Science.gov

Sample records for mechanical activation assisted

  1. Mechanical efficiency and user power requirement with a pushrim activated power assisted wheelchair.

    PubMed

    Arva, J; Fitzgerald, S G; Cooper, R A; Boninger, M L

    2001-12-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the difference in mechanical efficiency and user power generation between traditional manual wheelchairs and a pushrim activated power assisted wheelchair (PAPAW). Ten manual wheelchair users were evaluated in a repeated measures design trial with and without the PAPAW for propulsion efficiency. Subjects propelled a Quickie GP equipped with the PAPAW and their own chair on a computer controlled wheelchair dynamometer at five different resistance levels. Power output, user power with the PAPAW hubs, subjects' oxygen consumption per minute and mechanical efficiency were analyzed. Metabolic energy and user power were significantly lower (p<0.05), and mechanical efficiency significantly higher with the PAPAW than with subjects' own chairs. Subjects needed to generate on average 3.65 times more power when propelling their own wheelchairs as compared to PAPAW. Mean mechanical efficiency over all trials was 80.33% higher with the power assisted hubs. PAPAW provides on average 73% of the total power when subjects propel with power assistance. Significantly increased efficiency and reduced requirement of user power is achieved using the PAPAW. With use, the PAPAW may contribute to delaying secondary injuries of manual wheelchair users. In addition, it may be suitable for people who have (or at risk for) upper extremity joint degeneration, reduced exercise capacity, low strength or endurance who currently use electric powered wheelchairs.

  2. Mechanical cardiac assistance.

    PubMed

    Sezai, Y

    1998-08-01

    In our institute, we have intensively introduced both pulsatile and non-pulsatile mechanical cardiac assist devices, such as the pneumatic ventricular assist device (VAD) and percutaneous cardiopulmonary support (PCPS), using a centrifugal pump. From various kinds of clinical views, these cases were estimated and evaluated retrospectively according to the weaning results, long-term survival rate and cause of death. Based upon our experiences and clinical results, an alternate strategy of mechanical cardiac assistance for severe heart failure is suggested as follows. In the case of post-cardiotomy cardiogenic shock or low output syndrome, PCPS system should be applied firstly under intra-aortic balloon pumping (IABP) assist for a maximum of 2-3 days. If the native cardiac function does not recover and more long-term support is needed, several types of VAD, which are more powerful and durable devices should be introduced, according to end organ function and expected support duration. In order to obtain better clinical results, we have to select an appropriate device depending on the limited availability of supporting duration. Generally speaking, centrifugal pumps can support in short-term duration, while pulsatile devices cover the broad spectrum of the supporting period. Pneumatic VADs can cover short-term to long-term support up to a year, and electric VADs can cover over 1 year, and can be used as a bridge to heart transplantation.

  3. Mechanical Activation-Assisted Reductive Leaching of Cadmium from Zinc Neutral Leaching Residue Using Sulfur Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chun; Min, Xiaobo; Chai, Liyuan; Zhang, Jianqiang; Wang, Mi

    2015-12-01

    In this work, zinc neutral leaching residue was mechanically activated by ball-milling. The subsequent leaching behavior and kinetics of cadmium extraction in a mixed SO2-H2SO4 system were studied. Changes in the crystalline phase, lattice distortion, particle size and morphology, which were induced by mechanical activation, were also investigated. The activated samples showed different physicochemical characteristics, and cadmium extraction was found to be easier than for the un-activated samples. Under the same conditions, mechanical activation contributed to higher cadmium leaching. The cadmium extraction kinetics at 75-95°C was found to fit the shrinking core model. The raw neutral leaching residue, and the samples activated for 60 min and 120 min had a calculated activation energy of 65.02 kJ/mol, 59.45 kJ/mol and 53.46 kJ/mol, respectively. The leaching residue was characterized by ICP, XRD and SEM analysis. According to XRD analysis, the main phases in the residue were lead sulfate (PbSO4), zinc sulfide (ZnS) and cadmium sulfide (CdS).

  4. [Mechanical resuscitation assist devices].

    PubMed

    Fischer, M; Breil, M; Ihli, M; Messelken, M; Rauch, S; Schewe, J-C

    2014-03-01

    In Germany 100,000-160,000 people suffer from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) annually. The incidence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) after OHCA varies between emergency ambulance services but is in the range of 30-90 CPR attempts per 100,000 inhabitants per year. Basic life support (BLS) involving chest compressions and ventilation is the key measure of resuscitation. Rapid initiation and quality of BLS are the most critical factors for CPR success. Even healthcare professionals are not always able to ensure the quality of CPR measures. Consequently in recent years mechanical resuscitation devices have been developed to optimize chest compression and the resulting circulation. In this article the mechanical resuscitation devices currently available in Germany are discussed and evaluated scientifically in context with available literature. The ANIMAX CPR device should not be used outside controlled trials as no clinical results have so far been published. The same applies to the new device Corpuls CPR which will be available on the market in early 2014. Based on the current published data a general recommendation for the routine use of LUCAS™ and AutoPulse® CPR cannot be given. The preliminary data of the CIRC trial and the published data of the LINC trial revealed that mechanical CPR is apparently equivalent to good manual CPR. For the final assessment further publications of large randomized studies must be analyzed (e.g. the CIRC and PaRAMeDIC trials). However, case control studies, case series and small studies have already shown that in special situations and in some cases patients will benefit from the automatic mechanical resuscitation devices (LUCAS™, AutoPulse®). This applies especially to emergency services where standard CPR quality is far below average and for patients who require prolonged CPR under difficult circumstances. This might be true in cases of resuscitation due to hypothermia, intoxication and pulmonary embolism as well as

  5. Dynamically Assisted Schwinger Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Schuetzhold, Ralf; Gies, Holger; Dunne, Gerald

    2008-09-26

    We study electron-positron pair creation from the Dirac vacuum induced by a strong and slowly varying electric field (Schwinger effect) which is superimposed by a weak and rapidly changing electromagnetic field (dynamical pair creation). In the subcritical regime where both mechanisms separately are strongly suppressed, their combined impact yields a pair creation rate which is dramatically enhanced. Intuitively speaking, the strong electric field lowers the threshold for dynamical particle creation--or, alternatively, the fast electromagnetic field generates additional seeds for the Schwinger mechanism. These findings could be relevant for planned ultrahigh intensity lasers.

  6. The Resonating Arm Exerciser: design and pilot testing of a mechanically passive rehabilitation device that mimics robotic active assistance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Robotic arm therapy devices that incorporate actuated assistance can enhance arm recovery, motivate patients to practice, and allow therapists to deliver semi-autonomous training. However, because such devices are often complex and actively apply forces, they have not achieved widespread use in rehabilitation clinics or at home. This paper describes the design and pilot testing of a simple, mechanically passive device that provides robot-like assistance for active arm training using the principle of mechanical resonance. Methods The Resonating Arm Exerciser (RAE) consists of a lever that attaches to the push rim of a wheelchair, a forearm support, and an elastic band that stores energy. Patients push and pull on the lever to roll the wheelchair back and forth by about 20 cm around a neutral position. We performed two separate pilot studies of the device. In the first, we tested whether the predicted resonant properties of RAE amplified a user’s arm mobility by comparing his or her active range of motion (AROM) in the device achieved during a single, sustained push and pull to the AROM achieved during rocking. In a second pilot study designed to test the therapeutic potential of the device, eight participants with chronic stroke (35 ± 24 months since injury) and a mean, stable, initial upper extremity Fugl-Meyer (FM) score of 17 ± 8 / 66 exercised with RAE for eight 45 minute sessions over three weeks. The primary outcome measure was the average AROM measured with a tilt sensor during a one minute test, and the secondary outcome measures were the FM score and the visual analog scale for arm pain. Results In the first pilot study, we found people with a severe motor impairment after stroke intuitively found the resonant frequency of the chair, and the mechanical resonance of RAE amplified their arm AROM by a factor of about 2. In the second pilot study, AROM increased by 66% ± 20% (p = 0.003). The mean FM score increase was 8.5 ± 4 pts (p = 0

  7. The Resonating Arm Exerciser: design and pilot testing of a mechanically passive rehabilitation device that mimics robotic active assistance.

    PubMed

    Zondervan, Daniel K; Palafox, Lorena; Hernandez, Jorge; Reinkensmeyer, David J

    2013-04-18

    Robotic arm therapy devices that incorporate actuated assistance can enhance arm recovery, motivate patients to practice, and allow therapists to deliver semi-autonomous training. However, because such devices are often complex and actively apply forces, they have not achieved widespread use in rehabilitation clinics or at home. This paper describes the design and pilot testing of a simple, mechanically passive device that provides robot-like assistance for active arm training using the principle of mechanical resonance. The Resonating Arm Exerciser (RAE) consists of a lever that attaches to the push rim of a wheelchair, a forearm support, and an elastic band that stores energy. Patients push and pull on the lever to roll the wheelchair back and forth by about 20 cm around a neutral position. We performed two separate pilot studies of the device. In the first, we tested whether the predicted resonant properties of RAE amplified a user's arm mobility by comparing his or her active range of motion (AROM) in the device achieved during a single, sustained push and pull to the AROM achieved during rocking. In a second pilot study designed to test the therapeutic potential of the device, eight participants with chronic stroke (35 ± 24 months since injury) and a mean, stable, initial upper extremity Fugl-Meyer (FM) score of 17 ± 8 / 66 exercised with RAE for eight 45 minute sessions over three weeks. The primary outcome measure was the average AROM measured with a tilt sensor during a one minute test, and the secondary outcome measures were the FM score and the visual analog scale for arm pain. In the first pilot study, we found people with a severe motor impairment after stroke intuitively found the resonant frequency of the chair, and the mechanical resonance of RAE amplified their arm AROM by a factor of about 2. In the second pilot study, AROM increased by 66% ± 20% (p = 0.003). The mean FM score increase was 8.5 ± 4 pts (p = 0.009). Subjects did not report

  8. A Substrate-Assisted Mechanism of Nucleophile Activation in a Ser-His-Asp Containing C-C Bond Hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Ruzzini, Antonio C.; Bhowmik, Shiva; Ghosh, Subhangi; Yam, Katherine C.; Bolin, Jeffrey T.; Eltis, Lindsay D.

    2013-11-12

    The meta-cleavage product (MCP) hydrolases utilize a Ser–His–Asp triad to hydrolyze a carbon–carbon bond. Hydrolysis of the MCP substrate has been proposed to proceed via an enol-to-keto tautomerization followed by a nucleophilic mechanism of catalysis. Ketonization involves an intermediate, ESred, which possesses a remarkable bathochromically shifted absorption spectrum. We investigated the catalytic mechanism of the MCP hydrolases using DxnB2 from Sphingomonas wittichii RW1. Pre-steady-state kinetic and LC ESI/MS evaluation of the DxnB2-mediated hydrolysis of 2-hydroxy-6-oxo-6-phenylhexa-2,4-dienoic acid to 2-hydroxy-2,4-pentadienoic acid and benzoate support a nucleophilic mechanism catalysis. In DxnB2, the rate of ESred decay and product formation showed a solvent kinetic isotope effect of 2.5, indicating that a proton transfer reaction, assigned here to substrate ketonization, limits the rate of acylation. For a series of substituted MCPs, this rate was linearly dependent on MCP pKa2nuc ~ 1). Structural characterization of DxnB2 S105A:MCP complexes revealed that the catalytic histidine is displaced upon substrate-binding. The results provide evidence for enzyme-catalyzed ketonization in which the catalytic His–Asp pair does not play an essential role. The data further suggest that ESred represents a dianionic intermediate that acts as a general base to activate the serine nucleophile. This substrate-assisted mechanism of nucleophilic catalysis distinguishes MCP hydrolases from other serine hydrolases.

  9. Chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process

    DOEpatents

    Vobach, A.R.

    1987-11-24

    There is provided a chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process including the steps of: mechanically compressing a refrigerant stream which includes vaporized refrigerant; contacting the refrigerant with a solvent in a mixer at a pressure sufficient to promote substantial dissolving of the refrigerant in the solvent in the mixer to form a refrigerant-solvent solution while concurrently placing the solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to transfer energy to the working medium, said refrigerant-solvent solution exhibiting a negative deviation from Raoult's Law; reducing the pressure over the refrigerant-solvent solution in an evaporator to allow the refrigerant to vaporize and substantially separate from the solvent while concurrently placing the evolving refrigerant-solvent solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to remove energy from the working medium to thereby form a refrigerant stream and a solvent stream; and passing the solvent and refrigerant stream from the evaporator. 5 figs.

  10. Chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process

    DOEpatents

    Vobach, Arnold R.

    1987-01-01

    There is provided a chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process including the steps of: mechanically compressing a refrigerant stream which includes vaporized refrigerant; contacting the refrigerant with a solvent in a mixer (11) at a pressure sufficient to promote substantial dissolving of the refrigerant in the solvent in the mixer (11) to form a refrigerant-solvent solution while concurrently placing the solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to transfer energy to the working medium, said refrigerant-solvent solution exhibiting a negative deviation from Raoult's Law; reducing the pressure over the refrigerant-solvent solution in an evaporator (10) to allow the refrigerant to vaporize and substantially separate from the solvent while concurrently placing the evolving refrigerant-solvent solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to remove energy from the working medium to thereby form a refrigerant stream and a solvent stream; and passing the solvent and refrigerant stream from the evaporator.

  11. Chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process

    DOEpatents

    Vobach, Arnold R.

    1987-01-01

    There is provided a chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process including the steps of: mechanically compressing a refrigerant stream which includes vaporized refrigerant; contacting the refrigerant with a solvent in a mixer (11) at a pressure sufficient to promote substantial dissolving of the refrigerant in the solvent in the mixer (11) to form a refrigerant-solvent solution while concurrently placing the solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to transfer energy to the working medium, said refrigerant-solvent solution exhibiting a negative deviation from Raoult's Law; reducing the pressure over the refrigerant-solvent solution in an evaporator (10) to allow the refrigerant to vaporize and substantially separate from the solvent while concurrently placing he evolving refrigerant-solvent solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to remove energy from the working medium to thereby form a refrigerant stream and a solvent stream; and passing the solvent and refrigerant stream from the evaporator.

  12. Chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process

    DOEpatents

    Vobach, A.R.

    1987-06-23

    There is provided a chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process including the steps of: mechanically compressing a refrigerant stream which includes vaporized refrigerant; contacting the refrigerant with a solvent in a mixer at a pressure sufficient to promote substantial dissolving of the refrigerant in the solvent in the mixer to form a refrigerant-solvent solution while concurrently placing the solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to transfer energy to the working medium, said refrigerant-solvent solution exhibiting a negative deviation from Raoult's Law; reducing the pressure over the refrigerant-solvent solution in an evaporator to allow the refrigerant to vaporize and substantially separate from the solvent while concurrently placing the evolving refrigerant-solvent solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to remove energy from the working medium to thereby form a refrigerant stream and a solvent stream; and passing the solvent and refrigerant stream from the evaporator. 5 figs.

  13. [Active euthanasia, or assisted suicide?

    PubMed

    Julesz, Máté

    2016-10-01

    Both active euthanasia and assisted suicide are legal in The Netherlands, Belgium, Luxemburg and, most recently, in Canada. Examination of national legislations of countries where both active euthanasia and assisted suicide are legal. The number of accomplished active euthanasia cases and that of assisted suicide cases. Analysis of national statistical data. Comparison of statistical data before and after 2010. Comparison of the related practices in the surveyed countries. The number of active euthanasia cases markedly predominates over the number of assisted suicide cases. Cancer is a main reason for active euthanasia, or assisted suicide. In countries with a larger population, the number of active euthanasia cases is higher than that in countries with a smaller population. Regarding the fact that the applicants for active euthanasia withdraw their requests in a smaller number than the applicants for assisted suicide, patients prefer the choice of active euthanasia. Since the related legislative product is too recent in Canada at present, it may be only presumed that a certain preference will also develop in the related practices in Canada. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(40), 1595-1600.

  14. Assessing the Relative Contributions of Active Ankle and Knee Assistance to the Walking Mechanics of Transfemoral Amputees Using a Powered Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Ann M.; Hargrove, Levi J.

    2016-01-01

    Powered knee-ankle prostheses are capable of providing net-positive mechanical energy to amputees. Yet, there are limitless ways to deliver this energy throughout the gait cycle. It remains largely unknown how different combinations of active knee and ankle assistance affect the walking mechanics of transfemoral amputees. This study assessed the relative contributions of stance phase knee swing initiation, increasing ankle stiffness and powered plantarflexion as three unilateral transfemoral amputees walked overground at their self-selected walking speed. Five combinations of knee and ankle conditions were evaluated regarding the kinematics and kinetics of the amputated and intact legs using repeated measures analyses of variance. We found eliminating active knee swing initiation or powered plantarflexion was linked to increased compensations of the ipsilateral hip joint during the subsequent swing phase. The elimination of knee swing initiation or powered plantarflexion also led to reduced braking ground reaction forces of the amputated and intact legs, and influenced both sagittal and frontal plane loading of the intact knee joint. Gradually increasing prosthetic ankle stiffness influenced the shape of the prosthetic ankle plantarflexion moment, more closely mirroring the intact ankle moment. Increasing ankle stiffness also corresponded to increased prosthetic ankle power generation (despite a similar maximum stiffness value across conditions) and increased braking ground reaction forces of the amputated leg. These findings further our understanding of how to deliver assistance with powered knee-ankle prostheses and the compensations that occur when specific aspects of assistance are added/removed. PMID:26807889

  15. Computer Assisted Introduction to Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Elisha R.

    These six chapters provide an introduction to Newtonian mechanics, based on a coordinated use of text material, laboratory work, and the computer. The material is essentially self-contained so that it can serve as a short text on mechanics or as a text supplement in a regular physics course. Chapter 1 is a brief introduction to the computer…

  16. Computer Assisted Introduction to Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Elisha R.

    These six chapters provide an introduction to Newtonian mechanics, based on a coordinated use of text material, laboratory work, and the computer. The material is essentially self-contained so that it can serve as a short text on mechanics or as a text supplement in a regular physics course. Chapter 1 is a brief introduction to the computer…

  17. Automobile Mechanic Assistant Work Sample.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational-Technical High School, Billerica, MA.

    This manual contains a work sample intended to assess a handicapped student's interest in and potential to pass sucessfully a training program in automotive mechanics or in a similar automotive job. Section 1 describes the assessment, correlates the work performed and worker traits required for completing the work sample, and lists related…

  18. Assisted mechanical ventilation: the future is now!

    PubMed

    Kacmarek, Robert M; Pirrone, Massimiliano; Berra, Lorenzo

    2015-07-29

    Assisted ventilation is a highly complex process that requires an intimate interaction between the ventilator and the patient. The complexity of this form of ventilation is frequently underappreciated by the bedside clinician. In assisted mechanical ventilation, regardless of the specific mode, the ventilator's gas delivery pattern and the patient's breathing pattern must match near perfectly or asynchrony between the patient and the ventilator occurs. Asynchrony can be categorized into four general types: flow asynchrony; trigger asynchrony; cycle asynchrony; and mode asynchrony. In an article recently published in BMC Anesthesiology, Hodane et al. have demonstrated reduced asynchrony during assisted ventilation with Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NAVA) as compared to pressure support ventilation (PSV). These findings add to the growing volume of data indicating that modes of ventilation that provide proportional assistance to ventilation - e.g., NAVA and Proportional Assist Ventilation (PAV) - markedly reduce asynchrony. As it becomes more accepted that the respiratory center of the patient in most circumstances is the most appropriate determinant of ventilatory pattern and as the negative outcome effects of patient-ventilator asynchrony become ever more recognized, we can expect NAVA and PAV to become the preferred modes of assisted ventilation!

  19. Mechanical Serial-Sectioning Data Assistant

    SciTech Connect

    Poulter, Gregory A.; Madison, Jonathan D.

    2015-11-17

    Mechanical Serial-Sectioning Data Assistant (MECH-SSDA) is a real-time data analytics software with graphical user-interface that; 1) tracks and visualizes material removal rates for mechanical serial-sectioning experiments using at least two height measurement methods; 2) tracks process time for specific segments of the serial-sectioning experiment; and 3) alerts the user to anomalies in expected removal rate, process time or unanticipated operational pauses

  20. New modes of assisted mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Suarez-Sipmann, F

    2014-05-01

    Recent major advances in mechanical ventilation have resulted in new exciting modes of assisted ventilation. Compared to traditional ventilation modes such as assisted-controlled ventilation or pressure support ventilation, these new modes offer a number of physiological advantages derived from the improved patient control over the ventilator. By implementing advanced closed-loop control systems and using information on lung mechanics, respiratory muscle function and respiratory drive, these modes are specifically designed to improve patient-ventilator synchrony and reduce the work of breathing. Depending on their specific operational characteristics, these modes can assist spontaneous breathing efforts synchronically in time and magnitude, adapt to changing patient demands, implement automated weaning protocols, and introduce a more physiological variability in the breathing pattern. Clinicians have now the possibility to individualize and optimize ventilatory assistance during the complex transition from fully controlled to spontaneous assisted ventilation. The growing evidence of the physiological and clinical benefits of these new modes is favoring their progressive introduction into clinical practice. Future clinical trials should improve our understanding of these modes and help determine whether the claimed benefits result in better outcomes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  1. Gravity-Assist Mechanical Simulator for Outreach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doody, David F.; White, Victor E.; Schaff, Mitch D.

    2012-01-01

    There is no convenient way to demonstrate mechanically, as an outreach (or inreach) topic, the angular momentum trade-offs and the conservation of angular momentum associated with gravityassist interplanetary trajectories. The mechanical concepts that underlie gravity assist are often misunderstood or confused, possibly because there is no mechanical analog to it in everyday experience. The Gravity Assist Mech - anical Simulator is a hands-on solution to this longstanding technical communications challenge. Users intuitively grasp the concepts, meeting specific educational objectives. A manually spun wheel with high angular mass and low-friction bearings supplies momentum to an attached spherical neodymium magnet that represents a planet orbiting the Sun. A steel bearing ball following a trajectory across a glass plate above the wheel and magnet undergoes an elastic collision with the revolving magnet, illustrating the gravitational elastic collision between spacecraft and planet on a gravity-assist interplanetary trajectory. Manually supplying the angular momentum for the elastic collision, rather than observing an animation, intuitively conveys the concepts, meeting nine specific educational objectives. Many NASA and JPL interplanetary missions are enabled by the gravity-assist technique.

  2. Spatially Assisted Schwinger Mechanism and Magnetic Catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copinger, Patrick; Fukushima, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    Using the worldline formalism we compute an effective action for fermions under a temporally modulated electric field and a spatially modulated magnetic field. It is known that the former leads to an enhanced Schwinger mechanism, while we find that the latter can also result in enhanced particle production and even cause a reorganization of the vacuum to acquire a larger dynamical mass in equilibrium which spatially assists the magnetic catalysis.

  3. Mechanically assisted laser forming of thin beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucha, Zygmunt; Widłaszewski, Jacek; Kurp, Piotr; Mulczyk, Krystian

    2016-12-01

    Laser-assisted forming techniques have been developed in recent years to aid plastic working of materials, which are difficult in processing at normal temperatures due to a high brittleness, effects of high work-hardening or a high spring-back phenomenon. This paper reports initial experimental investigations and numerical simulations of a mechanically-assisted laser forming process. The research is aimed at facilitating plastic shaping of thin-walled parts made of high temperature resistant alloys. Stainless steel plate, 1 mm thick, 20 mm wide, was mounted in the cantilever arrangement and a gravitational load was applied to its free end. A CO2 laser beam with rectangular cross-section traversed along the plate, towards the fixed edge. Laser spot covered the whole width of the plate. Experiments and simulations using the finite element method were performed for different values of mechanical load and with constant laser processing parameters. Experimentally validated numerical model allowed analysis of plastic deformation mechanism under the hybrid thermo-mechanical processing. The revealed mechanism of deformation consists in intense material plastic flow near the laser heated surface. This behavior results mainly from the tension state close to the heated surface and the decrease of material yield stress at elevated temperature. Stress state near the side edges of the processed plate favored more intense plastic deformation and the involved residual stress in this region.

  4. Enhancement of activity of cross-linked enzyme aggregates by a sugar-assisted precipitation strategy: technical development and molecular mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mengfan; Qi, Wei; Jia, Chenxi; Ren, Yufei; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2011-10-20

    The precipitation of enzyme causes the major activity loss in the conventional protocol for CLEAs preparation. Herein, a sugar-assisted strategy was developed to minimize the activity loss in the step of enzyme precipitation by adding sugar as the stabilizer, which contributed to improve the activity yield of resulting CLEAs. Penicillin G acylase (PGA) was employed as a model enzyme. The effects of glucose, sucrose and trehalose on the activity yields of CLEAs were investigated. The highest activity was obtained in the case of adding trehalose. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that the polar microenvironment and the secondary structure of native enzyme were preserved to some extent when PGA was prepared as sugar-assisted CLEAs, resulting in PGA's higher activity than sugar-free CLEAs. Scanning electron microscope revealed the different inner morphologies, and the kinetic studies showed the higher affinity and resist-inhibition capacity of sugar-assisted CLEAs. Furthermore, stability experiments demonstrated that CLEAs prepared in sugar-assisted strategy remained higher thermal stability when it was incubated at high temperature. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Fuzzy logic-based risk of fall estimation using smartwatch data as a means to form an assistive feedback mechanism in everyday living activities.

    PubMed

    Iakovakis, Dimitrios E; Papadopoulou, Fotini A; Hadjileontiadis, Leontios J

    2016-12-01

    This Letter aims to create a fuzzy logic-based assistive prevention tool for falls, based on accessible sensory technology, such as smartwatch, resulting in monitoring of the risk factors of falls caused by orthostatic hypotension (OH); a drop in systolic blood pressure (DSBP) >20 mmHg due to postural changes. Epidemiological studies have shown that OH is a high risk factor for falls and has a strong impact in quality of life (QoL) of the elderly's, especially for some cases such as Parkinsonians. Based on smartwatch data, it is explored here how statistical features of heart rate variability (HRV) can lead to DSBP prediction and estimation of the risk of fall. In this vein, a pilot study was conducted in collaboration with five Greek Parkinson's Foundation patients and ten healthy volunteers. Taking into consideration, the estimated DSBP and additional statistics of the user's medical/behavioural history, a fuzzy logic inference system was developed, to estimate the instantaneous risk of fall. The latter is fed back to the user with a mechanism chosen by him/her (i.e. vibration and/or sound), to prevent a possible fall, and also sent to the attentive carers and/or healthcare professionals for a home-based monitoring beyond the clinic. The proposed approach paves the way for effective exploitation of the contribution of smartwatch data, such as HRV, in the sustain of QoL in everyday living activities.

  6. Discrete divalent rare-earth cationic ROP catalysts: ligand-dependent redox behavior and discrepancies with alkaline-earth analogues in a ligand-assisted activated monomer mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Roisnel, Thierry; Maron, Laurent; Carpentier, Jean-François; Sarazin, Yann

    2013-03-18

    The first solvent-free cationic complexes of the divalent rare-earth metals, [{RO}RE(II) ](+) [A](-) (RE(II) =Yb(II) , 1; Eu(II) , 2) and [{LO}RE(II) ](+) [A](-) ([A](-) =[H2 N{B(C6 F5 )3 }2 ](-) ; RE(II) =Yb(II) , 3; Eu(II) , 4), have been prepared by using highly chelating monoanionic aminoether-fluoroalkoxide ({RO}(-) ) and aminoether-phenolate ({LO}(-) ) ligands. Complexes 1 and 2 are structurally related to their alkaline-earth analogues [{RO}AE](+) [A](-) (AE=Ca, 5; Sr, 6). Yet, the two families behave very differently during catalysis of the ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of L-lactide (L-LA) and trimethylene carbonate (TMC) performed under immortal conditions with excess BnOH as an exogenous chain-transfer agent. The ligand was found to strongly influence the behavior of the RE(II) complexes during ROP catalysis. The fluoroalkoxide RE(II) catalysts 1 and 2 are not oxidized under ROP conditions, and compare very favorably with their Ca and Sr congeners 5 and 6 in terms of activity (turnover frequency (TOF) in the range 200-400 molL-LA (molEu  h(-1) )) and control over the parameters during the immortal ROP of L-LA (Mn,theor ≈Mn,SEC , Mw /Mn <1.05). The Eu(II) -phenolate 4 provided one of the most effective ROP cationic systems known to date for L-LA polymerization, exhibiting high activity (TOF up to 1 880 molL-LA ⋅(molEu  h)(-1) ) and good control (Mw /Mn =1.05). By contrast, upon addition of L-LA the Yb(II) -phenolate 3 immediately oxidizes to inactive RE(III) species. Yet, the cyclic carbonate TMC was rapidly polymerized by combinations of 3 (or even 1) and BnOH, revealing excellent activities (TOF=5000-7000 molTMC ⋅(molEu  h)(-1) ) and unusually high control (Mn,theor ≈Mn,SEC , Mw /Mn <1.09); under identical conditions, the calcium derivative 5 was entirely inert toward TMC. Based on experimental and kinetic data, a new ligand-assisted activated monomer ROP mechanism is suggested, in which the so-called ancillary ligand plays a

  7. Modeling of tRNA-assisted mechanism of Arg activation based on a structure of Arg-tRNA synthetase, tRNA, and an ATP analog (ANP).

    PubMed

    Konno, Michiko; Sumida, Tomomi; Uchikawa, Emiko; Mori, Yukie; Yanagisawa, Tatsuo; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Yokoyama, Shigeuki

    2009-09-01

    The ATP-pyrophosphate exchange reaction catalyzed by Arg-tRNA, Gln-tRNA and Glu-tRNA synthetases requires the assistance of the cognate tRNA. tRNA also assists Arg-tRNA synthetase in catalyzing the pyrophosphorolysis of synthetic Arg-AMP at low pH. The mechanism by which the 3'-end A76, and in particular its hydroxyl group, of the cognate tRNA is involved with the exchange reaction catalyzed by those enzymes has yet to be established. We determined a crystal structure of a complex of Arg-tRNA synthetase from Pyrococcus horikoshii, tRNA(Arg)(CCU) and an ATP analog with Rfactor = 0.213 (Rfree = 0.253) at 2.0 A resolution. On the basis of newly obtained structural information about the position of ATP bound on the enzyme, we constructed a structural model for a mechanism in which the formation of a hydrogen bond between the 2'-OH group of A76 of tRNA and the carboxyl group of Arg induces both formation of Arg-AMP (Arg + ATP --> Arg-AMP + pyrophosphate) and pyrophosphorolysis of Arg-AMP (Arg-AMP + pyrophosphate --> Arg + ATP) at low pH. Furthermore, we obtained a structural model of the molecular mechanism for the Arg-tRNA synthetase-catalyzed deacylation of Arg-tRNA (Arg-tRNA + AMP --> Arg-AMP + tRNA at high pH), in which the deacylation of aminoacyl-tRNA bound on Arg-tRNA synthetase and Glu-tRNA synthetase is catalyzed by a quite similar mechanism, whereby the proton-donating group (-NH-C+(NH2)2 or -COOH) of Arg and Glu assists the aminoacyl transfer from the 2'-OH group of tRNA to the phosphate group of AMP at high pH.

  8. [Mechanical cardiac assist systems in intensive care].

    PubMed

    Figulla, H R; Scholz, K H

    1994-01-01

    The indications for the use of mechanical cardiac assist-devices are sudden death, cardiogenic shock, severe coronary ischemia and high-risk PTCA. Among the cardiac assist-devices, currently available for cardiologists and cardiac surgeons, are the Intraaortal Balloon Pump (IABP), the implantable turbine-pump, the percutaneous cardiopulmonary support (PCPS), centrifugal pumps which are connected via a thoracotomy and intra- and extrathoracic total artificial hearts. It is easy to position the IABP, which can be continuously used over the course of several days. In the case of cardiogenic shock, the pump should be implanted as soon as possible, in order to facilitate revascularisation procedure in a patient with ischemic heart disease. By this procedures the survival rate of ischemic cardiogenic shock has been raised from 20% to 60%. However, the IABP does not prove supportive in the case of an MI without shock or in high-risk PTCA. The implantable turbine pump (Hemopump TM) is available in 3 configurations, ranging in external size from 14 F to 26 F. Of these, only the 14 F pumps can be implanted percutaneously by a Seldinger technique, whereas the bigger pumps require arteriotomy or thoracotomy for placement. The pump-rates of these systems reach from 2.0 l/min to 4.5 l/min. These pumps are used in high-risk PTCA as well as CABG-surgery without cardiopulmonary support, but are still currently in a test phase. However, at this point, it is still too early to finally evaluate the clinical importance of these systems. The percutaneous cardiopulmonary support (PCPS) has a major advantage over all other assist device systems, as it completely replaces the circulation. Therefore, PCPS is especially indicated in cardiac arrest, because it can be inserted very quickly, even without having to interrupt resuscitation. A second indication is high-risk PTCA, where it can be used also as a stand-by system. A study with 801 patients, investigating the use of this system in high

  9. Compensating Artificial Airway Resistance via Active Expiration Assistance.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Steffen; Seywert, Luc; Spaeth, Johannes; Schumann, Stefan

    2016-12-01

    Artificial airway resistance as provided by small-lumen tracheal tubes or catheters increases the risk of intrinsic PEEP (PEEPi). We hypothesized that by active expiration assistance, larger minute volumes could be generated without causing PEEPi compared with conventional mechanical ventilation when using small-lumen tracheal tubes or a cricothyrotomy catheter. We investigated the active expiration assistance in a physical model of the respiratory system and estimated its hypothetical performance in terms of maximal flow generated with endotracheal tubes ranging from 3.0 to 8.0 mm inner diameter (ID); with microlaryngeal tubes of 4.0, 5.0, and 6.0 mm ID; and with a cricothyrotomy catheter. Furthermore, we determined the minute volumes that could be achieved without generating PEEPi by ventilating a physical lung model using conventional mechanical ventilation or using active expiration assistance. The inspiratory and expiratory flow during active expiration assistance increased with increasing supply flow and decreased with decreasing ID of the connected endotracheal tubes (both P < .001). With small-lumen tracheal tubes, the active expiration assistance generated similar or higher minute volumes than conventional ventilation. Conventional mechanical ventilation with PEEPi <1 cm H2O was not achievable via a microlaryngeal tube of 4.0 mm ID and smaller lumen tubes. For mechanical ventilation via small-lumen tubes or thin catheters, active compensation of airway resistance might be a necessary means to generate adequate minute ventilation without causing PEEPi. Active expiration assistance can generate reasonable respiratory minute volumes via small-lumen tubes or thin catheters. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  10. Vibrationally Assisted Electron Transfer Mechanism of Olfaction: Myth or Reality?

    PubMed Central

    Solov’yov, Ilia A.; Chang, Po-Yao; Schulten, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Smell is a vital sense for animals. The mainstream explanation of smell is based on recognition of the odorant molecules through characteristics of their surface, e.g., shape, but certain experiments suggest that such recognition is complemented by recognition of vibrational modes. According to this suggestion an olfactory receptor is activated by electron transfer assisted through odorant vibrational excitation. The hundreds to thousands of different olfactory receptors in an animal recognize odorants over a discriminant landscape with surface properties and vibrational frequencies as the two major dimensions. In the present paper we introduce the vibrationally assisted mechanism of olfaction and demonstrate for several odorants that, indeed, a strong enhancement of an electron tunneling rate due to odorant vibrations can arise. We discuss in this regard the influence of odorant deuteration and explain, thereby, recent experiments performed on Drosophila melanogaster. Our demonstration is based on known physical properties of biological electron transfer and on ab initio calculations on odorants carried out for the purpose of the present study. We identify a range of physical characteristics which olfactory receptors and odorants must obey for the vibrationally assisted electron transfer mechanism to function. We argue that the stated characteristics are feasible for realistic olfactory receptors, noting, though, that the receptor structure presently is still unknown, but can be studied through homology modeling. PMID:22899100

  11. Mechanics of active surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salbreux, Guillaume; Jülicher, Frank

    2017-09-01

    We derive a fully covariant theory of the mechanics of active surfaces. This theory provides a framework for the study of active biological or chemical processes at surfaces, such as the cell cortex, the mechanics of epithelial tissues, or reconstituted active systems on surfaces. We introduce forces and torques acting on a surface, and derive the associated force balance conditions. We show that surfaces with in-plane rotational symmetry can have broken up-down, chiral, or planar-chiral symmetry. We discuss the rate of entropy production in the surface and write linear constitutive relations that satisfy the Onsager relations. We show that the bending modulus, the spontaneous curvature, and the surface tension of a passive surface are renormalized by active terms. Finally, we identify active terms which are not found in a passive theory and discuss examples of shape instabilities that are related to active processes in the surface.

  12. 34 CFR 300.119 - Technical assistance and training activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Technical assistance and training activities. 300.119... Technical assistance and training activities. Each SEA must carry out activities to ensure that teachers and....114; and (b) Are provided with technical assistance and training necessary to assist them in this...

