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Sample records for measuring prior environment

  1. Inducing multipartite entanglement revival in dissipative environment by means of prior quantum uncollapsing measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Juan; Xu, Shuai; Ye, Liu

    2015-11-01

    A scheme for inducing multipartite entanglement revival in the dissipative environment is proposed, which is implemented by performing a prior quantum uncollapsing (weak measurements or measurement reversals) procedure on partial qubits of the system simultaneously. This procedure preferentially equips our initial states, and make them hold more powerful ability to actively battle against degradation of entanglement, even postpone entanglement sudden death (ESD). Notably, the effect is more pronounced for the multipartite system with less initial entanglement. In addition, we found that our scheme also works for the N-qubit GHZ-class state.

  2. Calculation of Measurement Uncertainty Using Prior Information

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, S. D.; Estler, W. T.; Levenson, M. S.; Eberhardt, K. R.

    1998-01-01

    We describe the use of Bayesian inference to include prior information about the value of the measurand in the calculation of measurement uncertainty. Typical examples show this can, in effect, reduce the expanded uncertainty by up to 85 %. The application of the Bayesian approach to proving workpiece conformance to specification (as given by international standard ISO 14253-1) is presented and a procedure for increasing the conformance zone by modifying the expanded uncertainty guard bands is discussed. PMID:28009370

  3. Calculation of Measurement Uncertainty Using Prior Information

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-12-01

    included measurement uncertainty in proving conformance of products. These decision rules reward accurate metrology by increasing the conformance zone...are within the specification zone and that the distribution is approximately Gaussian. (In dimen- sional metrology this means that 95 % of the...sufficiently large to shift the mea- surement result inside the conformance zone. However, the situation where U In = 0 is an indication of poor metrology and

  4. Satellite Infrared Radiation Measurements Prior to the Major Earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ouzounov, Dimitar; Pulintes, S.; Bryant, N.; Taylor, Patrick; Freund, F.

    2005-01-01

    This work describes our search for a relationship between tectonic stresses and increases in mid-infrared (IR) flux as part of a possible ensemble of electromagnetic (EM) phenomena that may be related to earthquake activity. We present and &scuss observed variations in thermal transients and radiation fields prior to the earthquakes of Jan 22, 2003 Colima (M6.7) Mexico, Sept. 28 .2004 near Parkfield (M6.0) in California and Northern Sumatra (M8.5) Dec. 26,2004. Previous analysis of earthquake events has indicated the presence of an IR anomaly, where temperatures increased or did not return to its usual nighttime value. Our procedures analyze nighttime satellite data that records the general condtion of the ground after sunset. We have found from the MODIS instrument data that five days before the Colima earthquake the IR land surface nighttime temperature rose up to +4 degrees C in a 100 km radius around the epicenter. The IR transient field recorded by MODIS in the vicinity of Parkfield, also with a cloud free environment, was around +1 degree C and is significantly smaller than the IR anomaly around the Colima epicenter. Ground surface temperatures near the Parkfield epicenter four days prior to the earthquake show steady increase. However, on the night preceding the quake, a significant drop in relative humidity was indicated, process similar to those register prior to the Colima event. Recent analyses of continuous ongoing long- wavelength Earth radiation (OLR) indicate significant and anomalous variability prior to some earthquakes. The cause of these anomalies is not well understood but could be the result of a triggering by an interaction between the lithosphere-hydrosphere and atmospheric related to changes in the near surface electrical field and/or gas composition prior to the earthquake. The OLR anomaly usually covers large areas surrounding the main epicenter. We have found strong anomalies signal (two sigma) along the epicentral area signals on Dec 21

  5. Interplay of Prior Knowledge, Self-Regulation and Motivation in Complex Multimedia Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, H. S.; Kalet, A. L.; Plass, J. L.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the direct and indirect effects of medical clerkship students' prior knowledge, self-regulation and motivation on learning performance in complex multimedia learning environments. The data from 386 medical clerkship students from six medical schools were analysed using structural equation modeling. The structural model revealed…

  6. Review of Prior U.S. Attribute Measurement Systems

    SciTech Connect

    White, G K

    2012-07-06

    Attribute Measurement Systems have been developed and demonstrated several times in the United States over the last decade or so; under the Trilateral Initiative (1996-2002), FMTTD (Fissile Material Transparency Technology Demonstration, 2000), and NG-AMS (Next Generation Attribute Measurement System, 2005-2008). Each Attribute Measurement System has contributed to the growing body of knowledge regarding the use of such systems in warhead dismantlement and other Arms Control scenarios. The Trilateral Initiative, besides developing prototype hardware/software, introduced the topic to the international community. The 'trilateral' parties included the United States, the Russian Federation, and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). With the participation of a Russian delegation, the FMTTD demonstrated that measurements behind an information barrier are feasible while meeting host party security requirements. The NG-AMS system explored the consequences of maximizing the use of Commercial off the Shelf (COTS) equipment, which made construction easier, but authentication harder. The 3rd Generation Attribute Measurement System (3G-AMS) will further the scope of previous systems by including additional attributes and more rigor in authentication.

  7. Enhancement of Auditory Fear Conditioning after Housing in a Complex Environment Is Attenuated by Prior Treatment with Amphetamine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briand, Lisa A.; Robinson, Terry E.; Maren, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    Prior exposure to drugs of abuse has been shown to occlude the structural plasticity associated with living in a complex environment. Amphetamine treatment may also occlude some cognitive advantages normally associated with living in a complex environment. To test this hypothesis we examined the influence of prior exposure to amphetamine on fear…

  8. Clearance Measurements prior to the Shut-Down of ERAM

    SciTech Connect

    Kunze, V.; Ibach, T.M.

    2008-07-01

    Low and intermediate level radioactive waste was emplaced in the Morsleben Repository (ERAM), a former salt mine, until 1998. Now the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection (Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz - BfS) has applied for the decommissioning of the plant. The ERAM's own radioactive waste requires clearance as far as it may not remain in the repository. The German Mining Law also demands all non-mining typical waste to be removed from the mine when being decommissioned and the Waste Avoidance, Recovery and Disposal Act demands waste to remain within the economy cycle if this is economically justifiable. Therefore new clearance measuring devices have to be applied using gamma and beta radiation to determine the contamination of objects and substances regarding the special nuclide spectra in the ERAM. Even if a very multifaceted radionuclide spectrum is to be expected due to the fact that the emplaced waste results from various applications such as nuclear engineering, medicine, research, and military, numerous investigations have confirmed that only a few radionuclides have to be considered. To facilitate this procedure the controlled area of the ERAM is to be classified according to different contamination categories. Assumptions about the radionuclide mixture are permanently controlled by routine measurements and the evaluation of possible contamination events. The considerations about the radionuclide mixture and the structure of the controlled area will be described in this presentation. Furthermore a new methodology to measure Sr-90 is discussed which uses the Cerenkov effect and the low level of background gamma radiation in the salt mine. (authors)

  9. Satellite IR Thermal Measurements Prior to the September 2004 Earthquakes in Central California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ouzounov, D.; Logan, T.; Taylor, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    We present and discuss observed variations in thermal transients and radiation fields prior to the earthquakes of September 18 near Bodie (M5.5) and September 28,2004 near Parkfield(M6.0) in California. Previous analysis of earthquake events have indicated the presence of a thermal anomaly, where temperatures increased or did not return to its usual nighttime value. The procedures used in our work is to analyze weather satellite data taken at night and to record the general condition where the ground cools after sunset. Two days before the Bodie earthquake lower temperature radiation was observed by the NOAA/AVHRR satellite. This occurred when the entire region was relatively cloud-free. IR land surface nighttime temperature from the MODIS instrument rose to +4 C in a 100 km radius around the Bodie epicenter. The thermal transient field recorded by MODIS in the vicinity of Parkfield, also with a cloud free environment, was around +l C and it is significantly smaller than the Parkfield epicenter, however, for that period showed a steady increase 4 days prior to the earthquake and a significant drop of the night before the quake. Geosynchronous weather satellite thermal IR measurements taken every half hour from sunset to dawn, were also recorded for 10 days prior to the Parkfield event and 5 days after as well as the day of the quake. To establish a baseline we also obtained GOES data for the same Julian sets were then used to systematically observe and record any thermal anomaly prior to the events that deviated from the baseline. Our recent results support the hypothesis of a possible relationship between an thermodynamic processes produced by increasing tectonic stress in the Earth's crust and a subsequent electro-chemical interaction between this crust and the atmosphere/ionosphere.

  10. Prior exposure to enriched environment reduces nitric oxide synthase after transient MCAO in rats.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kewei; Wu, Yi; Hu, Yongshan; Zhang, Qi; Xie, Hongyu; Liu, Gang; Chen, Yao; Guo, Zhenzhen; Jia, Jie

    2013-12-01

    Increasing evidence shows that exposure to an enriched environment (EE) after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury is neuroprotective in animal models. However, little is known about of the neuroprotective effects of EE exposure prior to injury. The current study examined the effects of prior EE exposure on inducible and neuronal nitric oxide syntheses (iNOS and nNOS) after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) in rats. A total of 72 rats were exposed to EE or standard housing condition (SC) for 1 month, followed by 90-min MCAO and reperfusion or sham surgery, leading to the following three groups: (1) EE+MCAO (n=24), (2) SC+MCAO (n=24), (3) SC+sham (n=24). Rats were sacrificed at 1, 6, or 24h after MCAO (n=6/group) for iNOS and nNOS mRNA quantification by real-time PCR and at 24h after MCAO (n=6/group) for iNOS and nNOS protein quantification by Western blot or were evaluated for neurological function outcomes, then sacrificed to assess infarct volume (n=6/group). Results showed that prior exposure to EE reduced iNOS and nNOS mRNA and protein and improved neurological status after MCAO without affecting infarct volume, suggesting that EE may provide neuroprotection via ischemic preconditioning.

  11. Measuring latency in virtual environments.

    PubMed

    Friston, Sebastian; Steed, Anthony

    2014-04-01

    Latency of interactive computer systems is a product of the processing, transport and synchronisation delays inherent to the components that create them. In a virtual environment (VE) system, latency is known to be detrimental to a user's sense of immersion, physical performance and comfort level. Accurately measuring the latency of a VE system for study or optimisation, is not straightforward. A number of authors have developed techniques for characterising latency, which have become progressively more accessible and easier to use. In this paper, we characterise these techniques. We describe a simple mechanical simulator designed to simulate a VE with various amounts of latency that can be finely controlled (to within 3ms). We develop a new latency measurement technique called Automated Frame Counting to assist in assessing latency using high speed video (to within 1ms). We use the mechanical simulator to measure the accuracy of Steed's and Di Luca's measurement techniques, proposing improvements where they may be made. We use the methods to measure latency of a number of interactive systems that may be of interest to the VE engineer, with a significant level of confidence. All techniques were found to be highly capable however Steed's Method is both accurate and easy to use without requiring specialised hardware.

  12. Neuroprotective effects of prior exposure to enriched environment on cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats: the possible molecular mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kewei; Wu, Yi; Hu, Yongshan; Zhang, Qi; Xie, Hongyu; Liu, Gang; Chen, Yao; Guo, Zhenzhen; Jia, Jie

    2013-11-13

    Increasing evidence shows that exposure to an enriched environment (EE) after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury is neuroprotective in animal models. Recent studies have demonstrated that animals housed in an enriched environment condition after an experimental stroke obtained a better functional outcome than those housed in a standard condition. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms of neuroprotective effects of enriched environment exposure prior to injury. The current study examined the neuroprotective effects of prior enriched environment exposure after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in rats. Male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats, weighing 55-65g at the beginning of the experiment, were randomly assigned to a pre-ischemic enriched environment (PIEE) or pre-ischemic standard condition (PISC) group for 1 month. They were weighed on days1, 7, 18, and 28, and their locomotor activity was tracked during the period between 9:00am and 3:00pm daily. After 1 month, ischemia was induced by occluding the middle cerebral artery for 90min, followed by reperfusion. After approximately 24h of the operation, functional outcomes were assessed using the beam-walking test and a neurological evaluation scale in all rats. We measured the expression of extracellular signal regulated protein kinases1/2 (ERK1/2) by western blotting and gene expression levels of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthasen (iNOS) by Real-Time PCR in the cortical area affected by ischemia. Finally, we measured the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) content, which is a biomarker of oxidative stress. The results showed that rats in the PIEE group had lighter weight than those in the PISC group. The functional outcomes of rats in the PIEE group were better than those in the PISC group, and substances associated with inflammation, such as MDA, nNOS, iNOS, and phospho-ERK1/2, were lower in the PIEE group compared with the PISC group. These results

  13. Aircraft Lightning Electromagnetic Environment Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ely, Jay J.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Szatkowski, George N.

    2011-01-01

    This paper outlines a NASA project plan for demonstrating a prototype lightning strike measurement system that is suitable for installation onto research aircraft that already operate in thunderstorms. This work builds upon past data from the NASA F106, FAA CV-580, and Transall C-180 flight projects, SAE ARP5412, and the European ILDAS Program. The primary focus is to capture airframe current waveforms during attachment, but may also consider pre and post-attachment current, electric field, and radiated field phenomena. New sensor technologies are being developed for this system, including a fiber-optic Faraday polarization sensor that measures lightning current waveforms from DC to over several Megahertz, and has dynamic range covering hundreds-of-volts to tens-of-thousands-of-volts. A study of the electromagnetic emission spectrum of lightning (including radio wave, microwave, optical, X-Rays and Gamma-Rays), and a compilation of aircraft transfer-function data (including composite aircraft) are included, to aid in the development of other new lightning environment sensors, their placement on-board research aircraft, and triggering of the onboard instrumentation system. The instrumentation system will leverage recent advances in high-speed, high dynamic range, deep memory data acquisition equipment, and fiber-optic interconnect.

  14. Parental Depression and Family Environment Predict Distress in Children Prior to Stem-Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jobe-Shields, Lisa; Alderfer, Melissa A.; Barrera, Maru; Vannatta, Kathryn; Currier, Joseph M.; Phipps, Sean

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine parental symptoms of depression, family environment, and the interaction of these parent and family factors in explaining severity of distress in children scheduled to undergo stem cell/bone marrow transplantation (SCT). Method A self-report measure of illness related distress, adjusted to reflect the experience of medical diagnosis and associated stressors was completed by 146 youth scheduled to undergo SCT. Measures of parental depressive symptoms and family environment (cohesion, expressiveness, and conflict) were completed by the resident parent. Results Parental symptoms of depression, family cohesion, and family expressiveness emerged as significant predictors of child-reported distress. Additionally, significant Parental Depression x Family Cohesion and Parental Depression x Family Expressiveness interactions emerged as predictors of the intensity of the child's distress. When parental depressive symptomatology was high, child distress was high regardless of family environment. However, when parental depressive symptomatology was low, family cohesion and expression served as protective factors against child distress. Conclusion Parental depressive symptomatology and family functioning relate to child distress in an interactive manner. These findings inform future directions for research, including interventions for parents aimed at promoting child adjustment during the pediatric cancer experience. PMID:19322103

  15. Temperature, hydric environment, and prior pathogen exposure alter the experimental severity of chytridiomycosis in boreal toads

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, Peter J.; St-Hilaire, Sophie; Corn, Paul Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Prevalence of the pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), implicated in amphibian population declines worldwide, is associated with habitat moisture and temperature, but few studies have varied these factors and measured the response to infection in amphibian hosts. We evaluated how varying humidity, contact with water, and temperature affected the manifestation of chytridiomycosis in boreal toads Anaxyrus (Bufo) boreas boreas and how prior exposure to Bd affects the likelihood of survival after re-exposure, such as may occur seasonally in long-lived species. Humidity did not affect survival or the degree of Bd infection, but a longer time in contact with water increased the likelihood of mortality. After exposure to ~106 Bd zoospores, all toads in continuous contact with water died within 30 d. Moreover, Bd-exposed toads that were disease-free after 64 d under dry conditions, developed lethal chytridiomycosis within 70 d of transfer to wet conditions. Toads in unheated aquaria (mean = 15°C) survived less than 48 d, while those in moderately heated aquaria (mean = 18°C) survived 115 d post-exposure and exhibited behavioral fever, selecting warmer sites across a temperature gradient. We also found benefits of prior Bd infection: previously exposed toads survived 3 times longer than Bd-naïve toads after re-exposure to 106 zoospores (89 vs. 30 d), but only when dry microenvironments were available. This study illustrates how the outcome of Bd infection in boreal toads is environmentally dependent: when continuously wet, high reinfection rates may overwhelm defenses, but periodic drying, moderate warming, and previous infection may allow infected toads to extend their survival.

  16. 26 CFR 1.1333-1 - Tax adjustment measured by prior benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ....1333-1 Section 1.1333-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) War Loss Recoveries § 1.1333-1 Tax adjustment measured by prior benefits. (a) Amount of recovery. The amount of recovery for purposes of this...

  17. 26 CFR 1.1333-1 - Tax adjustment measured by prior benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ....1333-1 Section 1.1333-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES War Loss Recoveries § 1.1333-1 Tax adjustment measured by prior benefits. (a) Amount of recovery. The amount of recovery for purposes of this section shall...

  18. 26 CFR 1.1333-1 - Tax adjustment measured by prior benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ....1333-1 Section 1.1333-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) War Loss Recoveries § 1.1333-1 Tax adjustment measured by prior benefits. (a) Amount of recovery. The amount of recovery for purposes of this...

  19. 26 CFR 1.1333-1 - Tax adjustment measured by prior benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ....1333-1 Section 1.1333-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) War Loss Recoveries § 1.1333-1 Tax adjustment measured by prior benefits. (a) Amount of recovery. The amount of recovery for purposes of this...

  20. 26 CFR 1.1333-1 - Tax adjustment measured by prior benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ....1333-1 Section 1.1333-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) War Loss Recoveries § 1.1333-1 Tax adjustment measured by prior benefits. (a) Amount of recovery. The amount of recovery for purposes of this...

  1. The Influence of Self-Regulated Learning and Prior Knowledge on Knowledge Acquisition in Computer-Based Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernacki, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    This study examined how learners construct textbase and situation model knowledge in hypertext computer-based learning environments (CBLEs) and documented the influence of specific self-regulated learning (SRL) tactics, prior knowledge, and characteristics of the learner on posttest knowledge scores from exposure to a hypertext. A sample of 160…

  2. Abundance measurements in stellar environments

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, F.

    2014-05-09

    Most of what we know about stars, and systems of stars, is derived from the analysis of their electromagnetic radiation. This lesson is an attempt to describe to Physicists, without any Astrophysical background, the framework to understand the present status of abundance determination in stellar environments and its limit. These notes are dedicated to the recently passed, November 21, 2013, Prof. Dimitri Mihalas who spent his life confuting the 19th century positivist philosopher Auguste Comte who stated that we shall not at all be able to determine the chemical composition of stars.

  3. Abundance measurements in stellar environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, F.

    2014-05-01

    Most of what we know about stars, and systems of stars, is derived from the analysis of their electromagnetic radiation. This lesson is an attempt to describe to Physicists, without any Astrophysical background, the framework to understand the present status of abundance determination in stellar environments and its limit. These notes are dedicated to the recently passed, November 21, 2013, Prof. Dimitri Mihalas who spent his life confuting the 19th century positivist philosopher Auguste Comte who stated that we shall not at all be able to determine the chemical composition of stars.

  4. Artefact-reduced kinematics measurement using a geometric finger model with mixture-prior particle filtering.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cheung-Wen; Kuo, Li-Chieh; Jou, I-Ming; Su, Fong-Chin; Sun, Yung-Nien

    2013-01-01

    It is challenging to measure the finger's kinematics of underlying bones in vivo. This paper presents a new method of finger kinematics measurement, using a geometric finger model and several markers deliberately stuck on skin surface. Using a multiple-view camera system, the optimal motion parameters of finger model were estimated using the proposed mixture-prior particle filtering. This prior, consisting of model and marker information, avoids generating improper particles for achieving near real-time performance. This method was validated using a planar fluoroscopy system that worked simultaneously with photographic system. Ten male subjects with asymptomatic hands were investigated in experiments. The results showed that the kinematic parameters could be estimated more accurately by the proposed method than by using only markers. There was 20-40% reduction in skin artefacts achieved for finger flexion/extension. Thus, this profile system can be developed as a tool of reliable kinematics measurement with good applicability for hand rehabilitation.

  5. Measuring food environments: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Glanz, Karen

    2009-04-01

    Food and nutrition environments are believed to contribute to obesity and chronic diseases. There is a need for valid, reliable measures of nutrition environments. Familiarity with previous efforts to measure food and nutrition environments can help researchers and practitioners build on past accomplishments. This article describes sources of food-environment data, discusses how they have been used, and places the definition and measurement of food and nutrition environments in historical context. Review articles, agency websites, and peer-reviewed articles were the main sources of information. The review is organized around three main types of data sources identified as historic traditions: government, industry, and research. Types of data include archives, business monitoring records, surveys, observational assessments, and self-report surveys. Future development of clear, adaptable measures of food and nutrition environments will build on lessons of the past and will update and improve on past tools.

  6. Measuring Effectiveness in Conflict Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    media. In the early aftermath of the actual war, journalist Krugman described for the New York Times a scenario that characterizes much of the post...accessed June 21, 2009). 136 P. Krugman , “What Went Wrong?” New York Times (April 23, 2004) http://www.nytimes.com/2004/04/23/opinion/23KRUG.html...www.roguelystated.com/2007/07/07/measuring-success-in-iraq-is-the-us- military-using-the-wrong-metrics/ (accessed August 11, 2009). Krugman , P. “What

  7. Economic measurement of environment damages

    SciTech Connect

    Krawiec, F.

    1980-05-01

    The densities, energy consumption, and economic development of the increasing population exacerbate environmental degradation. Air and water pollution is a major environmental problem affecting life and health, outdoor recreation, household soiling, vegetation, materials, and production. The literature review indicated that numerous studies have assessed the physical and monetary damage to populations at risk from excessive concentrations of major air and water pollutants-sulfur dioxide, total suspended particulate matter, oxidants, and carbon monoxide in air; and nutrients, oil, pesticides, and toxic metals and others in water. The measurement of the damages was one of the most controversial issues in pollution abatement. The methods that have been used to estimate the societal value of pollution abatement are: (1) chain of effects, (2) market approaches, and (3) surveys. National gross damages of air pollution of $20.2 billion and of water pollution of $11.1 billion for 1973 are substantial. These best estimates, updated for the economic and demographic conditions, could provide acceptable control totals for estimating and predicting benefits and costs of abating air and water pollution emissions. The major issues to be resolved are: (1) lack of available noneconomic data, (2) theoretical and empirical difficulties of placing a value on human life and health and on benefits such as aesthetics, and (3) lack of available demographic and economic data.

  8. Vision of the hand prior to movement onset allows full motor adaptation to a multi-force environment.

    PubMed

    Bourdin, C; Bringoux, L; Gauthier, G M; Vercher, J L

    2006-12-11

    In everyday life, because of unexpected mechanical perturbation applied to the hand or to the whole body, hand movements may become suddenly inaccurate. With prolonged exposure to the perturbation, trajectories slowly recover their normal accuracy, which is the mark of motor adaptation. However, full development of this adaptive process in complete darkness has been recently challenged in a multi-force environment. Here, we report on the effectiveness of static hand position information as specified through vision prior to movement onset on the adaptative changes, over trials, of pointing movements performed in a gravitoinertial force field. For this, subjects seated off-center on a platform rotating at constant velocity, were either confined to complete darkness (No Vision Session, NV) or provided with vision of the hand resting on the starting position prior to movement onset (Hand Vision Prior to Movement Session, HVPM). Overall, our results showed that adaptation to the centrifugal force was very rapid, and allowed subjects to demonstrate appropriate motor control as early as of the very first trials performed during the rotation period, even in the NV condition. They also showed that the integration by the Central Nervous System (CNS) of visual and proprioceptive information prior to the execution of a reaching movement allows subjects to reach full motor adaptation in a multi-force environment. Furthermore, our data confirm the existence of differentiated motor adaptive mechanisms for centrifugal and Coriolis forces. Adaptation to the former may fully develop on the basis of an a priori coding of the characteristics of the background force level even without visual information, while the latter needs visual cues about hand position prior to movement onset to take place.

  9. Sensitivity to Prior and Reliability Measurements for Value of Geophysical Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trainor, W. J.; Caers, J.; Mukerji, T.

    2009-12-01

    To ensure the sustainability of groundwater resources, actions that require spatial decisions may need to be taken although much spatial uncertainty about the aquifer flow properties exists. Geophysical data may be critical to reduce this uncertainty but may be too expensive. Therefore, the value of information (VOI) of such data needs to be assessed before proceeding with the actual survey. We present an example where the decision is whether existing contaminant sources must be relocated by identifying critical surface recharge locations. Hence assessing the aquifer vulnerability is critical. From decision analysis theory, VOI equals value with information minus the prior value. Estimating VOI requires several components. The prior geological uncertainty and a measure for information reliability are two components crucial in the VOI metric. The goal of this work is to assess the sensitivity of VOI to these two components. To address the prior geological uncertainty realistically, multiple-point geostatistical algorithms (ie snesim) stochastically model the patterns of the interpreted geological depositional system (represented by the training image). For this example study, geological concepts for glacial buried valleys are used to develop training images of the valleys. Since properties such as valley width, length and direction are not well known, many possible alternative training images can be built. To assess the most important geological components impacting aquifer vulnerability, we apply a novel distance-based clustering technique to rank the various geological factors. Secondly, to compute VOI, a measure of reliability for the proposed geophysical measurement is needed. For this example, three types of datasets collected in Denmark (in a buried valley system) are used: transient electromagnetic (TEM), DC resistivity and driller’s log. Bayesian calibration is performed to obtain likelihood and posterior functions of electrical resistivity and lithology

  10. Measuring the Built Environment for Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Brownson, Ross C.; Hoehner, Christine M.; Day, Kristen; Forsyth, Ann; Sallis, James F.

    2009-01-01

    Physical inactivity is one of the most important public health issues in the U.S. and internationally. Increasingly, links are being identified between various elements of the physical—or built—environment and physical activity. To understand the impact of the built environment on physical activity, the development of high-quality measures is essential. Three categories of built environment data are being used: (1) perceived measures obtained by telephone interview or self-administered questionnaires; (2) observational measures obtained using systematic observational methods (audits); and (3) archival data sets that are often layered and analyzed with GIS. This review provides a critical assessment of these three types of built-environment measures relevant to the study of physical activity. Among perceived measures, 19 questionnaires were reviewed, ranging in length from 7 to 68 questions. Twenty audit tools were reviewed that cover community environments (i.e., neighborhoods, cities), parks, and trails. For GIS-derived measures, more than 50 studies were reviewed. A large degree of variability was found in the operationalization of common GIS measures, which include population density, land-use mix, access to recreational facilities, and street pattern. This first comprehensive examination of built-environment measures demonstrates considerable progress over the past decade, showing diverse environmental variables available that use multiple modes of assessment. Most can be considered first-generation measures, so further development is needed. In particular, further research is needed to improve the technical quality of measures, understand the relevance to various population groups, and understand the utility of measures for science and public health. PMID:19285216

  11. Operational neuroscience: neurophysiological measures in applied environments.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Amy A

    2007-05-01

    There is, without question, an interest within the military services to understand, account for, and adapt to the cognitive state of the individual warfighter. As the field of neuroscience has matured through investments from numerous government agencies, we are on the cusp of being able to move confidently from the lab into the field--and deepen our understanding of the cognitive issues embedded in the warfighting environment. However, as we edge closer to this integration--it is critical for researchers in this arena to understand the landscape they are entering-reflected not only in the challenges of each task or operational environment but also in the individual differences intrinsic to each warfighter. The research papers in this section cover this spectrum, including individual differences and their prediction of adaptability to high-stress environments, the influence of sleep-deprivation on neurophysiological measures of stimulus categorization, neurophysiological measures of stress in the training environment and, finally, real-time neural measures of task engagement, mental workload and vigilance. It is clear from this research, and other work detailed in this supplement, that the judicious use of neuroscience, cognitive psychology, and physiology in the applied environment is desirable for both researchers and operators. In fact, we suggest that these investigations merit a field designation unto their own: Operational Neuroscience. It is our hope that the discussion of this new field of study will galvanize others to increase the confidence and utility of this research through their own investigations.

  12. The Development and Validation of an End-User Satisfaction Measure in a Student Laptop Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sung; Meng, Juan; Kalinowski, Jon; Shin, Dooyoung

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the development and validation of a measurement model for student user satisfaction in a laptop environment. Using a "quasi Delphi" method in addition to contributions from prior research we used EFA and CFA (LISREL) to identify a five factor (14 item) measurement model that best fit the data. The…

  13. Perfusion measurements by micro-CT using prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS): initial phantom results.

    PubMed

    Nett, Brian E; Brauweiler, Robert; Kalender, Willi; Rowley, Howard; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2010-04-21

    Micro-CT scanning has become an accepted standard for anatomical imaging in small animal disease and genome mutation models. Concurrently, perfusion imaging via tracking contrast dynamics after injection of an iodinated contrast agent is a well-established tool for clinical CT scanners. However, perfusion imaging is not yet commercially available on the micro-CT platform due to limitations in both radiation dose and temporal resolution. Recent hardware developments in micro-CT scanners enable continuous imaging of a given volume through the use of a slip-ring gantry. Now that dynamic CT imaging is feasible, data may be acquired to measure tissue perfusion using a micro-CT scanner (CT Imaging, Erlangen, Germany). However, rapid imaging using micro-CT scanners leads to high image noise in individual time frames. Using the standard filtered backprojection (FBP) image reconstruction, images are prohibitively noisy for calculation of voxel-by-voxel perfusion maps. In this study, we apply prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) to reconstruct images with significantly lower noise variance. In perfusion phantom experiments performed on a micro-CT scanner, the PICCS reconstruction enabled a reduction to 1/16 of the noise variance of standard FBP reconstruction, without compromising the spatial or temporal resolution. This enables a significant increase in dose efficiency, and thus, significantly less exposure time is needed to acquire images amenable to perfusion processing. This reduction in required irradiation time enables voxel-by-voxel perfusion maps to be generated on micro-CT scanners. Sample perfusion maps using a deconvolution-based perfusion analysis are included to demonstrate the improvement in image quality using the PICCS algorithm.

  14. MSL-RAD radiation environment measurements.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingnan; Zeitlin, Cary; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F; Hassler, Donald M; Ehresmann, Bent; Köhler, Jan; Böhm, Eckart; Böttcher, Stephan; Brinza, David; Burmeister, Sönke; Cucinotta, Francis; Martin, Cesar; Posner, Arik; Rafkin, Scot; Reitz, Guenther

    2015-09-01

    In this study, results are presented from the on-board radiation assessment detector (RAD) of Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). RAD is designed to measure the energetic particle radiation environment, which consists of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) and solar energetic particles (SEPs) as well as secondary particles created by nuclear interactions of primary particles in the shielding (during cruise) or Martian soil and atmosphere (surface measurements). During the cruise, RAD collected data on space radiation from inside the craft, thus allowing for a reasonable estimation of what a human crew travelling to/from Mars might be exposed to. On the surface of Mars, RAD is shielded by the atmosphere (from above) and the planet itself (from below). RAD measures the first detailed radiation data from the surface of another planet, and they are highly relevant for planning future crewed missions. The results for radiation dose and dose equivalent (a quantity most directly related to human health risk) are presented during the cruise phase, as well as on the Martian surface. Dose and dose equivalent are dominated by the continuous GCR radiation, but several SEP events were also detected and are discussed here.

  15. Anatomy education environment measurement inventory: A valid tool to measure the anatomy learning environment.

    PubMed

    Hadie, Siti Nurma Hanim; Hassan, Asma'; Ismail, Zul Izhar Mohd; Asari, Mohd Asnizam; Khan, Aaijaz Ahmed; Kasim, Fazlina; Yusof, Nurul Aiman Mohd; Manan Sulong, Husnaida Abdul; Tg Muda, Tg Fatimah Murniwati; Arifin, Wan Nor; Yusoff, Muhamad Saiful Bahri

    2017-01-30

    Students' perceptions of the education environment influence their learning. Ever since the major medical curriculum reform, anatomy education has undergone several changes in terms of its curriculum, teaching modalities, learning resources, and assessment methods. By measuring students' perceptions concerning anatomy education environment, valuable information can be obtained to facilitate improvements in teaching and learning. Hence, it is important to use a valid inventory that specifically measures attributes of the anatomy education environment. In this study, a new 11-factor, 132-items Anatomy Education Environment Measurement Inventory (AEEMI) was developed using Delphi technique and was validated in a Malaysian public medical school. The inventory was found to have satisfactory content evidence (scale-level content validity index [total] = 0.646); good response process evidence (scale-level face validity index [total] = 0.867); and acceptable to high internal consistency, with the Raykov composite reliability estimates of the six factors are in the range of 0.604-0.876. The best fit model of the AEEMI is achieved with six domains and 25 items (X(2)  = 415.67, P < 0.001, ChiSq/df = 1.63, RMSEA = 0.045, GFI = 0.905, CFI = 0.937, NFI = 0.854, TLI = 0.926). Hence, AEEMI was proven to have good psychometric properties, and thus could be used to measure the anatomy education environment in Malaysia. A concerted collaboration should be initiated toward developing a valid universal tool that, using the methods outlined in this study, measures the anatomy education environment across different institutions and countries. Anat Sci Educ. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists.

  16. Relax and refill: xylem rehydration prior to hydraulic measurements favours embolism repair in stems and generates artificially low PLC values.

    PubMed

    Trifilò, Patrizia; Raimondo, Fabio; Lo Gullo, Maria A; Barbera, Piera M; Salleo, Sebastiano; Nardini, Andrea

    2014-11-01

    Diurnal changes in percentage loss of hydraulic conductivity (PLC), with recorded values being higher at midday than on the following morning, have been interpreted as evidence for the occurrence of cycles of xylem conduits' embolism and repair. Recent reports have suggested that diurnal PLC changes might arise as a consequence of an experimental artefact, that is, air entry into xylem conduits upon cutting stems, even if under water, while under substantial tension generated by transpiration. Rehydration procedures prior to hydraulic measurements have been recommended to avoid this artefact. In the present study, we show that xylem rehydration prior to hydraulic measurements might favour xylem refilling and embolism repair, thus leading to PLC values erroneously lower than those actually experienced by transpiring plants. When xylem tension relaxation procedures were performed on stems where refilling mechanisms had been previously inhibited by mechanical (girdling) or chemical (orthovanadate) treatment, PLC values measured in stems cut under native tension were the same as those measured after sample rehydration/relaxation. Our data call for renewed attention to the procedures of sample collection in the field and transport to the laboratory, and suggest that girdling might be a recommendable treatment prior to sample collection for PLC measurements.

  17. Decoherence suppression of tripartite entanglement in non-Markovian environments by using weak measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhi-yong; He, Juan; Ye, Liu

    2017-02-01

    A feasible scheme for protecting the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) entanglement state in non-Markovian environments is proposed. It consists of prior weak measurement on each qubit before the interaction with decoherence environments followed by post quantum measurement reversals. It is shown that both the fidelity and concurrence of the GHZ state can be effectively improved. Meanwhile, we also verified that our scenario can enhance tripartite nonlocality remarkably. In addition, the result indicates that the larger the weak measurement strength, the better the effectiveness of the scheme with the lower success probability.

  18. Veterinary students’ perceptions of their learning environment as measured by the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) has been widely used to evaluate the learning environment within health sciences education, however, this tool has not been applied in veterinary medical education. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of the DREEM tool in a veterinary medical program and to determine veterinary students’ perceptions of their learning environment. Methods The DREEM is a survey tool which quantitatively measures students’ perceptions of their learning environment. The survey consists of 50 items, each scored 0–4 on a Likert Scale. The 50 items are subsequently analysed within five subscales related to students’ perceptions of learning, faculty (teachers), academic atmosphere, and self-perceptions (academic and social). An overall score is obtained by summing the mean score for each subscale, with an overall possible score of 200. All students in the program were asked to complete the DREEM. Means and standard deviations were calculated for the 50 items, the five subscale scores and the overall score. Cronbach’s alpha was determined for the five subscales and overall score to evaluate reliability. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to evaluate construct validity. Results 224 responses (53%) were received. The Cronbach’s alpha for the overall score was 0.93 and for the five subscales were; perceptions of learning 0.85, perceptions of faculty 0.79, perceptions of atmosphere 0.81, academic self-perceptions 0.68, and social self-perceptions 0.72. Construct validity was determined to be acceptable (p < 0.001) and all items contributed to the overall validity of the DREEM. The overall DREEM score was 128.9/200, which is a positive result based on the developers’ descriptors and comparable to other health science education programs. Four individual items of concern were identified by students. Conclusions In this setting the DREEM was a reliable and valid tool to measure

  19. Use of chromosome translocations for measuring prior environment exposures in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, J. D.

    1997-05-01

    Recent advances in cytogenetic methodology are beginning to have a major impact upon our ability to provide assessments of environmental exposure in humans. The advent of fluorescent-based techniques for `painting` whole chromosomes has made the analysis of chromosome translocations rapid, specific, sensitive and routine. Chromosome painting has been used to address a wide variety of scientific questions, resulting in an increased understanding of the biological consequences of adverse environmental exposure. This paper describes the use of chromosome translocations as a biological marker of exposure and effect in humans. The relevance of translocations is discussed, as are the advantages and disadvantages of painting compared to classical cytogenetic methods for translocation evaluation. The factors to consider in the use of translocations as a retrospective indicator of exposure are then described. Several theoretical parameters that are important to the use of translocations are provided, and the paper concludes with a vision for the future of cytogenetic methodology.

  20. Absolute Thickness Measurements on Coatings Without Prior Knowledge of Material Properties Using Terahertz Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Cosgriff, Laura M.; Harder, Bryan; Zhu, Dongming; Martin, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the applicability of a novel noncontact single-sided terahertz electromagnetic measurement method for measuring thickness in dielectric coating systems having either dielectric or conductive substrate materials. The method does not require knowledge of the velocity of terahertz waves in the coating material. The dielectric coatings ranged from approximately 300 to 1400 m in thickness. First, the terahertz method was validated on a bulk dielectric sample to determine its ability to precisely measure thickness and density variation. Then, the method was studied on simulated coating systems. One simulated coating consisted of layered thin paper samples of varying thicknesses on a ceramic substrate. Another simulated coating system consisted of adhesive-backed Teflon adhered to conducting and dielectric substrates. Alumina samples that were coated with a ceramic adhesive layer were also investigated. Finally, the method was studied for thickness measurement of actual thermal barrier coatings (TBC) on ceramic substrates. The unique aspects and limitations of this method for thickness measurements are discussed.

  1. Interlaboratory comparison of size and surface charge measurements on nanoparticles prior to biological impact assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roebben, G.; Ramirez-Garcia, S.; Hackley, V. A.; Roesslein, M.; Klaessig, F.; Kestens, V.; Lynch, I.; Garner, C. M.; Rawle, A.; Elder, A.; Colvin, V. L.; Kreyling, W.; Krug, H. F.; Lewicka, Z. A.; McNeil, S.; Nel, A.; Patri, A.; Wick, P.; Wiesner, M.; Xia, T.; Oberdörster, G.; Dawson, K. A.

    2011-07-01

    The International Alliance for NanoEHS Harmonization (IANH) organises interlaboratory comparisons of methods used to study the potential biological impacts of nanomaterials. The aim of IANH is to identify and reduce or remove sources of variability and irreproducibility in existing protocols. Here, we present results of the first IANH round robin studies into methods to assess the size and surface charge of suspended nanoparticles. The test materials used (suspensions of gold, silica, polystyrene, and ceria nanoparticles, with [primary] particles sizes between 10 nm and 80 nm) were first analysed in repeatability conditions to assess the possible contribution of between-sample heterogeneity to the between-laboratory variability. Reproducibility of the selected methods was investigated in an interlaboratory comparison between ten different laboratories in the USA and Europe. Robust statistical analysis was used to evaluate within- and between-laboratory variability. It is shown that, if detailed shipping, measurement, and reporting protocols are followed, measurement of the hydrodynamic particle diameter of nanoparticles in predispersed monomodal suspensions using the dynamic light scattering method is reproducible. On the other hand, measurements of more polydisperse suspensions of nanoparticle aggregates or agglomerates were not reproducible between laboratories. Ultrasonication, which is commonly used to prepare dispersions before cell exposures, was observed to further increase variability. The variability of the zeta potential values, which were also measured, indicates the need to define better surface charge test protocols and to identify sources of variability.

  2. Measurement of Infrasound from the Marine Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    challenges include sensor motion, wind noise, composing arrays of sensors, and survivability in the ocean environment. This report outlines the...counter wind noise and operate multiple sensors as an array will be developed. iv CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY...1 Multi-element arrays

  3. Measurement of Intrasound from the Marine Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    around the world. The technical challenges include sensor motion, wind noise, composing arrays of sensors, and survivability in the ocean environment...demonstrated, approaches to counter wind noise and operate multiple sensors as an array will be developed. iv CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY...Wind ......................................................................................................................... 1 Multi-element arrays

  4. The Measurement, Treatment, and Impact of Spectral Covariance and Bayesian Priors in Integral-field Spectroscopy of Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, Johnny P.; Brandt, Timothy D.

    2016-12-01

    The recovery of an exoplanet’s atmospheric parameters from its spectrum requires accurate knowledge of the spectral errors and covariances. Unfortunately, the complex image processing used in high-contrast integral-field spectrograph (IFS) observations generally produces spectral covariances that are poorly understood and often ignored. In this work, we show how to measure the spectral errors and covariances and include them self-consistently in parameter retrievals. By combining model exoplanet spectra with a realistic noise model generated from the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) early science data, we show that ignoring spectral covariance in high-contrast IFS data can both bias inferred parameters and lead to unreliable confidence regions on those parameters. This problem is made worse by the common practice of scaling the χ 2 per degree of freedom to unity; the input parameters then fall outside the 95% confidence regions in as many as ∼80% of noise realizations. The biases we observe can approach the typical levels of precision achieved in high-contrast spectroscopy. Accounting for realistic priors in fully Bayesian retrievals can also have a significant impact on the inferred parameters. Plausible priors on effective temperature and surface gravity can vary by an order of magnitude across the confidence regions appropriate for objects with weak age constraints; priors for objects with good age constraints are dominated by modeling uncertainties. Our methods are directly applicable to existing high-contrast IFSs including GPI and SPHERE, as well as upcoming instruments like CHARIS and, ultimately, WFIRST-AFTA.

  5. Isotropic probability measures in infinite dimensional spaces: Inverse problems/prior information/stochastic inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backus, George

    1987-01-01

    Let R be the real numbers, R(n) the linear space of all real n-tuples, and R(infinity) the linear space of all infinite real sequences x = (x sub 1, x sub 2,...). Let P sub n :R(infinity) approaches R(n) be the projection operator with P sub n (x) = (x sub 1,...,x sub n). Let p(infinity) be a probability measure on the smallest sigma-ring of subsets of R(infinity) which includes all of the cylinder sets P sub n(-1) (B sub n), where B sub n is an arbitrary Borel subset of R(n). Let p sub n be the marginal distribution of p(infinity) on R(n), so p sub n(B sub n) = p(infinity)(P sub n to the -1(B sub n)) for each B sub n. A measure on R(n) is isotropic if it is invariant under all orthogonal transformations of R(n). All members of the set of all isotropic probability distributions on R(n) are described. The result calls into question both stochastic inversion and Bayesian inference, as currently used in many geophysical inverse problems.

  6. Multi-day convective-environmental evolution prior to tropical cyclone formation from geostationary satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Minhee; Ho, Chang-Hoi; Park, Myung-Sook

    2016-04-01

    Tropical cyclones (TCs) are developed through persistent latent heating taken from deep convective process. By analyzing aircraft and polar-orbit satellite observations, distinct upper-level warm-core induced by strong updraft was found in pre-TCs while vertically uniform temperature profile is found in non-developers. Precipitation is also broader and more frequent in developing disturbances than in nondeveloping ones. However, large uncertainties remain in determining which disturbance will develop into TC by using observation snap-shots. Here, five-day systematic evolution of deep convection and environments in developing (80) and non-developing (491) disturbances are examined over the western North Pacific for 20072009 by using geostationary satellite observation. Daily, positive tendencies in the hourly time series of the area of the MTSAT-1R infrared (IR) and water vapor (WV) brightness temperature difference < 0 are used to define single diurnal convective burst (CB) event. In terms of single CB properties (duration, expanded convective area, maximum convective area, and expanding rate), developing and nondeveloping disturbances shows significantly different mean values in the statistics, but it is not effective to estimate TC genesis. The presence of continuous CB events more than two days (i.e. multi-day CB; mCB), however, is generally found in developing disturbances. Based on the presence and absence mCB in the IR-WV time series, two different evolutions from Day 1 to Day 5 of TC formation (non-development) are explored, in which Day 6 is set to be a TC formation day (Day5 as non-development vortex decaying day). The majority of developing disturbances with mCB (83 %) initially have stronger large-scale vorticity with low-level maxima, tend to have gradually increasing deep convective area and vorticities at low-to-upper troposphere. By contrast, few developing disturbances (17 %) without mCB are pre-conditioned by much weaker large-scale vorticity

  7. Measuring discrimination- and reversal learning in mouse models within 4 days and without prior food deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Smit, August B.; Verhage, Matthijs

    2016-01-01

    Many neurological and psychiatric disorders are characterized by deficits in cognitive flexibility. Modeling cognitive flexibility in mice enables the investigation of mechanisms underlying these deficits. The majority of currently available behavioral tests targeting this cognitive domain are reversal learning tasks that require scheduled food restriction, extended training periods and labor-intensive, and stress-inducing animal handling. Here, we describe a novel 4-day (4-d) continuously running task measuring discrimination- and reversal learning in an automated home cage (CognitionWall DL/RL task) that largely eliminates these limitations. In this task, mice can earn unlimited number of food rewards by passing through the correct hole of the three-holed CognitionWall. To assess the validity and sensitivity of this novel task, the performance of C57BL/6J mice, amyloid precursor protein/presenilin1 transgenic (APP/PS1) mice, α-calmodulin kinase-II (αCaMKII) T305D knock-in mice, and mice with an orbitofrontal cortex lesion were examined. We found that C57BL/6J mice reach stable performance levels within the 4 d of the task, while experiencing only slight reductions in weight and no major effects on circadian rhythm. The task detected learning deficits in APP/PS1 transgenic and αCaMKII T305D mutant mice. Additionally, we established that the orbitofrontal cortex underlies reversal learning performance in our task. Because of its short duration and the absence of food deprivation and concurrent weight loss, this novel automated home-cage task substantially improves comprehensive preclinical assessment of cognitive functions in mouse models of psychiatric and neurological disorders and also enables analysis during specific developmental stages. PMID:27918287

  8. Measuring discrimination- and reversal learning in mouse models within 4 days and without prior food deprivation.

    PubMed

    Remmelink, Esther; Smit, August B; Verhage, Matthijs; Loos, Maarten

    2016-11-01

    Many neurological and psychiatric disorders are characterized by deficits in cognitive flexibility. Modeling cognitive flexibility in mice enables the investigation of mechanisms underlying these deficits. The majority of currently available behavioral tests targeting this cognitive domain are reversal learning tasks that require scheduled food restriction, extended training periods and labor-intensive, and stress-inducing animal handling. Here, we describe a novel 4-day (4-d) continuously running task measuring discrimination- and reversal learning in an automated home cage (CognitionWall DL/RL task) that largely eliminates these limitations. In this task, mice can earn unlimited number of food rewards by passing through the correct hole of the three-holed CognitionWall. To assess the validity and sensitivity of this novel task, the performance of C57BL/6J mice, amyloid precursor protein/presenilin1 transgenic (APP/PS1) mice, α-calmodulin kinase-II (αCaMKII) T305D knock-in mice, and mice with an orbitofrontal cortex lesion were examined. We found that C57BL/6J mice reach stable performance levels within the 4 d of the task, while experiencing only slight reductions in weight and no major effects on circadian rhythm. The task detected learning deficits in APP/PS1 transgenic and αCaMKII T305D mutant mice. Additionally, we established that the orbitofrontal cortex underlies reversal learning performance in our task. Because of its short duration and the absence of food deprivation and concurrent weight loss, this novel automated home-cage task substantially improves comprehensive preclinical assessment of cognitive functions in mouse models of psychiatric and neurological disorders and also enables analysis during specific developmental stages.

  9. The Effects of Learners' Prior Knowledge, Self-Regulation, and Motivation on Learning Performance in Complex Multimedia Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Hyuksoon S.

    2010-01-01

    Many medical schools have developed computer-based, multimedia learning environments to fill the knowledge gap and provide common cases and resources to students. However, considering that multimedia in education may impede effective learning if the characteristics of learners and tasks are not considered thoroughly in instructional design, it is…

  10. The Influence of Children's Prior Knowledge and Previous Experience on Their Spatial Orientation Skills in an Urban Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemmer, Ingrid; Hemmer, Michael; Neidhardt, Eva; Obermaier, Gabriele; Uphues, Rainer; Wrenger, Katja

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the capacity of children to develop map-based skills in spatial orientation in an urban environment unknown to them. In this quantitative study, a total of 328 pupils of grades 3-5 had to achieve specific skills with regard to map-based skills in spatial orientation (such as turning-off skills, transformation from map to…

  11. Automatic Measurement of Thalamic Diameter in 2D Fetal Ultrasound Brain Images using Shape Prior Constrained Regularized Level Sets.

    PubMed

    Sridar, Pradeeba; Kumar, Ashnil; Li, Changyang; Woo, Joyce; Quinton, Ann; Benzie, Ron; Peek, Michael; Feng, Dagan; Ramarathnam, Krishna Kumar; Nanan, Ralph; Kim, Jinman

    2016-06-20

    We derived an automated algorithm for accurately measuring the thalamic diameter from 2D fetal ultrasound (US) brain images. The algorithm overcomes the inherent limitations of the US image modality: non-uniform density, missing boundaries, and strong speckle noise. We introduced a 'guitar' structure that represents the negative space surrounding the thalamic regions. The guitar acts as a landmark for deriving the widest points of the thalamus even when its boundaries are not identifiable. We augmented a generalized level-set framework with a shape prior and constraints derived from statistical shape models of the guitars; this framework was used to segment US images and measure the thalamic diameter. Our segmentation method achieved a higher mean Dice similarity coefficient, Hausdorff distance, specificity and reduced contour leakage when compared to other well-established methods. The automatic thalamic diameter measurement had an inter-observer variability of -0.56±2.29 millimeters compared to manual measurement by an expert sonographer. Our method was capable of automatically estimating the thalamic diameter, with the measurement accuracy on par with clinical assessment. Our method can be used as part of computer-assisted screening tools that automatically measure the biometrics of the fetal thalamus; these biometrics are linked to neuro-developmental outcomes.

  12. Electromagnetic Measurements in an Active Oilfield Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, K. A.; Aldridge, D. F.; Bartel, L. C.; Knox, H. A.; Weiss, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    An important issue in oilfield development pertains to mapping and monitoring of the fracture distributions (either natural or man-made) controlling subsurface fluid flow. Although microseismic monitoring and analysis have been used for this purpose for several decades, there remain several ambiguities and uncertainties with this approach. We are investigating a novel electromagnetic (EM) technique for detecting and mapping hydraulic fractures in a petroleum reservoir by injecting an electrically conductive contrast agent into an open fracture. The fracture is subsequently illuminated by a strong EM field radiated by a large engineered antenna. Specifically, a grounded electric current source is applied directly to the steel casing of the borehole, either at/near the wellhead or at a deep downhole point. Transient multicomponent EM signals (both electric and magnetic) scattered by the conductivity contrast are then recorded by a surface receiver array. We are presently utilizing advanced 3D numerical modeling algorithms to accurately simulate fracture responses, both before and after insertion of the conductive contrast agent. Model results compare favorably with EM field data recently acquired in a Permian Basin oilfield. However, extraction of the very-low-amplitude fracture signatures from noisy data requires effective noise suppression strategies such as long stacking times, rejection of outliers, and careful treatment of natural magnetotelluric fields. Dealing with the ever-present "episodic EM noise" typical in an active oilfield environment (associated with drilling, pumping, machinery, traffic, etc.) constitutes an ongoing problem. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. Nonlinear Ultrasonic Measurements in Nuclear Reactor Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, Brian T.

    Several Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs, such as the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD), Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC), Light Water Reactor Sustainability, and Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants (NGNP), are investigating new fuels, materials, and inspection paradigms for advanced and existing reactors. A key objective of such programs is to understand the performance of these fuels and materials during irradiation. In DOE-NE's FCRD program, ultrasonic based technology was identified as a key approach that should be pursued to obtain the high-fidelity, high-accuracy data required to characterize the behavior and performance of new candidate fuels and structural materials during irradiation testing. The radiation, high temperatures, and pressure can limit the available tools and characterization methods. In this thesis, two ultrasonic characterization techniques will be explored. The first, finite amplitude wave propagation has been demonstrated to be sensitive to microstructural material property changes. It is a strong candidate to determine fuel evolution; however, it has not been demonstrated for in-situ reactor applications. In this thesis, finite amplitude wave propagation will be used to measure the microstructural evolution in Al-6061. This is the first demonstration of finite amplitude wave propagation at temperatures in excess of 200 °C and during an irradiation test. Second, a method based on contact nonlinear acoustic theory will be developed to identify compressed cracks. Compressed cracks are typically transparent to ultrasonic wave propagation; however, by measuring harmonic content developed during finite amplitude wave propagation, it is shown that even compressed cracks can be characterized. Lastly, piezoelectric transducers capable of making these measurements are developed. Specifically, three piezoelectric sensors (Bismuth Titanate, Aluminum Nitride, and Zinc Oxide) are tested in the Massachusetts

  14. Measurement of borate in occupational environments.

    PubMed

    Smith, R A; Ascherl, F M

    1998-01-01

    The hydration stability for inhalable borate particles has been characterized as a function of temperature and relative humidity when collected by a field personnel monitor. The rate of hydration was measured for boric acid (B[OH]3); Neobor borax 5 mol (Na2O x 2B2O3 x 5H2O); borax 10 mol (Na2O x 2B2O3 x 10H2O); anhydrous boric acid (B2O3); and anhydrous borax (Na2O x 2B2O3). The particle size is large in bulk commercial products, such that they can be handled and stored without problems. However, inhalable dust particles, in the range of 20 microm (MMD), undergo hydration/dehydration rapidly owing to their high surface-to-volume ratio. The hydration state of a collected air sample was found to be strongly dependent on the conditions of relative humidity and temperature during its collection. As a consequence, the actual chemical species of dust being inspired cannot be identified accurately. Inhalable particles of borax 10 mol placed in a field personal monitoring cartridge and exposed to dry air at 2.0 L/min at 70 degrees F for 7 h undergo rapid dehydration, producing a sodium borate residue having significantly less than four waters of hydration. Likewise, inhalable particles of anhydrous boric acid and anhydrous borax were found to hydrate under normal atmospheric conditions. Borax 5 mol and boric acid were found to be stable to dehydration. In most cases, the specific borate species or borate compounds collected in a field monitor cannot be accurately characterized other than by their boron (B) content.

  15. Measuring the Environment through Digital Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickle, J.; Schloss, A. L.

    2009-12-01

    A network of sites for citizen scientists to take a consistent time sequence of digital photographs of the landscape and an Internet site (http://picturepost.unh.edu/) that efficiently stores and distributes the digital images creates a low-cost and sustainable resource for scientific environmental monitoring and formal and informal science education. Digital photographs taken from the same location and positioned in the same direction and orientation allow scientists to monitor a variety of environmental parameters, including plant health, growth, and phenology; erosion and deposition; water levels; and cloud and canopy cover. The PicturePost platform is simply an octagon placed in the center of a flat surface and secured to a post anchored in the ground or onto a building. The edges of the octagon allow positioning of the camera so the complete landscape may be photographed in less than a minute. A NASA-funded project, Digital Earth Watch (aka Measuring Vegetation Health, (http://mvh.sr.unh.edu) provides educational activities and background materials that help people learn about plants as environmental “green canaries” and about the basics of cameras and digital images. The website also provides free software to analyze digital images. Although this project has been in development for four years, it is only beginning to find partners in which the data support multiple efforts. A large part of this integration is a result of recent NASA funding, which has allowed a new website to be developed to archive and display the images. The developing collaborations and the development of the new website at the same time enhanced both efforts. Because the website could include tools/features that appealed to the collaborating groups, all participants contributed ideas facing fewer restrictions. PicturePost made from recycled plastic lumber.

  16. Gyroscopic corrections improve wearable sensor data prior to measuring dynamic sway in the gait of people with Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Brodie, Matthew A D; Psarakis, Michael; Hoang, Phu

    2016-09-01

    Accelerometers are incorporated into many consumer devices providing new ways to monitor gait, mobility, and fall risk. However, many health benefits have not been realised because of issues with data quality that results from gravitational 'cross-talk' when the wearable device is tilted. Here we present an adaptive filter designed to improve the quality of accelerometer data prior to measuring dynamic pelvic sway patterns during a six minute walk test in people with and without Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Optical motion capture was used as the gold standard. Improved wearable device accuracy (≤4.4% NRMSE) was achieved using gyroscopic corrections and scaling filter thresholds by step frequency. The people with MS presented significantly greater pelvis sway range to compensate for their lower limb weaknesses and joint contractures. The visualisation of asymmetric pelvic sway in people with MS illustrates the potential to better understand their mobility impairments for reducing fall risk.

  17. Automatic change detection of buildings in urban environment from very high spatial resolution images using existing geodatabase and prior knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouziani, Mourad; Goïta, Kalifa; He, Dong-Chen

    2010-01-01

    The updating of geodatabases (GDB) in urban environments is a difficult and expensive task. It may be facilitated by an automatic change detection method. Several methods have been developed for medium and low spatial resolution images. This study proposes a new method for change detection of buildings in urban environments from very high spatial resolution images (VHSR) and using existing digital cartographic data. The proposed methodology is composed of several stages. The existing knowledge on the buildings and the other urban objects are first modelled and saved in a knowledge base. Some change detection rules are defined at this stage. Then, the image is segmented. The parameters of segmentation are computed thanks to the integration between the image and the geodatabase. Thereafter, the segmented image is analyzed using the knowledge base to localize the segments where the change of building is likely to occur. The change detection rules are then applied on these segments to identify the segments that represent the changes of buildings. These changes represent the updates of buildings to be added to the geodatabase. The data used in this research concern the city of Sherbrooke (Quebec, Canada) and the city of Rabat (Morocco). For Sherbrooke, we used an Ikonos image acquired in October 2006 and a GDB at the scale of 1:20,000. For Rabat, a QuickBird image acquired in August 2006 has been used with a GDB at the scale of 1:10,000. The rate of good detection is 90%. The proposed method presents some limitations on the detection of the exact contours of the buildings. It could be improved by including a shape post-analysis of detected buildings. The proposed method could be integrated into a cartographic update process or as a method for the quality assessment of a geodatabase. It could be also be used to identify illegal building work or to monitor urban growth.

  18. Measuring the Dimensions of Serendipity in Digital Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCay-Peet, Lori; Toms, Elaine

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Serendipitous information retrieval is the perhaps inevitable consequence of immersion in an information-rich environment. Just how well chance encounters are supported, however, within these environments varies and one of the challenges to the development of tools and systems to facilitate serendipity is measuring how well they…

  19. Measuring the Food Environment State of the Science

    PubMed Central

    Lytle, Leslie A.

    2009-01-01

    The past decades have seen an increased interest in understanding how the environment affects population health. In particular, public health practitioners and researchers alike are eager to know how the food environments of neighborhoods, schools, and worksites affect food choices and, ultimately, population risk for obesity and other diet-related chronic disease. However, the measurement tools for assessing the environment and the employed study designs have limited our ability to gain important ground. The field has not yet fully considered the psychometric properties of the environmental measurement tools, or how to deal with the copious amounts of data generated from many environmental measures. The field is dominated by research using unsophisticated study designs and has frequently failed to see the role of social and individual factors and how they interrelate with the physical environment. This paper examines some of the measurement issues to be considered as public health practitioners and researchers attempt to understand the impact of the food environment on the health of communities and takes a broad look at where the science currently is with regard to how the food environment is measured, thoughts on what issues may benefit from more deliberate inspection, and directions for future work. PMID:19285204

  20. Measuring the food environment: state of the science.

    PubMed

    Lytle, Leslie A

    2009-04-01

    The past decades have seen an increased interest in understanding how the environment affects population health. In particular, public health practitioners and researchers alike are eager to know how the food environments of neighborhoods, schools, and worksites affect food choices and, ultimately, population risk for obesity and other diet-related chronic disease. However, the measurement tools for assessing the environment and the employed study designs have limited our ability to gain important ground. The field has not yet fully considered the psychometric properties of the environmental measurement tools, or how to deal with the copious amounts of data generated from many environmental measures. The field is dominated by research using unsophisticated study designs and has frequently failed to see the role of social and individual factors and how they interrelate with the physical environment. This paper examines some of the measurement issues to be considered as public health practitioners and researchers attempt to understand the impact of the food environment on the health of communities and takes a broad look at where the science currently is with regard to how the food environment is measured, thoughts on what issues may benefit from more deliberate inspection, and directions for future work.

  1. High-precision Photogrammetric Surface Figure Measurements under Cryogenic Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Z.; Qian, Y.; Fan, S. H.; Liu, C. R.; Wang, H. R.; Zuo, Y. X.; Cheng, J. Q.; Yang, J.

    2016-01-01

    Limited by the working temperature of the measurement equipments, most of the high-precision surface figure measurement techniques cannot be applied under a cryogenic environment. This paper reports the first attempt to measure the surface figure of a high-precision terahertz reflector panel under low temperatures based on photogrammetry. The measurement employs a high resolution industrial camera sitting on an automatic experimental platform which enables photos been taken in an automatic fashion inside a climate chamber. A repeatable accuracy of 2.1 μm rms is achieved under the cryogenic environment. Furthermore, surface figure measured by a three-coordinate measuring machine under room temperature is used to calibrate the thickness variation of the paper targets. By this technique, the surface figure of an aluminum prototype panel of the 5 meter Dome A Terahertz Telescope (DATE5) is measured from room temperature down to -55°C.

  2. Quantifying Error in Survey Measures of School and Classroom Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schweig, Jonathan David

    2014-01-01

    Developing indicators that reflect important aspects of school and classroom environments has become central in a nationwide effort to develop comprehensive programs that measure teacher quality and effectiveness. Formulating teacher evaluation policy necessitates accurate and reliable methods for measuring these environmental variables. This…

  3. Estimation of measurement variance in the context of environment statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Pulakesh

    2015-02-01

    The object of environment statistics is for providing information on the environment, on its most important changes over time, across locations and identifying the main factors that influence them. Ultimately environment statistics would be required to produce higher quality statistical information. For this timely, reliable and comparable data are needed. Lack of proper and uniform definitions, unambiguous classifications pose serious problems to procure qualitative data. These cause measurement errors. We consider the problem of estimating measurement variance so that some measures may be adopted to improve upon the quality of data on environmental goods and services and on value statement in economic terms. The measurement technique considered here is that of employing personal interviewers and the sampling considered here is that of two-stage sampling.

  4. Electrophysiological measurement of interest during walking in a simulated environment.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Yuji; Okuma, Takashi; Kimura, Motohiro; Kurata, Takeshi; Takenaka, Takeshi; Iwaki, Sunao

    2014-09-01

    A reliable neuroscientific technique for objectively estimating the degree of interest in a real environment is currently required in the research fields of neuroergonomics and neuroeconomics. Toward the development of such a technique, the present study explored electrophysiological measures that reflect an observer's interest in a nearly-real visual environment. Participants were asked to walk through a simulated shopping mall and the attractiveness of the shopping mall was manipulated by opening and closing the shutters of stores. During the walking task, participants were exposed to task-irrelevant auditory probes (two-stimulus oddball sequence). The results showed a smaller P2/early P3a component of task-irrelevant auditory event-related potentials and a larger lambda response of eye-fixation-related potentials in an interesting environment (i.e., open-shutter condition) than in a boring environment (i.e., closed-shutter condition); these findings can be reasonably explained by supposing that participants allocated more attentional resources to visual information in an interesting environment than in a boring environment, and thus residual attentional resources that could be allocated to task-irrelevant auditory probes were reduced. The P2/early P3a component and the lambda response may be useful measures of interest in a real visual environment.

  5. Microgravity acceleration measurement and environment characterization science (17-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) is a general purpose instrumentation system designed to measure the accelerations onboard the Shuttle Orbiter and Shuttle/Spacelab vehicles. These measurements are used to support microgravity experiments and investigation into the microgravity environment of the vehicle. Acceleration measurements can be made at locations remote from the SAMS main instrumentation unit by the use of up to three remote triaxial sensor heads. The prime objective for SAMS on the International Microgravity Lab (IML-1) mission will be to measure the accelerations experienced by the Fluid Experiment System (FES). The SAMS acceleration measurements for FES will be complemented by low level, low frequency acceleration measurements made by the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) installed on the shuttle. Secondary objectives for SAMS will be to measure accelerations at several specific locations to enable the acceleration transfer function of the Spacelab module to be analyzed. This analysis effort will be in conjunction with similar measurements analyses on other Spacelab missions.

  6. Nutrition environment measures survey-vending: development, dissemination, and reliability.

    PubMed

    Voss, Carol; Klein, Susan; Glanz, Karen; Clawson, Margaret

    2012-07-01

    Researchers determined a need to develop an instrument to assess the vending machine environment that was comparably reliable and valid to other Nutrition Environment Measures Survey tools and that would provide consistent and comparable data for businesses, schools, and communities. Tool development, reliability testing, and dissemination of the Nutrition Environment Measures Survey-Vending (NEMS-V) involved a collaboration of students, professionals, and community leaders. Interrater reliability testing showed high levels of agreement among trained raters on the products and evaluations of products. NEMS-V can benefit public health partners implementing policy and environmental change initiatives as a part of their community wellness activities. The vending machine project will support a policy calling for state facilities to provide a minimum of 30% of foods and beverages in vending machines as healthy options, based on NEMS-V criteria, which will be used as a model for other businesses.

