugitive emissions from these systems suggest that current mitiga- tion approaches are absent or ineffective. These findings illustrate that tackling urban CH 4 emissions will require research efforts to identify mitigation targets, develop and implement new mitigation strategies, and monitor atmospheric CH 4 levels to ensure the success of mitigation efforts. This research will require a variety of techniques to achieve these objectives and should be deployed in cities globally. In conclusion, we suggest that metropolitan scale partnerships may effectively coordinate systematic measurements and actions focused on emission reduction goals.« less

  19. Mitigation of methane emissions in cities: How new measurements and partnerships can contribute to emissions reduction strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Francesca M.; Ehleringer, James R.; Bush, Susan E.; Duren, Riley M.; Miller, Charles E.; Lai, Chun-Ta; Hsu, Ying-Kuang; Carranza, Valerie; Randerson, James T.

    2016-09-01

    Cities generate 70% of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions, a fraction that is growing with global urbanization. While cities play an important role in climate change mitigation, there has been little focus on reducing urban methane (CH4) emissions. Here, we develop a conceptual framework for CH4 mitigation in cities by describing emission processes, the role of measurements, and a need for new institutional partnerships. Urban CH4 emissions are likely to grow with expanding use of natural gas and organic waste disposal systems in growing population centers; however, we currently lack the ability to quantify this increase. We also lack systematic knowledge of the relative contribution of these distinct source sectors on emissions. We present new observations from four North American cities to demonstrate that CH4 emissions vary in magnitude and sector from city to city and hence require different mitigation strategies. Detections of fugitive emissions from these systems suggest that current mitigation approaches are absent or ineffective. These findings illustrate that tackling urban CH4 emissions will require research efforts to identify mitigation targets, develop and implement new mitigation strategies, and monitor atmospheric CH4 levels to ensure the success of mitigation efforts. This research will require a variety of techniques to achieve these objectives and should be deployed in cities globally. We suggest that metropolitan scale partnerships may effectively coordinate systematic measurements and actions focused on emission reduction goals.

  20. Mitigation of methane emissions in cities: How new measurements and partnerships can contribute to emissions reduction strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, Francesca M.; Ehleringer, James R.; Bush, Susan E.

    Cities generate 70% of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions, a fraction that is grow-ing with global urbanization. While cities play an important role in climate change mitigation, there has been little focus on reducing urban methane (CH4) emissions. Here, we develop a conceptual framework for CH 4 mitigation in cities by describing emission processes, the role of measurements, and a need for new institutional partnerships. Urban CH 4 emissions are likely to grow with expanding use of natural gas and organic waste disposal systems in growing population centers; however, we currently lack the ability to quantify this increase. We also lackmore » systematic knowledge of the relative contribution of these distinct source sectors on emissions. We present new observations from four North American cities to demonstrate that CH4 emissions vary in magnitude and sector from city to city and hence require different mitigation strategies. Detections of fugitive emissions from these systems suggest that current mitiga- tion approaches are absent or ineffective. These findings illustrate that tackling urban CH 4 emissions will require research efforts to identify mitigation targets, develop and implement new mitigation strategies, and monitor atmospheric CH 4 levels to ensure the success of mitigation efforts. This research will require a variety of techniques to achieve these objectives and should be deployed in cities globally. In conclusion, we suggest that metropolitan scale partnerships may effectively coordinate systematic measurements and actions focused on emission reduction goals.« less

  1. The Advocacy Portfolio: A Standardized Tool for Documenting Physician Advocacy.

    PubMed

    Nerlinger, Abby L; Shah, Anita N; Beck, Andrew F; Beers, Lee S; Wong, Shale L; Chamberlain, Lisa J; Keller, David

    2018-01-02

    Recent changes in health care delivery systems and in medical training have primed academia for a paradigm shift, with strengthened support for an expanded definition of scholarship. Physicians who consider advocacy to be relevant to their scholarly endeavors need a standardized format to display activities and measure the value of health outcomes to which their work can be attributed. Similar to the Educator Portfolio, the authors here propose the Advocacy Portfolio (AP) to document a scholarly approach to advocacy.Despite common challenges faced in the arguments for both education and advocacy to be viewed as scholarship, the authors highlight inherent differences between the two fields. Based on prior literature, the authors propose a broad yet comprehensive set of domains to categorize advocacy activities, including advocacy engagement, knowledge dissemination, community outreach, advocacy teaching/mentoring, and advocacy leadership/administration. Documenting quality, quantity, and a scholarly approach to advocacy within each domain is the first of many steps to establish congruence between advocacy and scholarship for physicians utilizing the AP format.This standardized format can be applied in a variety of settings, from medical training to academic promotion. Such documentation will encourage institutional buy-in by aligning measured outcomes with institutional missions. The AP will also provide physician advocates with a method to display the impact of advocacy projects on health outcomes for patients and populations. Future challenges to broad application include establishing institutional support and developing consensus regarding criteria by which to evaluate the contributions of advocacy activities to scholarship.

  2. Achieving Gender Equity in Physician Compensation and Career Advancement: A Position Paper of the American College of Physicians.

    PubMed

    Butkus, Renee; Serchen, Joshua; Moyer, Darilyn V; Bornstein, Sue S; Hingle, Susan Thompson

    2018-05-15

    Women comprise more than one third of the active physician workforce, an estimated 46% of all physicians-in-training, and more than half of all medical students in the United States. Although progress has been made toward gender diversity in the physician workforce, disparities in compensation exist and inequities have contributed to a disproportionately low number of female physicians achieving academic advancement and serving in leadership positions. Women in medicine face other challenges, including a lack of mentors, discrimination, gender bias, cultural environment of the workplace, imposter syndrome, and the need for better work-life integration. In this position paper, the American College of Physicians summarizes the unique challenges female physicians face over the course of their careers and provides recommendations to improve gender equity and ensure that the full potential of female physicians is realized.

  3. Measuring the contribution of low Bjorken-x gluons to the proton spin with polarized proton-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolin, Scott Justin

    The PHENIX experiment is one of two detectors located at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, NY. Understanding the spin structure of the proton is a central goal at RHIC, the only polarized proton-on-proton collider in existence. The PHENIX spin program has two primary objectives. The first is to improve the constraints on the polarized parton distributions of the anti-u and anti-d quarks within the proton. The second objective is to improve the constraint on the gluon spin contribution to the proton spin, DeltaG. The focus of this thesis is the second objective. PHENIX experiment has been successful at providing the first meaningful constraints on DeltaG, along with STAR, the other detector located at RHIC. These constraints have, in fact, eliminated the extreme scenarios for gluon polarization through measurements of the double spin asymmetry, ALL, between the cross section of like and unlike sign helicity pp interactions. ALL measurements can be performed with a variety of final states at PHENIX. Until 2009, these final states were only measured for pseudo-rapidities of |eta| < 0.35. This range of eta is referred to as mid-rapidity. These mid-rapidity measurements, like the polarized DIS measurements, suffer from a limited kinematic reach. Final states containing a measured particle with pT [special character omitted] 1 GeV/c are considered to have occurred in the hard scattering domain where the pp interaction is well approximated as an interaction of a quark or gluon in one proton and a quark or gluon in the second proton. Each of these interacting particles has a momentum fraction, x, of its parent proton's momentum. The gluon polarization is dependent on the momentum fraction and the net gluon polarization can be written as the integral of the momentum fraction dependent polarization: DeltaG = f(1,0)Delta g(x)dx. The momentum fractions of the two interacting particles give information about the final state

  4. Are physicians and patients in agreement? Exploring dyadic concordance.

    PubMed

    Coran, Justin J; Koropeckyj-Cox, Tanya; Arnold, Christa L

    2013-10-01

    Dyadic concordance in physician-patient interactions can be defined as the extent of agreement between physicians and patients in their perceptions of the clinical encounter. The current research specifically examined two types of concordance: informational concordance-the extent of agreement in physician and patient responses regarding patient information (education, self-rated health, pain); and interactional concordance-the extent of physician-patient agreement regarding the patient's level of confidence and trust in the physician and the perceived quality of explanations concerning diagnosis and treatment. Using a convenience sample of physicians and patients (N = 50 dyads), a paired survey method was tested, which measured and compared physician and patient reports to identify informational and interactional concordances. Factors potentially related to dyadic concordance were also measured, including demographic characteristics (patient race, gender, age, and education) and clinical factors (whether this was a first visit and physician specialty in family medicine or oncology). The paired survey showed informational discordances, as physicians tended to underestimate patients' pain and overestimate patient education. Interactional discordances included overestimating patients' understanding of diagnosis and treatment explanations and patients' level of confidence and trust. Discordances were linked to patient dissatisfaction with physician listening, having unanswered questions, and feeling the physician had not spent enough time. The paired survey method effectively identified physician-patient discordances that may interfere with effective medical practice; this method may be used in various settings to identify potential areas of improvement in health communication and education.

  5. Vertically resolved measurements of nighttime radical reservoirs in Los Angeles and their contribution to the urban radical budget.

    PubMed

    Young, Cora J; Washenfelder, Rebecca A; Roberts, James M; Mielke, Levi H; Osthoff, Hans D; Tsai, Catalina; Pikelnaya, Olga; Stutz, Jochen; Veres, Patrick R; Cochran, Anthony K; VandenBoer, Trevor C; Flynn, James; Grossberg, Nicole; Haman, Christine L; Lefer, Barry; Stark, Harald; Graus, Martin; de Gouw, Joost; Gilman, Jessica B; Kuster, William C; Brown, Steven S

    2012-10-16

    Photolabile nighttime radical reservoirs, such as nitrous acid (HONO) and nitryl chloride (ClNO(2)), contribute to the oxidizing potential of the atmosphere, particularly in early morning. We present the first vertically resolved measurements of ClNO(2), together with vertically resolved measurements of HONO. These measurements were acquired during the California Nexus (CalNex) campaign in the Los Angeles basin in spring 2010. Average profiles of ClNO(2) exhibited no significant dependence on height within the boundary layer and residual layer, although individual vertical profiles did show variability. By contrast, nitrous acid was strongly enhanced near the ground surface with much smaller concentrations aloft. These observations are consistent with a ClNO(2) source from aerosol uptake of N(2)O(5) throughout the boundary layer and a HONO source from dry deposition of NO(2) to the ground surface and subsequent chemical conversion. At ground level, daytime radical formation calculated from nighttime-accumulated HONO and ClNO(2) was approximately equal. Incorporating the different vertical distributions by integrating through the boundary and residual layers demonstrated that nighttime-accumulated ClNO(2) produced nine times as many radicals as nighttime-accumulated HONO. A comprehensive radical budget at ground level demonstrated that nighttime radical reservoirs accounted for 8% of total radicals formed and that they were the dominant radical source between sunrise and 09:00 Pacific daylight time (PDT). These data show that vertical gradients of radical precursors should be taken into account in radical budgets, particularly with respect to HONO.

  6. Physicians' knowledge, expectations, and practice regarding antibiotic use in primary health care.

    PubMed

    Al-Homaidan, Homaidan T; Barrimah, Issam E

    2018-01-01

    Physicians' knowledge of antibiotics, their attitudes, expectations, and practices regarding antibiotic prescription is fundamental for controlling the irrational antibiotic use. This study evaluates primary health care (PHC) physicians' knowledge, expectation, and practices regarding antibiotics use in upper respiratory tract infections. A cross-sectional study conducted in the Qassim region where 32 PHC centers were selected randomly. A total of 294 PHC physicians were surveyed. A pre-tested questionnaire was used after an orientation of participating physicians. Response rate was 80.3%. There is a significant belief among participants that the use of antibiotics leads to relief of symptoms in the case of viral disease and that taking antibiotics without rational indication increases the side effects. Participants identified that inadequate prescription, use without prescription, and non-compliance of patients are the most important factors contributing to the development of bacterial resistance. Participants often blamed the pharmacist for contributing mostly to the development of the problem of antibiotic resistance. Most physicians identified that they feel under pressure if patients expect an antibiotic prescription. In the absence of laboratory confirmation, most physicians selected high fever as the symptom that makes them prescribe antibiotics. Although having practice guidelines, participants demonstrated that these guidelines do not consider individual variations of patients' need. They do not support a regulation to prohibit antibiotic prescription without laboratory confirmation. The distribution of PHC physicians' knowledge, attitudes, and practices did not significantly vary between urban and rural centers. Therefore, whichever measures will be taken to improve the antibiotics practices can be applied to any PHC setting.

  7. Primary care physicians in underserved areas. Family physicians dominate.

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, W H; Mark, D H; Midtling, J E; Zellner, B B

    1995-01-01

    Using the definitions of "medically underserved areas" developed by the California Health Manpower Policy Commission and data on physician location derived from a survey of California physicians applying for licensure or relicensure between 1984 and 1986, we examined the extent to which different kinds of primary care physicians located in underserved areas. Among physicians completing postgraduate medical education after 1974, board-certified family physicians were 3 times more likely to locate in medically underserved rural communities than were other primary care physicians. Non-board-certified family and general physicians were 1.6 times more likely than other non-board-certified primary care physicians to locate in rural underserved areas. Family and general practice physicians also showed a slightly greater likelihood than other primary care physicians of being located in urban underserved areas. PMID:8553635

  8. Comparison of Pharmacist and Physician Managed Annual Medicare Wellness Services.

    PubMed

    Sewell, Mary Jean; Riche, Daniel M; Fleming, Joshua W; Malinowski, Scott S; Jackson, R Terry

    2016-12-01

    Medicare Annual Wellness Visits (AWV) are a benefit provided for Medicare beneficiaries to increase focus on wellness and preventive measures. Pharmacists can conduct AWVs, which offers a potential avenue for outpatient revenue generation. To compare a composite of interventions and screenings and revenue generated by a pharmacist with those made by a physician during a subsequent AWV. A report generated through the electronic health record was used to determine AWVs conducted by a pharmacist or 3 participating physicians from December 2013 to March 2016, including revenue generated. Through electronic chart review, documentation was accessed to quantify and categorize the number and types of referrals, health advice, laboratory tests, procedures, vaccinations, and screenings that were recommended during each patient's AWV. The pharmacist performed 19 subsequent visits, and the 3 physicians performed 89 subsequent visits. Overall, the composite of interventions and screenings was significantly higher in the pharmacist group than the physician group (P = 0.03). More interventions were made in the areas of health advice (P = 0.020), vaccine recommendations (P = 0.009), and screenings in the pharmacist group (P < 0.001). The physicians ordered significantly more laboratory tests per visit (P < 0.001). The pharmacist was reimbursed on average $105 per visit versus $99 per visit for the physicians. Pharmacist-provided AWVs are at least comparable to those provided by physicians and offer an additional access point for valuable services for Medicare beneficiaries. There was no financial contribution to this study. Riche reports participation in the Speaker's Bureau for Merck and the Speaker's Bureau and Advisory Board for Novo Nordisk. The authors have no other conflicts of interest to report pertinent to this research. This data has not been previously published in any other location. Richie, Sewell, Malinowski, Jackson, and Fleming were involved in study design and

  9. Job Satisfaction Among Academic Family Physicians.

    PubMed

    Agana, Denny Fe; Porter, Maribeth; Hatch, Robert; Rubin, Daniel; Carek, Peter

    2017-09-01

    Family physicians report some of the highest rates of burnout among their physician peers. Over the past few years, this rate has increased and work-life balance has decreased. In academic medicine, many report lack of career satisfaction and have considered leaving academia. Our aim was to explore the factors that contribute to job satisfaction and burnout in faculty members in a family medicine department. Six academic family medicine clinics were invited to participate in this qualitative study. Focus groups were conducted to allow for free-flowing, rich dialogue between the moderator and the physician participants. Transcripts were analyzed in a systematic manner by independent investigators trained in grounded theory. The constant comparison method was used to code and synthesize the qualitative data. Six main themes emerged: time (62%), benefits (9%), resources (8%), undervalue (8%), physician well-being (7%), and practice demand (6%). Within the main theme of time, four subthemes emerged: administrative tasks/emails (61%), teaching (17%), electronic medical records (EMR) requirements (13%), and patient care (9%). Academic family physicians believe that a main contributor to job satisfaction is time. They desire more resources, like staff, to assist with increasing work demands. Overall, they enjoy the academic primary care environment. Future directions would include identifying the specific time restraints that prevent them from completing tasks, the type of staff that would assist with the work demands, and the life stressors the physicians are experiencing.

  10. Emergency physicians accumulate more stress factors than other physicians-results from the French SESMAT study.

    PubMed

    Estryn-Behar, M; Doppia, M-A; Guetarni, K; Fry, C; Machet, G; Pelloux, P; Aune, I; Muster, D; Lassaunière, J-M; Prudhomme, C

    2011-05-01

    France is facing a shortage of available physicians due to a greying population and the lack of a proportional increase in the formation of doctors. Emergency physicians are the medical system's first line of defence. The authors prepared a comprehensive questionnaire using established scales measuring various aspects of working conditions, satisfaction and health of salaried physicians and pharmacists. It was made available online, and the two major associations of emergency physicians promoted its use. 3196 physicians filled out the questionnaire. Among them were 538 emergency physicians. To avoid bias, 1924 physicians were randomly selected from the total database to match the demographic characteristics of France's physician population: 42.5% women, 57.5% men, 8.2% < 35 years old, 33.8% 35-44 years old, 34.5% 45-54 years old and 23.6% ≥ 55 years old. The distribution of physicians in the 23 administrative regions and by speciality was also precisely taken into account. This representative sample was used to compare subgroups of physicians by speciality. The outcomes indicate that the intent to leave the profession (ITL) was quite prevalent across French physicians and even more so among emergency physicians (17.4% and 21.4% respectively), and burnout was highly prevalent (42.4% and 51.5%, respectively). Among the representative sample and among emergency physicians, work-family conflict (OR=4.47 and OR=6.14, respectively) and quality of teamwork (OR=2.21 and OR=5.44, respectively) were associated with burnout in a multivariate analysis, and these risk factors were more prevalent among emergency physicians than other types. A serious lack of quality of teamwork appears to be associated with a higher risk of ITL (OR=3.92 among the physicians in the representative sample and OR=4.35 among emergency physicians), and burnout doubled the risk of ITL in multivariate analysis. In order to prevent the premature departure of French doctors, it is important to improve

  11. 75 FR 62451 - National Physician Assistants Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ... National Physician Assistants Week, 2010 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation In... clinics, and other settings with provider shortages. During National Physician Assistants Week, we honor... heart-wrenching circumstances. As we recognize their countless contributions this week, we also pay...

  12. Nuclear emulsion measurements of the dose contribution from tissue disintegration stars on the Apollo-Soyuz mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, H. J.

    1977-01-01

    A total of 996 disintegration stars were prong-counted in two 100 micron llford K.2 emulsions from the dosimeter of the Docking Pilot on Apollo-Soyuz. The change of slope of the distribution at a prong number of about 6 or 7 indicates 219 stars as originating in gelatin. Applying the QF values set forth in official regulations to the energy spectra of the proton and a alpha prongs of the gelatin stars leads to a tissue star dose of 7.8 millirad or 45 millirem. The quoted values do not include the dose contribution from star-produced neutrons since neutrons do not leave visible prongs in emulsion. Nuclear theory, in good agreement with measurements of galactic radiation in the earth's atmosphere, indicates that the dose equivalent from neutrons is about equal to the one from all ionizing secondaries of stars. Application of this proposition to the star prong spectrum found on Apollo-Soyuz would set the total tissue star dose for the mission at approximately 90 millirem.

  13. Views regarding the training of ethics consultants: a survey of physicians caring for patients in ICU

    PubMed Central

    Chwang, Eric; Landy, David C; Sharp, Richard R

    2007-01-01

    Background Despite the expansion of ethics consultation services, questions remain about the aims of clinical ethics consultation, its methods and the expertise of those who provide such services. Objective To describe physicians' expectations regarding the training and skills necessary for ethics consultants to contribute effectively to the care of patients in intensive care unit (ICU). Design Mailed survey. Participants Physicians responsible for the care of at least 10 patients in ICU over a 6‐month period at a 921‐bed private teaching hospital with an established ethics consultation service. 69 of 92 (75%) eligible physicians responded. Measurements Importance of specialised knowledge and skills for ethics consultants contributing to the care of patients in ICU; need for advanced disciplinary training; expectations regarding formal‐training programmes for ethics consultants. Results Expertise in ethics was described most often as important for ethics consultants taking part in the care of patients in ICU, compared with expertise in law (p<0.03), religious traditions (p<0.001), medicine (p<0.001) and conflict‐mediation techniques (p<0.001). When asked about the formal training consultants should possess, however, physicians involved in the care of patients in ICU most often identified advanced medical training as important. Conclusions Although many physicians caring for patients in ICU believe ethics consultants must possess non‐medical expertise in ethics and law if they are to contribute effectively to patient care, these physicians place a very high value on medical training as well, suggesting a “medicine plus one” view of the training of an ideal ethics consultant. As ethics consultation services expand, clear expectations regarding the training of ethics consultants should be established. PMID:17526680

  14. Examining the influence of family physician supply on district health system performance in South Africa: An ecological analysis of key health indicators

    PubMed Central

    Mash, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    Background The supply of appropriate health workers is a key building block in the World Health Organization’s model of effective health systems. Primary care teams are stronger if they contain doctors with postgraduate training in family medicine. The contribution of such family physicians to the performance of primary care systems has not been evaluated in the African context. Family physicians with postgraduate training entered the South African district health system (DHS) from 2011. Aim This study aimed to evaluate the impact of family physicians within the DHS of South Africa. The objectives were to evaluate the impact of an increase in family physician supply in each district (number per 10 000 population) on key health indicators. Setting All 52 South African health districts were included as units of analysis. Methods An ecological study evaluated the correlations between the supply of family physicians and routinely collected data on district performance for two time periods: 2010/2011 and 2014/2015. Results Five years after the introduction of the new generation of family physicians, this study showed no demonstrable correlation between family physician supply and improved health indicators from the macro-perspective of the district. Conclusion The lack of a measurable impact at the level of the district is most likely because of the very low supply of family physicians in the public sector. Studies which evaluate impact closer to the family physician’s circle of control may be better positioned to demonstrate a measurable impact in the short term. PMID:28470076

  15. Dismembering the ethical physician

    PubMed Central

    Genuis, S J

    2006-01-01

    Physicians may experience ethical distress when they are caught in difficult clinical situations that demand ethical decision making, particularly when their preferred action may contravene the expectations of patients and established authorities. When principled and competent doctors succumb to patient wishes or establishment guidelines and participate in actions they perceive to be ethically inappropriate, or agree to refrain from interventions they believe to be in the best interests of patients, individual professional integrity may be diminished, and ethical reliability is potentially compromised. In a climate of ever‐proliferating ethical quandaries, it is essential for the medical community, health institutions, and governing bodies to pursue a judicious tension between the indispensable regulation of physicians necessary to maintain professional standards and preserve public safety, and the support for “freedom of conscience” that principled physicians require to practise medicine in keeping with their personal ethical orientation. PMID:16597808

  16. Burnout among physicians.

    PubMed

    Romani, Maya; Ashkar, Khalil

    2014-01-01

    Burnout is a common syndrome seen in healthcare workers, particularly physicians who are exposed to a high level of stress at work; it includes emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and low personal accomplishment. Burnout among physicians has garnered significant attention because of the negative impact it renders on patient care and medical personnel. Physicians who had high burnout levels reportedly committed more medical errors. Stress management programs that range from relaxation to cognitive-behavioral and patient-centered therapy have been found to be of utmost significance when it comes to preventing and treating burnout. However, evidence is insufficient to support that stress management programs can help reducing job-related stress beyond the intervention period, and similarly mindfulness-based stress reduction interventions efficiently reduce psychological distress and negative vibes, and encourage empathy while significantly enhancing physicians' quality of life. On the other hand, a few small studies have suggested that Balint sessions can have a promising positive effect in preventing burnout; moreover exercises can reduce anxiety levels and exhaustion symptoms while improving the mental and physical well-being of healthcare workers. Occupational interventions in the work settings can also improve the emotional and work-induced exhaustion. Combining both individual and organizational interventions can have a good impact in reducing burnout scores among physicians; therefore, multidisciplinary actions that include changes in the work environmental factors along with stress management programs that teach people how to cope better with stressful events showed promising solutions to manage burnout. However, until now there have been no rigorous studies to prove this. More interventional research targeting medical students, residents, and practicing physicians are needed in order to improve psychological well-being, professional careers, as well as the

  17. Differences between physician social networks for cardiac surgery serving communities with high versus low proportions of black residents.