  13. Pump in Parallel-Mechanical Assistance of Partial Cavopulmonary Circulation Using a Conventional Ventricular Assist Device.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Pranava; Deutsch, Nina; Ratnayaka, Kanishka; He, Dingchao; Peer, Murfad; Kurkluoglu, Mustafa; Nuszkowski, Mark; Montague, Erin; Mikesell, Gerald; Zurakowski, David; Jonas, Richard

    2017-06-15

    Mechanical assistance of systemic single ventricle is effective in pulling blood through a cavopulmonary circuit. In patients with superior cavopulmonary connection, this strategy can lead to arterial desaturation secondary to increased inferior caval flow. We hypothesized that overall augmentation in cardiac output with mechanical assistance compensates for the drop in oxygen saturation thereby maintaining tissue oxygen delivery (DO2). Bidirectional Glenn (BDG) was established in seven swine (25 kg) after a common atrium had been established by balloon septostomy. Mechanical circulatory assistance of the single ventricle was achieved using an axial flow pump with ventricular inflow and aortic outflow. Cardiac output, mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAP), common atrial pressure (left atrial pressure [LAP]), arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2), and DO2 were compared between assisted and nonassisted circulation. Significant augmentation of cardiac output was achieved with mechanical assistance in BDG circulation (BDG: median [interquartile range {IQR}], 0.8 [0.9-1.15] L/min versus assisted BDG: median [IQR], 1.5 [1.15-1.7] L/min; p = 0.05). Although oxygen saturations and PaO2 trended to be lower with assistance (SaO2; BDG: median [IQR], 43% [32-57%]; assisted BDG: median [IQR], 32% [24-35%]; p = 0.07) (PaO2; BDG: median [IQR], 24 [20-30] mm Hg; assisted BDG: median [IQR], 20 [17-21] mm Hg; p = 0.08), DO2 was unchanged with mechanical assistance (BDG: median [IQR], 94 [35-99] ml/min; assisted BDG: median [IQR], 79 [63-85] ml/min; p = 0.81). No significant change in the LAP or PAP was observed. In the setting of superior cavopulmonary connection/single ventricle, the systemic ventricular assistance with a ventricular assist device (VAD) leads to increase in cardiac output. Arterial oxygen saturations however may be lower with mechanical assistance, without any change in DO2.

  14. [Inflammasome: activation mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Suárez, Raibel; Buelvas, Neudo

    2015-03-01

    Inflammation is a rapid biologic response of the immune system in vascular tissues, directed to eliminate stimuli capable of causing damage and begin the process of repair. The macromolecular complexes known as "inflammasomes" are formed by a receptor, either NOD (NLR) or ALR, the receptor absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2). In addition, the inflammasome is formed by the speck-like protein associated to apoptosis (ASC) and procaspase-1, that may be activated by variations in the ionic and intracellular and extracellular ATP concentrations; and the loss of stabilization of the fagolisosomme by internalization of insoluble crystals and redox mechanisms. As a result, there is activation of the molecular platform and the processing of inflammatory prointerleukins to their active forms. There are two modalities of activation of the inflammasome: canonical and non-canonical, both capable of generating effector responses. Recent data associate NLRP 3, IL-1β and IL-18 in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases, including atherosclerosis, type II diabetes, hyperhomocysteinemia, gout, malaria and hypertension. The inflammasome cascade is emerging as a new chemotherapeutic target in these diseases. In this review we shall discuss the mechanisms of activation and regulation of the inflammasome that stimulate, modulate and resolve inflammation.

  15. Mechanically Activated Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Ranade, Sanjeev S; Syeda, Ruhma; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-09-23

    Mechanotransduction, the conversion of physical forces into biochemical signals, is essential for various physiological processes such as the conscious sensations of touch and hearing, and the unconscious sensation of blood flow. Mechanically activated (MA) ion channels have been proposed as sensors of physical force, but the identity of these channels and an understanding of how mechanical force is transduced has remained elusive. A number of recent studies on previously known ion channels along with the identification of novel MA ion channels have greatly transformed our understanding of touch and hearing in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Here, we present an updated review of eukaryotic ion channel families that have been implicated in mechanotransduction processes and evaluate the qualifications of the candidate genes according to specified criteria. We then discuss the proposed gating models for MA ion channels and highlight recent structural studies of mechanosensitive potassium channels.

  16. Mechanically Activated Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Ranade, Sanjeev S.; Syeda, Ruhma; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-01-01

    Mechanotransduction, the conversion of physical forces into biochemical signals, is an essential component of numerous physiological processes including not only conscious senses of touch and hearing, but also unconscious senses such as blood pressure regulation. Mechanically activated (MA) ion channels have been proposed as sensors of physical force, but the identity of these channels and an understanding of how mechanical force is transduced has remained elusive. A number of recent studies on previously known ion channels along with the identification of novel MA ion channels have greatly transformed our understanding of touch and hearing in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Here, we present an updated review of eukaryotic ion channel families that have been implicated in mechanotransduction processes and evaluate the qualifications of the candidate genes according to specified criteria. We then discuss the proposed gating models for MA ion channels and highlight recent structural studies of mechanosensitive potassium channels. PMID:26402601

  17. Ambient ultrasonic-assisted synthesis, stepwise growth mechanisms, and photocatalytic activity of flower-like nanostructured ZnO and Ag/ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yingming; Liu, Dongsheng; Lai, Youlei; Meng, Ming

    2014-03-01

    Flower-like nanostructured ZnO and Ag/ZnO catalysts were synthesized at ambient condition by a facile one-pot ultrasonic irradiation process. The ZnO morphology could be modified by both ultrasonic frequency and Ag amount. The acoustic cavitation effect dependent on ultrasonic frequency directly affects ZnO morphology. Doping of Ag not only promotes the transformation of zinc hydroxide to oxide, facilitating the formation of flower-like ZnO, but also enhances the photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B due to the promoted electron-hole segregation. The optimized ratio of Ag/Zn is 5 % (atomic ratio); more Ag can cover the surface of ZnO, decreasing the UV-vis light availability and mass transfer efficiency during reaction. The catalysts prepared at different ultrasonic frequencies show different UV-vis light absorbances and different UV-vis light availabilities. Among the catalysts of Ag/ZnO with 5 % Ag (ZA5- x), ZA5-100 prepared using 100 kHz ultrasonic frequency possesses the highest UV-vis light absorbance and best photocatalytic activity. Potential mechanisms for flower-like ZnO growth and Rhodamine B photodegradation are proposed.

  18. Mechanism of Chromophore Assisted Laser Inactivation Employing Fluorescent Proteins

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Mark A.; Rajfur, Zenon; Chen, Zaozao; Humphrey, David; Yang, Bing; Sligar, Stephen G.; Jacobson, Ken

    2009-01-01

    Chromophore Assisted Laser Inactivation (CALI) is a technique that uses irradiation of chromophores proximate to a target protein to inactivate function. Previously, EGFP mediated CALI has been used to inactivate EGFP-fusion proteins in a spatio-temporally defined manner within cells but the mechanism of inactivation is unknown 1, 2. To help elucidate the mechanism of protein inactivation mediated by fluorescent protein CALI ([FP]-CALI), the activities of purified Glutathione-S-transferase-FP (GST-EXFP) fusions were measured after laser irradiation in vitro. Singlet oxygen and free radical quenchers as well as the removal of oxygen inhibited CALI, indicating the involvement of a reactive oxygen species (ROS). At higher concentrations of protein, turbidity after CALI increased significantly indicating cross-linking of proximate fusion proteins suggesting that damage of residues on the surface the protein, distant from the active site, results in inactivation. Control experiments removed sample heating as a possible cause of these effects. Different FP mutants fused to GST vary in their CALI efficiency in the order EGFP>EYFP>ECFP, while a GST construct that binds FlAsH results in significantly higher CALI efficiency than any of the XFPs tested. It is likely that the hierarchy of XFP effectiveness reflects the balance between ROS that are trapped within the XFP structure and cause fluorophore and chromophore bleaching and those that escape to effect CALI of proximate proteins. PMID:19199572

  19. Automated Assistance for Designing Active Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imlach, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    MagBear12 is a computer code that assists in the design of radial, heteropolar active magnetic bearings (AMBs). MagBear12 was developed to help in designing the system described in "Advanced Active-Magnetic-Bearing Thrust-Measurement System". Beyond this initial application, MagBear12 is expected to be useful for designing AMBs for a variety of rotating machinery. This program incorporates design rules and governing equations that are also implemented in other, proprietary design software used by AMB manufacturers. In addition, this program incorporates an advanced unpublished fringing-magnetic-field model that increases accuracy beyond that offered by the other AMB-design software.

  20. Plasma Assisted Combustion Mechanism for Small Hydrocarbons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    O2 C2H6 C2H4 CH3OH iso‐propane CO2 C3H8 C3H6 C2H5OH neo‐pentane H2O C4H10 CH3OCH3  DME O3 C5H12 Ar H2 N2O PAC  Kinetic  Mechanism  O(-)+N(+)=N+O... Kinetic  Model:  Previous Versions D.V.Zatsepin, S.M.Starikovskaia, A.Yu.Starikovskii Hydrogen oxidation in a  stoichiometric hydrogen‐air mixtures in the... Kinetics  of ignition of saturated hydrocarbons by nonequilibrium plasma: C2H6‐ to C5H12‐containing mixtures. Combustion and Flame 156  (2009) 221–233

  1. Clinical review: Respiratory mechanics in spontaneous and assisted ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Grinnan, Daniel C; Truwit, Jonathon Dean

    2005-01-01

    Pulmonary disease changes the physiology of the lungs, which manifests as changes in respiratory mechanics. Therefore, measurement of respiratory mechanics allows a clinician to monitor closely the course of pulmonary disease. Here we review the principles of respiratory mechanics and their clinical applications. These principles include compliance, elastance, resistance, impedance, flow, and work of breathing. We discuss these principles in normal conditions and in disease states. As the severity of pulmonary disease increases, mechanical ventilation can become necessary. We discuss the use of pressure–volume curves in assisting with poorly compliant lungs while on mechanical ventilation. In addition, we discuss physiologic parameters that assist with ventilator weaning as the disease process abates. PMID:16277736

  2. Robot assisted treadmill training: mechanisms and training strategies.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Shahid; Xie, Sheng Quan; Liu, Guangyu

    2011-06-01

    The rehabilitation engineering community is working towards the development of robotic devices that can assist during gait training of patients suffering from neurologic injuries such as stroke and spinal cord injuries (SCI). The field of robot assisted treadmill training has rapidly evolved during the last decade. The robotic devices can provide repetitive, systematic and prolonged gait training sessions. This paper presents a review of the treadmill based robotic gait training devices. An overview of design configurations and actuation methods used for these devices is provided. Training strategies designed to actively involve the patient in robot assisted treadmill training are studied. These training strategies assist the patient according to the level of disability and type of neurologic injury. Although the efficacy of these training strategies is not clinically proven, adaptive strategies may result in substantial improvements. We end our review with a discussion covering major advancements made at device design and training strategies level and potential challenges to the field.

  3. [Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist: a revolution of mechanical ventilation?].

    PubMed

    Piquilloud, Lise; Jolliet, Philippe; Tassaux, Didier

    2010-12-15

    Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist or NAVA is a new assisted ventilatory mode which, in comparison with pressure support, leads to improved patient-ventilator synchrony and a more variable ventilatory pattern. It also improves arterial oxygenation. With NAVA, the electrical activity of the diaphragm is recorded through a nasogastric tube equipped with electrodes. This electrical activity is then used to pilot the ventilator. With NAVA, the patient's respiratory pattern controls the ventilator's timing of triggering and cycling as well as the magnitude of pressurization, which is proportional to inspiratory demand. The effect of NAVA on patient outcome remains to be determined through well-designed prospective studies.

  4. Active gated imaging in driver assistance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grauer, Yoav

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we shall present the active gated imaging system (AGIS) in relation to the automotive field. AGIS is based on a fast-gated camera and pulsed illuminator, synchronized in the time domain to record images of a certain range of interest. A dedicated gated CMOS imager sensor and near infra-red (NIR) pulsed laser illuminator, is presented in this paper to provide active gated technology. In recent years, we have developed these key components and learned the system parameters, which are most beneficial to nighttime (in all weather conditions) driving in terms of field of view, illumination profile, resolution, and processing power. We shall present our approach of a camera-based advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) named BrightEye™, which makes use of the AGIS technology in the automotive field.

  5. Mechanisms of opsin activation.

    PubMed

    Buczyłko, J; Saari, J C; Crouch, R K; Palczewski, K

    1996-08-23

    Rhodopsin is constrained in an inactive conformation by interactions with 11-cis-retinal including formation of a protonated Schiff base with Lys296. Upon photoisomerization, major structural rearrangements that involve protonation of the active site Glu113 and cytoplasmic acidic residues, including Glu134, lead to the formation of the active form of the receptor, metarhodopsin II b, which decays to opsin. However, an activated receptor may be generated without illumination by addition of all-trans-retinal or its analogues to opsin, as measured in this study by the increased phosphorylation of opsin by rhodopsin kinase. The potency of stimulation depended on the chemical and isomeric nature of the analogues and the length of the polyene chain with all-trans-C17 aldehyde and all-trans-retinal being the most active and trans-C12 aldehyde being the least active. Certain cis-isomers, 11-cis-13-demethyl-retinal and 9-cis-C17 aldehyde, were also active. Most of the retinal analogues tested did not regenerate a spectrally identifiable pigment, and many were incapable of Schiff base formation (ketone, stable oximes, and Schiff base-derivatives of retinal). Thus, receptor activation resulted from formation of non-covalent complexes with opsin. pH titrations suggested that an equilibrium exists between partially active (protonated) and inactive (deprotonated) forms of opsin. These findings are consistent with a model in which protonation of one or more cytoplasmic carboxyl groups of opsin is essential for activity. Upon addition of retinoids, the partially active conformation of opsin is converted to a more active intermediate similar to metarhodopsin II b. The model provides an understanding of the structural requirements for opsin activation and an interpretation of the observed activities of natural and experimental opsin mutants.

  6. [Importance of mechanical assist devices in acute circulatory arrest].

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Markus Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    Mechanical assist devices are indicated for hemodynamic stabilization in acute circulatory arrest if conventional means of cardiopulmonary resuscitation are unable to re-establish adequate organ perfusion. Their temporary use facilitates further diagnostic and therapeutic options in selected patients, e.g. coronary angiography followed by revascularization.External thorax compression devices allow sufficient cardiac massage in case of preclinical or in-hospital circulatory arrest, especially under complex transfer conditions. These devices perform standardized thorax compressions at a rate of 80-100 per minute. Invasive mechanical support devices are used in the catheter laboratory or in the intensive care unit. Axial turbine pumps, e.g. the Impella, continuously pump blood from the left ventricle into the aortic root. The Impella can also provide right ventricle support by pumping blood from the vena cava into the pulmonary artery. So-called emergency systems or ECMO devices consist of a centrifugal pump and a membrane oxygenator allowing complete takeover of cardiac and pulmonary functions. Withdrawing blood from the right atrium and vena cava, oxygenated blood is returned to the abdominal aorta. Isolated centrifugal pumps provide left heart support without an oxygenator after transseptal insertion of a venous cannula into the left atrium.Mechanical assist devices are indicated for acute organ protection and hemodynamic stabilization for diagnostic and therapeutic measures as well as bridge to myocardial recovery. Future technical developments and better insights into the pathophysiology of mechanical circulatory support will broaden the spectrum of indications of such devices in acute circulatory arrest.

  7. Mechanisms in environmentally assisted one-photon phase control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachón, Leonardo A.; Brumer, Paul

    2013-10-01

    The ability of an environment to assist in one-photon phase control relies upon entanglement between the system and bath and on the breaking of the time reversal symmetry. Here, one-photon phase control is examined analytically and numerically in a model system, allowing an analysis of the relative strength of these contributions. Further, the significant role of non-Markovian dynamics and of moderate system-bath coupling in enhancing one-photon phase control is demonstrated, and an explicit role for quantum mechanics is noted in the existence of initial non-zero stationary coherences. Finally, desirable conditions are shown to be required to observe such environmentally assisted control, since the system will naturally equilibrate with its environment at longer times, ultimately resulting in the loss of phase control.

  8. Active MRI tracking for robotic assisted FUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xu; Huang, Zhihong; Melzer, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    MR guided FUS is a noninvasive method producing thermal necrosis at the position of tumors with high accuracy and temperature control. Because the typical size of the ultrasound focus is smaller than the area of interested treatment tissues, focus repositioning become necessary to achieve multiple sonications to cover the whole targeted area. Using MR compatible mechanical actuators could help the ultrasound beam to reach a wider treatment range than using electrical beam steering technique and more flexibility in position the transducer. An active MR tracking technique was combined into the MRgFUS system to help locating the position of the mechanical actuator and the FUS transducer. For this study, a precise agar reference model was designed and fabricated to test the performance of the active tracking technique when it was used on the MR-compatible robotics InnoMotion™ (IBSMM, Engineering spol. s r.o. / Ltd, Czech Republic). The precision, tracking range and positioning speed of the combined robotic FUS system were evaluated in this study. Compared to the existing MR guided HIFU systems, the combined robotic system with active tracking techniques provides a potential that allows the FUS treatment to operate in a larger spatial range and with a faster speed, which is one of the main challenges for organ motion tracking.

  9. Effects of Equine Assisted Activities on Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanning, Beth A.; Baier, Margaret E. Matyastik; Ivey-Hatz, Julie; Krenek, Nancy; Tubbs, Jack D.

    2014-01-01

    Quality of life assessments were used in this study to determine the behavioral changes of children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who participated in equine assisted activities. Behavioral changes of children with ASD participating in 9 weeks of equines assisted activities (EAA) (N = 10) were compared to behavioral changes of…

  10. Effects of Equine Assisted Activities on Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanning, Beth A.; Baier, Margaret E. Matyastik; Ivey-Hatz, Julie; Krenek, Nancy; Tubbs, Jack D.

    2014-01-01

    Quality of life assessments were used in this study to determine the behavioral changes of children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who participated in equine assisted activities. Behavioral changes of children with ASD participating in 9 weeks of equines assisted activities (EAA) (N = 10) were compared to behavioral changes of…

  11. Mechanically Active Electrospun Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Jaimee M.

    Electrospinning, a technique used to fabricate small diameter polymer fibers, has been employed to develop unique, active materials falling under two categories: (1) shape memory elastomeric composites (SMECs) and (2) water responsive fiber mats. (1) Previous work has characterized in detail the properties and behavior of traditional SMECs with isotropic fibers embedded in an elastomer matrix. The current work has two goals: (i) characterize laminated anisotropic SMECs and (ii) develop a fabrication process that is scalable for commercial SMEC manufacturing. The former ((i)) requires electrospinning aligned polymer fibers. The aligned fibers are similarly embedded in an elastomer matrix and stacked at various fiber orientations. The resulting laminated composite has a unique response to tensile deformation: after stretching and releasing, the composite curls. This curling response was characterized based on fiber orientation. The latter goal ((ii)) required use of a dual-electrospinning process to simultaneously electrospin two polymers. This fabrication approach incorporated only industrially relevant processing techniques, enabling the possibility of commercial application of a shape memory rubber. Furthermore, the approach had the added benefit of increased control over composition and material properties. (2) The strong elongational forces experienced by polymer chains during the electrospinning process induce molecular alignment along the length of electrospun fibers. Such orientation is maintained in the fibers as the polymer vitrifies. Consequently, residual stress is stored in electrospun fiber mats and can be recovered by heating through the polymer's glass transition temperature. Alternatively, the glass transition temperature can be depressed by introducing a plasticizing agent. Poly(vinyl acetate) (PVAc) is plasticized by water, and its glass transition temperature is lowered below room temperature. Therefore, the residual stress can be relaxed at room

  12. Neuroreceptor Activation by Vibration-Assisted Tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Hoehn, Ross D.; Nichols, David; Neven, Hartmut; Kais, Sabre

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a large family of receptor proteins that sense molecular signals on the exterior of a cell and activate signal transduction pathways within the cell. Modeling how an agonist activates such a receptor is fundamental for an understanding of a wide variety of physiological processes and it is of tremendous value for pharmacology and drug design. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) has been proposed as a model for the mechanism by which olfactory GPCRs are activated by a bound agonist. We apply this hyothesis to GPCRs within the mammalian nervous system using quantum chemical modeling. We found that non-endogenous agonists of the serotonin receptor share a particular IET spectral aspect both amongst each other and with the serotonin molecule: a peak whose intensity scales with the known agonist potencies. We propose an experiential validation of this model by utilizing lysergic acid dimethylamide (DAM-57), an ergot derivative, and its deuterated isotopologues; we also provide theoretical predictions for comparison to experiment. If validated our theory may provide new avenues for guided drug design and elevate methods of in silico potency/activity prediction. PMID:25909758

  13. Neuroreceptor activation by vibration-assisted tunneling.

    PubMed

    Hoehn, Ross D; Nichols, David; Neven, Hartmut; Kais, Sabre

    2015-04-24

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a large family of receptor proteins that sense molecular signals on the exterior of a cell and activate signal transduction pathways within the cell. Modeling how an agonist activates such a receptor is fundamental for an understanding of a wide variety of physiological processes and it is of tremendous value for pharmacology and drug design. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) has been proposed as a model for the mechanism by which olfactory GPCRs are activated by a bound agonist. We apply this hyothesis to GPCRs within the mammalian nervous system using quantum chemical modeling. We found that non-endogenous agonists of the serotonin receptor share a particular IET spectral aspect both amongst each other and with the serotonin molecule: a peak whose intensity scales with the known agonist potencies. We propose an experiential validation of this model by utilizing lysergic acid dimethylamide (DAM-57), an ergot derivative, and its deuterated isotopologues; we also provide theoretical predictions for comparison to experiment. If validated our theory may provide new avenues for guided drug design and elevate methods of in silico potency/activity prediction.

  14. Active auditory mechanics in mosquitoes.

    PubMed Central

    Göpfert, M. C.; Robert, D.

    2001-01-01

    In humans and other vertebrates, hearing is improved by active contractile properties of hair cells. Comparable active auditory mechanics is now demonstrated in insects. In mosquitoes, Johnston's organ transduces sound-induced vibrations of the antennal flagellum. A non-muscular 'motor' activity enhances the sensitivity and tuning of the flagellar mechanical response in physiologically intact animals. This motor is capable of driving the flagellum autonomously, amplifying sound-induced vibrations at specific frequencies and intensities. Motor-related electrical activity of Johnston's organ strongly suggests that mosquito hearing is improved by mechanoreceptor motility. PMID:11270428

  15. Environment assisted degradation mechanisms in aluminum-lithium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Stoner, Glenn E.; Swanson, Robert E.

    1988-01-01

    Section 1 of this report records the progress achieved on NASA-LaRC Grant NAG-1-745 (Environment Assisted Degradation Mechanisms in Al-Li Alloys), and is based on research conducted during the period April 1 to November 30, 1987. A discussion of work proposed for the project's second year is included. Section 2 provides an overview of the need for research on the mechanisms of environmental-mechanical degradation of advanced aerospace alloys based on aluminum and lithium. This research is to provide NASA with the basis necessary to permit metallurgical optimization of alloy performance and engineering design with respect to damage tolerance, long term durability and reliability. Section 3 reports on damage localization mechanisms in aqueous chloride corrosion fatigue of aluminum-lithium alloys. Section 4 reports on progress made on measurements and mechanisms of localized aqueous corrosion in aluminum-lithium alloys. Section 5 provides a detailed technical proposal for research on environmental degradation of Al-Li alloys, and the effect of hydrogen in this.

  16. Nucleophile-Assisted Alkene Activation: Olefins Alone Are Often Incompetent.

    PubMed

    Ashtekar, Kumar Dilip; Vetticatt, Mathew; Yousefi, Roozbeh; Jackson, James E; Borhan, Babak

    2016-07-06

    Emerging work on organocatalytic enantioselective halocyclizations naturally draws on conditions where both new bonds must be formed under delicate control, the reaction regime where the concerted nature of the AdE3 mechanism is of greatest importance. Without assistance, many simple alkene substrates react slowly or not at all with conventional halenium donors under synthetically relevant reaction conditions. As demonstrated earlier by Shilov, Cambie, Williams, Fahey, and others, alkenes can undergo a concerted AdE3-type reaction via nucleophile participation, which sets the configuration of the newly created stereocenters at both ends in one step. Herein, we explore the modulation of alkene reactivity and halocyclization rates by nucleophile proximity and basicity, through detailed analyses of starting material spectroscopy, addition stereopreferences, isotope effects, and nucleophile-alkene interactions, all obtained in a context directly relevant to synthesis reaction conditions. The findings build on the prior work by highlighting the reactivity spectrum of halocyclizations from stepwise to concerted, and suggest strategies for design of new reactions. Alkene reactivity is seen to span the range from the often overgeneralized "sophomore textbook" image of stepwise electrophilic attack on the alkene and subsequent nucleophilic bond formation, to the nucleophile-assisted alkene activation (NAAA) cases where electron donation from the nucleophilic addition partner activates the alkene for electrophilic attack. By highlighting the factors that control reactivity across this range, this study suggests opportunities to explain and control stereo-, regio-, and organocatalytic chemistry in this important class of alkene additions.

  17. Magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS): utility in assisted reproduction.

    PubMed

    Makker, Kartikeya; Agarwal, Ashok; Sharma, Rakesh K

    2008-07-01

    Assisted reproductive techniques (ART) have now been extensively incorporated in the management of infertile couples. But even after rapid methodological and technological advances the success rates of these procedures have been below expectations. This has led to development of many sperm preparation protocols to obtain an ideal semen sample for artificial reproduction. Sperm apoptosis has been heavily linked to failures in reproductive techniques. One of the earliest changes shown by apoptotic spermatozoa is externalization of phosphatidyl serine. Magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) is a novel sperm preparation technique that separates apoptotic and non-apoptotic spermatozoa based on the expression of phosphatidylserine. This has led to the incorporation of MACS as a sperm preparation technique. The review highlights the principle and mechanism of this novel technique and enumerates its advantages as a sperm preparation technique. Its utility in ART as an efficient tool for sperm recovery and its application in cryopreservation of semen samples is also explained.

  18. Mechanical heating by active galaxies.

    PubMed

    Begelman, Mitchell C; Ruszkowski, Mateusz

    2005-03-15

    Jets and winds are significant channels for energy loss from accreting black holes. These outflows mechanically heat their surroundings, through shocks as well as gentler forms of heating. We discuss recent efforts to understand the nature and distribution of mechanical heating by central active galactic nuclei (AGN) in clusters of galaxies, using numerical simulations and analytic models. Specifically, we will discuss whether the relatively gentle 'effervescent heating' mechanism can compensate for radiative losses in the central regions of clusters, and account for the excess entropy observed at larger radii. J. Binney discusses the possible role of violent, episodic heating by AGN in clusters.

  19. Whisking mechanics and active sensing.

    PubMed

    Bush, Nicholas E; Solla, Sara A; Hartmann, Mitra Jz

    2016-10-01

    We describe recent advances in quantifying the three-dimensional (3D) geometry and mechanics of whisking. Careful delineation of relevant 3D reference frames reveals important geometric and mechanical distinctions between the localization problem ('where' is an object) and the feature extraction problem ('what' is an object). Head-centered and resting-whisker reference frames lend themselves to quantifying temporal and kinematic cues used for object localization. The whisking-centered reference frame lends itself to quantifying the contact mechanics likely associated with feature extraction. We offer the 'windowed sampling' hypothesis for active sensing: that rats can estimate an object's spatial features by integrating mechanical information across whiskers during brief (25-60ms) windows of 'haptic enclosure' with the whiskers, a motion that resembles a hand grasp.

  20. A mechanically assisted heat pipe using micro-pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, J.L.; Campbell, G.; Hassapis, C.; Chang, W.S.

    1996-12-31

    A new mechanically assisted heat pipe has been developed and tested by the authors that combines the high performance of a pumped fluid loop with the reliability of passive heat pipes. The new unit employs micro-pumps inside a passive heat pipe to enhance the return of working fluid from the condenser to the evaporator, and thereby increases the capability of the system. This hybrid device is lighter, smaller and handles higher heat flux compared with a passive heat pipe of similar weight and dimensions. Best of all, if the mechanical pump fails, the heat transport will be impaired, but not totally paralyzed, allowing some form of lower level operation. This micro-pump design installs fins at critical locations inside the heat pipe. These fins can be parallel (flag) or perpendicular (flap) to the flow direction. By vibrating these fins in a motion similar to dolphin kicks for the flaps, and in a motion similar to a fishtail for the flags, these fins were found capable of pumping the working fluid effectively. The size and geometry of these fins were tested extensively. Several actuation approaches were examined. The results of these tests are presented in this paper.

  1. Advances in mechanical assist devices and artificial hearts for children.

    PubMed

    Kirklin, James K

    2015-10-01

    Mechanical circulatory support (MCS) has rapidly evolved toward continuous flow technology in adults. In the pediatric population, the Berlin EXCOR, a paracorporeal pulsatile pump, is the only MCS device specifically approved for pediatric use. The current era of pediatric MCS includes an increasing application of adult continuous flow pumps to pediatric patients. The Berlin EXCOR pulsatile pump has been studied in over 200 patients. The major limitations of this device are neurologic dysfunction (which occurs in about 30% of supported patients) and the requirement for in-hospital care until transplant. Two continuous flow pumps (HVAD and HeartMate II) have been successfully applied in children and adolescents, and the SynCardia total artificial heart has been used in adolescents. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute - sponsored Pediatric Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support registry has collected pediatric MCS data since 2012 and will provide valuable outcomes data to help refine this field. Survival with these durable devices has been generally good (except for small infants and patients with complex congenital heart disease), with nearly 50% receiving a heart transplant within 6 months. Patients with single ventricle physiology continue to pose major challenges. Two clinical trials for miniaturized adult continuous flow devices and one trial for a new pediatric pump will begin within the next year. New continuous flow devices are entering or poised to enter clinical trials. If approved, these devices will enhance the safety and variety of options for longer-term pediatric support.

  2. Performance Assessment Assistance Activities in the DOE Complex - 12325

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, Roger R.; Phifer, Mark A.; Letourneau, Martin J.

    2012-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) has established a Performance Assessment Community of Practice (PA CoP) to foster the sharing of information among performance assessment (PA) and risk assessment practitioners, regulators and oversight personnel. The general intent is to contribute to continuous improvement in the consistency, technical adequacy and quality of implementation of PAs and risk assessments around the DOE Complex. The PA CoP activities have involved commercial disposal facilities and international participants to provide a global perspective. The PA CoP has also sponsored annual technical exchanges as a means to foster improved communication and to share lessons learned from on-going modelling activities. The PA CoP encourages activities to provide programmatic and technical assistance in the form of sharing experience and lessons learned with practitioners during the development of PAs and risk assessments. This assistance complements DOE-EM reviews through the Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group (LFRG) that are conducted after modelling efforts are completed. Such up-front assistance is providing additional value in terms of improving consistency and sharing of information. There has been a substantial increase in the amount of assistance being provided. The assistance has been well received by practitioners and regulators that have been involved. The paper highlights assistance and sharing of information that has been conducted in the last two years to support activities underway in support of proposed disposal facilities at Paducah, Portsmouth, and the Idaho National Laboratory and tank closure at Hanford. DOE-EM established the PA CoP to help improve the consistency and quality of implementation of modelling activities around the DOE Complex. The PA CoP has sponsored annual technical exchanges as a means to foster improved communication and to share lessons learned from ongoing

  3. Molecular mechanisms of microglial activation.

    PubMed

    Zielasek, J; Hartung, H P

    1996-01-01

    Microglial cells are brain macrophages which serve specific functions in the defense of the central nervous system (CNS) against microorganisms, the removal of tissue debris in neurodegenerative diseases or during normal development, and in autoimmune inflammatory disorders of the brain. In cultured microglial cells, several soluble inflammatory mediators such as cytokines and bacterial products like lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were demonstrated to induce a wide range of microglial activities, e.g. increased phagocytosis, chemotaxis, secretion of cytokines, activation of the respiratory burst and induction of nitric oxide synthase. Since heightened microglial activation was shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of experimental inflammatory CNS disorders, understanding the molecular mechanisms of microglial activation may lead to new treatment strategies for neurodegenerative disorders, multiple sclerosis and bacterial or viral infections of the nervous system.

  4. New mechanism of lenalidomide activity.

    PubMed

    Keevan, Jacob; Figg, William D

    2014-08-01

    Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory agent (IMiD) that has activity in hematologic cancer (e.g., multiple myeloma). The immunomodulatory and apoptotic properties are readily apparent in therapy. However, the exact mechanism of action has been difficult to quantify until recently when it was shown that another IMiD, thalidomide, binds to an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex constituent, CRBN. The article by Kronke et al. demonstrates that, by binding to CRBN and altering its selectivity, lenalidomide potentiates the ubiquitination and proteolysis of 2 specific proteins, IKZF1 and IKZF3. An article in the same issue, by Lu et al., supports these observations. IKZF1 and IKZF3 are transcription factors that are necessary for multiple myeloma, and repression of these transcription factors is a likely mechanism for lenalidomide activity in this disease.

  5. Mobile-Assisted Seamless Learning Activities in Higher Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amhag, Lisbeth

    2017-01-01

    Among online learning factors stated in the research literature, it is argued that online activities is the strongest factor which contributes to online learning. This article illuminates mobile-assisted seamless learning activities by using laptops, tablets, or smart phones. Two conditions are compared, a) face-to-face (F2F) online webinars…

  6. Durability of left ventricular assist devices: Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support (INTERMACS) 2006 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Holman, William L; Naftel, David C; Eckert, Chad E; Kormos, Robert L; Goldstein, Daniel J; Kirklin, James K

    2013-08-01

    The present study compared the interval until device exchange or death from pump-related failure in patients with pulsatile versus continuous flow left ventricular assist devices. Data from Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support (June 23, 2006, to March 31, 2011) compared the durability of implanted pulsatile and continuous flow left ventricular assist devices. The durability issues included pump replacement for infection, thrombosis-hemolysis, driveline failure, or pump drive unit failure, and death from driveline or pump drive unit failure. A total of 3302 left ventricular assist devices were implanted (486 pulsatile, 2816 continuous flow) and 98 pump exchanges or deaths from durability issues (46 pulsatile, 52 continuous flow; 3% of implants). The interval to device issue was greater for the continuous flow than for the pulsatile devices (P < .001). A comparisons of the causes for pump exchange or pump-related death showed (1) greater freedom from pump failure in the continuous flow compared with the pulsatile left ventricular assist devices (10 events/2816 continuous flow implants vs 39 events/486 pulsatile implants; P < .0001); (2) similar exchange or pump-related death for driveline failure (1/486 pulsatile vs 7/2816 continuous flow; P = .82); (3) similar exchange or pump-related death for thrombosis-hemolysis (2/486 pulsatile vs 28/2816 continuous flow; P = .25); and (4) fewer exchanges or pump-related deaths from infection in continuous flow left ventricular assist devices (4/486 pulsatile vs 7/2816 continuous flow; P = .034). Competing outcomes analysis corroborated this finding, with 54% of continuous flow versus 23% of pulsatile patients alive and receiving support at 12 months after implantation. The Analysis of Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support data showed greater durability for continuous flow than for pulsatile left ventricular assist devices. Even longer durations of support can be

  7. PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT ASSISTANCE ACTIVITIES IN THE DOE COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, R.

    2012-01-23

    The United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) has established a Performance Assessment Community of Practice (PA CoP) to foster the sharing of information among performance assessment (PA) and risk assessment practitioners, regulators and oversight personnel. The general intent is to contribute to continuous improvement in the consistency, technical adequacy and quality of implementation of PAs and risk assessments around the DOE Complex. The PA CoP activities have involved commercial disposal facilities and international participants to provide a global perspective. The PA CoP has also sponsored annual technical exchanges as a means to foster improved communication and to share lessons learned from on-going modelling activities. The PA CoP encourages activities to provide programmatic and technical assistance in the form of sharing experience and lessons learned with practitioners during the development of PAs and risk assessments. This assistance complements DOE-EM reviews through the Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group (LFRG) that are conducted after modelling efforts are completed. Such up-front assistance is providing additional value in terms of improving consistency and sharing of information. There has been a substantial increase in the amount of assistance being provided. The assistance has been well received by practitioners and regulators that have been involved. The paper highlights assistance and sharing of information that has been conducted in the last two years to support activities underway in support of proposed disposal facilities at Paducah, Portsmouth, and the Idaho National Laboratory and tank closure at Hanford.

  8. 21 CFR 890.5050 - Daily activity assist device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Daily activity assist device. 890.5050 Section 890.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5050 Daily...

  9. 21 CFR 890.5050 - Daily activity assist device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Daily activity assist device. 890.5050 Section 890.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5050 Daily...

  10. 34 CFR 300.119 - Technical assistance and training activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES State Eligibility Least Restrictive Environment (lre) § 300.119... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Technical assistance and training activities. 300.119 Section 300.119 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE...

  11. 34 CFR 300.119 - Technical assistance and training activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES State Eligibility Least Restrictive Environment (lre) § 300.119... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Technical assistance and training activities. 300.119 Section 300.119 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE...

  12. 34 CFR 300.119 - Technical assistance and training activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES State Eligibility Least Restrictive Environment (lre) § 300.119... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Technical assistance and training activities. 300.119 Section 300.119 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE...

  13. 34 CFR 300.119 - Technical assistance and training activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES State Eligibility Least Restrictive Environment (lre) § 300.119... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Technical assistance and training activities. 300.119 Section 300.119 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE...

  14. 21 CFR 890.5050 - Daily activity assist device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Daily activity assist device. 890.5050 Section 890.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5050 Daily...

  15. 21 CFR 890.5050 - Daily activity assist device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Daily activity assist device. 890.5050 Section 890.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5050 Daily...

  16. 21 CFR 890.5050 - Daily activity assist device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Daily activity assist device. 890.5050 Section 890.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5050 Daily...

  17. Fluid Assisted Fault Weakening: Mechanical vs. Chemical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collettini, C.

    2011-12-01

    time. Chemical weakening associated with phyllosilicate development along fault zones represents a valuable explanation for long term weak and creeping faults. The activation of mechanical or chemical weakening processes is primarily controlled by pressure, temperature, strain-rate, protolith composition and type of fluids. The interplay between mechanical and chemical weakening favors the development of heterogeneous crustal scale faults that can contribute to explain the complex fault slip behaviour recently documented by high-resolution GPS and seismological data.