  7. Preserving differential privacy for similarity measurement in smart environments.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kok-Seng; Kim, Myung Ho

    2014-01-01

    Advances in both sensor technologies and network infrastructures have encouraged the development of smart environments to enhance people's life and living styles. However, collecting and storing user's data in the smart environments pose severe privacy concerns because these data may contain sensitive information about the subject. Hence, privacy protection is now an emerging issue that we need to consider especially when data sharing is essential for analysis purpose. In this paper, we consider the case where two agents in the smart environment want to measure the similarity of their collected or stored data. We use similarity coefficient function (F SC) as the measurement metric for the comparison with differential privacy model. Unlike the existing solutions, our protocol can facilitate more than one request to compute F SC without modifying the protocol. Our solution ensures privacy protection for both the inputs and the computed F SC results.

  8. The Meaning and Measurement of Environments in Holland's Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottfredson, Linda S.; Richards, James M., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Holland's theory provides a means of describing both people and environments. He has developed techniques for assessing and classifying different vocational instruments. His newest measure, the Position Classification Inventory, should stimulate new research in vocational psychology. (49 references) (Author/SK)

  9. Measuring Performance of Virtual Learning Environment System in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, William; Higson, Helen E.; Dey, Prasanta K.; Xu, Xiaowei; Bahsoon, Rami

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to measure the performance of commercial virtual learning environment (VLE) systems, which helps the decision makers to select the appropriate system for their institutions. Design/methodology/approach: This paper develops an integrated multiple criteria decision making approach, which combines the analytic…

  10. X-Ray Measurements Of Displacements In Hostile Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Canistraro, Howard A.; Jordan, Eric H.; Pease, Douglas M.

    1995-01-01

    Developmental method of noncontact extensometry of objects in hot or otherwise hostile environments based on focusing and scanning of x rays. Principal advantage: ability to make measurements through stratified and/or flowing gases, smoke, and flames, as well as through solid layers of x-ray-transparent materials.

  11. Measuring Self-Regulation in Online and Blended Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, Lucy; Lan, William Y.; To, Yen M.; Paton, Valerie Osland; Lai, Shu-Ling

    2009-01-01

    In developing the Online Self-regulated Learning Questionnaire (OSLQ) to address the need for an instrument measuring self-regulation in the online learning environment, this study provides evidence toward the reliability and validity of the instrument. Data were collected from two samples of students. The first sample of students took coursework…

  12. Indirect Measures of Learning Transfer between Real and Virtual Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Michael; McMahon, Mark

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on research undertaken to determine the effectiveness of a 3D simulation environment used to train mining personnel in emergency evacuation procedures, designated the Fires in Underground Mines Evacuation Simulator (FUMES). Owing to the operational constraints of the mining facility, methods for measuring learning transfer were…

  13. A Performance Measurement and Evaluation Environment for Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominick, Wayne D.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the concept of an integrated environment which allows managers to evaluate and measure the performance of computer based information systems. Both system efficiency evaluation and user interaction evaluation are addressed, and MADAM, a system currently operational at the University of Southwestern Louisiana, is briefly described.…

  14. Selenium supplementation in radiotherapy patients: do we need to measure selenium levels in serum or blood regularly prior radiotherapy?

    PubMed

    Muecke, Ralph; Micke, Oliver; Schomburg, Lutz; Kisters, Klaus; Buentzel, Jens; Huebner, Jutta; Kriz, Jan

    2014-12-16

    Considering the review by Puspitasari and colleagues, an additional discussion of the endpoints of the Se supplementation studies described would be helpful. In our view, selenium can safely be given to selenium-deficient cancer patients prior to and during radiotherapy. Therefore, in order to help the radiation oncologist in decision making, we strongly advocate to determine the selenium status prior to and during a potential adjuvant selenium supplementation, e.g. when trying to ease the side-effects of radiation treatment or in the aftercare situation when the selenium status may become insufficient.

  15. Temperature measurements using multicolor pyrometry in thermal radiation heating environments

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Tairan; Liu, Jiangfan; Duan, Minghao; Zong, Anzhou

    2014-04-15

    Temperature measurements are important for thermal-structural experiments in the thermal radiation heating environments such as used for thermal-structural stress analyses. This paper describes the use of multicolor pyrometry for the measurements of diffuse surfaces in thermal radiation environments that eliminates the effects of background radiation reflections and unknown emissivities based on a least-squares algorithm. The near-infrared multicolor pyrometer had a spectral range of 1100–2400 nm, spectrum resolution of 6 nm, maximum sampling frequency of 2 kHz, working distance of 0.6 m to infinity, temperature range of 700–1700 K. The pyrometer wavelength response, nonlinear intensity response, and spectral response were all calibrated. The temperature of a graphite sample irradiated by quartz lamps was then measured during heating and cooling using the least-squares algorithm based on the calibrated irradiation data. The experiments show that higher temperatures and longer wavelengths are more suitable for the thermal measurements in the quartz lamp radiation heating system. This analysis provides a valuable method for temperature measurements of diffuse surfaces in thermal radiation environments.

  16. Measuring the Internal Environment of Solid Rocket Motors During Ignition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisenberg, Brent; Smith, Doug; Speas, Kyle; Corliss, Adam

    2003-01-01

    A new instrumentation system has been developed to measure the internal environment of solid rocket test motors during motor ignition. The system leverages conventional, analog gages with custom designed, electronics modules to provide safe, accurate, high speed data acquisition capability. To date, the instrumentation system has been demonstrated in a laboratory environment and on subscale static fire test motors ranging in size from 5-inches to 24-inches in diameter. Ultimately, this system is intended to be installed on a full-scale Reusable Solid Rocket Motor. This paper explains the need for the data, the components and capabilities of the system, and the test results.

  17. Measuring family food environments in diverse families with young children.

    PubMed

    McCurdy, Karen; Gorman, Kathleen S

    2010-06-01

    This study reports the development and validation of the 20 item Family Food Behavior Survey, a measure designed to assess broad components of the family food environment that may contribute to child overweight. In a diverse sample of 38 parents, factor analyses verified 4 domains: (1) maternal control of child eating behavior; (2) maternal presence during eating; (3) child choice, and (4) organization of eating environment. All domains achieved acceptable internal reliability (alphas= .73, -.83), and test-retest reliability. Mothers of overweight children scored significantly lower on maternal presence and somewhat higher on maternal control than mothers of normal weight children.

  18. Measuring Knowledge Acquisition in 3D Virtual Learning Environments.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Eunice P dos Santos; Roque, Licínio G; Nunes, Fatima de Lourdes dos Santos

    2016-01-01

    Virtual environments can contribute to the effective learning of various subjects for people of all ages. Consequently, they assist in reducing the cost of maintaining physical structures of teaching, such as laboratories and classrooms. However, the measurement of how learners acquire knowledge in such environments is still incipient in the literature. This article presents a method to evaluate the knowledge acquisition in 3D virtual learning environments (3D VLEs) by using the learner's interactions in the VLE. Three experiments were conducted that demonstrate the viability of using this method and its computational implementation. The results suggest that it is possible to automatically assess learning in predetermined contexts and that some types of user interactions in 3D VLEs are correlated with the user's learning differential.

  19. High-precision Photogrammetric Surface Figure Measurements under Cryogenic Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lou; Yuan, Qian; Sheng-hong, Fan; Chang-ru, Liu; Hai-ren, Wang; Ying-xi, Zuo; Jin-quan, Cheng; Ji, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Limited by the working temperature of the test equipment, most of high-precision surface figure measurement techniques cannot be put into application under a cryogenic environment. This paper reports the first attempt to measure the surface figure of a high-precision terahertz reflector panel under low temperatures based on photogrammetry. The measurement employs a high-resolution industrial camera sitting on the automatic testing platform which enables photos been taken in an automatic fashion inside a climate chamber. A repeatable accuracy of 2.1 μm (rms) is achieved under the cryogenic environment. Furthermore, the surface figure measured by a three-coordinate measuring machine under the room temperature is used to calibrate the thickness differences of the targets. By this technique, the surface figure of an aluminum prototype panel of the 5 meter Dome A Terahertz Telescope (DATE5) is measured from room temperature down to -55°C to obtain the rule of variation of surface deformation of the panel under low temperatures.

  20. Determining Transmission Loss from Measured External and Internal Acoustic Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scogin, Tyler; Smith, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    An estimate of the internal acoustic environment in each internal cavity of a launch vehicle is needed to ensure survivability of Space Launch System (SLS) avionics. Currently, this is achieved by using the noise reduction database of heritage flight vehicles such as the Space Shuttle and Saturn V for liftoff and ascent flight conditions. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is conducting a series of transmission loss tests to verify and augment this method. For this test setup, an aluminum orthogrid curved panel representing 1/8th of the circumference of a section of the SLS main structure was mounted in between a reverberation chamber and an anechoic chamber. Transmission loss was measured across the panel using microphones. Data measured during this test will be used to estimate the internal acoustic environments for several of the SLS launch vehicle internal spaces.

  1. Advantages of High Tolerance Measurements in Fusion Environments Applying Photogrammetry

    SciTech Connect

    T. Dodson, R. Ellis, C. Priniski, S. Raftopoulos, D. Stevens, M. Viola

    2009-02-04

    Photogrammetry, a state-of-the-art technique of metrology employing digital photographs as the vehicle for measurement, has been investigated in the fusion environment. Benefits of this high tolerance methodology include relatively easy deployment for multiple point measurements and deformation/distortion studies. Depending on the equipment used, photogrammetric systems can reach tolerances of 25 microns (0.001 in) to 100 microns (0.004 in) on a 3-meter object. During the fabrication and assembly of the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) the primary measurement systems deployed were CAD coordinate-based computer metrology equipment and supporting algorithms such as both interferometer-aided (IFM) and absolute distance measurementbased (ADM) laser trackers, as well as portable Coordinate Measurement Machine (CMM) arms. Photogrammetry was employed at NCSX as a quick and easy tool to monitor coil distortions incurred during welding operations of the machine assembly process and as a way to reduce assembly downtime for metrology processes.

  2. Undercooling measurement in a low-gravity containerless environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, M. B.

    1981-01-01

    A technique is described for measuring the amount of undercooling for samples processed in a low-gravity containerless environment. The time of undercooling is determined by measuring the time of cooling before nucleation and recalescence by two infrared detectors. Once the cooling curve for each drop is calculated, the amount of undercooling can then be found. The technique is demonstrated by measuring the amount of undercooling for drops of pure niobium and select compositions of the niobium-germanium alloy system while free falling in a 32 n evacuated drop tube. The total hemispherical emissivities and specific heats for these materials were measured using a high-temperature containerless calorimeter. An overview of the effect of undercooling on drops of niobium and niobium-germanium is given.

  3. Assessing Built Environment Walkability using Activity-Space Summary Measures

    PubMed Central

    Tribby, Calvin P.; Miller, Harvey J.; Brown, Barbara B.; Werner, Carol M.; Smith, Ken R.

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing emphasis on active transportation, such as walking, in transportation planning as a sustainable form of mobility and in public health as a means of achieving recommended physical activity and better health outcomes. A research focus is the influence of the built environment on walking, with the ultimate goal of identifying environmental modifications that invite more walking. However, assessments of the built environment for walkability are typically at a spatially disaggregate level (such as street blocks) or at a spatially aggregate level (such as census block groups). A key issue is determining the spatial units for walkability measures so that they reflect potential walking behavior. This paper develops methods for assessing walkability within individual activity spaces: the geographic region accessible to an individual during a given walking trip. We first estimate street network-based activity spaces using the shortest path between known trip starting/ending points and a travel time budget that reflects potential alternative paths. Based on objective walkability measures of the street blocks, we use three summary measures for walkability within activity spaces: i) the average walkability score across block segments (representing the general level of walkability in the activity space); ii) the standard deviation (representing the walkability variation), and; iii) the network autocorrelation (representing the spatial coherence of the walkability pattern). We assess the method using data from an empirical study of built environment walkability and walking behavior in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. We visualize and map these activity space summary measures to compare walkability among individuals’ trips within their neighborhoods. We also compare summary measures for activity spaces versus census block groups, with the result that they agree less than half of the time. PMID:27213027

  4. [Assessment of measured respirable dust sampler penetration and the sampling convention for work environment measurement].

    PubMed

    Myojo, Toshihiko

    2005-11-01

    The relationship between dust size and penetration for a static horizontal elutriator (Sibata C-30) was measured in calm air. The elutriator as a low-volume air sampler is widely used as a dust size classifier in work environment measurements. The actual penetrations were compared with the theoretical models of the sampler and with sampling convention for respirable dust in work environment measurement. The sampling convention was recently introduced into the Japanese standard for work environment measurement and is based on the ISO 7708 respirable dust convention. The bias of sampled masses from the respirable dust was calculated for two flow rates of the sampler, i.e., 50% cut sizes of 4 microm and 5 microm, from measured penetration curves. The bias of the sampler was overestimated in the 5 microm, 50% cut condition and underestimated in the 4 microm, 50% cut condition for most workplace sampling situations.

  5. Visualization of Radiation Environment on Mars: Assessment with MARIE Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saganti, P.; Cucinotta, F.; Zeitlin, C.; Cleghorn, T.; Flanders, J.; Riman, F.; Hu, X.; Pinsky, L.; Lee, K.; Anderson, V.; Atwell, W.; Turner, R.

    2003-01-01

    For a given GCR (Galactic Cosmic Ray) environment at Mars, particle flux of protons, alpha particles, and heavy ions, are also needed on the surface of Mars for future human exploration missions. For the past twelve months, the MARJE (Martian Radiation Environment Experiment) instrument onboard the 200J Mars Odyssey has been providing the radiation measurements from the Martian orbit. These measurements are well correlated with the HZETRN (High Z and Energy Transport) and QMSFRG (Quantum Multiple-Scattering theory of nuclear Fragmentation) model calculations. These model calculations during these specific GCR environment conditions are now extended and transported through the CO2 atmosphere onto the Martian surface. These calculated pa11icle flux distributions are presented as a function of the Martian topography making use of the MOLA (Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter) data from the MGS (Mars Global Surveyor). Also, particle flux calculations are presented with visualization in the human body from skin depth to the internal organs including the blood-forming organs.

  6. Measurement of Radiation Pressure in an Ambient Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Dakang; Garrett, Joseph; Munday, Jeremy

    2015-03-01

    Light has momentum and thus exerts ``radiation pressure'' when it is reflected or absorbed due to the conservation of momentum. Micromechanical transducers and oscillators are suitable for measurement and utilization of radiation pressure due to their high sensitivities. However, other light-induced mechanical deformations such as photothermal effects often obscure accurate measurements of radiation pressure in these systems. In this work, we investigate the radiation pressure and photothermal force on an uncoated silicon nitride microcantilever under illumination by a 660 nm laser in an ambient environment. To magnify the mechanical effects, the cantilever is driven optically from dc across its resonance frequency, and the amplitude and phase of its oscillation are acquired by an optical beam deflection method and a lockin amplifier. We show that radiation pressure and photothermal effects can be distinguished through the cantilever's frequency response. Furthermore, in a radiation pressure dominant regime, our measurement of the radiation force agrees quantitatively with the theoretical calculation.

  7. Two spacecraft measurements of the Martian plasma environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brain, David; Luhmann, Janet G.; Barabash, Stas; Fedorov, A.; Winningham, D. L.; Acuna, Mario; Frahm, Rudy

    For a period of nearly three years from early 2004 through late 2006, two spacecraft made complementary in situ measurements of the Martian plasma environment. The Mars Global Surveyor magnetometer and electron reflectometer (MGS MAG/ER) measured magnetic fields and suprathermal electrons from an orbit fixed in local time and altitude. The Mars Express Analyzer of Space Plasma and Energetic Atoms (MEX ASPERA-3) measured and still measures ions and suprathermal electrons from a precessing elliptical orbit. MGS lacked an ion instrument, and MEX lacks a magnetometer. Study of the two sets of measurements together provides an opportunity to better understand the complete Martian plasma environment spatially and temporally. We will discuss several advantageous configurations of MEX and MGS, and present examples of each. 'Close conjunctions' are defined as periods when the spacecraft passed very close to each other, within an ion gyroradius or inertial length, allowing examination of more complete particle and field measurements in a given region. 'Delay conjunctions' are defined as instances when the two spacecraft passed through the same region of space separated by a time delay, allowing examination of the evolution of electron distributions in a given region. 'Flux tube conjunctions' are defined as instances when it was likely that the two spacecraft occupied the same flux tube some distance apart, allowing study of the spatial evolution of plasma as it moves along a flux tube. We will also present examples of other fortuitous configurations of MEX and MGS, such as times when they were on opposite sides of a given plasma boundary.

  8. Disparities in neighborhood food environments: implications of measurement strategies.

    PubMed

    Bader, Michael D M; Purciel, Marnie; Yousefzadeh, Paulette; Neckerman, Kathryn M

    2010-01-01

    Public health researchers have begun to map the neighborhood “food environment” and examine its association with the risk of overweight and obesity. Some argue that “food deserts”—areas with little or no provision of fresh produce and other healthy food—may contribute to disparities in obesity, diabetes, and related health problems. While research on neighborhood food environments has taken advantage of more technically sophisticated ways to assess distance and density, in general, it has not considered how individual or neighborhood conditions might modify physical distance and thereby affect patterns of spatial accessibility. This study carried out a series of sensitivity analyses to illustrate the effects on the measurement of disparities in food environments of adjusting for cross-neighborhood variation in vehicle ownership rates, public transit access, and impediments to pedestrian travel, such as crime and poor traffic safety. The analysis used geographic information systems data for New York City supermarkets, fruit and vegetable markets, and farmers' markets and employed both kernel density and distance measures. We found that adjusting for vehicle ownership and crime tended to increase measured disparities in access to supermarkets by neighborhood race/ethnicity and income, while adjusting for public transit and traffic safety tended to narrow these disparities. Further, considering fruit and vegetable markets and farmers' markets, as well as supermarkets, increased the density of healthy food outlets, especially in neighborhoods with high concentrations of Hispanics, Asians, and foreign-born residents and in high-poverty neighborhoods.

  9. Neighborhood Environments and Objectively Measured Physical Activity in 11 Countries

    PubMed Central

    Cerin, Ester; Cain, Kelli L; Conway, Terry L; Dyck, Delfien Van; Hinckson, Erica; Schipperijn, Jasper; Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse De; Owen, Neville; Davey, Rachel C; Hino, Adriano Akira Ferreira; Mitáš, Josef; Orzanco-Garralda, Rosario; Salvo, Deborah; Sarmiento, Olga L; Christiansen, Lars B; Macfarlane, Duncan J; Schofield, Grant; Sallis, James F

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Environmental changes are potentially effective population-level physical activity (PA) promotion strategies. However, robust multi-site evidence to guide international action for developing activity-supportive environments is lacking. We estimated pooled associations of perceived environmental attributes with objectively-measured PA outcomes; between-site differences in such associations; and, the extent to which perceived environmental attributes explain between-site differences in PA. Methods This was a cross-sectional study conducted in 16 cities located in Belgium, Brazil, Colombia, Czech Republic, Denmark, China, Mexico, New Zealand, Spain, United Kingdom, and USA. Participants were 6,968 adults residing in administrative units stratified by socio-economic status and transport-related walkability. Predictors were 10 perceived neighborhood environmental attributes. Outcome measures were accelerometry-assessed weekly minutes of moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) and meeting the PA guidelines for cancer/weight gain prevention (420 min/week of MVPA). Results Most perceived neighborhood attributes were positively associated with the PA outcomes in the pooled, site-adjusted, single-predictor models. Associations were generalizable across geographical locations. Aesthetics and land use mix – access were significant predictors of both PA outcomes in the fully-adjusted models. Environmental attributes accounted for within-site variability in MVPA corresponding to a 3 min/d or 21 min/week standard deviation. Large between-site differences in PA outcomes were observed: 15.9% to 16.8% of these differences were explained by perceived environmental attributes. All neighborhood attributes were associated with between-site differences in the total effects of the perceived environment on PA outcomes. Conclusions Residents’ perceptions of neighborhood attributes that facilitate walking were positively associated with objectively-measured MVPA and meeting the guidelines

  10. Measurement of reverberation gain in an urban environment.

    PubMed

    Mijić, Miomir; Šumarac Pavlović, Dragana

    2012-09-01

    Multipath propagation within an urban area introduces a specific type of reverberation in response to sound excitation. That appearance affects the level of ambient noise produced by strong sound sources. In this paper, the signals recorded during the 1999 bombing of Belgrade were used to analyze the characteristics of reverberation in that urban environment. Six recorded signals were selected among more than 50 explosions recorded at that time. Due to the impulse nature of sound sources, the recorded signals represent the impulse responses of that area. The measured reverberation time T30 is about 7 ± 1 s in octaves between 31.5 Hz and 1 kHz. There is a variation of decay slope in time that is verified by differences between values of T10 and T30. The reverberation gain calculated from recorded signals is 2-7 dB, depending on the global position of the sound excitation point as well as its micro-location according to its position among the surrounding buildings. A variation of gain over octave bands is in the interval of approximately 3 dB. Information about reverberation gain in urban environment can be useful in a quick estimation of noise level produced by strong sound sources in a large area of urban environment.

  11. Measurements and predictions for nonevaporating sprays in a quiescent environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, A. S. P.; Shuen, J.-S.; Faeth, G. M.; Zhang, Q.-F.

    1983-01-01

    Yule et al. (1982) have conducted a study of vaporizing sprays with the aid of laser techniques. The present investigation has the objective to supplement the measurements performed by Yule et al., by considering the limiting case of a spray in a stagnant environment. Mean and fluctuating velocities of the continuous phase are measured by means of laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) techniques, while Fraunhofer diffraction and slide impaction methods are employed to determine drop sizes. Liquid fluxes in the spray are found by making use of an isokinetic sampling probe. The obtained data are used as a basis for the evaluation of three models of the process, including a locally homogeneous flow (LHF) model, a deterministic separated flow (DSF) model, and a stochastic separated flow (SSF) model. It is found that the LHF and DSF models do not provide very satisfactory predictions for the test sprays, while the SSF model does provide reasonably good predictions of the observed structure.

  12. Martian Radiation Environment: Model Calculations and Recent Measurements with "MARIE"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saganti, P. B.; Cucinotta, F. A.; zeitlin, C. J.; Cleghorn, T. F.

    2004-01-01

    The Galactic Cosmic Ray spectra in Mars orbit were generated with the recently expanded HZETRN (High Z and Energy Transport) and QMSFRG (Quantum Multiple-Scattering theory of nuclear Fragmentation) model calculations. These model calculations are compared with the first eighteen months of measured data from the MARIE (Martian Radiation Environment Experiment) instrument onboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft that is currently in Martian orbit. The dose rates observed by the MARIE instrument are within 10% of the model calculated predictions. Model calculations are compared with the MARIE measurements of dose, dose-equivalent values, along with the available particle flux distribution. Model calculated particle flux includes GCR elemental composition of atomic number, Z = 1-28 and mass number, A = 1-58. Particle flux calculations specific for the current MARIE mapping period are reviewed and presented.

  13. Acoustic Environment of Admiralty Inlet: Broadband Noise Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jinshan; Deng, Zhiqun; Martinez, Jayson J.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Myers, Joshua R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Jones, Mark E.

    2011-09-30

    Admiralty Inlet has been selected as a potential tidal energy site. It is located near shipping lanes, is a highly variable acoustic environment, and is frequented by the highly endangered southern resident killer whale (SRKW). Resolving environmental impacts is the first step to receiving approval to deploy tidal turbines at Admiralty Inlet. Of particular concern is the potential for blade strike or other negative interactions between the SRKW and the tidal turbine. A variety of technologies including passive and active monitoring systems are being considered as potential tools to determine the presence of SRKW in the vicinity of the turbines. Broadband noise level measurements are critical for the determination of design and operation specifications of all marine and hydrokinetic energy capture technologies. Acoustic environment data at the proposed site was acquired at different depths using a cabled vertical line array (VLA) with four calibrated hydrophones. The sound pressure level (SPL) power spectrum density was estimated based on the fast Fourier transform. This study describes the first broadband SPL measurements for this site at different depths with frequency ranging from 10 kHz to 480 kHz in combination with other information. To understand the SPL caused by this bedload transport, three different pressure sensors with temperature and conductivity were also assembled on the VLA to measure the conditions at the hydrophone deployment depth. The broadband SPL levels at frequency ranges of 3 kHz to 7 kHz as a function of depth were estimated. Only the hydrophone at an average depth of 40 m showed the strong dependence of SPL with distance from the bottom, which was possibly caused by the cobbles shifting on the seabed. Automatic Identification System data were also studied to understand the SPL measurements.

  14. General preventive measures against carcinogenic exposure in the external environment.

    PubMed

    Keiding, L M

    1993-01-01

    Different measures are used to prevent unacceptable carcinogenic exposure from different sources in the external environment, be it accumulated carcinogens from previous pollution, exposure related to life-style, and exposure related to living standards and the organization of the community as a whole. A precondition for goal-directed prevention is knowledge of exposures to carcinogens and measures to minimize or substitute carcinogens in products and in emissions. One of the most significant sources of carcinogens in the outdoor air in many Western countries is the traffic, especially diesel-powered vehicles. Necessary preventive measures include restriction of carcinogenic exhaust from the individual vehicle, plans for the community to diminish transportation needs, as well as to changing the usual behaviour of the individual. Unlike exposure to carcinogens in the surrounding air, exposure to accumulated carcinogens in ground-water and in soil at polluted sites may be diminished by the pattern of use. International aspects are involved in for instance minimizing the risk of getting skin cancer from sunlight. Besides protecting vulnerable individuals there should be a global preservation of the ozone layer. Lowering the risk of long transported air pollution, like radioactivity from accidents at nuclear power stations, demands international efforts to increase safety measures and information about accidents.

  15. Measured force on elongated bodies in a simulated low-Earth orbit environment

    SciTech Connect

    Maldonado, C. A.; Ketsdever, A. D.; Gimelshein, S. F.

    2014-12-09

    An overview of the development of a magnetically filtered atomic oxygen plasma source and the application of the source to study low-Earth orbit drag on elongated bodies is presented. Plasma diagnostics show that the magnetic filter plasma source produces atomic oxygen ions (O{sup +}) with streaming energies equivalent to the relative orbital environment of approximately 5eV and can supply the appropriate density for LEO simulation. Previous research has demonstrated that momentum transfer between ions and metal surfaces is equivalent to the momentum transfer expected for neutral molecules with similar energy, due to charge exchange occurring prior to momentum transfer. Total drag measurements of aluminum cuboid geometries of varying length to diameter ratios immersed in the extracted plasma plume are presented as a function of streaming ion energy.

  16. Mars environment and magnetic orbiter scientific and measurement objectives.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, F; Langlais, B; Fouchet, T; Barabash, S; Breuer, D; Chassefière, E; Coates, A; Dehant, V; Forget, F; Lammer, H; Lewis, S; Lopez-Valverde, M; Mandea, M; Menvielle, M; Pais, A; Paetzold, M; Read, P; Sotin, C; Tarits, P; Vennerstrom, S

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we summarize our present understanding of Mars' atmosphere, magnetic field, and surface and address past evolution of these features. Key scientific questions concerning Mars' surface, atmosphere, and magnetic field, along with the planet's interaction with solar wind, are discussed. We also define what key parameters and measurements should be performed and the main characteristics of a martian mission that would help to provide answers to these questions. Such a mission--Mars Environment and Magnetic Orbiter (MEMO)--was proposed as an answer to the Cosmic Vision Call of Opportunity as an M-class mission (corresponding to a total European Space Agency cost of less than 300 Meuro). MEMO was designed to study the strong interconnection between the planetary interior, atmosphere, and solar conditions, which is essential to our understanding of planetary evolution, the appearance of life, and its sustainability. The MEMO main platform combined remote sensing and in situ measurements of the atmosphere and the magnetic field during regular incursions into the martian upper atmosphere. The micro-satellite was designed to perform simultaneous in situ solar wind measurements. MEMO was defined to conduct: * Four-dimensional mapping of the martian atmosphere from the surface up to 120 km by measuring wind, temperature, water, and composition, all of which would provide a complete view of the martian climate and photochemical system; Mapping of the low-altitude magnetic field with unprecedented geographical, altitude, local time, and seasonal resolutions; A characterization of the simultaneous responses of the atmosphere, magnetic field, and near-Mars space to solar variability by means of in situ atmospheric and solar wind measurements.

  17. Aldehyde measurements in indoor environments in Strasbourg (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, C.; Bulliot, B.; Le Calvé, S.; Mirabel, Ph.

    Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde concentrations have been measured in indoor environments of various public spaces (railway station, airport, shopping center, libraries, underground parking garage, etc.) of Strasbourg area (east of France). In addition, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde propionaldehyde and hexanal concentrations have been measured in 22 private homes in the same area. In most of the sampling sites, indoor and outdoor formaldehyde and acetaldehyde concentrations were measured simultaneously. Gaseous aldehydes levels were quantified by a conventional DNHP-derivatization method followed by liquid chromatography coupled to UV detection. Outdoor formaldehyde and acetaldehyde concentrations were both in the range 1-10 μg m -3, the highest values being measured at the airport and railway station. Indoor concentrations were strongly dependant upon the sampling sites. In homes, the average concentrations were 37 μg m -3 (living rooms) and 46 μg m -3 (bedrooms) for formaldehyde, 15 μg m -3 (living rooms) and 18 μg m -3 (bedrooms) for acetaldehyde, 1.2 μg m -3 (living rooms) and 1.6 μg m -3 (bedrooms) for propionaldehyde, 9 μg m -3 (living rooms) and 10 μg m -3 (bedrooms) for hexanal. However, concentrations as high as 123, 80 and 47 μg m -3 have been found for formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and hexanal respectively. In public spaces, the highest formaldehyde concentration (62 μg m -3) was found in a library and the highest concentration of acetaldehyde (26 μg m -3) in the hall of a shopping center. Additional measurements of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were made inside a car both at rest or in a fluid or heavy traffic as well as in a room where cigarettes were smoked. Our data have been discussed and compared with those of previous studies.

  18. X ray based displacement measurement for hostile environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canistraro, Howard A.; Jordon, Eric H.; Pease, Douglas M.; Fralick, Gustave C.

    1992-01-01

    A new method on noncontacting, high temperature extensometry based on the focus and scanning of x rays is currently under development and shows great promise of overcoming limitations associated with available techniques. The chief advantage is the ability to make undisturbed measurements through stratified or flowing gases, smoke, and flame. The system is based on the ability to focus and scan low energy, hard x rays such as those emanating from copper or molybdenum sources. The x rays are focused into a narrow and intense line image which can be scanned onto targets that fluoresce secondary x ray radiation. The final goal of the system is the ability to conduct macroscopic strain measurements in hostile environments by utilizing two or more fluorescing targets. Current work is limited to displacement measurement of a single target with a resolution of 1.25 micro-m and a target temperature of 1200 C, directly through an open flame. The main advantage of the technique lies in the penetrating nature of x rays which are not affected by the presence of refracting gas layers, smoke, flame, or intense thermal radiation, all of which could render conventional extensometry methods inoperative or greatly compromise their performance.

  19. X-ray-based displacement measurement for hostile environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canistraro, H. A.; Jordan, E. H.; Pease, D. M.

    1992-01-01

    A new method on noncontacting, high temperature extensometry based on the focus and scanning of X-rays is currently under development and shows great promise of overcoming limitations associated with available techniques. The chief advantage is the ability to make undisturbed measurements through stratified or flowing gases, smoke, and flame. The system is based on the ability to focus and scan low energy, hard X-rays such as those emanating from copper or molybdenum sources. The X-rays are focused into a narrow and intense line image which can be scanned onto targets that fluoresce secondary X-ray radiation. The final goal of the system is the ability to conduct macroscopic strain measurements in hostile environments by utilizing two or more fluorescing targets. Current work is limited to displacement measurement of a single target with a resolution of 1.25 micro-m and a target temperature of 1200 C, directly through an open flame. The main advantage of the technique lies in the penetrating nature of X-rays which are not affected by the presence of refracting gas layers, smoke, flame, or intense thermal radiation, all of which could render conventional extensometry methods inoperative or greatly compromise their performance.

  20. Preliminary Examination and Measurement of the Internship Research Training Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Julia C.; Szymanski, Dawn M.; Ozegovic, Jelena Jovanovic; Briggs-Phillips, Melissa

    2004-01-01

    Consistent with C. J. Gelso's (1979, 1993, 1997) research training environment theory, the authors hypothesized that research training environments exist in predoctoral internships. The Internship Research Training Environment Scale (IRTES) was developed to assess research training environments found in predoctoral psychology internships.…

  1. Beam Shaping for CARS Measurements in Turbulent Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magnotti, Gaetano; Cutler, Andrew D.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a new technique to mitigate the effect of beam steering on CARS measurements in turbulent, variable density environments. The new approach combines Planar BOXCARS phase-matching with elliptical shaping of one of the beams to generate a signal insensitive to beam steering, while keeping the same spatial resolution. Numerical and experimental results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach. One set of experiments investigated the effect of beam shaping in the presence of a controlled and well quantified displacement of the beams at the focal plane. Another set of experiments, more qualitative, proved the effectiveness of the technique in the presence of severe beam steering due to turbulence.

  2. A Participatory Approach to the Identification of Measures of Number Sense in Children Prior to School Entry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Sally; Kemp, Coral

    2009-01-01

    The research reported in this paper used a modified Delphi procedure in an attempt to establish a consensus on tasks proposed to assess components of number sense identified as essential for early mathematics success by a broad range of academics with expertise in the area of early mathematics. Tasks included as measures of these components were…

  3. Evaluation of occupational cold environments: field measurements and subjective analysis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A Virgílio M; Gaspar, Adélio R; Raimundo, António M; Quintela, Divo A

    2014-01-01

    The present work is dedicated to the study of occupational cold environments in food distribution industrial units. Field measurements and a subjective assessment based on an individual questionnaire were considered. The survey was carried out in 5 Portuguese companies. The field measurements include 26 workplaces, while a sample of 160 responses was considered for the subjective assessment. In order to characterize the level of cold exposure, the Required Clothing Insulation Index (IREQ) was adopted. The IREQ index highlights that in the majority of the workplaces the clothing ensembles worn are inadequate, namely in the freezing chambers where the protection provided by clothing is always insufficient. The questionnaires results show that the food distribution sector is characterized by a female population (70.6%), by a young work force (60.7% are less than 35 yr old) and by a population with a medium-length professional career (80.1% in this occupation for less than 10 yr). The incidence of health effects which is higher among women, the distribution of protective clothing (50.0% of the workers indicate one garment) and the significant percentage of workers (>75%) that has more difficulties in performing the activity during the winter represent other important results of the present study.

  4. Measuring the Interestingness of Articles in a Limited User Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Pon, R; Cardenas, A; Buttler, David; Critchlow, Terence J

    2011-01-01

    Search engines, such as Google, assign scores to news articles based on their relevance to a query. However, not all relevant articles for the query may be interesting to a user. For example, if the article is old or yields little new information, the article would be uninteresting. Relevance scores do not take into account what makes an article interesting, which would vary from user to user. Although methods such as collaborative filtering have been shown to be effective in recommendation systems, in a limited user environment, there are not enough users that would make collaborative filtering effective. A general framework, called iScore, is presented for defining and measuring the ‘‘interestingness of articles, incorporating user-feedback. iScore addresses the various aspects of what makes an article interesting, such as topic relevance, uniqueness, freshness, source reputation, and writing style. It employs various methods, such as multiple topic tracking, online parameter selection, language models, clustering, sentiment analysis, and phrase extraction to measure these features. Due to varying reasons that users hold about why an article is interesting, an online feature selection method in naι¨ve Bayes is also used to improve recommendation results. iScore can outperform traditional IR techniques by as much as 50.7%. iScore and its components are evaluated in the news recommendation task using three datasets from Yahoo! News, actual users, and Digg.

  5. Measurement realities of current collection in dynamic space plasma environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szuszczewicz, Edward P.

    1990-01-01

    Theories which describe currents collected by conducting and non-conducting bodies immersed in plasmas have many of their concepts based upon the fundamentals of sheath-potential distributions and charged-particle behavior in superimposed electric and magnetic fields. Those current-collecting bodies (or electrodes) may be Langmuir probes, electric field detectors, aperture plates on ion mass spectrometers and retarding potential analyzers, or spacecraft and their rigid and tethered appendages. Often the models are incomplete in representing the conditions under which the current-voltage characteristics of the electrode and its system are to be measured. In such cases, the experimenter must carefully take into account magnetic field effects and particle anisotropies, perturbations caused by the current collection process itself and contamination on electrode surfaces, the complexities of non-Maxwellian plasma distributions, and the temporal variability of the local plasma density, temperature, composition and fields. This set of variables is by no means all-inclusive, but it represents a collection of circumstances guaranteed to accompany experiments involving energetic particle beams, plasma discharges, chemical releases, wave injection and various events of controlled and uncontrolled spacecraft charging. Here, an attempt is made to synopsize these diagnostic challenges and frame them within a perspective that focuses on the physics under investigation and the requirements on the parameters to be measured. Examples include laboratory and spaceborne applications, with specific interest in dynamic and unstable plasma environments.

  6. Knee joint functional range of movement prior to and following total knee arthroplasty measured using flexible electrogoniometry.

    PubMed

    Myles, Christine M; Rowe, Philip J; Walker, Colin R C; Nutton, Richard W

    2002-08-01

    The functional ranges of movement of the knee were investigated in a group of patients with knee osteoarthritis (n = 42, mean age 70 years) before, 4 months and at 18-24 months after total knee arthroplasty and then compared with age matched normal subjects (n = 20, mean age 67 years). Flexible electrogoniometry was used to record the maximum flexion-extension angle, the minimum flexion-extension angle and flexion-extension excursions of both knees during eleven functional activities along with the active and passive knee joint range of motion measured using a manual goniometer. Over the eleven functional activities the patients pre-operatively exhibited 28% less knee joint excursion than normal age matched subjects. By 18-24 months following total knee arthroplasty only 2% of this deficit was recovered. Statistically this recovery was only significant in level walking, slope ascent and slope descent. A greater range of movement was measured in a non-weight bearing position than was used in weight bearing functional activity. It is concluded that total knee arthroplasty gives rise to little improvement in knee motion during functional activities and that functional range of movement of the knee remains limited when compared to normal knee function for a minimum of 18 months following operation.

  7. Air Traffic Complexity Measurement Environment (ACME): Software User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    A user's guide for the Air Traffic Complexity Measurement Environment (ACME) software is presented. The ACME consists of two major components, a complexity analysis tool and user interface. The Complexity Analysis Tool (CAT) analyzes complexity off-line, producing data files which may be examined interactively via the Complexity Data Analysis Tool (CDAT). The Complexity Analysis Tool is composed of three independently executing processes that communicate via PVM (Parallel Virtual Machine) and Unix sockets. The Runtime Data Management and Control process (RUNDMC) extracts flight plan and track information from a SAR input file, and sends the information to GARP (Generate Aircraft Routes Process) and CAT (Complexity Analysis Task). GARP in turn generates aircraft trajectories, which are utilized by CAT to calculate sector complexity. CAT writes flight plan, track and complexity data to an output file, which can be examined interactively. The Complexity Data Analysis Tool (CDAT) provides an interactive graphic environment for examining the complexity data produced by the Complexity Analysis Tool (CAT). CDAT can also play back track data extracted from System Analysis Recording (SAR) tapes. The CDAT user interface consists of a primary window, a controls window, and miscellaneous pop-ups. Aircraft track and position data is displayed in the main viewing area of the primary window. The controls window contains miscellaneous control and display items. Complexity data is displayed in pop-up windows. CDAT plays back sector complexity and aircraft track and position data as a function of time. Controls are provided to start and stop playback, adjust the playback rate, and reposition the display to a specified time.

  8. Orbital debris environment as measured at the Mir space station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maag, Carl R.; Deshpande, Sunil P.; Stevenson, Tim J.; Mitzen, Paul S.

    1996-10-01

    A new European Space Agency (ESA) flight instrument attached to the exterior of the MIR Space Station is providing a better understanding of the effects of the space environment. The instrument was designed to measure, real time, the impacts and trajectory of hypervelocity particles, the atomic oxygen flux and contamination deposition/effects during the course of the mission. The ESA mission, EuroMir'95, began in September 1995 and was completed in March 1996. Active data from the momentum detectors have reconfirmed the existence of an orbital debris cloud. The mission also allowed for an EVA which returned passive materials to Earth for subsequent laboratory analyses. The early results of this experiment suggest the existence of one reasonable size cloud of small size debris particles with momenta in the range of 4E-11 kg-m/s to 5E-10 kg-m/s. These data are considered quite germane due to the similarity in orbital altitude and inclination of the Mir and Alpha Space Stations.

  9. Thick Films acoustic sensors devoted to MTR environment measurements. Thick Films acoustic sensors devoted to Material Testing Reactor environment measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Very, F.; Rosenkrantz, E.; Combette, P.; Ferrandis, J.Y.; Fourmentel, D.; Destouches, C.; Villard, J.F.

    2015-07-01

    The development of advanced instrumentation for in-pile experiments in Material Testing Reactor constitutes a main goal for the improvement of the nuclear fuel behavior knowledge. An acoustic method for fission gas release detection was tested with success during a first experiment called REMORA 3 in 2010 and 2011, and the results were used to differentiate helium and fission gas release kinetics under transient operating conditions. This experiment was lead at OSIRIS reactor (CEA Saclay, France). The maximal temperature on the sensor during the irradiation was about 150 deg. C. In this paper we present a thick film transducer produce by screen printing process. The screen printing of piezoelectric offers a wide range of possible applications for the development of acoustic sensors and piezoelectric structure for measurements in high temperature environment. We firstly produced a Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) based paste composed of Pz27 powder from Ferroperm, CF7575 glass, and organic solvent ESL 400. Likewise a Bismuth Titanate based paste synthesized in our laboratory was produced. With these inks we produced thick film up to 130 μm by screen printing process. Material properties characterizations of these thick-film resonators are essential for device design and applications. The piezoelectric coefficients d33 and pyro-electric P(T) coefficient are investigated. The highest P(T) and d33 are respectively 80 μC.m{sup -2}.K{sup -1} and 130 μC.N{sup -1} for the PZT transducer -which validates the fabrication process-. In view of the development of this transducer oriented for high temperature and irradiation environment, we investigated the electrical properties of the transducers for different ranges of frequencies and temperature - from 20 Hz up to 40 MHz between 30 and 400 deg. C. We highlight the evolution of the impedance response and piezoelectric parameters of screen printed piezoelectric structures on alumina. Shortly an irradiation will be realized in

  10. An equal start: absence of group differences in cognitive, social, and neural measures prior to music or sports training in children

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Assal; Ilari, Beatriz; Crimi, Kevin; Metke, Michael; Kaplan, Jonas T.; Joshi, Anand A.; Leahy, Richard M.; Shattuck, David W.; Choi, So Y.; Haldar, Justin P.; Ficek, Bronte; Damasio, Antonio; Damasio, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Several studies comparing adult musicians and non-musicians have provided compelling evidence for functional and anatomical differences in the brain systems engaged by musical training. It is not known, however, whether those differences result from long-term musical training or from pre-existing traits favoring musicality. In an attempt to begin addressing this question, we have launched a longitudinal investigation of the effects of childhood music training on cognitive, social and neural development. We compared a group of 6- to 7-year old children at the start of intense after-school musical training, with two groups of children: one involved in high intensity sports training but not musical training, another not involved in any systematic training. All children were tested with a comprehensive battery of cognitive, motor, musical, emotional, and social assessments and underwent magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography. Our first objective was to determine whether children who participate in musical training were different, prior to training, from children in the control groups in terms of cognitive, motor, musical, emotional, and social behavior measures as well as in structural and functional brain measures. Our second objective was to determine whether musical skills, as measured by a music perception assessment prior to training, correlates with emotional and social outcome measures that have been shown to be associated with musical training. We found no neural, cognitive, motor, emotional, or social differences among the three groups. In addition, there was no correlation between music perception skills and any of the social or emotional measures. These results provide a baseline for an ongoing longitudinal investigation of the effects of music training. PMID:25249961

  11. An equal start: absence of group differences in cognitive, social, and neural measures prior to music or sports training in children.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Assal; Ilari, Beatriz; Crimi, Kevin; Metke, Michael; Kaplan, Jonas T; Joshi, Anand A; Leahy, Richard M; Shattuck, David W; Choi, So Y; Haldar, Justin P; Ficek, Bronte; Damasio, Antonio; Damasio, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Several studies comparing adult musicians and non-musicians have provided compelling evidence for functional and anatomical differences in the brain systems engaged by musical training. It is not known, however, whether those differences result from long-term musical training or from pre-existing traits favoring musicality. In an attempt to begin addressing this question, we have launched a longitudinal investigation of the effects of childhood music training on cognitive, social and neural development. We compared a group of 6- to 7-year old children at the start of intense after-school musical training, with two groups of children: one involved in high intensity sports training but not musical training, another not involved in any systematic training. All children were tested with a comprehensive battery of cognitive, motor, musical, emotional, and social assessments and underwent magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography. Our first objective was to determine whether children who participate in musical training were different, prior to training, from children in the control groups in terms of cognitive, motor, musical, emotional, and social behavior measures as well as in structural and functional brain measures. Our second objective was to determine whether musical skills, as measured by a music perception assessment prior to training, correlates with emotional and social outcome measures that have been shown to be associated with musical training. We found no neural, cognitive, motor, emotional, or social differences among the three groups. In addition, there was no correlation between music perception skills and any of the social or emotional measures. These results provide a baseline for an ongoing longitudinal investigation of the effects of music training.

  12. Measuring the Interestingness of Articles in a Limited User Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Pon, Raymond K.

    2008-01-01

    Search engines, such as Google, assign scores to news articles based on their relevancy to a query. However, not all relevant articles for the query may be interesting to a user. For example, if the article is old or yields little new information, the article would be uninteresting. Relevancy scores do not take into account what makes an article interesting, which varies from user to user. Although methods such as collaborative filtering have been shown to be effective in recommendation systems, in a limited user environment, there are not enough users that would make collaborative filtering effective. A general framework, called iScore, is presented for defining and measuring the 'interestingness' of articles, incorporating user-feedback. iScore addresses various aspects of what makes an article interesting, such as topic relevancy, uniqueness, freshness, source reputation, and writing style. It employs various methods to measure these features and uses a classifier operating on these features to recommend articles. The basic iScore configuration is shown to improve recommendation results by as much as 20%. In addition to the basic iScore features, additional features are presented to address the deficiencies of existing feature extractors, such as one that tracks multiple topics, called MTT, and a version of the Rocchio algorithm that learns its parameters online as it processes documents, called eRocchio. The inclusion of both MTT and eRocchio into iScore is shown to improve iScore recommendation results by as much as 3.1% and 5.6%, respectively. Additionally, in TREC11 Adaptive Filter Task, eRocchio is shown to be 10% better than the best filter in the last run of the task. In addition to these two major topic relevancy measures, other features are also introduced that employ language models, phrases, clustering, and changes in topics to improve recommendation results. These additional features are shown to improve recommendation results by iScore by up to 14

  13. Gene-Environment Interaction in Adults’ IQ Scores: Measures of Past and Present Environment

    PubMed Central

    Willemsen, Gonneke; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Posthuma, Danielle

    2008-01-01

    Gene-environment interaction was studied in a sample of young (mean age 26 years, N = 385) and older (mean age 49 years, N = 370) adult males and females. Full scale IQ scores (FSIQ) were analyzed using biometric models in which additive genetic (A), common environmental (C), and unique environmental (E) effects were allowed to depend on environmental measures. Moderators under study were parental and partner educational level, as well as urbanization level and mean real estate price of the participants’ residential area. Mean effects were observed for parental education, partner education and urbanization level. On average, FSIQ scores were roughly 5 points higher in participants with highly educated parents, compared to participants whose parents were less well educated. In older participants, IQ scores were about 2 points higher when their partners were highly educated. In younger males, higher urbanization levels were associated with slightly higher FSIQ scores. Our analyses also showed increased common environmental variation in older males whose parents were more highly educated, and increased unique environmental effects in older males living in more affluent areas. Contrary to studies in children, however, the variance attributable to additive genetic effects was stable across all levels of the moderators under study. Most results were replicated for VIQ and PIQ. PMID:18535898

  14. Measuring personal heat exposure in an urban and rural environment

    PubMed Central

    Bernhard, Molly C; Kent, Shia T; Sloan, Meagan E; Evans, Mary B; McClure, Leslie A; Gohlke, Julia M

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have linked heat waves to adverse health outcomes using ambient temperature as a proxy for estimating exposure. The goal of the present study was to test a method for determining personal heat exposure. An occupationally exposed group (urban groundskeepers in Birmingham, AL, USA N=21), as well as urban and rural community members from Birmingham, AL (N=30) or west central AL (N=30) wore data logging temperature and light monitors clipped to the shoe for 7 days during the summer of 2012. We found that a temperature monitor clipped to the shoe provided a comfortable and feasible method for recording personal heat exposure. Ambient temperature (°C) recorded at the nearest weather station was significantly associated with personal heat exposure [β 0.37, 95%CI (0.35, 0.39)], particularly in groundskeepers who spent more of their total time outdoors [β 0.42, 95%CI (0.39, 0.46)]. Factors significantly associated with lower personal heat exposure include reported time indoors [β −2.02, 95%CI (−2.15, −1.89)], reported income > 20K [β −1.05, 95%CI (−1.79, −0.30)], and measured % body fat [β −0.07, 95%CI (−0.12, −0.02)]. There were significant associations between income and % body fat with lower indoor and nighttime exposures, but not with outdoor heat exposure, suggesting modifications of the home thermal environment play an important role in determining overall heat exposure. Further delineation of the effect of personal characteristics on heat exposure may help to develop targeted strategies for preventing heat-related illness. PMID:25617601

  15. Measuring personal heat exposure in an urban and rural environment.

    PubMed

    Bernhard, Molly C; Kent, Shia T; Sloan, Meagan E; Evans, Mary B; McClure, Leslie A; Gohlke, Julia M

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have linked heat waves to adverse health outcomes using ambient temperature as a proxy for estimating exposure. The goal of the present study was to test a method for determining personal heat exposure. An occupationally exposed group (urban groundskeepers in Birmingham, AL, USA N=21), as well as urban and rural community members from Birmingham, AL (N=30) or west central AL (N=30) wore data logging temperature and light monitors clipped to the shoe for 7 days during the summer of 2012. We found that a temperature monitor clipped to the shoe provided a comfortable and feasible method for recording personal heat exposure. Ambient temperature (°C) recorded at the nearest weather station was significantly associated with personal heat exposure [β 0.37, 95%CI (0.35, 0.39)], particularly in groundskeepers who spent more of their total time outdoors [β 0.42, 95%CI (0.39, 0.46)]. Factors significantly associated with lower personal heat exposure include reported time indoors [β -2.02, 95%CI (-2.15, -1.89)], reported income>20K [β -1.05, 95%CI (-1.79, -0.30)], and measured % body fat [β -0.07, 95%CI (-0.12, -0.02)]. There were significant associations between income and % body fat with lower indoor and nighttime exposures, but not with outdoor heat exposure, suggesting modifications of the home thermal environment play an important role in determining overall heat exposure. Further delineation of the effect of personal characteristics on heat exposure may help to develop targeted strategies for preventing heat-related illness.

  16. The Counseling Training Environment Scale (CTES): Development of a Self-Report Measure to Assess Counseling Training Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, Jared Miki Jun Kong

    2012-01-01

    Based on Bronfenbrenner's (1979, 1992) ecological framework, the Counseling Training Environment Scale (CTES) was developed as a self-report measure that assesses the learning and training environment of counseling and related mental health training programs as perceived by current students. A two-phase mixed-methods design was used to create…

  17. Effective method of measuring the radioactivity of [ 131I]-capsule prior to radioiodine therapy with significant reduction of the radiation exposure to the medical staff.

    PubMed

    Lützen, Ulf; Zhao, Yi; Marx, Marlies; Imme, Thea; Assam, Isong; Siebert, Frank-Andre; Culman, Juraj; Zuhayra, Maaz

    2016-07-01

    Radiation Protection in Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Radio Oncology is of the utmost importance. Radioiodine therapy is a frequently used and effective method for the treatment of thyroid disease. Prior to each therapy the radioactivity of the [ 131I]-capsule must be determined to prevent misadministration. This leads to a significant radiation exposure to the staff. We describe an alternative method, allowing a considerable reduction of the radiation exposure. Two [ 131I]-capsules (A01=2818.5; A02=73.55.0 MBq) were measured multiple times in their own delivery lead containers - that is to say, [ 131I]-capsules remain inside the containers during the measurements (shielded measurement) using a dose calibrator and a well-type and a thyroid uptake probe. The results of the shielded measurements were correlated linearly with the [ 131I]-capsules radioactivity to create calibration curves for the used devices. Additional radioactivity measurements of 50 [ 131I]-capsules of different radioactivities were done to validate the shielded measuring method. The personal skin dose rate (HP(0.07)) was determined using calibrated thermo luminescent dosimeters. The determination coefficients for the calibration curves were R2>0.9980 for all devices. The relative uncertainty of the shielded measurement was <6.8%. At a distance of 10 cm from the unshielded capsule the HP(0.07) was 46.18 μSv/(GBq⋅s), and on the surface of the lead container containing the [ 131I]-capsule the HP(0.07) was 2.99 and 0.27 μSv/(GBq⋅s) for the two used container sizes. The calculated reduction of the effective dose by using the shielded measuring method was, depending on the used container size, 74.0% and 97.4%, compared to the measurement of the unshielded [ 131I]-capsule using a dose calibrator. The measured reduction of the effective radiation dose in the practice was 56.6% and 94.9 for size I and size II containers. The shielded [ 131I]-capsule measurement reduces the

  18. Nigerian Physiotherapy Clinical Students' Perception of Their Learning Environment Measured by the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odole, Adesola C.; Oyewole, Olufemi O.; Ogunmola, Oluwasolape T.

    2014-01-01

    The identification of the learning environment and the understanding of how students learn will help teacher to facilitate learning and plan a curriculum to achieve the learning outcomes. The purpose of this study was to investigate undergraduate physiotherapy clinical students' perception of University of Ibadan's learning environment. Using the…

  19. Characterization and Quantification of Intact 26S Proteasome Proteins by Real-Time Measurement of Intrinsic Fluorescence Prior to Top-down Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Jason D.; Scalf, Mark; Book, Adam J.; Ladror, Daniel T.; Vierstra, Richard D.; Smith, Lloyd M.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2013-01-01

    Quantification of gas-phase intact protein ions by mass spectrometry (MS) is impeded by highly-variable ionization, ion transmission, and ion detection efficiencies. Therefore, quantification of proteins using MS-associated techniques is almost exclusively done after proteolysis where peptides serve as proxies for estimating protein abundance. Advances in instrumentation, protein separations, and informatics have made large-scale sequencing of intact proteins using top-down proteomics accessible to the proteomics community; yet quantification of proteins using a top-down workflow has largely been unaddressed. Here we describe a label-free approach to determine the abundance of intact proteins separated by nanoflow liquid chromatography prior to MS analysis by using solution-phase measurements of ultraviolet light-induced intrinsic fluorescence (UV-IF). UV-IF is measured directly at the electrospray interface just prior to the capillary exit where proteins containing at least one tryptophan residue are readily detected. UV-IF quantification was demonstrated using commercially available protein standards and provided more accurate and precise protein quantification than MS ion current. We evaluated the parallel use of UV-IF and top-down tandem MS for quantification and identification of protein subunits and associated proteins from an affinity-purified 26S proteasome sample from Arabidopsis thaliana. We identified 26 unique proteins and quantified 13 tryptophan-containing species. Our analyses discovered previously unidentified N-terminal processing of the β6 (PBF1) and β7 (PBG1) subunit - such processing of PBG1 may generate a heretofore unknown additional protease active site upon cleavage. In addition, our approach permitted the unambiguous identification and quantification both isoforms of the proteasome-associated protein DSS1. PMID:23536786

  20. Measuring the effects of an ever-changing environment on malaria control.

    PubMed

    McCutchan, Thomas F; Grim, K Christiana; Li, Jun; Weiss, Walter; Rathore, Darmendar; Sullivan, Margery; Graczyk, Thaddeus K; Kumar, Sanjai; Cranfield, Mike R

    2004-04-01

    The effectiveness of malaria control measures depends not only on the potency of the control measures themselves but also upon the influence of variables associated with the environment. Environmental variables have the capacity either to enhance or to impair the desired outcome. An optimal outcome in the field, which is ultimately the real goal of vaccine research, will result from prior knowledge of both the potency of the control measures and the role of environmental variables. Here we describe both the potential effectiveness of control measures and the problems associated with testing in an area of endemicity. We placed canaries with different immunologic backgrounds (e.g., naïve to malaria infection, vaccinated naïve, and immune) directly into an area where avian malaria, Plasmodium relictum, is endemic. In our study setting, canaries that are naïve to malaria infection routinely suffer approximately 50% mortality during their first period of exposure to the disease. In comparison, birds vaccinated and boosted with a DNA vaccine plasmid encoding the circumsporozoite protein of P. relictum exhibited a moderate degree of protection against natural infection (P < 0.01). In the second year we followed the fate of all surviving birds with no further manipulation. The vaccinated birds from the first year were no longer statistically distinguishable for protection against malaria from cages of naïve birds. During this period, 36% of vaccinated birds died of malaria. We postulate that the vaccine-induced protective immune responses prevented the acquisition of natural immunity similar to that concurrently acquired by birds in a neighboring cage. These results indicate that dominant environmental parameters associated with malaria deaths can be addressed before their application to a less malleable human system.

  1. An Evaluation of the Measurement of Perceived Classroom Assessment Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alkharusi, Hussain

    2015-01-01

    A classroom assessment environment is a classroom context experienced by students as the teacher determines assessment purposes, develops assessment tasks, defines assessment criteria and standards, provides feedback, and monitors outcomes (Brookhart, 1997). It is usually a group experience varying from class to class dependent upon the teacher's…

  2. Shuttle measured contaminant environment and modeling for payloads. Preliminary assessment of the space telescope environment in the shuttle bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scialdone, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    A baseline gaseous and particulate environment of the Shuttle bay was developed based on the various measurements which were made during the first four flights of the Shuttle. The environment is described by the time dependent pressure, density, scattered molecular fluxes, the column densities and including the transient effects of water dumps, engine firings and opening and closing of the bay doors. The particulate conditions in the ambient and on surfaces were predicted as a function of the mission time based on the available data. This basic Shuttle environment when combined with the outgassing and the particulate contributions of the payloads, can provide a description of the environment of a payload in the Shuttle bay. As an example of this application, the environment of the Space Telescope in the bay, which may be representative of the environment of several payloads, was derived. Among the many findings obtained in the process of modeling the environment, one is that the payloads environment in the bay is not substantially different or more objectionable than the self-generated environment of a large payload or spacecraft. It is, however, more severe during ground facilities operations, the first 15 to 20 hours of the flight, during and for a short period after ater was dumped overboard, and the reaction control engines are being fired.

  3. Nanomaterials and the environment: uses, methods and measurement.

    PubMed

    Carl Englert, Brian

    2007-11-01

    Nanotechnology has emerged as a field of science and engineering which offers many new product possibilities and potential solutions for a variety of problems. Nanomaterials come in many shapes and forms and contribute to potential products that do everything from sense analytes on a molecular level to function as self cleaning surfaces. With new and significant applications, it is likely that nanomaterial containing products may replace many of the products we use on a daily basis, leading to an increased presence of these materials in the environment. This will result in new needs and requirements from detection tools. It is likely that the analytical methods used to monitor nanomaterials in the environment will be very different than those used in risk assessment and exposure studies. This paper briefly outlines the history, impacts, and uses of nanomaterials and discusses possible methods of detection and quantification for environmental samples. The discussions in this article are specific to those matrices relating to wastewaters and sludge.

  4. Utilization of Low Gravity Environment for Measuring Liquid Viscosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.; Ethridge, Edwin

    1998-01-01

    The method of drop coalescence is used for determining the viscosity of highly viscous undercooled liquids. Low gravity environment is necessary in order to allow for examining large volumes affording much higher accuracy for the viscosity calculations than possible for smaller volumes available under 1 - g conditions. The drop coalescence method is preferred over the drop oscillation technique since the latter method can only be applied for liquids with vanishingly small viscosities. The technique developed relies on both the highly accurate solution of the Navier-Stokes equations as well as on data from experiments conducted in near zero gravity environment. Results are presented for method validation experiments recently performed on board the NASA/KC-135 aircraft. While the numerical solution was produced using the Boundary Element Method. In these tests the viscosity of a highly viscous liquid, glycerine at room temperature, was determined using the liquid coalescence method. The results from these experiments will be discussed.

  5. Identification and measurement of nitrous acid in an indoor environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pttts, James N.; Wallington, Timothy J.; Biermann, Heinz W.; Winer, Arthur M.

    We report here direct observation by differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) of the formation of ppb levels of gaseous nitrous acid (MONO) from the reaction of ppm levels of nitrogen dioxide (NO 2) with water vapor, in an indoor environment. The rate of formation of HONO displayed first order kinetics with respect to NO 2 with a rate of (0.25 ±0.04) ppb min -1 per ppm of NO 2 present. Assuming a lifetime of l h with respect to both physical and chemical removal processes for HONO, this leads to an estimated steady state concentration of ~ 15 ppb of HONO per ppm of NO 2 present. This relatively high level of HONO associated with NO 2-air mixtures raises new questions concerning the health implications of elevated NO 2 concentrations in indoor environments e.g. HONO is a respirable nitrite known to convert secondary amines invitro to carcinogenic nitrosamines.

  6. A multi-sensor oceanographic measurement system for coastal environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martini, Marinna A.; Strahle, William J.

    1993-01-01

    An instrument system has been developed for long-term sediment transport studies that uses a modular design to combine off the shelf components into a complete and flexible package. A common data storage format is used in each instrument system so that the same hardware can be assembled in different ways to address specific scientific studies with minimal engineering support and modification. Three systems have been constructed and successfully deployed to date in two different coastal environments.

  7. The delivery of PEBBLE nanosensors to measure the intracellular environment.

    PubMed

    Webster, A; Coupland, P; Houghton, F D; Leese, H J; Aylott, J W

    2007-06-01

    Cellular introduction of PEBBLEs (photonic explorers for bioanalysis with biologically localized embedding) has been investigated by a wide variety of methods in a range of cell types. These methods include surface functionalization with CPPs (cell-penetrating peptides), pinocytosis, commercial lipid transfection agents, cytochalasin D, picoinjection, and Gene gun bombardment. This paper will overview several of the most popular methods used for the introduction of PEBBLE nanosensors to the cellular environment and discuss the efficacy of the techniques.

  8. Measuring transient high temperature thermal phenomena in hostile environment

    SciTech Connect

    Brenden, B.B.; Hartman, J.S.; Reich, F.R.

    1980-01-01

    The design of equipment for measuring temperature and strain in a rapidly heated and pressurized cylinder of stainless steel is discussed. Simultaneous cinematography of the full circumference of the cylinder without interference with temperature and strain measurements is also illustrated. The integrated system uses a reflective chamber for the sample and requires careful consideration of the spectral energy distribution utilized by each instrument.

  9. Measuring Service Quality in the Networked Environment: Approaches and Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertot, John Carlo

    2001-01-01

    This article offers a number of statistics and performance measures that libraries may find useful in determining the overall quality of their network-based services; identifies a number of service quality criteria; and provides a framework to assist librarians in selecting statistics and performance measures based on service quality criteria.…

  10. Local Measurement of Fuel Energy Deposition and Heat Transfer Environment During Fuel Lifetime Using Controlled Calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Don W. Miller; Andrew Kauffmann; Eric Kreidler; Dongxu Li; Hanying Liu; Daniel Mills; Thomas D. Radcliff; Joseph Talnagi

    2001-12-31

    A comprehensive description of the accomplishments of the DOE grant titled, ''Local Measurement of Fuel Energy Deposition and Heat Transfer Environment During Fuel Lifetime using Controlled Calorimetry''.

  11. Measuring fluid flow and heat output in seafloor hydrothermal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germanovich, Leonid N.; Hurt, Robert S.; Smith, Joshua E.; Genc, Gence; Lowell, Robert P.

    2015-12-01

    We review techniques for measuring fluid flow and advective heat output from seafloor hydrothermal systems and describe new anemometer and turbine flowmeter devices we have designed, built, calibrated, and tested. These devices allow measuring fluid velocity at high- and low-temperature focused and diffuse discharge sites at oceanic spreading centers. The devices perform at ocean floor depths and black smoker temperatures and can be used to measure flow rates ranging over 2 orders of magnitude. Flow velocity is determined from the rotation rate of the rotor blades or paddle assembly. These devices have an open bearing design that eliminates clogging by particles or chemical precipitates as the fluid passes by the rotors. The devices are compact and lightweight enough for deployment from either an occupied or remotely operated submersible. The measured flow rates can be used in conjunction with vent temperature or geochemical measurements to obtain heat outputs or geochemical fluxes from both vent chimneys and diffuse flow regions. The devices have been tested on 30 Alvin dives on the Juan de Fuca Ridge and 3 Jason dives on the East Pacific Rise (EPR). We measured an anomalously low entrainment coefficient (0.064) and report 104 new measurements over a wide range of discharge temperatures (5°-363°C), velocities (2-199 cm/s), and depths (1517-2511 m). These include the first advective heat output measurements at the High Rise vent field and the first direct fluid flow measurement at Middle Valley. Our data suggest that black smoker heat output at the Main Endeavour vent field may have declined since 1994 and that after the 2005-2006 eruption, the high-temperature advective flow at the EPR 9°50'N field may have become more channelized, predominately discharging through the Bio 9 structure. We also report 16 measurements on 10 Alvin dives and 2 Jason dives with flow meters that predate devices described in this work and were used in the process of their development

  12. Vestibular ontogeny: Measuring the influence of the dynamic environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Timothy A.; Devries, Sherri M.; Dubois, Linda M.; Nelson, Rick C.

    1993-01-01

    In comparison to other special senses, we are only meagerly informed about the development of vestibular function and the mechanisms that may operate to control or influence the course of vestibular ontogeny. Perhaps one contributing factor to this disparity is the difficulty of evaluating vestibular sense organs directly and noninvasively. The present report describes a recently developed direct noninvasive vestibular function test that can be used to address many basic questions about the developing vestibular system. More particularly, the test can be used to examine the effects of the dynamic environment (e.g. gravitational field and vibration) on vestibular ontogeny.