    PubMed

    Hollingsworth, John M; Funk, Russell J; Garrison, Spencer A; Owen-Smith, Jason; Kaufman, Samuel R; Landon, Bruce E; Birkmeyer, John D

    2015-02-01

    Compared with white patients, black patients are more likely to undergo cardiac surgery at low-quality hospitals, even when they live closer to high-quality ones. Opportunities for organizational interventions to alleviate this problem remain elusive. To explore physician isolation in communities with high proportions of black residents as a factor contributing to racial disparities in access to high-quality hospitals for cardiac surgery. Using national Medicare data (2008-2011), we mapped physician social networks at hospitals where coronary artery bypass grafting procedures were performed, measuring their degree of connectedness. We then fitted a series of multivariate regression models to examine for associations between physician connectedness and the proportion of black residents in the hospital service area (HSA) served by each network. Measures of physician connectedness (ie, repeat-tie fraction, clustering, and number of external ties). After accounting for regional differences in healthcare capacity, the social networks of physicians practicing in areas with more black residents varied in many important respects from those of HSAs with fewer black residents. Physicians serving HSAs with many black residents had a smaller number of repeated interactions with each other than those in other HSAs (P<0.001). When these physicians did interact, they tended to assemble in smaller groups of highly interconnected colleagues (P<0.001). They also had fewer interactions with physicians outside their immediate geographic area (P=0.048). Physicians in HSAs with many black residents are more isolated than those in HSAs with fewer black residents. This isolation may negatively impact on care coordination and information sharing. As such, planned delivery system reforms that encourage minorities to seek care within their established local networks may further exacerbate existing surgical disparities.

  18. Microstructural and compositional contributions towards the mechanical behavior of aging human bone measured by cyclic and impact reference point indentation.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Adam C; Agarwalla, Avinesh; Yadavalli, Aditya; Liu, Jenny Y; Tang, Simon Y

    2016-06-01

    The assessment of fracture risk often relies primarily on measuring bone mineral density, thereby accounting for only a single pathology: the loss of bone mass. However, bone's ability to resist fracture is a result of its biphasic composition and hierarchical structure that imbue it with high strength and toughness. Reference point indentation (RPI) testing is designed to directly probe bone mechanical behavior at the microscale in situ, although it remains unclear which aspects of bone composition and structure influence the results at this scale. Therefore, our goal in this study was to investigate factors that contribute to bone mechanical behavior measured by cyclic reference point indentation, impact reference point indentation, and three-point bending. Twenty-eight female cadavers (ages 57-97) were subjected to cyclic and impact RPI in parallel at the unmodified tibia mid-diaphysis. After RPI, the middiaphyseal tibiae were removed, scanned using micro-CT to obtain cortical porosity (Ct.Po.) and tissue mineral density (TMD), then tested using three-point bending, and lastly assayed for the accumulation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). Both the indentation distance increase from cyclic RPI (IDI) and bone material strength index from impact RPI (BMSi) were significantly correlated with TMD (r=-0.390, p=0.006; r=0.430, p=0.002; respectively). Accumulation of AGEs was significantly correlated with IDI (r=0.281, p=0.046), creep indentation distance (CID, r=0.396, p=0.004), and BMSi (r=-0.613, p<0.001). There were no significant relationships between tissue TMD or AGEs accumulation with the quasi-static material properties. Toughness decreased with increasing tissue Ct.Po. (r=-0.621, p<0.001). Other three-point bending measures also correlated with tissue Ct.Po. including the bending modulus (r=-0.50, p<0.001) and ultimate stress (r=-0.56, p<0.001). The effects of Ct.Po. on indentation were less pronounced with IDI (r=0.290, p=0.043) and BMSi (r=-0.299, p

  19. Physician. A metapaedogogical text.

    PubMed

    Dean-Jones, Lesley

    2010-01-01

    It has generally been thought that the short treatise Physician was written for the beginning medical student and as such it has been criticized for being so superficial as to be worthless for producing anything but an empty charade of a physician. There are also numerous cruces in the text on which scholars have failed to come to any consensus. This paper argues that by taking the audience of the treatise to be the beginning instructor rather than the beginning student the tone of and information included in the treatise can be seen to be appropriate and the textual cruces can all be explained with little or no amendment by the same hypothesis.

  20. Influencing physician prescribing.

    PubMed

    Segal, R; Wang, F

    1999-10-01

    The drug use process suffers from problems related to quality and cost that have not responded well to administrative or educational interventions. In many cases, attempts to improve the quality of physician prescribing have been clumsy, often based on intuition. This article begins by describing the drug use process and the role of prescribing in that process. In the following section, we describe what is known about how physicians make drug choice decisions. The paper concludes with suggestions, based on evidence, about the design of strategies for influencing prescribing.

  1. Healthcare economics for the emergency physician.

    PubMed

    Propp, Douglas A; Krubert, Christopher; Sasson, Andres

    2003-01-01

    Although the principles of healthcare economics are not usually part of the fundamental education of emergency physicians, an understanding of these elements will enhance our ability to contribute to improved health-care value. This article introduces the practical aspects of microeconomics, insurance, the supply-and-demand relationship, competition, and costs as they affect the practice of medicine on a daily basis. Being cognizant of how these elements create a dynamic interplay in the health-care industry will allow physicians to better understand the expanded role they need to assume in the ongoing cost and quality debate. Copyright 2003, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.)

  2. Measurement of the low energy spectral contribution in coincidence with valence band (VB) energy levels of Ag(100) using VB-VB coincidence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladen, R. W.; Joglekar, P. V.; Lim, Z. H.; Shastry, K.; Hulbert, S. L.; Weiss, A. H.

    A set of coincidence measurements were obtained for the study and measurement of the electron contribution arising from the inter-valence band (VB) transitions along with the inelastically scattered VB electron contribution. These Auger-unrelated contributions arise in the Auger spectrum (Ag 4p NVV) obtained using Auger Photoelectron Coincidence Spectroscopy (APECS). The measured Auger-unrelated contribution can be eliminated from Auger spectrum to obtain the spectrum related to Auger. In our VB-VB coincidence measurement, a photon beam of energy 180eV was used to probe the Ag(100) sample. The coincidence spectrum was obtained using two Cylindrical Mirror Analyzers (CMA's). The scan CMA measured the low energy electron contribution in the energy range 0-70eV in coincidence with VB electrons measured by the fixed CMA. In this talk, we present the data obtained for VB-VB coincidence at the valence band energy of 171eV along with the coincidence measurements in the energy range of 4p core and valence band. NSF DMR 0907679, NSF Award Number: 1213727. Use of the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, was supported by the U.S. DOE, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DEAC02-98CH10886.

  3. Measurement of the low energy spectral contribution in coincidence with valence band (VB) energy levels of Ag(100) using VB-VB coincidence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, P. V.; Gladen, R.; Lim, Z. H.; Shastry, K.; Hulbert, S. L.; Weiss, A. H.

    2015-03-01

    A set of coincidence measurements were obtained for the study and measurement of the electron contribution arising from the inter-valence band (VB) transitions along with the inelastically scattered VB electron contribution. These Auger-unrelated contributions arise in the Auger spectrum (Ag 4p NVV) obtained using Auger Photoelectron Coincidence Spectroscopy (APECS). The measured Auger-unrelated contribution can be eliminated from Auger spectrum to obtain the spectrum related to Auger. In our VB-VB coincidence measurement, a photon beam of energy 180eV was used to probe the Ag(100) sample. The coincidence spectrum was obtained using two Cylindrical Mirror Analyzers (CMA's). The scan CMA measured the low energy electron contribution in the energy range 0-70eV in coincidence with VB electrons measured by the fixed CMA. In this talk, we present the data obtained for VB-VB coincidence at the valence band energy of 171eV along with the coincidence measurements in the energy range of 4p core and valence band. NSF DMR 0907679, NSF Award Number: 1213727. Use of the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, was supported by the U.S. DOE, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  4. Burnout, Engagement, and Organizational Culture: Differences between Physicians and Nurses.

    PubMed

    Mijakoski, Dragan; Karadzinska-Bislimovska, Jovanka; Basarovska, Vera; Montgomery, Anthony; Panagopoulou, Efharis; Stoleski, Sasho; Minov, Jordan

    2015-09-15

    Burnout results from a prolonged response to chronic emotional and interpersonal workplace stressors. The focus of research has been widened to job engagement. Purpose of the study was to examine associations between burnout, job engagement, work demands, and organisational culture (OC) and to demonstrate differences between physicians and nurses working in general hospital in Skopje, Republic of Macedonia. Maslach Burnout Inventory and Utrecht Work Engagement Scale were used for assessment of burnout and job engagement. Work demands and OC were measured with Hospital Experience Scale and Competing Values Framework, respectively. Higher scores of dedication, hierarchy OC, and organizational work demands were found in physicians. Nurses demonstrated higher scores of clan OC. Burnout negatively correlated with clan and market OC in physicians and nurses. Job engagement positively correlated with clan and market OC in nurses. Different work demands were related to different dimensions of burnout and/or job engagement. Our findings support job demands-resources (JD-R) model (Demerouti and Bakker). Data obtained can be used in implementation of specific organizational interventions in the hospital setting. Providing adequate JD-R interaction can lead to prevention of burnout in health professionals (HPs) and contribute positively to better job engagement in HPs and higher quality of patient care.

  5. Burnout, Engagement, and Organizational Culture: Differences between Physicians and Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Mijakoski, Dragan; Karadzinska-Bislimovska, Jovanka; Basarovska, Vera; Montgomery, Anthony; Panagopoulou, Efharis; Stoleski, Sasho; Minov, Jordan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Burnout results from a prolonged response to chronic emotional and interpersonal workplace stressors. The focus of research has been widened to job engagement. AIM: Purpose of the study was to examine associations between burnout, job engagement, work demands, and organisational culture (OC) and to demonstrate differences between physicians and nurses working in general hospital in Skopje, Republic of Macedonia. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Maslach Burnout Inventory and Utrecht Work Engagement Scale were used for assessment of burnout and job engagement. Work demands and OC were measured with Hospital Experience Scale and Competing Values Framework, respectively. RESULTS: Higher scores of dedication, hierarchy OC, and organizational work demands were found in physicians. Nurses demonstrated higher scores of clan OC. Burnout negatively correlated with clan and market OC in physicians and nurses. Job engagement positively correlated with clan and market OC in nurses. Different work demands were related to different dimensions of burnout and/or job engagement. Our findings support job demands-resources (JD-R) model (Demerouti and Bakker). CONCLUSIONS: Data obtained can be used in implementation of specific organizational interventions in the hospital setting. Providing adequate JD-R interaction can lead to prevention of burnout in health professionals (HPs) and contribute positively to better job engagement in HPs and higher quality of patient care. PMID:27275279

  6. Physician communication coaching effects on patient experience

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, Adrianne; Knee, Alexander; Shaaban, Reham; Bryson, Christine; Paadam, Jasmine; Harvey, Rohini; Igarashi, Satoko; LaChance, Christopher; Benjamin, Evan; Lagu, Tara

    2017-01-01

    Background Excellent communication is a necessary component of high-quality health care. We aimed to determine whether a training module could improve patients’ perceptions of physician communication behaviors, as measured by change over time in domains of patient experience scores related to physician communication. Study design We designed a comprehensive physician-training module focused on improving specific “etiquette-based” physician communication skills through standardized simulations and physician coaching with structured feedback. We employed a quasi-experimental pre-post design, with an intervention group consisting of internal medicine hospitalists and residents and a control group consisting of surgeons. The outcome was percent “always” scores for questions related to patients’ perceptions of physician communication using the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey and a Non-HCAHPS Physician-Specific Patient Experience Survey (NHPPES) administered to patients cared for by hospitalists. Results A total of 128 physicians participated in the simulation. Responses from 5020 patients were analyzed using HCAHPS survey data and 1990 patients using NHPPES survey data. The intercept shift, or the degree of change from pre-intervention percent “always” responses, for the HCAHPS questions of doctors “treating patients with courtesy” “explaining things in a way patients could understand,” and “overall teamwork” showed no significant differences between surgical control and hospitalist intervention patients. Adjusted NHPPES percent excellent survey results increased significantly post-intervention for the questions of specified individual doctors “keeping patient informed” (adjusted intercept shift 9.9% P = 0.019), “overall teamwork” (adjusted intercept shift 11%, P = 0.037), and “using words the patient could understand” (adjusted intercept shift 14.8%, p = 0.001). Conclusion A

  7. Return to preinjury sports participation following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: contributions of demographic, knee impairment, and self-report measures.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Trevor A; Zeppieri, Giorgio; Tillman, Susan M; Indelicato, Peter A; Moser, Michael W; George, Steven Z; Chmielewski, Terese L

    2012-11-01

    Cross-sectional cohort. (1) To examine differences in clinical variables (demographics, knee impairments, and self-report measures) between those who return to preinjury level of sports participation and those who do not at 1 year following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, (2) to determine the factors most strongly associated with return-to-sport status in a multivariate model, and (3) to explore the discriminatory value of clinical variables associated with return to sport at 1 year postsurgery. Demographic, physical impairment, and psychosocial factors individually prohibit return to preinjury levels of sports participation. However, it is unknown which combination of factors contributes to sports participation status. Ninety-four patients (60 men; mean age, 22.4 years) 1 year post-anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction were included. Clinical variables were collected and included demographics, knee impairment measures, and self-report questionnaire responses. Patients were divided into "yes return to sports" or "no return to sports" groups based on their answer to the question, "Have you returned to the same level of sports as before your injury?" Group differences in demographics, knee impairments, and self-report questionnaire responses were analyzed. Discriminant function analysis determined the strongest predictors of group classification. Receiver-operating-characteristic curves determined the discriminatory accuracy of the identified clinical variables. Fifty-two of 94 patients (55%) reported yes return to sports. Patients reporting return to preinjury levels of sports participation were more likely to have had less knee joint effusion, fewer episodes of knee instability, lower knee pain intensity, higher quadriceps peak torque-body weight ratio, higher score on the International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective Knee Evaluation Form, and lower levels of kinesiophobia. Knee joint effusion, episodes of knee instability, and score on the

  8. The ideal physician entrepreneur.

    PubMed

    Bottles, K

    2000-01-01

    How does the sometimes elusive and high-stakes world of venture capital really work? How can physician executives with innovative ideas or new technologies approach venture capitalists to help them raise capital to form a start-up company? These important questions are explored in this new column on the physician as entrepreneur. The ideal physician executive is described as: (1) an expert in an area that Wall Street perceives as hot; (2) a public speaker who can enthusiastically communicate scientific and business plans to a variety of audiences; (3) a team leader who is willing to share equity in the company with other employees; (4) a recruiter and a motivator; (5) an implementer who can achieve milestones quickly that allow the company to go public as soon as possible; and (6) a realist who does not resent the terms of the typical deal. The lucrative world of the venture capitalists is foreign territory for physician executives and requires a great idea, charisma, risk-taking, connections, patience, and perseverance to navigate it successfully.

  9. [The occupational physicians' responsibilities].

    PubMed

    Guardavilla, A

    2010-01-01

    Occupational physicians can commit two kind of crimes: they can violate rules of safety and health at work with no immediate consequences for the employees but anyway creating a potential danger for them, or they can cause, because of their blame, occupational diseases or accidents at work to the employees. In both cases they can be punished. If we want to understand in detail this kind of responsibility, we must read the Supreme Court's judgements (Supreme Court, 19099/2009; 26539/2008; 20220/2006; 17838/2005; 26439/2007; 24290/2005). The numberless innovations introduced in recent years in the body of occupational safety and health laws called for a different reading of the meaning and the content of occupational physicians' functions, requiring them to collaborate, more than in the past, in the assessment of workplace risks. The responsibility of occupational physicians should be seen also in relation to the responsibility of employers and managers (see the link between health surveillance and art. 18 paragraph 1 letter c) of Legislative Decree no. 81/08). In the occupational safety and health context, the employer and his managers must also require (and ensure) occupational physicians to fulfill their obligations and professional duties.

  10. Counties Without a Physician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getz, Virginia

    1982-01-01

    Uses a budgeting technique to determine if free-market incentives or forces would provide an economic base sufficient to support medical professionals who might practice in the approximately 140 U.S. counties that lack a physician (located mainly in a narrow band from west Texas north through South Dakota). (AH)

  11. Physicians and Insider Trading.

    PubMed

    Kesselheim, Aaron S; Sinha, Michael S; Joffe, Steven

    2015-12-01

    Although insider trading is illegal, recent high-profile cases have involved physicians and scientists who are part of corporate governance or who have access to information about clinical trials of investigational products. Insider trading occurs when a person in possession of information that might affect the share price of a company's stock uses that information to buy or sell securities--or supplies that information to others who buy or sell--when the person is expected to keep such information confidential. The input that physicians and scientists provide to business leaders can serve legitimate social functions, but insider trading threatens to undermine any positive outcomes of these relationships. We review insider-trading rules and consider approaches to securities fraud in the health care field. Given the magnitude of the potential financial rewards, the ease of concealing illegal conduct, and the absence of identifiable victims, the temptation for physicians and scientists to engage in insider trading will always be present. Minimizing the occurrence of insider trading will require robust education, strictly enforced contractual provisions, and selective prohibitions against high-risk conduct, such as participation in expert consulting networks and online physician forums, by those individuals with access to valuable inside information.

  12. Becoming a Physician

    MedlinePlus

    ... for USMLE® or COMLEX-USA® Find tips on test preparation courses to study for medical and licensing exams with confidence. Learn More Related Content AMA Wire® Few physicians are fluent in data. New program aims to fix that AMA Wire® Pre-residency boot camps prep med school grads for ...

  13. Family caregivers, patients and physicians: ethical guidance to optimize relationships.

    PubMed

    Mitnick, Sheryl; Leffler, Cathy; Hood, Virginia L

    2010-03-01

    Family caregivers play a major role in maximizing the health and quality of life of more than 30 million individuals with acute and chronic illness. Patients depend on family caregivers for assistance with daily activities, managing complex care, navigating the health care system, and communicating with health care professionals. Physical, emotional and financial stress may increase caregiver vulnerability to injury and illness. Geographically distant family caregivers and health professionals in the role of family caregivers may suffer additional burdens. Physician recognition of the value of the caregiver role may contribute to a positive caregiving experience and decrease rates of patient hospitalization and institutionalization. However, physicians may face ethical challenges in partnering with patients and family caregivers while preserving the primacy of the patient-physician relationship. The American College of Physicians in conjunction with ten other professional societies offers ethical guidance to physicians in developing mutually supportive patient-physician-caregiver relationships.

  14. Fear of Death in a Sample of Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Keith; Robinson, Paul J.

    1984-01-01

    Recently, reliable and valid methods of assessing fear of death have been developed. In this study, three well established questionnaires (the Threat Index, the Death Anxiety Scale and the Collett-Lester Fear of Death Scale) were used to assess and compare fear of death in a group of physicians (n = 30) with a group of non-physicians (n = 30). T-tests and hierarchical multiple regression analyses revealed no significant differences between physicians' and non-physicians' fear of death as measured by the Threat Index and Templer's Death Anxiety Scale. The Collett-Lester Fear of Death Scale revealed that physicians were less fearful of death. More specifically, physicians demonstrated less fear on the Collett-Lester subscales, `fear of dying of self' and `fear of dying of others', than did non-physicians. These findings and those of earlier, contradictory research, are discussed. PMID:21279021

  15. Physician empowerment programme; a unique workshop for physician-managers of community clinics.

    PubMed

    Maza, Yafit; Shechter, Efrat; Pur Eizenberg, Neta; Segev, Efrat Gortler; Flugelman, Moshe Y

    2016-10-14

    The physician manager role in the health care system is invaluable as they serve as role models and quality setters. The requirements from physician managers have become more demanding and the role less prestigious; yet burnout and its prevention in this group have received little attention. Physician leadership development programmes have generally dealt directly with skill and knowledge acquisition. The aim of this research was to evaluate an intensive workshop designed to modify attitudes and improve skills of physician-managers of community clinics, through focus on personal well-being and empowerment. Two hundred fifty six physicians affiliated with Clalit Health Services, the largest health maintenance organization in Israel, participated in 16 IMPACT courses during the years 2013-2015. The programme comprised five full days during a two-week period, including an overnight and follow-up meetings three and six weeks later. Theoretical knowledge, experiential learning, practical tools, deep personal exercises, and simulations were conveyed through individual and group work. Topics included: models of self-awareness, outcome thinking, determining a personal and organizational vision, and creating a personal approach to leadership. At the end of each course, and by email at 6 or more months after completion of the course, participants were asked to anonymously respond to closed questions (on a scale of 1-6) and an open question. Mean scores for the contribution of IMPACT to participants' role of physician manager were 5.3 at the end of the course, and 4.7 at 6 or more months later. Mean scores at 6 or more months were 5.0 regarding the contribution of the programme to personal development, 4.4 regarding satisfaction in the role of physician manager, and 4.6 regarding their coping with managerial dilemmas. A workshop that focused on personal growth and self-awareness increased physicians' job satisfaction and their sense of managerial capability, coping with

  16. Operational and financial impact of physician screening in the ED.

    PubMed

    Soremekun, Olanrewaju A; Biddinger, Paul D; White, Benjamin A; Sinclair, Julia R; Chang, Yuchiao; Carignan, Sarah B; Brown, David F M

    2012-05-01

    Physician screening is one of many front-end interventions being implemented to improve emergency department (ED) efficiency. We aimed to quantify the operational and financial impact of this intervention at an urban tertiary academic center. We conducted a 2-year before-after analysis of a physician screening system at an urban tertiary academic center with 90 000 annual visits. Financial impact consisted of the ED and inpatient revenue generated from the incremental capacity and the reduction in left without being seen (LWBS) rates. The ED and inpatient margin contribution as well as capital expenditure were based on available published data. We summarized the financial impact using net present value of future cash flows performing sensitivity analysis on the assumptions. Operational outcome measures were ED length of stay and percentage of LWBS. During the first year, we estimate the contribution margin of the screening system to be $2.71 million and the incremental operational cost to be $1.86 million. Estimated capital expenditure for the system was $1 200 000. The NPV of this investment was $2.82 million, and time to break even from the initial investment was 13 months. Operationally, despite a 16.7% increase in patient volume and no decrease in boarding hours, there was a 7.4% decrease in ED length of stay and a reduction in LWBS from 3.3% to 1.8%. In addition to improving operational measures, the implementation of a physician screening program in the ED allowed for an incremental increase in patient care capacity leading to an overall positive financial impact. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Physician substance use by medical specialty.

