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Sample records for measuring single-cell oxygen

  1. Metabolic oxygen consumption measurement with a single-cell biosensor after particle microbeam irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Messerli, Mark; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Hei, Tom K.; Brenner, David J.

    2015-01-01

    A noninvasive, self-referencing biosensor/probe system has been integrated into the Columbia University Radiological Research Accelerator Facility Microbeam II end station. A single-cell oxygen consumption measurement has been conducted with this type of oxygen probe in 37°C Krebs–Ringer Bicarbonate buffer immediately before and after a single-cell microbeam irradiation. It is the first such measurement made for a microbeam irradiation, and a six fold increment of oxygen flux induced during a 15-s period of time has been observed following radiation exposure. The experimental procedure and the results are discussed. PMID:25335641

  2. A microwell array device capable of measuring single-cell oxygen consumption rates

    PubMed Central

    Molter, Timothy W.; McQuaide, Sarah C.; Suchorolski, Martin T.; Strovas, Tim J.; Burgess, Lloyd W.; Meldrum, Deirdre R.; Lidstrom, Mary E.

    2009-01-01

    Due to interest in cell population heterogeneity, the development of new technology and methodologies for studying single cells has dramatically increased in recent years. The ideal single cell measurement system would be high throughput for statistical relevance, would measure the most important cellular parameters, and minimize disruption of normal cell function. We have developed a microwell array device capable of measuring single cell oxygen consumption rates (OCR). This OCR device is able to diffusionally isolate single cells and enables the quantitative measurement of oxygen consumed by a single cell with fmol/min resolution in a non-invasive and relatively high throughput manner. A glass microwell array format containing fixed luminescent sensors allows for future incorporation of additional cellular parameter sensing capabilities. To demonstrate the utility of the OCR device, we determined the oxygen consumption rates of a small group of single cells (12 to 18) for three different cells lines: murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7, human epithelial lung cancer cell line A549, and human Barrett’s esophagus cell line CP-D. PMID:20084089

  3. A New Approach for Measuring Single-Cell Oxygen Consumption Rates

    PubMed Central

    Molter, Timothy W.; McQuaide, Sarah C.; Holl, Mark R.; Meldrum, Deirdre R.; Dragavon, Joseph M.; Anderson, Judith B.; Young, A. Cody; Burgess, Lloyd W.; Lidstrom, Mary E.

    2010-01-01

    A novel system that has enabled the measurement of single-cell oxygen consumption rates is presented. The experimental apparatus includes a temperature controlled environmental chamber, an array of microwells etched in glass, and a lid actuator used to seal cells in the microwells. Each microwell contains an oxygen sensitive platinum phosphor sensor used to monitor the cellular metabolic rates. Custom automation software controls the digital image data collection for oxygen sensor measurements, which are analyzed using an image-processing program to yield the oxygen concentration within each microwell versus time. Two proof-of-concept experiments produced oxygen consumption rate measurements for A549 human epithelial lung cancer cells of 5.39 and 5.27 fmol/min/cell, closely matching published oxygen consumption rates for bulk A549 populations. PMID:21057593

  4. Measuring single-cell density

    PubMed Central

    Grover, William H.; Bryan, Andrea K.; Diez-Silva, Monica; Suresh, Subra; Higgins, John M.; Manalis, Scott R.

    2011-01-01

    We have used a microfluidic mass sensor to measure the density of single living cells. By weighing each cell in two fluids of different densities, our technique measures the single-cell mass, volume, and density of approximately 500 cells per hour with a density precision of 0.001 g mL-1. We observe that the intrinsic cell-to-cell variation in density is nearly 100-fold smaller than the mass or volume variation. As a result, we can measure changes in cell density indicative of cellular processes that would be otherwise undetectable by mass or volume measurements. Here, we demonstrate this with four examples: identifying Plasmodium falciparum malaria-infected erythrocytes in a culture, distinguishing transfused blood cells from a patient’s own blood, identifying irreversibly sickled cells in a sickle cell patient, and identifying leukemia cells in the early stages of responding to a drug treatment. These demonstrations suggest that the ability to measure single-cell density will provide valuable insights into cell state for a wide range of biological processes. PMID:21690360

  5. Single Cell Oxygen Mapping (SCOM) by Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy Uncovers Heterogeneous Intracellular Oxygen Consumption.

    PubMed

    Santos, Carla Santana; Kowaltowski, Alicia J; Bertotti, Mauro

    2017-09-12

    We developed a highly sensitive oxygen consumption scanning microscopy system using platinized platinum disc microelectrodes. The system is capable of reliably detecting single-cell respiration, responding to classical regulators of mitochondrial oxygen consumption activity as expected. Comparisons with commercial multi-cell oxygen detection systems show that the system has comparable errors (if not smaller), with the advantage of being able to monitor inter and intra-cell heterogeneity in oxygen consumption characteristics. Our results uncover heterogeneous oxygen consumption characteristics between cells and within the same cell´s microenvironments. Single Cell Oxygen Mapping (SCOM) is thus capable of reliably studying mitochondrial oxygen consumption characteristics and heterogeneity at a single-cell level.

  6. Measuring and Modeling Apoptosis in Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Sabrina L.; Sorger, Peter K.

    2011-01-01

    Cell death plays an essential role in the development of tissues and organisms, the etiology of disease, and the responses of cells to therapeutic drugs. Here we review progress made over the last decade in using mathematical models and quantitative, often single-cell, data to study apoptosis. We discuss the delay that follows exposure of cells to prodeath stimuli, control of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, switch-like activation of effector caspases, and variability in the timing and probability of death from one cell to the next. Finally, we discuss challenges facing the fields of biochemical modeling and systems pharmacology. PMID:21414484

  7. Propellant production on Mars - Single cell oxygen production test bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colvin, James; Schallhorn, Paul; Ramohalli, Kumar

    1991-01-01

    A study focusing on oxygen production using resources indigenous to Mars is presented. A bank of solid zirconia electrolytic cells that will electrochemically separate oxygen from a high temperature stream of carbon dioxide is at the center of the oxygen production system. The experimental data are discussed with attention given to the cell operating temperature, the carbon dioxide flow rate, and the voltage applied across the cell.

  8. Robust measurement of telomere length in single cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Pan, Xinghua; Kalmbach, Keri; Seth-Smith, Michelle L.; Ye, Xiaoying; Antumes, Danielle M. F.; Yin, Yu; Liu, Lin; Keefe, David L.; Weissman, Sherman M.

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of telomere length currently requires a large population of cells, which masks telomere length heterogeneity in single cells, or requires FISH in metaphase arrested cells, posing technical challenges. A practical method for measuring telomere length in single cells has been lacking. We established a simple and robust approach for single-cell telomere length measurement (SCT-pqPCR). We first optimized a multiplex preamplification specific for telomeres and reference genes from individual cells, such that the amplicon provides a consistent ratio (T/R) of telomeres (T) to the reference genes (R) by quantitative PCR (qPCR). The average T/R ratio of multiple single cells corresponded closely to that of a given cell population measured by regular qPCR, and correlated with those of telomere restriction fragments (TRF) and quantitative FISH measurements. Furthermore, SCT-pqPCR detected the telomere length for quiescent cells that are inaccessible by quantitative FISH. The reliability of SCT-pqPCR also was confirmed using sister cells from two cell embryos. Telomere length heterogeneity was identified by SCT-pqPCR among cells of various human and mouse cell types. We found that the T/R values of human fibroblasts at later passages and from old donors were lower and more heterogeneous than those of early passages and from young donors, that cancer cell lines show heterogeneous telomere lengths, that human oocytes and polar bodies have nearly identical telomere lengths, and that the telomere lengths progressively increase from the zygote, two-cell to four-cell embryo. This method will facilitate understanding of telomere heterogeneity and its role in tumorigenesis, aging, and associated diseases. PMID:23661059

  9. Using measures of single-cell physiology and physiological state to understand organismic aging.

    PubMed

    Mendenhall, Alexander; Driscoll, Monica; Brent, Roger

    2016-02-01

    Genetically identical organisms in homogeneous environments have different lifespans and healthspans. These differences are often attributed to stochastic events, such as mutations and 'epimutations', changes in DNA methylation and chromatin that change gene function and expression. But work in the last 10 years has revealed differences in lifespan- and health-related phenotypes that are not caused by lasting changes in DNA or identified by modifications to DNA or chromatin. This work has demonstrated persistent differences in single-cell and whole-organism physiological states operationally defined by values of reporter gene signals in living cells. While some single-cell states, for example, responses to oxygen deprivation, were defined previously, others, such as a generally heightened ability to make proteins, were, revealed by direct experiment only recently, and are not well understood. Here, we review technical progress that promises to greatly increase the number of these measurable single-cell physiological variables and measureable states. We discuss concepts that facilitate use of single-cell measurements to provide insight into physiological states and state transitions. We assert that researchers will use this information to relate cell level physiological readouts to whole-organism outcomes, to stratify aging populations into groups based on different physiologies, to define biomarkers predictive of outcomes, and to shed light on the molecular processes that bring about different individual physiologies. For these reasons, quantitative study of single-cell physiological variables and state transitions should provide a valuable complement to genetic and molecular explanations of how organisms age.

  10. A photoacoustic technique to measure the properties of single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohm, Eric M.; Berndl, Elizabeth S. L.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate a new technique to non-invasively determine the diameter and sound speed of single cells using a combined ultrasonic and photoacoustic technique. Two cell lines, B16-F1 melanoma cells and MCF7 breast cancer cells were examined using this technique. Using a 200 MHz transducer, the ultrasound backscatter from a single cell in suspension was recorded. Immediately following, the cell was irradiated with a 532 nm laser and the resulting photoacoustic wave recorded by the same transducer. The melanoma cells contain optically absorbing melanin particles, which facilitated photoacoustic wave generation. MCF7 cells have negligible optical absorption at 532 nm; the cells were permeabilized and stained with trypan blue prior to measurements. The measured ultrasound and photoacoustic power spectra were compared to theoretical equations with the cell diameter and sound speed as variables (Anderson scattering model for ultrasound, and a thermoelastic expansion model for photoacoustics). The diameter and sound speed were extracted from the models where the spectral shape matched the measured signals. However the photoacoustic spectrum for the melanoma cell did not match theory, which is likely because melanin particles are located around the cytoplasm, and not within the nucleus. Therefore a photoacoustic finite element model of a cell was developed where the central region was not used to generate a photoacoustic wave. The resulting power spectrum was in better agreement with the measured signal than the thermoelastic expansion model. The MCF7 cell diameter obtained using the spectral matching method was 17.5 μm, similar to the optical measurement of 16 μm, while the melanoma cell diameter obtained was 22 μm, similar to the optical measurement of 21 μm. The sound speed measured from the MCF7 and melanoma cell was 1573 and 1560 m/s, respectively, which is within acceptable values that have been published in literature.

  11. High Throughput Micropatterning of Optical Oxygen Sensor for Single Cell Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haixin; Tian, Yanqing; Bhushan, Shivani; Su, Fengyu; Meldrum, Deirdre R

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we present our results from process development and characterization of optical oxygen sensors that are patterned by traditional UV lithography. An oxygen sensitive luminescent probe, platinum octaethylporphyrin (PtOEP), was encapsulated in commercially purchased photoresist (AZ5214) to form uniform thin sensor films on fused silica substrates. Plasticizer ethoxylated trimethylolpropane triacrylate (SR454) was added to the dye-photoresist sensor mixtures to improve the oxygen sensitivity. The optimum sensor mixture composition that can be patterned with maximum sensitivity was identified. The microfabrication process conditions, cell adherence and oxygen sensitivity results from patterned structures were characterized in detail. Down to 3 µm features have been fabricated on fused silica substrates using the developed techniques. The result implies the developed methods can provide a feasible way to miniaturize the optical sensor system for single cell analysis with precise control of sensor volume and response.

  12. High Throughput Micropatterning of Optical Oxygen Sensor for Single Cell Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Haixin; Tian, Yanqing; Bhushan, Shivani; Su, Fengyu; Meldrum, Deirdre R.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present our results from process development and characterization of optical oxygen sensors that are patterned by traditional UV lithography. An oxygen sensitive luminescent probe, platinum octaethylporphyrin (PtOEP), was encapsulated in commercially purchased photoresist (AZ5214) to form uniform thin sensor films on fused silica substrates. Plasticizer ethoxylated trimethylolpropane triacrylate (SR454) was added to the dye-photoresist sensor mixtures to improve the oxygen sensitivity. The optimum sensor mixture composition that can be patterned with maximum sensitivity was identified. The microfabrication process conditions, cell adherence and oxygen sensitivity results from patterned structures were characterized in detail. Down to 3 µm features have been fabricated on fused silica substrates using the developed techniques. The result implies the developed methods can provide a feasible way to miniaturize the optical sensor system for single cell analysis with precise control of sensor volume and response PMID:23066352

  13. A combined electrochemical and optical trapping platform for measuring single cell respiration rates at electrode interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, Benjamin J.; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.

    2015-06-15

    Metal-reducing bacteria gain energy by extracellular electron transfer to external solids, such as naturally abundant minerals, which substitute for oxygen or the other common soluble electron acceptors of respiration. This process is one of the earliest forms of respiration on earth and has significant environmental and technological implications. By performing electron transfer to electrodes instead of minerals, these microbes can be used as biocatalysts for conversion of diverse chemical fuels to electricity. Understanding such a complex biotic-abiotic interaction necessitates the development of tools capable of probing extracellular electron transfer down to the level of single cells. Here, we describe an experimental platform for single cell respiration measurements. The design integrates an infrared optical trap, perfusion chamber, and lithographically fabricated electrochemical chips containing potentiostatically controlled transparent indium tin oxide microelectrodes. Individual bacteria are manipulated using the optical trap and placed on the microelectrodes, which are biased at a suitable oxidizing potential in the absence of any chemical electron acceptor. The potentiostat is used to detect the respiration current correlated with cell-electrode contact. We demonstrate the system with single cell measurements of the dissimilatory-metal reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, which resulted in respiration currents ranging from 15 fA to 100 fA per cell under our measurement conditions. Mutants lacking the outer-membrane cytochromes necessary for extracellular respiration did not result in any measurable current output upon contact. In addition to the application for extracellular electron transfer studies, the ability to electronically measure cell-specific respiration rates may provide answers for a variety of fundamental microbial physiology questions.

  14. A combined electrochemical and optical trapping platform for measuring single cell respiration rates at electrode interfaces.

    PubMed

    Gross, Benjamin J; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y

    2015-06-01

    Metal-reducing bacteria gain energy by extracellular electron transfer to external solids, such as naturally abundant minerals, which substitute for oxygen or the other common soluble electron acceptors of respiration. This process is one of the earliest forms of respiration on earth and has significant environmental and technological implications. By performing electron transfer to electrodes instead of minerals, these microbes can be used as biocatalysts for conversion of diverse chemical fuels to electricity. Understanding such a complex biotic-abiotic interaction necessitates the development of tools capable of probing extracellular electron transfer down to the level of single cells. Here, we describe an experimental platform for single cell respiration measurements. The design integrates an infrared optical trap, perfusion chamber, and lithographically fabricated electrochemical chips containing potentiostatically controlled transparent indium tin oxide microelectrodes. Individual bacteria are manipulated using the optical trap and placed on the microelectrodes, which are biased at a suitable oxidizing potential in the absence of any chemical electron acceptor. The potentiostat is used to detect the respiration current correlated with cell-electrode contact. We demonstrate the system with single cell measurements of the dissimilatory-metal reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, which resulted in respiration currents ranging from 15 fA to 100 fA per cell under our measurement conditions. Mutants lacking the outer-membrane cytochromes necessary for extracellular respiration did not result in any measurable current output upon contact. In addition to the application for extracellular electron transfer studies, the ability to electronically measure cell-specific respiration rates may provide answers for a variety of fundamental microbial physiology questions.

  15. A combined electrochemical and optical trapping platform for measuring single cell respiration rates at electrode interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Benjamin J.; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.

    2015-06-01

    Metal-reducing bacteria gain energy by extracellular electron transfer to external solids, such as naturally abundant minerals, which substitute for oxygen or the other common soluble electron acceptors of respiration. This process is one of the earliest forms of respiration on earth and has significant environmental and technological implications. By performing electron transfer to electrodes instead of minerals, these microbes can be used as biocatalysts for conversion of diverse chemical fuels to electricity. Understanding such a complex biotic-abiotic interaction necessitates the development of tools capable of probing extracellular electron transfer down to the level of single cells. Here, we describe an experimental platform for single cell respiration measurements. The design integrates an infrared optical trap, perfusion chamber, and lithographically fabricated electrochemical chips containing potentiostatically controlled transparent indium tin oxide microelectrodes. Individual bacteria are manipulated using the optical trap and placed on the microelectrodes, which are biased at a suitable oxidizing potential in the absence of any chemical electron acceptor. The potentiostat is used to detect the respiration current correlated with cell-electrode contact. We demonstrate the system with single cell measurements of the dissimilatory-metal reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, which resulted in respiration currents ranging from 15 fA to 100 fA per cell under our measurement conditions. Mutants lacking the outer-membrane cytochromes necessary for extracellular respiration did not result in any measurable current output upon contact. In addition to the application for extracellular electron transfer studies, the ability to electronically measure cell-specific respiration rates may provide answers for a variety of fundamental microbial physiology questions.

  16. Low-pressure airlift fermenter for single cell protein production: I. Design and oxygen transfer studies.

    PubMed

    Chen, N Y; Kondis, E F; Srinivasan, S

    1987-03-01

    The energy consumption of a fermenter constitutes a major part of the operating expense of a single cell protein process. A low-pressure airlift fermenter was designed to reduce this cost. In this new design, the fermenter broth is kept below 120 cm in depth, and air alone is employed to fulfill the need of supplying oxygen, and cooling and agitating the broth. The use of low-pressure air from air blowers instead of air compressors lowers the capital cost of air delivery and reduces the energy consumption in the fermenter section to below 1 kWh/kg protein, a saving of over 70% as compared to a conventional stirred tank fermenter. It also eliminates the investment of mechanical agitators, heat exchangers, and air compressors. Sulfite oxidation studies confirmed the design concepts.

  17. Single Cell Magnetic Measurements with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmstrom, Johanna C.; Arps, Jennifer; Dwyer, Bo; Kalisky, Beena; Kirtley, John R.; Moler, Kathryn A.; Qian, Lisa C.; Rosenberg, Aaron J.; Rutt, Brian; Tee, Sui Seng; Theis, Eric; Urbach, Elana; Wang, Yihua

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles play an important role in numerous biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging and targeted drug delivery. There is a need for tools to characterize individual magnetic nanoparticles and the magnetic properties of individual cells. We use a scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) to observe the magnetic fields from single mammalian cells loaded with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. We show that the SQUID is a useful tool for imaging biological magnetism and is capable of resolving cell to cell variations in magnetic dipole moments. We hope to correlate these magnetic images with real space imaging techniques such as optical and scanning electron microscopy. The visualization of single cell magnetism can be used to optimize biological magnetic imaging techniques, such as MRI, by quantifying the strength of magnetic dipole moments of in vitro magnetic labeling. This work is supported by a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship and a Gabilan Stanford Graduate Fellowship.

  18. Single Cell Measurements of Vacuolar Rupture Caused by Intracellular Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Danckaert, Anne; Simeone, Roxane; Brosch, Roland; Enninga, Jost; Bobard, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Shigella flexneri are pathogenic bacteria that invade host cells entering into an endocytic vacuole. Subsequently, the rupture of this membrane-enclosed compartment allows bacteria to move within the cytosol, proliferate and further invade neighboring cells. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is phagocytosed by immune cells, and has recently been shown to rupture phagosomal membrane in macrophages. We developed a robust assay for tracking phagosomal membrane disruption after host cell entry of Shigella flexneri or Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The approach makes use of CCF4, a FRET reporter sensitive to β-lactamase that equilibrates in the cytosol of host cells. Upon invasion of host cells by bacterial pathogens, the probe remains intact as long as the bacteria reside in membrane-enclosed compartments. After disruption of the vacuole, β-lactamase activity on the surface of the intracellular pathogen cleaves CCF4 instantly leading to a loss of FRET signal and switching its emission spectrum. This robust ratiometric assay yields accurate information about the timing of vacuolar rupture induced by the invading bacteria, and it can be coupled to automated microscopy and image processing by specialized algorithms for the detection of the emission signals of the FRET donor and acceptor. Further, it allows investigating the dynamics of vacuolar disruption elicited by intracellular bacteria in real time in single cells. Finally, it is perfectly suited for high-throughput analysis with a spatio-temporal resolution exceeding previous methods. Here, we provide the experimental details of exemplary protocols for the CCF4 vacuolar rupture assay on HeLa cells and THP-1 macrophages for time-lapse experiments or end points experiments using Shigella flexneri as well as multiple mycobacterial strains such as Mycobacterium marinum, Mycobacterium bovis, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:23792688

  19. Bioluminescence Microscopy as a Method to Measure Single Cell Androgen Receptor Activity Heterogeneous Responses to Antiandrogens

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Pallavi; Neveu, Bertrand; Velot, Lauriane; Wu, Lily; Fradet, Yves; Pouliot, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cell heterogeneity is well-documented. Therefore, techniques to monitor single cell heterogeneous responses to treatment are needed. We developed a highly translational and quantitative bioluminescence microscopy method to measure single cell androgen receptor (AR) activity modulation by antiandrogens from fluid biopsies. We showed that this assay can detect heterogeneous cellular response to drug treatment and that the sum of single cell AR activity can mirror the response in the whole cell population. This method may thus be used to monitor heterogeneous dynamic treatment responses in cancer cells. PMID:27678181

  20. Using buoyant mass to measure the growth of single cells.

    PubMed

    Godin, Michel; Delgado, Francisco Feijó; Son, Sungmin; Grover, William H; Bryan, Andrea K; Tzur, Amit; Jorgensen, Paul; Payer, Kris; Grossman, Alan D; Kirschner, Marc W; Manalis, Scott R

    2010-05-01

    We used a suspended microchannel resonator (SMR) combined with picoliter-scale microfluidic control to measure buoyant mass and determine the 'instantaneous' growth rates of individual cells. The SMR measures mass with femtogram precision, allowing rapid determination of the growth rate in a fraction of a complete cell cycle. We found that for individual cells of Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mouse lymphoblasts, heavier cells grew faster than lighter cells.

  1. A fast solution switching system with temperature control for single cell measurements

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Duk-Su; Chen, Liangyi; Ufret-Vincenty, Carmen A.; Jung, Seung-Ryoung

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a perfusion system for biophysical single cell experiments at the physiological temperature. Our system regulates temperature of test solutions using a small heat exchanger that includes several capillaries. Water circulating inside the heat exchanger warms or cools test solutions flowing inside the capillaries. Temperature-controlled solutions are delivered directly to a single cell(s) through a multibarreled manifold that switches solutions bathing a cell in less than 1 s. This solution exchange is optimal for patch clamp, single-cell microamperometry, and microfluorometry experiments. Using this system, we demonstrate that exocytosis from pancreatic β cells and activation of TRPV1 channels are temperature sensitive. We also discuss how to measure local temperature near a single cell under investigation. PMID:21536068

  2. DESIGN, PROTOTYPE AND MEASUREMENT OF A SINGLE-CELL DEFLECTING CAVITY FOR THE ADVANCED PHOTON SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Haipeng Wang, Guangfeng Cheng, Gianluigi Ciovati, Peter Kneisel, Robert Rimmer, Kai Tian, Larry Turlington, Alireza Nassiri, Geoff Waldschmidt

    2009-05-01

    After the design optimization of a squashed elliptical shape, single-cell, superconducting (SC) deflecting cavity at 2.815 GHz, a copper prototype has been bench measured to determine its rf properties and the effectiveness of waveguide damping of parasitic modes [1]. RF cold tests were also performed at 2K on niobium single-cell and two-cell prototype cavities. Details of impedance calculation using wakefiled analysis of the single-cell cavity are shown to meet the strict 200 mA beam stability requirement of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Lab where a total of 16 single-cell cavities will be divided into two cryomodule. The design of higher-order mode (HOM) waveguide damping, the simulations of the Lorenz force detuning, and the prototype of on-cell damping are presented.

  3. Single Cell Mass Measurement Using Drag Force Inside Lab-on-Chip Microfluidics System.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Habibur; Ahmad, Mohd Ridzuan; Takeuchi, Masaru; Nakajima, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa; Fukuda, Toshio

    2015-12-01

    Single cell mass (SCM) is an intrinsic property of single cell, it arouses a great interest among scientists as cell mass depends on the synthesis of proteins, DNA replication, cell wall stiffness, cell cytoplasm density, cell growth, ribosome, and other analogous of organisms. To date, several great strides have been taken to the advancements of SCM measurement techniques. Nevertheless, more works are required to enable the technology to push frontier in deep analysis of SCM measurement, hence to elucidate intracellular properties. In this paper, we present a lab-on-chip microfluidics system for SCM measurement, related with the force required to drag a single cell and Newton's law of motion inside microfluidics channel. Drag force on the cell was generated by a pressure driven syringe micropump and the motion of the cell was measured using optical observation under an inverted microscope. This approach of measuring SCM was calibrated using known mass (77.3 pg) of a polystyrene particle of 5.2 μm diameter. Furthermore, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae baker's yeast cells of different sizes ([Formula: see text] diameter) for SCM measurement. Mass of 4.4 μm diameter of single yeast cell was measured as 2.12 pg which is in the range of previously reported single yeast cell mass (2-3 pg). In addition, we also studied the relation between SCM and single cell size. Results showed that single yeast cell mass increases exponentially with the increasing of single cell size.

  4. Single Cell Mass Measurement Using Drag ForceInside Lab-on-Chip Microfluidics System.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md; Ahmad, Mohd; Takeuchi, Masaru; Nakajima, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa; Fukuda, Toshio

    2015-12-22

    Single Cell Mass (SCM) is an intrinsic property of single cell, it arouses a great interest among scientists as cell mass depends on the synthesis of proteins, DNA replication, cell wall stiffness, cell cytoplasm density, cell growth, ribosome and other analogous of organisms. To date, several great strides have been taken to the advancements of SCM measurement techniques. Nevertheless, more works are required to enable the technology to push frontier in deep analysis of SCM measurement, hence to elucidate intracellular properties. In this paper, we present a Lab-on-Chip microfluidics system for SCM measurement, related with the force required to drag a single cell and Newton's law of motion inside microfluidics channel. Drag force on the cell was generated by a pressure driven syringe micropump and the motion of the cell was measured using optical observation under an inverted microscope. This approach of measuring SCM was calibrated using known mass (77.3 pg) of a polystyrene particle of 5.2 μm diameter. Furthermore, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae baker's yeast cells of different sizes (2-7 μm diameter) for SCM measurement. Mass of 4.4 μm diameter of single yeast cell was measured as 2.12 pg which is in the range of previously reported single yeast cell mass (2-3 pg). In addition, we also studied the relation between SCM and single cell size. Results showed that single yeast cell mass increases exponentially with the increasing of single cell size.

  5. Heat conduction nanocalorimeter for pl-scale single cell measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannessen, E. A.; Weaver, J. M. R.; Cobbold, P. H.; Cooper, J. M.

    2002-03-01

    An ultrasensitive nanocalorimeter for use with pl-scale biological samples using silicon microfabrication technology has been developed in which a 720 pl reaction vessel, a calibration heater, and a thermoelectric transducer of 125 μK sensitivity were integrated into a single multilayer thin-film configuration. The resolution of the system ranged from 10 to 25 nW depending on the heat capacity, conductance and power density of the samples studied. The device has been used in heat conduction measurements of the energy released from the enzyme catalyzed hydrolysis of hydrogen peroxide using purified catalase, and for the determination of the catalase activity within a single mouse hepatocyte. The nanocalorimeter has the potential for integration in a high-density array format, where the change in temperature from ultralow volume cellular assays could be used as a generic analytical tool for high throughput screening of bioactive compounds.

  6. Reliable measurement of E. coli single cell fluorescence distribution using a standard microscope set-up.

    PubMed

    Cortesi, Marilisa; Bandiera, Lucia; Pasini, Alice; Bevilacqua, Alessandro; Gherardi, Alessandro; Furini, Simone; Giordano, Emanuele

    2017-01-01

    Quantifying gene expression at single cell level is fundamental for the complete characterization of synthetic gene circuits, due to the significant impact of noise and inter-cellular variability on the system's functionality. Commercial set-ups that allow the acquisition of fluorescent signal at single cell level (flow cytometers or quantitative microscopes) are expensive apparatuses that are hardly affordable by small laboratories. A protocol that makes a standard optical microscope able to acquire quantitative, single cell, fluorescent data from a bacterial population transformed with synthetic gene circuitry is presented. Single cell fluorescence values, acquired with a microscope set-up and processed with custom-made software, are compared with results that were obtained with a flow cytometer in a bacterial population transformed with the same gene circuitry. The high correlation between data from the two experimental set-ups, with a correlation coefficient computed over the tested dynamic range > 0.99, proves that a standard optical microscope- when coupled with appropriate software for image processing- might be used for quantitative single-cell fluorescence measurements. The calibration of the set-up, together with its validation, is described. The experimental protocol described in this paper makes quantitative measurement of single cell fluorescence accessible to laboratories equipped with standard optical microscope set-ups. Our method allows for an affordable measurement/quantification of intercellular variability, whose better understanding of this phenomenon will improve our comprehension of cellular behaviors and the design of synthetic gene circuits. All the required software is freely available to the synthetic biology community (MUSIQ Microscope flUorescence SIngle cell Quantification).

  7. Measurement of DNA damage in individual cells using the Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis (Comet) assay.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Janet M; Spanswick, Victoria J; Hartley, John A

    2011-01-01

    The Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis (Comet) assay is a simple, versatile and sensitive method for measuring DNA damage in individual cells, allowing the determination of heterogeneity of response within a cell population. The basic alkaline technique described is for the determination of DNA strand break damage and its repair at a single cell level. Specific modifications to the method use a lower pH ('neutral' assay), or allow the measurement of DNA interstrand cross-links. It can be further adapted to, for example, study specific DNA repair mechanisms, be combined with fluorescent in situ hybridisation, or incorporate lesion specific enzymes.

  8. Single cell stiffness measurement at various humidity conditions by nanomanipulation of a nano-needle.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yajing; Nakajima, Masahiro; Yang, Zhan; Tajima, Hirotaka; Najdovski, Zoran; Homma, Michio; Fukuda, Toshio

    2013-04-12

    This paper presents a method for single cell stiffness measurement based on a nano-needle and nanomanipulation. The nano-needle with a buffering beam was fabricated from an atomic force microscope cantilever by the focused ion beam etching technique. Wild type yeast cells (W303) were prepared and placed on the sample stage inside an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) chamber. The nanomanipulator actuated the nano-needle to press against a single yeast cell. As a result, the deformation of the cell and nano-needle was observed by the ESEM system in real-time. Finally, the stiffness of the single cell was determined based on this deformation information. To reveal the relationship between the cell stiffness and the environmental humidity conditions, the cell stiffness was measured at three different humidity conditions, i.e. 40, 70 and 100%, respectively. The results show that the stiffness of a single cell is reduced with increasing humidity.

  9. Single cell stiffness measurement at various humidity conditions by nanomanipulation of a nano-needle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yajing; Nakajima, Masahiro; Yang, Zhan; Tajima, Hirotaka; Najdovski, Zoran; Homma, Michio; Fukuda, Toshio

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a method for single cell stiffness measurement based on a nano-needle and nanomanipulation. The nano-needle with a buffering beam was fabricated from an atomic force microscope cantilever by the focused ion beam etching technique. Wild type yeast cells (W303) were prepared and placed on the sample stage inside an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) chamber. The nanomanipulator actuated the nano-needle to press against a single yeast cell. As a result, the deformation of the cell and nano-needle was observed by the ESEM system in real-time. Finally, the stiffness of the single cell was determined based on this deformation information. To reveal the relationship between the cell stiffness and the environmental humidity conditions, the cell stiffness was measured at three different humidity conditions, i.e. 40, 70 and 100%, respectively. The results show that the stiffness of a single cell is reduced with increasing humidity.

  10. Single Cell Spectroscopy: Noninvasive Measures of Small-Scale Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Mousoulis, Charilaos; Xu, Xin; Reiter, David A.; Neu, Corey P.

    2013-01-01

    The advancement of spectroscopy methods attained through increases in sensitivity, and often with the coupling of complementary techniques, has enabled real-time structure and function measurements of single cells. The purpose of this review is to illustrate, in light of advances, the strengths and the weaknesses of these methods. Included also is an assessment of the impact of the experimental setup and conditions of each method on cellular function and integrity. A particular emphasis is placed on noninvasive and nondestructive techniques for achieving single cell detection, including nuclear magnetic resonance, in addition to physical, optical, and vibrational methods. PMID:23886910

  11. Measuring tissue oxygenation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soyemi, Olusola O. (Inventor); Soller, Babs R. (Inventor); Yang, Ye (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Methods and systems for calculating tissue oxygenation, e.g., oxygen saturation, in a target tissue are disclosed. In some embodiments, the methods include: (a) directing incident radiation to a target tissue and determining reflectance spectra of the target tissue by measuring intensities of reflected radiation from the target tissue at a plurality of radiation wavelengths; (b) correcting the measured intensities of the reflectance spectra to reduce contributions thereto from skin and fat layers through which the incident radiation propagates; (c) determining oxygen saturation in the target tissue based on the corrected reflectance spectra; and (d) outputting the determined value of oxygen saturation.

  12. A microchip integrating cell array positioning with in situ single-cell impedance measurement.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoliang; Zhu, Rong; Zong, Xianli

    2015-10-07

    This paper presents a novel microarray chip integrating cell positioning with in situ, real-time and long-time impedance measurement on a single cell. The microchip integrates a plurality of quadrupole-electrode units (termed positioning electrodes) patterned into an array with pairs of planar electrodes (termed measuring electrodes) located at the centers of each quadrupole-electrode unit. The positioning electrodes are utilized to trap and position living cells onto the measuring electrodes based on negative dielectrophoresis (nDEP), while the measuring electrodes are used to measure impedances of the trapped single cells. Each measuring electrode has a small footprint area of 7 × 7 μm(2) to ensure inhabiting only one single cell on it. However, the electrode with a small surface area has a low double-layer capacitance when it is immersed in a liquid solution, thus generating a large double-layer impedance, which reduces the sensitivity for impedance measurement on the single cell. To enlarge the effective surface areas of the measuring electrodes, a novel surface-modification process is proposed to controllably construct gold nanostructures on the surfaces of the measuring electrodes while the positioning electrodes are unstained. The double layer capacitances of the modified electrodes are increased by about one order after surface-modification. The developed microchip is used to monitor the adhering behavior of a single HeLa cell by measuring its impedance spectra in real time. The measured impedance is analyzed and used to extract cellular electrical parameters, which demonstrated that the cell compresses the electrical double layer in the process of adherence and adheres onto the measuring electrodes after 4-5 hours.

  13. Nanofork for single cells adhesion measurement via ESEM-nanomanipulator system.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mohd Ridzuan; Nakajima, Masahiro; Kojima, Masaru; Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio; Fukuda, Toshio

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, single cells adhesion force was measured using a nanofork. The nanofork was used to pick up a single cell on a line array substrate inside an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). The line array substrate was used to provide small gaps between the single cells and the substrate. Therefore, the nanofork could be inserted through these gaps in order to successfully pick up a single cell. Adhesion force was measured during the cell pick-up process from the deflection of the cantilever beam. The nanofork was fabricated using focused ion beam (FIB) etching process while the line array substrate was fabricated using nanoimprinting technology. As to investigate the effect of contact area on the strength of the adhesion force, two sizes of gap distance of line array substrate were used, i.e., 1 μm and 2 μm. Results showed that cells attached on the 1 μm gap line array substrate required more force to be released as compared to the cells attached on the 1 μm gap line array substrate.

  14. Oxygen measurements to improve singlet oxygen dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Michele M.; Penjweini, Rozhin; Ong, Yi Hong; Finlay, Jarod C.; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2017-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves interactions between the three main components of light fluence, photosensitizer concentration, and oxygenation. Currently, singlet oxygen explicit dosimetry (SOED) has focused on the first two of these components. The macroscopic model to calculate reacted singlet oxygen has previously involved a fixed initial ground state oxygen concentration. A phosphorescence-based oxygen probe was used to measure ground state oxygen concentration throughout treatments for mice bearing radioactively induced fibroscarcoma tumors. Photofrin-, BPD-, and HPPH-mediated PDT was performed on mice. Model-calculated oxygen and measured oxygen was compared to evaluate the macroscopic model as well as the photochemical parameters involved. Oxygen measurements at various depths were compared to calculated values. Furthermore, we explored the use of noninvasive diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) to measure tumor blood flow changes in response to PDT to improve the model calculation of reacted singlet oxygen. Mice were monitored after treatment to see the effect of oxygenation on long-term recurrence-free survival as well as the efficacy of using reacted singlet oxygen as a predictive measure of outcome. Measurement of oxygenation during treatment helps to improve SOED as well as confirm the photochemical parameters involved in the macroscopic model. Use of DCS in predicting oxygenation changes was also investigated.

  15. Single cell responses to spatially controlled photosensitized production of extracellular singlet oxygen.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Brian W; Sinks, Louise E; Breitenbach, Thomas; Schack, Nickolass B; Vinogradov, Sergei A; Ogilby, Peter R

    2011-01-01

    The response of individual HeLa cells to extracellularly produced singlet oxygen was examined. The spatial domain of singlet oxygen production was controlled using the combination of a membrane-impermeable Pd porphyrin-dendrimer, which served as a photosensitizer, and a focused laser, which served to localize the sensitized production of singlet oxygen. Cells in close proximity to the domain of singlet oxygen production showed morphological changes commonly associated with necrotic cell death. The elapsed postirradiation "waiting period" before necrosis became apparent depended on: (1) the distance between the cell membrane and the domain irradiated, (2) the incident laser fluence and, as such, the initial concentration of singlet oxygen produced and (3) the lifetime of singlet oxygen. The data imply that singlet oxygen plays a key role in this process of light-induced cell death. The approach of using extracellularly generated singlet oxygen to induce cell death can provide a solution to a problem that often limits mechanistic studies of intracellularly photosensitized cell death: it can be difficult to quantify the effective light dose, and hence singlet oxygen concentration, when using an intracellular photosensitizer. © 2011 The Authors. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2011 The American Society of Photobiology.

  16. Evaluating quantitative methods for measuring plasmid copy numbers in single cells

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Shay; Paulsson, Johan

    2013-01-01

    The life of plasmids is a constant battle against fluctuations: failing to correct copy number fluctuations can increase the plasmid loss rate by many orders of magnitude, as can a failure to more evenly divide the copies between daughters at cell division. Plasmids are therefore long-standing model systems for stochastic processes in cells, much thanks to the efforts of Kurt Nordström to whose memory this issue is dedicated. Here we analyze a range of experimental methods for measuring plasmid copy numbers in single cells, focusing on challenges, trade-offs and necessary experimental controls. In particular we analyze published and unpublished strategies to infer copy numbers from expression of plasmid-encoded reporters, direct labeling of plasmids with fluorescent probes or DNA binding proteins fused to fluorescent reporters, PCR based methods applied to single cell lysates, and plasmid-specific replication arrest. We conclude that no method currently exists to measure plasmid copy numbers in single cells, and that most methods instead inadvertently measure various types of experimental noise. We also discuss how accurate methods can be developed. PMID:22305922

  17. Sensitive thermal microsensor with pn junction for heat measurement of a single cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Taito; Inomata, Naoki; Ono, Takahito

    2016-02-01

    A sensitive thermal microsensor based on a pn junction diode for heat measurements of biological single cells is developed and evaluated. Using a fabricated device, we demonstrated the heat measurement of a single brown fat cell. The principle of the sensor relies on the temperature dependence of the pn junction diode resistance. This method has a capability of the highly thermal sensitivity by downsizing and the advantage of a simple experimental setup using electrical circuits without any special equipment. To achieve highly sensitive heat measurement of single cells, downsizing of the sensor is necessary to reduce the heat capacity of the sensor itself. The sensor with the pn junction diode can be downsized by microfabrication. A bridge beam structure with the pn junction diode as a thermal sensor is placed in vacuum using a microfludic chip to decrease the heat loss to the surroundings. A temperature coefficient of resistance of 1.4%/K was achieved. The temperature and thermal resolutions of the fabricated device are 1.1 mK and 73.6 nW, respectively. The heat measurements of norepinephrine stimulated and nonstimulated single brown fat cells were demonstrated, and different behaviors in heat generation were observed.

  18. Robust organelle size extractions from elastic scattering measurements of single cells (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannaday, Ashley E.; Draham, Robert; Berger, Andrew J.

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this project is to estimate non-nuclear organelle size distributions in single cells by measuring angular scattering patterns and fitting them with Mie theory. Simulations have indicated that the large relative size distribution of organelles (mean:width≈2) leads to unstable Mie fits unless scattering is collected at polar angles less than 20 degrees. Our optical system has therefore been modified to collect angles down to 10 degrees. Initial validations will be performed on polystyrene bead populations whose size distributions resemble those of cell organelles. Unlike with the narrow bead distributions that are often used for calibration, we expect to see an order-of-magnitude improvement in the stability of the size estimates as the minimum angle decreases from 20 to 10 degrees. Scattering patterns will then be acquired and analyzed from single cells (EMT6 mouse cancer cells), both fixed and live, at multiple time points. Fixed cells, with no changes in organelle sizes over time, will be measured to determine the fluctuation level in estimated size distribution due to measurement imperfections alone. Subsequent measurements on live cells will determine whether there is a higher level of fluctuation that could be attributed to dynamic changes in organelle size. Studies on unperturbed cells are precursors to ones in which the effects of exogenous agents are monitored over time.

  19. Apparatus and method for measuring single cell and sub-cellular photosynthetic efficiency

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Ryan Wesley; Singh, Seema; Wu, Huawen

    2013-07-09

    Devices for measuring single cell changes in photosynthetic efficiency in algal aquaculture are disclosed that include a combination of modulated LED trans-illumination of different intensities with synchronized through objective laser illumination and confocal detection. Synchronization and intensity modulation of a dual illumination scheme were provided using a custom microcontroller for a laser beam block and constant current LED driver. Therefore, single whole cell photosynthetic efficiency, and subcellular (diffraction limited) photosynthetic efficiency measurement modes are permitted. Wide field rapid light scanning actinic illumination is provided for both by an intensity modulated 470 nm LED. For the whole cell photosynthetic efficiency measurement, the same LED provides saturating pulses for generating photosynthetic induction curves. For the subcellular photosynthetic efficiency measurement, a switched through objective 488 nm laser provides saturating pulses for generating photosynthetic induction curves. A second near IR LED is employed to generate dark adapted states in the system under study.

  20. Measuring single cell mass, volume, and density with dual suspended microchannel resonators.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Andrea K; Hecht, Vivian C; Shen, Wenjiang; Payer, Kristofor; Grover, William H; Manalis, Scott R

    2014-02-07

    Cell size, measured as either volume or mass, is a fundamental indicator of cell state. Far more tightly regulated than size is density, the ratio between mass and volume, which can be used to distinguish between cell populations even when volume and mass appear to remain constant. Here we expand upon a previous method for measuring cell density involving a suspended microchannel resonator (SMR). We introduce a new device, the dual SMR, as a high-precision instrument for measuring single-cell mass, volume, and density using two resonators connected by a serpentine fluidic channel. The dual SMR designs considered herein demonstrate the critical role of channel geometry in ensuring proper mixing and damping of pressure fluctuations in microfluidic systems designed for precision measurement. We use the dual SMR to compare the physical properties of two well-known cancer cell lines: human lung cancer cell H1650 and mouse lymphoblastic leukemia cell line L1210.

  1. ATP Consumption of Eukaryotic Flagella Measured at a Single-Cell Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daniel T. N.; Heymann, Michael; Fraden, Seth; Nicastro, Daniela; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-12-01

    The motility of cilia and flagella is driven by thousands of dynein motors that hydrolyze adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Despite decades of genetic, biochemical, structural and biophysical studies, some aspects of ciliary motility remain elusive, such as the regulation of beating patterns and the energetic efficiency of these nanomachines. Here, we introduce an experimental method to measure ATP consumption of actively beating axonemes on a single-cell level. We encapsulated individual sea urchin sperm with demembranated flagellum inside water-in-oil emulsion droplets and measured the axonemes ATP consumption by monitoring fluorescence intensity of a fluorophore-coupled reporter system for ATP turnover in the droplet. Concomitant phase contrast imaging allowed us to extract a linear dependence between the ATP consumption rate and the flagellar beating frequency, with ~2.3e5 ATP molecules consumed per beat of a demembranated flagellum. Increasing the viscosity of the aqueous medium led to modified beating waveforms of the axonemes and to higher energy consumption per beat cycle. Our single-cell experimental platform provides both new insights into the beating mechanism of flagella and a powerful tool for future studies.

  2. ATP Consumption of Eukaryotic Flagella Measured at a Single-Cell Level.

    PubMed

    Chen, Daniel T N; Heymann, Michael; Fraden, Seth; Nicastro, Daniela; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-12-15

    The motility of cilia and flagella is driven by thousands of dynein motors that hydrolyze adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Despite decades of genetic, biochemical, structural, and biophysical studies, some aspects of ciliary motility remain elusive, such as the regulation of beating patterns and the energetic efficiency of these nanomachines. In this study, we introduce an experimental method to measure ATP consumption of actively beating axonemes on a single-cell level. We encapsulated individual sea urchin sperm with demembranated flagellum inside water-in-oil emulsion droplets and measured the axoneme's ATP consumption by monitoring fluorescence intensity of a fluorophore-coupled reporter system for ATP turnover in the droplet. Concomitant phase contrast imaging allowed us to extract a linear dependence between the ATP consumption rate and the flagellar beating frequency, with ∼2.3 × 10(5) ATP molecules consumed per beat of a demembranated flagellum. Increasing the viscosity of the aqueous medium led to modified beating waveforms of the axonemes and to higher energy consumption per beat cycle. Our single-cell experimental platform provides both new insights, to our knowledge, into the beating mechanism of flagella and a powerful tool for future studies.

  3. Fluorescence emission spectral shift measurements of membrane potential in single cells.

    PubMed

    Kao, W Y; Davis, C E; Kim, Y I; Beach, J M

    2001-08-01

    Previous measurements of transmembrane potential using the electrochromic probe di-8-ANEPPS have used the excitation spectral shift response by alternating excitation between two wavelengths centered at voltage-sensitive portions of the excitation spectrum and recording at a single wavelength near the peak of the emission spectrum. Recently, the emission spectral shift associated with the change in transmembrane potential has been used for continuous membrane potential monitoring. To characterize this form of the electrochromic response from di-8-ANEPPS, we have obtained fluorescence signals from single cells in response to step changes in transmembrane potentials set with a patch electrode, using single wavelength excitation near the peak of the dye absorption spectrum. Fluorescence changes at two wavelengths near voltage-sensitive portions of the emission spectrum and shifts in the complete emission spectrum were determined for emission from plasma membrane and internal membrane. We found that the fluorescence ratio from either dual-wavelength recordings, or from opposite sides of the emission spectrum, varied linearly with the amplitude of the transmembrane potential step between -80 and +60 mV. Voltage dependence of difference spectra exhibit a crossover point near the peak of the emission spectra with approximately equal gain and loss of fluorescence intensity on each side of the spectrum and equal response amplitude for depolarization and hyperpolarization. These results are consistent with an electrochromic mechanism of action and demonstrate how the emission spectral shift response can be used to measure the transmembrane potential in single cells.

  4. ATP Consumption of Eukaryotic Flagella Measured at a Single-Cell Level

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Daniel T.N.; Heymann, Michael; Fraden, Seth; Nicastro, Daniela; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-01-01

    The motility of cilia and flagella is driven by thousands of dynein motors that hydrolyze adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Despite decades of genetic, biochemical, structural, and biophysical studies, some aspects of ciliary motility remain elusive, such as the regulation of beating patterns and the energetic efficiency of these nanomachines. In this study, we introduce an experimental method to measure ATP consumption of actively beating axonemes on a single-cell level. We encapsulated individual sea urchin sperm with demembranated flagellum inside water-in-oil emulsion droplets and measured the axoneme’s ATP consumption by monitoring fluorescence intensity of a fluorophore-coupled reporter system for ATP turnover in the droplet. Concomitant phase contrast imaging allowed us to extract a linear dependence between the ATP consumption rate and the flagellar beating frequency, with ∼2.3 × 105 ATP molecules consumed per beat of a demembranated flagellum. Increasing the viscosity of the aqueous medium led to modified beating waveforms of the axonemes and to higher energy consumption per beat cycle. Our single-cell experimental platform provides both new insights, to our knowledge, into the beating mechanism of flagella and a powerful tool for future studies. PMID:26682814

  5. High-sensitivity measurements of multiple kinase activities in live single cells.

    PubMed

    Regot, Sergi; Hughey, Jacob J; Bajar, Bryce T; Carrasco, Silvia; Covert, Markus W

    2014-06-19

    Increasing evidence has shown that population dynamics are qualitatively different from single-cell behaviors. Reporters to probe dynamic, single-cell behaviors are desirable yet relatively scarce. Here, we describe an easy-to-implement and generalizable technology to generate reporters of kinase activity for individual cells. Our technology converts phosphorylation into a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling event that can be measured by epifluorescence microscopy. Our reporters reproduce kinase activity for multiple types of kinases and allow for calculation of active kinase concentrations via a mathematical model. Using this technology, we made several experimental observations that had previously been technicallyunfeasible, including stimulus-dependent patterns of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation. We also measured JNK, p38, and ERK activities simultaneously, finding that p38 regulates the peak number, but not the intensity, of ERK fluctuations. Our approach opens the possibility of analyzing a wide range of kinase-mediated processes in individual cells.

  6. A microfluidic device for simultaneous electrical and mechanical measurements on single cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Zheng, Yi; Tan, Qingyuan; Zhang, Yan Liang; Li, Jason; Geddie, William R.; Jewett, Michael A. S.; Sun, Yu

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a microfluidic device for simultaneous mechanical and electrical characterization of single cells. The device performs two types of cellular characterization (impedance spectroscopy and micropipette aspiration) on a single chip to enable cell electrical and mechanical characterization. To investigate the performance of the device design, electrical and mechanical properties of MC-3T3 osteoblast cells were measured. Based on electrical models, membrane capacitance of MC-3T3 cells was determined to be 3.39±1.23 and 2.99±0.82 pF at the aspiration pressure of 50 and 100 Pa, respectively. Cytoplasm resistance values were 110.1±37.7 kΩ (50 Pa) and 145.2±44.3 kΩ (100 Pa). Aspiration length of cells was found to be 0.813±0.351 μm at 50 Pa and 1.771±0.623 μm at 100 Pa. Quantified Young’s modulus values were 377±189 Pa at 50 Pa and 344±156 Pa at 100 Pa. Experimental results demonstrate the device’s capability for characterizing both electrical and mechanical properties of single cells. PMID:21523251

  7. Ultrasonic Scattering Measurements of a Live Single Cell at 86 MHz

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Changyang; Jung, Hayong; Lam, Kwok Ho; Yoon, Changhan; Shung, K. Kirk

    2016-01-01

    Cell separation and sorting techniques have been employed biomedical applications such as cancer diagnosis and cell gene expression analysis. The capability to accurately measure ultrasonic scattering properties from cells is crucial in making an ultrasonic cell sorter a reality if ultrasound scattering is to be used as the sensing mechanism as well. To assess the performance of sensing and identifying live single cells with high-frequency ultrasound, an 86-MHz lithium niobate press-focused single-element acoustic transducer was used in a high-frequency ultrasound scattering measurement system that was custom designed and developed for minimizing noise and allowing better mobility. Peak-to-peak echo amplitude, integrated backscatter (IB) coefficient, spectral parameters including spectral slope and intercept, and midband fit from spectral analysis of the backscattered echoes were measured and calculated from a live single cell of two different types on an agar surface: leukemia cells (K562 cells) and red blood cells (RBCs). The amplitudes of echo signals from K562 cells and RBCs were 48.25 ± 11.98 mVpp and 56.97 ± 7.53 mVpp, respectively. The IB coefficient was −89.39 ± 2.44 dB for K562 cells and −89.00 ± 1.19 dB for RBCs. The spectral slope and intercept were 0.30 ± 0.19 dB/MHz and −56.07 ± 17.17 dB, respectively, for K562 cells and 0.78 ± 0.092 dB/MHz and −98.18 ± 8.80 dB, respectively, for RBCs. Midband fits of K562 cells and RBCs were −31.02 ± 3.04 dB and −33.51 ± 1.55 dB, respectively. Acoustic cellular discrimination via these parameters was tested by Student’s t-test. Their values, except for the IB value, showed statistically significant difference (p < 0.001). This paper reports for the first time that ultrasonic scattering measurements can be made on a live single cell with a highly focused high-frequency ultrasound microbeam at 86 MHz. These results also suggest the feasibility of ultrasonic scattering as a sensing mechanism in

  8. Parallel measurement of dynamic changes in translation rates in single cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyuho; Jaimovich, Ariel; Dey, Gautam; Ruggero, Davide; Meyuhas, Oded; Sonenberg, Nahum; Meyer, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Protein concentrations are often regulated by dynamic changes in translation rates. Nevertheless, it has been challenging to directly monitor changes in translation in living cells. We have developed a reporter system to measure real-time changes of translation rates in human or mouse individual cells by conjugating translation regulatory motifs to sequences encoding a nuclear targeted fluorescent protein and a controllable destabilization domain. Application of the method showed that individual cells undergo marked fluctuations in the translation rate of mRNAs whose 5' terminal oligopyrimidine (5' TOP) motif regulates the synthesis of ribosomal proteins. Furthermore, we show that small reductions in amino acid levels signal through different mTOR-dependent pathways to control TOP mRNA translation, whereas larger reductions in amino acid levels control translation through eIF2A. Our study demonstrates that dynamic measurements of single-cell activities of translation regulatory motifs can be used to identify and investigate fundamental principles of translation.

  9. Measurement of intracellular Ca2+ concentration in single cells using ratiometric calcium dyes.

    PubMed

    Srikanth, Sonal; Gwack, Yousang

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) is useful to study the upstream and downstream events of Ca(2+) signaling. Ca(2+)-binding proteins including EF-hand-containing proteins are important downstream effector molecules after an increase of [Ca(2+)](i). Conversely, these proteins can also act as key modulators for regulation of [Ca(2+)](i) by sensing the Ca(2+) levels in the intracellular organelles and cytoplasm. Here we describe a single-cell Ca(2+) imaging technique that was used to measure the intracellular Ca(2+) levels to examine the function of Ca(2+)-binding proteins, STIM1 and Calcium release-activated Calcium channel regulator 2A (CRACR2A), using ratiometric Ca(2+) dye Fura-2 in adherent and non-adherent cells.

  10. SC3-seq: a method for highly parallel and quantitative measurement of single-cell gene expression.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tomonori; Yabuta, Yukihiro; Okamoto, Ikuhiro; Aramaki, Shinya; Yokobayashi, Shihori; Kurimoto, Kazuki; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi; Nakagawa, Masato; Yamamoto, Takuya; Saitou, Mitinori

    2015-05-19

    Single-cell mRNA sequencing (RNA-seq) methods have undergone rapid development in recent years, and transcriptome analysis of relevant cell populations at single-cell resolution has become a key research area of biomedical sciences. We here present single-cell mRNA 3-prime end sequencing (SC3-seq), a practical methodology based on PCR amplification followed by 3-prime-end enrichment for highly quantitative, parallel and cost-effective measurement of gene expression in single cells. The SC3-seq allows excellent quantitative measurement of mRNAs ranging from the 10,000-cell to 1-cell level, and accordingly, allows an accurate estimate of the transcript levels by a regression of the read counts of spike-in RNAs with defined copy numbers. The SC3-seq has clear advantages over other typical single-cell RNA-seq methodologies for the quantitative measurement of transcript levels and at a sequence depth required for the saturation of transcript detection. The SC3-seq distinguishes four distinct cell types in the peri-implantation mouse blastocysts. Furthermore, the SC3-seq reveals the heterogeneity in human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) cultured under on-feeder as well as feeder-free conditions, demonstrating a more homogeneous property of the feeder-free hiPSCs. We propose that SC3-seq might be used as a powerful strategy for single-cell transcriptome analysis in a broad range of investigations in biomedical sciences.

  11. Quantitative photoacoustics to measure single cell melanin production and nanoparticle attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Kiran; Eshein, Adam; Chandrasekhar, Anand; Viator, John A.

    2015-04-01

    Photoacoustics can be used as a label-free spectroscopic method of identifying pigmented proteins and characterizing their intracellular concentration over time in a single living cell. The authors use a microscopic laser irradiation system with a 5 ns, Q-switched laser focused onto single cells in order to collect photoacoustic responses of melanoma cells from the HS936 cell line and gold nanoparticle labeled breast cancer cells from the T47D cell line. The volume averaged intracellular concentration of melanin is found to range from 29-270 mM for single melanoma cells and the number of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) is shown to range from 850-5900 AuNPs/cell. Additionally, the melanin production response to UV-A light stimulus is measured in four melanoma cells to find a mass production rate of 5.7 pg of melanin every 15 min.

  12. Quantitative photoacoustics to measure single cell melanin production and nanoparticle attachment

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Kiran; Eshein, Adam; Chandrasekhar, Anand; Viator, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustics can be used as a label-free spectroscopic method of identifying pigmented proteins and characterizing their intracellular concentration over time in a single living cell. The authors use a microscopic laser irradiation system with a 5 ns, Q-switched laser focused onto single cells in order to collect photoacoustic responses of melanoma cells from the HS936 cell line and gold nanoparticle labeled breast cancer cells from the T47D cell line. The volume averaged intracellular concentration of melanin is found to range from 29–270mM for single melanoma cells and the number of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) is shown to range from 850–5900 AuNPs/cell. Additionally, the melanin production response to UV-A light stimulus is measured in four melanoma cells to find a mass production rate of 5.7 pg of melanin every 15 minutes. PMID:25803095

  13. PolyMUMPs MEMS device to measure mechanical stiffness of single cells in aqueous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnat, S.; King, H.; Forbrigger, C.; Hubbard, T.

    2015-02-01

    A method of experimentally determining the mechanical stiffness of single cells by using differential displacement measurements in a two stage spring system is presented. The spring system consists of a known MEMS reference spring and an unknown cellular stiffness: the ratio of displacements is related to the ratio of stiffness. A polyMUMPs implementation for aqueous media is presented and displacement measurements made from optical microphotographs using a FFT based displacement method with a repeatability of ~20 nm. The approach was first validated on a MEMS two stage spring system of known stiffness. The measured stiffness ratios of control structures (i) MEMS spring systems and (ii) polystyrene microspheres were found to agree with theoretical values. Mechanical tests were then performed on Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker’s yeast) in aqueous media. Cells were placed (using a micropipette) inside MEMS measuring structures and compressed between two jaws using an electrostatic actuator and displacements measured. Tested cells showed stiffness values between 5.4 and 8.4 N m-1 with an uncertainty of 11%. In addition, non-viable cells were tested by exposing viable cells to methanol. The resultant mean cell stiffness dropped by factor of 3 × and an explicit discrimination between viable and non-viable cells based on mechanical stiffness was seen.

  14. The physical origins of transit time measurements for rapid, single cell mechanotyping.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Kendra D; Scott, Michael B; Bruce, Samuel L; Gopinath, Ajay B; Bikos, Dimitri; Mason, Thomas G; Kim, Jin Woong; Choi, Hong Sung; Rowat, Amy C

    2016-08-16

    The mechanical phenotype or 'mechanotype' of cells is emerging as a potential biomarker for cell types ranging from pluripotent stem cells to cancer cells. Using a microfluidic device, cell mechanotype can be rapidly analyzed by measuring the time required for cells to deform as they flow through constricted channels. While cells typically exhibit deformation timescales, or transit times, on the order of milliseconds to tens of seconds, transit times can span several orders of magnitude and vary from day to day within a population of single cells; this makes it challenging to characterize different cell samples based on transit time data. Here we investigate how variability in transit time measurements depends on both experimental factors and heterogeneity in physical properties across a population of single cells. We find that simultaneous transit events that occur across neighboring constrictions can alter transit time, but only significantly when more than 65% of channels in the parallel array are occluded. Variability in transit time measurements is also affected by the age of the device following plasma treatment, which could be attributed to changes in channel surface properties. We additionally investigate the role of variability in cell physical properties. Transit time depends on cell size; by binning transit time data for cells of similar diameters, we reduce measurement variability by 20%. To gain further insight into the effects of cell-to-cell differences in physical properties, we fabricate a panel of gel particles and oil droplets with tunable mechanical properties. We demonstrate that particles with homogeneous composition exhibit a marked reduction in transit time variability, suggesting that the width of transit time distributions reflects the degree of heterogeneity in subcellular structure and mechanical properties within a cell population. Our results also provide fundamental insight into the physical underpinnings of transit measurements

  15. Oxygen measurements via phosphorescence.

    PubMed

    Shaban, Sami; Marzouqi, Farida; Al Mansouri, Aysha; Penefsky, Harvey S; Souid, Abdul-Kader

    2010-12-01

    Accurate measurements of dissolved O(2) as a function of time have numerous chemical and biological applications. The Pd (II) complex of meso-tetra-(4-sulfonatophenyl)-tetrabenzoporphyrin (Pd phosphor) was used for this purpose. Detection is based on the principle that the phosphorescence of this oxygen probe is inversely related to dissolved O(2) (O(2) quenches the phosphorescence). Biologic samples containing the Pd phosphor were flashed (10/s) with a peak output of 625nm; emitted light was detected at 800nm. Amplified pulses of phosphorescence were digitized at 1-2MHz using an analog/digital converter (PCI-DAS 4020/12 I/O Board) with outputs ranging from 1 to 20MHz. Assessment revealed a customized program was necessary. Pulses were captured using a developed software at 0.1-4MHz, depending on the speed of the computer. O(2) concentration was calculated by fitting to an exponential the decay of the phosphorescence. Twelve tasks were identified, which allowed full control and customization of the data acquisition, storage and analysis. The program used Microsoft Visual Basic 6 (VB6), Microsoft Access Database 2007, and a Universal Library component that allowed direct reading from the PCI-DAS 4020/12 I/O Board. It involved a relational database design to store experiments, pulses and pulse metadata, including phosphorescence decay rates. The method permitted reliable measurements of cellular O(2) consumption over several hours. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Measuring activity in the ubiquitin-proteasome system: From large scale discoveries to single cells analysis

    PubMed Central

    Melvin, Adam T.; Woss, Gregery S.; Park, Jessica H.; Waters, Marcey L.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is the primary pathway responsible for the recognition and degradation of misfolded, damaged, or tightly regulated proteins in addition to performing essential roles in DNA repair, cell cycle regulation, cell migration, and the immune response. While traditional biochemical techniques have proven useful in the identification of key proteins involved in this pathway, the implementation of novel reporters responsible for measuring enzymatic activity of the UPS have provided valuable insight into the effectiveness of therapeutics and role of the UPS in various human diseases such as multiple myeloma and Huntington’s disease. These reporters, usually consisting of a recognition sequences fused to an analytical handle, are designed to specifically evaluate enzymatic activity of certain members of the UPS including the proteasome, E3 ubiquitin ligases, and deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs). This review highlights the more commonly used reporters employed in a variety of scenarios ranging from high-throughput screening of novel inhibitors to single cell microscopy techniques measuring E3 ligase or proteasome activity. Finally, recent work is presented highlighting the development of novel degron-based substrate designed to overcome the limitations of current reporting techniques in measuring E3 ligase and proteasome activity in patient samples. PMID:23686610

  17. Measuring activity in the ubiquitin-proteasome system: from large scale discoveries to single cells analysis.

    PubMed

    Melvin, Adam T; Woss, Gregery S; Park, Jessica H; Waters, Marcey L; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2013-09-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is the primary pathway responsible for the recognition and degradation of misfolded, damaged, or tightly regulated proteins in addition to performing essential roles in DNA repair, cell cycle regulation, cell migration, and the immune response. While traditional biochemical techniques have proven useful in the identification of key proteins involved in this pathway, the implementation of novel reporters responsible for measuring enzymatic activity of the UPS has provided valuable insight into the effectiveness of therapeutics and role of the UPS in various human diseases such as multiple myeloma and Huntington's disease. These reporters, usually consisting of a recognition sequence fused to an analytical handle, are designed to specifically evaluate enzymatic activity of certain members of the UPS including the proteasome, E3 ubiquitin ligases, and deubiquitinating enzymes. This review highlights the more commonly used reporters employed in a variety of scenarios ranging from high-throughput screening of novel inhibitors to single cell microscopy techniques measuring E3 ligase or proteasome activity. Finally, a recent study is presented highlighting the development of a novel degron-based substrate designed to overcome the limitations of current reporting techniques in measuring E3 ligase and proteasome activity in patient samples.

  18. MEMS squeezer for the measurement of single cell rupture force, stiffness change, and hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barazani, B.; Warnat, S.; Fine, A.; Hubbard, T.

    2017-02-01

    A MEMS squeezer able to compress single living cells underwater until rupture was designed and tested. The relatively large motion range of the device in aqueous media (~2.5 µm) allows provoking cell disruption while measuring cell mechanical properties before and after membrane rupture. An AC driven electrothermal micro actuator with mechanical amplification pressed single cells against a reference back spring. Deformations of the cell and the reference spring were measured with nanoscale resolution using optical Fourier transform techniques. The motion of the reference spring divided by the cell deformation provides the cell stiffness relative to the reference spring constant. An abrupt change in the cell stiffness and the appearance of cracks indicated the cell wall rupture force was reached. A total of 22 baker’s yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) were squeezed with the micro device. The average force necessary to rupture the cell membrane was 0.47  ±  0.1 µN. Before rupture the cells had an average stiffness of 9.3  ±  3.1 N m-1 the post-rupture stiffness dropped to 0.94  ±  0.57 N m-1. Cell hysteresis was also measured: cells squeezed and released before reaching the rupture force showed residual deformations below 100 nm, while cells squeezed past the rupture force and then released showed residual deformations between 490 and 990 nm.