  13. Checklist of Health Promotion Environments at Worksites (CHEW): Development and Measurement Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oldenburg, Brian; Sallis, James F.; Harris, David; Owen, Neville

    2002-01-01

    Describes the development and administration of the Checklist of Health Promotion Environments at Worksites (CHEW), which measures health-promoting characteristics of the workplace environment by direct observation (physical characteristics, information environment, and immediate neighborhood). Findings illustrate the type of data on environmental…

  14. A Bayesian approach to estimating snow depth from passive microwave measurements using a multi-layer model and minimal prior information (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, M. T.; Liu, D.

    2010-12-01

    Estimates of snow water equivalent (SWE) for hydrologic applications from passive microwave (PM) brightness temperature (Tb) measurements are often subject to errors in mountainous areas. Data assimilation (DA) schemes have typically utilized land surface models (LSMs) coupled with a radiative transfer model (RTM) within an ensemble framework, generating joint ensembles of state variables (SWE, grain size, etc.) and Tb predictions. The posterior states are estimated from the priors and the observations, weighted based on the ensemble-derived correlation between the states and Tb. We have developed a new Bayesian DA scheme utilizing a Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC) to estimate snow states from Tb measurements. Our motivation was two-fold: First, we wanted a platform to better characterize the prior information needed to calculate estimate snow depth or SWE from Tb; e.g., what are the accuracy tradeoffs for different types of snow if an LSM is not used? Second, the often-used correlation-based DA schemes are arguably not ideal to handle the highly non-linear relationship between snow variables and Tb; this issue is bypassed by using a random walk algorithm in the MCMC. Here we present a synthetic data assimilation study. In the MCMC, we treat the number of snow layers as being unknown, as well as the thickness, grain size, density and temperature of each snow layer. We perform the estimation of the posterior state variables in two steps: First, we generate four separate Markov Chains, assuming 1, 2, 3, and 4 snowpack layers. Second, we perform a model selection using a maximum a-posteriori (MAP) estimate to select the optimal Markov Chain. Given the model selection, the posterior Markov Chain is sampled to estimate the full posterior distribution of the snow variables. We performed separate synthetic experiments at each of 191 snowpits sampled in the NASA CLPX-1 campaign in February, 2003. We assimilated synthetic observations at 19, 37, and 89 GHz and at both V

  15. MCG measurement in the environment of active magnetic shield.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, K; Kato, K; Kobayashi, K; Igarashi, A; Sato, T; Haga, A; Kasai, N

    2004-11-30

    MCG (Magnetocardiography) measurement by a SQUID gradiometer was attempted with only active magnetic shielding (active shielding). A three-axis-canceling-coil active shielding system, where three 16-10-16 turns-coil sets were put in the orthogonal directions, produces a homogeneous magnetic field in a considerable volume surrounding the center. Fluxgate sensors were used as the reference sensors of the system. The system can reduce environmental magnetic noise at low frequencies of less than a few Hz, at 50 Hz and at 150 Hz. Reducing such disturbances stabilizes biomagnetic measurement conditions for SQUIDs in the absence of magnetically shielded rooms (MSR). After filtering and averaging the measured MCG data by a first-order SQUID gradiometer with only the active shielding during the daytime, the QRS complex and T wave was clearly presented.

  16. Accuracy of Measurements in Oblique Aerial Images for Urban Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrowski, W.

    2016-10-01

    Oblique aerial images have been a source of data for urban areas for several years. However, the accuracy of measurements in oblique images during this time has been limited to a single meter due to the use of direct -georeferencing technology and the underlying digital elevation model. Therefore, oblique images have been used mostly for visualization purposes. This situation changed in recent years as new methods, which allowed for a higher accuracy of exterior orientation, were developed. Current developments include the process of determining exterior orientation and the previous but still crucial process of tie point extraction. Progress in this area was shown in the ISPRS/EUROSDR Benchmark on Multi-Platform Photogrammetry and is also noticeable in the growing interest in the use of this kind of imagery. The higher level of accuracy in the orientation of oblique aerial images that has become possible in the last few years should result in a higher level of accuracy in the measurements of these types of images. The main goal of this research was to set and empirically verify the accuracy of measurements in oblique aerial images. The research focused on photogrammetric measurements composed of many images, which use a high overlap within an oblique dataset and different view angles. During the experiments, two series of images of urban areas were used. Both were captured using five DigiCam cameras in a Maltese cross configuration. The tilt angles of the oblique cameras were 45 degrees, and the position of the cameras during flight used a high grade GPS/INS navigation system. The orientation of the images was set using the Pix4D Mapper Pro software with both measurements of the in-flight camera position and the ground control points (measured with GPS RTK technology). To control the accuracy, check points were used (which were also measured with GPS RTK technology). As reference data for the whole study, an area of the city-based map was used. The archived results

  17. Evaluation of instruments developed to measure the clinical learning environment: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Hooven, Katie

    2014-01-01

    The nature of the clinical learning environment has a huge impact on student learning. This article reviews current methods available for evaluating the clinical learning environment. Five instruments were identified that measure the clinical learning environment. All of these instruments focus solely on the student perspective of the clinical learning environment. Although gaining student input is important, there are other perspectives that offer valuable insights on the nature of the clinical learning environment. The findings from this integrative review indicate the need for future development and testing of an instrument to evaluate the clinical learning environment from the staff nurse and nurse faculty perspective.

  18. Force Exertion Capacity Measurements in Haptic Virtual Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munih, Marko; Bardorfer, Ales; Ceru, Bojan; Bajd, Tadej; Zupan, Anton

    2010-01-01

    An objective test for evaluating functional status of the upper limbs (ULs) in patients with muscular distrophy (MD) is presented. The method allows for quantitative assessment of the UL functional state with an emphasis on force exertion capacity. The experimental measurement setup and the methodology for the assessment of maximal exertable force…

  19. Towards a mature measurement environment: Creating a software engineering research environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basili, Victor R.

    1990-01-01

    Software engineering researchers are building tools, defining methods, and models; however, there are problems with the nature and style of the research. The research is typically bottom-up, done in isolation so the pieces cannot be easily logically or physically integrated. A great deal of the research is essentially the packaging of a particular piece of technology with little indication of how the work would be integrated with other prices of research. The research is not aimed at solving the real problems of software engineering, i.e., the development and maintenance of quality systems in a productive manner. The research results are not evaluated or analyzed via experimentation or refined and tailored to the application environment. Thus, it cannot be easily transferred into practice. Because of these limitations we have not been able to understand the components of the discipline as a coherent whole and the relationships between various models of the process and product. What is needed is a top down experimental, evolutionary framework in which research can be focused, logically and physically integrated to produce quality software productively, and evaluated and tailored to the application environment. This implies the need for experimentation, which in turn implies the need for a laboratory that is associated with the artifact we are studying. This laboratory can only exist in an environment where software is being built, i.e., as part of a real software development and maintenance organization. Thus, we propose that Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) type activities exist in all organizations to support software engineering research. We describe the SEL from a researcher's point of view, and discuss the corporate and government benefits of the SEL. The discussion focuses on the benefits to the research community.

  20. Measured Gene-by-Environment Interaction in Relation to Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nigg, Joel; Nikolas, Molly; Burt, S. Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To summarize and evaluate the state of knowledge regarding the role of measured gene-by-environment interactions in relation to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Method: A selective review of methodologic issues was followed by a systematic search for relevant articles on measured gene-by-environment interactions; the search…

  1. Measurement of Exercise Tolerance before Surgery (METS) study: a protocol for an international multicentre prospective cohort study of cardiopulmonary exercise testing prior to major non-cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pearse, Rupert M; Shulman, Mark A; Abbott, Tom E F; Torres, Elizabeth; Croal, Bernard L; Granton, John T; Thorpe, Kevin E; Grocott, Michael P W; Farrington, Catherine; Myles, Paul S; Cuthbertson, Brian H

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Preoperative functional capacity is considered an important risk factor for cardiovascular and other complications of major non-cardiac surgery. Nonetheless, the usual approach for estimating preoperative functional capacity, namely doctors’ subjective assessment, may not accurately predict postoperative morbidity or mortality. 3 possible alternatives are cardiopulmonary exercise testing; the Duke Activity Status Index, a standardised questionnaire for estimating functional capacity; and the serum concentration of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT pro-BNP), a biomarker for heart failure and cardiac ischaemia. Methods and analysis The Measurement of Exercise Tolerance before Surgery (METS) Study is a multicentre prospective cohort study of patients undergoing major elective non-cardiac surgery at 25 participating study sites in Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the UK. We aim to recruit 1723 participants. Prior to surgery, participants undergo symptom-limited cardiopulmonary exercise testing on a cycle ergometer, complete the Duke Activity Status Index questionnaire, undergo blood sampling to measure serum NT pro-BNP concentration and have their functional capacity subjectively assessed by their responsible doctors. Participants are followed for 1 year after surgery to assess vital status, postoperative complications and general health utilities. The primary outcome is all-cause death or non-fatal myocardial infarction within 30 days after surgery, and the secondary outcome is all-cause death within 1 year after surgery. Both receiver-operating-characteristic curve methods and risk reclassification table methods will be used to compare the prognostic accuracy of preoperative subjective assessment, peak oxygen consumption during cardiopulmonary exercise testing, Duke Activity Status Index scores and serum NT pro-BNP concentration. Ethics and dissemination The METS Study has received research ethics board approval at all sites

  2. Measurement of surface reactions in the space environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdou, Wedad A.; Megill, Lawrence R.; Brinza, David A.; Hart, Roger C.; Moore, R. Gilbert

    1989-01-01

    The Atomic Oxygen Measurement Spacecraft, ATOMS, and a suite of associated instruments, designed to measure the performance of improved atomic-oxygen-resistant materials and coatings in orbit and to telemeter the resulting data and video images to earth at intervals during a one-year mission, have been described in a definition study sponsored by the Langley Research Center under NASA's In-Space Technology Experiments Program. The objective of the program is to work toward an improvement of base materials and surface coatings which will resist the serious degradation experienced by the external surfaces of LEO spacecraft as a result of the ablative effects of atmospheric oxygen, possibly catalyzed by solar UV radiation. This miniature orbiting laboratory includes a radio-frequency mass spectrometer, a set of osmium actinometers, and a scanning optical microscope. The design of these instruments and their use in the overall experiment are discussed.

  3. Work Environment Questionnaires and Army Unit Effectiveness and Satisfaction Measures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-09-01

    excluded under this criterions 1. Peieomallty tests . Measures of individual traits, characteristics, intelligence, attitudes, and the like (e.g., the...Prefer- ence Test , or Navy Vocational Interest Inventory) were excluded as being primarily masures of individual attitudes, not variables of...e.g., Stock & Thelans "Reactions to Group Personality Test ," Bales’ "Interaction Process Inventory," Schutz’s FIRO-B) have a quasi-organizational

  4. Measured electron contribution to Shuttle plasma environment: Abbreviated update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmahon, W.; Salter, R.; Hills, R.; Delorey, D.

    1985-01-01

    The differential energy spectra of electrons between 1 and 100 eV were measured by an electron spectrometer flown on an early shuttle. This energy range was scanned in 64 incremental steps with a resolution of 7%. The most striking feature that was observed throughout these spectra was a relatively flat distribution of the higher energy electrons out to 100 eV. This is in contrast to normal ambient spectra which consistently show a rapid decline in quantitative flux beyond 50 to 55 eV. The lower energy (1 to 2 eV) end of these spectra showed steep thermal trails comparable to normal ambient spectral structure. In general, daytime fluxes were significantly higher than those obtained during nighttime measurements. Quantitative flux excursions which may possibly be associated with thruster firing were frequently observed. Spectral structure suggestive of the N2 vibrational excitation energy loss mechanism was also seen in the data from some measurement periods. Examples of these spectra are shown and possible correlations are discussed.

  5. Measuring the robustness of link prediction algorithms under noisy environment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Wang, Xiang; Wang, Futian; Zeng, An; Xiao, Jinghua

    2016-01-01

    Link prediction in complex networks is to estimate the likelihood of two nodes to interact with each other in the future. As this problem has applications in a large number of real systems, many link prediction methods have been proposed. However, the validation of these methods is so far mainly conducted in the assumed noise-free networks. Therefore, we still miss a clear understanding of how the prediction results would be affected if the observed network data is no longer accurate. In this paper, we comprehensively study the robustness of the existing link prediction algorithms in the real networks where some links are missing, fake or swapped with other links. We find that missing links are more destructive than fake and swapped links for prediction accuracy. An index is proposed to quantify the robustness of the link prediction methods. Among the twenty-two studied link prediction methods, we find that though some methods have low prediction accuracy, they tend to perform reliably in the “noisy” environment. PMID:26733156

  6. Measuring human capital cost through benchmarking in health care environment.

    PubMed

    Kocakülâh, Mehmet C; Harris, Donna

    2002-01-01

    Each organization should seek to maximize its human capital investments, which ultimately lead to increased profits and asset efficiency. Service companies utilize less capital equipment and more human productivity, customer service, and/or delivery of service as the product. With the measurement of human capital, one can understand what is happening, exercise some degree of control, and make positive changes. Senior management lives or dies by the numbers and if Human Resources (HR) really wants to be a strategic business partner, HR must be judged by the same standards as everyone else in the health care organization.

  7. Mountain Heavy Rainfall Measurement Experiments in a Subtropical Monsoon Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jong-Dao Jou, Ben; Chi-June Jung, Ultimate; Lai, Hsiao-Wei; Feng, Lei

    2014-05-01

    Quantitative rainfall measurement experiments have been conducted in Taiwan area for the past 5 years (since 2008), especially over the complex terrain region. In this paper, results from these experiments will be analyzed and discussed, especially those associated with heavy rain events in the summer monsoon season. Observations from s-band polarimetric radar (SPOL of NCAR) and also x-band vertically-pointing radar are analyzed to reveal the high resolution temporal and spatial variation of precipitation structure. May and June, the Meiyu season in the area, are months with subtropical frontal rainfall events. Mesoscale convective systems, i.e., pre-frontal squall lines and frontal convective rainbands, are very active and frequently produce heavy rain events over mountain areas. Accurate quantitative precipitation measurements are needed in order to meet the requirement for landslide and flood early warning purpose. Using ground-based disdrometers and vertically-pointing radar, we have been trying to modify the quantitative precipitation estimation in the mountain region by using coastal operational radar. In this paper, the methodology applied will be presented and the potential of its application will be discussed. *corresponding author: Ben Jong-Dao Jou, jouben43@gmail.com

  8. Cross-Level Measurement Invariance in School and Classroom Environment Surveys: Implications for Policy and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schweig, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Measures of classroom and school environments are central to policy efforts that assess school and teacher quality. These measures are often formed by aggregating individual survey responses to form group-level measures, and assume an invariant measurement model holds across the individual and group levels. This article explores the tenability of…

  9. Work group IV: Future directions for measures of the food and physical activity environments.

    PubMed

    Story, Mary; Giles-Corti, Billie; Yaroch, Amy Lazarus; Cummins, Steven; Frank, Lawrence Douglas; Huang, Terry T-K; Lewis, LaVonna Blair

    2009-04-01

    Much progress has been made in the past 5 to 10 years in measuring and understanding the impact of the food and physical activity environments on behavioral outcomes. Nevertheless, this research is in its infancy. A work group was convened to identify current evidence gaps and barriers in food and physical activity environments and policy research measures, and develop recommendations to guide future directions for measurement and methodologic research efforts. A nominal group process was used to determine six priority areas for food and physical activity environments and policy measures to move the field forward by 2015, including: (1) identify relevant factors in the food and physical activity environments to measure, including those most amenable to change; (2) improve understanding of mechanisms for relationships between the environment and physical activity, diet, and obesity; (3) develop simplified measures that are sensitive to change, valid for different population groups and settings, and responsive to changing trends; (4) evaluate natural experiments to improve understanding of food and physical activity environments and their impact on behaviors and weight; (5) establish surveillance systems to predict and track change over time; and (6) develop standards for adopting effective health-promoting changes to the food and physical activity environments. The recommendations emanating from the work group highlight actions required to advance policy-relevant research related to food and physical activity environments.

  10. Measurement Tools for the Immersive Visualization Environment: Steps Toward the Virtual Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Hagedorn, John G.; Dunkers, Joy P.; Satterfield, Steven G.; Peskin, Adele P.; Kelso, John T.; Terrill, Judith E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a set of tools for performing measurements of objects in a virtual reality based immersive visualization environment. These tools enable the use of the immersive environment as an instrument for extracting quantitative information from data representations that hitherto had be used solely for qualitative examination. We provide, within the virtual environment, ways for the user to analyze and interact with the quantitative data generated. We describe results generated by these methods to obtain dimensional descriptors of tissue engineered medical products. We regard this toolbox as our first step in the implementation of a virtual measurement laboratory within an immersive visualization environment. PMID:27110469

  11. A systematic review of the relationship between objective measurements of the urban environment and psychological distress.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yi; Palmer, Stephen; Gallacher, John; Marsden, Terry; Fone, David

    2016-11-01

    The urban environment has become the main place that people live and work. As a result it can have profound impacts on our health. While much of the literature has focused on physical health, less attention has been paid to the possible psychological impacts of the urban environment. In order to understand the potential relevance and importance of the urban environment to population mental health, we carried out a systematic review to examine the associations between objective measurements of the urban environment and psychological distress, independently of the individual's subjective perceptions of the urban environment. 11 peer-reviewed papers published in English between January 2000 and February 2012 were identified. All studies were cross-sectional. Despite heterogeneity in study design, the overall findings suggested that the urban environment has measurable associations with psychological distress, including housing with deck access, neighbourhood quality, the amount of green space, land-use mix, industry activity and traffic volume. The evidence supports the need for development of interventions to improve mental health through changing the urban environment. We also conclude that new methods for measuring the urban environment objectively are needed which are meaningful to planners. In particular, future work should look at the spatial-temporal dynamic of the urban environment measured in Geographical Information System (GIS) in relation to psychological distress.

  12. Prior Knowledge Assessment Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    Research Product 2015-01 Prior Knowledge Assessment Guide Gary M. Stallings Northrop Grumman Corporation Jean L...Prior Knowledge Assessment Guide 5a. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER W5J9CQ-11-D-0001 5b. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 633007 6. AUTHOR(S...instructors had a good understanding of what prior knowledge was relevant for their courses. The purpose of the guide documented in this report is

  13. Constrained noninformative priors

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, C.L.

    1994-10-01

    The Jeffreys noninformative prior distribution for a single unknown parameter is the distribution corresponding to a uniform distribution in the transformed model where the unknown parameter is approximately a location parameter. To obtain a prior distribution with a specified mean but with diffusion reflecting great uncertainty, a natural generalization of the noninformative prior is the distribution corresponding to the constrained maximum entropy distribution in the transformed model. Examples are given.

  14. Measurement of contact angles in a simulated microgravity environment generated by a large gradient magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong-Ming; Chen, Rui-Qing; Wu, Zi-Qing; Zhu, Jing; Shi, Jian-Yu; Lu, Hui-Meng; Shang, Peng; Yin, Da-Chuan

    2016-09-01

    The contact angle is an important parameter that is essential for studying interfacial phenomena. The contact angle can be measured using commercially available instruments. However, these well-developed instruments may not function or may be unsuitable for use in some special environments. A simulated microgravity generated by a large gradient magnetic field is such an environment in which the current measurement instruments cannot be installed. To measure the contact angle in this environment, new tools must be designed and manufactured to be compatible with the size and physical environment. In this study, we report the development and construction of a new setup that was specifically designed for use in a strong magnetic field to measure the contact angle between a levitated droplet and a solid surface. The application of the setup in a large gradient magnetic field was tested, and the contact angles were readily measured.

  15. Measurement and modeling of phosphorous transport in shallow groundwater environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, G. S.; Shukla, S.; Obreza, T. A.; Harris, W. G.

    2014-08-01

    amount of added fertilizer P between HEI (187 kg P2O5/ha) and REI (124 kg P2O5/ha), soil Mehlich 1 P (M1P) values were similar for both systems while they received Pinput. Soil M1P for REI and REI-SD increased to a maximum of 55 mg/kg while they received Pinput, and then gradually decreased after Pinput ceased. However, M1P for HEI increased steadily to a maximum of 145 mg/kg by the end of the study with continued Pinput. Mehlich-1 P measured six years after the study still showed relatively high levels of P, a legacy effect of Pinput. The main factors influencing groundwater P concentration varied by seasons. During fall with frequent rainfall, the concentrations were influenced mainly by M1P and Pinput, and highlight a need for greater focus on Pinput management (vs. water management) during this season. However, during the dry period of spring, a greater focus on irrigation management is required since depth to water table and rainfall also become contributing factors. Three multivariate models (r2 = 0.67 to 0.93), for spring, fall, and annual periods, were developed for predicting groundwater P concentrations for a wide range of water and P inputs (0 to 191 kg P2O5/ha of Pinput). The uniqueness of these models is that they use readily available hydrologic (rainfall and water table depth), management (Pinput), and soil (M1P) data commonly monitored by growers when managing water and nutrient inputs on agricultural landscapes. The development of similar models may not be necessary for other agro-ecosystems in similar regions since long-term data collected in these regions may be applied, with verification, to the models presented here.

  16. Measurement and modeling of phosphorous transport in shallow groundwater environments.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, G S; Shukla, S; Obreza, T A; Harris, W G

    2014-08-01

    added fertilizer P between HEI (187kg P2O5/ha) and REI (124kg P2O5/ha), soil Mehlich 1 P (M1P) values were similar for both systems while they received Pinput. Soil M1P for REI and REI-SD increased to a maximum of 55mg/kg while they received Pinput, and then gradually decreased after Pinput ceased. However, M1P for HEI increased steadily to a maximum of 145mg/kg by the end of the study with continued Pinput. Mehlich-1 P measured six years after the study still showed relatively high levels of P, a legacy effect of Pinput. The main factors influencing groundwater P concentration varied by seasons. During fall with frequent rainfall, the concentrations were influenced mainly by M1P and Pinput, and highlight a need for greater focus on Pinput management (vs. water management) during this season. However, during the dry period of spring, a greater focus on irrigation management is required since depth to water table and rainfall also become contributing factors. Three multivariate models (r(2)=0.67 to 0.93), for spring, fall, and annual periods, were developed for predicting groundwater P concentrations for a wide range of water and P inputs (0 to 191kg P2O5/ha of Pinput). The uniqueness of these models is that they use readily available hydrologic (rainfall and water table depth), management (Pinput), and soil (M1P) data commonly monitored by growers when managing water and nutrient inputs on agricultural landscapes. The development of similar models may not be necessary for other agro-ecosystems in similar regions since long-term data collected in these regions may be applied, with verification, to the models presented here.

  17. Airborne RF Measurement System (ARMS) and Analysis of Representative Flight RF Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppen, Sandra V.; Ely, Jay J.; Smith, Laura J.; Jones, Richard A.; Fleck, Vincent J.; Salud, Maria Theresa; Mielnik, John J.

    2007-01-01

    Environmental radio frequency (RF) data over a broad band of frequencies (30 MHz to 1000 MHz) were obtained to evaluate the electromagnetic environment in airspace around several airports. An RF signal measurement system was designed utilizing a spectrum analyzer connected to the NASA Lancair Columbia 300 aircraft's VHF/UHF navigation antenna. This paper presents an overview of the RF measurement system and provides analysis of sample RF signal measurement data. This aircraft installation package and measurement system can be quickly returned to service if needed by future projects requiring measurement of an RF signal environment or exploration of suspected interference situations.

  18. Measuring the Computer Classroom Environment: Lessons Learned from Using a New Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Keri A.; Crump, Barbara J.; Rennie, Leonie J.

    2006-01-01

    Research over the last four decades has shown that the classroom learning environment impacts on students' cognitive and affective outcomes. Different approaches have been taken to measure students' perceptions of their learning environment, and this has led to the development of a large number of survey instruments. One such instrument is the…

  19. The Relationship between Measures of Home Environment and School Achievement of Follow Through Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Joseph J.; Hanes, Michael L.

    The investigators hypothesized that home environment variables--as measured by the Home Environment Review, administered upon entrance to kindergarten--account for the variance in children's reading achievement at the end of kindergarten, first, and second grade. One hundred fifty-three children representing a longitudinal, traced sample from two…

  20. The CANEP Scale: Preliminary Psychometric Findings of a Measure of Youths' Perception of Their Neighborhood Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisegger, Corinna; Cloetta, Bernhard; Ravens-Sieberer, Ulrike

    2008-01-01

    The impact of the environment on the quality of life and health is considered to be important for adults as well as for children and adolescents. To include the subjective view of children and adolescents in this context, instruments for measuring the perception of the environment are needed. The new scale CANEP (Children's and Adolescents'…

  1. Measuring the Medical School Educational Environment: Validating an Approach from Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alshehri, Sarah A.; Alshehri, Abdulrahman F.; Erwin, T. Dary

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study is an empirical analysis of the female students' attitudes toward the medical educational environment and climate in the College of Medicine at King Khalid University. Setting: The Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure (DREEM) questionnaire was administered on the same day to 100 female students studying in the third…

  2. Evaluation of a Brazilian Postgraduate Dental Program by the Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    do Vale Placa, Rebeca; Ragghianti Zangrando, Mariana S.; Sant'Ana, Adriana C. P.; Greghi, Sebastião L. A.; de Rezende, Maria Lucia R.; Damante, Carla A.

    2015-01-01

    The evaluation of education environment is essential to provide to the professors a better understanding of the teaching process. One valuable tool for this assessment is the Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure (DREEM). This questionnaire has 50 questions and is divided in five dimensions: D1--Perceptions of teaching, D2--Perceptions of…

  3. A Student Environment Model: A Measure of Institutional Effectiveness. AIR 1998 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris-Baldwin, Darline

    This study traces the development of a student environment model (SEM) at Texas State Technical College (Waco) that is used to assess students' perceptions of their college environment outside the formal classroom, provides baseline data for comparative analyses, establishes goals for student support services, measures program and process…

  4. Developing the School Physical Activity and Nutrition Environment Tool to Measure Qualities of the Obesogenic Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Deborah H.; Gunter, Katherine; Jackson, Jennifer A.; Manore, Melinda

    2016-01-01

    Background: Practical tools are needed that reliably measure the complex physical activity (PA) and nutrition environments of elementary schools that influence children's health and learning behaviors for obesity prevention. The School Physical Activity and Nutrition-Environment Tool (SPAN-ET) was developed and beta tested in 6 rural Oregon…

  5. Interest and Prior Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobias, Sigmund

    This paper selectively reviews research on the relationship between topic interest and prior knowledge, and discusses the optimal association between these variables. The paper points out that interest has a facilitating impact on learning, and at least part of this effect must be ascribed to prior knowledge. While the interest-knowledge…

  6. Business list vs ground observation for measuring a food environment: saving time or waste of time (or worse)?

    PubMed

    Lucan, Sean C; Maroko, Andrew R; Bumol, Joel; Torrens, Luis; Varona, Monica; Berke, Ethan M

    2013-10-01

    In food-environment research, an alternative to resource-intensive direct observation on the ground has been the use of commercial business lists. We sought to determine how well a frequently used commercial business list measures a dense urban food environment like the Bronx, NY. On 155 Bronx street segments, investigators compared two different levels for matches between the business list and direct ground observation: lenient (by business type) and strict (by business name). For each level of matching, researchers calculated sensitivities and positive predictive values (PPVs) for the business list overall and by broad business categories: General Grocers (eg, supermarkets), Specialty Food Stores (eg, produce markets), Restaurants, and Businesses Not Primarily Selling Food (eg, newsstands). Even after cleaning the business list (eg, for cases of multiple listings at a single location), and allowing for inexactness in listed street addresses and spellings of business names, the overall performance of the business list was poor. For strict matches, the business list had an overall sensitivity of 39.3% and PPV of 45.5%. Sensitivities and PPVs by broad business categories were not meaningfully different from overall values, although sensitivity for General Grocers and PPV for Specialty Food Stores were particularly low: 26.2% and 32%, respectively. For lenient matches, sensitivities and PPVs were somewhat higher but still poor: 52.4% to 60% and 60% to 75%, respectively. The business list is inadequate to measure the actual food environment in the Bronx. If results represent performance in other settings, findings from prior studies linking food environments to diet and diet-related health outcomes using such business lists are in question, and future studies of this type should avoid relying solely on such business lists.

  7. Business list vs. ground observation for measuring a food environment: saving time or waste of time (or worse)?

    PubMed Central

    Lucan, Sean C.; Maroko, Andrew R.; Bumol, Joel; Torrens, Luis; Varona, Monica; Berke, Ethan M.

    2013-01-01

    In food-environment research, an alternative to resource-intensive direct observation on the ground has been the use of commercial business lists. We sought to determine how well a frequently-used commercial business list measures a dense urban food environment like the Bronx. On 155 Bronx street segments, investigators compared two different levels for “matches” between the business list and direct ground observation: lenient (by business type) and strict (by business name). For each level of matching, researchers calculated sensitivities and positive predictive values (PPVs) for the business list overall and by broad business categories: General grocers (e.g., supermarkets), Specialty-food stores (e.g., produce markets), Restaurants, and Businesses not primarily selling food (e.g., newsstands). Even after cleaning the business list (e.g., for cases of multiple listings at a single location), and allowing for inexactness in listed street addresses and spellings of business names, the overall performance of the business list was poor. For strict “matches”, the business list had an overall sensitivity of 39.3% and PPV of 45.5%. Sensitivities and PPVs by broad business categories were not meaningfully different from overall values, although sensitivity for General grocers and PPV for Specialty-food stores were particularly low: 26.2% and 32.0% respectively. For lenient “matches”, sensitivities and PPVs were somewhat higher but still poor: 52.4–60.0% and 60.0–75.0% respectively. The business list is inadequate to measures the actual food environment in the Bronx. If results represent performance in other settings, findings from prior studies linking food environments to diet and diet-related health outcomes using such business lists are in question, and future studies of this type should avoid relying solely on such business lists. PMID:23871107

  8. Measuring the built environment for physical activity: state of the science.

    PubMed

    Brownson, Ross C; Hoehner, Christine M; Day, Kristen; Forsyth, Ann; Sallis, James F

    2009-04-01

    Physical inactivity is one of the most important public health issues in the U.S. and internationally. Increasingly, links are being identified between various elements of the physical-or built-environment and physical activity. To understand the impact of the built environment on physical activity, the development of high-quality measures is essential. Three categories of built environment data are being used: (1) perceived measures obtained by telephone interview or self-administered questionnaires; (2) observational measures obtained using systematic observational methods (audits); and (3) archival data sets that are often layered and analyzed with GIS. This review provides a critical assessment of these three types of built-environment measures relevant to the study of physical activity. Among perceived measures, 19 questionnaires were reviewed, ranging in length from 7 to 68 questions. Twenty audit tools were reviewed that cover community environments (i.e., neighborhoods, cities), parks, and trails. For GIS-derived measures, more than 50 studies were reviewed. A large degree of variability was found in the operationalization of common GIS measures, which include population density, land-use mix, access to recreational facilities, and street pattern. This first comprehensive examination of built-environment measures demonstrates considerable progress over the past decade, showing diverse environmental variables available that use multiple modes of assessment. Most can be considered first-generation measures, so further development is needed. In particular, further research is needed to improve the technical quality of measures, understand the relevance to various population groups, and understand the utility of measures for science and public health.

  9. Measuring the Environment for Friendliness Toward Physical Activity: A Comparison of the Reliability of 3 Questionnaires

    PubMed Central

    Brownson, Ross C.; Chang, Jen Jen; Eyler, Amy A.; Ainsworth, Barbara E.; Kirtland, Karen A.; Saelens, Brian E.; Sallis, James F.

    2004-01-01

    Objectives. We tested the reliability of 3 instruments that assessed social and physical environments. Methods. We conducted a test–retest study among US adults (n = 289). We used telephone survey methods to measure suitableness of the perceived (vs objective) environment for recreational physical activity and nonmotorized transportation. Results. Most questions in our surveys that attempted to measure specific characteristics of the built environment showed moderate to high reliability. Questions about the social environment showed lower reliability than those that assessed the physical environment. Certain blocks of questions appeared to be selectively more reliable for urban or rural respondents. Conclusions. Despite differences in content and in response formats, all 3 surveys showed evidence of reliability, and most items are now ready for use in research and in public health surveillance. PMID:14998817

  10. Measuring Physical Activity in Outdoor Community Recreational Environments: Implications for Research, Policy, and Practice.

    PubMed

    Aytur, Semra A; Jones, Sydney A; Stransky, Michelle; Evenson, Kelly R

    2015-01-01

    Chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) are major contributors to escalating health care costs in the USA. Physical activity is an important protective factor against CVD, and the National Prevention Strategy recognizes active living (defined as a way of life that integrates physical activity into everyday routines) as a priority for improving the nation's health. This paper focuses on developing more inclusive measures of physical activity in outdoor community recreational environments, specifically parks and trails, to enhance their usability for at-risk populations such as persons with mobility limitations. We develop an integrated conceptual framework for measuring physical activity in outdoor community recreational environments, describe examples of evidence-based tools for measuring physical activity in these settings, and discuss strategies to improve measurement of physical activity for persons with mobility limitations. Addressing these measurement issues is critically important to making progress towards national CVD goals pertaining to active community environments.

  11. Measuring Physical Activity in Outdoor Community Recreational Environments: Implications for Research, Policy, and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Sydney A.; Stransky, Michelle; Evenson, Kelly R.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) are major contributors to escalating health care costs in the USA. Physical activity is an important protective factor against CVD, and the National Prevention Strategy recognizes active living (defined as a way of life that integrates physical activity into everyday routines) as a priority for improving the nation’s health. This paper focuses on developing more inclusive measures of physical activity in outdoor community recreational environments, specifically parks and trails, to enhance their usability for at-risk populations such as persons with mobility limitations. We develop an integrated conceptual framework for measuring physical activity in outdoor community recreational environments, describe examples of evidence-based tools for measuring physical activity in these settings, and discuss strategies to improve measurement of physical activity for persons with mobility limitations. Addressing these measurement issues is critically important to making progress towards national CVD goals pertaining to active community environments. PMID:26005510

  12. Making priors a priority

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segall, Matthew; Chadwick, Andrew

    2010-12-01

    When we build a predictive model of a drug property we rigorously assess its predictive accuracy, but we are rarely able to address the most important question, "How useful will the model be in making a decision in a practical context?" To answer this requires an understanding of the prior probability distribution ("the prior") and hence prevalence of negative outcomes due to the property being assessed. In this perspective, we illustrate the importance of the prior to assess the utility of a model in different contexts: to select or eliminate compounds, to prioritise compounds for further investigation using more expensive screens, or to combine models for different properties to select compounds with a balance of properties. In all three contexts, a better understanding of the prior probabilities of adverse events due to key factors will improve our ability to make good decisions in drug discovery, finding higher quality molecules more efficiently.

  13. Constructing priors in synesthesia.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Tessa M

    2014-01-01

    A new theoretical framework (PPSMC) applicable to synesthesia has been proposed, in which the discrepancy between the perceptual reality of (some) synesthetic concurrents and their subjective non-veridicality is being explained. The PPSMC framework stresses the relevance of the phenomenology of synesthesia for synesthesia research-and beyond. When describing the emergence and persistence of synesthetic concurrents under PPSMC, it is proposed that precise, high-confidence priors are crucial in synesthesia. I discuss the construction of priors in synesthesia.

  14. Measurements Required to Understand the Lunar Dust Environment and Transport Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James F., Jr.; Abbas, Mian

    2006-01-01

    Going back to the lunar surface offers an opportunity to understand the dust environment and associated transport mechanisms. This talk will explore what measurements are required to understand and characterize the dust-plasma environment in which robotic and human activities will be conducted. The understanding gained with the measurements can be used to make informed decisions on engineering solutions and follow-on investigations. Particular focus will be placed on required measurements of the size, spatial and charge distribution of the suspended lunar regolith.

  15. Measurement with verification of stationary signals and noise in extremely quiet environments: measuring below the noise floor.

    PubMed

    Ellingson, Roger M; Gallun, Frederick J; Bock, Guillaume

    2015-03-01

    It can be problematic to measure stationary acoustic sound pressure level in any environment when the target level approaches or lies below the minimum measureable sound pressure level of the measurement system itself. This minimum measureable level, referred to as the inherent measurement system noise floor, is generally established by noise emission characteristics of measurement system components such as microphones, preamplifiers, and other system circuitry. In this paper, methods are presented and shown accurate measuring stationary levels within 20 dB above and below this system noise floor. Methodology includes (1) measuring inherent measurement system noise, (2) subtractive energy based, inherent noise adjustment of levels affected by system noise floor, and (3) verifying accuracy of inherent noise adjustment technique. While generalizable to other purposes, the techniques presented here were specifically developed to quantify ambient noise levels in very quiet rooms used to evaluate free-field human hearing thresholds. Results obtained applying the methods to objectively measure and verify the ambient noise level in an extremely quiet room, using various measurement system noise floors and analysis bandwidths, are presented and discussed. The verified results demonstrate the adjustment method can accurately extend measurement range to 20 dB below the measurement system noise floor, and how measurement system frequency bandwidth can affect accuracy of reported noise levels.

  16. Measurement and Characterization of the Acceleration Environment on Board the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baugher, Charles R. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    This workshop provides a comprehensive overview of the work and status of each of these areas to provide a basis for establishing a systematic approach to the challenge of avoiding these difficulties during the Space Station era of materials experimentation. The discussions were arranged in the order of: the scientific understanding of the requirements for a micro-gravity environment, a history of acceleration measurements on spacecraft, the state of accelerometer technology, and the current understanding of the predicted Space Station environment.

  17. Recovering full coherence in a qubit by measuring half of its environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miatto, Filippo M.; Piché, Kevin; Brougham, Thomas; Boyd, Robert W.

    2015-12-01

    When a quantum system interacts with its environment it may incur in decoherence. Quantum erasure makes it possible to restore coherence in a system by gaining information about its environment, but measuring the whole of it may be prohibitive: Realistically, one might be forced to address only an accessible subspace and neglect the rest. In such a case, under what conditions will quantum erasure still be effective? In this work we compute analytically the largest recoverable coherence of a random qubit plus environment state and we show that it approaches 100% with overwhelmingly high probability as long as the dimension of the accessible subspace of the environment is larger than √{D }, where D is the dimension of the whole environment. Additionally, we find a sharp transition between a linear behavior and a power-law behavior as soon as the dimension of the inaccessible environment exceeds the dimension of the accessible one. Our results imply that the typical states of a qubit plus environment system admit a measurement spanning only about √{D } degrees of freedom, any outcome of which projects the qubit on a maximally coherent state. This suggests, for instance, that in the dynamics of open quantum systems, if the interactions are known, it would in principle be possible to gain sufficient information and restore coherence in a qubit by dealing with a fraction of the physical resources.

  18. Mars' surface radiation environment measured with the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover.

    PubMed

    Hassler, Donald M; Zeitlin, Cary; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F; Ehresmann, Bent; Rafkin, Scot; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L; Brinza, David E; Weigle, Gerald; Böttcher, Stephan; Böhm, Eckart; Burmeister, Soenke; Guo, Jingnan; Köhler, Jan; Martin, Cesar; Reitz, Guenther; Cucinotta, Francis A; Kim, Myung-Hee; Grinspoon, David; Bullock, Mark A; Posner, Arik; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Vasavada, Ashwin; Grotzinger, John P

    2014-01-24

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover began making detailed measurements of the cosmic ray and energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars on 7 August 2012. We report and discuss measurements of the absorbed dose and dose equivalent from galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles on the martian surface for ~300 days of observations during the current solar maximum. These measurements provide insight into the radiation hazards associated with a human mission to the surface of Mars and provide an anchor point with which to model the subsurface radiation environment, with implications for microbial survival times of any possible extant or past life, as well as for the preservation of potential organic biosignatures of the ancient martian environment.

  19. Mars' Surface Radiation Environment Measured with the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity Rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassler, Donald M.; Zeitlin, Cary; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Ehresmann, Bent; Rafkin, Scot; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Brinza, David E.; Weigle, Gerald; Böttcher, Stephan; Böhm, Eckart; Burmeister, Soenke; Guo, Jingnan; Köhler, Jan; Martin, Cesar; Reitz, Guenther; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Kim, Myung-Hee; Grinspoon, David; Bullock, Mark A.; Posner, Arik; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Vasavada, Ashwin; Grotzinger, John P.; MSL Science Team; Kemppinen, Osku; Cremers, David; Bell, James F.; Edgar, Lauren; Farmer, Jack; Godber, Austin; Wadhwa, Meenakshi; Wellington, Danika; McEwan, Ian; Newman, Claire; Richardson, Mark; Charpentier, Antoine; Peret, Laurent; King, Penelope; Blank, Jennifer; Schmidt, Mariek; Li, Shuai; Milliken, Ralph; Robertson, Kevin; Sun, Vivian; Baker, Michael; Edwards, Christopher; Ehlmann, Bethany; Farley, Kenneth; Griffes, Jennifer; Miller, Hayden; Newcombe, Megan; Pilorget, Cedric; Rice, Melissa; Siebach, Kirsten; Stack, Katie; Stolper, Edward; Brunet, Claude; Hipkin, Victoria; Léveillé, Richard; Marchand, Geneviève; Sánchez, Pablo Sobrón; Favot, Laurent; Cody, George; Steele, Andrew; Flückiger, Lorenzo; Lees, David; Nefian, Ara; Martin, Mildred; Gailhanou, Marc; Westall, Frances; Israël, Guy; Agard, Christophe; Baroukh, Julien; Donny, Christophe; Gaboriaud, Alain; Guillemot, Philippe; Lafaille, Vivian; Lorigny, Eric; Paillet, Alexis; Pérez, René; Saccoccio, Muriel; Yana, Charles; Armiens-Aparicio, Carlos; Rodríguez, Javier Caride; Blázquez, Isaías Carrasco; Gómez, Felipe Gómez; Hettrich, Sebastian; Malvitte, Alain Lepinette; Jiménez, Mercedes Marín; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Martín-Soler, Javier; Martín-Torres, F. Javier; Jurado, Antonio Molina; Mora-Sotomayor, Luis; Caro, Guillermo Muñoz; López, Sara Navarro; Peinado-González, Verónica; Pla-García, Jorge; Manfredi, José Antonio Rodriguez; Romeral-Planelló, Julio José; Fuentes, Sara Alejandra Sans; Martinez, Eduardo Sebastian; Redondo, Josefina Torres; Urqui-O'Callaghan, Roser; Mier, María-Paz Zorzano; Chipera, Steve; Lacour, Jean-Luc; Mauchien, Patrick; Sirven, Jean-Baptiste; Manning, Heidi; Fairén, Alberto; Hayes, Alexander; Joseph, Jonathan; Squyres, Steven; Sullivan, Robert; Thomas, Peter; Dupont, Audrey; Lundberg, Angela; Melikechi, Noureddine; Mezzacappa, Alissa; Berger, Thomas; Matthia, Daniel; Prats, Benito; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Genzer, Maria; Harri, Ari-Matti; Haukka, Harri; Kahanpää, Henrik; Kauhanen, Janne; Kemppinen, Osku; Paton, Mark; Polkko, Jouni; Schmidt, Walter; Siili, Tero; Fabre, Cécile; Wray, James; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Poitrasson, Franck; Patel, Kiran; Gorevan, Stephen; Indyk, Stephen; Paulsen, Gale; Gupta, Sanjeev; Bish, David; Schieber, Juergen; Gondet, Brigitte; Langevin, Yves; Geffroy, Claude; Baratoux, David; Berger, Gilles; Cros, Alain; d'Uston, Claude; Forni, Olivier; Gasnault, Olivier; Lasue, Jérémie; Lee, Qiu-Mei; Maurice, Sylvestre; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Pallier, Etienne; Parot, Yann; Pinet, Patrick; Schröder, Susanne; Toplis, Mike; Lewin, Éric; Brunner, Will; Heydari, Ezat; Achilles, Cherie; Oehler, Dorothy; Sutter, Brad; Cabane, Michel; Coscia, David; Israël, Guy; Szopa, Cyril; Dromart, Gilles; Robert, François; Sautter, Violaine; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Mangold, Nicolas; Nachon, Marion; Buch, Arnaud; Stalport, Fabien; Coll, Patrice; François, Pascaline; Raulin, François; Teinturier, Samuel; Cameron, James; Clegg, Sam; Cousin, Agnès; DeLapp, Dorothea; Dingler, Robert; Jackson, Ryan Steele; Johnstone, Stephen; Lanza, Nina; Little, Cynthia; Nelson, Tony; Wiens, Roger C.; Williams, Richard B.; Jones, Andrea; Kirkland, Laurel; Treiman, Allan; Baker, Burt; Cantor, Bruce; Caplinger, Michael; Davis, Scott; Duston, Brian; Edgett, Kenneth; Fay, Donald; Hardgrove, Craig; Harker, David; Herrera, Paul; Jensen, Elsa; Kennedy, Megan R.; Krezoski, Gillian; Krysak, Daniel; Lipkaman, Leslie; Malin, Michael; McCartney, Elaina; McNair, Sean; Nixon, Brian; Posiolova, Liliya; Ravine, Michael; Salamon, Andrew; Saper, Lee; Stoiber, Kevin; Supulver, Kimberley; Van Beek, Jason; Van Beek, Tessa; Zimdar, Robert; French, Katherine Louise; Iagnemma, Karl; Miller, Kristen; Summons, Roger; Goesmann, Fred; Goetz, Walter; Hviid, Stubbe; Johnson, Micah; Lefavor, Matthew; Lyness, Eric; Breves, Elly; Dyar, M. Darby; Fassett, Caleb; Blake, David F.; Bristow, Thomas; DesMarais, David; Edwards, Laurence; Haberle, Robert; Hoehler, Tori; Hollingsworth, Jeff; Kahre, Melinda; Keely, Leslie; McKay, Christopher; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Bleacher, Lora; Brinckerhoff, William; Choi, David; Conrad, Pamela; Dworkin, Jason P.; Floyd, Melissa; Freissinet, Caroline; Garvin, James; Glavin, Daniel; Harpold, Daniel; Jones, Andrea; Mahaffy, Paul; Martin, David K.; McAdam, Amy; Pavlov, Alexander; Raaen, Eric; Smith, Michael D.; Stern, Jennifer; Tan, Florence; Trainer, Melissa; Meyer, Michael; Voytek, Mary; Anderson, Robert C.; Aubrey, Andrew; Beegle, Luther W.; Behar, Alberto; Blaney, Diana; Calef, Fred; Christensen, Lance; Crisp, Joy A.; DeFlores, Lauren; Ehlmann, Bethany; Feldman, Jason; Feldman, Sabrina; Flesch, Gregory; Hurowitz, Joel; Jun, Insoo; Keymeulen, Didier; Maki, Justin; Mischna, Michael; Morookian, John Michael; Parker, Timothy; Pavri, Betina; Schoppers, Marcel; Sengstacken, Aaron; Simmonds, John J.; Spanovich, Nicole; Juarez, Manuel de la Torre; Webster, Christopher R.; Yen, Albert; Archer, Paul Douglas; Jones, John H.; Ming, Douglas; Morris, Richard V.; Niles, Paul; Rampe, Elizabeth; Nolan, Thomas; Fisk, Martin; Radziemski, Leon; Barraclough, Bruce; Bender, Steve; Berman, Daniel; Dobrea, Eldar Noe; Tokar, Robert; Vaniman, David; Williams, Rebecca M. E.; Yingst, Aileen; Lewis, Kevin; Leshin, Laurie; Cleghorn, Timothy; Huntress, Wesley; Manhès, Gérard; Hudgins, Judy; Olson, Timothy; Stewart, Noel; Sarrazin, Philippe; Grant, John; Vicenzi, Edward; Wilson, Sharon A.; Hamilton, Victoria; Peterson, Joseph; Fedosov, Fedor; Golovin, Dmitry; Karpushkina, Natalya; Kozyrev, Alexander; Litvak, Maxim; Malakhov, Alexey; Mitrofanov, Igor; Mokrousov, Maxim; Nikiforov, Sergey; Prokhorov, Vasily; Sanin, Anton; Tretyakov, Vladislav; Varenikov, Alexey; Vostrukhin, Andrey; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Clark, Benton; Wolff, Michael; McLennan, Scott; Botta, Oliver; Drake, Darrell; Bean, Keri; Lemmon, Mark; Schwenzer, Susanne P.; Anderson, Ryan B.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth; Lee, Ella Mae; Sucharski, Robert; Hernández, Miguel Ángel de Pablo; Ávalos, Juan José Blanco; Ramos, Miguel; Malespin, Charles; Plante, Ianik; Muller, Jan-Peter; Navarro-González, Rafael; Ewing, Ryan; Boynton, William; Downs, Robert; Fitzgibbon, Mike; Harshman, Karl; Morrison, Shaunna; Dietrich, William; Kortmann, Onno; Palucis, Marisa; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Williams, Amy; Lugmair, Günter; Wilson, Michael A.; Rubin, David; Jakosky, Bruce; Balic-Zunic, Tonci; Frydenvang, Jens; Jensen, Jaqueline Kløvgaard; Kinch, Kjartan; Koefoed, Asmus; Madsen, Morten Bo; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane; Boyd, Nick; Campbell, John L.; Gellert, Ralf; Perrett, Glynis; Pradler, Irina; VanBommel, Scott; Jacob, Samantha; Owen, Tobias; Rowland, Scott; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Savijärvi, Hannu; García, César Martín; Mueller-Mellin, Reinhold; Bridges, John C.; McConnochie, Timothy; Benna, Mehdi; Franz, Heather; Bower, Hannah; Brunner, Anna; Blau, Hannah; Boucher, Thomas; Carmosino, Marco; Atreya, Sushil; Elliott, Harvey; Halleaux, Douglas; Rennó, Nilton; Wong, Michael; Pepin, Robert; Elliott, Beverley; Spray, John; Thompson, Lucy; Gordon, Suzanne; Newsom, Horton; Ollila, Ann; Williams, Joshua; Vasconcelos, Paulo; Bentz, Jennifer; Nealson, Kenneth; Popa, Radu; Kah, Linda C.; Moersch, Jeffrey; Tate, Christopher; Day, Mackenzie; Kocurek, Gary; Hallet, Bernard; Sletten, Ronald; Francis, Raymond; McCullough, Emily; Cloutis, Ed; ten Kate, Inge Loes; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Arvidson, Raymond; Fraeman, Abigail; Scholes, Daniel; Slavney, Susan; Stein, Thomas; Ward, Jennifer; Berger, Jeffrey; Moores, John E.

    2014-01-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover began making detailed measurements of the cosmic ray and energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars on 7 August 2012. We report and discuss measurements of the absorbed dose and dose equivalent from galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles on the martian surface for ~300 days of observations during the current solar maximum. These measurements provide insight into the radiation hazards associated with a human mission to the surface of Mars and provide an anchor point with which to model the subsurface radiation environment, with implications for microbial survival times of any possible extant or past life, as well as for the preservation of potential organic biosignatures of the ancient martian environment.

  20. The DREEM, part 1: measurement of the educational environment in an osteopathy teaching program

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Measurement of the educational environment has become more common in health professional education programs. Information gained from these investigations can be used to implement and measure changes to the curricula, educational delivery and the physical environment. A number of questionnaires exist to measure the educational environment, and the most commonly utilised of these is the Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure (DREEM). Methods The DREEM was administered to students in all year levels of the osteopathy program at Victoria University (VU), Melbourne, Australia. Students also completed a demographic survey. Inferential and correlational statistics were employed to investigate the educational environment based on the scores obtained from the DREEM. Results A response rate of 90% was achieved. The mean total DREEM score was 135.37 (+/- 19.33) with the scores ranging from 72 to 179. Some subscales and items demonstrated differences for gender, clinical phase, age and whether the student was in receipt of a government allowance. Conclusions There are a number of areas in the program that are performing well, and some aspects that could be improved. Overall students rated the VU osteopathy program as more positive than negative. The information obtained in the present study has identified areas for improvement and will enable the program leaders to facilitate changes. It will also provide other educational institutions with data on which they can make comparisons with their own programs. PMID:24884931

  1. An Inexpensive, Stable, and Accurate Relative Humidity Measurement Method for Challenging Environments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Ma, Hong; Yang, Simon X

    2016-03-18

    In this research, an improved psychrometer is developed to solve practical issues arising in the relative humidity measurement of challenging drying environments for meat manufacturing in agricultural and agri-food industries. The design in this research focused on the structure of the improved psychrometer, signal conversion, and calculation methods. The experimental results showed the effect of varying psychrometer structure on relative humidity measurement accuracy. An industrial application to dry-cured meat products demonstrated the effective performance of the improved psychrometer being used as a relative humidity measurement sensor in meat-drying rooms. In a drying environment for meat manufacturing, the achieved measurement accuracy for relative humidity using the improved psychrometer was ±0.6%. The system test results showed that the improved psychrometer can provide reliable and long-term stable relative humidity measurements with high accuracy in the drying system of meat products.

  2. An Inexpensive, Stable, and Accurate Relative Humidity Measurement Method for Challenging Environments

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Ma, Hong; Yang, Simon X.

    2016-01-01

    In this research, an improved psychrometer is developed to solve practical issues arising in the relative humidity measurement of challenging drying environments for meat manufacturing in agricultural and agri-food industries. The design in this research focused on the structure of the improved psychrometer, signal conversion, and calculation methods. The experimental results showed the effect of varying psychrometer structure on relative humidity measurement accuracy. An industrial application to dry-cured meat products demonstrated the effective performance of the improved psychrometer being used as a relative humidity measurement sensor in meat-drying rooms. In a drying environment for meat manufacturing, the achieved measurement accuracy for relative humidity using the improved psychrometer was ±0.6%. The system test results showed that the improved psychrometer can provide reliable and long-term stable relative humidity measurements with high accuracy in the drying system of meat products. PMID:26999161

  3. Performance measurement and modeling of component applications in a high performance computing environment : a case study.

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Robert C.; Ray, Jaideep; Malony, A.; Shende, Sameer; Trebon, Nicholas D.

    2003-11-01

    We present a case study of performance measurement and modeling of a CCA (Common Component Architecture) component-based application in a high performance computing environment. We explore issues peculiar to component-based HPC applications and propose a performance measurement infrastructure for HPC based loosely on recent work done for Grid environments. A prototypical implementation of the infrastructure is used to collect data for a three components in a scientific application and construct performance models for two of them. Both computational and message-passing performance are addressed.

  4. Analogue Materials Measured Under Simulated Lunar and Asteroid Environments: Application to Thermal Infrared Measurements of Airless Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson Hanna, K. L.; Pieters, C. M.; Patterson, W., III; Moriarty, D.

    2012-12-01

    Remote sensing observations provide key insights into the composition and evolution of planetary surfaces. A fundamentally important component to any remote sensing study of planetary surfaces is laboratory measurements of well-characterized samples measured under the appropriate environmental conditions. The near-surface vacuum environment of airless bodies like the Moon and asteroids creates a thermal gradient in the upper hundred microns of regolith. Lab studies of particulate rocks and minerals as well as selected lunar soils under vacuum and lunar-like conditions have identified significant effects of this thermal gradient on thermal infrared (TIR) spectral measurements [e.g. Logan et al. 1973, Salisbury and Walter 1989, Thomas et al. 2010, Donaldson Hanna et al. 2012]. Compared to ambient conditions, these effects include: (1) the Christiansen feature (CF), an emissivity maximum diagnostic of mineralogy and average composition, shifts to higher wavenumbers and (2) an increase in spectral contrast of the CF relative to the Reststrahlen bands (RB), the fundamental molecular vibration bands due to Si-O stretching and bending. Such lab studies demonstrate the high sensitivity of TIR emissivity spectra to environmental conditions under which they are measured. The Asteroid and Lunar Environment Chamber (ALEC) is the newest addition to the RELAB at Brown University. The vacuum chamber simulates the space environment experienced by the near-surface soils of the Moon and asteroids. The internal rotation stage allows for six samples and two blackbodies to be measured without breaking vacuum (<10-4 mbar). Liquid nitrogen is used to cool the interior of the chamber, creating a cold, low emission environment (mimicking the space environment) for heated samples to radiate into. Sample cups can be heated in one of three configurations: (1) from below using heaters embedded in the base of the sample cup, (2) from above using a solar-like radiant heat source, and (3) from

  5. Precise Temperature Measurement for Increasing the Survival of Newborn Babies in Incubator Environments

    PubMed Central

    Frischer, Robert; Penhaker, Marek; Krejcar, Ondrej; Kacerovsky, Marian; Selamat, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Precise temperature measurement is essential in a wide range of applications in the medical environment, however the regarding the problem of temperature measurement inside a simple incubator, neither a simple nor a low cost solution have been proposed yet. Given that standard temperature sensors don't satisfy the necessary expectations, the problem is not measuring temperature, but rather achieving the desired sensitivity. In response, this paper introduces a novel hardware design as well as the implementation that increases measurement sensitivity in defined temperature intervals at low cost. PMID:25494352

  6. Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Measurement of Temperature and Velocity in Harsh Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard G.; Greer, Lawrence C., III

    1998-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh scattering system for temperature and velocity measurements in unseeded flows is described. The system is capable of making measurements in the harsh environments commonly found in aerospace test facilities, which may have high acoustic sound levels, varying temperatures, and high vibration levels. Light from an argon-ion laser is transmitted via an optical fiber to a remote location where two flow experiments were located. One was a subsonic free air jet; the second was a low-speed heated airjet. Rayleigh scattered light from the probe volume was transmitted through another optical fiber from the remote location to a controlled environment where a Fabry-Perot interferometer and cooled CCD camera were used to analyze the Rayleigh scattered light. Good agreement between the measured velocity and the velocity calculated from isentropic flow relations was demonstrated (less than 5 m/sec). The temperature measurements, however, exhibited systematic errors on the order of 10-15%.

  7. Conceptualizing and Measuring Safe, Stable, Nurturing Relationships and Environments in Educational Settings

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Lara R.; Leeb, Rebecca T.; Merrick, Melissa T.; Forbes, Lauren W.

    2016-01-01

    Most children and adolescents older than five years spend at least six hours of their day in school settings. Like parents, education professionals can promote health and protect youth from harm by providing safe, stable, nurturing relationships and environments. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed a framework which posits that safe, stable, nurturing relationships and environments are Essentials for Childhood and are fundamental to promoting health and well-being; protecting youth from maltreatment and other violence and victimization; and ensuring optimal, healthy development. In this paper, the authors propose an approach to applying safe, stable, nurturing relationships and environments to the school ecology; review select survey measures to examine these constructs within educational settings; and suggest available indicators to measure safety, stability, and nurturance within the school context. PMID:28018122

  8. Aerospace Application of Fiber Optic Strain Measurement Technology in Cryogenic Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, Tadahito; Takeda, Nobuo

    Strain and temperature measurement, especially in cryogenic environments, was studied using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors for the purpose of the aerospace structural health monitoring. Although the relationship between the applied strain and the Bragg wavelength shift was the same as that at room temperature, the temperature-wavelength relationship became non-linear under cryogenic environment. In order to show the applicability of the sensor in aerospace applications, FBG strain and temperature sensors were embedded in a composite liquid hydrogen tank and measured in the cryogenic and pressurized environment. Encapsulated and small-size temperature sensors were used in this article and the temperature drift of the strain sensor was compensated by using the output of the temperature sensor. It was revealed throughout the experiment that the optical power loss could be critical in the case of existing large temperature difference. The practical solution for this issue was also discussed in this article.

  9. Measuring College Students' Alcohol Consumption in Natural Drinking Environments: Field Methodologies for Bars and Parties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clapp, John D.; Holmes, Megan R.; Reed, Mark B.; Shillington, Audrey M.; Freisthler, Bridget; Lange, James E.

    2007-01-01

    In recent years researchers have paid substantial attention to the issue of college students' alcohol use. One limitation to the current literature is an over reliance on retrospective, self-report survey data. This article presents field methodologies for measuring college students' alcohol consumption in natural drinking environments.…

  10. Measuring School Climate in High Schools: A Focus on Safety, Engagement, and the Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Catherine P.; Waasdorp, Tracy E.; Debnam, Katrina J.; Johnson, Sarah Lindstrom

    2014-01-01

    Background: School climate has been linked to multiple student behavioral, academic, health, and social-emotional outcomes. The US Department of Education (USDOE) developed a 3-factor model of school climate comprised of safety, engagement, and environment. This article examines the factor structure and measurement invariance of the USDOE model.…

  11. Elastic and plastic strain measurement in high temperature environment using laser speckle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, Fu-Pen

    1992-01-01

    Two laser speckle methods are described to measure strain in high temperature environment and thermal strain caused by high temperature. Both are non-contact, non-destructive and remote sensing techniques that can be automated. The methods have different but overlapping ranges of application with one being more suitable for large plastic deformation.

  12. Performance Analysis of MIMO Schemes in Residential Home Environment via Wideband MIMO Propagation Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Gia Khanh; Dao, Nguyen Dung; Sakaguchi, Kei; Araki, Kiyomichi; Iwai, Hiroshi; Sakata, Tsutomu; Ogawa, Koichi

    This paper illustrates a large-scale MIMO propagation channel measurement in a real life environment and evaluates throughput performance of various MIMO schemes in that environment. For that purpose, 4 × 4 MIMO transceivers and a novel spatial scanner are fabricated for wideband MIMO channel measurements in the 5GHz band. A total of more than 50, 000 spatial samples in an area of 150m2, which includes a bedroom, a Japanese room, a hallway, and the living and dining areas, are taken in a real residential home environment. Statistical properties of the propagation channel and throughput performance of various MIMO schemes are evaluated by using measured data. Propagation measurement results show large dynamic channel variations occurring in a real environment in which statistical properties of the channel, such as frequency correlation and spatial correlation are not stationary any more, and become functions of the SNR. Furthermore, evaluation of throughput shows that although MIMO schemes outperform the SISO system in most areas, open loop systems perform badly in the far areas with low SNR. Paying for the cost of CSI or partial CSI at Tx, closed loop and hybrid systems have superior performance compared to other schemes, especially in reasonable SNR areas ranging from 10dB to 30dB. Spatial correlation, which is common in Japanese wooden residences, is also found to be a dominant factor causing throughput degradation of the open loop MIMO schemes.

  13. An assessment of corrections for eddy covariance measured turbulent fluxes over snow in mountain environments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Snow-covered complex terrain is an extremely important runoff generating landscape in high altitude and latitude environments, yet is often considered non-viable for eddy covariance measurements of turbulent fluxes. Turbulent flux data are useful for evaluating the coupled snow cover mass and energ...

  14. Perceived and Objective Measures of Neighborhood Environment for Physical Activity Among Mexican Adults, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Salvo, Deborah; Lamadrid-Figueroa, Héctor; Hernández, Bernardo; Rivera-Dommarco, Juan A.; Pratt, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Environmental supports for physical activity may help residents to be physically active. However, such supports might not help if residents’ perceptions of the built environment do not correspond with objective measures. We assessed the associations between objective and perceived measures of the built environment among adults in Cuernavaca, Mexico, and examined whether certain variables modified this relationship. Methods We conducted a population-based (n = 645) study in 2011 that used objective (based on geographic information systems) and perceived (by questionnaire) measures of the following features of the built environment: residential density, mixed-land use, intersection density, and proximity to parks and transit stops. We used linear regression to assess the adjusted associations between these measures and to identify variables modifying these relationships. Results Adjusted associations were significant for all features (P < .05) except intersection density and proximity to transit stops. Significantly stronger associations between perceived and objective measures were observed among participants with low socioeconomic status, participants who did not own a motor vehicle or did not meet physical activity recommendations, and participants perceiving parks as safe. Conclusion Perceived measures of residential density, mixed-land use, and proximity to parks are associated with objective environmental measures related to physical activity. However, in Mexico, it should not be assumed that perceived measures of intersection density and proximity to transit stops are the same as objective measures. Our results are consistent with those from high-income countries in that associations between perceived and objective measures are modified by individual sociodemographic and psychosocial factors. PMID:27281391

  15. Direct measurements of near-highway emissions in a high diesel environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWitt, H. L.; Hellebust, S.; Temime-Roussel, B.; Ravier, S.; Polo, L.; Jacob, V.; Buisson, C.; Charron, A.; André, M.; Pasquier, A.; Besombes, J. L.; Jaffrezo, J. L.; Wortham, H.; Marchand, N.

    2014-10-01

    Diesel-powered passenger cars currently outnumber gasoline-powered cars in many countries, particularly in Europe. In France, diesel cars represented 61% of Light Duty Vehicles in 2011 and this percentage is still increasing (French Environment and Energy Management Agency, ADEME). As part of the September~2011 joint PM-DRIVE (Particulate Matter- DiRect and Indirect on-road Vehicular Emissions) and MOCOPO (Measuring and mOdeling traffic COngestion and POllution) field campaign, the concentration and high-resolution chemical composition of aerosols and volatile organic carbon (VOC) species were measured adjacent to a major urban highway south of Grenoble, France. Alongside these atmospheric measurements, detailed traffic data were collected from nearby traffic cameras and loop detectors, which allowed the identification of vehicle type and characteristics, traffic concentration, and traffic speed to be quantified and compared to measured aerosol and VOCs. Six aerosol age and source profiles were resolved using the positive matrix factorization (PMF) model on real-time high-resolution aerosol mass spectra. These six aerosol source/age categories included a hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) commonly associated with primary vehicular emissions, a nitrogen containing aerosol (NOA) with a diurnal pattern similar to that of HOA, oxidized organic aerosol (OOA), and biomass burning aerosol (BBOA). While quantitatively separating the influence of diesel vs. gasoline proved impossible, a low HOA : black carbon ratio, similar to that measured in other high-diesel environments, and high levels of NOx, also indicative of diesel emissions, were observed. A comparison between these high-diesel environment measurements and measurements taken in low-diesel (North American) environments was examined and the potential feedback between vehicular emissions and SOA formation was probed. Although the measurement site was located next to a large source of primary emissions, which are

  16. Prior Computer Experience and Technology Acceptance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varma, Sonali

    2010-01-01

    Prior computer experience with information technology has been identified as a key variable (Lee, Kozar, & Larsen, 2003) that can influence an individual's future use of newer computer technology. The lack of a theory driven approach to measuring prior experience has however led to conceptually different factors being used interchangeably in…

  17. Physical Processes and Real-Time Chemical Measurement of the Insect Olfactory Environment

    PubMed Central

    Abrell, Leif; Hildebrand, John G.