    PubMed

    Hughes, P H; Storr, C L; Brandenburg, N A; Baldwin, D C; Anthony, J C; Sheehan, D V

    1999-01-01

    Self-reported past year use of alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, cocaine, and two controlled prescription substances (opiates, benzodiazepines); and self-reported lifetime substance abuse or dependence was estimated and compared for 12 specialties among 5,426 physicians participating in an anonymous mailed survey. Logistic regression models controlled for demographic and other characteristics that might explain observed specialty differences. Emergency medicine physicians used more illicit drugs. Psychiatrists used more benzodiazepines. Comparatively, pediatricians had overall low rates of use, as did surgeons, except for tobacco smoking. Anesthesiologists had higher use only for major opiates. Self-reported substance abuse and dependence were at highest levels among psychiatrists and emergency physicians, and lowest among surgeons. With evidence from studies such as this one, a specialty can organize prevention programs to address patterns of substance use specific to that specialty, the specialty characteristics of its members, and their unique practice environments that may contribute risk of substance abuse and dependence.

  18. Patient Education: A Challenge to Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Schatz, Douglas L.

    1972-01-01

    There is an increasing responsibility for the physician to participate in health care beyond the conventional doctor-patient relationships. The layman's ability to cope with health problems is directly proportional to his knowledge of the area. As physicians we must be prepared to provide leadership and cooperation in the area of community health education. A description of one suburban hospital's contribution to this area of patient education is presented. North York General Hospital prepared and delivered in the spring of 1972, a series of health forums for the public. These forums were intended to entertain as well as inform community members, on important health issues. Many alternative methods for public health education are available to the physician and hospital; positive action must be taken by the medical profession to improve liaison with the community. PMID:20468807

  19. Physicians' evaluations of patients' decisions to refuse oncological treatment

    PubMed Central

    van Kleffens, T; van Leeuwen, E

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To gain insight into the standards of rationality that physicians use when evaluating patients' treatment refusals. Design of the study: Qualitative design with indepth interviews. Participants: The study sample included 30 patients with cancer and 16 physicians (oncologists and general practitioners). All patients had refused a recommended oncological treatment. Results: Patients base their treatment refusals mainly on personal values and/or experience. Physicians mainly emphasise the medical perspective when evaluating patients' treatment refusals. From a medical perspective, a patient's treatment refusal based on personal values and experience is generally evaluated as irrational and difficult to accept, especially when it concerns a curative treatment. Physicians have a different attitude towards non-curative treatments and have less difficulty accepting a patient's refusal of these treatments. Thus, an important factor in the physician's evaluation of a treatment refusal is whether the treatment refused is curative or non-curative. Conclusion: Physicians mainly use goal oriented and patients mainly value oriented rationality, but in the case of non-curative treatment refusal, physicians give more emphasis to value oriented rationality. A consensus between the value oriented approaches of patient and physician may then emerge, leading to the patient's decision being understood and accepted by the physician. The physician's acceptance is crucial to his or her attitude towards the patient. It contributes to the patient's feeling free to decide, and being understood and respected, and thus to a better physician–patient relationship. PMID:15738431

  20. Intimate Partner Violence Experienced by Physicians: A Review.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Barbara Couden; Reibling, Ellen T; Maddux, Charles; Kahn, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Physicians play a significant role in screening for domestic violence. However, little information is available about the prevalence of physicians who experience intimate partner violence (IPV) or the implications for their clinical practice. National surveys indicate a potential prevalence of 16% for sexual abuse and 32% for abuse by an intimate partner. This extrapolates to more than 395,000 potential physician victims, the majority of which are women. We conducted a systematic review of IPV and physician victims from 1990 to 2014 that included peer-reviewed journals, trade books, and dissertations that referenced physician victims. We identified 17 publications; nine quantitative studies, four first-person accounts, one qualitative study, and a qualitative dissertation that included two physician subjects. Two case studies of victimized physicians were identified in trade books. Quantitative results noted that women reported higher prevalence for all experiences of violence [childhood exposure (6%-32%), adult IPV exposure (7%-24%)] than men (6%-10%). This review highlights the need for improved understanding of physician experience with IPV, and development of physician-sensitive resources and treatment approaches. Contributions and limitations are provided for each publication. IPV exposure impacts clinical practice, including reticence to consistently screen patients. Lower reported prevalence may be related to extreme stigma among physicians that may prevent their reporting and help seeking, but more research is needed. We provide recommendations for clinical practice, education, and future research.

  1. Patient-Centeredness as Physician Behavioral Adaptability to Patient Preferences.

    PubMed

    Carrard, Valérie; Schmid Mast, Marianne; Jaunin-Stalder, Nicole; Junod Perron, Noëlle; Sommer, Johanna

    2018-05-01

    A physician who communicates in a patient-centered way is a physician who adapts his or her communication style to what each patient needs. In order to do so, the physician has to (1) accurately assess each patient's states and traits (interpersonal accuracy) and (2) possess a behavioral repertoire to choose from in order to actually adapt his or her behavior to different patients (behavioral adaptability). Physician behavioral adaptability describes the change in verbal or nonverbal behavior a physician shows when interacting with patients who have different preferences in terms of how the physician should interact with them. We hypothesized that physician behavioral adaptability to their patients' preferences would lead to better patient outcomes and that physician interpersonal accuracy was positively related to behavioral adaptability. To test these hypotheses, we recruited 61 physicians who completed an interpersonal accuracy test before being videotaped during four consultations with different patients. The 244 participating patients indicated their preferences for their physician's interaction style prior to the consultation and filled in a consultation outcomes questionnaire directly after the consultation. We coded the physician's verbal and nonverbal behavior for each of the consultations and compared it to the patients' preferences to obtain a measure of physician behavioral adaptability. Results partially confirmed our hypotheses in that female physicians who adapted their nonverbal (but not their verbal) behavior had patients who reported more positive consultation outcomes. Moreover, the more female physicians were accurate interpersonally, the more they showed verbal and nonverbal behavioral adaptability. For male physicians, more interpersonal accuracy was linked to less nonverbal adaptability.

  2. Twenty-year trends in the Ohio generalist physician workforce.

    PubMed

    Williams, P T

    1998-12-01

    Many factors contribute to the variations seen in physician workforce projections, including assumptions about attrition, new physician entry, and geographic requirements. Our study offers data for bench-marking future research into this complex issue. At 5-year intervals starting in 1975, data were collected for each Ohio county by local physician census takers. Total Ohio family physician rates per population did not increase appreciably during the 20-year period. A decrease in the number of allopathic family physicians was balanced by an increase in the number of osteopathic family physicians, many of whom were graduates of the state's first osteopathic medical school, which graduated its first class in 1980. Rates of general internists and general pediatricians increased. In 1975, the percentage of physicians older than 59 years was higher for family physicians than for general internists and general pediatricians. By 1995, this disparity in age distribution had greatly decreased. Rural family physician rates per 100,000 population decreased, and urban rates increased, while both urban and rural rates increased for general internists and general pediatricians. Variations in accounting for clinical time used for non-generalist clinical and nonclinical activities may explain a large part of the difference between generalist head count and full-time equivalency (FTE) study results; together these activities can be said to make up a "fourth compartment" contributing to improper specialty designation. The decrease in the percentage of family physicians older than 59 years indicates that the future supply of practicing family physicians is not in jeopardy. The rural family physician workforce is decreasing, while the general internist and general pediatrician rural workforce is increasing, but the total rural workforce is still well below the urban workforce. Neither component of the rural workforce appears to have stabilized.

  3. 360-degree physician performance assessment.

    PubMed

    Dubinsky, Isser; Jennings, Kelly; Greengarten, Moshe; Brans, Amy

    2010-01-01

    Few jurisdictions have a robust common approach to assessing the quantitative and qualitative dimensions of physician performance. In this article, we examine the need for 360-degree physician performance assessment and review the literature supporting comprehensive physician assessment. An evidence-based, "best practice" approach to the development of a 360-degree physician performance assessment framework is presented, including an overview of a tool kit to support implementation. The focus of the framework is to support physician career planning and to enhance the quality of patient care. Finally, the legal considerations related to implementing 360-degree physician performance assessment are explored.

  4. Supplementary physicians' fees: a sustainable system?

    PubMed

    Calcoen, Piet; van de Ven, Wynand P M M

    2018-01-25

    In Belgium and France, physicians can charge a supplementary fee on top of the tariff set by the mandatory basic health insurance scheme. In both countries, the supplementary fee system is under pressure because of financial sustainability concerns and a lack of added value for the patient. Expenditure on supplementary fees is increasing much faster than total health expenditure. So far, measures taken to curb this trend have not been successful. For certain categories of physicians, supplementary fees represent one-third of total income. For patients, however, the added value of supplementary fees is not that clear. Supplementary fees can buy comfort and access to physicians who refuse to treat patients who are not willing to pay supplementary fees. Perceived quality of care plays an important role in patients' willingness to pay supplementary fees. Today, there is no evidence that physicians who charge supplementary fees provide better quality of care than physicians who do not. However, linking supplementary fees to objectively proven quality of care and limiting access to top quality care to patients able and willing to pay supplementary fees might not be socially acceptable in many countries. Our conclusion is that supplementary physicians' fees are not sustainable.

  5. Financial capital and intellectual capital in physician practice management.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J C

    1998-01-01

    Medical groups need financial resources yet most retain no earnings and have no reserves. Physician practice management (PPM) companies have recognized the need for investment and the scarcity of indigenous capital in the physician sector and are rushing to fill the void. Resources are being contributed by venture capitalists, bond underwriters, private investors, pharmaceutical manufacturers, health plans, hospital systems, and public equity markets. The potential contribution of PPM firms is to nurture the intellectual capital of leading physician organizations and diffuse it throughout the health care system. The risk is that short-term financial imperatives will impede necessary long-term investments.

  6. Health Care Workplace Discrimination and Physician Turnover

    PubMed Central

    Nunez-Smith, Marcella; Pilgrim, Nanlesta; Wynia, Matthew; Desai, Mayur M.; Bright, Cedric; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Bradley, Elizabeth H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between physician race/ethnicity, workplace discrimination, and physician job turnover. Methods Cross-sectional, national survey conducted in 2006–2007 of practicing physicians [n = 529] randomly identified via the American Medical Association Masterfile and The National Medical Association membership roster. We assessed the relationships between career racial/ethnic discrimination at work and several career-related dependent variables, including 2 measures of physician turnover, career satisfaction, and contemplation of career change. We used standard frequency analyses, odds ratios and χ2 statistics, and multivariate logistic regression modeling to evaluate these associations. Results Physicians who self-identified as nonmajority were significantly more likely to have left at least 1 job because of workplace discrimination (black, 29%; Asian, 24%; other race, 21%; Hispanic/Latino, 20%; white, 9%). In multivariate models, having experienced racial/ethnic discrimination at work was associated with high job turnover [adjusted odes ratio, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.4–4.9]. Among physicians who experienced work-place discrimination, only 45% of physicians were satisfied with their careers (vs 88% among those who had not experienced workplace discrimination, p value < .01], and 40% were con-templating a career change (vs 10% among those who had not experienced workplace discrimination, p value < .001). Conclusion Workplace discrimination is associated with physician job turnover, career dissatisfaction, and contemplation of career change. These findings underscore the importance of monitoring for workplace discrimination and responding when opportunities for intervention and retention still exist. PMID:20070016

  7. Collaboration between family physicians and psychologists

    PubMed Central

    Grenier, Jean; Chomienne, Marie-Hélène; Gaboury, Isabelle; Ritchie, Pierre; Hogg, William

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore factors affecting collaboration between family physicians and psychologists. DESIGN Mailed French-language survey. SETTING Eastern Ontario. PARTICIPANTS Family physicians practising in the area of the Réseau des services de santé en français de l’Est de l’Ontario. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Physicians’ knowledge and understanding of the qualifications of psychologists and the regulations governing their profession; beliefs regarding the effectiveness of psychological treatments; views on the integration of psychologists into primary care; and factors affecting referrals to psychologists. RESULTS Of 457 surveys sent, 118 were returned and analyzed (27% of surveys delivered). Most family physicians were well aware that there were evidence-based psychological interventions for mental health and personal difficulties, and some knew that psychological interventions could help with physical conditions. Physicians had some knowledge about the qualifications and training of psychologists. Many physicians reported being uncomfortable providing counseling themselves owing to time constraints, the perception that they were inadequately trained for such work, and personal preferences. The largest barrier to referring patients to psychologists was cost, since services were not covered by public health insurance. Some physicians were deterred from referring by previous experience of not receiving feedback on patients from psychologists. Increased access to clinical psychologists through collaborative care was considered a desirable goal for primary health care. CONCLUSIONS Family physicians know that there are evidence-based psychological interventions for mental health issues. Psychologists need to communicate better about their credentials and what they can offer, and share their professional opinions and recommendations on referred patients. Physicians would welcome practice-based psychological services and integrated interdisciplinary collaboration

  8. Older Patient, Physician and Pharmacist Perspectives about Community Pharmacists’ Roles

    PubMed Central

    Paterniti, Debora A.; Wenger, Neil S.; Williams, Bradley R.; Chewning, Betty A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To investigate older patient, physician and pharmacist perspectives about the pharmacists’ role in pharmacist-patient interactions. Methods Design Eight focus group discussions. Settings Senior centers, community pharmacies, primary care physician offices. Participants Forty-two patients aged 63 and older, 17 primary care physicians, and 13 community pharmacists. Measurements Qualitative analysis of focus group discussions. Results Participants in all focus groups indicated that pharmacists are a good resource for basic information about medications. Physicians appreciated pharmacists’ ability to identify drug interactions, yet did not comment on other specific aspects related to patient education and care. Physicians noted that pharmacists often were hindered by time constraints that impede patient counseling. Both patient and pharmacist participants indicated that patients often asked pharmacists to expand upon, reinforce, and explain physician-patient conversations about medications, as well as to evaluate medication appropriateness and physician treatment plans. These groups also noted that patients confided in pharmacists about medication-related problems before contacting physicians. Pharmacists identified several barriers to patient counseling, including lack of knowledge about medication indications and physician treatment plans. Conclusions Community-based pharmacists may often be presented with opportunities to address questions that can affect patient medication use. Older patients, physicians and pharmacists all value greater pharmacist participation in patient care. Suboptimal information flow between physicians and pharmacists may hinder pharmacist interactions with patients and detract from patient medication management. Interventions to integrate pharmacists into the patient healthcare team could improve patient medication management. PMID:22953767

  9. Physician Information Seeking Behaviors: Are Physicians Successful Searchers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swiatek-Kelley, Janice

    2010-01-01

    In the recent past, physicians found answers to questions by consulting colleagues, textbooks, and professional journals. Now, the availability of medical information through electronic resources has changed physician information-seeking behaviors. Evidence-based medicine is now the accepted decision-making paradigm, and a physician's ability to…

  10. Are Physician Estimates of Asthma Severity Less Accurate in Black than in White Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Albert W.; Merriman, Barry; Krishnan, Jerry A.; Diette, Gregory B.

    2007-01-01

    Background Racial differences in asthma care are not fully explained by socioeconomic status, care access, and insurance status. Appropriate care requires accurate physician estimates of severity. It is unknown if accuracy of physician estimates differs between black and white patients, and how this relates to asthma care disparities. Objective We hypothesized that: 1) physician underestimation of asthma severity is more frequent among black patients; 2) among black patients, physician underestimation of severity is associated with poorer quality asthma care. Design, Setting and Patients We conducted a cross-sectional survey among adult patients with asthma cared for in 15 managed care organizations in the United States. We collected physicians’ estimates of their patients’ asthma severity. Physicians’ estimates of patients’ asthma as being less severe than patient-reported symptoms were classified as underestimates of severity. Measurements Frequency of underestimation, asthma care, and communication. Results Three thousand four hundred and ninety-four patients participated (13% were black). Blacks were significantly more likely than white patients to have their asthma severity underestimated (OR = 1.39, 95% CI 1.08–1.79). Among black patients, underestimation was associated with less use of daily inhaled corticosteroids (13% vs 20%, p < .05), less physician instruction on management of asthma flare-ups (33% vs 41%, p < .0001), and lower ratings of asthma care (p = .01) and physician communication (p = .04). Conclusions Biased estimates of asthma severity may contribute to racially disparate asthma care. Interventions to improve physicians’ assessments of asthma severity and patient–physician communication may minimize racial disparities in asthma care. PMID:17453263

  11. Organizational Culture and Physician Satisfaction with Dimensions of Group Practice

    PubMed Central

    Zazzali, James L; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Shortell, Stephen M; Burns, Lawton R

    2007-01-01

    Research Objective To assess the extent to which the organizational culture of physician group practices is associated with individual physician satisfaction with the managerial and organizational capabilities of the groups. Study Design and Methods Physician surveys from 1997 to 1998 assessing the culture of their medical groups and their satisfaction with six aspects of group practice. Organizational culture was conceptualized using the Competing Values framework, yielding four distinct cultural types. Physician-level data were aggregated to the group level to attain measures of organizational culture. Using hierarchical linear modeling, individual physician satisfaction with six dimensions of group practice was predicted using physician-level variables and group-level variables. Separate models for each of the four cultural types were estimated for each of the six satisfaction measures, yielding a total of 24 models. Sample Studied Fifty-two medical groups affiliated with 12 integrated health systems from across the U.S., involving 1,593 physician respondents (38.3 percent response rate). Larger medical groups and multispecialty groups were over-represented compared with the U.S. as a whole. Principal Findings Our models explain up to 31 percent of the variance in individual physician satisfaction with group practice, with individual organizational culture scales explaining up to 5 percent of the variance. Group-level predictors: group (i.e., participatory) culture was positively associated with satisfaction with staff and human resources, technological sophistication, and price competition. Hierarchical (i.e., bureaucratic) culture was negatively associated with satisfaction with managerial decision making, practice level competitiveness, price competition, and financial capabilities. Rational (i.e., task-oriented) culture was negatively associated with satisfaction with staff and human resources, and price competition. Developmental (i.e., risk-taking) culture

  12. The Work Lives of Women Physicians

    PubMed Central

    McMurray, Julia E; Linzer, Mark; Konrad, Thomas R; Douglas, Jeffrey; Shugerman, Richard; Nelson, Kathleen

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe gender differences in job satisfaction, work life issues, and burnout of U.S. physicians. DESIGN/PARTICIPANTS The Physician Work life Study, a nationally representative random stratified sample of 5,704 physicians in primary and specialty nonsurgical care (N = 2,326 respondents; 32% female, adjusted response rate = 52%). Survey contained 150 items assessing career satisfaction and multiple aspects of work life. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Odds of being satisfied with facets of work life and odds of reporting burnout were modeled with survey-weighted logistic regression controlling for demographic variables and practice characteristics. Multiple linear regression was performed to model dependent variables of global, career, and specialty satisfaction with independent variables of income, time pressure, and items measuring control over medical and workplace issues. Compared with male physicians, female physicians were more likely to report satisfaction with their specialty and with patient and colleague relationships (P < .05), but less likely to be satisfied with autonomy, relationships with community, pay, and resources (P < .05). Female physicians reported more female patients and more patients with complex psychosocial problems, but the same numbers of complex medical patients, compared with their male colleagues. Time pressure in ambulatory settings was greater for women, who on average reported needing 36% more time than allotted to provide quality care for new patients or consultations, compared with 21% more time needed by men (P < .01). Female physicians reported significantly less work control than male physicians regarding day-to-day aspects of practice including volume of patient load, selecting physicians for referrals, and details of office scheduling (P < .01). When controlling for multiple factors, mean income for women was approximately $22,000 less than that of men. Women had 1.6 times the odds of reporting burnout compared

  13. Modeling factors explaining physicians' satisfaction with competence.

    PubMed

    Lepnurm, Rein; Dobson, Roy Thomas; Peña-Sánchez, Juan-Nicolás; Nesdole, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Attention to physician wellness has increased as medical practice gains in complexity. Physician satisfaction with practice is critical for quality of care and practice growth. The purpose of this study was to model physicians' self-reported Satisfaction with Competence as a function of their perceptions of the Quality of Health Services, Distress, Coping, Practice Management, Personal Satisfaction and Professional Equity. Comprehensive questionnaires were sent to a stratified sample of 5300 physicians across Canada. This cross-sectional study focused on physicians who examined and treated individual patients for a final study population of 2639 physicians. Response bias was negligible. The questionnaires contained measures of Satisfaction with Competence, Quality of Health Services, Distress, Coping, Personal Satisfaction, Practice Management and Professional Equity. Exploring relationships was done using Pearson correlations and one-way analysis of variance. Modeling was by hierarchical regressions. The measures were reliable: Satisfaction with Competence (α = .86), Quality (α = .86), Access (α = .82), Distress (α = .82), Coping (α = .76), Personal Satisfaction (α = .78), Practice Management (α = .89) and the dimensions of Professional Equity (Fulfillment, α = .81; Financial, α = .93; and Recognition, α = .75) with comparative validity. Satisfaction with Competence was positively correlated with Quality (r = .32), Efficiency (r = .37) and Access (r = .32); negatively correlated with Distress (r = -.54); and positively correlated with Coping strategies (r = .43), Personal Satisfaction (r = .57), Practice Management (r = .17), Fulfillment (r = .53), Financial (r = .36) and Recognition (r = .54). Physicians' perceptions on Quality, Efficiency, Access, Distress, Coping, Personal Satisfaction, Practice Management, Fulfillment, Pay and Recognition explained 60.2% of the variation

  14. The future for physician assistants.

    PubMed

    Cawley, J F; Ott, J E; DeAtley, C A

    1983-06-01

    Physician assistants were intended to be assistants to primary care physicians. Physicians in private practice have only moderately responded to the availability of these professionals. Cutbacks in the numbers of foreign medical graduates entering American schools for graduate medical education, concern for overcrowding in some specialties, and the economic and clinical capabilities of physician assistants have lead to new uses for these persons. Physician assistants are employed in surgery and surgical subspecialties; in practice settings in institutions such as medical, pediatric, and surgical house staff; and in geriatric facilities, occupational medicine clinics, emergency rooms, and prison health systems. The projected surplus of physicians by 1990 may affect the use of physician assistants by private physicians in primary care.