  19. Parallel measurement of dynamic changes in translation rates in single cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kyuho; Jaimovich, Ariel; Dey, Gautam; Ruggero, Davide; Meyuhas, Oded; Sonenberg, Nahum; Meyer, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Protein concentrations are often regulated by dynamic changes in translation rates. Nevertheless, it has been challenging to directly monitor changes in translation in living cells. We have developed a reporter system to measure real-time changes of translation rates in human or mouse individual cells by conjugating translation regulatory motifs to sequences encoding a nuclear targeted fluorescent protein and a controllable destabilization domain. Application of the method showed that individual cells undergo marked fluctuations in the translation rate of mRNAs whose 5′ terminal oligopyrimidine (5′ TOP) motif regulates the synthesis of ribosomal proteins. Furthermore, we show that small reductions in amino acid levels signal through different mTOR-dependent pathways to control TOP mRNA translation, whereas larger reductions in amino acid levels control translation through eIF2A. Our study demonstrates that dynamic measurements of single-cell activities of translation regulatory motifs can be used to identify and investigate fundamental principles of translation. PMID:24213167

  20. Finite Element Analysis of Single Cell Stiffness Measurements Using PZT-Integrated Buckling Nanoneedles

    PubMed Central

    Rad, Maryam Alsadat; Tijjani, Auwal Shehu; Ahmad, Mohd Ridzuan; Auwal, Shehu Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a new technique for real-time single cell stiffness measurement using lead zirconate titanate (PZT)-integrated buckling nanoneedles. The PZT and the buckling part of the nanoneedle have been modelled and validated using the ABAQUS software. The two parts are integrated together to function as a single unit. After calibration, the stiffness, Young’s modulus, Poisson’s ratio and sensitivity of the PZT-integrated buckling nanoneedle have been determined to be 0.7100 N·m−1, 123.4700 GPa, 0.3000 and 0.0693 V·m·N−1, respectively. Three Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells have been modelled and validated based on compression tests. The average global stiffness and Young’s modulus of the cells are determined to be 10.8867 ± 0.0094 N·m−1 and 110.7033 ± 0.0081 MPa, respectively. The nanoneedle and the cell have been assembled to measure the local stiffness of the single Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells The local stiffness, Young’s modulus and PZT output voltage of the three different size Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been determined at different environmental conditions. We investigated that, at low temperature the stiffness value is low to adapt to the change in the environmental condition. As a result, Saccharomyces cerevisiae becomes vulnerable to viral and bacterial attacks. Therefore, the proposed technique will serve as a quick and accurate process to diagnose diseases at early stage in a cell for effective treatment. PMID:28025571

  1. Battery-powered portable instrument system for single-cell trapping, impedance measurements, and modeling analyses.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Sung-Lin; Chiang, Yang; Wang, Min-Haw; Chen, Ming-Kun; Jang, Ling-Sheng

    2014-08-01

    A battery-powered portable instrument system for the single-HeLa-cell trapping and analyses is developed. A method of alternating current electrothermal (ACET) and DEP are employed for the cell trapping and the method of impedance spectroscopy is employed for cell characterizations. The proposed instrument (160 mm × 170 mm × 110 mm, 1269 g) equips with a highly efficient energy-saving design that promises approximately 120 h of use. It includes an impedance analyzer performing an excitation voltage of 0.2-2 Vpp and a frequency sweep of 11-101 kHz, function generator with the sine wave output at an operating voltage of 1-50 Vpp with a frequency of 4-12 MHz, cell-trapping biochip, microscope, and input/output interface. The biochip for the single cell trapping is designed and simulated based on a combination of ACET and DEP forces. In order to improve measurement accuracy, the curve fitting method is adopted to calibrate the proposed impedance spectroscopy. Measurement results from the proposed system are compared with results from a precision impedance analyzer. The trapped cell can be modeled for numerical analyses. Many advantages are offered in the proposed instrument such as the small volume, real-time monitoring, rapid analysis, low cost, low-power consumption, and portable application. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Finite Element Analysis of Single Cell Stiffness Measurements Using PZT-Integrated Buckling Nanoneedles.

    PubMed

    Rad, Maryam Alsadat; Tijjani, Auwal Shehu; Ahmad, Mohd Ridzuan; Auwal, Shehu Muhammad

    2016-12-23

    This paper proposes a new technique for real-time single cell stiffness measurement using lead zirconate titanate (PZT)-integrated buckling nanoneedles. The PZT and the buckling part of the nanoneedle have been modelled and validated using the ABAQUS software. The two parts are integrated together to function as a single unit. After calibration, the stiffness, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio and sensitivity of the PZT-integrated buckling nanoneedle have been determined to be 0.7100 N·m(-1), 123.4700 GPa, 0.3000 and 0.0693 V·m·N(-1), respectively. Three Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells have been modelled and validated based on compression tests. The average global stiffness and Young's modulus of the cells are determined to be 10.8867 ± 0.0094 N·m(-1) and 110.7033 ± 0.0081 MPa, respectively. The nanoneedle and the cell have been assembled to measure the local stiffness of the single Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells The local stiffness, Young's modulus and PZT output voltage of the three different size Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been determined at different environmental conditions. We investigated that, at low temperature the stiffness value is low to adapt to the change in the environmental condition. As a result, Saccharomyces cerevisiae becomes vulnerable to viral and bacterial attacks. Therefore, the proposed technique will serve as a quick and accurate process to diagnose diseases at early stage in a cell for effective treatment.

  3. Single-Cell Measurements of the Contributions of Cytosolic Na+ and K+ to Salt Tolerance1

    PubMed Central

    Carden, David E.; Walker, David J.; Flowers, Timothy J.; Miller, Anthony J.

    2003-01-01

    Ion concentrations in the roots of two barley (Hordeum vulgare) varieties that differed in NaCl tolerance were compared after exposure to NaCl. Triple-barreled H+-, K+-, and Na+-selective microelectrodes were used to measure cytosolic activities of the three ions after 5 and 8 d of NaCl stress. In both varieties of barley, it was only possible to record successfully from root cortical cells because the epidermal cells appeared to be damaged. The data show that from the 1st d of full NaCl stress, there were differences in the way in which the two varieties responded. At 5 d, the tolerant variety maintained a 10-fold lower cytosolic Na+ than the more sensitive variety, although by 8 d the two varieties were not significantly different. At this time, the more tolerant variety was better at maintaining root cytosolic K+ in the high-NaCl background than was the more sensitive variety. In contrast to earlier work on K+-starved barley (Walker et al., 1996), there was no acidification of the cytosol associated with the decreased cytosolic K+ activity during NaCl stress. These single-cell measurements of cytosolic and vacuolar ion activities allow calculation of thermodynamic gradients that can be used to reveal (or predict) the type of active transporters at both the plasma membrane and tonoplast. PMID:12586891

  4. Decoding the Regulatory Network for Blood Development from Single-Cell Gene Expression Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Haghverdi, Laleh; Lilly, Andrew J.; Tanaka, Yosuke; Wilkinson, Adam C.; Buettner, Florian; Macaulay, Iain C.; Jawaid, Wajid; Diamanti, Evangelia; Nishikawa, Shin-Ichi; Piterman, Nir; Kouskoff, Valerie; Theis, Fabian J.; Fisher, Jasmin; Göttgens, Berthold

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the use of diffusion maps and network synthesis from state transition graphs to better understand developmental pathways from single cell gene expression profiling. We map the progression of mesoderm towards blood in the mouse by single-cell expression analysis of 3,934 cells, capturing cells with blood-forming potential at four sequential developmental stages. By adapting the diffusion plot methodology for dimensionality reduction to single-cell data, we reconstruct the developmental journey to blood at single-cell resolution. Using transitions between individual cellular states as input, we develop a single-cell network synthesis toolkit to generate a computationally executable transcriptional regulatory network model that recapitulates blood development. Model predictions were validated by showing that Sox7 inhibits primitive erythropoiesis, and that Sox and Hox factors control early expression of Erg. We therefore demonstrate that single-cell analysis of a developing organ coupled with computational approaches can reveal the transcriptional programs that control organogenesis. PMID:25664528

  5. Single-cell measurement of archaeal and bacterial carbon assimilation in dark Pacific Ocean waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekas, A. E.; Mayali, X.; Parada, A. E.; Fuhrman, J. A.; Weber, P. K.; Pett-Ridge, J.

    2016-02-01

    Microbial activity in the dark ocean plays a critical role in nutrient and elemental cycling. Here, we investigated the activity of archaea and bacteria on the single-cell level during dark incubations of Pacific Ocean water, and specifically their capacity for chemoautotrophy. Samples were collected 19 km off the coast of Los Angeles, at a depth of 150 m, and off the coast of San Francisco, at the surface. Incubations were amended with isotopically-labeled organic or inorganic carbon (13C-bicarbonate, 15N-amino acids or dual-labeled 13C-15N-amino acids), and uptake was detected using nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS). We analyzed 4,968 individual cells using an automated NanoSIMS analysis with particle-recognition software. After 7 days, 95% and 89% of cells (deep and shallow, respectively) demonstrated anabolic activity, i.e., incorporation of at least one isotopically-labeled substrate. Chemoautotrophy was detected at both sites, with 36% and 9% of cells (deep and shallow, respectively) assimilating 13C-bicarbonate in the dark. Fluorescence in situ hybridization coupled to NanoSIMS analysis was performed to link 16S rRNA phylogeny to patterns of C-assimilation. Thaumarchaea were found to dominate chemoautotrophy at both sites, with 13C-bicarbonate assimilation in nearly all cells hybridized with the Cren537 probe, but none hybridized with a general bacterial probe (Eub338). Conversely, widespread assimilation of both 15N and 13C from 15N-13C-amino acids was observed in the bacterial assemblage, but not in the Thaumarchaea. Interestingly, Thaumarchaeal cells were enriched in 15N after incubation with 15N-13C-amino acids, but not 13C, suggesting selective N assimilation from amino acids or substrate recycling. Together, our results demonstrate the value of single-cell measurements in characterizing patterns of C metabolism in mixed microbial community, and underscore the importance of Thaumarchaea in marine chemoautotrophy.

  6. Measuring fast gene dynamics in single cells with time-lapse luminescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mazo-Vargas, Anyimilehidi; Park, Heungwon; Aydin, Mert; Buchler, Nicolas E.

    2014-01-01

    Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy is an important tool for measuring in vivo gene dynamics in single cells. However, fluorescent proteins are limited by slow chromophore maturation times and the cellular autofluorescence or phototoxicity that arises from light excitation. An alternative is luciferase, an enzyme that emits photons and is active upon folding. The photon flux per luciferase is significantly lower than that for fluorescent proteins. Thus time-lapse luminescence microscopy has been successfully used to track gene dynamics only in larger organisms and for slower processes, for which more total photons can be collected in one exposure. Here we tested green, yellow, and red beetle luciferases and optimized substrate conditions for in vivo luminescence. By combining time-lapse luminescence microscopy with a microfluidic device, we tracked the dynamics of cell cycle genes in single yeast with subminute exposure times over many generations. Our method was faster and in cells with much smaller volumes than previous work. Fluorescence of an optimized reporter (Venus) lagged luminescence by 15–20 min, which is consistent with its known rate of chromophore maturation in yeast. Our work demonstrates that luciferases are better than fluorescent proteins at faithfully tracking the underlying gene expression. PMID:25232010

  7. Classification of cell types using a microfluidic device for mechanical and electrical measurement on single cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Zheng, Yi; Tan, Qingyuan; Shojaei-Baghini, Ehsan; Zhang, Yan Liang; Li, Jason; Prasad, Preethy; You, Lidan; Wu, Xiao Yu; Sun, Yu

    2011-09-21

    This paper presents a microfluidic system for cell type classification using mechanical and electrical measurements on single cells. Cells are aspirated continuously through a constriction channel with cell elongations and impedance profiles measured simultaneously. The cell transit time through the constriction channel and the impedance amplitude ratio are quantified as cell's mechanical and electrical property indicators. The microfluidic device and measurement system were used to characterize osteoblasts (n=206) and osteocytes (n=217), revealing that osteoblasts, compared with osteocytes, have a larger cell elongation length (64.51 ± 14.98 μm vs. 39.78 ± 7.16 μm), a longer transit time (1.84 ± 1.48 s vs. 0.94 ± 1.07 s), and a higher impedance amplitude ratio (1.198 ± 0.071 vs. 1.099 ± 0.038). Pattern recognition using the neural network was applied to cell type classification, resulting in classification success rates of 69.8% (transit time alone), 85.3% (impedance amplitude ratio alone), and 93.7% (both transit time and impedance amplitude ratio as input to neural network) for osteoblasts and osteocytes. The system was also applied to test EMT6 (n=747) and EMT6/AR1.0 cells (n=770, EMT6 treated by doxorubicin) that have a comparable size distribution (cell elongation length: 51.47 ± 11.33 μm vs. 50.09 ± 9.70 μm). The effects of cell size on transit time and impedance amplitude ratio were investigated. Cell classification success rates were 51.3% (cell elongation alone), 57.5% (transit time alone), 59.6% (impedance amplitude ratio alone), and 70.2% (both transit time and impedance amplitude ratio). These preliminary results suggest that biomechanical and bioelectrical parameters, when used in combination, could provide a higher cell classification success rate than using electrical or mechanical parameter alone.

  8. Single cell measurement of telomerase expression and splicing using microfluidic emulsion cultures

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Richard; Hart, Kristina; Mathies, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Telomerase is a reverse transcriptase that maintains telomeres on the ends of chromosomes, allowing rapidly dividing cells to proliferate while avoiding senescence and apoptosis. Understanding telomerase gene expression and splicing at the single cell level could yield insights into the roles of telomerase during normal cell growth as well as cancer development. Here we use droplet-based single cell culture followed by single cell or colony transcript abundance analysis to investigate the relationship between cell growth and transcript abundance of the telomerase genes encoding the RNA component (hTR) and protein component (hTERT) as well as hTERT splicing. Jurkat and K562 cells were examined under normal cell culture conditions and during exposure to curcumin, a natural compound with anti-carcinogenic and telomerase activity-reducing properties. Individual cells predominantly express single hTERT splice variants, with the α+/β− variant exhibiting significant transcript abundance bimodality that is sustained through cell division. Sub-lethal curcumin exposure results in reduced bimodality of all hTERT splice variants and significant upregulation of alpha splicing, suggesting a possible role in cellular stress response. The single cell culture and transcript abundance analysis method presented here provides the tools necessary for multiparameter single cell analysis which will be critical for understanding phenotypes of heterogeneous cell populations, disease cell populations and their drug response. PMID:26202962

  9. Computation and measurement of cell decision making errors using single cell data.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Iman; Cheong, Raymond; Lipniacki, Tomasz; Levchenko, Andre; Emamian, Effat S; Abdi, Ali

    2017-04-01

    In this study a new computational method is developed to quantify decision making errors in cells, caused by noise and signaling failures. Analysis of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) signaling pathway which regulates the transcription factor Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) using this method identifies two types of incorrect cell decisions called false alarm and miss. These two events represent, respectively, declaring a signal which is not present and missing a signal that does exist. Using single cell experimental data and the developed method, we compute false alarm and miss error probabilities in wild-type cells and provide a formulation which shows how these metrics depend on the signal transduction noise level. We also show that in the presence of abnormalities in a cell, decision making processes can be significantly affected, compared to a wild-type cell, and the method is able to model and measure such effects. In the TNF-NF-κB pathway, the method computes and reveals changes in false alarm and miss probabilities in A20-deficient cells, caused by cell's inability to inhibit TNF-induced NF-κB response. In biological terms, a higher false alarm metric in this abnormal TNF signaling system indicates perceiving more cytokine signals which in fact do not exist at the system input, whereas a higher miss metric indicates that it is highly likely to miss signals that actually exist. Overall, this study demonstrates the ability of the developed method for modeling cell decision making errors under normal and abnormal conditions, and in the presence of transduction noise uncertainty. Compared to the previously reported pathway capacity metric, our results suggest that the introduced decision error metrics characterize signaling failures more accurately. This is mainly because while capacity is a useful metric to study information transmission in signaling pathways, it does not capture the overlap between TNF-induced noisy response curves.

  10. Computation and measurement of cell decision making errors using single cell data

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Iman; Cheong, Raymond; Levchenko, Andre; Emamian, Effat S.; Abdi, Ali

    2017-01-01

    In this study a new computational method is developed to quantify decision making errors in cells, caused by noise and signaling failures. Analysis of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) signaling pathway which regulates the transcription factor Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) using this method identifies two types of incorrect cell decisions called false alarm and miss. These two events represent, respectively, declaring a signal which is not present and missing a signal that does exist. Using single cell experimental data and the developed method, we compute false alarm and miss error probabilities in wild-type cells and provide a formulation which shows how these metrics depend on the signal transduction noise level. We also show that in the presence of abnormalities in a cell, decision making processes can be significantly affected, compared to a wild-type cell, and the method is able to model and measure such effects. In the TNF—NF-κB pathway, the method computes and reveals changes in false alarm and miss probabilities in A20-deficient cells, caused by cell’s inability to inhibit TNF-induced NF-κB response. In biological terms, a higher false alarm metric in this abnormal TNF signaling system indicates perceiving more cytokine signals which in fact do not exist at the system input, whereas a higher miss metric indicates that it is highly likely to miss signals that actually exist. Overall, this study demonstrates the ability of the developed method for modeling cell decision making errors under normal and abnormal conditions, and in the presence of transduction noise uncertainty. Compared to the previously reported pathway capacity metric, our results suggest that the introduced decision error metrics characterize signaling failures more accurately. This is mainly because while capacity is a useful metric to study information transmission in signaling pathways, it does not capture the overlap between TNF-induced noisy response curves. PMID:28379950

  11. Sugar concentrations along and across the Ricinus communis L. hypocotyl measured by single cell sampling analysis.

    PubMed

    Verscht, Jutta; Tomos, Deri; Komor, Ewald

    2006-11-01

    Single cell sap sampling and analysis were used to measure the longitudinal and radial distribution of sucrose, glucose and fructose in the apical cell division zone and in the basal, elongated zone of the Ricinus hypocotyl. Sucrose and hexose increased in concentration from the apex to the base of the seedling axis. In the cell division zone low hexose and sucrose concentrations prevailed in cortex and pith, with a slightly higher hexose concentration in pith cells. The sucrose concentrations in sieve tubes and in phloem were much higher than in the cortex and pith cells. In the basal zone of the hypocotyl high levels of sucrose in phloem, cortex and pith were found, therefore radial, diffusional sucrose flow away from the phloem was considered unlikely. It is proposed that radial flow of growth-water to the hypocotyl periphery together with the down-regulation of a sucrose transporter at the phloem leads to a preferential sucrose flow to the expanding cortex. The pith cells, which do not experience flow of growth-water, are probably insufficiently supplied with sucrose from the phloem resulting eventually in cell death as the plant grows. Shortage of sucrose supply, experimentally achieved by removal of the endosperm, led to sucrose hydrolysis in the pith. The sucrose levels in the other tissues decreased less. It appears that the hydrolysis to hexose was initiated to maintain the osmotic value in the pith cell sap. It is speculated that high hexose levels in the cells are indicative of insufficient sucrose supply via the phloem and that the pith cells are confronted with that situation during early seedling development.

  12. Tissue oxygen measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soller, Babs R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A device and method in accordance with the invention for determining the oxygen partial pressure (PO.sub.2) of a tissue by irradiating the tissue with optical radiation such that the light is emitted from the tissue, and by collecting the reflected or transmitted light from the tissue to form an optical spectrum. A spectral processor determines the PO.sub.2 level in tissue by processing this spectrum with a previously-constructed spectral calibration model. The tissue may, for example, be disposed underneath a covering tissue, such as skin, of a patient, and the tissue illuminated and light collected through the skin. Alternatively, direct tissue illumination and collection may be effected with a hand-held or endoscopic probe. A preferred system also determines pH from the same spectrum, and the processor may determine critical conditions and issue warnings based on parameter values.

  13. An automatic measure for classifying clusters of suspected spikes into single cells versus multiunits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tankus, Ariel; Yeshurun, Yehezkel; Fried, Itzhak

    2009-10-01

    While automatic spike sorting has been investigated for decades, little attention has been allotted to consistent evaluation criteria that will automatically determine whether a cluster of spikes represents the activity of a single cell or a multiunit. Consequently, the main tool for evaluation has remained visual inspection by a human. This paper quantifies the visual inspection process. The results are well-defined criteria for evaluation, which are mainly based on visual features of the spike waveform, and an automatic adaptive algorithm that learns the classification by a given human and can apply similar visual characteristics for classification of new data. To evaluate the suggested criteria, we recorded the activity of 1652 units (single cells and multiunits) from the cerebrum of 12 human patients undergoing evaluation for epilepsy surgery requiring implantation of chronic intracranial depth electrodes. The proposed method performed similar to human classifiers and obtained significantly higher accuracy than two existing methods (three variants of each). Evaluation on two synthetic datasets is also provided. The criteria are suggested as a standard for evaluation of the quality of separation that will allow comparison between different studies. The proposed algorithm is suitable for real-time operation and as such may allow brain-computer interfaces to treat single cells differently than multiunits.

  14. Single cell studies of mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) differentiation by electrical impedance measurements in a microfluidic device

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ying; Basu, Srinjan; Laue, Ernest; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Biological populations of cells show considerable cell-to-cell variability. Study of single cells and analysis of cell heterogeneity are considered to be critical in understanding biological processes such as stem cell differentiation and cancer development. Recent advances in lab-on-a-chip techniques have allowed single-cell capture in microfluidic channels with the possibility of precise environmental control and high throughput of experiments with minimal usage of samples and reagents. In recent years, label-free techniques such as electrical impedance spectroscopy have emerged as a non-invasive approach to studying cell properties. In this study, we have designed and fabricated a microfluidic device that combines hydrodynamic trapping of single cells in pre-defined locations with the capability of running electrical impedance measurements within the same device. We have measured mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) at different states during differentiation (t=0 h, 24 h and 48 h) and quantitatively analysed the changes in electrical parameters of cells during differentiation. A marked increase in the magnitude of the cell impedance is found during cell differentiation, which can be attributed to an increase in cell size. The analysis of the measurements shows that the nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratio decreases during this process. The degree of cell heterogeneity is observed to be the highest when the cells are at the transition state (24 h), compare with cells at undifferentiated (0 h) and fully differentiated (48 h) states. The device enables highly efficient single cell trapping and provides sensitive, label-free electrical impedance measurements of individual cells, enabling the possibility of quantitatively analysing their physical state as well as studying the associated heterogeneity of a cell population. PMID:26963790

  15. Single cell studies of mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) differentiation by electrical impedance measurements in a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying; Basu, Srinjan; Laue, Ernest; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-07-15

    Biological populations of cells show considerable cell-to-cell variability. Study of single cells and analysis of cell heterogeneity are considered to be critical in understanding biological processes such as stem cell differentiation and cancer development. Recent advances in lab-on-a-chip techniques have allowed single-cell capture in microfluidic channels with the possibility of precise environmental control and high throughput of experiments with minimal usage of samples and reagents. In recent years, label-free techniques such as electrical impedance spectroscopy have emerged as a non-invasive approach to studying cell properties. In this study, we have designed and fabricated a microfluidic device that combines hydrodynamic trapping of single cells in pre-defined locations with the capability of running electrical impedance measurements within the same device. We have measured mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) at different states during differentiation (t=0h, 24h and 48h) and quantitatively analysed the changes in electrical parameters of cells during differentiation. A marked increase in the magnitude of the cell impedance is found during cell differentiation, which can be attributed to an increase in cell size. The analysis of the measurements shows that the nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratio decreases during this process. The degree of cell heterogeneity is observed to be the highest when the cells are at the transition state (24h), compare with cells at undifferentiated (0h) and fully differentiated (48h) states. The device enables highly efficient single cell trapping and provides sensitive, label-free electrical impedance measurements of individual cells, enabling the possibility of quantitatively analysing their physical state as well as studying the associated heterogeneity of a cell population.

  16. Single-Cell Growth Rates in Photoautotrophic Populations Measured by Stable Isotope Probing and Resonance Raman Microspectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Gordon T.; Suter, Elizabeth A.; Li, Zhuo Q.; Chow, Stephanie; Stinton, Dallyce; Zaliznyak, Tatiana; Beaupré, Steven R.

    2017-01-01

    A new method to measure growth rates of individual photoautotrophic cells by combining stable isotope probing (SIP) and single-cell resonance Raman microspectrometry is introduced. This report explores optimal experimental design and the theoretical underpinnings for quantitative responses of Raman spectra to cellular isotopic composition. Resonance Raman spectra of isogenic cultures of the cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp., grown in 13C-bicarbonate revealed linear covariance between wavenumber (cm−1) shifts in dominant carotenoid Raman peaks and a broad range of cellular 13C fractional isotopic abundance. Single-cell growth rates were calculated from spectra-derived isotopic content and empirical relationships. Growth rates among any 25 cells in a sample varied considerably; mean coefficient of variation, CV, was 29 ± 3% (σ/x¯), of which only ~2% was propagated analytical error. Instantaneous population growth rates measured independently by in vivo fluorescence also varied daily (CV ≈ 53%) and were statistically indistinguishable from single-cell growth rates at all but the lowest levels of cell labeling. SCRR censuses of mixtures prepared from Synechococcus sp. and T. pseudonana (a diatom) populations with varying 13C-content and growth rates closely approximated predicted spectral responses and fractional labeling of cells added to the sample. This approach enables direct microspectrometric interrogation of isotopically- and phylogenetically-labeled cells and detects as little as 3% changes in cellular fractional labeling. This is the first description of a non-destructive technique to measure single-cell photoautotrophic growth rates based on Raman spectroscopy and well-constrained assumptions, while requiring few ancillary measurements. PMID:28824580

  17. Nanoindentation methods to measure viscoelastic properties of single cells using sharp, flat, and buckling tips inside ESEM.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mohd Ridzuan; Nakajima, Masahiro; Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio; Fukuda, Toshio

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, methods to measure viscoelastic properties of time-dependent materials are proposed using sharp, flat, and buckling tips inside an environmental SEM. Single W303 yeast cells were employed in this study. Each of the tips was used to indent single cells in a nanoindentation test. Three loading histories were used: 1) a ramp loading history, in which a sharp indenter was used; 2) a step loading history, in which a flat indenter was implemented; and 3) a fast unloading history, in which a buckling nanoneedle was applied. Analysis of the viscoelastic properties of single cells was performed for each of the loading histories by choosing an appropriate theory between the correspondence principle and the functional equation. Results from each of the tests show good agreement, from which strong conclusion can be drawn.

  18. Measurement of enzyme activity in single cells by voltammetry using a microcell with a positionable dual electrode.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ning; Zhao, Minghui; Zhang, Xiaoli; Jin, Wenrui

    2006-01-01

    The electrochemical single-cell analysis for enzyme activity was developed using microcells on a microcell array coupled with a positionable dual microelectrode. The microcell array with the nanoliter-scale microcells was constructed using simple chemical etching without photolithographic techniques. The positionable dual microelectrodes consisted of the nanometer-to-micrometer-radius Au disk working electrode and a approximately 80-microm-radius Ag/AgCl reference electrode. Peroxidase was chosen as the model enzyme. Factors that concern electrochemical single-cell analysis in microcells such as solution evaporation, interference of soluble oxygen, electrode size, solution volume, and electrode fouling were investigated and discussed. The 20 or 100 nL of detection volume was found to be suitable for peroxidase determination in single neutrophils or single acute promyelocytic leukemia cells without interference from intracellular macromolecules and electrode fouling, when the dual electrode with a 10-microm-radius Au disk working electrode was used. Cells were perforated with digitonin before transferring them into the microcells, to lyse cells easily. The perforated cells were transferred into the microcells by pushing a microscope slide on a drop of the cell suspension on the microcell array. After a single cell in the microcell was lysed using a freeze-thawing technique and allowed to dry, physiological buffer saline containing 2.0 x 10(-3) mol/L hydroquinone and 2.0 x 10(-3) mol/L H2O2 as the substrates of the enzyme-catalyzed reaction was added. The microcell array was positioned in a constant-humidity chamber to prevent evaporation. Then the dual electrode was inserted into the microcell by means of a scanning electrochemical microscope and the product benzoquinone of the enzyme-catalyzed reaction was voltammetrically detected. Peroxidase activity could be quantified using the steady-state current on the voltammogram after subtracting the blank and using the

  19. Comparison between steady-state and dynamic I-V measurements from a single-cell thermionic fuel element

    SciTech Connect

    Wernsman, B.

    1997-01-01

    A comparison between steady-state and dynamic I-V measurements from a single-cell thermionic fuel element (TFE) is made. The single-cell TFE used in this study is the prototype for the 40kW{sub e} space nuclear power system that is similar to the 6kW{sub e} TOPAZ-II. The steady-state I-V measurements influence the emitter temperature due to electron cooling. Therefore, to eliminate the steady-state I-V measurement influence on the TFE and provide a better understanding of the behavior of the thermionic energy converter and TFE characteristics, dynamic I-V measurements are made. The dynamic I-V measurements are made at various input power levels, cesium pressures, collector temperatures, and steady-state current levels. From these measurements, it is shown that the dynamic I-V{close_quote}s do not change the TFE characteristics at a given operating point. Also, the evaluation of the collector work function from the dynamic I-V measurements shows that the collector optimization is not due to a minimum in the collector work function but due to an emission optimization. Since the dynamic I-V measurements do not influence the TFE characteristics, it is believed that these measurements can be done at a system level to understand the influence of TFE placement in the reactor as a function of the core thermal distribution. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Comparison between steady-state and dynamic I-V measurements from a single-cell thermionic fuel element

    SciTech Connect

    Wernsman, Bernard

    1997-01-10

    A comparison between steady-state and dynamic I-V measurements from a single-cell thermionic fuel element (TFE) is made. The single-cell TFE used in this study is the prototype for the 40 kW{sub e} space nuclear power system that is similar to the 6 kW{sub e} TOPAZ-II. The steady-state I-V measurements influence the emitter temperature due to electron cooling. Therefore, to eliminate the steady-state I-V measurement influence on the TFE and provide a better understanding of the behavior of the thermionic energy converter and TFE characteristics, dynamic I-V measurements are made. The dynamic I-V measurements are made at various input power levels, cesium pressures, collector temperatures, and steady-state current levels. From these measurements, it is shown that the dynamic I-V's do not change the TFE characteristics at a given operating point. Also, the evaluation of the collector work function from the dynamic I-V measurements shows that the collector optimization is not due to a minimum in the collector work function but due to an emission optimization. Since the dynamic I-V measurements do not influence the TFE characteristics, it is believed that these measurements can be done at a system level to understand the influence of TFE placement in the reactor as a function of the core thermal distribution.

  1. Single-Cell Measurements of IgE-Mediated FcεRI Signaling Using an Integrated Microfluidic Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yanli; Barua, Dipak; Liu, Peng; Wilson, Bridget S.; Oliver, Janet M.; Hlavacek, William S.; Singh, Anup K.

    2013-03-27

    Heterogeneity in responses of cells to a stimulus, such as a pathogen or allergen, can potentially play an important role in deciding the fate of the responding cell population and the overall systemic response. Measuring heterogeneous responses requires tools capable of interrogating individual cells. Cell signaling studies commonly do not have single-cell resolution because of the limitations of techniques used such as Westerns, ELISAs, mass spectrometry, and DNA microarrays. Microfluidics devices are increasingly being used to overcome these limitations. In this paper, we report on a microfluidic platform for cell signaling analysis that combines two orthogonal single-cell measurement technologies: on-chip flow cytometry and optical imaging. The device seamlessly integrates cell culture, stimulation, and preparation with downstream measurements permitting hands-free, automated analysis to minimize experimental variability. The platform was used to interrogate IgE receptor (FcεRI) signaling, which is responsible for triggering allergic reactions, in RBL-2H3 cells. Following on-chip crosslinking of IgE-FcεRI complexes by multivalent antigen, we monitored signaling events including protein phosphorylation, calcium mobilization and the release of inflammatory mediators. The results demonstrate the ability of our platform to produce quantitative measurements on a cell-by-cell basis from just a few hundred cells. Finally, model-based analysis of the Syk phosphorylation data suggests that heterogeneity in Syk phosphorylation can be attributed to protein copy number variations, with the level of Syk phosphorylation being particularly sensitive to the copy number of Lyn.

  2. Single-cell measurements of IgE-mediated FcεRI signaling using an integrated microfluidic platform.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanli; Barua, Dipak; Liu, Peng; Wilson, Bridget S; Oliver, Janet M; Hlavacek, William S; Singh, Anup K

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneity in responses of cells to a stimulus, such as a pathogen or allergen, can potentially play an important role in deciding the fate of the responding cell population and the overall systemic response. Measuring heterogeneous responses requires tools capable of interrogating individual cells. Cell signaling studies commonly do not have single-cell resolution because of the limitations of techniques used such as Westerns, ELISAs, mass spectrometry, and DNA microarrays. Microfluidics devices are increasingly being used to overcome these limitations. Here, we report on a microfluidic platform for cell signaling analysis that combines two orthogonal single-cell measurement technologies: on-chip flow cytometry and optical imaging. The device seamlessly integrates cell culture, stimulation, and preparation with downstream measurements permitting hands-free, automated analysis to minimize experimental variability. The platform was used to interrogate IgE receptor (FcεRI) signaling, which is responsible for triggering allergic reactions, in RBL-2H3 cells. Following on-chip crosslinking of IgE-FcεRI complexes by multivalent antigen, we monitored signaling events including protein phosphorylation, calcium mobilization and the release of inflammatory mediators. The results demonstrate the ability of our platform to produce quantitative measurements on a cell-by-cell basis from just a few hundred cells. Model-based analysis of the Syk phosphorylation data suggests that heterogeneity in Syk phosphorylation can be attributed to protein copy number variations, with the level of Syk phosphorylation being particularly sensitive to the copy number of Lyn.

  3. Yeast Replicator: A High-Throughput Multiplexed Microfluidics Platform for Automated Measurements of Single-Cell Aging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Young, Thomas Z; Acar, Murat

    2015-10-20

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a model organism for replicative aging studies; however, conventional lifespan measurement platforms have several limitations. Here, we present a microfluidics platform that facilitates simultaneous lifespan and gene expression measurements of aging yeast cells. Our multiplexed high-throughput platform offers the capability to perform independent lifespan experiments using different yeast strains or growth media. Using this platform in minimal media environments containing glucose, we measured the full lifespan of individual yeast cells in wild-type and canonical gene deletion backgrounds. Compared to glucose, in galactose we observed a 16.8% decrease in replicative lifespan accompanied by an ∼2-fold increase in single-cell oxidative stress levels reported by PSOD1-mCherry. Using PGAL1-YFP to measure the activity of the bistable galactose network, we saw that OFF and ON cells are similar in their lifespan. Our work shows that aging cells are committed to a single phenotypic state throughout their lifespan.

  4. Measurement of intracellular pH (pH i) in a single cell using fluorescent probe and fiber optic nanoprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qinmiao; Qiu, Yishen; Chen, Zhihao; Fang, Na; Li, Gaoming

    2007-11-01

    An optical system for measurement of the intracellular pH (pHi) in a single living cell by using the fluorescent probe, 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate (CFDA) and fiber optic nanoprobe was demonstrated in this work. The CFDA probe is used to determine pHi in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae 97 while fiber optic nanoprobe is used to guide excitation light and receive emission light within a single cell. Experimental results showed that our system had higher detection sensitivity than other standard spectrometer, which is important to single-cell analysis, especially for the microanalysis in a single-cell.

  5. Single-Cell Measurements of IgE-Mediated FcεRI Signaling Using an Integrated Microfluidic Platform

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Yanli; Barua, Dipak; Liu, Peng; ...

    2013-03-27

    Heterogeneity in responses of cells to a stimulus, such as a pathogen or allergen, can potentially play an important role in deciding the fate of the responding cell population and the overall systemic response. Measuring heterogeneous responses requires tools capable of interrogating individual cells. Cell signaling studies commonly do not have single-cell resolution because of the limitations of techniques used such as Westerns, ELISAs, mass spectrometry, and DNA microarrays. Microfluidics devices are increasingly being used to overcome these limitations. In this paper, we report on a microfluidic platform for cell signaling analysis that combines two orthogonal single-cell measurement technologies: on-chipmore » flow cytometry and optical imaging. The device seamlessly integrates cell culture, stimulation, and preparation with downstream measurements permitting hands-free, automated analysis to minimize experimental variability. The platform was used to interrogate IgE receptor (FcεRI) signaling, which is responsible for triggering allergic reactions, in RBL-2H3 cells. Following on-chip crosslinking of IgE-FcεRI complexes by multivalent antigen, we monitored signaling events including protein phosphorylation, calcium mobilization and the release of inflammatory mediators. The results demonstrate the ability of our platform to produce quantitative measurements on a cell-by-cell basis from just a few hundred cells. Finally, model-based analysis of the Syk phosphorylation data suggests that heterogeneity in Syk phosphorylation can be attributed to protein copy number variations, with the level of Syk phosphorylation being particularly sensitive to the copy number of Lyn.« less

  6. Direct measurement of cell detachment force on single cells using a new electromechanical method.

    PubMed

    Francis, G W; Fisher, L R; Gamble, R A; Gingell, D

    1987-05-01

    We describe a new device in which an accurately measured force is applied to individual adherent cells while the topography of the adhesion zone is simultaneously monitored. The force is applied via a flexible glass micropipette, attached by suction to the cell under study, and is calculated directly from the measured pipette deflection. Regions of close contact in the adhesion zone are observed using interference reflection microscopy. We have used the device to measure the force required to detach human red blood cells from hydrophobic and hydrophilic glass surfaces, and to detach Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae from a hydrophobic glass surface. The measured forces per unit length of contact perimeter are within an order of magnitude of the tensions required for membrane rupture.

  7. MEMS measurements of single cell stiffness decay due to cyclic mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Barazani, Bruno; Warnat, Stephan; MacIntosh, Andrew J; Hubbard, Ted

    2017-08-25

    The goal of this study was to measure the mechanical stiffness of individual cells and to observe changes due to the application of repeated cell mechanical loads. 28 single baker's yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) were fatigue tested and had their stiffness measured during repetitive loading cycles performed by a MEMS squeezer in aqueous media. Electrothermal micro-actuators compressed individual cells against a reference back spring; cell and spring motions were measured using a FFT image analysis technique with ~10 nm resolution. Cell stiffness was calculated based on measurements of cell elongation vs. applied force which resulted in stiffness values in the 2-10 N/m range. The effect of increased force was studied for cells mechanically cycled 37 times. Cell stiffness decreased as the force and the cycle number increased. After 37 loading cycles (~4 min), forces of 0.24, 0.29, 0.31, and 0.33 μN caused stiffness drops of 5%, 13%, 31% and 41% respectively. Cells force was then set to 0.29 μN and cells were tested over longer runs of 118 and 268 cycles. After 118 cycles (~12 min) cells experienced an average stiffness drop of 68%. After 268 cycles (~25 min) cells had a stiffness drop of 77%, and appeared to reach a stiffness plateau of 20-25% of the initial stiffness after approximately 200 cycles.

  8. Measuring molecular motions inside single cells with improved analysis of single-particle trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, David J.; Biteen, Julie S.

    2017-04-01

    Single-molecule super-resolution imaging and tracking can measure molecular motions inside living cells on the scale of the molecules themselves. Diffusion in biological systems commonly exhibits multiple modes of motion, which can be effectively quantified by fitting the cumulative probability distribution of the squared step sizes in a two-step fitting process. Here we combine this two-step fit into a single least-squares minimization; this new method vastly reduces the total number of fitting parameters and increases the precision with which diffusion may be measured. We demonstrate this Global Fit approach on a simulated two-component system as well as on a mixture of diffusing 80 nm and 200 nm gold spheres to show improvements in fitting robustness and localization precision compared to the traditional Local Fit algorithm.

  9. Measurement of Single Cell Refractive Index, Dry Mass, Volume, and Density Using a Transillumination Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Kevin G.; Jacques, Steven L.; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2013-01-01

    Phase contrast microscopy has become ubiquitous in the field of biology, particularly in qualitative investigations of cellular morphology. However, the use of quantitative phase retrieval methods and their connection to cellular refractive index and dry mass density remain under utilized. This is due in part to the restriction of phase and cellular mass determination to custom built instruments, involved mathematical analysis, and prohibitive sample perturbations. We introduce tomographic bright field imaging, an accessible optical imaging technique enabling the three dimensional measurement of cellular refractive index and dry mass density using a standard transillumination optical microscope. The validity of the technique is demonstrated on polystyrene spheres. The technique is then applied to the measurement of the refractive index, dry mass, volume, and density of red blood cells. This optical technique enables a simple and robust means to perform quantitative investigations of engineered and biological specimens in three dimensions using standard optical microscopes. PMID:23005682

  10. Deformation measurement of individual cells in large populations using a single-cell microchamber array chip.

    PubMed

    Doh, I; Lee, W C; Cho, Y-H; Pisano, A P; Kuypers, F A

    2012-04-23

    We analyze the deformability of individual red blood cells (RBCs) using SiCMA technology. Our approach is adequate to quickly measure large numbers of individual cells in heterogeneous populations. Individual cells are trapped in a large-scale array of micro-wells, and dielectrophoretic (DEP) force is applied to deform the cells. The simple structures of micro-wells and DEP electrodes facilitate the analysis of thousands of RBCs in parallel. This unique method allows the correlation of red cell deformation with cell surface and cytosolic characteristics to define the distribution of individual cellular characteristics in heterogeneous populations.

  11. FORMING SELF-ASSEMBLED CELL ARRAYS AND MEASURING THE OXYGEN CONSUMPTION RATE OF A SINGLE LIVE CELL.

    PubMed

    Etzkorn, James R; McQuaide, Sarah C; Anderson, Judy B; Meldrum, Deirdre R; Parviz, Babak A

    2009-06-01

    We report a method for forming arrays of live single cells on a chip using polymer micro-traps made of SU8. We have studied the toxicity of the microfabricated structures and the associated environment for two cell lines. We also report a method for measuring the oxygen consumption rate of a single cell using optical interrogation of molecular oxygen sensors placed in micromachined micro-wells by temporarily sealing the cells in the micro-traps. The new techniques presented here add to the collection of tools available for performing "single-cell" biology. A single-cell self-assembly yield of 61% was achieved with oxygen draw down rates of 0.83, 0.82, and 0.71 fmol/minute on three isolated live A549 cells.

  12. High-throughput measurement of single-cell growth rates using serial microfluidic mass sensor arrays

    PubMed Central

    Cermak, Nathan; Olcum, Selim; Delgado, Francisco Feijó; Wasserman, Steven C.; Payer, Kristofor R.; Murakami, Mark; Knudsen, Scott M.; Kimmerling, Robert J.; Stevens, Mark M.; Kikuchi, Yuki; Sandikci, Arzu; Ogawa, Masaaki; Agache, Vincent; Baléras, François; Weinstock, David M.; Manalis, Scott R.

    2016-01-01

    Methods to rapidly assess cell growth would be useful for many applications, including drug susceptibility testing, but current technologies have limited sensitivity or throughput. Here we present an approach to precisely and rapidly measure growth rates of many individual cells simultaneously. We flow cells in suspension through a microfluidic channel with 10–12 resonant mass sensors distributed along its length, weighing each cell repeatedly over the 4–20 min it spends in the channel. Because multiple cells traverse the channel at the same time, we obtain growth rates for >60 cells/h with a resolution of 0.2 pg/h for mammalian cells and 0.02 pg/h for bacteria. We measure the growth of single lymphocytic cells, mouse and human T cells, primary human leukemia cells, yeast, Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis. Our system reveals subpopulations of cells with divergent growth kinetics and enables assessment of cellular responses to antibiotics and antimicrobial peptides within minutes. PMID:27598230

  13. Patch-clamp techniques for time-resolved capacitance measurements in single cells.

    PubMed

    Lindau, M; Neher, E

    1988-02-01

    Two methods are described for estimation of passive cell parameters such as membrane capacitance, membrane conductance and access resistance in tight-seal whole cell recording. Both methods are restricted in their application to cases where the cell under study can be approximated by a simple three-component network with linear properties over some voltage range. One method, referred to as the time domain technique, requires only standard electrophysiological equipment and a computer. Parameters are derived from an analysis of capacitive transients during square wave stimulation. It is readily adaptable to wide variations in experimental parameters. Particularly, it is equally applicable to the "slow whole-cell" configuration (access resistance in the range 100 M omega to 1 G omega) and to normal whole-cell measurements (access resistance typically 10 M omega). The other method applies a sine wave command signal to the cell and employs a lock-in amplifier to analyse the resulting current signal. Two modes of operating the lock-in amplifier are described. One mode provides an output signal directly proportional to small changes in capacitance at maximum resolution (1-10 fF). The other mode, in conjunction with a digital computer, supplies estimates of all passive cell parameters, as does the time domain technique, but with a large amount of data reduction performed by the lock-in amplifier itself. Due to the special hardware, however, this method is not as flexible as the time domain technique.

  14. A new Pt-Rh carbon nitride electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells: Synthesis, characterization and single-cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Noto, Vito; Negro, Enrico

    In this paper the preparation of a new bimetal electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), which is one of the most important bottlenecks in the operation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), is described. This material was synthesized through a pyrolysis process of a zeolitic inorganic-organic polymer electrolyte (Z-IOPE-like) precursor, followed by suitable washing and activation procedures of the product. The electrocatalyst, whose active sites consist of platinum and rhodium, was: (a) extensively characterized from the chemical, structural, morphological and electrochemical points of view and (b) used to prepare a membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) which was tested under operative conditions in a single-cell configuration. It was observed that, with respect to a reference material based on supported platinum, rhodium did not compromise the performance of the electrocatalyst in the ORR. This behaviour was interpreted in the framework of a general model concerning the enhancement of ORR performance in bimetal systems supported on carbon nitrides. Finally, the material shows a slightly better tolerance toward a few common contaminants for the ORR such as methanol and chloride anions, typical of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) and vehicular applications, respectively.

  15. Measurement of oxidatively-induced clustered DNA lesions using a novel adaptation of single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay).

    PubMed

    Georgakilas, Alexandros G; Holt, Stewart M; Hair, Jessica M; Loftin, Charles W

    2010-12-01

    The two basic groups of complex DNA damage are double-strand breaks (DSBs) and non-DSB oxidatively-induced clustered DNA lesions (OCDLs). The single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) or comet assay has been widely used for the detection of low levels of various types of DNA lesions including single-strand breaks (SSBs), DSBs, and oxidized bases per individual cell. There are limited data on the use of the comet assay for the detection of non-DSB clustered DNA lesions using different repair enzymes as enzymatic probes. This unit discusses a novel adaptation of the comet assay used to measure these unique types of lesions. Until now OCDL yields have been measured using primarily pulsed-field agarose gel electrophoresis. The advantages offered by the current approach are: (1) measurement of OCDL levels per individual cell; (2) use of a small number of cells (∼10,000) and relatively low doses of ionizing radiation (1 to 2 Gy) or low levels of oxidative stress, which are not compatible with standard agarose gel electrophoresis; and finally, (3) the assay is fast and allows direct comparison with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis results.

  16. Quantification of the specific membrane capacitance of single cells using a microfluidic device and impedance spectroscopy measurement

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Qingyuan; Ferrier, Graham A.; Chen, Brandon K.; Wang, Chen; Sun, Yu

    2012-01-01

    The specific membrane capacitance (SMC) is an electrical parameter that correlates with both the electrical activity and morphology of the plasma membrane, which are physiological markers for cellular phenotype and health. We have developed a microfluidic device that enables impedance spectroscopy measurements of the SMC of single biological cells. Impedance spectra induced by single cells aspirated into the device are captured over a moderate frequency range (5 kHz–1 MHz). Maximum impedance sensitivity is achieved using a tapered microfluidic channel, which effectively routes electric fields across the cell membranes. The SMC is extracted by curve-fitting impedance spectra to an equivalent circuit model. From our measurement, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells are found to exhibit larger SMC values in hypertonic solutions as compared with those in isotonic solutions. In addition, AML cell phenotypes (AML2 and NB4) exhibiting varying metastatic potential yield distinct SMC values (AML2: 16.9 ± 1.9 mF/m2 (n = 23); NB4: 22.5 ± 4.7 mF/m2 (n = 23)). Three-dimensional finite element simulations of the microfluidic device confirm the feasibility of this approach. PMID:23940502

  17. Multiphoton photochemical crosslinking-based fabrication of protein micropatterns with controllable mechanical properties for single cell traction force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Ming Hui; Huang, Nan; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Zhuo Long; Ngan, Alfonso Hing Wan; Du, Yanan; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2016-01-01

    Engineering 3D microstructures with predetermined properties is critical for stem cell niche studies. We have developed a multiphoton femtosecond laser-based 3D printing platform, which generates complex protein microstructures in minutes. Here, we used the platform to test a series of fabrication and reagent parameters in precisely controlling the mechanical properties of protein micropillars. Atomic force microscopy was utilized to measure the reduced elastic modulus of the micropillars, and transmission electron microscopy was used to visualize the porosity of the structures. The reduced elastic modulus of the micropillars associated positively and linearly with the scanning power. On the other hand, the porosity and pore size of the micropillars associated inversely and linearly with the scanning power and reagent concentrations. While keeping the elastic modulus constant, the stiffness of the micropillars was controlled by varying their height. Subsequently, the single cell traction forces of rabbit chondrocytes, human dermal fibroblasts, human mesenchymal stem cells, and bovine nucleus pulposus cells (bNPCs) were successfully measured by culturing the cells on micropillar arrays of different stiffness. Our results showed that the traction forces of all groups showed positive relationship with stiffness, and that the chondrocytes and bNPCs generated the highest and lowest traction forces, respectively.

  18. Multiphoton photochemical crosslinking-based fabrication of protein micropatterns with controllable mechanical properties for single cell traction force measurements

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Ming Hui; Huang, Nan; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Zhuo Long; Ngan, Alfonso Hing Wan; Du, Yanan; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2016-01-01

    Engineering 3D microstructures with predetermined properties is critical for stem cell niche studies. We have developed a multiphoton femtosecond laser-based 3D printing platform, which generates complex protein microstructures in minutes. Here, we used the platform to test a series of fabrication and reagent parameters in precisely controlling the mechanical properties of protein micropillars. Atomic force microscopy was utilized to measure the reduced elastic modulus of the micropillars, and transmission electron microscopy was used to visualize the porosity of the structures. The reduced elastic modulus of the micropillars associated positively and linearly with the scanning power. On the other hand, the porosity and pore size of the micropillars associated inversely and linearly with the scanning power and reagent concentrations. While keeping the elastic modulus constant, the stiffness of the micropillars was controlled by varying their height. Subsequently, the single cell traction forces of rabbit chondrocytes, human dermal fibroblasts, human mesenchymal stem cells, and bovine nucleus pulposus cells (bNPCs) were successfully measured by culturing the cells on micropillar arrays of different stiffness. Our results showed that the traction forces of all groups showed positive relationship with stiffness, and that the chondrocytes and bNPCs generated the highest and lowest traction forces, respectively. PMID:26817674

  19. Multiphoton photochemical crosslinking-based fabrication of protein micropatterns with controllable mechanical properties for single cell traction force measurements.

    PubMed

    Tong, Ming Hui; Huang, Nan; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Zhuo Long; Ngan, Alfonso Hing Wan; Du, Yanan; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2016-01-28

    Engineering 3D microstructures with predetermined properties is critical for stem cell niche studies. We have developed a multiphoton femtosecond laser-based 3D printing platform, which generates complex protein microstructures in minutes. Here, we used the platform to test a series of fabrication and reagent parameters in precisely controlling the mechanical properties of protein micropillars. Atomic force microscopy was utilized to measure the reduced elastic modulus of the micropillars, and transmission electron microscopy was used to visualize the porosity of the structures. The reduced elastic modulus of the micropillars associated positively and linearly with the scanning power. On the other hand, the porosity and pore size of the micropillars associated inversely and linearly with the scanning power and reagent concentrations. While keeping the elastic modulus constant, the stiffness of the micropillars was controlled by varying their height. Subsequently, the single cell traction forces of rabbit chondrocytes, human dermal fibroblasts, human mesenchymal stem cells, and bovine nucleus pulposus cells (bNPCs) were successfully measured by culturing the cells on micropillar arrays of different stiffness. Our results showed that the traction forces of all groups showed positive relationship with stiffness, and that the chondrocytes and bNPCs generated the highest and lowest traction forces, respectively.

  20. The Measurement of Dissolved Oxygen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thistlethwayte, D.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Describes an experiment in environmental chemistry which serves to determine the dissolved oxygen concentration in both fresh and saline water. Applications of the method at the undergraduate and secondary school levels are recommended. (CC)

  1. The Measurement of Dissolved Oxygen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thistlethwayte, D.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Describes an experiment in environmental chemistry which serves to determine the dissolved oxygen concentration in both fresh and saline water. Applications of the method at the undergraduate and secondary school levels are recommended. (CC)

  2. Measuring tissue oxygen saturation using NIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sircan-Kucuksayan, Aslinur; Uyuklu, Mehmet; Canpolat, Murat

    2014-05-01

    Tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) is known quite useful parameter for medical applications. A spectroscopic method has been developed to diagnose pathologic tissues due to lack of normal blood circulation by measuring tissue oxygen saturation. In the study, human blood samples with different level of oxygen saturations have been prepared and spectra were taken using an optical fiber probe to investigate correlation between the oxygen saturations and the spectra. The experimental set up for the spectroscopic measurements was consists of a miniature NIR light spectrometer, an optical fiber probe, a halogen-tungsten light source and a laptop. A linear correlation between the oxygen saturation of the blood samples and the ratio of the light of wavelengths 660 nm to 790 nm has been found from the spectra. Then, oxygen saturations of the blood samples were estimated from the spectroscopic measurements within an error of 2.9%. Furthermore, it has been shown that the linear dependence between the ratio and the oxygen saturation of the blood samples was valid for the blood samples with different hematocrits. Tissue oxygen saturation has been estimated from the spectroscopic measurements were taken from the fingers of healthy volunteers using the correlation between the spectra and blood oxygen saturation. The tissue StO2 measured was 80% as expected. The technique developed to measure tissue oxygen saturation has potential to diagnose premalignant tissues, follow up prognosis of cancerous tissues, and evaluation of ischemia reperfusion tissues.

  3. Single-cell western blotting

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Alex J.; Spelke, Dawn P.; Xu, Zhuchen; Kang, Chi-Chih; Schaffer, David V.; Herr, Amy E.

    2014-01-01

    To measure cell-to-cell variation in protein-mediated functions — a hallmark of biological processes — we developed an approach to conduct ~103 concurrent single-cell western blots (scWesterns) in ~4 hours. A microscope slide supporting a 30 µm-thick photoactive polyacrylamide gel enables western blotting comprised of: settling of single cells into microwells, lysis in situ, gel electrophoresis, photoinitiated blotting to immobilize proteins, and antibody probing. We apply this scWestern to monitor single rat neural stem cell differentiation and responses to mitogen stimulation. The scWestern quantifies target proteins even with off-target antibody binding, multiplexes to 11 protein targets per single cell with detection thresholds of <30,000 molecules, and supports analyses of low starting cell numbers (~200) when integrated with fluorescence activated cell sorting. The scWestern thus overcomes limitations in single-cell protein analysis (i.e., antibody fidelity, sensitivity, and starting cell number) and constitutes a versatile tool for the study of complex cell populations at single-cell resolution. PMID:24880876

  4. Single-cell irradiation from [211At] astatine-labeled C215 monoclonal antibody: improved estimates of radiosensitivity from measurements on cellular uptake and retention.

    PubMed

    Palm, Stig; Bäck, Tom; Claesson, Ingela; Delle, Ulla; Hultborn, Ragnar; Lindegren, Sture; Jacobsson, Lars

    2003-01-01

    New data on the biological effect of 211At-C215 monoclonal antibody in a slowly rotating, widely dispersed single-cell suspension of the human cancer cell line Colo-205 is presented. Cell growth curves of each experiment were used to calculate an apparent cell survival after irradiation. Uptake measurements provided the data needed to calculate the average number of 211At decays per cell in the cell suspension. The results from each experiment were then fit to a mono-exponential function. From the exponential fit, an average of 35 +/- 2 (SD) astatine-211 decays per cell are required for 37% apparent cell survival (D0).

  5. Single-Cell Measurements of Enzyme Levels as a Predictive Tool for Cellular Fates during Organic Acid Production

    PubMed Central

    Zdraljevic, Stefan; Wagner, Drew; Cheng, Kevin; Ruohonen, Laura; Jäntti, Jussi; Penttilä, Merja; Resnekov, Orna

    2013-01-01

    Organic acids derived from engineered microbes can replace fossil-derived chemicals in many applications. Fungal hosts are preferred for organic acid production because they tolerate lignocellulosic hydrolysates and low pH, allowing economic production and recovery of the free acid. However, cell death caused by cytosolic acidification constrains productivity. Cytosolic acidification affects cells asynchronously, suggesting that there is an underlying cell-to-cell heterogeneity in acid productivity and/or in resistance to toxicity. We used fluorescence microscopy to investigate the relationship between enzyme concentration, cytosolic pH, and viability at the single-cell level in Saccharomyces cerevisiae engineered to synthesize xylonic acid. We found that cultures producing xylonic acid accumulate cells with cytosolic pH below 5 (referred to here as “acidified”). Using live-cell time courses, we found that the probability of acidification was related to the initial levels of xylose dehydrogenase and sharply increased from 0.2 to 0.8 with just a 60% increase in enzyme abundance (Hill coefficient, >6). This “switch-like” relationship likely results from an enzyme level threshold above which the produced acid overwhelms the cell's pH buffering capacity. Consistent with this hypothesis, we showed that expression of xylose dehydrogenase from a chromosomal locus yields ∼20 times fewer acidified cells and ∼2-fold more xylonic acid relative to expression of the enzyme from a plasmid with variable copy number. These results suggest that strategies that further reduce cell-to-cell heterogeneity in enzyme levels could result in additional gains in xylonic acid productivity. Our results demonstrate a generalizable approach that takes advantage of the cell-to-cell variation of a clonal population to uncover causal relationships in the toxicity of engineered pathways. PMID:24038690

  6. Oxygen fugacities directly measured in magmatic gases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sato, M.; Wright, T.L.

    1966-01-01

    An electrochemical device was used to measure the fugacity of oxygen (fO2) in holes drilled through the crust of Makaopuhi lava lake, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. Results obtained within 6 months of the lake formation show that log fO2 normally varies linearly with the reciprocal of the absolute temperature, and that chemical changes occurring in the cooling tholeiitic basalt are reflected in the fO2 values measured in the holes.

  7. Oxygen fugacities directly measured in magmatic gases.

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Wright, T L

    1966-09-02

    An electrochemical device was used to measure the fugacity of oxygen (fo(o2)) in holes drilled through the crust of Makaopuhi lava lake, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. Results obtained within 6 months of the lake formation show that log fo(o2) normally varies linearly with the reciprocal of the absolute temperature, and that chemical changes occurring in the cooling tholeiitic basalt are reflected in the fo(o2) values measured in the holes.

  8. Quantitative measurement of oxygen in microgravity combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silver, Joel A.

    1995-01-01

    This research combines two innovations in an experimental system which should result in a new capability for quantitative, nonintrusive measurement of major combustion species. Using a newly available vertical cavity surface-emitting diode laser (VCSEL) and an improved spatial scanning method, we plan to measure the temporal and spatial profiles of the concentrations and temperatures of molecular oxygen in a candle flame and in a solid fuel (cellulose sheet) system. The required sensitivity for detecting oxygen is achieved by the use of high frequency wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS). Measurements will be performed in the NASA Lewis 2.2-second Drop Tower Facility. The objective of this research is twofold. First, we want to develop a better understanding of the relative roles of diffusion and reaction of oxygen in microgravity combustion. As the primary oxidizer species, oxygen plays a major role in controlling the observed properties of flames, including flame front speed (in solid or liquid flames), extinguishment characteristics, flame size, and flame temperature. The second objective is to develop better diagnostics based on diode laser absorption which can be of real value in microgravity combustion research. We will also demonstrate diode lasers' potential usefulness for compact, intrinsically-safe monitoring sensors aboard spacecraft. Such sensors could be used to monitor any of the major cabin gases as well as important pollutants.

  9. Single-Cell Metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Emara, Samy; Amer, Sara; Ali, Ahmed; Abouleila, Yasmine; Oga, April; Masujima, Tsutomu

    2017-01-01

    The dynamics of a cell is always changing. Cells move, divide, communicate, adapt, and are always reacting to their surroundings non-synchronously. Currently, single-cell metabolomics has become the leading field in understanding the phenotypical variations between them, but sample volumes, low analyte concentrations, and validating gentle sample techniques have proven great barriers toward achieving accurate and complete metabolomics profiling. Certainly, advanced technologies such as nanodevices and microfluidic arrays are making great progress, and analytical techniques, such as matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), are gaining popularity with high-throughput methodology. Nevertheless, live single-cell mass spectrometry (LCSMS) values the sample quality and precision, turning once theoretical speculation into present-day applications in a variety of fields, including those of medicine, pharmaceutical, and agricultural industries. While there is still room for much improvement, it is clear that the metabolomics field is progressing toward analysis and discoveries at the single-cell level.

  10. Single Cell Oncogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xin

    It is believed that cancer originates from a single cell that has gone through generations of evolution of genetic and epigenetic changes that associate with the hallmarks of cancer. In some cancers such as various types of leukemia, cancer is clonal. Yet in other cancers like glioblastoma (GBM), there is tremendous tumor heterogeneity that is likely to be caused by simultaneous evolution of multiple subclones within the same tissue. It is obvious that understanding how a single cell develops into a clonal tumor upon genetic alterations, at molecular and cellular levels, holds the key to the real appreciation of tumor etiology and ultimate solution for therapeutics. Surprisingly very little is known about the process of spontaneous tumorigenesis from single cells in human or vertebrate animal models. The main reason is the lack of technology to track the natural process of single cell changes from a homeostatic state to a progressively cancerous state. Recently, we developed a patented compound, photoactivatable (''caged'') tamoxifen analogue 4-OHC and associated technique called optochemogenetic switch (OCG switch), which we believe opens the opportunity to address this urgent biological as well as clinical question about cancer. We propose to combine OCG switch with genetically engineered mouse models of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and high grade astrocytoma (including GBM) to study how single cells, when transformed through acute loss of tumor suppressor genes PTEN and TP53 and gain of oncogenic KRAS, can develop into tumor colonies with cellular and molecular heterogeneity in these tissues. The abstract is for my invited talk in session ``Beyond Darwin: Evolution in Single Cells'' 3/18/2016 11:15 AM.

  11. A New Radio Frequency Plasma Oxygen Primary Ion Source on Nano Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry for Improved Lateral Resolution and Detection of Electropositive Elements at Single Cell Level.

    PubMed

    Malherbe, Julien; Penen, Florent; Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Frank, Julia; Hause, Gerd; Dobritzsch, Dirk; Gontier, Etienne; Horréard, François; Hillion, François; Schaumlöffel, Dirk

    2016-07-19

    An important application field of secondary ion mass spectrometry at the nanometer scale (NanoSIMS) is the detection of chemical elements and, in particular, metals at the subcellular level in biological samples. The detection of many trace metals requires an oxygen primary ion source to allow the generation of positive secondary ions with high yield in the NanoSIMS. The duoplasmatron oxygen source is commonly used in this ion microprobe but cannot achieve the same quality of images as the cesium primary ion source used to produce negative secondary ions (C(-), CN(-), S(-), P(-)) due to a larger primary ion beam size. In this paper, a new type of an oxygen ion source using a rf plasma is fitted and characterized on a NanoSIMS50L. The performances of this primary ion source in terms of current density and achievable lateral resolution have been characterized and compared to the conventional duoplasmatron and cesium sources. The new rf plasma oxygen source offered a net improvement in terms of primary beam current density compared to the commonly used duoplasmatron source, which resulted in higher ultimate lateral resolutions down to 37 nm and which provided a 5-45 times higher apparent sensitivity for electropositive elements. Other advantages include a better long-term stability and reduced maintenance. This new rf plasma oxygen primary ion source has been applied to the localization of essential macroelements and trace metals at basal levels in two biological models, cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Arabidopsis thaliana.

  12. Spatiotemporally controlled single cell sonoporation

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zhenzhen; Liu, Haiyan; Mayer, Michael; Deng, Cheri X.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents unique approaches to enable control and quantification of ultrasound-mediated cell membrane disruption, or sonoporation, at the single-cell level. Ultrasound excitation of microbubbles that were targeted to the plasma membrane of HEK-293 cells generated spatially and temporally controlled membrane disruption with high repeatability. Using whole-cell patch clamp recording combined with fluorescence microscopy, we obtained time-resolved measurements of single-cell sonoporation and quantified the size and resealing rate of pores. We measured the intracellular diffusion coefficient of cytoplasmic RNA/DNA from sonoporation-induced transport of an intercalating fluorescent dye into and within single cells. We achieved spatiotemporally controlled delivery with subcellular precision and calcium signaling in targeted cells by selective excitation of microbubbles. Finally, we utilized sonoporation to deliver calcein, a membrane-impermeant substrate of multidrug resistance protein-1 (MRP1), into HEK-MRP1 cells, which overexpress MRP1, and monitored the calcein efflux by MRP1. This approach made it possible to measure the efflux rate in individual cells and to compare it directly to the efflux rate in parental control cells that do not express MRP1. PMID:23012425

  13. Label-free isolation of a prostate cancer cell among blood cells and the single-cell measurement of drug accumulation using an integrated microfluidic chip

    PubMed Central

    Khamenehfar, A.; Beischlag, T. V.; Russell, P. J.; Ling, M. T. P.; Nelson, C.; Li, P. C. H.

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are found in the blood of patients with cancer. Although these cells are rare, they can provide useful information for chemotherapy. However, isolation of these rare cells from blood is technically challenging because they are small in numbers. An integrated microfluidic chip, dubbed CTC chip, was designed and fabricated for conducting tumor cell isolation. As CTCs usually show multidrug resistance (MDR), the effect of MDR inhibitors on chemotherapeutic drug accumulation in the isolated single tumor cell is measured. As a model of CTC isolation, human prostate cancer cells were mixed with mouse blood cells and the label-free isolation of the tumor cells was conducted based on cell size difference. The major advantages of the CTC chip are the ability for fast cell isolation, followed by multiple rounds of single-cell measurements, suggesting a potential assay for detecting the drug responses based on the liquid biopsy of cancer patients. PMID:26594265

  14. Single-cell nanosurgery.

    PubMed

    Zeigler, Maxwell B; Chiu, Daniel T

    2013-01-01

    This chapter explains the steps necessary to perform laser surgery upon single adherent mammalian cells, where individual organelles are extracted from the cells by optical tweezers and the cells are monitored post-surgery to check their viability. Single-cell laser nanosurgery is used in an increasing range of methodologies because it offers great flexibility. Its main advantages are (a) there is not any physical contact with the cells so they remain in a sterile environment, (b) high spatial selectivity so that single organelles can be extracted from specific areas of individual cells, (c) the method can be conducted in the cell's native media, and (d) in comparison to other techniques that target single cells, such as micromanipulators, laser nanosurgery has a comparatively high throughput.

  15. EVALUATING AN INNOVATIVE OXYGEN SENSOR FOR REMOTE SUBSURFACE OXYGEN MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Millings, M; Brian Riha, B; Warren Hyde, W; Karen Vangelas, K; Brian02 Looney, B

    2006-10-12

    Oxygen is a primary indicator of whether anaerobic reductive dechlorination and similar redox based processes contribute to natural attenuation remedies at chlorinated solvent contaminated sites. Thus, oxygen is a viable indicator parameter for documenting that a system is being sustained in an anaerobic condition. A team of researchers investigated the adaptation of an optical sensor that was developed for oceanographic applications. The optical sensor, because of its design and operating principle, has potential for extended deployment and sensitivity at the low oxygen levels relevant to natural attenuation. The results of the research indicate this tool will be useful for in situ long-term monitoring applications, but that the traditional characterization tools continue to be appropriate for characterization activities.