    2009-01-01

    Odor-mediated insect navigation in airborne chemical plumes is vital to many ecological interactions, including mate finding, flower nectaring, and host locating (where disease transmission or herbivory may begin). After emission, volatile chemicals become rapidly mixed and diluted through physical processes that create a dynamic olfactory environment. This review examines those physical processes and some of the analytical technologies available to characterize those behavior-inducing chemical signals at temporal scales equivalent to the olfactory processing in insects. In particular, we focus on two areas of research that together may further our understanding of olfactory signal dynamics and its processing and perception by insects. First, measurement of physical atmospheric processes in the field can provide insight into the spatiotemporal dynamics of the odor signal available to insects. Field measurements in turn permit aspects of the physical environment to be simulated in the laboratory, thereby allowing careful investigation into the links between odor signal dynamics and insect behavior. Second, emerging analytical technologies with high recording frequencies and field-friendly inlet systems may offer new opportunities to characterize natural odors at spatiotemporal scales relevant to insect perception and behavior. Characterization of the chemical signal environment allows the determination of when and where olfactory-mediated behaviors may control ecological interactions. Finally, we argue that coupling of these two research areas will foster increased understanding of the physicochemical environment and enable researchers to determine how olfactory environments shape insect behaviors and sensory systems. PMID:18548311

  18. Semiparametric Bayesian analysis of gene-environment interactions with error in measurement of environmental covariates and missing genetic data.

    PubMed

    Lobach, Iryna; Mallick, Bani; Carroll, Raymond J

    2011-01-01

    Case-control studies are widely used to detect gene-environment interactions in the etiology of complex diseases. Many variables that are of interest to biomedical researchers are difficult to measure on an individual level, e.g. nutrient intake, cigarette smoking exposure, long-term toxic exposure. Measurement error causes bias in parameter estimates, thus masking key features of data and leading to loss of power and spurious/masked associations. We develop a Bayesian methodology for analysis of case-control studies for the case when measurement error is present in an environmental covariate and the genetic variable has missing data. This approach offers several advantages. It allows prior information to enter the model to make estimation and inference more precise. The environmental covariates measured exactly are modeled completely nonparametrically. Further, information about the probability of disease can be incorporated in the estimation procedure to improve quality of parameter estimates, what cannot be done in conventional case-control studies. A unique feature of the procedure under investigation is that the analysis is based on a pseudo-likelihood function therefore conventional Bayesian techniques may not be technically correct. We propose an approach using Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling as well as a computationally simple method based on an asymptotic posterior distribution. Simulation experiments demonstrated that our method produced parameter estimates that are nearly unbiased even for small sample sizes. An application of our method is illustrated using a population-based case-control study of the association between calcium intake with the risk of colorectal adenoma development.

  19. Semiparametric Bayesian analysis of gene-environment interactions with error in measurement of environmental covariates and missing genetic data

    PubMed Central

    Mallick, Bani; Carroll, Raymond J.

    2011-01-01

    Case-control studies are widely used to detect gene-environment interactions in the etiology of complex diseases. Many variables that are of interest to biomedical researchers are difficult to measure on an individual level, e.g. nutrient intake, cigarette smoking exposure, long-term toxic exposure. Measurement error causes bias in parameter estimates, thus masking key features of data and leading to loss of power and spurious/masked associations. We develop a Bayesian methodology for analysis of case-control studies for the case when measurement error is present in an environmental covariate and the genetic variable has missing data. This approach offers several advantages. It allows prior information to enter the model to make estimation and inference more precise. The environmental covariates measured exactly are modeled completely nonparametrically. Further, information about the probability of disease can be incorporated in the estimation procedure to improve quality of parameter estimates, what cannot be done in conventional case-control studies. A unique feature of the procedure under investigation is that the analysis is based on a pseudo-likelihood function therefore conventional Bayesian techniques may not be technically correct. We propose an approach using Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling as well as a computationally simple method based on an asymptotic posterior distribution. Simulation experiments demonstrated that our method produced parameter estimates that are nearly unbiased even for small sample sizes. An application of our method is illustrated using a population-based case-control study of the association between calcium intake with the risk of colorectal adenoma development. PMID:21949562

  20. Continuous measurement of nitrous acid (HONO) in indoor environment using a diffusion scrubber and chemiluminescence method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.; Hong, J.; Lee, J.; Cho, S.

    2006-12-01

    Recent study has demonstrated that the use of combustion appliances in indoor environments, e.g., gas stoves and heaters, results in significant concentrations of NO2 and nitrous acid (HONO). Indoor HONO is formed by both direct emissions from combustion processes and the heterogeneous reaction of NO2 with water vapor on surfaces present indoors. In this study in-situ instrument was constructed for measuring HONO concentration in both indoor and outdoor environments, utilizing diffusion scrubber and peroxynitrite-induced luminol chemiluminescent methods. We measured the HONO concentration under the conditions existing in living room of an apartment, along with NO, NO2, temperature, and relative humidity, to investigate the sources, chemical transformation, and lifetimes of nitrogen oxides and HONO. Some experiments investigated the emissions and transformations of nitrogen species from operation of unvented or vented gas appliance. Measurement data of NO, NO2, and HONO will be reported, and formation pathway of the HONO under the experimental conditions will also be discussed. In addition to measurement of indoor HONO, comparison of HONO measurements by luminol chemiluminescence and annular denuder integrated samples was made in outdoor environment. HONO in ambient air was sampled with annular denuders (Teflon-coated PM2.5 cyclone inlet followed by two Na2CO3-coated denuders coupled in series) operated at 16.7 L/min. Acknowledgement This study was supported by grant No. (# R01-2005-000-10775-0) from the Basic Research Program of the Korea Science and Engineering Foundation (KOSEF).

  1. Measurement in a marine environment using low cost sensors of temperature and dissolved oxygen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godshall, F.A.; Cory, R.L.; Phinney, D.E.

    1974-01-01

    Continuous records of physical parameters of the marine environment are difficult as well as expensive to obtain. This paper describes preliminary results of an investigative program with the purpose of developing low cost time integrating measurement and averaging devices for water temperature and dissolved oxygen. Measurements were made in an estuarine area of the Chesapeake Bay over two week periods. With chemical thermometers average water temperature for the two week period was found to be equal to average water temperature measured with thermocouples plus or minus 1.0 C. The slow diffusion of oxygen through the semipermiable sides of plastic bottles permitted the use of water filled bottles to obtain averaged oxygen measurements. Oxygen measurements for two week averaging times using 500 ml polyethylene bottles were found to vary from conventionally measured and averaged dissolved oxygen by about 1.8 mg/l. ?? 1974 Estuarine Research Federation.

  2. Development of a Composite Measure of State-Level Malpractice Environment

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jeanette W; Sohn, Min-Woong; Merkow, Ryan P; Oh, Elissa H; Minami, Christina; Black, Bernard S; Bilimoria, Karl Y

    2014-01-01

    Objective To develop a composite measure of state-level malpractice environment. Data Sources Public use data from the National Practitioner Data Bank, Medical Liability Monitor, the National Conference of State Legislatures, and the American Bar Association. Study Design Principal component analysis of state-level indicators (paid claims rate, malpractice premiums, lawyers per capita, average award size, and malpractice laws), with indirect validation of the composite using receiver-operating characteristic curves to determine how accurately the composite could identify states with high-tort activity and costs. Principal Findings A single composite accounted for over 73 percent of total variance in the seven indicators and demonstrated reasonable criterion validity. Conclusion An empirical composite measure of state-level malpractice risk may offer advantages over single indicators in measuring overall risk and may facilitate cross-state comparisons of malpractice environments. PMID:24117397

  3. Mobile robot self-localization system using single webcam distance measurement technology in indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Li, I-Hsum; Chen, Ming-Chang; Wang, Wei-Yen; Su, Shun-Feng; Lai, To-Wen

    2014-01-27

    A single-webcam distance measurement technique for indoor robot localization is proposed in this paper. The proposed localization technique uses webcams that are available in an existing surveillance environment. The developed image-based distance measurement system (IBDMS) and parallel lines distance measurement system (PLDMS) have two merits. Firstly, only one webcam is required for estimating the distance. Secondly, the set-up of IBDMS and PLDMS is easy, which only one known-dimension rectangle pattern is needed, i.e., a ground tile. Some common and simple image processing techniques, i.e., background subtraction are used to capture the robot in real time. Thus, for the purposes of indoor robot localization, the proposed method does not need to use expensive high-resolution webcams and complicated pattern recognition methods but just few simple estimating formulas. From the experimental results, the proposed robot localization method is reliable and effective in an indoor environment.

  4. A Model of Generating Visual Place Cells Based on Environment Perception and Similar Measure

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    It is an important content to generate visual place cells (VPCs) in the field of bioinspired navigation. By analyzing the firing characteristic of biological place cells and the existing methods for generating VPCs, a model of generating visual place cells based on environment perception and similar measure is abstracted in this paper. VPCs' generation process is divided into three phases, including environment perception, similar measure, and recruiting of a new place cell. According to this process, a specific method for generating VPCs is presented. External reference landmarks are obtained based on local invariant characteristics of image and a similar measure function is designed based on Euclidean distance and Gaussian function. Simulation validates the proposed method is available. The firing characteristic of the generated VPCs is similar to that of biological place cells, and VPCs' firing fields can be adjusted flexibly by changing the adjustment factor of firing field (AFFF) and firing rate's threshold (FRT). PMID:27597859

  5. Selective determination of gold(III) ion using CuO microsheets as a solid phase adsorbent prior by ICP-OES measurement.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mohammed M; Khan, Sher Bahadar; Marwani, Hadi M; Asiri, Abdullah M; Alamry, Khalid A; Al-Youbi, Abdulrahman O

    2013-01-30

    We have prepared calcined CuO microsheets (MSs) by a wet-chemical process using reducing agents in alkaline medium and characterized by UV/vis., fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) etc. The detailed structural, compositional, and optical characterizations of the MSs were evaluated by XRD pattern, FT-IR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and UV-vis spectroscopy, respectively which confirmed that the obtained MSs are well-crystalline CuO and possessed good optical properties. The CuO MSs morphology was investigated by FESEM, which confirmed that the calcined nanomaterials were sheet-shaped and grown in large-quantity. Here, the efficiency of the CuO MS was applied for a selective adsorption of gold(III) ion prior to its detection by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The selectivity of CuO MSs towards various metal ions, including Au(III), Cd(II), Co(II), Cr(III), Fe(III), Pd(II), and Zn(II) was analyzed. Based on the adsorption isotherm study, it was confirmed that the selectivity of MSs phase was mostly towards Au(III) ion. The static adsorption capacity for Au(III) was calculated to be 57.0 mg g(-1). From Langmuir adsorption isotherm, it was confirmed that the adsorption process was mainly monolayer-adsorption onto a surface containing a finite number of adsorption sites.

  6. The application of magnetic measurements for the characterization of atmospheric particulate pollution within the airport environment.

    PubMed

    Jones, S; Richardson, N; Bennett, M; Hoon, S R

    2015-01-01

    The significant increase in global air travel which has occurred during the last fifty years has generated growing concern regarding the potential impacts associated with increasing emissions of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) on health and the environment. PM within the airport environment may be derived from a range of sources. To date, however, the identification of individual sources of airport derived PM has remained elusive but constitutes a research priority for the aviation industry.The aim of this research was to identify distinctive and characteristic fingerprints of atmospheric PM derived from various sources in an airport environment through the use of environmental magnetic measurements. PM samples from aircraft engine emissions, brake wear and tire wear residues have been obtained from a range of different aircraft and engine types. Samples have been analyzed utilizing a range of magnetic mineral properties indicative of magnetic mineralogy and grain size. Results indicate that the dusts from the three 'aircraft' sources, (i.e. engines, brakes and tires) display distinctive magnetic mineral characteristics which may serve as 'magnetic fingerprints' for these sources. Magnetic measurements of runway dusts collected at different locations on the runway surface also show contrasting magnetic characteristics which, when compared with those of the aircraft-derived samples, suggest that they may relate to different sources characteristic of aircraft emissions at various stages of the take-off/landing cycle. The findings suggest that magnetic measurements could have wider applicability for the differentiation and identification of PM within the airport environment.

  7. Measurement of high carrier mobility in graphene in an aqueous electrolyte environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Morgan A.; Crosser, Michael S.; Leyden, Matthew R.; Qi, Yabing; Minot, Ethan D.

    2016-08-01

    Graphene is a promising material for applications in aqueous electrolyte environments. To explore the impact of such environments on graphene's electrical properties, we performed Hall bar measurements on electrolyte-gated graphene. Assuming a Drude model, we find that the room temperature carrier mobility in water-gated, SiO2-supported graphene reaches 7000 cm2/Vs, comparable to the best dry SiO2-supported graphene devices. Our results show that the electrical performance of graphene is robust, even in the presence of dissolved ions that introduce an additional mechanism for Coulomb scattering.

  8. A wireless inertial measurement system (WIMS) for an interactive dance environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, A.; Majeed, B.; O'Flynn, B.; Barton, J.; Murphy, F.; Delaney, K.; O'Mathuna, S. C.

    2005-01-01

    This paper will present the work carried out in designing a Wireless Inertial Measurement System (WIMS) designed for a wearable system operating in an interactive dance environment. The concept underpinning this system is the generation of inertial information from multiple nodes distributed over a dancer's body, which will enable the dancer to communicate with their environment and interact with their surroundings through movement. The IMU nodes will be arranged in a network configuration whose control will be based upon existing technology developed at Tyndall.

  9. Tuning your priors to the world.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    The idea that perceptual and cognitive systems must incorporate knowledge about the structure of the environment has become a central dogma of cognitive theory. In a Bayesian context, this idea is often realized in terms of "tuning the prior"-widely assumed to mean adjusting prior probabilities so that they match the frequencies of events in the world. This kind of "ecological" tuning has often been held up as an ideal of inference, in fact defining an "ideal observer." But widespread as this viewpoint is, it directly contradicts Bayesian philosophy of probability, which views probabilities as degrees of belief rather than relative frequencies, and explicitly denies that they are objective characteristics of the world. Moreover, tuning the prior to observed environmental frequencies is subject to overfitting, meaning in this context overtuning to the environment, which leads (ironically) to poor performance in future encounters with the same environment. Whenever there is uncertainty about the environment-which there almost always is-an agent's prior should be biased away from ecological relative frequencies and toward simpler and more entropic priors.

  10. Near-highway aerosol and gas-phase measurements in a high-diesel environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWitt, H. L.; Hellebust, S.; Temime-Roussel, B.; Ravier, S.; Polo, L.; Jacob, V.; Buisson, C.; Charron, A.; André, M.; Pasquier, A.; Besombes, J. L.; Jaffrezo, J. L.; Wortham, H.; Marchand, N.

    2015-04-01

    Diesel-powered passenger cars currently outnumber gasoline-powered cars in many countries, particularly in Europe. In France, diesel cars represented 61% of light duty vehicles in 2011 and this percentage is still increasing (French Environment and Energy Management Agency, ADEME). As part of the September 2011 joint PM-DRIVE (Particulate Matter - DiRect and Indirect on-road Vehicular Emissions) and MOCOPO (Measuring and mOdeling traffic COngestion and POllution) field campaign, the concentration and high-resolution chemical composition of aerosols and volatile organic carbon species were measured adjacent to a major urban highway south of Grenoble, France. Alongside these atmospheric measurements, detailed traffic data were collected from nearby traffic cameras and loop detectors, which allowed the vehicle type, traffic concentration, and traffic speed to be quantified. Six aerosol age and source profiles were resolved using the positive matrix factorization model on real-time high-resolution aerosol mass spectra. These six aerosol source/age categories included a hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) commonly associated with primary vehicular emissions, a nitrogen-containing aerosol with a diurnal pattern similar to that of HOA, oxidized organic aerosol (OOA), and biomass burning aerosol. While quantitatively separating the influence of diesel from that of gasoline proved impossible, a low HOA : black carbon ratio, similar to that measured in other high-diesel environments, and high levels of NOx, also indicative of diesel emissions, were observed. Although the measurement site was located next to a large source of primary emissions, which are typically found to have low oxygen incorporation, OOA was found to comprise the majority of the measured organic aerosol, and isotopic analysis showed that the measured OOA contained mainly modern carbon, not fossil-derived carbon. Thus, even in this heavily vehicular-emission-impacted environment, photochemical processes

  11. District-level local measuring program of the urban environment in Budapest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dian, Csenge; Pongrácz, Rita; Dezsö, Zsuzsanna; Bartholy, Judit

    2016-04-01

    The natural environment and thus, the climatic conditions are modified by the concentrated human presence of urban areas. In our research we aim to analyze the resulting urban climatic effects in a downtown district of Budapest, Hungary. For this purpose, we have started a measuring program of in-situ measurements in the southern central located district called Ferencváros, which can be found near the river Danube, and mainly consists of 3- and 4-storey older and newly built buildings. The newly built buildings are mainly the results of the Ferencváros local government's efforts to improve the environment for the citizens. Within the framework of the block rehabilitation program, inner parts of the old house blocks were demolished, and inside the blocks common green areas have been created. In our urban climate measurement program air temperature and relative humidity are recorded along a pre-defined path consisting of 22 measuring points, which covers the studied area. The measuring sites are located in different characteristical points of the district, such as green parks, narrow streets, paved squares and roads. In order to calculate the urban heat island intensity, temperature measurements are compared to the hourly recorded data of the Budapest synoptic station (ID number: 12843) located in the southeastern suburb district of the city. After completing an entire year of measurements, the seasonal cycle of temperature and relative humidity differences are analyzed as well, as the diurnal changes and the spatial structure within the study area.

  12. Remote Sensing Plant Stress Using Combined Fluorescence and Reflectance Measurements for Early Detection of Defoliants within the Battlefield Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-02

    REPORT Remote sensing plant stress using combined fluorescence and reflectance measurements for early detection of defoliants within the battlefied...stress using combined fluorescence and reflectance measurements for early detection of defoliants within the battlefied environment Report Title...combined fluorescence and reflectance measurements for early detection of defoliants within the battlefield environment ARO Proposal # (49364-EV

  13. The Africentric Home Environment Inventory: An Observational Measure of the Racial Socialization Features of the Home Environment for African American Preschool Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caughy, Margaret O'Brien; Randolph, Suzanne M.; O'Campo, Patricia J.

    2002-01-01

    Pilot tested the Africentric Home Environment Inventory (AHEI), an observational measure for racial socialization features of the home environment, collecting data during home visits with socioeconomically diverse, urban, African American families with preschoolers. There was a strong association between AHEI scores and family socioeconomic…

  14. Characterizing ISS Charging Environments with On-Board Ionospheric Plasma Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Jospeh I.; Craven, Paul D.; Coffey, Victoria N.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Wright Jr, Kenneth; Parker, Paul D.; Mikatarian, Ronald R.; Kramer, Leonard; Hartman, William A.; Alred, John W.; Koontz, Steven L.

    2008-01-01

    Charging of the International Space Station (ISS) is dominated by interactions of the biased United States (US) 160 volt solar arrays with the relatively high density, low temperature plasma environment in low Earth orbit. Conducting surfaces on the vehicle structure charge negative relative to the ambient plasma environment because ISS structure is grounded to the negative end of the US solar arrays. Transient charging peaks reaching potentials of some tens of volts negative controlled by photovoltaic array current collection typically occur at orbital sunrise and sunset as well as near orbital noon. In addition, surface potentials across the vehicle structure vary due to an induced v x B (dot) L voltage generated by the high speed motion of the conducting structure across the Earth's magnetic field. Induced voltages in low Earth orbit are typically only approx.0.4 volts/meter but the approx.100 meter scale dimensions of the ISS yield maximum induced potential variations ofapprox.40 volts across the vehicle. Induced voltages are variable due to the orientation of the vehicle structure and orbital velocity vector with respect to the orientation of the Earth's magnetic field along the ISS orbit. In order to address the need to better understand the ISS spacecraft potential and plasma environments, NASA funded development and construction of the Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU) which was deployed on an ISS starboard truss arm in August 2006. The suite of FPMU instruments includes two Langmuir probes, a plasma impedance probe, and a potential probe for use in in-situ monitoring of electron temperatures and densities and the vehicle potential relative to the plasma environment. This presentation will describe the use of the FPMU to better characterize interactions of the ISS with the space environment, changes in ISS charging as the vehicle configuration is modified during ISS construction, and contributions of FPMU vehicle potential and plasma environment

  15. Thermal history sensors for non-destructive temperature measurements in harsh environments

    SciTech Connect

    Pilgrim, C. C.; Heyes, A. L.; Feist, J. P.

    2014-02-18

    The operating temperature is a critical physical parameter in many engineering applications, however, can be very challenging to measure in certain environments, particularly when access is limited or on rotating components. A new quantitative non-destructive temperature measurement technique has been proposed which relies on thermally induced permanent changes in ceramic phosphors. This technique has several distinct advantages over current methods for many different applications. The robust ceramic material stores the temperature information allowing long term thermal exposures in harsh environment to be measured at a convenient time. Additionally, rare earth dopants make the ceramic phosphorescent so that the temperature information can be interpreted by automated interrogation of the phosphorescent light. This technique has been demonstrated by application of YAG doped with dysprosium and europium as coatings through the air-plasma spray process. Either material can be used to measure temperature over a wide range, namely between 300°C and 900°C. Furthermore, results show that the material records the peak exposure temperature and prolonged exposure at lower temperatures would have no effect on the temperature measurement. This indicates that these materials could be used to measure peak operating temperatures in long-term testing.

  16. Genetic and environmental mediation between measures of personality and family environment in twins reared together.

    PubMed

    Kandler, Christian; Riemann, Rainer; Kämpfe, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    In this study we analyzed the etiology of the relationship between personality traits and retrospectively recalled family environment. The data of 226 identical and 168 fraternal twin pairs reared together from the Jena twin study of social attitudes were available. Personality traits were measured using the self- and peer report versions of the German NEO-personality inventory-revised. A German version of Blocks Environmental Questionnaire was applied to measure two broad dimensions of the family environment retrospectively: support and organization. We could replicate earlier findings that retrospective reports of these family environment dimensions were in part genetically influenced. A total of 66% of the genetic variance in support and 24% in organization could be accounted for by heritable variance in self-rated personality. That was replicated by using peer reports of personality, 41% explained genetic variance in support and 17% in organization. Environmental mediations were negligible. This indicates that the relationship between personality and retrospectively recalled family environment is largely genetically mediated.

  17. The acoustic environment of intensive care wards based on long period nocturnal measurements.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hui; Kang, Jian

    2012-01-01

    The patients in the Intensive Care Units are often exposed to excessive levels of noise and activities. They can suffer from sleep disturbance, especially at night, but they are often too ill to cope with the poor environment. This article investigates the acoustic environment of typical intensive care wards in the UK, based on long period nocturnal measurements, and examines the differences between singlebed and multibed wards, using statistical analysis. It has been shown that the acoustic environment differs significantly every night. There are also significant differences between the noise levels in the singlebed and multibed wards, where acoustic ceilings are present. Despite the similar background noises in both ward types, more intrusive noises tend to originate from the multibed wards, while more extreme sounds are likely to occur in the single wards. The sound levels in the measured wards for each night are in excess of the World Health Organization's (WHO) guide levels by at least 20 dBA, dominantly at the middle frequencies. Although the sound level at night varies less than that in the daytime, the nocturnal acoustic environment is not dependant on any specific time, thus neither the noisiest nor quietest period can be determined. It is expected that the statistical analysis of the collected data will provide essential information for the development of relevant guidelines and noise reduction strategies.

  18. Validity of a Measure to Assess the Child Care Nutrition and Physical Activity Environment

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Kathryn E; Grode, Gabrielle M; Middleton, Ann E; Kenney, Erica L; Falbe, Jennifer; Schwartz, Marlene B

    2014-01-01

    Background Licensed childcare centers, represent an opportunity to positively influence children's health behaviors. Valid and easy-to-use measures of the childcare environment are needed to assess the impact of environmental change on health. Objective To develop and validate a self-administered survey to assess the nutrition and physical activity environment of child care centers, and to identify domains which may be evaluated adequately through self-report. Design A survey was developed to assess four areas related to nutrition and physical activity: center policies, practices related to the social environment, physical environment, and nutrition quality. Development involved review of literature, existing measures, and regulations/standards; and collaboration with a working group. The survey was piloted and feedback sought from expert consultants. It was administered statewide and validated against a menu rating tool, a center director interview, and a direct observation tool developed for this study. Participants/Setting Participating sites were drawn from CACFP-participating licensed Connecting childcare centers serving 13 or greater 3 to 5 year olds. Survey responses from 146 center directors were included, as were 62 center menus, and director interviews and observational data from 33 sites. Primary Outcomes/Statistical Analyses Criterion validity of the survey was assessed through percent agreement with mirroring items in the additional measures. Healthy and unhealthy food scores were calculated for menu and survey tools, and Pearson correlations computed. Results Percent agreement with criterion outcomes ranged from 39 to 97%, with 61% of items achieving agreement at or above 80%. Agreement was highest for nutrition and policy domains, and lowest for physical activity and barriers to promoting health. Correlations between food scores across measures were moderate. Conclusions The self-report survey demonstrated adequate criterion validity; recommendations

  19. Current and Near-Term Future Measurements of the Orbital Debris Environment at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stansbery, Gene; Liou, J.-C.; Mulrooney, M.; Horstman, M

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office places great emphasis on obtaining and understanding direct measurements of the orbital debris environment. The Orbital Debris Program Office's environmental models are all based on these measurements. Because OD measurements must cover a very wide range of sizes and altitudes, one technique realistically cannot be used for all measurements. In general, radar measurements have been used for lower altitudes and optical measurements for higher altitude orbits. For very small debris, in situ measurements such as returned spacecraft surfaces are utilized. In addition to receiving information from large debris (> 5-10 cm diameter) from the U.S. Space Surveillance Network, NASA conducts statistical measurements of the debris population for smaller sizes. NASA collects data from the Haystack and Goldstone radars for debris in low Earth orbit as small as 2- 4 mm diameter and from the Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope for debris near geosynchronous orbit altitude for sizes as small as 30-60 cm diameter. NASA is also currently examining the radiator panel of the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 which was exposed to space for 16 years and was recently returned to Earth during the STS- 125 Space Shuttle mission. This paper will give an overview of these on-going measurement programs at NASA as well as discuss progress and plans for new instruments and techniques in the near future.

  20. Where is the Theoretical Basis for Understanding and Measuring the Environment for Physical Activity?

    PubMed

    Nelson, N M; Wright, A; Lowry, R G; Mutrie, N

    2008-12-02

    Researchers are beginning to explore environmental correlates to further the field of physical activity research. Before interventions and experimental investigations can be undertaken, it is necessary to identify specific environmental features that are consistent correlates of physical activity. There has been a plethora of research measuring such cross-sectional associations since this field came to the fore in 2003. This paper posits that it is time for researchers to evaluate the state of knowledge, and suggests that future developments in this field focus on the theoretical bases for (i) measurement of the environment and (ii) understanding the links between perceptions of the environment and behaviour through psychological theories of cognition. Key theories considered include social ecology and the theory of planned behaviour. It is suggested that with a continued absence of a common conceptual framework, vocabulary and measurement tools the majority of studies may remain at a correlates stage. In highlighting issues with current methodologies, this commentary encourages more grounded theoretical approaches to the study of the environment and physical activity.

  1. Characteristic measurements of silicon dioxide aerogel plasmas generated in a Planckian radiation environment

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Quanli; Wang Shoujun; Li Yutong; Zhang Yi; Zhao Jing; Wei Huigang; Shi Jianrong; Zhao Gang; Zhang Jiyan; Gu Yuqiu; Ding Yongkun; Wen Tianshu; Zhang Wenhai; Hu Xin; Liu Shenye; Zhang Lin; Tang Yongjian; Zhang Baohan; Zheng Zhijian; Nishimura, Hiroaki

    2010-01-15

    The temporally and spatially resolved characteristics of silicon dioxide aerogel plasmas were studied using x-ray spectroscopy. The plasma was generated in the near-Planckian radiation environment within gold hohlraum targets irradiated by laser pulses with a total energy of 2.4 kJ in 1 ns. The contributions of silicon ions at different charge states to the specific components of the measured absorption spectra were also investigated. It was found that each main feature in the absorption spectra of the measured silicon dioxide aerogel plasmas was contributed by two neighboring silicon ionic species.

  2. A New Correction Technique for Strain-Gage Measurements Acquired in Transient-Temperature Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, W. Lance

    1996-01-01

    Significant strain-gage errors may exist in measurements acquired in transient-temperature environments if conventional correction methods are applied. As heating or cooling rates increase, temperature gradients between the strain-gage sensor and substrate surface increase proportionally. These temperature gradients introduce strain-measurement errors that are currently neglected in both conventional strain-correction theory and practice. Therefore, the conventional correction theory has been modified to account for these errors. A new experimental method has been developed to correct strain-gage measurements acquired in environments experiencing significant temperature transients. The new correction technique has been demonstrated through a series of tests in which strain measurements were acquired for temperature-rise rates ranging from 1 to greater than 100 degrees F/sec. Strain-gage data from these tests have been corrected with both the new and conventional methods and then compared with an analysis. Results show that, for temperature-rise rates greater than 10 degrees F/sec, the strain measurements corrected with the conventional technique produced strain errors that deviated from analysis by as much as 45 percent, whereas results corrected with the new technique were in good agreement with analytical results.

  3. Defining Neighbourhoods as a Measure of Exposure to the Food Environment

    PubMed Central

    Lyseen, Anders K.; Hansen, Henning S.; Harder, Henrik; Jensen, Anders S.; Mikkelsen, Bent E.

    2015-01-01

    Neighbourhoods are frequently used as a measure for individuals’ exposure to the food environment. However, the definitions of neighbourhoods fluctuate and have not been applied consistently in previous studies. Neighbourhoods defined from a single fixed location fail to capture people’s complete exposure in multiple locations, but measuring behaviour using traditional methods can be challenging. This study compares the traditional methods of measuring exposure to the food environment to methods that use data from GPS tracking. For each of the 187 participants, 11 different neighbourhoods were created in which the exposure to supermarkets and fast food outlets were measured. ANOVA, Tukey’s Honestly Significant Difference (HSD) test and t-tests were performed to compare the neighbourhoods. Significant differences were found between area sizes and the exposure to supermarkets and fast food outlets for different neighbourhood types. Second, significant differences in exposure to food outlets were found between the urban and rural neighbourhoods. Neighbourhoods are clearly a diffused and blurred concept that varies in meaning depending on each person’s perception and the conducted study. Complexity and heterogeneity of human mobility no longer appear to correspond to the use of residential neighbourhoods but rather emphasise the need for methods, concepts and measures of individual activity and exposure. PMID:26197331

  4. Real-Time Measurement of Material Elastic Properties in a High Gamma Irradiation Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Telschow; Rob Schley; Dave Cottle

    2006-05-01

    This paper describes the first noncontact elastic vibration measurements of an object in a high gamma radiation field. Using a laser-coupled resonant ultrasound technique, the vibration modes of an Inconel hollow capped cylinder were measured as the gamma radiation field was increased to 104 Gy/h. This measurement technique allowed shifts in the resonant frequency of the sample’s vibration modes to be tracked over a 170-h period. The vibration mode frequencies changed in a manner consistent with the temperature dependence of the elastic stiffness coefficients of the material. These results demonstrate the efficacy of the laser approach for real-time resonant ultrasound measurements in this severely hostile nuclear environment.

  5. On-body calibration and measurements using personal radiofrequency exposimeters in indoor diffuse and specular environments.

    PubMed

    Aminzadeh, Reza; Thielens, Arno; Bamba, Aliou; Kone, Lamine; Gaillot, Davy Paul; Lienard, Martine; Martens, Luc; Joseph, Wout

    2016-07-01

    For the first time, response of personal exposimeters (PEMs) is studied under diffuse field exposure in indoor environments. To this aim, both numerical simulations, using finite-difference time-domain method, and calibration measurements were performed in the range of 880-5875 MHz covering 10 frequency bands in Belgium. Two PEMs were mounted on the body of a human male subject and calibrated on-body in an anechoic chamber (non-diffuse) and a reverberation chamber (RC) (diffuse fields). This was motivated by the fact that electromagnetic waves in indoor environments have both specular and diffuse components. Both calibrations show that PEMs underestimate actual incident electromagnetic fields. This can be compensated by using an on-body response. Moreover, it is shown that these responses are different in anechoic chamber and RC. Therefore, it is advised to use an on-body calibration in an RC in future indoor PEM measurements where diffuse fields are present. Using the response averaged over two PEMs reduced measurement uncertainty compared to single PEMs. Following the calibration, measurements in a realistic indoor environment were done for wireless fidelity (WiFi-5G) band. Measured power density values are maximally 8.9 mW/m(2) and 165.8 μW/m(2) on average. These satisfy reference levels issued by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection in 1998. Power density values obtained by applying on-body calibration in RC are higher than values obtained from no body calibration (only PEMs) and on-body calibration in anechoic room, by factors of 7.55 and 2.21, respectively. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:298-309, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. The light spot test: Measuring anxiety in mice in an automated home-cage environment.

    PubMed

    Aarts, Emmeke; Maroteaux, Gregoire; Loos, Maarten; Koopmans, Bastijn; Kovačević, Jovana; Smit, August B; Verhage, Matthijs; Sluis, Sophie van der

    2015-11-01

    Behavioral tests of animals in a controlled experimental setting provide a valuable tool to advance understanding of genotype-phenotype relations, and to study the effects of genetic and environmental manipulations. To optimally benefit from the increasing numbers of genetically engineered mice, reliable high-throughput methods for comprehensive behavioral phenotyping of mice lines have become a necessity. Here, we describe the development and validation of an anxiety test, the light spot test, that allows for unsupervised, automated, high-throughput testing of mice in a home-cage system. This automated behavioral test circumvents bias introduced by pretest handling, and enables recording both baseline behavior and the behavioral test response over a prolonged period of time. We demonstrate that the light spot test induces a behavioral response in C57BL/6J mice. This behavior reverts to baseline when the aversive stimulus is switched off, and is blunted by treatment with the anxiolytic drug Diazepam, demonstrating predictive validity of the assay, and indicating that the observed behavioral response has a significant anxiety component. Also, we investigated the effectiveness of the light spot test as part of sequential testing for different behavioral aspects in the home-cage. Two learning tests, administered prior to the light spot test, affected the light spot test parameters. The light spot test is a novel, automated assay for anxiety-related high-throughput testing of mice in an automated home-cage environment, allowing for both comprehensive behavioral phenotyping of mice, and rapid screening of pharmacological compounds.

  7. Arctic (and Antarctic) Observing Experiment - an Assessment of Methods to Measure Temperature over Polar Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigor, I. G.; Clemente-Colon, P.; Nghiem, S. V.; Hall, D. K.; Woods, J. E.; Henderson, G. R.; Zook, J.; Marshall, C.; Gallage, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Arctic environment has been undergoing profound changes; the most visible is the dramatic decrease in Arctic sea ice extent (SIE). These changes pose a challenge to our ability to measure surface temperature across the Polar Regions. Traditionally, the International Arctic Buoy Programme (IABP) and International Programme for Antarctic Buoys (IPAB) have measured surface air temperature (SAT) at 2-m height, which minimizes the ambiguity of measurements near of the surface. Specifically, is the temperature sensor measuring open water, snow, sea ice, or air? But now, with the dramatic decrease in Arctic SIE, increase in open water during summer, and the frailty of the younger sea ice pack, the IABP has had to deploy and develop new instruments to measure temperature. These instruments include Surface Velocity Program (SVP) buoys, which are commonly deployed on the world's ice-free oceans and typically measure sea surface temperature (SST), and the new robust Airborne eXpendable Ice Beacons (AXIB), which measure both SST and SAT. "Best Practice" requires that these instruments are inter-compared, and early results showing differences in collocated temperature measurements of over 2°C prompted the establishment of the IABP Arctic Observing Experiment (AOX) buoy test site at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in Barrow, Alaska. Preliminary results showed that the color of the hull of SVP buoys introduces a bias due to solar heating of the buoy. Since then, we have recommended that buoys should be painted white to reduce biases in temperature measurements due to different colors of the buoys deployed in different regions of the Arctic or the Antarctic. Measurements of SAT are more robust, but some of the temperature shields are susceptible to frosting. During our presentation we will provide an intercomparison of the temperature measurements at the AOX test site (i.e. high quality DOE/ARM observations compared with

  8. ATK Launch Vehicle (ALV-X1) Liftoff Acoustic Environments: Prediction vs. Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Janice; Counter, Douglas; Kenny, Jeremy; Murphy, John

    2009-01-01

    The ATK Launch Vehicle (ALV-X1) provided an opportunity to measure liftoff acoustic noise data. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) engineers were interested in the ALV-X1 launch because the First Stage motor and launch pad conditions, including a relativity short deflector ducting, provide a potential analogue to future Ares I launches. This paper presents the measured liftoff acoustics on the vehicle and tower. Those measured results are compared to predictions based upon the method described in NASA SP-8072 "Acoustic Loads Generated by the Propulsion System" and the Vehicle Acoustic Environment Prediction Program (VAEPP) which was developed by MSFC acoustics engineers. One-third octave band sound pressure levels will be presented. This data is useful for the ALV-X1 in validating the pre-launch environments and loads predictions. Additionally, the ALV-X1 liftoff data can be scaled to define liftoff environments for the NASA Constellation program Ares vehicles. Vehicle liftoff noise is caused by the supersonic jet flow interaction with surrounding atmosphere or more simply, jet noise. As the vehicle's First Stage motor is ignited, an acoustic noise field is generated by the exhaust. This noise field persists due to the supersonic jet noise and reflections from the launch pad and tower, then changes as the vehicle begins to liftoff from the launch pad. Depending on launch pad and adjacent tower configurations, the liftoff noise is generally very high near the nozzle exit and decreases rapidly away from the nozzle. The liftoff acoustic time range of interest is typically 0 to 20 seconds after ignition. The exhaust plume thermo-fluid mechanics generates sound at approx.10 Hz to 20 kHz. Liftoff acoustic noise is usually the most severe dynamic environment for a launch vehicle or payload in the mid to high frequency range (approx.50 to 2000 Hz). This noise environment can induce high-level vibrations along the external surfaces of the vehicle and surrounding

  9. Current Measurements and Overwash Monitoring Using Tilt Current Meters in Three Coastal Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowell, N. S.; Sherwood, C. R.; Decarlo, T. M.; Grant, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Tilt Current Meters (TCMs) provide accurate, cost effective measurements of near-bottom current velocities. Many studies in coastal environments require current measurements, which are frequently made with Acoustic Doppler Profilers (ADPs). ADPs are expensive, however, and may not be suitable for locations where there is significant risk of damage, loss, or theft or where a large spatial array of measurements is required. TCMs, by contrast, are smaller, less expensive, and easier to deploy. This study tested TCMs in three sites to determine their suitability for use in research applications. TCMs are based on the drag-tilt principle, where the instrument tilts in response to current. The meter consists of a buoyant float with an onboard accelerometer, three-axis tilt sensor, three-axis magnetometer (compass), and a data logger. Current measurements are derived by post processing the tilt and compass values and converting them to velocity using empirical calibration data. Large data-storage capacity (4 GB) and low power requirements allow long deployments (many months) at high sample rates (16 Hz). We demonstrate the utility of TCM current measurements on a reef at Dongsha Atoll in the South China Sea, and in Vineyard Sound off Cape Cod, where the TCM performance was evaluated against ADP measurements. We have also used the TCM to record waves during an overwash event on a Cape Cod barrier beach during a winter storm. The TCM recorded waves as they came through the overwash channel, and the data were in agreement with the water-level record used as a reference. These tests demonstrate that TCMs may be used in a variety of near shore environments and have the potential to significantly increase the density of meters in future studies were current measurements are required.

  10. Measures of the consumer food store environment: a systematic review of the evidence 2000-2011.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, Alison; Hankins, Scott; Jilcott, Stephanie

    2012-08-01

    Description of the consumer food environment has proliferated in publication. However, there has been a lack of systematic reviews focusing on how the consumer food environment is associated with the following: (1) neighborhood characteristics; (2) food prices; (3) dietary patterns; and (4) weight status. We conducted a systematic review of primary, quantitative, observational studies, published in English that conducted an audit of the consumer food environment. The literature search included electronic, hand searches, and peer-reviewed from 2000 to 2011. Fifty six papers met the inclusion criteria. Six studies reported stores in low income neighborhoods or high minority neighborhoods had less availability of healthy food. While, four studies found there was no difference in availability between neighborhoods. The results were also inconsistent for differences in food prices, dietary patterns, and weight status. This systematic review uncovered several key findings. (1) Systematic measurement of determining availability of food within stores and store types is needed; (2) Context is relevant for understanding the complexities of the consumer food environment; (3) Interventions and longitudinal studies addressing purchasing habits, diet, and obesity outcomes are needed; and (4) Influences of price and marketing that may be linked with why people purchase certain items.

  11. Measuring natural resource scarcity under common property environment and uncertainty: an interpretive analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.N.

    1987-01-01

    In order to extract and use a natural resource (e.g., coal) the environment (air, water, etc.) must also be used as a repository of the discharged wastes (e.g., sulfur oxides, nitrous oxides, particulates, etc.). Moreover, if there is a mandated level of the environmental resource (e.g., clean air) that has to be maintained, then certain additional costs must be borne by society (firms utilizing the resource). Thus, in evaluating the scarcity of an extractible resource, the relative position of the environmental resource also must be evaluated. This study incorporated such jointness in the evaluation of the measure of resource scarcity, something earlier studies did not address. The theoretical model was developed in an optimal-control framework. It was analytically shown that this new measure of resource scarcity would indicate a different trend compared to earlier ones. The measure of resource scarcity developed in this study captures previous measures as special cases. In an uncertain world, when the impacts of use of an extractible resource on the environment is not known, the stock size of the environmental resource becomes uncertain.

  12. The Power of Food Scale. A new measure of the psychological influence of the food environment.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Michael R; Butryn, Meghan L; Didie, Elizabeth R; Annunziato, Rachel A; Thomas, J Graham; Crerand, Canice E; Ochner, Christopher N; Coletta, Maria C; Bellace, Dara; Wallaert, Matthew; Halford, Jason

    2009-08-01

    This paper describes the psychometric evaluation of a new measure called the Power of Food Scale (PFS). The PFS assesses the psychological impact of living in food-abundant environments. It measures appetite for, rather than consumption of, palatable foods, at three levels of food proximity (food available, food present, and food tasted). Participants were 466 healthy college students. A confirmatory factor analysis replicated the three-factor solution found previously by Capelleri et al. [Capelleri, J. C., Bushmakin, A. G., Gerber, R. A., Leidy, N. K., Sexton, C., Karlsson, J., et al. (in press). Discovering the structure of the Power of Food Scale (PFS) in obese patients. International Journal of Obesity, 11, A165]. The PFS was found to have adequate internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The PFS and the Restraint Scale were regressed on four self-report measures of overeating. The PFS was independently related to all four whereas the Restraint Scale was independently related to two. Expert ratings of items suggested that the items are an acceptable reflection of the construct that the PFS is designed to capture. The PFS may be useful as a measure of the hedonic impact of food environments replete with highly palatable foods.

  13. Acoustical environment measurement at a very shallow port: Trial case in Hashirimizu Port

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogasawara, Hanako; Mori, Kazuyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Recently, the needs for coastal environment measurement has been increasing for many purposes, such as fishing, weather forecasting, ocean noise measurement for power plants, and coastal security. Acoustical measurement is one of the solutions because it can cover a wide area with few sensors, and it is possible to monitor long term or in real time. In this study, a small-scale reciprocal sound travel experiment was carried out in Hashirimizu Port for coastal environment measurement, such as current speed and water temperature. Since the distance between the surface and the transducer becomes short according to the tidal effect, the direct signal is canceled by the surface-reflected signal under a specific condition. However, even under such a condition, mean water temperature could be estimated from the reciprocal travel time using bottom-reflected signals. The current along the travel path was a reasonable value. It is possible to obtain a special current speed with another reciprocal path, which is in a direction perpendicular to the current travel path.

  14. Measurement of the local food environment: a comparison of existing data sources.

    PubMed

    Bader, Michael D M; Ailshire, Jennifer A; Morenoff, Jeffrey D; House, James S

    2010-03-01

    Studying the relation between the residential environment and health requires valid, reliable, and cost-effective methods to collect data on residential environments. This 2002 study compared the level of agreement between measures of the presence of neighborhood businesses drawn from 2 common sources of data used for research on the built environment and health: listings of businesses from commercial databases and direct observations of city blocks by raters. Kappa statistics were calculated for 6 types of businesses-drugstores, liquor stores, bars, convenience stores, restaurants, and grocers-located on 1,663 city blocks in Chicago, Illinois. Logistic regressions estimated whether disagreement between measurement methods was systematically correlated with the socioeconomic and demographic characteristics of neighborhoods. Levels of agreement between the 2 sources were relatively high, with significant (P < 0.001) kappa statistics for each business type ranging from 0.32 to 0.70. Most business types were more likely to be reported by direct observations than in the commercial database listings. Disagreement between the 2 sources was not significantly correlated with the socioeconomic and demographic characteristics of neighborhoods. Results suggest that researchers should have reasonable confidence using whichever method (or combination of methods) is most cost-effective and theoretically appropriate for their research design.

  15. Thin Film Sensors for Minimally-Intrusive Measurements in Harsh High Temperature Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, Jih-Fen; Will, Herbert A.; Martin, Lisa C.

    1998-01-01

    Advanced thin film sensors are being developed to provide accurate surface temperature, heat flux and strain measurements for components used in hostile propulsion environments. These sensors are sputter deposited and microfabricated directly onto the test articles with no additional bonding agent. The thickness of the sensors is only a few micrometers which creates minimal disturbance of the gas flow over the test surface. Thus thin film sensors have the advantage over conventional wire- based sensors by providing minimally intrusive measurement and having a faster response. These thin film sensors are being developed for characterization of advanced materials and structures in hostile, high-temperature environments, and for validation of design codes. This paper presents the advances of three high temperature thin film sensor technologies developed at NASA Lewis Research Center: thermocouples, heat-flux gages and strain gages. The fabrication techniques of these thin film sensors which include physical vapor deposition, photolithography patterning and lead Wire attachment are described. Sensors demonstrations on a variety of engine materials, including superalloys, ceramics and advanced ceramic matrix composites, in several hostile, high-temperature test environments are presented. The advantages and limitations of thin film sensor technology are also discussed.

  16. Adding Papillomacular Bundle Measurements to Standard Optical Coherence Tomography Does Not Increase Sensitivity to Detect Prior Optic Neuritis in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Laible, Mona; Jarius, Sven; Schmidt-Bacher, Annette; Platten, Michael; Haas, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To improve the detection of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thinning in multiple sclerosis (MS), a special peripapillary ring scanning algorithm (N-site RNFL, N-RNFL) was developed for spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). In contrast to the standard protocol (ST-RNFL) scanning starts nasally, not temporally, and provides an additional sector of analysis, the papillomacular bundle (PMB). We aimed to ascertain whether the temporal RNFL differs between the two techniques, whether N-RNFL is more sensitive than ST-RNFL to detect previous optic neuritis (ON), and whether analyzing the PMB adds additional sensitivity. Furthermore, we investigated whether RNFL is associated with disease severity and/or disease duration. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional case-control study of 38 patients with MS, of whom 24 had a history of ON, and 40 healthy controls (HC). Subjects with ON within the previous 6 months were excluded. Records included clinical characteristics, visual evoked potentials (VEP), and SD-OCT in both techniques. Results In a total of 73 evaluable MS eyes, temporal N-RNFL was abnormal in 17.8%, temporal ST-RNFL in 19.2%, and the PMB-RNFL in 21.9%. In ON eyes, the sensitivity of temporal N-RNFL and ST-RNFL did not differ significantly (37.0%/33.3%, p = 0.556). The sensitivity of VEP was 85.2%. RNFL thickness was associated with disease severity in all eyes, with and without a history of ON, and with disease duration. Conclusion The two OCT techniques detected previous ON with similar sensitivity, but the sensitivity of VEPs was superior to that of both N-RNFL and ST-RNFL. Our results indicate that the widely used ST-RNFL technique is appropriate for peripapillary RNFL measurements in MS patients. PMID:27171375

  17. Design of a Multisensory Probe for Measuring Carbon Cycle Processes in Aqueous Subterranean Environments

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, Timothy J; Kisner, Roger; Woodworth, Ken; Lenarduzzi, Roberto; Frank, Steven Shane; McKnight, Timothy E

    2015-01-01

    The global carbon cycle describes the exchange of carbon between the atmosphere, terrestrial vegetation, oceans, and soil. Mechanisms involving carbon in sub-terrestrial ecosystems and their impact on climate are not well understood. This lack of understanding limits current climate models and prevents accurate soil-carbon storage predications for future climate conditions. To address the lack of instrumentation for conducting high fidelity measurements of appropriate parameters in the field, a multi-sensory probe using a mix of optical, fiber optic, and electronic technologies to measure CO2, temperature, dissolved oxygen, redox potential, and water level in subsurface environments has been developed. Details of the design, fabrication and laboratory performance verification are presented. Use cases and the anticipated impacts of such measurements on climate models are discussed.

  18. Resolving small signal measurements in experimental plasma environments using calibrated subtraction of noise signals

    SciTech Connect

    Fimognari, P. J. Demers, D. R.; Chen, X.; Schoch, P. M.

    2014-11-15

    The performance of many diagnostic and control systems within fusion and other fields of research are often detrimentally affected by spurious noise signals. This is particularly true for those (such as radiation or particle detectors) working with very small signals. Common sources of radiated and conducted noise in experimental fusion environments include the plasma itself and instrumentation. The noise complicates data analysis, as illustrated by noise on signals measured with the heavy ion beam probe (HIBP) installed on the Madison Symmetric Torus. The noise is time-varying and often exceeds the secondary ion beam current (in contrast with previous applications). Analysis of the noise identifies the dominant source as photoelectric emission from the detectors induced by ultraviolet light from the plasma. This has led to the development of a calibrated subtraction technique, which largely removes the undesired temporal noise signals from data. The advantages of the technique for small signal measurement applications are demonstrated through improvements realized on HIBP fluctuation measurements.

  19. An instrument design to measure the sustainability of technology in risky environments: Case study of Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Sammarraie, Munadil Khaleel Faaeq; Faieq, Alaa K.; Al-Qasa, Khaled

    2016-08-01

    Electronic Government (eG) has become a vital tool to serve the beneficiaries; therefore, it has received the attention of many Information System (IS) researchers. Due to the importance of the sustainability of IS, this paper identifies the emergence of a clear gape to measure the sustainability of IS in risky circumstances, such as wars, conflicts and violence; nowadays, the risky issue is increasing remarkably. This paper expands previous studies whose focus was on investigating the sustainability of electronic services unsecured countries in the world. Consequently, a need for a specific tool to measure the sustainability of technology among the users in risky conditions has become urgent. Based on the findings, it can be confirmed that this instrument is reliable to measure the sustainability of technology in risky environments.

  20. Conceptual Design and Demonstration of Space Scale for Measuring Mass in Microgravity Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youn-Kyu; Lee, Joo-Hee; Choi, Gi-Hyuk; Choi, Ik-Hyeon

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a new idea for developing a space scale for measuring mass in a microgravity environment was proposed by using the inertial force properties of an object to measure its mass. The space scale detected the momentum change of the specimen and reference masses by using a load-cell sensor as the force transducer based on Newton's laws of motion. In addition, the space scale calculated the specimen mass by comparing the inertial forces of the specimen and reference masses in the same acceleration field. By using this concept, a space scale with a capacity of 3 kg based on the law of momentum conservation was implemented and demonstrated under microgravity conditions onboard International Space Station (ISS) with an accuracy of ±1 g. By the performance analysis on the space scale, it was verified that an instrument with a compact size could be implemented and be quickly measured with a reasonable accuracy under microgravity conditions.

  1. Optical scintillation measurements in a desert environment IV: simulated effects of scintillation on communications links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suite, Michele; Rabinovich, W. S.; Mahon, Rita; Moore, Christopher; Ferraro, Mike; Burris, H. R., Jr.; Thomas, L. M.

    2011-09-01

    Optical scintillation is an effect that limits the performance of many optical systems including imagers and free space optical communication links. The Naval Research Laboratory is undertaking a series of measurement campaigns of optical scintillation in a variety of environments. In December of 2010 measurements were made over a one week period in the desert at China Lake, CA. The NRL TATS system was used to measure time resolved scintillation over a variety of different ranges and terrains. This data has been used to determine fade rate and duration as a function of weather and link margin. Temporal correlation of fades has also been calculated. This data allows simulation of a variety of communication protocols and the effects of those protocols on link throughput. In this paper we present a comparison of different protocols for both direct and retroreflector links.

  2. The measured radiation environment within Spacelabs 1 and 2 and comparison with predictions.

    PubMed

    Parnell, T A; Watts, J W; Fishman, G J; Benton, E V; Frank, A L; Gregory, J C

    1986-01-01

    To measure the radiation environment in the Spacelab (SL) module and on the pallet, a set of passive and active radiation detectors was flown as part of the Verification Flight Instrumentation (VFI). SL 1 carried 4 passive and 2 active detector packages which, with the data from the 26 passive detectors of Experiment INS006, provided a comprehensive survey of the radiation environment within the spacecraft. SL 2 carried 2 passive VFI units on the pallet. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) measured the low linear energy transfer (LET) dose component; the HZE fluence and LET spectra were mapped with CR-39 track detectors; thermal and epithermal neutrons were measured with the use of fission foils; metal samples analyzed by gamma ray spectroscopy measured low levels of several activation lines. The TLDs registered from 97 to 143 mrad in the SL 1 module. Dose equivalents of 330 +/- 70 mrem in the SL 1 module and 537 +/- 37 mrem on the SL 2 pallet were measured. The active units in the SL 1 module each contained an integrating tissue-equivalent ion chamber and two differently-shielded xenon-filled proportional counters. The ion chambers accumulated 125 and 128 mrads for the mission with 17 and 12 mrads accumulated during passages through the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). The proportional counter rates (approximately 1 cps at sea level) were approximately 100 cps in the middle of the SAA (mostly protons), approximately 35 cps at large geomagnetic latitudes (cosmic rays) and approximately 100 cps in the South Horn of the electron belts (mostly bremsstrahlung). Detailed results of the measurements and comparison with calculated values are described.

  3. Measurement and assessment of carrying capacity of the environment in Ningbo, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, R Z; Borthwick, Alistair G L

    2011-08-01

    Carrying Capacity of the Environment (CCE) provides a useful measure of the sustainable development of a region. Approaches that use integrated assessment instead of measurement can lead to misinterpretation of sustainable development because of confusion between Environmental Stress (ES) indexes and CCE indexes, and the selection of over-simple linear plus models. The present paper proposes a comprehensive measurement system for CCE which comprises models of natural resources capacity, environmental assimilative capacity, ecosystem services capacity, and society supporting capacity. The corresponding measurable indexes are designed to assess CCE using a carrying capacity surplus ratio model and a vector of surplus ratio of carrying capacity model. The former aims at direct comparison of ES and CCE based on the values of basic indexes, and the latter uses a Euclidean vector to assess CCE states. The measurement and assessment approaches are applicable to Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) and environmental planning and management. A case study is presented for Ningbo, China, whereby all the basic indexes of ECC are measured and the CCE states assessed for 2005 and 2010.

  4. Subjective versus objective measures of tic severity in Tourette syndrome - The influence of environment.

    PubMed

    Barnea, Meirav; Benaroya-Milshtein, Noa; Gilboa-Sechtman, Eva; Woods, Douglas W; Piacentini, John; Fennig, Silvana; Apter, Alan; Steinberg, Tamar

    2016-08-30

    The objective of this study was to examine the influence of environmental challenges on tic expression by subjective and objective measures. The study group consisted of 41 children aged 6-18 years (M=10.15, SD=2.73) with a primary diagnosis of Tourette syndrome. Subjective measures included the Functional Assessment Interview developed for this study and three standard validated instruments. The objective measure was a video-recording of the patients in five daily-life situations: watching television, doing homework, being alone, receiving attention when ticcing, and talking to a stranger. In addition, the effect of premonitory urges on assessment of tic expression was evaluated. The associations between the subjective and objective measures of tic expression were moderate to low. A significantly higher number of tics were observed in the television situation, and a significantly lower number in the alone situation, compared to the other situations. Higher levels of premonitory urge were associated with greater awareness of objectively measured tic expression. In conclusion, tic expression is significantly influenced by the environment. Subjective measures of tic expression may be misleading. These results have implications for refining the clinical assessment of tics, improving research methodology, and developing new therapeutic strategies.

  5. Frequency scanning interferometry in ATLAS: remote, multiple, simultaneous and precise distance measurements in a hostile environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, P. A.; Howell, D. F.; Nickerson, R. B.

    2004-11-01

    ATLAS is the largest particle detector under construction at CERN Geneva. Frequency scanning interferometry (FSI), also known as absolute distance interferometry, will be used to monitor shape changes of the SCT (semiconductor tracker), a particle tracker in the inaccessible, high radiation environment at the centre of ATLAS. Geodetic grids with several hundred fibre-coupled interferometers (30 mm to 1.5 m long) will be measured simultaneously. These lengths will be measured by tuning two lasers and comparing the resulting phase shifts in grid line interferometers (GLIs) with phase shifts in a reference interferometer. The novel inexpensive GLI design uses diverging beams to reduce sensitivity to misalignment, albeit with weaker signals. One micrometre precision length measurements of grid lines will allow 10 µm precision tracker shape corrections to be fed into ATLAS particle tracking analysis. The technique was demonstrated by measuring a 400 mm interferometer to better than 400 nm and a 1195 mm interferometer to better than 250 nm. Precise measurements were possible, even with poor quality signals, using numerical analysis of thousands of intensity samples. Errors due to drifts in interferometer length were substantially reduced using two lasers tuned in opposite directions and the precision was further improved by linking measurements made at widely separated laser frequencies.

  6. The School Assessment for Environmental Typology (SAfETy): An Observational Measure of the School Environment.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Catherine P; Milam, Adam J; Furr-Holden, C Debra M; Johnson, Sarah Lindstrom

    2015-12-01

    School safety is of great concern for prevention researchers, school officials, parents, and students, yet there are a dearth of assessments that have operationalized school safety from an organizational framework using objective tools and measures. Such a tool would be important for deriving unbiased assessments of the school environment, which in turn could be used as an evaluative tool for school violence prevention efforts. The current paper presents a framework for conceptualizing school safety consistent with Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED) model and social disorganization theory, both of which highlight the importance of context as a driver for adolescents' risk for involvement in substance use and violence. This paper describes the development of a novel observational measure, called the School Assessment for Environmental Typology (SAfETy), which applies CPTED and social disorganizational frameworks to schools to measure eight indicators of school physical and social environment (i.e., disorder, trash, graffiti/vandalism, appearance, illumination, surveillance, ownership, and positive behavioral expectations). Drawing upon data from 58 high schools, we provide preliminary data regarding the validity and reliability of the SAfETy and describe patterns of the school safety indicators. Findings demonstrate the reliability and validity of the SAfETy and are discussed with regard to the prevention of violence in schools.

  7. A dynamic technique for measuring surface tension at high temperatures in microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miiller, A. P.; Cezairliyan, A.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of a dynamic technique for measuring surface tension of liquid metals at high temperatures in a microgravity environment was demonstrated. The basic method involves heating a tubular specimen resistively from ambient temperature through its melting point in about 1 sec by passing an electrical current pulse through it, while simultaneously recording the pertinent experimental quantities. Static equilibrium for the molten specimen is achieved in a microgravity environment by splitting the current after it passes through the specimen tube and returning a fraction along the tube axis, and the remaining fraction outside the specimen. Adjustments to the current split enable a balance between the magnetic and surface tension forces acting on the specimen. Values for surface tension are determined from measurements of the equilibrium dimensions of the molten specimen tube, and the magnitudes of the currents. Rapid melting experiments, performed during microgravity simulations with the NASA KC-135 aircraft, yield a value for the surface tension of copper at its melting point which is in agreement with literature data. Measurements of surface tension of a refractory metal (tantalum) are underway.

  8. In Situ ATP Bioluminescent Measurements in Subglacial Environments - The Engabreen Glacier in the Norwegian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullen, D. C.; Wadham, J. L.; Pancost, R.; Kelly, S.; Barnett, M. J.; Jackson, M.

    2007-12-01

    Engabreen is a northern outlet glacier from the western Svartisen ice cap on the Nordland coast of Norway just inside the Arctic Circle. A unique feature of the glacier is a man-made tunnel system within the bedrock beneath the glacier that offers scientists direct access to the glacier-bedrock interface. This unique facility - called the Engabreen Subglacial Laboratory - is ideal to test developments of new in situ analytical techniques. We have used the facility to perform the first in situ detection of microbial life in a subglacial environment using standard off-the-shelf ATP bioluminescence detection technology and therefore using ATP levels as a proxy of microbial life. Measurements were performed both in melt-waters in the tunnels and from melted ice samples directly from the glacier-bedrock interface. Levels of ATP above background were detected and appeared to be associated with suspended sediment particles rather than in the water or ice component. This indicated the presence of microbial life. Development of protocols for in situ sample processing and use of in situ ATP measurements in the directing and choice of sampling points for other techniques was explored. This study has shown that off-the-shelf portable ATP bioluminescence can be used to perform in situ measurements within sub-glacial environments but that further development work is required to optimize experimental protocols and to correlate findings with other life detection and enumeration techniques.

  9. Multiparameter Flowfield Measurements in High-Pressure, Cryogenic Environments Using Femtosecond Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Ross A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Peters, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Femtosecond laser electronic excitation tagging (FLEET) and Rayleigh scattering (RS) from a femtosecond laser are demonstrated in the NASA Langley 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT). The measured signals from these techniques are examined for their thermodynamic dependencies in pure nitrogen. The FLEET signal intensity and signal lifetimes are found to scale primarily with the gas density, as does the RS signal. Several models are developed, which capture these physical behaviors. Notably, the FLEET and Rayleigh scattering intensities scale linearly with the flow density, while the FLEET signal decay rates are a more complex function of the thermodynamic state of the gas. The measurement of various flow properties are demonstrated using these techniques. While density was directly measured from the signal intensities and FLEET signal lifetime, temperature and pressure were measured using the simultaneous FLEET velocity measurements while assuming the flow had a constant total enthalpy. Measurements of density, temperature, and pressure from the FLEET signal are made with accuracies as high as 5.3 percent, 0.62 percent, and 6.2 percent, respectively, while precisions were approximately 10 percent, 0.26 percent, and 11 percent for these same quantities. Similar measurements of density from Rayleigh scattering showed an overall accuracy of 3.5 percent and a precision of 10.2 percent over a limited temperature range (T greater than 195 K). These measurements suggest a high degree of utility at using the femtosecond-laser based diagnostics for making multiparameter measurements in high-pressure, cryogenic environments such as large-scale TCT facilities.

  10. Ultrasonic techniques for measuring physical properties of fluids in harsh environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantea, Cristian

    Ultrasonic-based measurement techniques, either in the time domain or in the frequency domain, include a wide range of experimental methods for investigating physical properties of materials. This discussion is specifically focused on ultrasonic methods and instrumentation development for the determination of liquid properties at conditions typically found in subsurface environments (in the U.S., more than 80% of total energy needs are provided by subsurface energy sources). Such sensors require materials that can withstand harsh conditions of high pressure, high temperature and corrosiveness. These include the piezoelectric material, electrically conductive adhesives, sensor housings/enclosures, and the signal carrying cables, to name a few. A complete sensor package was developed for operation at high temperatures and pressures characteristic to geothermal/oil-industry reservoirs. This package is designed to provide real-time, simultaneous measurements of multiple physical parameters, such as temperature, pressure, salinity and sound speed. The basic principle for this sensor's operation is an ultrasonic frequency domain technique, combined with transducer resonance tracking. This multipurpose acoustic sensor can be used at depths of several thousand meters, temperatures up to 250 °C, and in a very corrosive environment. In the context of high precision measurement of sound speed, the determination of acoustic nonlinearity of liquids will also be discussed, using two different approaches: (i) the thermodynamic method, in which precise and accurate frequency domain sound speed measurements are performed at high pressure and high temperature, and (ii) a modified finite amplitude method, requiring time domain measurements of the second harmonic at room temperature. Efforts toward the development of an acoustic source of collimated low-frequency (10-150 kHz) beam, with applications in imaging, will also be presented.

  11. In-Situ VIS/NIR Measurements of Space Environment Effects on Spacecraft Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedard, D.; Seitzer, P.; Willison, A.; Somers, P.

    2016-09-01

    Laboratory material characterization experiments have shown that passive observational techniques that measure the spectral energy distribution of reflected sunlight from spacecraft and space debris could potentially be used to determine an object's surface compositional make-up and even possibly its orientation. Such techniques, if proven to be reliable and consistent, would represent non-intrusive and cost effective tools that would benefit the overall space situational awareness (SSA) mission. However, to date, observations using either colour photometry or spectrophotometry to determine surface material characteristics of such objects have not produced encouraging results. One common problem that has plagued these attempts is the lack of understanding on how the spectral reflectance of the spacecraft surfaces evolves with time. There are a number of spacecraft materials whose spectral reflectance characteristics have been studied before and after spaceflight in LEO; there are no measurements on how the space environment gradually modifies the spectral scattering characteristics of these materials as a function of time. Furthermore, there are little or no in-situ observations of environmental effects on individually identifiable materials in MEO and GEO. This complicates the task of interpreting the spectral measurements of spatially unresolved spacecraft and orbital debris. This paper presents instrument concepts whose sole purpose will be to acquire on-orbit spectral reflectance measurements, at different observational geometries, of either witness samples or materials covering the surface of the host spacecraft. Such instruments could be flown as a hosted payload on an operational GEO satellite or as a dedicated payload on a microsatellite. Measurements would be acquired over the lifetime of the satellite and would observe how the spectral reflectance characteristics evolve during its lifetime. Furthermore, installation of one of the proposed instruments on

  12. TRMM ground truth in a monsoon environment - Darwin, Australia. [Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keenan, T. D.; Holland, G. J.; Manton, M. J.; Simpson, J.

    1988-01-01

    A ground truth station for the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) is described. The station is situated in Darwin, Australia in a monsoon environment typical for Southeast Asia. The climatological features of the site, and the Darwin observational program are examined. The instruments and operations at the station are discussed, including a Doppler radar making full upper tropospheric soundings every 12 hrs and wind soundings every 6 hrs, and a mesoscale raingauge and surface observing network operating continuously through the summer monsoon seasons. The spatial and temporal characteristics of rainfall in the area and an outline of the research objectives of the program are presented.