  15. A Physician's Guide to Radon

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This booklet has been developed for physicians by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in consultation with the American Medical Association (AMA). Its purpose is to enlist physicians in the national effort to inform the American public about radon.

  16. Merger mania: physicians beware.

    PubMed

    Weil, T P; Pearl, G M

    1998-01-01

    Corporate consolidations, mergers, and acquisitions would seem to provide immense promise in furthering the development of health networking because they affect the governance of entire organizations, rather than simply establishing revised arrangements for specific services or patients. Yet, a limited number of empirical studies have been published to date that explore whether hospital mergers actually improve access, reduce cost, or improve quality of care; and, among the reports available, the conclusions are somewhat equivocal. Physicians should be cautious of these mergers, since they seem to focus either on eliminating a direct competitor or on forming a large horizontally and vertically diversified health network that then can become a major player in gaining exclusivity in managed care contracting. With either of these merger strategies, there are antitrust-type concerns that competition among physicians and other providers will be significantly curtailed, and that consumers will end up with fewer choices in obtaining cost effective, quality patient care.

  17. Physicians of ancient India.

    PubMed

    Saini, Anu

    2016-01-01

    A survey of Indian medical historiography will reveal no dearth of work on the systems of medicine and medical literature of ancient India. However, the people who were responsible for the healing have not received much attention. This article traces the evolution of the physician as a professional in ancient India. This article reviews the secondary literature on healing and medical practice in India, specifically pertaining to the individual medical practitioner, drawing from varied sources. The healers of ancient India hailed from different castes and classes. They were well-respected and enjoyed state patronage. They were held to the highest ethical standards of the day and were bound by a strict code of conduct. They underwent rigorous training in both medicine and surgery. Most physicians were multi-skilled generalists, and expected to be skilled in elocution and debate. They were reasonably well-off financially. The paper also briefly traces the evolution of medicinal ideas in ancient India.

  18. [The travelling sports physician].

    PubMed

    Jenoure, Peter

    2016-07-13

    Travelling around your own country or even further abroad with a sports team or individual athletes as a sports physician is to be considered as a fundamental part of the various activities of a sports medicine practitioner.However, in our modern and quickly changing world, it is imperative to understand the different aspects of caring for athletes, also the legal ones. These may include licensing issues, malpractice coverage, access to care at outside institutions and prescribing and transporting medication of all sorts, including narcotics and substances of the list of prohibited ones (doping).With significant changes in healthcare at state and national levels, physicians must be aware of how these policy differences can affect their way of working, their ability to provide the expected care.

  19. The unhealthy physician

    PubMed Central

    Magnavita, Nicola

    2007-01-01

    Background Physicians, if affected by transmissible or impairing diseases, could be hazardous for third persons. Aim To solve the apparent chasm between patient's and sick worker's rights, a consensus‐building process leading to hospital‐wide policies is the better alternative to individual decision making. Conclusions Policies have to balance the rights of the sick worker, the right of the other workers, patients and customers, and society's expectations. PMID:17400618

  20. Exploring family physician stress

    PubMed Central

    Lee, F. Joseph; Brown, Judith Belle; Stewart, Moira

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To explore the nature of professional stress and the strategies used by family physicians to deal with this stress. DESIGN Qualitative study. SETTING Kitchener-Waterloo, Ont. PARTICIPANTS Ten key-informant family physicians. METHODS In-depth interviews were conducted with key informants. A total of 40 key informants were identified, based on selected criteria; 24 provided consent. The potential participants were rank-ordered for interviews to provide maximum variation in age, sex, and years in practice. Interviews were conducted, audiotaped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed until thematic saturation was reached, as determined through an iterative process. This occurred after 10 in-depth interviews. Immersion and crystallization techniques were used. MAIN FINDINGS The participants described professional stresses and strategies at the personal, occupational, and health care system levels. Personal stressors included personality traits and the need to balance family and career, which were countered by biological, psychological, social, and spiritual strategies. Occupational stressors included challenging patients, high workload, time limitations, competency issues, challenges of documentation and practice management, and changing roles within the workplace. Occupational stressors were countered by strategies such as setting limits, participating in continuing medical education, soliciting support from colleagues and staff, making use of teams, improving patient-physician relationships, exploring new forms of remuneration, and scheduling appropriately. Stressors affecting the wider health care system included limited resources, imposed rules and regulations, lack of support from specialists, feeling undervalued, and financial concerns. CONCLUSION Family physicians face a multitude of challenges at personal, occupational, and health care system levels. A systems approach provides a new framework in which proactive strategies can augment more than

  1. The Physician-Patient Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Ennis, Jeffrey H.

    1990-01-01

    The physician-patient relationship, like any human relationship, blends two types of interactions described by philosopher Martin Buber. In an “I-It” interaction, the physician objectifies the patient and his or her problem; in an “I-Thou” interaction, the physician perceives the patient as an emotional being. My encounters with medical practitioners as a patient with brachial neuritis and Guillain-Barré syndrome illustrate these forms of the physician-patient relationship. Imagesp2216-a PMID:11651130

  2. Physician Surveys to Assess Customary Care in Medical Malpractice Cases

    PubMed Central

    Hartz, Arthur; Lucas, Joshua; Cramm, Timothy; Green, Michael; Bentler, Suzanne; Ely, John; Wolfe, Steven; James, Paul

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Physician experts hired and prepared by the litigants provide most information on standard of care for medical malpractice cases. Since this information may not be objective or accurate, we examined the feasibility and potential value of surveying community physicians to assess standard of care. DESIGN Seven physician surveys of mutually exclusive groups of randomly selected physicians. SETTING Iowa. PARTICIPANTS Community and academic primary care physicians and relevant specialists. INTERVENTIONS Included in each survey was a case vignette of a primary care malpractice case and key quotes from medical experts on each side of the case. Surveyed physicians were asked whether the patient should have been referred to a specialist for additional evaluation. The 7 case vignettes included 3 closed medical malpractice cases, 3 modifications of these cases, and 1 active case. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Sixty-three percent of 350 community primary care physicians and 51% of 216 community specialists completed the questionnaire. For 3 closed cases, 47%, 78%, and 88% of primary care physician respondents reported that they would have made a different referral decision than the defendant. Referral percentages were minimally affected by modifying patient outcome but substantially changed by modifying patient presentation. Most physicians, even those whose referral decisions were unusual, assumed that other physicians would make similar referral decisions. For each case, at least 65% of the primary care physicians disagreed with the testimony of one of the expert witnesses. In the active case, the response rate was high (71%), and the respondents did not withhold criticism of the defendant doctor. CONCLUSIONS Randomly selected peer physicians are willing to participate in surveys of medical malpractice cases. The surveys can be used to construct the distribution of physician self-reported practice relevant to a particular malpractice case. This distribution may

  3. Physicians in Literature: Three Portrayals

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Ian A.

    1986-01-01

    Literature can provide an objective glimpse of how the public perceives physicians. Physicians have been recipients of the full range of human response in literature, from contempt to veneration. This article examines the impressions of three authors: Mark Twain, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and Arthur Hailey. Their descriptions provide insight into the complex relationship physicians have with their colleagues and patients. PMID:21267273

  4. The Primary Care Physician Workforce: Ethical and Policy Implications

    PubMed Central

    Starfield, Barbara; Fryer, George E.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE We undertook a study to examine the characteristics of countries exporting physicians to the United States according to their relative contribution to the primary care supply in the United States. METHODS We used data from the World Health Organization and from the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile to gather sociodemographic, health system, and health characteristics of countries and the number of international medical graduates (IMGs) for the countries, according to the specialty of their practice in the United States. RESULTS Countries whose medical school graduates added a relatively greater percentage of the primary care physicians than the overall percentage of primary care physicians in the United States (31%) were poor countries with relatively extreme physician shortages, high infant mortality rates, lower life expectancies, and lower immunization rates than countries contributing relatively more specialists to the US physician workforce. CONCLUSION The United States disproportionately uses graduates of foreign medical schools from the poorest and most deprived countries to maintain its primary care physician supply. The ethical aspects of depending on foreign medical graduates is an important issue, especially when it deprives disadvantaged countries of their graduates to buttress a declining US primary care physician supply. PMID:18025485

  5. Gender disparities in research productivity among 9952 academic physicians.

    PubMed

    Eloy, Jean Anderson; Svider, Peter F; Cherla, Deepa V; Diaz, Lucia; Kovalerchik, Olga; Mauro, Kevin M; Baredes, Soly; Chandrasekhar, Sujana S

    2013-08-01

    The number of women in medicine has increased considerably over the past 3 decades, and they now comprise approximately half of medical school matriculants. We examine whether gender disparities in research productivity are present throughout various specialties and compare these findings to those previously described among otolaryngologists. Bibliometric analysis. Research productivity, measured by the h-index, was calculated for 9,952 academic physicians representing 34 medical specialties. Additionally, trends in how rate of research productivity changed throughout different career stages were compared. Women were underrepresented at the level of professor and in positions of departmental leadership relative to their representation among assistant and associate professors. Male faculty had statistically higher research productivity both overall (H = 10.3 ± 0.14 vs. 5.6 ± 0.14) and at all academic ranks. For the overall sample, men and women appeared to have equivalent rates of research productivity. In internal medicine, men had higher early-career productivity, while female faculty had productivity equaling and even surpassing that of their male colleagues beyond 20 to 25 years. Men and women had equivalent productivity in surgical specialties throughout their careers, and similar rates in pediatrics until 25 to 30 years. Female academic physicians have decreased research productivity relative to men, which may be one factor contributing to their underrepresentation at the level of professor and departmental leader relative to their proportions in junior academic ranks. Potential explanations may include fewer woman physicians in the age groups during which higher academic ranks are attained, greater family responsibilities, and greater involvement in clinical service and educational contributions. © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  6. Growth and contribution of stocked channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus (Rafinesque, 1818): the importance of measuring post-stocking performance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, David R.; Long, James M.

    2015-01-01

    In this study it was sought to quantify post-stocking growth, survival, and contribution of advanced size (178 mm total length [TL]) channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus fingerlings, something rarely done. Channel catfish populations were evaluated before (May 2010) and after (May to August 2011 and 2012) stocking. Relative abundance, stocking contribution, and growth were different (P < 0.05) in the two study impoundments (lakes Lone Chimney and Greenleaf, Oklahoma). For fish stocked in Lake Lone Chimney, stocking contribution was lower (3–35%), and average length and weight of stocked fish by age-2 reached 230 mm TL and 85 g, whereas the stocking contribution (84–98%) and growth in length (340 mm TL) and weight (280 g) were higher by age-2 in Lake Greenleaf. Given these unambiguous differences of post-stocking performance, benchmark metrics that represent population-level information such as relative abundance and average length and weight of the sample masked these significant differences, highlighting the importance of marking hatchery-fish and then following them through time to determine the effectiveness of stocking. These results suggest that stock enhancement programmes would benefit from studies that quantify post-stocking performance of hatchery fish.

  7. Measuring the Contribution of Higher Education to Innovation Capacity in the EU. Executive Summary of the Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    European Commission, 2017

    2017-01-01

    This current study is part of the actions taken aiming to analyse the links between the operations and effects of higher-education institutions on the capacity to innovate in the economies in Europe. Providing insights into the contribution of higher education to the innovative capacity of the EU economies is crucial for policy making and the…

  8. Physician-industry relations. Part 1: individual physicians.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Susan L

    2002-03-05

    This is part 1 of a 2-part paper on ethics and physician-industry relationships. Part 1 offers advice to individual physicians; part 2 gives recommendations to medical education providers and medical professional societies. Physicians and industry have a shared interest in advancing medical knowledge. Nonetheless, the primary ethic of the physician is to promote the patient's best interests, while the primary ethic of industry is to promote profitability. Although partnerships between physicians and industry can result in impressive medical advances, they also create opportunities for bias and can result in unfavorable public perceptions. Many physicians and physicians-in-training think they are impervious to commercial influence. However, recent studies show that accepting industry hospitality and gifts, even drug samples, can compromise judgment about medical information and subsequent decisions about patient care. It is up to the physician to judge whether a gift is acceptable. A very general guideline is that it is ethical to accept modest gifts that advance medical practice. It is clearly unethical to accept gifts or services that obligate the physician to reciprocate. Conflicts of interest can arise from other financial ties between physicians and industry, whether to outside companies or self-owned businesses. Such ties include honorariums for speaking or writing about a company's product, payment for participating in clinic-based research, and referrals to medical resources. All of these relationships have the potential to influence a physician's attitudes and practices. This paper explores the ethical quandaries involved and offers guidelines for ethical business relationships.

  9. Family Physician attitudes about prescribing using a drug formulary

    PubMed Central

    Suggs, L Suzanne; Raina, Parminder; Gafni, Amiram; Grant, Susan; Skilton, Kevin; Fan, Aimei; Szala-Meneok, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Background Drug formularies have been created by third party payers to control prescription drug usage and manage costs. Physicians try to provide the best care for their patients. This research examines family physicians' attitudes regarding prescription reimbursement criteria, prescribing and advocacy for patients experiencing reimbursement barriers. Methods Focus groups were used to collect qualitative data on family physicians' prescribing decisions related to drug reimbursement guidelines. Forty-eight family physicians from four Ontario cities participated. Ethics approval for this study was received from the Hamilton Health Sciences/Faculty of Health Sciences Research Ethics Board at McMaster University. Four clinical scenarios were used to situate and initiate focus group discussions about prescribing decisions. Open-ended questions were used to probe physicians' experiences and attitudes and responses were audio recorded. NVivo software was used to assist in data analysis. Results Most physicians reported that drug reimbursement guidelines complicated their prescribing process and can require lengthy interpretation and advocacy for patients who require medication that is subject to reimbursement restrictions. Conclusion Physicians do not generally see their role as being cost-containment monitors and observed that cumbersome reimbursement guidelines influence medication choice beyond the clinical needs of the patient, and produce unequal access to medication. They observed that frustration, discouragement, fatigue, and lack of appreciation can often contribute to family physicians' failure to advocate more for patients. Physicians argue cumbersome reimbursement regulations contribute to lower quality care and misuse of physicians' time increasing overall health care costs by adding unnecessary visits to family physicians, specialists, and emergency rooms. PMID:19835601

  10. A Study to Establish a Measure of Clinical Productivity among Physicians in the Department of Family Practice Outpatient Clinics, Madigan Army Medical Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-01

    789.0 7890 pelvic ) (64) 61 Psoriasis and Pityriasis (70) 696.0 to 696.9 6961,6963 62 Irritable Colon (72) 564.1 558- 564.5 63 Chronic Cystic Disease of...075.9 573.3 80 Chronic Ulcer of Skin 707.0 to 707.9 707- (-) 81 Strabismus (84) 378.0 to 378.9 No equivalent separate code 82 Diverticular Disease of...of ensuring product ( disease treatment) output... (Arbitman, 1986, p. 31). Along with new developments in productivity measurement in the inpatient

  11. Leveraging Telehealth to Bring Volunteer Physicians Into Underserved Communities.

    PubMed

    Uscher-Pines, Lori; Rudin, Robert; Mehrotra, Ateev

    2017-06-01

    Many disadvantaged communities lack sufficient numbers of local primary care and specialty physicians. Yet tens of thousands of physicians, in particular those who are retired or semiretired, desire meaningful volunteer opportunities. Multiple programs have begun to use telehealth to bridge the gap between volunteer physicians and underserved patients. In this brief, we describe programs that are using this model and discuss the promise and pitfalls. Physician volunteers in these programs report that the work can be fulfilling and exciting, a cutting-edge yet convenient way to remain engaged and contribute. Given the projected shortfall of physicians in the United States, recruiting retired and semiretired physicians to provide care through telehealth increases the total supply of active physicians and the capacity of the existing workforce. However, programs typically use volunteers in a limited capacity because of uncertainty about the level and duration of commitment. Acknowledging this reality, most programs only use volunteer physicians for curbside consults rather than fully integrating them into longitudinal patient care. The part-time availability of volunteers may also be difficult to incorporate into the workflow of busy safety net clinics. As more physicians volunteer in a growing number of telehealth programs, the dual benefits of enriching the professional lives of volunteers and improving care for underserved communities will make further development of these programs worthwhile.

  12. Assessment of physician performance in Alberta: the Physician Achievement Review

    PubMed Central

    Hall, W; Violato, C; Lewkonia, R; Lockyer, J; Fidler, H; Toews, J; Jennett, P; Donoff, M; Moores, D

    1999-01-01

    The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Alberta, in collaboration with the Universities of Calgary and Alberta, has developed a program to routinely assess the performance of physicians, intended primarily for quality improvement in medical practice. The Physician Achievement Review (PAR) provides a multidimensional view of performance through structured feedback to physicians. The program will also provide a new mechanism for identifying physicians for whom more detailed assessment of practice performance or medical competence may be needed. Questionnaires were created to assess an array of performance attributes, and then appropriate assessors were designated--the physician himself or herself (self-evaluation), patients, medical peers, consultants and referring physicians, and non-physician coworkers. A pilot study with 308 physician volunteers was used to evaluate the psychometric and statistical properties of the questionnaires and to develop operating policies. The pilot surveys showed good statistical validity and technical reliability of the PAR questionnaires. For only 28 (9.1%) of the physicians were the PAR results more than one standard deviation from the peer group means for 3 or more of the 5 major domains of assessment (self, patients, peers, consultants and coworkers). In post-survey feedback, two-thirds of the physicians indicated that they were considering or had implemented changes to their medical practice on the basis of their PAR data. The estimated operating cost of the PAR program is approximately $200 per physician. In February 1999, on the basis of the operating experience and the results of the pilot survey, the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Alberta implemented this innovative program, in which all Alberta physicians will be required to participate every 5 years. PMID:10420867

  13. The "physician on call patient engagement trial" (POPET): measuring the impact of a mobile patient engagement application on health outcomes and quality of life in allergic rhinitis and asthma patients.

    PubMed

    Cingi, Cemal; Yorgancioglu, Arzu; Cingi, Can Cemal; Oguzulgen, Kıvılcım; Muluk, Nuray Bayar; Ulusoy, Seçkin; Orhon, Nezih; Yumru, Cengiz; Gokdag, Dursun; Karakaya, Gul; Çelebi, Şaban; Çobanoglu, H Bengü; Unlu, Halis; Aksoy, Mehmet Akif

    2015-06-01

    In this prospective, multicenter, randomized, controlled, double-blind study, we investigated the impact of a mobile patient engagement application on health outcomes and quality of life in allergic rhinitis (AR) and asthma patients. In total, 327 patients with diagnoses of persistent AR or mild-to-severe persistent asthma were randomized into 2 intervention groups and 2 control groups upon their admission at outpatient clinics. The intervention groups (POPET-AR and POPET-Asthma) received a mobile phone application ("physician on call patient engagement trial" [POPET]), enabling them to communicate with their physician, and record their health status and medication compliance. The AR groups completed the Rhinitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (RQLQ) at initiation and at the first month of the study. The asthma groups completed the Asthma Control Test (ACT) at initiation and at the third month of the study. The POPET-AR group showed better clinical improvement than the control group in terms of the overall RQLQ score as well in measures of general problems, activity, symptoms other than nose/eye, and emotion domains (p < 0.05). In the POPET-Asthma group, more patients (49%) achieved a well-controlled asthma score (ACT > 19) compared with the control group (27%); this was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Use of a mobile engagement platform, such as POPET, can have a significant impact on health outcomes and quality of life in both AR and asthma, potentially decreasing the number of hospital admissions, repeat doctor visits, and losses in productivity. Improvements were seen in domains related to activity, productivity, perception of disease, and emotion. © 2015 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  14. Appealing to an important customer. Physicians should be the target of marketing.

    PubMed

    Weiss, R

    1989-05-01

    Although many healthcare professionals are turning to the general public to increase market share and referrals, they should be directing their attention to physicians instead. One of the major challenges facing hospitals is determining physician needs. A survey may be necessary to identify physicians' perceptions, attitudes, values, expectations, market, and hospital loyalty. Another important research document is the physician profile, which includes each doctor by age, specialty, office location, admitting and outpatient referral activity, financial contribution, and referral and other affiliations. Surveying should not end with the physician. One of the best means of evaluating patient and physician satisfaction is by questioning physicians' office staff. To centralize physician services, a number of hospitals have established physician liaison programs, which bridge the gap between the hospital and the physician's office, heighten physician satisfaction, and increase referrals. Physician orientation is a key element of most outreach programs, providing an opportunity to develop relationships with new physicians. Other means of directly aiding physicians are physician referral services and practice enhancement and assistance.

  15. [Burnout syndrome among family physicians].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Cruz, Juan; Mugártegui-Sánchez, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    burnout syndrome is a state of physical and emotional exhaustion that can occur among workers who interact directly with others. This could affect job performance. The objective was to determine the prevalence of this syndrome and its associated factors among family physicians. a cross-sectional survey applying the Maslach Burnout Inventory was conducted in a selected convenience non-probability sampling of family physicians. Central tendency and dispersion measures were used in determining the prevalence of burnout syndrome; the associated factors were analysed by χ(2) test. there were 59 cases of burnout syndrome, 36 had involvement in a single component, 15 in 2 and 8 were affected in 3 components; we observed that 35 % of positive cases reported doing an average of 10 extra shifts a month (p = 0.013). Having a second job was associated with positive cases of burnout syndrome. the results are consistent with similar studies. Working extra shifts or having a second job were the related factors most associated to this syndrome.