  16. Rational Design of a Dephosphorylation-Resistant Reporter Enables Single-Cell Measurement of Tyrosine Kinase Activity.

    PubMed

    Turner, Abigail H; Lebhar, Michael S; Proctor, Angela; Wang, Qunzhao; Lawrence, David S; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2016-02-19

    Although peptide-based reporters of protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity have been used to study PTK enzymology in vitro, the application of these reporters to intracellular conditions is compromised by their dephosphorylation, preventing PTK activity measurements. Nonproteinogenic amino acids may be utilized to rationally design selective peptidic ligands by accessing greater chemical and structural diversity than is available using the native amino acids. We describe a peptidic reporter that, upon phosphorylation by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), is resistant to dephosphorylation both in vitro and in cellulo. The reporter contains a conformationally constrained phosphorylatable moiety (7-(S)-hydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid) in the place of L-tyrosine and is efficiently phosphorylated in A431 epidermoid carcinoma cells. Dephosphorylation of the reporter occurs 3 orders of magnitude more slowly compared with that of the conventional tyrosine-containing reporter.

  17. Measuring oxygen levels in Caco-2 cultures

    PubMed Central

    Zeitouni, Nathalie E; Fandrey, Joachim; Naim, Hassan Y; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Measuring oxygen levels in three different systems of Caco-2 cell culture. Methods Caco-2 cells were cultured in three different systems, using conventional polystyrene 24-well plates, special 24-well gas permeable plates, or on membrane inserts in conventional plates. Optical sensor spots were used to measure dissolved O2 levels in these cultured cells over the course of 6 days under normoxia (143 mmHg) and for 6 hours under hypoxia (7 mmHg). Western blot analysis was used to determine the protein levels of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) in the different cultures. Results All culture systems displayed lower O2 levels over time than expected when cultured under normoxia conditions. On average, O2 levels reached as low as 25 mmHg in 24-well plates but remained at 97 and 117 mmHg in gas permeable plates and membrane inserts, respectively. Under hypoxia, 1 mL cell cultures equilibrated to 7 mmHg O2 within the first 60 minutes and dropped to 0.39 and 0.61 mmHg O2 in 24-well and gas permeable plates, respectively, after the 6-hour incubation period. Cultures in membrane inserts did not equilibrate to 7 mmHg by the end of the 6-hour incubation period, where the lowest O2 measurements reached 23.12 mmHg. Western blots of HIF-1α protein level in the whole cell lysates of the different Caco-2 cultures revealed distinct stabilization of HIF-1α after hypoxic incubation for 1, 2, and 4 hours in 24-well plates as well as gas permeable plates. For membrane inserts, notable HIF-1α was seen after 4 hours of hypoxic incubation. Conclusion Cellular oxygen depletion was achieved in different hypoxic Caco-2 culture systems. However, different oxygen levels comparing different culture systems indicate that O2 level should be carefully considered in oxygen-dependent experiments. PMID:27774482

  18. Temperature-Dependent Model of Multi-step Transcription Initiation in Escherichia coli Based on Live Single-Cell Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd-Price, Jason; Tran, Huy; Ribeiro, Andre S.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription kinetics is limited by its initiation steps, which differ between promoters and with intra- and extracellular conditions. Regulation of these steps allows tuning both the rate and stochasticity of RNA production. We used time-lapse, single-RNA microscopy measurements in live Escherichia coli to study how the rate-limiting steps in initiation of the Plac/ara-1 promoter change with temperature and induction scheme. For this, we compared detailed stochastic models fit to the empirical data in maximum likelihood sense using statistical methods. Using this analysis, we found that temperature affects the rate limiting steps unequally, as nonlinear changes in the closed complex formation suffice to explain the differences in transcription dynamics between conditions. Meanwhile, a similar analysis of the PtetA promoter revealed that it has a different rate limiting step configuration, with temperature regulating different steps. Finally, we used the derived models to explore a possible cause for why the identified steps are preferred as the main cause for behavior modifications with temperature: we find that transcription dynamics is either insensitive or responds reciprocally to changes in the other steps. Our results suggests that different promoters employ different rate limiting step patterns that control not only their rate and variability, but also their sensitivity to environmental changes. PMID:27792724

  19. Single cell wound repair

    PubMed Central

    Abreu-Blanco, Maria Teresa; Verboon, Jeffrey M

    2011-01-01

    Cell wounding is a common event in the life of many cell types, and the capacity of the cell to repair day-to-day wear-and-tear injuries, as well as traumatic ones, is fundamental for maintaining tissue integrity. Cell wounding is most frequent in tissues exposed to high levels of stress. Survival of such plasma membrane disruptions requires rapid resealing to prevent the loss of cytosolic components, to block Ca2+ influx and to avoid cell death. In addition to patching the torn membrane, plasma membrane and cortical cytoskeleton remodeling are required to restore cell function. Although a general understanding of the cell wound repair process is in place, the underlying mechanisms of each step of this response are not yet known. We have developed a model to study single cell wound repair using the early Drosophila embryo. Our system combines genetics and live imaging tools, allowing us to dissect in vivo the dynamics of the single cell wound response. We have shown that cell wound repair in Drosophila requires the coordinated activities of plasma membrane and cytoskeleton components. Furthermore, we identified an unexpected role for E-cadherin as a link between the contractile actomyosin ring and the newly formed plasma membrane plug. PMID:21922041

  20. Flow Cytometric Single-Cell Analysis for Quantitative in Vivo Detection of Protein-Protein Interactions via Relative Reporter Protein Expression Measurement.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lina; Wang, Xu; Zhang, Jianqiang; Luan, Tian; Bouveret, Emmanuelle; Yan, Xiaomei

    2017-03-07

    Cell-based two-hybrid assays have been key players in identifying pairwise interactions, yet quantitative measurement of protein-protein interactions in vivo remains challenging. Here, we show that by using relative reporter protein expression (RRPE), defined as the level of reporter expression normalized to that of the interacting protein, quantitative analysis of protein interactions in a bacterial adenylate cyclase two-hybrid (BACTH) system can be achieved. A multicolor flow cytometer was used to measure simultaneously the expression levels of one of the two putative interacting proteins and the β-galactosidase (β-gal) reporter protein upon dual immunofluorescence staining. Single-cell analysis revealed that there exists bistability in the BACTH system and the RRPE is an intrinsic characteristic associated with the binding strength between the two interacting proteins. The RRPE-BACTH method provides an efficient tool to confirm interacting pairs of proteins, investigate determinant residues in protein-protein interaction, and compare interaction strength of different pairs.

  1. Measurement of renal tissue oxygenation with blood oxygen level-dependent MRI and oxygen transit modeling

    PubMed Central

    Morrell, Glen; Rusinek, Henry; Warner, Lizette; Vivier, Pierre-Hugues; Cheung, Alfred K.; Lerman, Lilach O.; Lee, Vivian S.

    2014-01-01

    Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) MRI data of kidney, while indicative of tissue oxygenation level (Po2), is in fact influenced by multiple confounding factors, such as R2, perfusion, oxygen permeability, and hematocrit. We aim to explore the feasibility of extracting tissue Po2 from renal BOLD data. A method of two steps was proposed: first, a Monte Carlo simulation to estimate blood oxygen saturation (SHb) from BOLD signals, and second, an oxygen transit model to convert SHb to tissue Po2. The proposed method was calibrated and validated with 20 pigs (12 before and after furosemide injection) in which BOLD-derived tissue Po2 was compared with microprobe-measured values. The method was then applied to nine healthy human subjects (age: 25.7 ± 3.0 yr) in whom BOLD was performed before and after furosemide. For the 12 pigs before furosemide injection, the proposed model estimated renal tissue Po2 with errors of 2.3 ± 5.2 mmHg (5.8 ± 13.4%) in cortex and −0.1 ± 4.5 mmHg (1.7 ± 18.1%) in medulla, compared with microprobe measurements. After injection of furosemide, the estimation errors were 6.9 ± 3.9 mmHg (14.2 ± 8.4%) for cortex and 2.6 ± 4.0 mmHg (7.7 ± 11.5%) for medulla. In the human subjects, BOLD-derived medullary Po2 increased from 16.0 ± 4.9 mmHg (SHb: 31 ± 11%) at baseline to 26.2 ± 3.1 mmHg (SHb: 53 ± 6%) at 5 min after furosemide injection, while cortical Po2 did not change significantly at ∼58 mmHg (SHb: 92 ± 1%). Our proposed method, validated with a porcine model, appears promising for estimating tissue Po2 from renal BOLD MRI data in human subjects. PMID:24452640

  2. Quantitative Measurement of Oxygen in Microgravity Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silver, Joel A.

    1997-01-01

    A low-gravity environment, in space or in ground-based facilities such as drop towers, provides a unique setting for studying combustion mechanisms. Understanding the physical phenomena controlling the ignition and spread of flames in microgravity has importance for space safety as well as for better characterization of dynamical and chemical combustion processes which are normally masked by buoyancy and other gravity-related effects. Due to restrictions associated with performing measurements in reduced gravity, diagnostic methods which have been applied to microgravity combustion studies have generally been limited to capture of flame emissions on film or video, laser Schlieren imaging and (intrusive) temperature measurements using thermocouples. Given the development of detailed theoretical models, more sophisticated diagnostic methods are needed to provide the kind of quantitative data necessary to characterize the properties of microgravity combustion processes as well as provide accurate feedback to improve the predictive capabilities of the models. When the demands of space flight are considered, the need for improved diagnostic systems which are rugged, compact, reliable, and operate at low power becomes apparent. The objective of this research is twofold. First, we want to develop a better understanding of the relative roles of diffusion and reaction of oxygen in microgravity combustion. As the primary oxidizer species, oxygen plays a major role in controlling the observed properties of flames, including flame front speed (in solid or liquid flames), extinguishment characteristics, flame size and flame temperature. The second objective is to develop better diagnostics based on diode laser absorption which can be of real value in both microgravity combustion research and as a sensor on-board Spacelab as either an air quality monitor or as part of a fire detection system. In our prior microgravity work, an eight line-of-sight fiber optic system measured

  3. Quantitative Measurement of Oxygen in Microgravity Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silver, Joel A.

    1997-01-01

    A low-gravity environment, in space or in ground-based facilities such as drop towers, provides a unique setting for studying combustion mechanisms. Understanding the physical phenomena controlling the ignition and spread of flames in microgravity has importance for space safety as well as for better characterization of dynamical and chemical combustion processes which are normally masked by buoyancy and other gravity-related effects. Due to restrictions associated with performing measurements in reduced gravity, diagnostic methods which have been applied to microgravity combustion studies have generally been limited to capture of flame emissions on film or video, laser Schlieren imaging and (intrusive) temperature measurements using thermocouples. Given the development of detailed theoretical models, more sophisticated diagnostic methods are needed to provide the kind of quantitative data necessary to characterize the properties of microgravity combustion processes as well as provide accurate feedback to improve the predictive capabilities of the models. When the demands of space flight are considered, the need for improved diagnostic systems which are rugged, compact, reliable, and operate at low power becomes apparent. The objective of this research is twofold. First, we want to develop a better understanding of the relative roles of diffusion and reaction of oxygen in microgravity combustion. As the primary oxidizer species, oxygen plays a major role in controlling the observed properties of flames, including flame front speed (in solid or liquid flames), extinguishment characteristics, flame size and flame temperature. The second objective is to develop better diagnostics based on diode laser absorption which can be of real value in both microgravity combustion research and as a sensor on-board Spacelab as either an air quality monitor or as part of a fire detection system. In our prior microgravity work, an eight line-of-sight fiber optic system measured

  4. Single Cell Physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neveu, Pierre; Sinha, Deepak Kumar; Kettunen, Petronella; Vriz, Sophie; Jullien, Ludovic; Bensimon, David

    The possibility to control at specific times and specific places the activity of biomolecules (enzymes, transcription factors, RNA, hormones, etc.) is opening up new opportunities in the study of physiological processes at the single cell level in a live organism. Most existing gene expression systems allow for tissue specific induction upon feeding the organism with exogenous inducers (e.g., tetracycline). Local genetic control has earlier been achieved by micro-injection of the relevant inducer/repressor molecule, but this is an invasive and possibly traumatic technique. In this chapter, we present the requirements for a noninvasive optical control of the activity of biomolecules and review the recent advances in this new field of research.

  5. Voltage clamp measurements of the hyperpolarization-activated inward current I(f) in single cells from rabbit sino-atrial node.

    PubMed Central

    van Ginneken, A C; Giles, W

    1991-01-01

    1. The kinetics and ion transfer characteristics of the hyperpolarization-activated inward current, I(f), have been studied in single cells obtained by enzymatic dispersion from the rabbit sino-atrial (S-A) node. These experiments were done to assess the role of I(f) in the generation of the pacemaker depolarization in the S-A node. 2. The activation and the deactivation of I(f) in these single cells are accompanied by significant conductance increases and decreases respectively, confirming earlier findings from multicellular man-made strips of rabbit S-A node, and from mammalian Purkinje fibres. 3. The steady-state activation of I(f) lies between -40 and -120 mV, and its voltage dependence can be described by a Boltzmann relation with the half-activation point at approximately -70 mV. 4. The delay or sigmoidicity in both the onset of I(f) and the deactivation of the tail currents can be accounted for semi-quantitatively by using a second-order Hodgkin-Huxley kinetic scheme. 5. The reversal potential for I(f) is -24 +/- 2 mV (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 6). It does not change significantly as a function of the amount of I(f) which is activated, indicating that ion accumulation or depletion phenomena are not important variables controlling the time course of I(f), or its selectivity. 6. The fully-activated current-voltage relationship for I(f) is approximately linear with a slope conductance of 12.0 +/- 0.88 nS per cell (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 6). 7. A simple mathematical model based on the measured values of maximum conductance, reversal potential, and kinetics of I(f) has been developed to simulate the size and time course of I(f) during typical spontaneous pacemaker activity in rabbit sino-atrial node cells. The calculations show that I(f) can change significantly during pacing and suggest that this current change is, at least in part, responsible for the pacemaker depolarization. Images Fig. 1 PMID:1708824

  6. Single cell ionization by a laser trap: a preliminary study in measuring radiation dose and charge in BT20 breast carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Michele; Gao, Ying; Erenso, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a preliminary study in the application of a laser trap for ionization of living carcinoma cells is presented. The study was conducted using BT20 breast carcinoma cells cultured and harvested in our laboratory. Each cell, for a total of 50 cells, was trapped and ionized by a high intensity infrared laser at 1064 nm. The threshold radiation dose and the resultant charge from the ionization for each cell were determined. With the laser trap serving as a radiation source, the cell underwent dielectric breakdown of the membrane. When this process occurs, the cell becomes highly charged and its dielectric susceptibility changes. The charge creates an increasing electrostatic force while the changing dielectric susceptibility diminishes the strength of the trapping force. Consequently, at some instant of time the cell gets ejected from the trap. The time inside the trap while the cell is being ionized, the intensity of the radiation, and the post ionization trajectory of the cell were used to determine the threshold radiation dose and the charge for each cell. The measurement of the charge vs ionization radiation dose at single cell level could be useful in the accuracy of radiotherapy as the individual charges can collectively create a strong enough electrical interaction to cause dielectric breakdown in other cells in a tumor. PMID:27699110

  7. Epidermal growth factor receptor targeting alters gene expression and restores the adhesion function of cancerous cells as measured by single cell force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Azadi, Shohreh; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad; Omidvar, Ramin; Moradi, Lida; Habibi-Anbouhi, Mahdi

    2016-12-01

    Loss of cell-cell adhesion function is a common characteristic of many human epithelial carcinomas that is frequently due to loss of E-cadherin expression. In cancer progression, loss of E-cadherin is associated with invasion and metastasis potential, hence restoration of its function may contribute to the metastasis inhibition. This study examined effect of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR/Her1) blockade on the E-cadherin expression, cellular adherence, and cell elasticity in two human epithelial cancer cell lines, MCF7 and A431. EGFR blocking agents as antibodies or small molecules target EGFR directly. Furthermore, due to intracellular signaling pathways they influence cell behavior and activities. The idea here is to investigate the effect of reduced activity of this signaling pathway using anti-EGFR Antibody (Cetuximab) and tyrosine kinase inhibitor (Lapatinib) on cell-cell adhesion and cell mechanical properties. Real-Time PCR analysis demonstrated that treatment of cells with considered drugs increased the expression of E-cadherin gene among samples. The atomic force microscopy-based single cell force spectroscopy technique was used to measure adhesive force of cancerous cells. Results indicated that inhibition of EGFR activity elevated cell-cell adhesion force, accompanied by stiffening of the cell bodies. In summary, Cetuximab and Lapatinib have been found to mediate cell-cell adhesion by restoration of E-cadherin expression and function. Our data suggest possible therapeutic potential for inhibition of metastasis via the blockade of EGFR signaling.

  8. A New Generation of FRET Sensors for Robust Measurement of Gαi1, Gαi2 and Gαi3 Activation Kinetics in Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    van Unen, Jakobus; Stumpf, Anette D.; Schmid, Benedikt; Reinhard, Nathalie R.; Hordijk, Peter L.; Hoffmann, Carsten; Gadella, Theodorus W. J.; Goedhart, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) can activate a heterotrimeric G-protein complex with subsecond kinetics. Genetically encoded biosensors based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) are ideally suited for the study of such fast signaling events in single living cells. Here we report on the construction and characterization of three FRET biosensors for the measurement of Gαi1, Gαi2 and Gαi3 activation. To enable quantitative long-term imaging of FRET biosensors with high dynamic range, fluorescent proteins with enhanced photophysical properties are required. Therefore, we use the currently brightest and most photostable CFP variant, mTurquoise2, as donor fused to Gαi subunit, and cp173Venus fused to the Gγ2 subunit as acceptor. The Gαi FRET biosensors constructs are expressed together with Gβ1 from a single plasmid, providing preferred relative expression levels with reduced variation in mammalian cells. The Gαi FRET sensors showed a robust response to activation of endogenous or over-expressed alpha-2A-adrenergic receptors, which was inhibited by pertussis toxin. Moreover, we observed activation of the Gαi FRET sensor in single cells upon stimulation of several GPCRs, including the LPA2, M3 and BK2 receptor. Furthermore, we show that the sensors are well suited to extract kinetic parameters from fast measurements in the millisecond time range. This new generation of FRET biosensors for Gαi1, Gαi2 and Gαi3 activation will be valuable for live-cell measurements that probe Gαi activation. PMID:26799488

  9. A chemiluminescence biochemical oxygen demand measuring method.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hideaki; Abe, Yuta; Koizumi, Rui; Suzuki, Kyota; Mogi, Yotaro; Hirayama, Takumi; Karube, Isao

    2007-10-17

    A new chemiluminescence biochemical oxygen demand (BOD(CL)) determining method was studied by employing redox reaction between quinone and Baker's yeast. The measurement was carried out by utilizing luminol chemiluminescence (CL) reaction catalyzed by ferricyanide with oxidized quinone of menadione, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a batch-type luminometer. In this study, dimethyl sulfoxide was used as a solvent for menadione. After optimization of the measuring conditions, the CL response to hydrogen peroxide in the incubation mixture had a linear response between 0.1 and 100 microM H2O2 (r2=0.9999, 8 points, n=3, average of relative standard deviation; R.S.D.(av)=4.22%). Next, a practical relationship between the BOD(CL) response and the glucose glutamic acid concentration was obtained over a range of 11-220 mg O2 L(-1) (6 points, n=3, R.S.D.(av) 3.71%) with a detection limit of 5.5 mg O2 L(-1) when using a reaction mixture and incubating for only 5 min. Subsequently, the characterization of this method was studied. First, the BOD(CL) responses to 16 pure organic substances were examined. Second, the influences of chloride ions, artificial seawater, and heavy metal ions on the BOD(CL) response were investigated. Real sample measurements using river water were performed. Finally, BOD(CL) responses were obtained for at least 8 days when the S. cerevisiae suspension was stored at 4 degrees C (response reduction, 69.9%; R.S.D. for 5 testing days, 18.7%). BOD(CL) responses after 8 days and 24 days were decreased to 69.9% and 35.8%, respectively, from their original values (R.S.D. for 8 days involving 5 testing days, 18.7%).

  10. Measuring Traces Of Oxygen By Resonant Electron Attachment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Man, Kin Fung; Boumsellek, Said; Chutjian, Ara

    1995-01-01

    Method of detecting trace amounts of oxygen based on dissociative attachment of electrons to oxygen molecules followed by measurement of resulting flux of negative oxygen ions in mass spectrometer. High sensitivity achieved in method by exploiting resonance in dissociative attachment of electrons to oxygen molecules: electron-attachment cross section rises to high peak at incident electron kinetic energy of 6.2 eV. Relative concentrations below 1 ppb detected. Devised to increase sensitivity of detection of oxygen in processing chambers in which oxygen regarded as contaminant; for example, chambers used in making semiconductor devices and in growing high-purity crystals.

  11. BENZO[A]PYRENE AND ITS K-REGION DIOL INDUCE DNA DAMAGE IN C3H10T1/2C18 CELLS AS MEASURED BY THE ALKALINE SINGLE CELL GEL (COMET) ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory


    160. Benzo[a]pyrene and its K-region diol induce DNA damage in C3HlOTl/2Cl8 cells as measured by the alkaline single cell gel (Comet) assay

    In a continuing series of studies on the genotoxicity ofK-region dihydrodiols of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, we have repo...

  12. BENZO[A]PYRENE AND ITS K-REGION DIOL INDUCE DNA DAMAGE IN C3H10T1/2C18 CELLS AS MEASURED BY THE ALKALINE SINGLE CELL GEL (COMET) ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory


    160. Benzo[a]pyrene and its K-region diol induce DNA damage in C3HlOTl/2Cl8 cells as measured by the alkaline single cell gel (Comet) assay

    In a continuing series of studies on the genotoxicity ofK-region dihydrodiols of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, we have repo...

  13. Measurement of arterial and capillary blood oxygen tension

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, J. H.

    1966-01-01

    An oxygen electrode system, supplied as an attachment to the Radiometer Astrup micro equipment for blood pH determination (AME I), has been investigated. Determination of blood oxygen tension using this electrode system has been compared with tension measurements using an established Bishop type oxygen electrode and satisfactory agreement was found. The storage of blood for routine estimation of oxygen tension has been investigated. Capillary blood oxygen tension has been measured and compared with that of simultaneously taken arterial blood samples. PMID:5929338

  14. Optoacoustic measurements of human placenta and umbilical blood oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanovskaya, T. N.; Petrov, I. Y.; Petrov, Y.; Patrikeeva, S. L.; Ahmed, M. S.; Hankins, G. D. V.; Prough, D. S.; Esenaliev, R. O.

    2016-03-01

    Adequate oxygenation is essential for normal embryogenesis and fetal growth. Perturbations in the intrauterine oxidative environment during pregnancy are associated with several pathophysiological disorders such as pregnancy loss, preeclampsia, and intrauterine growth restriction. We proposed to use optoacoustic technology for monitoring placental and fetal umbilical blood oxygenation. In this work, we studied optoacoustic monitoring of oxygenation in placenta and umbilical cord blood ex vivo using technique of placenta perfusion. We used a medical grade, nearinfrared, tunable, optoacoustic system developed and built for oxygenation monitoring in blood vessels and in tissues. First, we calibrated the system for cord blood oxygenation measurements by using a CO-Oximeter (gold standard). Then we performed validation in cord blood circulating through the catheters localized on the fetal side of an isolated placental lobule. Finally, the oxygenation measurements were performed in the perfused placental tissue. To increase or decrease blood oxygenation, we used infusion of a gas mixture of 95% O2 + 5% CO2 and 95% N2 + 5% CO2, respectively. In placental tissue, up to four cycles of changes in oxygenation were performed. The optoacoustically measured oxygenation in circulating cord blood and in placental lobule closely correlated with the actual oxygenation data measured by CO-Oximeter. We plan to further test the placental and cord blood oxygenation monitoring with optoacoustics in animal and clinical studies.

  15. Measuring Oxygen Consumption Rate in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Palikaras, Konstantinos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios

    2017-01-01

    The rate of oxygen consumption is a vital marker indicating cellular function during lifetime under normal or metabolically challenged conditions. It is used broadly to study mitochondrial function (Artal-Sanz and Tavernarakis, 2009; Palikaras et al., 2015; Ryu et al., 2016) or investigate factors mediating the switch from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis (Chen et al., 2015; Vander Heiden et al., 2009). In this protocol, we describe a method for the determination of oxygen consumption rates in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. PMID:28239622

  16. Quantification noise in single cell experiments

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, M.; Kirchner, B.; Müller, H.; Holzhauer, C.; Mann, W.; Pfaffl, M. W.

    2011-01-01

    In quantitative single-cell studies, the critical part is the low amount of nucleic acids present and the resulting experimental variations. In addition biological data obtained from heterogeneous tissue are not reflecting the expression behaviour of every single-cell. These variations can be derived from natural biological variance or can be introduced externally. Both have negative effects on the quantification result. The aim of this study is to make quantitative single-cell studies more transparent and reliable in order to fulfil the MIQE guidelines at the single-cell level. The technical variability introduced by RT, pre-amplification, evaporation, biological material and qPCR itself was evaluated by using RNA or DNA standards. Secondly, the biological expression variances of GAPDH, TNFα, IL-1β, TLR4 were measured by mRNA profiling experiment in single lymphocytes. The used quantification setup was sensitive enough to detect single standard copies and transcripts out of one solitary cell. Most variability was introduced by RT, followed by evaporation, and pre-amplification. The qPCR analysis and the biological matrix introduced only minor variability. Both conducted studies impressively demonstrate the heterogeneity of expression patterns in individual cells and showed clearly today's limitation in quantitative single-cell expression analysis. PMID:21745823

  17. Device for measuring the total concentration of oxygen in gases

    DOEpatents

    Isaacs, Hugh S.; Romano, Anthony J.

    1977-01-01

    This invention provides a CO equilibrium in a device for measuring the total concentration of oxygen impurities in a fluid stream. To this end, the CO equilibrium is produced in an electrochemical measuring cell by the interaction of a carbon element in the cell with the chemically combined and uncombined oxygen in the fluid stream at an elevated temperature.

  18. Dynamics of single-cell gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Diane; Hasty, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    Cellular behavior has traditionally been investigated by utilizing bulk-scale methods that measure average values for a population of cells. Such population-wide studies mask the behavior of individual cells and are often insufficient for characterizing biological processes in which cellular heterogeneity plays a key role. A unifying theme of many recent studies has been a focus on the development and utilization of single-cell experimental techniques that are capable of probing key biological phenomena in individual living cells. Recently, novel information about gene expression dynamics has been obtained from single-cell experiments that draw upon the unique capabilities of fluorescent reporter proteins. PMID:17130866

  19. Capillary Electrophoretic Technologies for Single Cell Metabolomics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapainis, Theodore E.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the functioning of the brain is hindered by a lack of knowledge of the full complement of neurotransmitters and neuromodulatory compounds. Single cell measurements aid in the discovery of neurotransmitters used by small subsets of neurons that would be diluted below detection limits or masked by ubiquitous compounds when working with…

  20. Capillary Electrophoretic Technologies for Single Cell Metabolomics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapainis, Theodore E.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the functioning of the brain is hindered by a lack of knowledge of the full complement of neurotransmitters and neuromodulatory compounds. Single cell measurements aid in the discovery of neurotransmitters used by small subsets of neurons that would be diluted below detection limits or masked by ubiquitous compounds when working with…

  1. Measurement of oxygen transfer from air into organic solvents

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Hemalata; Hobisch, Mathias; Borisov, Sergey; Klimant, Ingo; Krühne, Ulrich; Woodley, John M

    2015-01-01

    Abstract BACKGROUND The use of non‐aqueous organic media is becoming increasingly important in many biotechnological applications in order to achieve process intensification. Such media can be used, for example, to directly extract poorly water‐soluble toxic products from fermentations. Likewise many biological reactions require the supply of oxygen, most normally from air. However, reliable online measurements of oxygen concentration in organic solvents (and hence oxygen transfer rates from air to the solvent) has to date proven impossible due to limitations in the current analytical methods. RESULTS For the first time, online oxygen measurements in non‐aqueous media using a novel optical sensor are demonstrated. The sensor was used to measure oxygen concentration in various organic solvents including toluene, THF, isooctane, DMF, heptane and hexane (which have all been shown suitable for several biological applications). Subsequently, the oxygen transfer rates from air into these organic solvents were measured. CONCLUSION The measurement of oxygen transfer rates from air into organic solvents using the dynamic method was established using the solvent resistant optical sensor. The feasibility of online oxygen measurements in organic solvents has also been demonstrated, paving the way for new opportunities in process control. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Chemical Technology & Biotechnology published by JohnWiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:27773958

  2. PHASE I SINGLE CELL ELECTROLYZER TEST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Steimke, J; Timothy Steeper, T

    2008-08-05

    This document reports the results of Phase I Single Cell testing of an SO{sub 2}-Depolarized Water Electrolyzer. Testing was performed primarily during the first quarter of FY 2008 at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) using an electrolyzer cell designed and built at SRNL. Other facility hardware were also designed and built at SRNL. This test further advances this technology for which work began at SRNL in 2005. This research is valuable in achieving the ultimate goal of an economical hydrogen production process based on the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Cycle. The focus of this work was to conduct single cell electrolyzer tests to further develop the technology of SO{sub 2}-depolarized electrolysis as part of the HyS Cycle. The HyS Cycle is a hybrid thermochemical cycle that may be used in conjunction with advanced nuclear reactors or centralized solar receivers to produce hydrogen by water-splitting. Like all other sulfur-based cycles, HyS utilizes the high temperature thermal decomposition of sulfuric acid to produce oxygen and regenerate sulfur dioxide. The unique aspect of HyS is the generation of hydrogen in a water electrolyzer that is operated under conditions where dissolved sulfur dioxide depolarizes the anodic reaction, resulting in substantial voltage reduction. Low cell voltage is essential for both thermodynamic efficiency and hydrogen cost. Sulfur dioxide is oxidized at the anode, producing sulfuric acid that is sent to the high temperature acid decomposition portion of the cycle. The electrolyzer cell uses the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) concept. The anode and cathode are formed by spraying platinum containing catalyst on both sides of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM). In most testing the material of the PEM was NafionR. The electrolyzer cell active area can be as large as 54.8 cm{sup 2}. Feed to the anode of the electrolyzer is a sulfuric acid solution containing sulfur dioxide. The partial pressure of sulfur dioxide could be varied in the

  3. Visible light optical coherence tomography measures retinal oxygen metabolic response to systemic oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ji; Liu, Wenzhong; Chen, Siyu; Backman, Vadim; Sheibani, Nader; Sorenson, Christine M.; Fawzi, Amani A.; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Zhang, Hao F.

    2015-01-01

    The lack of capability to quantify oxygen metabolism noninvasively impedes both fundamental investigation and clinical diagnosis of a wide spectrum of diseases including all the major blinding diseases such as age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. Using visible light optical coherence tomography (vis-OCT), we demonstrated accurate and robust measurement of retinal oxygen metabolic rate (rMRO2) noninvasively in rat eyes. We continuously monitored the regulatory response of oxygen consumption to a progressive hypoxic challenge. We found that both oxygen delivery, and rMRO2 increased from the highly regulated retinal circulation (RC) under hypoxia, by 0.28 ± 0.08 μL min−1 (p < 0.001), and 0.20 ± 0.04 μL min−1 (p < 0.001) per 100 mmHg systemic pO2 reduction, respectively. The increased oxygen extraction compensated for the deficient oxygen supply from the poorly regulated choroidal circulation. Results from an oxygen diffusion model based on previous oxygen electrode measurements corroborated our in vivo observations. We believe that vis-OCT has the potential to reveal the fundamental role of oxygen metabolism in various retinal diseases. PMID:26658555

  4. Single Cell Electrical Characterization Techniques.

    PubMed

    Mansor, Muhammad Asraf; Ahmad, Mohd Ridzuan

    2015-06-04

    Electrical properties of living cells have been proven to play significant roles in understanding of various biological activities including disease progression both at the cellular and molecular levels. Since two decades ago, many researchers have developed tools to analyze the cell's electrical states especially in single cell analysis (SCA). In depth analysis and more fully described activities of cell differentiation and cancer can only be accomplished with single cell analysis. This growing interest was supported by the emergence of various microfluidic techniques to fulfill high precisions screening, reduced equipment cost and low analysis time for characterization of the single cell's electrical properties, as compared to classical bulky technique. This paper presents a historical review of single cell electrical properties analysis development from classical techniques to recent advances in microfluidic techniques. Technical details of the different microfluidic techniques are highlighted, and the advantages and limitations of various microfluidic devices are discussed.

  5. ASRDI oxygen technology survey. Volume 6: Flow measurement instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, D. B.

    1974-01-01

    A summary is provided of information available on liquid and gaseous oxygen flowmetering including an evaluation of commercial meters. The instrument types, physical principles of measurement, and performance characteristics are described. Problems concerning flow measurements of less than plus or minus two percent uncertainty are reviewed. Recommendations concerning work on flow reference systems, the use of surrogate fluids, and standard tests for oxygen flow measurements are also presented.

  6. A novel method for multiparameter physiological phenotype characterization at the single-cell level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelbauskas, Laimonas; Ashili, Shashanka; Houkal, Jeff; Smith, Dean; Mohammadreza, Aida; Lee, Kristen; Kumar, Ashok; Anis, Yasser; Paulson, Tom; Youngbull, Cody; Tian, Yanqing; Johnson, Roger; Holl, Mark; Meldrum, Deirdre

    2011-02-01

    Non-genetic intercellular heterogeneity has been increasingly recognized as one of the key factors in a variety of core cellular processes including proliferation, stimulus response, carcinogenesis and drug resistance. Many diseases, including cancer, originate in a single or a few cells. Early detection and characterization of these abnormal cells can provide new insights into the pathogenesis and serve as a tool for better disease diagnosis and treatment. We report on a novel technology for multiparameter physiological phenotype characterization at the single-cell level. It is based on real-time measurements of concentrations of several metabolites by means of extracellular optical sensors in microchambers of sub-nL volume containing single cells. In its current configuration, the measurement platform features the capability to detect oxygen consumption rate and pH changes under normoxic and hypoxic conditions at the single-cell level. We have conceived, designed and developed a semi-automated method for single-cell manipulation and loading into microwells utilizing custom, high-precision fluid handling at the nanoliter scale. We present the results of a series of measurements of oxygen consumption rates (OCRs) of single human metaplastic esophageal epithelial cells. In addition, to assess the effects of cell-to-cell interactions, we have measured OCRs of two and three cells placed in a single well. The major advantages of the approach are a) multiplexed characterization of cell phenotype at the single-cell level, b) minimal invasiveness due to the distant positioning of sensors, and c) flexibility in terms of accommodating measurements of other metabolites or biomolecules of interest.

  7. ASRDI oxygen technology survey. Volume 8: Pressure measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, J. M.; Brennan, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Pressure transducers and their current uses with gaseous or liquid oxygen are reviewed. All transducer types such as strain gage, capacitance, potentiometric, piezoelectric, etc., are included. Topics covered include: cryogenic pressure measurement; material compatibility with gaseous and liquid oxygen; cleaning procedures; pressure tap connections; transducer types and descriptions; and calibration techniques.

  8. Visible light optical coherence tomography measure retinal oxygen metabolic response to systemic oxygenation (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Ji; Liu, Wenzhong; Chen, Siyu; Backman, Vadim; Sheibani, Nader; Sorenson, Christine M.; Fawzi, Amani A.; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-03-01

    The lack of capability to quantify oxygen metabolism noninvasively impedes both fundamental investigation and clinical diagnosis of a wide spectrum of diseases including all the major blinding diseases such as age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. Using visible light optical coherence tomography (vis-OCT), we demonstrated accurate and robust measurement of retinal oxygen metabolic rate (rMRO2) noninvasively in rat eyes. The rMRO2 was calculated by concurrent measurement of blood flow and blood oxygen saturation (sO2). Blood flow was calculated by the principle of Doppler optical coherence tomography, where the phase shift between two closely spaced A-lines measures the axial velocity. The distinct optical absorption spectra of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin provided the contrast for sO2 measurement, combined with the spectroscopic analysis of vis-OCT signal within the blood vessels. We continuously monitored the regulatory response of oxygen consumption to a progressive hypoxic challenge. We found that both oxygen delivery, and rMRO2 increased from the highly regulated retinal circulation (RC) under hypoxia, by 0.28+/-0.08 μL/min (p<0.001), and 0.20+/-0.04 μL/min (p<0.001) per 100 mmHg systemic pO2 reduction, respectively. The increased oxygen extraction compensated for the deficient oxygen supply from the poorly regulated choroidal circulation (CC).

  9. Method measuring oxygen tension and transport within subcutaneous devices

    PubMed Central

    Weidling, John; Sameni, Sara; Lakey, Jonathan R. T.; Botvinick, Elliot

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Cellular therapies hold promise to replace the implantation of whole organs in the treatment of disease. For most cell types, in vivo viability depends on oxygen delivery to avoid the toxic effects of hypoxia. A promising approach is the in situ vascularization of implantable devices which can mediate hypoxia and improve both the lifetime and utility of implanted cells and tissues. Although mathematical models and bulk measurements of oxygenation in surrounding tissue have been used to estimate oxygenation within devices, such estimates are insufficient in determining if supplied oxygen is sufficient for the entire thickness of the implanted cells and tissues. We have developed a technique in which oxygen-sensitive microparticles (OSMs) are incorporated into the volume of subcutaneously implantable devices. Oxygen partial pressure within these devices can be measured directly in vivo by an optical probe placed on the skin surface. As validation, OSMs have been incorporated into alginate beads, commonly used as immunoisolation devices to encapsulate pancreatic islet cells. Alginate beads were implanted into the subcutaneous space of Sprague–Dawley rats. Oxygen transport through beads was characterized from dynamic OSM signals in response to changes in inhaled oxygen. Changes in oxygen dynamics over days demonstrate the utility of our technology. PMID:25162910

  10. Single cell dynamic phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Patsch, Katherin; Chiu, Chi-Li; Engeln, Mark; Agus, David B.; Mallick, Parag; Mumenthaler, Shannon M.; Ruderman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Live cell imaging has improved our ability to measure phenotypic heterogeneity. However, bottlenecks in imaging and image processing often make it difficult to differentiate interesting biological behavior from technical artifact. Thus there is a need for new methods that improve data quality without sacrificing throughput. Here we present a 3-step workflow to improve dynamic phenotype measurements of heterogeneous cell populations. We provide guidelines for image acquisition, phenotype tracking, and data filtering to remove erroneous cell tracks using the novel Tracking Aberration Measure (TrAM). Our workflow is broadly applicable across imaging platforms and analysis software. By applying this workflow to cancer cell assays, we reduced aberrant cell track prevalence from 17% to 2%. The cost of this improvement was removing 15% of the well-tracked cells. This enabled detection of significant motility differences between cell lines. Similarly, we avoided detecting a false change in translocation kinetics by eliminating the true cause: varied proportions of unresponsive cells. Finally, by systematically seeking heterogeneous behaviors, we detected subpopulations that otherwise could have been missed, including early apoptotic events and pre-mitotic cells. We provide optimized protocols for specific applications and step-by-step guidelines for adapting them to a variety of biological systems. PMID:27708391

  11. Measuring blood oxygenation of pulsatile arteries using photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qian; Yu, Tianhao; Li, Lin; Chai, Xinyu; Zhou, Chuanqing

    2016-10-01

    Heart pumps blood through the blood vessels to provide body with oxygen and nutrients. As the result, the blood flow, volume and oxygenation in arteries has a pulsatile nature. Measuring these pulsatile parameters enables more precise monitoring of oxygen metabolic rate and is thus valuable for researches and clinical applications. Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is a proven label-free method for in vivo measuring blood oxygenation at single blood vessel level. However, studies using PAM to observe the pulsatile nature of blood oxygenation in arteries were not reported. In this paper, we use optical-resolution PAM (OR-PAM) technology to study the blood oxygenation dynamics of pulsatile arteries. First, the ability of our OR-PAM system to accurately reflect the change of optical absorption in imaged objects is demonstrated in a phantom study. Then the system is used to image exposed cortical blood vessels of cat. The pulsatile nature of blood volume and oxygenation in arteries is clearly reflected in photoacoustic (PA) signals, whereas it's not observable in veins. By using a multi-wavelength laser, the dynamics of the blood oxygenation of pulsatile arteries in cardiac cycles can be measured, based on the spectroscopic method.

  12. Measurement of dissolved oxygen during red wines tank aging with chips and micro-oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Nevares, I; del Alamo, M

    2008-07-21

    Nowadays, micro-oxygenation is a very important technique used in aging wines in order to improve their characteristics. The techniques of wine tank aging imply the use of small doses of oxygen and the addition of wood pieces of oak to the wine. Considering the low dissolved oxygen (DO) levels used by micro-oxygenation technique it is necessary to choose the appropriate measurement principle to apply the precise oxygen dosage in wine at any time, in order to assure its correct assimilation. This knowledge will allow the oenologist to control and run the wine aging correctly. This work is a thorough revision of DO measurement main technologies applied to oenology. It describes the strengths and weaknesses of each of them, and draws a comparison of their workings in wine measurement. Both, the traditional systems by electrochemical probes, and the newest photoluminescence-based probes have been used. These probes adapted to red wines ageing study are then compared. This paper also details the first results of the dissolved oxygen content evolution in red wines during a traditional and alternative tank aging. Samples have been treated by three different ageing systems: oak barrels, stainless-steel tanks with small oak wood pieces (chips) and with bigger oak pieces (staves) with low micro-oxygenation levels. French and American oak barrels manufactured by the same cooperage have been used.

  13. HERSCHEL MEASUREMENTS OF MOLECULAR OXYGEN IN ORION

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, Paul F.; Chen, Jo-Hsin; Li Di; Liseau, Rene; Black, John H.; Bell, Tom A.; Hollenbach, David; Kaufman, Michael J.; Lis, Dariusz C.; Melnick, Gary; Neufeld, David; Pagani, Laurent; Encrenaz, Pierre; Snell, Ronald; Benz, Arnold O.; Bruderer, Simon; Bergin, Edwin; Caselli, Paola; Caux, Emmanuel; Falgarone, Edith

    2011-08-20

    We report observations of three rotational transitions of molecular oxygen (O{sub 2}) in emission from the H{sub 2} Peak 1 position of vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen in Orion. We observed the 487 GHz, 774 GHz, and 1121 GHz lines using the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared on the Herschel Space Observatory, having velocities of 11 km s{sup -1} to 12 km s{sup -1} and widths of 3 km s{sup -1}. The beam-averaged column density is N(O{sub 2}) = 6.5 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}, and assuming that the source has an equal beam-filling factor for all transitions (beam widths 44, 28, and 19''), the relative line intensities imply a kinetic temperature between 65 K and 120 K. The fractional abundance of O{sub 2} relative to H{sub 2} is (0.3-7.3) x 10{sup -6}. The unusual velocity suggests an association with a {approx}5'' diameter source, denoted Peak A, the Western Clump, or MF4. The mass of this source is {approx}10 M{sub sun} and the dust temperature is {>=}150 K. Our preferred explanation of the enhanced O{sub 2} abundance is that dust grains in this region are sufficiently warm (T {>=} 100 K) to desorb water ice and thus keep a significant fraction of elemental oxygen in the gas phase, with a significant fraction as O{sub 2}. For this small source, the line ratios require a temperature {>=}180 K. The inferred O{sub 2} column density {approx_equal}5 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2} can be produced in Peak A, having N(H{sub 2}) {approx_equal} 4 x 10{sup 24} cm{sup -2}. An alternative mechanism is a low-velocity (10-15 km s{sup -1}) C-shock, which can produce N(O{sub 2}) up to 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}.

  14. Plant single-cell and single-cell-type metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Misra, Biswapriya B; Assmann, Sarah M; Chen, Sixue

    2014-10-01

    In conjunction with genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics, plant metabolomics is providing large data sets that are paving the way towards a comprehensive and holistic understanding of plant growth, development, defense, and productivity. However, dilution effects from organ- and tissue-based sampling of metabolomes have limited our understanding of the intricate regulation of metabolic pathways and networks at the cellular level. Recent advances in metabolomics methodologies, along with the post-genomic expansion of bioinformatics knowledge and functional genomics tools, have allowed the gathering of enriched information on individual cells and single cell types. Here we review progress, current status, opportunities, and challenges presented by single cell-based metabolomics research in plants.

  15. Surface pressure measurement by oxygen quenching of luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gouterman, Martin P. (Inventor); Kavandi, Janet L. (Inventor); Gallery, Jean (Inventor); Callis, James B. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Methods and compositions for measuring the pressure of an oxygen-containing gas on an aerodynamic surface, by oxygen-quenching of luminescence of molecular sensors is disclosed. Objects are coated with luminescent films containing a first sensor and at least one of two additional sensors, each of the sensors having luminescences that have different dependencies on temperature and oxygen pressure. Methods and compositions are also provided for improving pressure measurements (qualitative or quantitive) on surfaces coated with a film having one or more types of sensor.

  16. Surface pressure measurement by oxygen quenching of luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gouterman, Martin P. (Inventor); Kavandi, Janet L. (Inventor); Gallery, Jean (Inventor); Callis, James B. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Methods and compositions for measuring the pressure of an oxygen-containing gas on an aerodynamic surface, by oxygen-quenching of luminescence of molecular sensors is disclosed. Objects are coated with luminescent films containing a first sensor and at least one of two additional sensors, each of the sensors having luminescences that have different dependencies on temperature and oxygen pressure. Methods and compositions are also provided for improving pressure measurements (qualitative or quantitive) on surfaces coated with a film having one or more types of sensor.

  17. A review on recent upper atmosphere atomic oxygen measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Martin; Ern, Manfred; Riese, Martin; Zhu, Yajun

    2016-07-01

    Atomic oxygen is a key player in the upper mesosphere lower and thermosphere chemistry, energy balance, and dynamics. In recent years, a few new global datasets of this species have been presented. They are based on airglow measurements from low earth satellites. Surprisingly, the atomic oxygen abundance differs by 30-50% for similar atmospheric conditions. This paper gives an overview on the various atomic oxygen datasets available so far and presents most recent results obtained from measurements of the SCIAMACHY instrument on Envisat. Differences between the datasets are discussed.

  18. Introduction: why analyze single cells?

    PubMed

    Di Carlo, Dino; Tse, Henry Tat Kwong; Gossett, Daniel R

    2012-01-01

    Powerful methods in molecular biology are abundant; however, in many fields including hematology, stem cell biology, tissue engineering, and cancer biology, data from tools and assays that analyze the average signals from many cells may not yield the desired result because the cells of interest may be in the minority-their behavior masked by the majority-or because the dynamics of the populations of interest are offset in time. Accurate characterization of samples with high cellular heterogeneity may only be achieved by analyzing single cells. In this chapter, we discuss the rationale for performing analyses on individual cells in more depth, cover the fields of study in which single-cell behavior is yielding new insights into biological and clinical questions, and speculate on how single-cell analysis will be critical in the future.

  19. Single Cell Isolation and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ping; Zhang, Wenhua; Xin, Hongbo; Deng, Glenn

    2016-01-01

    Individual cell heterogeneity within a population can be critical to its peculiar function and fate. Subpopulations studies with mixed mutants and wild types may not be as informative regarding which cell responds to which drugs or clinical treatments. Cell to cell differences in RNA transcripts and protein expression can be key to answering questions in cancer, neurobiology, stem cell biology, immunology, and developmental biology. Conventional cell-based assays mainly analyze the average responses from a population of cells, without regarding individual cell phenotypes. To better understand the variations from cell to cell, scientists need to use single cell analyses to provide more detailed information for therapeutic decision making in precision medicine. In this review, we focus on the recent developments in single cell isolation and analysis, which include technologies, analyses and main applications. Here, we summarize the historical background, limitations, applications, and potential of single cell isolation technologies. PMID:27826548

  20. Single Cell Electrical Characterization Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Mansor, Muhammad Asraf; Ahmad, Mohd Ridzuan

    2015-01-01

    Electrical properties of living cells have been proven to play significant roles in understanding of various biological activities including disease progression both at the cellular and molecular levels. Since two decades ago, many researchers have developed tools to analyze the cell’s electrical states especially in single cell analysis (SCA). In depth analysis and more fully described activities of cell differentiation and cancer can only be accomplished with single cell analysis. This growing interest was supported by the emergence of various microfluidic techniques to fulfill high precisions screening, reduced equipment cost and low analysis time for characterization of the single cell’s electrical properties, as compared to classical bulky technique. This paper presents a historical review of single cell electrical properties analysis development from classical techniques to recent advances in microfluidic techniques. Technical details of the different microfluidic techniques are highlighted, and the advantages and limitations of various microfluidic devices are discussed. PMID:26053399

  1. Ultra High Precision Laser Monitor for Oxygen Eddy Flux Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahniser, M. S.; Nelson, D. D.; Roscioli, J. R.; Herndon, S. C.; McManus, J. B.; Jervis, D.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric oxygen provides one of the most powerful tracers to study the carbon cycle through its close interaction with carbon dioxide. Keeling and co-workers demonstrated this at the global scale by using small variations in atmospheric oxygen content to disentangle oceanic and terrestrial carbon sinks. It would be very exciting to apply similar ideas at the ecosystem level to improve our understanding of biosphere-atmosphere exchange and our ability to predict the response of the biosphere and atmosphere to climate change. The eddy covariance technique is perhaps the most effective approach available to quantify the exchange of gases between these spheres. Therefore, eddy covariance flux measurements of oxygen would be extremely valuable. However, this requires a fast response (0.1 seconds), high relative precision (0.001% or 10 per meg) oxygen sensor. We report recent progress in developing such a sensor using a high resolution visible laser to probe the oxygen A-band electronic transition. This sensor will enable oxygen flux measurements using eddy covariance. In addition, we will incorporate a second laser in this instrument to simultaneously determine the fluxes of oxygen, carbon dioxide and water vapor within the same sampling cell. This will provide a direct, real time measurement of the ratio of the flux of oxygen to that of carbon dioxide. This ratio is expected to vary on short time scales and small spatial scales due to the differing stoichiometry of processes producing and consuming carbon dioxide. Thus measuring the variations in the ratio of oxygen and carbon dioxide fluxes will provide mechanistic information to improve our understanding of the crucial exchange of carbon between the atmosphere and biosphere.

  2. Direct measurement of oxygen stoichiometry in perovskite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scola, J.; Benamar, A.; Berini, B.; Jomard, F.; Dumont, Y.

    2017-02-01

    We present a direct method to measure the oxygen stoichiometry in an oxide film with an accuracy of about 2%. It is based on a combination of 18O annealing and high mass resolution secondary ion mass spectroscopy. Calibration has been done on a LaNiO3 film whose electrical properties dependence on oxygen stoichiometry are well documented. The method is illustrated with a series of LaNiO3 films grown on SrTiO3 substrates prepared with different oxygen stoichiometries. The large influence of the surface state on oxygen exchange is evidenced in films grown on different substrate orientations or coated with a thin layer of LaAlO3. Oxygen surface exchange and bulk diffusion is then discussed for both LaNiO3 and SrVO3 films.

  3. [Study of plasma temperature measurements for oxygen discharge].

    PubMed

    Li, Liu-Cheng; Wang, Zeng-Qiang; Li, Gu-Fu; Duo, Li-Ping

    2011-10-01

    A radio-frequency discharge setup was constructed by two shell-shaped copper electrodes and a 30 cm long pyrex glass tube (i. d. = 1.65 cm) to examine the gas temperature of oxygen plasma in electric discharge oxygen iodine laser. The discharge was supplied by a 500 watt, 13.56 MHz radio-frequency power. The gas pressure in the discharge cavity was 1 330 Pa. The temperature of oxygen discharge plasma was measured by using the P branch of O2 (b, v = 0) rotational emission spectrum. Two methods were used to deduce the oxygen gas temperature. They are Boltzman plotting method and computer simulating spectrum method, respectively. Gauss fitting method was used to distinguish spectrum peaks for lower resolution spectrum. The spectrum peak area was used to characterize the optical emission intensity. The gas temperature of oxygen discharge plasma was obtained by Boltzmann plotting method. Alternatively, the optical emission spectrum was simulated by computer modeling with spectrometer slit function which was obtained by He-Ne laser. Consequently, the gas temperature of oxygen plasma was obtained by comparing the computer simulating spectrum and the experimentally observed spectrum according to the least square fitting rule. The measurement results with the two methods agree well. It was concluded that the simple optical technique can be used conveniently in the temperature diagnostics of oxygen radio-frequency discharge plasma.

  4. Oxygen measurement by multimode diode lasers employing gas correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lou, Xiutao; Somesfalean, Gabriel; Chen, Bin; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2009-02-10

    Multimode diode laser (MDL)-based correlation spectroscopy (COSPEC) was used to measure oxygen in ambient air, thereby employing a diode laser (DL) having an emission spectrum that overlaps the oxygen absorption lines of the A band. A sensitivity of 700 ppm m was achieved with good accuracy (2%) and linearity (R(2)=0.999). For comparison, measurements of ambient oxygen were also performed by tunable DL absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) technique employing a vertical cavity surface emitting laser. We demonstrate that, despite slightly degraded sensitivity, the MDL-based COSPEC-based oxygen sensor has the advantages of high stability, low cost, ease-of-use, and relaxed requirements in component selection and instrument buildup compared with the TDLAS-based instrument.

  5. Fetal oxygenation measurement using wireless near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macnab, Andrew; Shadgan, Babak; Janssen, Patricia; Rurak, Dan

    2012-03-01

    Background: Fetal well-being is determined in large part by how well the placenta is able to supply oxygen and nutrients, but current technology is unable to directly measure how well a placenta functions. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) utilizes optical methods to measure tissue oxygenation. This pilot project evaluated the feasibility of NIRS for fetal monitoring through the maternal abdominal wall using a sheep model. Methods: A miniature wireless 2-wavelength NIRS device was placed on the abdominal skin over the placenta of a pregnant ewe whose fetus had been chronically catheterized to allow arterial sampling for measurement of arterial oxygen saturation. The NIRS device has 3-paired light emitting diodes and a single photodiode detector; allowing measurement of an index of tissue oxygen saturation (TSI%). Fetal limb TSI% values were compared before and during fetal breathing movements. Correlation was made during these events between arterial values and placental TSI% monitored continuously in real time. Results: Serial measurements were obtained in a single experiment. The correlation between transcutaneous NIRS derived TSI% and direct arterial oxygen saturation was very high (R2=0.86). Measures of fetal limb TSI% were declined after episodes of fetal breathing (P<0.005). Conclusions: This correlation suggests that NIRS is sensitive enough to detect changes in fetal tissue oxygenation noninvasively through the maternal abdominal wall in real-time in a sheep model. NIRS data confirmed that fetal breathing movements decrease arterial oxygen saturation in fetal lambs. If validated by further study this optical methodology could be applied as means of monitoring fetal wellbeing in humans.

  6. Analysis of mitochondria isolated from single cells.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ryan D; Navratil, Marian; Poe, Bobby G; Xiong, Guohua; Olson, Karen J; Ahmadzadeh, Hossein; Andreyev, Dmitry; Duffy, Ciarán F; Arriaga, Edgar A

    2007-01-01

    Bulk studies are not suitable to describe and study cell-to-cell variation, which is of high importance in biological processes such as embryogenesis, tissue differentiation, and disease. Previously, capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIF) was used to measure the properties of organelles isolated from millions of cells. As such, these bulk measurements reported average properties for the organelles of cell populations. Similar measurements for organelles released from single cells would be highly relevant to describe the subcellular variations among cells. Toward this goal, here we introduce an approach to analyze the mitochondria released from single mammalian cells. Osteosarcoma 143B cells are labeled with either the fluorescent mitochondrion-specific 10-N-nonyl acridine orange (NAO) or via expression of the fluorescent protein DsRed2. Subsequently, a single cell is introduced into the CE-LIF capillary where the organelles are released by a combined treatment of digitonin and trypsin. After this treatment, an electric field is applied and the released organelles electromigrate toward the LIF detector. From an electropherogram, the number of detected events per cell, their individual electrophoretic mobilities, and their individual fluorescence intensities are calculated. The results obtained from DsRed2 labeling, which is retained in intact mitochondria, and NAO labeling, which labels all mitochondria, are the basis for discussion of the strengths and limitations of this single-cell approach.

  7. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for the measurement of tissue oxygen saturation.

    PubMed

    Sircan-Kucuksayan, A; Uyuklu, M; Canpolat, M

    2015-12-01

    Tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) is a useful parameter for medical applications. A spectroscopic method has been developed to detect pathologic tissues, due to a lack of normal blood circulation, by measuring StO2. In this study, human blood samples with different levels of oxygen saturation have been prepared and spectra were acquired using an optical fiber probe to investigate the correlation between the oxygen saturation levels and the spectra. A linear correlation between the oxygen saturation and ratio of the intensities (760 nm to 790 nm) of the spectra acquired from blood samples has been found. In a validation study, oxygen saturations of the blood samples were estimated from the spectroscopic measurements with an error of 2.9%. It has also been shown that the linear dependence between the ratio and the oxygen saturation of the blood samples was valid for the blood samples with different hematocrits. Spectra were acquired from the forearms of 30 healthy volunteers to estimate StO2 prior to, at the beginning of, after 2 min, and at the release of total vascular occlusion. The average StO2 of a forearm before and after the two minutes occlusion was significantly different. The results suggested that optical reflectance spectroscopy is a sensitive method to estimate the StO2 levels of human tissue. The technique developed to measure StO2 has potential to detect ischemia in real time.

  8. Light-addressable measurements of cellular oxygen consumption rates in microwell arrays based on phase-based phosphorescence lifetime detection

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shih-Hao; Hsu, Yu-Hsuan; Wu, Chih-Wei; Wu, Chang-Jer

    2012-01-01

    A digital light modulation system that utilizes a modified commercial digital micromirror device (DMD) projector, which is equipped with a UV light-emitting diode as a light modulation source, has been developed to spatially direct excited light toward a microwell array device to detect the oxygen consumption rate (OCR) of single cells via phase-based phosphorescence lifetime detection. The microwell array device is composed of a combination of two components: an array of glass microwells containing Pt(II) octaethylporphine (PtOEP) as the oxygen-sensitive luminescent layer and a microfluidic module with pneumatically actuated glass lids set above the microwells to controllably seal the microwells of interest. By controlling the illumination pattern on the DMD, the modulated excitation light can be spatially projected to only excite the sealed microwell for cellular OCR measurements. The OCR of baby hamster kidney-21 fibroblast cells cultivated on the PtOEP layer within a sealed microwell has been successfully measured at 104 ± 2.96 amol s−1 cell−1. Repeatable and consistent measurements indicate that the oxygen measurements did not adversely affect the physiological state of the measured cells. The OCR of the cells exhibited a good linear relationship with the diameter of the microwells, ranging from 400 to 1000 μm and containing approximately 480 to 1200 cells within a microwell. In addition, the OCR variation of single cells in situ infected by Dengue virus with a different multiplicity of infection was also successfully measured in real-time. This proposed platform provides the potential for a wide range of biological applications in cell-based biosensing, toxicology, and drug discovery. PMID:24348889

  9. Light-addressable measurements of cellular oxygen consumption rates in microwell arrays based on phase-based phosphorescence lifetime detection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Hao; Hsu, Yu-Hsuan; Wu, Chih-Wei; Wu, Chang-Jer

    2012-01-01

    A digital light modulation system that utilizes a modified commercial digital micromirror device (DMD) projector, which is equipped with a UV light-emitting diode as a light modulation source, has been developed to spatially direct excited light toward a microwell array device to detect the oxygen consumption rate (OCR) of single cells via phase-based phosphorescence lifetime detection. The microwell array device is composed of a combination of two components: an array of glass microwells containing Pt(II) octaethylporphine (PtOEP) as the oxygen-sensitive luminescent layer and a microfluidic module with pneumatically actuated glass lids set above the microwells to controllably seal the microwells of interest. By controlling the illumination pattern on the DMD, the modulated excitation light can be spatially projected to only excite the sealed microwell for cellular OCR measurements. The OCR of baby hamster kidney-21 fibroblast cells cultivated on the PtOEP layer within a sealed microwell has been successfully measured at 104 ± 2.96 amol s(-1) cell(-1). Repeatable and consistent measurements indicate that the oxygen measurements did not adversely affect the physiological state of the measured cells. The OCR of the cells exhibited a good linear relationship with the diameter of the microwells, ranging from 400 to 1000 μm and containing approximately 480 to 1200 cells within a microwell. In addition, the OCR variation of single cells in situ infected by Dengue virus with a different multiplicity of infection was also successfully measured in real-time. This proposed platform provides the potential for a wide range of biological applications in cell-based biosensing, toxicology, and drug discovery.

  10. Noninvasive measurement of cerebral oxygen saturation and cerebral phronetal function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shengli; Zhang, Aiyu; Xu, Min; Jin, Taiyi

    1998-08-01

    Using the Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS), the noninvasive measurement of cerebral oxygen concentration can be achieved in vivo based on the Lambert-Beer Law. In this paper, we discuss the possibility of studying higher brain functions through combining cerebral oxygen saturation and cerebral function measurement. Event-related experiments are introduced to measure the cerebral phronetal function. Time domain curves show sight differences among these experiment results. However, with the aid of DFT, experiment data of all five human volunteers show the frequency near 20 Hz or 40 Hz is evoked depending on the difficulty of the mental tasks. The results demonstrate the feasibility of cerebral functions study by means of cerebral oxygen saturation measurement analyzed in the frequency domain.

  11. The measurement of hemoglobin oxygen saturation using multiwavelength photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zilin; Yang, Xiaoquan; Yu, Lejun; Gong, Hui

    2010-02-01

    Hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO2) is one of the most critical functional parameters to the metabolism. In this paper, we mainly introduced some initial results of measuring blood oxygen using multi-wavelength photoacoustic microscopy (PAM). In phantom study, we demonstrate the photoacoustic signal amplitude increases linearly with the concentration of red or blue ink. Then the calculated concentration of red ink in double-ink mixtures with PAM has a 5% difference with the result measured with spectrophotometric analysis. In ex vivo experiment, the measured result exhibt 15% difference between the PAM and spectrophotometric analysis. Experiment results suggest that PAM could be used to determine the SO2 quantitatively.

  12. The measurement of hemoglobin oxygen saturation using multiwavelength photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zilin; Yang, Xiaoquan; Yu, Lejun; Gong, Hui

    2009-10-01

    Hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO2) is one of the most critical functional parameters to the metabolism. In this paper, we mainly introduced some initial results of measuring blood oxygen using multi-wavelength photoacoustic microscopy (PAM). In phantom study, we demonstrate the photoacoustic signal amplitude increases linearly with the concentration of red or blue ink. Then the calculated concentration of red ink in double-ink mixtures with PAM has a 5% difference with the result measured with spectrophotometric analysis. In ex vivo experiment, the measured result exhibt 15% difference between the PAM and spectrophotometric analysis. Experiment results suggest that PAM could be used to determine the SO2 quantitatively.

  13. Cerebral blood oxygenation measurements in neonates with optoacoustic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Stephen; Petrov, Irene Y.; Petrov, Yuriy; Richardson, C. Joan; Fonseca, Rafael A.; Prough, Donald S.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2017-03-01

    Cerebral hypoxia is a major contributor to neonatal/infant mortality and morbidity including severe neurological complications such as mental retardation, cerebral palsy, motor impairment, and epilepsy. Currently, no technology is capable of accurate monitoring of neonatal cerebral oxygenation. We proposed to use optoacoustics for this application by probing the superior sagittal sinus (SSS), a large central cerebral vein. We developed and built a multi-wavelength, optical parametric oscillator (OPO) and laser diode optoacoustic systems for measurement of SSS blood oxygenation in the reflection mode through open anterior or posterior fontanelles and in the transmission mode through the skull in the occipital area. In this paper we present results of initial tests of the laser diode system for neonatal cerebral oxygenation measurements. First, the system was tested in phantoms simulating neonatal SSS. Then, using the data obtained in the phantoms, we optimized the system's hardware and software and tested it in neonates admitted in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. The laser diode system was capable of detecting SSS signals in the reflection mode through the open anterior and posterior fontanelles as well as in the transmission mode through the skull with high signal-to-noise ratio. Using the signals measured at different wavelengths and algorithms developed for oxygenation measurements, the laser diode system provided real-time, continuous oxygenation monitoring with high precision at all these locations.

  14. Cerebral Blood Oxygenation Measurement Based on Oxygen-dependent Quenching of Phosphorescence

    PubMed Central

    Sakadžić, Sava; Roussakis, Emmanuel; Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Mandeville, Emiri T.; Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Arai, Ken; Ruvinskaya, Svetlana; Wu, Weicheng; Devor, Anna; Lo, Eng H.; Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Boas, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring of the spatiotemporal characteristics of cerebral blood and tissue oxygenation is crucial for better understanding of the neuro-metabolic-vascular relationship. Development of new pO2 measurement modalities with simultaneous monitoring of pO2 in larger fields of view with higher spatial and/or temporal resolution will enable greater insight into the functioning of the normal brain and will also have significant impact on diagnosis and treatment of neurovascular diseases such as stroke, Alzheimer's disease, and head injury. Optical imaging modalities have shown a great potential to provide high spatiotemporal resolution and quantitative imaging of pO2 based on hemoglobin absorption in visible and near infrared range of optical spectrum. However, multispectral measurement of cerebral blood oxygenation relies on photon migration through the highly scattering brain tissue. Estimation and modeling of tissue optical parameters, which may undergo dynamic changes during the experiment, is typically required for accurate estimation of blood oxygenation. On the other hand, estimation of the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) based on oxygen-dependent quenching of phosphorescence should not be significantly affected by the changes in the optical parameters of the tissue and provides an absolute measure of pO2. Experimental systems that utilize oxygen-sensitive dyes have been demonstrated in in vivo studies of the perfused tissue as well as for monitoring the oxygen content in tissue cultures, showing that phosphorescence quenching is a potent technology capable of accurate oxygen imaging in the physiological pO2 range. Here we demonstrate with two different imaging modalities how to perform measurement of pO2 in cortical vasculature based on phosphorescence lifetime imaging. In first demonstration we present wide field of view imaging of pO2 at the cortical surface of a rat. This imaging modality has relatively simple experimental setup based on a CCD camera and a

  15. Progress toward single cell metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Lanni, Eric J.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2012-01-01

    The metabolome refers to the entire set of small molecules, or metabolites, within a biological sample. These molecules are involved in many fundamental intracellular functions and reflect the cell’s physiological condition. The ability to detect and identify metabolites and determine and monitor their amounts at the single cell level enables an exciting range of studies of biological variation and functional heterogeneity between cells, even within a presumably homogenous cell population. Significant progress has been made in the development and application of bioanalytical tools for single cell metabolomics based on mass spectrometry, microfluidics, and capillary separations. Remarkable improvements in the sensitivity, specificity, and throughput of these approaches enable investigation of multiple metabolites simultaneously in a range of individual cell samples. PMID:23246232

  16. Nanokit for single-cell electrochemical analyses

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Rongrong; Xu, Mingchen; Jiang, Dechen; Burgess, Jame D.; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    The development of more intricate devices for the analysis of small molecules and protein activity in single cells would advance our knowledge of cellular heterogeneity and signaling cascades. Therefore, in this study, a nanokit was produced by filling a nanometer-sized capillary with a ring electrode at the tip with components from traditional kits, which could be egressed outside the capillary by electrochemical pumping. At the tip, femtoliter amounts of the kit components were reacted with the analyte to generate hydrogen peroxide for the electrochemical measurement by the ring electrode. Taking advantage of the nanotip and small volume injection, the nanokit was easily inserted into a single cell to determine the intracellular glucose levels and sphingomyelinase (SMase) activity, which had rarely been achieved. High cellular heterogeneities of these two molecules were observed, showing the significance of the nanokit. Compared with the current methods that use a complicated structural design or surface functionalization for the recognition of the analytes, the nanokit has adapted features of the well-established kits and integrated the kit components and detector in one nanometer-sized capillary, which provides a specific device to characterize the reactivity and concentrations of cellular compounds in single cells. PMID:27671654

  17. [Measurement of oxygen concentration using multimode diode laser absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Gao, Guang-zhen; Cai, Ting-dong; Hu, Bo; Jia, Tian-jun

    2015-01-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) is a widely used technique for high sensitivity, good selectivity and fast response. It is widely used in environment monitoring, industrial process control and biomedical sensing. In order to overcome the drawbacks of TDLAS including high cost, poor stability and center wavelength shift problem. A multi-mode diode laser system based on correlation spectroscopy and wavelength modulation spectroscopy (TMDL-COSPEC-WMS) was used to measure O2 concentration near 760nm at the 1%~30% range of near room temperature. During the experiment, the light is splitter into two beams, respectively through the sample and measuring cell, two receiving optical signal collection containing gas concentration information sent back stage treatment, invert the oxygen concentration through correlation and ratio between measured signal and reference signal, the correlation spectroscopy harmonic detection technique is used to improve the stability of the system and the signal to noise ratio. The result showed that, there was a good linear relationship between the measured oxygen concentration and the actual concentration value. A detection limit of 280 pmm. m in the 1 atmospheric which approved of the same sample. A continuous measurement for oxygen with the standard deviation of 0. 056% in ambient air during approximately 30 minutes confirms the stability and the capability of the system. The design of the system includes soft and hardware can meet the needs of oxygen online monitoring. The experimental device is simple and easy to use, easy to complex environment application.