  13. Tuning Your Priors to the World

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    The idea that perceptual and cognitive systems must incorporate knowledge about the structure of the environment has become a central dogma of cognitive theory. In a Bayesian context, this idea is often realized in terms of “tuning the prior”—widely assumed to mean adjusting prior probabilities so that they match the frequencies of events in the world. This kind of “ecological” tuning has often been held up as an ideal of inference, in fact defining an “ideal observer.” But widespread as this viewpoint is, it directly contradicts Bayesian philosophy of probability, which views probabilities as degrees of belief rather than relative frequencies, and explicitly denies that they are objective characteristics of the world. Moreover, tuning the prior to observed environmental frequencies is subject to overfitting, meaning in this context overtuning to the environment, which leads (ironically) to poor performance in future encounters with the same environment. Whenever there is uncertainty about the environment—which there almost always is—an agent's prior should be biased away from ecological relative frequencies and toward simpler and more entropic priors. PMID:23335572

  14. Family and School Psychosocial Environment (FSPE): development of a brief questionnaire measuring perceived psychosocial environments in children/siblings.

    PubMed

    Persson, Bertil

    2011-06-01

    The aim of the study was to develop a short Swedish standardized, factor analyzed and cross-validated, family and school psychosocial environment questionnaire (FSPE). The study was based on 244 Swedish girls and boys, 10-19 years old, who filled in the FSPE. Maximum likelihood factor analysis, promax rotation, yielded six primary factors, based on absolute ratings. Since the factors were somewhat correlated, two broader secondary factors, with satisfactory reliabilities, were also included in the form, named Warmth, support and openness from parents, siblings and peers, and Family conflicts and school discipline, respectively. Means and standard deviations for girls and boys showed sex differences in most of the factors. Because the children participated anonymously they could report about spanking without negative consequences. Indeed, 8.1% of the children had been spanked by their parents. Based on relative ratings, two factors were identified, covering environmental questions about "more than, the same as or less than" a sibling. Only 6.6% of the children rated their environment exactly the same on the Family Psychosocial Environment (FPE) factors, compared to a sibling within the family. Thus the majority reported environmental differences. Further research is proposed to evaluate such differences and relations to personality, genotype-environment correlation and genetic mediation.

  15. Measuring X-ray Binary Accretion State Distributions in Extragalactic Environments using XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Lacey; Lehmer, Bret; Yukita, Mihoko; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Ptak, Andrew; Wik, Daniel R.; Zezas, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    X-ray binary systems (XRBs) in the MW can exist in several different accretion states, and many have been found to vary along specific tracks on intensity-color diagrams. Observationally measuring the distributions of these accretion states in a variety of environments can aid in population synthesis modeling and ultimately help us understand the formation and evolution of XRBs and their compact object components (i.e., black holes and neutron stars). Recent innovative studies with NuSTAR have demonstrated the utility of color-color and intensity-color diagrams in differentiating between XRB accretion states in extragalactic environments (NGC 253, M83, and M31). The key to NuSTAR’s success is its sensitivity above »10keV, where spectral differences between accretion states are most pronounced. However, due to the relatively low spatial resolution and large background of NuSTAR, the constraints from these diagrams is limited to only bright sources in nearby galaxies. In this poster, we present evidence that XMM-Newton observations of M83 in the 4.0-12.0 keV range can be used to create similar color-intensity and color-color diagrams and therefore differentiate between these accretion states. We will further discuss plans to leverage XMM-Newton’s vast archive and 17-year baseline to dramatically expand studies of accretion state distributions and state transitions for XRB populations in extragalactic environments.

  16. Performance Analysis of MIMO Relay Network via Propagation Measurement in L-Shaped Corridor Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lertwiram, Namzilp; Tran, Gia Khanh; Mizutani, Keiichi; Sakaguchi, Kei; Araki, Kiyomichi

    Setting relays can address the shadowing problem between a transmitter (Tx) and a receiver (Rx). Moreover, the Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) technique has been introduced to improve wireless link capacity. The MIMO technique can be applied in relay network to enhance system performance. However, the efficiency of relaying schemes and relay placement have not been well investigated with experiment-based study. This paper provides a propagation measurement campaign of a MIMO two-hop relay network in 5GHz band in an L-shaped corridor environment with various relay locations. Furthermore, this paper proposes a Relay Placement Estimation (RPE) scheme to identify the optimum relay location, i.e. the point at which the network performance is highest. Analysis results of channel capacity show that relaying technique is beneficial over direct transmission in strong shadowing environment while it is ineffective in non-shadowing environment. In addition, the optimum relay location estimated with the RPE scheme also agrees with the location where the network achieves the highest performance as identified by network capacity. Finally, the capacity analysis shows that two-way MIMO relay employing network coding has the best performance while cooperative relaying scheme is not effective due to shadowing effect weakening the signal strength of the direct link.

  17. Comparison of path visualizations and cognitive measures relative to travel technique in a virtual environment.

    PubMed

    Zanbaka, Catherine A; Lok, Benjamin C; Babu, Sabarish V; Ulinski, Amy C; Hodges, Larry F

    2005-01-01

    We describe a between-subjects experiment that compared four different methods of travel and their effect on cognition and paths taken in an immersive virtual environment (IVE). Participants answered a set of questions based on Crook's condensation of Bloom's taxonomy that assessed their cognition of the IVE with respect to knowledge, understanding and application, and higher mental processes. Participants also drew a sketch map of the IVE and the objects within it. The users' sense of presence was measured using the Steed-Usoh-Slater Presence Questionnaire. The participants' position and head orientation were automatically logged during their exposure to the virtual environment. These logs were later used to create visualizations of the paths taken. Path analysis, such as exploring the overlaid path visualizations and dwell data information, revealed further differences among the travel techniques. Our results suggest that, for applications where problem solving and evaluation of information is important or where opportunity to train is minimal, then having a large tracked space so that the participant can walk around the virtual environment provides benefits over common virtual travel techniques.

  18. AC Magnetic Properties of Large Volume of Water — Susceptibility Measurement in Unshielded Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukada, Keiji; Kiwa, Toshihiko; Masuda, Yuuki

    2006-10-01

    To investigate the effect of low-frequency magnetic-field exposure of a human body, the low-frequency AC magnetic property of a large volume of water was measured by low-frequency magnetic field exposure (from 50 Hz to 1.2 kHz). The results indicate that the AC magnetic property of water is due to diamagnetism in the low-frequency range. The phase between the main magnetic field and the generated magnetic field remained constant at about 180°. Results were not affected by conductivity or pH. Moreover, the magnetic-field strength from water showed a susceptibility frequency dependence proportional to the frequency above approximately 400 Hz. Because of the incremental effects of susceptibility, the magnetic field from water was measured using a conventional magnetic sensor (magnetic resistive; MR) in an unshielded environment.

  19. Item wording and internal consistency of a measure of cohesion: the group environment questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Eys, Mark A; Carron, Albert V; Bray, Steven R; Brawley, Lawrence R

    2007-06-01

    A common practice for counteracting response acquiescence in psychological measures has been to employ both negatively and positively worded items. However, previous research has highlighted that the reliability of measures can be affected by this practice (Spector, 1992). The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect that the presence of negatively worded items has on the internal reliability of the Group Environment Questionnaire (GEQ). Two samples (N = 276) were utilized, and participants were asked to complete the GEQ (original and revised) on separate occasions. Results demonstrated that the revised questionnaire (containing all positively worded items) had significantly higher Cronbach alpha values for three of the four dimensions of the GEQ. Implications, alternatives, and future directions are discussed.

  20. Conceptualizing and Comparing Neighborhood and Activity Space Measures for Food Environment Research

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Thomas W.; Pitts, Stephanie B. Jilcott; McGuirt, Jared T.; Keyserling, Thomas C.; Ammerman, Alice S.

    2014-01-01

    Greater accessibility to geospatial technologies has led to a surge of spatialized public health research, much of which has focused on food environments. The purpose of this study was to analyze differing spatial measures of exposure to supermarkets and farmers’ markets among women of reproductive age in eastern North Carolina. Exposure measures were derived using participant-defined neighborhoods, investigator-defined road network neighborhoods, and activity spaces incorporating participants’ time space behaviors. Results showed that mean area for participant-defined neighborhoods (0.04 sq. miles) was much smaller than 2.0 mile road network neighborhoods (3.11 sq. miles) and activity spaces (26.36 sq. miles), and that activity spaces provided the greatest market exposure. The traditional residential neighborhood concept may not be particularly relevant for all places. Time-space approaches capturing activity space may be more relevant, particularly if integrated with mixed methods strategies. PMID:25306420

  1. Backpack-portable mass spectrometer for measurement of volatile compounds in the environment. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Hemond, H.F.

    1991-01-01

    Environmental measurements of volatile pollutants and metabolic gases are preferably made in situ. In situ measurement provides immediate information to the investigator while minimizing disturbance and eliminating the need for sample collection, preservation, and transport. A self-contained mass spectrometer, capable of being carried by one person, has been designed and built for this purpose. The instrument is based on a compact crossed-field analyzer using a high-energy-product magnet and control circuitry optimized for low power consumption using a 12V DC primary power source. An internal, rechargable battery can provide up to several hours of operation in the field. Provision is made for interface, via RS-232, to a compact battery-operated laptop microcomputer. A variety of inlet configurations is possible, the simplest being a probe, containing a small silicone-rubber membrane, which may be inserted into a gas- or water-containing environment of interest.

  2. How Natural Water Retention Measures (NWRM) can help rural and urban environments improve their resilience?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siauve, Sonia

    2016-04-01

    The challenges related to water resources management are exacerbated by climate change which implies additional complexity and uncertainty. The impacts of climate change have thus to be taken into account, from today on the next decades, to ensure a sustainable integrated water resources management. One of the main environmental objective of the Water Framework Directive (2000/30/CE) was to achieve and maintain a good status for all water bodies by the target date of 2015. Unfortunately, Member States didn't manage to reach this goal and in this context, the European Commission (EC), since many years, have started many initiatives and reforms to improve the global situation. In 2012 the DG Environment (DGENV) of the EC published a "Blueprint to safeguard Europe's water resources" that states the need for further implementation of water resource management measures and in particular Natural Water Retention Measures (NWRMs). NWRM are measures that aim to safeguard and enhance the water storage potential of landscape, soils and aquifers, by restoring ecosystems, natural features and characteristics of water courses, and by using natural processes. They are Nature-Based Solutions supporting adaptation and reducing vulnerability of water resources. Their interest lies with the multiple benefits they can deliver, and their capacity to contribute simultaneously to the achievement of the objectives of different European policies (WFD, FD, Biodiversity strategy …). However the knowledge on NWRM is scattered and addressed differently in the countries, whereas the NWRM potential for improving the state of the environment and resilience (drought, flood, biodiversity…) in a changing environment is high. In 2013, all EU countries started the elaboration of the second River Basin Management Plan and associated Programme of Measures. To support MS authorities and local implementers of these measures DGENV launched a 14 month project for collaboratively building knowledge and

  3. Recommendations for Guidelines for Environment-Specific Magnetic-Field Measurements, Rapid Program Engineering Project #2

    SciTech Connect

    Electric Research and Management, Inc.; IIT Research Institute; Magnetic Measurements; Survey Research Center, University of California; T. Dan Bracken, Inc.

    1997-03-11

    The purpose of this project was to document widely applicable methods for characterizing the magnetic fields in a given environment, recognizing the many sources co-existing within that space. The guidelines are designed to allow the reader to follow an efficient process to (1) plan the goals and requirements of a magnetic-field study, (2) develop a study structure and protocol, and (3) document and carry out the plan. These guidelines take the reader first through the process of developing a basic study strategy, then through planning and performing the data collection. Last, the critical factors of data management, analysis reporting, and quality assurance are discussed. The guidelines are structured to allow the researcher to develop a protocol that responds to specific site and project needs. The Research and Public Information Dissemination Program (RAPID) is based on exposure to magnetic fields and the potential health effects. Therefore, the most important focus for these magnetic-field measurement guidelines is relevance to exposure. The assumed objective of an environment-specific measurement is to characterize the environment (given a set of occupants and magnetic-field sources) so that information about the exposure of the occupants may be inferred. Ideally, the researcher seeks to obtain complete or "perfect" information about these magnetic fields, so that personal exposure might also be modeled perfectly. However, complete data collection is not feasible. In fact, it has been made more difficult as the research field has moved to expand the list of field parameters measured, increasing the cost and complexity of performing a measurement and analyzing the data. The guidelines address this issue by guiding the user to design a measurement protocol that will gather the most exposure-relevant information based on the locations of people in relation to the sources. We suggest that the "microenvironment" become the base unit of area in a study, with

  4. Advanced Liquid-Free, Piezoresistive, SOI-Based Pressure Sensors for Measurements in Harsh Environments.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Ha-Duong; Mukhopadhyay, Biswaijit; Ehrmann, Oswin; Lang, Klaus-Dieter

    2015-08-18

    In this paper we present and discuss two innovative liquid-free SOI sensors for pressure measurements in harsh environments. The sensors are capable of measuring pressures at high temperatures. In both concepts media separation is realized using a steel membrane. The two concepts represent two different strategies for packaging of devices for use in harsh environments and at high temperatures. The first one is a "one-sensor-one-packaging_technology" concept. The second one uses a standard flip-chip bonding technique. The first sensor is a "floating-concept", capable of measuring pressures at temperatures up to 400 °C (constant load) with an accuracy of 0.25% Full Scale Output (FSO). A push rod (mounted onto the steel membrane) transfers the applied pressure directly to the center-boss membrane of the SOI-chip, which is placed on a ceramic carrier. The chip membrane is realized by Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE or Bosch Process). A novel propertied chip housing employing a sliding sensor chip that is fixed during packaging by mechanical preloading via the push rod is used, thereby avoiding chip movement, and ensuring optimal push rod load transmission. The second sensor can be used up to 350 °C. The SOI chips consists of a beam with an integrated centre-boss with was realized using KOH structuring and DRIE. The SOI chip is not "floating" but bonded by using flip-chip technology. The fabricated SOI sensor chip has a bridge resistance of 3250 Ω. The realized sensor chip has a sensitivity of 18 mV/µm measured using a bridge current of 1 mA.

  5. Designing virtual environments to measure behavioral correlates of state-level body satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Purvis, Clare K; Jones, Megan; Bailey, Jakki; Bailenson, Jeremy; Taylor, C Barr

    2013-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) offers a unique method for eliciting state-variable fluctuations in body satisfaction and associated behaviors by allowing near-perfect control over environmental factors. Greater variability in momentary body satisfaction is associated with more problematic eating behavior and cognitive styles predictive of eating disorders. The field currently lacks a model for understanding environmental variables and everyday events that tend to influence fluctuations in state body satisfaction. This study proposes a model of state-level body satisfaction and presents a method for measuring changes as they occur. We aim to investigate body comparison, selective attention and body checking behaviors in relation to self-report levels of state body satisfaction. We additionally assess interpersonal correlates of state body satisfaction using VR to measure personal distance between subjects and avatars of varying body sizes. 80 female college students with varying levels of weight and shape concerns will be exposed to five virtual environments designed to elicit varying levels of body dissatisfaction: (a) an empty room; (b) an empty beach; (c) a beach populated with avatars; (d) an empty party scene; (e) a party scene populated with avatars. Self-report body satisfaction was measured immediately following each exposure. A tracking system automatically tracked subjects' head orientation and body translation to measure visual gaze and personal space behavior relative to each virtual human within the environment. Data collection is currently underway and expected to be completed by May 2013. Preliminary data and development of the VR model for state-variable assessment will be presented.

  6. Effort for money? Farmers' rationale for participation in agri-environment measures with different implementation complexity.

    PubMed

    Van Herzele, Ann; Gobin, Anne; Van Gossum, Peter; Acosta, Lilibeth; Waas, Tom; Dendoncker, Nicolas; Henry de Frahan, Bruno

    2013-12-15

    European agri-environment programmes are based on the common principle that farmers deliver environmental services for which society pays. Due to the voluntary nature of agri-environment measures (AEM), the issue of farmers' motives or reasons for participation has been an important topic of investigation in past years. The present paper examines farmers' rationale for participation in AEM against the backdrop of continued debate over whether to develop relatively simple measures that can be readily applied by many farmers or give greater priority to measures that are more targeted - i.e. to the specific management requirement of particular habitats or species - but are often more complex. The paper draws on empirical material from a case study in the Dyle valley, Belgium, including in-depth interviews, expert consultations and a mail survey. It was sought not only to identify and quantify the importance of separate reasons for participation, but also to reveal how these reasons and other elements of relevance were logically interrelated in the explanation that farmers themselves give for their participation. As a result, six modes or styles of participation were identified: opportunistic, calculative, compensatory, optimising, catalysing and engaged. The analyses suggest that there were notable differences in that both separate reasons for and modes of participation do vary with the complexity of the measures' requirements. Overall, the study demonstrates that participation in AEM is not simply a matter of weighing the money against the effort for adoption. Whereas money is an important driver for participation (in particular, for those adopting complex AEM) it plays widely differing roles depending on the level of farmers' reasoning (farm enterprise, single practice or landscape feature) and the importance they give to other considerations (environmental effect, production potential of land, goodness of fit, etc.). Practical implications are drawn for both policy

  7. Advanced Liquid-Free, Piezoresistive, SOI-Based Pressure Sensors for Measurements in Harsh Environments

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Ha-Duong; Mukhopadhyay, Biswaijit; Ehrmann, Oswin; Lang, Klaus-Dieter

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present and discuss two innovative liquid-free SOI sensors for pressure measurements in harsh environments. The sensors are capable of measuring pressures at high temperatures. In both concepts media separation is realized using a steel membrane. The two concepts represent two different strategies for packaging of devices for use in harsh environments and at high temperatures. The first one is a “one-sensor-one-packaging_technology” concept. The second one uses a standard flip-chip bonding technique. The first sensor is a “floating-concept”, capable of measuring pressures at temperatures up to 400 °C (constant load) with an accuracy of 0.25% Full Scale Output (FSO). A push rod (mounted onto the steel membrane) transfers the applied pressure directly to the center-boss membrane of the SOI-chip, which is placed on a ceramic carrier. The chip membrane is realized by Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE or Bosch Process). A novel propertied chip housing employing a sliding sensor chip that is fixed during packaging by mechanical preloading via the push rod is used, thereby avoiding chip movement, and ensuring optimal push rod load transmission. The second sensor can be used up to 350 °C. The SOI chips consists of a beam with an integrated centre-boss with was realized using KOH structuring and DRIE. The SOI chip is not “floating” but bonded by using flip-chip technology. The fabricated SOI sensor chip has a bridge resistance of 3250 Ω. The realized sensor chip has a sensitivity of 18 mV/µm measured using a bridge current of 1 mA. PMID:26295235

  8. LP DAAC MEaSUREs Project Artifact Tracking Via the NASA Earthdata Collaboration Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, S. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC) is a NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) Data and Information System (EOSDIS) DAAC that supports selected EOS Community non-standard data products such as the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Global Emissivity Database (GED), and also supports NASA Earth Science programs such as Making Earth System Data Records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) to contribute in providing long-term, consistent, and mature data products. As described in The LP DAAC Project Lifecycle Plan (Daucsavage, J.; Bennett, S., 2014), key elements within the Project Inception Phase fuse knowledge between NASA stakeholders, data producers, and NASA data providers. To support and deliver excellence for NASA data stewardship, and to accommodate long-tail data preservation with Community and MEaSUREs products, the LP DAAC is utilizing NASA's own Earthdata Collaboration Environment to bridge stakeholder communication divides. By leveraging a NASA supported platform, this poster describes how the Atlassian Confluence software combined with a NASA URS/Earthdata support can maintain each project's members, status, documentation, and artifact checklist. Furthermore, this solution provides a gateway for project communities to become familiar with NASA clients, as well as educating the project's NASA DAAC Scientists for NASA client distribution.

  9. Acoustic Doppler current profiler measurements in coastal and estuarine environments: examples from the Tay Estuary, Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wewetzer, Silke F. K.; Duck, Robert W.; Anderson, James M.

    1999-08-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) provide a means to measure the components of water current velocities in three dimensions. Such instruments have been used widely by the oil industry in deep offshore waters but their application to nearshore coastal and estuarine environments has been principally confined to the USA. Using examples of ADCP datasets acquired from the macrotidal Tay Estuary, eastern Scotland, the principles of field deployment, data acquisition and forms of output are critically summarised. It is shown, for the first time in the Tay Estuary, that vertical current velocities are significant and are particularly so in downwelling zones associated with the development and passage of axially convergent tidal fronts. The improved understanding of three-dimensional water and suspended sediment dynamics in coastal and estuarine waters is crucial to, inter alia, the sustainable management of effluent discharges and, in more general terms, it is predicted on the basis of the Tay case study, that ADCP measurements afford significant opportunities to refine understanding of geomorphological processes in a variety of aquatic environments worldwide.

  10. Measuring the food environment: a systematic technique for characterizing food stores using display counts.

    PubMed

    Miller, Cassandra; Bodor, J Nicholas; Rose, Donald

    2012-01-01

    Marketing research has documented the influence of in-store characteristics-such as the number and placement of display stands-on consumer purchases of a product. However, little information exists on this topic for key foods of interest to those studying the influence of environmental changes on dietary behavior. This study demonstrates a method for characterizing the food environment by measuring the number of separate displays of fruits, vegetables, and energy-dense snack foods (including chips, candies, and sodas) and their proximity to cash registers in different store types. Observations in New Orleans stores (N = 172) in 2007 and 2008 revealed significantly more displays of energy-dense snacks than of fruits and vegetables within all store types, especially supermarkets. Moreover, supermarkets had an average of 20 displays of energy-dense snacks within 1 meter of their cash registers, yet none of them had even a single display of fruits or vegetables near their cash registers. Measures of the number of separate display stands of key foods and their proximity to a cash register can be used by researchers to better characterize food stores and by policymakers to address improvements to the food environment.

  11. Informative prior distributions for ELISA analyses.

    PubMed

    Klauenberg, Katy; Walzel, Monika; Ebert, Bernd; Elster, Clemens

    2015-07-01

    Immunoassays are capable of measuring very small concentrations of substances in solutions and have an immense range of application. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) tests in particular can detect the presence of an infection, of drugs, or hormones (as in the home pregnancy test). Inference of an unknown concentration via ELISA usually involves a non-linear heteroscedastic regression and subsequent prediction, which can be carried out in a Bayesian framework. For such a Bayesian inference, we are developing informative prior distributions based on extensive historical ELISA tests as well as theoretical considerations. One consideration regards the quality of the immunoassay leading to two practical requirements for the applicability of the priors. Simulations show that the additional prior information can lead to inferences which are robust to reasonable perturbations of the model and changes in the design of the data. On real data, the applicability is demonstrated across different laboratories, for different analytes and laboratory equipment as well as for previous and current ELISAs with sigmoid regression function. Consistency checks on real data (similar to cross-validation) underpin the adequacy of the suggested priors. Altogether, the new priors may improve concentration estimation for ELISAs that fulfill certain design conditions, by extending the range of the analyses, decreasing the uncertainty, or giving more robust estimates. Future use of these priors is straightforward because explicit, closed-form expressions are provided. This work encourages development and application of informative, yet general, prior distributions for other types of immunoassays.

  12. The measurement of gamma ray induced heating in a mixed neutron and gamma ray environment

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, H.K.

    1991-10-01

    The problem of measuring the gamma heating in a mixed DT neutron and gamma ray environment was explored. A new detector technique was developed to make this measurement. Gamma heating measurements were made in a low-Z assembly irradiated with 14-Mev neutrons and (n, n{prime}) gammas produced by a Texas Nuclear Model 9400 neutron generator. Heating measurements were made in the mid-line of the lattice using a proportional counter operating in the Continuously-varied Bias-voltage Acquisition mode. The neutron-induced signal was separated from the gamma-induced signal by exploiting the signal rise-time differences inherent to radiations of different linear energy transfer coefficient, which are observable in a proportional counter. The operating limits of this measurement technique were explored by varying the counter position in the low-Z lattice, hence changing the irradiation spectrum observed. The experiment was modelled numerically to help interpret the measured results. The transport of neutrons and gamma rays in the assembly was modelled using the one- dimensional radiation transport code ANISN/PC. The cross-section set used for these calculations was derived from the ENDF/B-V library using the code MC{sup 2}-2 for the case of DT neutrons slowing down in a low-Z material. The calculated neutron and gamma spectra in the slab and the relevant mass-stopping powers were used to construct weighting factors which relate the energy deposition in the counter fill-gas to that in the counter wall and in the surrounding material. The gamma energy deposition at various positions in the lattice is estimated by applying these weighting factors to the measured gamma energy deposition in the counter at those locations.

  13. Optical Mass Gauging System for Measuring Liquid Levels in a Reduced Gravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullenberger, Ryan M.; Munoz, Wesley M.; Lyon, Matt P.; Vogel, Kenny; Yalin, Azer P.; Korman, Valentin; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2010-01-01

    A compact and rugged fiber-coupled liquid volume sensor designed for flight on a sounding rocket platform is presented. The sensor consists of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer capable of measuring the amount of liquid contained in a tank under any gravitational conditions, including a microgravity environment, by detecting small changes in the index of refraction of the gas contained within a sensing region. By monitoring changes in the interference fringe pattern as the system undergoes a small compression provided by a piston, the ullage volume of a tank can be directly measured allowing for a determination of the liquid volume. To demonstrate the technique, data are acquired using two tanks containing different volumes of liquid, which are representative of the levels of liquid in a tank at different time periods during a mission. The two tanks are independently exposed to the measurement apparatus, allowing for a determination of the liquid level in each. In a controlled, laboratory test of the unit, the system demonstrated a capability of measuring a liquid level in an individual tank of 10.53 mL with a 2% error. The overall random uncertainty for the flight system is higher than that one test, at +/- 1.5 mL.

  14. Charged Particle Environment on Mars - One Mars Year of MSL/RAD Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehresmann, B.; Hassler, D.; Zeitlin, C. J.; Kohler, J.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Brinza, D. E.; Rafkin, S. C.; Reitz, G.; Appel, J. K.; Guo, J.; Lohf, H.; Burmeister, S.; Matthiae, D.; Boettcher, S. I.; Boehm, E.; Martin-Garcia, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory's Radiation Assessment Detector (MSL/RAD) has been conducting measurements of the ionizing radiation field on the Martian surface since August 2012. This field is mainly dominated by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) and their interactions with the atoms in the atmosphere and soil. This yields a radiation environment consisting of a wide variety of particles and energies which, at high energies, is dominated by charged particles, e.g., ions, and their isotopes, electrons, and others. Over the course of the first Martian year (~2 Earth years) of the MSL mission, the radiation field was mainly modulated by two influences: the seasonal pressure cycle at Gale crater; and the variation of the impeding GCR flux due to changes in the solar activity. Here, we present charged particle fluxes measured over a 1000 days and analyze how the more-abundant ion species vary over that time frame. A second major influence to the radiation field can be the contribution from Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events. In particular, the Martian surface proton flux can be enhanced by orders of magnitude on short time scales during strong events. Here, we present measurements of the proton fluxes during the SEP events MSL/RAD has so far directly measured in Gale crater.

  15. Establishing aeolian particulate 'fingerprints' in an airport environment using magnetic measurements and SEM/EDAX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Sue; Hoon, Stephen R.; Richardson, Nigel; Bennett, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The significant increase in global air travel which has occurred during the last fifty years has generated growing concern regarding the potential impacts associated with increasing emissions of particulate matter (PM) from aviation activity on health and the environment. PM within the airport environment, in particular, may be derived from a wide range of potential sources including aircraft; vehicles; ground support equipment and buildings. In order to investigate and remediate potential problem sources, it is important to be able to identify characteristic particulate 'fingerprints' which would allow source attribution, particularly respirable particulates. To date the identification of such 'fingerprints' has remained elusive but remains a key research priority for the aviation industry (Webb et al, 2008). In previous PM studies, environmental magnetism has been used as a successful technique for discriminating between different emission types and particulate sources in both urban and industrial environments (e.g. Hunt et al 1984; Lecoanet et al 2003, Jones et al 2015). Environmental magnetism is a non-destructive and relatively rapid technique involving the use of non-directional, rock magnetic measurements to characterise the mineral magnetic properties of natural and anthropogenic materials. In other studies scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has also been used as an effective characterisation technique for the investigation of grain size and morphology of PM derived from vehicle emissions (e.g. Bucko et al 2010) and fossil fuel combustion sources (Kim et al 2009). In this study, environmental magnetic measurements and SEM/EDAX have been used to characterise dusts from specific aircraft sources including engines, brakes and tyres. Furthermore, these methods have also been applied to runway (both hard and grass covered surfaces), taxiway and apron dusts collected during extensive environmental sampling at Manchester International Airport, UK in order to

  16. The Martian surface radiation environment - a comparison of models and MSL/RAD measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthiä, Daniel; Ehresmann, Bent; Lohf, Henning; Köhler, Jan; Zeitlin, Cary; Appel, Jan; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Slaba, Tony; Martin, Cesar; Berger, Thomas; Boehm, Eckart; Boettcher, Stephan; Brinza, David E.; Burmeister, Soenke; Guo, Jingnan; Hassler, Donald M.; Posner, Arik; Rafkin, Scot C. R.; Reitz, Günther; Wilson, John W.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2016-03-01

    Context: The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) has been measuring the radiation environment on the surface of Mars since August 6th 2012. MSL-RAD is the first instrument to provide detailed information about charged and neutral particle spectra and dose rates on the Martian surface, and one of the primary objectives of the RAD investigation is to help improve and validate current radiation transport models. Aims: Applying different numerical transport models with boundary conditions derived from the MSL-RAD environment the goal of this work was to both provide predictions for the particle spectra and the radiation exposure on the Martian surface complementing the RAD sensitive range and, at the same time, validate the results with the experimental data, where applicable. Such validated models can be used to predict dose rates for future manned missions as well as for performing shield optimization studies. Methods: Several particle transport models (GEANT4, PHITS, HZETRN/OLTARIS) were used to predict the particle flux and the corresponding radiation environment caused by galactic cosmic radiation on Mars. From the calculated particle spectra the dose rates on the surface are estimated. Results: Calculations of particle spectra and dose rates induced by galactic cosmic radiation on the Martian surface are presented. Although good agreement is found in many cases for the different transport codes, GEANT4, PHITS, and HZETRN/OLTARIS, some models still show large, sometimes order of magnitude discrepancies in certain particle spectra. We have found that RAD data is helping to make better choices of input parameters and physical models. Elements of these validated models can be applied to more detailed studies on how the radiation environment is influenced by solar modulation, Martian atmosphere and soil, and changes due to the Martian seasonal pressure cycle. By extending the range of the calculated particle spectra with respect to

  17. Measurement Error in Multilevel Models of School and Classroom Environments: Implications for Reliability, Precision, and Prediction. CRESST Report 828

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schweig, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Measuring school and classroom environments has become central in a nation-wide effort to develop comprehensive programs that measure teacher quality and teacher effectiveness. Formulating successful programs necessitates accurate and reliable methods for measuring these environmental variables. This paper uses a generalizability theory framework…

  18. In-Situ Acoustic Measurements of Temperature Profile in Extreme Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Skliar, Mikhail

    2015-03-31

    A gasifier’s temperature is the primary characteristic that must be monitored to ensure its performance and the longevity of its refractory. One of the key technological challenges impacting the reliability and economics of coal and biomass gasification is the lack of temperature sensors that are capable of providing accurate, reliable, and long-life performance in an extreme gasification environment. This research has proposed, demonstrated, and validated a novel approach that uses a noninvasive ultrasound method that provides real-time temperature distribution monitoring across the refractory, especially the hot face temperature of the refractory. The essential idea of the ultrasound measurements of segmental temperature distribution is to use an ultrasound propagation waveguide across a refractory that has been engineered to contain multiple internal partial reflectors at known locations. When an ultrasound excitation pulse is introduced on the cold side of the refractory, it will be partially reflected from each scatterer in the US propagation path in the refractory wall and returned to the receiver as a train of partial echoes. The temperature in the corresponding segment can be determined based on recorded ultrasonic waveform and experimentally defined relationship between the speed of sound and temperature. The ultrasound measurement method offers a powerful solution to provide continuous real time temperature monitoring for the occasions that conventional thermal, optical and other sensors are infeasible, such as the impossibility of insertion of temperature sensor, harsh environment, unavailable optical path, and more. Our developed ultrasound system consists of an ultrasound engineered waveguide, ultrasound transducer/receiver, and data acquisition, logging, interpretation, and online display system, which is simple to install on the existing units with minimal modification on the gasifier or use with new units. This system has been successfully tested

  19. Shallow water radio-magnetotelluric (RMT) measurements in urban environment: A case study from Stockholm city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Suman; Bastani, Mehrdad; Malehmir, Alireza; Wang, Shunguo; Pedersen, Laust

    2014-05-01

    The Radio-MagnetoTelluric (RMT) method uses the electromagnetic signal from distant radio transmitters in the frequency range 15 to 250 kHz. RMT applications in near-surface studies have already been well established. Two components of electric field and three components of magnetic field are measured. These measured components are related to each other via transfer functions which contain detailed information about the variation of electrical resistivity of the subsurface. The present study is carried out in the frame of TRUST (TRansparent Underground STructure) project supported by several research and public organizations as well as industry. The study area is located close to central Stockholm in Sweden where the Swedish traffic authority has planned to construct a 21-km long motorway to bypass the city. In order to reduce the impact on natural and cultural environments, 18 km of the motorway will be located in tunnels. The main objective of this study is thus to identify potential fracture zones and faults as well as the general geological settings. The proposed path of the tunnel partly passes under the Lake Mälaren at a depth of about 60 m. Thus a challenge was posed on the applicability of RMT method in shallow water environments. Successful applications of RMT measurements using the Uppsala University's EnviroMT system on land encouraged us to modify the system to acquire data over lake water especially in urban areas. Pioneered by the Geological Survey of Sweden (SGU), RMT data were collected over the Lake Mälaren in spring 2012. The prototype acquisition system did not only turn out to be appropriate for such a challenging environment, but it was also much more efficient as compared with land surveys. Fifty two lines including 1160 stations with an average spacing of 15 m were covered in three days. Cultural noise associated with the city-related environment had to be identified and filtered out before inversion could be carried out. Reliable estimates

  20. Cooperative Mobile Sensing Systems for In Situ Measurements in Hazardous Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argrow, B.

    2005-12-01

    Sondes are typically deployed from manned aircraft or taken to altitude by a balloon before they are dropped. There are obvious safety and physical limitations that dictate where and how sondes are deployed. These limitations have severely constrained sonde deployment into highly dynamic and dangerous environments. Additionally, conventional parachute dropsondes provide no means for active control. The "smartsonde" idea is to integrate miniature sonde packages into micro air vehicles (MAVs). These MAVs will be ferried into the hard to reach and hazardous environments to provide in situ measurements in regions that have been heretofore out of reach. Once deployed, the MAV will provide some means of control of the sonde, to enable it to remain aloft and to provide some measure of directional control. Preliminary smartsonde communications experiments have been completed. These experiments focused on characterizing the capabilities of the 802.11.4 wireless protocol. Range measurements with 60-mW, 2.4-GHz radios showed 100% throughput rate over 2.7 km during air to ground tests. The experiments also demonstrated the integration of an in-house distributed computing system that provides the interface between the sensors, UAV flight computers, and the telemetry system. The University of Colorado's Research and Engineering Center for Unmanned Vehicles (RECUV) is developing an engineering system that integrates small mobile sensor attributes into flexible mobile sensor infrastructures to be deployed for in situ sensing in hazardous environments. There are three focus applications: 1) Wildfire, to address sensing, communications, situational awareness, and safety needs to support fire-fighting operations and to increase capabilities for dynamic data acquisition for modeling and prediction; 2) Polar, where heterogeneous mixes of platforms and sensors will provide in-situ data acquisition from beneath the ocean surface into the troposphere; 3) Storm, to address the challenges

  1. The Construction and Validation of a New Scale for Measuring Features of Constructivist Learning Environments in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alt, Dorit

    2014-01-01

    This study was aimed at mapping features of constructivist activities in higher education settings, constructing and validating a new scale for measuring their presence in lecture face-to-face based environments (LBE), seminars (SM), and distance learning environments (DLE). A mix-method approach was implemented in three phases. The first phase…

  2. Psychometric analysis of the ambulatory care learning education environment measure (ACLEEM) in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Naghizadeh Moogari, Zahra; Koohpayehzadeh, Jalil; Roff, Susanne; Montazeri, Ali; Soltani Arabshahi, Seyyed Kamran; Bigdeli, Shoaleh; Moosavi, Maryam; Azaminejad, Faranak; Tavousi, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Background: Examining educational environment (academic and clinical) by means of a valid, reliable and comprehensive questionnaire is a major key in achieving a highly qualified student – oriented curricula. The Persian translation of Ambulatory Care Learning Education Environment Measure-ACLEEM questionnaire has been developed to support this goal, and its psychometrics has been explored in this administration in teaching hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This descriptive – analytical study involved medical residents in four major clinics. In this study, the ACLEEM Questionnaire was conducted after translating and retranslating the questionnaire and examine the face and content validity, construct validity, test retest reliability and internal consistency coefficient. Results: In this study, 157 out of 192 residents completed the questionnaire (response rate 82%). The mean age of the residents was 31.81 years .The final mean of the questionnaire was calculated as 110.91 out of 200 (with 95% confidence interval). Test – retest stability of the questionnaire was between 0.322 and 0.968. The face validity of the questionnaire was confirmed. The content validity ratio was 0.64; and content validity Index was 0.78. In Exploratory factor analysis, eight factors were confirmatory that changed the orientation of some questions. The Cronbach's alpha coefficient of the whole questionnaire was 0.936. Conclusion: According to the data, the Persian version of the ACLEEM questionnaire has sufficient psychometric reliability and validity to be used for conducting research, teaching and practicing the educational learning environment in ambulatory care in Iran. PMID:26913262

  3. A new multichannel UV spectroradiometer for field measurements in harsh environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tueg, H.; Hanken, Th.; Schrems, O.

    2003-04-01

    Longterm trend measurements of solar UV radiation from 280 to 400 nm are an important task of environmental research in particular in polar regions. In order to be able to carry out UV measurements under the extreme climatical and logistical conditions at high latitudes we developed a new type of UV spectroradiometer, which fulfils the requirements necessary for field measurements in harsh environments. One of the most important features is the stable and automatic operation in the field for longer time periods without the necessity for maintenance and calibration. Since the UV spectroradiometers have to be shipped to remote areas, they have to be shock-prove, resistant against motion during operation, e.g. aboard ships or under water. Another leading point is that one needs spectroradiometers with a high time resolution to be able to investigate radiative transfer processes under fast changing inhomogeneous cloud conditions. The design of our none-scanning UV spectroradiomter is based on a multichannel detection system. Due to the much higher dynamics of the UV spectrum below 320 nm the wavelength ranges 280-320 nm and 320-400 nm are handled separately. For the shorter wavelengths a Bentham DM 150 double monochromator is being used with a low-resistance microchannel-plate photomultiplier-tube providing 32 detection channels working in a single photon counting mode. To measure above 320 nm a single monochromator is sufficient, combined with a photodiode array with 256 detection channels . The whole system is mounted in a weatherproof and temperature controlled housing with separate entrance optics for both wavelength ranges. The maximum time resolution is 1 spectrum per second allowing to measure even under fast changing conditions.

  4. Using continuous underway isotope measurements to map water residence time in hydrodynamically complex tidal environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Downing, Bryan D.; Bergamaschi, Brian; Kendall, Carol; Kraus, Tamara; Dennis, Kate J.; Carter, Jeffery A.; von Dessonneck, Travis

    2016-01-01

    Stable isotopes present in water (δ2H, δ18O) have been used extensively to evaluate hydrological processes on the basis of parameters such as evaporation, precipitation, mixing, and residence time. In estuarine aquatic habitats, residence time (τ) is a major driver of biogeochemical processes, affecting trophic subsidies and conditions in fish-spawning habitats. But τ is highly variable in estuaries, owing to constant changes in river inflows, tides, wind, and water height, all of which combine to affect τ in unpredictable ways. It recently became feasible to measure δ2H and δ18O continuously, at a high sampling frequency (1 Hz), using diffusion sample introduction into a cavity ring-down spectrometer. To better understand the relationship of τ to biogeochemical processes in a dynamic estuarine system, we continuously measured δ2H and δ18O, nitrate and water quality parameters, on board a small, high-speed boat (5 to >10 m s–1) fitted with a hull-mounted underwater intake. We then calculated τ as is classically done using the isotopic signals of evaporation. The result was high-resolution (∼10 m) maps of residence time, nitrate, and other parameters that showed strong spatial gradients corresponding to geomorphic attributes of the different channels in the area. The mean measured value of τ was 30.5 d, with a range of 0–50 d. We used the measured spatial gradients in both τ and nitrate to calculate whole-ecosystem uptake rates, and the values ranged from 0.006 to 0.039 d–1. The capability to measure residence time over single tidal cycles in estuaries will be useful for evaluating and further understanding drivers of phytoplankton abundance, resolving differences attributable to mixing and water sources, explicitly calculating biogeochemical rates, and exploring the complex linkages among time-dependent biogeochemical processes in hydrodynamically complex environments such as estuaries.

  5. Measurement and Modeling of Hydrogen Environment-Assisted Cracking in Monel K-500

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Ha, Hung M.; Burns, James T.; Scully, John R.

    2014-08-01

    Hydrogen environment-assisted cracking (HEAC) of Monel K-500 is quantified using slow-rising stress intensity loading with electrical potential monitoring of small crack propagation and elastoplastic J-integral analysis. For this loading, with concurrent crack tip plastic strain and H accumulation, aged Monel K-500 is susceptible to intergranular HEAC in NaCl solution when cathodically polarized at -800 mVSCE ( E A, vs saturated calomel) and lower. Intergranular cracking is eliminated by reduced cathodic polarization more positive than -750 mVSCE. Crack tip diffusible H concentration rises, from near 0 wppm at E A of -765 mVSCE, with increasing cathodic polarization. This behavior is quantified by thermal desorption spectroscopy and barnacle cell measurements of hydrogen solubility vs overpotential for planar electrodes, plus measured-local crevice potential, and pH scaled to the crack tip. Using crack tip H concentration, excellent agreement is demonstrated between measurements and decohesion-based model predictions of the E A dependencies of threshold stress intensity and Stage II growth rate. A critical level of cathodic polarization must be exceeded for HEAC to occur in aged Monel K-500. The damaging-cathodic potential regime likely shifts more negative for quasi-static loading or increasing metallurgical resistance to HEAC.

  6. Measuring the Quality of Generalized Gradient Approximations in a Density Functional Theory Pseudopotential Environment for Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nault, Zachary; Cancio, Antonio

    2013-03-01

    Much recent development in DFT has focused on improving GGAs. Two schemes are second order GGA (SOGGA) and the APBE which builds the GGA from atomic systems and not the HEG. Both of these have been tested within an all electron (AE) environment, providing the most accurate results. The focus of many simulations, however, is on large systems using pseudopotentials (PsP's). Are these PsP calculations, which rely on functionals tested in an AE environment, accurately reproducing the AE ground state properties? If not, can the deficiencies be identified? To assess this, we use the PsP generator APE, using the functional library libXC which works with the PsP package ABINIT and the AE package Elk. We generate standard Troullier-Martin PsP's based on common and new XC functionals (LDA, PBE, PBEsol, APBE, SOGGA) and test their performance in 13 solids (Na, Li, Al, C, Si, GaAs, NaCl, LiF, LiCl, Cu, Pd, Rh, and Ag). We measure how well three ground state properties (lattice constant, bulk modulus, and cohesive energy) are calculated with PsP's as compared to the corresponding AE calculations.

  7. In-situ measurements of Cu in an estuarine environment using a portable spectrophotometric analysis system.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Michael R; Kaltenbacher, Eric A; Byrne, Robert H

    2004-01-15

    Application of a portable in-situ spectrophotometric analysis system for the measurement of Cu in estuarine environments is described in this work. Our spectrophotometric elemental analysis system (SEAS) used for in-situ observations of Cu concentrations is capable of fully autonomous or user-controlled operations. The optical cells used in SEAS systems are flexible liquid core waveguides (LCWs) with optical path lengths as long as 5 m. The 1-m waveguide used in the present study provided a 3.0 nM detection limit and a 5.0% relative standard deviation for a 25 nM copper sample. Analysis times range between 1 and 5 min, allowing for acquisition of data on scales appropriate to the highly dynamic biogeochemical nature of copper in the coastal environment. Field deployments of SEAS-Cu in Tampa Bay, FL, showed low Cu concentrations near the mouth of the estuary (3-4 nM), with elevated concentrations (approximately 25 nM) in anthropogenically impacted regions of the bay (e.g., marinas and areas adjacent wastewater treatment plants). Transect data between Tampa Bay and a deep water harborage exhibited copper concentrations ranging between 5 and 50 nM.

  8. Psychosocial environment: definitions, measures and associations with weight status--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Glonti, K; Mackenbach, J D; Ng, J; Lakerveld, J; Oppert, J-M; Bárdos, H; McKee, M; Rutter, H

    2016-01-01

    Socio-ecological models suggest that many elements of the social environment act as upstream determinants of obesity. This systematic review examined definitions, measures and strength of associations between the psychosocial environment and adult weight status. Studies were included if they were conducted on adults, the outcome was weight status, carried out in any developed country and investigated at least one psychosocial environmental construct. Six databases for primary studies were searched: EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Scopus, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library. We restricted our search to studies published in English between January 1995 and February 2015. An adapted 'Quality Assessment Tool for Quantitative Studies' was used to evaluate risk of bias of included studies. Out of 14,784 screened records, 42 articles were assessed using full text. A total of 19 studies were included. The strongest associations with weight status were found for social capital and collective efficacy, although few studies found significant associations. There was heterogeneity in the definitions and metrics of psychosocial environmental constructs. There is limited evidence that greater social capital and collective efficacy are associated with healthier weight status. The research conducted to date has not robustly identified relations. We highlight challenges to undertaking research and establishing causality in this field and provide recommendations for further research.

  9. Fitting Procedures for Novel Gene-by-Measured Environment Interaction Models in Behavior Genetic Designs

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hao; Rathouz, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    For quantitative behavior genetic (e.g., twin) studies, Purcell proposed a novel model for testing gene-by-measured environment (GxM) interactions while accounting for gene-by-environment correlation. Rathouz et al. expanded this model into a broader class of non-linear biometric models for quantifying and testing such interactions. In this work, we propose a novel factorization of the likelihood for this class of models, and adopt numerical integration techniques to achieve model estimation, especially for those without close-form likelihood. The validity of our procedures is established through numerical simulation studies. The new procedures are illustrated in a twin study analysis of the moderating effect of birth weight on the genetic influences on childhood anxiety. A second example is given in an online appendix. Both the exant GxM models and the new non-linear models critically assume normality of all structural components, which implies continuous, but not normal, manifest response variables. PMID:25732055

  10. High speed railway environment safety evaluation based on measurement attribute recognition model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qizhou; Gao, Ningbo; Zhang, Bing

    2014-01-01

    In order to rationally evaluate the high speed railway operation safety level, the environmental safety evaluation index system of high speed railway should be well established by means of analyzing the impact mechanism of severe weather such as raining, thundering, lightning, earthquake, winding, and snowing. In addition to that, the attribute recognition will be identified to determine the similarity between samples and their corresponding attribute classes on the multidimensional space, which is on the basis of the Mahalanobis distance measurement function in terms of Mahalanobis distance with the characteristics of noncorrelation and nondimensionless influence. On top of the assumption, the high speed railway of China environment safety situation will be well elaborated by the suggested methods. The results from the detailed analysis show that the evaluation is basically matched up with the actual situation and could lay a scientific foundation for the high speed railway operation safety.

  11. Measuring and modelling the radiological impact of a phosphogypsum deposition site on the surrounding environment.

    PubMed

    Bituh, Tomislav; Petrinec, Branko; Skoko, Božena; Vučić, Zlatko; Marović, Gordana

    2015-03-01

    Phosphogypsum (PG) is a waste product (residue) from the production of phosphoric acid characterized by technologically enhanced natural radioactivity. Croatia's largest PG deposition site is situated at the edge of Lonjsko Polje Nature Park, a sensitive ecosystem possibly endangered by PG particles. This field study investigates two aspects relevant for the general radiological impact of PG: risk assessment for the environment and risk assessment for occupationally exposed workers and local inhabitants. Activity concentrations of natural radionuclides ((238)U, (235)U, (232)Th, (226)Ra, (210)Pb, and (40)K) were measured in the PG (at the deposition site), soil, and grass samples (in the vicinity of the site). The ERICA Assessment Tool was used to estimate the radiological impact of PG particles on non-human biota of the Lonjsko Polje Nature Park. The average annual effective dose for occupationally exposed workers was 0.4 mSv which was within the worldwide range.

  12. USB environment measurements based on full-scale static engine ground tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sussman, M. B.; Harkonen, D. L.; Reed, J. B.

    1976-01-01

    Flow turning parameters, static pressures, surface temperatures, surface fluctuating pressures and acceleration levels were measured in the environment of a full-scale upper surface blowing (USB) propulsive lift test configuration. The test components included a flightworthy CF6-50D engine, nacelle, and USB flap assembly utilized in conjunction with ground verification testing of the USAF YC-14 Advanced Medium STOL Transport propulsion system. Results, based on a preliminary analysis of the data, generally show reasonable agreement with predicted levels based on model data. However, additional detailed analysis is required to confirm the preliminary evaluation, to help delineate certain discrepancies with model data, and to establish a basis for future flight test comparisons.

  13. Fluorescence measurements for evaluating the application of multivariate analysis techniques to optically thick environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Reichardt, Thomas A.; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Jones, Howland D. T.; Sickafoose, Shane M.; Schmitt, Randal L.

    2010-09-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence measurements of cuvette-contained laser dye mixtures are made for evaluation of multivariate analysis techniques to optically thick environments. Nine mixtures of Coumarin 500 and Rhodamine 610 are analyzed, as well as the pure dyes. For each sample, the cuvette is positioned on a two-axis translation stage to allow the interrogation at different spatial locations, allowing the examination of both primary (absorption of the laser light) and secondary (absorption of the fluorescence) inner filter effects. In addition to these expected inner filter effects, we find evidence that a portion of the absorbed fluorescence is re-emitted. A total of 688 spectra are acquired for the evaluation of multivariate analysis approaches to account for nonlinear effects.

  14. Community food environment measures in the Alabama Black Belt: Implications for cancer risk reduction

    PubMed Central

    Gyawu, Rebecca; Quansah, Joseph E.; Fall, Souleymane; Gichuhi, Peter N.; Bovell-Benjamin, Adelia C.

    2015-01-01

    In-store measures were utilized to evaluate the availability of healthy food choices and nutrition/health promotion messages for cancer risk reduction in the selected Alabama Black Belt counties/cities. Sixty one retail food outlets (RFOs) were audited in 12 Alabama Black Belt cities. Store types included convenience stores (49.2%), restaurants (19.7%), fast food restaurants (16.4%), small supermarkets (8.2%), and large supermarket and farmers' markets (3.3 %), respectively. Although there were low numbers of farmers' markets/street stands and large supermarkets, these had significantly (p < 0.0001) higher health scores than the other store types. A few health promotion messages were highly visible or obscurely positioned in some RFOs. The Alabama Black Belt food environment had limited opportunities for healthy food choices. PMID:26844138

  15. Light Emitting Diodes and Astronomical Environments: Results from in situ Field Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craine, Brian L.; Craine, Eric R.

    2015-05-01

    Light emitting diode (LED) light fixtures are rapidly becoming industry standards for outdoor lighting. They are promoted on the strength of long lifetimes (hence economic efficiencies), low power requirements, directability, active brightness controls, and energy efficiency. They also tend to produce spectral shifts that are undesirable in astronomical settings, but which can be moderated by filters. LED lighting for continuous roadway and parking lot lighting is particularly popular, and many communities are in the process of retrofitting Low Pressure Sodium (LPS) and other lights by tens of thousands of new LED fixtures at a time. What is the impact of this process on astronomical observatories and on dark skies upon which amateur astronomers rely? We bypass modeling and predictions to make actual measurements of these lights in the field. We report on original ground, airborne, and satellite observations of LED lights and discuss their light budgets, zenith angle functions, and impacts on observatory environs.

  16. Inferring metabolic states in uncharacterized environments using gene-expression measurements.

    PubMed

    Rossell, Sergio; Huynen, Martijn A; Notebaart, Richard A

    2013-01-01

    The large size of metabolic networks entails an overwhelming multiplicity in the possible steady-state flux distributions that are compatible with stoichiometric constraints. This space of possibilities is largest in the frequent situation where the nutrients available to the cells are unknown. These two factors: network size and lack of knowledge of nutrient availability, challenge the identification of the actual metabolic state of living cells among the myriad possibilities. Here we address this challenge by developing a method that integrates gene-expression measurements with genome-scale models of metabolism as a means of inferring metabolic states. Our method explores the space of alternative flux distributions that maximize the agreement between gene expression and metabolic fluxes, and thereby identifies reactions that are likely to be active in the culture from which the gene-expression measurements were taken. These active reactions are used to build environment-specific metabolic models and to predict actual metabolic states. We applied our method to model the metabolic states of Saccharomyces cerevisiae growing in rich media supplemented with either glucose or ethanol as the main energy source. The resulting models comprise about 50% of the reactions in the original model, and predict environment-specific essential genes with high sensitivity. By minimizing the sum of fluxes while forcing our predicted active reactions to carry flux, we predicted the metabolic states of these yeast cultures that are in large agreement with what is known about yeast physiology. Most notably, our method predicts the Crabtree effect in yeast cells growing in excess glucose, a long-known phenomenon that could not have been predicted by traditional constraint-based modeling approaches. Our method is of immediate practical relevance for medical and industrial applications, such as the identification of novel drug targets, and the development of biotechnological processes that

  17. X-ray based displacement and strain measurements for hostile environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canistraro, Howard A.; Jordan, Eric H.; Pease, Douglas M.

    1993-01-01

    A completely new method of non-contacting, hostile environment displacement and strain measurement based on the focus and scanning of x-rays, has been developed and demonstrated. The new technique has the ability to overcome many of the limitations associated with available methods. The system is based on the focus and scanning of low energy, hard x-rays such as those emanating from table top copper or molybdenum sources. The x-rays are focused into a narrow and intense line image which can be swept onto targets that fluoresce secondary x-ray radiation. By monitoring the secondary radiation intensity and comparing it with the focused x-ray image's position as it is swept over the target edge, the position of the target edge relative to the focused image can be determined. The present system has a resolution of 0.5 micron, which has been shown to be limited by bearing backlash (or 'yaw' error) in the linear translation table. Its use has been demonstrated in the presence of an open flame with a resultant target temperature in excess of 2000 degrees Fahrenheit (1000 degrees Celsius). Strain measurements have been conducted in a laboratory environment at both room temperature and at a specimen temperature of 1300 degrees Fahrenheit, with an accuracy of within 20 microstrain (primarily a function of the 0.5 micron resolution limit). The main advantage of the technique lies in the penetrating, non-refractive nature of x-rays, which are virtually immune to the presence of refracting gas layers, smoke, flame or intense thermal radiation.

  18. Inferring Metabolic States in Uncharacterized Environments Using Gene-Expression Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Rossell, Sergio; Huynen, Martijn A.; Notebaart, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    The large size of metabolic networks entails an overwhelming multiplicity in the possible steady-state flux distributions that are compatible with stoichiometric constraints. This space of possibilities is largest in the frequent situation where the nutrients available to the cells are unknown. These two factors: network size and lack of knowledge of nutrient availability, challenge the identification of the actual metabolic state of living cells among the myriad possibilities. Here we address this challenge by developing a method that integrates gene-expression measurements with genome-scale models of metabolism as a means of inferring metabolic states. Our method explores the space of alternative flux distributions that maximize the agreement between gene expression and metabolic fluxes, and thereby identifies reactions that are likely to be active in the culture from which the gene-expression measurements were taken. These active reactions are used to build environment-specific metabolic models and to predict actual metabolic states. We applied our method to model the metabolic states of Saccharomyces cerevisiae growing in rich media supplemented with either glucose or ethanol as the main energy source. The resulting models comprise about 50% of the reactions in the original model, and predict environment-specific essential genes with high sensitivity. By minimizing the sum of fluxes while forcing our predicted active reactions to carry flux, we predicted the metabolic states of these yeast cultures that are in large agreement with what is known about yeast physiology. Most notably, our method predicts the Crabtree effect in yeast cells growing in excess glucose, a long-known phenomenon that could not have been predicted by traditional constraint-based modeling approaches. Our method is of immediate practical relevance for medical and industrial applications, such as the identification of novel drug targets, and the development of biotechnological processes that

  19. Distributed optical fibre temperature measurements in a low dose rate radiation environment based on Rayleigh backscattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faustov, A.; Gussarov, A.; Wuilpart, M.; Fotiadi, A. A.; Liokumovich, L. B.; Kotov, O. I.; Zolotovskiy, I. O.; Tomashuk, A. L.; Deschoutheete, T.; Mégret, P.

    2012-04-01

    On-line monitoring of environmental conditions in nuclear facilities is becoming a more and more important problem. Standard electronic sensors are not the ideal solution due to radiation sensitivity and difficulties in installation of multiple sensors. In contrast, radiation-hard optical fibres can sustain very high radiation doses and also naturally offer multi-point or distributed monitoring of external perturbations. Multiple local electro-mechanical sensors can be replaced by just one measuring fibre. At present, there are over four hundred operational nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the world 1. Operating experience has shown that ineffective control of the ageing degradation of major NPP components can threaten plant safety and also plant life. Among those elements, cables are vital components of I&C systems in NPPs. To ensure their safe operation and predict remaining life, environmental monitoring is necessary. In particular, temperature and radiation dose are considered to be the two most important parameters. The aim of this paper is to assess experimentally the feasibility of optical fibre temperature measurements in a low doserate radiation environment, using a commercially available reflectometer based on Rayleigh backscattering. Four different fibres were installed in the Sub-Pile Room of the BR2 Material testing nuclear reactor in Mol, Belgium. This place is man-accessible during the reactor shut-down, allowing easy fibre installation. When the reactor operates, the dose-rates in the room are in a range 0.005-5 Gy/h with temperatures of 40-60 °C, depending on the location. Such a surrounding is not much different to some "hot" environments in NPPs, where I&C cables are located.

  20. The System of the Calibration for Visibility Measurement Instrument Under the Atmospheric Aerosol Simulation Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Zhifeng; Yang, ShaoChen; Xu, Wenjing

    2016-06-01

    divided by 3 is MOR. The aerosol concentration in chamber can be changed by adjusting aerosol generator that producing variety of visibility atmospherical environment. The experiment has been carried out and the measurement accuracy of atmospheric transmittance is 0.3‰ Corresponding to the accuracy of MOR 4.9% at the 2km visibility environment. So this system can be calibrated and validated the other visibility measuring devices.

  1. Radiation Protection. Measurement of radioactivity in the environment - Air- radon 222. A proposed ISO standard.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillmore, G.; Woods, M.

    2009-04-01

    Radon isotopes (222, 220, 219) are radioactive gases produced by the disintegration of radium isotopes 226, 224 and 223, which are decay products of uranium238, thorium232 and uranium235 respectively. All are found in the earth's crust. Solid elements, also radioactive, are produced by radon disintegration. Radon is classed as a rare gas in the periodic table of elements, along with helium, argon, neon, krypton and xenon. When disintegrating, radon emits alpha particles and generates solid decay products, which are also radioactive (polonium, bismuth, lead etc.). The potential danger of radon lies in its solid decay products rather than the gas itself. Whether or not they are attached aerosols, radon decay products can be inhaled and deposited in the bronchopulmonary tree to varying depths according to their size. Radon today is considered to be the main source of human exposure to natural radiation. At the international level, radon accounts for 52% of global average exposure to natural radiation. Isotope 222 (48%) is far more significant than isotope 220 (4%), whilst isotope 219 is considered as negligible. Exposure to radon varies considerably from one region to another, depending on factors such as weather conditions, and underlying geology. Activity concentration can therefore vary by a factor of 10 or even a 100 from one period of time to the next and from one area to another. There are many ways of measuring the radon 222 activity concentration and the potential alpha energy concentration of its short-lived decay products. Measuring techniques fall into three categories: - spot measurement methods; continuous measurement; integrated measurement. The proposed ISO (International Organisation for Standardisation) document suggests guidelines for measuring radon222 activity concentration and the potential alpha energy concentration of its short-lived decay products in a free (environment) and confined (buildings) atmosphere. The target date for availability of

  2. Measurement of Effective Canopy Temperature: The Missing Link to Modeling Transpiration in Controlled Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monje, O. A.; McCormack, Ann; Bugbee, Bruce; Jones, Harry W., Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The objectives were to apply energy balance principles to plant canopies, and to determine which parameters are essential for predicting plant canopy transpiration (E) in controlled environments. Transpiration was accurately measured in a gas-exchange system. Absorbed radiation (R(sub abs)) by the canopy was measured with a net radiometer and calculated from short and long-wave radiation components. Average canopy foliar temperature T(sub L) can be measured with an infrared radiometer, but since T(sub L) is seldom uniform, a weighed average measurement of T(sub L) must be made. The effective canopy temperature T(sub C) is that temperature that balances the energy flux between absorbed radiation and latent heat L(sub E) and sensible heat (H) fluxes. TC should exactly equal air temperature T(sub A) when L(sub E) equals R(sub abs). When unnecessary thermal radiation from the lighting system is removed by a water filter, the magnitude of L(sub E) from transpiration approaches Rabs and T(sub C) is close to T(sub A). Unlike field models, we included the energy used in photosynthesis and found that up to 10% of Rabs was used in photosynthesis. We calculated aerodynamic conductance for H from measurements of wind speed and canopy height using the wind profile equation. Canopy aerodynamic conductance ranged from.03 to.04 m/s for wind speeds from.6 to 1 m/s; thus a 0.1 C canopy to air temperature difference results in a sensible heat flux of about 4 W/sq m, which is only 1% of R(sub abs). We examined the ability of wide angle infrared transducers to accurately integrate T(sub L) from the top to the bottom of the canopy. We measured evaporation from the hydroponic media to be approximately 1 micro mol/sq m s or 10% of R(sub abs). This result indicates that separating evaporation from transpiration is more important than exact measurement of canopy temperature.

  3. Predicted versus measured photosynthetic water-use efficiency of crop stands under dynamically changing field environments.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liu-Kang; Hsiao, Theodore C

    2004-11-01

    Water-use efficiency (WUE) is critical in determining the adaptation and productivity of plants in water-limited areas, either under the present climate or future global change. Data on WUE are often highly variable and a unifying and quantitative approach is needed to analyse and predict WUE for different environments. Hsiao has already proposed a set of paradigm equations based on leaf gas exchange for this purpose, calculating WUE (ratio of assimilation to transpiration) relative to the WUE for a chosen reference situation. This study tests the validity and applicability of these equations to cotton and sweet corn stands with full canopies in the open field. Measured were evapotranspiration and downward flux of atmospheric CO2 into the canopy, soil CO2 efflux, canopy temperature, and CO2 and vapour pressure of the air surrounding the canopy. With the measured mean WUE and conditions at midday serving as the reference, WUE for other times was predicted from the air CO2 and water vapour data, intercellular water vapour pressure calculated from canopy temperature, and an assumed ratio of Ci/Ca based on leaf gas-exchange data. Provided that the stomatal response to humidity as it affected the Ci/Ca ratio was accounted for, the equations predicted the moment-by-moment changes in canopy WUE of cotton over daily cycles reasonably well, and also the variation in midday WUE from day-to-day over a 47 d period. The prediction for sweet corn was fairly good for most parts of the day except the early morning. Measurement uncertainties and possible causes of the differences between predicted and measured WUE are discussed. Overall, the results indicate that the equations may be suitable to simulate changes in WUE without upscaling, and also demonstrate clearly the importance of stomatal response to humidity in determining stand WUE in the field.

  4. Multiplex CARS temperature measurements in a coal-fired MHD environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiting, E. J.

    1986-01-01

    Multiplex CARS spectra of nitrogen were recorded in an environment that simulates the post-magnet gas stream of a coal-fired MHD generator. The presence of coal fly ash and potassium seed created a weakly ionized, highly luminous medium with a high number density of relatively large (1-50 microns) diameter particles. Maximum temperatures of 2500 K were measured with a spatial resolution of 5 mm. The precision optical alignment necessary for folded BOXCARS phasematching was maintained for the long distances (greater than 10 m) necessary to route the laser beams from the CARS instrument to the combustion facility. The increased luminosity caused by the injection of potassium seed did not impede the recovery of good quality spectra. The coal fly ash particles precipitated laser induced breakdown which, in turn, led to the generation of a coherent interference with N2 spectra. Techniques to overcome this problem are discussed. The accuracy of the temperature measurements are estimated to be + or - 3 percent.

  5. Electrosurgical Smoke: Ultrafine Particle Measurements and Work Environment Quality in Different Operating Theatres.

    PubMed

    Romano, Francesco; Gustén, Jan; De Antonellis, Stefano; Joppolo, Cesare M

    2017-01-30

    Air cleanliness in operating theatres (OTs) is an important factor for preserving the health of both the patient and the medical staff. Particle contamination in OTs depends mainly on the surgery process, ventilation principle, personnel clothing systems and working routines. In many open surgical operations, electrosurgical tools (ESTs) are used for tissue cauterization. ESTs generate a significant airborne contamination, as surgical smoke. Surgical smoke is a work environment quality problem. Ordinary surgical masks and OT ventilation systems are inadequate to control this problem. This research work is based on numerous monitoring campaigns of ultrafine particle concentrations in OTs, equipped with upward displacement ventilation or with a downward unidirectional airflow system. Measurements performed during ten real surgeries highlight that the use of ESTs generates a quite sharp and relevant increase of particle concentration in the surgical area as well within the entire OT area. The measured contamination level in the OTs are linked to surgical operation, ventilation principle, and ESTs used. A better knowledge of airborne contamination is crucial for limiting the personnel's exposure to surgical smoke. Research results highlight that downward unidirectional OTs can give better conditions for adequate ventilation and contaminant removal performances than OTs equipped with upward displacement ventilation systems.