  16. Female Physicians and the Future of Endocrinology.

    PubMed

    Pelley, Elaine; Danoff, Ann; Cooper, David S; Becker, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    Given that approximately 70% of current endocrinology fellows are women, female physicians will compose the majority of the future endocrinology workforce. This gender shift partly reflects an apparent waning of interest in endocrinology among male trainees. It also coincides with a projected shortage of endocrinologists overall. Female physicians face unique challenges in the workplace. To continue to attract trainees to the specialty and support their success, it is imperative that these challenges be recognized, understood, and addressed. A PubMed search using the terms "female physician" and "physician gender" covering the years 2000-2015 was performed. Additional references were identified through review of the citations of the retrieved articles. The following topics were identified as key to understanding the impact of this gender shift: professional satisfaction, work-life balance, income, parenthood, academic success, and patient satisfaction. Several changes can be predicted to occur as endocrinology becomes a female-predominant specialty. Although professional satisfaction should remain stable, increased burnout rates are likely. Work-life balance challenges will likely be magnified. The combined effects of occupational gender segregation and a gender pay gap are predicted to negatively impact salaries of endocrinologists of both genders. The underrepresentation of women in academic leadership may mean a lesser voice for endocrinology in this arena. Finally, gender biases evident in patient satisfaction measures--commonly used as proxies for quality of care--may disproportionately impact endocrinology. Endocrinology is predicted to become the most female-predominant subspecialty of internal medicine. The specialty of endocrinology should take a lead role in advocating for changes that support the success of female physicians. Strengthening and supporting the physician workforce can only serve to attract talented physicians of both genders to the

  17. Variations in patient response to tiered physician networks.

    PubMed

    Sinaiko, Anna D

    2016-06-01

    Prior studies found that tiered provider networks channel patients to preferred providers in certain contexts. This paper evaluates whether the effects of tiered physician networks vary for different types of patients. Cross-sectional analysis of fiscal year 2009 to 2010 administrative enrollment and claims data on nonelderly beneficiaries in Massachusetts Group Insurance Commission health plans. Main outcome measures are physician market share among new patients and the percent of physician's patients who switch away. We utilized estimated fixed effects linear regression models that were stratified by patient characteristics. Physicians with the worst tier rankings had lower market share among new patients who are older and sicker, or male, representing losses in market share of 10% and 15%, respectively, than other tiered physicians. A poor tier ranking did not affect physician market share of new patients who are female or younger. There was no effect of a physician's tier ranking on the proportion of patients who switch to other doctors among any groups of patients. Loyalty to their own physicians is pervasive across groups of patients. Physicians with poor tier rankings lost market share among new patients who are older and sicker, and among new male patients. Together, these findings suggest that tiered network designs have the potential for the greatest impact on value in healthcare over time, as more patients seek new relationships with physicians.

  18. Patient-Physician Web Messaging

    PubMed Central

    Liederman, Eric M; Lee, Jerry C; Baquero, Victor H; Seites, Paul G

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients want electronic access to providers. Providers fear being overwhelmed by unreimbursed messages. OBJECTIVE Measure the effects of patient-physician web messaging on primary care practices. DESIGN/SETTING Retrospective analysis of 6 case and 9 control internal medicine (IM) and family practice (FP) physicians' message volume, and a survey of 5,971 patients' web messaging with 267 providers and staff in 16 community primary care clinics in the Sacramento, CA region. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Case telephone volume was 18.2% lower (P =.002) and fell 6.50 times faster than control. Case total telephone plus web message volume was 13.7% lower (P =.025) and fell 5.84 times faster than control. Surveys were responded to by 40.3% (1,743/4,320) of patients and 61.4% (164/267) of providers and staff. Patients were overwhelmingly satisfied and providers and staff were generally satisfied; both found the system easy to use. Patient satisfaction correlated strongly with provider response time (Γ=0.557), and provider/staff satisfaction with computer skills (Γ=0.626) (Goodman-Kruskal Gamma [Γ] measure of ordinal association). CONCLUSIONS Secure web messaging improves on e-mail with encryption, access controls, message templates, customized message and prescription routing, knowledge content, and reimbursement. Further study is needed to determine whether reducing telephone traffic through the use of web messaging decreases provider interruptions and increases clinical efficiency during the workday. Satisfaction with web messaging may increase patient retention. PMID:15693928

  19. Medicare, physicians, and patients.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Joseph F

    2004-05-01

    There are many other provisions to the MMA. It is important to remind our patients that these changes are voluntary. If patients are satisfied with their current Medicare benefits and plan, they need not change to these new plans. However, as physicians we should familiarize ourselves with these new Medicare options so as to better advise our patients. For more information, visit www.ama-assn.org. The Medical Society of Delaware will strive to keep you informed as these new changes are implemented.

  20. Improving interunit transitions of care between emergency physicians and hospital medicine physicians: a conceptual approach.

    PubMed

    Beach, Christopher; Cheung, Dickson S; Apker, Julie; Horwitz, Leora I; Howell, Eric E; O'Leary, Kevin J; Patterson, Emily S; Schuur, Jeremiah D; Wears, Robert; Williams, Mark

    2012-10-01

    Patient care transitions across specialties involve more complexity than those within the same specialty, yet the unique social and technical features remain underexplored. Further, little consensus exists among researchers and practitioners about strategies to improve interspecialty communication. This concept article addresses these gaps by focusing on the hand-off process between emergency and hospital medicine physicians. Sensitivity to cultural and operational differences and a common set of expectations pertaining to hand-off content will more effectively prepare the next provider to act safely and efficiently when caring for the patient. Through a consensus decision-making process of experienced and published authorities in health care transitions, including physicians in both specialties as well as in communication studies, the authors propose content and style principles clinicians may use to improve transition communication. With representation from both community and academic settings, similarities and differences between emergency medicine and internal medicine are highlighted to heighten appreciation of the values, attitudes, and goals of each specialty, particularly pertaining to communication. The authors also examine different communication media, social and cultural behaviors, and tools that practitioners use to share patient care information. Quality measures are proposed within the structure, process, and outcome framework for institutions seeking to evaluate and monitor improvement strategies in hand-off performance. Validation studies to determine if these suggested improvements in transition communication will result in improved patient outcomes will be necessary. By exploring the dynamics of transition communication between specialties and suggesting best practices, the authors hope to strengthen hand-off skills and contribute to improved continuity of care. © 2012 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  1. Canadian physicians' knowledge and counseling practices related to antibiotic use and antimicrobial resistance: Two-cycle national survey.

    PubMed

    Smith, Courtney R; Pogany, Lisa; Foley, Simon; Wu, Jun; Timmerman, Karen; Gale-Rowe, Margaret; Demers, Alain

    2017-12-01

    To establish a baseline for physicians' knowledge of and counseling practices on the use of antibiotics and antimicrobial resistance (AMR), and to determine potential changes in these measures after the implementation of a national AMR awareness campaign. Cross-sectional design. Canada. A total of 1600 physicians. Physicians' knowledge of and counseling practices on antibiotic use and AMR at baseline and after implementation of the AMR awareness campaign. A total of 336 physicians responded to the first-cycle survey (before the campaign), and 351 physicians responded to the second-cycle survey (after the campaign). Overall, physicians' knowledge of appropriate antibiotic use and AMR was high and their counseling practices in relation to antibiotics were appropriate in both surveys. Counseling levels about topics related to infection prevention and control (eg, food handling, household hygiene) were slightly lower. Counseling levels were also lower for certain antibiotic-use practices (eg, proper disposal of antibiotics). In addition, physicians with less than 10 years of practice experience had significantly lower odds of counseling their patients on topics related to preventing antibiotic resistance and infection prevention than those with 15 or more years of practice experience (adjusted odds ratio = 0.27, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.74). Significantly more physicians from the second-cycle survey counseled patients on the appropriate disposal of antibiotics ( P = .03), as well as on some of the infection prevention topics (eg, using antibacterial hand soap [ P = .02] and cleaning supplies [ P = .01]). Most respondents in both surveys reported feeling confident with respect to counseling their patients on the appropriate use of antibiotics and AMR. Physicians' knowledge of and levels of counseling on the use of antibiotics and AMR were high and fairly stable in both survey results. This shows that Canadian physicians are demonstrating behaviour patterns of AMR stewardship

  2. RADIOCARBON MEASUREMENT OF THE BIOGENIC CONTRIBUTION TO SUMMERTIME PM 2.5 AMBIENT AEROSOL IN NASHVILLE, TN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radiocarbon (14C) measurements performed on PM-2.5 samples collected near Nashville, TN from June 21 to July 13, 1999, showed high levels of modern carbon, ranging from 56 to 80% of the total carbon in the samples. Radiocarbon measurements performed on dichloromethane extracts of...

  3. Physicians' attitudes toward the legalization of marijuana use.

    PubMed Central

    Linn, L S; Yager, J; Leake, B

    1989-01-01

    We asked 303 practicing physicians in general internal medicine, family medicine, gastroenterology, or psychiatry to indicate whether possessing or using marijuana should be considered a felony, a misdemeanor, warrant the issuance of a citation, or be legalized. The position physicians advocated was unrelated to their specialty, experience diagnosing or treating substance abuse problems, their attitudes toward the efficacy of the treatment of drug abuse, or any other work role or habit we measured. Legalization or citation as compared with harsher penalties, however, was more likely favored by physicians who were younger, less religious, politically more liberal, and those less likely to perceive a serious drug problem in society. Legalization was also more likely favored by physicians who themselves had used marijuana, cocaine, and amphetamines but was unrelated to the use of alcohol, cigarettes, or tranquilizers. Although physician opinion should be sought as society deals with the drug problem, this study suggests how physicians' characteristics may influence the opinions that are rendered. PMID:2750164

  4. Physicians' attitudes toward the legalization of marijuana use.

    PubMed

    Linn, L S; Yager, J; Leake, B

    1989-06-01

    We asked 303 practicing physicians in general internal medicine, family medicine, gastroenterology, or psychiatry to indicate whether possessing or using marijuana should be considered a felony, a misdemeanor, warrant the issuance of a citation, or be legalized. The position physicians advocated was unrelated to their specialty, experience diagnosing or treating substance abuse problems, their attitudes toward the efficacy of the treatment of drug abuse, or any other work role or habit we measured. Legalization or citation as compared with harsher penalties, however, was more likely favored by physicians who were younger, less religious, politically more liberal, and those less likely to perceive a serious drug problem in society. Legalization was also more likely favored by physicians who themselves had used marijuana, cocaine, and amphetamines but was unrelated to the use of alcohol, cigarettes, or tranquilizers. Although physician opinion should be sought as society deals with the drug problem, this study suggests how physicians' characteristics may influence the opinions that are rendered.

  5. The effect of HMO penetration on physician retirement.

    PubMed

    Kletke, P R; Polsky, D; Wozniak, G D; Escarce, J J

    2000-12-01

    To examine the effect of HMO penetration on physician retirement. We linked together historical data from the Physician Masterfile of the American Medical Association for successive years to track changes in physicians' activity status between 1980 and 1997. We used a multivariate discrete-time survival model to examine how the probability of physician retirement was affected by the level of HMO penetration in the physician's market area, controlling for other physician and market characteristics. The study population included all active allopathic patient-care physicians in the United States who reached age 55 between the years of 1980 and 1996. The main outcome measure was physician retirements as reported on the Physician Masterfile. HMO penetration had a statistically significant positive effect on the retirement probabilities of generalists and medical/surgical specialists, but it s effect on hospital-based specialists and psychiatrists was not significant . For generalists regression-adjusted retirement probabilities were roughly 13 percent greater in high-penetration markets (HMO penetration of 45 percent ) than in low-penetration markets (HMO penetration of 5 percent ). For medical/surgical specialist s regression-adjusted retirement probabilities were roughly 17 percent greater in high-penetration markets than in low-penetration markets. Our findings suggest that many older physicians have found it preferable to retire rather than adapt their practices to an environment with a high degree of managed care penetration . Because the number of physicians entering the older age categories will increase rapidly over the next 20 years, the growth of managed care and other influences on physician retirement will play an increasingly important role in determining the size of the physician workforce.

  6. Details on suicide among US physicians: data from the National Violent Death Reporting System.

    PubMed

    Gold, Katherine J; Sen, Ananda; Schwenk, Thomas L

    2013-01-01

    Physician suicide is an important public health problem as the rate of suicide is higher among physicians than the general population. Unfortunately, few studies have evaluated information about mental health comorbidities and psychosocial stressors which may contribute to physician suicide. We sought to evaluate these factors among physicians versus non-physician suicide victims. We used data from the United States National Violent Death Reporting System to evaluate demographics, mental health variables, recent stressors and suicide methods among physician versus non-physician suicide victims in 17 states. The data set included 31,636 suicide victims of whom 203 were identified as physicians. Multivariable logistic regression found that having a known mental health disorder or a job problem which contributed to the suicide significantly predicted being a physician. Physicians were significantly more likely than non-physicians to have antipsychotics, benzodiazepines and barbiturates present on toxicology testing but not antidepressants. Mental illness is an important comorbidity for physicians who complete a suicide but postmortem toxicology data shows low rates of medication treatment. Inadequate treatment and increased problems related to job stress may be potentially modifiable risk factors to reduce suicidal death among physicians. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The physician's response to climate change.

    PubMed

    Sarfaty, Mona; Abouzaid, Safiya

    2009-05-01

    Climate change will have an effect on the health and well-being of the populations cared for by practicing physicians. The anticipated medical effects include heat- and cold-related deaths, cardiovascular illnesses, injuries and mental harms from extreme weather events, respiratory illnesses caused by poor air quality, infectious diseases that emanate from contaminated food, water, or spread of disease vectors, the injuries caused by natural disasters, and the mental harm associated with social disruption. Within several years, such medical problems are likely to reach the doorsteps of many physicians. In the face of this reality, physicians should assume their traditional roles as medical professionals, health educators, and community leaders. Clinicians provide individual health services to patients, some of whom will be especially vulnerable to the emerging health consequences of global warming. Physicians also work in academic medical institutions and hospitals that educate and provide continuing medical education to students, residents, and practitioners. The institutions also produce a measurable carbon footprint. Societies of physicians at national, state, and local levels can choose to use their well-developed avenues of communication to raise awareness of the key issues that are raised by climate change as well as other environmental concerns that have profound implications for human health and well-being.

  8. Task and socioemotional behaviors of physicians: a test of reciprocity and social interaction theories in analogue physician-patient encounters.

    PubMed

    Roberts, C A; Aruguete, M S

    2000-02-01

    The purpose of the present study is to assess social interaction and reciprocity theories as explanations for patient responses to a physician in a medical consultation. Social interaction theory predicts that patients mostly recognize and react to socioemotional behavior of their physicians due to a lack of understanding of physician task behaviors or a preoccupation with anxiety. Reciprocity theory predicts that patients recognize socioemotional and task behaviors of their physicians, and they respond to these behaviors in thematically similar ways. We examined these hypotheses by having subjects view one of four videotapes which varied in physician task behavior (thorough or minimum levels of explanation of etiology, symptoms, and treatment) and physician socioemotional behavior (high or low levels of concern and affection displayed verbally and non-verbally). Results supported the general proposition of social interaction theory in that high levels of socioemotional behavior of the physician increased measures of patient self-disclosure, trust, satisfaction, and likelihood of recommending the physician. Physician task behavior had no effect on patient response to the physician, a finding inconsistent with reciprocity theory.

  9. Patients' trust in their physician--psychometric properties of the Dutch version of the "Wake Forest Physician Trust Scale".

    PubMed

    Bachinger, Suse Maria; Kolk, Annemarie M; Smets, Ellen M A

    2009-07-01

    Aim was to investigate the psychometric properties of a Dutch version of the "Wake Forest Physician Trust Scale", which intends to measure patients' trust in their physician. A random sample of internal medicine patients visiting the outpatient clinic completed the questionnaire (N=201). Dimensionality, reliability and validity of the instrument were examined. The structure of the questionnaire was best explained by a unidimensional construct. Reliability was confirmed: internal consistency was high (alpha=.88), and mean item-total correlations were all above .40. Construct validity was indicated by patients' trust in their physician correlating significantly and as hypothesized with (1) satisfaction with their physician (r=.64), (2) with the length of the patient-physician relationship (r=.28), (3) with their willingness to recommend their physician (r=.71) and (4) their unwillingness to switch their physician (r=.61). The results suggest the Dutch version of the Wake Forest Physician Trust Scale to be a psychometrically sound instrument to assess patients' interpersonal trust. Trust is a key feature of the patient-physician relationship, yet has been scarcely researched in other than Anglophone cultures. An adequate Dutch trust questionnaire forms the first step to gaining more knowledge about patient-physician trust in another culture and health care setting.

  10. MACRA: A New Age for Physician Payments.

    PubMed

    Huston, Kent Kwasind

    2017-04-01

    The Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA) of 2015 introduced a new system of physician payments in the United States. This legislation and the complex rules written to enact the law intend to force a shift away from volume-based payments and into so called value-based payments. Physicians and other clinicians will be graded via quality and cost metrics and payments will be adjusted based on performance. Robust use of certified electronic health records is required under MACRA. Physicians will follow one of two payment reform tracks known as the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) and the Alternative Payment Model (APM) pathways. Although there are rheumatology and other specialty specific quality measures in the MIPS program, there are no rheumatology specific APMs to date. A thorough understating of MACRA is required for medical practices to survive the new era of payment reform.

  11. Development of physician leadership competencies: perceptions of physician leaders, physician educators and medical students.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Mindi K; Gartland, Myles P; Pugno, Perry A

    2004-01-01

    Research regarding the development of healthcare leadership competencies is widely available. However, minimal research has been published regarding the development of physician leadership competencies, despite growing recognition in recent years of the important need for effective physician leadership. Usingdata from an electronically distributed, self-administered survey, the authors examined the perceptions held by 110 physician leaders, physician educators, and medical students regarding the extent to which nine competencies are important for effective physician leadership, ten activities are indicative of physician leadership, and seven methods are effective for the development of physician leadership competencies. Results indicated that "interpersonal and communication skills" and "professional ethics and social responsibility" are perceived as the most important competencies for effective physician leadership. Furthermore, respondents believe "influencing peers to adopt new approaches in medicine" and "administrative responsibility in a healthcare organization" are the activities most indicative of effective physician leadership. Finally, respondents perceive"coaching or mentoring from an experienced leader" and "on-job experience (e.g., a management position)" as the most effective methods for developing physician leadership competencies. The implications of these findings for the education and development of physician leaders are discussed.

  12. Sex Role Stress and Job Burnout among Family Practice Physicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemkau, Jeanne P.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Explored relationships among sex role stress, gender, and job burnout in family practice physicians (N=67) in four residency programs. Results showed sexes agreed in describing ideal physician. Men saw themselves falling short on expressiveness; women saw themselves short on instrumentality and sensitivity. Sex role measures were most related to…

  13. The liberal arts physician.

    PubMed

    Burrow, G N

    1999-10-01

    The United States is in the midst of the second revolution in American health care to occur during this century, as Kenneth Ludmerer makes clear in his book Time to Heal: American Medical Education from the Turn of the Century to the Era of Managed Care. The "Flexnerian revolution" eventually led to the closing of a third of the medical schools. Although such closures are not likely this time, familiar arrangements are collapsing, without a clear picture of the shape of things to come. Whatever the outcome of the current revolution, well-trained physicians will be needed to care for the sick. Academic medical centers truly are at risk and increasingly require public support to flourish or even to survive, but medical schools and their teaching hospitals must demonstrate that they deserve this support. These institutions have responded by focusing on the business aspects of medicine, perhaps to the detriment of medical education. Lost in this focus is teaching time, and perhaps even more important, the time for mentoring. Often lacking too is a clear vision of the preparation needed by the student to practice medicine successfully in the future: different specialty mixes, interdisciplinary group practice; vastly increased use of information technologies, and overwhelming amounts of relevant and interrelated information. Yet the answer is the same as it was 75 years ago when Yale introduced the first radical medical curricular reform--the "liberal arts physician," trained in science, the values of medicine, and particularly for uncertainly and with the capacity to adapt.

  14. Assessment of Contribution of Contemporary Carbon Sources to Size-Fractionated Particulate Matter and Time-Resolved Bulk Particulate Matter Using the Measurement of Radiocarbon

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, H M; Young, T M; Buchholz, B A

    2009-04-16

    This study was motivated by a desire to improve understanding of the sources contributing to the carbon that is an important component of airborne particulate matter (PM). The ultimate goal of this project was to lay a ground work for future tools that might be easily implemented with archived or routinely collected samples. A key feature of this study was application of radiocarbon measurement that can be interpreted to indicate the relative contributions from fossil and non-fossil carbon sources of atmospheric PM. Size-resolved PM and time-resolved PM{sub 10} collected from a site in Sacramento, CA in November 2007 (Phase I)more » and March 2008 (Phase II) were analyzed for radiocarbon and source markers such as levoglucosan, cholesterol, and elemental carbon. Radiocarbon data indicates that the contributions of non-fossil carbon sources were much greater than that from fossil carbon sources in all samples. Radiocarbon and source marker measurements confirm that a greater contribution of non-fossil carbon sources in Phase I samples was highly likely due to residential wood combustion. The present study proves that measurement of radiocarbon and source markers can be readily applied to archived or routinely collected samples for better characterization of PM sources. More accurate source apportionment will support ARB in developing more efficient control strategies.« less

  15. [Physicians--victims or promoters of corruption?].

    PubMed

    Kind, M

    2002-01-01

    According to the media the recent physician bribery scandal in Germany draws ever further sets. The public prosecutor determines against hospital physicians and coworkers of a pharmaceutical firm. The suspicion: Physicians were recompensed for using up medicines particularly with pleasure trips. Which is qualified in Germany regularly as bribery and advantage grant as well as aid for tax evasion, is punishable in Austria as unfaithfulness, gift acceptance as well as bribery. The following contribution lights up--from Austrian view--the criminal page of the narrow burr between permitted sponsoring and undue corruption in the medicine. Bribery is globally punishable in Austria. Allowances to physicians can be for the payee in particular gift acceptance (section 153a StGB) or gift acceptance by leading employees of a public enterprise (section 305 StGB), for the giver in particular bribery (section 307 StGB). Occasional allowances, which are not located in connection to a concrete business, but only promoted the sympathetic consideration of the recipient, are not usually punishable. The punishing frameworks for offensces reach up to three years imprisonment. In addition still the absorption of enriching comes (section 20 StGB).

  16. Measurement of non-instantaneous contribution to the χ(3) in different liquids using femtosecond chirped pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langot, P.; Montant, S.; Freysz, E.

    2000-04-01

    In the Born-Oppenheimer approximation and considering a Debye nuclear motion, a theoretical computation of pump-probe two-beam coupling in liquids using femtosecond chirped pulses is proposed. This technique makes it possible to specifically evidence the non-instantaneous contribution to the third-order susceptibility χ(3). Our model, which is an extension at the femtosecond scale of the one proposed by Dogariu et al., describes the temporal evolution of the probe signal as a function of different parameters such as the linear laser chirp, the ratio between the pulse duration and the nuclear response time. Experimentally, this method is applied to characterize the non-instantaneous χ(3) contribution in transparent liquids such as CS 2, benzene and toluene. Time resolved pump-probe coupling data using parallel and perpendicular linear polarizations fit well with the model developed. The experimental ratio R between both fast and slow non-instantaneous χ(3)XXXX and χ(3)XYYX elements of the tensor is equal to 1.33±0.01 in all the liquids studied, and is in good agreement with the expected liquid nuclear symmetry.