  18. 78 FR 63972 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Student Assistance General Provisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Student Assistance General Provisions AGENCY... considered public records. Title of Collection: Student Assistance General Provisions. OMB Control Number... is expiring. Sections of the regulations in 34 CFR part 668 Student Assistance General...

  19. Mechanical ventilation and thoracic artificial lung assistance during mechanical circulatory support with PUCA pump: in silico study.

    PubMed

    De Lazzari, Claudio; Genuini, Igino; Quatember, Bernhard; Fedele, Francesco

    2014-02-01

    Patients assisted with left ventricular assist device (LVAD) may require prolonged mechanical ventilatory assistance secondary to postoperative respiratory failure. The goal of this work is the study of the interdependent effects LVAD like pulsatile catheter (PUCA) pump and mechanical ventilatory support or thoracic artificial lung (TAL), by the hemodynamic point of view, using a numerical simulator of the human cardiovascular system. In the simulator, different circulatory sections are described using lumped parameter models. Lumped parameter models have been designed to describe the hydrodynamic behavior of both PUCA pump and thoracic artificial lung. Ventricular behavior atrial and septum functions were reproduced using variable elastance model. Starting from simulated pathological conditions we studied the effects produced on some hemodynamic variables by simultaneous PUCA pump, thoracic artificial lung or mechanical ventilation assistance. Thoracic artificial lung was applied in parallel or in hybrid mode. The effects of mechanical ventilation have been simulated by changing mean intrathoracic pressure value from -4 mmHg to +5 mmHg. The hemodynamic variables observed during the simulations, in different assisted conditions, were: left and right ventricular end systolic (diastolic) volume, systolic/diastolic aortic pressure, mean pulmonary arterial pressure, left and right mean atrial pressure, mean systemic venous pressure and the total blood flow. Results show that the application of PUCA (without mechanical ventilatory assistance) increases the total blood flow, reduces the left ventricular end systolic volume and increases the diastolic aortic pressure. Parallel TAL assistance increases the right ventricular end diastolic (systolic) volume reduction both when PUCA is switched "ON" and both when PUCA is switched "OFF". By switching "OFF" the PUCA pump, it seems that parallel thoracic artificial lung assistance produces a greater cardiac output (respect to

  20. The mechanism of galvanic/metal-assisted etching of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolasinski, Kurt W.

    2014-08-01

    Metal-assisted etching is initiated by hole injection from an oxidant catalyzed by a metal nanoparticle or film on a Si surface. It is shown that the electronic structure of the metal/Si interface, i.e., band bending, is not conducive to diffusion of the injected hole away from the metal in the case of Ag or away from the metal/Si interface in the cases of Au, Pd, and Pt. Since holes do not diffuse away from the metals, the electric field resulting from charging of the metal after hole injection must instead be the cause of metal-assisted etching.

  1. The mechanism of galvanic/metal-assisted etching of silicon.

    PubMed

    Kolasinski, Kurt W

    2014-01-01

    Metal-assisted etching is initiated by hole injection from an oxidant catalyzed by a metal nanoparticle or film on a Si surface. It is shown that the electronic structure of the metal/Si interface, i.e., band bending, is not conducive to diffusion of the injected hole away from the metal in the case of Ag or away from the metal/Si interface in the cases of Au, Pd, and Pt. Since holes do not diffuse away from the metals, the electric field resulting from charging of the metal after hole injection must instead be the cause of metal-assisted etching.

  2. [Active euthanasia in Colombia and assisted suicide in California].

    PubMed

    Julesz, Máté

    2016-01-31

    The institution of active euthanasia has been legal in Colombia since 2015. In California, the regulation on physician-assisted suicide will come into effect on January 1, 2016. The legal institution of active euthanasia is not accepted under the law of the United States of America, however, physician-assisted suicide is accepted in an increasing number of member states. The related regulation in Oregon is imitated in other member states. In South America, Colombia is not the first country to legalize active euthanasia: active euthanasia has been legal in Uruguay since 1932. The North American legal tradition markedly differs from the South American one and both are incompatible with the Central European rule of law. In Hungary and in most European Union countries, solely the passive form of euthanasia is legal. In the Benelux countries, the active form of euthanasia is legal because the supranational law of the European Union does not prohibit it. Notwithstanding, European Union law does not prescribe legalization of either the active form of euthanasia, or the physician-assisted suicide.

  3. Theoretical evaluation of the substrate-assisted catalysis mechanism for the hydrolysis of phosphate monoester dianions.

    PubMed

    Iché-Tarrat, Nathalie; Ruiz-Lopez, Manuel; Barthelat, Jean-Claude; Vigroux, Alain

    2007-01-01

    Quantum chemistry methods coupled with a continuum solvation model have been applied to evaluate the substrate-assisted catalysis (SAC) mechanism recently proposed for the hydrolysis of phosphate monoester dianions. The SAC mechanism, in which a proton from the nucleophile is transferred to a nonbridging phosphoryl oxygen atom of the substrate prior to attack, has been proposed in opposition to the widely accepted mechanism of direct nucleophilic reaction. We have assessed the SAC proposal for the hydrolysis of three representative phosphate monoester dianions (2,4-dinitrophenyl phosphate, phenyl phosphate, and methyl phosphate) by considering the reactivity of the hydroxide ion toward the phosphorus center of the corresponding singly protonated monoesters. The reliability of the calculations was verified by comparing the calculated and the observed values of the activation free energies for the analogous S(N)2(P) reactions of F- with the monoanion of the monoester 2,4-dinitrophenyl phosphate and its diester analogue, methyl 2,4-dinitrophenyl phosphate. It was found that the orientation of the phosphate hydrogen atom has important implications with regard to the nature of the transition state. Hard nucleophiles such as OH- and F- can attack the phosphorus atom of a singly protonated phosphate monoester only if the phosphate hydrogen atom is oriented toward the leaving-group oxygen atom. As a result of this proton orientation, the SAC mechanism in solution is characterized by a small Brønsted coefficient value (beta(lg)=-0.25). This mechanism is unlikely to apply to aryl phosphates, but becomes a likely possibility for alkyl phosphate esters. If oxyanionic nucleophiles of pK(a)<11 are involved, as in alkaline phosphatase, then the S(N)2(P) reaction may proceed with the phosphate hydrogen atom oriented toward the nucleophile. In this situation, a large negative value of beta(lg) (-0.95) is predicted for the substrate-assisted catalysis mechanism.

  4. Gravitational assist in celestial mechanics-a tutorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Allen, James A.

    2003-05-01

    In planning certain types of trajectories of spacecraft within the solar system, engineers rely on a technique called gravitational assist, or gravity assist. This technique underlies the feasibility of effecting a net change in both the speed and direction of motion of a spacecraft by passage through the gravitational field of a planet or a planetary satellite. The resulting increase, or decrease, in the kinetic energy of the spacecraft appears to contradict the casual expectation that in such an encounter the kinetic energy of the spacecraft after the encounter would be the same as that before the encounter. This paper describes the December 1973 encounter of the Pioneer 10 spacecraft with the planet Jupiter as a real-life example of gravitational assist. It then discusses the physical principles involved in understanding the dynamics of the encounter and concludes with remarks on the important role of gravitational assist in space exploration with artificial spacecraft and in understanding the motion of comets within the solar system.

  5. Substrate-assisted cysteine deprotonation in the mechanism of dimethylargininase (DDAH) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Stone, Everett M; Costello, Alison L; Tierney, David L; Fast, Walter

    2006-05-02

    The enzyme dimethylargininase (also known as dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase or DDAH; EC 3.5.3.18) catalyzes the hydrolysis of endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitors, N(omega)-methyl-l-arginine and N(omega),N(omega)-dimethyl-l-arginine. Understanding the mechanism and regulation of DDAH activity is important for developing ways to control nitric oxide production during angiogenesis and in many cases of vascular endothelial pathobiology. Several possible physiological regulation mechanisms of DDAH depend upon the presence of an active-site cysteine residue, Cys249 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) DDAH, which is proposed to serve as a nucleophile in the catalytic mechanism. Through the use of pH-dependent ultraviolet and visible (UV-vis) difference spectroscopy and inactivation kinetics, the pK(a) of the active-site Cys249 in the resting enzyme was found to be unperturbed from pK(a) values of typical noncatalytic cysteine residues. In contrast, the pH dependence of k(cat) values indicates a much lower apparent pK(a) value. UV-vis difference spectroscopy between wild-type and C249S DDAH shows absorbance changes consistent with Cys249 deprotonation to the anionic thiolate upon binding positively charged ligands. The proton from Cys249 is lost either to the solvent or to an unidentified general base. A mutation of the active-site histidine residue, H162G, does not eliminate cysteine nucleophilicity, further arguing against a pre-formed ion pair with Cys249. Finally, UV-vis and X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed that inhibitory metal ions can bind at these two active-site residues, Cys249 and His162, and also stabilize the anionic form of Cys249. These results support a proposed substrate-assisted mechanism for Pa DDAH in which ligand binding modulates the reactivity of the active-site cysteine.

  6. Mechanics of soft active materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuanhe

    Soft active materials, mostly elastomers and polymeric gels, are being developed to mimic a salient feature of life: movement in response to stimuli. For example, when an electric voltage is applied across a layer of a dielectric elastomer, the layer reduces in thickness and expands in area, giving a strain greater than 100%. As another example, in response to a small change of pH or temperature, a hydrogel may absorb a large amount of water and increase its volume over 100 times. The mechanics involved in these processes is important, interesting, and not well understood. This thesis studies large deformations and instabilities in dielectric elastomers and polymeric gels. The thesis first presents a nonlinear field theory for deformable dielectrics. The theory uses measurable quantities to define field variables. The definitions lead to decoupled field equations, and electromechanical coupling enters the theory through material laws. We use the theory to study electromechanical instability and coexistent states in dielectric elastomers. A computational method is also developed to analyze inhomogeneous deformations in complicated structures of dielectric elastomers. The second part of the thesis discusses large deformation and mass transportation in polymeric gels. A gel can undergo large deformation of two modes: local rearrangement and long-range migration. We assume that the local rearrangement is instantaneous, and model the long-range migration by assuming that the solvent molecules diffuse inside the gel. We further study inhomogeneous and anisotropic deformations and instabilities in gels constrained by rigid materials.

  7. Ribosomal crystallography: peptide bond formation, chaperone assistance and antibiotics activity.

    PubMed

    Yonath, Ada

    2005-08-31

    The peptidyl transferase center (PTC) is located in a protein free environment, thus confirming that the ribosome is a ribozyme. This arched void has dimensions suitable for accommodating the 3' ends of the A-and the P-site tRNAs, and is situated within a universal sizable symmetry-related region that connects all ribosomal functional centers involved in amino-acid polymerization. The linkage between the elaborate PTC architecture and the A-site tRNA position revealed that the A- to P-site passage of the tRNA 3' end is performed by a rotatory motion, which leads to stereochemistry suitable for peptide bond formation and for substrate mediated catalysis, thus suggesting that the PTC evolved by gene-fusion. Adjacent to the PTC is the entrance of the protein exit tunnel, shown to play active roles in sequence-specific gating of nascent chains and in responding to cellular signals. This tunnel also provides a site that may be exploited for local co-translational folding and seems to assist in nascent chain trafficking into the hydrophobic space formed by the first bacterial chaperone, the trigger factor. Many antibiotics target ribosomes. Although the ribosome is highly conserved, subtle sequence and/or conformational variations enable drug selectivity, thus facilitating clinical usage. Comparisons of high-resolution structures of complexes of antibiotics bound to ribosomes from eubacteria resembling pathogens, to an archaeon that shares properties with eukaryotes and to its mutant that allows antibiotics binding, demonstrated the unambiguous difference between mere binding and therapeutical effectiveness. The observed variability in antibiotics inhibitory modes, accompanied by the elucidation of the structural basis to antibiotics mechanism justifies expectations for structural based improved properties of existing compounds as well as for the development of novel drugs.

  8. Effects of equine assisted activities on autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Lanning, Beth A; Baier, Margaret E Matyastik; Ivey-Hatz, Julie; Krenek, Nancy; Tubbs, Jack D

    2014-08-01

    Quality of life assessments were used in this study to determine the behavioral changes of children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who participated in equine assisted activities. Behavioral changes of children with ASD participating in 9 weeks of equines assisted activities (EAA) (N = 10) were compared to behavioral changes of children who participated in a non-equine intervention (N = 8). Parents noted significant improvements in their child's physical, emotional and social functioning following the first 6 weeks of EAA. The children participating in the non-equine program also demonstrated improvement in behavior, but to a lesser degree. The favorable outcome of this study lends support for continuation of programs utilizing EAA in the treatment of children with ASD.

  9. 78 FR 46829 - Assistance to Foreign Atomic Energy Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ...On September 7, 2011, DOE issued a notice of proposed rulemaking (NOPR) to propose the first comprehensive updating of regulations concerning Assistance to Foreign Atomic Energy Activities since 1986. The NOPR reflected a need to make the regulations consistent with current global civil nuclear trade practices and nonproliferation norms, and to update the activities and technologies subject to the Secretary of Energy's specific authorization and DOE reporting requirements. It also identified destinations with respect to which most assistance would be generally authorized and destinations that would require a specific authorization by the Secretary of Energy. After careful consideration of all comments received, DOE today is issuing this supplemental notice of proposed rulemaking (SNOPR) to respond to those comments, propose new or revised rule changes, and afford interested parties a second opportunity to comment.

  10. Contrasting grading approaches in introductory physics and quantum mechanics: The case of graduate teaching assistants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshman, Emily; Sayer, Ryan; Henderson, Charles; Singh, Chandralekha

    2017-06-01

    At large research universities, physics graduate teaching assistants (TAs) are often responsible for grading in courses at all levels. However, few studies have focused on TAs' grading practices in introductory and advanced physics courses. This study was designed to investigate whether physics graduate TAs grade students in introductory physics and quantum mechanics using different criteria and if so, why they may be inclined to do so. To investigate possible discrepancies in TAs' grading approaches in courses at different levels, we implemented a sequence of instructional activities in a TA professional development course that asked TAs to grade student solutions of introductory physics and upper-level quantum mechanics problems and explain why, if at all, their grading approaches were different or similar in the two contexts. We analyzed the differences in TAs' grading approaches in the two contexts and discuss the reasons they provided for the differences in their grading approaches in introductory physics and quantum mechanics in individual interviews, class discussions, and written responses. We find that a majority of the TAs graded solutions to quantum mechanics problems differently than solutions to introductory physics problems. In quantum mechanics, the TAs focused more on physics concepts and reasoning and penalized students for not showing evidence of understanding. The findings of the study have implications for TA professional development programs, e.g., the importance of helping TAs think about the difficulty of a problem from an introductory students' perspective and reflecting on the benefits of formative assessment.

  11. Active cell mechanics: Measurement and theory.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Wylie W; Fodor, Étienne; Betz, Timo

    2015-11-01

    Living cells are active mechanical systems that are able to generate forces. Their structure and shape are primarily determined by biopolymer filaments and molecular motors that form the cytoskeleton. Active force generation requires constant consumption of energy to maintain the nonequilibrium activity to drive organization and transport processes necessary for their function. To understand this activity it is necessary to develop new approaches to probe the underlying physical processes. Active cell mechanics incorporates active molecular-scale force generation into the traditional framework of mechanics of materials. This review highlights recent experimental and theoretical developments towards understanding active cell mechanics. We focus primarily on intracellular mechanical measurements and theoretical advances utilizing the Langevin framework. These developing approaches allow a quantitative understanding of nonequilibrium mechanical activity in living cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology.

  12. Study on chemical mechanical polishing of silicon wafer with megasonic vibration assisted.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Ke; He, Qing; Li, Liang; Ren, Yi

    2017-09-01

    Chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) is the primary method to realize the global planarization of silicon wafer. In order to improve this process, a novel method which combined megasonic vibration to assist chemical mechanical polishing (MA-CMP) is developed in this paper. A matching layer structure of polishing head was calculated and designed. Silicon wafers are polished by megasonic assisted chemical mechanical polishing and traditional chemical mechanical polishing respectively, both coarse polishing and precision polishing experiments were carried out. With the use of megasonic vibration, the surface roughness values Ra reduced from 22.260nm to 17.835nm in coarse polishing, and the material removal rate increased by approximately 15-25% for megasonic assisted chemical mechanical polishing relative to traditional chemical mechanical polishing. Average Surface roughness values Ra reduced from 0.509nm to 0.387nm in precision polishing. The results show that megasonic assisted chemical mechanical polishing is a feasible method to improve polishing efficiency and surface quality. The material removal and finishing mechanisms of megasonic vibration assisted polishing are investigated too. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Brillouin microspectroscopy of nanostructured biomaterials: photonics assisted tailoring mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhaokai; Jaiswal, Manish K.; Chitrakar, Chandani; Thakur, Teena; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2016-03-01

    Developing new biomaterials is essential for the next-generation of materials for bioenergy, bioelectronics, basic biology, medical diagnostics, cancer research, and regenerative medicine. Specifically, recent progress in nanotechnology has stimulated the development of multifunctional biomaterials for tissue engineering applications. The physical properties of nanocomposite biomaterials, including elasticity and viscosity, play key roles in controlling cell fate, which underlines therapeutic success. Conventional mechanical tests, including uniaxial compression and tension, dynamic mechanical analysis and shear rheology, require mechanical forces to be directly exerted onto the sample and therefore may not be suitable for in situ measurements or continuous monitoring of mechanical stiffness. In this study, we employ spontaneous Brillouin spectroscopy as a viscoelasticity-specific probing technique. We utilized a Brillouin spectrometer to characterize biomaterial's microscopic elasticity and correlated those with conventional mechanical tests (e.g., rheology).

  14. Mechanism of plasma-assisted ignition for H2 and C1-C5 hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starikovskiy, Andrey; Aleksandrov, Nikolay

    2016-09-01

    Nonequilibrium plasma demonstrates ability to control ultra-lean, ultra-fast, low-temperature flames and appears to be an extremely promising technology for a wide range of applications, including aviation GTEs, piston engines, ramjets, scramjets and detonation initiation for pulsed detonation engines. To use nonequilibrium plasma for ignition and combustion in real energetic systems, one must understand the mechanisms of plasma-assisted ignition and combustion and be able to numerically simulate the discharge and combustion processes under various conditions. A new, validated mechanism for high-temperature hydrocarbon plasma assisted combustion was built and allows to qualitatively describe plasma-assisted combustion close and above the self-ignition threshold. The principal mechanisms of plasma-assisted ignition and combustion have been established and validated for a wide range of plasma and gas parameters. These results provide a basis for improving various energy-conversion combustion systems, from automobile to aircraft engines, using nonequilibrium plasma methods.

  15. A novel active heads-up display for driver assistance.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Anup; Cheng, Shinko Yuanhsien; Trivedi, Mohan Manubhai

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel laser-based wide-area heads-up windshield display which is capable of actively interfacing with a human as part of a driver assistance system. The dynamic active display (DAD) is a unique prototype interface that presents safety-critical visual icons to the driver in a manner that minimizes the deviation of his or her gaze direction without adding to unnecessary visual clutter. As part of an automotive safety system, the DAD presents alerts in the field of view of the driver only if necessary, which is based upon the state and pose of the driver, vehicle, and environment. This paper examines the effectiveness of DAD through a comprehensive comparative experimental evaluation of a speed compliance driver assistance system, which is implemented on a vehicular test bed. Three different types of display protocols for assisting a driver to comply with speed limits are tested on actual roadways, and these are compared with a conventional dashboard display. Given the inclination, drivers who are given an overspeed warning alert reduced the time required to slow down to the speed limit by 38% (p < 0.01) as compared with the drivers not given the alert. Additionally, certain alerts decreased distraction levels by reducing the time spent looking away from the road by 63% (p < 0.01). Ultimately, these alerts demonstrate the utility and promise of the DAD system.

  16. [Effects of manually assisted coughing on respiratory mechanics in patients requiring full ventilatory support].

    PubMed

    Avena, Katia de Miranda; Duarte, Antonio Carlos Magalhães; Cravo, Sergio Luiz Domingues; Sologuren, Maria José Junho; Gastaldi, Ada Clarice

    2008-06-01

    Manually assisted coughing (MAC) consists of a vigorous thrust applied to the chest at the beginning of a spontaneous expiration or of the expiratory phase of mechanical ventilation. Due to routine use of MAC in intensive care units, the objective of this study was to assess the effects of MAC on respiratory system mechanics in patients requiring full ventilatory support. We assessed 16 sedated patients on full ventilatory support (no active participation in ventilation). Respiratory system mechanics and oxyhemoglobin saturation were measured before and after MAC, as well as after endotracheal aspiration. Bilateral MAC was performed ten times on each patient, with three respiratory cycle intervals between each application. Data analysis demonstrated a decrease in resistive pressure and respiratory system resistance, together with an increase in oxyhemoglobin saturation, after MAC combined with endotracheal aspiration. No evidence of alterations in peak pressures, plateau pressures or respiratory system compliance change was observed after MAC. The use of MAC alters respiratory system mechanics, increasing resistive forces by removing secretions. The technique is considered safe and efficacious for postoperative patients. Using MAC in conjunction with endotracheal aspiration provided benefits, achieving the proposed objective: the displacement and removal of airway secretions.

  17. [Mechanical circulatory assist using a miniaturized Archimedes screw].

    PubMed

    von Segesser, L K; Bisang, B; Leskosek, B; Turina, M

    1991-01-01

    An axial flow blood pump (Archimedes screw) for intraarterial left ventricular assist was evaluated in comparison to standard roller pump left heart bypass (LHBP) in 13 bovine experiments (bodyweight 74 +/- 15 kg). Full systemic heparinization (ACT greater than 500 s) was used for LHBP in comparison to limited systemic heparinization (ACT greater than 180 s) for axial. A standard battery of blood samples was taken before and at regular intervals throughout perfusion: (table; see text) Transarterial access and relatively limited blood trauma appear to be the main advantages of the evaluated axial flow blood pump. However, the impossibility to assess the pump flow may be a major problem for the management of the failing left ventricle.

  18. Environment assisted degradation mechanisms in advanced light metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, R. P.; Stoner, G. E.; Swanson, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    A multifaceted research program on the performance of advanced light metallic alloys in aggressive aerospace environments, and associated environmental failure mechanisms was initiated. The general goal is to characterize alloy behavior quantitatively and to develop predictive mechanisms for environmental failure modes. Successes in this regard will provide the basis for metallurgical optimization of alloy performance, for chemical control of aggressive environments, and for engineering life prediction with damage tolerance and long term reliability.

  19. On the Primary Ionization Mechanism(s) in Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization

    PubMed Central

    Molin, Laura; Seraglia, Roberta; Czarnocki, Zbigniew; Maurin, Jan K.; Pluciński, Franciszek A.; Traldi, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    A mechanism is proposed for the first step of ionization occurring in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization, leading to protonated and deprotonated matrix (Ma) molecules ([Ma + H]+ and [Ma − H]− ions). It is based on observation that in solid state, for carboxyl-containing MALDI matrices, the molecules form strong hydrogen bonds and their carboxylic groups can act as both donors and acceptors. This behavior leads to stable dimeric structures. The laser irradiation leads to the cleavage of these hydrogen bonds, and theoretical calculations show that both [Ma + H]+ and [Ma − H]− ions can be formed through a two-photon absorption process. Alternatively, by the absorption of one photon only, a heterodissociation of one of the O–H bonds can lead to a stable structure containing both cationic and anionic sites. This structure could be considered an intermediate that, through the absorption of a further photon, leads to the formation of matrix ions. Some experiments have been performed to evaluate the role of thermal ionization and indicate that its effect is negligible. Some differences have been observed for different matrices in the formation of analyte molecule (M) ion [M + H]+, [M − H]−, M+•, and [M − 2H]-•, and they have been explained in terms of ionization energies, pKa values, and thermodynamic stability. PMID:23251835

  20. 76 FR 55278 - Assistance to Foreign Atomic Energy Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ...DOE proposes to amend its regulation concerning unclassified assistance to foreign atomic energy activities. This regulation provides that persons subject to the jurisdiction of the United States who engage directly or indirectly in the production of special nuclear material outside the United States must be authorized to do so by the Secretary of Energy (Secretary). The proposed revisions update and clarify several provisions in the current regulation, and identify information applicants are required to submit in support of applications for an authorization under this part. The revisions are intended to reduce uncertainties for industry users concerning which foreign nuclear-related activities by U.S. persons are ``generally authorized'' under the regulation and which activities require a ``specific authorization'' from the Secretary. In this regard, one proposed organizational change is the listing of countries and territories for which a general authorization for foreign atomic energy activities is available. This proposed change contrasts with the current regulation, which lists those countries for which a specific authorization to conduct such activities is required. Unclassified nuclear activities are generally authorized with respect to these listed countries if they do not involve ``sensitive nuclear technology'' as defined in the regulation. Conversely, the proposed revised regulation specifically identifies those assistance activities and technologies under DOE's jurisdiction, the export of which requires a specific authorization from the Secretary. Additionally, DOE is proposing to add regulations to address ``deemed exports.'' Companies seeking to employ foreign nationals in positions involving a proposed transfer of technology are provided information on the documentation required to be submitted to request specific authorization for those transfers. Finally, DOE proposes to update its regulations in this area to reflect terminological and other

  1. Photon assisted hopping conduction mechanism in Tl2SSe crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qasrawi, A. F.; Ziqan, Abdelhalim M.; Jazzar, Suha Kh.; Gasanly, N. M.

    2015-02-01

    In this article, the powder X-ray diffraction data and the dark and the photo-excited electrical conduction parameters of Tl2SSe crystal are reported. The dark and photon excited electrical conduction in the tetragonal crystal are found to be dominated by thermionic emission assisted variable range hopping conduction (VRH). The dark Mott's VRH parameters representing by the degree of disorder (To), the density of localized states near the Fermi level (N (EF)), the average hopping range (R) and average hopping energy (W) exhibited wide tunability via incremental photon intensity. Particularly, while the dark values of T0 , W and R significantly decreased from 2.32 ×108 to 1.52 ×105 K, 114 to 18.25 meV and from 66.15 to 10.58 A°, respectively, the values of N (EF) increased from 7.23 ×1018 to 1.10 ×1022cm-3 /eV when the crystal was photo-excited with a 53.6 mW/cm2 light intensity. These variations in the hopping parameters via photon excitations are promisig for using the crystal in the fabrication of well controlled, widely tunable, low energy consuming and highly efficient electronic devices.

  2. Environment assisted degradation mechanisms in advanced light metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Stoner, Glenn E.; Swanson, Robert E.

    1988-01-01

    The general goals of the research program are to characterize alloy behavior quantitatively and to develop predictive mechanisms for environmental failure modes. Successes in this regard will provide the basis for metallurgical optimization of alloy performance, for chemical control of aggressive environments, and for engineering life prediction with damage tolerance and long term reliability.

  3. Patient-ventilator dyssynchrony during assisted invasive mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Murias, G; Villagra, A; Blanch, L

    2013-04-01

    Patient-ventilator dyssynchrony is common during mechanical ventilation. Dyssynchrony decreases comfort, prolongs mechanical ventilation and intensive care unit stays, and might lead to worse outcome. Dyssynchrony can occur during the triggering of the ventilator, the inspiration period after triggering, the transition from inspiration to expiration, and the expiratory phase. The most common dyssynchronies are delayed triggering, autotriggering, ineffective inspiratory efforts (which can occur at any point in the respiratory cycle), mismatch between the patient's and ventilator's inspiratory times, and double triggering. At present, the detection of dyssynchronies usually depends on healthcare staff observing ventilator waveforms; however, performance is suboptimal and many events go undetected. To date, technological complexity has made it impossible to evaluate patient-ventilator synchrony throughout the course of mechanical ventilation. Studies have shown that a high index of dyssynchrony may increase the duration of mechanical ventilation. Better training, better ventilatory modes, and/or computerized systems that permit better synchronization of patients' demands and ventilator outputs are necessary to improve patient-ventilator synchrony.

  4. Mechanisms and Kinetics of Environmentally Assisted Cracking: Current Status, Issues, and Suggestions for Further Work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, S. P.

    2013-03-01

    Mechanisms and kinetics of metal-induced embrittlement, hydrogen-embrittlement, and stress-corrosion cracking are discussed, and long-standing controversies are addressed by reviewing critical observations. Recommendations are also made regarding further work (including repetition of previous work using more advanced measurement and characterisation techniques) that should be carried out in order to resolve some of the contentious issues. The evidence to date suggests that adsorption-based mechanisms, involving weakening of substrate interatomic bonds so that dislocation emission or decohesion is facilitated, accounts for embrittlement in many systems. Embrittling adsorbed species include some metal atoms, hydrogen, and complex ions produced by de-alloying. Other viable mechanisms of embrittlement include those based on (1) dissolution of anodic grain-boundary regions, and (2) decohesion at grain boundaries owing to segregated hydrogen and impurities. The hydrogen-enhanced localised-plasticity mechanism, based on solute hydrogen facilitating dislocation activity in the plastic zone ahead of cracks, makes a contribution in some cases, but is relatively unimportant compared with these other mechanisms for most fracture modes. The film-induced cleavage mechanism, proposed especially for stress-corrosion cracking in systems involving de-alloying at crack tips, is questionable on numerous grounds, and is probably not viable. Rate-controlling processes for environmentally assisted cracking are not well established, except for solid-metal induced embrittlement where surface self-diffusion of embrittling atoms to crack tips controls cracking kinetics. In some systems, adsorption kinetics are probably rate-controlling for liquid-metal embrittlement, hydrogen-environment embrittlement, and stress-corrosion cracking. In other cases, rate-controlling processes could include the rate of anodic or cathodic reactions at and behind crack tips (responsible for producing embrittling

  5. Molecular Mechanisms of Anthracycline Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beretta, Giovanni Luca; Zunino, Franco

    On the basis of evidence that anthracyclines are DNA intercalating agents and DNA is the primary target, a large number of analogs and related intercalators have been developed. However, doxorubicin and closely related anthracyclines still remain among the most effective antitumor agents. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed to explain their efficacy. They include inhibition of DNA-dependent functions, free radical formation, and membrane interactions. The primary mechanism of action is now ascribed to drug interference with the function of DNA topoisomerase II. The stabilization of the topoisomerase-mediated cleavable complex results in a specific type of DNA damage (i.e., double-strand protein-associated DNA breaks). The drug-stabilized cleavable complex is a potentially reversible molecular event and its persistence, as a consequence of strong DNA binding, may be recognized as an apoptotic stimulus. Indirect evidence supports the notion that the bioreductive processes of the quinone moiety generating the semiquinone radical with concomitant production of reactive oxygen species may contribute to the drug effects. The cellular defense mechanisms and response to genotoxic/cytotoxic stress appear to be critical determinants of the tumor sensitivity to anthracyclines.

  6. Electrochemically assisted deposition of transparent, mechanically robust TiO2 films for advanced applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maino, Giulia; Meroni, Daniela; Pifferi, Valentina; Falciola, Luigi; Soliveri, Guido; Cappelletti, Giuseppe; Ardizzone, Silvia

    2013-11-01

    In recent years, titanium dioxide has received ever growing interest, thanks to its promising applications in numerous fields such as environmental remediation, H2 generation and photovoltaics. Here, transparent and mechanically robust TiO2 films are deposited by a simple and inexpensive electrochemically assisted procedure on various kinds of substrates, both conductive and nonconductive (e.g., glass slides or different metal laminas with variable surface roughness). The obtained films are uniform, crack-free and exhibit excellent chemical, mechanical, and electrochemical robustness. The obtained layers are compared to films prepared by a routine preparation technique, such as dip coating, showing much better morphological, optical, and conductive properties. The photo-activity of TiO2 can be exploited to obtain transparent spectroelectrochemical systems and to control the wetting features of the surface. Applications concerning the modulation of the wettability are presented with respect to both the antifogging and antistain properties. The photoelectrochemical properties of TiO2 films are exploited to activate a photoelectrochemical polymerization of polypyrrole onto an unconductive support. These materials are promising for numerous applications such as smart windows, antifogging mirrors, solar cells, and optically transparent electrodes.

  7. Antimicrobial activity of ultrasound-assisted solvent-extracted spices.

    PubMed

    Thongson, C; Davidson, P M; Mahakarnchanakul, W; Weiss, J

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this research was to determine the antimicrobial activity of conventional and high-intensity ultrasound-assisted (HI-US) solvent-extracted Thai spices, including ginger (Zingiber officinale Rose), fingerroot (Bosenbergia pandurata Holtt) and turmeric (Curouma longa Linn). Extracts were obtained using hexane, isopropanol and a 7 : 3 isopropanol : hexane mixture as solvents with and without HI-US. The antimicrobial activity of the extracts was assayed against four strains each of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella Typhimurium DT 104 using an agar dilution assay. Application of HI-US did not alter antibacterial activity against S. Typhimurium, but antilisterial activity of some HI-US spice extracts decreased. Solvent type affected antimicrobial efficacy of extracts with hexane producing the least antimicrobial activity. Fingerroot extracted with isopropanol-hexane and without HI-US had the best antilisterial effect while HI-US-isopropanol fingerroot extract had the greatest antimicrobial efficacy against S. Typhimurium. Application of HI-US reduced time of extraction to 5 min, compared with the 24 h required for conventional extraction and maintained antimicrobial activity against Salmonella but slightly reduced activity against Listeria. HI-US in combination with proper solvent selection may offer a new tool to optimize extraction of spice essential oil for use as antimicrobial agents, and reduce processing time and costs.

  8. Enthalpy assisted size exclusion chromatography. Part 2. Adsorption retention mechanism.

    PubMed

    Russ, Albert; Berek, Dusan

    2007-08-01

    A novel high performance liquid chromatographic method for separation of synthetic polymers has been tested. It involves combination of the enthalpic and entropic retention mechanisms, resulting in increased selectivity of separation within a specific molar mass range. In this present case, the enthalpic retention mechanism is adsorption of macromolecules on a bare silica gel column packing. Under critical conditions of enthalpic interactions, homopolymers are known to elute irrespective of their molar mass. However, in the vicinity of critical conditions, a situation can be identified when retention volumes (V(R)) rapidly decrease with increasing molar mass. Typically, this happens for polymer species close to or above their exclusion limit observed with the same column in the absence of enthalpic interactions between macromolecules and packing, that is near "ideal SEC" conditions. The dependence of polymer retention volume on molar mass closely resembles size exclusion conditions. However, the witnessed rate of change in V(R )with polymer molar mass is more pronounced, thus indicating increased selectivity of separation. This situation not only offers the benefit of more selective separation according to molar mass but efficient discrimination of macromolecules possessing different nature and interactivity with the column packing can be accomplished as well.

  9. Ruptured subcapsular liver haematoma following mechanically-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Joseph, John R; Freundlich, Robert Edward; Abir, Mahshid

    2016-02-02

    A 64-year-old man with a history of ascending aortic surgery and pulmonary embolus presented with shortness of breath. He rapidly decompensated, prompting intubation, after which he lost pulses. Manual resuscitation was initiated immediately, with subsequent use of a LUCAS-2 mechanical compression device. The patient was given bolus thrombolytic therapy and regained pulses after 7 min of CPR. Compressions were reinitiated with the LUCAS-2 twice more during resuscitation over the subsequent hour for brief episodes of PEA. After confirmation of massive pulmonary embolism on CT, the patient underwent interventional radiology-guided ultrasonic catheter placement with local thrombolytic therapy and experienced immediate improvement in oxygenation. He later developed abdominal compartment syndrome, despite cessation of thrombolytic and anticoagulation therapy. Bedside exploratory abdominal laparotomy revealed a ruptured subcapsular haematoma of the liver. The patient's haemodynamics improved following surgery and he was extubated 11 days postarrest with intact neurological function.

  10. 78 FR 54457 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Student Assistance General Provisions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-04

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Student Assistance General Provisions--Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy AGENCY: Federal Student Aid (FSA), Department of Education (ED). ACTION... to this notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: Student Assistance...

  11. Immunologic mechanisms of antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Foss, Francine M

    2002-06-01

    The growth and metastatic spread of tumors, to a large extent, depends on their capacity to evade host immune surveillance and overcome host defenses. All tumors express antigens that are recognized to a variable extent by the immune system, but in many cases an inadequate immune response is elicited because of partial antigen masking or ineffective activation of effector cells. Tumor antigens presented in the context of major histocompatability antigen (MHC) class I complexes on either the tumor cell itself or on antigen-presenting cells are capable of inducing tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The presence of costimulatory molecules, such as B7-1 and B7-2, on antigen-presenting cells and the secretion of IL-2 promote the differentiation of recruited CD8+ lymphocytes into cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Tumor escape from immune effectors is most often caused by weak immunogenicity of tumor antigens, antigen masking, or overall immunosuppression, a characteristic of advanced cancer. Failure of antigen processing or binding to MHC molecules, inadequate or low-affinity binding of MHC complexes to T-cell receptors, or inadequate expression of costimulatory adhesion molecules in conjunction with the antigen-presenting MHC complex may all lead to poor immunogenicity of tumor-associated peptides and impaired antitumor response. Therapeutic interventions to augment tumor antigenicity include vaccination with immunogenic peptides, administration of in vitro expanded and activated immune effector cells, in vivo effector cell expansion with cytokine therapies, or genetic modification of either immune effectors or tumor cells with cytokine genes or genes encoding costimulatory molecules to effectively activate the immune response. Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  12. Cavopulmonary assist for the failing Fontan circulation: Impact of ventricular function on mechanical support strategy

    PubMed Central

    Giridharan, Guruprasad A; Ising, Mickey; Sobieski, Michael A.; Koenig, Steven C; Chen, Jun; Frankel, Steven; Rodefeld, Mark D

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical circulatory support - either ventricular assist device (VAD, left-sided systemic support) or cavopulmonary assist device (CPAD, right-sided support) - has been suggested as treatment for Fontan failure. The selection of left- vs. right-sided support for failing Fontan has not been previously defined. Computer simulation and mock circulation models of pediatric Fontan patients (15–25 kg) with diastolic, systolic, and combined systolic and diastolic dysfunction were developed. The global circulatory response to assisted Fontan flow using VAD (HeartWare HVAD, FL) support, CPAD (Viscous Impeller Pump, IN) support, and combined VAD and CPAD support were evaluated. Cavopulmonary assist improves failing Fontan circulation during diastolic dysfunction but preserved systolic function. In the presence of systolic dysfunction and elevated ventricular end-diastolic pressure (VEDP), VAD support augments cardiac output and diminishes VEDP, while increased preload with cavopulmonary assist may worsen circulatory status. Fontan circulation can be stabilized to biventricular values with modest cavopulmonary assist during diastolic dysfunction. Systemic VAD support may be preferable to maintain systemic output during systolic dysfunction. Both systemic and cavopulmonary support may provide best outcome during combined systolic and diastolic dysfunction. These findings may be useful to guide clinical cavopulmonary assist strategies in failing Fontan circulations. PMID:25158887

  13. Effects of Interaction Between Ventricular Assist Device Assistance and Autoregulated Mock Circulation Including Frank-Starling Mechanism and Baroreflex.