  6. Direct measurement of efflux in Pseudomonas aeruginosa using an environment-sensitive fluorescent dye.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Ramkumar; Erwin, Alice L

    2015-01-01

    Resistance-Nodulation-Division (RND) family pumps AcrB and MexB are the major efflux routes in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa respectively. Fluorescent environment-sensitive dyes provide a means to study efflux pump function in live bacterial cells in real-time. Recently, we demonstrated the utility of this approach using the dye Nile Red to quantify AcrB-mediated efflux and measured the ability of antibiotics and other efflux pump substrates to compete with efflux of Nile Red, independent of antibacterial activity. Here, we extend this method to P. aeruginosa and describe a novel application that permits the comparison and rank-ordering of bacterial strains by their inherent efflux potential. We show that glucose and l-malate re-energize Nile Red efflux in P. aeruginosa, and we highlight differences in the glucose dependence and kinetics of efflux between P. aeruginosa and E. coli. We quantify the differences in efflux among a set of P. aeruginosa laboratory strains, which include PAO1, the hyper-sensitive strain ATCC 35151 and its parent, ATCC 12055. Efflux of Nile Red in P. aeruginosa is mediated by MexAB-OprM and is slower than in E. coli. In conclusion, we describe an efflux measurement tool for use in antibacterial drug discovery and basic research on P. aeruginosa efflux pumps.

  7. Dependence of the Martian radiation environment on atmospheric depth: Modeling and measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jingnan; Slaba, Tony C.; Zeitlin, Cary; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Badavi, Francis F.; Böhm, Eckart; Böttcher, Stephan; Brinza, David E.; Ehresmann, Bent; Hassler, Donald M.; Matthiä, Daniel; Rafkin, Scot

    2017-02-01

    The energetic particle environment on the Martian surface is influenced by solar and heliospheric modulation and changes in the local atmospheric pressure (or column depth). The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on board the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity on the surface of Mars has been measuring this effect for over four Earth years (about two Martian years). The anticorrelation between the recorded surface Galactic Cosmic Ray-induced dose rates and pressure changes has been investigated by Rafkin et al. (2014) and the long-term solar modulation has also been empirically analyzed and modeled by Guo et al. (2015). This paper employs the newly updated HZETRN2015 code to model the Martian atmospheric shielding effect on the accumulated dose rates and the change of this effect under different solar modulation and atmospheric conditions. The modeled results are compared with the most up-to-date (from 14 August 2012 to 29 June 2016) observations of the RAD instrument on the surface of Mars. Both model and measurements agree reasonably well and show the atmospheric shielding effect under weak solar modulation conditions and the decline of this effect as solar modulation becomes stronger. This result is important for better risk estimations of future human explorations to Mars under different heliospheric and Martian atmospheric conditions.

  8. Effectiveness of incentives for agri-environment measure in Mediterranean degraded and eroded vineyards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galati, Antonino; Gristina, Luciano; Crescimanno, Maria; Barone, Ettore; Novara, Agata

    2015-04-01

    The evaluation of the economic damage caused by soil erosion assumes great importance. It serves to increase awareness of the problem among farmers and policy makers. Moreover, it can promote the implementation of conservative measures at the field and basin level by spurring the development of more sustainable soil management practices. In the present study we have developed a new approach to evaluate the incentive for the adoption of Agri-Environment Measure (AEM) in Mediterranean degraded and eroded vineyards. In order to estimate this incentive, the replacement cost and the loss of income are calculated under two different soil management such as Conventional Tillage (CT) and Cover crop (AEM). Our findings show that the incentive could range between the loss of income due to AEM adoption and ecosystem service benefit (RCCT - RC AEM). In the case of study the incentive ranged between 315 € ha-1 (loss of income) and 1,087.86 € ha-1 (Ecosystem service benefit). Within this range, the incentive amount is determined according to efficiency criteria taking into account the morphological conditions of the territory in which operate the farms. Moreover, a conceptual model on the public spending efficiency has been developed to allocate the incentives where the economic return in term of ecosystem service is higher.

  9. X-ray beam method for displacement measurement in hostile environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Eric H.; Pease, D. M.; Canistraro, H.; Brew, Dale

    1989-01-01

    A new method of extensometry using an X-ray beam was devised, and the results of current testing reveal it to be highly feasible. This technique has been shown to provide a non-contacting system that is immune to problems associated with density variations in gaseous environments, that plague currently available optical methods. This advantage is a result of the non-refracting penetrating nature of X-rays. The method is based on X-ray-induced X-ray fluorescence of targets, which subsequently serve as fudicial markers. Some target materials have melting points over 1600 degrees C which will facilitate measurement at extremely high temperatures. A highly focused intense X-ray beam, which is produced using a Johansen 'bent crystal', is then scanned across the target, which responds by fluorescing X-rays when stimulated by the incident beam. This secondary radiation is monitored using a detector. By carefully measuring beam orientation, change in target edge position can be determined. Many variations on this basic theme are now possible such as two targets demarcating a gage length, or a beam shadowing method using opaque targets.

  10. Measurement of dissolved organic matter fluorescense in aquatic environments: An interlaboratory comparison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, Kathleen R.; Butler, Kenna D.; Spencer, Robert G. M.; Stedmon, Colin A.; Boehme, Jennifer R.; Aiken, George R.

    2010-01-01

    The fluorescent properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM) are often studied in order to infer DOM characteristics in aquatic environments, including source, quantity, composition, and behavior. While a potentially powerful technique, a single widely implemented standard method for correcting and presenting fluorescence measurements is lacking, leading to difficulties when comparing data collected by different research groups. This paper reports on a large-scale interlaboratory comparison in which natural samples and well-characterized fluorophores were analyzed in 20 laboratories in the U.S., Europe, and Australia. Shortcomings were evident in several areas, including data quality-assurance, the accuracy of spectral correction factors used to correct EEMs, and the treatment of optically dense samples. Data corrected by participants according to individual laboratory procedures were more variable than when corrected under a standard protocol. Wavelength dependency in measurement precision and accuracy were observed within and between instruments, even in corrected data. In an effort to reduce future occurrences of similar problems, algorithms for correcting and calibrating EEMs are described in detail, and MATLAB scripts for implementing the study's protocol are provided. Combined with the recent expansion of spectral fluorescence standards, this approach will serve to increase the intercomparability of DOM fluorescence studies.

  11. Electrosurgical Smoke: Ultrafine Particle Measurements and Work Environment Quality in Different Operating Theatres

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Francesco; Gustén, Jan; De Antonellis, Stefano; Joppolo, Cesare M.

    2017-01-01

    Air cleanliness in operating theatres (OTs) is an important factor for preserving the health of both the patient and the medical staff. Particle contamination in OTs depends mainly on the surgery process, ventilation principle, personnel clothing systems and working routines. In many open surgical operations, electrosurgical tools (ESTs) are used for tissue cauterization. ESTs generate a significant airborne contamination, as surgical smoke. Surgical smoke is a work environment quality problem. Ordinary surgical masks and OT ventilation systems are inadequate to control this problem. This research work is based on numerous monitoring campaigns of ultrafine particle concentrations in OTs, equipped with upward displacement ventilation or with a downward unidirectional airflow system. Measurements performed during ten real surgeries highlight that the use of ESTs generates a quite sharp and relevant increase of particle concentration in the surgical area as well within the entire OT area. The measured contamination level in the OTs are linked to surgical operation, ventilation principle, and ESTs used. A better knowledge of airborne contamination is crucial for limiting the personnel’s exposure to surgical smoke. Research results highlight that downward unidirectional OTs can give better conditions for adequate ventilation and contaminant removal performances than OTs equipped with upward displacement ventilation systems. PMID:28146089

  12. A new method to measure higher visual functions in an immersive environment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Higher visual functions can be defined as cognitive processes responsible for object recognition, color and shape perception, and motion detection. People with impaired higher visual functions after unilateral brain lesion are often tested with paper pencil tests, but such tests do not assess the degree of interaction between the healthy brain hemisphere and the impaired one. Hence, visual functions are not tested separately in the contralesional and ipsilesional visual hemifields. Methods A new measurement setup, that involves real-time comparisons of shape and size of objects, orientation of lines, speed and direction of moving patterns, in the right or left visual hemifield, has been developed. The setup was implemented in an immersive environment like a hemisphere to take into account the effects of peripheral and central vision, and eventual visual field losses. Due to the non-flat screen of the hemisphere, a distortion algorithm was needed to adapt the projected images to the surface. Several approaches were studied and, based on a comparison between projected images and original ones, the best one was used for the implementation of the test. Fifty-seven healthy volunteers were then tested in a pilot study. A Satisfaction Questionnaire was used to assess the usability of the new measurement setup. Results The results of the distortion algorithm showed a structural similarity between the warped images and the original ones higher than 97%. The results of the pilot study showed an accuracy in comparing images in the two visual hemifields of 0.18 visual degrees and 0.19 visual degrees for size and shape discrimination, respectively, 2.56° for line orientation, 0.33 visual degrees/s for speed perception and 7.41° for recognition of motion direction. The outcome of the Satisfaction Questionnaire showed a high acceptance of the battery by the participants. Conclusions A new method to measure higher visual functions in an immersive environment was

  13. The Importance of Prior Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleary, Linda Miller

    1989-01-01

    Recounts a college English teacher's experience of reading and rereading Noam Chomsky, building up a greater store of prior knowledge. Argues that Frank Smith provides a theory for the importance of prior knowledge and Chomsky's work provided a personal example with which to interpret and integrate that theory. (RS)

  14. Towards a practical Johnson noise thermometer for long-term measurements in harsh environments

    SciTech Connect

    Greenen, Adam; Pearce, Jonathan; Cruickshank, David; Bramley, Paul

    2015-07-01

    The impact of mechanical and chemical changes in conventional sensors such as thermocouples and resistance thermometers can be avoided by instead using temperature sensors based on fundamental thermometry. A prime example of this is Johnson noise thermometry, which is based on measurement of the fluctuations in the voltage of a resistor arising from thermal motion of charge carriers - i.e. the 'Johnson noise'. A Johnson noise thermometer never needs calibration and is insensitive to the condition of the sensor material. It is therefore ideally suited to long-term temperature measurements in harsh environments, such as nuclear reactor coolant circuits, in-pile measurements, nuclear waste management and storage, and severe accident monitoring. There have been a number of previous attempts to develop a Johnson noise thermometer for the nuclear industry, but none have reached commercial exploitation because of technical problems in practical implementation. The main challenge is to extract the tiny Johnson noise signal from ambient electrical noise influences, both from the internal amplification electronics, and from external electrical noise sources. Recent advances in electronics technology and digital signal processing techniques have opened up new possibilities for developing a viable, practical Johnson noise thermometer. We describe a project funded by the UK Technology Strategy Board (now Innovate UK) 'Developing the nuclear supply chain' call, currently underway, to develop a practical Johnson noise thermometer that makes use of innovative electronics for ultralow noise amplification and signal processing. The new electronics technology has the potential to help overcome the problems encountered with previous attempts at constructing a practical Johnson noise thermometer. An outline of the new developments is presented, together with an overview of the current status of the project. (authors)

  15. Measuring galaxy environment with the synergy of future photometric and spectroscopic surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucciati, O.; Marulli, F.; Cimatti, A.; Merson, A. I.; Norberg, P.; Pozzetti, L.; Baugh, C. M.; Branchini, E.

    2016-10-01

    We exploit the synergy between low-resolution spectroscopy and photometric redshifts to study environmental effects on galaxy evolution in slitless spectroscopic surveys from space. As a test case, we consider the future Euclid Deep survey (˜40 deg2), which combines a slitless spectroscopic survey limited at Hα flux ≥5 × 10-17 erg cm-2 s-1 and a photometric survey limited in H band (H ≤ 26). We use Euclid-like galaxy mock catalogues, in which we anchor the photometric redshifts to the 3D galaxy distribution of the available spectroscopic redshifts. We then estimate the local density contrast by counting objects in cylindrical cells with radius from 1 to 10 h-1Mpc, over the redshift range 0.9 < z < 1.8. We compare this density field with the one computed in a mock catalogue with the same depth as the Euclid Deep survey (H = 26) but without redshift measurement errors. We find that our method successfully separates high- from low-density environments (the last from the first quintile of the density distribution), with higher efficiency at low redshift and large cells: the fraction of low-density regions mistaken by high-density peaks is <1 per cent for all scales and redshifts explored, but for scales of 1 h-1Mpc for which is a few per cent. These results show that we can efficiently study environment in photometric samples if spectroscopic information is available for a smaller sample of objects that sparsely samples the same volume. We demonstrate that these studies are possible in the Euclid Deep survey, i.e. in a redshift range in which environmental effects are different from those observed in the local Universe, hence providing new constraints for galaxy evolution models.

  16. Conceptual design of a device to measure hand swelling in a micro-gravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hysinger, Christopher L.

    1993-01-01

    In the design of pressurized suits for use by astronauts in space, proper fit is an important consideration. One particularly difficult aspect of the suit design is the design of the gloves. If the gloves of the suit do not fit properly, the grip strength of the astronaut can be decreased by as much as fifty percent. These gloves are designed using an iterative process and can cost over 1.5 million dollars. Glove design is further complicated by the way the body behaves in a micro-gravity environment. In a micro-gravity setting, fluid from the lower body tends to move into the upper body. Some of this fluid collects in the hands and causes the hands to swell. Therefore, a pair of gloves that fit well on earth may not fit well when they are used in space. The conceptual design process for a device which can measure the swelling that occurs in the hands in a micro-gravity environment is described. This process involves developing a specifications list and function structure for the device and generating solution variants for each of the sub functions. The solution variants are then filtered, with the variants that violate any of the specifications being discarded. After acceptable solution variants are obtained, they are combined to form design concepts. These design concepts are evaluated against a set of criteria and the design concepts are ranked in order of preference. Through this process, the two most plausible design concepts were an ultrasonic imaging technique and a laser mapping technique. Both of these methods create a three dimensional model of the hand, from which the amount of swelling can be determined. In order to determine which of the two solutions will actually work best, a further analysis will need to be performed.

  17. Measuring Global Perceptions of the Research Training Environment Using a Short Form of the RTES-R.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Jeffrey H.; Miller, Steven A.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the development and cross validation of a brief measure of the Research Training Environment Scale-Revised (RTES-R) in counseling graduate programs. Results indicate that the new RTES-R-S total scores correlate strongly with the original form and show good internal consistency. Recommends this new instrument when efficient measurement is…

  18. Spatially resolved measurements of nitrogen dioxide in an urban environment using concurrent multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leigh, R. J.; Corlett, G. K.; Frieß, U.; Monks, P. S.

    2006-12-01

    A novel system using the technique of concurrent multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy system has been developed and applied to the measurement of nitrogen dioxide in an urban environment. Using five fixed telescopes, slant columns of nitrogen dioxide, ozone, water vapour, and the oxygen dimer, O4, are simultaneously retrieved in five vertically separated viewing directions. The application of this remote sensing technique in the urban environment is explored. Through, the application of several simplifying assumptions a tropospheric concentration of NO2 is derived and compared with an urban background in-situ chemiluminescence detector. The remote sensing and in-situ techniques show good agreement. Owing to the high time resolution of the measurements, the ability to image and quantify plumes within the urban environment is demonstrated. The CMAX-DOAS measurements provide a useful measure of overall NO2 concentrations on a city-wide scale.

  19. MELIFT - A new device for accurate measurements in a snow rich environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorninger, M.

    2012-04-01

    A deep snow pack, remote locations, no external power supply and very low temperatures are often the main ingredients when it comes to the deployment of meteorological stations in mountainous terrain. The accurate position of the sensor related to the snow surface is normally not known. A new device called METLIFT overcomes the problems. WMO recommends a height between 1.2 m and 2 m above ground level for the measurement of air temperature and humidity. The height above ground level is specified to take care of the possible strong vertical temperature and humidity gradients at the lowest layers in the atmosphere. Especially in snow rich and remote locations it may be hardly possible to follow this advice. Therefore most of the meteorological stations in mountainous terrain are situated at mountain tops where strong winds will blow off the snow or in valleys where a daily inspection of the sensors is possible. In other unpopulated mountainous areas, e.g. basins, plateaus, the distance of the sensor to the snow surface is not known or the sensor will be snow-covered. A new device was developed to guarantee the sensor height above surface within the WMO limits in harsh and remote environments. An ultrasonic snow height sensor measures the distance to the snow surface. If it exceeds certain limits due to snow accumulation or snow melt the lift adapts its height accordingly. The prototype of METLIFT has been installed in Lower Austria at an altitude of 1000m. The lift is 6 m high and can pull out for another 4 m. Sensor arms are mounted every meter to allow the connection of additional sensors or to measure a profile of a certain parameter of the lowest 5 m above surface. Sensors can be added easily since cable wiring is provided to each sensor arm. Horizontal winds are measured at 7 m height above surface. METLIFT is independent of external power supply. Three lead gel accumulators recharged by three solar panels provide the energy necessary for the sensors, the data

  20. Combined application of alpha-track and fission-track techniques for detection of plutonium particles in environmental samples prior to isotopic measurement using thermo-ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi-Gyu; Suzuki, Daisuke; Esaka, Fumitaka; Magara, Masaaki; Kimura, Takaumi

    2011-07-15

    The fission track technique is a sensitive detection method for particles which contain radio-nuclides like (235)U or (239)Pu. However, when the sample is a mixture of plutonium and uranium, discrimination between uranium particles and plutonium particles is difficult using this technique. In this study, we developed a method for detecting plutonium particles in a sample mixture of plutonium and uranium particles using alpha track and fission track techniques. The specific radioactivity (Bq/g) for alpha decay of plutonium is several orders of magnitude higher than that of uranium, indicating that the formation of the alpha track due to alpha decay of uranium can be disregarded under suitable conditions. While alpha tracks in addition to fission tracks were detected in a plutonium particle, only fission tracks were detected in a uranium particle, thereby making the alpha tracks an indicator for detecting particles containing plutonium. In addition, it was confirmed that there is a linear relationship between the numbers of alpha tracks produced by plutonium particles made of plutonium certified standard material and the ion intensities of the various plutonium isotopes measured by thermo-ionization mass spectrometry. Using this correlation, the accuracy in isotope ratios, signal intensity and measurement errors is presumable from the number of alpha tracks prior to the isotope ratio measurements by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. It is expected that this method will become an effective tool for plutonium particle analysis. The particles used in this study had sizes between 0.3 and 2.0 μm.

  1. Endocrine actions of pesticides measured in the Flemish environment and health studies (FLEHS I and II).

    PubMed

    Croes, K; Den Hond, E; Bruckers, L; Govarts, E; Schoeters, G; Covaci, A; Loots, I; Morrens, B; Nelen, V; Sioen, I; Van Larebeke, N; Baeyens, W

    2015-10-01

    Within the Flemish Environment and Health studies (FLEHS I, 2002-2006, and FLEHS II, 2007-2012), pesticide exposure, hormone levels and degree of sexual maturation were measured in 14-15-year-old adolescents residing in Flanders (Belgium). In FLEHS II, geometric mean concentrations (with 95 % confidence interval (CI)) of 307 (277-341) and 36.5 ng L(-1) (34.0-39.2) were found for p,p'-dichlorophenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB). These values were respectively 26 and 60 % lower than levels in FLEHS I, 5 years earlier. Metabolites of organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) and of para-dichlorobenzene were measured for the first time in FLEHS II, yielding concentrations of 11.4, 3.27 and 1.57 μg L(-1) for the sum of dimethyl- and diethyl phosphate metabolites and 2,5-dichlorophenol (2,5-DCP), respectively. Data on internal exposure of HCB showed a positive correlation with sexual maturation, testosterone and the aromatase index for boys and with free thyroxine (fT4) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) (both boys and girls). For both p,p'-DDE and HCB, a negative association with sexual development in girls was found. The OPP metabolites were negatively associated with sex hormone levels in the blood of boys and with sexual maturation (both boys and girls). The pesticide metabolite 2,5-DCP was negatively correlated with free T4, while a positive association with TSH was reported (boys and girls). These results show that even exposure to relatively low concentrations of pesticides can have significant influences on hormone levels and the degree of sexual maturation in 14-15-year-old adolescents.

  2. Quantum Measurement of Two-Qubit System in Damping Noise Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qing; Liu, Hui; Zhen, Xiu-Lan; Yang, Ming; Cao, Zhuo-Liang

    2016-03-01

    It is known that the inevitable interaction of the entangled qubits with their environments may result in the degradation of quantum correlation. We study the decoherence of two remote qubits under general local single- and two-sided amplitude-damping channel (ADC). By using concurrence, quantum discord and Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) inequality, we find that the relation between the residual quantum correlations and the initial ones are different. Recently, Wang et al. [Int. J. Theor. Phys. 54 (2015) 5] showed that there exist a set of partially entangled states that are more robust than maximally entangled states in terms of the residual quantum correlation measured by concurrence, fully entangled fraction and quantum discord, respectively. Here we find that both in single- and two-sided ADC, only the evolution of CHSH inequality with the initial parameter is proportional to that of the initial nonlocality. That means the initial state with maximally nonlocality will retain its role in the evolution. It implies that the evolution of nonlocality may reveal the characteristics of quantum state better. Furthermore, we discuss the evolutions of the three different quantum measurements with the initial parameter under generalized amplitude damping channel (GADC) and find that they are all proportional to that of the initial state. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11204002, 11274010, 61073048, 11005029, the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education (20123401120003, 20113401110002), the Key Project of Chinese Ministry of Education (Nos. 211080, 210092), the Key Program of the Education Department of Anhui Province under Grant No. KJ2012A020, the “211” Project of Anhui University, the Talent Foundation of Anhui University, the personnel department of Anhui province

  3. The microphysical properties of ice fog measured in urban environments of Interior Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Carl G.; Stuefer, Martin; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Kim, Chang Ki

    2013-10-01

    microphysical properties of ice fog were measured at two sites during a small field campaign in January and February of 2012 in Interior Alaska. The National Center for Atmospheric Research Video Ice Particle Sampler probe and Formvar (polyvinyl formal)-coated microscope slides were used to sample airborne ice particles at two polluted sites in the Fairbanks region. Both sites were significantly influenced by anthropogenic emission and additional water vapor from nearby open water power plant cooling ponds. Measurements show that ice fog particles were generally droxtal shaped (faceted, quasi-spherical) for sub-10 µm particles, while plate-shaped crystals were the most frequently observed particles between 10 and 50 µm. A visibility cutoff of 3 km was used to separate ice fog events from other observations which were significantly influenced by larger (50-150 µm) diamond dust particles. The purpose of this study is to more realistically characterize ice fog microphysical properties in order to facilitate better model predictions of the onset of ice fog in polluted environments. Parameterizations for mass and projected area are developed and used to estimate particle terminal velocity. Dimensional characteristics are based on particle geometry and indicated that ice fog particles have significantly lower densities than water droplets as well as reduced cross-sectional areas, the net result being that terminal velocities are estimated to be less than half the value of those calculated for water droplets. Particle size distributions are characterized using gamma functions and have a shape factor (μ) of between -0.5 and -1.0 for polluted ice fog conditions.

  4. COMBO-17 measurements of the effect of environment on the type-dependent galaxy luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phleps, S.; Wolf, C.; Peacock, J. A.; Meisenheimer, K.; van Kampen, E.

    2007-06-01

    We have developed a method to calculate overdensities in multicolour surveys, facilitating a direct comparison of the local density contrast measured using galaxy samples that have different redshift error distributions, i.e. for red and blue, or bright and faint galaxies, respectively. We calculate overdensities in small redshift slices (Δ z =0.02, which at z=0.3 corresponds roughly to Δ r_comoving=53~h-1 Mpc) for 9176 galaxies with R≤23.65, MB(Vega)-5log h≤-18, and z≤ 0.7, in three COMBO-17 fields (measuring 31'×31' each). The mean redshift errors of this sample are approximately σ_z/(1+z)≃ 0.015. In the Chandra Deep Field South we identify a region that is underdense by almost a factor 2 compared to the other two fields in the same redshift range (0.25⪉ z ⪉ 0.4). This can be used for an investigation of the variation of the colour-dependent luminosity function with environment: We calculate the luminosity function in this redshift range for red sequence and blue cloud galaxies (as defined by Bell et al. 2004) in each of the fields separately. While the luminosity function of the blue galaxies remains unaffected by different density contrasts, the luminosity function of the red galaxies clearly has a more positive faint-end slope in the Chandra Deep Field South as compared to the other two COMBO-17 fields. The underdensity there is thus mainly due to a deficiency of faint red galaxies. This result is in qualitative agreement with the trends seen at z=0.1, e.g. in the 2dFGRS (Croton et al. 2005), or in the SDSS (Zandivarez et al. 2006).

  5. Interferometric Tomographic Measurement of an Instataneous Flow Field Under Adverse Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, En-Xi; Cha, Soyoung Stephen; Burner, Alpheus W.

    1995-01-01

    Measurement of an instantaneous flow field by interferometric tomography, that is, reconstruction of a three-dimensional refractive-index field from multi-directional projection data, has been conducted. In order to simulate the expected experimental arrangement at a wind tunnel, reconstructions are made from a restricted view angle less than 40 degrees and incomplete projections. In addition, appreciable ambient air and experimental setup disturbances are present. A new phase-stepping technique, based on a generalized phase-stepping approach of a four-bucket model, is applied for expeditious and accurate phase information extraction from projection interferograms under the harsh environments. Phase errors caused by the various disturbances, which can include ambient refractive-index change, optical component disturbance, hologram repositioning error, etc., are partially compensated with a linear corrective model. A new computational tomographic technique based on a series expansion approach was also utilized to efficiently deal with arbitrary boundary shapes and the continuous flow fields in reconstruction. The results of the preliminary investigation are encouraging; however, the technique needs to be further developed in the future through refinement of the approaches reported here and through hybridization with previously developed techniques. Keywords: interferometry, tomography, phase stepping

  6. Interfermometric tomographic measurement of an instantaneous flow field under adverse environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Enxi; Cha, Soyoung S.; Burner, Alpheus W.

    1995-09-01

    Measurement of an instantaneous flow field by interferometric tomography, that is, reconstruction of a 3D refractive-index field from multidirectional projection data, has ben conducted. In order to simulate the expected experimental arrangement at a wind tunnel, reconstructions are made from a restricted view angle less than 40 degrees and incomplete projections. In addition, appreciable ambient air and experimental setup disturbances are present. A new phase-stepping technique, based on a generalized phase-stepping approach of a four- bucket model, is applied for expeditious and accurate phase information extraction from projection interferograms under the harsh environments. Phase errors caused by the various disturbances, which can include ambient refractive-index change, optical component disturbance, hologram repositioning error, etc., are partially compensated with a linear corrective model. A new computational tomographic technique based on a series expansion approach was also utilized to efficiently deal with arbitrary boundary shapes and the continuous flow fields in reconstruction. The results of the preliminary investigation are encouraging; however, the technique needs to be further developed in the future through refinement of the approaches reported here and through hybridization with previously developed techniques.

  7. Measuring the electric properties of planetary environments with Mutual Impedance (MI) Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautner, R.; Grard, R.

    2002-10-01

    Mutual Impedance Probes measure the complex permittivity of material by means of a quadrupolar array of electrodes and associated electronics for generating, recording and processing waveforms. MI instruments have been developed for a number of ongoing space missions. The HASI/PWA MI probe will determine the electric properties of the atmosphere of Titan, Saturn's largest moon, during the descent of the Huygens probe. After landing, the instrument will provide data on the properties of Titan's surface materials. The permittivity probe PP, as part of the SESAME instrument package for the Rosetta Lander, will determine the electrical properties of comet Wirtanen's surface. The main features of MI probes are first recapitulated. Instrument architectures for atmospheric, surface and subsurface investigations are described. Results from recent field test campaigns in harsh environments are presented. A new MI probe prototype employing a linear electrode array for application on mobile platforms or on penetrator devices is described. New application areas for future MI probes and relevant technology requirements are discussed.

  8. Atmospheric electric field measurements in urban environment and the pollutant aerosol weekly dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, H. G.; Conceição, R.; Melgão, M.; Nicoll, K.; Mendes, P. B.; Tlemçani, M.; Reis, A. H.; Harrison, R. G.

    2014-11-01

    The weekly dependence of pollutant aerosols in the urban environment of Lisbon (Portugal) is inferred from the records of atmospheric electric field at Portela meteorological station (38°47‧N, 9°08‧W). Measurements were made with a Bendorf electrograph. The data set exists from 1955 to 1990, but due to the contaminating effect of the radioactive fallout during 1960 and 1970s, only the period between 1980 and 1990 is considered here. Using a relative difference method a weekly dependence of the atmospheric electric field is found in these records, which shows an increasing trend between 1980 and 1990. This is consistent with a growth of population in the Lisbon metropolitan area and consequently urban activity, mainly traffic. Complementarily, using a Lomb-Scargle periodogram technique the presence of a daily and weekly cycle is also found. Moreover, to follow the evolution of theses cycles, in the period considered, a simple representation in a colour surface plot representation of the annual periodograms is presented. Further, a noise analysis of the periodograms is made, which validates the results found. Two datasets were considered: all days in the period, and fair-weather days only.

  9. PV Ramping in a Distributed Generation Environment: A Study Using Solar Measurements; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, M.; Keller, J.

    2012-06-01

    Variability in Photovoltaic (PV) generation resulting from variability in the solar radiation over the PV arrays is a topic of continuing concern for those involved with integrating renewables onto existing electrical grids. The island of Lanai, Hawaii is an extreme example of the challenges that integrators will face due to the fact that it is a small standalone grid. One way to study this problem is to take high-resolution solar measurements in multiple locations and model simultaneous PV production for various sizes at those locations. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) collected high-resolution solar data at four locations on the island where proposed PV plants will be deployed in the near future. This data set provides unique insight into how the solar radiation may vary between points that are proximal in distance, but diverse in weather, due to the formation of orographic clouds in the center of the island. Using information about each proposed PV plant size, power output was created at high resolution. The team analyzed this output to understand power production ramps at individual locations and the effects of aggregating the production from all four locations. Hawaii is a unique environment, with extremely variable events occurring on a daily basis. This study provided an excellent opportunity for understanding potential worst-case scenarios for PV ramping. This paper provides an introduction to the datasets that NREL collected over a year and a comprehensive analysis of PV variability in a distributed generation scenario.

  10. Muramic Acid Measurements for Bacterial Investigations in Marine Environments by High-Pressure Liquid Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Mimura, Toru; Romano, Jean-Claude

    1985-01-01

    Muramic acid, a constituent of procaryotic cell walls, was assayed by high-pressure liquid chromatography in samples from several marine environments (water column, surface microlayer, and sediment) and a bacterial culture. It is used as a microbial biomass indicator. The method gave a good separation of muramic acid from interfering compounds with satisfactory reproducibility. A pseudomonad culture had a muramic acid content of 4.7 × 10−10 to 5.3 × 10−10 μg per cell during growth. In natural water samples, highly significant relationships were found between muramic acid concentrations and bacterial numbers for populations of 108 to 1011 cells per liter. The muramic acid content in natural marine water decreased from 5.3 × 10−10 to 1.6 × 10−10 μg per cell with increasing depth. In coastal sediments exposed to sewage pollution, concentrations of muramic acid, ATP, organic carbon, and total amino acids displayed a parallel decrease with increasing distance from the sewage outlet. Advantages of muramic acid measurement by high-pressure liquid chromatography are its high sensitivity and reduction of preparation steps, allowing a short time analysis. PMID:16346848

  11. High temperature measurements in irradiated environment using Raman fiber optics distributed temperature sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecomte, Pierre; Blairon, Sylvain; Boldo, Didier; Taillade, Frédéric; Caussanel, Matthieu; Beauvois, Gwendal; Duval, Hervé; Grieu, Stéphane; Laffont, Guillaume; Lainé, Frédéric; Carrel, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    Optical fiber temperature sensors using Raman effect are a promising technology for temperature mapping of nuclear power plant pipes. These pipes are exposed to high temperature (350 °C) and gamma radiations, which is a harsh environment for standard telecom fibers. Therefore metal coated fibers are to be used to perform measurement over 300 °C. Temperature variations can affect the attenuation of the metallic coated fiber before irradiation. The latter induces an extra attenuation, due to light absorption along the fiber by radiation-induced defects. The recombination of these defects can be strongly accelerated by the high temperature value. As backscattered Raman signal is weak it is important to test optical fibers under irradiation to observe how it gets attenuated. Different experiments are described in this conference paper: two in situ irradiation campaigns with different dose rates at, both ambient and high temperature. We observe that the tested off-the-shelf metallic coated fibers have a high attenuation under irradiation. We also noticed the fact that thermal annealing plays a massive role in the +300 °C temperature range.

  12. Evolution of the sensor fish device for measuring physical conditions in sever hydraulic environments

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, J. P.

    2003-03-01

    To assist in deriving biological specifications for design of turbine rehabilitation measures, new “fish-friendly” turbines, and spillway designs and operations, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) scientists have developed and tested an autonomous multi-sensor device called a Sensor Fish that can acquire pressure and tri-axial linear acceleration data during passage through severe hydraulic conditions. The purpose of the Sensor Fish is to characterize physical conditions fish experience during passage through hydro turbines, spill stilling basins, high-discharge outfalls, and other dam passage routes. This report discusses the development and field tests of the Sensor Fish at Rock Island, McNary, The Dalles, Bonneville, and Wanapum dams on the Columbia River and the Prosser Irrigation District on the Yakima River, which have shown that the device can withstand the severe environments of turbine, spill, and fish bypass passage and provide useful environmental data that can ultimately aid in the design and operation of new and existing turbines, spill, and dam fish bypass facilities.

  13. Evolution of the Sensor Fish Device for Measuring Physical Conditions in Severe Hydraulic Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.

    2003-02-28

    To assist in deriving biological specifications for design of turbine rehabilitation measures, new ''fish-friendly'' turbines, and spillway designs and operations, scientists at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have developed and tested an autonomous multi-sensor device called a Sensor Fish that can acquire pressure and tri-axial linear acceleration data during passage through severe hydraulic conditions. The purpose of the Sensor Fish is to characterize physical conditions fish experience during passage through hydro turbines, spill stilling basins, high-discharge outfalls, and other dam passage routes. The Sensor Fish was developed with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Hydropower Turbine System program. Field tests of the Sensor Fish at Rock Island, McNary, The Dalles, Bonneville, and Wanapum dams on the Columbia River and the Prosser Irrigation District on the Yakima River have shown that the device can withstand the severe environments of turbine, spill, and fish bypass passage and provide useful environmental data that can ultimately aid in the design and operation of new and existing turbines, spill, and dam fish bypass facilities.

  14. Scenario analysis of Agro-Environment measure adoption for soil erosion protection in Sicilian vineyard (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novara, Agata; Gristina, Luciano; Fantappiè, Maria; Costantini, Edoardo

    2014-05-01

    Most of the challenges in designing land use policies that address sustainability issues are inherent to the concept of Agro-Environmental Measures (AEM). Researchers, farmers and mainly policy makers need to evaluate the impact of new and existing policies for soil protection. In Europe, farmers commit themselves, for a minimum period of at least five years, to adopt environmentally-friendly farming techniques that undergone legal obligations. On the other hand, farmers receive payments that provide compensation for additional costs and income foregone resulting from applying those environmentally friendly farming practices in line with the stipulations of agri-environment contracts. In this context we prospect scenarios on soil erosion variations in a detailed case study after the application of Agro-Environmental Measures (AEM). The study area is located in the South part of Sicily. In a district area of 11,588 ha, 35.5 % is devoted to vineyard cultivation, 32.2 % is arable land and only 11.1 % cultivated to olive grow. 2416 ha are urbanized areas and other less important crops. A paired-site approach was chosen to study the difference in soil organic carbon stocks after AEM adoption, following criteria based on Conteh (1999) also applied in several research studies. For the purpose of comparison, the members of a paired site were selected to be similar with respect to the type of soil, slope, elevation, and drainage, but not to AEM. The comparisons were made between adjacent patches of land with different AEM, and a known history of land use and management. 100 paired sites (two adjacent plots) were chosen and three soil samples (0-30 cm depth) were collected in each plot (600 soil samples). The rainfall erosivity (R) factor (Mj mm ha-1 hour-1 year-1) was estimated with the formula specifically proposed for Sicily by Ferro and coauthors in 1999. The soil erodibility factor (K, in tons hour MJ-1 mm-1) was mapped on the base of soil texture and soil organic

  15. Measurements of Ground Acoustic Environments for Small Solid Rocket Motor Firings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce; Plotkin, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Mobile launcher deck and tower are exposed to severe acoustic environments during launch. These environments, if not properly managed, can weaken ground support equipment and result in structure failure. The objectives of this study were: (1) Characterize the acoustic ground environment with and without water suppression systems. (2) Validate the ground acoustic prediction based on scaling of Saturn V data. and (3) Validate a semi-empirical acoustic analysis.

  16. Branch enclosure BVOC flux measurements from Fagus sylvatica L. in a natural forest environment: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demarcke, M.; Amelynck, C.; Schoon, N.; Müller, J.-F.; Joo, E.; Dewulf, J.; van Langenhove, H.; Šimpraga, M.; Steppe, K.; Lemeur, R.; Samson, R.

    2009-04-01

    Natural ecosystems, such as forests, are known to be important sources of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs). Oxidation of these biogenic VOCs (BVOCs) in the presence of nitrogen oxides can result in net ozone formation and the low-volatility oxidation products may contribute to secondary organic aerosol formation and/or growth. As a result BVOC emissions can have a negative effect on air quality and human health. In the commonly used emission algorithms [Guenther et al., 1995], leaf temperature and photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) are the driving variables for BVOC emissions. However, in order to better explain the variability over time of BVOC emissions for a given tree species, the most recent emission algorithms, such as MEGAN [Guenther et al., 2006], also consider other driving variables such as phenology, temperature and light history. To validate these new emission algorithms, dynamic branch enclosure BVOC flux measurements have been performed on an adult Fagus sylvatica L. tree in a natural forest environment under ambient PPFD and temperature conditions. Branches at different levels in the canopy were accessible from a 35 m high measurement tower. The cuvette air was analysed on-line with a hs-PTR-MS instrument, which was located in a log cabin at the bottom of the tower. Ion signals related to monoterpenoid compounds (m/z 81 and 137), isoprene (m/z 69), acetone (m/z 59) and methanol (m/z 33) have been measured continuously with the PTR-MS during several phenological periods, from bud-break to senescence. The data show high monoterpenoid emission rates in spring which gradually decrease until leaf fall. Furthermore, monoterpenoid emissions from shaded leaves in the lower layers of the canopy were found to be negligible compared to those from sunlit leaves in the upper layer of the canopy. Effects of light and temperature history on monoterpenoid emissions from Fagus sylvatica L. will be discussed and compared with results obtained in

  17. Recruiting for Prior Service Market

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    perceptions, expectations and issues for re-enlistment • Develop potential marketing and advertising tactics and strategies targeted to the defined...01 JUN 2008 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Recruiting for Prior Service Market 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...Command First Handshake to First Unit of Assignment An Army of One Proud to Be e e to Serve Recruiting for Prior Service Market MAJ Eric Givens / MAJ Brian

  18. Construct validation of 4 food-environment assessment methods: adapting a multitrait-multimethod matrix approach for environmental measures.

    PubMed

    Minaker, Leia M; Raine, Kim D; Wild, T Cameron; Nykiforuk, Candace I J; Thompson, Mary E; Frank, Lawrence D

    2014-02-15

    Few studies have assessed the construct validity of measures of neighborhood food environment, which remains a major challenge in accurately assessing food access. In this study, we adapted a psychometric tool to examine the construct validity of 4 such measures for 3 constructs. We used 4 food-environment measures to collect objective data from 422 Ontario, Canada, food stores in 2010. Residents' perceptions of their neighborhood food environment were collected from 2,397 households between 2009 and 2010. Objective and perceptual data were aggregated within buffer zones around respondents' homes (at 250 m, 500 m, 1,000 m, and 1,500 m). We constructed multitrait-multimethod matrices for each scale to examine construct validity for the constructs of food availability, food quality, and food affordability. Convergent validity between objective measures decreased with increasing geographic scale. Convergent validity between objective and subjective measures increased with increasing geographic scale. High discriminant validity coefficients existed between food availability and food quality, indicating that these two constructs may not be distinct in this setting. We conclude that the construct validity of food environment measures varies over geographic scales, which has implications for research, policy, and practice.

  19. Evaluation of Learning Environments for Object-Oriented Programming: Measuring Cognitive Load with a Novel Measurement Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uysal, Murat Pasa

    2016-01-01

    Various methods and tools have been proposed to overcome the learning obstacles for Object-Oriented Programming (OOP). However, it remains difficult especially for novice learners. The problem may be not only adopting an instructional method, but also an Integrated Development Environment (IDE). Learners employ IDEs as a means to solve programming…

  20. Medical laboratory science and nursing students’ perception of academic learning environment in a Philippine university using Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure (DREEM)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to compare the perception of the academic learning environment between medical laboratory science students and nursing students at Saint Louis University, Baguio City, Philippines. Methods A cross-sectional survey research design was used to measure the perceptions of the participants. A total of 341 students from the Department of Medical Laboratory Science, School of Natural Sciences, and the School of Nursing answered the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) instrument from April to May 2016. Responses were compared according to course of study, gender, and year level. Results The total mean DREEM scores of the medical laboratory science students and nursing students did not differ significantly when grouped according to course of study, gender, or year level. Medical laboratory science students had significantly lower mean scores in the sub-domains ‘perception of learning’ and ‘perception of teaching.’ Male medical laboratory science students had significantly lower mean scores in the sub-domain ‘perception of learning’ among second year students. Medical laboratory science students had significantly lower mean scores in the sub-domain ‘perception of learning.’ Nursing students identified 7 problem areas, most of which were related to their instructors. Conclusion Medical laboratory science and nursing students viewed their academic learning environment as ‘more positive than negative.’ However, the relationship of the nursing instructors to their students needs improvement. PMID:27649901

  1. Measuring Sports Class Learning Climates: The Development of the Sports Class Environment Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowdell, Trevor; Tomson, L. Mich; Davies, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The development and validation of a new and unique learning climate instrument, the Sports Class Environment Scale (SCES), was the focus of this study. We began with a consolidation of the dimensions and items of the Perceived Motivational Climate in Sport Questionnaire-2 and the Classroom Environment Scale. Field-testing of the SCES involved 204…

  2. Stability of Measures of the Home Environment for Families of Children with Severe Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rousey, Ann Maria; Wild, Margaret; Blacher, Jan

    2002-01-01

    Evaluation of the home environments of 64 families of children with severe disabilities 7 and 9 years after the initial assessment found a high degree of stability, especially on the Family Environment Scale (FES). However, internal consistency reliability of the FES was lower for these families than in the standardization samples. (Contains…

  3. Predictions of the nuclear activation of materials on LDEF produced by the space radiation environment and comparison with flight measurements.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, T W; Colborn, B L; Harmon, B A; Laird, C E

    1996-11-01

    Model calculations have been made to compare with the induced radioactivity measured for materials on the LDEF satellite. Predictions and data comparisons are made for aluminum spacecraft components and for vanadium and nickel samples placed at multiple locations on the spacecraft. The calculated vs observed activations provide an indication of present model uncertainties in predicting nuclear activation as well as the magnitude and directionality of the trapped proton environment for low-Earth orbit missions. Environment model uncertainties based on the activation measurements are consistent with the uncertainties evaluated using other LDEF radiation dosimetry data.

  4. Measuring the plasma environment at Mercury: The fast imaging plasma spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehn, P. L.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Gloeckler, G.; Lundgren, R. A.; Fisk, L. A.

    2002-09-01

    The plasma environment at Mercury is a rich laboratory for studying the interaction of the solar wind with a planet. Three primary populations of ions exist at Mercury: solar wind, magnetospheric and pickup ions. These pickup ions are generated through the ionization of Mercury's exosphere or are sputtered particles from the Mercury surface. A comprehensive mission to Mercury, such as MESSENGER, should include a sensor that is able to determine the dynamical properties and composition of all these plasma components. An instrument to measure the composition of these ion populations and their three dimensional velocity distribution functions must be lightweight, fast, and have a very large field of view. The Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) is an imaging mass spectrometer, part of NASA's MESSENGER mission, the first Mercury orbiter. This versatile instrument has a very small footprint, and has a mass that is about one order of magnitude less than other comparable systems. It maintains a nearly full-hemisphere field of view, suitable for either spinning or three-axis-stabilized platforms. The major piece of innovation to enable this sensor is a new deflection system geometry that enables a large instantaneous (~1.5() field of view. This novel electrostatic analyzer system is then combined with a position sensitive time-of-flight system. We discuss the design and prototype tests of the FIPS deflection system and show how this system is expected to address one key problem in Mercury science, that of the nature of the radar-bright regions at the Hermean poles.

  5. An innovative experimental setup for Large Scale Particle Image Velocimetry measurements in riverine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauro, Flavia; Olivieri, Giorgio; Porfiri, Maurizio; Grimaldi, Salvatore

    2014-05-01

    Large Scale Particle Image Velocimetry (LSPIV) is a powerful methodology to nonintrusively monitor surface flows. Its use has been beneficial to the development of rating curves in riverine environments and to map geomorphic features in natural waterways. Typical LSPIV experimental setups rely on the use of mast-mounted cameras for the acquisition of natural stream reaches. Such cameras are installed on stream banks and are angled with respect to the water surface to capture large scale fields of view. Despite its promise and the simplicity of the setup, the practical implementation of LSPIV is affected by several challenges, including the acquisition of ground reference points for image calibration and time-consuming and highly user-assisted procedures to orthorectify images. In this work, we perform LSPIV studies on stream sections in the Aniene and Tiber basins, Italy. To alleviate the limitations of traditional LSPIV implementations, we propose an improved video acquisition setup comprising a telescopic, an inexpensive GoPro Hero 3 video camera, and a system of two lasers. The setup allows for maintaining the camera axis perpendicular to the water surface, thus mitigating uncertainties related to image orthorectification. Further, the mast encases a laser system for remote image calibration, thus allowing for nonintrusively calibrating videos without acquiring ground reference points. We conduct measurements on two different water bodies to outline the performance of the methodology in case of varying flow regimes, illumination conditions, and distribution of surface tracers. Specifically, the Aniene river is characterized by high surface flow velocity, the presence of abundant, homogeneously distributed ripples and water reflections, and a meagre number of buoyant tracers. On the other hand, the Tiber river presents lower surface flows, isolated reflections, and several floating objects. Videos are processed through image-based analyses to correct for lens

  6. Objective measures of the built environment and physical activity in children: from walkability to moveability.

    PubMed

    Buck, Christoph; Tkaczick, Tobias; Pitsiladis, Yannis; De Bourdehaudhuij, Ilse; Reisch, Lucia; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Pigeot, Iris

    2015-02-01

    Features of the built environment that may influence physical activity (PA) levels are commonly captured using a so-called walkability index. Since such indices typically describe opportunities for walking in everyday life of adults, they might not be applicable to assess urban opportunities for PA in children. Particularly, the spatial availability of recreational facilities may have an impact on PA in children and should be additionally considered. We linked individual data of 400 2- to 9-year-old children recruited in the European IDEFICS study to geographic data of one German study region, based on individual network-dependent neighborhoods. Environmental features of the walkability concept and the availability of recreational facilities, i.e. playgrounds, green spaces, and parks, were measured. Relevant features were combined to a moveability index that should capture urban opportunities for PA in children. A gamma log-regression model was used to model linear and non-linear effects of individual variables on accelerometer-based moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) stratified by pre-school children (<6 years) and school children (≥6 years). Single environmental features and the resulting indices were separately included into the model to investigate the effect of each variable on MVPA. In school children, commonly used features such as residential density [Formula: see text], intersection density [Formula: see text], and public transit density [Formula: see text] showed a positive effect on MVPA, while land use mix revealed a negative effect on MVPA [Formula: see text]. In particular, playground density [Formula: see text] and density of public open spaces, i.e., playgrounds and parks combined [Formula: see text], showed positive effects on MVPA. However, availability of green spaces showed no effect on MVPA. Different moveability indices were constructed based on the walkability index accounting for the negative impact of land use mix. Moveability

  7. Validity of a self-report survey tool measuring the nutrition and physical activity environment of primary schools

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Valid tools measuring characteristics of the school environment associated with the physical activity and dietary behaviours of children are needed to accurately evaluate the impact of initiatives to improve school environments. The aim of this study was to assess the validity of Principal self-report of primary school healthy eating and physical activity environments. Methods Primary school Principals (n = 42) in New South Wales, Australia were invited to complete a telephone survey of the school environment; the School Environment Assessment Tool – SEAT. Equivalent observational data were collected by pre-service teachers located within the school. The SEAT, involved 65 items that assessed food availability via canteens, vending machines and fundraisers and the presence of physical activity facilities, equipment and organised physical activities. Kappa statistics were used to assess agreement between the two measures. Results Almost 70% of the survey demonstrated moderate to almost perfect agreement. Substantial agreement was found for 10 of 13 items assessing foods sold for fundraising, 3 of 6 items assessing physical activity facilities of the school, and both items assessing organised physical activities that occurred at recess and lunch and school sport. Limited agreement was found for items assessing foods sold through canteens and access to small screen recreation. Conclusions The SEAT provides researchers and policy makers with a valid tool for assessing aspects of the school food and physical activity environment. PMID:23758936

  8. Self-Report Measures of the Home Learning Environment in Large Scale Research: Measurement Properties and Associations with Key Developmental Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niklas, Frank; Nguyen, Cuc; Cloney, Daniel S.; Tayler, Collette; Adams, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    Favourable home learning environments (HLEs) support children's literacy, numeracy and social development. In large-scale research, HLE is typically measured by self-report survey, but there is little consistency between studies and many different items and latent constructs are observed. Little is known about the stability of these items and…

  9. Work group I: Measures of the food and physical activity environment: instruments.

    PubMed

    Saelens, Brian E; Glanz, Karen

    2009-04-01

    A work group was convened to identify the core challenges, content gaps, and corresponding possible solutions for improving food- and physical activity-environment instrumentation. Identified challenges included instrument proliferation, the scaling or grain of instruments and appropriate aggregation to the neighborhood or community level, and unknown sensitivity to change of most instruments. Solutions for addressing these challenges included establishing an interactive and real-time instrument repository, developing and enforcing high standards for instrument reporting, increasing community-researcher collaborations, and implementing surveillance of food and physical activity environment. Solid instrumentation will accelerate a better understanding of food- and physical activity-environment effects on eating and physical activity behaviors.

  10. Color measurements on marble and limestone briquettes exposed to outdoor environment in the Eastern United States. Volume I: Results of exposure 1984-1990

    SciTech Connect

    Reimann, K.J.

    1994-04-01

    In a long-term program that began in 1984, limestone and marble briquettes have been exposed to both anthropogenic acid deposition and natural weathering at four field sites in the eastern United States. Similar tests began at an Ohio site in 1986. Effects of exposure on the briquettes and other materials at the sites are evaluated periodically by several federal agencies cooperating in the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). One of the primary contributions of Argonne National Laboratory to the NAPAP has been the measurement of tristimulus color change on samples exposed to the environment. Results from the first six years indicate a yellowing of the marble and a darkening of limestone on both the skyward and groundward surfaces of fresh and preexposed briquettes. The relationship between discoloration and exposure period appears to be linear. Discoloration rates as a function of a cumulative exposure time are almost constant for marble and slightly decreasing for limestone Dark spots on groundward surfaces were measured with tristimulus color equipment prior to chemical analysis to determine if a correlation exists between darkening (change in reflectance) and SO{sub 4} concentration. Taking exposure time into consideration, and assuming that the airborne concentration of dark particles, which cause darkening, is proportional to airborne SO{sub 2} concentration, one can establish a linear relationship between exposure time, darkening, and SO{sub 2} concentration. The program is continuing so that additional data can be obtained.

  11. Methods to measure indicators of exposure in real-world aquatic environments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most of what is known about the implications of endocrine disrupting chemicals in the environment is somewhat anecdotal. There are numerous reports of gonadal histological abnormalities (Potomac, United Kingdom Rivers), alterations in sex ratios (Boulder Creek, Colorado) and high...

  12. Radioactivity in the Kuwait marine environment--Baseline measurements and review.

    PubMed

    Uddin, S; Aba, A; Fowler, S W; Behbehani, M; Ismaeel, A; Al-Shammari, H; Alboloushi, A; Mietelski, J W; Al-Ghadban, A; Al-Ghunaim, A; Khabbaz, A; Alboloushi, O

    2015-11-30

    The Arabian Gulf region is moving towards a nuclear energy option with the first nuclear power plant now operational in Bushehr, Iran, and others soon to be constructed in Abu Dhabi and Saudi Arabia. Radiological safety is becoming a prime concern in the region. This study compiles available data and presents recent radionuclide data for the northern Gulf waters, considered as pre-nuclear which will be a valuable dataset for future monitoring work in this region. Radionuclide monitoring in the marine environment is a matter of prime concern for Kuwait, and an assessment of the potential impact of radionuclides requires the establishment and regular updating of baseline levels of artificial and natural radionuclides in various environmental compartments. Here we present baseline measurements for (210)Po, (210)Pb, (137)Cs, (90)Sr, and (3)H in Kuwait waters. The seawater concentration of (3)H, (210)Po, (210)Pb, (137)Cs, and (90)Sr vary between 130-146, 0.48-0.68, 0.75-0.89, 1.25-1.38 and 0.57-0.78 mBq L(-1), respectively. The (40)K concentration in seawater varies between 8.9-9.3 Bq L(-1). The concentration of (40)K, total (210)Pb, (137)Cs, (90)Sr, (226)Ra, (228)Ra, (238)U, (235)U, (234)U, (239+240)Pu and (238)Pu were determined in sediments and range, respectively, between 353-445, 23.6-44.3, 1.0-3.1, 4.8-5.29, 17.3-20.5, 15-16.4, 28.7-31.4, 1.26-1.30, 29.7-30.0, 0.045-0.21 and 0.028-0.03 Bq kg(-1) dry weight. Since, radionuclides are concentrated in marine biota, a large number of marine biota samples covering several trophic levels, from microalgae to sharks, were analyzed. The whole fish concentration of (40)K, (226)Ra, (224)Ra, (228)Ra, (137)Cs, (210)Po and (90)Sr range between 230-447, 0.7-7.3, <0.5-6.6, <0.5-15.80, <0.17, 0.88-4.26 and 1.86-5.34 Bq kg(-1) dry weight, respectively. (210)Po was found to be highly concentrated in several marine organisms with the highest (210)Po concentration found in Marica marmorata (193.5-215.6 Bq kg(-1) dry weight). (210)Po in

  13. Measuring Psychosocial Environments Using Individual Responses: an Application of Multilevel Factor Analysis to Examining Students in Schools

    PubMed Central

    Masyn, Katherine E.; Jones, Stephanie M.; Subramanian, S. V.; Koenen, Karestan C.

    2015-01-01

    Interest in understanding how psychosocial environments shape youth outcomes has grown considerably. School environments are of particular interest to prevention scientists as many prevention interventions are school-based. Therefore, effective conceptualization and operationalization of the school environment is critical. This paper presents an illustration of an emerging analytic method called multilevel factor analysis (MLFA) that provides an alternative strategy to conceptualize, measure, and model environments. MLFA decomposes the total sample variance-covariance matrix for variables measured at the individual level into within-cluster (e.g., student level) and between-cluster (e.g., school level) matrices and simultaneously models potentially distinct latent factor structures at each level. Using data from 79,362 students from 126 schools in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (formerly known as the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health), we use MLFA to show how 20 items capturing student self-reported behaviors and emotions provide information about both students (within level) and their school environment (between level). We identified four latent factors at the within level: (1) school adjustment, (2) externalizing problems, (3) internalizing problems, and (4) self-esteem. Three factors were identified at the between level: (1) collective school adjustment, (2) psychosocial environment, and (3) collective self-esteem. The finding of different and substantively distinct latent factor structures at each level emphasizes the need for prevention theory and practice to separately consider and measure constructs at each level of analysis. The MLFA method can be applied to other nested relationships, such as youth in neighborhoods, and extended to a multilevel structural equation model to better understand associations between environments and individual outcomes and therefore how to best implement preventive interventions

  14. The Resource-Infrastructure-Environment Index for Measuring Progress: An Application to Australia, Mexico and the US

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natoli, Riccardo; Zuhair, Segu

    2013-01-01

    The resource-infrastructure-environment (RIE) index was proposed as an alternative measure of progress which was then employed to: (1) compare the aggregate (single summary) index findings between Australia (mid-industrialised nation), Mexico (emerging economy), and the US (highly industrialised nation); and (2) compare the RIE index against the…

  15. Characterization and exposure measurement for indium oxide nanofibers generated as byproducts in the LED manufacturing environment.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kwang-Min; An, Hee-Chul

    2016-01-01

    This article aimed to elucidate the physicochemical characteristics and exposure concentration of powder and airborne particles as byproducts generated from indium tin oxide thin film process by an electron beam evaporation method during maintenance in light-emitting diode manufacturing environment. The chemical composition, size, shape, and crystal structure of powder and airborne particles as byproducts were investigated using a scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer, and an X-ray diffractometer. The number and mass concentration measurements of airborne particles were performed by using an optical particle counter of direct-reading aerosol monitor and an inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry after sampling, respectively. The airborne particles are composed of oxygen and indium. On the other hand, the powder byproducts consist mostly of oxygen and indium, but tin was found as a minor component. The shapes of the airborne and powder byproducts were fiber type. The length and diameter of fibrous particles were approximately 500-2,000 nm and 30-50 nm, respectively. The powder byproducts indicated indium oxide nanofibers with a rhombohedral structure. On the other hand, the indium oxide used as a source material in the preparation of ITO target showed spherical morphology with a body-centered cubic structure, and it was the same as that of the pure crystalline indium oxide powder. During maintenance, the number concentrations ranged from 350-75,693 particles/ft(3), and arithmetic mean±standard deviation and geometric mean±geometric standard deviation were 11,624±15,547 and 4,846±4.12 particles/ft(3), respectively. Meanwhile, under the same conditions, the airborne mass concentrations of the indium based on respirable particle size (3.5 µm cut-point 50%) were 0.09-0.19 µg/m(3). Physicochemical characteristics of nanoparticle can affect toxicity so the fact that shape and crystal structure have changed is important. Thus

  16. Nulling interferometers for space-based high contrast visible imaging and measurement of exoplanetary environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Brian Andrew

    This dissertation presents the legacy, theory, design, characterization, and application prospects of a fully symmetric monolithic nulling interferometer (nuller). A nuller's function is to destructively interfere light originating from a bright, on-axis, unresolved source in order to lower its contrast with faint, off-axis sources of light in the field of view. The primary application lies in astronomical instrumentation, serving as an enabling technology for directly imaging exoplanets and measuring exozodiacal dust and debris disks, the planetary system evolutionary components around nearby stars. Typical on-sky planet/star flux ratios are 1:109 or less in the visible. Mitigating this contrast is key to spectroscopic study of exoplanets, which aims to characterize exoplanetary atmospheres and potentially locate biosignatures on exo-Earths. Within the past decade, adaptive optics-equipped breadboard demonstrations of nullers and other coronagraphs have shown the capability to image nearby (≤ 30 lightyears) extrasolar analogs to Jupiter with a 0.5 meter diameter telescope in the visible. The quiet laboratory environments that have been produced to demonstrate this capability do not reflect those of typical ground-based observatories where thermal drifts perturb optical alignment and atmospheric turbulence perturbs the source wavefront. Space-based platforms circumvent the atmosphere problem, but are still subjected to thermal instabilities and their associated risks. Robust optical systems must be designed and flight-tested in order to address such risks and provide grounds for their inclusion in the design of future exo-Earth imaging satellites. Sub-orbital platforms such as sounding rockets and high-altitude balloons provide a rapid, low-cost means of providing heritage for such optical systems while also delivering significant scientific results. The primary risk inherent with these platforms are harsh transient environmental conditions, for which, similar to

  17. Measuring the Interestingness of Articles in a Limited User Environment Prospectus

    SciTech Connect

    Pon, Raymond K.

    2007-04-18

    Search engines, such as Google, assign scores to news articles based on their relevancy to a query. However, not all relevant articles for the query may be interesting to a user. For example, if the article is old or yields little new information, the article would be uninteresting. Relevancy scores do not take into account what makes an article interesting, which would vary from user to user. Although methods such as collaborative filtering have been shown to be effective in recommendation systems, in a limited user environment there are not enough users that would make collaborative filtering effective. I present a general framework for defining and measuring the ''interestingness'' of articles, called iScore, incorporating user-feedback including tracking multiple topics of interest as well as finding interesting entities or phrases in a complex relationship network. I propose and have shown the validity of the following: 1. Filtering based on only topic relevancy is insufficient for identifying interesting articles. 2. No single feature can characterize the interestingness of an article for a user. It is the combination of multiple features that yields higher quality results. For each user, these features have different degrees of usefulness for predicting interestingness. 3. Through user-feedback, a classifier can combine features to predict interestingness for the user. 4. Current evaluation corpora, such as TREC, do not capture all aspects of personalized news filtering systems necessary for system evaluation. 5. Focusing on only specific evolving user interests instead of all topics allows for more efficient resource utilization while yielding high quality recommendation results. 6. Multiple profile vectors yield significantly better results than traditional methods, such as the Rocchio algorithm, for identifying interesting articles. Additionally, the addition of tracking multiple topics as a new feature in iScore, can improve iScore's classification

  18. Physical, consumer, and social aspects of measuring the food environment among diverse low-income populations.

    PubMed

    Gittelsohn, Joel; Sharma, Sangita

    2009-04-01

    Obesity and other diet-related chronic diseases are directly related to the food environment. We describe how to better assess the food environment in specific ethnic minority settings for designing and implementing interventions, based on a review of our previous work on the food environment in American Indian reservations, Canadian First Nations reserves, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, and inner-city Baltimore. The types of food stores available within each setting and the range of healthy foods available varied greatly across these geographic regions. In all settings, proximity to food stores/supermarkets, cost, and limited availability of healthful foods were common features, which limited access to health-promoting food options. Features specific to each population should be considered in an assessment of the food environment, including physical (e.g., openness of stores, mix of types of food sources); consumer (e.g., adequacy of the food supply, seasonal factors); and social (e.g., inter-household food sharing, perceptions of food quality, language differences) aspects. The food environments common in low-income ethnic subpopulations require special focus and consideration due to the vulnerability of the populations and to specific and unique aspects of each setting.

  19. Prior Distributions on Symmetric Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Jayanti; Damien, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Fully and partially ranked data arise in a variety of contexts. From a Bayesian perspective, attention has focused on distance-based models; in particular, the Mallows model and extensions thereof. In this paper, a class of prior distributions, the "Binary Tree," is developed on the symmetric group. The attractive features of the class are: it…

  20. Physical priors in virtual colonoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivaz, Hassan; Shinagawa, Yoshihisa; Liang, Jianming

    2009-02-01

    Electronic colon cleansing (ECC) aims to remove the contrast agent from the CT abdominal images so that a virtual model of the colon can be constructed. Virtual colonoscopy requires either liquid or solid preparation of the colon before CT imaging. This paper has two parts to address ECC in both preparation methods. In the first part, meniscus removal in the liquid preparation is studied. The meniscus is the curve seen at the top of a liquid in response to its container. Left on the colon wall, the meniscus can decrease the sensitivity and specificity of virtual colonoscopy. We state the differential equation that governs the profile of the meniscus and propose an algorithm for calculating the boundary of the contrast agent. We compute the surface tension of the liquid-colon wall contact using in-vivo CT data. Our results show that the surface tension can be estimated with an acceptable degree of uncertainty. Such an estimate, along with the meniscus profile differential equation will be used as an a priori knowledge to aid meniscus segmentation. In the second part, we study ECC in solid preparation of colon. Since the colon is pressurized with air before acquisition of the CT images, a prior on the shape of the colon wall can be obtained. We present such prior and investigate it using patient data. We show the shape prior is held in certain parts of the colon and propose a method that uses this prior to ease pseudoenhancement correction.

  1. Passive Space Environment Effect Measurement on JEM/MPAC&SEED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimoto, Yugo; Ishizawa, Junichiro; Shimamura, Hiroyuki

    A space materials exposure experiment was conducted on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS) using the Micro-Particles Capturer and Space Environment Exposure Device (MPAC&SEED) of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). The MPAC&SEED experiments were aboard both the Russian Service Module (SM/MPAC&SEED) and the exposed Facility of the Japanese Experiment Module, KIBO Exposed Facility (JEM/MPAC&SEED). The JEM/MPAC&SEED was attached to the Space Environment Data Acquisition Equipment-Attached Payload (SEDA-AP).

  2. [Research on accurate measurement of oxygen content in coal using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in air environment].

    PubMed

    Yin, Wang-bao; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Le; Dong, Lei; Ma, Wei-guang; Jia, Suo-tang

    2012-01-01

    A technique about accurate measurement of oxygen content in coal in air environment using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is introduced in the present paper. Coal samples were excited by the laser, and plasma spectra were obtained. Combining internal standard method, temperature correction method and multi-line methods, the oxygen content of coal samples was precisely measured. The measurement precision is not less than 1.37% for oxygen content in coal analysis, so is satisfied for the requirement of coal-fired power plants in coal analysis. This method can be used in surveying, environmental protection, medicine, materials, archaeological and food safety, biochemical and metallurgy application.

  3. Prior knowledge-based approach for associating ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Evaluating the potential human health and/or ecological risks associated with exposures to complex chemical mixtures in the ambient environment is one of the central challenges of chemical safety assessment and environmental protection. There is a need for approaches that can help to integrate chemical monitoring and bio-effects data to evaluate risks associated with chemicals present in the environment. We used prior knowledge about chemical-gene interactions to develop a knowledge assembly model for detected chemicals at five locations near two wastewater treatment plants. The assembly model was used to generate hypotheses about the biological impacts of the chemicals at each location. The hypotheses were tested using empirical hepatic gene expression data from fathead minnows exposed for 12 d at each location. Empirical gene expression data was also mapped to the assembly models to statistically evaluate the likelihood of a chemical contributing to the observed biological responses. The prior knowledge approach was able reasonably hypothesize the biological impacts at one site but not the other. Chemicals most likely contributing to the observed biological responses were identified at each location. Despite limitations to the approach, knowledge assembly models have strong potential for associating chemical occurrence with potential biological effects and providing a foundation for hypothesis generation to guide research and/or monitoring efforts relat

  4. The 1992 NASA Langley Measurement Technology Conference: Measurement Technology for Aerospace Applications in High-Temperature Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J. (Editor); Antcliff, Richard R. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    An intensive 2-day conference to discuss the current status of measurement technology in the areas of temperature/heat flux, stress/strain, pressure, and flowfield diagnostics for high temperature aerospace applications was held at Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, on April 22 and 23, 1993. Complete texts of the papers presented at the Conference are included in these proceedings.