  17. Team physicians in college athletics.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Mark E; Quigley, D Bradford; Wang, Frank; Balint, Christopher R; Boland, Arthur L

    2005-10-01

    There has been little documentation of what constitutes the clinical work of intercollegiate team physicians. Team physicians could be recruited based on the needs of athletes. A multidisciplinary team of physicians is necessary to treat college athletes. Most physician evaluations are for musculoskeletal injuries treated nonoperatively. Descriptive epidemiology study. For a 2-year period, a database was created that recorded information on team physician encounters with intercollegiate athletes at a major university. Data on imaging studies, hospitalizations, and surgeries were also recorded. The diagnoses for physician encounters with all undergraduates through the university's health service were also recorded. More initial athlete evaluations were for musculoskeletal diagnoses (73%) than for general medical diagnoses (27%) (P < .05). Four percent of musculoskeletal injuries required surgery. Most general medical evaluations were single visits for upper respiratory infections and dermatologic disorders, or multiple visits for concussions. Football accounted for 22% of all physician encounters, more than any other sport (P < .05). Per capita, men and women sought care at an equal rate. In contrast, 10% of physician encounters with the general pool of undergraduates were for musculoskeletal diagnoses. Student athletes did not require a greater number of physician encounters than did the general undergraduate pool of students on a per capita basis. Intercollegiate team physicians primarily treat musculoskeletal injuries that do not require surgery. General medical care is often single evaluations of common conditions and repeat evaluations for concussions.

  18. The aging physician and surgeon.

    PubMed

    Sataloff, Robert T; Hawkshaw, Mary; Kutinsky, Joshua; Maitz, Edward A

    2016-01-01

    As the population of aging physicians increases, methods of assessing physicians' cognitive function and predicting clinically significant changes in clinical performance become increasingly important. Although several approaches have been suggested, no evaluation system is accepted or utilized widely. This article reviews literature using MEDLINE, PubMed, and other sources. Articles discussing the problems of geriatric physicians are summarized, stressing publications that proposed methods of evaluation. Selected literature on evaluating aging pilots also was reviewed, and potential applications for physician evaluation are proposed. Neuropsychological cognitive test protocols were summarized, and a reduced evaluation protocol is proposed for interdisciplinary longitudinal research. Although there are several articles evaluating cognitive function in aging physicians and aging pilots, and although a few institutions have instituted cognitive evaluation, there are no longitudinal data assessing cognitive function in physicians over time or correlating them with performance. Valid, reliable testing of cognitive function of physicians is needed. In order to understand its predictive value, physicians should be tested over time starting when they are young, and results should be correlated with physician performance. Early testing is needed to determine whether cognitive deficits are age-related or long-standing. A multi-institutional study over many years is proposed. Additional assessments of other factors such as manual dexterity (perhaps using simulators) and physician frailty are recommended.

  19. Improved knowledge of and difficulties in palliative care among physicians during 2008 and 2015 in Japan: Association with a nationwide palliative care education program.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Yoko; Yamamoto, Ryo; Kato, Masashi; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Kizawa, Yoshiyuki; Morita, Tatsuya

    2018-02-01

    Palliative care education for health care professionals is a key element in improving access to quality palliative care. The Palliative Care Emphasis Program on Symptom Management and Assessment for Continuous Medical Education (PEACE) was designed to provide educational opportunities for all physicians in Japan. As of 2015, 57,764 physicians had completed it. The objective of this study was to estimate the effects of the program. This study was an analysis of 2 nationwide observational studies from 2008 and 2015. We conducted 2 questionnaire surveys for representative samples of physicians. The measurements used were the Palliative Care Knowledge Test (range, 0-100) and the Palliative Care Difficulties Scale (range, 1-4). Comparisons were made with the unpaired Student t test and with a multivariate linear regression model using 2 cohorts and a propensity score-matched sample. This study analyzed a total of 48,487 physicians in 2008 and a total of 2720 physicians in 2015. Between 2008 and 2015, physicians' knowledge and difficulties significantly improved on the Palliative Care Knowledge Test with total scores of 68 and 78, respectively (P < .001; effect size, 0.40) and on the Palliative Care Difficulties Scale with total scores of 2.65 and 2.49, respectively (P < .001; effect size, 0.29). Propensity-score matching resulted in 619 untrained physicians matched to 619 trained physicians, and physicians who trained with the PEACE program had a higher knowledge score (74 vs 86; P < .001; effect size, 0.64) and a lower difficulties score (2.6 vs 2.3; P < .001; effect size, 0.42). Physicians' knowledge of and difficulties with palliative care improved on a national level. The PEACE program may have contributed to these improvements. Cancer 2018;124:626-35. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  20. Measurement and evaluation practices of factors that contribute to effective health promotion collaboration functioning: A scoping review.

    PubMed

    Stolp, Sean; Bottorff, Joan L; Seaton, Cherisse L; Jones-Bricker, Margaret; Oliffe, John L; Johnson, Steven T; Errey, Sally; Medhurst, Kerensa; Lamont, Sonia

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this scoping review was to identify promising factors that underpin effective health promotion collaborations, measurement approaches, and evaluation practices. Measurement approaches and evaluation practices employed in 14 English-language articles published between January 2001 and October 2015 were considered. Data extraction included research design, health focus of the collaboration, factors being evaluated, how factors were conceptualized and measured, and outcome measures. Studies were methodologically diverse employing either quantitative methods (n=9), mixed methods (n=4), or qualitative methods (n=1). In total, these 14 studies examined 113 factors, 88 of which were only measured once. Leadership was the most commonly studied factor but was conceptualized differently across studies. Six factors were significantly associated with outcome measures across studies; leadership (n=3), gender (n=2), trust (n=2), length of the collaboration (n=2), budget (n=2) and changes in organizational model (n=2). Since factors were often conceptualized differently, drawing conclusions about their impact on collaborative functioning remains difficult. The use of reliable and validated tools would strengthen evaluation of health promotion collaborations and would support and enhance the effectiveness of collaboration. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Patient–Physician Connectedness and Quality of Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Atlas, Steven J.; Grant, Richard W.; Ferris, Timothy G.; Chang, Yuchiao; Barry, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Valid measurement of physician performance requires accurate identification of patients for whom a physician is responsible. Among all patients seen by a physician, some will be more strongly connected to their physician than others, but the effect of connectedness on measures of physician performance is not known. Objective To determine whether patient–physician connectedness affects measures of clinical performance. Design Population-based cohort study. Setting Academic network of 4 community health centers and 9 hospital-affiliated primary care practices. Patients 155 590 adults with 1 or more visits to a study practice from 2003 to 2005. Measurements A validated algorithm was used to connect patients to either 1 of 181 physicians or 1 of 13 practices in which they received most of their care. Performance measures included breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening in eligible patients; hemoglobin A1c measurement and control in patients with diabetes; and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol measurement and control in patients with diabetes and coronary artery disease. Results Overall, 92 315 patients (59.3%) were connected to a specific physician, whereas 53 669 patients (34.5%) were connected only to a specific practice and 9606 patients (6.2%) could not be connected to a physician or practice. The proportion of patients in a practice who could be connected to a physician varied markedly (45.6% to 71.2% of patients per practice; P < 0.001). Physician-connected patients were significantly more likely than practice-connected patients to receive guideline-consistent care (for example, adjusted mammography rates were 78.1% vs. 65.9% [P < 0.001] and adjusted hemoglobin A1c rates were 90.3% vs. 74.9% [P < 0.001]). Receipt of preventive care varied more by whether patients were more or less connected to a physician than by race or ethnicity. Limitation Patient–physician connectedness was assessed in 1 primary care network. Conclusion Patients

  2. 75 FR 78247 - Medicare Program; Town Hall Meeting on Physician Quality Reporting System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-15

    ...] Medicare Program; Town Hall Meeting on Physician Quality Reporting System AGENCY: Centers for Medicare... to discuss the Physician Quality Reporting System (previously known as the Physician Quality... stakeholders on the individual quality measures and measures groups being considered for possible inclusion in...

  3. Carotenoids, polyphenols and micronutrient profiles of Brassica oleraceae and plum varieties and their contribution to measures of total antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Kaulmann, Anouk; Jonville, Marie-Caroline; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Hoffmann, Lucien; Bohn, Torsten

    2014-07-15

    The consumption of phytochemicals such as carotenoids and polyphenols within whole fruits and vegetables has been associated with decreased incidence of various inflammation and oxidative stress related chronic diseases, which may be due to direct antioxidant effects, or indirect mechanisms such as affecting signal transduction/gene expression. Within the present study, we investigated the antioxidant composition of two major groups of vegetables and fruits, Brassica oleraceae and prunus spp., and estimated their contribution to antioxidant capacity. For this purpose, 17 plum and 27 Brassica varieties were collected in Luxembourg, and analysed for their individual polyphenol and carotenoid profile, vitamin C, dietary fibre, and minerals/trace elements, and their correlation with markers of antioxidant capacity (FRAP, ABTS, Folin-Ciocalteu). Total carotenoid and polyphenol content varied considerably between the different Brassica and plum varieties, with highest concentrations in the variety Kale (13.3 ± 0.58 mg/100g wet weight) and Cherry plum (1.96 ± 0.28 mg/100g) for carotenoids; and Kale (27.0 ± 0.91 mg/100g) and Kirks plum (185 ± 14 mg/100g) for polyphenols. In developed multiple linear-regression-models for Brassica, flavonoids, anthocyanins, lutein and vitamin C were found to be the best predictors of antioxidant capacity as assessed by FRAP (R(2)=0.832) and flavonoids, neochlorogenic acid and vitamin C as assessed by ABTS (R(2)=0.831); while for plums these were selenium, total sugars, chlorogenic acid and vitamin C (R(2)=0.853), and selenium, chlorogenic acid and flavonoids for FRAP (R(2)=0.711). When considering Brassica and plum consumption in Luxembourg, it is estimated that both contribute to an antioxidant intake equivalent to 26 and 6 mg per day of ascorbic acid equivalents, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Referring physician satisfaction: toward a better understanding of hospital referrals.

    PubMed

    Ponzurick, T G; France, K R; Logar, C M

    1998-01-01

    Customer satisfaction literature has contributed significantly to the development of marketing strategies in the health-care arena. The research has led to the development of hospital-driven relationship marketing programs. This study examines the inclusion of referring physicians as partners in the hospital's relationship marketing program. In exploring this relationship, medical and hospital facility characteristics that referring physicians find important in making patient referrals to specialty care hospitals are identified and analyzed. The results lead to the development of strategic initiatives which hospital marketers should consider when developing relationship marketing programs designed to satisfy their referring physicians.

  5. The effect of explicit financial incentives on physician behavior.

    PubMed

    Armour, B S; Pitts, M M; Maclean, R; Cangialose, C; Kishel, M; Imai, H; Etchason, J

    2001-05-28

    Managed care organizations use explicit financial incentives to influence physicians' use of resources. This has contributed to concerns regarding conflicts of interest for physicians and adverse effects on the quality of patient care. In light of recent publicized legislative and legal battles about this issue, we reviewed the literature and analyzed studies that examine the effect of these explicit financial incentives on the behavior of physicians. The method used to undertake the literature review followed the approach set forth in the Cochrane Collaboration handbook. Our literature review revealed a paucity of data on the effect of explicit financial incentives. Based on this limited evidence, explicit incentives that place individual physicians at financial risk appear to be effective in reducing physician resource use. However, the empirical evidence regarding the effectiveness of bonus payments on physician resource use is mixed. Similarly, our review revealed mixed effects of the influence of explicit financial incentives on the quality of patient care. The effect of explicit financial incentives on physician behavior is complicated by a lack of understanding of the incentive structure by the managed care organization and the physician. The lack of a universally acceptable definition of quality renders it important that future researchers identify the term explicitly.

  6. The ACO paradox impacting physicians.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Gunjan; West, Daniel J

    2012-01-01

    Accountable care organizations (ACOs) would hold care providers jointly accountable for the quality and costs of care, allow consumers the freedom to choose their providers, and involve physicians and consumers in their shared decision-making. Even though the ACO model proposes physician empowerment, it also poses significant financial and change-management challenges for physicians. Furthermore, the "patient-centered" ACOs that have been established to safeguard consumer sovereignty pose the risks of concentrating healthcare markets further and exacerbating the existing disparities in healthcare. We conducted a survey study to understand physicians' perspectives of ACOs by seeking their first-hand feedback. The survey results suggest that there are significant communication gaps between physicians and healthcare administrators; and efficient communication can help improve physician-administrator alignment and help them identify opportunities that would be critical to the success of ACOs.

  7. The physician leader as logotherapist.

    PubMed

    Washburn, E R

    1998-01-01

    Today's physicians feel helpless and angry about changing conditions in the medical landscape. This is due, in large part, to our postmodernist world view and the influence of corporations on medical practice. The life and work of existentialist psychiatrist Viktor Frankl is proposed as a role model for physicians to take back control of their profession. Physician leaders are in the best position to bring the teachings and insight of Frankl's logotherapy to rank-and-file physicians in all practice settings, as well as into the board rooms of large medical corporations. This article considers the spiritual and moral troubles of American medicine, Frankl's answer to that affliction, and the implications of logotherapy for physician organizations and leadership. Physician executives are challenged to take up this task.

  8. Physicians' attitudes about interprofessional treatment of chronic pain: family physicians are considered the most important collaborators.

    PubMed

    Klinar, Ivana; Ferhatovic, Lejla; Banozic, Adriana; Raguz, Marija; Kostic, Sandra; Sapunar, Damir; Puljak, Livia

    2013-06-01

    Interprofessional collaboration is the process in which different professional groups work together to positively impact health care. We aimed to explore physicians' attitudes toward interprofessional collaboration in the context of chronic pain management with the implication that if attitudes are not positive, appropriate interventions could be developed. A quantitative attitudes study. The ethical committee approved the study. A web-based survey about interprofessional treatment of chronic pain was administered to physicians. Outcome measures were as follows: physicians' demographic and workplace information, previous experience of working within an interprofessional team, and attitudes towards interprofessional collaboration in chronic pain management. There were 90 physicians who responded to the survey. Physicians had positive attitudes towards team work in the context of chronic pain, but they were undecided about sharing their role within an interprofessional team. The family physician was singled out as the most important as well as the most common collaborator in chronic pain treatment. Interprofessional educational seminars and workshops were suggested as methods for improving interprofessional collaboration. Interprofessional collaboration may be enhanced with continuing medical education that will bring together different healthcare professionals, enable them to exchange experiences and learn about their potential roles within a team. © 2012 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  9. Urbanization and physician maldistribution: a longitudinal study in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The relative shortage of physicians in Japan's rural areas is an important issue in health policy. In the 1970s, the Japanese government began a policy to increase the number of medical students and to achieve a better distribution of physicians. Beginning in 1985, however, admissions to medical school were reduced to prevent a future oversupply of physicians. In 2007, medical school entrants equaled just 92% of their 1982 peers. The urban annual population growth rate is positive and the rural is negative, a trend that may affect denominator populations and physician distribution. Methods Our data cover six time points and span a decade: 1998, 2000, 2002, 2004, 2006, and 2008. The spatial units for analysis are the secondary tier of medical care (STM) as defined by the Medical Service Law and related legislation. We examined trends in the geographic disparities in population and physician distribution among 348 STMs in Japan. We compared populations and the number of physicians per 100,000 populations in each STM. To measure maldistribution quantitatively, we calculated Gini coefficients for physician distribution. Results Between 1998 and 2008, the total population and the number of practicing physicians for every 100,000 people increased by 0.95% and 13.6%, respectively. However, the inequality of physician distribution remained constant, although small and mostly rural areas experienced an increase in physician to population ratios. In contrast, as the maldistribution of population escalated during the same period, the Gini coefficient of population rose. Although the absolute number of practicing physicians in small STMs decreased, the fall in the denominator population of the STMs resulted in an increase in the number of practicing physicians per population in those located in rural areas. Conclusions A policy that increased the number of physicians and the physician to population ratios between 1998 and 2008 in all geographic areas of Japan

  10. A New Measure for Assessing the Contributions of Higher Level Processes to Language Comprehension Performance in Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannon, Brenda; Frias, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    The present study reports the development of a theoretically motivated measure that provides estimates of a preschooler's ability to recall auditory text, to make text-based inferences, to access knowledge from long-term memory, and to integrate this accessed knowledge with new information from auditory text. This new preschooler component…

  11. Empathy in cooperative versus non-cooperative situations: the contribution of self-report measures and autonomic responses.

    PubMed

    Balconi, Michela; Bortolotti, Adriana

    2012-09-01

    Shared representations, emotion comprehension, and emotion regulation constitute the basic macro components of social empathy. The present study integrated two different measures of empathic behavior in a social context: verbal self-report measures (empathic response, emotional involvement and emotional significance, and valence), and autonomic responses (facial expression-corrugator supercilii and zygomaticus major muscle-, SCR-skin conductance-, and HR-heart rate-). Participants (N = thirty-five) were presented with different interpersonal scene types (cooperation, non-cooperation, conflict, indifference). Different empathic sensitivity to these interpersonal situations was verified, since self-rating on empathy, emotional involvement and valence varied as a function of interpersonal context. Situation rated as more empathically significant were considered also as the most positive (cooperation) and negative (non cooperation and conflictual) and emotionally significant (high emotional significance of the scenes) in comparison with neutral scenes. Nevertheless, subjective empathic response and personal emotional involvement were found to be dissociated measures in non-cooperative condition. On the autonomic level, facial mimicry was linked to and coherent with the empathic response in cooperative, non-cooperative and conflictual conditions, whereas SCR and HR were increased only in response to cooperative and conflictual situation, rated as more involving by the subject. The convergence of these multidimensional measures was discussed: empirical evidences are far from able to warrant claims that processes of emotional contagion and simulation provide the sole, primary important way by which we come to know what others are feeling.

  12. Family Violence and Family Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Carol P.

    1991-01-01

    The acronym IDEALS summarizes family physicians' obligations when violence is suspected: to identify family violence; document injuries; educate families and ensure safety for victims; access resources and coordinate care; co-operate in the legal process; and provide support for families. Failure to respond reflects personal and professional experience and attitudes, fear of legal involvement, and lack of knowledge. Risks of intervention include physician burnout, physician overfunctioning, escalation of violence, and family disruption. PMID:21228987

  13. Physician revalidation in Europe.

    PubMed

    Merkur, Sherry; Mossialos, Elias; Long, Morgan; McKee, Martin

    2008-08-01

    Despite the increasing attention on patient mobility, there remains a lack of European-level interest in assuring the sustained competence of health professionals. Specifically, the existing European legal framework fails to recognise the introduction of periodic revalidation and requirements to participate in continuing professional development in some countries. This study shows that the definitions and mechanisms of revalidation vary significantly across member states. While some countries, eg Austria, Germany and Spain, look to continuing medical education as a means to promote recertification and quality of care, other countries, eg Belgium, France and the Netherlands, also incorporate peer review. In the UK the proposed revalidation scheme would include elements of relicensure through appraisal and feedback as well as physician recertification. Divergence between countries also exists in monitoring and enforcement. The European Commission should explore the implications for professional mobility of the diversity in the regulation of the medical profession.

  14. Computerized Physician Order Entry

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Raman; Yen, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Computerized physician order entry (CPOE) has been promoted as an important component of patient safety, quality improvement, and modernization of medical practice. In practice, however, CPOE affects health care delivery in complex ways, with benefits as well as risks. Every implementation of CPOE is associated with both generally recognized and unique local factors that can facilitate or confound its rollout, and neurohospitalists will often be at the forefront of such rollouts. In this article, we review the literature on CPOE, beginning with definitions and proceeding to comparisons to the standard of care. We then proceed to discuss clinical decision support systems, negative aspects of CPOE, and cultural context of CPOE implementation. Before concluding, we follow the experiences of a Chief Medical Information Officer and neurohospitalist who rolled out a CPOE system at his own health care organization and managed the resulting workflow changes and setbacks. PMID:24381708

  15. Aerosol and precipitation chemistry measurements in a remote site in Central Amazonia: the role of biogenic contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauliquevis, T.; Lara, L. L.; Antunes, M. L.; Artaxo, P.

    2012-06-01

    In this analysis a 3.5 years data set of aerosol and precipitation chemistry, obtained in a remote site in Central Amazonia (Balbina, (1°55' S, 59°29' W, 174 m a.s.l.), about 200 km north of Manaus) is discussed. Aerosols were sampled using stacked filter units (SFU), which separate fine (d < 2.5 μm) and coarse mode (2.5 μm < d < 10.0 μm) aerosol particles. Filters were analyzed for particulate mass (PM), Equivalent Black Carbon (BCE) and elemental composition by Particle Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE). Rainwater samples were collected using a wet-only sampler and samples were analyzed for pH and ionic composition, which was determined using ionic chromatography (IC). Natural sources dominated the aerosol mass during the wet season, when it was predominantly of natural biogenic origin mostly in the coarse mode, which comprised up to 81% of PM10. Biogenic aerosol from both primary emissions and secondary organic aerosol dominates the fine mode in the wet season, with very low concentrations (average 2.2 μg m-3). Soil dust was responsible for a minor fraction of the aerosol mass (less than 17%). Sudden increases in the concentration of elements as Al, Ti and Fe were also observed, both in fine and coarse mode (mostly during the April-may months), which we attribute to episodes of Saharan dust transport. During the dry periods, a significant contribution to the fine aerosols loading was observed, due to the large-scale transport of smoke from biomass burning in other portions of the Amazon basin. This contribution is associated with the enhancement of the concentration of S, K, Zn and BCE. Chlorine, which is commonly associated to sea salt and also to biomass burning emissions, presented higher concentration not only during the dry season but also for the April-June months, due to the establishment of more favorable meteorological conditions to the transport of Atlantic air masses to Central Amazonia. The chemical composition of rainwater was similar to those

  16. Physicians' perceptions of managed care.

    PubMed

    Levine, R A; Lieberson, A

    1998-02-01

    We wished to determine physicians' views and knowledge of managed care, particularly their beliefs about the provisions of managed care contracts in terms of legality and ethics. A questionnaire was sent to the 315 physicians of the medical staff of Norwalk Hospital in Connecticut regarding managed care and managed care contracts. Sixty-six responses were received within a 45-day period (20.9% return). Although only 1 of 11 contract provisions presented in one section of the questionnaire was illegal in Connecticut, a majority of physicians believed 7 of the 11 were illegal. On average, 50% of physicians polled thought each of the provisions was illegal, and a varying majority of physicians (53% to 95.4%) felt the various provisions were unethical. The majority of respondents (84.8% to 92.4%) believed that nondisclosure provisions were unethical. Ninety-seven percent thought managed care interferes with quality of care, and 72.7% of physicians felt that the managed care industry should be held legally responsible for ensuring quality of care. However, 92.4% of physicians considered themselves to be ethically responsible for ensuring quality of care. Physicians have a poor understanding of the legal aspects of managed care contracts but feel strongly that many provisions of these contracts are unethical. Physicians also believe that managed care is causing medicine to be practiced in a manner that is contrary to patients' interests and that legal recourse is needed to prevent this.