    PubMed

    Jansen-Park, So-Hyun; Mahmood, Mohammad Nauzef; Müller, Indra; Turnhoff, Lisa Kathrin; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Sonntag, Simon Johannes

    2016-10-01

    A mock heart circulation loop (MHCL) is a hydraulic model simulating the human circulatory system. It allows in vitro investigations of the interaction between cardiac assist devices and the human circulatory system. In this study, a preload sensitive MHCL, the MHCLAUTO , was developed to investigate the interaction between the left ventricle and left ventricular assist devices (LVADs). The Frank-Starling mechanism was modeled by regulating the stroke volume (SV) based on the measured mean diastolic left atrial pressure (MLAPdiast ). The baroreflex autoregulation mechanism was implemented to maintain a constant mean aortic pressure (MAP) by varying ventricular contractility (Emax ), heart rate (HR), afterload/systemic vascular resistance (SVR) and unstressed venous volume (UVV). The DP3 blood pump (Medos Medizintechnik GmbH) was used to simulate the LVAD. Characteristic parameters were measured in pathological conditions both with and without LVAD to assess the hemodynamic effect of LVAD on the MHCLAUTO . The results obtained from the MHCLAUTO show a high correlation to literature data. The study demonstrates the possibility of using the MHCLAUTO as a research tool to better understand the physiological interactions between cardiac implants and human circulation.

  14. A benchtop biorobotic platform for in vitro observation of muscle-tendon dynamics with parallel mechanical assistance from an elastic exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Benjamin D; Vadakkeveedu, Siddarth; Sawicki, Gregory S

    2017-05-24

    We present a novel biorobotic framework comprised of a biological muscle-tendon unit (MTU) mechanically coupled to a feedback controlled robotic environment simulation that mimics in vivo inertial/gravitational loading and mechanical assistance from a parallel elastic exoskeleton. Using this system, we applied select combinations of biological muscle activation (modulated with rate-coded direct neural stimulation) and parallel elastic assistance (applied via closed-loop mechanical environment simulation) hypothesized to mimic human behavior based on previously published modeling studies. These conditions resulted in constant system-level force-length dynamics (i.e., stiffness), reduced biological loads, increased muscle excursion, and constant muscle average positive power output-all consistent with laboratory experiments on intact humans during exoskeleton assisted hopping. Mechanical assistance led to reduced estimated metabolic cost and MTU apparent efficiency, but increased apparent efficiency for the MTU+Exo system as a whole. Findings from this study suggest that the increased natural resonant frequency of the artificially stiffened MTU+Exo system, along with invariant movement frequencies, may underlie observed limits on the benefits of exoskeleton assistance. Our novel approach demonstrates that it is possible to capture the salient features of human locomotion with exoskeleton assistance in an isolated muscle-tendon preparation, and introduces a powerful new tool for detailed, direct examination of how assistive devices affect muscle-level neuromechanics and energetics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Ultrasound assisted, thermally activated persulfate oxidation of coal tar DNAPLs.

    PubMed

    Peng, Libin; Wang, Li; Hu, Xingting; Wu, Peihui; Wang, Xueqing; Huang, Chumei; Wang, Xiangyang; Deng, Dayi

    2016-11-15

    The feasibility of ultrasound assisted, thermally activated persulfate for effective oxidation of twenty 2-6 ringed coal tar PAHs in a biphasic tar/water system and a triphasic tar/soil/water system were investigated and established. The results indicate that ultrasonic assistance, persulfate and elevated reaction temperature are all required to achieve effective oxidation of coal tar PAHs, while the heating needed can be provided by ultrasonic induced heating as well. Further kinetic analysis reveals that the oxidation of individual PAH in the biphasic tar/water system follows the first-order kinetics, and individual PAH oxidation rate is primary determined by the mass transfer coefficients, tar/water interfacial areas, the aqueous solubility of individual PAH and its concentration in coal tar. Based on the kinetic analysis and experimental results, the contributions of ultrasound, persulfate and elevated reaction temperature to PAHs oxidation were characterized, and the effects of ultrasonic intensity and oxidant dosage on PAHs oxidation efficiency were investigated. In addition, the results indicate that individual PAH degradability is closely related to its reactivity as well, and the high reactivity of 4-6 ringed PAHs substantially improves their degradability.

  16. Mechanistic Studies of Substrate-assisted Inhibition of Ubiquitin-activating Enzyme by Adenosine Sulfamate Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jesse J.; Tsu, Christopher A.; Gavin, James M.; Milhollen, Michael A.; Bruzzese, Frank J.; Mallender, William D.; Sintchak, Michael D.; Bump, Nancy J.; Yang, Xiaofeng; Ma, Jingya; Loke, Huay-Keng; Xu, Qing; Li, Ping; Bence, Neil F.; Brownell, James E.; Dick, Lawrence R.

    2011-01-01

    Ubiquitin-activating enzyme (UAE or E1) activates ubiquitin via an adenylate intermediate and catalyzes its transfer to a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2). MLN4924 is an adenosine sulfamate analogue that was identified as a selective, mechanism-based inhibitor of NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE), another E1 enzyme, by forming a NEDD8-MLN4924 adduct that tightly binds at the active site of NAE, a novel mechanism termed substrate-assisted inhibition (Brownell, J. E., Sintchak, M. D., Gavin, J. M., Liao, H., Bruzzese, F. J., Bump, N. J., Soucy, T. A., Milhollen, M. A., Yang, X., Burkhardt, A. L., Ma, J., Loke, H. K., Lingaraj, T., Wu, D., Hamman, K. B., Spelman, J. J., Cullis, C. A., Langston, S. P., Vyskocil, S., Sells, T. B., Mallender, W. D., Visiers, I., Li, P., Claiborne, C. F., Rolfe, M., Bolen, J. B., and Dick, L. R. (2010) Mol. Cell 37, 102–111). In the present study, substrate-assisted inhibition of human UAE (Ube1) by another adenosine sulfamate analogue, 5′-O-sulfamoyl-N6-[(1S)-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-yl]-adenosine (Compound I), a nonselective E1 inhibitor, was characterized. Compound I inhibited UAE-dependent ATP-PPi exchange activity, caused loss of UAE thioester, and inhibited E1-E2 transthiolation in a dose-dependent manner. Mechanistic studies on Compound I and its purified ubiquitin adduct demonstrate that the proposed substrate-assisted inhibition via covalent adduct formation is entirely consistent with the three-step ubiquitin activation process and that the adduct is formed via nucleophilic attack of UAE thioester by the sulfamate group of Compound I after completion of step 2. Kinetic and affinity analysis of Compound I, MLN4924, and their purified ubiquitin adducts suggest that both the rate of adduct formation and the affinity between the adduct and E1 contribute to the overall potency. Because all E1s are thought to use a similar mechanism to activate their cognate ubiquitin-like proteins, the substrate-assisted inhibition by adenosine

  17. Center-of-pressure movements during equine-assisted activities.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Hilary M; Kaiser, Leeann J; de Pue, Bonnie; Kaiser, Lana

    2011-01-01

    We compared anteroposterior and mediolateral range of motion and velocity of the center of pressure (COP) on the horse's back between riders without disabilities and riders with cerebral palsy. An electronic pressure mat was used to track COP movements beneath the saddle in 4 riders without disabilities and 4 riders with cerebral palsy. Comparisons between rider groups were made using the Mann-Whitney test (p < .05). The two rider groups differed significantly in anteroposterior range of COP motion, mediolateral range of COP motion, and mediolateral COP velocity. Anteroposterior COP velocity did not differ between groups. The results suggest that measurements of COP range of motion and velocity are potentially useful for monitoring changes in balance as an indicator of core stability during equine-assisted activities.

  18. Robot Assisted Stapedotomy ex vivo with an Active Handheld Instrument*

    PubMed Central

    Vendrametto, Tobia; McAfee, Jacob S.; Hirsch, Barry E.; Riviere, Cameron N.; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; De Momi, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Micron is a fully handheld active micromanipulator that helps to improve position accuracy and precision in microsurgery by cancelling hand tremor. This work describes adaptation, tuning, and testing of the Micron system for stapedotomy, a microsurgical procedure performed in the middle ear to restore hearing that requires accurate manipulation in narrow spaces. Two end-effectors, a handle, and a brace (or rest) were designed and prototyped. The control system was adapted for the new hardware. The system was tested ex vivo in stapedotomy procedure comparing manually-performed and Micron-assisted surgical tasks. Tremor amplitude was found to be reduced significantly. Further testing is needed in order to obtain statistically significant results regarding other parameters dealing with regularity of the fenestra shape. PMID:26737386

  19. Simulation of current-activated pressure-assisted densification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Dietrich; Angst, Sebastian; Schierning, Gabi

    2013-03-01

    Cohesive particles usually form very porous agglomerates. They support loads up to a consolidation pressure, which increases with decreasing particle size. Compaction of nano-powders can therefore be very costly and time consuming. If the particles are electrically conducting, which is the case e.g. for novel nano-structured thermoelectric materials, the technique of current-activated pressure-assisted densification (CAPAD) turns out to have many advantages. Electrical power deposited locally as Joule heat lowers the consolidation pressure such that particles fill nearby pores. This process leads to fast, scalable densification without much coarsening. Simulations are presented which address the influence of correlations on density and conductivity. They also take thermal conductivity and Peltier coefficient into account. Funded by DFG within the Priority Programme SPP 1386 (Nanostructured Thermoelectrics).

  20. Mechanisms of hemolysis-associated platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Helms, C. C.; Marvel, M.; Zhao, W.; Stahle, M.; Vest, R.; Kato, G. J.; Lee, J. S.; Christ, G.; Gladwin, M. T.; Hantgan, R. R.; Kim-Shapiro, D. B.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Intravascular hemolysis occurs after blood transfusion, in hemolytic anemias and other conditions, and is associated with hypercoagulable states. Hemolysis has been shown to potently activate platelets in vitro and in vivo and several mechanisms have been suggested to account for this including (1) direct activation by hemoglobin, (2) increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), (3) scavenging of nitric oxide by released hemoglobin, and (4) release of intraerythrocytic ADP. Objective The aim of the current study is to elucidate the mechanism of hemolysis-mediated platelet activation. Methods We used flow cytometry to detect PAC-1 binding to activated platelets for in vitro experiments and a Siemens’ Advia 120 hematology system to assess platelet aggregation using platelet counts from in vivo experiments in a rodent model. Results We show that Hb does not directly activate platelets. However, ADP bound to Hb can cause platelet activation. Furthermore, platelet activation due to shearing of RBCs is reduced in the presence of apyrase which metabolizes ADP to AMP. Use of ROS scavengers did not affect platelet activation. We also show that cell free Hb does enhance platelet activation by abrogating the inhibitory effect of NO on platelet activation. In vivo infusions of ADP and purified (ADP-free) Hb as well as hemolysate result in platelet aggregation as evidenced by decreased platelet counts. Conclusion Two primary mechanisms account for red blood cell hemolysis-associated platelet activation: ADP release which activates platelets and cell-free hemoglobin release which enhances platelet activation by lowering NO bioavailability. PMID:24119131

  1. Adaptive mechanical backup ventilation for preterm infants on respiratory assist modes - a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Herber-Jonat, Susanne; Rieger-Fackeldey, Esther; Hummler, Helmut; Schulze, Andreas

    2006-02-01

    Mechanical respiratory-assist modes, such as assist/control, low-rate intermittent mandatory ventilation, continuous positive airway pressure, or proportional assist ventilation (PAV), require a continuous respiratory effort. Because of the frequent occurrence of periodic breathing and/or apnea, mechanical backup ventilation must be initiated during episodes of reduced or absent respiratory drive to maintain gas exchange. The common approach to this problem is a regular conventional mechanical ventilation, which is initiated and withdrawn in an "on/off" function. To develop and evaluate a mechanical backup ventilation mode that is adaptive to the rapidly changing breathing pattern of preterm infants. Prospective randomized clinical crossover trial. Neonatal intensive care unit at the University of Munich, Germany. Preterm infants undergoing PAV. The infants were ventilated with PAV using a newly developed adaptive backup support, with and without pulse-oximetry-guided operation (SpO(2)-sensitive backup). Each infant was ventilated with both modes of backup support on 2 consecutive days, with the sequence randomized. The analysis on 11 preterm infants showed a statistically significant and clinically relevant reduction of the incidence (33%) and duration of oxygen desaturations (52%) when SpO(2)-sensitive adaptive backup support was used. SpO(2)-sensitive adaptive backup proved safe and effective in reducing the incidence and duration of oxygen desaturation in this short-term trial. This technology is potentially applicable to other assisted modalities of ventilation, such as noninvasive nasal ventilation.

  2. Magnetic-Assisted Noncontact Triboelectric Nanogenerator Converting Mechanical Energy into Electricity and Light Emissions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Long-Biao; Bai, Gongxun; Wong, Man-Chung; Yang, Zhibin; Xu, Wei; Hao, Jianhua

    2016-04-13

    A magnetic-assisted noncontact triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) is developed by combining a magnetic responsive layer with a TENG. The novel TENG device is applied to harvest mechanical energy which can be converted into electricity and light emissions. This work has potential for energy harvesting, magnetic sensors, self-powered electronics and optoelectronics applications.

  3. Mechanism for the activation of glutamate receptors

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at the NIH have used a technique called cryo-electron microscopy to determine a molecular mechanism for the activation and desensitization of ionotropic glutamate receptors, a prominent class of neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and spina

  4. Web-Assisted Instruction for Changing Social Cognitive Variables Related to Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suminski, Richard R.; Petosa, Rick

    2006-01-01

    The authors examined the efficacy of Web-assisted instruction for promoting the use of social cognitive theory (SCT) strategies related to physical activity. They recruited college students attending health courses. The authors created 3 groups (Web-assisted, comparison, and control) based on the course structure. The Web-assisted group received…

  5. 76 FR 60133 - Agency Information Collection (Application for Individualized Tutorial Assistance): Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-28

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Application for Individualized Tutorial Assistance): Activity Under... INFORMATION: Title: Application for Individualized Tutorial Assistance, VA Form 22-1990t. OMB Control Number... VA Form 22-1990t to apply for supplemental allowance for tutorial assistance. The student...

  6. Ultrasound-assisted Micro-emulsion Synthesis of a Highly Active Nano-particle Catalyst

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    Ultrasound-assisted Micro -emulsion Synthesis of a Highly Active Nano -particle Catalyst by Rongzhong Jiang and Charles Rong ARL-TR-5114...ARL-TR-5114 March 2010 Ultrasound-assisted Micro -emulsion Synthesis of a Highly Active Nano -particle Catalyst Rongzhong Jiang and...TYPE DRI 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 2009 to 2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ultrasound-assisted Micro -emulsion Synthesis of a Highly Active Nano

  7. Therapeutic effect of increased openness: Investigating mechanism of action in MDMA-assisted psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Mark T; Mithoefer, Michael C; Mithoefer, Ann T; MacAulay, Rebecca K; Jerome, Lisa; Yazar-Klosinski, Berra; Doblin, Rick

    2017-08-01

    A growing body of research suggests that traumatic events lead to persisting personality change characterized by increased neuroticism. Relevantly, enduring improvements in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) symptoms have been found in response to 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA)-assisted psychotherapy. There is evidence that lasting changes in the personality feature of "openness" occur in response to hallucinogens, and that this may potentially act as a therapeutic mechanism of change. The present study investigated whether heightened Openness and decreased Neuroticism served as a mechanism of change within a randomized trial of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for chronic, treatment-resistant PTSD. The Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) Global Scores and NEO PI-R Personality Inventory (NEO) Openness and Neuroticism Scales served as outcome measures. Results indicated that changes in Openness but not Neuroticism played a moderating role in the relationship between reduced PTSD symptoms and MDMA treatment. Following MDMA-assisted psychotherapy, increased Openness and decreased Neuroticism when comparing baseline personality traits with long-term follow-up traits also were found. These preliminary findings suggest that the effect of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy extends beyond specific PTSD symptomatology and fundamentally alters personality structure, resulting in long-term persisting personality change. Results are discussed in terms of possible mechanisms of psychotherapeutic change.

  8. CO assisted N2 functionalization activated by a dinuclear hafnium complex: a DFT mechanistic exploration.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xuelu; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Wenchao; Lei, Ming

    2013-01-21

    In this paper, the reaction mechanisms of CO assisted N(2) cleavage and functionalization activated by a dinuclear hafnium complex are studied using a density function theory (DFT) method. Several key intermediates (Ia, Ib, Ic and Id) with axial/equatorial N=C=O coordination structures are found to be of importance along reaction pathways of CO assisted N(2) functionalization, which could provide a profound theoretical insight into the C-N bond formation and N-N bond cleavage. There are two different attack directions to insert the first CO molecule into the Hf-N bonds of the dinuclear hafnium complex, which lead to C-N bond formation. The calculated results imply that CO insertion into the Hf(1)-N(3) bond (Path A1) reacts more easily than that into the Hf(2)-N(3) bond (Path A3). But for the insertion of the second CO insertion to give 2A, there are two possibilities (Path A1 and Path A2) according to this insertion being after/before N-N bond cleavage. Two pathways (Path A1 and Path A2) are proved to be possible to form final dinitrogen functionalized products (oxamidide 2A, 2B and 2C) in this study, which explain the formation of different oxamidide isomers in CO assisted N(2) functionalization activated by a dinuclear hafnium complex.

  9. Potential fluid mechanic pathways of platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Shadden, Shawn C; Hendabadi, Sahar

    2013-06-01

    Platelet activation is a precursor for blood clotting, which plays leading roles in many vascular complications and causes of death. Platelets can be activated by chemical or mechanical stimuli. Mechanically, platelet activation has been shown to be a function of elevated shear stress and exposure time. These contributions can be combined by considering the cumulative stress or strain on a platelet as it is transported. Here, we develop a framework for computing a hemodynamic-based activation potential that is derived from a Lagrangian integral of strain rate magnitude. We demonstrate that such a measure is generally maximized along, and near to, distinguished material surfaces in the flow. The connections between activation potential and these structures are illustrated through stenotic flow computations. We uncover two distinct structures that may explain observed thrombus formation at the apex and downstream of stenoses. More broadly, these findings suggest fundamental relationships may exist between potential fluid mechanic pathways for mechanical platelet activation and the mechanisms governing their transport.

  10. Acquisition of Mechanically Assisted Spark Plasma Sintering System for Advanced Research and Education on Functionally Graded Hybrid Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-14

    March 14, 2012 Final Progress Report September 15, 2010 - December 14, 2011 ACQUISITION OF MECHANICALLY ASSISTED SPARK PLASMA SINTERING SYSTEM FOR...Instrumentation Program (DURIP) Project titled, “Acquisition of Mechanically Assisted Spark Plasma Sintering System for Advanced Research and Education...at developing facilities for pressure-assisted fabrication of hybrid materials by spark plasma sintering (SPS) of metallic and ceramic powders to

  11. Design of Mechanism for Assisting Standing Movement Using Planar Linkage and Gear Train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nango, Jun; Yoshizawa, Hisato; Liu, Jiajun

    The number of people who are in need of nursing care due to difficulties they experience with performing various activities of daily living is increasing. In particular, the action of standing up is performed frequently in daily life, and this action starts to induce pain in joints as people age. In this research, we develop a device whose seat plate follows the movement of the thigh in the action of standing up for the purpose of relieving the burden from the joints and reducing the effort associated with nursing care. The device is designed by using a planar five-link mechanism and a gear train, and only a single input is needed to drive the device. The respective lengths of the links are determined by comparing the movement of the seat plate of the device with the movement of the human thigh in the action of standing up. In addition, this device is expected to be useful for assisting users in standing up in a natural manner, including in the case when the body remains supported by the seat plate, as well as for guiding the individual movements of users in the action of standing up.

  12. Mechanical circulatory assist device development at the Texas Heart Institute: a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Frazier, O H

    2014-06-01

    In December 2013, we performed our 1000th ventricular assist device implantation at the Texas Heart Institute. In my professional career, I have been fortunate to see the development of numerous mechanical circulatory support devices for the treatment of patients with advanced heart failure. In fact, most of the cardiac pumps in wide use today were developed in the Texas Heart Institute research laboratories in cooperation with the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute or device innovators and manufacturers and implanted clinically at our partner St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital. My early involvement in this field was guided by my mentors, Dr Michael E. DeBakey and, especially, Dr Denton A. Cooley. Also, many of the advances are directly attributable to my ongoing clinical experience. What I learned daily in my surgical practice allowed me to bring insights to the development of this technology that a laboratory researcher alone might not have had. Young academic surgeons interested in this field might be well served to be active not only in laboratory research but also in clinical practice.

  13. Personal care assistants' experiences of caring for people on home mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Israelsson-Skogsberg, Åsa; Lindahl, Berit

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe personal care assistants' (PCA) experiences of working with a ventilator-assisted person at home. Data were collected from fifteen audiotaped semistructured interviews with PCAs supporting a child or adult using home mechanical ventilation (HMV). Thirteen women and two men participated; their working experience with HMV users ranged from one to 17 years (median 6 years). Data were subjected to qualitative content analysis in an inductive and interpretive manner. Five categories emerged from the data: Being part of a complex work situation; Taking on a multidimensional responsibility; Caring carried out in someone's home; Creating boundaries in an environment with indistinct limits; and Being close to another's body and soul. The participants felt very close to the person they worked with, both physically and emotionally. They had a great responsibility and therefore a commensurate need for support, guidance and a well-functioning organisation around the HMV user. There is international consensus that advanced home care will continue to expand and personal care assistance is key in this development. We suggest that one way to move forward for PCAs working with HMV users is to create multiprofessional teams led by a key-person who coordinates the individual needs. More research is needed within this area from a broad perspective including the HMV-assisted persons, relatives, personal care assistants and management organisations. © 2016 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  14. Environmental friendly cold-mechanical/sonic enzymatic assisted extraction of genipin from genipap (Genipa americana).

    PubMed

    Ramos-de-la-Peña, Ana Mayela; Renard, Catherine M G C; Wicker, Louise; Montañez, Julio C; García-Cerda, Luis Alfonso; Contreras-Esquivel, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    An efficient cold-mechanical/sonic-assisted extraction technique was developed for extraction of genipin from genipap (Genipa americana) peel. Ultrasound assisted extraction (285 W, 24 kHz) was performed at 5, 10 and 15 °C for 5, 10 and 15 min. After cold-extraction, genipin was separated from pectin and proteins by aid of fungal pectinesterase. The maximum yield of non-cross-linked genipin was 7.85±0.33 mg/g, at 10 °C for 15 min by means of ultrasound extraction. The protein amount in extracts decreased in all samples. If mechanical process is combined with ultrasound assisted extraction the yield is increased by 8 times after the pectinesterase-assisted polyelectrolyte complex formation between pectic polysaccharides and proteins, avoiding the typical cross-linking of genipin. This novel process is viable to obtain non-cross-linked genipin, to be used as a natural colorant and cross-linker in the food and biotechnological industries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Implicit Active Constraints for Robot-Assisted Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Edoardo; Kwok, Ka-Wai; Payne, Christopher J.; Giataganas, Petros; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an Implicit Active Constraints control framework for robot-assisted minimally invasive surgery. It extends on current frameworks by prescribing the external constraints implicitly from the operator motion, forgoing the need for pre-operative imaging; the constraints are defined in situ so as to avoid the use of invasive fiducial markers. A hands-on cooperatively-controlled robotic platform, comprising of a surgical instrument and a compliant manipulator, has been designed for an arthroscopic procedure. The surgical platform is capable of constraining the pose of the instrument so as to ensure it passes through the incision point and does not cause trauma to the surrounding tissue. A flexible arthroscopic instrument is designed and its use is investigated to enlarge reachable and dexterous workspace, increasing the accessibility to the target anatomy. The behaviour of the flexible instrument is analysed. A detailed performance analysis is conducted on a group of subjects for validating the control framework, simulating a minimally invasive arthroscopic procedure. Results demonstrate a statistically significant enhancement in the control ergonomics as well as the accuracy and safety of the procedure. PMID:24748994

  16. Implicit Active Constraints for Robot-Assisted Arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Edoardo; Kwok, Ka-Wai; Payne, Christopher J; Giataganas, Petros; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2013-05-10

    This paper presents an Implicit Active Constraints control framework for robot-assisted minimally invasive surgery. It extends on current frameworks by prescribing the external constraints implicitly from the operator motion, forgoing the need for pre-operative imaging; the constraints are defined in situ so as to avoid the use of invasive fiducial markers. A hands-on cooperatively-controlled robotic platform, comprising of a surgical instrument and a compliant manipulator, has been designed for an arthroscopic procedure. The surgical platform is capable of constraining the pose of the instrument so as to ensure it passes through the incision point and does not cause trauma to the surrounding tissue. A flexible arthroscopic instrument is designed and its use is investigated to enlarge reachable and dexterous workspace, increasing the accessibility to the target anatomy. The behaviour of the flexible instrument is analysed. A detailed performance analysis is conducted on a group of subjects for validating the control framework, simulating a minimally invasive arthroscopic procedure. Results demonstrate a statistically significant enhancement in the control ergonomics as well as the accuracy and safety of the procedure.

  17. Spontaneous mechanical activity in depolarized frog ventricle

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    Spontaneous mechanical activity can be produced in depolarized frog ventricle by bathing the tissue in a solution with low Na, Iow Ca, and high K+. The contractions can be inhibited by depleting the tissue of Ca first, but they are relatively insensitive to changes in either extracellular [Ca++] or [Ca++]/[Na+]2. They are terminated very rapidly by raising [Na+] to 40 mM. Local anesthetics enhance the spontaneous activity in proportion to the concentration of their free base form. These contractions occur relatively rhythmically for several hours. Since the preparation is multicellular, this suggests a mechanism for intercellular communication without change in membrane potential. PMID:822122

  18. The effect of animal-assisted activity on inpatients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chu, Cheng-I; Liu, Chao-Yin; Sun, Chi-Tzu; Lin, Jung

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of animal-assisted activity on self-esteem, control over activities of daily living, and other psycho-physiological aspects among Taiwanese inpatients with schizophrenia. Thirty participants were randomly assigned to either the treatment or control group. A weekly animal-assisted activity program was arranged for patients in the treatment group for 2 months. A questionnaire assessing self-esteem, self-determination, social support, and psychiatric symptoms was completed the week before and the week after the animal-assisted activity. Compared with the control group, the treatment group showed significant improvement on all measures except for social support and negative psychiatric symptoms. The results of this study showed that animal-assisted activity can promote significant improvements in many clinical aspects among inpatients with schizophrenia. Therefore, animal-assisted activity should be integrated into the treatment of institutionalized patients with schizophrenia.

  19. Fracture mechanics approach to hydrogen-assisted microdamage in eutectoid steel

    SciTech Connect

    Toribio, J.

    1997-01-01

    A fracture mechanics approach to hydrogen-assisted microdamage in eutectoid steel is presented. Fractographic analysis revealed micromechanical effects of hydrogen in the form of tearing topography surface (TTS). The progress of this microdamage is modeled as a macroscopic crack that extends the original fatigue precrack and involves linear elastic fracture mechanics principles. In this case, the change from hydrogen-assisted microdamage (TTS) to cleavagelike topography takes place when a critical stress intensity factor (K{sub H}) is reached, and this value depends on the amount of hydrogen which penetrated the vicinity of the actual crack tip (the fatigue precrack plus the TTS area). It is shown that the value K{sub H} depends on experimental variables--mainly on the fatigue precracking regime--and its value may be associated with a characteristic level of stress intensity factor in the crack growth kinetics curve.

  20. Fe-Nx/C assisted chemical-mechanical polishing for improving the removal rate of sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Li; Zou, Chunli; Shi, Xiaolei; Pan, Guoshun; Luo, Guihai; Zhou, Yan

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a novel non-noble metal catalyst (Fe-Nx/C) is used to improve the removal mass of sapphire as well as obtain atomically smooth sapphire wafer surfaces. The results indicate that Fe-Nx/C shows good catalytic activity towards sapphire removal rate. And the material removal rates (MRRs) are found to vary with the catalyst content in the polishing fluid. Especially that when the polishing slurry mixes with 16 ppm Fe-Nx/C shows the maximum MRR and its removal mass of sapphire is 38.43 nm/min, more than 15.44% larger than traditional CMP using the colloidal silicon dioxide (SiO2) without Fe-Nx/C. Catalyst-assisted chemical-mechanical polishing of sapphire is studied with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It is found that the formation of a soft hydration layer (boehmite, γ-AlOOH or γ-AlO(OH)) on sapphire surface facilitates the material removal and achieving fine surface finish on basal plane. Abrasives (colloid silica together with magnetite, ingredient of Fe-Nx/C) with a hardness between boehmite and sapphire polish the c-plane of sapphire with good surface finish and efficient removal. Fe2O3, Fe3O4, pyridinic N as well as pyrrolic N group would be the catalytical active sites and accelerate this process. Surface quality is characterized with atomic force microscopy (AFM). The optimum CMP removal by Fe-Nx/C also yields a superior surface finish of 0.078 nm the average roughness (Ra).

  1. Mechanisms of stroke protection by physical activity.

    PubMed

    Endres, Matthias; Gertz, Karen; Lindauer, Ute; Katchanov, Juri; Schultze, Jörg; Schröck, Helmut; Nickenig, Georg; Kuschinsky, Wolfgang; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Laufs, Ulrich

    2003-11-01

    Regular physical activity is associated with a decrease of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events, which may relate to enhanced endothelium-dependent vasodilation. Here, we provide evidence that physical activity protects against ischemic stroke via mechanisms related to the upregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in the vasculature. Voluntary training on running wheels or exercise on a treadmill apparatus for 3 weeks, respectively, reduced cerebral infarct size and functional deficits, improved endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation, and augmented cerebral blood flow in wild-type mice. The neuroprotective effects of physical training were completely absent in eNOS-deficient mice, indicating that the enhanced eNOS activity by physical training was the predominant mechanism by which this modality protects against cerebral injury. Our results suggest that physical activity not only decreases stroke risk, but also provides a prophylactic treatment strategy for increasing blood flow and reducing brain injury during cerebral ischemia.

  2. Electrophilic assistance to the cleavage of an RNA model phopshodiester via specific and general base-catalyzed mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Corona-Martínez, David Octavio; Gomez-Tagle, Paola; Yatsimirsky, Anatoly K

    2012-10-19

    Kinetics of transesterification of the RNA model substrate 2-hydroxypropyl 4-nitrophenyl phosphate promoted by Mg(2+) and Ca(2+), the most common biological metals acting as cofactors for nuclease enzymes and ribozymes, as well as by Co(NH(3))(6)(3+), Co(en)(3)(3+), Li(+), and Na(+) cations, often employed as mechanistic probes, was studied in 80% v/v (50 mol %) aqueous DMSO, a medium that allows one to discriminate easily specific base (OH(-)-catalyzed) and general base (buffer-catalyzed) reaction paths. All cations assist the specific base reaction, but only Mg(2+) and Na(+) assist the general base reaction. For Mg(2+)-assisted reactions, the solvent deuterium isotope effects are 1.23 and 0.25 for general base and specific base mechanisms, respectively. Rate constants for Mg(2+)-assisted general base reactions measured with different bases fit the Brønsted correlation with a slope of 0.38, significantly lower than the slope for the unassisted general base reaction (0.77). Transition state binding constants for catalysts in the specific base reaction (K(‡)(OH)) both in aqueous DMSO and pure water correlate with their binding constants to 4-nitrophenyl phosphate dianion (K(NPP)) used as a minimalist transition state model. It was found that K(‡)(OH) ≈ K(NPP) for "protic" catalysts (Co(NH(3))(6)(3+), Co(en)(3)(3+), guanidinium), but K(‡)(OH) ≫ K(NPP) for Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) acting as Lewis acids. It appears from results of this study that Mg(2+) is unique in its ability to assist efficiently the general base-catalyzed transesterification often occurring in active sites of nuclease enzymes and ribozymes.

  3. Active euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide: the German discussion.

    PubMed

    Oehmichen, Manfred; Meissner, Christoph

    2003-03-01

    The debate on legalization of active euthanasia in the Netherlands and Belgium and the refused legal right to choose the circumstances of Diana Pretty's own death are the last actual reasons for reconsidering the situation in Germany. Around the world heated debates have broken out on the topic of active euthanasia. Specialists in the field of 'forensic medicine' have taken full part in these discussions. The present survey from the point of view of forensic medicine begins with a look at current terminology and at the laws pertaining to euthanasia in Germany. These laws are then contrasted with actual practice, including a description of the increasing acceptance of active euthanasia by the German population. The main argument against legalization of active euthanasia is that its formal acceptance in law would cause the dam of restraint to burst, culminating in widespread misuse, as already seen in recent serial killings by nurses in hospitals and homes for the elderly around the world. Contrasted with this are the arguments for taking active steps at the end of life, including emotional considerations such as the revulsion against mechanized medicine and the fear of pain and rational arguments such as the necessity to end a 'life unworthy of life', to save medical costs, and obtaining prior consent in 'living wills'. Such considerations have put in jeopardy the moral integrity of the medical profession - and thus the layperson's trust in physicians--around the world. In Germany especially the history of mass killing during the Nazi era constitutes a fundamental argument against active euthanasia. As a consequence, in Germany active euthanasia will not receive legal sanction, although recommendations on rendering dying more bearable are permitted.

  4. Muscle-tendon mechanics explain unexpected effects of exoskeleton assistance on metabolic rate during walking.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Rachel W; Dembia, Christopher L; Delp, Scott L; Collins, Steven H

    2017-06-01

    The goal of this study was to gain insight into how ankle exoskeletons affect the behavior of the plantarflexor muscles during walking. Using data from previous experiments, we performed electromyography-driven simulations of musculoskeletal dynamics to explore how changes in exoskeleton assistance affected plantarflexor muscle-tendon mechanics, particularly for the soleus. We used a model of muscle energy consumption to estimate individual muscle metabolic rate. As average exoskeleton torque was increased, while no net exoskeleton work was provided, a reduction in tendon recoil led to an increase in positive mechanical work performed by the soleus muscle fibers. As net exoskeleton work was increased, both soleus muscle fiber force and positive mechanical work decreased. Trends in the sum of the metabolic rates of the simulated muscles correlated well with trends in experimentally observed whole-body metabolic rate (R(2)=0.9), providing confidence in our model estimates. Our simulation results suggest that different exoskeleton behaviors can alter the functioning of the muscles and tendons acting at the assisted joint. Furthermore, our results support the idea that the series tendon helps reduce positive work done by the muscle fibers by storing and returning energy elastically. We expect the results from this study to promote the use of electromyography-driven simulations to gain insight into the operation of muscle-tendon units and to guide the design and control of assistive devices. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. Implantable mechanical circulatory support: demystifying patients with ventricular assist devices and artificial hearts.