  5. A Study of Measures of Classroom Learning Environments. Technical Report Number 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cichon, Donald J.; Olson, George E.

    This study deals with the following topics: (1) the extent to which three different learning environment instruments and their underlying conceptual framework are empirically related, and (2) the extent to which intensive observation of classrooms aids in the interpretation of instruments' characterizations of a class. In the first part of the…

  6. Measuring the Effectiveness of Blended Learning Environment: A Case Study in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wai, Cho Cho; Seng, Ernest Lim Kok

    2015-01-01

    Learning environment has always been traditionally associated with the physical presence of classrooms, textbooks, pen-and-paper examinations and teachers. However, today's evolving technology has rapidly changed the face of education. Online learning, teleconferencing, internet, Computer Assisted Learning (CAL), Web-Based Distance Learning (WBDL)…

  7. Zostera marina root demography in an intertidal estuarine environment measured using minirhizotron technology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the last four decades there have been major advances in our understanding of the biology, ecology and physiology of seagrasses and their interaction with the environment. Despite these advances, there has been relatively little advancement in our understanding of the belowg...

  8. Detection of Silver Nanoparticles in Vadose Zone Environments using Complex ConductivityMeasurements

    EPA Science Inventory

    The emergence of engineered nano-materials (ENMs) in the global marketplace and their accidental introduction into the subsurface pose a potential risk to the environment and public health. There is a need for the development of techniques to detect their presence and transport i...

  9. Measuring Flow Experience in an Immersive Virtual Environment for Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Schaik, P.; Martin, S.; Vallance, M.

    2012-01-01

    In contexts other than immersive virtual environments, theoretical and empirical work has identified flow experience as a major factor in learning and human-computer interaction. Flow is defined as a "holistic sensation that people feel when they act with total involvement". We applied the concept of flow to modeling the experience of…

  10. Effect of Environment on the Fidelity of Control and Measurements of Solid-State Quantum Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-22

    ii Contents v List of Figures viii 1 Introduction 1 1.1 Thesis outline...Qubit devices and decoherence 9 2.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 2.2 Decoherence in...20 3 Effect of the Ohmic environment on optimally controlled flux-biased phase qubit 22 3.1 Introduction

  11. School Policy on Teaching and School Learning Environment: Direct and Indirect Effects upon Student Outcome Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyriakides, Leonidas; Creemers, Bert P. M.

    2012-01-01

    School policy on teaching and the school learning environment (SLE) are the main school factors of the dynamic model of educational effectiveness (Creemers & Kyriakides, 2008). A longitudinal study in which 50 primary schools, 108 classes, and 2369 students participated generated evidence supporting the validity of the dynamic model. This…

  12. Comparative Measurements of Earth and Martian Entry Environments in the NASA Langley HYMETS Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Splinter, Scott C.; Bey, Kim S.; Gragg, Jeffrey G.; Brewer, Amy

    2011-01-01

    Arc-jet facilities play a major role in the development of heat shield materials for entry vehicles because they are capable of producing representative high-enthalpy flow environments. Arc-jet test data is used to certify material performance for a particular mission and to validate or calibrate models of material response during atmospheric entry. Materials used on missions entering Earth s atmosphere are certified in an arc-jet using a simulated air entry environment. Materials used on missions entering the Martian atmosphere should be certified in an arc-jet using a simulated Martian atmosphere entry environment, which requires the use of carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide has not been used as a test gas in a United States arc-jet facility since the early 1970 s during the certification of materials for the Viking Missions. Materials certified for the Viking missions have been used on every entry mission to Mars since that time. The use of carbon dioxide as a test gas in an arc-jet is again of interest to the thermal protection system community for certification of new heat shield materials that can increase the landed mass capability for Mars bound missions beyond that of Viking and Pathfinder. This paper describes the modification, operation, and performance of the Hypersonic Materials Environmental Test System (HYMETS) arc-jet facility with carbon dioxide as a test gas. A basic comparison of heat fluxes, various bulk properties, and performance characteristics for various Earth and Martian entry environments in HYMETS is provided. The Earth and Martian entry environments consist of a standard Earth atmosphere, an oxygen-rich Earth atmosphere, and a simulated Martian atmosphere. Finally, a preliminary comparison of the HYMETS arc-jet facility to several European plasma facilities is made to place the HYMETS facility in a more global context of arc-jet testing capability.

  13. Image Reconstruction Using Analysis Model Prior

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yu; Du, Huiqian; Lam, Fan; Mei, Wenbo; Fang, Liping

    2016-01-01

    The analysis model has been previously exploited as an alternative to the classical sparse synthesis model for designing image reconstruction methods. Applying a suitable analysis operator on the image of interest yields a cosparse outcome which enables us to reconstruct the image from undersampled data. In this work, we introduce additional prior in the analysis context and theoretically study the uniqueness issues in terms of analysis operators in general position and the specific 2D finite difference operator. We establish bounds on the minimum measurement numbers which are lower than those in cases without using analysis model prior. Based on the idea of iterative cosupport detection (ICD), we develop a novel image reconstruction model and an effective algorithm, achieving significantly better reconstruction performance. Simulation results on synthetic and practical magnetic resonance (MR) images are also shown to illustrate our theoretical claims. PMID:27379171

  14. Measurement of rotor centre flow direction and turbulence in wind farm environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, T. F.; Demurtas, G.; Sommer, A.; Højstrup, J.

    2014-06-01

    The measurement of inflow to a wind turbine rotor was made with a spinner anemometer on a 2 MW wind turbine in a wind farm of eight wind turbines. The wind speed, yaw misalignment and flow inclination angle was measured during a five months measurement campaign. Angular measurements were calibrated by yawing the wind turbine in and out of the wind in stopped conditions. Wind speed was calibrated relative to a met mast in a wake-free wind sector during operation. The calibration measurements were used to determine the basic k1 and k2 constants of the spinner anemometer and a four parameter induction factor function. Yaw measurements and turbulence measurements, where the average wind speed was corrected to the far field with the induction function, showed good correlation with mast measurements. The yaw misalignment measurements showed a significant yaw misalignment for most of the wind speed range, and also a minor symmetric yaw misalignment pattern. The flow inclination angle showed slight variation of inflow angle with wind speed and clear wake swirl patterns in the wakes of the other wind turbines. Turbulence intensity measurements showed clear variations from low turbulence in the wake-free wind sector to high turbulence in the wakes of the other wind turbines.

  15. Design and Testing of the Strain Transducer for Measuring Deformations of Pipelines Operating in the Mining-deformable Ground Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawedzki, Waclaw; Tarnowski, Jerzy

    2015-10-01

    Design and laboratory test results of the strain transducer intended for monitoring and assessing stress states of pipelines sited in mining areas are presented in this paper. This transducer allows measuring strains of pipelines subjected to external forces - being the mining operations effect. Pipeline strains can have a direct influence on a tightness loss and penetration of the transported fluid into the environment. The original strain gauge transducer was proposed for performing measurements of strains. It allows measuring circumferential strains and determining the value and direction of the main longitudinal strain. This strain is determined on the basis of measuring component longitudinal strains originating from axial forces and the resultant bending moment. The main purpose of investigations was the experimental verification of the possibility of applying the strain transducer for measuring strains of polyethylene pipelines. The obtained results of the transducer subjected to influences of tensile and compression forces are presented and tests of relaxation properties of polyethylene are performed.

  16. Airborne RF Measurement System and Analysis of Representative Flight RF Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppen, Sandra V.; Ely, Jay J.; Smith, Laura J.; Jones, Richard A.; Fleck, Vincent J.; Salud, Maria Theresa; Mielnik, John

    2007-01-01

    Environmental radio frequency (RF) data over a broad band of frequencies were needed to evaluate the airspace around several airports. An RF signal measurement system was designed using a spectrum analyzer connected to an aircraft VHF/UHF navigation antenna installed on a small aircraft. This paper presents an overview of the RF measurement system and provides analysis of a sample of RF signal measurement data over a frequency range of 30 MHz to 1000 MHz.

  17. Ozone measurements in the troposphere of an Amazonian rain forest environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirchhoff, V. W. J. H.; Browell, E. V.; Gregory, G. L.

    1988-01-01

    Ozone concentration profiles from the ground to above the stratospheric peak were obtained in an equatorial rain forest environment near Manaus in the Amazon Basin between July and August of 1985. The peak ozone concentration (4.4 x 10 to the 22 molecules/cu cm) was found at 20 mbar (26.6 km). A major pollution (biomass-burning) event which occurred near the end of the experiment was responsible for large changes in ozone concentration.

  18. Diagnostic techniques for measurement of aerodynamic noise in free field and reverberant environment of wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Sum, H. M. A.; Mawardi, O. K.

    1973-01-01

    Techniques for studying aerodynamic noise generating mechanisms without disturbing the flow in a free field, and in the reverberation environment of the ARC wind tunnel were investigated along with the design and testing of an acoustic antenna with an electronic steering control. The acoustic characteristics of turbojet as a noise source, detection of direct sound from a source in a reverberant background, optical diagnostic methods, and the design characteristics of a high directivity acoustic antenna. Recommendations for further studies are included.

  19. Robot Path Planning in Uncertain Environments: A Language-Measure-Theoretic Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    PAGES 7 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a . REPORT unclassified b . ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98...that is navigated from point A to point B in a similar environment with three different directions of the ocean current. The optimal nominal paths in...reflect the views of the sponsoring agencies. References [1] Garau, B ., Alvarez, A ., and Oliver, G., 2005, “Path Planning of Autonomous Underwater

  20. A generalized longitudinal mixture IRT model for measuring differential growth in learning environments.

    PubMed

    Kadengye, Damazo T; Ceulemans, Eva; Van den Noortgate, Wim

    2014-09-01

    This article describes a generalized longitudinal mixture item response theory (IRT) model that allows for detecting latent group differences in item response data obtained from electronic learning (e-learning) environments or other learning environments that result in large numbers of items. The described model can be viewed as a combination of a longitudinal Rasch model, a mixture Rasch model, and a random-item IRT model, and it includes some features of the explanatory IRT modeling framework. The model assumes the possible presence of latent classes in item response patterns, due to initial person-level differences before learning takes place, to latent class-specific learning trajectories, or to a combination of both. Moreover, it allows for differential item functioning over the classes. A Bayesian model estimation procedure is described, and the results of a simulation study are presented that indicate that the parameters are recovered well, particularly for conditions with large item sample sizes. The model is also illustrated with an empirical sample data set from a Web-based e-learning environment.

  1. Perceptual quality measurement for scalable video at low spatial resolution in mobile environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Hosik; Yoo, Hana; Kim, Cheon Seog; De Neve, Wesley; Ro, Yong Man

    2009-02-01

    Environments for the delivery and consumption of multimedia are often very heterogeneous, due to the use of various terminals in varying network conditions. One example of such an environment is a wireless network providing connectivity to a plethora of mobile devices. H.264/AVC Scalable Video Coding (SVC) can be utilized to deal with diverse usage environments. However, in order to optimally tailor scalable video content along the temporal, spatial, or perceptual quality axes, a quality metric is needed that reliably models subjective quality. The major contribution of this paper is the development of a novel quality metric for scalable video bit streams having a low spatial resolution, targeting consumption in wireless video applications. The proposed quality metric allows modeling the temporal, spatial, and perceptual quality characteristics of SVC bit streams. This is realized by taking into account several properties of the compressed bit streams, such as the temporal and spatial variation of the video content, the frame rate, and PSNR values. An extensive number of subjective experiments have been conducted to construct and verify the reliability of our quality metric. The experimental results show that the proposed quality metric is able to efficiently reflect subjective quality. Moreover, the performance of the quality metric is uniformly high for video sequences with different temporal and spatial characteristics.

  2. The Influence of Prior Knowledge on Memory: A Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Brod, Garvin; Werkle-Bergner, Markus; Shing, Yee Lee

    2013-01-01

    Across ontogenetic development, individuals gather manifold experiences during which they detect regularities in their environment and thereby accumulate knowledge. This knowledge is used to guide behavior, make predictions, and acquire further new knowledge. In this review, we discuss the influence of prior knowledge on memory from both the psychology and the emerging cognitive neuroscience literature and provide a developmental perspective on this topic. Recent neuroscience findings point to a prominent role of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and of the hippocampus (HC) in the emergence of prior knowledge and in its application during the processes of successful memory encoding, consolidation, and retrieval. We take the lateral PFC into consideration as well and discuss changes in both medial and lateral PFC and HC across development and postulate how these may be related to the development of the use of prior knowledge for remembering. For future direction, we argue that, to measure age differential effects of prior knowledge on memory, it is necessary to distinguish the availability of prior knowledge from its accessibility and use. PMID:24115923

  3. Measures of Light in Studies on Light-Driven Plant Plasticity in Artificial Environments

    PubMed Central

    Niinemets, Ülo; Keenan, Trevor F.

    2012-01-01

    Within-canopy variation in light results in profound canopy profiles in foliage structural, chemical, and physiological traits. Studies on within-canopy variations in key foliage traits are often conducted in artificial environments, including growth chambers with only artificial light, and greenhouses with and without supplemental light. Canopy patterns in these systems are considered to be representative to outdoor conditions, but in experiments with artificial and supplemental lighting, the intensity of artificial light strongly deceases with the distance from the light source, and natural light intensity in greenhouses is less than outdoors due to limited transmittance of enclosure walls. The implications of such changes in radiation conditions on canopy patterns of foliage traits have not yet been analyzed. We developed model-based methods for retrospective estimation of distance vs. light intensity relationships, for separation of the share of artificial and natural light in experiments with combined light and for estimation of average enclosure transmittance, and estimated daily integrated light at the time of sampling (Qint,C), at foliage formation (Qint,G), and during foliage lifetime (Qint,av). The implications of artificial light environments were analyzed for altogether 25 studies providing information on within-canopy gradients of key foliage traits for 70 species × treatment combinations. Across the studies with artificial light, Qint,G for leaves formed at different heights in the canopy varied from 1.8- to 6.4-fold due to changing the distance between light source and growing plants. In experiments with combined lighting, the share of natural light at the top of the plants varied threefold, and the share of natural light strongly increased with increasing depth in the canopy. Foliage nitrogen content was most strongly associated with Qint,G, but photosynthetic capacity with Qint,C, emphasizing the importance of explicit description of light

  4. America's Children and the Environment: A First View of Available Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, Tracey J.; Axelrad, Daniel A.; Kyle, Amy D.

    Noting that children may be affected by environmental contaminants quite differently from the way adults are affected, this report is the first on trends in measures reflecting environmental factors that may affect the health and well-being of children in the United States. For most measures presented, data between 1990 and 1999 were provided by…

  5. Measuring User Experience of the Student-Centered e-Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santoso, Harry B.; Schrepp, Martin; Isal, R. Yugo Kartono; Utomo, Andika Yudha; Priyogi, Bilih

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study is to develop an adapted version of User Experience Questionnaire (UEQ) and evaluate a learning management system. Although there is a growing interest on User Experience, there are still limited resources (i.e. measurement tools or questionnaires) available to measure user experience of any products, especially…

  6. High Sensitivity Gravity Measurements in the Adverse Environment of Oil Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfutzner, Harold

    2014-03-01

    Bulk density is a primary measurement within oil and gas reservoirs and is the basis of most reserves calculations by oil companies. The measurement is performed with a gamma-ray source and two scintillation gamma-ray detectors from within newly drilled exploration and production wells. This nuclear density measurement, while very precise is also very shallow and is therefore susceptible to errors due to any alteration of the formation and fluids in the vicinity of the borehole caused by the drilling process. Measuring acceleration due to gravity along a well provides a direct measure of bulk density with a very large depth of investigation that makes it practically immune to errors from near-borehole effects. Advances in gravity sensors and associated mechanics and electronics provide an opportunity for routine borehole gravity measurements with comparable density precision to the nuclear density measurement and with sufficient ruggedness to survive the rough handling and high temperatures experienced in oil well logging. We will describe a borehole gravity meter and its use under very realistic conditions in an oil well in Saudi Arabia. The density measurements will be presented. Alberto Marsala (2), Paul Wanjau (1), Olivier Moyal (1), and Justin Mlcak (1); (1) Schlumberger, (2) Saudi Aramco.

  7. America's Children and the Environment: Measures of Contaminants, Body Burdens, and Illnesses. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, Tracey J.; Axelrad, Daniel A.; Kyle, Amy D.; Nweke, Onyemaechi; Miller, Gregory G.

    Noting that children may be affected by environmental contaminants in ways quite different from the way adults are affected, this report is the second on trends in measures reflecting environmental factors that may affect the U.S. children's health and well-being. A list of measures and key findings begins the report, followed by five main…

  8. Measurements of Gas and Particle Phase Emissions From Munitions Detonation in a Field Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortner, E. C.; Knighton, W. B.; Timko, M.; Wood, E.; Onasch, T. B.; Kolb, C. E.; Beardsley, H. M.

    2007-12-01

    During the Point of Fire (POF) field campaign conducted at Fort Sill Oklahoma U.S.A. in March 2007 a suite of real- time trace gas and fine (submicron) particulate matter (PM) instrumentation characterized the point of fire emission plumes from large, medium and small caliber weapons systems. Muzzle emission plumes were measured and where appropriate, breach plumes and gun crew breathing zone measurements were also conducted. Aerosol measurements were conducted with an aerosol mass spectrometer (Aerodyne CTOF-AMS) for particle composition, condensation particle counter (CPC) for particle number density and DUSTRAK aerosol monitor for particle mass. Gas phase measurements included CO, CO2, NOx and a variety of trace gas species measured by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) including hydrogen cyanide (HCN), acetonitrile, acrylonitrile, benzene, toluene, benzonitrile and styrene. In the majority of the plume measurements, HCN was the most prominent compound measured by PTR-MS. Quantification of HCN by PTR-MS is difficult due to its proton affinity being close enough to that of water to allow a significant backward reaction of protonated HCN with water, reducing the detection sensitivity and making the response dependent on humidity. We have developed a quantification procedure for HCN based on laboratory measurements of a calibration gas standard of HCN, which allows the humidity dependence to be extracted directly from the proton hydrate ion intensities. The correction factors for HCN are quite significant varying between 10 and 30 depending on sample humidity.

  9. Furnace endoscope—measuring fuel spray properties in hot and corrosive environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miikkulainen, P.; Kankkunen, A.; Järvinen, M. P.

    2004-12-01

    A furnace endoscope was developed to carry out in-furnace measurements of black liquor sprays in order to discover the initial velocity, opening angle and trajectory of the spray, and compare spray disintegration mechanisms and spray appearance with the ones measured in a spray chamber. An error analysis of the velocity measurement method was carried out, and the meaning of the optimum measurement distance from the optics to the observed object is discussed. Some details of the development process of the probe are also presented, especially the definition of the scale of the image and the cooling system of the protection tubes. The furnace endoscope can be used in difficult conditions, such as those found inside a chemical recovery boiler (~1,200°C and corrosive chemicals) with promising and accurate measurement results. The equipment has been tested in several furnaces.

  10. Experience with checking potentially contaminated materials released to the environment and testing of the measuring instruments used

    PubMed

    Dryak; Kovar; Suran

    2000-07-01

    Several systems with large area plastic scintillators were tested, which are used to avoid the undesirable and illegal transport of radioactive materials especially at border crossings, in metallurgical works and in plants processing metal scrap, were tested. Measuring equipment with germanium detectors, which is used for check of material released from the Dukovany Nuclear Power Plant, was also tested. The detection possibilities of a chamber with plastic scintillators, for the use during checking of materials released to the environment, were investigated.

  11. Effect of various environments and computed tomography scanning parameters on renal volume measurements in vitro: A phantom study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wangyan; Zhu, Yinsu; Tang, Lijun; Zhu, Xiaomei; Xu, Yi; Yang, Guanyu

    2016-01-01

    Kidney volume is an important parameter in clinical practice, and accurate assessment of kidney volume is vital. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of various environments, tube voltages, tube currents and slice thicknesses on the accuracy of a novel segmentation software in determining renal volume on computed tomography (CT) images. The volumes of potatoes and porcine kidneys were measured on CT images and compared with the actual volumes, which were determined by a water displacement method. CT scans were performed under various situations, including different environments (air or oil); tube voltages/tube currents (80 kVp/200 mAs, 120 kVp/200 mAs, 120 kVp/100 mAs); and reconstructed slice thicknesses (0.75 or 1.5 mm). Percentage errors (PEs) relative to the reference standards were calculated. In addition, attenuation and image noise under different CT scanning parameters were compared. Student's t-test was also used to analyze the effect of various conditions on image quality and volume measurements. The results indicated that the volumes measured in oil were closer to the actual volumes (P<0.05). Furthermore, attenuation and image noise significantly increased when using a tube voltage of 80 kVp, while the mean PEs between 120 and 80 kVp voltages were not significantly different. The mean PEs were greater when using a tube current of 100 mAs compared with a current of 200 mAs (P<0.05). In addition, the volumes measured on 1.5 mm slice thickness were closer to the actual volumes (P<0.05). In conclusion, different environments, tube currents and slice thicknesses may affect the volume measurements. In the present study, the most accurate volume measurements were obtained at 120 kVp/200 mAs and a slice thickness of 1.5 mm. PMID:27446271

  12. Gender and the environment. Women's time use as a measure of environmental change.

    PubMed

    Awumbila, M; Momsen, J H

    1995-09-01

    These case studies pertain to marginal dry land rural areas in developing countries. The evidence suggests that women have shorter rest periods, greater intensity and fragmentation of work, and greater use of multiple simultaneous occupations than men. Macroeconomic policies have increased the work burden for women and for the poorest populations and have contributed to environmental deterioration. This paper focuses on women's use of time as a factor in explaining women's changing gender role under conditions of environmental stress. The women and the environment debate encompasses two philosophical positions. The ecofeminist theory is that women are one with nature and are unlike men, who manipulate and exploit the environment. The other theory posits that women are managers of the environment and should be approached as separate groups. The developmentalist improves on theory by offering the view that there are differences in resource allocation, entitlements, and responsibilities. The case studies deny that women's roles are fixed and generalized. The case study in Sri Lanka reveals that the Mahaweli irrigation and settlement project brought widespread deforestation and forced women to spend more time and energy in seeking fuel wood. Women adjusted to the changes by reducing the number of trips for wood, increasing the amount of the load, and involving men in the process. The number of families who switched to alternative cooking methods increased. During the dry season more of women's time is spent in washing clothes and cleaning the house. Kitchen gardening is only a wet season activity. A Burkina Faso study found that the average daily hours of work for women was 10.6 in the wet season and 12.4 in the dry season in 1991. In the Caribbean, life revolves around crop and no-crop time. Multiple job holding is a common strategy for small farmers. Gender division of labor and time use are determined by household, local context, family structure, and stage in the

  13. [A measure of team cohesion in sport. Spanish adaptation of Group Environment Questionnaire (GEQ)].

    PubMed

    Iturbide, Luis María; Elosua, Paula; Yanes, Félix

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this work was to adapt the Group Environment Questionnaire (GEQ) to Spanish. Judgmental procedures were used to assess the linguistic and cultural equivalence of the versions. Psychometric procedures were used in the operational phase of the study. The normative sample comprised 924 sportsmen/sportswomen from 75 teams. The GEQ scale showed suitable indexes of internal consistency and a bidimensional structure based on two factors of the cohesion model, the Task component and the Social component. In addition, a positive relation between team-performance and the Task component of team cohesion was observed. Overall, the results supported the Spanish version of the GEQ.

  14. Use of aluminum nitride to obtain temperature measurements in a high temperature and high radiation environment

    SciTech Connect

    Wernsman, Bernard R.; Blasi, Raymond J.; Tittman, Bernhard R.; Parks, David A.

    2016-04-26

    An aluminum nitride piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer successfully operates at temperatures of up to 1000.degree. C. and fast (>1 MeV) neutron fluencies of more than 10.sup.18 n/cm.sup.2. The transducer comprises a transparent, nitrogen rich aluminum nitride (AlN) crystal wafer that is coupled to an aluminum cylinder for pulse-echo measurements. The transducer has the capability to measure in situ gamma heating within the core of a nuclear reactor.

  15. Fusion of inertial, optical flow, and airspeed measurements for UAV navigation in GPS-denied environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, Andrey; Rutkowski, Adam J.

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes the data fusion approach that is developed for navigation of autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for those applications where the Global Positioning System (GPS) signals are denied. Example scenarios include navigation under interference and jamming and urban navigation missions. The system architecture is biologically inspired and exploits measurements that are utilized by flying insects for self-localization purposes. The data fusion algorithm implements the Kalman filter mechanization that fuses INS data (position velocity and attitude), optical flow data from a monocular downward looking visual system (scaled body-frame vehicle velocity components), and compass measurements (azimuth angle). Kalman filter measurement observables are formulated in a complimentary form, i.e., as differences between optical flow/compass measurements and INS states that are projected into the measurement domain. The filter estimates inertial error states and error in the flight height. We present the navigation solution architecture and demonstrate its feasibility using simulations and actual data experiments. Also, we compare our results to a data fusion algorithm that fuses airspeed and optical flow measurements.

  16. Precision mass measurements of neutron-rich nuclei, and limitations on the r-process environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Schelt, Jonathon A.

    2012-05-01

    The masses of 65 neutron-rich nuclides and 6 metastable states from Z = 49 to 64 were measured at a typical precision of δm/m= 10-7 using the Canadian Penning Trap mass spectrometer at Argonne National Laboratory. The measurements are on fission fragments from 252Cf spontaneous fission sources, including those measurements made at the new Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade facility (CARIBU) and an earlier source. The measured nuclides lie on or approach the predicted path of the astrophysical r process. Where overlap exists, this data set is largely consistent with previous measurements from Penning traps, storage rings, and reaction energetics, but large systematic deviations are apparent in β-endpoint measurements. Simulations of the r process were undertaken to determine how quickly material can pass through the studied elements for a variety of conditions, placing limits on what temperatures densities allow passage on a desired timescale. The new masses produce manifold differences in effective lifetime compared to simulations performed with some model masses.

  17. Obstacle classification and 3D measurement in unstructured environments based on ToF cameras.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongshan; Zhu, Jiang; Wang, Yaonan; Jia, Wenyan; Sun, Mingui; Tang, Yandong

    2014-06-18

    Inspired by the human 3D visual perception system, we present an obstacle detection and classification method based on the use of Time-of-Flight (ToF) cameras for robotic navigation in unstructured environments. The ToF camera provides 3D sensing by capturing an image along with per-pixel 3D space information. Based on this valuable feature and human knowledge of navigation, the proposed method first removes irrelevant regions which do not affect robot's movement from the scene. In the second step, regions of interest are detected and clustered as possible obstacles using both 3D information and intensity image obtained by the ToF camera. Consequently, a multiple relevance vector machine (RVM) classifier is designed to classify obstacles into four possible classes based on the terrain traversability and geometrical features of the obstacles. Finally, experimental results in various unstructured environments are presented to verify the robustness and performance of the proposed approach. We have found that, compared with the existing obstacle recognition methods, the new approach is more accurate and efficient.

  18. Stability measurement of double-side-surface-coated Bi-2212 tape conductors in water environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, J. P.; McDevitt, J. T.; Hazelton, D. W.

    1999-09-01

    The stability of double-side-coated Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 (Bi-2212) tapes on Ag substrates in a water environment has been studied. A phase analysis of the as-processed tape conductors was performed and indicated that aqueous precipitates are formed in the tapes exposed to aerated water solution. The nominal composition of the precipitates was found to be Sr1-xCaxCuO2 (xicons/Journals/Common/backsimeq" ALT="backsimeq" ALIGN="TOP"/>0.4). This phase is present in the tapes before the corrosive damage ensues. In order to evaluate the stability properties of the Sr0.6Ca0.4CuO2 phase in a water environment, the pure compound was synthesized and treated under the same conditions as the tapes. Studies reveal that similar corrosion occurs in the Sr0.6Ca0.4CuO2 phase. Thus, the presence of this impurity phase, which appears upon heat treatment of the tape assemblies, is found to be an important factor in the degradation behaviour of the Bi-2212 tape conductors.

  19. Application of the Development in Environment Measurement and Sensibility Nano-Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Kazutoshi; Aizawa, Hidenobu

    Recently, environmental pollution is social problem with nano materials and food contamination is a new social problem. On the other hand, the complaint related to the offensive odor in Japan exceeded 20,000 affairs in 1998, and these problems are not solved. The odor sensing system for detecting and control an offensive odor at an early stage is required. The sensing system using the sense of odor known as one of the fifth senses of human is proposed to these demands. Especially as for e-NOSE system, application will be expected from now on in many fields, such as medical diagnosis, health monitoring, environment, food, robot and a car. The sensing technology in which an electrochemical sensor called quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) is mainly used is making detection mechanisms, such as an electrode and a detection thin film on the nano-level. Therefore, detection films of sensor depend on the characteristic of the sensing devices using on material and processing technology. That the new technology sensor is asked can detect extremely low concentration from ppm to ppb level, and it is the sensor with low influence of environment, such as a gas of the outside for detection, temperature and humidity.

  20. Obstacle Classification and 3D Measurement in Unstructured Environments Based on ToF Cameras

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongshan; Zhu, Jiang; Wang, Yaonan; Jia, Wenyan; Sun, Mingui; Tang, Yandong

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by the human 3D visual perception system, we present an obstacle detection and classification method based on the use of Time-of-Flight (ToF) cameras for robotic navigation in unstructured environments. The ToF camera provides 3D sensing by capturing an image along with per-pixel 3D space information. Based on this valuable feature and human knowledge of navigation, the proposed method first removes irrelevant regions which do not affect robot's movement from the scene. In the second step, regions of interest are detected and clustered as possible obstacles using both 3D information and intensity image obtained by the ToF camera. Consequently, a multiple relevance vector machine (RVM) classifier is designed to classify obstacles into four possible classes based on the terrain traversability and geometrical features of the obstacles. Finally, experimental results in various unstructured environments are presented to verify the robustness and performance of the proposed approach. We have found that, compared with the existing obstacle recognition methods, the new approach is more accurate and efficient. PMID:24945679

  1. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy measurements of MCF7 cells adhesion in confined micro-environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vitis, Stefania; Coluccio, Maria Laura; Gentile, Francesco; Malara, Natalia; Perozziello, Gerardo; Dattola, Elisabetta; Candeloro, Patrizio; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    Undoubtedly cells can perceive the external environment, not only from a biochemical point of view with the related signalling pathways, but also from a physical and topographical perspective. In this sense controlled three dimensional micro-structures as well as patterns at the nano-scale can affect and guide the cell evolution and proliferation, due to the fact that the surrounding environment is no longer isotropic (like the flat surfaces of standard cell culturing) but possesses well defined symmetries and anisotropies. In this work regular arrays of silicon micro-pillars with hexagonal arrangement are used as culturing substrates for MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The characteristic size and spacing of the pillars are tens of microns, comparable with MCF-7 cell dimensions and then well suited to induce acceptable external stimuli. It is shown that these cells strongly modify their morphology for adapting themselves to the micro-structured landscape, by means of protrusions from the main body of the cell. Scanning electron microscopy along with both Raman micro-spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy are used for topographical and biochemical studies of the new cell arrangement. We have revealed that single MCF-7 cells exploit their capability to produce invadopodia, usually generated to invade the neighboring tissue in metastatic activity, for spanning and growing across separate pillars.

  2. An integrated platform enabling optogenetic illumination of Caenorhabditis elegans neurons and muscular force measurement in microstructured environments

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Zhichang; Tu, Long; Huang, Liang; Zhu, Taoyuanmin; Nock, Volker; Yu, Enchao; Liu, Xiao; Wang, Wenhui

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetics has been recently applied to manipulate the neural circuits of Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) to investigate its mechanosensation and locomotive behavior, which is a fundamental topic in model biology. In most neuron-related research, free C. elegans moves on an open area such as agar surface. However, this simple environment is different from the soil, in which C. elegans naturally dwells. To bridge up the gap, this paper presents integration of optogenetic illumination of C. elegans neural circuits and muscular force measurement in a structured microfluidic chip mimicking the C. elegans soil habitat. The microfluidic chip is essentially a ∼1 × 1 cm2 elastomeric polydimethylsiloxane micro-pillar array, configured in either form of lattice (LC) or honeycomb (HC) to mimic the environment in which the worm dwells. The integrated system has four key modules for illumination pattern generation, pattern projection, automatic tracking of the worm, and force measurement. Specifically, two optical pathways co-exist in an inverted microscope, including built-in bright-field illumination for worm tracking and pattern generation, and added-in optogenetic illumination for pattern projection onto the worm body segment. The behavior of a freely moving worm in the chip under optogenetic manipulation can be recorded for off-line force measurements. Using wild-type N2 C. elegans, we demonstrated optical illumination of C. elegans neurons by projecting light onto its head/tail segment at 14 Hz refresh frequency. We also measured the force and observed three representative locomotion patterns of forward movement, reversal, and omega turn for LC and HC configurations. Being capable of stimulating or inhibiting worm neurons and simultaneously measuring the thrust force, this enabling platform would offer new insights into the correlation between neurons and locomotive behaviors of the nematode under a complex environment. PMID:25759756

  3. Least Squares Estimation Without Priors or Supervision

    PubMed Central

    Raphan, Martin; Simoncelli, Eero P.

    2011-01-01

    Selection of an optimal estimator typically relies on either supervised training samples (pairs of measurements and their associated true values) or a prior probability model for the true values. Here, we consider the problem of obtaining a least squares estimator given a measurement process with known statistics (i.e., a likelihood function) and a set of unsupervised measurements, each arising from a corresponding true value drawn randomly from an unknown distribution. We develop a general expression for a nonparametric empirical Bayes least squares (NEBLS) estimator, which expresses the optimal least squares estimator in terms of the measurement density, with no explicit reference to the unknown (prior) density. We study the conditions under which such estimators exist and derive specific forms for a variety of different measurement processes. We further show that each of these NEBLS estimators may be used to express the mean squared estimation error as an expectation over the measurement density alone, thus generalizing Stein’s unbiased risk estimator (SURE), which provides such an expression for the additive gaussian noise case. This error expression may then be optimized over noisy measurement samples, in the absence of supervised training data, yielding a generalized SURE-optimized parametric least squares (SURE2PLS) estimator. In the special case of a linear parameterization (i.e., a sum of nonlinear kernel functions), the objective function is quadratic, and we derive an incremental form for learning this estimator from data. We also show that combining the NEBLS form with its corresponding generalized SURE expression produces a generalization of the score-matching procedure for parametric density estimation. Finally, we have implemented several examples of such estimators, and we show that their performance is comparable to their optimal Bayesian or supervised regression counterparts for moderate to large amounts of data. PMID:21105827

  4. Development of a Nationally Representative Built Environment Measure of Access to Exercise Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Roubal, Anne M.; Jovaag, Amanda; Park, Hyojun

    2015-01-01

    We sought to develop a county-level measure to evaluate residents’ access to exercise opportunities. Data were acquired from Esri, DeLorme World Vector (MapMart), and OneSource Global Business Browser (Avention). Using ArcGIS (Esri), we considered census blocks to have access to exercise opportunities if the census block fell within a buffer area around at least 1 park or recreational facility. The percentage of county residents with access to exercise opportunities was reported. Measure validity was examined through correlations with other County Health Rankings & Roadmaps’ measures. Included were 3,114 of 3,141 US counties. The average population with access to exercise opportunities was 52% (range, 0%–100%) with large regional variation. Access to exercise opportunities was most notably associated with no leisure-time physical activity (r = −0.47), premature death (r = −0.38), and obesity (r = −0.36). The measure uses multiple sources to create a valid county-level measure of exercise access. We highlight geographic disparities in access to exercise opportunities and call for improved data. PMID:25611798

  5. Aeroelastic measurements and simulations of a small wind turbine operating in the built environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, S. P.; Bradney, D. R.; Clausen, P. D.

    2016-09-01

    Small wind turbines, when compared to large commercial scale wind turbines, often lag behind with respect to research investment, technological development, and experimental verification of design standards. In this study we assess the simplified load equations outlined in IEC 61400.2-2013 for use in determining fatigue loading of small wind turbine blades. We compare these calculated loads to fatigue damage cycles from both measured in-service operation, and aeroelastic modelling of a small 5 kW Aerogenesis wind turbine. Damage cycle ranges and corresponding stress ratios show good agreement when comparing both aeroelastic simulations and operational measurements. Loads calculated from simplified load equations were shown to significantly overpredict load ranges while underpredicting the occurrence of damage cycles per minute of operation by 89%. Due to the difficulty in measuring and acquiring operational loading, we recommend the use of aeroelastic modelling as a method of mitigating the over-conservative simplified load equation for fatigue loading.

  6. Quantitative measurement of radiation pressure on a microcantilever in ambient environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Dakang; Garrett, Joseph L.; Munday, Jeremy N.

    2015-03-01

    Light reflected off a material or absorbed within it exerts radiation pressure through the transfer of momentum. Micro/nano-mechanical transducers have become sensitive enough that radiation pressure can influence these systems. However, photothermal effects often accompany and overwhelm the radiation pressure, complicating its measurement. In this letter, we investigate the radiation force on an uncoated silicon nitride microcantilever in ambient conditions. We identify and separate the radiation pressure and photothermal forces through an analysis of the cantilever's frequency response. Further, by working in a regime where radiation pressure is dominant, we are able to accurately measure the radiation pressure. Experimental results are compared to theory and found to agree within the measured and calculated uncertainties.

  7. Measuring lipid packing of model and cellular membranes with environment sensitive probes.

    PubMed

    Sezgin, Erdinc; Sadowski, Tomasz; Simons, Kai

    2014-07-15

    The extent of lipid packing is one of the key physicochemical features of biological membranes and is involved in many membrane processes. Polarity sensitive fluorescent probes are commonly used tools to measure membrane lipid packing in both artificial and biological membranes. In this paper, we have systematically compared eight different probes to measure membrane lipid ordering. We investigated how these probes behave in small unilamellar liposomes, phase-separated giant unilamellar vesicles, cell-derived giant plasma membrane vesicles, and live cells. We have tested the order sensitivity of a variety of measurable parameters, including generalized polarization, peak shift, or intensity shift. We also investigated internalization and photostability of the probes to assess probe potential for time-lapse live cell imaging. These results provide a catalogue of properties to facilitate the choice of probe according to need.

  8. Optical measurements and tests performed in a low-gravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, R. B.

    1980-01-01

    Shadowgraph and schlieren techniques have been used on board the NASA KC-135 low-gravity simulation aircraft to measure gravity-related fluid flow occurring in various experimental configurations. These configurations included cooled and solidified ammonium chloride and water, electrodeposited cobalt in CoSO4 solution, and immiscible and crystal melt solutions. Hardware tests have also been performed for such critical optical system components as lasers and spatial filters to determine their performance and operation under low-gravity conditions. These test results will be used in the design of the various future Shuttle experiments which will utilize advanced optical measurement techniques. The design and configuration of the optical systems used to make these measurements and tests are presented, and the performance and operation of these systems and their components under low-gravity conditions are discussed. Some preliminary results are included.

  9. A measurement of the radiation environment in the CDF tracking volume

    SciTech Connect

    R. J. Tesarek,S. D'Auria and A. Hocker

    2002-09-19

    We present direct measurements of the spatial distribution of both ionizing radiation and low energy neutrons (E{sub n} < 200 keV) inside the tracking volume of the collider detector at Fermilab (CDF). Two types of thermal luminescent dosimeters are used for these measurements. Data collected from exposures with different accelerator conditions allow us to separate the radiation fields into contributions from proton beam losses and from proton-antiproton collisions. Using a simple model of a power law in 1/r, where r is the distance from the beam axis we find the power depends on the distance from the interaction point along the beam axis with the range 1.5-2.0. Predictions based on this model show good qualitative agreement with initial measurements of the leakage currents in the low radius silicon detectors.

  10. CO2 emission estimation in the urban environment: Measurement of the CO2 storage term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjorkegren, A. B.; Grimmond, C. S. B.; Kotthaus, S.; Malamud, B. D.

    2015-12-01

    Eddy covariance has been used in urban areas to evaluate the net exchange of CO2 between the surface and the atmosphere. Typically, only the vertical flux is measured at a height 2-3 times that of the local roughness elements; however, under conditions of relatively low instability, CO2 may accumulate in the airspace below the measurement height. This can result in inaccurate emissions estimates if the accumulated CO2 drains away or is flushed upwards during thermal expansion of the boundary layer. Some studies apply a single height storage correction; however, this requires the assumption that the response of the CO2 concentration profile to forcing is constant with height. Here a full seasonal cycle (7th June 2012 to 3rd June 2013) of single height CO2 storage data calculated from concentrations measured at 10 Hz by open path gas analyser are compared to a data set calculated from a concurrent switched vertical profile measured (2 Hz, closed path gas analyser) at 10 heights within and above a street canyon in central London. The assumption required for the former storage determination is shown to be invalid. For approximately regular street canyons at least one other measurement is required. Continuous measurements at fewer locations are shown to be preferable to a spatially dense, switched profile, as temporal interpolation is ineffective. The majority of the spectral energy of the CO2 storage time series was found to be between 0.001 and 0.2 Hz (500 and 5 s respectively); however, sampling frequencies of 2 Hz and below still result in significantly lower CO2 storage values. An empirical method of correcting CO2 storage values from under-sampled time series is proposed.

  11. Measuring software development characteristics in the local environment. [considering project requirements for spacecraft control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basili, V. R.; Zelkowitz, M. V.

    1978-01-01

    In a brief evaluation of software-related considerations, it is found that suitable approaches for software development depend to a large degree on the characteristics of the particular project involved. An analysis is conducted of development problems in an environment in which ground support software is produced for spacecraft control. The amount of work involved is in the range from 6 to 10 man-years. Attention is given to a general project summary, a programmer/analyst survey, a component summary, a component status report, a resource summary, a change report, a computer program run analysis, aspects of data collection on a smaller scale, progress forecasting, problems of overhead, and error analysis.

  12. Operating in "Strange New Worlds" and Measuring Success - Test and Evaluation in Complex Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qualls, Garry; Cross, Charles; Mahlin, Matthew; Montague, Gilbert; Motter, Mark; Neilan, James; Rothhaar, Paul; Tran, Loc; Trujillo, Anna; Allen, B. Danette

    2015-01-01

    Software tools are being developed by the Autonomy Incubator at NASA's Langley Research Center that will provide an integrated and scalable capability to support research and non-research flight operations across several flight domains, including urban and mixed indoor-outdoor operations. These tools incorporate a full range of data products to support mission planning, approval, flight operations, and post-flight review. The system can support a number of different operational scenarios that can incorporate live and archived data streams for UAS operators, airspace regulators, and other important stakeholders. Example use cases are described that illustrate how the tools will benefit a variety of users in nominal and off-nominal operational scenarios. An overview is presented for the current state of the toolset, including a summary of current demonstrations that have been completed. Details of the final, fully operational capability are also presented, including the interfaces that will be supported to ensure compliance with existing and future airspace operations environments.

  13. The role of metrics and measurements in a software intensive total quality management environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Charles B.

    1992-01-01

    Paramax Space Systems began its mission as a member of the Rockwell Space Operations Company (RSOC) team which was the successful bidder on a massive operations consolidation contract for the Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) at JSC. The contract awarded to the team was the Space Transportation System Operations Contract (STSOC). Our initial challenge was to accept responsibility for a very large, highly complex and fragmented collection of software from eleven different contractors and transform it into a coherent, operational baseline. Concurrently, we had to integrate a diverse group of people from eleven different companies into a single, cohesive team. Paramax executives recognized the absolute necessity to develop a business culture based on the concept of employee involvement to execute and improve the complex process of our new environment. Our executives clearly understood that management needed to set the example and lead the way to quality improvement. The total quality management policy and the metrics used in this endeavor are presented.

  14. Configuration management and software measurement in the Ground Systems Development Environment (GSDE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Church, Victor E.; Long, D.; Hartenstein, Ray; Perez-Davila, Alfredo

    1992-01-01

    A set of functional requirements for software configuration management (CM) and metrics reporting for Space Station Freedom ground systems software are described. This report is one of a series from a study of the interfaces among the Ground Systems Development Environment (GSDE), the development systems for the Space Station Training Facility (SSTF) and the Space Station Control Center (SSCC), and the target systems for SSCC and SSTF. The focus is on the CM of the software following delivery to NASA and on the software metrics that relate to the quality and maintainability of the delivered software. The CM and metrics requirements address specific problems that occur in large-scale software development. Mechanisms to assist in the continuing improvement of mission operations software development are described.

  15. [Heat exchange between human body and environment (theoretical bases of physiological measurement and evaluation)].

    PubMed

    Pezzagno, G

    1999-01-01

    In the first part of this report the theory of the heat exchange between human body and external environment is developed. In particular, the problems concerning energy expenditure and heat production [metabolic heat] during physical activity, the heat exchange between internal organs and body surface, and its elimination are considered. Proposal of heat exchange equations (in case of conduction, convection, evaporation, radiation transport) are made, and the involved parameters and constants are indicated. Some pages are devoted to heat exchange through the lung and to "perspiratio insensibilis". In the second part the problems concerning the wellbeing and the thermal discomfort are discussed. A description of some widely employed indices of thermal stress, strain and comfort concludes the report [P4SR index, HSI index, ITS index, TTL index, HR index, WBGT index, TE indices]. In the end, the Fanger equations of thermal comfort are presented and discussed.

  16. Radionuclides in man and his environment measured by accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hellborg, Ragnar; Erlandsson, Bengt; Kiisk, Madis; Persson, Per; Skog, Goeran; Stenstroem, Kristina; Mattsson, Soeren; Leide-Svegborn, Sigrid; Olofsson, Mikael

    1999-06-10

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a highly sensitive analytical method for measuring very low concentrations of both radionuclides and stable nuclides. For radioanalytical purposes, the main advantages of AMS compared to conventional radiometric methods are the use of smaller samples (mg size) and shorter measuring times (less than one hour). In this report some current applications of the AMS technique at the Lund Pelletron accelerator are presented, in particular studies of {sup 14}C-labeled pharmaceuticals used in clinical nuclear medicine and biomedical research.

  17. Measurement scheme for the Lamb shift in a superconducting circuit with broadband environment

    SciTech Connect

    Gramich, V.; Ankerhold, J.; Solinas, P.; Moettoenen, M.; Pekola, J. P.

    2011-11-15

    Motivated by recent experiments on quantum mechanical charge pumping in a Cooper pair sluice, we present a measurement scheme for observing shifts of transition frequencies in two-level quantum systems induced by broadband environmental fluctuations. In contrast to quantum optical and related setups based on cavities, the impact of a thermal phase reservoir is considered. A thorough analysis of Lamb and Stark shifts within weak-coupling master equations is complemented by nonperturbative results for the model of an exactly solvable harmonic system. The experimental protocol to measure the Lamb shift in experimentally feasible superconducting circuits is analyzed in detail and supported by numerical simulations.

  18. Clean access, measurement, and sampling of Ellsworth Subglacial Lake: A method for exploring deep Antarctic subglacial lake environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegert, Martin J.; Clarke, Rachel J.; Mowlem, Matt; Ross, Neil; Hill, Christopher S.; Tait, Andrew; Hodgson, Dominic; Parnell, John; Tranter, Martyn; Pearce, David; Bentley, Michael J.; Cockell, Charles; Tsaloglou, Maria-Nefeli; Smith, Andy; Woodward, John; Brito, Mario P.; Waugh, Ed

    2012-01-01

    Antarctic subglacial lakes are thought to be extreme habitats for microbial life and may contain important records of ice sheet history and climate change within their lake floor sediments. To find whether or not this is true, and to answer the science questions that would follow, direct measurement and sampling of these environments are required. Ever since the water depth of Vostok Subglacial Lake was shown to be >500 m, attention has been given to how these unique, ancient, and pristine environments may be entered without contamination and adverse disturbance. Several organizations have offered guidelines on the desirable cleanliness and sterility requirements for direct sampling experiments, including the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research. Here we summarize the scientific protocols and methods being developed for the exploration of Ellsworth Subglacial Lake in West Antarctica, planned for 2012-2013, which we offer as a guide to future subglacial environment research missions. The proposed exploration involves accessing the lake using a hot-water drill and deploying a sampling probe and sediment corer to allow sample collection. We focus here on how this can be undertaken with minimal environmental impact while maximizing scientific return without compromising the environment for future experiments.

  19. Monte Carlo simulation of a NaI(Tl) detector for in situ radioactivity measurements in the marine environment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingying; Li, Changkai; Liu, Dongyan; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Yan

    2015-04-01

    To develop in situ NaI(Tl) detector for radioactivity measurement in the marine environment, the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) Transport Code was utilized to simulate the measurement of NaI(Tl) detector immersed in seawater, taking into account the material and geometry of the detector, and the interactions between the photons with the atoms of the seawater and the detector. The simulation results of the marine detection efficiency and distance were deduced and analyzed. In order to test their reliability, the field measurement was made at open sea and the experimental value of the marine detection efficiency was deduced and seems to be in good agreement with the simulated one. The minimum detectable activity for (137)Cs in the seawater of NaI(Tl) detector developed was determined mathematically at last. The simulation method and results in the paper can be used for the better design and quantitative calculation of in situ NaI(Tl) detector for radioactivity measurement in the marine environment, and also for some applications such as the installation on the marine monitoring platform and the quantitative analysis of radionuclides.

  20. Improving semantic scene understanding using prior information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laddha, Ankit; Hebert, Martial

    2016-05-01

    Perception for ground robot mobility requires automatic generation of descriptions of the robot's surroundings from sensor input (cameras, LADARs, etc.). Effective techniques for scene understanding have been developed, but they are generally purely bottom-up in that they rely entirely on classifying features from the input data based on learned models. In fact, perception systems for ground robots have a lot of information at their disposal from knowledge about the domain and the task. For example, a robot in urban environments might have access to approximate maps that can guide the scene interpretation process. In this paper, we explore practical ways to combine such prior information with state of the art scene understanding approaches.

  1. Measuring Transactional Distance in Web-Based Learning Environments: An Initial Instrument Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Xiaoxia; Chandra, Aruna; DePaolo, Concetta; Cribbs, Jennifer; Simmons, Lakisha

    2015-01-01

    This study was an initial attempt to operationalise Moore's transactional distance theory by developing and validating an instrument measuring the related constructs: dialogue, structure, learner autonomy and transactional distance. Data were collected from 227 online students and analysed through an exploratory factor analysis. Results suggest…

  2. Conceptualizing and Measuring the Optimal Experience of the eLearning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Robert; Wong, Don

    2007-01-01

    Online learning (eLearning) has become a global phenomenon as many organizations and educational institutions worldwide have entered the field in an attempt to enhance the students' experience of learning. While numerous studies have focused on the effectiveness and benefits of eLearning, few have focused on understanding and measuring the user…

  3. Design of measurement methodology for the evaluation of human exposure to vibration in residential environments.

    PubMed

    Sica, G; Peris, E; Woodcock, J S; Moorhouse, A T; Waddington, D C

    2014-06-01

    Exposure-response relationships are important tools for policy makers to assess the impact of an environmental stressor on the populace. Their validity lies partly in their statistical strength which is greatly influenced by the size of the sample from which the relationship is derived. As such, the derivation of meaningful exposure-response relationships requires estimates of vibration exposure at a large number of receiver locations. In the United Kingdom a socio-vibrational survey has been conducted with the aim of deriving exposure-response relationships for annoyance due to vibration from (a) railway traffic and (b) the construction of a new light rail system. Response to vibration was measured via a questionnaire conducted face-to-face with residents in their own homes and vibration exposure was estimated using data from a novel measurement methodology. In total, 1281 questionnaires were conducted: 931 for vibration from railway traffic and 350 for vibration from construction sources. Considering the interdisciplinary nature of this work along with the volume of experimental data required, a number of significant technical and logistical challenges needed to be overcome through the planning and implementation of the fieldwork. Four of these challenges are considered in this paper: the site identification for providing a robust sample of the residents affected, the strategies used for measuring both exposure and response and the coordination between the teams carrying out the social survey and the vibration measurements.

  4. Measurement and apportionment of radon source terms for modeling indoor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, N.H.

    1992-01-01

    During the present 2 1/2 year contract period, we have made significant Progress in modeling the source apportionment of indoor [sup 222]Rn and in [sup 222]Rn decay product dosimetry. Two additional areas were worked on which we believe are useful for the DOE Radon research Program. One involved an analysis of the research house data, grouping the hourly house [sup 222]Rn measurements into 2 day, 7 day and 90 day intervals to simulate the response of passive monitors. Another area requiring some attention resulted in a publication of 3 years of our indoor/outdoor measurements in a high-rise apartment. Little interest has been evinced in apartment measurements yet 20% of the US population lives in multiple-family dwellings, not in contact with the ground. These data together with a summary of all other published data on apartments showed that apartments have only about 50% greater [sup 222]Rn concentration than the measured outdoor [sup 222]Rn. Apartment dwellers generally represent a low risk group regarding [sup 222]Rn exposure. The following sections describe the main projects in some detail.

  5. A new anemometer for 2D atmospheric flow measurements in rough environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heisselmann, Hendrik; Hoelling, Michael; Peinke, Joachim

    2010-11-01

    One major downside of cup anemometry is the different response time for increasing and decreasing wind speeds, causing a systematic over-estimation of the mean wind speed under turbulent conditions. Especially under harsh environmental conditions like in offshore operation, the measuring principle leads to a wear of bearings causing a de-calibration over time and the requirement of regular maintenance. Therefore, we propose the newly developed sphere anemometer as a simple and robust alternative without any moving parts. The sphere anemometer consists of a flexible tube with a sphere mounted on top of it. The drag force acting on the sphere and its support causes a deflection, which is measured by means of a light pointer. Via calibration, this allows for simultaneous determination of wind speed and direction using only one sensor. In our contribution, we introduce the anemometer's setup and it's optimization towards offshore application. Additionally, experimental results obtained from wind tunnel measurements of turbulent flows are presented. Measurements under real wind conditions are compared to those of state-of-the-art wind speed sensors, such as cup and ultrasonic anemometers.

  6. Recent Advances in the Tempest UAS for In-Situ Measurements in Highly-Dynamic Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argrow, B. M.; Frew, E.; Houston, A. L.; Weiss, C.

    2014-12-01

    The spring 2010 deployment of the Tempest UAS during the VORTEX2 field campaign verified that a small UAS, supported by a customized mobile communications, command, and control (C3) architecture, could simultaneously satisfy Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airspace requirements, and make in-situ thermodynamic measurements in supercell thunderstorms. A multi-hole airdata probe was recently integrated into the Tempest UAS airframe and verification flights were made in spring 2013 to collect in-situ wind measurements behind gust fronts produced by supercell thunderstorms in northeast Colorado. Using instantaneous aircraft attitude estimates from the autopilot, the in-situ measurements were converted to inertial wind estimates, and estimates of uncertainty in the wind measurements was examined. To date, the limited deployments of the Tempest UAS have primarily focused on addressing the engineering and regulatory requirements to conduct supercell research, and the Tempest UAS team of engineers and meteorologists is preparing for deployments with the focus on collecting targeted data for meteorological exploration and hypothesis testing. We describe the recent expansion of the operations area and altitude ceiling of the Tempest UAS, engineering issues for accurate inertial wind estimates, new concepts of operation that include the simultaneous deployment of multiple aircraft with mobile ground stations, and a brief description of our current effort to develop a capability for the Tempest UAS to perform autonomous path planning to maximize energy harvesting from the local wind field for increased endurance.

  7. High resolution pollutant measurements in complex urban environments using mobile monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measuring air pollution in real-time using an instrumented vehicle platform has been an emerging strategy to resolve air pollution trends at a very fine spatial scale (10s of meters). Achieving second-by-second data representative of urban air quality trends requires advanced in...

  8. High- and low-pressure pneumotachometers measure respiration rates accurately in adverse environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fagot, R. J.; Mc Donald, R. T.; Roman, J. A.

    1968-01-01

    Respiration-rate transducers in the form of pneumotachometers measure respiration rates of pilots operating high performance research aircraft. In each low pressure or high pressure oxygen system a sensor is placed in series with the pilots oxygen supply line to detect gas flow accompanying respiration.

  9. DARE: Distance and Angle Retrieval Environment: A Tale of the Two Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jin; Korfhage, Robert R.

    1999-01-01

    Presents a visualization tool for information retrieval that can display two different similarity measures, angle and distance, in the same space. Discusses the visual display of information-retrieval evaluation models and develops a new retrieval means based on the visual retrieval tool, the controlling bar. (Author/LRW)

  10. Measuring Sustainability: Deriving Metrics From A Secure Human-Environment Relationship

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of individuals and institutions to take actions that would achieve sustainability is often lost in rhetoric about what it is or isn't and how to measure progress. Typically, sustainability is viewed as an objective and in this capacity efforts are made to identify i...

  11. Measuring leaf chlorophyll concentration from its color: A way in monitoring environment change to plantations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibghatallah, Muhammad Abdul Hakim; Khotimah, Siti Nurul; Suhandono, Sony; Viridi, Sparisoma; Kesuma, Teja

    2013-09-01

    Leaf colors of a plant can be used to identify stress level due to its adaptation to environmental change. For most leaves green-related colors are sourced from chlorophyll a and b. Chlorophyll concentration is normally measured using a spectrophotometer in laboratory. In some remote observation places, it is impossible to collect the leaves, preserve them, and bring them to laboratory to measure their chlorophyll content. Based on this need, measurement of chlorophyll content is observed through its color. Using CIE chromaticity diagram leaf_color information in RGB is transformed into wavelength (in nm). Paddy seed with variety name IR-64 is used in observation during its vegetation stage t (age of 0-10 days). Light exposure time τ is chosen as environmental change, which normally should be about 12 hours/day, is varied (0-12 hours/day). Each day sample from different exposure time is taken, its color is recorded using HP Deskjet 1050 scanner with 1200 dpi, and its chlorophyll content is obtained from absorption spectrum measured using Campspec M501 Single Beam UV/Vis Spectrophotometer after it is rinsed in 85 % acetone solution and the information from the spectrum is calculated using Arnon method. It has been observed that average wavelength of leaf color λavg is decreased from 570.55 nm to 566.01 nm as is measured for t = 1 - 10 days with τ = 9 hours/day, but chlorophyll concentration C is increased from 0.015 g/l to 3.250 g/l and from 0.000 g/l to 0.774 g/l for chlorophyll a and b, respectively. Other value of τ gives similar results. Based on these results an empirical relation between concentration of chlorophyll a Cc-a and its wavelength λavg can be formulated.

  12. Built environment attributes related to GPS measured active trips in mid-life and older adults with mobility disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Gell, Nancy M.; Rosenberg, Dori E.; Carlson, Jordan; Kerr, Jacqueline; Belza, Basia

    2015-01-01

    Background Understanding factors which may promote walking in mid-life and older adults with mobility impairments is key given the association between physical activity and positive health outcomes. Objective To examine the relationship between active trips and objective measures of the home neighborhood built environment. Methods Global positioning systems (GPS) data collected on 28 adults age 50+ with mobility disabilities were analyzed for active trips from home. Objective and geographic information systems (GIS) derived measures included Walk Score, population density, street connectivity, crime rates, and slope within the home neighborhood. For this cross-sectional observational study, we conducted mean comparisons between participants who took active trips from home and those who did not for the objective measures. Effect sizes were calculated to assess the magnitude of group differences. Results Nine participants (32%) took active trips from home. Walking in the home neighborhood was significantly associated with GIS derived measures (Walk Score, population density, and street density; effect sizes .9-1.2). Participants who used the home neighborhood for active trips had less slope within 1 km of home but the difference was not significant (73.5 meters±22 vs. 100.8 meters ±38.1, p=.06, d=0.8). There were no statistically significant differences in mean scores for crime rates between those with active trips from home and those without. Conclusions The findings provide preliminary evidence that more walkable environments promote active mobility among mid-life and older adults with mobility disabilities. The data suggest that this population can and does use active transportation modes when the built environment is supportive. PMID:25637503

  13. Performance Evaluation of MIMO-UWB Systems Using Measured Propagation Data and Proposal of Timing Control Scheme in LOS Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takanashi, Masaki; Nishimura, Toshihiko; Ogawa, Yasutaka; Ohgane, Takeo

    Ultrawide-band impulse radio (UWB-IR) technology and multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems have attracted interest regarding their use in next-generation high-speed radio communication. We have studied the use of MIMO ultrawide-band (MIMO-UWB) systems to enable higher-speed radio communication. We used frequency-domain equalization based on the minimum mean square error criterion (MMSE-FDE) to reduce intersymbol interference (ISI) and co-channel interference (CCI) in MIMO-UWB systems. Because UWB systems are expected to be used for short-range wireless communication, MIMO-UWB systems will usually operate in line-of-sight (LOS) environments and direct waves will be received at the receiver side. Direct waves have high power and cause high correlations between antennas in such environments. Thus, it is thought that direct waves will adversely affect the performance of spatial filtering and equalization techniques used to enhance signal detection. To examine the feasibility of MIMO-UWB systems, we conducted MIMO-UWB system propagation measurements in LOS environments. From the measurements, we found that the arrival time of direct waves from different transmitting antennas depends on the MIMO configuration. Because we can obtain high power from the direct waves, direct wave reception is critical for maximizing transmission performance. In this paper, we present our measurement results, and propose a way to improve performance using a method of transmit (Tx) and receive (Rx) timing control. We evaluate the bit error rate (BER) performance for this form of timing control using measured channel data.

  14. Adaptation and Validation of the HOME-SF as a Caregiver-Report Home Environment Measure for Use in the Taiwan Birth Cohort Study (TBCS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Jennifer Chun-Li; Chiang, Tung-liang; Bradley, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a brief caregiver-report instrument for measuring the home environment of children aged three and under, as part of the Taiwan Birth Cohort Study (TBCS). Instrument development was conducted by translating and adapting the Home Observation for the Measurement of Environment Inventory-Short Form (HOME-SF) which comprises…

  15. Digital Earth Watch And Picture Post Network: Measuring The Environment Through Digital Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schloss, A. L.; Beaudry, J.; Carrera, F.; Pickle, J.

    2010-12-01

    Digital Earth Watch (DEW) involves individuals, schools, organizations and communities in a systematic monitoring project of their local environment, especially vegetation health. The program offers people the means to join the Picture Post network and to study and analyze their own findings using DEW software. A Picture Post is an easy-to-use and inexpensive platform for repeatedly taking digital photographs as a standardized set of images of the entire 360 ° landscape, which then can be shared over the Internet on the Picture Post website. This simple concept has the potential to create a wealth of information and data on changing environmental conditions, which is important for a society grappling with the effects of environmental change. Picture Post participants study change over time in their local area, compare digital images with NASA satellite imagery and contribute towards improving their own communities. A key message in DEW is that although plants are dynamic and respond continuously to their environment, they do so either on a time-scale that most people don't notice or with a subtlety our senses can't detect. DEW has created simple tools for monitoring vegetation as a means towards understanding the connection between global climate change and local effects. Picture Posts may be added by anyone interested in monitoring a particular location. The value of a Picture Post is in the commitment of participants to take repeated photographs - monthly, weekly, or even daily - to build up a long-term record over many years. DEW is being developed by a collaborative effort led by the University of New Hampshire with the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners, the University of Southern Maine, and Worcester Polytechnic Institute. This poster will show examples of picture posts and data that can be collected and will describe our soon-to-be-released “ virtual ” picture post cell phone app. The Picture Post network is new and we invite individuals

  16. Comparison of light scattering devices and impactors for particulate measurements in indoor, outdoor, and personal environments.

    PubMed

    Liu, L J Sally; Slaughter, James C; Larson, Timothy V

    2002-07-01

    Short-term monitoring of individual particulate matter (PM) exposures on subjects and inside residences in health effect studies have been sparse due to the lack of adequate monitoring devices. The recent development of small and portable light scattering devices, including the Radiance nephelometer (neph) and the personal DataRAM (pDR) has made this monitoring possible. This paper evaluates the performance of both the passive pDR and neph (without any size fractionation inlet) against measurements from both Harvard impactors (HI2.5) and Harvard personal environmental monitors (HPEM2.5) for PM2.5 in indoor, outdoor, and personal settings. These measurements were taken at the residences and on the person of nonsmoking elderly subjects across the metropolitan Seattle area and represent a wide range of light scattering measurements directly related to exposures and health effects. At low PM levels, nephs provided finer resolution and more precise measurements (precision = 3-8% and uncertainty = 2.8 x 10(-7) m(-1) or <1 microg/m3) than the pDRs. The unbiased precision of pDRs above 10 microg/m3 is around 5% (with an unbiased uncertainty of 4.4 microg/m3). The 24-h average responses of the pDR and neph, as compared to 24-h integrated gravimetric measurements, are not affected by indoor sources of PM. When regressed against 24-h gravimetric measurements, nephs showed higher coefficients of determination (R2 = 0.81-0.93) than pDRs (R2 = 0.77-0.84). The default mass calibration on the pDRs generally overestimated indoor HI2.5 measurements by 56%. When carried by subjects, the pDR overestimated the HPEM2.5 measurements by approximately 27%. Collocated real-time indoor nephs and pDRs at diverse residential sites had varied coefficients of determination across homes (R2 = 0.75-0.96), and the difference between pDR and neph responses increased during cooking hours. This difference was larger during baking or frying episodes than during other cooking or cleaning activities

  17. Measurement comparisons of radioactivity among European monitoring laboratories for the environment and food stuff.

    PubMed

    Wätjen, U; Spasova, Y; Altzitzoglou, T

    2008-01-01

    For more than 15 years, European Union (EU) laboratories monitoring environmental radioactivity have been obliged to participate in measurement comparisons organised by the European Commission. After a short review of comparisons conducted during the 1990s, the approach of IRMM organising these comparisons since 2003 is presented. It relies on the provision of comparison samples with reference values traceable to the International Reference System for radionuclides (SIR). The results of the most recent comparison, the determination of (40)K, (90)Sr and (137)Cs in milk powder, are presented. The influence of repetitive participation in measurement comparisons on laboratory performance is studied on the basis of data from more than 20 laboratories having participated in several exercises during the last 15 years.