  18. Instrument for the measurement of retinal vessel oxygen saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewes, Jonathan J.; Smith, Matthew H.; Denninghoff, Kurt R.; Hillman, Lloyd W.

    1999-06-01

    Retinal vessel oxygen saturation has been suggested as a parameter for monitoring a wide range of conditions including occult blood los and a variety of ophthalmic diseases. We have developed an Eye Oximeter (EOX), that noninvasively measures the oxygen saturation of the blood in individual large retinal vessels using scanning lasers. 1D vessel extinction profiles are obtained at four wavelengths (629, 678, 821 and 899 nm), and the vessel transmittances computed. The oxygen saturation of blood within the vessel is then calculated from the transmittance data. We have performed an in vitro experiment on human blood which demonstrates the calibration of the EOX measurements and validates our oximetry equations. Retinal vessel oxygen saturation was measured in a human subject and found to be 65%O2Sat and 101 - 102%O2Sat in the veins and arteries on the optic disk. Irregularities in the background measured away from the optic disk resulted in a large variance in the calculated saturation when compared to measurements made on the disk.

  19. Disposable screen-printed biosensor for transcutaneous oxygen measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Yu-Zhi Liza; Atkinson, John

    2002-12-01

    A disposable transcutaneous oxygen sensor has been designed and fabricated in-house employing screen-printing methods so as to achieve cost-effective and reliable production. The oxygen sensing module of the device is based on the amperometric Clarke cell principle. A three-electrode configuration consisting of miniature gold working and counter-electrodes and a silver/silver chloride reference electrode is screen-printed onto alumina substrate resulting in approximately 15 µm thickness layers. A platinum heater element is integrated into the design to make transcutaneous measurements, typically at 44°C. The performances of different screen-printed membrane materials have been evaluated in both hydrated and dry test conditions using cyclic voltammographs and static tests where the devices are subjected to different oxygen levels. All measurements are made by a fully automated computer-controlled gas rig.

  20. Measuring the Yield of Singlet Oxygen in a Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    release; distribution is unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES *Los Gatos Research, 67 East Evelyn Ave., Suite 3, Mountain View, CA 94041-1518...Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5776 bLos Gatos Research, 67 East Evelyn Avenue, Suite 3, Mountain View, CA 94041-1518 ABSTRACT A critical parameter...oxygen to be measured. Ongoing work will enable researchers at AFRL and Los Gatos Research to more accurately measure the yield as additional

  1. Data acquisition and information processing in MDO oxygen electrode measurement of tissue oxygen pressure.

    PubMed

    Odman, S; Lund, N

    1980-06-01

    In 1956, CLARK presented the principle for the modern, membrane-covered, oxygen electrode, comprising the anode and the cathode within the same unit. A further development was the MDO (Mehrdraht Dortmund Oberfläche) oxygen electrode presented by LUBBERS & KESSLER during the 1960s. This electrode comprises eight separate measuring points for collecting statistical samples to calculate tissue oxygen pressure fields. In order to perform studies on humans and to enable fast presentation of measurement results, a system was developed including a PDP 11/03 D computer, which fulfils patient safety demands. The computer program included corrections for electrode drift and temperature influences, as well as statistical calculations including mean, standard deviation, skewness and kurtosis. Also included was the two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for comparison of tissue oxygen distributions. Experience from studies on humans has shown that the measurement system enables us to collect and read important patient data directly at the bedside in the intensive care ward.

  2. Biological Oxygen Productivity Over The Last Glacial Termination From Triple Oxygen Isotope Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blunier, T.; Bender, M. L.; Hendricks, M. B.

    The atmospheric oxygen isotope signature of O2 is linked to the oxygen signature of seawater through photosynthesis and respiration. Fractionation during these pro- cesses is mass dependent affecting 17O about half as much as 18O. A mass indepen- dent fractionation process takes place during isotope exchange between O2 and CO2 in the stratosphere (Thiemens, 1999; Luz et al., 1999). The magnitude of the mass- independent anomaly in the triple isotope composition of O2 depends on relative rates of biological O2 cycling and photochemical reactions in the stratosphere. Variations of this anomaly thus allows us to estimate changes of mass dependent O2 production by photosynthesis versus mass independent O2-CO2 exchange in the stratosphere. We reconstruct total oxygen productivity for the past from 17O and 18O measure- ments of O2 trapped in ice cores. With a box model we estimate that the total biogenic productivity was only 76-83 % of today for the glacial and was probably still lower than today during the glacial-interglacial transition and the early Holocene. In principle we can calculate the oxygen flux from the ocean biosphere if we know the oxygen flux from the land biosphere. Calculated ocean production is very sensitive to the estimate of land biosphere production. The latter term remains uncertain, however, and we can presently only constrain glacial ocean production to 88 to 140 % of the present value.

  3. Biological Oxygen Productivity Over the Last Glacial Termination From Triple Oxygen Isotope Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blunier, T.; Bender, M. L.; Hendricks, M. B.

    2001-05-01

    The atmospheric oxygen isotope signature of O2 is linked to the oxygen signature of seawater through photosynthesis and respiration. Fractionation during these processes is mass dependent affecting δ 17O about half as much as δ 18O. A mass independent fractionation process takes place during isotope exchange between O2 and CO2 in the stratosphere (Thiemens, 1999; Luz et al., 1999). The magnitude of the mass-independent anomaly in the triple isotope composition of O2 depends on relative rates of biological O2 cycling and photochemical reactions in the stratosphere. Variations of this anomaly thus allows us to estimate changes of mass dependent O2 production by photosynthesis versus mass independent O2-CO2 exchange in the stratosphere. We reconstruct total oxygen productivity for the past from δ ^ {17}O and δ ^ {18}O measurements of O2 trapped in ice cores. With a box model we estimate that the total biogenic productivity was only ~70-80 % of today for the glacial and was probably still lower than today during the glacial-interglacial transition and the early Holocene. In principle we can calculate the oxygen flux from the ocean biosphere if we know the oxygen flux from the land biosphere. Calculated ocean production is very sensitive to the estimate of land biosphere production. The latter term remains uncertain, however, and we can presently only constrain glacial ocean production to 70 to 140 % of the present value.

  4. Nonlinear photoacoustic measurements of oxygen saturation levels in blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamanzi, Albert

    Oxygen is necessary for metabolism. It is carried from lungs to the rest of the body by hemoglobin in blood. As each hemoglobin molecule can carry a maximum of four oxygen molecules, oxygen saturation (sO2) is the measure of percentage of oxygen content in blood. For a normal person sO2 is 95% - 100%. Point-of-care testing of sO2 in blood is important in medicine. It enables doctors and caregivers for monitoring a wide variety of chronic illnesses. On the other hand, mapping of sO2 values by performing a raster scan across the region of interest in vivo is also essential in clinical and research settings, such as to evaluate the therapeutic effects of a treatment, monitoring healing of wounds, etc. Several non-invasive methods have been developed for this purpose. In this thesis, I measured the nonlinear absorption coefficient (beta) of blood samples using photoacoustic Z-scan technique. Results depict linear dependency between beta and blood oxygenation levels.

  5. Monitoring microvascular free flaps with tissue oxygen measurement and PET.

    PubMed

    Schrey, Aleksi R; Kinnunen, Ilpo A J; Grénman, Reidar A; Minn, Heikki R I; Aitasalo, Kalle M J

    2008-07-01

    Tissue oxygen measurement and positron emission tomography (PET) were evaluated as methods for predicting ischemia in microvascular free flaps of the head and neck. Ten patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer underwent resection of the tumour followed by microvascular reconstruction with a free flap. Tissue oxygenation of the flap (P(ti)O(2)) was continuously monitored for three postoperative (POP) days and the blood flow of the flap was assessed using oxygen-15 labelled water and PET. In three free flaps a perfusion problem was suspected due to a remarkable drop in P(ti)O(2)-values, due to two anastomosis problems and due to POP turgor. No flap losses occurred. During the blood flow measurements with PET [mean 8.5 mL 100 g(-1) min(-1 )(SD 2.5)], the mean P(ti)O(2) of the flaps [46.8 mmHg (SD 17.0)] appeared to correlate with each other in each patient (p<0.05, n=10). Tissue oxygenation measurement is a feasible monitoring system of free flaps. The perfusion-study with PET correlates with P(ti)O(2)-measurement.

  6. FIELD MEASUREMENT OF DISSOLVED OXYGEN: A COMPARISON OF METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability to confidently measure the concentration of dissolved oxygen (D.O.) in ground water is a key aspect of remedial selection and assessment. Presented here is a comparison of the commonly practiced methods for determining D.O. concentrations in ground water, including c...

  7. How to Measure the Oxygen Content of Air.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedenbaugh, John H.

    1991-01-01

    Provides a step-by-step guide for a simple experiment to measure the approximate percentage of oxygen found in the air that we breathe. Includes background theory, working drawings, chemicals needed, list of supplies, experimental procedure, data evaluation method, and suggestions for extended study. (Author/JJK)

  8. FIELD MEASUREMENT OF DISSOLVED OXYGEN: A COMPARISON OF METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability to confidently measure the concentration of dissolved oxygen (D.O.) in ground water is a key aspect of remedial selection and assessment. Presented here is a comparison of the commonly practiced methods for determining D.O. concentrations in ground water, including c...

  9. Parmitano in Columbus module during Oxygen Uptake measurement session

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-10-02

    ISS037-E-004950 (2 Oct. 2013) --- European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano, Expedition 37 flight engineer, performs an oxygen uptake measurement session in the Columbus laboratory of the International Space Station. He is wearing a Pulmonary Function System (PFS) face mask during the session.

  10. Potentials of single-cell biology in identification and validation of disease biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Niu, Furong; Wang, Diane C; Lu, Jiapei; Wu, Wei; Wang, Xiangdong

    2016-09-01

    Single-cell biology is considered a new approach to identify and validate disease-specific biomarkers. However, the concern raised by clinicians is how to apply single-cell measurements for clinical practice, translate the message of single-cell systems biology into clinical phenotype or explain alterations of single-cell gene sequencing and function in patient response to therapies. This study is to address the importance and necessity of single-cell gene sequencing in the identification and development of disease-specific biomarkers, the definition and significance of single-cell biology and single-cell systems biology in the understanding of single-cell full picture, the development and establishment of whole-cell models in the validation of targeted biological function and the figure and meaning of single-molecule imaging in single cell to trace intra-single-cell molecule expression, signal, interaction and location. We headline the important role of single-cell biology in the discovery and development of disease-specific biomarkers with a special emphasis on understanding single-cell biological functions, e.g. mechanical phenotypes, single-cell biology, heterogeneity and organization of genome function. We have reason to believe that such multi-dimensional, multi-layer, multi-crossing and stereoscopic single-cell biology definitely benefits the discovery and development of disease-specific biomarkers. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  11. ASRDI oxygen technology survey. Volume 4: Low temperature measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, L. L.

    1974-01-01

    Information is presented on temperature measurement between the triple point and critical point of liquid oxygen. The criterion selected is that all transducers which may reasonably be employed in the liquid oxygen (LO2) temperature range are considered. The temperature range for each transducer is the appropriate full range for the particular thermometer. The discussion of each thermometer or type of thermometer includes the following information: (1) useful temperature range, (2) general and particular methods of construction and the advantages of each type, (3) specifications (accuracy, reproducibility, response time, etc.), (4) associated instrumentation, (5) calibrations and procedures, and (6) analytical representations.

  12. Single cell studies of the cell cycle and some models

    PubMed Central

    Mitchison, JM

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of growth and division often involves measurements made on cell populations, which tend to average data. The value of single cell analysis needs to be appreciated, and models based on findings from single cells should be taken into greater consideration in our understanding of the way in which cell size and division are co-ordinated. Examples are given of some single cell analyses in mammalian cells, yeast and other microorganisms. There is also a short discussion on how far the results are in accord with simple models. PMID:15703075

  13. Economy of running: beyond the measurement of oxygen uptake.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Jared R; Esau, Shane P; Macintosh, Brian R

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare running economy across three submaximal speeds expressed as both oxygen cost (mlxkg(-1)xkm(-1)) and the energy required to cover a given distance (kcalxkg(-1)xkm(-1)) in a group of trained male distance runners. It was hypothesized that expressing running economy in terms of caloric unit cost would be more sensitive to changes in speed than oxygen cost by accounting for differences associated with substrate utilization. Sixteen highly trained male distance runners [maximal oxygen uptake (Vo(2max)) 66.5 +/- 5.6 mlxkg(-1)xmin(-1), body mass 67.9 +/- 7.3 kg, height 177.6 +/- 7.0 cm, age 24.6 +/- 5.0 yr] ran on a motorized treadmill for 5 min with a gradient of 0% at speeds corresponding to 75%, 85%, and 95% of speed at lactate threshold with 5-min rest between stages. Oxygen uptake was measured via open-circuit calorimetry. Average oxygen cost was 221 +/- 19, 217 +/- 15, and 221 +/- 13 mlxkg(-1)xkm(-1), respectively. Caloric unit cost was 1.05 +/- 0.09, 1.07 +/- 0.08, and 1.11 +/- 0.07 kcalxkg(-1)xkm(-1) at the three trial speeds, respectively. There was no difference in oxygen cost with respect to speed (P = 0.657); however, caloric unit cost significantly increased with speed (P < 0.001). It was concluded that expression of running economy in terms of caloric unit cost is more sensitive to changes in speed and is a more valuable expression of running economy than oxygen uptake, even when normalized per distance traveled.

  14. Calibrated BOLD using direct measurement of changes in venous oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Driver, Ian D; Hall, Emma L; Wharton, Samuel J; Pritchard, Susan E; Francis, Susan T; Gowland, Penny A

    2012-11-15

    Calibration of the BOLD signal is potentially of great value in providing a closer measure of the underlying changes in brain function related to neuronal activity than the BOLD signal alone, but current approaches rely on an assumed relationship between cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebral blood flow (CBF). This is poorly characterised in humans and does not reflect the predominantly venous nature of BOLD contrast, whilst this relationship may vary across brain regions and depend on the structure of the local vascular bed. This work demonstrates a new approach to BOLD calibration which does not require an assumption about the relationship between cerebral blood volume and cerebral blood flow. This method involves repeating the same stimulus both at normoxia and hyperoxia, using hyperoxic BOLD contrast to estimate the relative changes in venous blood oxygenation and venous CBV. To do this the effect of hyperoxia on venous blood oxygenation has to be calculated, which requires an estimate of basal oxygen extraction fraction, and this can be estimated from the phase as an alternative to using a literature estimate. Additional measurement of the relative change in CBF, combined with the blood oxygenation change can be used to calculate the relative change in CMRO(2) due to the stimulus. CMRO(2) changes of 18 ± 8% in response to a motor task were measured without requiring the assumption of a CBV/CBF coupling relationship, and are in agreement with previous approaches.

  15. Continuous measurement of scalp tissue oxygen tension and carotid arterial oxygen tension in the fetal lamb.

    PubMed

    Aarnoudse, J G; Oeseburg, B; Kwant, G; Huisjes, H J; Zijlstra, W G

    1980-01-01

    Scalp tissue PO2, carotid arterial PO2 fetal heart rate were continuously measured in the anaesthetized fetal lamb in utero while variations in oxygen supply were brought about. In some experiments the transcutaneously measured fetal scalp PO2 was recorded in addition. Scalp tissue PO2 was measured using specially designed miniature needle-type oxygen electrode, incorporated in an easily applicable spiral scalp electrode as commonly used for fetal heart rate monitoring. The measurements showed that fetal carotid arterial hypoxaemia is always nearly immediately followed by fetal scalp tissue hypoxia, and that the recovery of scalp tissue PO2 after a hypoxic period has a remarkably varying time course. Fetal heart rate usually decreased during hypoxia, but in some instances it did not change or even increased, demonstrating that heart rate is not always a reliable indicator of fetal hypoxia. PO2 values obtained with the transcutaneous method were higher than those with the needle electrode, because of the effect of the heating system of the transcutaneous electrode on tissue blood flow and haemoglobin oxygen affinity. It would seem that during hypoxaemia the decrease in scalp tissue PO2 is poossibly the combined result of the fall in arterial PO2 and a concomitant decrease in blood flow through the skin.

  16. Atomic force microscopy for the examination of single cell rheology.

    PubMed

    Okajima, Takaharu

    2012-11-01

    Rheological properties of living cells play important roles in regulating their various biological functions. Therefore, measuring cell rheology is crucial for not only elucidating the relationship between the cell mechanics and functions, but also mechanical diagnosis of single cells. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is becoming a useful technique for single cell diagnosis because it allows us to measure the rheological properties of adherent cells at any region on the surface without any modifications. In this review, we summarize AFM techniques for examining single cell rheology in frequency and time domains. Recent applications of AFM for investigating the statistical analysis of single cell rheology in comparison to other micro-rheological techniques are reviewed, and we discuss what specificity and universality of cell rheology are extracted using AFM.

  17. Measuring oxygen uptake in fishes with bimodal respiration.

    PubMed

    Lefevre, S; Bayley, M; McKenzie, D J

    2016-01-01

    Respirometry is a robust method for measurement of oxygen uptake as a proxy for metabolic rate in fishes, and how species with bimodal respiration might meet their demands from water v. air has interested researchers for over a century. The challenges of measuring oxygen uptake from both water and air, preferably simultaneously, have been addressed in a variety of ways, which are briefly reviewed. These methods are not well-suited for the long-term measurements necessary to be certain of obtaining undisturbed patterns of respiratory partitioning, for example, to estimate traits such as standard metabolic rate. Such measurements require automated intermittent-closed respirometry that, for bimodal fishes, has only recently been developed. This paper describes two approaches in enough detail to be replicated by the interested researcher. These methods are for static respirometry. Measuring oxygen uptake by bimodal fishes during exercise poses specific challenges, which are described to aid the reader in designing experiments. The respiratory physiology and behaviour of air-breathing fishes is very complex and can easily be influenced by experimental conditions, and some general considerations are listed to facilitate the design of experiments. Air breathing is believed to have evolved in response to aquatic hypoxia and, probably, associated hypercapnia. The review ends by considering what realistic hypercapnia is, how hypercapnic tropical waters can become and how this might influence bimodal animals' gas exchange.

  18. Magnetic levitation of single cells

    PubMed Central

    Durmus, Naside Gozde; Tekin, H. Cumhur; Guven, Sinan; Sridhar, Kaushik; Arslan Yildiz, Ahu; Calibasi, Gizem; Davis, Ronald W.; Steinmetz, Lars M.; Demirci, Utkan

    2015-01-01

    Several cellular events cause permanent or transient changes in inherent magnetic and density properties of cells. Characterizing these changes in cell populations is crucial to understand cellular heterogeneity in cancer, immune response, infectious diseases, drug resistance, and evolution. Although magnetic levitation has previously been used for macroscale objects, its use in life sciences has been hindered by the inability to levitate microscale objects and by the toxicity of metal salts previously applied for levitation. Here, we use magnetic levitation principles for biological characterization and monitoring of cells and cellular events. We demonstrate that each cell type (i.e., cancer, blood, bacteria, and yeast) has a characteristic levitation profile, which we distinguish at an unprecedented resolution of 1 × 10−4 g⋅mL−1. We have identified unique differences in levitation and density blueprints between breast, esophageal, colorectal, and nonsmall cell lung cancer cell lines, as well as heterogeneity within these seemingly homogenous cell populations. Furthermore, we demonstrate that changes in cellular density and levitation profiles can be monitored in real time at single-cell resolution, allowing quantification of heterogeneous temporal responses of each cell to environmental stressors. These data establish density as a powerful biomarker for investigating living systems and their responses. Thereby, our method enables rapid, density-based imaging and profiling of single cells with intriguing applications, such as label-free identification and monitoring of heterogeneous biological changes under various physiological conditions, including antibiotic or cancer treatment in personalized medicine. PMID:26124131

  19. Magnetic levitation of single cells.

    PubMed

    Durmus, Naside Gozde; Tekin, H Cumhur; Guven, Sinan; Sridhar, Kaushik; Arslan Yildiz, Ahu; Calibasi, Gizem; Ghiran, Ionita; Davis, Ronald W; Steinmetz, Lars M; Demirci, Utkan

    2015-07-14

    Several cellular events cause permanent or transient changes in inherent magnetic and density properties of cells. Characterizing these changes in cell populations is crucial to understand cellular heterogeneity in cancer, immune response, infectious diseases, drug resistance, and evolution. Although magnetic levitation has previously been used for macroscale objects, its use in life sciences has been hindered by the inability to levitate microscale objects and by the toxicity of metal salts previously applied for levitation. Here, we use magnetic levitation principles for biological characterization and monitoring of cells and cellular events. We demonstrate that each cell type (i.e., cancer, blood, bacteria, and yeast) has a characteristic levitation profile, which we distinguish at an unprecedented resolution of 1 × 10(-4) g ⋅ mL(-1). We have identified unique differences in levitation and density blueprints between breast, esophageal, colorectal, and nonsmall cell lung cancer cell lines, as well as heterogeneity within these seemingly homogenous cell populations. Furthermore, we demonstrate that changes in cellular density and levitation profiles can be monitored in real time at single-cell resolution, allowing quantification of heterogeneous temporal responses of each cell to environmental stressors. These data establish density as a powerful biomarker for investigating living systems and their responses. Thereby, our method enables rapid, density-based imaging and profiling of single cells with intriguing applications, such as label-free identification and monitoring of heterogeneous biological changes under various physiological conditions, including antibiotic or cancer treatment in personalized medicine.

  20. Analysis of global RNA synthesis at the single cell level following hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Biddlestone, John; Druker, Jimena; Shmakova, Alena; Ferguson, Gus; Swedlow, Jason R; Rocha, Sonia

    2014-05-13

    Hypoxia or lowering of the oxygen availability is involved in many physiological and pathological processes. At the molecular level, cells initiate a particular transcriptional program in order to mount an appropriate and coordinated cellular response. The cell possesses several oxygen sensor enzymes that require molecular oxygen as cofactor for their activity. These range from prolyl-hydroxylases to histone demethylases. The majority of studies analyzing cellular responses to hypoxia are based on cellular populations and average studies, and as such single cell analysis of hypoxic cells are seldom performed. Here we describe a method of analysis of global RNA synthesis at the single cell level in hypoxia by using Click-iT RNA imaging kits in an oxygen controlled workstation, followed by microscopy analysis and quantification.  Using cancer cells exposed to hypoxia for different lengths of time, RNA is labeled and measured in each cell. This analysis allows the visualization of temporal and cell-to-cell changes in global RNA synthesis following hypoxic stress.

  1. Single-Cell Genomics for Virology.

    PubMed

    Ciuffi, Angela; Rato, Sylvie; Telenti, Amalio

    2016-05-04

    Single-cell sequencing technologies, i.e., single cell analysis followed by deep sequencing investigate cellular heterogeneity in many biological settings. It was only in the past year that single-cell sequencing analyses has been applied in the field of virology, providing new ways to explore viral diversity and cell response to viral infection, which are summarized in the present review.

  2. On reactive oxygen species measurement in living systems.

    PubMed

    Pavelescu, L A

    2015-01-01

    Studies devoted to the detection and measurement of free radicals in biological systems generally generated accepted methods of reactive oxygen species (ROS) level analysis. When out of control, ROS induces tissue damage, chronic inflammatory processes and cellular functional disturbances. Aerobic organisms have adapted to defense against ROS aggression by developing potent antioxidant mechanisms. Recent advances in ROS measurement methodology allow the study of ROS biology at a previously unachievable level of precision. However, their high activity, very short life span and extremely low concentration, make ROS measurement a challenging subject for researchers.

  3. Continuous differential impedance spectroscopy of single cells

    PubMed Central

    Nevill, J. Tanner; Lee, Luke P.; Morgan, Hywel

    2009-01-01

    A device for continuous differential impedance analysis of single cells held by a hydrodynamic cell trapping is presented. Measurements are accomplished by recording the current from two closely-situated electrode pairs, one empty (reference) and one containing a cell. We demonstrate time-dependent measurement of single cell impedance produced in response to dynamic chemical perturbations. First, the system is used to assay the response of HeLa cells to the effects of the surfactant Tween, which reduces the impedance of the trapped cells in a concentration dependent way and is interpreted as gradual lysis of the cell membrane. Second, the effects of the bacterial pore-forming toxin, Streptolysin-O are measured: a transient exponential decay in the impedance is recorded as the cell membrane becomes increasingly permeable. The decay time constant is inversely proportional to toxin concentration (482, 150, and 30 s for 0.1, 1, and 10 kU/ml, respectively). Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10404-009-0534-2) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20927185

  4. Microfabricated devices for single cell analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yuanfang

    BioMEMS or lab-on-a-chip technology is promising technology and enables the possibility of microchip devices with higher throughput or better performance for single cell analysis. We have designed and fabricated microdevices for single cell analysis, with impedance based device for fast cell screening and microchannel based flow systems for high throughput, high time resolution quantal exocytosis measurement with automatic cell positioning and reusability. The automatic cell positioning is realized by differential forces of fluidic dynamics. Microelectrodes are patterned at automatic trap positions for electrochemical detection quantal release of hormones like catecholamines secreted by cells. We also developed diamond-like carbon (DLC) microelectrodes onto chip device for low noise exocytosis measurement. The DLC microelectrodes were deposited by magnetron sputtering process with nitrogen doping and a bottom ITO conductive layer. Test results show the developed DLC can detect exocytosis with low noise and a stable background current which are comparable to that of carbon-fiber electrodes. They are batch producible at low cost and can realize high-throughput on-chip measurement of quantal exocytosis. The technology developed in this research can have wide ranging applications in fields such as electrophysiology, cell based sensors, high throughput screening of new drug development.

  5. Tissue oxygenation and haemodynamics measurement with spatially resolved NIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Scopesi, F.; Serra, G.; Sun, J. W.; Rolfe, P.

    2010-08-01

    We describe the use of Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) for the non-invasive investigation of changes in haemodynamics and oxygenation of human peripheral tissues. The goal was to measure spatial variations of tissue NIRS oxygenation variables, namely deoxy-haemoglobin (HHb), oxy-haemoglobin (HbO2), total haemoglobin (HbT), and thereby to evaluate the responses of the peripheral circulation to imposed physiological challenges. We present a skinfat- muscle heterogeneous tissue model with varying fat thickness up to 15mm and a Monte Carlo simulation of photon transport within this model. The mean partial path length and the mean photon visit depth in the muscle layer were derived for different source-detector spacing. We constructed NIRS instrumentation comprising of light-emitting diodes (LED) as light sources at four wavelengths, 735nm, 760nm, 810nm and 850nm and sensitive photodiodes (PD) as the detectors. Source-detector spacing was varied to perform measurements at different depths within forearm tissue. Changes in chromophore concentration in response to venous and arterial occlusion were calculated using the modified Lambert-Beer Law. Studies in fat and thin volunteers indicated greater sensitivity in the thinner subjects for the tissue oxygenation measurement in the muscle layer. These results were consistent with those found using Monte Carlo simulation. Overall, the results of this investigation demonstrate the usefulness of the NIRS instrument for deriving spatial information from biological tissues.

  6. Oxygen Respiration rates of benthic foraminifera measured under laboratory conditions using oxygen microelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geslin, Emmanuelle; Risgaard-Petersen, N.; Langlet, D.; Metzger, E.; Jorissen, F.

    2010-05-01

    Oxygen respiration rates of benthic foraminifera are not well documented because of the difficulties to measure them. However, the determination of the respiration rates of benthic foraminifera is important in order: 1) to compare the metabolic rates of different species, of various size, and with different microhabitats in the sediment; 2) to estimate the contribution of benthic foraminifera in the aerobic mineralization of organic matter. Benthic foraminifera from 4 different natural environments were used: three species from the intertidal rocky shore of Yeu island, two species from the muddy Bay of Aiguillon, two species from the Bay of Biscay and eleven species from the Rhône prodelta (France). Living foraminifera were placed in a small tube, in which oxygen gradients were determined using oxygen microelectrodes. Respiration rates were calculated on the basis of the oxygen fluxes measured in the vivinity of the foraminiferal specimens. Foraminiferal biovolumes were estimated on the basis of the overall shape of the various species (for example, Ammonia is assimilated to a half sphere) and the width of the shell walls. The results show a wide range of respiration rates according to the species (around 90 to 5300 pmol. cell-1.day-1) and a clear correlation with the biovolume of the foraminifera. No clear relationship between respiration rates and microhabitat is observed. A comparison with previously published data shows that our estimations are generally lower for the small size species. For example, the respiration rate estimations published recently by Nomaki et al. (Journal of Foraminiferal Research, 37, 281-286, 2007) show a range of 900 to 10 000 pmol. cell-1.day-1. The total contribution of benthic foraminifera in the aerobic mineralization of organic matter is estimated for the studied areas. The first results suggest a minor role of benthic foraminifera in this process, which strongly contrasts with their strong contribution to anaerobic mineralisation

  7. Measured fraction of carboxyhaemoglobin depends on oxygen saturation of haemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Hütler, M; Beneke, R; Littschwager, A; Böning, D

    2001-02-01

    The use of the OSM3 oximeter for measurement of the fraction of carboxyhaemoglobin (FCOHb) in blood allows for estimation of total circulating haemoglobin mass (Hb(tot)) by using the carbon monoxide rebreathing method. To ensure high accuracy of Hb(tot) estimation, potential sources of analytical errors should be identified and adjusted for. Based on observed differences in results of measured FCOHb between simultaneously sampled, arterialized and venous blood samples we investigated the influence of haemoglobin oxygen saturation (sO2) on results of measured FCOHb. Blood from nine healthy non-smokers was tonometered with gas mixtures containing 94% N2 or air and 6% CO2. The resulting oxygenated and deoxygenated specimens were mixed in different proportions to obtain varying sO2 values in the same blood. sO2, fractions of dyshaemoglobins, pO2, pCO2 and pH were measured at each step. FCOHb was significantly (p<0.001) higher in oxygenated (median, range: 0.6%, 0.4-0.9%) compared to deoxygenated (-0.2%, -0.5-0.0%) blood. Regression analysis identified the sO2 as the most important factor explaining 86% of the variance in observed changes in FCOHb. The observed sO2 effect has important implications on calibration procedure of OSM3, accuracy of measured FCOHb, and FCOHb dependent calculations such as estimation of Hb(tot) and related quantities. If the highest accuracy of FCOHb measurement is needed, an sO2 effect on results of measured FCOHb has to be considered and adjusted for.

  8. Single-Cell Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Passarelli, Melissa K.; Ewing, Andrew G.

    2013-01-01

    Single-cell imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a powerful technique used to map the distributions of endogenous biomolecules with sub-cellular resolution. Currently, secondary ion mass spectrometry is the predominant technique for single-cell IMS, thanks to its sub-micron lateral resolution and surface sensitivity. However, recent methodological and technological developments aimed at improving the spatial resolution of matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) have made this technique a potential platform of single-cell IMS. MALDI opens the field of single-cell IMS to new possibilities, including single cell proteomic imaging and atmospheric pressure analyses; however, sensitivity is a challenge. In this report, we estimate the availability of proteins and lipids in a single cell and discuss strategies employed to improve sensitivity at the single-cell level. PMID:23948695

  9. Pseudotime estimation: deconfounding single cell time series

    PubMed Central

    Reid, John E.; Wernisch, Lorenz

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Repeated cross-sectional time series single cell data confound several sources of variation, with contributions from measurement noise, stochastic cell-to-cell variation and cell progression at different rates. Time series from single cell assays are particularly susceptible to confounding as the measurements are not averaged over populations of cells. When several genes are assayed in parallel these effects can be estimated and corrected for under certain smoothness assumptions on cell progression. Results: We present a principled probabilistic model with a Bayesian inference scheme to analyse such data. We demonstrate our method’s utility on public microarray, nCounter and RNA-seq datasets from three organisms. Our method almost perfectly recovers withheld capture times in an Arabidopsis dataset, it accurately estimates cell cycle peak times in a human prostate cancer cell line and it correctly identifies two precocious cells in a study of paracrine signalling in mouse dendritic cells. Furthermore, our method compares favourably with Monocle, a state-of-the-art technique. We also show using held-out data that uncertainty in the temporal dimension is a common confounder and should be accounted for in analyses of repeated cross-sectional time series. Availability and Implementation: Our method is available on CRAN in the DeLorean package. Contact: john.reid@mrc-bsu.cam.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27318198

  10. Pseudotime estimation: deconfounding single cell time series.

    PubMed

    Reid, John E; Wernisch, Lorenz

    2016-10-01

    Repeated cross-sectional time series single cell data confound several sources of variation, with contributions from measurement noise, stochastic cell-to-cell variation and cell progression at different rates. Time series from single cell assays are particularly susceptible to confounding as the measurements are not averaged over populations of cells. When several genes are assayed in parallel these effects can be estimated and corrected for under certain smoothness assumptions on cell progression. We present a principled probabilistic model with a Bayesian inference scheme to analyse such data. We demonstrate our method's utility on public microarray, nCounter and RNA-seq datasets from three organisms. Our method almost perfectly recovers withheld capture times in an Arabidopsis dataset, it accurately estimates cell cycle peak times in a human prostate cancer cell line and it correctly identifies two precocious cells in a study of paracrine signalling in mouse dendritic cells. Furthermore, our method compares favourably with Monocle, a state-of-the-art technique. We also show using held-out data that uncertainty in the temporal dimension is a common confounder and should be accounted for in analyses of repeated cross-sectional time series. Our method is available on CRAN in the DeLorean package. john.reid@mrc-bsu.cam.ac.uk Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  11. Device for measuring oxygen activity in liquid sodium

    DOEpatents

    Roy, P.; Young, R.S.

    1973-12-01

    A composite ceramic electrolyte in a configuration (such as a closed end tube or a plate) suitable to separate liquid sodium from a reference electrode with a high impedance voltmeter connected to measure EMF between the sodium and the reference electrode as a measure of oxygen activity in the sodium is described. The composite electrolyte consists of zirconiacalcia with a bonded layer of thoria-yttria. The device is used with a gaseous reference electrode on the zirconia-calcia side and liquid sodium on the thoria-yttria side of the electrolyte. (Official Gazette)

  12. A new method for measuring the oxygen diffusion constant and oxygen consumption rate of arteriolar walls.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Nobuhiko; Horinouchi, Hirohisa; Ushiyama, Akira; Minamitani, Haruyuki

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen transport is believed to primarily occur via capillaries and depends on the oxygen tension gradient between the vessels and tissues. As blood flows along branching arterioles, the O(2) saturation drops, indicating either consumption or diffusion. The blood flow rate, the O(2) concentration gradient, and Krogh's O(2) diffusion constant (K) of the vessel wall are parameters affecting O(2)delivery. We devised a method for evaluating K of arteriolar wall in vivo using phosphorescence quenching microscopy to measure the partial pressure of oxygen in two areas almost simultaneously. The K value of arteriolar wall (inner diameter, 63.5 ± 11.9 μm; wall thickness, 18.0 ± 1.2 μm) was found to be 6.0 ± 1.2 × 10(-11) (cm(2)/s)(ml O(2)·cm(-3) tissue·mmHg(-1)). The arteriolar wall O(2) consumption rate (M) was 1.5 ± 0.1 (ml O(2)·100 cm(-3) tissue·min(-1)), as calculated using Krogh's diffusion equation. These results suggest that the arteriolar wall consumes a considerable proportion of the O(2) that diffuses through it.

  13. Tissue oxygen tension measurement for monitoring musculocutaneous and cutaneous flaps.

    PubMed

    Hjortdal, V E; Awwad, A M; Gottrup, F; Kirkegaard, L; Gellett, S

    1990-01-01

    In pigs, latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous island flaps and buttock skin island flaps were raised. Subcutaneous (PscO2) and intramuscular oxygen tension (PimO2) were measured using a non-heated needle electrode before, during and after repeated occlusion of the supplying artery or the draining vein. During arterial and venous occlusion, the tissue oxygen tension in the musculocutaneous flap dropped rapidly. A plateau was reached after 15 min. After arterial occlusion the mean value was 20 mmHg (SEM = +/- 5 mmHg, N = 6) in the subcutis and 16 mmHg in the muscle (SEM = +/- 4 mmHg, N = 10). After venous occlusion the mean value was 11 mmHg (SEM = +/- 3 mmHg, N = 6) in the subcutis. In the skin flap the drop of PscO2 was slower, and after 30 min of arterial occlusion the mean value was 29 mmHg (SEM = +/- 9 mmHg, N = 6). This study has shown that tissue oxygen tension measurement can be used as a sensitive indicator of acute impairment of the supplying vessels in island flaps. The method seems to have potential for monitoring free tissue transfers. A comparable decrease in PscO2 was found for arterial and venous impairment.

  14. Thenar oxygen saturation and invasive oxygen delivery measurements in critically ill patients in early septic shock.

    PubMed

    Mesquida, Jaume; Gruartmoner, Guillem; Martínez, Maria Luisa; Masip, Jordi; Sabatier, Caroline; Espinal, Cristina; Artigas, Antonio; Baigorri, Francisco

    2011-05-01

    This prospective study was aimed to test the hypothesis that tissue hemoglobin oxygen saturation (StO₂) measured noninvasively using near-infrared spectroscopy is a reliable indicator of global oxygen delivery (DO₂) measured invasively using a pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) in patients with septic shock. The study setting was a 26-bed medical-surgical intensive care unit at a university hospital. Subjects were adult patients in septic shock who required PAC hemodynamic monitoring for resuscitation. Interventions included transient ischemic challenge on the forearm. After blood pressure normalization, hemodynamic and oximetric PAC variables and, simultaneously, steady-state StO₂ and its changes from ischemic challenge (deoxygenation and reoxygenation rates) were measured. Fifteen patients were studied. All the patients had a mean arterial pressure above 65 mmHg. The DO₂ index (iDO₂) range in the studied population was 215 to 674 mL O₂/min per m. The mean mixed venous oxygen saturation value was 61% ± 10%, mean cardiac index was 3.4 ± 0.9 L/min per m, and blood lactate level was 4.6 ± 2.7 mmol/L. Steady-state StO₂ significantly correlated with iDO₂, arterial and venous O₂ content, and O₂ extraction ratio. A StO₂ cutoff value of 75% predicted iDO₂ below 450, with a sensitivity of 0.9 and a specificity of 0.9. In patients in septic shock and normalized MAP, low StO₂ reflects extremely low iDO₂. Steady-state StO₂ does not correlate with moderately low iDO₂, indicating poor sensitivity of StO₂ to rule out hypoperfusion.

  15. Redox-filled Carbon-Fiber Microelectrodes for Single-Cell Exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jonathan T; Gunderson, Christopher G; Zhang, Bo

    2013-09-01

    Carbon-fiber microelectrodes (CFEs) are the primary electroanalytical tool in single-cell exocytosis and in-vivo studies. Here we report a new study on the kinetic properties of electrolyte-filled CFEs in single-cell measurements and demonstrate that the addition of outer sphere redox species, such as Fe(CN)6(3-) and Ru(NH3)6(3+), in the backfill electrolyte solution can greatly enhance the kinetic response of CFEs. We show that at 750 mV, a voltage normally applied for detection of dopamine, the presence of fast outer sphere redox species in the backfilling solution significantly enhances the kinetic response of CFEs toward fast dopamine detection at single PC12 cells. Moreover, we also demonstrate that the use of Fe(CN)6(3-) in the backfilling solution has enabled direct measurement of dopamine at applied voltages as low as 200 mV. This kinetic enhancement is believed to be due to faster electron-transfer kinetics on the coupling pole as compared to the sluggish reduction of oxygen. We anticipate that such redox-filled CFE ultramicroelectrodes will find many useful applications in single cell exocytosis and in-vivo sensing.

  16. The measure in vivo of regional cerebral oxygen utilization by means of oxyhemoglobin labeled with radioactive oxygen-15

    PubMed Central

    Ter-Pogossian, Michel M.; Eichling, John O.; Davis, David O.; Welch, Michael J.

    1970-01-01

    Regional cerebral oxygen utilization rate is measured in vivo by the following method: A small volume of blood with radioactive oxygen-15-tagged hemoglobin is rapidly injected into the internal carotid artery of the patient under study. The first injection is followed by the injection carried out under identical circumstances but with blood labeled with water-15O. After each injection, the distribution of the radioactive label in the brain is measured and recorded, as a function of time, by six collimated scintillation probes placed over the subject's head. The recording, subsequent to the first injection, reflects (a) the arrival of the labeled oxygen into the tissues, (b) its partial conversion into water of metabolism, and (c) the washout of labeled water from the brain. The ratio of the amount of labeled water formed to the amount of oxygen perfusing the tissues, which can be derived from the recording, is a measure of fractional oxygen utilization. The second injection provides a measure of blood flow by the interpretation of the washout of labeled water from brain tissues. The product, fractional oxygen utilization × blood flow × arterial oxygen content, gives a measure of oxygen utilization rate. Some aspects of the validity of this method are tested by the injection of a nondiffusible indicator, carboxyhemoglobin-15O. Regional cerebral oxygen utilization rates for a series of patients with cerebral pathology are reported. Images PMID:5411789

  17. Single Cell Chromatography, LDRD Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Knize, M G; Bailey, C G

    2007-02-22

    A limitation in the mass spectrometry of biological materials is the reduced ion formation caused by sample complexity. We proposed to develop an enabling technology, single cell planar chromatography, which will greatly increase the amount of chemical information that can be obtained from single biological cells when using imaging mass spectrometry or other surface analysis methods. The sample preparation methods were developed for the time-of-flight secondary mass spectrometer (ToF-SIMS) at LLNL. This instrument has a measured zeptomole (10{sup -21} mole, 600 atoms) limit-of-detection for a molecule with a mass to charge ratio of 225[1]. Our goal was to use planar chromatographic separation to approach similar low limits of detection even with the chemically complex contents of a single cell. The process was proposed to reduce ion suppression and at the same time expose more of the cell contents to the ion beam. The method of work was to deposit biological cells on a silicon chip with suitable chromatographic and electrical properties, dissolve the cell with a droplet of solvent, allow the solvent to evaporate, and then allow the movement of cell contents laterally by immersing an edge of the chip in to a chromatographic solvent, that then moves through the chromatographic matrix allowing the components to interact with, and be separated by, the chromatographic substrate. This process is a miniaturized version of thin layer chromatography with detection by surface mass spectrometry.

  18. Defining uncertainty and error in planktic foraminiferal oxygen isotope measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraass, A. J.; Lowery, C. M.

    2017-02-01

    Foraminifera are the backbone of paleoceanography. Planktic foraminifera are one of the leading tools for reconstructing water column structure. However, there are unconstrained variables when dealing with uncertainty in the reproducibility of oxygen isotope measurements. This study presents the first results from a simple model of foraminiferal calcification (Foraminiferal Isotope Reproducibility Model; FIRM), designed to estimate uncertainty in oxygen isotope measurements. FIRM uses parameters including location, depth habitat, season, number of individuals included in measurement, diagenesis, misidentification, size variation, and vital effects to produce synthetic isotope data in a manner reflecting natural processes. Reproducibility is then tested using Monte Carlo simulations. Importantly, this is not an attempt to fully model the entire complicated process of foraminiferal calcification; instead, we are trying to include only enough parameters to estimate the uncertainty in foraminiferal δ18O records. Two well-constrained empirical data sets are simulated successfully, demonstrating the validity of our model. The results from a series of experiments with the model show that reproducibility is not only largely controlled by the number of individuals in each measurement but also strongly a function of local oceanography if the number of individuals is held constant. Parameters like diagenesis or misidentification have an impact on both the precision and the accuracy of the data. FIRM is a tool to estimate isotopic uncertainty values and to explore the impact of myriad factors on the fidelity of paleoceanographic records, particularly for the Holocene.

  19. Defining Uncertainty and Error in Planktic Foraminiferal Oxygen Isotope Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraass, A. J.; Lowery, C.

    2016-12-01

    Foraminifera are the backbone of paleoceanography, and planktic foraminifera are one of the leading tools for reconstructing water column structure. Currently, there are unconstrained variables when dealing with the reproducibility of oxygen isotope measurements. This study presents the first results from a simple model of foraminiferal calcification (Foraminiferal Isotope Reproducibility Model; FIRM), designed to estimate the precision and accuracy of oxygen isotope measurements. FIRM produces synthetic isotope data using parameters including location, depth habitat, season, number of individuals included in measurement, diagenesis, misidentification, size variation, and vital effects. Reproducibility is then tested using Monte Carlo simulations. The results from a series of experiments show that reproducibility is largely controlled by the number of individuals in each measurement, but also strongly a function of local oceanography if the number of individuals is held constant. Parameters like diagenesis or misidentification have an impact on both the precision and the accuracy of the data. Currently FIRM is a tool to estimate isotopic error values best employed in the Holocene. It is also a tool to explore the impact of myriad factors on the fidelity of paleoceanographic records. FIRM was constructed in the open-source computing environment R and is freely available via GitHub. We invite modification and expansion, and have planned inclusions for benthic foram reproducibility and stratigraphic uncertainty.

  20. CORSEN, a new software dedicated to microscope-based 3D distance measurements: mRNA-mitochondria distance, from single-cell to population analyses.

    PubMed

    Jourdren, Laurent; Delaveau, Thierry; Marquenet, Emelie; Jacq, Claude; Garcia, Mathilde

    2010-07-01

    Recent improvements in microscopy technology allow detection of single molecules of RNA, but tools for large-scale automatic analyses of particle distributions are lacking. An increasing number of imaging studies emphasize the importance of mRNA localization in the definition of cell territory or the biogenesis of cell compartments. CORSEN is a new tool dedicated to three-dimensional (3D) distance measurements from imaging experiments especially developed to access the minimal distance between RNA molecules and cellular compartment markers. CORSEN includes a 3D segmentation algorithm allowing the extraction and the characterization of the cellular objects to be processed--surface determination, aggregate decomposition--for minimal distance calculations. CORSEN's main contribution lies in exploratory statistical analysis, cell population characterization, and high-throughput assays that are made possible by the implementation of a batch process analysis. We highlighted CORSEN's utility for the study of relative positions of mRNA molecules and mitochondria: CORSEN clearly discriminates mRNA localized to the vicinity of mitochondria from those that are translated on free cytoplasmic polysomes. Moreover, it quantifies the cell-to-cell variations of mRNA localization and emphasizes the necessity for statistical approaches. This method can be extended to assess the evolution of the distance between specific mRNAs and other cellular structures in different cellular contexts. CORSEN was designed for the biologist community with the concern to provide an easy-to-use and highly flexible tool that can be applied for diverse distance quantification issues.

  1. Sound speed measurements in liquid oxygen-liquid nitrogen mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.; Mazel, D. S.

    1985-01-01

    The sound speed in liquid oxygen (LOX), liquid nitrogen (LN2), and five LOX-LN2 mixtures was measured by an ultrasonic pulse-echo technique at temperatures in the vicinity of -195.8C, the boiling point of N2 at a pressure of I atm. Under these conditions, the measurements yield the following relationship between sound speed in meters per second and LN2 content M in mole percent: c = 1009.05-1.8275M+0.0026507 M squared. The second speeds of 1009.05 m/sec plus or minus 0.25 percent for pure LOX and 852.8 m/sec plus or minus 0.32 percent for pure LN2 are compared with those reported by past investigators. Measurement of sound speed should prove an effective means for monitoring the contamination of LOX by Ln2.

  2. Microfluidic single-cell whole-transcriptome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Streets, Aaron M.; Zhang, Xiannian; Cao, Chen; Pang, Yuhong; Wu, Xinglong; Xiong, Liang; Yang, Lu; Fu, Yusi; Zhao, Liang; Tang, Fuchou; Huang, Yanyi

    2014-01-01

    Single-cell whole-transcriptome analysis is a powerful tool for quantifying gene expression heterogeneity in populations of cells. Many techniques have, thus, been recently developed to perform transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) on individual cells. To probe subtle biological variation between samples with limiting amounts of RNA, more precise and sensitive methods are still required. We adapted a previously developed strategy for single-cell RNA-Seq that has shown promise for superior sensitivity and implemented the chemistry in a microfluidic platform for single-cell whole-transcriptome analysis. In this approach, single cells are captured and lysed in a microfluidic device, where mRNAs with poly(A) tails are reverse-transcribed into cDNA. Double-stranded cDNA is then collected and sequenced using a next generation sequencing platform. We prepared 94 libraries consisting of single mouse embryonic cells and technical replicates of extracted RNA and thoroughly characterized the performance of this technology. Microfluidic implementation increased mRNA detection sensitivity as well as improved measurement precision compared with tube-based protocols. With 0.2 M reads per cell, we were able to reconstruct a majority of the bulk transcriptome with 10 single cells. We also quantified variation between and within different types of mouse embryonic cells and found that enhanced measurement precision, detection sensitivity, and experimental throughput aided the distinction between biological variability and technical noise. With this work, we validated the advantages of an early approach to single-cell RNA-Seq and showed that the benefits of combining microfluidic technology with high-throughput sequencing will be valuable for large-scale efforts in single-cell transcriptome analysis. PMID:24782542

  3. Microfluidic single-cell whole-transcriptome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Streets, Aaron M; Zhang, Xiannian; Cao, Chen; Pang, Yuhong; Wu, Xinglong; Xiong, Liang; Yang, Lu; Fu, Yusi; Zhao, Liang; Tang, Fuchou; Huang, Yanyi

    2014-05-13

    Single-cell whole-transcriptome analysis is a powerful tool for quantifying gene expression heterogeneity in populations of cells. Many techniques have, thus, been recently developed to perform transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) on individual cells. To probe subtle biological variation between samples with limiting amounts of RNA, more precise and sensitive methods are still required. We adapted a previously developed strategy for single-cell RNA-Seq that has shown promise for superior sensitivity and implemented the chemistry in a microfluidic platform for single-cell whole-transcriptome analysis. In this approach, single cells are captured and lysed in a microfluidic device, where mRNAs with poly(A) tails are reverse-transcribed into cDNA. Double-stranded cDNA is then collected and sequenced using a next generation sequencing platform. We prepared 94 libraries consisting of single mouse embryonic cells and technical replicates of extracted RNA and thoroughly characterized the performance of this technology. Microfluidic implementation increased mRNA detection sensitivity as well as improved measurement precision compared with tube-based protocols. With 0.2 M reads per cell, we were able to reconstruct a majority of the bulk transcriptome with 10 single cells. We also quantified variation between and within different types of mouse embryonic cells and found that enhanced measurement precision, detection sensitivity, and experimental throughput aided the distinction between biological variability and technical noise. With this work, we validated the advantages of an early approach to single-cell RNA-Seq and showed that the benefits of combining microfluidic technology with high-throughput sequencing will be valuable for large-scale efforts in single-cell transcriptome analysis.

  4. A microfluidic approach to parallelized transcriptional profiling of single cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; Olsen, Timothy; Zhu, Jing; Tao, Jianguo; Ponnaiya, Brian; Amundson, Sally A; Brenner, David J; Lin, Qiao

    2015-12-01

    The ability to correlate single-cell genetic information with cellular phenotypes is of great importance to biology and medicine, as it holds the potential to gain insight into disease pathways that is unavailable from ensemble measurements. We present a microfluidic approach to parallelized, rapid, quantitative analysis of messenger RNA from single cells via RT-qPCR. The approach leverages an array of single-cell RT-qPCR analysis units formed by a set of parallel microchannels concurrently controlled by elastomeric pneumatic valves, thereby enabling parallelized handling and processing of single cells in a drastically simplified operation procedure using a relatively small number of microvalves. All steps for single-cell RT-qPCR, including cell isolation and immobilization, cell lysis, mRNA purification, reverse transcription and qPCR, are integrated on a single chip, eliminating the need for off-chip manual cell and reagent transfer and qPCR amplification as commonly used in existing approaches. Additionally, the approach incorporates optically transparent microfluidic components to allow monitoring of single-cell trapping without the need for molecular labeling that can potentially alter the targeted gene expression and utilizes a polycarbonate film as a barrier against evaporation to minimize the loss of reagents at elevated temperatures during the analysis. We demonstrate the utility of the approach by the transcriptional profiling for the induction of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1a and the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase in single cells from the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. Furthermore, the methyl methanesulfonate is employed to allow measurement of the expression of the genes in individual cells responding to a genotoxic stress.

  5. Method for measurement of volatile oxygenated hydrocarbons in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibrock, E.; Slemr, J.

    An automated gas chromatographic method for the quantitative determination of oxygenated (C 2C 5 carbonyls and C 1C 2 alcohols) and some non-oxygenated (C 5C 8) hydrocarbons in ambient air has been developed. The analytical system consists of a gas chromatograph with a cryogenic sampling trap, a precolumn for the separation of water and other interfering compounds, a cryogenic focusing trap and two analytical columns connected in series. Substances are detected either by flame ionization or by a mass spectrometer. Ozone is removed by a potassium iodide scrubber placed upstream the sampling trap. External gas standards generated by a permeation device are used for calibration. The detection limits range between 0.03 and 0.08 ng (depending on the compound), equivalent to 5 to 56 ppt in 1 l of sampled air. The method was tested by an intercomparison with a different gas chromatographic technique for the determination of NMHC. The system has been applied since 1994 for measurements in ambient air. Data obtained during an intensive campaign in summer 1995 at the field station Wank (1778 m a.s.l.) near Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany, are reported and compared with NMHC mixing ratios measured simultaneously in the same air masses.

  6. Comparison of measured and calculated thermospheric molecular oxygen densities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, W. E.; Kayser, D. C.; Brinton, H. C.; Brace, L. H.; Oppenheimer, M.

    1977-01-01

    The open source neutral mass spectrometers on the AE-C, -D, and -E satellites were equipped with a 'fly-through' mode of operation which has provided direct measurements of molecular oxygen densities over a large portion of the globe. A complementary set of O2 densities is derived by using AE ion measurements and a scheme based on the daytime ion chemistry of O2(+) in the thermosphere. A comparison of the two data sets reveals general agreement over northern latitudes during periods of relatively low Ap and F10.7. The simplifying assumptions made in the photochemical scheme require that caution be used in calculating O2, especially at high latitudes and altitudes below 200 km

  7. Comparison of measured and calculated thermospheric molecular oxygen densities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, W. E.; Kayser, D. C.; Brinton, H. C.; Brace, L. H.; Oppenheimer, M.

    1977-01-01

    The open source neutral mass spectrometers on the AE-C, -D, and -E satellites were equipped with a 'fly-through' mode of operation which has provided direct measurements of molecular oxygen densities over a large portion of the globe. A complementary set of O2 densities is derived by using AE ion measurements and a scheme based on the daytime ion chemistry of O2(+) in the thermosphere. A comparison of the two data sets reveals general agreement over northern latitudes during periods of relatively low Ap and F10.7. The simplifying assumptions made in the photochemical scheme require that caution be used in calculating O2, especially at high latitudes and altitudes below 200 km

  8. Image analysis driven single-cell analytics for systems microbiology.

    PubMed

    Balomenos, Athanasios D; Tsakanikas, Panagiotis; Aspridou, Zafiro; Tampakaki, Anastasia P; Koutsoumanis, Konstantinos P; Manolakos, Elias S

    2017-04-04

    Time-lapse microscopy is an essential tool for capturing and correlating bacterial morphology and gene expression dynamics at single-cell resolution. However state-of-the-art computational methods are limited in terms of the complexity of cell movies that they can analyze and lack of automation. The proposed Bacterial image analysis driven Single Cell Analytics (BaSCA) computational pipeline addresses these limitations thus enabling high throughput systems microbiology. BaSCA can segment and track multiple bacterial colonies and single-cells, as they grow and divide over time (cell segmentation and lineage tree construction) to give rise to dense communities with thousands of interacting cells in the field of view. It combines advanced image processing and machine learning methods to deliver very accurate bacterial cell segmentation and tracking (F-measure over 95%) even when processing images of imperfect quality with several overcrowded colonies in the field of view. In addition, BaSCA extracts on the fly a plethora of single-cell properties, which get organized into a database summarizing the analysis of the cell movie. We present alternative ways to analyze and visually explore the spatiotemporal evolution of single-cell properties in order to understand trends and epigenetic effects across cell generations. The robustness of BaSCA is demonstrated across different imaging modalities and microscopy types. BaSCA can be used to analyze accurately and efficiently cell movies both at a high resolution (single-cell level) and at a large scale (communities with many dense colonies) as needed to shed light on e.g. how bacterial community effects and epigenetic information transfer play a role on important phenomena for human health, such as biofilm formation, persisters' emergence etc. Moreover, it enables studying the role of single-cell stochasticity without losing sight of community effects that may drive it.

  9. Highly multiplexed quantitation of gene expression on single cells

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Maria H.; Chattopadhyay, Pratip K.; Ma, Steven; Lamoreaux, Laurie; McDavid, Andrew; Finak, Greg; Gottardo, Raphael; Koup, Richard A.; Roederer, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Highly multiplexed, single-cell technologies reveal important heterogeneity within cell populations. Recently, technologies to simultaneously measure expression of 96 (or more) genes from a single cell have been developed for immunologic monitoring. Here, we report a rigorous, optimized, quantitative methodology for using this technology. Specifically: we describe a unique primer/probe qualification method necessary for quantitative results; we show that primers do not compete in highly multiplexed amplifications; we define the limit of detection for this assay as a single mRNA transcript; and, we show that the technical reproducibility of the system is very high. We illustrate two disparate applications of the platform: a “bulk” approach that measures expression patterns from 100 cells at a time in high throughput to define gene signatures, and a single-cell approach to define the coordinate expression patterns of multiple genes and reveal unique subsets of cells. PMID:23500781

  10. A new method to measure oxygenator oxygen transfer performance during cardiopulmonary bypass: clinical testing using the Medtronic Fusion oxygenator.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Carole; Marin, Denise; Weinbrenner, Frank; Engelhardt, Branka; Rosenzweig, Dow; Beck, Ulrich; Borisov, Pavel; Hohe, Stephen

    2017-03-01

    There is no acceptable method of testing oxygen transfer performance in membrane oxygenators quickly and easily during cardiopulmonary bypass. Pre-clinical testing of oxygenators is performed under controlled situations in the laboratory, correlating oxygen transfer to blood flow using 100% oxygen. This laboratory method cannot be used clinically as oxygen transfer values vary significantly at each blood flow and the FiO2 is not kept at 1. Therefore, a formula was developed which corrects the existing FiO2 to attain a PaO2 of 150 mmHg: the corrected FiO2 at 150 mmHg. In graph form, this corrected FiO2 (x-axis) is correlated to the patient's oxygen consumption levels (y-axis), which determines the membrane oxygenator oxygen transfer performance. Blood gas and hemodynamic parameters taken during cardiopulmonary bypass using the Medtronic Fusion were used to calculate the oxygen consumption (inlet conditions to the oxygenator) and the corrected FiO2 for a PaO2 of 150 mmHg. Validation of the formula "FiO2-PaO2/(Pb-pH2O)+0.21" was carried out by plotting the calculated values on a graph using PaO2 values between 145 to 155 mmHg and then, using the corrected FiO2 for PaO2s outside of this range. All trend-lines correlated significantly to confirm that the Medtronic Fusion had an extrapolated oxygen transfer of 419 milliliters O2/min at an FiO2 of 1 to achieve a PaO2 of 150 mmHg. Use of the corrected FiO2 correlated to the oxygen transfer conditions of the membrane oxygenator can easily be used on a routine basis, providing valuable information clinically. When used by the manufacturer under laboratory conditions, further clinically relevant data is provided in terms of FiO2 and resultant PaO2s instead of the present limitations using blood flow. In this way, a clinically justifiable method has been developed to finally establish a standard in testing membrane oxygenator performance.

  11. Integrated Electrowetting Nanoinjector for Single Cell Transfection

    PubMed Central

    Shekaramiz, Elaheh; Varadarajalu, Ganeshkumar; Day, Philip J.; Wickramasinghe, H. Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Single cell transfection techniques are essential to understand the heterogeneity between cells. We have developed an integrated electrowetting nanoinjector (INENI) to transfect single cells. The high transfection efficiency, controlled dosage delivery and ease of INENI fabrication promote the widespread application of the INENI in cell transfection assays. PMID:27374766

  12. Continuous Dissolved Oxygen Measurements and Modelling Metabolism in Peatland Streams

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Jonathan J.; Soulsby, Chris; Birkel, Christian; Malcolm, Iain; Tetzlaff, Doerthe

    2016-01-01

    Stream water dissolved oxygen was monitored in a 3.2km2 moorland headwater catchment in the Scottish Highlands. The stream consists of three 1st order headwaters and a 2nd order main stem. The stream network is fringed by peat soils with no riparian trees, though dwarf shrubs provide shading in the lower catchment. Dissolved oxygen (DO) is regulated by the balance between atmospheric re-aeration and the metabolic processes of photosynthesis and respiration. DO was continuously measured for >1 year and the data used to calibrate a mass balance model, to estimate primary production, respiration and re-aeration for a 1st order site and in the 2nd order main stem. Results showed that the stream was always heterotrophic at both sites. Sites were most heterotrophic in the summer reflecting higher levels of stream metabolism. The 1st order stream appeared more heterotrophic which was consistent with the evident greater biomass of macrophytes in the 2nd order stream, with resulting higher primary productivity. Comparison between respiration, primary production, re-aeration and potential physical controls revealed only weak relationships. However, the most basic model parameters (e.g. the parameter linking light and photosynthesis) controlling ecosystem processes resulted in significant differences between the sites which seem related to the stream channel geometry. PMID:27556278

  13. Continuous Dissolved Oxygen Measurements and Modelling Metabolism in Peatland Streams.

    PubMed

    Dick, Jonathan J; Soulsby, Chris; Birkel, Christian; Malcolm, Iain; Tetzlaff, Doerthe

    2016-01-01

    Stream water dissolved oxygen was monitored in a 3.2km2 moorland headwater catchment in the Scottish Highlands. The stream consists of three 1st order headwaters and a 2nd order main stem. The stream network is fringed by peat soils with no riparian trees, though dwarf shrubs provide shading in the lower catchment. Dissolved oxygen (DO) is regulated by the balance between atmospheric re-aeration and the metabolic processes of photosynthesis and respiration. DO was continuously measured for >1 year and the data used to calibrate a mass balance model, to estimate primary production, respiration and re-aeration for a 1st order site and in the 2nd order main stem. Results showed that the stream was always heterotrophic at both sites. Sites were most heterotrophic in the summer reflecting higher levels of stream metabolism. The 1st order stream appeared more heterotrophic which was consistent with the evident greater biomass of macrophytes in the 2nd order stream, with resulting higher primary productivity. Comparison between respiration, primary production, re-aeration and potential physical controls revealed only weak relationships. However, the most basic model parameters (e.g. the parameter linking light and photosynthesis) controlling ecosystem processes resulted in significant differences between the sites which seem related to the stream channel geometry.

  14. Microfluidics for single-cell genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Thompson, A M; Paguirigan, A L; Kreutz, J E; Radich, J P; Chiu, D T

    2014-09-07

    The ability to correlate single-cell genetic information to cellular phenotypes will provide the kind of detailed insight into human physiology and disease pathways that is not possible to infer from bulk cell analysis. Microfluidic technologies are attractive for single-cell manipulation due to precise handling and low risk of contamination. Additionally, microfluidic single-cell techniques can allow for high-throughput and detailed genetic analyses that increase accuracy and decrease reagent cost compared to bulk techniques. Incorporating these microfluidic platforms into research and clinical laboratory workflows can fill an unmet need in biology, delivering the highly accurate, highly informative data necessary to develop new therapies and monitor patient outcomes. In this perspective, we describe the current and potential future uses of microfluidics at all stages of single-cell genetic analysis, including cell enrichment and capture, single-cell compartmentalization and manipulation, and detection and analyses.

  15. A modified procedure for measuring oxygen-18 content of nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. A.; Aly, A. I. M.; Abdel Monem, N.; Hanafy, M.; Gomaa, H. E.

    2012-11-01

    SummaryMass spectrometric analysis of O-isotopic composition of nitrate has many potential applications in studies of environmental processes. Through this work, rapid, reliable, precise, broadly applicable, catalyst-free, low-priced and less labor intensive procedure for measuring δ18O of nitrate using Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer has been developed and implemented. The conditions necessary to effect complete nitrate recovery and complete removal of other oxygen containing anions and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) without scarifying the isotopic signature of nitrate were investigated. The developed procedure consists of two main parts: (1) wet chemistry train for extraction and purification of nitrate from the liquid matrix; (2) off-line pyrolysis of extracted nitrate salt with activated graphite at 550 °C for 30 min. The conditions necessary to effect complete nitrate recovery and complete removal of other oxygen containing compounds were investigated. Dramatic reduction in processing times needed for analysis of δ18O of nitrate at natural abundance level was achieved. Preservation experiments revealed that chloroform (99.8%) is an effective preservative. Isotopic contents of some selected nitrate salts were measured using the modified procedure and some other well established methods at two laboratories in Egypt and Germany. Performance assessment of the whole developed analytical train was made using internationally distributed nitrate isotopes reference materials and real world sample of initial zero-nitrate content. The uncertainty budget was evaluated using the graphical nested hierarchal approach. The obtained results proved the suitability for handling samples of complicated matrices. Reduction of consumables cost by about 80% was achieved.