    PubMed

    Shah, Keyur B; Tang, Daniel G; Cooke, Richard H; Harton, Suzanne; Flattery, Maureen; Katlaps, Gundars J; Kasirajan, Vigneshwar; Hess, Michael L

    2011-03-01

    Engineering advancements have expanded the role for mechanical circulatory support devices in the patient with heart failure. More patients with mechanical circulatory support are being discharged from the implanting institution and will be seen by clinicians outside the immediate surgical or heart-failure team. This review provides a practical understanding of device design and physiology, general troubleshooting, and limitations and complications for implantable left ventricular assist devices (pulsatile-flow and continuous-flow pumps) and the total artificial heart. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. A water-assisted nucleophilic mechanism utilized by BphD, the meta-cleavage product hydrolase in biphenyl degradation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lihua; Zhang, Shujun; Liu, Yongjun

    2017-09-01

    As members of the α/β-hydrolase superfamily, Meta-cleavage product (MCP) hydrolases generally utilize a Ser-His-Asp catalytic triad to hydrolyze the cleavage of CC bond during the aerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds by bacteria. BphD is one kind of MCP hydrolase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of 2-hydroxy-6-oxo-6-phenylhexa-2,4-dienoic acid (HOPDA) to 2-hydroxypenta-2,4-dienoic acid (HPD) and benzoate. In this article, a combined quantum mechanics and molecule mechanics (QM/MM) approach has been employed to explore the reaction mechanism of BphD from Burkholderia xenovorans LB400. On the basis of the recently resolved crystal structures, three computational models have been constructed. Our calculation results reveal that BphD utilizes a water-assisted nucleophilic mechanism, which contains acylation and deacylation stages. In acylation reaction, an active site water molecule assists the proton transfer from Ser112 to the carbanion intermediate (substrate) by forming hydrogen bonds with Ser112 and His265, and this proton transfer is in concert with the nucleophilic attack of deprotonated Ser112 on the C6-carbonyl of substrate to form the acylated intermediate. In deacylation, the Asp237-His265 dyad acts as a general base to activate the hydrolytic water, whose nucleophilic attack leads to the collapses of acyl-enzyme intermediate. The acylation and deacylation process correspond to the highest energy barriers of 21.0 and 23.9kcal/mol, respectively. During the catalytic reaction, the active site water and Asp237-His265 dyad play an important role for each elementary steps. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular mechanisms regulating NLRP3 inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Eun-Kyeong; Kim, Jin Kyung; Shin, Dong-Min; Sasakawa, Chihiro

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are multi-protein signaling complexes that trigger the activation of inflammatory caspases and the maturation of interleukin-1β. Among various inflammasome complexes, the NLRP3 inflammasome is best characterized and has been linked with various human autoinflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Thus, the NLRP3 inflammasome may be a promising target for anti-inflammatory therapies. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the mechanisms by which the NLRP3 inflammasome is activated in the cytosol. We also describe the binding partners of NLRP3 inflammasome complexes activating or inhibiting the inflammasome assembly. Our knowledge of the mechanisms regulating NLRP3 inflammasome signaling and how these influence inflammatory responses offers further insight into potential therapeutic strategies to treat inflammatory diseases associated with dysregulation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. PMID:26549800

  8. Anaphylaxis: mechanisms of mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Kalesnikoff, Janet; Galli, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is a severe systemic allergic response that is rapid in onset and potentially lethal, and that typically is induced by an otherwise innocuous substance. In IgE-dependent and other examples of anaphylaxis, tissue mast cells and circulating basophilic granulocytes (basophils) are thought to represent major (if not the major) sources of the biologically active mediators that contribute to the pathology and, in unfortunate individuals, fatal outcome, of anaphylaxis. In this chapter, we will describe the mechanisms of mast cell (and basophil) activation in anaphylaxis, with a focus on IgE-dependent activation, which is thought to be responsible for most examples of antigen-induced anaphylaxis in humans. We will also discuss the use of mouse models to investigate the mechanisms that can contribute to anaphylaxis in that species in vivo, and the relevance of such mouse studies to human anaphylaxis. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Development of an assistive motorized hip orthosis: kinematics analysis and mechanical design.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Jeremy; Bouri, Mohamed; Ortlieb, Amalric; Bleuler, Hannes; Clavel, Reymond

    2013-06-01

    With the increase of life expectancy, a higher number of elderly need assistance to maintain their mobility and their independance. The hip joint is crucial for walking and is problematic for a large number of aged people. In this paper we present a novel design of a motorized hip orthosis to assist elderly people while walking, stair climbing and during the sit-to-stand transistions. The kinematics was developed based on biomechanics considerations. To be able to achieve a large assistance rate, velocity and torques of the hip joint were studied from the literature. In order to fit with these requirements, an amplification mechanism inspired by excavators was developed and implemented. Comfort considerations were also taken into account and a custom interface was designed with the collaboration of a professional orthopaedic technician. First tests with the prototype showed that the workspace is sufficient for walking, for stair climbing as well as for sit-to-stand transitions. The assistance rate can go up to 30% for a 70 kg subject during walking at a cadence of 100 steps/min. The comfort is guaranteed despite the important weight (4.3 kg) of this first prototype.

  10. Mechanisms of Cell Propulsion by Active Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, A. E.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms by which cytoskeletal flows and cell-substrate interactions interact to generate cell motion are explored using a simplified model of the cytoskeleton as a viscous gel containing active stresses. This model yields explicit general results relating cell speed and traction forces to the distributions of active stress and cell-substrate friction. It is found that 1) the cell velocity is given by a function that quantifies the asymmetry of the active-stress distribution, 2) gradients in cell-substrate friction can induce motion even when the active stresses are symmetrically distributed, 3) the traction-force dipole is enhanced by protrusive stresses near the cell edges or contractile stresses near the center of the cell, and 4) the cell velocity depends biphasically on the cell-substrate adhesion strength if active stress is enhanced by adhesion. Specific experimental tests of the calculated dependences are proposed. PMID:21804763

  11. Neural Response During a Mechanically Assisted Spinal Manipulation in an Animal Model: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Reed, William R.; Liebschner, Michael A.K.; Sozio, Randall S.; Pickar, Joel G.; Gudavalli, Maruti R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mechanoreceptor stimulation is theorized to contribute to the therapeutic efficacy of spinal manipulation. Use of mechanically-assisted spinal manipulation (MA-SM) devices is increasing among manual therapy clinicians worldwide. The purpose of this pilot study is to determine the feasibility of recording in vivo muscle spindle responses during a MA-SM in an intervertebral fixated animal model. Methods Intervertebral fixation was created by inserting facet screws through the left L5-6 and L6-7 facet joints of a cat spine. Three L6muscle spindle afferents with receptive fields in back muscles were isolated. Recordings were made during MA-SM thrusts delivered to the L7 spinous process using an instrumented Activator IV clinical device. Results Nine MA-SM thrusts were delivered with peak forces ranging from 68-122N and with thrust durations of less than 5ms. High frequency muscle spindle discharge occurred during MA-SM. Following the MA-SM, muscle spindle responses included returning to pre-manipulation levels, slightly decreasing for a short window of time, and greatly decreasing for more than 40s. Conclusion This study demonstrates that recording in vivo muscle spindle response using clinical MA-SM devices in an animal model is feasible. Extremely short duration MA-SM thrusts (<5ms) can have an immediate and/or a prolonged (> 40s) effect on muscle spindle discharge. Greater peak forces during MA-SM thrusts may not necessarily yield greater muscle spindle responses. Determining peripheral response during and following spinal manipulation may be an important step in optimizing its’ clinical efficacy. Future studies may investigate the effect of thrust dosage and magnitude. PMID:26618202

  12. Assisted Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Dries, David J

    2016-01-01

    Controlled Mechanical Ventilation may be essential in the setting of severe respiratory failure but consequences to the patient including increased use of sedation and neuromuscular blockade may contribute to delirium, atelectasis, and diaphragm dysfunction. Assisted ventilation allows spontaneous breathing activity to restore physiological displacement of the diaphragm and recruit better perfused lung regions. Pressure Support Ventilation is the most frequently used mode of assisted mechanical ventilation. However, this mode continues to provide a monotonous pattern of support for respiration which is normally a dynamic process. Noisy Pressure Support Ventilation where tidal volume is varied randomly by the ventilator may improve ventilation and perfusion matching but the degree of support is still determined by the ventilator. Two more recent modes of ventilation, Proportional Assist Ventilation and Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NAVA), allow patient determination of the pattern and depth of ventilation. Proposed advantages of Proportional Assist Ventilation and NAVA include decrease in patient ventilator asynchrony and improved adaptation of ventilator support to changing patient demand. Work of breathing can be normalized with these modes as well. To date, however, a clear pattern of clinical benefit has not been demonstrated. Existing challenges for both of the newer assist modes include monitoring patients with dynamic hyperinflation (auto-positive end expiratory pressure), obstructive lung disease, and air leaks in the ventilator system. NAVA is dependent on consistent transduction of diaphragm activity by an electrode system placed in the esophagus. Longevity of effective support with this technique is unclear.

  13. Carboxylate-Assisted C(sp3)–H Activation in Olefin Metathesis-Relevant Ruthenium Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of C–H activation at metathesis-relevant ruthenium(II) benzylidene complexes was studied both experimentally and computationally. Synthesis of a ruthenium dicarboxylate at a low temperature allowed for direct observation of the C–H activation step, independent of the initial anionic ligand-exchange reactions. A first-order reaction supports an intramolecular concerted metalation–deprotonation mechanism with ΔG⧧298K = 22.2 ± 0.1 kcal·mol–1 for the parent N-adamantyl-N′-mesityl complex. An experimentally determined ΔS⧧ = −5.2 ± 2.6 eu supports a highly ordered transition state for carboxylate-assisted C(sp3)–H activation. Experimental results, including measurement of a large primary kinetic isotope effect (kH/kD = 8.1 ± 1.7), agree closely with a computed six-membered carboxylate-assisted C–H activation mechanism where the deprotonating carboxylate adopts a pseudo-apical geometry, displacing the aryl ether chelate. The rate of cyclometalation was found to be influenced by both the electronics of the assisting carboxylate and the ruthenium ligand environment. PMID:24731019

  14. Amino acid tautomerization reactions in aqueous solution via concerted and assisted mechanisms using free energy curves from MD simulation.

    PubMed

    Tolosa, Santiago; Hidalgo, Antonio; Sansón, Jorge A

    2012-11-01

    A theoretical study is described of chemical reactions in solution by means of molecular dynamics simulations, with solute-solvent interaction potentials derived from AMBER van der Waals parameters and QM/MM electrostatic charges in solution. The solvent is used as the reaction coordinate, and the free energy curves to calculate the properties related to the reaction mechanism. The proposed scheme is applied to the tautomerization process in aqueous solution for some amino acids H(2)NCHR-COOH (with R = H being glycine, R = CH(3) alanine, R = CH(2)OH serine, and R = CH(2)COOH aspartic acid), focusing on the role of the solvent in the reaction (assisted versus unassisted mechanisms) and on the effect of the hydrophilic/hydrophobic character of the radical R on the activation and reaction energies.

  15. [Activities and responsibilities of workers in embryologic and andrologic laboratories in assisted reproduction centers].

    PubMed

    Záková, J; Trávník, P; Malenovská, A; Hűttelová, R

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents the current status and rules for the laboratory staff activities and their competences in the centers of assisted reproduction. The rules were processed by the members of the Association of Reproductive Embryology (ARE) committee under the current legislation. Committee members of the Czech Sterility and Assisted Reproduction Society and Czech Gynecology and Obstetric Society approved these rules as obligatory for assisted reproduction centres in Czech Republic.

  16. Beyond the VAD: Human Factors Engineering for Mechanically Assisted Circulation in the 21st Century.

    PubMed

    Throckmorton, Amy L; Patel-Raman, Sonna M; Fox, Carson S; Bass, Ellen J

    2016-06-01

    Thousands of ventricular assist devices (VADs) currently provide circulatory support to patients worldwide, and dozens of heart pump designs for adults and pediatric patients are under various stages of development in preparation for translation to clinical use. The successful bench-to-bedside development of a VAD involves a structured evaluation of possible system states, including human interaction with the device and auxiliary component usage in the hospital or home environment. In this study, we review the literature and present the current landscape of preclinical design and assessment, decision support tools and procedures, and patient-centered therapy. Gaps of knowledge are identified. The study findings support the need for more attention to user-centered design approaches for medical devices, such as mechanical circulatory assist systems, that specifically involve detailed qualitative and quantitative assessments of human-device interaction to mitigate risk and failure.

  17. Efficient Catalytic Activity BiFeO3 Nanoparticles Prepared by Novel Microwave-Assisted Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jing; Gong, Wanyun; Ma, Jinai; Li, Lu; Jiang, Jizhou

    2015-02-01

    A novel microwave-assisted sol-gel method was applied to the synthesis of the single-phase perovskite bismuth ferrite nanoparticles (BFO NPs) with the mean diameter ca. 73.7 nm. The morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed the rhombohedral phase with R3c space group. The weak ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature was affirmed by the vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). According to the UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectrum (UV-DSR), the band gap energy of BFO NPs was determined to be 2.18 eV. The electrochemical activity was evaluated by BFO NPs-chitosan-glassy carbon electrode (BFO-CS-GCE) sensor for detection of p-nitrophenol contaminants. The material showed an efficient oxidation catalytic activity by degrading methylene blue (MB). It was found that the degradation efficiency of 10 mg L-1 MB at pH 6.0 was above 90.9% after ultrasound- and microwave-combined-assisted (US-MW) irradiation for 15 min with BFO NPs as catalyst and H202 as oxidant. A possible reaction mechanism of degradation of MB was also proposed.

  18. Program activities, DOE state and local assistance programs, 1980 report

    SciTech Connect

    Chiogioji, Melvin H.

    1981-01-01

    Progress achieved by DOE State and Local Assistance Programs during FY 1980 and since they were established is summarized. These programs enable improved energy efficiency of industry, transportation, commercial establishments, public buildings, and residences. Eight programs (State Energy Conservation, Energy Extension Service, Weatherization Assistance, Institutional Buildings Grants, Energy-Related Inventions, Appropriate Technology Small Grants, Emergency Energy Conservation, Emergency Building Temperature Restrictions) are described. They provide the impetus for thousands of individual and organizational actions that have significantly affected national energy use patterns. (MCW)

  19. ZnO-based hollow microspheres with mesoporous shells: Polyoxometalate-assisted fabrication, growth mechanism and photocatalytic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Li Qiuyu; Chen Weilin; Ju Mingliang; Liu Lin; Wang Enbo

    2011-06-15

    With the assistance of Keggin-type polyoxometalate, ZnO hollow microspheres with mesoporous shells were synthesized via a simple solvothermal approach without any templates and surfactants. The observations of morphology and structure performed by field emission scanning electronic microscopy and transmission electron microscopy indicated that the shells of the ZnO hollow spheres were built from nanosheets which were composed of nanoparticles. The transformation of structure and composition of samples were investigated by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectrometry and fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy. The formation mechanism of the hollow spheres is proposed based on time-dependent experimental results. The ZnO hollow microspheres exhibited a high photocatalytic activity for decolorization of Rhodamine B under ultraviolet irradiation. - Graphical Abstract: ZnO hollow spheres with mesporous shells were synthesized by an one-pot polyoxometalate-assisted solvothermal route. The ZnO hollow microspheres exhibited a high photocatalytic activity for decolorization of Rhodamine B (RhB) under UV irradiation. Highlights: > ZnO hollow microspheres were synthesized via a solvothermal route with polyoxometalate. > The polyoxometalate was vital for the formation of the hollow microspheres. > The ZnO hollow microspheres exhibited excellent photocatalytic activity of Rhodamine B.

  20. Mechanical characterization of active polymer gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, Steven P.; Ramesh, Kaliat T.; Douglas, Andrew S.

    2000-06-01

    Ionic polymer gels shrink and swell in response to certain environmental stimuli, such as the application of an electric field or a change in the pH level of the surroundings. This ability to achieve large, reversible deformations with no external mechanical loading has generated much interest in the use of these gels as actuators and artificial muscles. This work focuses on developing a means of characterizing the mechanical properties of such ionic gels and describing how these properties evolve as the gel actuates. A thermodynamically consistent finite elastic constitutive model of an active polymer gel is developed to describe this behavior. The mechanical properties of the gel are characterized by a strain-energy function and the model utilizes an evolving internal variable to describe the actuation state. Applications of the mode to poly(vinyl alcohol)-poly (acrylic acid) gels are presented.

  1. Topological mechanics: from metamaterials to active matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2015-03-01

    Mechanical metamaterials are artificial structures with unusual properties, such as negative Poisson ratio, bistability or tunable acoustic response, which originate in the geometry of their unit cell. At the heart of such unusual behavior is often a mechanism: a motion that does not significantly stretch or compress the links between constituent elements. When activated by motors or external fields, these soft motions become the building blocks of robots and smart materials. In this talk, we discuss topological mechanisms that possess two key properties: (i) their existence cannot be traced to a local imbalance between degrees of freedom and constraints (ii) they are robust against a wide range of structural deformations or changes in material parameters. The continuum elasticity of these mechanical structures is captured by non-linear field theories with a topological boundary term similar to topological insulators and quantum Hall systems. We present several applications of these concepts to the design and experimental realization of 2D and 3D topological structures based on linkages, origami, buckling meta-materials and lastly active media that break time-reversal symmetry.

  2. Mechanobiocatalysis: Modulating Enzymatic Activity with Mechanical Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-28

    displayed by enzymes and other materials. It was demonstrated that the application of forces to enzymes properly outfitted with polymers resulted in...distortions at the active sites of the corresponding enzymes. For example, polymer -protein composites were found to display photophysical properties that...were dependent on the applied force. Recent efforts have focused on new classes of polymeric materials that effectively resist mechanical degradation

  3. Mechanically activated artificial cell by using microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Kenneth K. Y.; Lee, Lap Man; Liu, Allen P.

    2016-09-01

    All living organisms sense mechanical forces. Engineering mechanosensitive artificial cell through bottom-up in vitro reconstitution offers a way to understand how mixtures of macromolecules assemble and organize into a complex system that responds to forces. We use stable double emulsion droplets (aqueous/oil/aqueous) to prototype mechanosensitive artificial cells. In order to demonstrate mechanosensation in artificial cells, we develop a novel microfluidic device that is capable of trapping double emulsions into designated chambers, followed by compression and aspiration in a parallel manner. The microfluidic device is fabricated using multilayer soft lithography technology, and consists of a control layer and a deformable flow channel. Deflections of the PDMS membrane above the main microfluidic flow channels and trapping chamber array are independently regulated pneumatically by two sets of integrated microfluidic valves. We successfully compress and aspirate the double emulsions, which result in transient increase and permanent decrease in oil thickness, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the influx of calcium ions as a response of our mechanically activated artificial cell through thinning of oil. The development of a microfluidic device to mechanically activate artificial cells creates new opportunities in force-activated synthetic biology.

  4. Mechanically activated artificial cell by using microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Kenneth K. Y.; Lee, Lap Man; Liu, Allen P.

    2016-01-01

    All living organisms sense mechanical forces. Engineering mechanosensitive artificial cell through bottom-up in vitro reconstitution offers a way to understand how mixtures of macromolecules assemble and organize into a complex system that responds to forces. We use stable double emulsion droplets (aqueous/oil/aqueous) to prototype mechanosensitive artificial cells. In order to demonstrate mechanosensation in artificial cells, we develop a novel microfluidic device that is capable of trapping double emulsions into designated chambers, followed by compression and aspiration in a parallel manner. The microfluidic device is fabricated using multilayer soft lithography technology, and consists of a control layer and a deformable flow channel. Deflections of the PDMS membrane above the main microfluidic flow channels and trapping chamber array are independently regulated pneumatically by two sets of integrated microfluidic valves. We successfully compress and aspirate the double emulsions, which result in transient increase and permanent decrease in oil thickness, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the influx of calcium ions as a response of our mechanically activated artificial cell through thinning of oil. The development of a microfluidic device to mechanically activate artificial cells creates new opportunities in force-activated synthetic biology. PMID:27610921

  5. Improvement of mechanical properties by additive assisted laser sintering of PEEK

    SciTech Connect

    Kroh, M. Bonten, C.; Eyerer, P.

    2014-05-15

    The additive assisted laser sintering was recently developed at IKT: A carbon black (CB) additive is used to adjust the polymer's laser absorption behavior with the aim to improve the interconnection of sintered powder layers. In this paper a parameter study, Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) samples were prepared with different contents of carbon black and were laser sintered with varying thermal treatment. The samples were mechanically tested and investigated by optical light and transmission electron microscopy. An influence on the morphology at the border areas of particles and intersections of laser sintered layers was found. Depending on the viscosity of the raw material and CB content, different shapes of lamellae were observed. These (trans-) crystalline or polymorph structures, respectively, influence the thermal and mechanical behavior of the virgin PEEK. Moreover, the thermal treatment during the sintering process caused an improvement of mechanical properties like tensile strength and elongation at break.

  6. Curriculum Development of Learning Activity Packets, Dental Assisting Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hempler, Nancy A.

    A dental assisting instructor was provided with 250 hours of released time to develop standardized Learning Activity Packets (LAPs) for the Dental Assisting program at the Bellingham (Washington) Vocational Technical Institute. The instructor reviewed unit objectives, gathered input from local dental professionals, reviewed reference materials,…

  7. Curriculum Development of Learning Activity Packets, Dental Assisting Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hempler, Nancy A.

    A dental assisting instructor was provided with 250 hours of released time to develop standardized Learning Activity Packets (LAPs) for the Dental Assisting program at the Bellingham (Washington) Vocational Technical Institute. The instructor reviewed unit objectives, gathered input from local dental professionals, reviewed reference materials,…

  8. 78 FR 52519 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Student Assistance General Provisions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-23

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Student Assistance General Provisions--Subpart K--Cash Management AGENCY: Federal Student Aid (FSA), Department of Education (ED). ACTION: Notice...: Student Assistance General Provisions--Subpart K--Cash Management. OMB Control Number: 1845-0049. Type...

  9. [Pressure support ventilation and proportional assist ventilation during weaning from mechanical ventilation].

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Bermeo, H; Bottiroli, M; Italiano, S; Roche-Campo, F; Santos, J A; Alonso, M; Mancebo, J

    2014-01-01

    To compare tolerance, duration of mechanical ventilation (MV) and clinical outcomes during weaning from MV in patients subjected to either pressure support ventilation (PSV) or proportional assist ventilation (PAV). A prospective, observational study was carried out. Intensive Care Unit. A total of 40 consecutive subjects were allocated to either the PSV or the PAV group until each group contained 20 patients. Patients were included in the study when they met the criteria to begin weaning and the attending physician decided to initiate the weaning process. The physician selected the modality and set the ventilatory parameters. None. Demographic data, respiratory mechanics, ventilatory parameters, duration of MV, and clinical outcomes (reintubation, tracheostomy, mortality). Baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. No significant differences were observed between the PSV and PAV groups in terms of the total duration of MV (10 [5-18] vs. 9 [7-19] days; P=.85), reintubation (5 [31%] vs. 3 [19%]; P=.69), or mortality (4 [20%] vs. 5 [25%] deaths; P=1). Eight patients (40%) in the PSV group and 6 patients (30%) in the PAV group (P=.74) required a return to volume assist-control ventilation due to clinical deterioration. Tolerance, duration of MV and clinical outcomes during weaning from mechanical ventilation were similar in PSV and PAV. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  10. Mechanism of FGF receptor dimerization and activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (fgfs) are widely believed to activate their receptors by mediating receptor dimerization. Here we show, however, that the FGF receptors form dimers in the absence of ligand, and that these unliganded dimers are phosphorylated. We further show that ligand binding triggers structural changes in the FGFR dimers, which increase FGFR phosphorylation. The observed effects due to the ligands fgf1 and fgf2 are very different. The fgf2-bound dimer structure ensures the smallest separation between the transmembrane (TM) domains and the highest possible phosphorylation, a conclusion that is supported by a strong correlation between TM helix separation in the dimer and kinase phosphorylation. The pathogenic A391E mutation in FGFR3 TM domain emulates the action of fgf2, trapping the FGFR3 dimer in its most active state. This study establishes the existence of multiple active ligand-bound states, and uncovers a novel molecular mechanism through which FGFR-linked pathologies can arise.

  11. Dynamic fascial release and the role of mechanical/vibrational assist devices in manual therapies.

    PubMed

    Comeaux, Zachary

    2011-01-01

    Machine-assisted vibrational devices have a following in current and historical approaches to bodywork. This article reviews several such devices, including the percussion vibrator, vibrational platforms, and deep tissue oscillation. The percussion vibrator, reintroduced by Robert Fulford, reflecting the author's practice style and is addressed in more detail. Usage, conceptualization of goals as well as possible mechanisms of effect on the fascial and neuromuscular system are discussed. Special attention is given to the physiologic phenomenon of tonic vibratory reflex. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The combined influence of chemical, metallurgical and mechanical factors on environment assisted cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. P., III; Pao, P. S.; Wei, R. P.

    1979-01-01

    The principal aim of the paper is to re-emphasize and focus on both the multidisciplinary nature of the environment assisted cracking or embrittlement phenomenon. The multiplicity of factors involved in the embrittlement process is indicated, the mutual dependence of these factors and the influences of mechanical and environmental conditions are considered, and the interactions of various factors in determining the overall embrittlement response are discussed. The need for an interdisciplinary approach for resolving the major differences and for understanding embrittlement is outlined.

  13. Growth mechanism of carbon nanotubes grown by microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muneyoshi, T.; Okai, M.; Yaguchi, T.; Sasaki, S.

    2001-10-01

    To investigate the most suitable deposition conditions and growth mechanism, we grew carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition under various conditions. The experimental parameters we varied were (a) the mixture ratio of methane in hydrogen, (b) the total gas pressure, and (c) the bias electric current. We found that the bias electric current was the most influential parameter in determining the shape of CNTs. We believe that the growth process of CNTs can be explained by using the solid solubility curves of metal-carbon phase diagrams. Selective growth and low-temperature growth of CNTs can also be understood from these phase diagrams.

  14. Robot-assisted total knee arthroplasty accurately restores the joint line and mechanical axis. A prospective randomised study.

    PubMed

    Liow, Ming Han Lincoln; Xia, Zhan; Wong, Merng Koon; Tay, Keng Jin; Yeo, Seng Jin; Chin, Pak Lin

    2014-12-01

    Robot-assisted Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) improves the accuracy and precision of component implantation and mechanical axis (MA) alignment. Joint-line restoration in robot-assisted TKA is not widely described and joint-line deviation of>5mm results in mid-flexion instability and poor outcomes. We prospectively randomised 60 patients into two groups: 31 patients (robot-assisted), 29 patients (conventional). No MA outliers (>±3° from neutral) or notching was noted in the robot-assisted group as compared with 19.4% (P=0.049) and 10.3% (P=0.238) respectively in the conventional group. The robot-assisted group had 3.23% joint-line outliers (>5mm) as compared to 20.6% in the conventional group (P=0.049). Robot-assisted TKA produces similar short-term clinical outcomes when compared to conventional methods with reduction of MA alignment and joint-line deviation outliers.

  15. Mechanical Modulation of Phonon-Assisted Field Emission in a Silicon Nanomembrane Detector for Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jonghoo; Blick, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate mechanical modulation of phonon-assisted field emission in a free-standing silicon nanomembrane detector for time-of-flight mass spectrometry of proteins. The impacts of ion bombardment on the silicon nanomembrane have been explored in both mechanical and electrical points of view. Locally elevated lattice temperature in the silicon nanomembrane, resulting from the transduction of ion kinetic energy into thermal energy through the ion bombardment, induces not only phonon-assisted field emission but also a mechanical vibration in the silicon nanomembrane. The coupling of these mechanical and electrical phenomenon leads to mechanical modulation of phonon-assisted field emission. The thermal energy relaxation through mechanical vibration in addition to the lateral heat conduction and field emission in the silicon nanomembrane offers effective cooling of the nanomembrane, thereby allowing high resolution mass analysis. PMID:26861329

  16. Mechanism on microwave-assisted acidic solvolysis of black-liquor lignin.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chengjian; Feng, Chunguang; Liu, Qian; Shen, Dekui; Xiao, Rui

    2014-06-01

    Microwave-assisted degradation of black-liquor lignin with formic acid was studied, concerning the product yield and distribution of phenolic compounds against reaction temperature (110-180°C) and reaction time (5-90 min). The liquid product consisting of bio-oil 1 and bio-oil 2, achieved the maxima yield of 64.08% at 160°C and 30 min (bio-oil 1: 9.69% and bio-oil 2: 54.39%). The chemical information of bio-oil 1 and bio-oil 2 were respectively identified by means of Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometer (GC-MS) and Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), while the solid residue was analyzed by Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). A possible mechanism was proposed for the microwave-assisted acidic solvolysis of lignin, specifying the kinetic relationship among the primary cracking of lignin, repolymerization of the oligomers and formation of solid residue.

  17. Micro-emulsion-assisted synthesis of ZnS nanospheres and their photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yao; He Xiaoyan; Cao Minhua

    2008-11-03

    ZnS nanospheres with rough surface were synthesized by using a micro-emulsion-assisted solvothemal process. The molar ratio of [water]/[surfactant] played an important role in controlling the size of the ZnS nanospheres. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission-scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) were used for the characterization of the resulting ZnS nanospheres. A possible formation mechanism was proposed. These ZnS nanospheres exhibited a good photocatalytic activity for degradation of an aqueous p-nitrophenol solution and the total organic carbon (TOC) of the degradation product has also been investigated.

  18. Amino acids assisted hydrothermal synthesis of hierarchically structured ZnO with enhanced photocatalytic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yanxia; Lin, Siwen; Li, Xuan; Liu, Yuping

    2016-10-01

    Novel hierarchically structured ZnO, including rose-like, dandelion-like and flower-like, have been synthesized through a simple hydrothermal process using different amino acids (glutamine, histidine and glycine) as structure-directing agents and urea as deposition agent, followed by subsequent calcination. Amino acids played a crucial role in the formation of hierarchically structured ZnO, and different amino acids could induce different exquisite shapes and assembly ways, as well as more oxygen defects. The prepared hierarchically structured ZnO exhibited excellent photocatalytic activities for the photodegradation of Rhodamine B, which was associated with their special hierarchical structures, large BET surface area and the existence of more oxygen defects. Amino acid-assisted growth mechanism of hierarchically structured ZnO was also discussed.

  19. Vessel wall perforation mechanism of the excimer laser-assisted non-occlusive anastomosis technique.

    PubMed

    Bremmer, Jochem; van Doormaal, Tristan P C; Verweij, Bon H; van der Zwan, Albert; Tulleken, Cornelius A F; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf

    2016-08-01

    The excimer laser assisted non-occlusive anastomosis (ELANA) technique is used to make anastomoses on intracerebral arteries. This end-to-side anastomosis is created without temporary occlusion of the recipient artery using a 308-nm excimer laser with a ring-shaped multi-fiber catheter to punch an opening in the arterial wall. Over 500 patients have received an ELANA bypass. However, the vessel wall perforation mechanism of the laser catheter is not known exactly and not 100 % successful. In this study, we aimed to understand the mechanism of ELANA vessel perforation using specialized imaging techniques to ultimately improve its effectiveness. High-speed imaging, high-contrast imaging, and high-sensitivity thermal imaging were used to study the laser wall perforation mechanism and reveal the mechanical and thermal effects involved. In vitro, rabbit arteries were exposed with the special designed laser catheter in a setup representative for the clinical setting, in which blood was replaced with a transparent UV absorbing liquid for visualization. We observed that laser vessel wall perforation was caused by explosive vapor bubbles tearing through the vessel wall, mostly within the first 20 of the total 200 pulses. Thermal effects were minimal. Unsymmetrical tension in the vessel wall inducing migration of the flap during laser exposure was observed in case of unsuccessful wall perforations. The laser wall perforation mechanism in the ELANA technique is primarily mechanical. Symmetric tension in the recipient vessel wall is essential and should be trained by neurosurgeons.

  20. Application of the Human Activity Assistive Technology model for occupational therapy research.

    PubMed

    Giesbrecht, Ed

    2013-08-01

    Theoretical models provide a framework for describing practice and integrating evidence into systematic research. There are few models that relate specifically to the provision of assistive technology in occupational therapy practice. The Human Activity Assistive Technology model is an enduring example that has continued to develop by integrating a social model of disability, concepts from occupational therapy theory and principles of assistive technology adoption and abandonment. This study first describes the core concepts of the Human Activity Assistive Technology model and reviews its development over three successive published versions. A review of the research literature reflects application of the model to clinical practice, study design, outcome measure selection and interpretation of results, particularly among occupational therapists. An evaluative framework is used to critique the adequacy of the Human Activity Assistive Technology model for practice and research, exploring attributes of clarity, simplicity, generality, accessibility and importance. Finally, recommendations are proposed for continued development of the model and research applications. Most of the existing research literature employs the Human Activity Assistive Technology model for background and study design; there is emerging evidence to support the core concepts as predictive factors. Although the concepts are generally simple, clear and applicable to occupational therapy practice and research, evolving terminology and outcomes become more complex with the conflation of integrated theories. The development of the Human Activity Assistive Technology model offers enhanced access and application for occupational therapists, but poses challenges to clarity among concepts. Suggestions are made for further development and applications of the model. © 2013 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  1. Disulfiram's Anticancer Activity: Evidence and Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yang; Hannafon, Bethany N; Ding, Wei-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Disulfiram (DSF), a derivative of thiuram, has been used in humans to treat alcoholism for more than 60 years. Over the past decade, however, increasing evidence indicates that DSF possesses a great potential for the treatment of human cancers. DSF's anticancer activity has been demonstrated in both in vitro and in vivo model systems, and has been tested in human clinical trials for various cancer types. It is also evident that DSF can sensitize tumor cells to radiotherapy and enhance the cytotoxicity of anticancer drugs, thus DSF may serve as an adjuvant therapy. The key to DSF's anticancer action relates to its ability to suppress cancer stem cells by targeting aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), a marker of cancer stem cells, and inhibit proteasome activity in cancer cells by forming complexes with metal ions. In addition, DSF targets epigenetic mechanisms and modulates cellular signaling pathways to slow down tumor progression. DSF also induces apoptosis, inhibits cancer cell proliferation, and suppresses cancer cell metastasis. Considering that the pharmacokinetics of DSF are well-established and a safety profile has been recorded, this compound is an attractive "old" drug that has great potential for rapid development into a new cancer therapeutic. This article provides a brief review of the history of DSF use in humans, evidence for its anticancer activities, the molecular mechanisms of DSF action that have been illustrated by recent studies, and the potential for repurposing DSF as a new chemotherapeutic drug in the near future.

  2. Activities of the Institute for Mechanical Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Institute of Mechanical Engineering (IME) is part of Canada's National Research Council. Its mission is to undertake, support, promote, and disseminate research and development in the mechanical engineering aspects of three vital sectors of the Canadian economy: transportation, resource industries, and manufacturing. The IME achieves its mission by performing research and development in its own facilities; by developing, providing, and transferring expertise and knowledge; by making its research facilities available to collaborators and clients; and by participating in international liaison and collaborative research activities. Six research programs are conducted in the IME: Advanced Manufacturing Technology; Coastal Zone Engineering; Cold Regions Engineering; Combustion and Fluids Engineering; Ground Transportation Technology; and Machinery and Engine Technology. The rationale and major research thrusts of each program are described, and specific achievements in 1991-92 are reviewed. Lists of technical reports and papers presented by IME personnel are also included.

  3. 76 FR 7870 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Cybersecurity and Communications Technical Assistance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Agency Information Collection Activities: Cybersecurity and Communications Technical Assistance... Homeland Security (DHS), National Protection and Programs Directorate (NPPD), Office of Cybersecurity and...

  4. 78 FR 54459 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Student Assistance General Provisions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-04

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Student Assistance General Provisions--Subpart E--Verification Student Aid Application Information AGENCY: Federal Student Aid (FSA), Department of... in ] response to this notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection:...

  5. Modelling of powder consolidation using electro heating assisted by mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knyazeva, A.; Sorokova, S.

    2017-01-01

    The model of the process of reactive sintering assisted by mechanical loading is suggested. The conjugate heat exchange of powder mixture is taken into account. The powder mixture motion is described as viscous liquid with effective viscosity. Mechanical sub problem is one dimensional because friction near the wall is assumed negligible small. Conjugate thermal conductivity problem includes thermal conduction equations for various materials (reactive mixture and walls of the camber. Heat release is possible due to external electrical heating, viscous dissipation and chemical reactions. Kinetical equations correspond to detailed reaction scheme. The problem is solved numerically with special algorithm. As a result the composition of the mixture is obtained for different time moments. The final composition is not uniform.

  6. Mechanism for accurate, protein-assisted DNA annealing by Deinococcus radiodurans DdrB

    PubMed Central

    Sugiman-Marangos, Seiji N.; Weiss, Yoni M.; Junop, Murray S.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate pairing of DNA strands is essential for repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). How cells achieve accurate annealing when large regions of single-strand DNA are unpaired has remained unclear despite many efforts focused on understanding proteins, which mediate this process. Here we report the crystal structure of a single-strand annealing protein [DdrB (DNA damage response B)] in complex with a partially annealed DNA intermediate to 2.2 Å. This structure and supporting biochemical data reveal a mechanism for accurate annealing involving DdrB-mediated proofreading of strand complementarity. DdrB promotes high-fidelity annealing by constraining specific bases from unauthorized association and only releases annealed duplex when bound strands are fully complementary. To our knowledge, this mechanism provides the first understanding for how cells achieve accurate, protein-assisted strand annealing under biological conditions that would otherwise favor misannealing. PMID:27044084

  7. Methods and mechanisms for contact feedback in a robot-assisted minimally invasive environment.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, M; Aziminejad, A; Patel, R V; Moallem, M

    2006-10-01

    Providing a surgeon with information regarding contacts made between instruments and tissue during robot-assisted interventions can improve task efficiency and reliability. In this report, different methods for feedback of such information to the surgeon are discussed. It is hypothesized that various methods of contact feedback have the potential to enhance performance in a robot-assisted minimally invasive environment. To verify the hypothesis, novel mechanisms needed for incorporating contact feedback were designed, including a surgeon-robot interface with full force feedback capabilities and a surgical end-effector with full force sensing capabilities, that are suitable for minimally invasive applications. These two mechanisms were used to form a robotic "master-slave" test bed for studying the effect of contact feedback on the system and user performance. Using the master-slave system, experiments for surgical tasks involving soft tissue palpation were conducted. The performance of the master-slave system was validated in terms of criteria that assess the accurate transmission of task-related information to the surgeon, which is critical in the context of soft tissue surgical applications. Moreover, using a set of experiments involving human subjects, the performance of several users in carrying out the task was compared among different methods of contact feedback.

  8. Prototype of a mechanical assistance device for the wrists' flexion-extension movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Politti, Julio C.; Puglisi, Lisandro J.; Farfán, Fernando D.

    2007-11-01

    Using CMU actuators, a Prototype of Mechanical Assistance Device for the Wrist's Flexion Movement (PMA) was developed and probed in a mechanical model, in order to be implemented in a future as a dynamic powered orthosis or as a rehabilitation assistant instrument. Two Mayor Actuators conformed by three CMU actuators arranged in a series configuration, allows to an artificial hand to be placed in four predefined positions: 0°, 20°, 40° and 60°. The synchronism and control of the actuators is achieved with the Programmable Control Module (PCM). It is capable to drive up to six CMU actuators, and possess two different modes of execution: a Manual mode and an Exercise mode. In the Manual Mode, the position of the hand responds directly to the commands of the keyboard of the front panel, and in the Exercise mode, the hand realizes a repetitive and programmed movement. The prototype was tested in 100 positions in the Manual Mode and for 225 works cycles in the Exercise Mode. The relative repetition error was less than 5% for both test. This prototype only consumes 4,15W, which makes it possible to be powered by small rechargeable batteries, allowing its use as a portable device.