  18. Field Measurements and Guidelines for the Application of Wireless Sensor Networks to the Environment and Security

    PubMed Central

    Gil Jiménez, Víctor P.; Armada, Ana García

    2009-01-01

    Frequently, Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) are designed focusing on applications and omitting transmission problems in these wireless networks. In this paper, we present a measurement campaign that has been carried out using one of the most commonly used WSN platforms, the micaZ from Crossbow©. Based on these measurements, some guidelines to deploy a robust and reliable WSN are provided. The results are focused on security and environmental applications but can also be extrapolated to other scenarios. A main conclusion that can be extracted is that, from the transmission point of view, a dense WSN is one of the best choices to overcome many of the transmission problems such as the existence of a transitional region, redundance, forwarding, obstructions or interference with other systems. PMID:22303175

  19. Field measurements and guidelines for the application of wireless sensor networks to the environment and security.

    PubMed

    Gil Jiménez, Víctor P; Armada, Ana García

    2009-01-01

    Frequently, Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) are designed focusing on applications and omitting transmission problems in these wireless networks. In this paper, we present a measurement campaign that has been carried out using one of the most commonly used WSN platforms, the micaZ from Crossbow(©). Based on these measurements, some guidelines to deploy a robust and reliable WSN are provided. The results are focused on security and environmental applications but can also be extrapolated to other scenarios. A main conclusion that can be extracted is that, from the transmission point of view, a dense WSN is one of the best choices to overcome many of the transmission problems such as the existence of a transitional region, redundance, forwarding, obstructions or interference with other systems.

  20. Measurement of Near Earth Radiation Environment in Japan—Overview and Plan—

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goka, Tateo; Matsumoto, Haruhisa

    2009-06-01

    The current status of measuring radiation using JAXA satellites is reviewed. Starting with Engineering Test Satellite-V (ETS-V; KIKU-5 in Japanese) in 1987, efforts to conduct radiation measurements in space have continued using almost all Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA formerly NASDA) satellites (ETS-VI, ADEOS, ADEOS-II, MDS-1, DRTS (ongoing), and ALOS (ongoing)), in geostationary orbit (GEO), geostationary -transfer orbit (GTO), and low-Earth orbit (LEO). Electrons, protons, alpha particles, and heavy ions have been the main objects of study. Future plans for radiation monitoring in JAXA, including GOSAT, Jason-2 (in ollaboration with CNES), SmartSat (in collaboration with NICT), and ISS/JEM/Exposure Facility/SEDA-AP, are presented.

  1. Transient technique for measuring heat transfer coefficients on stator airfoils in a jet engine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladden, H. J.; Proctor, M. P.

    A transient technique was used to measure heat transfer coefficients on stator airfoils in a high-temperature annular cascade at real engine conditions. The transient response of thin film thermocouples on the airfoil surface to step changes in the gas stream temperature was used to determine these coefficients. In addition, gardon gages and paired thermocouples were also utilized to measure heat flux on the airfoil pressure surface at steady state conditions. The tests were conducted at exit gas stream Reynolds numbers of one-half to 1.9 million based on true chord. The results from the transient technique show good comparison with the steady-state results in both trend and magnitude. In addition, comparison is made with the STAN5 boundary layer code and shows good comparison with the trends. However, the magnitude of the experimental data is consistently higher than the analysis.

  2. Transient technique for measuring heat transfer coefficients on stator airfoils in a jet engine environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladden, H. J.; Proctor, M. P.

    1985-01-01

    A transient technique was used to measure heat transfer coefficients on stator airfoils in a high-temperature annular cascade at real engine conditions. The transient response of thin film thermocouples on the airfoil surface to step changes in the gas stream temperature was used to determine these coefficients. In addition, gardon gages and paired thermocouples were also utilized to measure heat flux on the airfoil pressure surface at steady state conditions. The tests were conducted at exit gas stream Reynolds numbers of one-half to 1.9 million based on true chord. The results from the transient technique show good comparison with the steady-state results in both trend and magnitude. In addition, comparison is made with the STAN5 boundary layer code and shows good comparison with the trends. However, the magnitude of the experimental data is consistently higher than the analysis.

  3. Snow in the desert - measuring and modeling precipitation in an extreme environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlosser, Elisabeth; Stenni, Barbara; Valt, Mauro; Caganti, Anselmo; Powers, Jordan G.; Manning, Kevin W.; Duda, Michael G.

    2013-04-01

    Measuring precipitation in Antarctica remains a challenge that has been accepted only in a few cases. In coastal areas, precipitation events are usually accompanied by high wind speeds, which makes it very difficult to distinguish between blowing/drifting snow and falling precipitation. In the interior of the continent, wind speeds are lower, but the extreme small amounts of precipitation considerably complicate the measurements. A further uncertainty is the amount of precipitation due to the local cycle of sublimation and deposition. However, at the French-Italian wintering base Dome C, daily precipitation measurements have been carried out since 2006, representing the only multi-year precipitation series of continental Antarctica. Even though error possibilities are large, it is possible to clearly distinguish between diamond dust and synoptic precipitation, the latter yielding amounts approximately one order of magnitude higher than the first. The measured data are compared to AMPS (Antarctic Mesoscale Prediction System) archive data. AMPS employs the Polar WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting Model), a mesoscale model especially adapted for polar regions. The model generally overestimates precipitation amounts, partly due to a warm bias in air temperature. However, in most cases it clearly represents precipitation events that are also marked by an increase in air temperature and wind speed, sometimes also by a decrease in surface pressure. Using observed precipitation and model fields, the synoptic situations of the precipitation events are investigated. A better understanding of precipitation processes in Antarctica is necessary for both mass balance studies and a correct paleoclimatic interpretation of ice core data.

  4. Measurements of rain splash on bench terraces in a humid tropical steepland environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dijk, A. I. J. M.; Bruijnzeel, L. A.; Wiegman, S. E.

    2003-02-01

    Soil loss continues to threaten Java's predominantly bench-terraced volcanic uplands. Sediment transport processes on back-sloping terraces with well-aggregated clay-rich oxisols in West Java were studied using two different techniques. Splash on bare, cropped, or mulched sub-horizontal (2-3°) terrace beds was studied using splash cups of different sizes, whereas transport of sediment on the predominantly bare and steep (30-40/deg ) terrace risers was measured using a novel device combining a Gerlach-type trough with a splash box to enable the separate measurement of transport by wash and splash processes. Measurements were made during two consecutive rainy seasons. The results were interpreted using a recently developed splash distribution theory and related to effective rainfall erosive energy. Splash transportability (i.e. transport per unit contour length and unit erosive energy) on the terrace risers was more than an order of magnitude greater than on bare terrace beds (0·39-0·57 versus 0·013-0·016 g m J-1). This was caused primarily by a greater average splash distance on the short, steep risers (>11 cm versus c. 1 cm on the beds). Splashed amounts were reduced by the gradual formation of a protective pavement of coarser aggregates, in particular on the terrace beds. Soil aggregate size exhibited an inverse relationship with detachability (i.e. detachment per unit area and unit erosive energy) and average splash length, and therefore also with transportability, as did the degree of canopy and mulch cover. On the terrace risers, splash-creep and gravitational processes transported an additional 6-50% of measured rain splash, whereas transport by wash played a marginal role.

  5. Selected Team Performance Measures in a C3 Environment. An Annotated Bibliography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-01

    Communication media describes the different means of communication that a team employs. 9. Communication significance reflects the extent to which certain...effectiveness: A review and proposed integration. In L. Berkowitz (Ed.). Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, 2, New York: Academic Press, pp. 45...available). He also described various measures that have been developed to examine crews: an Operating Procedures test; an academic cross-knowledge test

  6. Direct measurement of local dissolved oxygen concentration spatial profiles in a cell culture environment.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Yuki; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Tsuneda, Satoshi

    2015-06-01

    Controlling local dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) in media is critical for cell or tissue cultures. Various biomaterials and culture methods have been developed to modulate DO. Direct measurement of local DO in cultures has not been validated as a method to test DO modulation. In the present study we developed a DO measurement system equipped with a Clark-type oxygen microelectrode manipulated with 1 μm precision in three-dimensional space to explore potential applications for tissue engineering. By determining the microelectrode tip position precisely against the bottom plane of culture dishes with rat or human cardiac cells in static monolayer culture, we successfully obtained spatial distributions of DO in the medium. Theoretical quantitative predictions fit the obtained data well. Based on analyses of the variance between samples, we found the data reflected "local" oxygen consumption in the vicinity of the microelectrode and the detection of temporal changes in oxygen consumption rates of cultured cells was limited by the diffusion rate of oxygen in the medium. This oxygen measuring system monitors local oxygen consumption and production with high spatial resolution, and can potentially be used with recently developed oxygen modulating biomaterials to design microenvironments and non-invasively monitor local DO dynamics during culture.

  7. Application of geotechnical and geophysical field measurements in an active alpine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, D. R.; Fankhauser, K.; Springman, S. M.

    2015-09-01

    Rainfall can trigger landslides, rockfalls and debris flow events. When rainfall infiltrates into the soil, the suction (if there is any) is reduced, until positive water pressure can be developed, decreasing the effective stresses and leading to a potential failure. A challenging site for the study of mass movement is the Meretschibach catchment, a location in the Swiss Alps in the vicinity of Agarn, Canton of Valais. To study the effect of rainfall on slope stabilities, the soil characterization provides valuable insight on soil properties, necessary to establish a realistic ground model. This model, together with an effective long term-field monitoring, deliver the essential information and boundary conditions for predicting and validating rainfall- induced slope instabilities using numerical and physical modelling. Geotechnical monitoring, including soil temperature and volumetric water content measurements, has been performed on the study site together with geophysical measurements (ERT) to study the effect of rainfall on the (potential) triggering of landslides on a scree slope composed of a surficial layer of gravelly soil. These techniques were combined to provide information on the soil characteristics and depth to the bedrock. Seasonal changes of precipitation and temperature were reflected in corresponding trends in all measurements. A comparison of volumetric water content records was obtained from decagons, time domain reflectometry (TDR) and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) conducted throughout the spring and summer months of 2014, yielding a reasonable agreement.

  8. Organic compounds in office environments - sensory irritation, odor, measurements and the role of reactive chemistry.

    PubMed

    Wolkoff, P; Wilkins, C K; Clausen, P A; Nielsen, G D

    2006-02-01

    Abstract Sensory irritation and odor effects of organic compounds in indoor environments are reviewed. It is proposed to subdivide volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into four categories: (i) chemically non-reactive, (ii) chemically 'reactive', (iii) biologically reactive (i.e. form chemical bonds to receptor sites in mucous membranes) and (iv) toxic compounds. Chemically non-reactive VOCs are considered non-irritants at typical indoor air levels. However, compounds with low odor thresholds contribute to the overall perception of the indoor air quality. Reported sensory irritation may be the result of odor annoyance. It appears that odor thresholds for many VOCs probably are considerably lower than previously reported. This explains why many building materials persistently are perceived as odorous, although the concentrations of the detected organic compounds are close to or below their reported odor thresholds. Ozone reacts with certain alkenes to form a gas and aerosol phase of oxidation products, some of which are sensory irritants. However, all of the sensory irritating species have not yet been identified and whether the secondary aerosols (ultrafine and fine particles) contribute to sensory irritation requires investigation. Low relative humidity may exacerbate the sensory irritation impact. Practical Implications Certain odors, in addition to odor annoyance, may result in psychological effects and distraction from work. Some building materials continually cause perceivable odors, because the odor thresholds of the emitted compounds are low. Some oxidation products of alkenes (e.g. terpenes) may contribute to eye and airway symptoms under certain conditions and low relative humidity.

  9. Experimental measurement of a shipboard fire environment with simulated radioactive materials packages

    SciTech Connect

    Koski, J.A.; Wix, S.D.; Beene, D.E. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    Results from a series of eight test fires ranging in size from 2.2 to 18.8 MW conducted aboard the Coast Guard fire test ship Mayo Lykes at Mobile, Alabama are presented and discussed. Tests aboard the break-bulk type cargo ship consisted of heptane spray fires simulating engine room and galley fires, wood crib fires simulating cargo hold fires, and pool fires staged for comparison to land-based regulatory fire results. Primary instrumentation for the tests consisted of two pipe calorimeters that simulated a typical package shape for radioactive materials packages. The calorimeters were both located adjacent to the fires and on the opposite side of the cargo hold bulkhead nearest the fire. The calorimeters were constructed from 1.5 m length sections of nominal 2 foot diameter schedule 60 steel pipe. Type K thermocouples were attached at 12 locations on the circumference and ends of the calorimeter. Fire heat fluxes to the calorimeter surfaces were estimated with the use of the Sandia SODDIT inverse heat conduction code. Experimental results from all types of tests are discussed, and some comparisons are made between the environments found on the ship and those found in land-based pool fire tests.

  10. Digital Earth Watch And Picture Post Network: Measuring The Environment Through Digital Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schloss, A. L.; Beaudry, J.; Pickle, J.; Carerra, F.

    2011-12-01

    Digital Earth Watch (DEW) involves individuals, schools, organizations and communities in a systematic monitoring project of their local environment, especially vegetation health. The program offers people the means to join the Picture Post network and to study and analyze their own findings using DEW software. A Picture Post is an easy-to-use and inexpensive platform for repeatedly taking digital photographs as a standardized set of images of the entire 360° landscape, which then can be shared over the Internet on the Picture Post website. This simple concept has the potential to create a wealth of information and data on changing environmental conditions, which is important for a society grappling with the effects of environmental change. Picture Posts may be added by anyone interested in monitoring a particular location. The value of a Picture Post is in the commitment of participants to take repeated photographs - monthly, weekly, or even daily - to build up a long-term record over many years. This poster will show examples of Picture Post pictures being used for capturing seasonal plant phenological events, monitoring the recovery of a landscape following a large storm, and intrusion of an invasive species. DEW is being developed by a collaborative effort led by the University of New Hampshire with the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners, the University of Southern Maine, and Worcester Polytechnic Institute, with support from NASA. We invite individuals, schools, informal education centers, groups and communities to join. Please visit us at our web site:

  11. Timepix-based radiation environment monitor measurements aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffle, Nicholas; Pinsky, Lawrence; Kroupa, Martin; Hoang, Son; Idarraga, John; Amberboy, Clif; Rios, Ryan; Hauss, Jessica; Keller, John; Bahadori, Amir; Semones, Edward; Turecek, Daniel; Jakubek, Jan; Vykydal, Zdenek; Pospisil, Stanislav

    2015-05-01

    A number of small, single element radiation detectors, employing the CERN-based Medipix2 Collaboration's Timepix Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) coupled to a specially modified version of the USB-Lite interface for that ASIC provided by the Institute for Experimental and Applied Physics (IEAP) at the Czech Technical University in Prague, have been developed at the University of Houston and NASA Johnson Space Center. These detectors, officially designated by NASA as Radiation Environment Monitors (REMs), were deployed aboard the International Space Station in late 2012. Six REM units are currently operating on Station Support Computers (SSCs) and returning data on a daily basis. The associated data acquisition software on the SSCs provides both automated data collection and transfer, as well as algorithms to handle adjustment of acquisition rates and recovery and restart of the acquisition software. A suite of ground software analysis tools has been developed to allow rapid analysis of the data and provides a ROOT-based framework for extending data analysis capabilities.

  12. Visual Earth observation performance in the space environment. Human performance measurement 4: Flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huth, John F.; Whiteley, James D.; Hawker, John E.

    1993-01-01

    A wide variety of secondary payloads have flown on the Space Transportation System (STS) since its first flight in the 1980's. These experiments have typically addressed specific issues unique to the zero-gravity environment. Additionally, the experiments use the experience and skills of the mission and payload specialist crew members to facilitate data collection and ensure successful completion. This paper presents the results of the Terra Scout experiment, which flew aboard STS-44 in November 1991. This unique Earth Observation experiment specifically required a career imagery analyst to operate the Spaceborne Direct-View Optical System (SpaDVOS), a folded optical path telescope system designed to mount inside the shuttle on the overhead aft flight deck windows. Binoculars and a small telescope were used as backup optics. Using his imagery background, coupled with extensive target and equipment training, the payload specialist was tasked with documenting the following: (1) the utility of the equipment; (2) his ability to acquire and track ground targets; (3) the level of detail he could discern; (4) the atmospheric conditions; and (5) other in-situ elements which contributed to or detracted from his ability to analyze targets. Special emphasis was placed on the utility of a manned platform for research and development of future spaceborne sensors. The results and lessons learned from Terra Scout will be addressed including human performance and equipment design issues.

  13. Heated Surface Temperatures Measured by Infrared Detector in a Cascade Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    Investigators have used infrared devices to accurately measure heated surface temperatures. Several of these applications have been for turbine heat transfer studies involving film cooling and surface roughness, typically, these measurements use an infrared camera positioned externally to the test section. In cascade studies, where several blades are used to ensure periodic flow, adjacent blades block the externally positioned camera's views of the test blade. To obtain a more complete mapping of the surface temperatures, researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center fabricated a probe with an infrared detector to sense the blade temperatures. The probe size was kept small to minimize the flow disturbance. By traversing and rotating the probe, using the same approach as for total pressure surveys, one can find the blade surface temperatures. Probe mounted infrared detectors are appropriate for measuring surface temperatures where an externally positioned infrared camera is unable to completely view the test object. This probe consists of a 8-mm gallium arsenide (GaAs) lens mounted in front of a mercury-cadmium-zinc-tellurium (HgCdZnTe) detector. This type of photovoltaic detector was chosen because of its high sensitivity to temperature when the detector is uncooled. The particular application is for relatively low surface temperatures, typically ambient to 100 C. This requires a detector sensitive at long wavelengths. The detector is a commercial product enclosed in a 9-mm-diameter package. The GaAs lens material was chosen because of its glass-like hardness and its good long-wavelength transmission characteristics. When assembled, the 6.4-mm probe stem is held in the traversing actuator. Since the entire probe is above the measurement plane, the flow field disturbance in the measurement plane is minimized. This particular probe body is somewhat wider than necessary, because it was designed to have replaceable detectors and lenses. The signal for the detector is

  14. Logarithmic Laplacian Prior Based Bayesian Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuanghui; Liu, Yongxiang; Li, Xiang; Bi, Guoan

    2016-04-28

    This paper presents a novel Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging (ISAR) algorithm based on a new sparse prior, known as the logarithmic Laplacian prior. The newly proposed logarithmic Laplacian prior has a narrower main lobe with higher tail values than the Laplacian prior, which helps to achieve performance improvement on sparse representation. The logarithmic Laplacian prior is used for ISAR imaging within the Bayesian framework to achieve better focused radar image. In the proposed method of ISAR imaging, the phase errors are jointly estimated based on the minimum entropy criterion to accomplish autofocusing. The maximum a posterior (MAP) estimation and the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) are utilized to estimate the model parameters to avoid manually tuning process. Additionally, the fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and Hadamard product are used to minimize the required computational efficiency. Experimental results based on both simulated and measured data validate that the proposed algorithm outperforms the traditional sparse ISAR imaging algorithms in terms of resolution improvement and noise suppression.

  15. Measurement result of the neutron monitor onboard Space Environment Data Acquisition Equipment - Attached Payload (SEDA-AP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, K.; Matsumoto, H.; Okudaira, O.; Obara, T.; Yamamoto, T.; Muraki, Y.

    2011-12-01

    To support future space activities, it is very important to acquire the space environmental data which causes the degradation of space parts and spacecraft anomalies. Such data are useful for spacecraft design and manned space activity. Space Environment Data Acquisition - Attached Payload (SEDA-AP) measures the space environment around the International Space Station (ISS) by being attached to the Exposed Facility(EF) of the Japanese Experimental Module ("Kibo"). The Neutron Monitor (NEM) is one of the detectors in SEDA-AP. This instrument was developed to measure the solar neutrons which are produced by solar flare event. The solar neutron is a good indicator to clarify the acceleration mechanism of charged particles at the solar flare. Because of the energy of solar neutron is not influenced by the interplanetary magnetic field, it has the information of the energy of the accelerated charged particle directly. We have been analyzing the neutron data at several M or X class solar flare from September 2009. The mission objectives, instrumentation and measurement status of the neutron monitor are reported.

  16. Cooling Effectiveness Measurements for Air Film Cooling of Thermal Barrier Coated Surfaces in a Burner Rig Environment Using Phosphor Thermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Shyam, Vikram; Wroblewski, Adam C.; Zhu, Dongming; Cuy, Michael D.; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2016-01-01

    While the effects of thermal barrier coating (TBC) thermal protection and air film cooling effectiveness are usually studied separately, their contributions to combined cooling effectiveness are interdependent and are not simply additive. Therefore, combined cooling effectiveness must be measured to achieve an optimum balance between TBC thermal protection and air film cooling. In this investigation, surface temperature mapping was performed using recently developed Cr-doped GdAlO3 phosphor thermometry. Measurements were performed in the NASA GRC Mach 0.3 burner rig on a TBC-coated plate using a scaled up cooling hole geometry where both the mainstream hot gas temperature and the blowing ratio were varied. Procedures for surface temperature and cooling effectiveness mapping of the air film-cooled TBC-coated surface are described. Applications are also shown for an engine component in both the burner rig test environment as well as an engine afterburner environment. The effects of thermal background radiation and flame chemiluminescence on the measurements are investigated, and advantages of this method over infrared thermography as well as the limitations of this method for studying air film cooling are discussed.

  17. Simultaneous Measurements of Neutron Environment at Mars from Orbit (Mars Odyssey HEND) and from the Surface (MSL DAN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez Sierra, L. M.; Jun, I.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B.; Mitrofanov, I. G.

    2015-12-01

    Currently, the high energy neutron detector (HEND) onboard Mars Odyssey and the dynamic albedo of neutrons (DAN) instrument onboard the Mars Science Laboratory rover are simultaneously measuring the neutron environment from orbit and from the surface, respectively. Naturally-occurring neutrons at Mars are produced from the interactions of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar energetic particles (SEP) with the Martian atmosphere and surface material. The neutron data from these simultaneous orbital and surface measurements are a good indicator for the state of general ambient radiation environments at Mars and can be also used as a means to infer how the ambient radiation is transported through the Martian atmosphere. Both HEND and DAN are healthy, and they provide the unique data sources valuable to study these phenomena for the period since the MSL landing in August 2012. Understanding of why there is correlation or no correlation between the two measurements will provide a key clue to understand the processes of GCR/SEP propagation through the Mars atmosphere and the interaction with the Mars surface materials. More detailed comparison between the two data sets and analysis of HEND/DAN data will be presented in the final presentation. Also, the long-term trend of the HEND/DAN data will be also compared with a general space weather condition. We used only publicly available HEND/DAN data in this study, e.g., open literature and/or planetary data system (PDS).

  18. PM2.5 soluble brown-carbon measured in contrasting urban and rural environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, R.; Zhang, X.

    2011-12-01

    An instrument was developed to continuously measure the light absorption spectra and carbon mass of soluble PM2.5 components by coupling a particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS), UV-VIS (200-800nm) spectrophotometer with long-path absorption cell and total organic carbon (TOC) analyzer. The analytical system has also been used to measure brown carbon in aqueous extracts from integrated filters. Measurements have been conducted at a number of locations, including urban sites in Los Angeles, Atlanta and smaller urban and rural locations in the southeastern US. At all locations a characteristic brown carbon absorption spectra was observed, where soluble chromophores produce an increasing absorption with decreasing wavelength, starting from mid-visible and extending into the near UV. Incomplete combustion from biomass and fossil fuel burning and secondary processes have been identified as sources of soluble brown carbon. During summer when biomass burning impacts were minimal, mass absorption efficiencies calculated relative to ambient particle water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) were highest in Los Angeles and correlated with the daily production of secondary organic aerosol. Nitro-aromatics were identified as a component of the brown carbon. In contrast, the Atlanta secondary aerosol was significantly less light-absorbing, and unlike Los Angeles the diurnal trend in brown carbon largely tracked primary sources. Absorption Angstrom exponents varied between 3 and 7 with fresh Los Angeles secondary organic aerosol associated with smaller exponents, indicting greater absorption into the visible spectrum. The southeastern US regional/rural brown carbon was the least absorbing per WSOC mass in the UV and with largest Angstrom exponents (7) the least absorbing at higher wavelengths. A correlation between the regional brown carbon and fine particle oxalate suggested an aqueous phase heterogeneous source for these chromophores. Compared to pure black carbon, brown carbon was

  19. Aerosol forcing efficiency in the UVA region from spectral solar irradiance measurements at an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazadzis, S.; Kouremeti, N.; Bais, A.; Kazantzidis, A.; Meleti, C.

    2009-06-01

    Spectral Ultraviolet (UV) measurements using a Brewer MKIII double spectroradiometer were used for the determination of the aerosol forcing efficiency (RFE) under cloud free conditions at Thessaloniki, Greece for the period 1998-2006. Using measured spectral UVA irradiance in combination with synchronous aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements at 340 nm, we calculated the seasonal and the percent RFE changes with the help of radiative transfer model calculations used for cloud and aerosol free conditions reference. The calculated RFE for the 325-340 nm wavelength integral was found to be -0.71±0.30 W m-2/τs340 nm and corresponds to a mean calculated RFE% value of -15.2%±3.8% (2 σ) per unit of τs340 nm, for the whole period. This indicates a mean reduction of 15.2% of the 325-340 nm irradiance for a unit of aerosol optical depth slant column increase. Lower RFE% was found during summertime, which is a possible indication of lower absorbing aerosols. Mean AOD slant at 340 nm for the city of Thessaloniki were processed in combination with RFE% and a mean monthly UVA attenuation of ~10% for the whole period was revealed. The nine years' analysis results showed a reduction in RFE%, which provides a possible indication of the changes in the optical properties over the city area. If such changes are only due to changes in the aerosol absorbing properties, the above finding suggests a 2% per decade increase in UVA due to changes in the aerosol absorption properties, in addition to the calculated increase by 4.2%, which is attributed only to AOD decrease at Thessaloniki area over the 1998-2006 period.

  20. 40 CFR 95.3 - Findings prior to application to Attorney General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Findings prior to application to Attorney General. 95.3 Section 95.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY PATENT LICENSES § 95.3 Findings prior to application to...

  1. 40 CFR 95.3 - Findings prior to application to Attorney General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Findings prior to application to Attorney General. 95.3 Section 95.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY PATENT LICENSES § 95.3 Findings prior to application to...

  2. 40 CFR 95.3 - Findings prior to application to Attorney General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Findings prior to application to Attorney General. 95.3 Section 95.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY PATENT LICENSES § 95.3 Findings prior to application to...

  3. Microclimatic effects of planted hydroponic structures in urban environment: measurements and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsoulas, N.; Antoniadis, D.; Tsirogiannis, I. L.; Labraki, E.; Bartzanas, T.; Kittas, C.

    2016-11-01

    The objectives of this effort was to study the effect of vertical (green wall) and horizontal (pergola) green structures on the microclimate conditions of the building surroundings and estimate the thermal perception and heat stress conditions near the two structures. The experimental data were used to validate the results simulated by the recent version (V4.0 preview III) of ENVI-met software which was used to simulate the effect of different design parameters of a pergola and a green façade on microclimate and heat stress conditions. Further aim is to use these results for better design of green structures. The microclimate measurements were carried out in real scale structures (hydroponic pergola and hydroponic green wall) at the Kostakii Campus of the Technological Education Institute of Epirus (Arta, Greece). The validation results showed a very good agreement between measured and simulated values of air temperature, with Tair,sim = 0.98 Tair,meas in the Empty atrium and Tair,sim = 0.99 Tair,meas in the Atrium with pergola, with a determination coefficient R 2 of 0.98 and 0.93, respectively. The model was used to predict the effects of green structures on air temperature (Tair), relative humidity (RH), and mean radiant temperature (Tmrt). The output values of these parameters were used as input data in the RayMan pro (V 2.1) model for estimating the physiologically equivalent temperature (PET) of different case scenarios. The average daytime value of simulated air temperature in the atrium for the case without and with pergola during three different days was 29.2 and 28.9 °C while the corresponding measured values were 29.7 and 29.2 °C. The results showed that compared to the case with no pergola in the atrium, covering 100% the atrium area with a planted pergola reduced at the hottest part of the day Tmrt and PET values by 29.4 and 17.9 °C, respectively. Although the values of air temperature (measured and simulated) were not greatly affected by the

  4. Prior Computer-Related Experiences and Hypermedia Metacognition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, W. Michael; Giessler, Steven F.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between prior computer experiences and the linear or nonlinear steps students choose when working with hypermedia environments and time spent on task (based on a study of graduate students). Experience with content-area software, word processing, databases, spreadsheets, programming, hypermedia, and authoring are…

  5. PASP Plus: An experiment to measure space-environment effects on photovoltaic power subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guidice, Donald A.

    1992-01-01

    The Photovoltaic Array Space Power Plus Diagnostic experiment (PASP Plus) was accepted as part of the APEX Mission payload aboard a Pegastar satellite to be orbited by a Pegasus launch vehicle in late 1992. The mission's elliptical orbit will allow us to investigate both space plasma and space radiation effects. PASP Plus will have eleven types of solar arrays and a full complement of environmental and interactions diagnostic sensors. Measurements of space-plasma interactions on the various solar arrays will be made at large negative voltages (to investigate arcing parameters) and at large positive voltages (to investigate leakage currents) by biasing the arrays to various levels up to -500 and +500 volts. The long-term deterioration in solar array performance caused by exposure to space radiation will also be investigated; radiation dosage will be measured by an electron/proton dosimeter included in the environmental sensor complement. Experimental results from PASP Plus will help establish cause-and-effect relationships and lead to improved design guidelines and test standards for new-technology solar arrays.

  6. An Undergraduate Field Experiment for Measuring Exposure to Environmental Tobacco Smoke in Indoor Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsella, Adam M.; Huang, Jiping; Ellis, David A.; Mabury, Scott A.

    1999-12-01

    An undergraduate field experiment is described for the measurement of nicotine and various carbonyl compounds arising from environmental tobacco smoke. Students are introduced to practical techniques in HPLC-UV and GC-NPD. Also introduced are current methods in personal air sampling using small and portable field sampling pumps. Carbonyls (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, and acetone) are sampled with silica solid-phase extraction cartridges impregnated with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine, eluted, and analyzed by HPLC-UV (360-380 nm). Nicotine is sampled using XAD-2 cartridges, extracted, and analyzed by GC-NPD. Students gain an appreciation for the problems associated with measuring ubiquitous pollutants such as formaldehyde, as well as the issue of chromatographic peak resolution when trying to resolve closely eluting peaks. By allowing the students to formulate their own hypothesis and sampling scheme, critical thinking and problem solving are developed in addition to analysis skills. As an experiment in analytical environmental chemistry, this laboratory introduces the application of field sampling and analysis techniques to the undergraduate lab.

  7. Towards an automatic early stress recognition system for office environments based on multimodal measurements: A review.

    PubMed

    Alberdi, Ane; Aztiria, Asier; Basarab, Adrian

    2016-02-01

    Stress is a major problem of our society, as it is the cause of many health problems and huge economic losses in companies. Continuous high mental workloads and non-stop technological development, which leads to constant change and need for adaptation, makes the problem increasingly serious for office workers. To prevent stress from becoming chronic and provoking irreversible damages, it is necessary to detect it in its early stages. Unfortunately, an automatic, continuous and unobtrusive early stress detection method does not exist yet. The multimodal nature of stress and the research conducted in this area suggest that the developed method will depend on several modalities. Thus, this work reviews and brings together the recent works carried out in the automatic stress detection looking over the measurements executed along the three main modalities, namely, psychological, physiological and behavioural modalities, along with contextual measurements, in order to give hints about the most appropriate techniques to be used and thereby, to facilitate the development of such a holistic system.

  8. Eddy covariance measurements and parameterisation of traffic related particle emissions in an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mårtensson, E. M.; Nilsson, E. D.; Buzorius, G.; Johansson, C.

    2006-03-01

    Urban aerosol sources are important due to the health effects of particles and their potential impact on climate. Our aim has been to quantify and parameterise the urban aerosol source number flux F (particles m-2 s-1), in order to help improve how this source is represented in air quality and climate models. We applied an aerosol eddy covariance flux system 118.0 m above the city of Stockholm. This allowed us to measure the aerosol number flux for particles with diameters >11 nm. Upward source fluxes dominated completely over deposition fluxes in the collected dataset. Therefore, the measured fluxes were regarded as a good approximation of the aerosol surface sources. Upward fluxes were parameterised using a traffic activity (TA) database, which is based on traffic intensity measurements.

    The footprint (area on the surface from which sources and sinks affect flux measurements, located at one point in space) of the eddy system covered road and building construction areas, forests and residential areas, as well as roads with high traffic density and smaller streets. We found pronounced diurnal cycles in the particle flux data, which were well correlated with the diurnal cycles in traffic activities, strongly supporting the conclusion that the major part of the aerosol fluxes was due to traffic emissions.

    The emission factor for the fleet mix in the measurement area EFfm=1.4±0.1×1014 veh-1 km-1 was deduced. This agrees fairly well with other studies, although this study has an advantage of representing the actual effective emission from a mixed vehicle fleet. Emission from other sources, not traffic related, account for a F0=15±18×106 m-2 s-1. The urban aerosol source flux can then be written as F=EFfmTA+F0. In a second attempt to find a parameterisation, the friction velocity U* normalised with the average friction velocity overline{U_ast} -> overline{U_ast} has been included, F=EF fm TA

  9. Size and environment dependence of surface phonon modes of gallium arsenide nanowires as measured by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Spirkoska, D; Abstreiter, G; Fontcuberta I Morral, A

    2008-10-29

    Gallium arsenide nanowires were synthesized by gallium-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. By varying the growth time, nanowires with diameters ranging from 30 to 160 nm were obtained. Raman spectra of the nanowire ensembles were measured. The small linewidth of the optical phonon modes agree with an excellent crystalline quality. A surface phonon mode was also revealed, as a shoulder at lower frequencies of the longitudinal optical mode. In agreement with the theory, the surface mode shifts to lower wavenumbers when the diameter of the nanowires is decreased or the environment dielectric constant increased.

  10. Optical techniques for sensing and measurement in hostile environments; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, May 21, 22, 1987

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, Calvin H.; Greenwell, Roger A.

    1987-01-01

    Papers are presented on referencing in fiber optic sensing systems, optical fiber chemical sensing networks, and the radiation response of new pure silica fibers. Also considered are a comparison of gamma, neutron, and proton irradiations of multimode fibers, a pinhole camera for hot environment viewing of electron beam materials processing, and the utilization of optical image data from the advanced test accelerator. Other topics include the application of an interferometer spectrometer aboard the Space Shuttle with a payload specialist in the control loop, hydrogen chloride measurements in launch-vehicle exhaust clouds, and a rocket-borne telescoped Fourier transform spectrometer operating at 10 K.

  11. Number size distribution measurements of biological aerosols under contrasting environments and seasons from southern tropical India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valsan, Aswathy; Cv, Biju; Krishna, Ravi; Huffman, Alex; Poschl, Ulrich; Gunthe, Sachin

    2016-04-01

    Biological aerosols constitute a wide range of dead and alive biological materials and structures that are suspended in the atmosphere. They play an important role in the atmospheric physical, chemical and biological processes and health of living being by spread of diseases among humans, plants, and, animals. The atmospheric abundance, sources, physical properties of PBAPs as compared to non-biological aerosols, however, is poorly characterized. Though omnipresent, their concentration and composition exhibit large spatial and temporal variations depending up on their sources, land-use, and local meteorology. The Indian tropical region, which constitutes approximately 18% of the world's total population exhibits vast geographical extend and experiences a distinctive meteorological phenomenon by means of Indian Summer Monsoon (IMS). Thus, the sources, properties and characteristics of biological aerosols are also expected to have significant variations over the Indian subcontinent depending upon the location and seasons. Here we present the number concentration and size distribution of Fluorescent Biological Aerosol Particles (FBAP) from two contrasting locations in Southern tropical India measured during contrasting seasons using Ultra Violet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UV-APS). Measurements were carried out at a pristine high altitude continental site, Munnar (10.09 N, 77.06 E; 1605 m asl) during two contrasting seasons, South-West Monsoon (June-August, 2014) and winter (Jan - Feb, 2015) and in Chennai, a coastal urban area, during July - November 2015. FBAP concentrations at both the locations showed large variability with higher concentrations occurring at Chennai. Apart from regional variations, the FBAP concentrations also exhibited variations over two different seasons under the same environmental condition. In Munnar the FBAP concentration increased by a factor of four from South-West Monsoon to winter season. The average size distribution of FBAP at both

  12. Insulator-protected mechanically controlled break junctions for measuring single-molecule conductance in aqueous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthusubramanian, N.; Galan, E.; Maity, C.; Eelkema, R.; Grozema, F. C.; van der Zant, H. S. J.

    2016-07-01

    We present a method to fabricate insulated gold mechanically controlled break junctions (MCBJ) by coating the metal with a thin layer of aluminum oxide using plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition. The Al2O3 thickness deposited on the MCBJ devices was varied from 2 to 15 nm to test the suppression of leakage currents in deionized water and phosphate buffered saline. Junctions coated with a 15 nm thick oxide layer yielded atomically sharp electrodes and negligible conductance counts in the range of 1 to 10-4 G0 (1 G0 = 77 μS), where single-molecule conductances are commonly observed. The insulated devices were used to measure the conductance of an amphiphilic oligophenylene ethynylene derivative in deionized water.

  13. Sequential quantum secret sharing in a noisy environment aided with weak measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Maharshi; Chatterjee, Sourav; Chakrabarty, Indranil

    2016-05-01

    In this work we give a (n,n)-threshold protocol for sequential secret sharing of quantum information for the first time. By sequential secret sharing we refer to a situation where the dealer is not having all the secrets at the same time, at the beginning of the protocol; however if the dealer wishes to share secrets at subsequent phases she/he can realize it with the help of our protocol. First of all we present our protocol for three parties and later we generalize it for the situation where we have more (n> 3) parties. Interestingly, we show that our protocol of sequential secret sharing requires less amount of quantum as well as classical resource as compared to the situation wherein existing protocols are repeatedly used. Further in a much more realistic situation, we consider the sharing of qubits through two kinds of noisy channels, namely the phase damping channel (PDC) and the amplitude damping channel (ADC). When we carry out the sequential secret sharing in the presence of noise we observe that the fidelity of secret sharing at the kth iteration is independent of the effect of noise at the (k - 1)th iteration. In case of ADC we have seen that the average fidelity of secret sharing drops down to ½ which is equivalent to a random guess of the quantum secret. Interestingly, we find that by applying weak measurements one can enhance the average fidelity. This increase of the average fidelity can be achieved with certain trade off with the success probability of the weak measurements.

  14. Complex role of secondary electron emissions in dust grain charging in space environments: measurements on Apollo 11 & 17 dust grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Mian; Tankosic, Dragana; Spann, James; Leclair, Andre C.

    Dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged electrostatically by photoelectric emissions with radiation from nearby sources, by electron/ion collisions, and sec-ondary electron emissions. Knowledge of the dust grain charges and equilibrium potentials is important for understanding of a variety of physical and dynamical processes in the interstel-lar medium (ISM), and heliospheric, interplanetary, planetary, and lunar environments. The high vacuum environment on the lunar surface leads to some unusual physical and dynam-ical phenomena involving dust grains with high adhesive characteristics, and levitation and transportation over long distances. It has been well recognized that the charging properties of individual micron/submicron size dust grains are expected to be substantially different from the corresponding values for bulk materials and theoretical models. In this paper we present experimental results on charging of individual dust grains selected from Apollo 11 and Apollo 17 dust samples by exposing them to mono-energetic electron beams in the 10-400 eV energy range. The charging rates of positively and negatively charged particles of 0.2 to 13 µm diam-eters are discussed in terms of the secondary electron emission (SEE) process, which is found to be a complex charging process at electron energies as low as 10-25 eV, with strong parti-cle size dependence. The measurements indicate substantial differences between dust charging properties of individual small size dust grains and of bulk materials.

  15. Design of a 0-50 mbar pressure measurement channel compatible with the LHC tunnel radiation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas, Juan; Jelen, Dorota; Trikoupis, Nikolaos

    2017-02-01

    The monitoring of cryogenic facilities often require the measurement of pressure in the sub 5’000 Pa range that are used for flow metering applications, for saturated superfluid helium, etc. The pressure measurement is based on the minute displacement of a sensing diaphragm often through contactless techniques by using capacitive or inductive methods. The LHC radiation environment forbid the use of standard commercial sensors because of the embedded electronics that are affected both by radiation induced drift and transient Single Event Effects (SEE). Passive pressure sensors from two manufacturers were investigated and a CERN designed radiation-tolerant electronics has been developed for measuring variable-reluctance sensors. During the last maintenance stop of the LHC accelerator, four absolute pressure sensors were installed in some of the low pressure bayonet heat exchangers and four differential pressure sensors on the venturi flowmeters that monitor the cooling flow of the 20.5 kA current leads of the ATLAS end-cap superconducting toroids. The pressure sensors operating range is about 1000 to 5000 Pa and the targeted uncertainty is +/- 50 Pa which would permit to measure the equivalent saturation temperature at 1.8 K within better than 0.01 K. This paper describes the radiation hard measuring head that is based on an inductive bridge, its associated radiation-tolerant electronics that is installed under the LHC superconducting magnets or the ATLAS detector cavern; and the first operational experience.

  16. Improving measurement of forest light environments with hemispherical photography: the use of non-RGB color spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prohaska, N.; Wu, J.; Stark, S. C.; Albert, L.; Smith, M.; Taylor, T.; Wiedemann, K.; da Silva, R.; Saleska, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    Light environments are fundamental determinants of leaf growth and function within forest canopies, and improved methods to quickly and easily measure light micro-environments can contribute to our ability to understand how light drives ecosystem processes. Upward facing hemispherical photographs are a common tool for quantifying the light environment of forest canopies, by classifying the photo (image segmentation) into ';sky' and ';not-sky' regions. However, accurate image segmentation of hemispherical photos into ';sky' and ';not sky' is difficult except under uniform diffuse light, which occurs only rarely (e.g. at dawn, dusk, or with uniform cloud conditions). This constraint on image acquisition greatly reduces the ability to obtain data in the field. Here, we develop and assess a new approach to using hemispherical image data acquired under non-ideal conditions in a broadleaf evergreen tropical forest in the Amazon of Brazil. Unlike one common approach that uses blue channel data only, we use information from all three channels by mathematically transforming images into other 3-channel color spaces. We compared results of image segmentation into sky and not-sky canopy regions across 14 non-RGB color spaces as well as the original RGB color space, as derived from 15 digital photos acquired at various positions within the forest canopy. Images were selected for variation in presence and absence of bright sun, overexposed leaves, specular highlights, blue-sky, and not-blue sky. We applied two widely used techniques (interactive thresholding and 2-dimensional maximum entropy) to classify the single-channel image from each color space into sky and not-sky regions for all photos. We assessed classification accuracy with confusion matrices that compared the automatic classifications to a user-defined ';true' classification. We found that the 14 non-RGB color spaces included four independent channels that were consistently superior to RGB channels in their

  17. Hepatic falciform ligament Tc-99m-macroaggregated albumin activity on SPECT/CT prior to Yttrium-90 microsphere radioembolization: prophylactic measures to prevent non-target microsphere localization via patent hepatic falciform arteries.

    PubMed

    Kao, Yung Hsiang; Tan, Andrew E H; Khoo, Li Ser; Lo, Richard H G; Chow, Pierce K H; Goh, Anthony S W

    2011-06-01

    Yttrium-90 (Y-90) selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) is increasingly used to treat inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma. We describe two patients where hepatic falciform ligament Technetium-99m-macroaggregated albumin (Tc-99m-MAA) activity was identified on single photon emission computed tomography with integrated low-dose CT (SPECT/CT) scan during pre-therapy planning, and the steps taken to prevent radiation dermatitis. The first patient underwent prophylactic coil embolization of the patent hepatic falciform artery; the second patient underwent super-selective infusion of Y-90 resin microspheres to avoid the patent hepatic falciform artery. The incidence of falciform ligament Tc-99m-MAA activity detected on SPECT/CT at our institution is 10%. Tc-99m-MAA SPECT/CT scan provides valuable diagnostic information for treatment planning prior to Y-90 SIRT.

  18. A Radio-Polarisation and Rotation Measure Study of the Gum Nebula and Its Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purcell, C. R.; Gaensler, B. M.; Sun, X. H.; Carretti, E.; Bernardi, G.; Haverkorn, M.; Kesteven, M. J.; Poppi, S.; Schnitzeler, D. H. F. M.; Staveley-Smith, L.

    2015-05-01

    The Gum Nebula is 36°-wide shell-like emission nebula at a distance of only ˜450 pc. It has been hypothesized to be an old supernova remnant, fossil H ii region, wind-blown bubble, or combination of multiple objects. Here we investigate the magneto-ionic properties of the nebula using data from recent surveys: radio-continuum data from the NRAO VLA and S-band Parkes All Sky Surveys, and H α data from the Southern H-Alpha Sky Survey Atlas. We model the upper part of the nebula as a spherical shell of ionized gas expanding into the ambient medium. We perform a maximum-likelihood Markov chain Monte Carlo fit to the NVSS rotation measure data, using the H α data to constrain average electron density in the shell ne. Assuming a latitudinal background gradient in rotation measure, we find {{n}e}=1.3-0.4+0.4 c{{m}-3}, angular radius {{φ }outer}=22\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 7-0.1+0.1, shell thickness dr=18.5-1.4+1.5 pc, ambient magnetic field strength {{B}0}=3.9-2.2+4.9 μ G, and warm gas filling factor f=0.3-0.1+0.3. We constrain the local, small-scale (˜260 pc) pitch-angle of the ordered Galactic magnetic field to +7{}^\\circ ≲ \\wp ≲ +44{}^\\circ , which represents a significant deviation from the median field orientation on kiloparsec scales (˜-7.°2). The moderate compression factor X=6.0-2.5+5.1 at the edge of the H α shell implies that the “old supernova remnant” origin is unlikely. Our results support a model of the nebula as a H ii region around a wind-blown bubble. Analysis of depolarization in 2.3 GHz S-PASS data is consistent with this hypothesis and our best-fitting values agree well with previous studies of interstellar bubbles.

  19. Spatial and Temporal Variation of Bulk Snow Properties in North Boreal and Tundra Environments Based on Extensive Field Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannula, H. R.; Lemmetyinen, J.; Pulliainen, J.; Kontu, A.; Derksen, C.

    2015-12-01

    A large collection of in situ snow data was collected in a support of ESA SnowSAR airborne acquisitions in Northern Finland (Lemmetyinen et al., 2014). The purpose was to demonstrate the mission concept of the proposed ESA CoReH2O (Cold Regions Hydrology High-resolution Observatory, Rott et al., 2010) mission, a candidate in the ESA Earth Explorer series of Earth observing satellites. Around 21400 snow depth measurements, 600 SWE measurements and a number of distributed snow pit measurements were collected during 19 days between December 2011 and March 2012. In this study, these field measurements will be used to analyse the snow property variation within and between different land-cover types in North boreal and tundra environments. The wide heterogeneity of snow properties forms a challenge for remote snow information retrieval as even in flat areas the amount and type of heterogeneity vary in a number of different scales. Especially, information of hemispheric scale SWE variation is suffering from large uncertainties, although, assimilation of ground-based and space-borne information and algorithms specific for a land-cover type have lowered these remaining uncertainties (Takala et al., 2011). This study aims to contribute to this future work for more reliable SWE retrievals by statistically describing the snow parameter variation in these northern environments. Lemmetyinen, J., J. Pulliainen, A. Kontu, A. Wiesmann, C. Mätzler, H. Rott, K. Voglmeier, T. Nagler, A. Meta, A. Coccia, M. Schneebeli, M. Proksch, M. Davidson, D. Schüttemeyer, Chung-Chi Lin, and M. Kern, 2014. Observations of seasonal snow cover at X- and Ku bands during the NoSREx campaign. Proc. EUSAR 2014, 3-5 June 2014, Berlin. Rott, H., S.H. Yueh, D.W. Cline, C. Duguay, R. Essery et al., 2010. Cold Regions Hydrology High-resolution Observatory for Snow and Cold Land Processes. Proc. IEEE, 98(5), 752-765. Takala, M., K. Luojus, J. Pulliainen, C. Derksen, J. Lemmetyinen, J-P. Kärnä, J. Koskinen

  20. Aging Cognition Unconfounded by Prior Test Experience

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Investigate time-related age differences in cognitive functioning without influences of prior test experience. Methods. Cognitive scores were compared in different individuals from the same birth years who were tested in different years, when they were at different ages. These types of quasi-longitudinal comparisons were carried out on data from three large projects: the Seattle Longitudinal Study [Schaie, K. W. (2013). Developmental influences on adult intelligence: The Seattle Longitudinal Study (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press], the Betula Project [Ronnlund, M., & Nilsson, L-G. (2008). The magnitude, generality, and determinants of Flynn effects on forms of declarative memory and visuospatial ability: Time-sequential analyses of data from a Swedish cohort study. Intelligence, 36, 192–209], and the Virginia Cognitive Aging Project (this study). Results. In each data set, the results revealed that the estimates of cognitive change with no prior test experience closely resembled the estimates of age relations based on cross-sectional comparisons. Furthermore, longitudinal comparisons revealed positive changes at young ages that gradually became more negative with increased age, whereas all of the estimates of change without prior test experience were negative except those for measures of vocabulary. Discussion. The current results suggest that retest effects can distort the mean age trends in longitudinal comparisons that are not adjusted for experience. Furthermore, the findings can be considered robust because the patterns were similar across three data sets involving different samples of participants and cognitive tests, and across different methods of controlling experience effects in the new data set. PMID:25182845

  1. Potential for Measurement of Trace Volatile Organic Compounds in Closed Environments Using Gas Chromatograph/Differential Mobility Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limero, Thomas; Cheng, Patti

    2007-01-01

    For nearly 3.5 years, the Volatile Organic Analyzer (VOA) has routinely analyzed the International Space Station (ISS) atmosphere for a target list of approximately 20 volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Additionally, an early prototype of the VOA collected data aboard submarines in two separate trials. Comparison of the data collected on ISS and submarines showed a surprising similarity in the atmospheres of the two environments. Furthermore, in both cases it was demonstrated that the VOA data can detect hardware issues unrelated to crew health. Finally, it was also clear in both operations that the VOA s size and resource consumption were major disadvantages that would restrict its use in the future. The VOA showed the value of measuring VOCs in closed environments, but it had to be shrunk if it was to be considered for future operations in these environments that are characterized by cramped spaces and limited resources. The Sionex Microanalyzer is a fraction of the VOA s size and this instrument seems capable of maintaining or improving upon the analytical performance of the VOA. The two design improvements that led to a smaller, less complex instrument are the Microanalyzer s use of recirculated air as the gas chromatograph s carrier gas and a micromachined detector. Although the VOA s ion mobility spectrometer and the Microanalyzer s differential mobility spectrometer (DMS) are related detector technologies, the DMS was more amenable to micromachining. This paper will present data from the initial assessment of the Microanalyzer. The instrument was challenged with mixtures that simulated the VOCs typically detected in closed-environment atmospheres.

  2. Measurement of gas/water uptake coefficients for trace gases active in the marine environment

    SciTech Connect

    Davidovits, P. . Dept. of Chemistry); Worsnop, D.W.; Zahniser, M.S.; Kolb, C.E. . Center for Chemical and Environmental Physics)

    1992-02-01

    Ocean produced reduced sulfur compounds including dimethylsulfide (DMS), hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}), methyl mercaptan (CH{sub 3}CH) and carbonyl sulfide (OCS) deliver a sulfur burden to the atmosphere which is roughly equal to sulfur oxides produced by fossil fuel combustion. These species and their oxidation products dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethyl sulfone (DMSO{sub 2}) and methane sulfonic acid (MSA) dominate aerosol and CCN production in clean marine air. Furthermore, oxidation of reduced sulfur species will be strongly influenced by NO{sub x}/O{sub 3} chemistry in marine atmospheres. The multiphase chemical processes for these species must be understood in order to study the evolving role of combustion produced sulfur oxides over the oceans. We have measured the chemical and physical parameters affecting the uptake of reduced sulfur compounds, their oxidation products, ozone, and nitrogen oxides by the ocean's surface, and marine clouds, fogs, and aerosols. These parameters include: gas/surface mass accommodation coefficients; physical and chemically modified (effective) Henry's law constants; and surface and liquid phase reaction constants. These parameters are critical to understanding both the interaction of gaseous trace species with cloud and fog droplets and the deposition of trace gaseous species to dew covered, fresh water and marine surfaces.

  3. Impact of automation: Measurement of performance, workload and behaviour in a complex control environment.

    PubMed

    Balfe, Nora; Sharples, Sarah; Wilson, John R

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes an experiment that was undertaken to compare three levels of automation in rail signalling; a high level in which an automated agent set routes for trains using timetable information, a medium level in which trains were routed along pre-defined paths, and a low level where the operator (signaller) was responsible for the movement of all trains. These levels are described in terms of a Rail Automation Model based on previous automation theory (Parasuraman et al., 2000). Performance, subjective workload, and signaller activity were measured for each level of automation running under both normal operating conditions and abnormal, or disrupted, conditions. The results indicate that perceived workload, during both normal and disrupted phases of the experiment, decreased as the level of automation increased and performance was most consistent (i.e. showed the least variation between participants) with the highest level of automation. The results give a strong case in favour of automation, particularly in terms of demonstrating the potential for automation to reduce workload, but also suggest much benefit can achieved from a mid-level of automation potentially at a lower cost and complexity.

  4. Precision long-term measurements of beta-decay-rate ratios in a controlled environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeson, S. D.; Peatross, J.; Ware, M. J.

    2017-04-01

    We report on measurements of relative beta-decay rates of Na-22, Cl-36, Co-60, Sr-90, Cs-137 monitored for more than one year. The radioactive samples are mounted in an automated sample changer that sequentially positions the five samples in turn, with high spatial precision, in front of each of four Geiger-Müller tubes. The sample wheel, detectors, and associated electronics are housed inside a sealed chamber held at constant absolute pressure, humidity, and temperature to isolate the experiment from environmental variations. The statistical uncertainty in the count rate approaches a few times 0.01% with two weeks of averaging. Other sources of error are on a similar scale. The data are analyzed in variety of ways, comparing count rates of the various samples on one or more detectors, and comparing count rates of a particular sample across multiple detectors. We observe no statistically significant variations in the ratios of decay rates, either annual or at higher-frequency, at a level above 0.01%.

  5. Measurement of air exchange rates in different indoor environments using continuous CO2 sensors.

    PubMed

    You, Yan; Niu, Can; Zhou, Jian; Liu, Yating; Bai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Jiefeng; He, Fei; Zhang, Nan

    2012-01-01

    A new air exchange rate (AER) monitoring method using continuous CO2 sensors was developed and validated through both laboratory experiments and field studies. Controlled laboratory simulation tests were conducted in a 1-m3 environmental chamber at different AERs (0.1-10.0 hr(-1)). AERs were determined using the decay method based on box model assumptions. Field tests were conducted in classrooms, dormitories, meeting rooms and apartments during 2-5 weekdays using CO2 sensors coupled with data loggers. Indoor temperature, relative humidity (RH), and CO2 concentrations were continuously monitored while outdoor parameters combined with on-site climate conditions were recorded. Statistical results indicated that good laboratory performance was achieved: duplicate precision was within 10%, and the measured AERs were 90%-120% of the real AERs. Average AERs were 1.22, 1.37, 1.10, 1.91 and 0.73 hr(-1) in dormitories, air-conditioned classrooms, classrooms with an air circulation cooling system, reading rooms, and meeting rooms, respectively. In an elderly particulate matter exposure study, all the homes had AER values ranging from 0.29 to 3.46 hr(-1) in fall, and 0.12 to 1.39 hr(-1) in winter with a median AER of 1.15.

  6. Solar wind measurements near Mars and their implication in the Red Planet environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trotignon, J. G.; Grard, R.; Barabash, S.; Lundin, R.; Dubinin, E.

    1996-02-01

    The Phobos 2 spacecraft was operational around Mars for almost two months. From 29 January to 27 March 1989, the Martian bow shock was crossed at least 200 times and the upstream regions extensively probed. The solar wind density and velocity deduced from the a.c. electric-field measurements performed with the PWS plasma and wave experiment are compared with those of the ASPERA 3-D plasma composition experiment. A reasonably good agreement is found between the 12 min averages of the plasma density numbers derived from PWS and ASPERA (considering the poor precision of the instruments): they differ by at most a factor of four. The solar wind density is found to decrease when the flow speed increases, in agreement with the stream structure of the solar wind, which results from heliomagnetic latitude dependencies of solar wind parameters. The solar wind ram pressure, which is essential to study the solar wind-Mars interaction, is also estimated: the absence of a clear relationship between this dynamic pressure and the bow shock location is confirmed. The bow shock observations performed during very high solar activity do not support the hypothesis that Mars possesses a significant intrinsic magnetic field.

  7. Exploring social sensing techniques for measuring rainfall and flood response in urban environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koole, Wouter; Sips, Robert-Jan; ten Veldhuis, Marie-claire

    2016-04-01

    Extreme rainfall is expected to occur more often in the future as a result of climate change. To be able to react to this, urban water managers need to accurately know vulnerable spots in the city, as well as the potential impact to society. Currently, detailed information about rainfall intensities in cities, and effects of intense storm events on urban societies is lacking. In this study, we will present first results of social sensing experiments to measure rainfall and flooding using a smartphone app. Users of the app are asked to submit rainfall reports by selecting an rainfall class from a pre-defined list of (6) classes, to register time and location and to make a photo of the rainfall. Rainfall photos will be used in a future experiment for automated retrieval of rainfall classes using computer vision techniques. With the experiments we aim to validate rainfall observations made by lay people and to evaluate factors that influence the willingness of users to contribute observations. The results show that users consistently distinguish heavy and extreme rainfall from drizzle and mild rainfall, but have difficulty in making more detailed distinctions. The main factor driving willingness to contribute to the social rainfall sensing experiments is the perceived usefulness of rainfall reporting.

  8. Precision stress measurements in severe shock-wave environments with low-impedance manganin gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vantine, H.; Chan, J.; Erickson, L.; Janzen, J.; Weingart, R.; Lee, R.

    1980-01-01

    New techniques that permit the use of low-impedance manganin stress gauges in chemically reacting shock waves in the 1.0-40.0 GPa range are described. The rugged, small, and fast response gauge has reproducibility better than 2% when used in conjunction with a pulsed bridge circuit and adjustable, current-regulated power supplies. Techniques are presented for fabricating the transducer package, calibrating the bridge circuit and oscilloscopes, designing the drive system, and reducing the data. Data are presented for planar impact experiments performed with a 102-mm gas gun on high-explosive samples. In particular, the Chapman-Jouguet pressure in the explosive RX03-BB /92.5% triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB)/7.5% polychlorotrifluoroethylene (Kel-F binder)/ was directly measured to be 28.2 plus or minus 0.6 GPa. These new developments open the possibility of applying low-impedance manganin gauges in chemically reactive hydrodynamic flows such as the evolution of a shock wave into a detonation wave.

  9. Produced water toxicity tests accurately measure the produced water toxicity in marine environments?

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, W.S.; Veil, J.A.

    1996-10-01

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region VI has issued a general permit for offshore oil and gas discharges to the Gulf of Mexico that places numerical limits on whole effluent toxicity (WEI) for produced water. Recently proposed EPA general permits for other produced water discharges in Regions VI and X also include enforceable numerical limits on WET. Clearly, the industry will be conducting extensive produced water WET testing. Unfortunately, the WET test may not accurately measure the toxicity of the chemical constituents of produced water. Rather the mortality of test organisms may be attributable to (1) the high salinity of produced water, which causes salinity shock to the organisms, or (2) an ionic imbalance caused by excesses or deficiencies of one or more of seawater`s essential ions in the test chambers. Both of these effects are likely to be mitigated in actual offshore discharge settings, where the receiving water will be seawater and substantial dilution will be probable. Thus, the additional salinity of produced water will be rapidly assimilated, and the proper marine ionic balance will be quickly restored. Regulatory authorities should be aware of these factors when interpreting WET test results.

  10. Creating ‘obesogenic realities’; do our methodological choices make a difference when measuring the food environment?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) to objectively measure ‘obesogenic’ food environment (foodscape) exposure has become common-place. This increase in usage has coincided with the development of a methodologically heterogeneous evidence-base, with subsequent perceived difficulties for inter-study comparability. However, when used together in previous work, different types of food environment metric have often demonstrated some degree of covariance. Differences and similarities between density and proximity metrics, and within methodologically different conceptions of density and proximity metrics need to be better understood. Methods Frequently used measures of food access were calculated for North East England, UK. Using food outlet data from local councils, densities of food outlets per 1000 population and per km2 were calculated for small administrative areas. Densities (counts) were also calculated based on population-weighted centroids of administrative areas buffered at 400/800/1000m street network and Euclidean distances. Proximity (street network and Euclidean distances) from these centroids to the nearest food outlet were also calculated. Metrics were compared using Spearman’s rank correlations. Results Measures of foodscape density and proximity were highly correlated. Densities per km2 and per 1000 population were highly correlated (rs = 0.831). Euclidean and street network based measures of proximity (rs = 0.865) and density (rs = 0.667-0.764, depending on neighbourhood size) were also highly correlated. Density metrics based on administrative areas and buffered centroids of administrative areas were less strongly correlated (rs = 0.299-0.658). Conclusions Density and proximity metrics were largely comparable, with some exceptions. Whilst results suggested a substantial degree of comparability across existing studies, future comparability could be ensured by moving towards a more standardised set of

  11. Potential for measurement of the distribution of DNA folds in complex environments using Correlated X-ray Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, Gundolf; Krajina, Brad; Spakowitz, Andrew; Doniach, Sebastian

    2016-12-01

    In vivo chromosomal behavior is dictated by the organization of genomic DNA at length scales ranging from nanometers to microns. At these disparate scales, the DNA conformation is influenced by a range of proteins that package, twist and disentangle the DNA double helix, leading to a complex hierarchical structure that remains undetermined. Thus, there is a critical need for methods of structural characterization of DNA that can accommodate complex environmental conditions over biologically relevant length scales. Based on multiscale molecular simulations, we report on the possibility of measuring supercoiling in complex environments using angular correlations of scattered X-rays resulting from X-ray free electron laser (xFEL) experiments. We recently demonstrated the observation of structural detail for solutions of randomly oriented metallic nanoparticles [D. Mendez et al., Philos. Trans. R. Soc. B 360 (2014) 20130315]. Here, we argue, based on simulations, that correlated X-ray scattering (CXS) has the potential for measuring the distribution of DNA folds in complex environments, on the scale of a few persistence lengths.

  12. Electrochemical measurements of cathodic protection for reinforced concrete piles in a marine environment using embedded corrosion monitoring sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jin-A.; Chung, Won-Sub; Kim, Yong-Hwan

    2013-05-01

    This study developed a sensor to monitor the corrosion of reinforced concrete structures. Concrete pile specimens with embedded sensors were used to obtain data on corrosion and cathodic protection for bridge columns in a real marine environment. Corrosion potential, cathodic protection current density, concrete resistivity, and the degree of depolarization potential were measured with the embedded sensors in concrete pile specimens. The cathodic protection (CP) state was accurately monitored by sensors installed in underwater, tidal, splash, and atmospheric zones. The protection potential measurements confirmed that the CP by Zn-mesh sacrificial anode was fairly effective in the marine pile environment. The protection current densities in the tidal, splash zones were 2-3 times higher than those in underwater and atmospheric zones. The concrete resistivity in the tidal and splash zones was decreased through the installation of both mortar-embedded Zn-mesh (sacrificial anode) and outside an FRP jacket (cover). Considering the CP, the cathodic prevention was more effective than cathodic protection.

  13. Potential for measurement of the distribution of DNA folds in complex environments using Correlated X-ray Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, Gundolf; Krajina, Brad; Spakowitz, Andrew; Doniach, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    In vivo chromosomal behavior is dictated by the organization of genomic DNA at length scales ranging from nanometers to microns. At these disparate scales, the DNA conformation is influenced by a range of proteins that package, twist and disentangle the DNA double helix, leading to a complex hierarchical structure that remains undetermined. Thus, there is a critical need for methods of structural characterization of DNA that can accommodate complex environmental conditions over biologically relevant length scales. Based on multiscale molecular simulations, we report on the possibility of measuring supercoiling in complex environments using angular correlations of scattered X-rays resulting from X-ray free electron laser (xFEL) experiments. We recently demonstrated the observation of structural detail for solutions of randomly oriented metallic nanoparticles [D. Mendez et al., Philos. Trans. R. Soc. B 360 (2014) 20130315]. Here, we argue, based on simulations, that correlated X-ray scattering (CXS) has the potential for measuring the distribution of DNA folds in complex environments, on the scale of a few persistence lengths. PMID:27127310

  14. Measuring and Modeling Solute Transport in the Rootzone: Protecting the Receiving Water Environments of the Coral Atolls of Tonga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clothier, B. E.; van der Velde, M.; Green, S. R.; Gee, G. W.; Manu, V.; Menoniti, V.; Vanclooster, M.

    2005-05-01

    Intensification of agriculture on the raised coral atolls of the Tongan archipelago, notably through squash-pumpkin production, has lead to increased use of agrichemicals. Agrichemicals, both fertilisers and pesticides, pose a risk to these fragile environments. Sustainable land-management practices are needed for small-island developing states. On Tongatapu, solutes leaving the rootzone of the squash can rapidly find their way to the underlying freshwater lenses. These lenses are hydraulically linked to the internal lagoon, and the fringing reefs. We have used buried, non-suction fluxmeters to monitor both the quantity and quality of drainage leaving the rootzone of squash. Fertiliser is traditionally applied at planting. During establishment of the squash in 2003, some 350 mm of rain fell, with 70 % of this leaving the rootzone of this permeable soil as drainage. The concentration of nitrate-N in the drainage water was measured at around 50 mg-N/L. All of the initial fertiliser dressing had been lost, along with N mineralised from the plowed-in grass. Pesticides are needed in humid tropical environments to control weeds, pests and diseases. These chemicals can leach though the rootzone to contaminate receiving waters. We modeled the transport and fate of the presticides used in squash production, and we developed a Decision Support Tool (DST). Our DST can be used to select the best pesticides for local conditions, to tailor practices for minimising leaching losses below the ro