  16. Single-cell analysis of dihydroartemisinin-induced apoptosis through reactive oxygen species-mediated caspase-8 activation and mitochondrial pathway in ASTC-a-1 cells using fluorescence imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ying-Ying; Chen, Tong-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Li, Li

    2010-07-01

    Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), a front-line antimalarial herbal compound, has been shown to possess promising anticancer activity with low toxicity. We have previously reported that DHA induced caspase-3-dependent apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma cells. However, the cellular target and molecular mechanism of DHA-induced apoptosis is still poorly defined. We use confocal fluorescence microscopy imaging, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching techniques to explore the roles of DHA-elicited reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the DHA-induced Bcl-2 family proteins activation, mitochondrial dysfunction, caspase cascade, and cell death. Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and flow cytometry analysis showed that DHA induced ROS-mediated apoptosis. Confocal imaging analysis in a single living cell and Western blot assay showed that DHA triggered ROS-dependent Bax translocation, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, alteration of mitochondrial morphology, cytochrome c release, caspase-9, caspase-8, and caspase-3 activation, indicating the coexistence of ROS-mediated mitochondrial and death receptor pathway. Collectively, our findings demonstrate for the first time that DHA induces cell apoptosis by triggering ROS-mediated caspase-8/Bid activation and the mitochondrial pathway, which provides some novel insights into the application of DHA as a potential anticancer drug and a new therapeutic strategy by targeting ROS signaling in lung adenocarcinoma therapy in the future.

  17. Future medical applications of single-cell sequencing in cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Advances in whole genome amplification and next-generation sequencing methods have enabled genomic analyses of single cells, and these techniques are now beginning to be used to detect genomic lesions in individual cancer cells. Previous approaches have been unable to resolve genomic differences in complex mixtures of cells, such as heterogeneous tumors, despite the importance of characterizing such tumors for cancer treatment. Sequencing of single cells is likely to improve several aspects of medicine, including the early detection of rare tumor cells, monitoring of circulating tumor cells (CTCs), measuring intratumor heterogeneity, and guiding chemotherapy. In this review we discuss the challenges and technical aspects of single-cell sequencing, with a strong focus on genomic copy number, and discuss how this information can be used to diagnose and treat cancer patients. PMID:21631906

  18. Future medical applications of single-cell sequencing in cancer.

    PubMed

    Navin, Nicholas; Hicks, James

    2011-05-31

    Advances in whole genome amplification and next-generation sequencing methods have enabled genomic analyses of single cells, and these techniques are now beginning to be used to detect genomic lesions in individual cancer cells. Previous approaches have been unable to resolve genomic differences in complex mixtures of cells, such as heterogeneous tumors, despite the importance of characterizing such tumors for cancer treatment. Sequencing of single cells is likely to improve several aspects of medicine, including the early detection of rare tumor cells, monitoring of circulating tumor cells (CTCs), measuring intratumor heterogeneity, and guiding chemotherapy. In this review we discuss the challenges and technical aspects of single-cell sequencing, with a strong focus on genomic copy number, and discuss how this information can be used to diagnose and treat cancer patients.

  19. A single cell penetration system by ultrasonic driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhaoying; Xiao, Mingfei; Yang, Xing; Wu, Ting

    2008-12-01

    The researches of single cell's control and operation are the hotspots in whole world. Among the various technologies, the transmission of ectogenic genetic materials between cell membrane is very significant. Imitating the Chinese traditional acupuncture therapy, a new ultrasonic resonance driving method, is imported to drive a cell's penetration probe. A set of the single cell penetration system was established to perform this function. This system includes four subsystems: driving part, micromanipulation part, observation and measurement part, and actuation part. Some fish egg experiments indicate that this system is workable and effective.

  20. Imaging of anticancer drug action in single cells.

    PubMed

    Miller, Miles A; Weissleder, Ralph

    2017-06-23

    Imaging is widely used in anticancer drug development, typically for whole-body tracking of labelled drugs to different organs or to assess drug efficacy through volumetric measurements. However, increasing attention has been drawn to pharmacology at the single-cell level. Diverse cell types, including cancer-associated immune cells, physicochemical features of the tumour microenvironment and heterogeneous cell behaviour all affect drug delivery, response and resistance. This Review summarizes developments in the imaging of in vivo anticancer drug action, with a focus on microscopy approaches at the single-cell level and translational lessons for the clinic.

  1. Biochemical oxygen demand measurement by mediator method in flow system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ling; Bai, Lu; Yu, Dengbin; Zhai, Junfeng; Dong, Shaojun

    2015-06-01

    Using mediator as electron acceptor for biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) measurement was developed in the last decade (BODMed). However, until now, no BOD(Med) in a flow system has been reported. This work for the first time describes a flow system of BOD(Med) method (BOD(Med)-FS) by using potassium ferricyanide as mediator and carbon fiber felt as substrate material for microbial immobilization. The system can determine the BOD value within 30 min and possesses a wider analytical linear range for measuring glucose-glutamic acid (GGA) standard solution from 2 up to 200 mg L(-1) without the need of dilution. The analytical performance of the BOD(Med)-FS is comparable or better than that of the previously reported BOD(Med) method, especially its superior long-term stability up to 2 months under continuous operation. Moreover, the BOD(Med)-FS has same determination accuracy with the conventional BOD5 method by measuring real samples from a local wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Simultaneous Measurement of Dissolved Oxygen Pressure and Oxyhemoglobin Spectra in Solution.

    PubMed

    Litorja, Maritoni; Hwang, Jeeseong C

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of the spatial distribution of oxygen saturation (sO2) in superficial tissues using optical reflectance imaging has been useful in the clinical venue especially in temporally demanding applications such as monitoring tissue oxygenation during surgery. The measurement is based on relative spectrometry of oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin in tissues. We titrated deoxyhemoglobin with oxygen gas and simultaneously measured the dissolved oxygen pressure and the visible absorbance spectra to verify spectral shapes at different saturations. sO2 values derived from the measured pO2 are compared to those derived from the hemoglobin spectra at various stages of oxygenation.

  3. Measuring and interpreting respiratory critical oxygen pressures in roots

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, William; Webb, Trevor; Darwent, Marcus; Beckett, Peter M.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Respiratory critical oxygen pressures (COPR) determined from O2-depletion rates in media bathing intact or excised roots are unreliable indicators of respiratory O2-dependency in O2-free media and wetlands. A mathematical model was used to help illustrate this, and more relevant polarographic methods for determining COPR in roots of intact plants are discussed. Methods Cortical [O2] near the root apex was monitored indirectly (pea seedlings) from radial oxygen losses (ROL) using sleeving Pt electrodes, or directly (maize) using microelectrodes; [O2] in the root was controlled by manipulating [O2] around the shoots. Mathematical modelling of radial diffusive and respiratory properties of roots used Michaelis–Menten enzyme kinetics. Key Results Respiration declined only when the O2 partial pressure (OPP) in the cortex of root tips fell below 0·5–4·5 kPa, values consistent with depressed respiration near the centre of the stele as confirmed by microelectrode measurements and mathematical modelling. Modelling predictions suggested that the OPP of a significant core at the centre of roots could be below the usual detection limits of O2-microelectrodes but still support some aerobic respiration. Conclusions In O2-free media, as in wetlands, the COPR for roots is likely to be quite low, dependent upon the respiratory demands, dimensions and diffusion characteristics of the stele/stelar meristem and the enzyme kinetics of cytochrome oxidase. Roots of non-wetland plants may not differ greatly in their COPRs from those of wetland species. There is a possibility that trace amounts of O2 may still be present in stelar ‘anaerobic’ cores where fermentation is induced at low cortical OPPs. PMID:18819952

  4. Experiment to measure oxygen opacity at high density and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiter, Paul; Mussack, Katie; Orban, Chris; Colgan, James; Ducret, Jean-Eric; Fontes, Christopher J.; Guzik, Joyce Ann; Heeter, Robert F.; Kilcrease, Dave; Le Pennec, Maelle; Mancini, Roberto; Perry, Ted; Turck-Chièze, Sylvaine; Trantham, Matt

    2017-06-01

    In recent years, there has been a debate over the abundances of heavy elements (Z >2) in the solar interior. Recent solar atmosphere models [Asplund 2009] find a significantly lower abundance for C, N, and O compared to models used roughly a decade ago. This discrepancy has led to an investigation of opacities through laboratory experiments and improved opacity models for many of the larger contributors to the sun’s opacity, including iron and oxygen. Recent opacity measurements of iron disagree with opacity model predictions [Bailey et al, 2015]. Although these results are still controversial, repeated scrutiny of the experiment and data has not produced a conclusive reason for the discrepancy. New models have been implemented in the ATOMIC opacity code for C, O and Fe to address the solar abundance issue [Colgan, 2013]. Armstrong et al [2014] have also implemented changes in the ATOMIC code for low-Z elements. However, no data currently exists to test the low-Z material models in the regime relevant to the solar convection zone. We present an experimental design using the opacity platform developed at the National Ignition Facility to study the oxygen opacity at densities and temperatures near the solar convection zone conditions.This work is funded by the U.S. DOE, through the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in HEDPLP, grant No. DE-NA0001840, and the NLUF Program, grant No. DE-NA0000850, and through LLE, University of Rochester by the NNSA/OICF under Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302.

  5. Single cell sequencing: a distinct new field.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Song, Yuanlin

    2017-12-01

    Single cell sequencing (SCS) has become a new approach to study biological heterogeneity. The advancement in technologies for single cell isolation, amplification of genome/transcriptome and next-generation sequencing enables SCS to reveal the inherent properties of a single cell from the large scale of the genome, transcriptome or epigenome at high resolution. Recently, SCS has been widely applied in various clinical and research fields, such as cancer biology and oncology, immunology, microbiology, neurobiology and prenatal diagnosis. In this review, we will discuss the development of SCS methods and focus on the latest clinical and research applications of SCS.

  6. Automated Single Cell Data Decontamination Pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Tennessen, Kristin; Pati, Amrita

    2014-03-21

    Recent technological advancements in single-cell genomics have encouraged the classification and functional assessment of microorganisms from a wide span of the biospheres phylogeny.1,2 Environmental processes of interest to the DOE, such as bioremediation and carbon cycling, can be elucidated through the genomic lens of these unculturable microbes. However, contamination can occur at various stages of the single-cell sequencing process. Contaminated data can lead to wasted time and effort on meaningless analyses, inaccurate or erroneous conclusions, and pollution of public databases. A fully automated decontamination tool is necessary to prevent these instances and increase the throughput of the single-cell sequencing process

  7. A comparison of methods for the measurement of cardiac output and blood oxygen content.

    PubMed

    Douglas, I R; MacDonald, J A; Milligan, G F; Mellon, A; Ledingham, I M

    1975-04-01

    A comparison has been made between the recently introduced thermal dilution method for measurement of cardiac output and the standard dye dilution technique. Two relatively new methods of measurement of blood oxygen content, one involving the measurement of oxygen tension after release of oxygen by carbon monoxide, and the other the measurement of current flow upon reduction of oxygen in a galvanic cell, have been compared with a standard indirect method of measurement of blood oxygen content. All three new methods fulfilled the criteria of accuracy and simplicity and compared favourably with the standard methods. Of the two new methods for measurement of oxygen content, that involving reduction of oxygen in a galvanic cell was superior by virtue of compactness and speed of operation.

  8. Reaction rates of oxygen with hemoglobin measured by non-equilibrium facilitated oxygen diffusion through hemoglobin solutions.

    PubMed

    Bouwer, S T; Hoofd, L; Kreuzer, F

    2001-02-16

    The purpose of this study was to verify the concept of non-equilibrium facilitated oxygen diffusion. This work succeeds our previous study, where facilitated oxygen diffusion by hemoglobin was measured at conditions of chemical equilibrium, and which yielded diffusion coefficients of hemoglobin and of oxygen. In the present work chemical non-equilibrium was induced using very thin diffusion layers. As a result, facilitation was decreased as predicted by theory. Thus, this work presents the first experimental demonstration of non-equilibrium facilitated oxygen diffusion. In addition, association and dissociation rate parameters of the reaction between oxygen and bovine and human hemoglobin were calculated and the effect of the homotropic and heterotropic interactions on each rate parameter was demonstrated. The results indicate that the homotropic interaction--which leads to increasing oxygen affinity with increasing oxygenation--is predominantly due to an increase in the association rate. The heterotropic interaction--which leads to decreasing oxygen affinity by anionic ligands--appears to be effected in two ways. Cl- increases the dissociation rate. In contrast, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate decreases the association rate.

  9. Measurement of Respiration and Internal Oxygen in Germinating Cicer arietinum L. Seeds Using Optic Microsensor.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sonika; Kumari, Aprajita; Bharadwaj, Chellapilla; Gupta, Kapuganti Jagadis

    2017-01-01

    Internal oxygen concentrations vary in different tissues depending on tissue size, developmental stage, and their location. Respiratory rate of tissue also determines internal oxygen levels. For studying various signaling pathways it is essential to establish a correlation between respiration and internal oxygen. Seed germination is associated with increase in respiration which can dictate the internal oxygen and subsequent production of reactive oxygen species. Using optic oxygen microsensor we made an attempt to measure respiratory rate and internal oxygen. We found that microsensor is able to sense internal oxygen and it is also possible to measure oxygen levels in a close vial that contains seeds. Step-by-step protocol is described here along with illustration.

  10. Thermal measurements on divers in hyperbaric helium-oxygen environments.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, L A; Zumrick, J

    1978-09-01

    During a series of three saturation dives to simulated depths of 1000, 1200, and 1400 fsw at the Ocean Simulation Facility, measurements were made to establish the rate of heat loss of unclad divers in helium-oxygen gaseous environments. These measurements were part of a program to determine the dangers of cold stress and the temperature/time relationship tolerated by divers in cold diving bells or in hyperbaric chambers in which environmental conditions are uncontrolled. Three specific gaseous temperatures of 15, 20, and 25 degrees C were considered. In each experiment, as many as four subjects were monitored for body core and mean skin temperature over a 2-h testing period. One or two of the subjects were also monitored for mean body convective heat loss to determine physiological (shell) thermal insulation. Results of these experiments are expressed in depth-time-temperature three-dimensional graphs in whic, the temperature variable is one of the following: mean skin temperature change, mean body temperature change, or mean rectal (core) temperature change, each suitable for defining diver thermal limitations. It was also possible to rank body areas of the subjects in relation to heat loss and temperature decrease during exposure to the cold environment.

  11. Molecular Oxygen in the Thermosphere: Issues and Measurement Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picone, J. M.; Hedin, A. E.; Drob, D. P.; Meier, R. R.; Bishop, J.; Budzien, S. A.

    2002-05-01

    We review the state of empirical knowledge regarding the distribution of molecular oxygen in the lower thermosphere (100-200 km), as embodied by the new NRLMSISE-00 empirical atmospheric model, its predecessors, and the underlying databases. For altitudes above 120 km, the two major classes of data (mass spectrometer and solar ultraviolet [UV] absorption) disagree significantly regarding the magnitude of the O2 density and the dependence on solar activity. As a result, the addition of the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) data set (based on solar UV absorption) to the NRLMSIS database has directly impacted the new model, increasing the complexity of the model's formulation and generally reducing the thermospheric O2 density relative to MSISE-90. Beyond interest in the thermosphere itself, this issue materially affects detailed models of ionospheric chemistry and dynamics as well as modeling of the upper atmospheric airglow. Because these are key elements of both experimental and operational systems which measure and forecast the near-Earth space environment, we present strategies for augmenting the database through analysis of existing data and through future measurements in order to resolve this issue.

  12. Epigenetics reloaded: the single-cell revolution.

    PubMed

    Bheda, Poonam; Schneider, Robert

    2014-11-01

    Mechanistically, how epigenetic states are inherited through cellular divisions remains an important open question in the chromatin field and beyond. Defining the heritability of epigenetic states and the underlying chromatin-based mechanisms within a population of cells is complicated due to cell heterogeneity combined with varying levels of stability of these states; thus, efforts must be focused toward single-cell analyses. The approaches presented here constitute the forefront of epigenetics research at the single-cell level using classic and innovative methods to dissect epigenetics mechanisms from the limited material available in a single cell. This review further outlines exciting future avenues of research to address the significance of epigenetic heterogeneity and the contributions of microfluidics technologies to single-cell isolation and analysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Efficient Synergistic Single-Cell Genome Assembly.

    PubMed

    Movahedi, Narjes S; Embree, Mallory; Nagarajan, Harish; Zengler, Karsten; Chitsaz, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    As the vast majority of all microbes are unculturable, single-cell sequencing has become a significant method to gain insight into microbial physiology. Single-cell sequencing methods, currently powered by multiple displacement genome amplification (MDA), have passed important milestones such as finishing and closing the genome of a prokaryote. However, the quality and reliability of genome assemblies from single cells are still unsatisfactory due to uneven coverage depth and the absence of scattered chunks of the genome in the final collection of reads caused by MDA bias. In this work, our new algorithm Hybrid De novo Assembler (HyDA) demonstrates the power of coassembly of multiple single-cell genomic data sets through significant improvement of the assembly quality in terms of predicted functional elements and length statistics. Coassemblies contain significantly more base pairs and protein coding genes, cover more subsystems, and consist of longer contigs compared to individual assemblies by the same algorithm as well as state-of-the-art single-cell assemblers SPAdes and IDBA-UD. Hybrid De novo Assembler (HyDA) is also able to avoid chimeric assemblies by detecting and separating shared and exclusive pieces of sequence for input data sets. By replacing one deep single-cell sequencing experiment with a few single-cell sequencing experiments of lower depth, the coassembly method can hedge against the risk of failure and loss of the sample, without significantly increasing sequencing cost. Application of the single-cell coassembler HyDA to the study of three uncultured members of an alkane-degrading methanogenic community validated the usefulness of the coassembly concept. HyDA is open source and publicly available at http://chitsazlab.org/software.html, and the raw reads are available at http://chitsazlab.org/research.html.

  14. Quantitating intracellular oxygen tension in vivo by phosphorescence lifetime measurement

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Yosuke; Yoshihara, Toshitada; Kamiya, Mako; Mimura, Imari; Fujikura, Daichi; Masuda, Tsuyoshi; Kikuchi, Ryohei; Takahashi, Ippei; Urano, Yasuteru; Tobita, Seiji; Nangaku, Masaomi

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia appears to have an important role in pathological conditions in many organs such as kidney; however, a method to quantify intracellular oxygen tension in vivo has not been well established. In this study, we established an optical method to quantify oxygen tension in mice kidneys using a cationic lipophilic phosphorescence probe, BTPDM1, which has an intracellular oxygen concentration-sensitive phosphorescence lifetime. Since this probe is distributed inside the tubular cells of the mice kidney, we succeeded in detecting acute renal hypoxic conditions and chronic kidney disease. This technique enabled us to estimate intracellular partial pressures of oxygen in vivo by extrapolating the calibration curve generated from cultured tubular cells. Since intracellular oxygen tension is directly related to cellular hypoxic reactions, such as the activation of hypoxia-inducible factors, our method will shed new light on hypoxia research in vivo. PMID:26644023

  15. Single-cell intracellular nano-pH probes.

    PubMed

    Özel, Rıfat Emrah; Lohith, Akshar; Mak, Wai Han; Pourmand, Nader

    2015-01-01

    Within a large clonal population, such as cancerous tumor entities, cells are not identical, and the differences between intracellular pH levels of individual cells may be important indicators of heterogeneity that could be relevant in clinical practice, especially in personalized medicine. Therefore, the detection of the intracellular pH at the single-cell level is of great importance to identify and study outlier cells. However, quantitative and real-time measurements of the intracellular pH of individual cells within a cell population is challenging with existing technologies, and there is a need to engineer new methodologies. In this paper, we discuss the use of nanopipette technology to overcome the limitations of intracellular pH measurements at the single-cell level. We have developed a nano-pH probe through physisorption of chitosan onto hydroxylated quartz nanopipettes with extremely small pore sizes (~100 nm). The dynamic pH range of the nano-pH probe was from 2.6 to 10.7 with a sensitivity of 0.09 units. We have performed single-cell intracellular pH measurements using non-cancerous and cancerous cell lines, including human fibroblasts, HeLa, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7, with the pH nanoprobe. We have further demonstrated the real-time continuous single-cell pH measurement capability of the sensor, showing the cellular pH response to pharmaceutical manipulations. These findings suggest that the chitosan-functionalized nanopore is a powerful nano-tool for pH sensing at the single-cell level with high temporal and spatial resolution.

  16. Multiplex Single Cell Profiling of Chromatin Accessibility by Combinatorial Cellular Indexing

    PubMed Central

    Cusanovich, Darren A.; Daza, Riza; Adey, Andrew; Pliner, Hannah; Christiansen, Lena; Gunderson, Kevin L.; Steemers, Frank J.; Trapnell, Cole

    2016-01-01

    Technical advances have enabled the collection of genome and transcriptome datasets with single-cell resolution. However, single-cell characterization of the epigenome has remained challenging. Furthermore, because cells must be physically separated prior to biochemical processing, conventional single-cell preparatory methods scale linearly. We applied combinatorial cellular indexing to measure chromatin accessibility in thousands of single cells per assay, circumventing the need for compartmentalization of individual cells. We report chromatin accessibility profiles from over 15,000 single cells and use these data to cluster cells on the basis of chromatin accessibility landscapes. We identify modules of coordinately regulated chromatin accessibility at the level of single cells both between and within cell types, with a scalable method that may accelerate progress towards a human cell atlas. PMID:25953818

  17. Multiplex single cell profiling of chromatin accessibility by combinatorial cellular indexing.

    PubMed

    Cusanovich, Darren A; Daza, Riza; Adey, Andrew; Pliner, Hannah A; Christiansen, Lena; Gunderson, Kevin L; Steemers, Frank J; Trapnell, Cole; Shendure, Jay

    2015-05-22

    Technical advances have enabled the collection of genome and transcriptome data sets with single-cell resolution. However, single-cell characterization of the epigenome has remained challenging. Furthermore, because cells must be physically separated before biochemical processing, conventional single-cell preparatory methods scale linearly. We applied combinatorial cellular indexing to measure chromatin accessibility in thousands of single cells per assay, circumventing the need for compartmentalization of individual cells. We report chromatin accessibility profiles from more than 15,000 single cells and use these data to cluster cells on the basis of chromatin accessibility landscapes. We identify modules of coordinately regulated chromatin accessibility at the level of single cells both between and within cell types, with a scalable method that may accelerate progress toward a human cell atlas. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. Antioxidative activity of lactobacilli measured by oxygen radical absorbance capacity.

    PubMed

    Saide, J A O; Gilliland, S E

    2005-04-01

    The reducing ability and antioxidative activity of some species of Lactobacillus were compared under in vitro conditions. Cultures of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. lactis, Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, and Lactobacillus casei were grown at 37 degrees C in de Man, Rogosa, Sharpe (MRS) broth supplemented with 0.5% 2,3,5 triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC) to evaluate reducing activity. Reduced TTC was extracted from the cultures with acetone, and the intensity of the red color measured colorimetrically at 485 nm was an indication of reducing activity. The lactobacilli varied significantly in relative ability to reduce TTC when grown in MRS broth for 15 h. The relative amounts of growth as indicated by pH values at 18 h appeared to influence the amount of reduction. Antioxidative activity was evaluated by the ability of the whole cells or the cell-free extracts from cultures to protect a protein from being attacked by free radicals. These analyses were performed using the oxygen radical absorbance capacity method. All cultures tested exhibited some degree of antioxidative activity. Among the treatments, the cell-free extracts from cells grown in MRS broth exhibited significantly higher values than did whole cells. There was no apparent relationship between the reducing and antioxidative activities of the cultures evaluated. The results from this study show that these cultures can provide a source of dietary antioxidants. Furthermore, selection of cultures that produce antioxidants as starters could provide yet another health or nutritional benefit from cultured or culture-containing dairy products.

  19. ASRDI oxygen technology survey. Volume 5: Density and liquid level measurement instrumentation for the cryogenic fluids oxygen, hydrogen, and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roder, H. M.

    1974-01-01

    Information is presented on instrumentation for density measurement, liquid level measurement, quantity gauging, and phase measurement. Coverage of existing information directly concerned with oxygen was given primary emphasis. A description of the physical principle of measurement for each instrumentation type is included. The basic materials of construction are listed if available from the source document for each instrument discussed. Cleaning requirements, procedures, and verification techniques are included.

  20. Phenotype classification of single cells using SRS microscopy, RNA sequencing, and microfluidics (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streets, Aaron M.; Cao, Chen; Zhang, Xiannian; Huang, Yanyi

    2016-03-01

    Phenotype classification of single cells reveals biological variation that is masked in ensemble measurement. This heterogeneity is found in gene and protein expression as well as in cell morphology. Many techniques are available to probe phenotypic heterogeneity at the single cell level, for example quantitative imaging and single-cell RNA sequencing, but it is difficult to perform multiple assays on the same single cell. In order to directly track correlation between morphology and gene expression at the single cell level, we developed a microfluidic platform for quantitative coherent Raman imaging and immediate RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) of single cells. With this device we actively sort and trap cells for analysis with stimulated Raman scattering microscopy (SRS). The cells are then processed in parallel pipelines for lysis, and preparation of cDNA for high-throughput transcriptome sequencing. SRS microscopy offers three-dimensional imaging with chemical specificity for quantitative analysis of protein and lipid distribution in single cells. Meanwhile, the microfluidic platform facilitates single-cell manipulation, minimizes contamination, and furthermore, provides improved RNA-Seq detection sensitivity and measurement precision, which is necessary for differentiating biological variability from technical noise. By combining coherent Raman microscopy with RNA sequencing, we can better understand the relationship between cellular morphology and gene expression at the single-cell level.

  1. High Precision Oxygen Measurements as a Tool for CCS Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trugman, A. T.; Dvonch, C.; Clegg, S. M.; Rahn, T.

    2011-12-01

    CO2 emissions from below ground carbon storage reservoirs can be difficult to discriminate from CO2 produced via natural plant and microbial respiration. However, because respiration produces CO2 and consumes O2 in an approximately 1:1 ratio, it is possible to characterize leakage sources by measurement of simultaneous changes of both O2 and CO2. This approach is complicated by the fact that O2 comprises approximately 21% of the atmosphere, while CO2 is only present in the background atmosphere at ~400 parts per million, making it necessary to accurately measure changes in O2 concentration to six significant figures. Here we describe a portable high precision oxygen measurement system that employs a modified commercial fuel cell analyzer to quantify small changes in O2 concentration. High precision is achieved through precise control of flow and pressure, allowing near part per million precision of O2 and CO2 concentrations. This system has been incorporated into a mobile laboratory and has been deployed to the ZERT controlled release site in Bozeman, Montana and to a natural analog CO2 leak at Soda Springs, Idaho. Samples were collected at ground level, 1 meter, and 3 meters above the CO2 source and are displayed as the ratio of the O2 difference relative to a reference to the CO2 difference in concentration relative to the same reference (ΔO2/ΔCO2). It was observed that at wind speeds ≤ 2 m/s, the ΔO2/ΔCO2 anomaly decreased with height and was still significantly different from background at 3 m. With increasing wind speed, ΔO2/ΔCO2 anomalies decreased to background levels at 1 and 3 m but remained detectable at the ground surface. We will discuss attempts to quantify the CO2 release rate utilizing the measured ΔO2/ΔCO2 elevation profiles and will present complementary eddy covariance data for comparison.

  2. Biological oxygen productivity during the last 60,000 years from triple oxygen isotope measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blunier, Thomas; Barnett, Bruce; Bender, Michael L.; Hendricks, Melissa B.

    2002-07-01

    The oxygen isotope signature of atmospheric O2 is linked to the isotopic signature of seawater (H2O) through photosynthesis and respiration. Fractionation during these processes is mass dependent, affecting δ17O about half as much as δ18O. An ``anomalous'' fractionation process, which changes δ17O and δ18O of O2 about equally, takes place during isotope exchange between O2 and CO2 in the stratosphere. The relative rates of biologic O2 production and stratospheric processing determine the relationship between δ17O and δ18O of O2 in the atmosphere. Variations of this relationship thus allow us to estimate changes in the rate of mass-dependent O2 production by photosynthesis versus the rate of O2-CO2 exchange in the stratosphere with about equal fractionations of δ17O and δ18O. In this study we reconstruct total oxygen productivity for the last glacial, the last glacial termination, and the early Holocene from the triple isotope composition of atmospheric oxygen trapped in ice cores. With a box model we estimate that total biogenic productivity was only ~76-83% of today for the glacial and was probably lower than today during the glacial-interglacial transition and the early Holocene. Depending on how reduced the oxygen flux from the land biosphere was during the glacial, the oxygen flux from the glacial ocean biosphere was 88-140% of its present value.

  3. Selective single cell isolation for genomics using microraft arrays

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Joshua D.; Williams, Lindsay A.; DiSalvo, Matthew; Brandt, Alicia T.; Marayati, Raoud; Sims, Christopher E.; Allbritton, Nancy L.; Prins, Jan F.; Yeh, Jen Jen; Jones, Corbin D.

    2016-01-01

    Genomic methods are used increasingly to interrogate the individual cells that compose specific tissues. However, current methods for single cell isolation struggle to phenotypically differentiate specific cells in a heterogeneous population and rely primarily on the use of fluorescent markers. Many cellular phenotypes of interest are too complex to be measured by this approach, making it difficult to connect genotype and phenotype at the level of individual cells. Here we demonstrate that microraft arrays, which are arrays containing thousands of individual cell culture sites, can be used to select single cells based on a variety of phenotypes, such as cell surface markers, cell proliferation and drug response. We then show that a common genomic procedure, RNA-seq, can be readily adapted to the single cells isolated from these rafts. We show that data generated using microrafts and our modified RNA-seq protocol compared favorably with the Fluidigm C1. We then used microraft arrays to select pancreatic cancer cells that proliferate in spite of cytotoxic drug treatment. Our single cell RNA-seq data identified several expected and novel gene expression changes associated with early drug resistance. PMID:27530426

  4. Research highlights: microfluidic-enabled single-cell epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Manjima; Khojah, Reem; Tay, Andy; Di Carlo, Dino

    2015-11-07

    Individual cells are the fundamental unit of life with diverse functions from metabolism to motility. In multicellular organisms, a single genome can give rise to tremendous variability across tissues at the single-cell level due to epigenetic differences in the genes that are expressed. Signals from the local environment or a history of signals can drive these variations, and tissues have many cell types that play separate roles. This epigenetic heterogeneity is of biological importance in normal functions such as tissue morphogenesis and can contribute to development or resistance of cancer, or other disease states. Therefore, an improved understanding of variations at the single cell level are fundamental to understanding biology and developing new approaches to combating disease. Traditional approaches to characterize epigenetic modifications of chromatin or the transcriptome of cells have often focused on blended responses of many cells in a tissue; however, such bulk measures lose spatial and temporal differences that occur from cell to cell, and cannot uncover novel or rare populations of cells. Here we highlight a flurry of recent activity to identify the mRNA profiles from thousands of single-cells as well as chromatin accessibility and histone marks on single to few hundreds of cells. Microfluidics and microfabrication have played a central role in the range of new techniques, and will likely continue to impact their further development towards routine single-cell epigenetic analysis.

  5. Simultaneous measurement of macro- and microvascular blood flow and oxygen saturation for quantification of muscle oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Englund, Erin K; Rodgers, Zachary B; Langham, Michael C; Mohler, Emile R; Floyd, Thomas F; Wehrli, Felix W

    2017-05-11

    To investigate the relationship between blood flow and oxygen consumption in skeletal muscle, a technique called "Velocity and Perfusion, Intravascular Venous Oxygen saturation and T2*" (vPIVOT) is presented. vPIVOT allows the quantification of feeding artery blood flow velocity, perfusion, draining vein oxygen saturation, and muscle T2*, all at 4-s temporal resolution. Together, the measurement of blood flow and oxygen extraction can yield muscle oxygen consumption ( V˙O2) via the Fick principle. In five subjects, vPIVOT-derived results were compared with those obtained from stand-alone sequences during separate ischemia-reperfusion paradigms to investigate the presence of measurement bias. Subsequently, in 10 subjects, vPIVOT was applied to assess muscle hemodynamics and V˙O2 following a bout of dynamic plantar flexion contractions. From the ischemia-reperfusion paradigm, no significant differences were observed between data from vPIVOT and comparison sequences. After exercise, the macrovascular flow response reached a maximum 8 ± 3 s after relaxation; however, perfusion in the gastrocnemius muscle continued to rise for 101 ± 53 s. Peak V˙O2 calculated based on mass-normalized arterial blood flow or perfusion was 15.2 ± 6.7 mL O2 /min/100 g or 6.0 ± 1.9 mL O2 /min/100 g, respectively. vPIVOT is a new method to measure blood flow and oxygen saturation, and therefore to quantify muscle oxygen consumption. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  6. Dissolved oxygen distribution during micro-oxygenation. Determination of representative measurement points in hydroalcoholic solution and wines.

    PubMed

    Nevares, I; del Alamo, M; Gonzalez-Muñoz, C

    2010-02-15

    Red wine tank aging is monitored by organoleptic analysis, therefore, it is necessary to use an objective parameter representing the process. Among the possible parameters to be checked, it stands out the knowledge of dissolved oxygen because it offers the possibility of anticipating undesirable situations that bring about too much oxidation. Dissolved oxygen measurement, with non-intrusive luminescent technology is becoming an effective alternative. Uncertainty arises when trying to choose the measuring point able to represent the entire tank since previous works have considered the existence of gradients throughout the volume of the treated wine. This paper shows the results obtained from the study of the existence and the quantification of gradients of the dissolved oxygen in a 15% hydroalcoholic solution during the micro-oxygenation process. Different measuring point placements are studied and the solutions to monitor the process by controlling a representative point are set out. A successful monitoring of a red wine tank aging with alternative oak products and adaptative micro-oxygenation has proved that an objective control of the process is, indeed, possible.

  7. CONTINUOUS, AUTOMATED AND SIMULTANEOUS MEASUREMENT OF OXYGEN UPTAKE AND CARBON DIOXIDE EVOLUTION IN BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Commercial respirometers are capable of continuously and automatically measuring oxygen uptake in bioreactors. A method for continuously and automatically measuring carbon dioxide evolution can be retrofitted to commercial respirometers. Continuous and automatic measurements of...

  8. CONTINUOUS, AUTOMATED AND SIMULTANEOUS MEASUREMENT OF OXYGEN UPTAKE AND CARBON DIOXIDE EVOLUTION IN BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Commercial respirometers are capable of continuously and automatically measuring oxygen uptake in bioreactors. A method for continuously and automatically measuring carbon dioxide evolution can be retrofitted to commercial respirometers. Continuous and automatic measurements of...

  9. Intrinsic artefacts in optical oxygen sensors--how reliable are our measurements?

    PubMed

    Lehner, Philipp; Staudinger, Christoph; Borisov, Sergey M; Regensburger, Johannes; Klimant, Ingo

    2015-03-02

    Optical oxygen sensing is of broad interest in many areas of research, such as medicine, food processing, and micro- and marine biology. The operation principle of optical oxygen sensors is well established and these sensors are routinely employed in lab and field experiments. Ultratrace oxygen sensors, which enable measurements in the sub-nanomolar region (dissolved oxygen), are becoming increasingly important. Such sensors prominently exhibit phenomena that complicate calibration and measurements. However, these phenomena are not constrained to ultratrace sensors; rather, these effects are inherent to the way optical oxygen sensors work and may influence any optical oxygen measurement when certain conditions are met. This scenario is especially true for applications that deal with high-excitation light intensities, such as microscopy and microfluidic applications. Herein, we present various effects that we could observe in our studies with ultratrace oxygen sensors and discuss the reasons for their appearance, the mechanism by which they influence measurements, and how to best reduce their impact. The phenomena discussed are oxygen photoconsumption in the sensor material; depletion of the dye ground state by high-excitation photon-flux values, which can compromise both intensity and ratiometric-based measurements; triplet-triplet annihilation; and singlet-oxygen accumulation, which affects measurements at very low oxygen concentrations. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Technologies for Single-Cell Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Andre; Schoendube, Jonas; Zimmermann, Stefan; Steeb, Maximilian; Zengerle, Roland; Koltay, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The handling of single cells is of great importance in applications such as cell line development or single-cell analysis, e.g., for cancer research or for emerging diagnostic methods. This review provides an overview of technologies that are currently used or in development to isolate single cells for subsequent single-cell analysis. Data from a dedicated online market survey conducted to identify the most relevant technologies, presented here for the first time, shows that FACS (fluorescence activated cell sorting) respectively Flow cytometry (33% usage), laser microdissection (17%), manual cell picking (17%), random seeding/dilution (15%), and microfluidics/lab-on-a-chip devices (12%) are currently the most frequently used technologies. These most prominent technologies are described in detail and key performance factors are discussed. The survey data indicates a further increasing interest in single-cell isolation tools for the coming years. Additionally, a worldwide patent search was performed to screen for emerging technologies that might become relevant in the future. In total 179 patents were found, out of which 25 were evaluated by screening the title and abstract to be relevant to the field. PMID:26213926

  11. Single-cell transcriptomics for microbial eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Kolisko, Martin; Boscaro, Vittorio; Burki, Fabien; Lynn, Denis H; Keeling, Patrick J

    2014-11-17

    One of the greatest hindrances to a comprehensive understanding of microbial genomics, cell biology, ecology, and evolution is that most microbial life is not in culture. Solutions to this problem have mainly focused on whole-community surveys like metagenomics, but these analyses inevitably loose information and present particular challenges for eukaryotes, which are relatively rare and possess large, gene-sparse genomes. Single-cell analyses present an alternative solution that allows for specific species to be targeted, while retaining information on cellular identity, morphology, and partitioning of activities within microbial communities. Single-cell transcriptomics, pioneered in medical research, offers particular potential advantages for uncultivated eukaryotes, but the efficiency and biases have not been tested. Here we describe a simple and reproducible method for single-cell transcriptomics using manually isolated cells from five model ciliate species; we examine impacts of amplification bias and contamination, and compare the efficacy of gene discovery to traditional culture-based transcriptomics. Gene discovery using single-cell transcriptomes was found to be comparable to mass-culture methods, suggesting single-cell transcriptomics is an efficient entry point into genomic data from the vast majority of eukaryotic biodiversity.

  12. Technologies for Single-Cell Isolation.

    PubMed

    Gross, Andre; Schoendube, Jonas; Zimmermann, Stefan; Steeb, Maximilian; Zengerle, Roland; Koltay, Peter

    2015-07-24

    The handling of single cells is of great importance in applications such as cell line development or single-cell analysis, e.g., for cancer research or for emerging diagnostic methods. This review provides an overview of technologies that are currently used or in development to isolate single cells for subsequent single-cell analysis. Data from a dedicated online market survey conducted to identify the most relevant technologies, presented here for the first time, shows that FACS (fluorescence activated cell sorting) respectively Flow cytometry (33% usage), laser microdissection (17%), manual cell picking (17%), random seeding/dilution (15%), and microfluidics/lab-on-a-chip devices (12%) are currently the most frequently used technologies. These most prominent technologies are described in detail and key performance factors are discussed. The survey data indicates a further increasing interest in single-cell isolation tools for the coming years. Additionally, a worldwide patent search was performed to screen for emerging technologies that might become relevant in the future. In total 179 patents were found, out of which 25 were evaluated by screening the title and abstract to be relevant to the field.

  13. Measurement and Control of Oxygen Partial Pressure in an Electrostatic Levitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SanSoucie, Michael P.; Rogers, Jan R.

    2014-01-01

    Recently the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center electrostatic levitation (ESL) laboratory has been upgraded to include an oxygen control system. This system allows the oxygen partial pressure within the vacuum chamber to be measured and controlled, at elevated temperatures, theoretically in the range from 10(exp -36) to 10(exp 0) bar. The role of active surface agents in liquid metals is fairly well known; however, published surface tension data typically has large scatter, which has been hypothesized to be caused by the presence of oxygen. The surface tension of metals is affected by even a small amount of adsorption of oxygen. It has even been shown that oxygen partial pressures may need to be as low as 10(exp -24) bar to avoid oxidation. While electrostatic levitation is done under high vacuum, oxide films or dissolved oxygen may have significant effects on materials properties, such as surface tension and viscosity. Therefore, the ability to measure and control the oxygen partial pressure within the chamber is highly desirable. The oxygen control system installed at MSFC contains a potentiometric sensor, which measures the oxygen partial pressure, and an oxygen ion pump. In the pump, a pulse-width modulated electric current is applied to yttrium-stabilized zirconia, resulting in oxygen transfer into or out of the system. Also part of the system is a control unit, which consists of temperature controllers for the sensor and pump, PID-based current loop for the ion pump, and a control algorithm. This system can be used to study the effects of oxygen on the thermophysical properties of metals, ceramics, glasses, and alloys. It can also be used to provide more accurate measurements by processing the samples at very low oxygen partial pressures. The oxygen control system will be explained in more detail and an overview of its use and limitations in an electrostatic levitator will be described. Some preliminary measurements have been made, and the results to date will

  14. Measuring Spatial and Temporal Heterogeneity of Dissolved Oxygen in Streambed Sediments Using Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, K. T.; Salus, A.; Xie, M.; Roche, K. R.; Packman, A. I.

    2014-12-01

    Pressure sensitive paints (PSP) have been largely used in aerodynamic applications to measure pressure distributions on complex bodies such as aircraft. One common family of PSPs employ fluorescent pigments that are quenched in the presence of oxygen, yielding an inverse relationship between fluorescence intensity and oxygen concentration that is used to measure pressure in aerodynamic applications through the partial pressure of oxygen. These PSPs offer unexplored potential for visualizing dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration distributions on surfaces underwater. PSP was used to measure dissolved oxygen concentrations in streambed sediments in a laboratory flume. Two PSP-coated 2.5 cm diameter spheres were emplaced in a bed of similar material, and imaged under varying DO concentrations. Calibration curves relating fluorescence intensity to dissolved oxygen concentration were developed on a pixel-by-pixel basis, enabling spatial patterns of oxygen to be resolved in the sediment bed. This method of measuring dissolved oxygen concentration is advantageous because of its fast response time and ability to measure heterogeneous oxygen distributions in sediments. Future work will explore the combined effects of stream flow and biofilm growth on oxygen distributions in streambed sediments.

  15. Live single-cell mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Masujima, Tsutomu

    2009-08-01

    The history from bio-imaging to live single-cell mass spectrometry (MS) is herein reviewed. The limitation of the current bio-imaging method is probing only known molecules, and a method for finding new molecules is needed for cells which, however, show individual behaviors even in the same incubation dish. Single-cell MALDI-TOF/MS has been developed, but it can detect only molecules that can be easily ionized, and not be exhaustive. Recently, the contents of a single cell have been sucked out by a nano-electro spray tip, and directly introduced into MS by nano-spray ionization. Thousands of molecular peaks have been successfully and exhaustively detected, and an extraction method for key molecules was also developed. This new method is now being widely applied to explore site- or state-specific molecules in various aspects of cell dynamisms.

  16. Current techniques for single-cell lysis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Robert B; Audet, Julie

    2008-10-06

    Owing to the small quantities of analytes and small volumes involved in single-cell analysis techniques, manipulation strategies must be chosen carefully. The lysis of single cells for downstream chemical analysis in capillaries and lab-on-a-chip devices can be achieved by optical, acoustic, mechanical, electrical or chemical means, each having their respective strengths and weaknesses. Selection of the most appropriate lysis method will depend on the particulars of the downstream cell lysate processing. Ultrafast lysis techniques such as the use of highly focused laser pulses or pulses of high voltage are suitable for applications requiring high temporal resolution. Other factors, such as whether the cells are adherent or in suspension and whether the proteins to be collected are desired to be native or denatured, will determine the suitability of detergent-based lysis methods. Therefore, careful selection of the proper lysis technique is essential for gathering accurate data from single cells.

  17. Single-cell sequencing in cancer research.

    PubMed

    Mato Prado, Mireia; Frampton, Adam E; Stebbing, Justin; Krell, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide single-cell sequencing investigations have the potential to classify individual cells within a tumor mass. In recent years, various single-cell DNA and RNA quantification techniques have facilitated significant advances in our ability to classify subpopulations of cells within a heterogeneous population. These approaches provide the possibility of unraveling the complex variability in genetic, epigenetic and transcriptional interactions that occur within identical cells in a tumor. This should enhance our knowledge of the underlying biological phenotypes and could have a huge impact in designing more precise anticancer treatments in order to improve outcomes and avoid tumor resistance. In addition, single-cell sequencing analysis has the potential to allow the development of better diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers, and thus aid the delivery of more personalized targeted cancer therapy. Nevertheless, further research is still required to overcome technical, biological and computational problems before clinical application.

  18. Sampling techniques for single-cell electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Cecala, Christine; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2012-07-07

    Cells are extraordinarily complex, containing thousands of different analytes with concentrations spanning at least nine orders of magnitude. Analyzing single cells instead of tissue homogenates provides unique insights into cell-to-cell heterogeneity and aids in distinguishing normal cells from pathological ones. The high sensitivity and low sample consumption of capillary and on-chip electrophoresis, when integrated with fluorescence, electrochemical, and mass spectrometric detection methods, offer an ideal toolset for examining single cells and even subcellular organelles; however, the isolation and loading of such small samples into these devices is challenging. Recent advances have addressed this issue by interfacing a variety of enhanced mechanical, microfluidic, and optical sampling techniques to capillary and on-chip electrophoresis instruments for single-cell analyses.

  19. Origin of Individuality of Two Daughter Cells during the Division Process Examined by the Simultaneous Measurement of Growth and Swimming Property Using an On-Chip Single-Cell Cultivation System

    PubMed Central

    Umehara, Senkei; Inoue, Ippei; Wakamoto, Yuichi; Yasuda, Kenji

    2007-01-01

    We examined the origin of individuality of two daughter cells born from an isolated single Escherichia coli mother cell during its cell division process by monitoring the change in its swimming behavior and tumbling frequency using an on-chip single-cell cultivation system. By keeping the isolated condition of an observed single cell, we compared its growth and swimming property within a generation and over up to seven generations. It revealed that running speed decreased as cell length smoothly increased within each generation, whereas tumbling frequency fluctuated among generations. Also found was an extraordinary tumbling mode characterized by the prolonged duration of pausing in predivisional cells after cell constriction. The observed prolonged pausing may imply the coexistence of two distinct control systems in a predivisional cell, indicating that individuality of daughter cells emerges after a mother cell initiates constriction and before it gets physically separated into two new cell bodies. PMID:17496044

  20. Using near-infrared spectroscopy to measure cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen under multiple levels of arterial oxygenation in piglets.

    PubMed

    Tichauer, Kenneth M; Elliott, Jonathan T; Hadway, Jennifer A; Lee, David S; Lee, Ting-Yim; St Lawrence, Keith

    2010-09-01

    Improving neurological care of neonates has been impeded by the absence of suitable techniques for measuring cerebral hemodynamics and energy metabolism at the bedside. Currently, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) appears to be the technology best suited to fill this gap, and techniques have been proposed to measure both cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2). We have developed a fast and reliable bolus-tracking method of determining CMRO2 that combines measurements of CBF and cerebral venous oxygenation [venous oxygen saturation (CSvO2)]. However, this method has never been validated at different levels of arterial oxygenation [arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2)], which can be highly variable in the clinical setting. In this study, NIRS measurements of CBF, CSvO2, and CMRO2 were obtained over a range of SaO2 in newborn piglets (n=12); CSvO2 values measured directly from sagittal sinus blood samples were collected for validation. Two alternative NIRS methods that measure CSvO2 by manipulating venous oxygenation (i.e., head tilt and partial venous occlusion methods) were also employed for comparison. Statistically significant correlations were found between each NIRS technique and sagittal sinus blood oxygenation (P<0.05). Correlation slopes were 1.03 (r=0.91), 0.73 (r=0.73), and 0.73 (r=0.81) for the bolus-tracking, head tilt, and partial venous occlusion methods, respectively. The bolus-tracking technique displayed the best correlation under hyperoxic (SaO2=99.9±0.03%) and normoxic (SaO2=86.9±6.6%) conditions and was comparable to the other techniques under hypoxic conditions (SaO2=40.7±9.9%). The reduced precision of the bolus-tracking method under hypoxia was attributed to errors in CSvO2 measurement that were magnified at low SaO2 levels. In conclusion, the bolus-tracking technique of measuring CSvO2, and therefore CMRO2, is accurate and robust for an SaO2>50% but provides reduced accuracy under more severe hypoxic levels.

  1. Measurement of oxygen consumption during muscle flaccidity exercise by near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, K.; Fukawa, Y.

    2013-03-01

    Quantitative measurement oxygen consumption in the muscles is important to evaluate the effect of the exercise. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a noninvasive method for measuring muscle oxygenation. However, measurement results are affected by blood volume change due to changes in the blood pressure. In order to evaluate changes in blood volume and to improve measurement accuracy, we proposed a calculation method of three-wavelength measurement with considering the scattering factor and the measurement with monitoring blood flow for measuring the temporal change of the oxygen concentration more precisely. We applied three-wavelength light source (680nm, 808nm and 830nm) for the continued wave measurement. Two detectors (targeted detector and the reference detector) were placed near the target muscle and apart from it. We measured the blood flow by controlling the intravascular pressure and the oxygen consumption with the handgrip exercise in the forearm. The measured results show that the scattering factor contains the artifact at the surface and the blood flow in the artery and the vein in the same phase. The artifact and the blood flow in the same phase are reduced from the oxygenated and the deoxygenated hemoglobin densities. Thus our proposed method is effective for reducing the influence of the artifact and the blood flow in the same phase from the oxygen consumption measurement. Further, it is shown that the oxygen consumption is measured more accurately by subtracting the blood flow measured by the reference detector.

  2. Technical considerations in continuous jugular venous oxygen saturation measurement.

    PubMed

    Dearden, N M; Midgley, S

    1993-01-01

    Fibreoptic reflection oximetry allows continuous in-vivo estimation of jugular venous oxygen saturation. In combination with pulse oximetry the oxygen extraction ratio SaO2-SjO2/SaO2 can be derived enabling identification of states of global luxury perfusion, normal coupling of global cerebral blood flow with global cerebral metabolism, global cerebral hypoperfusion and global cerebral ischemia. Several technical difficulties may arise affecting the accuracy of SjO2 recordings which must be recognised by the clinician before medical intervention is contemplated.

  3. Thermomicrocapillaries as temperature biosensors in single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herth, Simone; Giesguth, Miriam; Wedel, Waldemar; Reiss, Günther; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2013-03-01

    Temperature is an important physical parameter in biology and its deviation from optimum can cause damage in biosystems. Thermocouples based on the Seebeck effect can be structured on glass microcapillaries to obtain thermomicrocapillaries (TMCs) usable in a micromanipulation setup. The suitability of the setup was proven by monitoring the temperature increase upon illumination of leaves and single cells following insertion of the TMC. The increase was 1.5 K in green tissue and 0.75 K in white leaf sections due to lower absorption. In single cells of trichomes, the increase was 0.5 K due to heat dissipation to the surrounding air.

  4. Single Cell Genomics: Advances and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Macaulay, Iain C.; Voet, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Advances in whole-genome and whole-transcriptome amplification have permitted the sequencing of the minute amounts of DNA and RNA present in a single cell, offering a window into the extent and nature of genomic and transcriptomic heterogeneity which occurs in both normal development and disease. Single-cell approaches stand poised to revolutionise our capacity to understand the scale of genomic, epigenomic, and transcriptomic diversity that occurs during the lifetime of an individual organism. Here, we review the major technological and biological breakthroughs achieved, describe the remaining challenges to overcome, and provide a glimpse into the promise of recent and future developments. PMID:24497842

  5. New technology for single-cell protein

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-08-31

    New technology used by three companies for the production of single cell protein is described. Phillips petroleum is reported to be ready to license a new process that uses methanol or ethanol as feedstock yielding a product called Provesteen which contains 60% protein. Envirocon (Vancouver) uses pulp-mill sludge for protein production while Imperial Chemical Industries uses methanol. ICI targets its Pruteen, which contains 72% protein, as a substitute for fish meal and milk in animal feed, while Phillips is putting special stress as premium markets. Both Phillips and ICI are examining single cell protein as a human food source.

  6. Measurement of oxygen saturation in small retinal vessels with adaptive optics confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Lu, Jing; Shi, Guohua; Zhang, Yudong

    2011-11-01

    We have used an adaptive optics confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope to assess oxygen saturation in small retinal vessels. Images of the vessels with a diameter smaller than 50 μm are recorded at oxygen sensitive and isosbestic wavelengths (680 and 796 nm, respectively). The vessel optical densities (ODs) are determined by a computer algorithm. Then, OD ratios (ODRs), which are inversely proportional to oxygen saturation, are calculated. The results show that arterial ODRs are significantly smaller than venous ODRs, indicating that oxygen saturation in the artery is higher than that in the vein. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first noninvasive measurement of oxygen saturation in small retinal vessels.

  7. Measurement in a marine environment using low cost sensors of temperature and dissolved oxygen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godshall, F.A.; Cory, R.L.; Phinney, D.E.

    1974-01-01

    Continuous records of physical parameters of the marine environment are difficult as well as expensive to obtain. This paper describes preliminary results of an investigative program with the purpose of developing low cost time integrating measurement and averaging devices for water temperature and dissolved oxygen. Measurements were made in an estuarine area of the Chesapeake Bay over two week periods. With chemical thermometers average water temperature for the two week period was found to be equal to average water temperature measured with thermocouples plus or minus 1.0 C. The slow diffusion of oxygen through the semipermiable sides of plastic bottles permitted the use of water filled bottles to obtain averaged oxygen measurements. Oxygen measurements for two week averaging times using 500 ml polyethylene bottles were found to vary from conventionally measured and averaged dissolved oxygen by about 1.8 mg/l. ?? 1974 Estuarine Research Federation.

  8. Method for physiologic phenotype characterization at the single-cell level in non-interacting and interacting cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelbauskas, Laimonas; Ashili, Shashanka P.; Houkal, Jeff; Smith, Dean; Mohammadreza, Aida; Lee, Kristen B.; Forrester, Jessica; Kumar, Ashok; Anis, Yasser H.; Paulson, Thomas G.; Youngbull, Cody A.; Tian, Yanqing; Holl, Mark R.; Johnson, Roger H.; Meldrum, Deirdre R.

    2012-03-01

    Intercellular heterogeneity is a key factor in a variety of core cellular processes including proliferation, stimulus response, carcinogenesis, and drug resistance. However, cell-to-cell variability studies at the single-cell level have been hampered by the lack of enabling experimental techniques. We present a measurement platform that features the capability to quantify oxygen consumption rates of individual, non-interacting and interacting cells under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. It is based on real-time concentration measurements of metabolites of interest by means of extracellular optical sensors in cell-isolating microwells of subnanoliter volume. We present the results of a series of measurements of oxygen consumption rates (OCRs) of individual non-interacting and interacting human epithelial cells. We measured the effects of cell-to-cell interactions by using the system's capability to isolate two and three cells in a single well. The major advantages of the approach are: 1. ratiometric, intensity-based characterization of the metabolic phenotype at the single-cell level, 2. minimal invasiveness due to the distant positioning of sensors, and 3. ability to study the effects of cell-cell interactions on cellular respiration rates.

  9. Method for physiologic phenotype characterization at the single-cell level in non-interacting and interacting cells

    PubMed Central

    Ashili, Shashanka P.; Houkal, Jeff; Smith, Dean; Mohammadreza, Aida; Lee, Kristen B.; Forrester, Jessica; Kumar, Ashok; Anis, Yasser H.; Paulson, Thomas G.; Youngbull, Cody A.; Tian, Yanqing; Holl, Mark R.; Johnson, Roger H.; Meldrum, Deirdre R.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Intercellular heterogeneity is a key factor in a variety of core cellular processes including proliferation, stimulus response, carcinogenesis, and drug resistance. However, cell-to-cell variability studies at the single-cell level have been hampered by the lack of enabling experimental techniques. We present a measurement platform that features the capability to quantify oxygen consumption rates of individual, non-interacting and interacting cells under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. It is based on real-time concentration measurements of metabolites of interest by means of extracellular optical sensors in cell-isolating microwells of subnanoliter volume. We present the results of a series of measurements of oxygen consumption rates (OCRs) of individual non-interacting and interacting human epithelial cells. We measured the effects of cell-to-cell interactions by using the system’s capability to isolate two and three cells in a single well. The major advantages of the approach are: 1. ratiometric, intensity-based characterization of the metabolic phenotype at the single-cell level, 2. minimal invasiveness due to the distant positioning of sensors, and 3. ability to study the effects of cell-cell interactions on cellular respiration rates. PMID:22502580

  10. Techniques for Measuring Low Earth Orbital Atomic Oxygen Erosion of Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Demko, Rikako

    2002-01-01

    Polymers such as polyimide Kapton and Teflon FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene) are commonly used spacecraft materials due to their desirable properties such as flexibility, low density, and in the case of FEP, a low solar absorptance and high thermal emittance. Polymers on the exterior of spacecraft in the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment are exposed to energetic atomic oxygen. Atomic oxygen reaction with polymers causes erosion, which is a threat to spacecraft durability. It is therefore important to understand the atomic oxygen erosion yield (E, the volume loss per incident oxygen atom) of polymers being considered in spacecraft design. The most common technique for determining E is through mass loss measurements. For limited duration exposure experiments, such as shuttle experiments, where the atomic oxygen fluence is often so low that mass loss measurements can not produce acceptable uncertainties, recession measurements based on atomic force microscopy analyses can be used. Equally necessary to knowing the mass loss or recession depth for determining the erosion yield of polymers is the knowledge of the atomic oxygen fluence that the polymers were exposed to in space. This paper discusses the procedures and relevant issues for mass loss and recession depth measurements for passive atomic oxygen erosion yield characterization of polymers, along with techniques for active atomic oxygen fluence and erosion characterization. One active atomic oxygen erosion technique discussed is a new technique based on optical measurements. Details including the use of both semi-transparent and opaque polymers for active erosion measurement are reviewed.

  11. JSC systems using solid ceramic oxygen electrolyte cells to measure oxygen fugacites in gas-mixing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. J.; Mullins, O.

    1981-01-01

    Details are given for the construction and operation of a 101.3 KN/sq meter (1 atmosphere) redox control system. A solid ceramic oxygen electrolyte cell is used to monitor the oxygen fugacity in the furnace. The system consists of a vertical quench gas mixing furnace with heads designed for mounting the electrolyte cell and with facilities for inserting and removing the samples, a simplified version of a gas mixing apparatus, and devices for experiments under controlled rates of change of temperature. A thermogravimetric analysis system employing these techniques of redox control and measurement is also described. The calibration and maintenance of the system are discussed.

  12. A system using solid ceramic oxygen electrolyte cells to measure oxygen fugacities in gas-mixing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. J.; Mullins, O.

    1976-01-01

    Details are given for the construction and operation of a 101.3 kN/sq m (1 atmosphere) redox control system. A solid ceramic oxygen electrolyte cell is used to monitor the oxygen fugacity in the furnace. The system consists of a vertical quench, gas mixing furnace with heads designed for mounting the electrolyte cell and with facilities for inserting and removing the samples. The system also contains the high input impedance electronics necessary for measurements, a simplified version of a gas mixing apparatus, and devices for experiments under controlled rates of change relative to temperature and redox state. The calibration and maintenance of the system are discussed.

  13. Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy of single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, De

    Raman scattering is an inelastic collision between the vibrating molecules inside the sample and the incident photons. During this process, energy exchange takes place between the photon and the scattering molecule. By measuring the energy change of the photon, the molecular vibration mode can be probed. The vibrational spectrum contains valuable information about the disposition of atomic nuclei and chemical bonds within a molecule, the chemical compositions and the interactions between the molecule and its surroundings. In this dissertation, laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) technique is applied for the analysis of biological cells and human cells at single cell level. In LTRS, an individual cell is trapped in aqueous medium with laser tweezers, and Raman scattering spectra from the trapped cell are recorded in real-time. The Raman spectra of these cells can be used to reveal the dynamical processes of cell growth, cell response to environment changes, and can be used as the finger print for the identification of a bacterial cell species. Several biophysical experiments were carried out using LTRS: (1) the dynamic germination process of individual spores of Bacillus thuringiensis was detected via Ca-DPA, a spore-specific biomarker molecule; (2) inactivation and killing of Bacillus subtilis spores by microwave irradiation and wet heat were studied at single cell level; (3) the heat shock activation process of single B. subtilis spores were analyzed, in which the reversible transition from glass-like state at low temperature to liquid-like state at high temperature in spore was revealed at the molecular level; (4) the kinetic processes of bacterial cell lysis of E. coli by lysozyme and by temperature induction of lambda phage were detected real-time; (5) the fixation and rehydration of human platelets were quantitatively evaluated and characterized with Raman spectroscopy method, which provided a rapid way to quantify the quality of freeze-dried therapeutic

  14. TOPAZ-2 single-cell TFE electric insulation properties study

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilchenko, A.V.; Izhvanov, O.L.

    1996-03-01

    TOPAZ-II single cell thermoinic fuel element (TFE) electric insulation parameters under testing with electric heating were measured. TFE electric design schematic, experimental procedure and measurements results are described. Collector resistance was measured in helium at 420{endash}890 K. Metal ceramic ceals insulation properties were measured in vacuum P=10{sup {minus}4} Pa and in cesium vapor P=10{sup {minus}1}{minus}260 Pa, at 420{endash}730 K. Results of separate TFE are compared with the data; that were measured during nuclear power system (NPS) Ya-21U test. Based upon this data NPS power losses were estimated. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. A Simple Experiment To Measure the Content of Oxygen in the Air Using Heated Steel Wool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vera, Francisco; Rivera, Rodrigo; Nunez, Cesar

    2011-01-01

    The typical experiment to measure the oxygen content in the atmosphere uses the rusting of steel wool inside a closed volume of air. Two key aspects of this experiment that make possible a successful measurement of the content of oxygen in the air are the use of a closed atmosphere and the use of a chemical reaction that involves the oxidation of…

  16. X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Turbulent Methane-Oxygen Shear Coaxial Flames (Briefing Charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) March 2015-May 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Turbulent Methane -Oxygen Shear...1 DISTRIBUTION A: Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. Clearance # X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Turbulent Methane -Oxygen Shear

  17. A Simple Experiment To Measure the Content of Oxygen in the Air Using Heated Steel Wool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vera, Francisco; Rivera, Rodrigo; Nunez, Cesar

    2011-01-01

    The typical experiment to measure the oxygen content in the atmosphere uses the rusting of steel wool inside a closed volume of air. Two key aspects of this experiment that make possible a successful measurement of the content of oxygen in the air are the use of a closed atmosphere and the use of a chemical reaction that involves the oxidation of…

  18. Microwave-induced thermogenetic activation of single cells

    SciTech Connect

    Safronov, N. A.; Fedotov, I. V.; Ermakova, Yu. G.; Matlashov, M. E.; Belousov, V. V.; Sidorov-Biryukov, D. A.; Fedotov, A. B.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2015-04-20

    Exposure to a microwave field is shown to enable thermogenetic activation of individual cells in a culture of cell expressing thermosensitive ion channels. Integration of a microwave transmission line with an optical fiber and a diamond quantum thermometer has been shown to allow thermogenetic single-cell activation to be combined with accurate local online temperature measurements based on an optical detection of electron spin resonance in nitrogen–vacancy centers in diamond.

  19. [Single-cell sequencing and tumour heterogeneity].

    PubMed

    Jordan, Bertrand

    2014-12-01

    The heterogeneity of tumours is now beginning to be documented precisely by single-cell new-generation sequencing. Recently published results on breast tumours show that each of the cells analysed displays a unique pattern of point mutations. This extensive genetic diversity is present before any treatment, and is likely to cause resistance to initially successful targeted therapies.

  20. Defining cell types and states with single-cell genomics

    PubMed Central

    Trapnell, Cole

    2015-01-01

    A revolution in cellular measurement technology is under way: For the first time, we have the ability to monitor global gene regulation in thousands of individual cells in a single experiment. Such experiments will allow us to discover new cell types and states and trace their developmental origins. They overcome fundamental limitations inherent in measurements of bulk cell population that have frustrated efforts to resolve cellular states. Single-cell genomics and proteomics enable not only precise characterization of cell state, but also provide a stunningly high-resolution view of transitions between states. These measurements may finally make explicit the metaphor that C.H. Waddington posed nearly 60 years ago to explain cellular plasticity: Cells are residents of a vast “landscape” of possible states, over which they travel during development and in disease. Single-cell technology helps not only locate cells on this landscape, but illuminates the molecular mechanisms that shape the landscape itself. However, single-cell genomics is a field in its infancy, with many experimental and computational advances needed to fully realize its full potential. PMID:26430159

  1. Resolution of Conflicting Signals at the Single-Cell Level in the Regulation of Cyanobacterial Photosynthesis and Nitrogen Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Wiebke; Vagner, Tomas; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.; Ackermann, Martin; LaRoche, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Unicellular, diazotrophic cyanobacteria temporally separate dinitrogen (N2) fixation and photosynthesis to prevent inactivation of the nitrogenase by oxygen. This temporal segregation is regulated by a circadian clock with oscillating activities of N2 fixation in the dark and photosynthesis in the light. On the population level, this separation is not always complete, since the two processes can overlap during transitions from dark to light. How do single cells avoid inactivation of nitrogenase during these periods? One possibility is that phenotypic heterogeneity in populations leads to segregation of the two processes. Here, we measured N2 fixation and photosynthesis of individual cells using nanometer-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (nanoSIMS) to assess both processes in a culture of the unicellular, diazotrophic cyanobacterium Crocosphaera watsonii during a dark-light and a continuous light phase. We compared single-cell rates with bulk rates and gene expression profiles. During the regular dark and light phases, C. watsonii exhibited the temporal segregation of N2 fixation and photosynthesis commonly observed. However, N2 fixation and photosynthesis were concurrently measurable at the population level during the subjective dark phase in which cells were kept in the light rather than returned to the expected dark phase. At the single-cell level, though, cells discriminated against either one of the two processes. Cells that showed high levels of photosynthesis had low nitrogen fixing activities, and vice versa. These results suggest that, under ambiguous environmental signals, single cells discriminate against either photosynthesis or nitrogen fixation, and thereby might reduce costs associated with running incompatible processes in the same cell. PMID:23805199

  2. Vacuum Ultraviolet Absorption Measurements of Atomic Oxygen in a Shock Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Scott Andrew

    1995-01-01

    The absorption of vacuum ultraviolet light by atomic oxygen has been measured in the Electric Arc-driven Shock Tube (EAST) Facility at NASA-Ames Research Center. This investigation demonstrates the instrumentation required to determine atomic oxygen concentrations from absorption measurements in impulse facilities. A shock wave dissociates molecular oxygen, producing a high temperature sample of atomic oxygen in the shock tube. A probe beam is generated with a Raman-shifted ArF excimer laser. By suitable tuning of the laser, absorption is measured over a range of wavelengths in the region of the atomic line at 130.49 nm. The line shape function is determined from measurements at atomic oxygen densities of 3x10(exp 17) and 9x10(exp 17) cm(exp -3). The broadening coefficient for resonance interactions is deduced from this data, and this value is in accord with available theoretical models.