  9. [Mechanical cardiac-assist devices in ST segment elevation myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Spaulding, C

    2015-12-01

    A 49-year-old woman was admitted for an anterior ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). At hospital arrival, she presented with cardiogenic shock. An immediate coronary angiogram showed an occluded ostial left anterior descending artery. During percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), ventricular fibrillation occurred requiring multiple electrical counter-shocks. The coronary artery was opened during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and two drug-eluting stents were implanted. At the end of the procedure, an Impella CP® mechanical cardiac-assist device was inserted. Rapid and marked improvement in the hemodynamic status was noted in the following days. The Impella CP® was withdrawn after five days and the patient was discharged two weeks later. Despite limited data, mechanical cardiac assistance is recommended in cardiogenic shock. Several devices are currently available; the choice of the system is based on the clinical presentation and the experience of each center. The Impella CP® is a microaxial pump which is inserted percutaneously and delivers up to 3.5L/min of continuous flow. In cardiogenic shock due to STEMI, this device allows temporary support while awaiting left ventricular recovery after primary PCI. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  10. NFC based provisioning of instructional videos to assist with instrumental activities of daily living.

    PubMed

    Rafferty, Joseph; Nugent, Chris; Liming Chen; Jun Qi; Dutton, Rachael; Zirk, Anna; Boye, Lars Thomas; Kohn, Michael; Hellman, Riitta

    2014-01-01

    Existing assistive living and prompting based solutions have adopted a relatively complex approach to supporting individuals. These solutions have involved sensor based monitoring, activity recognition and assistance provisioning. Traditionally they have suffered from a number of issues rooted in scalability and performance levels associated with the activity recognition process. This paper introduces a simplistic approach to assistive living within a user's residence through the use of NFC tags and smart devices. The core concept of this approach is presented and is subsequently placed within the context of related work. A description of the architecture is provided and results following technical evaluation of the first system prototype are discussed.

  11. Robot-assisted mechanical therapy attenuates stroke-induced limb skeletal muscle injury.

    PubMed

    Sen, Chandan K; Khanna, Savita; Harris, Hallie; Stewart, Richard; Balch, Maria; Heigel, Mallory; Teplitsky, Seth; Gnyawali, Surya; Rink, Cameron

    2017-03-01

    The efficacy and optimization of poststroke physical therapy paradigms is challenged in part by a lack of objective tools available to researchers for systematic preclinical testing. This work represents a maiden effort to develop a robot-assisted mechanical therapy (RAMT) device to objectively address the significance of mechanical physiotherapy on poststroke outcomes. Wistar rats were subjected to right hemisphere middle-cerebral artery occlusion and reperfusion. After 24 h, rats were split into control (RAMT(-)) or RAMT(+) groups (30 min daily RAMT over the stroke-affected gastrocnemius) and were followed up to poststroke d 14. RAMT(+) increased perfusion 1.5-fold in stroke-affected gastrocnemius as compared to RAMT(-) controls. Furthermore, RAMT(+) rats demonstrated improved poststroke track width (11% wider), stride length (21% longer), and travel distance (61% greater), as objectively measured using software-automated testing platforms. Stroke injury acutely increased myostatin (3-fold) and lowered brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression (0.6-fold) in the stroke-affected gastrocnemius, as compared to the contralateral one. RAMT attenuated the stroke-induced increase in myostatin and increased BDNF expression in skeletal muscle. Additional RAMT-sensitive myokine targets in skeletal muscle (IL-1ra and IP-10/CXCL10) were identified from a cytokine array. Taken together, outcomes suggest stroke acutely influences signal transduction in hindlimb skeletal muscle. Regimens based on mechanical therapy have the clear potential to protect hindlimb function from such adverse influence.-Sen, C. K., Khanna, S., Harris, H., Stewart, R., Balch, M., Heigel, M., Teplitsky, S., Gnyawali, S., Rink, C. Robot-assisted mechanical therapy attenuates stroke-induced limb skeletal muscle injury. © FASEB.

  12. Molecular Mechanisms of DNA Replication Checkpoint Activation

    PubMed Central

    Recolin, Bénédicte; van der Laan, Siem; Tsanov, Nikolay; Maiorano, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    The major challenge of the cell cycle is to deliver an intact, and fully duplicated, genetic material to the daughter cells. To this end, progression of DNA synthesis is monitored by a feedback mechanism known as replication checkpoint that is untimely linked to DNA replication. This signaling pathway ensures coordination of DNA synthesis with cell cycle progression. Failure to activate this checkpoint in response to perturbation of DNA synthesis (replication stress) results in forced cell division leading to chromosome fragmentation, aneuploidy, and genomic instability. In this review, we will describe current knowledge of the molecular determinants of the DNA replication checkpoint in eukaryotic cells and discuss a model of activation of this signaling pathway crucial for maintenance of genomic stability. PMID:24705291

  13. Mechanism and active variety of allelochemicals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peng, S.-L.; Wen, J.; Guo, Q.-F.

    2004-01-01

    This article summarizes allelochemicals' active variety, its potential causes and function mechanisms. Allelochemicals' activity varies with temperature, photoperiod, water and soils during natural processes, with its initial concentration, compound structure and mixed degree during functional processes, with plant accessions, tissues and maturity within-species, and with research techniques and operation processes. The prospective developmental aspects of allelopathy studies in the future are discussed. Future research should focus on: (1) to identify and purify allelochemicals more effectively, especially for agriculture, (2) the functions of allelopathy at the molecular structure level, (3) using allelopathy to explain plant species interactions, (4) allelopathy as a driving force of succession, and (5) the significance of allelopathy in the evolutionary processes.

  14. EEG Analysis During Active and Assisted Repetitive Movements: Evidence for Differences in Neural Engagement.

    PubMed

    Tacchino, Giulia; Gandolla, Marta; Coelli, Stefania; Barbieri, Riccardo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Bianchi, Anna Maria

    2016-08-02

    Two key ingredients of a successful neuro-rehabilitative intervention have been identified as intensive and repetitive training and subject's active participation, which can be coupled in an active robot-assisted training. To exploit these two elements, we recorded electroencephalography, electromyography and kinematics signals from 9 healthy subjects performing a 2×2 factorial design protocol, with subject's volitional intention and robotic glove assistance as factors. We quantitatively evaluated primary sensorimotor, premotor and supplementary motor areas activation during movement execution by computing Event-Related Desynchronization (ERD) patterns associated to mu and beta rhythms. ERD patterns showed a similar behavior for all investigated regions: statistically significant ERDs began earlier in conditions requiring subject's volitional contribution; ERDs were prolonged towards the end of movement in conditions in which the robotic assistance was present. Our study suggests that the combination between subject volitional contribution and movement assistance provided by the robotic device (i.e., active robot-assisted modality) is able to provide early brain activation (i.e., earlier ERD) associated with stronger proprioceptive feedback (i.e., longer ERD). This finding might be particularly important for neurological patients, where movement cannot be completed autonomously and passive/active robot-assisted modalities are the only possibilities of execution.

  15. Mechanisms of catalase activity of heme peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Vlasits, Jutta; Jakopitsch, Christa; Bernroitner, Margit; Zamocky, Marcel; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2010-08-01

    In the absence of exogenous electron donors monofunctional heme peroxidases can slowly degrade hydrogen peroxide following a mechanism different from monofunctional catalases. This pseudo-catalase cycle involves several redox intermediates including Compounds I, II and III, hydrogen peroxide reduction and oxidation reactions as well as release of both dioxygen and superoxide. The rate of decay of oxyferrous complex determines the rate-limiting step and the enzymes' resistance to inactivation. Homologous bifunctional catalase-peroxidases (KatGs) are unique in having both a peroxidase and high hydrogen dismutation activity without inhibition reactions. It is demonstrated that KatGs follow a similar reaction pathway as monofunctional peroxidases, but use a unique post-translational distal modification (Met+-Tyr-Trp adduct) in close vicinity to the heme as radical site that enhances turnover of oxyferrous heme and avoids release of superoxide. Similarities and differences between monofunctional peroxidases and bifunctional KatGs are discussed and mechanisms of pseudo-catalase activity are proposed. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Exoskeleton control for lower-extremity assistance based on adaptive frequency oscillators: adaptation of muscle activation and movement frequency.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Ollinger, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we analyze a novel strategy for assisting the lower extremities based on adaptive frequency oscillators. Our aim is to use the control algorithm presented here as a building block for the control of powered lower-limb exoskeletons. The algorithm assists cyclic movements of the human extremities by synchronizing actuator torques with the estimated net torque exerted by the muscles. Synchronization is produced by a nonlinear dynamical system combining an adaptive frequency oscillator with a form of adaptive Fourier analysis. The system extracts, in real time, the fundamental frequency component of the net muscle torque acting on a specific joint. Said component, nearly sinusoidal in shape, is the basis for the assistive torque waveform delivered by the exoskeleton. The action of the exoskeleton can be interpreted as a virtual reduction in the mechanical impedance of the leg. We studied the ability of human subjects to adapt their muscle activation to the assistive torque. Ten subjects swung their extended leg while coupled to a stationary hip joint exoskeleton. The experiment yielded a significant decrease, with respect to unassisted movement, of the activation levels of an agonist/antagonist pair of muscles controlling the hip joint's motion, which suggests the exoskeleton control has potential for assisting human gait. A moderate increase in swing frequency was observed as well. We theorize that the increase in frequency can be explained by the impedance model of the assisted leg. Per this model, subjects adjust their swing frequency in order to control the amount of reduction in net muscle torque. © IMechE 2015.

  17. Effect of drive mode of left ventricular assist device on the left ventricular mechanics.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, T; Hayashi, K; Seki, J; Nakatani, T; Noda, H; Takano, H; Akutsu, T

    1988-02-01

    Pneumatically driven left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) were acutely implanted between the left atria and the descending aortas of dogs, and were driven in five pumping modes: electrocardiogram synchronous modes with the duty factors of 1:1, 2:1, and 4:1, and asynchronous modes with the pulse rates of 60 and 80 beats/min (bpm). The ventricular diameter and myocardial segment length were measured by an ultrasonic displacement meter and implantable miniature sensors. Bulk mechanical work of the left ventricle and regional mechanical work of the myocardium were calculated from these dimensions and the left ventricular pressure. LVAD reduced the bulk mechanical work of the left ventricle by 30-50% and the regional work by 30-60%. The mean aortic pressure and the total flow (= aortic flow + pump bypass flow) were highest in the 1:1 synchronous pumping mode, which indicates that this mode is most effective to maintain the systemic circulation and coronary blood flow. Asynchronous pumping and synchronous pumping with 2:1 duty factor were most useful to reduce the mechanical work of the left ventricle.

  18. Direct droplet production from a liquid film: a new gas-assisted atomization mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Herman E.; Reitz, Rolf D.

    1998-11-01

    X-ray lithography and micro-machining have been used to study gas-assisted liquid atomization in which a liquid film was impinged by a large number of sonic micro-gas jets. Three distinct breakup regimes were demonstrated. Two of these regimes share characteristics with previously observed atomization processes: a bubble bursting at a free surface (Newitt et al. 1954; Boulton-Stone & Blake 1993) and liquid sheet disintegration in a high gas/liquid relative velocity environment (Dombrowski & Johns 1963). The present work shows that suitable control of the gas/liquid interface creates a third regime, a new primary atomization mechanism, in which single liquid droplets are ejected directly from the liquid film without experiencing an intermediate ligament formation stage. The interaction produces a stretched liquid sheet directly above each gas orifice. This effectively pre-films the liquid prior to its breakup. Following this, surface tension contracts the stretched film of liquid into a sphere which subsequently detaches from the liquid sheet and is entrained by the gas jet that momentarily pierces the film. After droplet ejection, the stretched liquid film collapses, covering the gas orifice, and the process repeats. This new mechanism is capable of the efficient creation of finely atomized sprays at low droplet ejection velocities (e.g. 20 [mu]m Sauter mean diameter methanol sprays using air at 239 kPa, with air-to-liquid mass ratios below 1.0, and droplet velocities lower than 2.0 m s[minus sign]1). Independent control of the gas and the liquid flows allows the droplet creation process to be effectively de-coupled from the initial droplet momentum, a characteristic not observed with standard gas-assisted atomization mechanisms.

  19. Mechanism of Highly Synchronized Bilateral Hippocampal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y.; Toprani, S.; Tang, Y.; Vrabec, T.; Durand, D.M.

    2014-01-01

    In vivo studies of epileptiform discharges in the hippocampi of rodents have shown that bilateral seizure activity can sometimes be synchronized with very small delays (< 2 ms). This observed small time delay of epileptiform activity between the left and right CA3 regions is unexpected given the physiological propagation time across the hemispheres (> 6 ms). The goal of this study is to determine the mechanisms of this tight synchronization with in-vitro electrophysiology techniques and computer simulations. The hypothesis of a common source was first eliminated by using an in-vitro preparation containing both hippocampi with a functional ventral hippocampal commissure (VHC) and no other tissue. Next, the hypothesis that a noisy baseline could mask the underlying synchronous activity between the two hemispheres was ruled out by low noise in-vivo recordings and computer simulation of the noisy environment. Then we built a novel bilateral CA3 model to test the hypothesis that the phenomenon of very small left-to-right propagation delay of seizure activity is a product of epileptic cell network dynamics. We found that the commissural tract connectivity could decrease the delay between seizure events recorded from two sides while the activity propagated longitudinally along the CA3 layer thereby yielding delays much smaller than the propagation time between the two sides. The modeling results indicate that both recurrent and feedforward inhibition were required for shortening the bilateral propagation delay and depended critically on the length of the commissural fiber tract as well as the number of cells involved in seizure generation. These combined modeling/experimental studies indicate that it is possible to explain near perfect synchronization between the two hemispheres by taking into account the structure of the hippocampal network. PMID:24262205

  20. Mechanism of base activation of persulfate.

    PubMed

    Furman, Olha S; Teel, Amy L; Watts, Richard J

    2010-08-15

    Base is the most commonly used activator of persulfate for the treatment of contaminated groundwater by in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO). A mechanism for the base activation of persulfate is proposed involving the base-catalyzed hydrolysis of persulfate to hydroperoxide anion and sulfate followed by the reduction of another persulfate molecule by hydroperoxide. Reduction by hydroperoxide decomposes persulfate into sulfate radical and sulfate anion, and hydroperoxide is oxidized to superoxide. The base-catalyzed hydrolysis of persulfate was supported by kinetic analyses of persulfate decomposition at various base:persulfate molar ratios and an increased rate of persulfate decomposition in D(2)O vs H(2)O. Stoichiometric analyses confirmed that hydroperoxide reacts with persulfate in a 1:1 molar ratio. Addition of hydroperoxide to basic persulfate systems resulted in rapid decomposition of the hydroperoxide and persulfate and decomposition of the superoxide probe hexachloroethane. The presence of superoxide was confirmed with scavenging by Cu(II). Electron spin resonance spectroscopy confirmed the generation of sulfate radical, hydroxyl radical, and superoxide. The results of this research are consistent with the widespread reactivity reported for base-activated persulfate when it is used for ISCO.

  1. Temporal and spatial patterns of cortical activation during assisted lower limb movement.

    PubMed

    Wieser, M; Haefeli, J; Bütler, L; Jäncke, L; Riener, R; Koeneke, S

    2010-05-01

    Human gait is a complex process in the central nervous system that results from the integrity of various mechanisms, including different cortical and subcortical structures. In the present study, we investigated cortical activity during lower limb movement using EEG. Assisted by a dynamic tilt table, all subjects performed standardized stepping movements in an upright position. Source localization of the movement-related potential in relation to spontaneous EEG showed activity in brain regions classically associated with human gait such as the primary motor cortex, the premotor cortex, the supplementary motor cortex, the cingulate cortex, the primary somatosensory cortex and the somatosensory association cortex. Further, we observed a task-related power decrease in the alpha and beta frequency band at electrodes overlying the leg motor area. A temporal activation and deactivation of the involved brain regions as well as the chronological sequence of the movement-related potential could be mapped to specific phases of the gait-like leg movement. We showed that most cortical capacity is needed for changing the direction between the flexion and extension phase. An enhanced understanding of the human gait will provide a basis to improve applications in the field of neurorehabilitation and brain-computer interfaces.

  2. Surface reaction mechanisms during ozone and oxygen plasma assisted atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide.

    PubMed

    Rai, Vikrant R; Vandalon, Vincent; Agarwal, Sumit

    2010-09-07

    We have elucidated the reaction mechanism and the role of the reactive intermediates in the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of aluminum oxide from trimethyl aluminum in conjunction with O(3) and an O(2) plasma. In situ attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy data show that both -OH groups and carbonates are formed on the surface during the oxidation cycle. These carbonates, once formed on the surface, are stable to prolonged O(3) exposure in the same cycle. However, in the case of plasma-assisted ALD, the carbonates decompose upon prolonged O(2) plasma exposure via a series reaction kinetics of the type, A (CH(3)) --> B (carbonates) --> C (Al(2)O(3)). The ratio of -OH groups to carbonates on the surface strongly depends on the oxidizing agent, and also the duration of the oxidation cycle in plasma-assisted ALD. However, in both O(3) and O(2) plasma cycles, carbonates are a small fraction of the total number of reactive sites compared to the hydroxyl groups.

  3. Analysis of plasma characteristics and conductive mechanism of laser assisted pulsed arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuangyu; Chen, Shixian; Wang, Qinghua; Li, Yanqing; Zhang, Hong; Ding, Hongtao

    2017-05-01

    This study aims to investigate the arc plasma shape and the spectral characteristics during the laser assisted pulsed arc welding process. The arc plasma shape was synchronously observed using a high speed camera, and the emission spectrum of plasma was obtained by spectrometer. The well-known Boltzmann plot method and Stark broadening were used to calculate the electron temperature and density respectively. The conductive mechanism of arc ignition in laser assisted arc hybrid welding was investigated, and it was found that the plasma current moved to the arc anode under the action of electric field. Thus, a significant parabolic channel was formed between the keyhole and the wire tip. This channel became the main method of energy transformation between the arc and the molten pool. The calculation results of plasma resistivity show that the laser plasma has low resistivity as the starting point of conductive channel formation. When the laser pulse duration increases, the intensity of the plasma radiation spectrum and the plasma electron density will increase, and the electron temperature will decrease.

  4. Mechanism of activation of elongation factor Tu by ribosome: catalytic histidine activates GTP by protonation.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, Alexey; Field, Martin

    2013-09-01

    Elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) is central to prokaryotic protein synthesis as it has the role of delivering amino-acylated tRNAs to the ribosome. Release of EF-Tu, after correct binding of the EF-Tu:aa-tRNA complex to the ribosome, is initiated by GTP hydrolysis. This reaction, whose mechanism is uncertain, is catalyzed by EF-Tu, but requires activation by the ribosome. There have been a number of mechanistic proposals, including those spurred by a recent X-ray crystallographic analysis of a ribosome:EF-Tu:aa-tRNA:GTP-analog complex. In this work, we have investigated these and alternative hypotheses, using high-level quantum chemical/molecular mechanical simulations for the wild-type protein and its His85Gln mutant. For both proteins, we find previously unsuggested mechanisms as being preferred, in which residue 85, either His or Gln, directly assists in the reaction. Analysis shows that the RNA has a minor catalytic effect in the wild-type reaction, but plays a significant role in the mutant by greatly stabilizing the reaction's transition state. Given the similarity between EF-Tu and other members of the translational G-protein family, it is likely that these mechanisms of ribosome-activated GTP hydrolysis are pertinent to all of these proteins.

  5. Mechanisms for Orientation in Low Energy Ion Beam Assisted TiAlN Thin Film Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliotta, Paul V.

    The effects of off-normal ionized vapor bombardment on the orientation and structure of off-normal sputter deposited TiAlN thin films has been investigated with the goal of better understanding the mechanistic pathways in ion beam assisted thin film growth for better control of film properties during deposition. The effects of incident angle for ion bombardment has been investigated as a potential variable during deposition and a comprehensive comparison to current theories of thin film orientation development has been made. It is shown that for low levels of ion energies and rates, films develop (220) orientation with a near amorphous zone 1 (Z1) morphology for low ion incident angles. As the rates and energies of ions increases, (111) orientation and fibrous transition zone (ZT) morphology develops. It is also seen that as the angle of ion bombardment increases the threshold level for rates and energies of ions to cause (111) orientation and ZT morphologies is reduced. This change in orientation and morphology has been shown to change in-situ according to the level of ion bombardment making this transition a potential tool for developing microstructures within thin films. Commonly accepted theories of thin film orientation have been investigated with respect to the development of (111) orientation for low energy ion beam assisted deposition including surface energy reduction, thermal influences, strain energy reduction, ion channeling, and ion damage anisotropy though such mechanisms were not successful in describing the development of (111) orientation. Atomic subplantation, generally regarded as a mechanism for bond formation in diamond-like carbon films, has also been investigated as a potential mechanism for orientation development. By treating the interaction of ions with the depositing film as a collision between ion and surface atom, the transition from (220) to (111) orientation is found to occur when the average energy transferred per atom normal to the

  6. Effect of process parameters on the mechanical properties of carbon nitride thin films synthesized by plasma assisted pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabbal, M.; Mérel, P.; Chaker, M.

    We present an investigation of the effect of the process parameters, namely deposition pressure and laser intensity, on the growth and mechanical properties of carbon nitride (CNx) thin films synthesized by plasma assisted pulsed laser deposition. Deposition at high remote plasma pressure (200 mTorr) enhances both growth rate and nitrogen incorporation (up to 40 at.%), but nano-indentation measurements indicate that these films are very soft and have poor mechanical properties. At low remote plasma pressure (0.5 mTorr), the nitrogen content varies from 24 to 16 at.% with increasing laser intensity as the films become much harder and more elastic, with hardness and Young's modulus values reaching 24 GPa and 230 GPa, respectively. These effects are explained in terms of a thermalization of the laser plasma at 200 mTorr and indicate that plasma activation of nitrogen does not provide any particular benefit to the film properties when deposition is performed at high pressure. However, at low pressure, the benefit of plasma activation is evidenced through enhanced nitrogen incorporation in the films while preserving the highly energetic species in the ablation plume. Such conditions lead to the synthesis, at room temperature, of hard and elastic films having properties close to those of fullerene-like CNx.

  7. Preparing high-density polymer brushes by mechanically assisted polymer assembly (MAPA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tao; Efimenko, Kirill; Genzer, Jan

    2001-03-01

    We introduce a novel method of modifying the surface properties of materials. This technique, called MAPA (="mechanically assisted polymer assembly"), is based on: 1) chemically attaching polymerization initiators to the surface of an elastomeric network that has been previously stretched by a certain length, Δx, and 2) growing end-anchored macromolecules using surface initiated ("grafting from") atom transfer living radical polymerization. After the polymerization, the strain is removed from the substrate, which returns to its original size causing the grafted macromolecules to stretch away from the substrate and form a dense polymer brush. We demonstrate the feasibility of the MAPA method by preparing high-density polymer brushes of poly(acryl amide), PAAm. We show that, as expected, the grafting density of the PAAm brushes can be increased by increasing Δx. We demonstrate that polymer brushes with extremely high grafting densities can be successfully prepared by MAPA.

  8. Mechanism of Irradiation Assisted Cracking of Core Components in Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Was, Gary S; Atzmon, Michael; Wang, Lumin

    2003-04-28

    The overall goal of the project is to determine the mechanism of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). IASCC has been linked to hardening, microstructural and microchemical changes during irradiation. Unfortunately, all of these changes occur simultaneously and at similar rates during irradiation, making attribution of IASCC to any one of these features nearly impossible to determine. The strategy set forth in this project is to develop means to separate microstructural from microchemical changes to evaluate each separately for their effect on IASCC. In the first part, post irradiation annealing (PIA) treatments are used to anneal the irradiated microstructure, leaving only radiation induced segregation (RIS) for evaluation for its contribution to IASCC. The second part of the strategy is to use low temperature irradiation to produce a radiation damage dislocation loop microstructure without radiation induced segregation in order to evaluate the effect of the dislocation microstructure alone.

  9. Mechanisms of heat transport across a nano-scale gap in heat assisted magnetic recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budaev, Bair V.; Bogy, David B.

    2012-06-01

    This paper compares different mechanisms of heat transport across nano-scale gaps and discusses the role of electromagnetic phenomena in heat transport in general nano-scale layered structures. The results of the analysis suggest that heat transfer across sub-5 nm gaps like that appearing in prototypes of heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) systems is dominated by direct intermolecular interactions between the separated bodies and is little affected by electromagnetic radiation. The analysis further suggests that local heating for HAMR with sub-5 nm spacing can be more efficiently achieved by a Joule heater that is simpler to fabricate than laser-based optical systems and is less destructive for the nano-scale transducers than laser radiation, which may lead to their structural damage and short duration life of nanoscale transducers.

  10. The mechanism of lipids extraction from wet microalgae Scenedesmus sp. by ionic liquid assisted subcritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhuanni; Chen, Xiaolin; Xia, Shuwei

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the total sugar concentration, protein concentration, lipid yield and morphology characteristics of the algae residue were determined to explain the mechanism of lipids extraction from wet microalgae Scenedesmus sp. by ionic liquid assisted subcritical water. The results showed similar variation for the sugar, protein and lipid. However, the total sugar was more similar to lipids yield, so the results showed that the reaction between ionic liquid and cellulose and hemicellulose in cell wall was the most important step which determined the lipids extration directly. And the total sugar variation may be representing the lipids yield. For later lipids extraction, we can determine the total sugar concentration to predict the extraction end product.

  11. Upper extremity muscle tone and response of tidal volume during manually assisted breathing for patients requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Morino, Akira; Shida, Masahiro; Tanaka, Masashi; Sato, Kimihiro; Seko, Toshiaki; Ito, Shunsuke; Ogawa, Shunichi; Yokoi, Yuka; Takahashi, Naoaki

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to examine, in patients requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation, if the response of tidal volume during manually assisted breathing is dependent upon both upper extremity muscle tone and the pressure intensity of manually assisted breathing. [Subjects] We recruited 13 patients on prolonged mechanical ventilation, and assessed their upper extremity muscle tone using the modified Ashworth scale (MAS). The subjects were assigned to either the low MAS group (MAS≤2, n=7) or the high MAS group (MAS≥3, n=6). [Methods] The manually assisted breathing technique was applied at a pressure of 2 kgf and 4 kgf. A split-plot ANOVA was performed to compare the tidal volume of each pressure during manually assisted breathing between the low and the high MAS groups. [Results] Statistical analysis showed there were main effects of the upper extremity muscle tone and the pressure intensity of the manually assisted breathing technique. There was no interaction between these factors. [Conclusion] Our findings reveal that the tidal volume during the manually assisted breathing technique for patients with prolonged mechanical ventilation depends upon the patient’s upper extremity muscle tone and the pressure intensity. PMID:26357431

  12. Stent-assisted mechanical recanalization for symptomatic subacute or chronic middle cerebral artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong; Ma, Ji; Li, Teng-Fei; Zhu, Ming; Han, Xin-Wei; Shui, Shao-Feng

    2015-01-01

    To assess the feasibility and short-term effects of treating patients with subacute or chronic middle cerebral artery (M1) occlusion by stent-assisted mechanical recanalization. Six patients with cerebral arteries occlusion underwent surgery. Six cerebral arteries occlusion in 5 patients were successfully recanalized. On postoperative day 1, four patients’ symptoms were relieved and two patients’ symptoms were exacerbated, of which one was significantly improved after 3 days, the other one’s symptoms were recovered to preoperative levels in 2 weeks. No patients died after surgery. No stroke or transient ischemic attack occurred. The average follow-up of was 4.2 months, no worsening of condition, recurrence or death occurred. The results indicate that for patients with subacute or chronic middle cerebral artery (M1) occlusion, mechanical recanalization was technically feasible under the premise of strict case screening. Mechanical recanalization is able to improve ischemic symptoms and promote dysfunction restoration. But its long-term effect remains to be evaluated by further large samples, long-term follow-up studies. PMID:26885148

  13. Preparation of sago starch-based biocomposite reinforced microfibrillated cellulose of bamboo assisted by mechanical treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silviana, S.; Hadiyanto, H.

    2017-06-01

    The utilization of green composites by using natural fibres is developed due to their availability, ecological benefits, and good properties in mechanical and thermal. One of the potential sources is bamboo that has relative high cellulose content. This paper was focused on the preparation of sago starch-based reinforced microfribrillated cellulose of bamboo that was assisted by mechanical treatment. Microfibrillated cellulose of bamboo was prepared by isolation of cellulose with chemical treatment. Preparation of bamboo microfibrillated cellulose was conducted by homogenizers for dispersing bamboo cellulose, i.e. high pressure homogenizer and ultrasonic homogenizer. Experiments were elaborated on several variables such as the concentration of bamboo microfibrillated cellulose dispersed in water (1-3 %w) and the volume of microfibrillated cellulose (37.5-75%v). Four %w of sago starch solution was mixed with bamboo microfibrillated cellulose and glycerol with plasticizer and citric acid as cross linker. This paper provided the analysis of tensile strength as well as SEM for mechanical and morphology properties of the biocomposite. The results showed that the preparation of sago starch-based biocomposite reinforced bamboo microfibrillated cellulose by using ultrasonic homogenizer yielded the highest tensile strength and well dispersed in the biocomposite.

  14. Mechanisms of hydrogen-assisted fracture in austenitic stainless steel welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Balch, Dorian K.; Sofronis, Petros; Somerday, Brian P.; Novak, Paul

    2005-03-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the hydrogen-assisted fracture susceptibility of gas-tungsten arc (GTA) welds in the nitrogen-strengthened, austenitic stainless steels 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn (21-6-9) and 22Cr-13Ni-5Mn (22-13-5). In addition, mechanisms of hydrogen-assisted fracture in the welds were identified using electron microscopy and finite-element modeling. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics experiments were conducted on hydrogen-charged GTA welds at 25 C. Results showed that hydrogen dramatically lowered the fracture toughness from 412 kJ/m{sup 2} to 57 kJ/m{sup 2} in 21-6-9 welds and from 91 kJ/m{sup 2} to 26 kJ/m{sup 2} in 22-13-5 welds. Microscopy results suggested that hydrogen served two roles in the fracture of welds: it promoted the nucleation of microcracks along the dendritic structure and accelerated the link-up of microcracks by facilitating localized deformation. A continuum finite-element model was formulated to test the notion that hydrogen could facilitate localized deformation in the ligament between microcracks. On the assumption that hydrogen decreased local flow stress in accordance with the hydrogen-enhanced dislocation mobility argument, the finite-element results showed that deformation was localized in a narrow band between two parallel, overlapping microcracks. In contrast, in the absence of hydrogen, the finite-element results showed that deformation between microcracks was more uniformly distributed.

  15. Ultrasound-assisted butyl acetate synthesis catalyzed by Novozym 435: enhanced activity and operational stability.

    PubMed

    Martins, Andréa B; Schein, Mirela F; Friedrich, John L R; Fernandez-Lafuente, Roberto; Ayub, Marco A Z; Rodrigues, Rafael C

    2013-09-01

    The influence of low-frequency ultrasound (40 kHz) in the esterification reaction between acetic acid and butanol for flavor ester synthesis catalyzed by the commercial immobilized lipase B from Candida antarctica (Novozym 435) was evaluated. A central composite design and the response surface methodology were used to analyze the effects of the reaction parameters (temperature, substrate molar ratio, enzyme content and added water) and their response (yields of conversion in 2.5 h of reaction). The reaction was carried out using n-hexane as solvent. The optimal conditions for ultrasound-assisted butyl acetate synthesis were found to be: temperature of 46 °C; substrate molar ratio of 3.6:1 butanol:acetic acid; enzyme content of 7%; added water of 0.25%, conditions that are slightly different from those found using mechanical mixing. Over 94% of conversion was obtained in 2.5h under these conditions. The optimal acid concentration for the reaction was determined to be 2.0 M, compared to 0.3 M without ultrasound treatment. Enzyme productivity was significantly improved to around 7.5-fold for each batch when comparing ultrasound and standard mechanical agitation. The biocatalyst could be directly reused for 14 reactions cycles keeping around 70% of its original activity, while activity was virtually zeroed in the third cycle using the standard mixing system. Thus, compared to the traditional mechanical agitation, ultrasound technology not only improves the process productivity, but also enhances enzyme recycling and stability in the presence of acetic acid, being a powerful tool to improve biocatalyst performance in this type of reaction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Enhancing human-animal relationships through veterinary medical instruction in animal-assisted therapy and animal-assisted activities.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Caroline Brunsman

    2008-01-01

    Instruction in animal-assisted therapy (AAT) and animal-assisted activities (AAAs) teaches veterinary medical students to confidently and assertively maximize the benefits and minimize the risks of this union of animals and people. Instruction in AAT/AAA also addresses requirements by the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education that accredited schools/colleges of veterinary medicine include in their standard curriculum the topics of the human-animal bond, behavior, and the contributions of the veterinarian to the overall public and professional health care teams. Entry-level veterinarians should be prepared to: (1) assure that animals who provide AAT/AAA are healthy enough to visit nursing homes, hospitals, or other institutions; (2) promote behavior testing that selects animals who will feel safe, comfortable, and connected; (3) advise facilities regarding infection control and ways to provide a safe environment where the animals, their handlers, and the people being visited will not be injured or become ill; and (4) advocate for their patients and show compassion for their clients when animals are determined to be inappropriate participants in AAT/AAA programs. This article presents AAT/AAA terminology, ways in which veterinarians can advocate for AAT/AAA, the advantages of being involved in AAT/AAA, a model AAT/AAA practicum from Tuskegee University's School of Veterinary Medicine (TUSVM), and examples of co-curricular activities in AAT/AAA by TUSVM's student volunteers.

  17. Development and Test of Robotically Assisted Extravehicular Activity Gloves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Jonathan M.; Peters, Benjamin J.; Laske, Evan A.; McBryan, Emily R.

    2017-01-01

    Over the past two years, the High Performance EVA Glove (HPEG) project under NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) funded an effort to develop an electromechanically-assisted space suit glove. The project was a collaboration between the Johnson Space Center's Software, Robotics, and Simulation Division and the Crew and Thermal Systems division. The project sought to combine finger actuator technology developed for Robonaut 2 with the softgoods from the ILC Phase VI EVA glove. The Space Suit RoboGlove (SSRG) uses a system of three linear actuators to pull synthetic tendons attached to the glove's fingers to augment flexion of the user's fingers. To detect the user's inputs, the system utilizes a combination of string potentiometers along the back of the fingers and force sensitive resistors integrated into the fingertips of the glove cover layer. This paper discusses the development process from initial concepts through two major phases of prototypes, and the results of initial human testing. Initial work on the project focused on creating a functioning proof of concept, designing the softgoods integration, and demonstrating augmented grip strength with the actuators. The second year of the project focused on upgrading the actuators, sensors, and software with the overall goal of creating a system that moves with the user's fingers in order to reduce fatigue associated with the operation of a pressurized glove system. This paper also discusses considerations for a flight system based on this prototype development and address where further work is required to mature the technology.

  18. Animal-Assisted Activity: Effects of a Complementary Intervention Program on Psychological and Physiological Variables.

    PubMed

    Nepps, Peggy; Stewart, Charles N; Bruckno, Stephen R

    2014-07-01

    Animal-assisted activity is the use of trained animals for the therapeutic, motivational, or educational benefit of patients. Subjects of this study were 218 patients hospitalized on the mental health unit of a community hospital with an existing, complementary animal-assisted activity program. Half of the patients participated in a 1-hour session of animal-assisted activity. The other half, who served as a comparison group, participated in a 1-hour stress management program. It was hypothesized that an animal-assisted activity program would improve ratings of depression, anxiety, and pain and the associated physiological measures of stress and discomfort. Self-report ratings of depression, anxiety, and pain were collected before and after treatment sessions, and blood pressure, pulse, and salivary cortisol were measured. There were significant decreases in depression (P < .0001), anxiety (P < .0001), pain (P < .0001), and pulse (P < .04) after animal-assisted activity program, comparable to those in the more traditional stress management group. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. The Evaluation of Scholarly Activity in Computer-Assisted Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Bryan; Lafford, Barbara A.

    2009-01-01

    The current study provides guidance for both junior computer-assisted language learning (CALL) researchers as they decide on the most appropriate forms and placement of scholarly activity and also for decision makers attempting to evaluate the scholarly activity of these CALL researchers in their quest for promotion and tenure. In this study, data…

  20. 24 CFR 1003.209 - Prohibition on use of assistance for employment relocation activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANTS FOR INDIAN... employment relocation activities. (a) Prohibition. ICDBG funds may not be used to directly assist a business... ICDBG funds for activities pursuant to: (i) § 1003.203(b); or (ii) §§ 1003.201(a)-(d), 1003.201(k), 1003...

  1. [Mechanisms of imiquimod indirect antiviral activity].