  17. HMO penetration and physicians' earnings.

    PubMed

    Hadley, J; Mitchell, J M

    1999-11-01

    The goal of this study is to estimate whether cross-sectional variations in enrollment in health maintenance organizations (HMOs) affected physicians' earnings and hourly income in 1990. Using data from a nationally representative sample of 4,577 younger physicians (<45 years) conducted in 1991, we estimated a partial reduced-form model of physicians annual income and per hour income. We tested whether HMO penetration is endogenous and used the instrumental variables approach to obtain unbiased estimates. HMO penetration had a negative and statistically significant impact on physicians earnings in 1990. A doubling of the average level of HMO penetration in the market is estimated to reduce annual earnings by 7% to 10.7%, and hourly earnings by approximately 6% to 9%. It appears that HMOs were successful in reducing physicians' annual and per hour earnings in 1990, presumably through a combination of fewer visits and lower payment rates for people covered by HMOs. Although these results cannot be generalized to all physicians, the experience of a younger cohort of physicians may still be a good indicator of the future effects of HMOs because younger physicians may be more susceptible to market forces than older and more established physicians. Moreover, these results may be somewhat conservative because they reflect market behavior in 1990, several years before the rapid growth and more aggressive market behavior of HMOs in recent years.

  18. Attitudes of Chinese Oncology Physicians Toward Death with Dignity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui-Ping; Huang, Bo-Yan; Yi, Ting-Wu; Deng, Yao-Tiao; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Yu-Qing; Zhang, Zong-Yan; Jiang, Yu

    2016-08-01

    Death with dignity (DWD) refers to the refusal of life-prolonging measures for terminally ill patients by "living wills" forms in advance. More and more oncology physicians are receiving DWD requests from advance cancer patients in mainland China. The study objective was to investigate the attitudes of Chinese oncology physicians toward the legalization and implementation of DWD. A questionnaire investigating the understanding and attitudes toward DWD was administered to 257 oncology physicians from 11 hospitals in mainland China. The effective response rate was 86.8% (223/257). The majority of oncology physicians (69.1%) had received DWD requests from patients. Half of the participants (52.5%) thought that the most important reason was the patients' unwillingness to maintain survival through machines. One-third of participants (33.0%) attributed the most important reason to suffering from painful symptoms. Most oncology physicians (78.9%) had knowledge about DWD. A fifth of respondents did not know the difference between DWD and euthanasia, and a few even considered DWD as euthanasia. The majority of oncology physicians supported the legalization (88.3%) and implementation (83.9%) of DWD. Many Chinese oncology physicians have received advanced cancer patients' DWD requests and think that DWD should be legalized and implemented. Chinese health management departments should consider the demands of physicians and patients. It is important to inform physicians about the difference between DWD and euthanasia, as one-fifth of them were confused about it.

  19. Physician recruitment and retention in rural and underserved areas.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dane M; Nichols, Tommy

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify the challenges when recruiting and retaining rural physicians and to ascertain methods that make rural physician recruitment and retention successful. There are studies that suggest rural roots is an important factor in recruiting rural physicians, while others look at rural health exposure in medical school curricula, self-actualization, community sense and spousal perspectives in the decision to practice rural medicine. An extensive literature review was performed using Academic Search Complete, PubMed and The Cochrane Collaboration. Key words were rural, rural health, community hospital(s), healthcare, physicians, recruitment, recruiting, retention, retaining, physician(s) and primary care physician(s). Inclusion criteria were peer-reviewed full-text articles written in English, published from 1997 and those limited to USA and Canada. Articles from foreign countries were excluded owing to their unique healthcare systems. While there are numerous articles that call for special measures to recruit and retain physicians in rural areas, there is an overall dearth. This review identifies several articles that suggest recruitment and retention techniques. There is a need for a research agenda that includes valid, reliable and rigorous analysis regarding formulating and implementing these strategies. Rural Americans are under-represented when it comes to healthcare and what research there is to assist recruitment and retention is difficult to find. This paper identify the relevant research and highlights key strategies.

  20. Performance assessment. Family physicians in Montreal meet the mark!

    PubMed Central

    Goulet, François; Jacques, André; Gagnon, Robert; Bourbeau, Denis; Laberge, Denis; Melanson, Jacques; Ménard, Claude; Racette, Pierre; Rivest, Raymond

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the clinical performance of a representative non-volunteer sample of family physicians in metropolitan Montreal, Que. DESIGN: Assessment of clinical performance was based on inspection visits to offices, peer review of medical records, and chart-stimulated recall interviews. The procedure was the one usually followed by the Professional Inspection Committee of the Collège des médecins du Québec. SETTING: Family physicians' practices in metropolitan Montreal. PARTICIPANTS: One hundred randomly selected family physicians. INTERVENTIONS: For each physician, 30 randomly chosen patient charts with data on three to five previous visits were reviewed using explicit criteria and a standard scale using global scores from 1 to 5 (unacceptable to excellent). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Scores were assigned for office practices; record keeping; number of continuing medical education (CME) activities; and quality of clinical performance assessed in terms of investigation plan, diagnostic accuracy, treatment plan, and relevance of care. RESULTS: Overall performance was judged to be good to excellent for 98% of physicians in their private practices; for 90% of physicians concerning CME activities; for 94% of physicians concerning their clinical performance in terms of quality of care; and for 75% of physicians as to record keeping. There was a link between record keeping and quality of care as well as between the number of CME activities and quality of care. CONCLUSION: The overall clinical performance of family physicians in the greater Montreal region is excellent. PMID:12228963

  1. Dynamics of change in local physician supply: an ecological perspective.

    PubMed

    Jiang, H Joanna; Begun, James W

    2002-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to employ an ecological framework to identify factors that have an impact on change in local physician supply within the USA. A particular specialty type of patient care physicians in a local market is defined as a physician population. Four physician populations are identified: generalists, medical specialists, surgical specialists, and hospital-based specialists. Based on population ecology theory, the proposed framework explains the growth of a particular physician population by four mechanisms: the intrinsic properties of this physician population; the local market's carrying capacity, which is determined by three environmental dimensions (munificence, concentration, diversity); competition within the same physician population; and interdependence between different physician populations. Data at the level of Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) were compiled from the US Area Resources File, the American Hospital Association Annual Surveys of Hospitals, the American Medical Association Census of Medical Groups, the InterStudy National HMO Census, and the US County Business Patterns. Changes in the number and percentage of physicians in a particular specialty population from 1985 to 1994 were regressed, respectively, on 1985-94 changes in the explanatory variables as well as their levels in 1985. The results indicate that the population ecology framework is useful in explaining dynamics of change in the local physician workforce. Variables measuring the three environmental dimensions were found to have significant, and in some cases, differential effects on change in the size of different specialty populations. For example, both hospital consolidation and managed care penetration showed significant positive eflects on growth of the generalist population but suppressing effects on growth of the specialist population. The percentage of physicians in a particular specialty population in 1985 was negatively related to change in the size

  2. Beliefs About Control in the Physician-patient Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Street, Richard L; Krupat, Edward; Bell, Robert A; Kravitz, Richard L; Haidet, Paul

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Effective communication is a critical component of quality health care, and to improve it we must understand its dynamics. This investigation examined the extent to which physicians' and patients' preferences for control in their relationship (e.g., shared control vs doctor control) were related to their communications styles and adaptations (i.e., how they responded to the communication of the other participant). DESIGN Stratified case-controlled study. PATIENTS/PARTICIPANTS Twenty family medicine and internal medicine physicians and 135 patients. MEASUREMENTS Based on scores from the Patient-Practitioner Orientation Scale, 10 patient-centered physicians (5 male, 5 female) and 10 doctor-centered physicians (5 male, 5 female) each interacted with 5 to 8 patients, roughly half of whom preferred shared control and the other half of whom were oriented toward doctor control. Audiotapes of 135 consultations were coded for behaviors indicative of physician partnership building and active patient participation. MAIN RESULTS Patients who preferred shared control were more active participants (i.e., expressed more opinions, concerns, and questions) than were patients oriented toward doctor control. Physicians' beliefs about control were not related to their use of partnership building. However, physicians did use more partnership building with male patients. Not only were active patient participation and physician partnership building mutually predictive of each other, but also approximately 14% of patient participation was prompted by physician partnership building and 33% of physician partnership building was in response to active patient participation. CONCLUSIONS Communication in medical encounters is influenced by the physician's and patient's beliefs about control in their relationship as well as by one another's behavior. The relationship between physicians' partnership building and active patient participation is one of mutual influence such that

  3. Measurement of the Two-Photon Exchange Contribution to the Elastic e ± p Scattering Cross Sections at the VEPP-3 Storage Ring

    DOE PAGES

    Rachek, I. A.; Arrington, J.; Dmitriev, V. F.; ...

    2015-02-12

    The ratio of the elastic e +p to e –p scattering cross sections has been measured precisely, allowing the determination of the two-photon exchange contribution to these processes. This neglected contribution is believed to be the cause of the discrepancy between the Rosenbluth and polarization transfer methods of measuring the proton electromagnetic form factors. The experiment was performed at the VEPP-3 storage ring at beam energies of 1.6 and 1.0 GeV and at lepton scattering angles between 15° and 105°. The data obtained show evidence of a significant two-photon exchange effect. Furthermore, the results are compared with several theoretical predictions.

  4. Measurement of residual chemical shift anisotropies in compressed polymethylmethacrylate gels. Automatic compensation of gel isotropic shift contribution.

    PubMed

    Hallwass, Fernando; Teles, Rubens R; Hellemann, Erich; Griesinger, Christian; Gil, Roberto R; Navarro-Vázquez, Armando

    2018-05-01

    Mechanical compression of polymer gels provides a simple way for the measurement of residual chemical shift anisotropies, which then can be employed, on its own, or in combination with residual dipolar couplings, for structural elucidation purposes. Residual chemical shift anisotropies measured using compression devices needed a posteriori correction to account for the increase of the polymer to solvent ratio inside the swollen gel. This correction has been cast before in terms of a single-free parameter which, as shown here, can be simultaneously optimized along with the components of the alignment tensor while still retaining discriminating power of the different relative configurations as illustrated in the stereochemical analysis of α-santonin and 10-epi-8-deoxycumambrin B. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Solutions Network Formulation Report. The Potential Contributions of the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission to Estuary Management in Acadia National Park

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Daniel; Hilbert, Kent; Lewis, David

    2007-01-01

    This candidate solution suggests the use of GPM precipitation observations to enhance the Acadia National Park NLERDSS. Simulated GPM data should provide measurements that would enable analysis of how precipitation affects runoff and nutrient load in the park?s wetlands. This solution benefits society by aiding park and resource managers in making predictions based on hypothetical changes and in identifying effective mitigation scenarios. This solution supports the Coastal Management, Water Management, and Ecological Forecasting National Applications.

  6. Analysis of free online physician advice services.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Raphael; Elhadad, Michael; Birk, Ohad

    2013-01-01

    Online Consumer Health websites are a major source of information for patients worldwide. We focus on another modality, online physician advice. We aim to evaluate and compare the freely available online expert physicians' advice in different countries, its scope and the type of content provided. Using automated methods for information retrieval and analysis, we compared consumer health portals from the US, Canada, the UK and Israel (WebMD,NetDoctor,AskTheDoctor and BeOK). The evaluated content was generated between 2002 and 2011. We analyzed the different sites, looking at the distribution of questions in the various health topics, answer lengths and content type. Answers could be categorized into longer broad-educational answers versus shorter patient-specific ones, with different physicians having personal preferences as to answer type. The Israeli website BeOK, providing 10 times the number of answers than in the other three health portals, supplied answers that are shorter on average than in the other websites. Response times in these sites may be rapid with 32% of the WebMD answers and 64% of the BeOK answers provided in less than 24 hours. The voluntary contribution model used by BeOK and WebMD enables generation of large numbers of physician expert answers at low cost, providing 50,000 and 3,500 answers per year, respectively. Unlike health information in online databases or advice and support in patient-forums, online physician advice provides qualified specialists' responses directly relevant to the questions asked. Our analysis showed that high numbers of expert answers could be generated in a timely fashion using a voluntary model. The length of answers varied significantly between the internet sites. Longer answers were associated with educational content while short answers were associated with patient-specific content. Standard site-specific guidelines for expert answers will allow for more desirable content (educational content) or better throughput

  7. Contributed Review: Source-localization algorithms and applications using time of arrival and time difference of arrival measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Zhiqun Daniel; Rauchenstein, Lynn T.; ...

    2016-04-01

    Locating the position of fixed or mobile sources (i.e., transmitters) based on received measurements from sensors is an important research area that is attracting much research interest. In this paper, we present localization algorithms using time of arrivals (TOA) and time difference of arrivals (TDOA) to achieve high accuracy under line-of-sight conditions. The circular (TOA) and hyperbolic (TDOA) location systems both use nonlinear equations that relate the locations of the sensors and tracked objects. These nonlinear equations can develop accuracy challenges because of the existence of measurement errors and efficiency challenges that lead to high computational burdens. Least squares-based andmore » maximum likelihood-based algorithms have become the most popular categories of location estimators. We also summarize the advantages and disadvantages of various positioning algorithms. By improving measurement techniques and localization algorithms, localization applications can be extended into the signal-processing-related domains of radar, sonar, the Global Positioning System, wireless sensor networks, underwater animal tracking, mobile communications, and multimedia.« less

  8. Contributed Review: Source-localization algorithms and applications using time of arrival and time difference of arrival measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Zhiqun Daniel; Rauchenstein, Lynn T.

    Locating the position of fixed or mobile sources (i.e., transmitters) based on received measurements from sensors is an important research area that is attracting much research interest. In this paper, we present localization algorithms using time of arrivals (TOA) and time difference of arrivals (TDOA) to achieve high accuracy under line-of-sight conditions. The circular (TOA) and hyperbolic (TDOA) location systems both use nonlinear equations that relate the locations of the sensors and tracked objects. These nonlinear equations can develop accuracy challenges because of the existence of measurement errors and efficiency challenges that lead to high computational burdens. Least squares-based andmore » maximum likelihood-based algorithms have become the most popular categories of location estimators. We also summarize the advantages and disadvantages of various positioning algorithms. By improving measurement techniques and localization algorithms, localization applications can be extended into the signal-processing-related domains of radar, sonar, the Global Positioning System, wireless sensor networks, underwater animal tracking, mobile communications, and multimedia.« less

  9. Total expenditures per patient in hospital-owned and physician-owned physician organizations in California.

    PubMed

    Robinson, James C; Miller, Kelly

    Hospitals are rapidly acquiring medical groups and physician practices. This consolidation may foster cooperation and thereby reduce expenditures, but also may lead to higher expenditures through greater use of hospital-based ambulatory services and through greater hospital pricing leverage against health insurers. To determine whether total expenditures per patient were higher in physician organizations (integrated medical groups and independent practice associations) owned by local hospitals or multihospital systems compared with groups owned by participating physicians. Data were obtained on total expenditures for the care provided to 4.5 million patients treated by integrated medical groups and independent practice associations in California between 2009 and 2012. The patients were covered by commercial health maintenance organization (HMO) insurance and the data did not include patients covered by commercial preferred provider organization (PPO) insurance, Medicare, or Medicaid. Total expenditures per patient annually, measured in terms of what insurers paid to the physician organizations for professional services, to hospitals for inpatient and outpatient procedures, to clinical laboratories for diagnostic tests, and to pharmaceutical manufacturers for drugs and biologics. Annual expenditures per patient were compared after adjusting for patient illness burden, geographic input costs, and organizational characteristics. Of the 158 organizations, 118 physician organizations (75%) were physician-owned and provided care for 3,065,551 patients, 19 organizations (12%) were owned by local hospitals and provided care for 728,608 patients, and 21 organizations (13%) were owned by multihospital systems and provided care for 693,254 patients. In 2012, physician-owned physician organizations had mean expenditures of $3066 per patient (95% CI, $2892 to $3240), hospital-owned physician organizations had mean expenditures of $4312 per patient (95% CI, $3768 to $4857), and

  10. Heart rate variability changes in physicians working on night call.

    PubMed

    Malmberg, Birgitta; Persson, Roger; Flisberg, Per; Ørbaek, Palle

    2011-03-01

    Adverse effects by night-call duty have become an important occupational health issue. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the heart rate variability (HRV) differed during recovery from day work and night-call duty between distinct physician specialities. We studied the impact of a 16-h night-call duty on autonomic balance, measured by HRV, among two physician groups differing with respect to having to deal with life-threatening conditions while on call. Nineteen anaesthesiologists (ANEST) and 16 paediatricians and ear, nose and throat surgeons (PENT) were monitored by ambulatory digital Holter electrocardiogram (ECG). Heart rate variability was analysed between 21:00 and 22:00 after an ordinary workday, on night call and in the evening post-call. Absolute and normalized high-frequency power (HF, HFnu) were the main outcome variables, expressing parasympathetic influence on the heart. ANEST had lower HF power than PENT while on night call and post-daytime work (p < 0.05), but not at post-night call. In the whole group of physicians, HFnu was lower on call and post-daytime work compared with post-night-call duty (p < 0.05). The physiological recovery after night duty seemed sufficient in terms of HRV patterns for HFnu, reflecting autonomic balance and did not differ between specialities. However, the less dynamic HRV after daytime work and during night-call duty in the ANEST group may indicate a higher physiological stress level. These results may contribute to the improvement of night-call schedules within the health care sector.

  11. Physician Professional Satisfaction and Area of Clinical Practice: Evidence from an Integrated Health Care Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Caloyeras, John P; Kanter, Michael; Ives, Nicole; Kim, Chong Y; Kanzaria, Hemal K; Berry, Sandra H; Brook, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    For health care reform to succeed, health care systems need a professionally satisfied primary care workforce. Evidence suggests that primary care physicians are less satisfied than those in other medical specialties. To assess three domains of physician satisfaction by area of clinical practice among physicians practicing in an established integrated health system. Cross-sectional online survey of all Southern California Permanente Medical Group (SCPMG) partner and associate physicians (N = 1034) who were primarily providing clinic-based care in 1 of 4 geographically and operationally distinct Kaiser Permanente Southern California Medical Centers. Primary measure was satisfaction with one's day-to-day professional life as a physician. Secondary measures were satisfaction with quality of care and income. Of the 636 physicians responding to the survey (61.5% response rate), on average, 8 in 10 SCPMG physicians reported satisfaction with their day-to-day professional life as a physician. Primary care physicians were only minimally less likely to report being satisfied (difference of 8.2-9.5 percentage points; p < 0.05) than were other physicians. Nearly all physicians (98.2%) were satisfied with the quality of care they are able to provide. Roughly 8 in 10 physicians reported satisfaction with their income. No differences were found between primary care physicians and those in other clinical practice areas regarding satisfaction with quality of care or income. It is possible to create practice settings, such as SCPMG, in which most physicians, including those in primary care, experience high levels of professional satisfaction.

  12. The importance of the command-physician in trauma resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Hoff, W S; Reilly, P M; Rotondo, M F; DiGiacomo, J C; Schwab, C W

    1997-11-01

    Definitive trauma team leadership, although difficult to measure, has been shown to improve trauma resuscitation performance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of an identified command-physician on resuscitation performance. In addition, the leadership capability of four physician combinations functioning as command-physician was studied. Retrospective review. Videotapes of trauma resuscitations performed at a Level I trauma center over a 25-month period were reviewed. The presence of an identified command-physician was determined by multidisciplinary consensus. Resuscitation performance was measured by compliance with three objective criteria: primary survey, secondary survey, and definitive plan; and two subjective criteria: orderliness, and adherence to Advanced Trauma Life Support protocol. Performance was then analyzed (1) as a function of the presence or absence of a command-physician, and (2) between four identified physician combinations: AF (attending surgeon + trauma fellow); F (trauma fellow); ASR (attending surgeon + senior surgical resident); SR (senior surgical resident). Chi square and the Mann-Whitney U tests were applied. A total of 425 trauma resuscitations were reviewed. A command-physician was identified (CP[Pos]) in 365 resuscitations (85.7%); no command-physician was identified (CP[NEG]) in 60 (14.3%). Compliance with completion of secondary survey (81.4%) and formulation of a definitive plan (89.6%) was significantly higher in the CP(POS) group. Subjective scores for orderliness and adherence to Advanced Trauma Life Support protocol were significantly higher in the CP(POS) group. In the CP(POS) resuscitations, formulation of a definitive plan was lower in SR when compared with the other three physician combinations. An identified command-physician enhances trauma resuscitation performance. Completion of the primary and secondary survey is not affected by the physician combination. Prompt formulation of a definitive plan is

  13. Social media: physicians-to-physicians education and communication.

    PubMed

    Fehring, Keith A; De Martino, Ivan; McLawhorn, Alexander S; Sculco, Peter K

    2017-06-01

    Physician to physician communication is essential for the transfer of ideas, surgical experience, and education. Social networks and online video educational contents have grown exponentially in recent years changing the interaction among physicians. Social media platforms can improve physician-to-physician communication mostly through video education and social networking. There are several online video platforms for orthopedic surgery with educational content on diagnosis, treatment, outcomes, and surgical technique. Social networking instead is mostly centered on sharing of data, discussion of confidential topics, and job seeking. Quality of educational contents and data confidentiality represent the major drawbacks of these platforms. Orthopedic surgeons must be aware that the quality of the videos should be better controlled and regulated to avoid inaccurate information that may have a significant impact especially on trainees that are more prone to use this type of resources. Sharing of data and discussion of confidential topics should be extremely secure according the HIPAA regulations in order to protect patients' confidentiality.