  3. Vacuum Ultraviolet Absorption Measurements of Atomic Oxygen in a Shock Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Scott Andrew

    1995-01-01

    The absorption of vacuum ultraviolet light by atomic oxygen has been measured in the Electric Arc-driven Shock Tube (EAST) Facility at NASA-Ames Research Center. This investigation demonstrates the instrumentation required to determine atomic oxygen concentrations from absorption measurements in impulse facilities. A shock wave dissociates molecular oxygen, producing a high temperature sample of atomic oxygen in the shock tube. A probe beam is generated with a Raman-shifted ArF excimer laser. By suitable tuning of the laser, absorption is measured over a range of wavelengths in the region of the atomic line at 130.49 nm. The line shape function is determined from measurements at atomic oxygen densities of 3 x 10(exp 17) and 9 x 10(exp 17) cm(exp -3). The broadening coefficient for resonance interactions is deduced from this data, and this value is in accord with available theoretical models.

  4. Vacuum Ultraviolet Absorption Measurements of Atomic Oxygen in a Shock Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Scott Andrew

    1995-01-01

    The absorption of vacuum ultraviolet light by atomic oxygen has been measured in the Electric Arc-driven Shock Tube (EAST) Facility at NASA-Ames Research Center. This investigation demonstrates the instrumentation required to determine atomic oxygen concentrations from absorption measurements in impulse facilities. A shock wave dissociates molecular oxygen, producing a high temperature sample of atomic oxygen in the shock tube. A probe beam is generated with a Raman-shifted ArF excimer laser. By suitable tuning of the laser, absorption is measured over a range of wavelengths in the region of the atomic line at 130.49 nm. The line shape function is determined from measurements at atomic oxygen densities of 3 x 10(exp 17) and 9 x 10(exp 17)/cu cm. The broadening coefficient for resonance interactions is deduced from this data, and this value is in accord with available theoretical models.

  5. Vacuum Ultraviolet Absorption Measurements of Atomic Oxygen in a Shock Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Scott Andrew

    1995-01-01

    The absorption of vacuum ultraviolet light by atomic oxygen has been measured in the Electric Arc-driven Shock Tube (EAST) Facility at NASA-Ames Research Center. This investigation demonstrates the instrumentation required to determine atomic oxygen concentrations from absorption measurements in impulse facilities. A shock wave dissociates molecular oxygen, producing a high temperature sample of atomic oxygen in the shock tube. A probe beam is generated with a Raman-shifted ArF excimer laser. By suitable tuning of the laser, absorption is measured over a range of wavelengths in the region of the atomic line at 130.49 nm. The line shape function is determined from measurements at atomic oxygen densities of 3 x 10(exp 17) and 9 x 10(exp 17)/cu cm. The broadening coefficient for resonance interactions is deduced from this data, and this value is in accord with available theoretical models.

  6. Measured and calculated variables of global oxygenation in healthy neonatal foals.

    PubMed

    Wong, David M; Hepworth-Warren, Kate L; Sponseller, Beatrice T; Howard, Joan M; Wang, Chong

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess multiple central venous and arterial blood variables that alone or in conjunction with one another reflect global oxygenation status in healthy neonatal foals. ANIMALS 11 healthy neonatal foals. PROCEDURES Central venous and arterial blood samples were collected from healthy neonatal foals at 12, 24, 36, 48, 72, and 96 hours after birth. Variables measured from central venous and arterial blood samples included oxygen saturation of hemoglobin, partial pressure of oxygen, lactate concentration, partial pressure of carbon dioxide, and pH. Calculated variables included venous-to-arterial carbon dioxide gap, estimated oxygen extraction ratio, ratio of partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood to the fraction of inspired oxygen, bicarbonate concentration, base excess, and blood oxygen content. RESULTS Significant differences between arterial and central venous blood obtained from neonatal foals were detected for several variables, particularly partial pressure of oxygen, oxygen saturation of hemoglobin, and oxygen content. In addition, the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in central venous blood samples was significantly higher than the value for corresponding arterial blood samples. Several temporal differences were detected for other variables. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results of this study provided information about several variables that reflect global oxygenation in healthy neonatal foals. Values for these variables in healthy foals can allow for comparison with values for critically ill foals in future studies. Comparison of these variables between healthy and ill foals may aid in treatment decisions and prognosis of clinical outcome for critically ill foals.

  7. Single-cell analysis in biotechnology, systems biology, and biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Fritzsch, Frederik S O; Dusny, Christian; Frick, Oliver; Schmid, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Single-cell analysis (SCA) has been increasingly recognized as the key technology for the elucidation of cellular functions, which are not accessible from bulk measurements on the population level. Thus far, SCA has been achieved by miniaturization of established engineering concepts to match the dimensions of a single cell. However, SCA requires procedures beyond the classical approach of upstream processing, fermentation, and downstream processing because the biological system itself defines the technical demands. This review characterizes currently available microfluidics and microreactors for invasive (i.e., chemical) and noninvasive (i.e., biological) SCA. We describe the recent SCA omics approaches as tools for systems biology and discuss the role of SCA in genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and fluxomics. Furthermore, we discuss applications of SCA for biocatalysis and metabolic engineering as well as its potential for bioprocess optimization. Finally, we define present and future challenges for SCA and propose strategies to overcome current limitations.

  8. Exploring Metabolic Configurations of Single Cells within Complex Tissue Microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Miller, Anne; Nagy, Csörsz; Knapp, Bernhard; Laengle, Johannes; Ponweiser, Elisabeth; Groeger, Marion; Starkl, Philipp; Bergmann, Michael; Wagner, Oswald; Haschemi, Arvand

    2017-09-05

    Over the past years, plenty of evidence has emerged illustrating how metabolism supports many aspects of cellular function and how metabolic reprogramming can drive cell differentiation and fate. Here, we present a method to assess the metabolic configuration of single cells within their native tissue microenvironment via the visualization and quantification of multiple enzymatic activities measured at saturating substrate conditions combined with subsequent cell type identification. After careful validation of the approach and to demonstrate its potential, we assessed the intracellular metabolic configuration of different human immune cell populations in healthy and tumor colon tissue. Additionally, we analyzed the intercellular metabolic relationship between cancer cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts in a breast cancer tissue array. This study demonstrates that the determination of metabolic configurations in single cells could be a powerful complementary tool for every researcher interested to study metabolic networks in situ. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Studying bacterial quorum-sensing at the single cell level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delfino Perez, Pablo; Pelakh, Leslie; Young, Jonathan; Johnson, Elaine; Hagen, Stephen

    2010-03-01

    Like many bacterial species, Vibrio fischeri can detect its own population density through a quorum sensing (QS) mechanism. The bacterium releases a signal molecule (AI, autoinducer), which accumulates at high population density and triggers a genetic switch. In V.fischeri this leads to bioluminescence. Little is known about how stochastic gene expression affects QS at the level of single cells. We are imaging the luminescence of individual V.fischeri cells in a flow chamber and directly measuring the intercell variability in AI activation of the QS circuit. Our single-cell luminescence experiments allow us to track cells over time and characterize variations in their response to AI levels. We find heterogeneous response to the external signal: at a given AI concentration some cells may be strongly luminescent while others are virtually dark. The analysis of noise in the individual cell response can eventually lead to a better understanding of how cells use QS to gather information about their environment.

  10. Massive and parallel expression profiling using microarrayed single-cell sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Vickovic, Sanja; Ståhl, Patrik L.; Salmén, Fredrik; Giatrellis, Sarantis; Westholm, Jakub Orzechowski; Mollbrink, Annelie; Navarro, José Fernández; Custodio, Joaquin; Bienko, Magda; Sutton, Lesley-Ann; Rosenquist, Richard; Frisén, Jonas; Lundeberg, Joakim

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell transcriptome analysis overcomes problems inherently associated with averaging gene expression measurements in bulk analysis. However, single-cell analysis is currently challenging in terms of cost, throughput and robustness. Here, we present a method enabling massive microarray-based barcoding of expression patterns in single cells, termed MASC-seq. This technology enables both imaging and high-throughput single-cell analysis, characterizing thousands of single-cell transcriptomes per day at a low cost (0.13 USD/cell), which is two orders of magnitude less than commercially available systems. Our novel approach provides data in a rapid and simple way. Therefore, MASC-seq has the potential to accelerate the study of subtle clonal dynamics and help provide critical insights into disease development and other biological processes. PMID:27739429

  11. Massive and parallel expression profiling using microarrayed single-cell sequencing.

    PubMed

    Vickovic, Sanja; Ståhl, Patrik L; Salmén, Fredrik; Giatrellis, Sarantis; Westholm, Jakub Orzechowski; Mollbrink, Annelie; Navarro, José Fernández; Custodio, Joaquin; Bienko, Magda; Sutton, Lesley-Ann; Rosenquist, Richard; Frisén, Jonas; Lundeberg, Joakim

    2016-10-14

    Single-cell transcriptome analysis overcomes problems inherently associated with averaging gene expression measurements in bulk analysis. However, single-cell analysis is currently challenging in terms of cost, throughput and robustness. Here, we present a method enabling massive microarray-based barcoding of expression patterns in single cells, termed MASC-seq. This technology enables both imaging and high-throughput single-cell analysis, characterizing thousands of single-cell transcriptomes per day at a low cost (0.13 USD/cell), which is two orders of magnitude less than commercially available systems. Our novel approach provides data in a rapid and simple way. Therefore, MASC-seq has the potential to accelerate the study of subtle clonal dynamics and help provide critical insights into disease development and other biological processes.

  12. Oxygen Pickup Ions Measured by MAVEN Outside the Martian Bow Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmati, A.; Cravens, T.; Larson, D. E.; Lillis, R. J.; Dunn, P.; Halekas, J. S.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Eparvier, F. G.; Thiemann, E.; Mitchell, D. L.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    The MAVEN (Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN) spacecraft entered orbit around Mars on September 21, 2014 and has since been detecting energetic oxygen pickup ions by its SEP (Solar Energetic Particles) and SWIA (Solar Wind Ion Analyzer) instruments. The oxygen pickup ions detected outside the Martian bowshock and in the upstream solar wind are associated with the extended hot oxygen exosphere of Mars, which is created mainly by the dissociative recombination of molecular oxygen ions with electrons in the ionosphere. We use analytic solutions to the equations of motion of pickup ions moving in the undisturbed upstream solar wind magnetic and motional electric fields and calculate the flux of oxygen pickup ions at the location of MAVEN. Our model calculates the ionization rate of oxygen atoms in the exosphere based on the hot oxygen densities predicted by Rahmati et al. (2014), and the sources of ionization include photo-ionization, charge exchange, and electron impact ionization. The photo-ionization frequency is calculated using the FISM (Flare Irradiance Spectral Model) solar flux model, based on MAVEN EUVM (Extreme Ultra-Violet Monitor) measurements. The frequency of charge exchange between a solar wind proton and an oxygen atom is calculated using MAVEN SWIA solar wind proton flux measurements, and the electron impact ionization frequency is calculated based on MAVEN SWEA (Solar Wind Electron Analyzer) solar wind electron flux measurements. The solar wind magnetic field used in the model is from the measurements taken by MAVEN MAG (magnetometer) in the upstream solar wind. The good agreement between our predicted pickup oxygen fluxes and the MAVEN SEP and SWIA measured ones confirms detection of oxygen pickup ions and these model-data comparisons can be used to constrain models of hot oxygen densities and photochemical escape flux.

  13. Precision of cerebral oxygenation and hemoglobin concentration measurements in neonates measured by near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arri, Sandra Jasminder; Muehlemann, Thomas; Biallas, Martin; Bucher, Hans Ulrich; Wolf, Martin

    2011-04-01

    Background and aim: One source of error with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is the assumption that the measured tissue is optically homogeneous. This is not always the case. Our aim is to assess the impact of tissue homogeneity (TH) on the precision of NIRS measurements in neonates. Methods: On 36 term and 27 preterm neonates at least five 1-min measurements are performed on each subject using the OxiplexTS. The sensor position is slightly changed before each measurement while assessing TH. The precision for cerebral tissue oxygenation saturation (StO2) and total hemoglobin concentration (tHb) are calculated by repeated measures analysis of variance. Results: The mean StO2 is not significantly different between term and preterm infants. The mean tHb is significantly lower in preterm infants (p < 0.01). With increasing TH, the precision of StO2 increase from 5.6 to 4.6% for preterm and from 11.0 to 2.0% for term infants; the precision of tHb increases from 10.1 to 7.5μM for preterm and from 16.4 to 3.5μM for term infants. The precision for StO2 is higher in term than in preterm infants. The precision for tHb shows no significant difference between the two groups. Conclusions: The precision of NIRS measurements correlates with tissue homogeneity.

  14. Accurate NIRS measurement of muscle oxygenation by correcting the influence of a subcutaneous fat layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Katsuyuki; Niwayama, Masatsugu; Lin, Ling; Shiga, Toshikazu; Kudo, Nobuki; Takahashi, Makoto

    1998-01-01

    Although the inhomogeneity of tissue structure affects the sensitivity of tissue oxygenation measurement by reflectance near-infrared spectroscopy, few analyses of this effect have been reported. In this study, the influence of a subcutaneous fat layer on muscle oxygenation measurement was investigated by Monte Carlo simulation and experimental studies. In the experiments, measurement sensitivity was examined by measuring the falling rate of oxygenation in occlusion tests on the forearm using a tissue oxygen monitor. The fat layer thickness was measured by ultrasonography. Results of the simulation and occlusion tests clearly showed that the presence of a fat layer greatly decreases the measurement sensitivity and increases the light intensity at the detector. The correction factors of sensitivity were obtained from this relationship and were successfully validated by experiments on 12 subjects whose fat layer thickness ranged from 3.5 to 8 mm.

  15. Accurate NIRS measurement of muscle oxygenation by correcting the influence of a subcutaneous fat layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Katsuyuki; Niwayama, Masatsugu; Lin, Ling; Shiga, Toshikazu; Kudo, Nobuki; Takahashi, Makoto

    1997-12-01

    Although the inhomogeneity of tissue structure affects the sensitivity of tissue oxygenation measurement by reflectance near-infrared spectroscopy, few analyses of this effect have been reported. In this study, the influence of a subcutaneous fat layer on muscle oxygenation measurement was investigated by Monte Carlo simulation and experimental studies. In the experiments, measurement sensitivity was examined by measuring the falling rate of oxygenation in occlusion tests on the forearm using a tissue oxygen monitor. The fat layer thickness was measured by ultrasonography. Results of the simulation and occlusion tests clearly showed that the presence of a fat layer greatly decreases the measurement sensitivity and increases the light intensity at the detector. The correction factors of sensitivity were obtained from this relationship and were successfully validated by experiments on 12 subjects whose fat layer thickness ranged from 3.5 to 8 mm.

  16. Atomic oxygen-metal surface studies as applied to mass spectrometer measurements of upper planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sjolander, G. W.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of atomic oxygen loss in mass spectrometer ion sources can be reduced to an understanding of the possible surface interactions between oxygen atoms and the metal surface of the ion source. Results are presented for an experimental study in which an atomic oxygen beam apparatus and a mass spectrometer were used to measure the oxygen atom reflection, recombination, general surface reaction, and occlusion probabilities on six different engineering surfaces as a function of atomic oxygen exposure. The materials studied are gold, Nichrome V, aluminum, titanium, silver, and platinum. The variation in measured reflection probability seems to occur with metals that form oxides, Nichrome V being stable in terms of reflection stability. Recombination is observed an all surfaces except aluminum and platinum. Variation in the complete set of measurements in a single experiment is the result of varying surface conditions.

  17. Atomic oxygen-metal surface studies as applied to mass spectrometer measurements of upper planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sjolander, G. W.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of atomic oxygen loss in mass spectrometer ion sources can be reduced to an understanding of the possible surface interactions between oxygen atoms and the metal surface of the ion source. Results are presented for an experimental study in which an atomic oxygen beam apparatus and a mass spectrometer were used to measure the oxygen atom reflection, recombination, general surface reaction, and occlusion probabilities on six different engineering surfaces as a function of atomic oxygen exposure. The materials studied are gold, Nichrome V, aluminum, titanium, silver, and platinum. The variation in measured reflection probability seems to occur with metals that form oxides, Nichrome V being stable in terms of reflection stability. Recombination is observed an all surfaces except aluminum and platinum. Variation in the complete set of measurements in a single experiment is the result of varying surface conditions.

  18. Membrane Transport of Singlet Oxygen Monitored by Dipole Potential Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Sokolov, Valerij S.; Pohl, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The efficiency of photodynamic reactions depends on 1), the penetration depth of the photosensitizer into the membrane and 2), the sidedness of the target. Molecules which are susceptible to singlet oxygen (1O2) experience less damage when separated from the photosensitizer by the membrane. Since 1O2 lifetime in the membrane environment is orders of magnitude longer than the time required for nonexcited oxygen (O2) to cross the membrane, this observation suggests that differences between the permeabilities or membrane partition of 1O2 and O2 exist. We investigated this hypothesis by releasing 1O2 at one side of a planar membrane while monitoring the kinetics of target damage at the opposite side of the same membrane. Damage to the target, represented by dipole-modifying molecules (phloretin or phlorizin), was indicated by changes in the interleaflet dipole potential difference Δϕb. A simple analytical model allowed estimation of the 1O2 interleaflet concentration difference from the rate at which Δϕb changed. It confirmed that the lower limit of 1O2 permeability is ∼2 cm/s; i.e., it roughly matches O2 permeability as predicted by Overton's rule. Consequently, the membrane cannot act as a barrier to 1O2 diffusion. Differences in the reaction rates at the cytoplasmic and extracellular membrane leaflets may be attributed only to 1O2 quenchers inside the membrane. PMID:18931253

  19. Measuring vertical oxygen profiles in the hyporheic zone using planar optodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieweg, M.; Fleckenstein, J. H.; Schmidt, C.

    2012-04-01

    On of the key parameters, controlling biogeochemical reactions in the hyporheic zone (HZ) is the distribution of oxygen. A reliable measurement of the vertical oxygen distribution is an important tool to understand the dynamic fluctuations of the aerobic zone within the HZ. With repeated measurements of continuous profiles, mixing of surface water and groundwater as well as the consumption of oxygen can be evaluated. We present a novel approach for the in situ measurements of vertical oxygen distribution in the riverbed using a planar optode. The luminescence based optode measurement enables a non invasive measurement without consumption of oxygen, no creation of preferential flow paths and only minimal disturbance of the flow field. Possible atmospheric contamination by pumping pore water into a vessel can be avoided and the readings are independent of flow velocity. A self manufactured planar optode is wrapped around an acrylic tube and installed in the riverbed. The measurement is performed by vertically moving a profiler-piston inside the acrylic tube. The piston holds a robust polymer optical fibre which emits a modulated light signal through the acrylic glass to the optode-foil and transmits the induced luminescence signal back to a commercially available trace oxygen meter. Temperature compensation is accomplished using a depth-oriented temperature probe nearby and processing the raw data within a Matlab script. Robust and unbiased oxygen profiles are obtained by averaging multiple consecutive measurements. To ensure a constant velocity of the profiler for replicating the exact measuring depths, an electric motor device is used. First results at our test site show a variable oxygen profile down to 40 cm depth which is strongly influenced by stream level and upwelling groundwater conditions. The measured oxygen profiles will serve as input parameter for a 3D solute transport and chemical reaction subsurface model of the HZ.

  20. An Inexpensive Electrode and Cell for Measurement of Oxygen Uptake in Chemical and Biochemical Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunet, Juan E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The continuous measurement of oxygen consumption in an enzymatic reaction is a frequent experimental fact and extremely important in the enzymatic activity of oxygenase. An electrochemical system, based on a polarographic method, has been developed to monitor the oxygen uptake. The system developed and electrode used are described. (JN)

  1. System for measuring oxygen consumption rates of mammalian cells in static culture under hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Yuki; Miyahara, Hirotaka; Ota, Yuri; Tsuneda, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Estimating the oxygen consumption rates (OCRs) of mammalian cells in hypoxic environments is essential for designing and developing a three-dimensional (3-D) cell culture system. However, OCR measurements under hypoxic conditions are infrequently reported in the literature. Here, we developed a system for measuring OCRs at low oxygen levels. The system injects nitrogen gas into the environment and measures the oxygen concentration by an optical oxygen microsensor that consumes no oxygen. The developed system was applied to HepG2 cells in static culture. Specifically, we measured the spatial profiles of the local dissolved oxygen concentration in the medium, then estimated the OCRs of the cells. The OCRs, and also the pericellular oxygen concentrations, decreased nonlinearly as the oxygen partial pressure in the environment decreased from 19% to 1%. The OCRs also depended on the culture period and the matrix used for coating the dish surface. Using this system, we can precisely estimate the OCRs of various cell types under environments that mimic 3-D culture conditions, contributing crucial data for an efficient 3-D culture system design.

  2. Soil Aeration and Tree Health: Correlating Soil Oxygen Measurements with the Decline of Established Oaks

    Treesearch

    L. R. Costello; J. D. MacDonald; K. A. Jacobs

    1991-01-01

    Field measurements of oxygen concentration and oxygen diffusion rate (ODR) indicate that ODR is a more reliable indicator of problem sites. In a landscaped area where oak trees are declining, ODR in the upper part of the soil profile ranged between 0.1-0.2 µg O2cm2/minute (where µg = micrograms, and O...

  3. Quantification of Circadian Rhythms in Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Westermark, Pål O.; Welsh, David K.; Okamura, Hitoshi; Herzel, Hanspeter

    2009-01-01

    Bioluminescence techniques allow accurate monitoring of the circadian clock in single cells. We have analyzed bioluminescence data of Per gene expression in mouse SCN neurons and fibroblasts. From these data, we extracted parameters such as damping rate and noise intensity using two simple mathematical models, one describing a damped oscillator driven by noise, and one describing a self-sustained noisy oscillator. Both models describe the data well and enabled us to quantitatively characterize both wild-type cells and several mutants. It has been suggested that the circadian clock is self-sustained at the single cell level, but we conclude that present data are not sufficient to determine whether the circadian clock of single SCN neurons and fibroblasts is a damped or a self-sustained oscillator. We show how to settle this question, however, by testing the models' predictions of different phases and amplitudes in response to a periodic entrainment signal (zeitgeber). PMID:19956762

  4. Digital microfluidic immunocytochemistry in single cells

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Alphonsus H. C.; Chamberlain, M. Dean; Situ, Haozhong; Lee, Victor; Wheeler, Aaron R.

    2015-01-01

    We report a new technique called Digital microfluidic Immunocytochemistry in Single Cells (DISC). DISC automates protocols for cell culture, stimulation and immunocytochemistry, enabling the interrogation of protein phosphorylation on pulsing with stimulus for as little as 3 s. DISC was used to probe the phosphorylation states of platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) and the downstream signalling protein, Akt, to evaluate concentration- and time-dependent effects of stimulation. The high time resolution of the technique allowed for surprising new observations—for example, a 10 s pulse stimulus of a low concentration of PDGF is sufficient to cause >30% of adherent fibroblasts to commit to Akt activation. With the ability to quantitatively probe signalling events with high time resolution at the single-cell level, we propose that DISC may be an important new technique for a wide range of applications, especially for screening signalling responses of a heterogeneous cell population. PMID:26104298

  5. Airborne Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric Pressure Made Using the Oxygen A-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riris, Haris; Rodriquez, Michael; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William E.; Stephen, Mark A.; Abshire, James B.

    2011-01-01

    We report on airborne measurements of atmospheric pressure using a fiber-laser based lidar operating in the oxygen A-band near 765 nm and the integrated path differential absorption measurement technique. Our lidar uses fiber optic technology and non-linear optics to generate tunable laser radiation at 765 nm, which overlaps an absorption line pair in the Oxygen A-band. We use a pulsed time resolved technique, which rapidly steps the laser wavelength across the absorption line pair, a 20 cm telescope and photon counting detector to measure Oxygen concentrations.

  6. Making an honest measurement scale out of the oxygen isotope delta-values.

    PubMed

    Gat, Joel R; DeBievre, Paul

    2002-01-01

    The differential measurement of the abundance of oxygen isotopes based on reference materials, such as VSMOW for the case of water, was used because the precision of the absolute mass-spectrometric determination of the abundance fell short of the differences to be measured. Since then these measurements have been much improved, so that a calibration scheme of the oxygen isotope abundance in water, carbonates, silica, phosphates, sulfates, nitrates and organic materials is suggested, based on an accredited primary standard of oxygen in air and using standard fluorination and O(2) to CO(2) conversion techniques. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Noninvasive oxygen partial pressure measurement of human body fluids in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Zaharchuk, Greg; Busse, Reed F; Rosenthal, Guy; Manley, Geoffery T; Glenn, Orit A; Dillon, William P

    2006-08-01

    The oxygen partial pressure (pO2) of human body fluids reflects the oxygenation status of surrounding tissues. All existing fluid pO2 measurements are invasive, requiring either microelectrode/optode placement or fluid removal. The purpose of this study is to develop a noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging method to measure the pO2 of human body fluids. We developed an imaging paradigm that exploits the paramagnetism of molecular oxygen to create quantitative images of fluid oxygenation. A single-shot fast spin echo pulse sequence was modified to minimize artifacts from motion, fluid flow, and partial volume. Longitudinal relaxation rate (R1 = 1/T1) was measured with a time-efficient nonequilibrium saturation recovery method and correlated with pO2 measured in phantoms. pO2 images of human and fetal cerebrospinal fluid, bladder urine, and vitreous humor are presented and quantitative oxygenation levels are compared with prior literature estimates, where available. Significant pO2 increases are shown in cerebrospinal fluid and vitreous following 100% oxygen inhalation. Potential errors due to temperature, fluid flow, and partial volume are discussed. Noninvasive measurements of human body fluid pO2 in vivo are presented, which yield reasonable values based on prior literature estimates. This rapid imaging-based measurement of fluid oxygenation may provide insight into normal physiology as well as changes due to disease or during treatment.

  8. In situ global method for measurement of oxygen demand and mass transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Klasson, K.T.; Lundbaeck, K.M.O.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1997-05-01

    Two aerobic microorganisms, Saccharomycopsis lipolytica and Brevibacterium lactofermentum, have been used in a study of mass transfer and oxygen uptake from a global perspective using a closed gas system. Oxygen concentrations in the gas and liquid were followed using oxygen electrodes, and the results allowed for easy calculation of in situ oxygen transport. The cell yields on oxygen for S. lipolytica and B. lactofermentum were 1.01 and 1.53 g/g respectively. The mass transfer coefficient was estimated as 10 h{sup {minus}1} at 500 rpm for both fermentations. The advantages with this method are noticeable since the use of model systems may be avoided, and the in situ measurements of oxygen demand assure reliable data for scale-up.

  9. Single cell microfluidics for systems oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Rong

    2012-02-01

    The singular term ``cancer'' is never one kind of disease, but deceivingly encompasses a large number of heterogeneous disease states, which makes it impossible to completely treat cancer using a generic approach. Rather systems approaches are urgently required to assess cancer heterogeneity, stratify patients and enable the most effective, individualized treatment. The heterogeneity of tumors at the single cell level is reflected by the hierarchical complexity of the tumor microenvironment. To identify all the cellular components, including both tumor and infiltrating immune cells, and to delineate the associated cell-to-cell signaling network that dictates tumor initiation, progression and metastasis, we developed a single cell microfluidics chip that can analyze a panel of proteins that are potentially associated inter-cellular signaling network in tumor microenvironment from hundreds of single cells in parallel. This platform integrates two advanced technologies -- microfluidic single cell handling and ultra-high density protein array. This device was first tested for highly multiplexed profiling of secreted proteins including tumor-immune signaling molecules from monocytic leukemia cells. We observed profound cellular heterogeneity with all functional phenotypes quantitatively identified. Correlation analysis further indicated the existence of an intercellular cytokine network in which TNFα-induced secondary signaling cascades further increased functional cellular diversity. It was also exploited to evaluate polyfunctionality of tumor antigen-specific T cells from melanoma patients being treated with adoptive T cell transfer immunotherapy. This platform could be further extended to analyze both solid tumor cells (e.g. human lung carcinoma cells) and infiltrating immune cells (e.g. macrophages) so as to enable systems analysis of the complex tumor microenvironment from small amounts of clinical specimens, e.g. skinny needle biopsies. Thus, it could potentially

  10. The Oxygen Ratio: A Fuel-Independent Measure of Mixture Stoichiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, C J; Musculus, M P; Pickett, L M; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2003-12-19

    The pollutant-formation characteristics and other properties of a combustion reaction typically depend strongly on the proximity of the mixture to its stoichiometric condition, i.e., the ''mixture stoichiometry.'' A quantitative, widely applicable measure of this mixture property is therefore a critical independent variable in the study of combustion systems. Such a parameter enables the clear separation of mixture stoichiometry effects from other effects (e.g., fuel molecular structure, product temperature, diluent concentration, pressure). The parameter most often used to quantify mixture stoichiometry is the equivalence ratio. Unfortunately, the equivalence ratio fails to properly account for oxygen in oxygenates, i.e., compounds that have oxygen chemically bound within the fuel molecule. This manuscript introduces the oxygen ratio, a parameter that properly characterizes mixture stoichiometry for a broader class of reactants than does the equivalence ratio, including oxygenates. A detailed definition of the oxygen ratio is provided and used to show its relationship to the equivalence ratio. The definition is also used to quantify errors involved when the equivalence ratio is used as a measure of mixture stoichiometry with oxygenates. Proper usage of the oxygen ratio is discussed and the oxygen ratio is used to interpret results in a practical example.

  11. Single-cell printing based on impedance detection

    PubMed Central

    Schoendube, J.; Wright, D.; Zengerle, R.; Koltay, P.

    2015-01-01

    Label-free isolation of single cells is essential for the growing field of single-cell analysis. Here, we present a device which prints single living cells encapsulated in free-flying picoliter droplets. It combines inkjet printing and impedance flow cytometry. Droplet volume can be controlled in the range of 500 pl–800 pl by piezo actuator displacement. Two sets of parallel facing electrodes in a 50 μm × 55 μm channel are applied to measure the presence and velocity of a single cell in real-time. Polystyrene beads with <5% variation in diameter generated signal variations of 12%–17% coefficients of variation. Single bead efficiency (i.e., printing events with single beads vs. total number of printing events) was 73% ± 11% at a throughput of approximately 9 events/min. Viability of printed HeLa cells and human primary fibroblasts was demonstrated by culturing cells for at least eight days. PMID:25759750

  12. Single-cell printing based on impedance detection.

    PubMed

    Schoendube, J; Wright, D; Zengerle, R; Koltay, P

    2015-01-01

    Label-free isolation of single cells is essential for the growing field of single-cell analysis. Here, we present a device which prints single living cells encapsulated in free-flying picoliter droplets. It combines inkjet printing and impedance flow cytometry. Droplet volume can be controlled in the range of 500 pl-800 pl by piezo actuator displacement. Two sets of parallel facing electrodes in a 50 μm × 55 μm channel are applied to measure the presence and velocity of a single cell in real-time. Polystyrene beads with <5% variation in diameter generated signal variations of 12%-17% coefficients of variation. Single bead efficiency (i.e., printing events with single beads vs. total number of printing events) was 73% ± 11% at a throughput of approximately 9 events/min. Viability of printed HeLa cells and human primary fibroblasts was demonstrated by culturing cells for at least eight days.

  13. A stochastic transcriptional switch model for single cell imaging data.

    PubMed

    Hey, Kirsty L; Momiji, Hiroshi; Featherstone, Karen; Davis, Julian R E; White, Michael R H; Rand, David A; Finkenstädt, Bärbel

    2015-10-01

    Gene expression is made up of inherently stochastic processes within single cells and can be modeled through stochastic reaction networks (SRNs). In particular, SRNs capture the features of intrinsic variability arising from intracellular biochemical processes. We extend current models for gene expression to allow the transcriptional process within an SRN to follow a random step or switch function which may be estimated using reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC). This stochastic switch model provides a generic framework to capture many different dynamic features observed in single cell gene expression. Inference for such SRNs is challenging due to the intractability of the transition densities. We derive a model-specific birth-death approximation and study its use for inference in comparison with the linear noise approximation where both approximations are considered within the unifying framework of state-space models. The methodology is applied to synthetic as well as experimental single cell imaging data measuring expression of the human prolactin gene in pituitary cells.

  14. Mie scatter corrections in single cell infrared microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Konevskikh, Tatiana; Lukacs, Rozalia; Blümel, Reinhold; Ponossov, Arkadi; Kohler, Achim

    2016-06-23

    Strong Mie scattering signatures hamper the chemical interpretation and multivariate analysis of the infrared microscopy spectra of single cells and tissues. During recent years, several numerical Mie scatter correction algorithms for the infrared spectroscopy of single cells have been published. In the paper at hand, we critically reviewed existing algorithms for the correction of Mie scattering and suggest improvements. We developed an iterative algorithm based on Extended Multiplicative Scatter Correction (EMSC), for the retrieval of pure absorbance spectra from highly distorted infrared spectra of single cells. The new algorithm uses the van de Hulst approximation formula for the extinction efficiency employing a complex refractive index. The iterative algorithm involves the establishment of an EMSC meta-model. While existing iterative algorithms for the correction of resonant Mie scattering employ three independent parameters for establishing a meta-model, we could decrease the number of parameters from three to two independent parameters, which reduced the calculation time for the Mie scattering curves for the iterative EMSC meta-model by a factor of 10. Moreover, by employing the Hilbert transform for evaluating the Kramers-Kronig relations based on a FFT algorithm in Matlab, we further improved the speed of the algorithm by a factor of 100. For testing the algorithm we simulate distorted apparent absorbance spectra by utilizing the exact theory for the scattering of infrared light at absorbing spheres, taking into account the high numerical aperture of infrared microscopes employed for the analysis of single cells and tissues. In addition, the algorithm was applied to measured absorbance spectra of single lung cancer cells.

  15. Single cell elemental analysis using nuclear microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, M. Q.; Thong, P. S. P.; Kara, U.; Watt, F.

    1999-04-01

    The use of Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) to provide quantitative elemental analysis of single cells is an area which has high potential, particularly when the trace elements such as Ca, Fe, Zn and Cu can be monitored. We describe the methodology of sample preparation for two cell types, the procedures of cell imaging using STIM, and the quantitative elemental analysis of single cells using RBS and PIXE. Recent work on single cells at the Nuclear Microscopy Research Centre,National University of Singapore has centred around two research areas: (a) Apoptosis (programmed cell death), which has been recently implicated in a wide range of pathological conditions such as cancer, Parkinson's disease etc, and (b) Malaria (infection of red blood cells by the malaria parasite). Firstly we present results on the elemental analysis of human Chang liver cells (ATTCC CCL 13) where vanadium ions were used to trigger apoptosis, and demonstrate that nuclear microscopy has the capability of monitoring vanadium loading within individual cells. Secondly we present the results of elemental changes taking place in individual mouse red blood cells which have been infected with the malaria parasite and treated with the anti-malaria drug Qinghaosu (QHS).

  16. Parallel single-cell analysis microfluidic platform.

    PubMed

    van den Brink, Floris T G; Gool, Elmar; Frimat, Jean-Philippe; Bomer, Johan; van den Berg, Albert; Le Gac, Séverine

    2011-11-01

    We report a PDMS microfluidic platform for parallel single-cell analysis (PaSCAl) as a powerful tool to decipher the heterogeneity found in cell populations. Cells are trapped individually in dedicated pockets, and thereafter, a number of invasive or non-invasive analysis schemes are performed. First, we report single-cell trapping in a fast (2-5  min) and reproducible manner with a single-cell capture yield of 85% using two cell lines (P3x63Ag8 and MCF-7), employing a protocol which is scalable and easily amenable to automation. Following this, a mixed population of P3x63Ag8 and MCF-7 cells is stained in situ using the nucleic acid probe (Hoechst) and a phycoerythrin-labeled monoclonal antibody directed at EpCAM present on the surface of the breast cancer cells MCF-7 and absent on the myeloma cells P3x63Ag8 to illustrate the potential of the device to analyze cell population heterogeneity. Next, cells are porated in situ using chemicals in a reversible (digitonin) or irreversible way (lithium dodecyl sulfate). This is visualized by the transportation of fluorescent dyes through the membrane (propidium iodide and calcein). Finally, an electrical protocol is developed for combined cell permeabilization and electroosmotic flow (EOF)-based extraction of the cell content. It is validated here using calcein-loaded cells and visualized through the progressive recovery of calcein in the side channels, indicating successful retrieval of individual cell content.

  17. Micro-Winkler titration method for dissolved oxygen concentration measurement.

    PubMed

    Helm, Irja; Jalukse, Lauri; Vilbaste, Martin; Leito, Ivo

    2009-08-26

    In this report a gravimetric micro-Winkler titration method for determination of dissolved oxygen concentration in water is presented. Mathematical model of the method taking into account all influence factors is derived and an uncertainty analysis is carried out to determine the uncertainty contributions of all influence factors. The method is highly accurate: the relative expanded uncertainties (k=2) are around 1% in the case of small (9-10 g) water samples. The uncertainty analysis carried out in characterizing the uncertainty of the method is the most comprehensive published for a micro-Winkler method, resulting in experimentally obtained estimates for all uncertainty sources of practical significance (around 20 uncertainty sources altogether).

  18. Optical manipulation and microfluidics for studies of single cell dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, E.; Scrimgeour, J.; Granéli, A.; Ramser, K.; Wellander, R.; Enger, J.; Hanstorp, D.; Goksör, M.

    2007-08-01

    Most research on optical manipulation aims towards investigation and development of the system itself. In this paper we show how optical manipulation, imaging and microfluidics can be combined for investigations of single cells. Microfluidic systems have been fabricated and are used, in combination with optical tweezers, to enable environmental changes for single cells. The environment within the microfluidic system has been modelled to ensure control of the process. Three biological model systems have been studied with different combinations of optical manipulation, imaging techniques and microfluidics. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, environmentally induced size modulations and spatial localization of proteins have been studied to elucidate various signalling pathways. In a similar manner the oxygenation cycle of single red blood cells was triggered and mapped using Raman spectroscopy. In the third experiment the forces between the endoplasmic reticulum and chloroplasts were studied in Pisum sativum and Arabidopsis thaliana. By combining different techniques we make advanced biological research possible, revealing information on a cellular level that is impossible to obtain with traditional techniques.

  19. Speed of blood withdrawal and accurate measurement of oxygen content in mixed venous blood.

    PubMed

    Jaschke, Katie; Brown, Dianna; Clark, Alicia; Doull, Sarah; English, Ashley; Hoover, Nicole; Jones, Philip; Klamm, David; Odom, Chung; Primrose, Brenna; Sollars, Kristin; Ebberts, Marci

    2014-11-01

    Measurement of mixed venous oxygen saturation helps determine whether cardiac output and oxygen delivery are sufficient for metabolic needs. As recommended by the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses guideline, blood samples for determining mixed venous oxygen saturation are obtained by slowly, in 1 to 2 minutes, withdrawing 1.5 mL of blood from the distal port of the pulmonary artery catheter. In theory, the negative force of rapid withdrawal could pull oxygenated blood from the pulmonary capillary bed, causing falsely elevated saturation values. To determine if the speed of withdrawal affects oxygen content in blood samples used to measure mixed venous oxygen saturation. The sample consisted of heart failure patients with pulmonary artery catheters admitted to a cardiac intensive care unit. A prospective, randomized, 2 × 2 crossover design was used to compare mixed venous oxygen saturation in blood samples obtained quickly or slowly. A total of 50 sets of saturation values were analyzed. Each set included 1 blood sample obtained slowly, in 1 to 2 minutes, and 1 obtained rapidly, in 5 seconds. The mean difference in saturation values between the fast and the slow groups was -0.3 (CI, -1.5 to 0.8; P = .55), indicating that no meaningful systematic bias is attributable to fast withdrawal of blood. Rapid blood sampling does not falsely elevate measurements of mixed venous oxygen saturation. ©2014 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  20. Direct measurement of local dissolved oxygen concentration spatial profiles in a cell culture environment.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Yuki; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Tsuneda, Satoshi

    2015-06-01

    Controlling local dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) in media is critical for cell or tissue cultures. Various biomaterials and culture methods have been developed to modulate DO. Direct measurement of local DO in cultures has not been validated as a method to test DO modulation. In the present study we developed a DO measurement system equipped with a Clark-type oxygen microelectrode manipulated with 1 μm precision in three-dimensional space to explore potential applications for tissue engineering. By determining the microelectrode tip position precisely against the bottom plane of culture dishes with rat or human cardiac cells in static monolayer culture, we successfully obtained spatial distributions of DO in the medium. Theoretical quantitative predictions fit the obtained data well. Based on analyses of the variance between samples, we found the data reflected "local" oxygen consumption in the vicinity of the microelectrode and the detection of temporal changes in oxygen consumption rates of cultured cells was limited by the diffusion rate of oxygen in the medium. This oxygen measuring system monitors local oxygen consumption and production with high spatial resolution, and can potentially be used with recently developed oxygen modulating biomaterials to design microenvironments and non-invasively monitor local DO dynamics during culture. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. A lenslet-based device for measuring oxygen saturation in the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.; Kandimalla, H.; Dinga, R.; Nabili, A.; Mathews, Scott A.; Nguyen, Q. D.

    2007-02-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a complication of diabetes affecting up to 80% of all diabetic patients. DR can lead to blindness and reduced quality of life. Some authors have hypothesized that changes in the flow dynamics associated with DR as well as changes in retinal oxygenation can lead to macular edema. Measurements of oxygen saturation in the retina could help understand the real mechanisms behind this condition. We present a novel spectroscopic imaging device to measure oxygen saturation in the retina. Our system uses a lenslet array to spatially and spectrocopically divide a fundus image. A three wavelengths algorithm is used to calculate oxygen saturation in small vessels. Only wavelengths in the 500 - 580 nm range are considered in order to minimize the wavelength dependence of the scattering from erythrocytes. Preliminary testing on healthy subjects showed values of oxygen saturation comparable to the one reported in the literature.

  2. Measurement and interpretation of low levels of dissolved oxygen in ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, A.F.; Peterson, M.L.; Solbau, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    A Rhodazine-D colorimetric technique was adapted to measure low-level dissolved oxygen concentrations in ground water. Prepared samples containing between 0 and 8.0 ??moles L-1 dissolved oxygen in equilibrium with known gas mixtures produced linear spectrophotometric absorbance with a lower detection limit of 0.2 ??moles L-1. Excellent reproducibility was found for solutions ranging in composition from deionized water to sea water with chemical interferences detected only for easily reduced metal species such as ferric ion, cupric ion, and hexavalent chromium. Such effects were correctable based on parallel reaction stoichiometries relative to oxygen. The technique, coupled with a downhole wire line tool, permitted low-level monitoring of dissolved oxygen in wells at the selenium-contaminated Kesterson Reservoir in California. Results indicated a close association between low but measurable dissolved oxygen concentrations and mobility of oxidized forms of selenium. -from Authors

  3. Electrochemiluminescence imaging for parallel single-cell analysis of active membrane cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Junyu; Ma, Guangzhong; Chen, Yun; Fang, Danjun; Jiang, Dechen; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2015-08-18

    Luminol electrochemiluminescence (ECL) imaging was developed for the parallel measurement of active membrane cholesterol at single living cells, thus establishing a novel electrochemical detection technique for single cells with high analysis throughput and low detection limit. In our strategy, the luminescence generated from luminol and hydrogen peroxide upon the potential was recorded in one image so that hydrogen peroxide at the surface of multiple cells could be simultaneously analyzed. Compared with the classic microelectrode array for the parallel single-cell analysis, the plat electrode only was needed in our ECL imaging, avoiding the complexity of electrode fabrication. The optimized ECL imaging system showed that hydrogen peroxide as low as 10 μM was visible and the efflux of hydrogen peroxide from cells could be determined. Coupled with the reaction between active membrane cholesterol and cholesterol oxidase to generate hydrogen peroxide, active membrane cholesterol at cells on the electrode was analyzed at single-cell level. The luminescence intensity was correlated with the amount of active membrane cholesterol, validating our system for single-cell cholesterol analysis. The relative high standard deviation on the luminescence suggested high cellular heterogeneities on hydrogen peroxide efflux and active membrane cholesterol, which exhibited the significance of single-cell analysis. This success in ECL imaging for single-cell analysis opens a new field in the parallel measurement of surface molecules at single cells.

  4. Fluidic Logic Used in a Systems Approach to Enable Integrated Single-Cell Functional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ramalingam, Naveen; Fowler, Brian; Szpankowski, Lukasz; Leyrat, Anne A.; Hukari, Kyle; Maung, Myo Thu; Yorza, Wiganda; Norris, Michael; Cesar, Chris; Shuga, Joe; Gonzales, Michael L.; Sanada, Chad D.; Wang, Xiaohui; Yeung, Rudy; Hwang, Win; Axsom, Justin; Devaraju, Naga Sai Gopi Krishna; Angeles, Ninez Delos; Greene, Cassandra; Zhou, Ming-Fang; Ong, Eng-Seng; Poh, Chang-Chee; Lam, Marcos; Choi, Henry; Htoo, Zaw; Lee, Leo; Chin, Chee-Sing; Shen, Zhong-Wei; Lu, Chong T.; Holcomb, Ilona; Ooi, Aik; Stolarczyk, Craig; Shuga, Tony; Livak, Kenneth J.; Larsen, Cate; Unger, Marc; West, Jay A. A.

    2016-01-01

    The study of single cells has evolved over the past several years to include expression and genomic analysis of an increasing number of single cells. Several studies have demonstrated wide spread variation and heterogeneity within cell populations of similar phenotype. While the characterization of these populations will likely set the foundation for our understanding of genomic- and expression-based diversity, it will not be able to link the functional differences of a single cell to its underlying genomic structure and activity. Currently, it is difficult to perturb single cells in a controlled environment, monitor and measure the response due to perturbation, and link these response measurements to downstream genomic and transcriptomic analysis. In order to address this challenge, we developed a platform to integrate and miniaturize many of the experimental steps required to study single-cell function. The heart of this platform is an elastomer-based integrated fluidic circuit that uses fluidic logic to select and sequester specific single cells based on a phenotypic trait for downstream experimentation. Experiments with sequestered cells that have been performed include on-chip culture, exposure to various stimulants, and post-exposure image-based response analysis, followed by preparation of the mRNA transcriptome for massively parallel sequencing analysis. The flexible system embodies experimental design and execution that enable routine functional studies of single cells. PMID:27709111

  5. Image-guided optical measurement of blood oxygen saturation within capillary vessels (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akons, Kfir; Zeidan, Adel; Yeheskely-Hayon, Daniella; Minai, Limor; Yelin, Dvir

    2016-03-01

    Values of blood oxygenation levels are useful for assessing heart and lung conditions, and are frequently monitored during routine patient care. Independent measurement of the oxygen saturation in capillary blood, which is significantly different from that of arterial blood, is important for diagnosing tissue hypoxia and for increasing the accuracy of existing techniques that measure arterial oxygen saturation. Here, we developed a simple, non-invasive technique for measuring the reflected spectra from individual capillary vessels within a human lip, allowing local measurement of the blood oxygen saturation. The optical setup includes a spatially incoherent broadband light that was focused onto a specific vessel below the lip surface. Backscattered light was imaged by a camera for identifying a target vessel and pointing the illumination beam to its cross section. Scattered light from the vessel was then collected by a single-mode fiber and analyzed by a fast spectrometer. Spectra acquired from small capillary vessels within a volunteer lip showed the characteristic oxyhemoglobin absorption bands in real time and with a high signal-to-noise ratio. Measuring capillary oxygen saturation using this technique would potentially be more accurate compared to existing pulse oximetry techniques due to its insensitivity to the patient's skin color, pulse rate, motion, and medical condition. It could be used as a standalone endoscopic technique for measuring tissue hypoxia or in conjunction with conventional pulse oximetry for a more accurate measurement of oxygen transport in the body.

  6. New Oxygen Isotope Measurements of Four Stardust Impact Crater Residues Show IDP-Like Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snead, C. J.; McKeegan, K. D.

    2015-07-01

    We have measured the oxygen isotope compositions of four Stardust impact crater residues. These analyses reveal compositions that are similar to those found in interplanetary dust particles, antarctic micrometeorites and CI chondrite components.

  7. Measuring respiration of cultured cell with oxygen electrode as a metabolic indicator for drug screening.

    PubMed

    Amano, Y; Okumura, C; Yoshida, M; Katayama, H; Unten, S; Arai, J; Tagawa, T; Hoshina, S; Hashimoto, H; Ishikawa, H

    1999-03-01

    New trend in methods for assessing pharmacological action to bacteria and cell is to measure their metabolic activities induced, while the conventional methods used population growth. We focused on respiration volume as an indicator of cell metabolism, and developed inexpensive disposable oxygen electrode sensor and multi-channel dissolved oxygen meters (DOX-10 and DOX-96KB). Using these instruments, cytotoxicity was measured for 48 hrs and the method showed superior features to conventional methods in its handiness of one step assay, and excellent adaptability to automated systems. Total usability of this oxygen electrode method is being evaluated in bacterial drug susceptibility test, anticancer drug susceptibility test, and alternatives to animal experiment.

  8. A technique for mass spectrometer measurements of atomic and molecular oxygen in the lower thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayser, D. C.; Potter, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    A neutral mass spectrometer with a quasi-open ion source was flown on each of the Atmosphere Explorer (AE) C, D, and E satellites. The three instruments provided an opportunity to study the effects of different source insert materials on the source surface chemistry. It was found that, after a period of conditioning in space, the recombination coefficient of atomic oxygen on gold appears to be substantially lower than it is on Nichrome V. The lower recombination coefficient on gold allows the spectrometer to directly measure a significant fraction of the incident atomic oxygen, making it possible to distinguish between ambient O and O2. Equations are developed to calculate the atomic and molecular oxygen densities. Preliminary measurements of molecular oxygen densities obtained by this technique agree well with measurements taken in the fly-through mode of operation.

  9. Optimal wavelengths for optoacoustic measurements of blood oxygen saturation in biological tissues

    PubMed Central

    Perekatova, Valeriya; Subochev, Pavel; Kleshnin, Mikhail; Turchin, Ilya

    2016-01-01

    The non-invasive measurement of blood oxygen saturation in blood vessels is a promising clinical application of optoacoustic imaging. Nevertheless, precise optoacoustic measurements of blood oxygen saturation are limited because of the complexities of calculating the spatial distribution of the optical fluence. In the paper error in the determination of blood oxygen saturation, associated with the use of approximate methods of optical fluence evaluation within the blood vessel, was investigated for optoacoustic measurements at two wavelengths. The method takes into account both acoustic pressure noise and the error in determined values of the optical scattering and absorption coefficients used for the calculation of the fluence. It is shown that, in conditions of an unknown (or partially known) spatial distribution of fluence at depths of 2 to 8 mm, minimal error in the determination of blood oxygen saturation is achieved at wavelengths of 658 ± 40 nm and 1069 ± 40 nm. PMID:27867709

  10. Get to Understand More from Single-Cells: Current Studies of Microfluidic-Based Techniques for Single-Cell Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Shih-Jie; Yao, Da-Jeng

    2015-01-01

    This review describes the microfluidic techniques developed for the analysis of a single cell. The characteristics of microfluidic (e.g., little sample amount required, high-throughput performance) make this tool suitable to answer and to solve biological questions of interest about a single cell. This review aims to introduce microfluidic related techniques for the isolation, trapping and manipulation of a single cell. The major approaches for detection in single-cell analysis are introduced; the applications of single-cell analysis are then summarized. The review concludes with discussions of the future directions and opportunities of microfluidic systems applied in analysis of a single cell. PMID:26213918

  11. Measuring Oxygen Cost During Level Walking in Individuals with Acquired Brain Injury in the Clinical Setting

    PubMed Central

    Dawes, Helen; Collett, Johnathen; Ramsbottom, Roger; Howells, Ken; Sackley, Cath; Wade, Derick

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the test-retest reliability of oxygen cost (ml·kg-1·min-1) during level walking in individuals with acquired brain injury (ABI). Ten individuals with ABI (5 men, 5 women) (Traumatic brain injury, 1, central pontine myelinolysis, 1, stroke 8) and 21 healthy controls (11 men, 10 women). Measurements of gross and net (walking minus resting) oxygen consumption (ml·kg-1·min-1), and oxygen cost (ml·kg-1·min-1) during level walking at self-selected speeds. Measurements were taken on two occasions within one week. Oxygen cost was significantly lower (p < 0.05) in individuals with ABI on the second test versus the first test. Percentage variability in oxygen cost from test to re-test ranged from 14.7 to 17.3% in the control group and from 17.4 to 20.8% in the brain injury group. Clinical populations may demonstrate a significant decrease in oxygen cost between testing occasions. Individuals require at least one period of familiarisation if oxygen cost is used as an outcome measure during level walking in clinical groups. The amount of familiarisation has yet to be investigated in individuals with ABI. Key Points Individuals with brain injury during level walking May demonstrate a significant decrease in oxygen cost between testing occasions. May require at least one period of familiarisation if oxygen cost is used as an outcome measure The degree of familiarisation required in this clinical group needs further investigation PMID:24482582

  12. Microvascular oxygen tension and flow measurements in rodent cerebral cortex during baseline conditions and functional activation

    PubMed Central

    Yaseen, Mohammad A; Srinivasan, Vivek J; Sakadžić, Sava; Radhakrishnan, Harsha; Gorczynska, Iwona; Wu, Weicheng; Fujimoto, James G; Boas, David A

    2011-01-01

    Measuring cerebral oxygen delivery and metabolism microscopically is important for interpreting macroscopic functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data and identifying pathological changes associated with stroke, Alzheimer's disease, and brain injury. Here, we present simultaneous, microscopic measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen partial pressure (pO2) in cortical microvessels of anesthetized rats under baseline conditions and during somatosensory stimulation. Using a custom-built imaging system, we measured CBF with Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT), and vascular pO2 with confocal phosphorescence lifetime microscopy. Cerebral blood flow and pO2 measurements displayed heterogeneity over distances irresolvable with fMRI and positron emission tomography. Baseline measurements indicate O2 extraction from pial arterioles and homogeneity of ascending venule pO2 despite large variation in microvessel flows. Oxygen extraction is linearly related to flow in ascending venules, suggesting that flow in ascending venules closely matches oxygen demand of the drained territory. Oxygen partial pressure and relative CBF transients during somatosensory stimulation further indicate arteriolar O2 extraction and suggest that arterioles contribute to the fMRI blood oxygen level dependent response. Understanding O2 supply on a microscopic level will yield better insight into brain function and the underlying mechanisms of various neuropathologies. PMID:21179069

  13. Fluence compensated optoacoustic measurements of blood oxygen saturation in vivo at two optimal wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perekatova, V. V.; Subochev, P. V.; Kirillin, M. Yu.; Turchin, I. V.

    2017-03-01

    Non-invasive measurement of blood oxygen saturation in blood vessels is a promising clinical application of optoacoustic imaging. However, unknown spatial and spectral distribution of optical fluence within biotissue challenges precise multispectral optoacoustic measurements of blood oxygen saturation. The accuracy of the blood oxygen saturation measurement can be improved by the choice of optimal laser wavelengths. We propose the numerical approach to determine the optimal wavelengths for two-wavelengths OA measurements of blood oxygen saturation at various depths. The developed approach accounts for acoustic pressure noise, error in determination of optical scattering and absorption coefficients used for the calculation of the optical fluence, and diameter of the investigated blood vessel. We demonstrate that in case of an unknown (or partially known) fluence spatial distribution at depths between 2 and 8 mm, minimal error in the determination of blood oxygen saturation is achieved at the wavelengths of 658+/-40 nm and 1069+/-40 nm. We report on the pilot results of OA in vivo measurements of blood oxygen saturation using optimal wavelengths obtained by the proposed approach.

  14. Continuous measurement of transcutaneous oxygen tension of neonates under general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Welle, P; Hayden, W; Miller, T

    1980-06-01

    Neonates present unique challenges to the anesthesiologist because of their susceptibility to oxygen toxicity and because clinical assessment of the degree of an infant's hypoxia is more difficult than in the adult. Equipment is now available for the continuous noninvasive measurement of transcutaneous oxygen tension. We used this equipment to monitor nine different neonates undergoing ten surgical procedures requiring general anesthesia. We found that certain of the infants were above and below what we considered to be a safe range for the transcutaneous oxygen tension for a significant portion of the surgery. Additionally, the manipulations of the surgeon and anesthesiologists were seen to cause sudden and large fluctuations in the transcutaneous oxygen tension. By providing the anesthesiologist with continuous and immediate data on the cardiorespiratory status of the infant, transcutaneous oxygen monitoring makes itself a valuable addition to the equipment used in the intraoperative monitoring of the neonate.

  15. Quantitative assessments of glycolysis from single cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young Shik; Kim, Jungwoo; Johnson, Dazy; Dooraghi, Alex A; Mai, Wilson X; Ta, Lisa; Chatziioannou, Arion F; Phelps, Michael E; Nathanson, David A; Heath, James R

    2015-06-01

    The most common positron emission tomography (PET) radio-labeled probe for molecular diagnostics in patient care and research is the glucose analog, 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG). We report on an integrated microfluidics-chip/beta particle imaging system for in vitro(18)F-FDG radioassays of glycolysis with single cell resolution. We investigated the kinetic responses of single glioblastoma cancer cells to targeted inhibitors of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling. Further, we find a weak positive correlation between cell size and rate of glycolysis.

  16. Quantitative assessments of glycolysis from single cells

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Young Shik; Kim, Jungwoo; Johnson, Dazy; Dooraghi, Alex A.; Mai, Wilson X.; Ta, Lisa; Chatziioannou, Arion F.; Phelps, Michael E.; Nathanson, David A.; Heath, James R.

    2015-01-01

    The most common positron emission tomography (PET) radio-labeled probe for molecular diagnostics in patient care and research is the glucose analog, 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG). We report on an integrated microfluidics-chip/beta particle imaging system for in vitro 18F-FDG radioassays of glycolysis with single cell resolution. We investigated the kinetic responses of single glioblastoma cancer cells to targeted inhibitors of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling. Further, we find a weak positive correlation between cell size and rate of glycolysis. PMID:26835505

  17. Visualization and analysis of single-cell RNA-seq data by kernel-based similarity learning.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Zhu, Junjie; Pierson, Emma; Ramazzotti, Daniele; Batzoglou, Serafim

    2017-04-01

    We present single-cell interpretation via multikernel learning (SIMLR), an analytic framework and software which learns a similarity measure from single-cell RNA-seq data in order to perform dimension reduction, clustering and visualization. On seven published data sets, we benchmark SIMLR against state-of-the-art methods. We show that SIMLR is scalable and greatly enhances clustering performance while improving the visualization and interpretability of single-cell sequencing data.

  18. Single cell adhesion assay using computer controlled micropipette.

    PubMed

    Salánki, Rita; Hős, Csaba; Orgovan, Norbert; Péter, Beatrix; Sándor, Noémi; Bajtay, Zsuzsa; Erdei, Anna; Horvath, Robert; Szabó, Bálint

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon vital for all multicellular organisms. Recognition of and adhesion to specific macromolecules is a crucial task of leukocytes to initiate the immune response. To gain statistically reliable information of cell adhesion, large numbers of cells should be measured. However, direct measurement of the adhesion force of single cells is still challenging and today's techniques typically have an extremely low throughput (5-10 cells per day). Here, we introduce a computer controlled micropipette mounted onto a normal inverted microscope for probing single cell interactions with specific macromolecules. We calculated the estimated hydrodynamic lifting force acting on target cells by the numerical simulation of the flow at the micropipette tip. The adhesion force of surface attached cells could be accurately probed by repeating the pick-up process with increasing vacuum applied in the pipette positioned above the cell under investigation. Using the introduced methodology hundreds of cells adhered to specific macromolecules were measured one by one in a relatively short period of time (∼30 min). We blocked nonspecific cell adhesion by the protein non-adhesive PLL-g-PEG polymer. We found that human primary monocytes are less adherent to fibrinogen than their in vitro differentiated descendants: macrophages and dendritic cells, the latter producing the highest average adhesion force. Validation of the here introduced method was achieved by the hydrostatic step-pressure micropipette manipulation technique. Additionally the result was reinforced in standard microfluidic shear stress channels. Nevertheless, automated micropipette gave higher sensitivity and less side-effect than the shear stress channel. Using our technique, the probed single cells can be easily picked up and further investigated by other techniques; a definite advantage of the computer controlled micropipette. Our experiments revealed the existence of a sub-population of

  19. Single Cell Adhesion Assay Using Computer Controlled Micropipette

    PubMed Central

    Salánki, Rita; Hős, Csaba; Orgovan, Norbert; Péter, Beatrix; Sándor, Noémi; Bajtay, Zsuzsa; Erdei, Anna; Horvath, Robert; Szabó, Bálint

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon vital for all multicellular organisms. Recognition of and adhesion to specific macromolecules is a crucial task of leukocytes to initiate the immune response. To gain statistically reliable information of cell adhesion, large numbers of cells should be measured. However, direct measurement of the adhesion force of single cells is still challenging and today’s techniques typically have an extremely low throughput (5–10 cells per day). Here, we introduce a computer controlled micropipette mounted onto a normal inverted microscope for probing single cell interactions with specific macromolecules. We calculated the estimated hydrodynamic lifting force acting on target cells by the numerical simulation of the flow at the micropipette tip. The adhesion force of surface attached cells could be accurately probed by repeating the pick-up process with increasing vacuum applied in the pipette positioned above the cell under investigation. Using the introduced methodology hundreds of cells adhered to specific macromolecules were measured one by one in a relatively short period of time (∼30 min). We blocked nonspecific cell adhesion by the protein non-adhesive PLL-g-PEG polymer. We found that human primary monocytes are less adherent to fibrinogen than their in vitro differentiated descendants: macrophages and dendritic cells, the latter producing the highest average adhesion force. Validation of the here introduced method was achieved by the hydrostatic step-pressure micropipette manipulation technique. Additionally the result was reinforced in standard microfluidic shear stress channels. Nevertheless, automated micropipette gave higher sensitivity and less side-effect than the shear stress channel. Using our technique, the probed single cells can be easily picked up and further investigated by other techniques; a definite advantage of the computer controlled micropipette. Our experiments revealed the existence of a sub

  20. Single-cell ATAC-seq: strength in numbers.

    PubMed

    Pott, Sebastian; Lieb, Jason D

    2015-08-21

    Single-cell ATAC-seq detects open chromatin in individual cells. Currently data are sparse, but combining information from many single cells can identify determinants of cell-to-cell chromatin variation.

  1. Single cell systems biology by super-resolution imaging and combinatorial labeling

    PubMed Central

    Lubeck, Eric; Cai, Long

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is a powerful quantitative tool for exploring regulatory networks in single cells. However, the number of molecular species that can be measured simultaneously is limited by the spectral separability of fluorophores. Here we demonstrate a simple but general strategy to drastically increase the capacity for multiplex detection of molecules in single cells by using optical super-resolution microscopy (SRM) and combinatorial labeling. As a proof of principle, we labeled mRNAs with unique combinations of fluorophores using Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH), and resolved the sequences and combinations of fluorophores with SRM. We measured the mRNA levels of 32 genes simultaneously in single S. cerevisiae cells. These experiments demonstrate that combinatorial labeling and super-resolution imaging of single cells provides a natural approach to bring systems biology into single cells. PMID:22660740

  2. Integration of plasma-assisted surface chemical modification, soft lithography, and protein surface activation for single-cell patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Q.; Komvopoulos, K.

    2010-07-01

    Surface patterning for single-cell culture was accomplished by combining plasma-assisted surface chemical modification, soft lithography, and protein-induced surface activation. Hydrophilic patterns were produced on Parylene C films deposited on glass substrates by oxygen plasma treatment through the windows of polydimethylsiloxane shadow masks. After incubation first with Pluronic F108 solution and then serum medium overnight, surface seeding with mesenchymal stem cells in serum medium resulted in single-cell patterning. The present method provides a means of surface patterning with direct implications in single-cell culture.

  3. New Active Optical Technique Developed for Measuring Low-Earth-Orbit Atomic Oxygen Erosion of Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; deGroh, Kim K.; Demko, Rikako

    2003-01-01

    Polymers such as polyimide Kapton (DuPont) and Teflon FEP (DuPont, fluorinated ethylene propylene) are commonly used spacecraft materials because of desirable properties such as flexibility, low density, and in the case of FEP, a low solar absorptance and high thermal emittance. Polymers on the exterior of spacecraft in the low-Earth-orbit (LEO) environment are exposed to energetic atomic oxygen. Atomic oxygen reaction with polymers causes erosion, which is a threat to spacecraft performance and durability. It is, therefore, important to understand the atomic oxygen erosion yield E (the volume loss per incident oxygen atom) of polymers being considered in spacecraft design. The most common technique for determining E is a passive technique based on mass-loss measurements of samples exposed to LEO atomic oxygen during a space flight experiment. There are certain disadvantages to this technique. First, because it is passive, data are not obtained until after the flight is completed. Also, obtaining the preflight and postflight mass measurements is complicated by the fact that many polymers absorb water and, therefore, the mass change due to water absorption can affect the E data. This is particularly true for experiments that receive low atomic oxygen exposures or for samples that have a very low E. An active atomic oxygen erosion technique based on optical measurements has been developed that has certain advantages over the mass-loss technique. This in situ technique can simultaneously provide the erosion yield data on orbit and the atomic oxygen exposure fluence, which is needed for erosion yield determination. In the optical technique, either sunlight or artificial light can be used to measure the erosion of semitransparent or opaque polymers as a result of atomic oxygen attack. The technique is simple and adaptable to a rather wide range of polymers, providing that they have a sufficiently high optical absorption coefficient. If one covers a photodiode with a

  4. [Measurement of multi-wavelength pulse oxygen saturation based on dynamic spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Fei; Zhao, Wen-Jun

    2014-05-01

    The present paper puts forward multi-wavelength pulse oxygen saturation measurement based on dynamic spectroscopy to do the non-invasive determination of oxygen saturation. Compared to conventional ways, the new method makes full use of more wavelengths light and improves the measurement accuracy. During the experiment, the in-vivo measurements were carried out on 60 patients and their spectroscopic data were collected by the high sensitivity type fiber optic spectrometer. Singletrial estimation method was used to extract the dynamic spectroscopy at the wavelengths of 606. 44 approximately 987. 55 nm. Oxygen saturation obtained from arterial blood gas analysis is regarded as the true value. Synergy interval partial least square (siPLS) was used to establish the calibration model of subjects' oxygen saturation values against dynamic spectroscopy data. The relative error of prediction is +/-0. 017 6, but the relative error of the subjects in the same set measured by the patient monitor which was two-wavelength measure system is +/-0. 116 4. Measurement results show that the use of the high sensitivity type fiber optic spectrometer to collect multi-wavelength spectroscopic data and dynamic spectroscopy method to process data can do better in improving the accuracy of the oxygen saturation measurement.