    PubMed

    Hober, D; Ajram, L; Chehadeh, W; Lazrek, M; Goffard, A; Dewilde, A; Wattré, P

    2005-01-01

    The potential role of an immune response in HPV-related anogenital disorders had already been anticipated by clinicians. Indeed the lesions efflorescence and the relapsing HPV infection in HIV positive patients as well as the lack of recurrence in patients with spontaneous cure, provided relevant clues for a likely immune mechanism. At present time, the role of the immune system in the development of HPV-related anogenital disorders is well established : HPV induce a humoral and cell mediated immune response. This response is mainly exerted towards infected cells; it is also exerted at the systemic level, through antibodies synthesis, but this pathway remains a secondary one. Due to the limits of the present therapies (either purely destructive and characterized by the rate of recurrences, or antiviral, but difficult to use), it was necessary to find a new treatment type which enhances the local immune response, results in the disappearance of lesions and allows for a decrease in the risk of recurrences. The original mechanism of action of the first cell-mediated immune response modifier: imiquimod, for local use (Aldara 5 % cream) is an answer to this need. The first positive results observed in vitro and in animals were confirmed in patients with HPV anogenital warts in a double blind placebo-controlled study: imiquimod inhibits HPV replication and results in the condyloma regression. Its action is based on the combined activation of the natural local immunity, by stimulating interferon alpha; and of the acquired immunity, by stimulating a T-cell mediated immune response. Thus imiquimod appears to be an original antiviral compound, because it does not act directly on the virus itself.

  2. Mechanism of ascaridole activation in Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Geroldinger, Gerald; Tonner, Matthias; Hettegger, Hubert; Bacher, Markus; Monzote, Lianet; Walter, Martin; Staniek, Katrin; Rosenau, Thomas; Gille, Lars

    2017-03-02

    values for Art. In a heme association assay Asc demonstrated a lower binding affinity to heme than Art. ICP-OES measurements revealed that in LtP the total iron concentrations were twice as high as values in J774 macrophages. Since low molecular iron was important in Asc activation we studied the influence of Asc on the labile iron pool (LIP) in LtP. Low temperature EPR experiments demonstrated that Asc shifts the redox balance of iron in the LIP to its oxidized state. These data demonstrate that univalent cleavage of Asc/Art in LtP is an essential part of their pharmacological mechanism. The structure of the EP determines whether activation by low molecular iron or heme is favored and the availability of these intracellular activators modulates their cytotoxicity. These findings may be helpful for synthesis of new Asc derivatives and understanding the action of EP in other cell types.

  3. Assessment of Initial Test Conditions for Experiments to Assess Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Busby, Jeremy T; Gussev, Maxim N

    2011-04-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking is a key materials degradation issue in today s nuclear power reactor fleet and affects critical structural components within the reactor core. The effects of increased exposure to irradiation, stress, and/or coolant can substantially increase susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking of austenitic steels in high-temperature water environments. . Despite 30 years of experience, the underlying mechanisms of IASCC are unknown. Extended service conditions will increase the exposure to irradiation, stress, and corrosive environment for all core internal components. The objective of this effort within the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program is to evaluate the response and mechanisms of IASCC in austenitic stainless steels with single variable experiments. A series of high-value irradiated specimens has been acquired from the past international research programs, providing a valuable opportunity to examine the mechanisms of IASCC. This batch of irradiated specimens has been received and inventoried. In addition, visual examination and sample cleaning has been completed. Microhardness testing has been performed on these specimens. All samples show evidence of hardening, as expected, although the degree of hardening has saturated and no trend with dose is observed. Further, the change in hardening can be converted to changes in mechanical properties. The calculated yield stress is consistent with previous data from light water reactor conditions. In addition, some evidence of changes in deformation mode was identified via examination of the microhardness indents. This analysis may provide further insights into the deformation mode under larger scale tests. Finally, swelling analysis was performed using immersion density methods. Most alloys showed some evidence of swelling, consistent with the expected trends for this class of alloy. The Hf-doped alloy showed densification rather than swelling. This observation may be

  4. Processing, Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior of Ultrasonic Assisted Cast Magnesium 1wt% Silicon Carbide Nano-Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erman, Ari

    The goal of this dissertation is to establish an understanding of processing -- microstructure -- mechanical behavior relationship in Mg-1wt% SiC metal matrix nano-composites fabricated via an ultrasonic assisted casting process, with the emphasis on the effect of the distribution of nanoparticles on this relationship. Ultrasonic assisted casting has been proved as an effective technique to distribute nanoparticles in Mg metal matrix nano-composites (MMNCs). Mg MMNCs reinforced with 1 wt% SiC nanoparticles, were cast by ultrasonic cavitation-based dispersion methods. Microstructural analyses of as cast specimens were conducted to characterize the grain size, shape and distribution, SiC nanoparticle size and distribution, and nanoparticle-matrix interface. Average grain size for the ultrasonic assisted cast composite specimens was 72 mum compared to 181 mum for pure Mg samples prepared by the same method. The average measured SiC nanoparticle size was 66 nm. TEM studies showed good local dispersion of SiC nanoparticles, with only a few small, widely spaced clusters. HRTEM showed a clean interface between SiC nanoparticles and the Mg matrix, with no evidence of secondary phases. The yield strength of Mg-1 wt% SiC nanocomposites was 67 MPa, which showed improvement from 47 MPa for the pure Mg samples. This extra strengthening is due to Orowan and Hall-Petch effects. Fatigue experiments were conducted to characterize the cyclic stress-strain response of pure Mg and Mg-1wt% SiC samples at 0.2%, 0.4% and 0.6% plastic strain amplitudes. The analyses of the cyclic stress response curves and hysteresis loops, combined with post failure TEM analyses provided an understanding of the role of twinning, and twin-particle interactions on the cyclic deformation behavior of Mg MMNCs. Tensile twinning and basal slip are the main forms of deformation mechanisms under compression, followed by detwinning and basal slip in subsequent tension. Fatigue lives of Mg MMNCs are comparable to

  5. Mechanistic studies of protein arginine deiminase 2: evidence for a substrate-assisted mechanism.

    PubMed

    Dreyton, Christina J; Knuckley, Bryan; Jones, Justin E; Lewallen, Daniel M; Thompson, Paul R

    2014-07-15

    Citrullination, which is catalyzed by protein arginine deiminases (PADs 1-4 and 6), is a post-translational modification (PTM) that effectively neutralizes the positive charge of a guanidinium group by its replacement with a neutral urea. Given the sequence similarity of PAD2 across mammalian species and the genomic organization of the PAD2 gene, PAD2 is predicted to be the ancestral homologue of the PADs. Although PAD2 has long been known to play a role in myelination, it has only recently been linked to other cellular processes, including gene transcription and macrophage extracellular trap formation. For example, PAD2 deiminates histone H3 at R26, and this PTM leads to the increased transcription of more than 200 genes under the control of the estrogen receptor. Given that our understanding of PAD2 biology remains incomplete, we initiated mechanistic studies on this enzyme to aid the development of PAD2-specific inhibitors. Herein, we report that the substrate specificity and calcium dependence of PAD2 are similar to those of PADs 1, 3, and 4. However, unlike those isozymes, PAD2 appears to use a substrate-assisted mechanism of catalysis in which the positively charged substrate guanidinium depresses the pKa of the nucleophilic cysteine. By contrast, PADs 1, 3, and 4 use a reverse-protonation mechanism. These mechanistic differences will aid the development of isozyme-specific inhibitors.

  6. Mechanical analysis of lunar gravity assist in the Earth-Moon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yi; Xu, Shijie

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the lunar gravity assist (LGA) is investigated under the planar circular restricted three-body problem (PCRTBP) and two-body model. In the PCRTBP, the approximate expression of energy of the LGA in a small region of the Moon is derived. The expression uncovers the mechanism and mechanical process of the LGA in the framework of the PCRTBP. Based on the expression, the change of energy during the LGA is obtained and analyzed. To solve the limitation of the expressions and complete the research range of the LGA, a numerical methodology based on the patched-conic model is presented to analyze the LGA in a large region near the Moon. This numerical methodology cannot only obtain the change of energy but also may classify the trajectories before and after the LGA. As an application, we present a method to design a special kind of double LGA orbit. The design method synthesizes the preliminary results in the patched-conic model and the optimization in the PCRTBP. We can quickly obtain abundant double LGA orbits for the Earth-Moon transfer and interplanetary spaceflight.

  7. The coercivity mechanism of Pr-Fe-B nanoflakes prepared by surfactant-assisted ball milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Wen-Liang; Zhang, Ming; Niu, E.; Shao, Xiao-Ping; Hu, Feng-Xia; Sun, Ji-Rong; Shen, Bao-Gen

    2015-09-01

    The strong (00l) textured Pr12+xFe82-xB6 (x=0, 1, 2, 3, 4) nanoflakes with high coercivity were prepared by surfactant-assisted ball milling (SABM). The thickness and length of the flakes are mainly in the range of 50-200 nm and 0.5-2 μm, respectively. A coercivity of 4.16 kOe for Pr15Fe79B6 nanoflakes was obtained, which is the maximum coercivity of R2Fe14B (R=Pr, Nd) nanoflakes or nanoparticles reported up to now. The results of XRD and SEM for the aligned Pr15Fe79B6 nanoflakes indicate that a strong (00l) texture is obtained and the easy magnetization direction is parallel to the surface of the flakes. The angular dependence of coercivity for aligned sample indicates that the coercivity mechanism of the as-milled nanoflakes is mainly dominated by domain wall pinning. Meanwhile, the field dependence of coercivity, isothermal (IRM) and dc demagnetizing (DCD) remanence curves also indicate that the coercivity is mainly determined by domain wall pinning, and nucleation also has an important effect. In addition, the mainly interaction of flakes is dipolar coupling. The research of coercivity mechanism for Pr15Fe79B6 nanoflakes is important for guidance the further increase its value, and is useful for the future development of the high performance nanocomposite magnets and soft/hard exchange spring magnets.

  8. Safety mechanism assisted by the repressor of tetracycline (SMART) vaccinia virus vectors for vaccines and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Grigg, Patricia; Titong, Allison; Jones, Leslie A; Yilma, Tilahun D; Verardi, Paulo H

    2013-09-17

    Replication-competent viruses, such as Vaccinia virus (VACV), are powerful tools for the development of oncolytic viral therapies and elicit superior immune responses when used as vaccine and immunotherapeutic vectors. However, severe complications from uncontrolled viral replication can occur, particularly in immunocompromised individuals or in those with other predisposing conditions. VACVs constitutively expressing interferon-γ (IFN-γ) replicate in cell culture indistinguishably from control viruses; however, they replicate in vivo to low or undetectable levels, and are rapidly cleared even in immunodeficient animals. In an effort to develop safe and highly effective replication-competent VACV vectors, we established a system to inducibly express IFN-γ. Our SMART (safety mechanism assisted by the repressor of tetracycline) vectors are designed to express the tetracycline repressor under a constitutive VACV promoter and IFN-γ under engineered tetracycline-inducible promoters. Immunodeficient SCID mice inoculated with VACVs not expressing IFN-γ demonstrated severe weight loss, whereas those given VACVs expressing IFN-γ under constitutive VACV promoters showed no signs of infection. Most importantly, mice inoculated with a VACV expressing the IFN-γ gene under an inducible promoter remained healthy in the presence of doxycycline, but exhibited severe weight loss in the absence of doxycycline. In this study, we developed a safety mechanism for VACV based on the conditional expression of IFN-γ under a tightly controlled tetracycline-inducible VACV promoter for use in vaccines and oncolytic cancer therapies.

  9. The strained sesquiterpene β-caryophyllene as a probe for the solvent-assisted epoxidation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Steenackers, Bart; Neirinckx, Alexander; De Cooman, Luc; Hermans, Ive; De Vos, Dirk

    2014-04-04

    In our attempt to synthesize β-caryophyllene oxide in food-compatible conditions, we observed the uncatalyzed and highly selective epoxidation of β-caryophyllene, a strained bicyclic sesquiterpene, in ethanol with aqueous H2 O2 under radical-suppressing conditions without the addition of a catalyst. The unusual reactivity of β-caryophyllene allowed us to use it as a probe for the mechanism of the solvent-assisted epoxidation in a wide range of organic solvents. A kinetic study was performed to investigate the epoxidation mechanism; an excellent correlation was found between the observed epoxidation rates in different solvents and the Abraham's hydrogen bond formation parameters of these solvents. By means of computational analysis, it was found that the main role of the solvent consists of the stabilization of the elongated OO bond of H2 O2 in the transition state through hydrogen-bond donation to the leaving OH moiety of H2 O2 . α-Humulene was found to possess similar reactivity as β-caryophyllene whereas isocaryophyllene-the unstrained isomer of β-caryophyllene-was unreactive.

  10. Mechanical Blood Trauma in Assisted Circulation: Sublethal RBC Damage Preceding Hemolysis

    PubMed Central

    Olia, Salim E.; Maul, Timothy M.; Antaki, James F.; Kameneva, Marina V.

    2016-01-01

    After many decades of improvements in mechanical circulatory assist devices (CADs), blood damage remains a serious problem during support contributing to variety of adverse events, and consequently affecting patient survival and quality of life. The mechanisms of cumulative cell damage in continuous-flow blood pumps are still not fully understood despite numerous in vitro, in vivo, and in silico studies of blood trauma. Previous investigations have almost exclusively focused on lethal blood damage, namely hemolysis, which is typically negligible during normal operation of current generation CADs. The measurement of plasma free hemoglobin (plfHb) concentration to characterize hemolysis is straightforward, however sublethal trauma is more difficult to detect and quantify since no simple direct test exists. Similarly, while multiple studies have focused on thrombosis within blood pumps and accessories, sublethal blood trauma and its sequelae have yet to be adequately documented or characterized. This review summarizes the current understanding of sublethal trauma to red blood cells (RBCs) produced by exposure of blood to flow parameters and conditions similar to those within CADs. It also suggests potential strategies to reduce and/or prevent RBC sublethal damage in a clinically-relevant context, and encourages new research into this relatively uncharted territory. PMID:27034320

  11. Promoting Technology-Assisted Active Learning in Computer Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Jinzhu; Hargis, Jace

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes specific active learning strategies for teaching computer science, integrating both instructional technologies and non-technology-based strategies shown to be effective in the literature. The theoretical learning components addressed include an intentional method to help students build metacognitive abilities, as well as…

  12. Eye-tracker-guided non-mechanical excimer laser assisted penetrating keratoplasty.

    PubMed

    Janunts, Edgar; Schirra, Frank; Szentmáry, Nora; Seitz, Berthold; Langenbucher, Achim

    2013-03-18

    The purpose of the study was to implement a new eye tracking mask which could be used to guide the laser beam in automated non-mechanical excimer laser assisted penetrating keratoplasty. A new trephination mask design with an elevated surface geometry has been proposed with a step formation between conical and flat interfaces. Two recipient masks of 7.5/8.0 mm have been manufactured and tested. The masks have outer diameter of 12.5 mm, step formation at 10.5 mm, and slope of conical surfaces 15°. Its functionality has been tested in different lateral positions and tilts on a planar surface, and pig eye experiments. After successful validation on porcine eyes, new masks have been produced and tested on two patients. The build-in eye tracking software of the MEL 70 was always able to capture the masks. It has been shown that the unwanted pigmentation/pattern induced by the laser pulses on the mask surface does not influence the eye-tracking efficiency. The masks could be tracked within the 18 × 14 mm lateral displacement and up to 12° tilt. Two patient cases are demonstrated. No complications were observed during the surgery, although it needs some attention for aligning the mask horizontally before trephination. Stability of eye tracking masks is emphasized by inducing on purpose movements of the patient head. Eye-tracking-guided penetrating keratoplasty was successfully applied in clinical practice, which enables robust tracking criteria within an extended range. It facilitates the automated trephination procedure of excimer laser-assisted penetrating keratoplasty.

  13. Eye-Tracker-Guided Non-Mechanical Excimer Laser Assisted Penetrating Keratoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Janunts, Edgar; Schirra, Frank; Szentmáry, Nora; Seitz, Berthold; Langenbucher, Achim

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to implement a new eye tracking mask which could be used to guide the laser beam in automated non-mechanical excimer laser assisted penetrating keratoplasty. Materials and methods: A new trephination mask design with an elevated surface geometry has been proposed with a step formation between conical and flat interfaces. Two recipient masks of 7.5/8.0 mm have been manufactured and tested. The masks have outer diameter of 12.5 mm, step formation at 10.5 mm, and slope of conical surfaces 15°. Its functionality has been tested in different lateral positions and tilts on a planar surface, and pig eye experiments. After successful validation on porcine eyes, new masks have been produced and tested on two patients. Results: The build-in eye tracking software of the MEL 70 was always able to capture the masks. It has been shown that the unwanted pigmentation/pattern induced by the laser pulses on the mask surface does not influence the eye-tracking efficiency. The masks could be tracked within the 18 × 14 mm lateral displacement and up to 12° tilt. Two patient cases are demonstrated. No complications were observed during the surgery, although it needs some attention for aligning the mask horizontally before trephination. Stability of eye tracking masks is emphasized by inducing on purpose movements of the patient head. Conclusion: Eye-tracking-guided penetrating keratoplasty was successfully applied in clinical practice, which enables robust tracking criteria within an extended range. It facilitates the automated trephination procedure of excimer laser-assisted penetrating keratoplasty. PMID:23507821

  14. Influence of mechanical activation of steel powder on its properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaulina, O. Yu; Darenskaia, E. A.; Myachin, Y. V.; Vasilyeva, I. E.; Kulkov, S. N.

    2017-02-01

    It has been studied properties of stainless steel based powders after mechanical activation using planetary ball milling technique. It have been shown that after one minute mechanical activation porosity of sintered steel is less than 5%, which is less than the porosity of the sintered steel powder without mechanical activation. The sample without activation has austenite state, which changes after activation toaustenite and ferrite mixtures. X-ray analysis confirmed that the mechanical activation leads to a change in the phase state of the samples: the samples without activation of the FCC structure (γ-Fe), after activation - FCC (γ-Fe) and BCC (α-Fe). The hardness increases at increasing activation time from 800 MPa for the sample without mechanical activation to 1250 MPa for the sample with the activation time of 10 minutes.

  15. Comparison of the iAssist Handheld Guidance System to Conventional Instruments for Mechanical Axis Restoration in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Matthew C; Cidambi, Krishna R; Severns, Dustyn L; Gonzales, Francis B

    2017-06-09

    Recent advances in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) include an intelligent instrument system designed to provide intraoperative guidance to reduce mechanical alignment errors. Internal position-sensing technology is integrated into microelectronic pods that attach to cutting blocks. The purpose of this prospective, randomized study was to determine whether this iAssist system enables the surgeon to make more accurate bone resections and better restore the mechanical axis compared to conventional instruments in TKA. We randomized patients undergoing TKA into 2 groups. Group I (n = 25) underwent TKA assisted by the iAssist guidance system, group II (n = 25) underwent TKA using conventional instruments. Preoperative and postoperative mechanical axes were measured from full-length lower extremity radiographs to evaluate alignment. Additional surgical parameters were also assessed, including tourniquet time and blood loss. Patient demographics and preoperative mechanical axis alignments were similar between the groups. Postoperatively, 4.0% of patients had greater than 3° of tibial or femoral component mal-alignment in the guidance-assisted cohort, compared with 36.0% in the conventional group (P < .05). Additionally, group I showed significant improvement in variance seen in both the femoral mechanical axis (1.65° ± 0.17° vs 2.23° ± 0.33°, P < .005) and tibial mechanical axis (1.28° ± 0.13° vs 1.71° ± 0.24°, P < .005) compared to group II. There were no significant differences in tourniquet time (P = .86) or blood loss (P = .39) between groups. Use of the iAssist system in TKA results in an improved postoperative mechanical axis and decreased alignment variability compared to conventional instruments, without significantly increasing operative time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A biofriendly silica gel for in situ protein entrapment: biopolymer-assisted formation and its kinetic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guan-Hai; Zhang, Li-Ming

    2009-03-05

    In an attempt to develop a biofriendly sol-gel route for the rapid formation of biofunctional silica gels, a biopolymer with good biocompatibility was used to assist the gelation of glycol-modified tetraethoxysilane (GMT) in aqueous system without the addition of any organic solvents. It was found that the biopolymer used could act as an effective accelerator for the sol-gel transition of GMT and an increase of its amount could shorten greatly the gelation time. For such a gelation reaction, its apparent activation energy was determined to be 64.9 kJ/mol according to the Arrhenius equation. In particular, the kinetic mechanism for the formation of the silica gel was investigated by using dynamic theological data and a scaling fractal model. It was revealed that the biopolymer used could change the sol-gel transition mechanism from reaction-limited kinetics to diffusion-limited kinetics. Circular dichroism analyses confirmed the suitability of using the resultant silica gel for the in situ protein encapsulation.

  17. International Assistance for Low-Emission Development Planning: Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN) Inventory of Activities and Tools--Preliminary Trends

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, S.; Benioff, R.

    2011-05-01

    The Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN) is a voluntary network of international practitioners supporting low-emission planning in developing countries. The network seeks to improve quality of support through sharing project information, tools, best practices and lessons, and by fostering harmonized assistance. CLEAN has developed an inventory to track and analyze international technical support and tools for low-carbon planning activities in developing countries. This paper presents a preliminary analysis of the inventory to help identify trends in assistance activities and tools available to support developing countries with low-emission planning.

  18. Robotic assistance for performing vocational rehabilitation activities using BaxBot.

    PubMed

    Ashley, Kyle; Alqasemi, Redwan; Dubey, Rajiv

    2017-07-01

    Activities of Daily Living (ADL's) refer to tasks that people do on a daily basis, such as self-feeding, cleaning the house, or bathing. These activities often require a degree of functional mobility that may be outside the ability of a person suffering from cognitive or physical impairment. This work describes methods of performing ADL's with a mobile robotic system. We examined the needs of potential users and caregivers through surveys to determine the most needed applications for robotic assistance. Using this information, we extended the functionality of our BaxBot mobile robotic system to provide meaningful, autonomous assistance in performing three specific ADL's with minimal user interaction.

  19. The Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center report of its activities and accomplishments in Fiscal Year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Menicucci, D.F.

    1994-03-01

    The Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center (STDAC) at Sandia National Laboratories is a resource provided by the US Department of Energy`s Solar Thermal Program. Its major objectives are to accelerate the use of solar thermal systems through (a) direct technical assistance to users, (b) cooperative test, evaluation, and development efforts with private industry, and (c) educational outreach activities. This report outlines the major activities and accomplishments of the STDAC in Fiscal Year 1993. The report also contains a comprehensive list of persons who contacted the STDAC by telephone for information or technical consulting.

  20. Hybrid test bench for evaluation of any device related to mechanical cardiac assistance.

    PubMed

    Colacino, F M; Arabia, M; Danieli, G A; Moscato, F; Nicosia, S; Piedimonte, F; Valigi, P; Pagnottelli, S

    2005-08-01

    Hydraulic mock circulatory systems have low flexibility to allow tests of different cardiovascular devices and low precision when a reference model must be reproduced. In this paper a new bench is described. It combines the computer model of the environment in which the device will operate and the electro-hydraulic interfaces by which device and computer are connected. A models library provided with basic functions allows implementing many layouts of the bench, which in turn depend both on the device properties and the desired experiment. In case of an apical LVAD evaluation, the bench can reproduce right and left ventricles, pulmonary and systemic circulations, inlet and outlet LVAD cannulas. An interface forces the instantaneous calculated flow at the VAD input and feeds back the measured pressure to the computer; another interface works in a similar -but complementary- way at the VAD output. The paper focuses on the operating principle of the electro hydraulic interfaces which represent a relevant component of the bench, on the RT-Linux-based software architecture, on the models of the basic elements of the bench. A patent is under preparation. At the moment, only a portion of the bench has been developed. It consists of a piston-cylinder mechanism, which mimics the elastance-based mechanism of a natural ventricle, and a hydraulic circuit representing the arterial load according to a modified windkessel model and the venous return according to the Guyton's model. The pump is driven by a real-time simulation of the cardiovascular system. This preliminary layout allowed testing the piston-cylinder mechanism, its control, and the software. This electro-hydraulic interface has been used to reproduce a pulsatile pump working in different modes. The hybrid model approach can support the development of new cardiac assist devices from their computer model to their manufacture.

  1. THE DETONATION MECHANISM OF THE PULSATIONALLY ASSISTED GRAVITATIONALLY CONFINED DETONATION MODEL OF Type Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, G. C. IV; Graziani, C.; Weide, K.; Norris, J.; Hudson, R.; Lamb, D. Q.; Fisher, R. T.; Townsley, D. M.; Meakin, C.; Reid, L. B.

    2012-11-01

    We describe the detonation mechanism composing the 'pulsationally assisted' gravitationally confined detonation (GCD) model of Type Ia supernovae. This model is analogous to the previous GCD model reported in Jordan et al.; however, the chosen initial conditions produce a substantively different detonation mechanism, resulting from a larger energy release during the deflagration phase. The resulting final kinetic energy and {sup 56}Ni yields conform better to observational values than is the case for the 'classical' GCD models. In the present class of models, the ignition of a deflagration phase leads to a rising, burning plume of ash. The ash breaks out of the surface of the white dwarf, flows laterally around the star, and converges on the collision region at the antipodal point from where it broke out. The amount of energy released during the deflagration phase is enough to cause the star to rapidly expand, so that when the ash reaches the antipodal point, the surface density is too low to initiate a detonation. Instead, as the ash flows into the collision region (while mixing with surface fuel), the star reaches its maximally expanded state and then contracts. The stellar contraction acts to increase the density of the star, including the density in the collision region. This both raises the temperature and density of the fuel-ash mixture in the collision region and ultimately leads to thermodynamic conditions that are necessary for the Zel'dovich gradient mechanism to produce a detonation. We demonstrate feasibility of this scenario with three three-dimensional (3D), full star simulations of this model using the FLASH code. We characterized the simulations by the energy released during the deflagration phase, which ranged from 38% to 78% of the white dwarf's binding energy. We show that the necessary conditions for detonation are achieved in all three of the models.

  2. The Detonation Mechanism of the Pulsationally Assisted Gravitationally Confined Detonation Model of Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, G. C., IV; Graziani, C.; Fisher, R. T.; Townsley, D. M.; Meakin, C.; Weide, K.; Reid, L. B.; Norris, J.; Hudson, R.; Lamb, D. Q.

    2012-11-01

    We describe the detonation mechanism composing the "pulsationally assisted" gravitationally confined detonation (GCD) model of Type Ia supernovae. This model is analogous to the previous GCD model reported in Jordan et al.; however, the chosen initial conditions produce a substantively different detonation mechanism, resulting from a larger energy release during the deflagration phase. The resulting final kinetic energy and 56Ni yields conform better to observational values than is the case for the "classical" GCD models. In the present class of models, the ignition of a deflagration phase leads to a rising, burning plume of ash. The ash breaks out of the surface of the white dwarf, flows laterally around the star, and converges on the collision region at the antipodal point from where it broke out. The amount of energy released during the deflagration phase is enough to cause the star to rapidly expand, so that when the ash reaches the antipodal point, the surface density is too low to initiate a detonation. Instead, as the ash flows into the collision region (while mixing with surface fuel), the star reaches its maximally expanded state and then contracts. The stellar contraction acts to increase the density of the star, including the density in the collision region. This both raises the temperature and density of the fuel-ash mixture in the collision region and ultimately leads to thermodynamic conditions that are necessary for the Zel'dovich gradient mechanism to produce a detonation. We demonstrate feasibility of this scenario with three three-dimensional (3D), full star simulations of this model using the FLASH code. We characterized the simulations by the energy released during the deflagration phase, which ranged from 38% to 78% of the white dwarf's binding energy. We show that the necessary conditions for detonation are achieved in all three of the models.

  3. Antioxidant activity and mechanism of Rhizoma Cimicifugae

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background As a typical Chinese herbal medicine, rhizoma Cimicifugae (RC, 升麻 in Chinese) possesses various pharmacological effects involved in antioxidant activity. However, its antioxidant activity has not been reported so far. The aim of the present study was to systematically evaluate the antioxidant ability of RC in vitro, then discuss the mechanism. Methods Firstly, five RC extracts (i.e. petroleum ether extract PERC, ethyl acetate extract EARC, absolute ethanol extract AERC, 95% ethanol extract 95ERC, and water extract WRC) were prepared and determined by various antioxidant methods, including anti-lipidperoxidation, protection against DNA damage, ·OH scavenging, ·O2- scavenging, DPPH· (1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazl radical) scavenging, ABTS+· (2,2’-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzo- thiazoline-6-sulfonic acid radical ion) scavenging, Cu2+-chelating, and Fe3+ reducing assays. Subsequently, we measured the chemical contents of five RC extracts, including total phenolics, total saponins, total sugars, caffeic acid, ferulic acid and isoferulic acid. Finally, we quantitatively analyzed the correlations between antioxidant levels (1/IC50 values) and chemical contents. Results In the study, the antioxidant levels and chemical contents (including total phenolics, total saponins, total sugars, caffeic acid, ferulic acid and isoferulic acid) of five RC extracts were determined by various methods. In all antioxidant assays, five RC extracts increased the antioxidant levels in a dose-dependent manner. However, their antioxidant levels (IC50 values) and chemical contents significantly differed from each other. Quantitative analysis of the correlation showed that total phenolic was of significant positive correlations (average R value was 0.56) with antioxidant levels; In contrast, total sugars and total saponins had no positive correlation with antioxidant (the average R values were −0.20 and −0.26, for total sugars and total saponins, respectively); Among total

  4. Development of Subischial Prosthetic Sockets with Vacuum-Assisted Suspension for Highly Active Persons with Transfemoral Amputations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0744 TITLE: Development of Subischial Prosthetic Sockets with Vacuum-Assisted Suspension for Highly Active Persons with...Sockets with Vacuum- Assisted Suspension for Highly Active Persons with Transfemoral Amputations 5b. GRANT NUMBER OR090122 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...prosthetic socket with assisted-vacuum suspension for highly active persons with transfemoral amputation. The Specific Aims are to: A1. Develop a

  5. Electromyographic reflex responses to mechanical force, manually assisted spinal manipulative therapy.

    PubMed

    Colloca, C J; Keller, T S

    2001-05-15

    Surface electromyographic reflex responses associated with mechanical force, manually assisted (MFMA) spinal manipulative therapy were analyzed in this prospective clinical investigation of 20 consecutive patients with low back pain. To characterize and determine the magnitude of electromyographic reflex responses in human paraspinal muscles during high loading rate mechanical force, manually assisted spinal manipulative therapy of the thoracolumbar spine and sacroiliac joints. Spinal manipulative therapy has been investigated for its effectiveness in the treatment of patients with low back pain, but its physiologic mechanisms are not well understood. Noteworthy is the fact that spinal manipulative therapy has been demonstrated to produce consistent reflex responses in the back musculature; however, no study has examined the extent of reflex responses in patients with low back pain. Twenty patients (10 male and 10 female, mean age 43.0 years) underwent standard physical examination on presentation to an outpatient chiropractic clinic. After repeated isometric trunk extension strength tests, short duration (<5 msec), localized posteroanterior manipulative thrusts were delivered to the sacroiliac joints, and L5, L4, L2, T12, and T8 spinous processes and transverse processes. Surface, linear-enveloped electromyographic (sEMG) recordings were obtained from electrodes located bilaterally over the L5 and L3 erector spinae musculature. Force-time and sEMG time histories were recorded simultaneously to quantify the association between spinal manipulative therapy mechanical and electromyographic response. A total of 1600 sEMG recordings were analyzed from 20 spinal manipulative therapy treatments, and comparisons were made between segmental level, segmental contact point (spinous vs. transverse processes), and magnitude of the reflex response (peak-peak [p-p] ratio and relative mean sEMG). Positive sEMG responses were defined as >2.5 p-p baseline sEMG output (>3.5% relative

  6. A Proposed Mechanism for Detergent-Assisted Foam Fractionation of Lysozyme and Cellulase Restored With β-Cyclodextrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burapatana, Vorakan; Booth, Elizabeth A.; Snyder, Ian M.; Prokop, Ales; Tanner, Robert D.

    Foam fractionation by itself cannot effectively concentrate hydrophilic proteins such as lysozyme and cellulase. However, the addition of a detergent to a protein solution can increase the foam volume, and thus, the performance of the foam fractionation process. In this article, we propose a possible protein concentration mechanism of this detergent-assisted foam fractionation: A detergent binds to an oppositely charged protein, followed by the detergent—protein complex being adsorbed onto a bubble during aeration. The formation of this complex is inferred by a decrease in surface tension of the detergent—protein solution. The surface tension of a solution with the complex is lower than the surface tension of a protein or a detergent solution alone. The detergent can then be stripped from the adsorbed protein, such as cellulase, by an artificial chaperone such as β-cyclodextrin. Stripping the detergent from the protein allows the protein to return to its original conformation and to potentially retain all of its original activity following the foam fractionation process. Low-cost alternatives to β-cyclodextrin such as corn dextrin were tested experimentally to restore the protein activity through detergent stripping, but without success.

  7. Vision based assistive technology for people with dementia performing activities of daily living (ADLs): an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    As'ari, M. A.; Sheikh, U. U.

    2012-04-01

    The rapid development of intelligent assistive technology for replacing a human caregiver in assisting people with dementia performing activities of daily living (ADLs) promises in the reduction of care cost especially in training and hiring human caregiver. The main problem however, is the various kinds of sensing agents used in such system and is dependent on the intent (types of ADLs) and environment where the activity is performed. In this paper on overview of the potential of computer vision based sensing agent in assistive system and how it can be generalized and be invariant to various kind of ADLs and environment. We find that there exists a gap from the existing vision based human action recognition method in designing such system due to cognitive and physical impairment of people with dementia.

  8. Microwave-assisted extraction of active pharmaceutical ingredient from solid dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Hoang, T H; Sharma, R; Susanto, D; Di Maso, M; Kwong, E

    2007-07-13

    The microwave assisted extraction (MAE) technique has been evaluated for the extraction of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) from various solid dosage forms. Using immediate release tablets of Compound A as a model, optimization of the extraction method with regards to extraction solvent composition, extraction time and temperature was briefly discussed. Complete recovery of Compound A was achieved when samples were extracted using acetonitrile as the extraction solvent under microwave heating at a constant cell temperature of 50 degrees C for 5 min. The optimized MAE method was applied for content uniformity (single tablet extraction) and potency (multiple tablets extraction) assays of release and stability samples of two products of Compound A (5 and 25mg dose strength) stored at various conditions. To further demonstrate the applicability of MAE, the instrumental extraction conditions (50 degrees C for 5 min) were adopted for the extraction of montelukast sodium (Singulair) from various solid dosage forms using methanol-water (75:25, v/v) as the extraction solvent. The MAE procedure demonstrated an extraction efficiency of 97.4-101.9% label claim with the greatest RSD at 1.4%. The results compare favorably with 97.6-102.3% label claim with the greatest RSD at 2.9% obtained with validated mechanical extraction procedures. The system is affordable, user-friendly and simple to operate and troubleshoot. Rapid extraction process (7 min/run) along with high throughput capacity (up to 23 samples simultaneously) would lead to reduced cycle time and thus increased productivity.

  9. Physical activity when riding an electric assisted bicycle.

    PubMed

    Berntsen, Sveinung; Malnes, Lena; Langåker, Aleksander; Bere, Elling

    2017-04-26

    The objectives of the present study were to compare time spent cycling, exercise intensity, and time spent in moderate- (MPA) and vigorous intensity physical activity (VPA) when cycling on an E-bike and a conventional bicycle on two "cycling-to-work" routes with differences in topography, defined as a hilly and a flat route. Eight adults (23-54 years, two women) cycled outdoors on a conventional bicycle and an E-bike, on a flat (8.2 km) and a hilly (7.1 km) route, resulting in 32 journeys. Duration, elevation, and oxygen consumption were recorded using a portable oxygen analyser with GPS. A maximal cardiorespiratory fitness test was performed on a cycle ergometer. Resting metabolic rate was obtained by indirect calorimetry with a canopy hood. The participants spent less time (median (IQR)) cycling on the E-bike compared with the conventional bicycle, on both the hilly (18.8 (4.9) vs. 26.3 (6.4) minutes) and the flat (20.0 (2.9) vs. 23.8 (1.8) minutes) routes. Lower exercise intensity was observed with the E-bike compared with the conventional bicycle, both on the hilly (50 (18) vs. 60 (22) % of maximal oxygen uptake) and the flat (52 (19) vs. 55 (12) % of maximal oxygen uptake) routes. In both cycling modes, most time was spent in MVPA (92-99%). However, fewer minutes were spent in MVPA with the E-bike than the conventional bicycle, for both the hilly (26% lower) and the flat (17% lower) routes. Cycling on the E-bike also resulted in 35 and 15% fewer minutes in vigorous intensity, respectively on the hilly and flat routes. Cycling on the E-bike resulted in lower trip duration and exercise intensity, compared with the conventional bicycle. However, most of the time was spent in MVPA. This suggests that changing the commuting mode from car to E-bike will significantly increase levels of physical activity while commuting.

  10. Strong magnetic field-assisted growth of carbon nanofibers and its microstructural transformation mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Chengzhi; Fu, Qiang; Pan, Chunxu

    2015-01-01

    It is well-known that electric and magnetic fields can control the growth direction, morphology and microstructure of one-dimensional carbon nanomaterials (1-DCNMs), which plays a key role for its potential applications in micro-nano-electrics and devices. In this paper, we introduce a novel process for controlling growth of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) with assistance of a strong magnetic field (up to 0.5 T in the center) in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system. The results reveal that: 1) The CNFs get bundled when grown in the presence of a strong magnetic field and slightly get aligned parallel to the direction of the magnetic field; 2) The CNFs diameter become narrowed and homogenized with increase of the magnetic field; 3) With the increase of the magnetic field, the microstructure of CNFs is gradually changed, i.e., the strong magnetic field makes the disordered “solid-cored” CNFs transform into a kind of bamboo-liked carbon nanotubes; 4) We propose a mechanism that the reason for these variations and transformation is due to diamagnetic property of carbon atoms, so that it has direction selectivity in the precipitation process. PMID:25761381

  11. Chromophore-assisted laser inactivation (CALI) to elucidate cellular mechanisms of cancer.

    PubMed

    Jay, D G; Sakurai, T

    1999-10-29

    Chromophore-assisted laser inactivation (CALI) is a new technology for acute protein inactivation in living cells. It targets laser energy to specific proteins via non-function-blocking antibodies that are labeled with the dye malachite green. Excitation of the dye generates short-lived free radicals that damage the bound protein without affecting other cellular components. The wavelength of laser light used (620 nm) is not readily absorbed by cells such that non-specific light damage does not occur. CALI provides an alternative to other inactivation strategies and has the advantages of high spatial and temporal resolution. The ultimate value of this technology for cancer research will be assessed by how effective CALI is in ascribing in situ function during cancer-relevant processes and in identifying and validating protein targets for drug discovery. Recent work using CALI on ezrin and pp60-c-src, two proteins that may be involved in cancer, suggests its potential. Further application of CALI will likely be of utility for understanding cellular mechanisms of cancer and developing cancer therapeutics.