  14. Measuring the preference towards patient-centred communication with the Chinese-revised Patient-Practitioner Orientation Scale: a cross-sectional study among physicians and patients in clinical settings in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Zou, Runyu; Fu, Hua; Qian, Haihong; Yan, Yueren; Wang, Fan

    2017-09-18

    To adapt the Patient-Practitioner Orientation Scale (PPOS), to a Chinese context, and explore the preference towards patient-centred communication among physicians and patients with the Chinese-revised Patient-Practitioner Orientation Scale (CR-PPOS). A cross-sectional questionnaire-based study. Clinical settings from eight medical units, including four community hospitals and four general hospitals, in Shanghai, China. 1018 participants, including 187 physicians and 831 patients, completed this study in two successive stages. Psychometric properties of the CR-PPOS and participants' score on the CR-PPOS. Compared with the original PPOS, the 11-item CR-PPOS obtained better psychometric indices. Physicians and patients scored differently on both the total CR-PPOS and its two subscales. Compared with physicians, the scores of patients were more influenced by their personal characteristics, such as age and education. The CR-PPOS is a better instrument in a Chinese context than the original translated version. The divergence in the extent to which patient-centred communication is preferred among Chinese physicians and patients should be noted. Adapting physicians' communication strategy to patients' preferences based on their personal characteristics can be a viable approach towards improving clinical efficiency. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Toward evidence-based conflicts of interest training for physician-investigators.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Kate; Coleman, Carl H; Boozang, Kathleen M

    2012-01-01

    The increased focus in recent years on the risks posed by conflicts of interest arising from financial relationships between physician-investigators and the pharmaceutical and medical device industries has led to a variety of measures that can broadly be described as "regulatory" interventions, including new federal and state laws, criminal prosecutions and private lawsuits, requirements attached to government funding, and institutional policies. Studies suggest, however, that physician-investigators have not internalized the message that financial conflicts of interest have the potential to influence their decision making. Simply informing physician-investigators of the content of relevant rules and the consequences of noncompliance - as appears to be the practice in many existing compliance training activities - is unlikely to lead to lasting changes in norms or behavior. Instead, we theorize that, for trainings to be maximally effective, they must appeal to the complex intrinsic and extrinsic motivations that contribute to individuals' willingness to comply with regulatory mandates. In addition, physician-investigators' beliefs that the risks posed by conflicts of interest do not apply to them need to be challenged. Rigorous evaluation of the newly-designed training programs will help determine whether these theories are borne out in fact. © 2012 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  16. Moral distress in physicians and nurses: Impact on professional quality of life and turnover.

    PubMed

    Austin, Cindy L; Saylor, Robert; Finley, Phillip J

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate moral distress (MD) and turnover intent as related to professional quality of life in physicians and nurses at a tertiary care hospital. Health care providers from a variety of hospital departments anonymously completed 2 validated questionnaires (Moral Distress Scale-Revised and Professional Quality of Life Scale). Compassion fatigue (as measured by secondary traumatic stress [STS] and burnout [BRN]) and compassion satisfaction are subscales which make up one's professional quality of life. Relationships between these constructs and clinicians' years in health care, critical care patient load, and professional discipline were explored. The findings (n = 329) demonstrated significant correlations between STS, BRN, and MD. Scores associated with intentions to leave or stay in a position were indicative of high verses low MD. We report highest scoring situations of MD as well as when physicians and nurses demonstrate to be most at risk for STS, BRN and MD. Both physicians and nurses identified the events contributing to the highest level of MD as being compelled to provide care that seems ineffective and working with a critical care patient load >50%. The results from this study of physicians and nurses suggest that the presence of MD significantly impacts turnover intent and professional quality of life. Therefore implementation of emotional wellness activities (e.g., empowerment, opportunity for open dialog regarding ethical dilemmas, policy making involvement) coupled with ongoing monitoring and routine assessment of these maladaptive characteristics is warranted. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Michigan's fee-for-value physician incentive program reduces spending and improves quality in primary care.

    PubMed

    Lemak, Christy Harris; Nahra, Tammie A; Cohen, Genna R; Erb, Natalie D; Paustian, Michael L; Share, David; Hirth, Richard A

    2015-04-01

    As policy makers and others seek to reduce health care cost growth while improving health care quality, one approach gaining momentum is fee-for-value reimbursement. This payment strategy maintains the traditional fee-for-service arrangement but includes quality and spending incentives. We examined Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan's Physician Group Incentive Program, which uses a fee-for-value approach focused on primary care physicians. We analyzed the program's impact on quality and spending from 2008 to 2011 for over three million beneficiaries in over 11,000 physician practices. Participation in the incentive program was associated with approximately 1.1 percent lower total spending for adults (5.1 percent lower for children) and the same or improved performance on eleven of fourteen quality measures over time. Our findings contribute to the growing body of evidence about the potential effectiveness of models that align payment with cost and quality performance, and they demonstrate that it is possible to transform reimbursement within a fee-for-service framework to encourage and incentivize physicians to provide high-quality care, while also reducing costs. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  18. Sample preparation for radiocarbon ( 14C) measurements of carbonyl compounds in the atmosphere . quantifying the biogenic contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, B. R.; Brussol, C.; Kotzias, D.; Veltkamp, T.; Zwaagstra, O.; Slanina, J.

    A method has been developed for the preparation of samples for radiocarbon ( 14C) measurements of carbonyl compounds in the atmosphere. Sampling on 25 ml 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH)- coated silica gel cartridges can be carried out with up to 10.000 ℓ of ambient air with no adverse effects on sample integrity. Methods for the selective clean-up of the extracts have been investigated. This is a necessary step in preparing ambient carbonyl samples for a measurement of the radiocarbon ( 14C) content. The method which gave the best results include extraction of the DNPH cartridge with CH 3CN and purification of the carbonyl hydrazones over activated silica gel to remove excess DNPH and non target compounds. This method has been validated with laboratory samples and has been proved to give reliable results The radiocarbon data from the first field experiment showed that ambient air over a semi-rural test site in Ispra, Italy on a late summer day contained mainly five carbonyls (formaldehyde>acetaldehyde>acetone>propanal>butanal) of a mixed biogenic (41-57%) and anthropogenic (43-59%) origin. The method will be used in future monitoring of radiocarbon ( 14C) on a number of test sites in Europe.

  19. Contributed Review: Source-localization algorithms and applications using time of arrival and time difference of arrival measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Zhiqun Daniel; Rauchenstein, Lynn T.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2016-04-01

    Locating the position of fixed or mobile sources (i.e., transmitters) based on measurements obtained from sensors (i.e., receivers) is an important research area that is attracting much interest. In this paper, we review several representative localization algorithms that use time of arrivals (TOAs) and time difference of arrivals (TDOAs) to achieve high signal source position estimation accuracy when a transmitter is in the line-of-sight of a receiver. Circular (TOA) and hyperbolic (TDOA) position estimation approaches both use nonlinear equations that relate the known locations of receivers and unknown locations of transmitters. Estimation of the location of transmitters using the standard nonlinear equations may not be very accurate because of receiver location errors, receiver measurement errors, and computational efficiency challenges that result in high computational burdens. Least squares and maximum likelihood based algorithms have become the most popular computational approaches to transmitter location estimation. In this paper, we summarize the computational characteristics and position estimation accuracies of various positioning algorithms. By improving methods for estimating the time-of-arrival of transmissions at receivers and transmitter location estimation algorithms, transmitter location estimation may be applied across a range of applications and technologies such as radar, sonar, the Global Positioning System, wireless sensor networks, underwater animal tracking, mobile communications, and multimedia.

  20. Less Physician Practice Competition Is Associated With Higher Prices Paid For Common Procedures.

    PubMed

    Austin, Daniel R; Baker, Laurence C

    2015-10-01

    Concentration among physician groups has been steadily increasing, which may affect prices for physician services. We assessed the relationship in 2010 between physician competition and prices paid by private preferred provider organizations for fifteen common, high-cost procedures to understand whether higher concentration of physician practices and accompanying increased market power were associated with higher prices for services. Using county-level measures of the concentration of physician practices and county average prices, and statistically controlling for a range of other regional characteristics, we found that physician practice concentration and prices were significantly associated for twelve of the fifteen procedures we studied. For these procedures, counties with the highest average physician concentrations had prices 8-26 percent higher than prices in the lowest counties. We concluded that physician competition is frequently associated with prices. Policies that would influence physician practice organization should take this into consideration. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  1. Isolating lattice from electronic contributions in thermal transport measurements of metals and alloys above ambient temperature and an adiabatic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criss, Everett M.; Hofmeister, Anne M.

    2017-06-01

    From femtosecond spectroscopy (fs-spectroscopy) of metals, electrons and phonons reequilibrate nearly independently, which contrasts with models of heat transfer at ordinary temperatures (T > 100 K). These electronic transfer models only agree with thermal conductivity (k) data at a single temperature, but do not agree with thermal diffusivity (D) data. To address the discrepancies, which are important to problems in solid state physics, we separately measured electronic (ele) and phononic (lat) components of D in many metals and alloys over ˜290-1100 K by varying measurement duration and sample length in laser-flash experiments. These mechanisms produce distinct diffusive responses in temperature versus time acquisitions because carrier speeds (u) and heat capacities (C) differ greatly. Electronic transport of heat only operates for a brief time after heat is applied because u is high. High Dele is associated with moderate T, long lengths, low electrical resistivity, and loss of ferromagnetism. Relationships of Dele and Dlat with physical properties support our assignments. Although kele reaches ˜20 × klat near 470 K, it is transient. Combining previous data on u with each D provides mean free paths and lifetimes that are consistent with ˜298 K fs-spectroscopy, and new values at high T. Our findings are consistent with nearly-free electrons absorbing and transmitting a small fraction of the incoming heat, whereas phonons absorb and transmit the majority. We model time-dependent, parallel heat transfer under adiabatic conditions which is one-dimensional in solids, as required by thermodynamic law. For noninteracting mechanisms, k≅ΣCikiΣCi/(ΣCi2). For metals, this reduces to k = klat above ˜20 K, consistent with our measurements, and shows that Meissner’s equation (k≅klat + kele) is invalid above ˜20 K. For one mechanism with multiple, interacting carriers, k≅ΣCiki/(ΣCi). Thus, certain dynamic behaviors of electrons and phonons in metals have been

  2. Adopting the Quadruple Aim: The University of Rochester Medical Center Experience: Moving from Physician Burnout to Physician Resilience.

    PubMed

    Anandarajah, Allen P; Quill, Timothy E; Privitera, Michael R

    2018-05-16

    The high rates of burnout among medical professionals in the United States are well documented. The reasons for burnout and the factors that contribute to physician resilience among health care providers in academic centers, however, are less well studied. Health care providers at a large academic center were surveyed to measure their degree of burnout and callousness and identify associated factors. Additional questions evaluated features linked to resilience. The survey assessed demographic variables, work characteristics, qualifications, experience, and citizenship. A total of 528 surveys were sent out; 469 providers responded, and 444 (84%) completed the survey. High burnout was reported by 214 providers (45.6%), and callousness was noted among 163 (34.8%). Rates of burnout and callousness were higher among advanced practice providers than physicians. Lack of support, lack of respect, and problems with work-life balance were themes significantly associated with a risk for burnout. Rates of burnout (P < .05) and callousness (P < .001) were also significantly higher among those who spent more than 80% of their time in patient care. Participation in patient care was the most sustaining factor, followed by teamwork, scholarly activities, autonomy, and medicine as a calling. Academic physicians enjoy patient care and value scholarly activities, but lack of support, lack of respect, workload, and problems with work-life balance prevent them from finding a sense of meaning in their professional work. Changes at the organizational level are needed to overcome these impediments and recreate joy in the practice of medicine. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Recent Improvement of Measurement Instrumentation to Supervise Nuclear Operations and to Contribute Input Data to 3D Simulation Code - 13289

    SciTech Connect

    Mahe, Charly; Chabal, Caroline

    2013-07-01

    The CEA has developed many compact characterization tools to follow sensitive operations in a nuclear environment. Usually, these devices are made to carry out radiological inventories, to prepare nuclear interventions or to supervise some special operations. These in situ measurement techniques mainly take place at different stages of clean-up operations and decommissioning projects, but they are also in use to supervise sensitive operations when the nuclear plant is still operating. In addition to this, such tools are often associated with robots to access very highly radioactive areas, and thus can be used in accident situations. Last but not least, themore » radiological data collected can be entered in 3D calculation codes used to simulate the doses absorbed by workers in real time during operations in a nuclear environment. Faced with these ever-greater needs, nuclear measurement instrumentation always has to involve on-going improvement processes. Firstly, this paper will describe the latest developments and results obtained in both gamma and alpha imaging techniques. The gamma camera has been used by the CEA since the 1990's and several changes have made this device more sensitive, more compact and more competitive for nuclear plant operations. It is used to quickly identify hot spots, locating irradiating sources from 50 keV to 1500 keV. Several examples from a wide field of applications will be presented, together with the very latest developments. The alpha camera is a new camera used to see invisible alpha contamination on several kinds of surfaces. The latest results obtained allow real time supervision of a glove box cleaning operation (for {sup 241}Am contamination). The detection principle as well as the main trials and results obtained will be presented. Secondly, this paper will focus on in situ gamma spectrometry methods developed by the CEA with compact gamma spectrometry probes (CdZnTe, LaBr{sub 3}, NaI, etc.). The radiological data collected

  4. Non invasive Measurements of Myocardial Hypertrophy in Patients with Essential Hypertension Treated with Eprosartan: Contribution of the Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Cabrera Sole, Ricardo

    Objective: The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of the treatment with eprosartan on cardiac hypertrophy in hypertensive patients using the echocardiogram to measure the hypertrophy of left ventricle. We studied 60 untreated patients diagnosed of mild to moderate hypertension which received after the diagnosis 600 mg/day of eprosartan, a novel direct angiotensin inhibitor recently introduced to treat hypertension. All patients were submitted to a standard echocardiographic study before the treatment and after 6 months of it We evaluated by echocardiogram the following parameters: left ventricular septum and posterior wall thickness, left ventricular mass, E/A indexmore » of mitral flow considering abnormal when this index was less than 1, and left ventricular ejection fraction. Results: at the beginning we found a systolic/diastolic pressures of 165{+-}9/ 96{+-}4 mmHg compared with the end of study of 124{+-}2/79{+-}3 mmHg (p<0.05). Septum and posterior wall thickness were respectively at baseline 13.2{+-}2 and 12.1{+-}1.1 mmHg and at the end 11.5{+-}1.2 and 10.5{+-}1.3 mmHg (p<0.05 for both of them). The E/A mitral flow index was less than 1 at baseline in 45 patients compared with 19 patients after treatment (p<0.05). Respect to left ventricular mass we found at the beginning 232{+-}7.5 gr., compared to 194{+-}9 gr., at the end of this study (p<0.05). We did not find any significant differences regarding left ventricular ejection fraction between both groups. Conclusions: we can remark that eprosartan is a very useful drug to reduce not only blood pressure but also left ventricular hypertrophy and improve left ventricular diastolic function in patients with essential hypertension according with parameters measured with non invasive methods.« less

  5. Physician Requirements-1990. For Cardiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracy, Octavious; Birchette-Pierce, Cheryl

    Professional requirements for physicians specializing in cardiology were estimated to assist policymakers in developing guidelines for graduate medical education. The determination of physician requirements was based on an adjusted needs rather than a demand or utilization model. For each illness, manpower requirements were modified by the…

  6. How consumers view physician advertising.

    PubMed

    Johns, H E; Moser, H R

    1989-01-01

    In this study, it was found that consumers generally favor advertising by physicians. They felt that newspaper and professional magazines were more appropriate media for such advertising than television, radio, billboards, telephones, direct mail, and popular magazines. Finally, most consumers have not seen physicians advertise, but of those who have, most have noticed such advertising in a newspaper.

  7. Assessment of atmospheric trace metal deposition in urban environments using direct and indirect measurement methodology and contributions from wet and dry depositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omrani, Mehrazin; Ruban, Véronique; Ruban, Gwenaël; Lamprea, Katerine

    2017-11-01

    Bulk Atmospheric Deposition (BAD), Wet Atmospheric Deposition (WAD) and Dry Atmospheric Deposition (DAD) were all measured within an urban residential area in Nantes (France) over a 9-month period (27 February - 10 December 2014). The objectives of this study were to compare 2 methods for measuring dry and wet atmospheric depositions in the urban environment (DAD and WAD: direct method; BAD and WAD: indirect one), and to characterize as well the variations and relative contributions of these depositions. Trace metals (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pt and V) were used to carry out these comparison and quantification. BAD was collected with two open polyethylene containers (72 × 54 × 21 cm), while WAD was collected by means of an automated rainwater collector and DAD was determined from both air measurements (recorded by an air sampler) and 7Be deposition velocities. The comparison based on a detailed evaluation of uncertainties showed a significant difference between the direct and indirect methods. Dry and wet depositions varied widely from one month to the next. Zn and Cu were the most abundant elements in both dry and wet depositions. The mean contribution of DAD to the bulk atmospheric deposition during this 9-month study was significant for Zn, Cu and V (about 25%) as well as for Pb (approx. 60%). For this relatively unpolluted urban residential catchment, the contribution of atmospheric deposition to global load at the catchment outlet was low, between 10% and 20% for Zn, Cu, V and Pb, 25% for Cr and about 30% for Ni. For other urban sites exhibiting high atmospheric pollution however, the atmospheric contribution to the global pollution load could be much greater. An accurate and representative estimation of DAD thus proves critical.

  8. Exploring dual commitment among physician executives in managed care.

    PubMed

    Hoff, T J

    2001-01-01

    The growth of a medical management specialty is a significant event associated with managed care. Physician executives are lauded for their potential in bridging the clinical and managerial realms. They also serve as a countervailing force to help the medical profession and patients maintain a strong voice in healthcare decision making at the strategic level. However, little is known about their work loyalties. These attitudes are important to explore because they speak to whose interests physician executives consider and represent in their everyday management roles. If physician executives are to maximize their effectiveness in the healthcare workplace, both physicians and organizations must view them as credible sources of authority. This study examines organizational and professional commitment among a national sample of physician executives employed in managed care settings. Data used for the analysis come from a national survey conducted through the American College of Physician Executives in 1996. The findings support the notion that physician executives can and do express simultaneous loyalty to organizational and professional interests. This dual commitment is related to other work attitudes that contribute to success in the management role. In addition, it appears that situational factors increase the chances for dual commitment. These factors derive from a favorable work environment that includes both organizational and professional socialization in the management role. The results of the study are useful in specifying the training and socialization needs of physicians who wish to do management work. They also provide a rationale for collaboration between healthcare organizations and rank-and-file physicians aimed at cultivating physician executives who are credible leaders within the healthcare system.

  9. Coaching of physicians by RNs to improve diabetes care.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Mary L; Johnson, Pamela Jo; Duffee, Janelle; McCarthy, Bruce D

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe preliminary results of an innovative quality improvement intervention focused on improving physician practice patterns in diabetes care via Coaching Physicians by RN certified diabetes educators (CDEs), a program called "CPR for Diabetes Care." METHODS The program identified primary care physicians with optimal diabetes control rates below the system aggregate (n = 195). Physicians with the lowest rates (n = 74) were targeted for comprehensive intervention. All other low-performing physicians practicing in the same clinic system (n = 121) comprised the comparison group. Data were obtained from electronic diabetes registries for 2007 and 2008. Each physician had a set of measures from 2 points in time. Measures included optimal diabetes scores and the 5 component measures of the optimal diabetes care bundle (A1C <7, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol <100, blood pressure <130/80, aspirin use if older than 40, and no tobacco use). T tests and difference-in-difference models were used to examine changes over time. Optimal diabetes scores increased 11.7 points (from 14.7% to 26.4%) for intervention physicians and 4.0 points (from 29.7% to 32.9%) for comparison physicians. The improvement was greater for the intervention group. The greatest component improvements were in control of blood pressure and cholesterol. CONCLUSIONS Coaching low-performing physicians dramatically improved the proportion of diabetes patients with optimal diabetes control. The CPR for Diabetes Care program represents an innovative and effective way to address the long-standing problem of disseminating and sustaining quality improvement efforts by focusing on low-performing physicians.

  10. Patient safety attitudes of paediatric trainee physicians.

    PubMed

    Parry, G; Horowitz, L; Goldmann, D

    2009-12-01

    To measure the patient safety attitudes of trainee physicians at an academic paediatric hospital. Cross-sectional survey. An academic paediatric hospital. 209 trainee physicians based at the academic paediatric hospital in January 2004. Patient safety attitudes of trainee physicians measured using the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (Inpatient Version) and a specific trainee survey. In the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire, responses were most positive in areas associated with independent care: job satisfaction (mean factor score = 77.5) safety climate (76.1), working conditions (75.6), perception of management (70.4) and less positively in areas associated with interdependent care: teamwork climate (64.6) and stress recognition (59.1). In the trainee survey, following a principal component analysis to identify summary factors, responses were most positive in the independent areas of clinical supervision and support (75.0), communication with their immediate senior physician (65.5) and orientation of new personnel (63.9), and less positive in the interdependent areas of handoffs and multiple services, (58.1), role identification during codes (51.0) and support following an adverse event (42.8). The combined independent factor scores were higher than the interdependent (difference = 17.9, 95% CI 16.1 to 19.7, p<0.001). Fellows reported higher independent factor scores than residents (5.5, 95% CI 2.2 to 8.9, p = 0.001), but not for the interdependent scores (-0.5, 95% CI -3.6 to 2.7, p = 0.767). Trainees appear comfortable with caring independently for patients but less so caring interdependently. With experience, trainee physicians may experience improvement in their ability to act independently but not interdependently. Recently developed patient safety culture instruments may enable additional understanding of what could be implemented to make improvements.

  11. Administrative skills for academy physicians.

    PubMed

    Aluise, J J; Schmitz, C C; Bland, C J; McArtor, R E

    To function effectively within the multifaceted environment of the academic medical center, academic physicians need to heighten their understanding of the economics of the health care system, and further develop their leadership and managerial skills. A literature base on organizational development and management education is now available, which addresses the unique nature of the professional organization, including academic medical centers. This article describes an administration development curriculum for academic physicians. Competency statements, instructional strategies, and references provide health care educators with a model for developing administrative skills programs for academic physicians and other health care professionals. The continuing success of the academic medical center as a responsive health care system may depend on the degree to which academic physicians and their colleagues in other fields gain sophistication in self-management and organizational administration. Health care educators can apply the competencies and instructional strategies offered in this article to administrative development programs for physicians and other health professionals in their institutions.

  12. The chaotic physician work world.

    PubMed

    Paterick, Timothy E

    2014-01-01

    Physicians are immersed in a work environment where daily challenges seem to represent a condition or place of increasing disorder and confusion. The degree of "entropy" in the physician workplace is increasing exponentially. Healthcare systems are in a state of chaos and are dynamic--meaning the behavior at one time influences its behavior in the future. The initial changes have future exponential fluctuations that have created a state of healthcare crisis. These systems are nonlinear; the metaphor to describe the unruly nature of the physician work world is that in which the flap of a butterfly wing in Brazil can set off a tornado in Texas. The tornado affecting physician work life must be understood to be rectified. Physicians must slow down and pay attention.

  13. Physician Agency and Patient Survival*

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Mireille G.; Chang, Tom Y.; Earle, Craig C.; Newhouse, Joseph P.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the role of physician agency in determining health care supply and patient outcomes. We show that an increase in health care supply due to a change in private physician incentives has a theoretically ambiguous impact on patient welfare. The increase can reflect either induced demand for ineffective care or a reduction in prior rationing of effective care. Furthermore, physician market structure matters in determining the welfare effe