  5. Development of 200-channel mapping system for tissue oxygenation measured by near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niwayama, Masatsugu; Kohata, Daisuke; Shao, Jun; Kudo, Nobuki; Hamaoka, Takatumi; Katsumura, Toshihito; Yamamoto, Katsuyuki

    2000-07-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a very useful technique for noninvasive measurement of tissue oxygenation. Among various methods of NIRS, continuous wave near-infrared spectroscopy (CW- NIRS) is especially suitable for real-time measurement and for practical use. CW-NIRS has recently been applied in vivo reflectance imaging of muscle oxygenation and brain activity. However, conventional mapping systems do not have a sufficient mapping area at present. Moreover, they do not enable quantitative measurement of tissue oxygenation because conventional NIRS is based on the inappropriate assumption that tissue is homogeneous. In this study, we developed a 200-channel mapping system that enables measurement of changes in oxygenation and blood volume and that covers a wider area (30 cm x 20 cm) than do conventional systems. The spatial resolution (source- detector separation) of this system is 15 mm. As for the effcts of tissue inhomogeneity on muscle oxygenation measurement, subcutaneous adipose tissue greatly reduces measurement sensitivity. Therefore, we also used a correction method for influence of the subcutaneous fat layer so that we could obtain quantitative changes in concentrations of oxy- and deoxy- hemoglobin. We conducted exercise tests and measured the changed in hemoglobin concentration in the thigh using the new system. The working muscles in the exercises could be imaged, and the heterogeneity of the muscles was shown. These results demonstrated the new 200-channel mapping system enables observation of the distribution of muscle metabolism and localization of muscle function.

  6. Phosphorescent nanoparticles for quantitative measurements of oxygen profiles in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Nak Won; Verbridge, Scott S.; Williams, Rebecca M.; Chen, Jin; Kim, Ju-Young; Schmehl, Russel; Farnum, Cornelia E.; Zipfel, Warren R.; Fischbach, Claudia; Stroock, Abraham D.

    2012-01-01

    We present the development and characterization of nanoparticles loaded with a custom phosphor; we exploit these nanoparticles to perform quantitative measurements of the concentration of oxygen within three-dimensional (3-D) tissue cultures in vitro and blood vessels in vivo. We synthesized a customized ruthenium (Ru)-phosphor and incorporated it into polymeric nanoparticles via self-assembly. We demonstrate that the encapsulated phosphor is non-toxic with and without illumination. We evaluated two distinct modes of employing the phosphorescent nanoparticles for the measurement of concentrations of oxygen: 1) in vitro, in a 3-D microfluidic tumor model via ratiometric measurements of intensity with an oxygen-insensitive fluorophore as a reference, and 2) in vivo, in mouse vasculature using measurements of phosphorescence lifetime. With both methods, we demonstrated micrometer-scale resolution and absolute calibration to the dissolved oxygen concentration. Based on the ease and customizability of the synthesis of the nanoparticles and the flexibility of their application, these oxygen-sensing polymeric nanoparticles will find a natural home in a range of biological applications, benefiting studies of physiological as well as pathological processes in which oxygen availability and concentration play a critical role. PMID:22240511

  7. Preliminary results of oxygen isotope ratio measurement with a particle-gamma coincidence method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borysiuk, Maciek; Kristiansson, Per; Ros, Linus; Abdel, Nassem S.; Elfman, Mikael; Nilsson, Charlotta; Pallon, Jan

    2015-04-01

    The possibility to study variations in the oxygen isotopic ratio with photon tagged nuclear reaction analysis (pNRA) is evaluated in the current work. The experiment described in the article was performed at Lund Ion Beam Analysis Facility (LIBAF) with a 2 MeV deuteron beam. Isotopic fractionation of light elements such as carbon, oxygen and nitrogen is the basis of many analytical tools in hydrology, geology, paleobiology and paleogeology. IBA methods provide one possible tool for measurement of isotopic content. During this experimental run we focused on measurement of the oxygen isotopic ratio. The measurement of stable isotopes of oxygen has a number of applications; the particular one driving the current investigation belongs to the field of astrogeology and specifically evaluation of fossil extraterrestrial material. There are three stable isotopes of oxygen: 16O, 17O and 18O. We procured samples highly enriched with all three isotopes. Isotopes 16O and 18O were easily detected in the enriched samples, but no significant signal from 17O was detected in the same samples. The measured yield was too low to detect 18O in a sample with natural abundances of oxygen isotopes, at least in the current experimental setup, but the spectral line from the reaction with 16O was clearly visible.

  8. Single molecule and single cell epigenomics.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Byung-Ryool; McElwee, John L; Soloway, Paul D

    2015-01-15

    Dynamically regulated changes in chromatin states are vital for normal development and can produce disease when they go awry. Accordingly, much effort has been devoted to characterizing these states under normal and pathological conditions. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) is the most widely used method to characterize where in the genome transcription factors, modified histones, modified nucleotides and chromatin binding proteins are found; bisulfite sequencing (BS-seq) and its variants are commonly used to characterize the locations of DNA modifications. Though very powerful, these methods are not without limitations. Notably, they are best at characterizing one chromatin feature at a time, yet chromatin features arise and function in combination. Investigators commonly superimpose separate ChIP-seq or BS-seq datasets, and then infer where chromatin features are found together. While these inferences might be correct, they can be misleading when the chromatin source has distinct cell types, or when a given cell type exhibits any cell to cell variation in chromatin state. These ambiguities can be eliminated by robust methods that directly characterize the existence and genomic locations of combinations of chromatin features in very small inputs of cells or ideally, single cells. Here we review single molecule epigenomic methods under development to overcome these limitations, the technical challenges associated with single molecule methods and their potential application to single cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Single Molecule and Single Cell Epigenomics

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Byung-Ryool; McElwee, John L.; Soloway, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamically regulated changes in chromatin states are vital for normal development and can produce disease when they go awry. Accordingly, much effort has been devoted to characterizing these states under normal and pathological conditions. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) is the most widely used method to characterize where in the genome transcription factors, modified histones, modified nucleotides and chromatin binding proteins are found; bisulfite sequencing (BS-seq) and its variants are commonly used to characterize the locations of DNA modifications. Though very powerful, these methods are not without limitations. Notably, they are best at characterizing one chromatin feature at a time, yet chromatin features arise and function in combination. Investigators commonly superimpose separate ChIP-seq or BS-seq datasets, and then infer where chromatin features are found together. While these inferences might be correct, they can be misleading when the chromatin source has distinct cell types, or when a given cell type exhibits any cell to cell variation in chromatin state. These ambiguities can be eliminated by robust methods that directly characterize the existence and genomic locations of combinations of chromatin features in very small inputs of cells or ideally, single cells. Here we review single molecule epigenomic methods under development to overcome these limitations, the technical challenges associated with single molecule methods and their potential application to single cells. PMID:25204781

  10. Analysis and methodology for measuring oxygen concentration in liquid sodium with a plugging meter

    SciTech Connect

    Nollet, B. K.; Hvasta, M.; Anderson, M.

    2012-07-01

    Oxygen concentration in liquid sodium is a critical measurement in assessing the potential for corrosion damage in sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs). There has been little recent work on sodium reactors and oxygen detection. Thus, the technical expertise dealing with oxygen measurements within sodium is no longer readily available in the U.S. Two methods of oxygen detection that have been investigated are the plugging meter and the galvanic cell. One of the overall goals of the Univ. of Wisconsin's sodium research program is to develop an affordable, reliable galvanic cell oxygen sensor. Accordingly, attention must first be dedicated to a well-known standard known as a plugging meter. Therefore, a sodium loop has been constructed on campus in effort to develop the plugging meter technique and gain experience working with liquid metal. The loop contains both a galvanic cell test section and a plugging meter test section. Consistent plugging results have been achieved below 20 [wppm], and a detailed process for achieving effective plugging has been developed. This paper will focus both on an accurate methodology to obtain oxygen concentrations from a plugging meter, and on how to easily control the oxygen concentration of sodium in a test loop. Details of the design, materials, manufacturing, and operation will be presented. Data interpretation will also be discussed, since a modern discussion of plugging data interpretation does not currently exist. (authors)

  11. Fluorescence lifetime imaging to quantify sub-cellular oxygen measurements in live macrophage during bacterial invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragavon, Joe; Amiri, Megdouda; Marteyn, Benoit; Sansonetti, Philipe; Shorte, Spencer

    2011-03-01

    Fluorophore concentration, the surrounding microenvironment, and photobleaching greatly influence the fluorescence intensity of a fluorophore, increasing the difficulty to directly observe micro-environmental factors such as pH and oxygen. However, the fluorescence lifetime of a fluorophore is essentially independent of both the fluorophore concentration and photobleaching, providing a viable alternative to intensity measurements. The development of fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLI) allows for the direct measurement of the microenvironment surrounding a fluorophore. Pt-porphyrin is a fluorophore whose optical properties include a very stable triplet excited state. This energy level overlaps strongly with the ground triplet state of oxygen, making the phosphorescent lifetime directly proportional to the surrounding oxygen concentration. Initial experiments using this fluorophore involved the use of individual microwells coated with the porphyrin. Cells were allowed to enter the micro-wells before being sealed to create a diffusionally isolated volume. The decrease in the extracellular oxygen concentration was observed using FLI. However, this isolation technique provides only the consumption rate but cannot indicate the subcellular oxygen distribution. To improve upon this, live macrophages are loaded with the porphyrin and the fluorescence lifetime determined using a Lambert Instruments Lifa-X FLI system. Initial results indicate that an increase in subcellular oxygen is observed upon initial exposure to invasive bacteria. A substantial decrease in oxygen is observed after about 1 hour of exposure. The cells remain in this deoxygenated state until the bacteria are removed or cell death occurs.

  12. Special article: measuring mitochondrial oxygen tension: from basic principles to application in humans.

    PubMed

    Mik, Egbert G

    2013-10-01

    The protoporphyrin IX-triplet state lifetime technique (PpIX-TSLT) has been recently introduced as the first method to measure mitochondrial oxygen tension (mitoPO2) in living cells and tissues. The current implementation of the technique is based on oxygen-dependent quenching of the delayed fluorescence lifetime of 5-aminolevulinic-acid-enhanced mitochondrial PpIX. It represents a significant step forward in our ability to comprehensively measure tissue oxygenation. PpIX-TSLT is feasible for application in humans and recently we have been able to measure for the first time mitoPO2 in humans. MitoPO2 in intact tissues reflects the balance between oxygen supply and demand at the cellular level. Administration of aminolevulinic acid induces measurable mitochondrial levels of PpIX. PpIX acts as a mitochondrially located oxygen-sensitive dye by emitting a red delayed fluorescence after excitation with a pulse of green light. The lifetime of the delayed fluorescence is inversely related to PO2 by the Stern-Volmer equation. In vivo measurements of mitoPO2 in liver, heart, and skin of rats have revealed surprisingly high values of typically several tens of mm Hg. Clinical measurements of mitoPO2 are possible as demonstrated by cutaneous measurements in healthy volunteers. Applications of PpIX-TSLT in anesthesiology and intensive care medicine might, e.g., be monitoring mitoPO2 as a resuscitation end point, targeting oxygen homeostasis in the critically ill, and assessing mitochondrial function at the bedside. PpIX-TSLT likely also has applications in other fields also, e.g., providing an oxygen-related feedback signal in photodynamic therapy of malignant tumors.

  13. Novel needle-electrochemical microsensor for in-vitro and in-vivo measurements of oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Weiya; Ma, Wentao; Li, Kaiyang; Hu, Jiming; Li, Hongyi; Cao, Lianxin; Song, Yu; Zhao, Lan

    2001-09-01

    Electrochemical microsensors have been applied in the field of biomedicine for many years. The aim of this work was to develop a novel oxygen sensor to monitor the partial pressure of oxygen in tissues and acupuncture points. The functions of microsensor were evaluated through in vitro experiments. In vivo in tissues and acupuncture points. The data from oxygen microsensor were compared with the data from blood gas analyzer. The measurements depend on the physiological changes of experimental animal. The further development of this new sensor is to be a tool for meridian research.

  14. Hydrodynamic stretching of single cells for large population mechanical phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Gossett, Daniel R.; Tse, Henry T. K.; Lee, Serena A.; Ying, Yong; Lindgren, Anne G.; Yang, Otto O.; Rao, Jianyu; Clark, Amander T.; Di Carlo, Dino

    2012-01-01

    Cell state is often assayed through measurement of biochemical and biophysical markers. Although biochemical markers have been widely used, intrinsic biophysical markers, such as the ability to mechanically deform under a load, are advantageous in that they do not require costly labeling or sample preparation. However, current techniques that assay cell mechanical properties have had limited adoption in clinical and cell biology research applications. Here, we demonstrate an automated microfluidic technology capable of probing single-cell deformability at approximately 2,000 cells/s. The method uses inertial focusing to uniformly deliver cells to a stretching extensional flow where cells are deformed at high strain rates, imaged with a high-speed camera, and computationally analyzed to extract quantitative parameters. This approach allows us to analyze cells at throughputs orders of magnitude faster than previously reported biophysical flow cytometers and single-cell mechanics tools, while creating easily observable larger strains and limiting user time commitment and bias through automation. Using this approach we rapidly assay the deformability of native populations of leukocytes and malignant cells in pleural effusions and accurately predict disease state in patients with cancer and immune activation with a sensitivity of 91% and a specificity of 86%. As a tool for biological research, we show the deformability we measure is an early biomarker for pluripotent stem cell differentiation and is likely linked to nuclear structural changes. Microfluidic deformability cytometry brings the statistical accuracy of traditional flow cytometric techniques to label-free biophysical biomarkers, enabling applications in clinical diagnostics, stem cell characterization, and single-cell biophysics. PMID:22547795

  15. In situ single cell detection via microfluidic magnetic bead assay

    PubMed Central

    KC, Pawan; Zhang, Ge; Zhe, Jiang

    2017-01-01

    We present a single cell detection device based on magnetic bead assay and micro Coulter counters. This device consists of two successive micro Coulter counters, coupled with a high gradient magnetic field generated by an external magnet. The device can identify single cells in terms of the transit time difference of the cell through the two micro Coulter counters. Target cells are conjugated with magnetic beads via specific antibody and antigen binding. A target cell traveling through the two Coulter counters interacts with the magnetic field, and have a longer transit time at the 1st counter than that at the 2nd counter. In comparison, a non-target cell has no interaction with the magnetic field, and hence has nearly the same transit times through the two counters. Each cell passing through the two counters generates two consecutive voltage pulses one after the other; the pulse widths and magnitudes indicating the cell’s transit times through the counters and the cell’s size respectively. Thus, by measuring the pulse widths (transit times) of each cell through the two counters, each single target cell can be differentiated from non-target cells even if they have similar sizes. We experimentally proved that the target human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and non-target rat adipose-derived stem cells (rASCs) have significant different transit time distribution, from which we can determine the recognition regions for both cell groups quantitatively. We further demonstrated that within a mixed cell population of rASCs and HUVECs, HUVECs can be detected in situ and the measured HUVECs ratios agree well with the pre-set ratios. With the simple device structure and easy sample preparation, this method is expected to enable single cell detection in a continuous flow and can be applied to facilitate general cell detection applications such as stem cell identification and enumeration. PMID:28222140

  16. Effects of incremental exercise on cerebral oxygenation measured by near-infrared spectroscopy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rooks, Cherie R; Thom, Nathaniel J; McCully, Kevin K; Dishman, Rod K

    2010-10-01

    We conducted a systematic review and meta-regression analysis to quantify effects of exercise on brain hemodynamics measured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). The results indicate that acute incremental exercise (categorized relative to aerobic capacity (VO(2)peak) as low - <30% VO(2)peak; moderate - ≥30% VO(2)peak to <60% VO(2)peak; hard - ≥60% VO(2)peak to oxygenated hemoglobin (O(2)Hb) or other measures of oxygen level (O(2)Hbdiff) or saturation (SCO(2)) (0.92±0.67, 1.17), deoxygenated hemoglobin (dHb) (0.87±0.56, 1.19), and blood volume estimated by total hemoglobin (tHb) (1.21±0.84, 1.59). After peaking at hard intensities, cerebral oxygen levels dropped during very hard intensities. People who were aerobically trained attained higher levels of cortical oxygen, dHb, and tHb than untrained people during very hard intensities. Among untrained people, a marked drop in oxygen levels and a small increase in dHb at very hard intensities accompanied declines in tHb, implying reduced blood flow. In 6 studies of 222 patients with heart or lung conditions, oxygenation and dHb were lowered or unchanged during exercise compared to baseline. In conclusion, prefrontal oxygenation measured with NIRS in healthy people showed a quadratic response to incremental exercise, rising between moderate and hard intensities, then falling at very hard intensities. Training status influenced the responses. While methodological improvements in measures of brain oxygen are forthcoming, these results extend the evidence relevant to existing models of central limitations to maximal exercise.

  17. Measurement of mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates in mouse primary neurons and astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Sofia M; Giménez-Cassina, Alfredo; Danial, Nika N

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of microplate-based assays that measure extracellular fluxes in intact, living cells has revolutionized the field of cellular bioenergetics. Here, we describe a method for real time assessment of mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates in primary mouse cortical neurons and astrocytes. This method requires the Extracellular Flux Analyzer Instrument (XF24, Seahorse Biosciences), which uses fluorescent oxygen sensors in a microplate assay format.

  18. Measurement of Oxygen Consumption Using the Canadian Clearance Diving Apparatus (CCDA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    tem for the measurement of Vo in water. * iii INTRODUCTION In semi- closed circuit underwater breathing apparatus (SCCBA) the oxygen partial pressure...13 9 9 0 0 ii ABSTRACT The Canadian Clearance Diving Apparatus (CCDA) was modified to serve as a 100% oxygen rebreathing ...were open- circuit , compressed-air systems based upon the principles used in the LRBS. In the LRBA and UMAS, the subject inspired gas from a bag

  19. An Optical Multifrequency Phase-Modulation Method Using Microbeads for Measuring Intracellular Oxygen Concentrations in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Schmälzlin, Elmar; van Dongen, Joost T.; Klimant, Ingo; Marmodée, Bettina; Steup, Martin; Fisahn, Joachim; Geigenberger, Peter; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd

    2005-01-01

    A technique has been developed to measure absolute intracellular oxygen concentrations in green plants. Oxygen-sensitive phosphorescent microbeads were injected into the cells and an optical multifrequency phase-modulation technique was used to discriminate the sensor signal from the strong autofluorescence of the plant tissue. The method was established using photosynthesis-competent cells of the giant algae Chara corallina L., and was validated by application to various cell types of other plant species. PMID:16049223

  20. Real time measurement of myocardial oxygen dynamics during cardiac ischemia-reperfusion of rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gi-Ja; Kim, Seung Ki; Kang, Sung Wook; Kim, Ok-Kyun; Chae, Su-Jin; Choi, Samjin; Shin, Jae Ho; Park, Hun-Kuk; Chung, Joo-Ho

    2012-11-21

    Because oxygen plays a critical role in the pathophysiology of myocardial injury during subsequent reperfusion, as well as ischemia, the accurate measurement of myocardial oxygen tension is crucial for the assessment of myocardial viability by ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury. Therefore, we utilized a sol-gel derived electrochemical oxygen microsensor to monitor changes in oxygen tension during myocardial ischemia-reperfusion. We also analyzed differences in oxygen tension recovery in post-ischemic myocardium depending on ischemic time to investigate the correlation between recovery parameters for oxygen tension and the severity of IR injury. An oxygen sensor was built using a xerogel-modified platinum microsensor and a coiled Ag/AgCl reference electrode. Rat hearts were randomly divided into 5 groups: control (0 min ischemia), I-10 (10 min ischemia), I-20 (20 min ischemia), I-30 (30 min ischemia), and I-40 (40 min ischemia) groups (n = 3 per group, respectively). After the induction of ischemia, reperfusion was performed for 60 min. As soon as the ischemia was initiated, oxygen tension rapidly declined to near zero levels. When reperfusion was initiated, the changes in oxygen tension depended on ischemic time. The normalized peak level of oxygen tension during the reperfusion episode was 188 ± 27 in group I-10, 120 ± 24 in group I-20, 12.5 ± 10.6 in group I-30, and 1.24 ± 1.09 in group I-40 (p < 0.001, n = 3, respectively). After 60 min of reperfusion, the normalized restoration level was 129 ± 30 in group I-10, 88 ± 4 in group I-20, 3.40 ± 4.82 in group I-30, and 0.99 ± 0.94 in group I-40 (p < 0.001, n = 3, respectively). The maximum and restoration values of oxygen tension in groups I-30 and I-40 after reperfusion were lower than pre-ischemic values. In particular, oxygen tension in the I-40 group was not recovered at all. These results were also demonstrated by TTC staining. We suggest that these recovery parameters could be utilized as an index of

  1. LUMOS - A Sensitive and Reliable Optode System for Measuring Dissolved Oxygen in the Nanomolar Range

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, Philipp; Larndorfer, Christoph; Garcia-Robledo, Emilio; Larsen, Morten; Borisov, Sergey M.; Revsbech, Niels-Peter; Glud, Ronnie N.; Canfield, Donald E.; Klimant, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Most commercially available optical oxygen sensors target the measuring range of 300 to 2 μmol L-1. However these are not suitable for investigating the nanomolar range which is relevant for many important environmental situations. We therefore developed a miniaturized phase fluorimeter based measurement system called the LUMOS (Luminescence Measuring Oxygen Sensor). It consists of a readout device and specialized “sensing chemistry” that relies on commercially available components. The sensor material is based on palladium(II)-5,10,15,20-tetrakis-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorphenyl)-porphyrin embedded in a Hyflon AD 60 polymer matrix and has a KSV of 6.25 x 10-3 ppmv-1. The applicable measurement range is from 1000 nM down to a detection limit of 0.5 nM. A second sensor material based on the platinum(II) analogue of the porphyrin is spectrally compatible with the readout device and has a measurement range of 20 μM down to 10 nM. The LUMOS device is a dedicated system optimized for a high signal to noise ratio, but in principle any phase flourimeter can be adapted to act as a readout device for the highly sensitive and robust sensing chemistry. Vise versa, the LUMOS fluorimeter can be used for read out of less sensitive optical oxygen sensors based on the same or similar indicator dyes, for example for monitoring oxygen at physiological conditions. The presented sensor system exhibits lower noise, higher resolution and higher sensitivity than the electrochemical STOX sensor previously used to measure nanomolar oxygen concentrations. Oxygen contamination in common sample containers has been investigated and microbial or enzymatic oxygen consumption at nanomolar concentrations is presented. PMID:26029920

  2. Measurements of electron attachment by oxygen molecule in proportional counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosaki, M.; Kawano, T.; Isozumi, Y.

    2013-11-01

    We present pulse height measurements for 5-keV Auger electrons from a radioactive 55Fe source mounted at the inner cathode surface of cylindrical proportional counter, which is operated with CH4 admixed dry air or N2. A clear shift of the pulse height has been observed by varying the amount of the admixtures; the number of electrons, created in the primary ionization by Auger electrons, is decreased by the electron attachment of the admixtures during their drift from the place near the source to the anode wire. The large gas amplification (typically 104) in the secondary ionization of proportional counter makes it possible to investigate a small change in the number of primary electrons. The electron attenuation cross-section of O2 has been evaluated by analyzing the shifts of the pulse height caused by the electron attachment to dry air and N2.

  3. Standardization for oxygen isotope ratio measurement - still an unsolved problem.

    PubMed

    Kornexl; Werner; Gehre

    1999-07-01

    Numerous organic and inorganic laboratory standards were gathered from nine European and North American laboratories and were analyzed for their delta(18)O values with a new on-line high temperature pyrolysis system that was calibrated using Vienna standard mean ocean water (VSMOW) and standard light Antartic precipitation (SLAP) internationally distributed reference water samples. Especially for organic materials, discrepancies between reported and measured values were high, ranging up to 2 per thousand. The reasons for these discrepancies are discussed and the need for an exact and reliable calibration of existing reference materials, as well as for the establishment of additional organic and inorganic reference materials is stressed. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Oxygen Isotope Measurements of a Rare Murchison Type A CAI and Its Rim

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matzel, J. E. P.; Simon, J. I.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Jacobsen, B.; Simon, S. B.; Grossman, L.

    2013-01-01

    Ca-, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) from CV chondrites commonly show oxygen isotope heterogeneity among different mineral phases within individual inclusions reflecting the complex history of CAIs in both the solar nebula and/or parent bodies. The degree of isotopic exchange is typically mineral-specific, yielding O-16-rich spinel, hibonite and pyroxene and O-16-depleted melilite and anorthite. Recent work demonstrated large and systematic variations in oxygen isotope composition within the margin and Wark-Lovering rim of an Allende Type A CAI. These variations suggest that some CV CAIs formed from several oxygen reservoirs and may reflect transport between distinct regions of the solar nebula or varying gas composition near the proto-Sun. Oxygen isotope compositions of CAIs from other, less-altered chondrites show less intra-CAI variability and 16O-rich compositions. The record of intra-CAI oxygen isotope variability in CM chondrites, which commonly show evidence for low-temperature aqueous alteration, is less clear, in part because the most common CAIs found in CM chondrites are mineralogically simple (hibonite +/- spinel or spinel +/- pyroxene) and are composed of minerals less susceptible to O-isotopic exchange. No measurements of the oxygen isotope compositions of rims on CAIs in CM chondrites have been reported. Here, we present oxygen isotope data from a rare, Type A CAI from the Murchison meteorite, MUM-1. The data were collected from melilite, hibonite, perovskite and spinel in a traverse into the interior of the CAI and from pyroxene, melilite, anorthite, and spinel in the Wark-Lovering rim. Our objectives were to (1) document any evidence for intra-CAI oxygen isotope variability; (2) determine the isotopic composition of the rim minerals and compare their composition(s) to the CAI interior; and (3) compare the MUM-1 data to oxygen isotope zoning profiles measured from CAIs in other chondrites.

  5. ACE EPAM and Van Allen Probes RBSPICE measurements of interplanetary oxygen injection to the inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, J. D.; Manweiler, J. W.; Gerrard, A. J.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2015-12-01

    On March 17, 2015, a significant oxygen-rich interplanetary event was measure by the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) Electron Proton Alpha Monitor (EPAM) instrument. At the same time the Van Allen Probes Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument recorded significant enhancements of oxygen in the inner magnetosphere. We present a detailed analysis of this event utilizing a new method of exploiting the EPAM Pulse Height Analyzer (PHA) data to precisely resolve helium and oxygen spectra within the 0.5 to 5 MeV/nuc range. We also present the flux, partial particle pressures, and pitch angle distributions of the ion measurements from RBSPICE. During this event, both EPAM and RBSPICE measured O:He ratios greater than 10:1. The pitch angle distributions from RBSPICE-B show a strong beam of oxygen at an L ~ 5.8 early on March 17th during orbit. The timing between the observations of the oxygen peak at ACE and the beam observed at RBSPICE-B is consistent with the travel-time required for energetic particle transport from L1 to Earth and access to the magnetosphere. We assert that the oxygen seen by RBSPICE during the initial phase of this event is the result of direct injection from the interplanetary medium of energetic ions. This poster contains the observations and detailed calculations to support this assertion.

  6. Determination of oxygen stoichiometry of oxide fuel during high temperature vapour pressure measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beneš, O.; Konings, R. J. M.; Colle, J.-Y.

    2015-07-01

    This study presents an original approach of oxygen stoichiometry determination during high temperature (>2000 K) measurements of vapour pressure using the Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry technique. The method has been developed taking into account the vapour pressure measurements of series of (U1-x,Pux)O2-δ samples with x(Pu) = 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 together with pure UO2-δ and PuO2-δ end-members coupled with equilibrium calculations based on thermodynamic assessment of the U-Pu-O system. The presented method consists of two steps; in the first step the oxygen potential of the oxide phase is determined based on the measured partial vapour pressures of UO(g), UO2(g), PuO(g) and PuO2(g) gaseous species and during the second step the thus determined oxygen potential is linked with the matching oxygen stoichiometry of the sample. From the obtained results it has been demonstrated that it is possible to accurately estimate the oxygen stoichiometry of the mixed oxide fuel samples knowing the description of the oxygen potential of the corresponding end-members only.

  7. Microwave absorption of oxygen measured with a Fabry-Perot spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poon, R. K. L.

    1977-01-01

    A semiconfocal configuration of a Fabry-Perot interferometer is described, which can be used for measuring moderately weak absorption at a fixed microwave frequency as a function of pressure by measuring the change in the Q of the system when the gas is introduced. An accuracy of 0.3 dB/km at 58.82 GHz is achieved with just conventional laboratory equipment. The absorption need not be resonant, and can be determined as a function of such physical factors as pressure, temperature, and mixture composition. Oxygen absorption measurements support calculations based on theories of line overlap inside the oxygen absorption band at subatmospheric pressure.

  8. High time resolution measurements of the thermosphere from Fabry-Perot Interferometer measurements of atomic oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, E. A. K.; Aruliah, A. L.; Griffin, E. M.; McWhirter, I.

    2007-06-01

    Recent advances in the performance of CCD detectors have enabled a high time resolution study of the high latitude upper thermosphere with Fabry-Perot Interferometers (FPIs) to be performed. 10-s integration times were used during a campaign in April 2004 on an FPI located in northern Sweden in the auroral oval. The FPI is used to study the thermosphere by measuring the oxygen red line emission at 630.0 nm, which emits at an altitude of approximately 240 km. Previous time resolutions have been 4 min at best, due to the cycle of look directions normally observed. By using 10 s rather than 40 s integration times, and by limiting the number of full cycles in a night, high resolution measurements down to 15 s were achievable. This has allowed the maximum variability of the thermospheric winds and temperatures, and 630.0 nm emission intensities, at approximately 240 km, to be determined as a few minutes. This is a significantly greater variability than the often assumed value of 1 h or more. A Lomb-Scargle analysis of this data has shown evidence of gravity wave activity with waves with short periods. Gravity waves are an important feature of mesosphere-lower thermosphere (MLT) dynamics, observed using many techniques and providing an important mechanism for energy transfer between atmospheric regions. At high latitudes gravity waves may be generated in-situ by localised auroral activity. Short period waves were detected in all four clear nights when this experiment was performed, in 630.0 nm intensities and thermospheric winds and temperatures. Waves with many periodicities were observed, from periods of several hours, down to 14 min. These waves were seen in all parameters over several nights, implying that this variability is a typical property of the thermosphere.

  9. Single-cell mRNA quantification and differential analysis with Census.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xiaojie; Hill, Andrew; Packer, Jonathan; Lin, Dejun; Ma, Yi-An; Trapnell, Cole

    2017-03-01

    Single-cell gene expression studies promise to reveal rare cell types and cryptic states, but the high variability of single-cell RNA-seq measurements frustrates efforts to assay transcriptional differences between cells. We introduce the Census algorithm to convert relative RNA-seq expression levels into relative transcript counts without the need for experimental spike-in controls. Analyzing changes in relative transcript counts led to dramatic improvements in accuracy compared to normalized read counts and enabled new statistical tests for identifying developmentally regulated genes. Census counts can be analyzed with widely used regression techniques to reveal changes in cell-fate-dependent gene expression, splicing patterns and allelic imbalances. We reanalyzed single-cell data from several developmental and disease studies, and demonstrate that Census enabled robust analysis at multiple layers of gene regulation. Census is freely available through our updated single-cell analysis toolkit, Monocle 2.

  10. Design and Analysis of Single-Cell Sequencing Experiments.

    PubMed

    Grün, Dominic; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2015-11-05

    Recent advances in single-cell sequencing hold great potential for exploring biological systems with unprecedented resolution. Sequencing the genome of individual cells can reveal somatic mutations and allows the investigation of clonal dynamics. Single-cell transcriptome sequencing can elucidate the cell type composition of a sample. However, single-cell sequencing comes with major technical challenges and yields complex data output. In this Primer, we provide an overview of available methods and discuss experimental design and single-cell data analysis. We hope that these guidelines will enable a growing number of researchers to leverage the power of single-cell sequencing.

  11. Brief inhalation method to measure cerebral oxygen extraction fraction with PET: Accuracy determination under pathologic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Altman, D.I.; Lich, L.L.; Powers, W.J. )

    1991-09-01

    The initial validation of the brief inhalation method to measure cerebral oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) with positron emission tomography (PET) was performed in non-human primates with predominantly normal cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO2). Sensitivity analysis by computer simulation, however, indicated that this method may be subject to increasing error as CMRO2 decreases. Accuracy of the method under pathologic conditions of reduced CMRO2 has not been determined. Since reduced CMRO2 values are observed frequently in newborn infants and in regions of ischemia and infarction in adults, we determined the accuracy of the brief inhalation method in non-human primates by comparing OEF measured with PET to OEF measured by arteriovenous oxygen difference (A-VO2) under pathologic conditions of reduced CMRO2 (0.27-2.68 ml 100g-1 min-1). A regression equation of OEF (PET) = 1.07 {times} OEF (A-VO2) + 0.017 (r = 0.99, n = 12) was obtained. The absolute error in oxygen extraction measured with PET was small (mean 0.03 {plus minus} 0.04, range -0.03 to 0.12) and was independent of cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, CMRO2, or OEF. The percent error was higher (19 {plus minus} 37), particularly when OEF is below 0.15. These data indicate that the brief inhalation method can be used for measurement of cerebral oxygen extraction and cerebral oxygen metabolism under pathologic conditions of reduced cerebral oxygen metabolism, with these limitations borne in mind.

  12. Polarographic Electrode Measures of Cerebral Tissue Oxygenation: Implications for Functional Brain Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Kate; Saka, Mohamad; Jones, Myles

    2008-01-01

    The changes in blood flow, blood volume and oxygenation that accompany focal increases in neural activity are collectively referred to as the hemodynamic response and form the basis of non-invasive neuroimaging techniques such as blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging. A principle factor influencing blood oxygenation, the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption is poorly understood and as such, data from imaging techniques are difficult to interpret in terms of the underlying neural activity. In particular how neurometabolic changes vary temporally, spatially and in magnitude remains uncertain. Furthermore knowledge of which aspects of neural activity are closely reflected by metabolic changes is essential for the correct interpretation of cognitive neuroscience studies in terms of information processing. Polarographic electrode measurements of cerebral tissue oxygenation in animal models following presentation of sensory stimuli have started to address these issues. Early studies demonstrated both increases and decreases in tissue oxygenation following neural activation. However a recent series of elegant studies in the cat visual system demonstrated a tight spatial and temporal coupling between evoked peri-synaptic activity and oxygen consumption following presentation of visual stimuli. PMID:27873951

  13. Comparison of atomic oxygen measurements by incoherent scatter and satellite-borne mass spectrometer techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedin, A. E.; Alcayde, D.

    1974-01-01

    Atomic oxygen densities determined by the incoherent scatter technique are compared to densities deduced from satellite-borne mass spectrometer measurements and are found to agree within experimental error. The diurnal variations inferred from the incoherent scatter measurements do show, however, some departure from diurnal variations found by modeling the mass spectrometer results. Some implications of these departures are briefly discussed.

  14. Comparison of atomic oxygen measurements by incoherent scatter and satellite-borne mass spectrometer techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedin, A. E.; Alcayde, D.

    1974-01-01

    Atomic oxygen densities determined by the incoherent scatter technique are compared to densities deduced from satellite-borne mass spectrometer measurements and are found to agree within experimental error. The diurnal variations inferred from the incoherent scatter measurements do show, however, some departure from diurnal variations found by modeling the mass spectrometer results. Some implications of these departures are briefly discussed.

  15. The Kety-Schmidt Technique for Quantitative Perfusion and Oxygen Metabolism Measurements in the MR Environment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, John J.; Powers, William J.; Faulkner, Chad B.; Boyle, Patrick J.; Derdeyn, Colin P.

    2013-01-01

    The Kety-Schmidt technique provides quantitative measurement of whole brain cerebral blood flow (CBF). CBF is measured as the area between the arterial and venous washout curves of a diffusible tracer. Oxygen extraction and metabolism may be calculated from arterial and venous samples. In this report we present a method for performing these measurements in an MR environment. This technique could be useful for validation of MR methods of hemodynamic and metabolic measurements in humans. PMID:22997166

  16. Single-cell protein from waste cellulose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, C. E.; Callihan, C. D.

    1973-01-01

    The recycle, reuse, or reclamation of single cell protein from liquid and solid agricultural waste fibers by a fermentation process is reported. It is shown that cellulose comprises the bulk of the fibers at 50% to 55% of the dry weight of the refuse and that its biodegradability is of prime importance in the choice of a substrate. The application of sodium hydroxide followed by heat and pressure serves to de-polymerize and disrupt lignin structure while swelling the cellulose to increase water uptake and pore volume. Some of the lignin, hemi-celluloses, ash, and cellulose of the material is hydrolized and solubilized. Introduction of microorganisms to the substrate fibers mixed with nutrients produces continuous fermentation of cellulose for further protein extraction and purification.

  17. Nanowire-based single-cell endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ruoxue; Park, Ji-Ho; Choi, Yeonho; Heo, Chul-Joon; Yang, Seung-Man; Lee, Luke P.; Yang, Peidong

    2012-03-01

    One-dimensional smart probes based on nanowires and nanotubes that can safely penetrate the plasma membrane and enter biological cells are potentially useful in high-resolution and high-throughput gene and drug delivery, biosensing and single-cell electrophysiology. However, using such probes for optical communication across the cellular membrane at the subwavelength level remains limited. Here, we show that a nanowire waveguide attached to the tapered tip of an optical fibre can guide visible light into intracellular compartments of a living mammalian cell, and can also detect optical signals from subcellular regions with high spatial resolution. Furthermore, we show that through light-activated mechanisms the endoscope can deliver payloads into cells with spatial and temporal specificity. Moreover, insertion of the endoscope into cells and illumination of the guided laser did not induce any significant toxicity in the cells.

  18. Nanosensing at the single cell level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2008-02-01

    This article presents an overview of the development, operation, and applications of optical nanobiosensors for use in in vivo detection of biotargets in individual living cells. The nanobiosensors are equipped with immobilized bioreceptor probes (e.g., antibodies, enzyme substrate) selective to specific molecular targets. Laser excitation is transmitted into the fiber producing an evanescent field at the tip of the fiber in order to excite target molecules bound to the bioreceptors immobilized at the fiber tips. A photometric system detects the optical signal (e.g., fluorescence) originated from the analyte molecules or from the analyte-bioreceptor reaction. Examples of detection of biospecies and molecular signaling pathways of apoptosis in a living cell are discussed to illustrate the potential of the nanobiosensor technology for single cell analysis.

  19. From single cells to social perception

    PubMed Central

    Barraclough, Nick E.; Perrett, David I.

    2011-01-01

    Research describing the cellular coding of faces in non-human primates often provides the underlying physiological framework for our understanding of face processing in humans. Models of face perception, explanations of perceptual after-effects from viewing particular types of faces, and interpretation of human neuroimaging data rely on monkey neurophysiological data and the assumption that neurophysiological responses of humans are comparable to those recorded in the non-human primate. Here, we review studies that describe cells that preferentially respond to faces, and assess the link between the physiological characteristics of single cells and social perception. Principally, we describe cells recorded from the non-human primate, although a limited number of cells have been recorded in humans, and are included in order to appraise the validity of non-human physiological data for our understanding of human face and social perception. PMID:21536557

  20. Hand-Held and Integrated Single-Cell Pipettes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Successful single-cell isolation is a primary step for subsequent chemical and biological analyses of single cells. Conventional single-cell isolation methods often encounter operational complexity, limited efficiency, deterioration of cell viability, incompetence in the isolation of a single-cell into nanoliter liquid, and/or inability to select single adherent cells with specific phenotypes. Here, we develop a hand-held single-cell pipet (hSCP) that is rapid, operationally simple, highly efficient, and inexpensive for unbiased isolation of single viable suspended cells directly from submicroliter cell suspensions into nanoliter droplets without the assistance of any additional equipment. An integrated SCP (iSCP) has also been developed for selective isolation of single suspended and adherent cells according to the fluorescence imaging and morphological features. The isolated single cells can be conveniently transferred into standard 96-/384-well plates, Petri dishes, or vials for cloning, PCR, and other single-cell biochemical assays. PMID:25036187

  1. Digital Microfluidics for Manipulation and Analysis of a Single Cell

    PubMed Central

    He, Jie-Long; Chen, An-Te; Lee, Jyong-Huei; Fan, Shih-Kang

    2015-01-01

    The basic structural and functional unit of a living organism is a single cell. To understand the variability and to improve the biomedical requirement of a single cell, its analysis has become a key technique in biological and biomedical research. With a physical boundary of microchannels and microstructures, single cells are efficiently captured and analyzed, whereas electric forces sort and position single cells. Various microfluidic techniques have been exploited to manipulate single cells through hydrodynamic and electric forces. Digital microfluidics (DMF), the manipulation of individual droplets holding minute reagents and cells of interest by electric forces, has received more attention recently. Because of ease of fabrication, compactness and prospective automation, DMF has become a powerful approach for biological application. We review recent developments of various microfluidic chips for analysis of a single cell and for efficient genetic screening. In addition, perspectives to develop analysis of single cells based on DMF and emerging functionality with high throughput are discussed. PMID:26389890

  2. Single-cell transcriptome sequencing: recent advances and remaining challenges

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Serena; Trapnell, Cole

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell RNA-sequencing methods are now robust and economically practical and are becoming a powerful tool for high-throughput, high-resolution transcriptomic analysis of cell states and dynamics. Single-cell approaches circumvent the averaging artifacts associated with traditional bulk population data, yielding new insights into the cellular diversity underlying superficially homogeneous populations. Thus far, single-cell RNA-sequencing has already shown great effectiveness in unraveling complex cell populations, reconstructing developmental trajectories, and modeling transcriptional dynamics. Ongoing technical improvements to single-cell RNA-sequencing throughput and sensitivity, the development of more sophisticated analytical frameworks for single-cell data, and an increasing array of complementary single-cell assays all promise to expand the usefulness and potential applications of single-cell transcriptomic profiling. PMID:26949524

  3. Digital Microfluidics for Manipulation and Analysis of a Single Cell.

    PubMed

    He, Jie-Long; Chen, An-Te; Lee, Jyong-Huei; Fan, Shih-Kang

    2015-09-15

    The basic structural and functional unit of a living organism is a single cell. To understand the variability and to improve the biomedical requirement of a single cell, its analysis has become a key technique in biological and biomedical research. With a physical boundary of microchannels and microstructures, single cells are efficiently captured and analyzed, whereas electric forces sort and position single cells. Various microfluidic techniques have been exploited to manipulate single cells through hydrodynamic and electric forces. Digital microfluidics (DMF), the manipulation of individual droplets holding minute reagents and cells of interest by electric forces, has received more attention recently. Because of ease of fabrication, compactness and prospective automation, DMF has become a powerful approach for biological application. We review recent developments of various microfluidic chips for analysis of a single cell and for efficient genetic screening. In addition, perspectives to develop analysis of single cells based on DMF and emerging functionality with high throughput are discussed.

  4. Robust high-performance nanoliter-volume single-cell multiple displacement amplification on planar substrates

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Kaston; Klaus, Anders; Lin, Bill K.; Laks, Emma; Biele, Justina; Lai, Daniel; Bashashati, Ali; Huang, Yi-Fei; Aniba, Radhouane; Moksa, Michelle; Steif, Adi; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Hirst, Martin; Shah, Sohrab P.; Aparicio, Samuel; Hansen, Carl L.

    2016-01-01

    The genomes of large numbers of single cells must be sequenced to further understanding of the biological significance of genomic heterogeneity in complex systems. Whole genome amplification (WGA) of single cells is generally the first step in such studies, but is prone to nonuniformity that can compromise genomic measurement accuracy. Despite recent advances, robust performance in high-throughput single-cell WGA remains elusive. Here, we introduce droplet multiple displacement amplification (MDA), a method that uses commercially available liquid dispensing to perform high-throughput single-cell MDA in nanoliter volumes. The performance of droplet MDA is characterized using a large dataset of 129 normal diploid cells, and is shown to exceed previously reported single-cell WGA methods in amplification uniformity, genome coverage, and/or robustness. We achieve up to 80% coverage of a single-cell genome at 5× sequencing depth, and demonstrate excellent single-nucleotide variant (SNV) detection using targeted sequencing of droplet MDA product to achieve a median allelic dropout of 15%, and using whole genome sequencing to achieve false and true positive rates of 9.66 × 10−6 and 68.8%, respectively, in a G1-phase cell. We further show that droplet MDA allows for the detection of copy number variants (CNVs) as small as 30 kb in single cells of an ovarian cancer cell line and as small as 9 Mb in two high-grade serous ovarian cancer samples using only 0.02× depth. Droplet MDA provides an accessible and scalable method for performing robust and accurate CNV and SNV measurements on large numbers of single cells. PMID:27412862

  5. Single cell trapping and DNA damage analysis using microwell arrays

    PubMed Central

    Wood, David K.; Weingeist, David M.; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.; Engelward, Bevin P.

    2010-01-01

    With a direct link to cancer, aging, and heritable diseases as well as a critical role in cancer treatment, the importance of DNA damage is well-established. The intense interest in DNA damage in applications ranging from epidemiology to drug development drives an urgent need for robust, high throughput, and inexpensive tools for objective, quantitative DNA damage analysis. We have developed a simple method for high throughput DNA damage measurements that provides information on multiple lesions and pathways. Our method utilizes single cells captured by gravity into a microwell array with DNA damage revealed morphologically by gel electrophoresis. Spatial encoding enables simultaneous assays of multiple experimental conditions performed in parallel with fully automated analysis. This method also enables novel functionalities, including multiplexed labeling for parallel single cell assays, as well as DNA damage measurement in cell aggregates. We have also developed 24- and 96-well versions, which are applicable to high throughput screening. Using this platform, we have quantified DNA repair capacities of individuals with different genetic backgrounds, and compared the efficacy of potential cancer chemotherapeutics as inhibitors of a critical DNA repair enzyme, human AP endonuclease. This platform enables high throughput assessment of multiple DNA repair pathways and subpathways in parallel, thus enabling new strategies for drug discovery, genotoxicity testing, and environmental health. PMID:20534572

  6. Near infrared noninvasive quantitative measurement of oxygen content in hepatic tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhicheng; Tian, Yan; Tian, Jinwen; Liu, Jian; Xie, Zeping

    2006-09-01

    A new noninvasive measurement of oxygen contents in hepatic tissues using near-infrared technique according to physiological characteristics is proposed. The procedure can be divided into three categories. First a quantitative formula is introduced to measure oxygen contents in hepatic tissues based on the relationship between absorption coefficient and typical wavelengths, where 760nm and 850nm infrared wavebands are utilized in this paper. Second, many characteristics such as waveforms of oxygen contents in hepatic tissues, cross correlation of blood-oxygen and power spectrum of oxygen contents, are analyzed detailedly with regard to different symptoms in hepatic tissues. Finally, a conclusion can be drawn that waveforms of oxygen contents, cross correlation and power spectrum are three main features, which can well depict the symptoms of hepatic tissues. The proposed method is applied to examine 143 people, including 40 normal people and 103 patients with different symptoms in hepatic tissues. The false probability is 8.3% and the missing probability is 13.7% under specified criterion. The clinical experiments show that our proposed method is simple but effective and can be used to routine examinations or intensive care units for liverish patients.

  7. Observations on intrauterine oxygen tension measured by fibre-optic microsensors.

    PubMed

    Ottosen, Lars D M; Hindkaer, Johnny; Husth, Merete; Petersen, Dorrit Elschner; Kirk, John; Ingerslev, Hans Jakob

    2006-09-01

    Understanding the biology of reproductive organs is essential for the development of assisted reproductive techniques. There is at present no direct evidence for either the concentration and dynamics of intrauterine oxygen tension at the endometrial surface, nor its importance for the receptiveness of the endometrium. In this study a new method measured mid-cycle (ranging from day 12-18) endometrial surface oxygen tension in 21 patients referred to intrauterine insemination (IUI). Time series was measured online for a period of 5-10 min. The (mean) individual oxygen tension among patients varied from 4 to 27% air saturation. Overall mean oxygen tension among all patients was 11.8% air saturation. Within the same patient, considerable time-related variations were observed. Some patients exhibited rhythmic oscillations with a frequency in the order of 1 min, whereas others did not show any regular patterns. A good description of endometrial surface oxygen concentration and dynamics was thus obtained, but given the relatively small number of participants, an association with pregnancy following insemination could not be established. Further studies using this new method could elucidate the association between individual intrauterine activity, embryo implantation and endometrial surface oxygen tension.

  8. The Choroidal Eye Oximeter - An instrument for measuring oxygen saturation of choroidal blood in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laing, R. A.; Danisch, L. A.; Young, L. R.

    1975-01-01

    The Choroidal Eye Oximeter is an electro-optical instrument that noninvasively measures the oxygen saturation of choroidal blood in the back of the human eye by a spectrophotometric method. Since choroidal blood is characteristic of blood which is supplied to the brain, the Choroidal Eye Oximeter can be used to monitor the amount of oxygen which is supplied to the brain under varying external conditions. The instrument consists of two basic systems: the optical system and the electronic system. The optical system produces a suitable bi-chromatic beam of light, reflects this beam from the fundus of the subject's eye, and onto a low-noise photodetector. The electronic system amplifies the weak composite signal from the photodetector, computes the average oxygen saturation from the area of the fundus that was sampled, and displays the value of the computed oxygen saturation on a panel meter.

  9. In-situ measurement of photosynthetic oxygen production in the water column.

    PubMed

    Häder, D P; Schäfer, J

    1994-09-01

    A novel hardware device is described to determine photosynthetic and respiratory oxygen uptake and release, respectively, in organisms in their natural habitat even under the rough conditions of their marine environment. Both macroalgae and phytoplankton can be utilized and oxygen exchange can be determined in solar radiation. The chamber can be used at or above the water surface or can be lowered into the water column. The data of oxygen concentration, irradiance and temperature are constantly monitored by a laptop computer and stored in disk files. The experimental data measured in some macroalgae as well as in phytoplankton indicate that the irradiance window for positive net photosynthetic oxygen production is fairly limited under natural conditions; at too low irradiances respiration exceeds photosynthesis and at too high irradiances photosynthesis is shut down by photoinhibition, at least in species not adapted to unattenuated solar radiation.

  10. Single-Cell Analysis of Growth and Cell Division of the Anaerobe Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    PubMed Central

    Fievet, Anouchka; Ducret, Adrien; Mignot, Tâm; Valette, Odile; Robert, Lydia; Pardoux, Romain; Dolla, Alain R.; Aubert, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen significant progress in understanding basic bacterial cell cycle properties such as cell growth and cell division. While characterization and regulation of bacterial cell cycle is quite well-documented in the case of fast growing aerobic model organisms, no data has been so far reported for anaerobic bacteria. This lack of information in anaerobic microorganisms can mainly be explained by the absence of molecular and cellular tools such as single cell microscopy and fluorescent probes usable for anaerobes and essential to study cellular events and/or subcellular localization of the actors involved in cell cycle. In this study, single-cell microscopy has been adapted to study for the first time, in real time, the cell cycle of a bacterial anaerobe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH). This single-cell analysis provides mechanistic insights into the cell division cycle of DvH, which seems to be governed by the recently discussed so-called incremental model that generates remarkably homogeneous cell sizes. Furthermore, cell division was reversibly blocked during oxygen exposure. This may constitute a strategy for anaerobic cells to cope with transient exposure to oxygen that they may encounter in their natural environment, thereby contributing to their aerotolerance. This study lays the foundation for the first molecular, single-cell assay that will address factors that cannot otherwise be resolved in bulk assays and that will allow visualization of a wide range of molecular mechanisms within living anaerobic cells. PMID:26696987

  11. Single-Cell Analysis of Growth and Cell Division of the Anaerobe Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    PubMed

    Fievet, Anouchka; Ducret, Adrien; Mignot, Tâm; Valette, Odile; Robert, Lydia; Pardoux, Romain; Dolla, Alain R; Aubert, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen significant progress in understanding basic bacterial cell cycle properties such as cell growth and cell division. While characterization and regulation of bacterial cell cycle is quite well-documented in the case of fast growing aerobic model organisms, no data has been so far reported for anaerobic bacteria. This lack of information in anaerobic microorganisms can mainly be explained by the absence of molecular and cellular tools such as single cell microscopy and fluorescent probes usable for anaerobes and essential to study cellular events and/or subcellular localization of the actors involved in cell cycle. In this study, single-cell microscopy has been adapted to study for the first time, in real time, the cell cycle of a bacterial anaerobe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH). This single-cell analysis provides mechanistic insights into the cell division cycle of DvH, which seems to be governed by the recently discussed so-called incremental model that generates remarkably homogeneous cell sizes. Furthermore, cell division was reversibly blocked during oxygen exposure. This may constitute a strategy for anaerobic cells to cope with transient exposure to oxygen that they may encounter in their natural environment, thereby contributing to their aerotolerance. This study lays the foundation for the first molecular, single-cell assay that will address factors that cannot otherwise be resolved in bulk assays and that will allow visualization of a wide range of molecular mechanisms within living anaerobic cells.

  12. Oxygen plasma flow properties deduced from laser-induced fluorescence and probe measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löhle, Stefan; Eichhorn, Christoph; Steinbeck, Andreas; Lein, Sebastian; Herdrich, Georg; Röser, Hans-Peter; Auweter-Kurtz, Monika

    2008-04-01

    Estimation of the local dissociation degree and the local mass-specific enthalpy of a pure oxygen plasma flow determined mainly from laser-induced fluorescence measurements are reported. Measurements have been conducted for several generator parameters in an inductively heated plasma wind tunnel. Additional probe measurements of total pressure together with the deduced translational temperature are used to estimate the local mass-specific enthalpy. For a reference condition, full dissociation has been measured. The measured translational temperature of atomic oxygen for this condition is T = 3500 K. Subsequently, the local mass-specific enthalpy has been derived using these local density and temperature measurements. For the reference condition the estimated value of h = 27 MJ/kg is in good agreement with the probe measurements and results from diode laser absorption spectroscopy.

  13. Flexible Sheet-Type Sensor for Noninvasive Measurement of Cellular Oxygen Metabolism on a Culture Dish.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Mari; Takehara, Hiroaki; Akagi, Takanori; Shiono, Hirofumi; Ichiki, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    A novel flexible sensor was developed for the noninvasive oxygen metabolism measurement of cultivated cells and tissues. This device is composed of a transparent double-layered polymer sheet of ethylene-vinyl alcohol (EVOH) and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) having an array of microhole structures of 90 μm diameter and 50 μm depth on its surface. All the microhole structures were equipped with a 1-μm-thick optical chemical sensing layer of platinum porphyrin-fluoropolymer on their bottom. The three-dimensional microstructures of the sensor were fabricated by a newly developed simple and low-cost production method named self-aligned hot embossing. The device was designed to be attached slightly above the cells cultivated on a dish to form a temporarily closed microspace over the target cells during measurement. Since the change in oxygen concentration is relatively fast in the microcompartmentalized culture medium, a rapid evaluation of the oxygen consumption rate is possible by measuring the phosphorescence lifetime of the platinum porphyrin-fluoropolymer. The combined use of the device and an automated optical measurement system enabled the high-throughput sensing of cellular oxygen consumption (100 points/min). We monitored the oxygen metabolism of the human breast cancer cell line MCF7 on a Petri dish and evaluated the oxygen consumption rate to be 0.72 ± 0.12 fmol/min/cell. Furthermore, to demonstrate the utility of the developed sensing system, we demonstrated the mapping of the oxygen consumption rate of rat brain slices and succeeded in visualizing a clear difference among the layer structures of the hippocampus, i.e., the cornu ammonis (CA1 and CA3) and dentate gyrus (DG).

  14. Flexible Sheet-Type Sensor for Noninvasive Measurement of Cellular Oxygen Metabolism on a Culture Dish

    PubMed Central

    Akagi, Takanori; Shiono, Hirofumi; Ichiki, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    A novel flexible sensor was developed for the noninvasive oxygen metabolism measurement of cultivated cells and tissues. This device is composed of a transparent double-layered polymer sheet of ethylene-vinyl alcohol (EVOH) and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) having an array of microhole structures of 90 μm diameter and 50 μm depth on its surface. All the microhole structures were equipped with a 1-μm-thick optical chemical sensing layer of platinum porphyrin-fluoropolymer on their bottom. The three-dimensional microstructures of the sensor were fabricated by a newly developed simple and low-cost production method named self-aligned hot embossing. The device was designed to be attached slightly above the cells cultivated on a dish to form a temporarily closed microspace over the target cells during measurement. Since the change in oxygen concentration is relatively fast in the microcompartmentalized culture medium, a rapid evaluation of the oxygen consumption rate is possible by measuring the phosphorescence lifetime of the platinum porphyrin-fluoropolymer. The combined use of the device and an automated optical measurement system enabled the high-throughput sensing of cellular oxygen consumption (100 points/min). We monitored the oxygen metabolism of the human breast cancer cell line MCF7 on a Petri dish and evaluated the oxygen consumption rate to be 0.72 ± 0.12 fmol/min/cell. Furthermore, to demonstrate the utility of the developed sensing system, we demonstrated the mapping of the oxygen consumption rate of rat brain slices and succeeded in visualizing a clear difference among the layer structures of the hippocampus, i.e., the cornu ammonis (CA1 and CA3) and dentate gyrus (DG). PMID:26624889

  15. Method of measuring blood oxygenation based on spectroscopy of diffusely scattered light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleshnin, M. S.; Orlova, A. G.; Kirillin, M. Yu.; Golubyatnikov, G. Yu.; Turchin, I. V.

    2017-05-01

    A new approach to the measurement of blood oxygenation is developed and implemented, based on an original two-step algorithm reconstructing the relative concentration of biological chromophores (haemoglobin, water, lipids) from the measured spectra of diffusely scattered light at different distances from the radiation source. The numerical experiments and approbation of the proposed approach using a biological phantom have shown the high accuracy of the reconstruction of optical properties of the object in question, as well as the possibility of correct calculation of the haemoglobin oxygenation in the presence of additive noises without calibration of the measuring device. The results of the experimental studies in animals agree with the previously published results obtained by other research groups and demonstrate the possibility of applying the developed method to the monitoring of blood oxygenation in tumour tissues.

  16. Measuring Flow Rate in Crystalline Bedrock Wells Using the Dissolved Oxygen Alteration Method.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Sarah A; Robbins, Gary A

    2017-03-22

    Determination of vertical flow rates in a fractured bedrock well can aid in planning and implementing hydraulic tests, water quality sampling, and improving interpretations of water quality data. Although flowmeters are highly accurate in flow rate measurement, the high cost and logistics may be limiting. In this study the dissolved oxygen alteration method (DOAM) is expanded upon as a low-cost alternative to determine vertical flow rates in crystalline bedrock wells. The method entails altering the dissolved oxygen content in the wellbore through bubbler aeration, and monitoring the vertical advective movement of the dissolved oxygen over time. Measurements were taken for upward and downward flows, and under ambient and pumping conditions. Vertical flow rates from 0.06 to 2.30 Lpm were measured. To validate the method, flow rates determined with the DOAM were compared to pump discharge rates and found to be in agreement within 2.5%.

  17. Flame temperature measurements by radar resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization of molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Sawyer, Jordan; Zhang, Zhili; Adams, Steven F

    2012-10-01

    Here we report nonintrusive local rotational temperature measurements of molecular oxygen, based on coherent microwave scattering (radar) from resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) in room air and hydrogen/air flames. Analyses of the rotational line strengths of the two-photon molecular oxygen C(3)Π(v=2)←X(3)Σ(v'=0) transition have been used to determine the hyperfine rotational state distribution of the ground X(3)Σ(v'=0) state. Rotationally resolved 2+1 REMPI spectra of the molecular oxygen C(3)Π(v=2)←X(3)Σ(v'=0) transition at different temperatures were obtained experimentally by radar REMPI. Rotational temperatures have been determined from the resulting Boltzmann plots. The measurements in general had an accuracy of ~±60 K in the hydrogen/air flames at various equivalence ratios. Discussions about the decreased accuracy for the temperature measurement at elevated temperatures have been presented.

  18. Calibration-free measurement of the oxygen saturation in human retinal vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, Dietrich; Leistritz, Lutz; Hammer, Martin; Scibor, Mateusz; Bartsch, Ulrich; Strobel, Juergen

    1995-05-01

    The detection of alterations in the microcirculation requires both the measurement of the blood-flow and the measurement of the oxygen saturation in whole blood. The basis for the non-invasive estimation of the oxygen saturation is the difference between extinction-spectra of hemoglobin and of oxyhemoglobin. Further in whole blood the scattering at the erythrocytes has to be taken into account. In principle spectral measurements at three neighboring wavelengths are sufficient for the calculation of the oxygen saturation, the concentration- thickness-geometry product and the scattering intensity. Caused by the maximal permissible exposure, the signal/noise ratio is very low in fundus reflectometry. But if the wavelength- range from 520 nm to 620 nm is evaluated, the requirement at the signal/noise ratio is reduced. This reduction corresponds to the square root of the number of discrete wavelengths at which the ocular fundus reflectance is measured. So the oxygen saturation can be calculated with an error lower than +/- 4%. For this purpose the extinction spectrum of whole blood is approximated by a model, including besides the above mentioned unknowns the spectral dependency of the scattering. The experimental arrangement for the measurement of the oxygen saturation is an imaging ophthalmo-spectrometer which allows reflectance measurements with a good spectral (< 3 nm) and local (> 3 micrometers ) resolution simultaneously at a vessel and in its neighborhood. The extinction of blood is calculated as the logarithm of the ratio of the reflectance of the neighborhood and of the vessel. In this calculation the influences of the ocular media, of the background and of eye movements are eliminated. The sensitivity of the detector system has to be very high in order to detect the light which is reflected at a dark background and travels through the blood. The new method was tested by a comparison the oxygen saturation of the blood in an arteriole and a venule in the brain

  19. Development of a new clinically applicable device for embryo evaluation which measures embryo oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Hiroki; Utsunomiya, Hiroki; Shiga, Naomi; Takahashi, Aiko; Ihara, Motomasa; Ishibashi, Masumi; Nishimoto, Mitsuo; Watanabe, Zen; Abe, Hiroyuki; Kumagai, Jin; Terada, Yukihiro; Igarashi, Hideki; Takahashi, Toshifumi; Fukui, Atsushi; Suganuma, Ryota; Tachibana, Masahito; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2016-10-01

    Does a new system-the chip-sensing embryo respiration monitoring system (CERMs)-enable evaluation of embryo viability for potential application in a clinical IVF setting? The system enabled the oxygen consumption rate of spheroids, bovine embryos and frozen-thawed human embryos to be measured, and this rate corresponded to the developmental potential of embryos. To date, no reliable and clinically suitable objective evaluation methods for embryos are available, which circumvent the differences in inter-observer subjective view. Existing systems such as the scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) technique, which enables the measurement of oxygen consumption rate in embryos, need improvement in usability before they can be applied to a clinical setting. This is a prospective original research study. The feasibility of measuring the oxygen consumption rate was assessed using CERMs for 9 spheroids, 9 bovine embryos and 30 redundant frozen-thawed human embryos. The endpoints for the study were whether CERMs could detect a dissolved oxygen gradient with high sensitivity, had comparable accuracy to the SECM measuring system with improved usability, and could predict the development of an embryo to a blastocyst by measuring the oxygen consumption rate. The relationship between the oxygen consumption rate and standard morphological evaluation was also examined. We developed a new CERMs, which enables the oxygen consumption rate to be measured automatically using an electrochemical method. The device was initially used for measuring a dissolved oxygen concentration gradient in order to calculate oxygen consumption rate using nine spheroids. Next, we evaluated data correlation between the CERMs and the SECM measuring systems using nine bovine embryos. Finally, the oxygen consumption rates of 30 human embryos, which were frozen-thawed on 2nd day after fertilization, were measured by CERMs at 6, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h after thawing with standard morphological evaluation

  20. Measuring reactive oxygen and nitrogen species with fluorescent probes: challenges and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Davies, Kelvin J.A.; Dennery, Phyllis A.; Forman, Henry Jay; Grisham, Matthew B.; Mann, Giovanni E.; Moore, Kevin; Roberts, L. Jackson; Ischiropoulos, Harry

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this position paper is to present a critical analysis of the challenges and limitations of the most widely used fluorescent probes for detecting and measuring reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Where feasible, we have made recommendations for the use of alternate probes and appropriate analytical techniques that measure the specific products formed from the reactions between fluorescent probes and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. We have proposed guidelines that will help present and future researchers with regard to the optimal use of selected fluorescent probes and interpretation of results. PMID:22027063

  1. Simple light guide for measuring irradiance in an aqueous oxygen electrode chamber.

    PubMed

    Vogtschaller, Jeff; Wise, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis are often measured with Clark-type oxygen electrodes yet the irradiance level inside aqueous oxygen electrode reaction vessels is seldom reported due to the difficulty of measuring light inside a small volume chamber. We describe a simple light guide terminating in a 90 degrees prism that can be inserted into a reaction vessel. Incoming irradiation is directed to a commercially available quantum sensor positioned at the other end of the light guide. Both materials for and construction of the device are inexpensive.

  2. Muscle oxygenation measurement in humans by noninvasive optical spectroscopy and Locally Weighted Regression.

    PubMed

    Arakaki, Lorilee S L; Schenkman, Kenneth A; Ciesielski, Wayne A; Shaver, Jeremy M

    2013-06-27

    We have developed a method to make real-time, continuous, noninvasive measurements of muscle oxygenation (Mox) from the surface of the skin. A key development was measurement in both the visible and near infrared (NIR) regions. Measurement of both oxygenated and deoxygenated myoglobin and hemoglobin resulted in a more accurate measurement of Mox than could be achieved with measurement of only the deoxygenated components, as in traditional near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Using the second derivative with respect to wavelength reduced the effects of scattering on the spectra and also made oxygenated and deoxygenated forms more distinguishable from each other. Selecting spectral bands where oxygenated and deoxygenated forms absorb filtered out noise and spectral features unrelated to Mox. NIR and visible bands were scaled relative to each other in order to correct for errors introduced by normalization. Multivariate Curve Resolution (MCR) was used to estimate Mox from spectra within each data set collected from healthy subjects. A Locally Weighted Regression (LWR) model was built from calibration set spectra and associated Mox values from 20 subjects using 2562 spectra. LWR and Partial Least Squares (PLS) allow accurate measurement of Mox despite variations in skin pigment or fat layer thickness in different subjects. The method estimated Mox in five healthy subjects with an RMSE of 5.4%.

  3. Noninvasive measurement of cerebral hemoglobin oxygen saturation using two near infrared spectroscopy approaches.

    PubMed

    Quaresima, V; Sacco, S; Totaro, R; Ferrari, M

    2000-04-01

    Spatially resolved spectroscopy (SRS) is a new near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) method that, using the multi-distance approach, measures local cerebral cortex hemoglobin oxygen saturation [J. Matcher, P. Kirkpatrick, K. Nahid, M. Cope, and D. T. Delpy, Proc. SPIE 2389, 486-495 (1995)]. Using a conventional continuous wave NIRS photometer, cerebral venous oxygen saturation (SvO2) can be calculated from oxyhemoglobin and total hemoglobin rise induced by partial occlusion of jugular vein [C. E. Elwell, S. J. Matcher, L. Tyszczuk, J. H. Meek, and D. T. Delpy, Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. 411, 453-460 (1997)]. The aim of this study was to compare direct measurements of forehead tissue oxygenation index (TOI) with the calculated SvO2 during venous occlusion in 16 adult volunteers using a clinical two-channel SRS oximeter (NIRO-300). Measured TOI and calculated SvO2 values of either right or left forehead did not significantly differ. A good agreement between the two NIRS methods was also demonstrated. On 16 other subjects, no significant differences were found between the right and left forehead TOI values measured simultaneously, and between the TOI values measured by channel 1 or 2 on the same side. The results confirm that cerebral cortex hemoglobin oxygen saturation, measured directly by the SRS method, reflects predominantly the saturation of the intracranial venous compartment of circulation.

  4. Microscopic Local Measurement of Blood Flow and Oxygen Tension in Brain Microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamitani, Haruyuki; Takahashi, Ryota; Tsukada, Kousuke

    A multi-photonic imaging system was proposed for measuring blood flow velocity, vessel diameter and blood oxygen tension pO2 simultaneously with high spatio-temporal resolution in the parenchymatous organ microcirculation, such as pial tissue, by using a closed cranial window and two light sources. FITC-stained erythrocytes was used to visualize the microcirculation, and the fluorescent image was recorded by a high-speed video camera for measuring blood flow velocity. Oxygen tension pO2 was measured by oxygen-dependent quenching of phosphorescent molecules, Pd-TCPP, in the microvessels after irradiation of second harmonic light of Nd:YAG pulse laser (532nm). Animal experiments were performed for investigation of blood flow dynamics and oxygen diffusion phenomenon during acute cerebral ischemia using photochemical thrombus formation in the closed cranial window of male Wistar rats. Experimental results showed specific and significant blood flow and oxygen diffusion phenomena related to the abnormal organ tissues, from those the proposed technique would contribute to the trasnlational research for the clinical medicine, concerned in the ischemic dysfunction, angiogenisis, tumorgenisis and so on.

  5. [The Research of Oxygen Measurement by TDLAS Based on Levenberg-Marquardt Nonlinear Fitting].

    PubMed

    Yan, Jie; Zhai, Chang; Wang, Xiao-niu; Huang, Wen-ping

    2015-06-01

    Oxygen concentration is an important monitoring parameter in industrial process. Wavelength modulation spectroscopy of tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) was used to measure concentration of oxygen gas in industrial process by online monitoring. In this paper, we use the characteristic absorption peak of Oxygen at 760 nm to measure the oxygen concentration. Because of the strong coherence of laser, the detection sensitivity of TDLAS is severely restricted by optical interference noise. Especially at low concentrations, there is larger error by extraction signal in the absorption peak waveform because of the background fluctuation caused by optical interference. In response to this situation, Levenberg-Marquardt nonlinear fitting algorithm was proposed, and the use of the absorption line-derivative form of Lorenz line to fit the second harmonic signal and to extract the peak amplitude. On the other hand, Levenberg-Marquardt nonlinear fitting method needs a large amount of calculation. In order to develop the TDLAS analyzer can achieve real-time monitoring of the site, we use the C28 series of DSQ for data processing which support floating-point arithmetic, and the instrument achieve real-time monitoring capabilities in industrial process. Experimental results show that the algorithm can effectively extract the absorption peak characteristic value of the 2nd harmonic signal and overcome the background noise, The ratio of calculated by algorithm to actual oxygen concentration is nearly 1.01, the linear error of the concentration measurement is 1.18%.

  6. Detecting Antigen-Specific T Cell Responses: From Bulk Populations to Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Phetsouphanh, Chansavath; Zaunders, John James; Kelleher, Anthony Dominic

    2015-01-01

    A new generation of sensitive T cell-based assays facilitates the direct quantitation and characterization of antigen-specific T cell responses. Single-cell analyses have focused on measuring the quality and breadth of a response. Accumulating data from these studies demonstrate that there is considerable, previously-unrecognized, heterogeneity. Standard assays, such as the ICS, are often insufficient for characterization of rare subsets of cells. Enhanced flow cytometry with imaging capabilities enables the determination of cell morphology, as well as the spatial localization of the protein molecules within a single cell. Advances in both microfluidics and digital PCR have improved the efficiency of single-cell sorting and allowed multiplexed gene detection at the single-cell level. Delving further into the transcriptome of single-cells using RNA-seq is likely to reveal the fine-specificity of cellular events such as alternative splicing (i.e., splice variants) and allele-specific expression, and will also define the roles of new genes. Finally, detailed analysis of clonally related antigen-specific T cells using single-cell TCR RNA-seq will provide information on pathways of differentiation of memory T cells. With these state of the art technologies the transcriptomics and genomics of Ag-specific T cells can be more definitively elucidated. PMID:26274954

  7. Detecting Antigen-Specific T Cell Responses: From Bulk Populations to Single Cells.

    PubMed

    Phetsouphanh, Chansavath; Zaunders, John James; Kelleher, Anthony Dominic

    2015-08-12

    A new generation of sensitive T cell-based assays facilitates the direct quantitation and characterization of antigen-specific T cell responses. Single-cell analyses have focused on measuring the quality and breadth of a response. Accumulating data from these studies demonstrate that there is considerable, previously-unrecognized, heterogeneity. Standard assays, such as the ICS, are often insufficient for characterization of rare subsets of cells. Enhanced flow cytometry with imaging capabilities enables the determination of cell morphology, as well as the spatial localization of the protein molecules within a single cell. Advances in both microfluidics and digital PCR have improved the efficiency of single-cell sorting and allowed multiplexed gene detection at the single-cell level. Delving further into the transcriptome of single-cells using RNA-seq is likely to reveal the fine-specificity of cellular events such as alternative splicing (i.e., splice variants) and allele-specific expression, and will also define the roles of new genes. Finally, detailed analysis of clonally related antigen-specific T cells using single-cell TCR RNA-seq will provide information on pathways of differentiation of memory T cells. With these state of the art technologies the transcriptomics and genomics of Ag-specific T cells can be more definitively elucidated.

  8. Stochastic models of transcription: from single molecules to single cells.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Alvaro; Choubey, Sandeep; Kondev, Jane

    2013-07-15

    Genes in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells are typically regulated by complex promoters containing multiple binding sites for a variety of transcription factors leading to a specific functional dependence between regulatory inputs and transcriptional outputs. With increasing regularity, the transcriptional outputs from different promoters are being measured in quantitative detail in single-cell experiments thus providing the impetus for the development of quantitative models of transcription. We describe recent progress in developing models of transcriptional regulation that incorporate, to different degrees, the complexity of multi-state promoter dynamics, and its effect on the transcriptional outputs of single cells. The goal of these models is to predict the statistical properties of transcriptional outputs and characterize their variability in time and across a population of cells, as a function of the input concentrations of transcription factors. The interplay between mathematical models of different regulatory mechanisms and quantitative biophysical experiments holds the promise of elucidating the molecular-scale mechanisms of transcriptional regulation in cells, from bacteria to higher eukaryotes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Block-Cell-Printing for live single-cell printing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kai; Chou, Chao-Kai; Xia, Xiaofeng; Hung, Mien-Chie; Qin, Lidong

    2014-01-01

    A unique live-cell printing technique, termed “Block-Cell-Printing” (BloC-Printing), allows for convenient, precise, multiplexed, and high-throughput printing of functional single-cell arrays. Adapted from woodblock printing techniques, the approach employs microfluidic arrays of hook-shaped traps to hold cells at designated positions and directly transfer the anchored cells onto various substrates. BloC-Printing has a minimum turnaround time of 0.5 h, a maximum resolution of 5 µm, close to 100% cell viability, the ability to handle multiple cell types, and efficiently construct protrusion-connected single-cell arrays. The approach enables the large-scale formation of heterotypic cell pairs with controlled morphology and allows for material transport through gap junction intercellular communication. When six types of breast cancer cells are allowed to extend membrane protrusions in the BloC-Printing device for 3 h, multiple biophysical characteristics of cells—including the protrusion percentage, extension rate, and cell length—are easily quantified and found to correlate well with their migration levels. In light of this discovery, BloC-Printing may serve as a rapid and high-throughput cell protrusion characterization tool to measure the invasion and migration capability of cancer cells. Furthermore, primary neurons are also compatible with BloC-Printing. PMID:24516129

  10. Single-cell force spectroscopy of pili-mediated adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullan, Ruby May A.; Beaussart, Audrey; Tripathi, Prachi; Derclaye, Sylvie; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Li, James K.; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2013-12-01

    Although bacterial pili are known to mediate cell adhesion to a variety of substrates, the molecular interactions behind this process are poorly understood. We report the direct measurement of the forces guiding pili-mediated adhesion, focusing on the medically important probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG). Using non-invasive single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS), we quantify the adhesion forces between individual bacteria and biotic (mucin, intestinal cells) or abiotic (hydrophobic monolayers) surfaces. On hydrophobic surfaces, bacterial pili strengthen adhesion through remarkable nanospring properties, which - presumably - enable the bacteria to resist high shear forces under physiological conditions. On mucin, nanosprings are more frequent and adhesion forces larger, reflecting the influence of specific pili-mucin bonds. Interestingly, these mechanical responses are no longer observed on human intestinal Caco-2 cells. Rather, force curves exhibit constant force plateaus with extended ruptures reflecting the extraction of membrane nanotethers. These single-cell analyses provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms by which piliated bacteria colonize surfaces (nanosprings, nanotethers), and offer exciting avenues in nanomedicine for understanding and controlling the adhesion of microbial cells (probiotics, pathogens).

  11. In vivo lipidomics using single-cell Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Huawen; Volponi, Joanne V.; Oliver, Ann E.; Parikh, Atul N.; Simmons, Blake A.; Singh, Seema

    2011-01-01

    We describe a method for direct, quantitative, in vivo lipid profiling of oil-producing microalgae using single-cell laser-trapping Raman spectroscopy. This approach is demonstrated in the quantitative determination of the degree of unsaturation and transition temperatures of constituent lipids within microalgae. These properties are important markers for determining engine compatibility and performance metrics of algal biodiesel. We show that these factors can be directly measured from a single living microalgal cell held in place with an optical trap while simultaneously collecting Raman data. Cellular response to different growth conditions is monitored in real time. Our approach circumvents the need for lipid extraction and analysis that is both slow and invasive. Furthermore, this technique yields real-time chemical information in a label-free manner, thus eliminating the limitations of impermeability, toxicity, and specificity of the fluorescent probes common in currently used protocols. Although the single-cell Raman spectroscopy demonstrated here is focused on the study of the microalgal lipids with biofuel applications, the analytical capability and quantitation algorithms demonstrated are applicable to many different organisms and should prove useful for a diverse range of applications in lipidomics. PMID:21310969

  12. Microfluidic single-cell analysis for systems immunology.

    PubMed

    Junkin, Michael; Tay, Savaş

    2014-04-07

    The immune system constantly battles infection and tissue damage, but exaggerated immune responses lead to allergies, autoimmunity and cancer. Discrimination of self from foreign and the fine-tuning of immunity are achieved by information processing pathways, whose regulatory mechanisms are little understood. Cell-to-cell variability and stochastic molecular interactions result in diverse cellular responses to identical signaling inputs, casting doubt on the reliability of traditional population-averaged analyses. Furthermore, dynamic molecular and cellular interactions create emergent properties that change over multiple time scales. Understanding immunity in the face of complexity and noisy dynamics requires time-dependent analysis of single-cells in a proper context. Microfluidic systems create precisely defined microenvironments by controlling fluidic and surface chemistries, feature sizes, geometries and signal input timing, and thus enable quantitative multi-parameter analysis of single cells. Such qualities allow observable dynamic environments approaching in vivo levels of biological complexity. Seamless parallelization of functional units in microfluidic devices allows high-throughput measurements, an essential feature for statistically meaningful analysis of naturally variable biological systems. These abilities recapitulate diverse scenarios such as cell-cell signaling, migration, differentiation, antibody and cytokine production, clonal selection, and cell lysis, thereby enabling accurate and meaningful study of immune behaviors in vitro.

  13. Limitations of fitting angular scattering from single cells (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xing; Cannaday, Ashley E.; Berger, Andrew J.

    2016-04-01

    The literature contains several reports of Mie-like fits to angular-domain elastic scattering measurements from multiple cells or isolated mitochondria. In these studies, the sampling volume typically contains hundreds or thousands of mitochondria, allowing for the size distribution of mitochondria to be modeled as a smooth function, (e.g. Gaussian or log-normal) with a small number of free parameters. In the case of a single-cell volume containing significantly fewer mitochondria, the true size distribution will no longer be as smooth. Increasing the number of free parameters can lead to unstable fits, however, as the forward-directed angular scattering pattern from such a population illuminated with 785 nm light is a monotonically decaying radial function with few distinct features. Using simulations, we have investigated the limitations of modeling single-cell mitochondrial scattering using smooth population distributions of Mie scatterers. In different instances, the fidelity of the estimated size information can be limited by the number of organelles, the angular detection range, or the non-ideality of the data (both speckle and shot noise). We will describe the conditions under which each of these effects dominates. We will also discuss whether mean and standard deviation are the best sizes to report from such Mie modeling, or if there are other size parameters that have greater fidelity to the true, non-smooth size distributions.

  14. In vivo lipidomics using single-cell Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huawen; Volponi, Joanne V; Oliver, Ann E; Parikh, Atul N; Simmons, Blake A; Singh, Seema

    2011-03-01

    We describe a method for direct, quantitative, in vivo lipid profiling of oil-producing microalgae using single-cell laser-trapping Raman spectroscopy. This approach is demonstrated in the quantitative determination of the degree of unsaturation and transition temperatures of constituent lipids within microalgae. These properties are important markers for determining engine compatibility and performance metrics of algal biodiesel. We show that these factors can be directly measured from a single living microalgal cell held in place with an optical trap while simultaneously collecting Raman data. Cellular response to different growth conditions is monitored in real time. Our approach circumvents the need for lipid extraction and analysis that is both slow and invasive. Furthermore, this technique yields real-time chemical information in a label-free manner, thus eliminating the limitations of impermeability, toxicity, and specificity of the fluorescent probes common in currently used protocols. Although the single-cell Raman spectroscopy demonstrated here is focused on the study of the microalgal lipids with biofuel applications, the analytical capability and quantitation algorithms demonstrated are applicable to many different organisms and should prove useful for a diverse range of applications in lipidomics.

  15. Single-cell sequencing for drug discovery and drug development.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongjin; Wang, Charles; Wu, Shixiu

    2016-11-16

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS), particularly single-cell sequencing, has revolutionized the scale and scope of genomic and biomedical research. Recent technological advances in NGS and single-cell studies have made the deep whole-genome (DNA-seq), whole epigenome and whole-transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) at single-cell level feasible. NGS at the single-cell level expands our view of genome, epigenome and transcriptome and allows the genome, epigenome and transcriptome of any organism to be explored without a priori assumptions and with unprecedented throughput. And it does so with single-nucleotide resolution. NGS is also a very powerful tool for drug discovery and drug development. In this review, we describe the current state of single-cell sequencing techniques, which can provide a new, more powerful and precise approach for analyzing effects of drugs on treated cells and tissues. Our review discusses single-cell whole genome/exome sequencing (scWGS/scWES), single-cell transcriptome sequencing (scRNA-seq), single-cell bisulfite sequencing (scBS), and multiple omics of single-cell sequencing. We also highlight the advantages and challenges of each of these approaches. Finally, we describe, elaborate and speculate the potential applications of single-cell sequencing for drug discovery and drug development.

  16. Use of an oxygen-insensitive microscale biosensor for methane to measure methane concentration profiles in a rice paddy.

    PubMed

    Damgaard, L R; Revsbech, N P; Reichardt, W

    1998-03-01

    An oxygen-insensitive microscale biosensor for methane was constructed by furnishing a previously described biosensor with an oxygen guard. The guard consisted of a glass capillary containing heterotrophic bacteria, which consumed oxygen diffusing through the tip membrane, thus preventing it from diffusing into the methane-sensing unit. Oxygen microprofiles were measured through the oxygen guard capillary, demonstrating the principle and limitations of the method. When the tip of the guard capillary was exposed to 100% oxygen at 21 degrees C, heterotrophic oxygen consumption prevented oxygen from diffusing further than 170 mum into the capillary, whereas atmospheric levels of oxygen were consumed within 50 mum. The capacity of the oxygen guard for scavenging oxygen decreased with decreasing temperature, and atmospheric levels of oxygen caused oxygen penetration to 200 mum at 5 degrees C. The sensors could be manufactured with tip diameters as small as 25 mum, and response times were about 1 min at room temperature. Pore water profiles of methane concentrations in a rice paddy soil were measured, and a strong correlation between the depths of oxygen penetration and methane appearance was observed as a function of the light regimen; this finding confirmed the role of microbenthic photosynthesis in limiting methane emissions from surfaces of waterlogged sediments and soils.

  17. Measurement of atomic oxygen and related airglows in the lower thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. J.; Young, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    Instruments on board a sounding rocket were used to make simultaneous observations of atomic oxygen density and airglow emissions between 80 and 120 km. Atomic oxygen was measured with a resonance lamp and was found to have a peak density of 6 x 10 to the 11th at 94 km. Similar structure is seen in the oxygen density profile on both uplegs and downlegs. The following airglow emissions were measured by using vertical-viewing photometers: Herzberg I bands near 300 nm; O(1S) green line at 557.7 nm; background at 566 nm; O2(1 Delta g) bands at 1.27 microns; and OH (X 2 pi) Meinel bands near 1.7 microns.

  18. Gravisensing in single-celled systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, M.; Limbach, C.

    Single-celled systems are favourable cell types for studying several aspects of gravisensing and gravitropic responses. Whether and how actin is involved in both processes in higher plant statocytes is still a matter of intensive debate. In single-celled and tip-growing characean rhizoids and protonemata, however, there is clear evidence that actin is a central keyplayer controlling polarized growth and the mechanisms of gravity sensing and growth reorientation. Both cell types exhibit a unique actin polymerization in the extending tip, strictly colocalized with the prominent ER-aggregate in the center of the Spitzenkoerper. The local accumulation of ADF and profilin in this central array suggest that actin polymerization is controlled by these actin-binding proteins, which can be regulated by calcium, pH and a variety of other parameters. Distinct actin filaments extend even into the outermost tip and form a dense meshwork in the apical and subapical region, before they become bundled by villin to form two populations of thick actin cables that generate rotational cytoplasmic streaming in the basal region. Actomyosin not only mediates the delivery of secretory vesicles to the growing tip and controls the incorporation pattern of cell wall material, but also coordinates the tip-focused distribution pattern of calcium channels in the apical membrane. They establish the tip-high calcium gradient, a prerequisite for exocytosis. Microgravity experiments have added much to our understanding that both cell types use an efficient actomyosin-based system to control and correct the position of their statoliths and to direct sedimenting statoliths to confined graviperception sites at the plasma membrane. Actin's involvement in the graviresponses is more indirect. The upward growth of negatively gravitropic protonemata was shown to be preceded by a statolith-induced relocalization the Ca2+-calcium gradient to the upper flank that does not occur in positively gravitropic

  19. Measurement of atomic oxygen in the middle atmosphere using solid electrolyte sensors and catalytic probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhart, M.; Löhle, S.; Steinbeck, A.; Binder, T.; Fasoulas, S.

    2015-03-01

    The atmospheric energy budget is largely dominated by reactions involving atomic oxygen (O). Modeling of these processes requires detailed knowledge about the distribution of this oxygen species. Understanding the mutual contributions of atomic oxygen and wave motions to the atmospheric heating is the main goal of the rocket campaign WADIS. It includes, amongst others, two of our instruments for the measurement of atomic oxygen that have both been developed with the aim of resolving density variations on small vertical scales along the trajectory. In this paper the instrument based on catalytic effects (PHLUX) is introduced briefly. The experiment employing solid electrolyte sensors (FIPEX) is presented in detail. These sensors were laboratory calibrated using a microwave plasma as a source for atomic oxygen in combination with mass spectrometer reference measurements. The spectrometer was in turn calibrated for O with a method based on methane. In order to get insight into the horizontal variability the rocket payload had instrument decks at both ends. Each housed several sensor heads measuring during both the up- and downleg of the trajectory. The WADIS campaign comprises two rocket flights during different geophysical conditions. Results from WADIS-1 are presented which was successfully launched in June 2013 from Andøya Rocket Range, Norway. FIPEX data was sampled with 100 Hz and yield atomic oxygen density profiles with a vertical resolution better than 10 m. Numerical simulations of the flow field around the rocket were done at several points of the trajectory to assess the influence of aerodynamic effects on the measurement results. Density profiles peak at 3 × 1010 cm-3 at altitudes of 93.6 and 96 km for up- and downleg respectively.

  20. Measurement of atomic oxygen in the middle atmosphere using solid electrolyte sensors and catalytic probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhart, M.; Löhle, S.; Steinbeck, A.; Binder, T.; Fasoulas, S.

    2015-09-01

    The middle- and upper-atmospheric energy budget is largely dominated by reactions involving atomic oxygen (O). Modeling of these processes requires detailed knowledge about the distribution of this oxygen species. Understanding the mutual contributions of atomic oxygen and wave motions to the atmospheric heating is the main goal of the rocket project WADIS (WAve propagation and DISsipation in the middle atmosphere). It includes, amongst others, our instruments for the measurement of atomic oxygen that have both been developed with the aim of resolving density variations on small vertical scales along the trajectory. In this paper the instrument based on catalytic effects (PHLUX: Pyrometric Heat Flux Experiment) is introduced briefly. The experiment employing solid electrolyte sensors (FIPEX: Flux φ(Phi) Probe Experiment) is presented in detail. These sensors were laboratory calibrated using a microwave plasma as a source of atomic oxygen in combination with mass spectrometer reference measurements. The spectrometer was in turn calibrated for O with a method based on methane. In order to get insight into the horizontal variability, the rocket payload had instrument decks at both ends. Each housed several sensor heads measuring during both the up- and downleg of the trajectory. The WADIS project comprises two rocket flights during different geophysical conditions. Results from WADIS-1 are presented, which was successfully launched in June 2013 from the Andøya Space Center, Norway. FIPEX data were sampled at 100 Hz and yield atomic oxygen density profiles with a vertical resolution better than 9 m. This allows density variations to be studied on very small spatial scales. Numerical simulations of the flow field around the rocket were done at several points of the trajectory to assess the influence of aerodynamic effects on the measurement results. Density profiles peak at 3 × 1010 cm-3 at altitudes of 93.6 and 96 km for the up- and downleg, respectively.

  1. Measurement of the oxygen isotopic composition of nitrate in seawater and freshwater using the denitrifier method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casciotti, K.L.; Sigman, D.M.; Hastings, M. Galanter; Böhlke, J.K.; Hilkert, A.

    2002-01-01

    We report a novel method for measurement of the oxygen isotopic composition (18O/16O) of nitrate (NO3-) from both seawater and freshwater. The denitrifier method, based on the isotope ratio analysis of nitrous oxide generated from sample nitrate by cultured denitrifying bacteria, has been described elsewhere for its use in nitrogen isotope ratio (15N/14N) analysis of nitrate.1Here, we address the additional issues associated with 18O/16O analysis of nitrate by this approach, which include (1) the oxygen isotopic difference between the nitrate sample and the N2O analyte due to isotopic fractionation associated with the loss of oxygen atoms from nitrate and (2) the exchange of oxygen atoms with water during the conversion of nitrate to N2O. Experiments with 18O-labeled water indicate that water exchange contributes less than 10%, and frequently less than 3%, of the oxygen atoms in the N2O product for Pseudomonas aureofaciens. In addition, both oxygen isotope fractionation and oxygen atom exchange are consistent within a given batch of analyses. The analysis of appropriate isotopic reference materials can thus be used to correct the measured 18O/16O ratios of samples for both effects. This is the first method tested for 18O/16O analysis of nitrate in seawater. Benefits of this method, relative to published freshwater methods, include higher sensitivity (tested down to 10 nmol and 1 μM NO3-), lack of interference by other solutes, and ease of sample preparation.

  2. Optical measurements of the dependence of chemoreception on oxygen pressure in the cat carotid body.

    PubMed

    Rumsey, W L; Iturriaga, R; Spergel, D; Lahiri, S; Wilson, D F

    1991-10-01

    The relationship between oxygen pressure (PO2) in the carotid body and carotid sinus nerve discharge was evaluated in the isolated perfused/superfused cat carotid body using the oxygen-dependent quenching of phosphorescence. Images of phosphorescence intensity arising from Pd-coproporphyrin within the microcirculation of the carotid body provided measurements of intravascular PO2. These measurements were substantiated by determining phosphorescence life-time. The carotid body was perfused in the isolated state via the common carotid artery with N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid-buffered Tyrode solution, pH 7.4, at a constant pressure of 80 mmHg. Superfusion was maintained with similar media equilibrated with 100% argon. PO2 in the exchange vessels was markedly less than that in the perfusate entering the carotid artery, 23 +/- 3 and 45 +/- 3 Torr for normoxic (111 +/- 15 Torr) and hyperoxic (345 +/- 72 Torr) perfusates, respectively. Chemosensory discharge rose slowly in response to a brief interruption of perfusate flow as PO2 steadily declined from either of these capillary PO2 values to approximately 10 Torr. Between approximately 10 and 3 Torr, chemosensory discharge increased strikingly, concomitant with an enhanced rate of oxygen disappearance, from -36 +/- 4 to -69 +/- 13 (92% change) and -28 +/- 3 to -48 +/- 3 (71% change) Torr/s for normoxic and hyperoxic perfusates, respectively. As PO2 fell below approximately 3 Torr, oxygen disappearance slowed and neural activity decayed. Thus the relationships between microvascular PO2 and chemosensory discharge and between oxygen disappearance and neural discharge suggest that oxygen metabolism in the carotid body determines the expression of oxygen chemoreception.

  3. Electrochemical Technology for Oxygen Removal and Measurement in the CELSS Test Facility, Engineering Development Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drews, Michael E.; Covington, Al (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    , the amount of oxygen that is removed from the EDU is directly proportional to the cell input current via Faraday's constant, potentially allowing for a mol/electron measurement of photosynthetic rate. The currently operative oxygen removal system has maintained reduced oxygen set points within the EDU, and preparation is underway to verify of the accuracy of electrochemical measurement of oxygen production and hence, photosynthesis. This paper examines the working principles of the electrochemical cell, outlines the overall design of the oxygen removal system and its integration with other EDU subsystems, and summarizes test results obtained over crop growth cycles in the CTF-EDU.

  4. Electrochemical Technology for Oxygen Removal and Measurement in the CELSS Test Facility, Engineering Development Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drews, Michael E.; Covington, Al (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    , the amount of oxygen that is removed from the EDU is directly proportional to the cell input current via Faraday's constant, potentially allowing for a mol/electron measurement of photosynthetic rate. The currently operative oxygen removal system has maintained reduced oxygen set points within the EDU, and preparation is underway to verify of the accuracy of electrochemical measurement of oxygen production and hence, photosynthesis. This paper examines the working principles of the electrochemical cell, outlines the overall design of the oxygen removal system and its integration with other EDU subsystems, and summarizes test results obtained over crop growth cycles in the CTF-EDU.

  5. Emergent Collective Chemotaxis without Single-Cell Gradient Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camley, Brian A.; Zimmermann, Juliane; Levine, Herbert; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2016-03-01

    Many eukaryotic cells chemotax, sensing and following chemical gradients. However, experiments show that even under conditions when single cells cannot chemotax, small clusters may still follow a gradient. This behavior is observed in neural crest cells, in lymphocytes, and during border cell migration in Drosophila, but its origin remains puzzling. Here, we propose a new mechanism underlying this "collective guidance," and study a model based on this mechanism both analytically and computationally. Our approach posits that contact inhibition of locomotion, where cells polarize away from cell-cell contact, is regulated by the chemoattractant. Individual cells must measure the mean attractant value, but need not measure its gradient, to give rise to directional motility for a cell cluster. We present analytic formulas for how the cluster velocity and chemotactic index depend on the number and organization of cells in the cluster. The presence of strong orientation effects provides a simple test for our theory of collective guidance.

  6. Emergent collective chemotaxis without single-cell gradient sensing

    PubMed Central

    Camley, Brian A.; Zimmermann, Juliane; Levine, Herbert; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2016-01-01

    Many eukaryotic cells chemotax, sensing and following chemical gradients. However, experiments have shown that even under conditions when single cells cannot chemotax, small clusters may still follow a gradient. This behavior has been observed in neural crest cells, in lymphocytes, and during border cell migration in Drosophila, but its origin remains puzzling. Here, we propose a new mechanism underlying this “collective guidance”, and study a model based on this mechanism both analytically and computationally. Our approach posits that contact inhibition of locomotion (CIL), where cells polarize away from cell-cell contact, is regulated by the chemoattractant. Individual cells must measure the mean attractant value, but need not measure its gradient, to give rise to directional motility for a cell cluster. We present analytic formulas for how cluster velocity and chemotactic index depend on the number and organization of cells in the cluster. The presence of strong orientation effects provides a simple test for our theory of collective guidance. PMID:26991203

  7. An irradiation system for photodynamic therapy with a fiber-optic sensor for measuring tissue oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintanar, L.; Fabila, D.; Stolik, S.; de la Rosa, J. M.

    2013-11-01

    Photodynamic Therapy is a well known treatment based on the interaction of light of specific wavelength with a photosensitizing drug. In the presence of oxygen molecules, the illumination of the photosensitizer can activate the production of reactive oxygen species, which leads to the death of target cells within the treated tissue. In order to obtain the best therapy response, the tissue oxygen concentration should be measured to adjust the therapy parameters before and during the treatment. In this work, an irradiation system for 5-Aminolevulinic Acid Photodynamic Therapy is presented. It allows the application of visible light radiation of 630 nm using as a light source a high-brightness light emitting diode with an optical-power automatic control considering a light depth-distribution model. A module to measure the tissue oxygen saturation has been implemented into the system. It is based on two light emitting diodes of 660 nm and 940 nm as light sources, a photodiode as a detector and a new handheld fiber optic reflectance pulse oximetry sensor for estimating the blood oxygen saturation within the tissue. The pulse oximetry sensor was modeled through multilayered Monte Carlo simulations to study the behavior of the sensor with changes in skin thickness and melanin content.

  8. Biochemical mediator demand--a novel rapid alternative for measuring biochemical oxygen demand.

    PubMed

    Pasco, N; Baronian, K; Jeffries, C; Hay, J

    2000-05-01

    The biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) test (BOD5) is a crucial environmental index for monitoring organic pollutants in waste water but is limited by the 5-day requirement for completing the test. We have optimised a rapid microbial technique for measuring the BOD of a standard BOD5 substrate (150 mg glucose/l, 150 mg glutamic acid/l) by quantifying an equivalent biochemical mediator demand in the absence of oxygen. Elevated concentrations of Escherichia coli were incubated with an excess of redox mediator, potassium hexacyanoferrate(III), and a known substrate for 1 h at 37 degrees C without oxygen. The addition of substrate increased the respiratory activity of the microorganisms and the accumulation of reduced mediator; the mediator was subsequently re-oxidised at a working electrode generating a current quantifiable by a coulometric transducer. Catabolic conversion efficiencies exceeding 75% were observed for the oxidation of the standard substrate. The inclusion of a mediator allowed a higher co-substrate concentration compared to oxygen and substantially reduced the incubation time from 5 days to 1 h. The technique replicates the traditional BOD5 method, except that a mediator is substituted for oxygen, and we aim to apply the principle to measure the BOD of real waste streams in future work.

  9. Pd tetrabenzoporphyrin-dendrimers: near-infrared phosphors for oxygen measurements by phosphorescence quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Kim, Evelyn; Wilson, David F.

    2002-06-01

    Phosphorescence quenching is an optical method for measuring tissue oxygenation. The technique is based on the quenching of phosphorescence originated from the injected dye by molecule oxygen dissolved in the medium. The phosphor is the only 'invasive' component of the measurement procedure, and thus it is important to have precise control over the bio- distribution of the phosphor, i.e. to confine it to a single compartment within the sample. For tissue applications the phosphor must also be an effective light absorber in the near IR and to exhibit oxygen quenching constant of 200-400 Torr-1 sec-1, to permit reliable quantification of oxygen in arterioles as well as in veins. Overall, it is desirable to have synthetic, inert, hydrophilic, phosphors with quenching characteristics that are not affected by molecules other than oxygen. We discuss a new generation of phosphors based on dendrimer- tetrabenzoporphyrins, designed to satisfy the above criteria. In these phosphors, the core metallotetrabenzoporphyrins prove the required physical characteristics, while their immediate surrounding environments consist of covalently attached dendritic branches. The dendritic cages around porphyrins control their quenching properties and protect porphyrins from interactions with other substances in the blood.

  10. Direct measurements of the light dependence of gross photosynthesis and oxygen consumption in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailleul, B.; Park, J.; Brown, C. M.; Bidle, K. D.; Lee, S.; Falkowski, P. G.

    2016-02-01

    For decades, a lack of understanding of how respiration is influenced by light has been stymying our ability to quantitatively analyze how phytoplankton allocate carbon in situ and the biological mechanisms that participate to the fate of blooms. Using membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS), the light dependencies of gross photosynthesis and oxygen uptake rates were measured during the bloom demises of two prymnesiophytes, in two open ocean regions. In the North Atlantic, dominated by Emiliania huxleyi, respiration was independent of irradiance and was higher than the gross photosynthetic rate at all irradiances. In the Amundsen Sea (Antarctica), dominated by Phaeocystis antarctica, the situation was very different. Dark respiration was one order of magnitude lower than the maximal gross photosynthetic rate. ut the oxygen uptake rate increased by 10 fold at surface irradiances, where it becomes higher than gross photosynthesis. Our results suggest that the light dependence of oxygen uptake in P. antarctica has two sources: one is independent of photosynthesis, and is possibly associated with the photo-reduction of O2 mediated by dissolved organic matter; the second reflects the activity of an oxidase fueled in the light with photosynthetic electron flow. Interestingly, these dramatic light-dependent changes in oxygen uptake were not reproduced in nutrient-replete P. antarctica cultures, in the laboratory. Our measurements highlight the importance of improving our understanding of oxygen consuming reactions in the euphotic zone, which is critical to investigating the physiology of phytoplankton and tracing the fate of phytoplankton blooms.

  11. Instrument for stable high temperature Seebeck coefficient and resistivity measurements under controlled oxygen partial pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Brown-Shaklee, Harlan James; Sharma, Peter Anand

    2015-04-28

    The transport properties of ceramic materials strongly depend on oxygen activity, which is tuned by changing the partial oxygen pressure (pO2) prior to and during measurement. Within, we describe an instrument for highly stable measurements of Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity at temperatures up to 1300 K with controlled oxygen partial pressure. An all platinum construction is used to avoid potential materials instabilities that can cause measurement drift. Two independent heaters are employed to establish a small temperature gradient for Seebeck measurements, while keeping the average temperature constant and avoiding errors associated with pO2-induced drifts in thermocouple readings. Oxygen equilibrium is monitored using both an O2 sensor and the transient behavior of the resistance as a proxy. A pO2 range of 10-25–100 atm can be established with appropriate gas mixtures. Seebeck measurements were calibrated against a high purity platinum wire, Pt/Pt–Rh thermocouple wire, and a Bi2Te3 Seebeck coefficient Standard Reference Material. To demonstrate the utility of this instrument for oxide materials we present measurements as a function of pO2 on a 1 % Nb-doped SrTiO3 single crystal, and show systematic changes in properties consistent with oxygen vacancy defect chemistry. Thus, an approximately 11% increase in power factor over a pO2 range of 10-19–10-8 atm at 973 K for the donor-doped single crystals is observed.

  12. Instrument for stable high temperature Seebeck coefficient and resistivity measurements under controlled oxygen partial pressure

    DOE PAGES

    Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Brown-Shaklee, Harlan James; Sharma, Peter Anand

    2015-04-28

    The transport properties of ceramic materials strongly depend on oxygen activity, which is tuned by changing the partial oxygen pressure (pO2) prior to and during measurement. Within, we describe an instrument for highly stable measurements of Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity at temperatures up to 1300 K with controlled oxygen partial pressure. An all platinum construction is used to avoid potential materials instabilities that can cause measurement drift. Two independent heaters are employed to establish a small temperature gradient for Seebeck measurements, while keeping the average temperature constant and avoiding errors associated with pO2-induced drifts in thermocouple readings. Oxygen equilibriummore » is monitored using both an O2 sensor and the transient behavior of the resistance as a proxy. A pO2 range of 10-25–100 atm can be established with appropriate gas mixtures. Seebeck measurements were calibrated against a high purity platinum wire, Pt/Pt–Rh thermocouple wire, and a Bi2Te3 Seebeck coefficient Standard Reference Material. To demonstrate the utility of this instrument for oxide materials we present measurements as a function of pO2 on a 1 % Nb-doped SrTiO3 single crystal, and show systematic changes in properties consistent with oxygen vacancy defect chemistry. Thus, an approximately 11% increase in power factor over a pO2 range of 10-19–10-8 atm at 973 K for the donor-doped single crystals is observed.« less

  13. The potential of single-cell profiling in plants.

    PubMed

    Efroni, Idan; Birnbaum, Kenneth D

    2016-04-05

    Single-cell transcriptomics has been employed in a growing number of animal studies, but the technique has yet to be widely used in plants. Nonetheless, early studies indicate that single-cell RNA-seq protocols developed for animal cells produce informative datasets in plants. We argue that single-cell transcriptomics has the potential to provide a new perspective on plant problems, such as the nature of the stem cells or initials, the plasticity of plant cells, and the extent of localized cellular responses to environmental inputs. Single-cell experimental outputs require different analytical approaches compared with pooled cell profiles and new tools tailored to single-cell assays are being developed. Here, we highlight promising new single-cell profiling approaches, their limitations as applied to plants, and their potential to address fundamental questions in plant biology.

  14. The added value of single-cell gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Ståhlberg, Anders; Rusnakova, Vendula; Kubista, Mikael

    2013-03-01

    Cells are the basic unit of life and they have remarkable abilities to respond individually as well as in concert to internal and external stimuli in a specific manner. Studying complex tissues and whole organs requires understanding of cell heterogeneity and responses to stimuli at the single-cell level. In this review, we discuss the potential of single-cell gene expression profiling, focusing on data analysis and biological interpretation. We exemplify several aspects of the added value of single-cell analysis by comparing the same experimental data at both single-cell and cell population level. Data normalization and handling of missing data are two important steps in data analysis that are performed differently at single-cell level compared with cell population level. Furthermore, we discuss how single-cell gene expression data can be viewed and how subpopulations of cells can be identified and characterized.

  15. Single-cell sequencing technologies: current and future.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jialong; Cai, Wanshi; Sun, Zhongsheng

    2014-10-20

    Intensively developed in the last few years, single-cell sequencing technologies now present numerous advantages over traditional sequencing methods for solving the problems of biological heterogeneity and low quantities of available biological materials. The application of single-cell sequencing technologies has profoundly changed our understanding of a series of biological phenomena, including gene transcription, embryo development, and carcinogenesis. However, before single-cell sequencing technologies can be used extensively, researchers face the serious challenge of overcoming inherent issues of high amplification bias, low accuracy and reproducibility. Here, we simply summarize the techniques used for single-cell isolation, and review the current technologies used in single-cell genomic, transcriptomic, and epigenomic sequencing. We discuss the merits, defects, and scope of application of single-cell sequencing technologies and then speculate on the direction of future developments.

  16. Thermogenetic neurostimulation with single-cell resolution

    PubMed Central

    Ermakova, Yulia G.; Lanin, Aleksandr A.; Fedotov, Ilya V.; Roshchin, Matvey; Kelmanson, Ilya V.; Kulik, Dmitry; Bogdanova, Yulia A.; Shokhina, Arina G.; Bilan, Dmitry S.; Staroverov, Dmitry B.; Balaban, Pavel M.; Fedotov, Andrei B.; Sidorov-Biryukov, Dmitry A.; Nikitin, Evgeny S.; Zheltikov, Aleksei M.; Belousov, Vsevolod V.

    2017-01-01

    Thermogenetics is a promising innovative neurostimulation technique, which enables robust activation of neurons using thermosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels. Broader application of this approach in neuroscience is, however, hindered by a limited variety of suitable ion channels, and by low spatial and temporal resolution of neuronal activation when TRP channels are activated by ambient temperature variations or chemical agonists. Here, we demonstrate rapid, robust and reproducible repeated activation of snake TRPA1 channels heterologously expressed in non-neuronal cells, mouse neurons and zebrafish neurons in vivo by infrared (IR) laser radiation. A fibre-optic probe that integrates a nitrogen−vacancy (NV) diamond quantum sensor with optical and microwave waveguide delivery enables thermometry with single-cell resolution, allowing neurons to be activated by exceptionally mild heating, thus preventing the damaging effects of excessive heat. The neuronal responses to the activation by IR laser radiation are fully characterized using Ca2+ imaging and electrophysiology, providing, for the first time, a complete framework for a thermogenetic manipulation of individual neurons using IR light. PMID:28530239

  17. Atmospheric Airborne Pressure Measurements using the Oxygen A Band for the ASCENDS Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riris, H.; Rodriguez, M.

    2014-12-01

    We report on an airborne demonstration of atmospheric oxygen optical depth measurements with an Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar using a fiber-based laser system and a photon counting detector. Accurate knowledge of atmospheric temperature and pressure is required for NASA's Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission, and climate modeling studies. The lidar uses a doubled Erbium Doped Fiber amplifier and single photon counting detector to measure oxygen absorption at 765 nm. Our approach uses a sequence of laser pulses at increasing wavelengths that sample a pair of absorption lines in the Oxygen A-band at 764.7 nm. The O2 lines were selected after careful spectroscopic analysis to minimize the O2 line temperature dependence and the availability of the transmitter and receiver technology to maximize transmitter power, doubling efficiency, and detector sensitivity. We compare our 2013 and 2014 Oxygen IPDA lidar measurements and evaluate the impact of receiver dynamic range, transmitter stability and signal to noise ratio on the differential optical depth measurements.

  18. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN NEAR-BOTTOM DISSOLVED OXYGEN AND SEDIMENT PROFILE CAMERA MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) and other environmental authorities regulate concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) as a measure of nutrient-related eutrophication in estuarine and coastal waters. However, in situ DO concentrations are extremely var...

  19. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN NEAR-BOTTOM DISSOLVED OXYGEN AND SEDIMENT PROFILE CAMERA MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) and other environmental authorities regulate concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) as a measure of nutrient-related eutrophication in estuarine and coastal waters. However, in situ DO concentrations are extremely var...

  20. Long-term growth data of Escherichia coli at a single-cell level

    PubMed Central

    Tanouchi, Yu; Pai, Anand; Park, Heungwon; Huang, Shuqiang; Buchler, Nicolas E.; You, Lingchong

    2017-01-01

    Long-term, single-cell measurement of bacterial growth is extremely valuable information, particularly in the study of homeostatic aspects such as cell-size and growth rate control. Such measurement has recently become possible due to the development of microfluidic technology. Here we present data from single-cell measurements of Escherichia coli growth over 70 generations obtained for three different growth conditions. The data were recorded every minute, and contain time course data of cell length and fluorescent intensity of constitutively expressed yellow fluorescent protein. PMID:28350394

  1. Measurements of oxygen tension in native and transplanted rat pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, P O; Liss, P; Andersson, A; Jansson, L

    1998-07-01

    This study was performed to measure the oxygen tension before and after revascularization of pancreatic islets transplanted beneath the renal capsule and to investigate to what extent this was affected by acute and chronic hyperglycemia. In addition, the oxygen tension in islets within the pancreas was determined. PO2 was measured with a modified Clark electrode (tip 2-6 microm o.d.). Within native pancreatic islets, the mean PO2 was higher (31-37 mmHg) than within the exocrine pancreas (20-23 mmHg). The mean oxygen tension in the transplanted islets the day after implantation was half of that recorded in native islets (14-19 mmHg) and did not differ between normoglycemic and diabetic recipients. At 1 month after transplantation, when revascularization had occurred, the mean PO2 in the islet grafts was 9-15 mmHgf in normoglycemic animals but was lower (6-8 mmHg) in diabetic animals, whereas the blood perfusion of the transplants, as measured with laser-Doppler flowmetry (probe diameter 0.45 mm), was similar in both groups. The mean oxygen tension in the superficial renal cortex surrounding the implanted islets was similar in all groups and remained stable at 13-21 mmHg. Intravenous administration of D-glucose (1 g/kg) did not affect the oxygen tension in any of the investigated tissues. We conclude that the mean PO2 in islets implanted under the renal capsule is markedly lower than in native islets, not only in the immediate posttransplantation period but also 1 month after implantation, i.e., when revascularization has occurred. Furthermore, persistent hyperglycemia in the recipient leads to a further decrease in graft oxygen tension. To what extent this may contribute to islet graft failure is at present unknown.

  2. Silicon dioxide thin film mediated single cell nucleic acid isolation.

    PubMed

    Bogdanov, Evgeny; Dominova, Irina; Shusharina, Natalia; Botman, Stepan; Kasymov, Vitaliy; Patrushev, Maksim

    2013-01-01

    A limited amount of DNA extracted from single cells, and the development of single cell diagnostics make it necessary to create a new highly effective method for the single cells nucleic acids isolation. In this paper, we propose the DNA isolation method from biomaterials with limited DNA quantity in sample, and from samples with degradable DNA based on the use of solid-phase adsorbent silicon dioxide nanofilm deposited on the inner surface of PCR tube.

  3. Silicon Dioxide Thin Film Mediated Single Cell Nucleic Acid Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanov, Evgeny; Dominova, Irina; Shusharina, Natalia; Botman, Stepan; Kasymov, Vitaliy; Patrushev, Maksim

    2013-01-01

    A limited amount of DNA extracted from single cells, and the development of single cell diagnostics make it necessary to create a new highly effective method for the single cells nucleic acids isolation. In this paper, we propose the DNA isolation method from biomaterials with limited DNA quantity in sample, and from samples with degradable DNA based on the use of solid-phase adsorbent silicon dioxide nanofilm deposited on the inner surface of PCR tube. PMID:23874571

  4. Magnetic susceptibility measurement of solid oxygen at pressures up to 3.3 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Mito, M. Yamaguchi, S.; Tsuruda, H.; Deguchi, H.; Ishizuka, M.

    2014-01-07

    The magnetic susceptibility of solid oxygen had long been observed only in the restricted pressure region below 0.8 GPa. We succeeded in extending the pressure region up to 3.3 GPa by clamping condensed oxygen in the sample chamber of a miniature diamond anvil cell and measuring the dc magnetic susceptibility using a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer. In this experiment, the well-known α–β and β–γ transitions are observed in the phase diagram, suggesting consistency with the previous results of X-ray and Raman studies. In addition, a new magnetic anomaly is observed in the β phase.

  5. Magnetic susceptibility measurement of solid oxygen at pressures up to 3.3 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mito, M.; Yamaguchi, S.; Tsuruda, H.; Deguchi, H.; Ishizuka, M.

    2014-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibility of solid oxygen had long been observed only in the restricted pressure region below 0.8 GPa. We succeeded in extending the pressure region up to 3.3 GPa by clamping condensed oxygen in the sample chamber of a miniature diamond anvil cell and measuring the dc magnetic susceptibility using a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer. In this experiment, the well-known α-β and β-γ transitions are observed in the phase diagram, suggesting consistency with the previous results of X-ray and Raman studies. In addition, a new magnetic anomaly is observed in the β phase.

  6. A Fiber Optic Catalytic Sensor for Neutral Atom Measurements in Oxygen Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Zaplotnik, Rok; Vesel, Alenka; Mozetic, Miran

    2012-01-01

    The presented sensor for neutral oxygen atom measurement in oxygen plasma is a catalytic probe which uses fiber optics and infrared detection system to measure the gray body radiation of the catalyst. The density of neutral atoms can be determined from the temperature curve of the probe, because the catalyst is heated predominantly by the dissipation of energy caused by the heterogeneous surface recombination of neutral atoms. The advantages of this sensor are that it is simple, reliable, easy to use, noninvasive, quantitative and can be used in plasma discharge regions. By using different catalyst materials the sensor can also be applied for detection of neutral atoms in other plasmas. Sensor design, operation, example measurements and new measurement procedure for systematic characterization are presented. PMID:22666005

  7. Measurement of cell respiration and oxygenation in standard multichannel biochips using phosphorescent O2-sensitive probes.

    PubMed

    Kondrashina, Alina V; Papkovsky, Dmitri B; Dmitriev, Ruslan I

    2013-09-07

    Measurement of cell oxygenation and oxygen consumption is useful for studies of cell bioenergetics, metabolism, mitochondrial function, drug toxicity and common pathophysiological conditions. Here we present a new platform for such applications which uses commercial multichannel biochips (μ-slides, Ibidi) and phosphorescent O2 sensitive probes. This platform was evaluated with both extracellular and intracellular O2 probes, several different cell types and treatments including mitochondrial uncoupling and inhibition, depletion of extracellular Ca(2+) and inhibition of V-ATPase and histone deacetylases. The results show that compared to the standard microwell plates currently used, the μ-slide platform provides facile O2 measurements with both suspension and adherent cells, higher sensitivity and reproducibility, and faster measurement time. It also allows re-perfusion and multiple treatments of cells and multi-parametric analyses in conjunction with other probes. Optical measurements are conducted on standard fluorescence readers and microscopes.

  8. The impact of flash intensity on retinal vessel oxygen saturation measurements using dual wavelength oximetry.

    PubMed

    Heitmar, Rebekka; Cubbidge, Robert Peter

    2013-04-17

    To establish the optimal flash settings for retinal vessel oxygen saturation parameters using dual-wavelength imaging in a multiethnic group. Twelve healthy young subjects (mean age 32 years [SD 7]; three Mediterranean, two South Asian, and seven Caucasian individuals) underwent retinal vessel oxygen saturation measurements using dual-wavelength oximetry, noncontact tonometry, and manual sphygmomanometry. In order to evaluate the impact of flash intensity, we obtained three images (fundus camera angle 30°, ONH centered) per flash setting. Flash settings of the fundus camera were increased in steps of 2 (initial setting of 6 and the final of 22), which reflect logarithmic increasing intensities from 13.5 to 214 Watt seconds (Ws). Flash settings below 27 Ws were too low to obtain saturation measurements, whereas flash settings of more than 214 Ws resulted in overexposed images. Retinal arteriolar and venular oxygen saturation was comparable at flash settings of 27 to 76 Ws (arterioles' range: 85%-92%; venules' range: 45%-53%). Higher flash settings lead to increased saturation measurements in both retinal arterioles (up to 110%) and venules (up to 92%), with a more pronounced increase in venules. Flash intensity has a significant impact on retinal vessel oxygen saturation measurements using dual-wavelength retinal oximetry. High flash intensities lead to supranormal oxygen saturation measurements with a magnified effect in retinal venules compared with arteries. In addition to even retinal illumination, the correct flash setting is of paramount importance for clinical acquisition of images in retinal oximetry. We recommend flash settings between 27 to 76 Ws.

  9. Single cell analysis: the new frontier in 'Omics'

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Daojing; Bodovitz, Steven

    2010-01-14

    Cellular heterogeneity arising from stochastic expression of genes, proteins, and metabolites is a fundamental principle of cell biology, but single cell analysis has been beyond the capabilities of 'Omics' technologies. This is rapidly changing with the recent examples of single cell genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. The rate of change is expected to accelerate owing to emerging technologies that range from micro/nanofluidics to microfabricated interfaces for mass spectrometry to third- and fourth-generation automated DNA sequencers. As described in this review, single cell analysis is the new frontier in Omics, and single cell Omics has the potential to transform systems biology through new discoveries derived from cellular heterogeneity.

  10. Chemical microenvironments and single-cell carbon and nitrogen uptake in field-collected colonies of Trichodesmium under different pCO2.

    PubMed

    Eichner, Meri J; Klawonn, Isabell; Wilson, Samuel T; Littmann, Sten; Whitehouse, Martin J; Church, Matthew J; Kuypers, Marcel Mm; Karl, David M; Ploug, Helle

    2017-06-01

    Gradients of oxygen (O2) and pH, as well as small-scale fluxes of carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and O2 were investigated under different partial pressures of carbon dioxide (pCO2) in field-collected colonies of the marine dinitrogen (N2)-fixing cyanobacterium Trichodesmium. Microsensor measurements indicated that cells within colonies experienced large fluctuations in O2, pH and CO2 concentrations over a day-night cycle. O2 concentrations varied with light intensity and time of day, yet colonies exposed to light were supersaturated with O2 (up to ~200%) throughout the light period and anoxia was not detected. Alternating between light and dark conditions caused a variation in pH levels by on average 0.5 units (equivalent to 15 nmol l(-1) proton concentration). Single-cell analyses of C and N assimilation using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS; large geometry SIMS and nanoscale SIMS) revealed high variability in metabolic activity of single cells and trichomes of Trichodesmium, and indicated transfer of C and N to colony-associated non-photosynthetic bacteria. Neither O2 fluxes nor C fixation by Trichodesmium were significantly influenced by short-term incubations under different pCO2 levels, whereas N2 fixation increased with increasing pCO2. The large range of metabolic rates observed at the single-cell level may reflect a response by colony-forming microbial populations to highly variable microenvironments.

  11. Continuous cultivation of fission yeast: analysis of single-cell protein synthesis kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Agar, D.W.; Bailey, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    A fundamental problem in microbial reactor analysis is identification of the relation between environment and individual cell metabolic activity. Population balance equations provide a link between experimental measurements of composition frequency functions in microbial populations on the one hand and macromolecule synthesis kinetics and cell division control parameters for single cells on the other. Flow microfluorometry measurements of frequency functions for single-cell protein content in Schizosaccharomyces pombe in balanced exponential growth were analyzed by 2 different methods. One approach utilizes the integrated form of the population balance equation known as the Collins-Richmond equation, and the other method involves optimization of parameters in assumed kinetic and cell division functional forms to fit measured frequency functions with corresponding model solutions. Both data interpretation techniques indicate that rates of protein synthesis increase most in low-protein-content cells as the population specific growth rate increases, leading to parabolic single-cell protein synthesis kinetics at large specific growth rates. Utilization of frequency function data for an asynchronous population is in this case a far more sensitive method for determination of single-cell kinetics than is monitoring the metabolic dynamics of a single cell or, equivalently, synchronous culture analyses.

  12. Self-digitization microfluidic chip for absolute quantification of mRNA in single cells.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Alison M; Gansen, Alexander; Paguirigan, Amy L; Kreutz, Jason E; Radich, Jerald P; Chiu, Daniel T

    2014-12-16

    Quantification of mRNA in single cells provides direct insight into how intercellular heterogeneity plays a role in disease progression and outcomes. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), the current gold standard for evaluating gene expression, is insufficient for providing absolute measurement of single-cell mRNA transcript abundance. Challenges include difficulties in handling small sample volumes and the high variability in measurements. Microfluidic digital PCR provides far better sensitivity for minute quantities of genetic material, but the typical format of this assay does not allow for counting of the absolute number of mRNA transcripts samples taken from single cells. Furthermore, a large fraction of the sample is often lost during sample handling in microfluidic digital PCR. Here, we report the absolute quantification of single-cell mRNA transcripts by digital, one-step reverse transcription PCR in a simple microfluidic array device called the self-digitization (SD) chip. By performing the reverse transcription step in digitized volumes, we find that the assay exhibits a linear signal across a wide range of total RNA concentrations and agrees well with standard curve qPCR. The SD chip is found to digitize a high percentage (86.7%) of the sample for single-cell experiments. Moreover, quantification of transferrin receptor mRNA in single cells agrees well with single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments. The SD platform for absolute quantification of single-cell mRNA can be optimized for other genes and may be useful as an independent control method for the validation of mRNA quantification techniques.

  13. Inferring fitness landscapes and selection on phenotypic states from single-cell genealogical data

    PubMed Central

    Kussell, Edo

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in single-cell time-lapse microscopy have revealed non-genetic heterogeneity and temporal fluctuations of cellular phenotypes. While different phenotypic traits such as abundance of growth-related proteins in single cells may have differential effects on the reproductive success of cells, rigorous experimental quantification of this process has remained elusive due to the complexity of single cell physiology within the context of a proliferating population. We introduce and apply a practical empirical method to quantify the fitness landscapes of arbitrary phenotypic traits, using genealogical data in the form of population lineage trees which can include phenotypic data of various kinds. Our inference methodology for fitness landscapes determines how reproductivity is correlated to cellular phenotypes, and provides a natural generalization of bulk growth rate measures for single-cell histories. Using this technique, we quantify the strength of selection acting on different cellular phenotypic traits within populations, which allows us to determine whether a change in population growth is caused by individual cells’ response, selection within a population, or by a mixture of these two processes. By applying these methods to single-cell time-lapse data of growing bacterial populations that express a resistance-conferring protein under antibiotic stress, we show how the distributions, fitness landscapes, and selection strength of single-cell phenotypes are affected by the drug. Our work provides a unified and practical framework for quantitative measurements of fitness landscapes and selection strength for any statistical quantities definable on lineages, and thus elucidates the adaptive significance of phenotypic states in time series data. The method is applicable in diverse fields, from single cell biology to stem cell differentiation and viral evolution. PMID:28267748

  14. DESIGN AND PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES OF THE SINGLE CELL TEST SYSTEM FOR SO2 DEPOLARIZED ELECTROLYZER DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Steimke, J

    2007-01-15

    The single cell test system development for the SRNL sulfur dioxide-depolarized electrolyzer has been completed. Operating experience and improved operating procedures were developed during test operations in FY06 and the first quarter of FY07. Eight different cell configurations, using various MEA designs, have been tested. The single cell test electrolyzer has been modified to overcome difficulties experienced during testing, including modifications to the inlet connection to eliminate minute acid leaks that caused short circuits. The test facility was modified by adding a water bath for cell heating, thus permitting operation over a wider range of flowrates and cell temperatures. Modifications were also identified to permit continuous water flushing of the cathode to remove sulfur, thus extending operating time between required shutdowns. This is also expected to permit a means of independently measuring the rate of sulfur formation, and the corresponding SO{sub 2} flux through the membrane. This report contains a discussion of the design issues being addressed by the single cell test program, a test matrix being conducted to address these issues, and a summary of the performance objectives for the single cell test system. The current primary objective of single cell test system is to characterize and qualify electrolyzer configurations for the following 100-hour longevity tests. Although the single cell test system development is considered complete, SRNL will continue to utilize the test facility and the single cell electrolyzer to measure the operability and performance of various cell design configurations, including new MEA's produced by the component development tasks.

  15. Microfabricated Collector-Generator Electrode Sensor for Measuring Absolute pH and Oxygen Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Dengler, Adam K; Wightman, R Mark; McCarty, Gregory S

    2015-10-20

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) has attracted attention for studying in vivo neurotransmission due to its subsecond temporal resolution, selectivity, and sensitivity. Traditional FSCV measurements use background subtraction to isolate changes in the local electrochemical environment, providing detailed information on fluctuations in the concentration of electroactive species. This background subtraction removes information about constant or slowly changing concentrations. However, determination of background concentrations is still important for understanding functioning brain tissue. For example, neural activity is known to consume oxygen and produce carbon dioxide which affects local levels of oxygen and pH. Here, we present a microfabricated microelectrode array which uses FSCV to detect the absolute levels of oxygen and pH in vitro. The sensor is a collector-generator electrode array with carbon microelectrodes spaced 5 μm apart. In this work, a periodic potential step is applied at the generator producing transient local changes in the electrochemical environment. The collector electrode continuously performs FSCV enabling these induced changes in concentration to be recorded with the sensitivity and selectivity of FSCV. A negative potential step applied at the generator produces a transient local pH shift at the collector. The generator-induced pH signal is detected using FSCV at the collector and correlated to absolute solution pH by postcalibration of the anodic peak position. In addition, in oxygenated solutions a negative potential step at the generator produces hydrogen peroxide by reducing oxygen. Hydrogen peroxide is detected with FSCV at the collector electrode, and the magnitude of the oxidative peak is proportional to absolute oxygen concentrations. Oxygen interference on the pH signal is minimal and can be accounted for with a postcalibration.

  16. Cerebral and muscle oxygen saturation measurement by a frequency-domain near-infrared spectroscopic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Marco; De Blasi, Roberto A.; Fantini, Sergio; Franceschini, Maria-Angela; Barbieri, Beniamino B.; Quaresima, Valentina; Gratton, Enrico

    1995-05-01

    Absorption and reduced scattering coefficients at 715 and 825 nm as well as hemoglobin saturation and content of the forehead and the forearm were measured by a 110 MHz frequency-domain multisource instrument. The absolute data obtained by the frequency- domain spectrometer were compared with oxygenation changes measured by a continuous wave instrument during quadriceps ischemia and postural changes. These preliminary results indicate that portable frequency-domain instruments could be very helpful to investigate brain and muscle pathophysiology.

  17. Limitations of quantitative photoacoustic measurements of blood oxygenation in small vessels.

    PubMed

    Sivaramakrishnan, Mathangi; Maslov, Konstantin; Zhang, Hao F; Stoica, George; Wang, Lihong V

    2007-03-07

    We investigate the feasibility of obtaining accurate quantitative information, such as local blood oxygenation level (sO2), with a spatial resolution of about 50 microm from spectral photoacoustic (PA) measurements. The optical wavelength dependence of the peak values of the PA signals is utilized to obtain the local blood oxygenation level. In our in vitro experimental models, the PA signal amplitude is found to be linearly proportional to the blood optical absorption coefficient when using ultrasonic transducers with central frequencies high enough such that the ultrasonic wavelengths are shorter than the light penetration depth into the blood vessels. For an optical wavelength in the 578-596 nm region, with a transducer central frequency that is above 25 MHz, the sensitivity and accuracy of sO2 inversion is shown to be better than 4%. The effect of the transducer focal position on the accuracy of quantifying blood oxygenation is found to be negligible. In vivo oxygenation measurements of rat skin microvasculature yield results consistent with those from in vitro studies, although factors specific to in vivo measurements, such as the spectral dependence of tissue optical attenuation, dramatically affect the accuracy of sO2 quantification in vivo.

  18. Terahertz Limb Sounder for Lower Thermosphere Wind, Temperature, and Atomic Oxygen Density Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, J. H.; Boldt, J.; Wu, D. L.; Mehdi, I.; Schlecht, E.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present the concept of a high-sensitivity heterodyne spectrometer operating at Terahertz (THz) frequency for global lower thermospheric neutral wind, temperature and atomic oxygen density measurements from a low earth orbit. The instrument, THz Limb Sounder (TLS) is aimed to provide, for the first time, global neutral wind/temperature/density profile measurements globally during day and night, with focus at altitudes of 100-150 km where most of the ion-neutral energy/momentum couplings take place. It is an ambient-temperature Schottky diode based all solid-state heterodyne spectrometer designed to extend the limb sounding technique employed by Microwave Limb Sounder for density/temperature/wind measurements by measuring the Doppler line shape of atomic oxygen (OI) fine structure emission at 2.06THz. This atomic oxygen line emission is very bright and distributed nearly uniformly globally (at all latitudes including high latitude aurora particle precipitation regions) and temporally (at all local times during both day and night), thus ideal for thermospheric remote sensing. TLS is an ambient-temperature Schottky diode based heterodyne receiver system The TLS instrument concept, measurement methodology, receiver performance, and the expected measurement capability will be presented and discussed in this paper.

  19. Laser photodetachment measurements of the negative ion density in an oxygen currentless plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Tsviatko K.; Gateva, Sanka V.

    2001-04-01

    Laser photodetachment measurements of the negative ion density in an oxygen currentless plasma are reported. For this experiments a DC gas discharge tube with a coaxial nickel sectional cathode (diameter 5.10-2 m) and a grid anode (diameter 2.10-2 m and length 0.2 m) is used. The measurements are made in pure oxygen at gas pressure 109 Pa and discharge current 40 - 80 mA. Inside the anode region the reduced electrical field E/Ng is near zero (Ng is the gas density). The currentless plasma is formed by plasma particles moving from the negative glow into the cavity inside the anode. The negative charged particles dominantly are negative ions with Maxwellian energy distribution. The negative ion density is measured on the axis in the center of the discharge tube by measurement of the relative absorption of the laser power. A 5 mW 785 nm diode laser is used for the measurements. The obtained values of the oxygen negative ion density at gas pressure 109 Pa and 80 mA are approximately 10-13 cm-3 and are in good agreement with the values obtained by second derivative Langmuir probe measurements.

  20. Quantitative measurements of ground state atomic oxygen in atmospheric pressure surface micro-discharge array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D.; Kong, M. G.; Britun, N.; Snyders, R.; Leys, C.; Nikiforov, A.

    2017-06-01

    The generation of atomic oxygen in an array of surface micro-discharge, working in atmospheric pressure He/O2 or Ar/O2 mixtures, is investigated. The absolute atomic oxygen density and its temporal and spatial dynamics are studied by means of two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence. A high density of atomic oxygen is detected in the He/O2 mixture with up to 10% O2 content in the feed gas, whereas the atomic oxygen concentration in the Ar/O2 mixture stays below the detection limit of 1013 cm-3. The measured O density near the electrode under the optimal conditions in He/1.75% O2 gas is 4.26  ×  1015 cm-3. The existence of the ground state O (2p 4 3 P) species has been proven in the discharge at a distance up to 12 mm away from the electrodes. Dissociative reactions of the singlet O2 with O3 and deep vacuum ultraviolet radiation, including the radiation of excimer \\text{He}2\\ast , are proposed to be responsible for O (2p 4 3 P) production in the far afterglow. A capability of the surface micro-discharge array delivering atomic oxygen to long distances over a large area is considered very interesting for various biomedical applications.

  1. Monte Carlo method for calculating oxygen abundances and their uncertainties from strong-line flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, F. B.; Modjaz, M.; Oh, S. M.; Fierroz, D.; Liu, Y. Q.; Kewley, L.; Graur, O.

    2016-07-01

    We present the open-source Python code pyMCZ that determines oxygen abundance and its distribution from strong emission lines in the standard metallicity calibrators, based on the original IDL code of Kewley and Dopita (2002) with updates from Kewley and Ellison (2008), and expanded to include more recently developed calibrators. The standard strong-line diagnostics have been used to estimate the oxygen abundance in the interstellar medium through various emission line ratios (referred to as indicators) in many areas of astrophysics, including galaxy evolution and supernova host galaxy studies. We introduce a Python implementation of these methods that, through Monte Carlo sampling, better characterizes the statistical oxygen abundance confidence region including the effect due to the propagation of observational uncertainties. These uncer