  12. Pearls and pitfalls in short-term mechanical circulatory assist: how to avoid and manage complications.

    PubMed

    Mohite, Prashant N; Maunz, Olaf; Simon, Andre R

    2014-10-01

    In today's era, given the worsening risk profiles of patients undergoing cardiac surgery, the increasing number of complex cardiac surgeries, and the increasing number of patients undergoing thoracic organ transplantation, short-term mechanical circulatory assist (MCA) devices are indispensable. MCA devices are capable of supporting heart and lung function and have emerged as potentially lifesaving instruments, but may prove to be as hazardous as helpful due to their inherent tendency toward hemolysis, thromboembolism, and hemorrhage. Although MCA devices are being used regularly at some specialized centers, surgeries involving MCA are not as common as other routine cardiac surgeries, and even though professionals implanting and maintaining short-term MCAs are well acquainted with operating such devices, it is not uncommon to come across complications as a result of minor mistakes committed while dealing with them. Avoiding simple mistakes and taking proper precautions while implanting and maintaining these devices can prevent major catastrophes. We discuss commonly encountered problems and complications during the implantation and maintenance of short-term MCAs and offer reasonable and practical solutions. In addition, crucial issues such as anticoagulation, replacement of the device circuit, and management of the distal perfusion cannula are discussed. Continuous and efficient monitoring of the MCA device and the patient supported on MCA, together with anticipation and avoidance of complications, is key for successful short-term MCA support. Copyright © 2014 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Recent advances in computational methodology for simulation of mechanical circulatory assist devices

    PubMed Central

    Marsden, Alison L.; Bazilevs, Yuri; Long, Christopher C.; Behr, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Ventricular assist devices (VADs) provide mechanical circulatory support to offload the work of one or both ventricles during heart failure. They are used in the clinical setting as destination therapy, as bridge to transplant, or more recently as bridge to recovery to allow for myocardial remodeling. Recent developments in computational simulation allow for detailed assessment of VAD hemodynamics for device design and optimization for both children and adults. Here, we provide a focused review of the recent literature on finite element methods and optimization for VAD simulations. As VAD designs typically fall into two categories, pulsatile and continuous flow devices, we separately address computational challenges of both types of designs, and the interaction with the circulatory system with three representative case studies. In particular, we focus on recent advancements in finite element methodology that has increased the fidelity of VAD simulations. We outline key challenges, which extend to the incorporation of biological response such as thrombosis and hemolysis, as well as shape optimization methods and challenges in computational methodology. PMID:24449607

  14. Mechanisms and clinical applications of the vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) Device: a review.

    PubMed

    Venturi, Mark L; Attinger, Christopher E; Mesbahi, Ali N; Hess, Christopher L; Graw, Katherine S

    2005-01-01

    The use of sub-atmospheric pressure dressings, available commercially as the vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) device, has been shown to be an effective way to accelerate healing of various wounds. The optimal sub-atmospheric pressure for wound healing appears to be approximately 125 mm Hg utilizing an alternating pressure cycle of 5 minutes of suction followed by 2 minutes off suction. Animal studies have demonstrated that this technique optimizes blood flow, decreases local tissue edema, and removes excessive fluid from the wound bed. These physiologic changes facilitate the removal of bacteria from the wound. Additionally, the cyclical application of sub-atmospheric pressure alters the cytoskeleton of the cells in the wound bed, triggering a cascade of intracellular signals that increases the rate of cell division and subsequent formation of granulation tissue. The combination of these mechanisms makes the VAC device an extremely versatile tool in the armamentarium of wound healing. This is evident in the VAC device's wide range of clinical applications, including treatment of infected surgical wounds, traumatic wounds, pressure ulcers, wounds with exposed bone and hardware, diabetic foot ulcers, and venous stasis ulcers. VAC has also proven useful in reconstruction of wounds by allowing elective planning of the definitive reconstructive surgery without jeopardizing the wound or outcome. Furthermore, VAC has significantly increased the skin graft success rate when used as a bolster over the freshly skin-grafted wound. VAC is generally well tolerated and, with few contraindications or complications, is fast becoming a mainstay of current wound care.

  15. Laser Pulse Width Dependence and Ionization Mechanism of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Sheng-Ping; Lu, I.-Chung; Tsai, Shang-Ting; Chen, Jien-Lian; Lee, Yuan Tseh; Ni, Chi-Kung

    2017-10-01

    Ultraviolet laser pulses at 355 nm with variable pulse widths in the region from 170 ps to 1.5 ns were used to investigate the ionization mechanism of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) for matrices 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB), α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA), and sinapinic acid (SA). The mass spectra of desorbed ions and the intensity and velocity distribution of desorbed neutrals were measured simultaneously for each laser shot. These quantities were found to be independent of the laser pulse width. A comparison of the experimental measurements and numerical simulations according to the multiphoton ionization, coupled photophysical and chemical dynamics (CPCD), and thermally induced proton transfer models showed that the predictions of thermally induced proton transfer model were in agreement with the experimental data, but those of the multiphoton ionization model were not. Moreover, the predictions of the CPCD model based on singlet-singlet energy pooling were inconsistent with the experimental data of CHCA and SA, but were consistent with the experimental data of DHB only when some parameters used in the model were adjusted to extreme values. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. Strong magnetic field-assisted growth of carbon nanofibers and its microstructural transformation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Chengzhi; Fu, Qiang; Pan, Chunxu

    2015-03-01

    It is well-known that electric and magnetic fields can control the growth direction, morphology and microstructure of one-dimensional carbon nanomaterials (1-DCNMs), which plays a key role for its potential applications in micro-nano-electrics and devices. In this paper, we introduce a novel process for controlling growth of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) with assistance of a strong magnetic field (up to 0.5 T in the center) in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system. The results reveal that: 1) The CNFs get bundled when grown in the presence of a strong magnetic field and slightly get aligned parallel to the direction of the magnetic field; 2) The CNFs diameter become narrowed and homogenized with increase of the magnetic field; 3) With the increase of the magnetic field, the microstructure of CNFs is gradually changed, i.e., the strong magnetic field makes the disordered ``solid-cored'' CNFs transform into a kind of bamboo-liked carbon nanotubes; 4) We propose a mechanism that the reason for these variations and transformation is due to diamagnetic property of carbon atoms, so that it has direction selectivity in the precipitation process.

  17. A study on dynamic heat assisted magnetization reversal mechanisms under insufficient reversal field conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. J.; Yang, H. Z.; Leong, S. H.; Wu, B. L.; Asbahi, M.; Yu Ko, Hnin Yu; Yang, J. K. W.; Ng, V.

    2014-10-01

    We report an experimental study on the dynamic thermomagnetic (TM) reversal mechanisms at around Curie temperature (Tc) for isolated 60 nm pitch single-domain [Co/Pd] islands heated by a 1.5 μm spot size laser pulse under an applied magnetic reversal field (Hr). Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) observations with high resolution MFM tips clearly showed randomly trapped non-switched islands within the laser irradiated spot after dynamic TM reversal process with insufficient Hr strength. This observation provides direct experimental evidence by MFM of a large magnetization switching variation due to increased thermal fluctuation/agitation over magnetization energy at the elevated temperature of around Tc. The average percentage of non-switched islands/magnetization was further found to be inversely proportional to the applied reversal field Hr for incomplete magnetization reversal when Hr is less than 13% of the island coercivity (Hc), showing an increased switching field distribution (SFD) at elevated temperature of around Tc (where main contributions to SFD broadening are from Tc distribution and stronger thermal fluctuations). Our experimental study and results provide better understanding and insight on practical heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) process and recording performance, including HAMR writing magnetization dynamics induced SFD as well as associated DC saturation noise that limits areal density, as were previously observed and investigated by theoretical simulations.

  18. A study on dynamic heat assisted magnetization reversal mechanisms under insufficient reversal field conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y. J.; Yang, H. Z.; Leong, S. H.; Yu Ko, Hnin Yu; Wu, B. L.; Ng, V.; Asbahi, M.; Yang, J. K. W.

    2014-10-20

    We report an experimental study on the dynamic thermomagnetic (TM) reversal mechanisms at around Curie temperature (Tc) for isolated 60 nm pitch single-domain [Co/Pd] islands heated by a 1.5 μm spot size laser pulse under an applied magnetic reversal field (Hr). Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) observations with high resolution MFM tips clearly showed randomly trapped non-switched islands within the laser irradiated spot after dynamic TM reversal process with insufficient Hr strength. This observation provides direct experimental evidence by MFM of a large magnetization switching variation due to increased thermal fluctuation/agitation over magnetization energy at the elevated temperature of around Tc. The average percentage of non-switched islands/magnetization was further found to be inversely proportional to the applied reversal field Hr for incomplete magnetization reversal when Hr is less than 13% of the island coercivity (Hc), showing an increased switching field distribution (SFD) at elevated temperature of around Tc (where main contributions to SFD broadening are from Tc distribution and stronger thermal fluctuations). Our experimental study and results provide better understanding and insight on practical heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) process and recording performance, including HAMR writing magnetization dynamics induced SFD as well as associated DC saturation noise that limits areal density, as were previously observed and investigated by theoretical simulations.

  19. Mechanism of irradiation assisted stress corrosion crack initiation in thermally sensitized 304 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onchi, T.; Dohi, K.; Soneda, N.; Navas, Marta; Castaño, M. L.

    2005-04-01

    Thermally sensitized 304 stainless steels, irradiated up to 1.2 × 1021 n/cm2 (E > 1 MeV), were slow-strain-rate-tensile tested in 290 °C water containing 0.2 ppm dissolved oxygen (DO), followed by scanning and transmission electron microscopic examinations, to study mechanism of irradiation-assisted-stress-corrosion-crack (IASCC) initiation. Intergranular (IG) cracking behaviors changed at a border fluence (around 1 × 1020 n/cm2), above which deformation twinning were predominant and deformation localization occurred earlier with increasing fluence. The crack initiation sites tended to link to the deformation bands, indicating that the crack initiation may be brought about by the deformation bands interacted with grain boundaries. Thus the border fluence is equivalent to the IASCC threshold fluence for the sensitized material, although the terminology of IASCC is originally given to the non-sensitized materials without microstructural definition. The IASCC threshold fluence was found to change with irradiation conditions. Changes in IASCC susceptibility and IASCC threshold fluence with fluence and DO were further discussed.

  20. Surfactant-assisted dispersion of carbon nanotubes: mechanism of stabilization and biocompatibility of the surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Raman Preet; Jain, Sanyog; Ramarao, Poduri

    2013-10-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are thermodynamically unstable system and tend to aggregate to reduce free energy. The aggregation property of NPs results in inhomogeneous exposure of cells to NPs resulting in variable cellular responses. Several types of surfactants are used to stabilize NP dispersions and obtain homogenous dispersions. However, the effects of these surfactants, per se, on cellular responses are not completely known. The present study investigated the application of Pluronic F68 (PF68) for obtaining stable dispersion of NPs using carbon nanotubes as model NPs. PF68-stabilized NP suspensions are stable for long durations and do not show signs of aggregation or settling during storage or after autoclaving. The polyethylene oxide blocks in PF68 provide steric hindrance between adjacent NPs leading to stable NP dispersions. Further, PF68 is biocompatible in nature and does not affect integrity of mitochondria, lysosomes, DNA, and nuclei. Also, PF68 neither induce free radical or cytokine production nor does it interfere with cellular uptake mechanisms. The results of the present study suggest that PF68-assisted dispersion of NPs produced suspensions, which are stable after autoclaving. Further, PF68 does not interfere with normal physiological functions suggesting its application in nanomedicine and nanotoxicity evaluation.

  1. Laser Pulse Width Dependence and Ionization Mechanism of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Sheng-Ping; Lu, I.-Chung; Tsai, Shang-Ting; Chen, Jien-Lian; Lee, Yuan Tseh; Ni, Chi-Kung

    2017-07-01

    Ultraviolet laser pulses at 355 nm with variable pulse widths in the region from 170 ps to 1.5 ns were used to investigate the ionization mechanism of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) for matrices 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB), α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA), and sinapinic acid (SA). The mass spectra of desorbed ions and the intensity and velocity distribution of desorbed neutrals were measured simultaneously for each laser shot. These quantities were found to be independent of the laser pulse width. A comparison of the experimental measurements and numerical simulations according to the multiphoton ionization, coupled photophysical and chemical dynamics (CPCD), and thermally induced proton transfer models showed that the predictions of thermally induced proton transfer model were in agreement with the experimental data, but those of the multiphoton ionization model were not. Moreover, the predictions of the CPCD model based on singlet-singlet energy pooling were inconsistent with the experimental data of CHCA and SA, but were consistent with the experimental data of DHB only when some parameters used in the model were adjusted to extreme values.

  2. Biomechanical effects of robot assisted walking on knee joint kinematics and muscle activation pattern.

    PubMed

    Thangavel, Pavithra; Vidhya, S; Li, Junhua; Chew, Effie; Bezerianos, Anastasios; Yu, Haoyong

    2017-07-01

    Since manual rehabilitation therapy can be taxing for both the patient and the physiotherapist, a gait rehabilitation robot has been built to reduce the physical strain and increase the efficacy of the rehabilitation therapy. The prototype of the gait rehabilitation robot is designed to provide assistance while walking for patients with abnormal gait pattern and it can also be used for rehabilitation therapy to restore an individual's normal gait pattern by aiding motor recovery. The Gait Rehabilitation Robot uses gait event based synchronization, which enables the exoskeleton to provide synchronous assistance during walking that aims to reduce the lower-limb muscle activation. This study emphasizes on the biomechanical effects of assisted walking on the lower limb by analyzing the EMG signal, knee joint kinematics data that was collected from the right leg during the various experimental conditions. The analysis of the measured data shows an improved knee joint trajectory and reduction in muscle activity with assistance. The result of this study does not only assess the functionality of the exoskeleton but also provides a profound understanding of the human-robot interaction by studying the effects of assistance on the lower limb.

  3. Characteristics of mechanical heart valve cavitation in a pneumatic ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwansung; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki

    2008-06-01

    In previous studies, we investigated the mechanism of mechanical heart valve (MHV) cavitation and cavitation intensity with a nonsynchronized experiment system. Our group is currently developing a pneumatic ventricular assist device (PVAD), and in this study we investigated MHV cavitation intensity in the PVAD using a synchronized analysis of the cavitation images and the acoustic signal of cavitation bubbles. A 23-mm Medtronic Hall valve with an opening angle of 70 degrees was mounted in the mitral position of the PVAD after removing the sewing ring. A function generator provided a square signal, which used the trigger signal of the electrocardiogram R wave (ECG-R) mode of the control-drive console for circulatory support. This square signal was delayed by a delay circuit and was then used as the trigger signal for a pressure sensor and a high-speed video camera. The data were stored using a digital oscilloscope at a 1-MHz sampling rate, and then the pressure signal was band-pass filtered between 35 and 200 kHz using a digital filter. The band-pass filtered root mean squared (RMS) pressure and cavitation cycle duration were used as an index of cavitation intensity. The cavitation bubbles were concentrated at the valve stop, and the cavitation cycle duration and RMS pressure increased as the heart rate and driving pressure increased. At the low valve-closing velocity, bubble cavitation was observed near the valve stop. However, at the fast valve-closing velocity, cloud cavitation was observed. A high-frequency signal wave was generated when the bubbles collapsed. The cavitation cycle duration and RMS pressure increased as the valve-closing velocity increased linearly.

  4. Mechanisms of defect complex formation and environmental-assisted fracture behavior of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, B.R.; Muratov, L.S.; Kang, B.S.J.; Li, K.Z.

    1997-12-01

    Iron aluminide has excellent corrosion resistance in high-temperature oxidizing-sulfidizing environments; however, there are problems at room and medium temperature with hydrogen embrittlement as related to exposure to moisture. In this research, a coordinated computational modeling/experimental study of mechanisms related to environmental-assisted fracture behavior of selected iron aluminides is being undertaken. The modeling and the experimental work will connect at the level of coordinated understanding of the mechanisms for hydrogen penetration and for loss of strength and susceptibility to fracture. The focus of the modeling component at this point is on the challenging question of accurately predicting the iron vacancy formation energy in Fe{sub 3}A{ell} and the subsequent tendency, if present, for vacancy clustering. The authors have successfully performed, on an ab initio basis, the first calculation of the vacancy formation energy in Fe{sub 3}A{ell}. These calculations include lattice relaxation effects which are quite large. This has significant implications for vacancy clustering effects with consequences to be explored for hydrogen diffusion. The experimental work at this stage has focused on the relationship of the choice and concentration of additives to the improvement of resistance to hydrogen embrittlement and hence to the fracture behavior. For this reason, comparative crack growth tests of FA-186, FA-187, and FA-189 iron aluminides (all with basic composition of Fe-28A{ell}-5Cr, at % with micro-alloying additives of Zr, C or B) under, air, oxygen, or water environment have been performed. These tests showed that the alloys are susceptible to room temperature hydrogen embrittlement in both B2 and DO{sub 3} conditions. Test results indicated that FA-187, and FA-189 are intrinsically more brittle than FA-186.

  5. Substrate-Assisted Catalysis in the Reaction Catalyzed by Salicylic Acid Binding Protein 2 (SABP2), a Potential Mechanism of Substrate Discrimination for Some Promiscuous Enzymes

    DOE PAGES

    Yao, Jianzhuang; Guo, Haobo; Chaiprasongsuk, Minta; ...

    2015-08-05

    Although one of an enzyme’s hallmarks is the high specificity for their natural substrates, substrate promiscuity has been reported more frequently. We know that promiscuous enzymes generally show different catalytic efficiencies to different substrates, but our understanding of the origin of such differences is still lacking. We report the results of quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations and an experimental study of salicylic acid binding protein 2 (SABP2). SABP2 has promiscuous esterase activity toward a series of substrates but shows a high activity toward its natural substrate, methyl salicylate (MeSA). Finally, our results demonstrate that this enzyme may use substrate-assisted catalysis involvingmore » the hydroxyl group from MeSA to enhance the activity and achieve substrate discrimination.« less

  6. Substrate-Assisted Catalysis in the Reaction Catalyzed by Salicylic Acid Binding Protein 2 (SABP2), a Potential Mechanism of Substrate Discrimination for Some Promiscuous Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jianzhuang; Guo, Haobo; Chaiprasongsuk, Minta; Zhao, Nan; Chen, Feng; Yang, Xiaohan; Guo, Hong

    2015-09-01

    Although one of an enzyme's hallmarks is the high specificity for their natural substrates, substrate promiscuity has been reported more frequently. It is known that promiscuous enzymes generally show different catalytic efficiencies to different substrates, but our understanding of the origin of such differences is still lacking. Here we report the results of quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations and an experimental study of salicylic acid binding protein 2 (SABP2). SABP2 has promiscuous esterase activity toward a series of substrates but shows a high activity toward its natural substrate, methyl salicylate (MeSA). Our results demonstrate that this enzyme may use substrate-assisted catalysis involving the hydroxyl group from MeSA to enhance the activity and achieve substrate discrimination.

  7. Substrate-Assisted Catalysis in the Reaction Catalyzed by Salicylic Acid Binding Protein 2 (SABP2), a Potential Mechanism of Substrate Discrimination for Some Promiscuous Enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Jianzhuang; Guo, Haobo; Chaiprasongsuk, Minta; Zhao, Nan; Chen, Feng; Yang, Xiaohan; Guo, Hong

    2015-08-05

    Although one of an enzyme’s hallmarks is the high specificity for their natural substrates, substrate promiscuity has been reported more frequently. We know that promiscuous enzymes generally show different catalytic efficiencies to different substrates, but our understanding of the origin of such differences is still lacking. We report the results of quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations and an experimental study of salicylic acid binding protein 2 (SABP2). SABP2 has promiscuous esterase activity toward a series of substrates but shows a high activity toward its natural substrate, methyl salicylate (MeSA). Finally, our results demonstrate that this enzyme may use substrate-assisted catalysis involving the hydroxyl group from MeSA to enhance the activity and achieve substrate discrimination.

  8. Pedagogical Values of Mobile-Assisted Task-Based Activities to Enhance Speaking Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammadi, Mojtaba; Safdari, Nastaran

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the impact of online mobile-assisted task-based activities on improving Iranian intermediate English as a Foreign Language (EFL) learners' speaking skills. To achieve the purpose of the study, 90 intermediate language learners were selected ranging between 13 to 16 years old and divided into three…

  9. Robots to assist daily activities: views of older adults with Alzheimer's disease and their caregivers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rosalie H; Sudhama, Aishwarya; Begum, Momotaz; Huq, Rajibul; Mihailidis, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Robots have the potential to both enable older adults with dementia to perform daily activities with greater independence, and provide support to caregivers. This study explored perspectives of older adults with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and their caregivers on robots that provide stepwise prompting to complete activities in the home. Ten dyads participated: Older adults with mild-to-moderate AD and difficulty completing activity steps, and their family caregivers. Older adults were prompted by a tele-operated robot to wash their hands in the bathroom and make a cup of tea in the kitchen. Caregivers observed interactions. Semi-structured interviews were conducted individually. Transcribed interviews were thematically analyzed. Three themes summarized responses to robot interactions: contemplating a future with assistive robots, considering opportunities with assistive robots, and reflecting on implications for social relationships. Older adults expressed opportunities for robots to help in daily activities, were open to the idea of robotic assistance, but did not want a robot. Caregivers identified numerous opportunities and were more open to robots. Several wanted a robot, if available. Positive consequences of robots in caregiving scenarios could include decreased frustration, stress, and relationship strain, and increased social interaction via the robot. A negative consequence could be decreased interaction with caregivers. Few studies have investigated in-depth perspectives of older adults with dementia and their caregivers following direct interaction with an assistive prompting robot. To fulfill the potential of robots, continued dialogue between users and developers, and consideration of robot design and caregiving relationship factors are necessary.

  10. 24 CFR 570.210 - Prohibition on use of assistance for employment relocation activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES COMMUNITY... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prohibition on use of assistance for employment relocation activities. 570.210 Section 570.210 Housing and Urban Development...

  11. 77 FR 14972 - Discrimination on the Basis of Disability in Federally Assisted Programs and Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-14

    ... CFR Part 104 Discrimination on the Basis of Disability in Federally Assisted Programs and Activities... Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Department's implementing regulations, which prohibit discrimination on the... Act of 1973 (Section 504),\\1\\ which prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability \\2\\...

  12. The Efficacy of Equine-Assisted Activities and Therapies on Improving Physical Function.

    PubMed

    Rigby, B Rhett; Grandjean, Peter W

    2016-01-01

    To summarize the physical benefits of therapeutic horseback riding and hippotherapy and suggest directions for future research. Review of databases for peer-reviewed articles related to equine-assisted activities and therapies. Databases included MEDLINE via EBSCO, Web of Science, PubMed, Google Scholar, and Academic Search Complete. Articles were limited to those with full-text access published in English since 1987. Acute and residual improvements in physical benefits, such as gross motor function (e.g., walking, running, jumping), spasticity, muscle symmetry, posture, balance, and gait occur in adults and children with varying disabilities. The benefits appear to be greatest following multiweek interventions with one or more sessions per week. Modest acute cardiovascular responses are observed during equine-assisted activities and therapies with little or no evidence for training improvements in heart rate or blood pressure at rest or during riding. The present body of literature provides evidence that equine-assisted activities and therapies are an effective means of improving many measures of physical health. However, more controlled trials are urgently needed to strengthen the current knowledge base, establish dose-response characteristics of equine-assisted activities and therapies, and explore the physiologic basis for the promising results suggested from the literature.

  13. 34 CFR 642.10 - Activities the Secretary assists under the Training Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Activities the Secretary assists under the Training Program. 642.10 Section 642.10 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TRAINING PROGRAM FOR FEDERAL TRIO...

  14. 34 CFR 654.3 - What kind of activity may be assisted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What kind of activity may be assisted? 654.3 Section 654.3 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ROBERT C. BYRD HONORS SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM General § 654.3...

  15. 34 CFR 464.3 - What kinds of activities may be assisted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What kinds of activities may be assisted? 464.3 Section 464.3 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STATE LITERACY RESOURCE CENTERS PROGRAM General § 464...

  16. 34 CFR 464.3 - What kinds of activities may be assisted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What kinds of activities may be assisted? 464.3 Section 464.3 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STATE LITERACY RESOURCE CENTERS PROGRAM General § 464...

  17. Assisting Persons with Multiple Disabilities to Move through Simple Occupational Activities with Automatic Prompting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Oliva, Doretta; Campodonico, Francesca; Groeneweg, Jop

    2008-01-01

    The present study assessed the possibility of assisting four persons with multiple disabilities to move through and perform simple occupational activities arranged within a room with the help of automatic prompting. The study involved two multiple probe designs across participants. The first multiple probe concerned the two participants with…

  18. Designing and Applying Web Assisted Activities to Be Used in Flipped Classroom Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çetinkaya, Murat

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop personalized web assisted activities for the flipped classroom model applied in the "Human and Environment Interactions" unit of science lesson and to research its effect on students' achievement. The study was conducted with the 74 participation of 7th grade science lesson students within a period…

  19. Effects of an Equine Assisted Activities Program on Youth with Emotional Disturbance: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stebbins, Tira

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of a 10-week Equine Assisted Activities (EAA) program on special education students (aged 9 to 15) identified as Emotionally Disturbed (ED) who were enrolled in an alternative school. A control group of special education students receiving treatment-as-usual was included. The Behavior Assessment Scale for Children,…

  20. Effects of an Equine Assisted Activities Program on Youth with Emotional Disturbance: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stebbins, Tira

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of a 10-week Equine Assisted Activities (EAA) program on special education students (aged 9 to 15) identified as Emotionally Disturbed (ED) who were enrolled in an alternative school. A control group of special education students receiving treatment-as-usual was included. The Behavior Assessment Scale for Children,…

  1. Need for Assistance in the Activities of Daily Living. Disability Statistics Abstract, Number 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Jae; LaPlante, Mitchell P.; Kaye, H. Stephen

    This abstract summarizes recent statistics on those needing assistance in Activities of Daily Living (ADLs), along with participation rates for various proposed benefit programs, based on an analysis of the 1990-91 Survey of Income and Program Participation. Analysis indicates: (1) an estimated 1.9 percent of the population has difficulty…

  2. Design and control of an active 1-DoF mechanism for knee rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Naghavi, Nader; Mahjoob, Mohammad J

    2016-10-01

    A 1-DoF robot is designed and fabricated to be used for knee rehabilitation training. The mechanism (robot) is designed to perform specific set of exercises while the patient is sitting on a chair. The therapy process for patients has different stages; each stage consists of specific exercises to recover the knee to its condition before injury. The maximum torque of healthy joint during the extension/flexion exercise is evaluated by simulation and suitable actuator is selected based on the results. A prototype is then fabricated as a platform to evaluate the design and control concepts. The experiment procedure consisting of three stages of therapy indicates good tracking performance and safe operation of the system. Implication for Rehabilitation A 1-DoF mechanism for knee rehabilitation has been designed to perform three stages of therapy: passive, active assist and active resist. The assistive and resistive torque, during active assist and active resist stages, can be set according to the progress in therapy. The results of this study suggest the system has the potential to result in various benefits including reduction of physical workload of physiotherapists and improved repeatability.

  3. Mechanical behaviour of metallic thin films on polymeric substrates and the effect of ion beam assistance on crack propagation

    SciTech Connect

    George, M. , E-Mail: matthieu.george@bnfl.com; Coupeau, C.; Colin, J.; Grilhe, J.

    2005-01-10

    The mechanisms of crack propagation in metallic films on polymeric substrates have been studied through in situ atomic force microscopy observations of thin films under tensile stresses and finite element stress calculations. Two series of films - ones deposited with ion beam assistance, the others without - have been investigated. The observations and stress calculations show that ion beam assistance can change drastically the propagation of cracks in coated materials: by improving the adhesion film/substrate, it slows down the delamination process, but in the same time enhances the cracks growth in the thickness of the material.

  4. Platelet Activation: The Mechanisms and Potential Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Seong-Hoon; Sim, Eun-Hye; Goh, Ri-Young; Park, Joo-In

    2016-01-01

    Beyond hemostasis and thrombosis, an increasing number of studies indicate that platelets play an integral role in intercellular communication, mediating inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities. Our knowledge about how platelets modulate inflammatory and immunity has greatly improved in recent years. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the pathways of platelet activation and potential application of platelet activation biomarkers to diagnosis and prediction of disease states. PMID:27403440

  5. Fibrinolytic agents: mechanisms of activity and pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Lijnen, H R; Collen, D

    1995-07-01

    Fibrinolytic (thrombolytic) agents activate the fibrinolytic system by conversion of the inactive proenzyme, plasminogen into the active enzyme plasmin, that degrades fibrin. Agents available for clinical use are: the physiologic tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA)--either in a single chain (scu-PA, prourokinase) or a two-chain (tcu-PA, urokinase) form, and the bacterial activator plasminogen streptokinase or its anisoylated complex with plasminogen (APSAC). Despite their widespread use, mainly in patients with acute myocardial infarction, all these agents suffer from a number of significant limitations, including resistance to reperfusion, the occurrence of acute coronary reocclusion and bleeding complications. Several lines of research towards improvement of thrombolytic agents are being explored, including the construction of mutants and variants of plasminogen activators, chimeric plasminogen activators, or plasminogen activators from animal (e.g. vampire bat) or bacterial (e.g. staphylokinase) origin. Pilot studies in patients with acute myocardial infarction have been performed with a few selected agents. Definition of their relative therapeutic benefit, or lack thereof, will require more detailed dose-finding studies, followed by randomized clinical trials against presently available thrombolytic agents.

  6. Study of the Stereochemistry and Oxidation Mechanism of Plant Polyphenols, Assisted by Computational Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Yosuke

    2017-01-01

     In recent years, plant polyphenols have attracted great attention due to their wide range of biological activities. Certain kinds of polyphenols have complex structures; therefore, it is difficult to elucidate their total structure, including stereochemistry. In this study, we reinvestigated the stereostructures of two major C-glycosidic ellagitannins contained in Quercus plants, vescalagin and castalagin, and revised their stereostructures based on theoretical calculations of spectroscopic data. We also determined the structures of quercusnins A and B, isolated from the sapwood of Quercus crispula, based on theoretical calculations of NMR data. The oxidation mechanism of polyphenols has not been entirely elucidated. Therefore, we have also studied the oxidation mechanism of tea catechins during black tea production. Our investigation of the oxidation mechanism of black tea pigment theaflavins revealed that the difference in the position of the galloyl ester affords different oxidation products of theaflavins. In addition, oxidation products of pyrogallol-type catechins could be classified into three types-dehydrotheasinensins, theacitrins, and proepitheaflagallins; their detailed production and degradation mechanisms were also examined.

  7. Temperature assisted radiative and non-radiative recombination mechanisms in sillimanite (Al2SiO5) mineral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalita, J. M.; Wary, G.

    2017-03-01

    Temperature assisted luminescence in sillimanite (Al2SiO5) mineral was studied using thermoluminescence (TL). TL characteristics were studied in un-annealed and different annealed samples. Analysis showed that in the un-annealed sample, there was four electron trapping sites at depths 0.56, 0.87, 1.08, 1.32 eV and a hole trapping site at depth 3.63 eV from the conduction band acting as a recombination center. Further analysis on the annealed samples showed that the 0.56 eV trapping site was a pressure induced surface trap and it disappeared after annealing. However, the other trapping and recombination sites were found to be stable under thermal treatment. Due to this trap distribution, three partially overlapping glow peaks were observed. The glow peaks were found to be affected by thermal quenching. The thermal quenching parameters were evaluated from the composite glow curves by using Computerized Resolved Peak (CRP) technique. The activation energies for thermal quenching (W) estimated from the three peaks were found to be 0.69 ± 0.05, 0.92 ± 0.06 and 1.15 ± 0.03 eV respectively and the pre-exponential factors (C) were 1.12 × 108, 2.65 × 1010 and 9.23 × 1011 respectively. Based on the analysis, a band model was proposed and the whole radiative and non-radiative recombination mechanisms were discussed.

  8. Intracellular mechanisms of lymphoid cell activation.

    PubMed

    Fresa, K; Hameed, M; Cohen, S

    1989-01-01

    Activation of lymphocytes for proliferation is associated with the appearance of an intracellular factor (ADR) that can induce DNA synthesis in isolated quiescent nuclei. ADR plays a role in the sequence of intracellular events leading to activation for IL-2-mediated proliferation. Because of the nature of the defining assay, the locus of ADR action appears to be near the terminal end of the transduction pathway. Interestingly, although lymphocytes from aged individuals respond poorly to proliferative stimuli, they appear to produce normal to above-normal levels of ADR. In contrast, their nuclei are only poorly responsive to stimulation by ADR. Preparations rich in ADR activity have proteolytic activity as well. In addition, aprotinin, as well as a variety of other protease inhibitors, suppresses ADR-induced DNA synthesis in a dose-dependent manner. ADR activity can be removed from active extracts by absorption with aprotinin-conjugated agarose beads, and can be removed from the beads by elution at pH 5.0. This latter suggests that ADR itself is a protease. However, its endogenous substrate is not yet known. We have also detected an inhibitor of ADR activity in the cytoplasm of resting lymphocytes. This is a heat-stable protein of approximately 60,000 Da. In addition to suppressing the interaction of ADR with quiescent nuclei, the inhibitor can suppress DNA synthetic activity of replicative nuclei isolated from mitogen-activated lymphocytes. Interestingly, these preparations had little or no activity on replicative nuclei derived from several neoplastic cell lines. The resistance of tumor cell nuclei to spontaneously occurring cytoplasmic inhibitory factors such as the one described here may provide one explanation for the loss of growth control in neoplastic cells.

  9. Dynamic and quasi-static lung mechanics system for gas-assisted and liquid-assisted ventilation.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Francisco J; Gastiasoro, Elena; Rey-Santano, M Carmen; Gomez-Solaetxe, Miguel A; Publicover, Nelson G; Larrabe, Juan L

    2009-07-01

    Our aim was to develop a computerized system for real-time monitoring of lung mechanics measurements during both gas and liquid ventilation. System accuracy was demonstrated by calculating regression and percent error of the following parameters compared to standard device: airway pressure difference (Delta P(aw)), respiratory frequency (f(R) ), tidal volume (V(T)), minute ventilation (V'(E)), inspiratory and expiratory maximum flows (V'(ins,max), V'(exp,max)), dynamic lung compliance (C(L,dyn) ), resistance of the respiratory system calculated by method of Mead-Whittenberger (R(rs,MW)) and by equivalence to electrical circuits (R(rs,ele)), work of breathing (W(OB)), and overdistension. Outcome measures were evaluated as function of gas exchange, cardiovascular parameters, and lung mechanics including mean airway pressure (mP(aw)). Delata P(aw), V(T), V'(ins,max), V'(exp,max), and V'(E) measurements had correlation coefficients r = 1.00, and %error < 0.5%. f(R), C(L,dyn), R(rs,MW), R(rs,ele), and W(OB) showed r > or = 0.98 and %error < 5%. Overdistension had r = 0.87 and %error < 15%. Also, resistance was accurately calculated by a new algorithm. The system was tested in rats in which lung lavage was used to induce acute respiratory failure. After lavage, both gas- and liquid-ventilated groups had increased mP(aw) and W(OB), with decreased V(T), V'(E), C(L,dyn), R(rs,MW), and R(rs,ele) compared to controls. After 1-h ventilation, both injured group had decreased V(T), V'(E) , and C(L,dyn), with increased mP(aw), R(rs,MW), R(rs,ele), and W(OB) . In lung-injured animals, liquid ventilation restored gas exchange, and cardiovascular and lung functions. Our lung mechanics system was able to closely monitor pulmonary function, including during transitions between gas and liquid phases.

  10. Activity profile and physical demands of football referees and assistant referees in international games.

    PubMed

    Krustrup, Peter; Helsen, Werner; Randers, Morten B; Christensen, Jesper F; MacDonald, Christopher; Rebelo, Antonio Natal; Bangsbo, Jens

    2009-09-01

    Time-motion analyses and physiological measurements were performed to investigate the physiological demands of football referees (n = 15) and assistant referees (n = 15) in international games and to examine whether high-intensity running (HIR) correlates to the referees' ability to keep up with play. Total distance covered (10.27 +/- 0.90 vs. 6.76 +/- 0.83 km) and HIR (1.92 +/- 0.58 vs. 0.97 +/- 0.22 km) was higher (P < 0.05) for referees than assistant referees, while sprinting distance was not different. Referees covered 0.89 +/- 0.37 km by backwards running and assistant referees covered 1.54 +/- 0.66 km by sideways running. Mean heart rate was higher (P < 0.05) for referees than assistant referees (150 +/- 3 vs. 123 +/- 3 b.p.m.), whereas blood lactate was not different. Backwards/sideways running decreased (P < 0.05) from the first to the last 15-min period for referees (49%) and assistant referees (42%), whereas HIR was unaltered. HIR was inversely correlated with the five highest distances from infringements in both halves (r = -0.60 and -0.58, P < 0.05). In conclusion, international match officials carry out an important amount of HIR throughout games, while low-intensity and unorthodox running activities are reduced during games. Referees performing the most high-intensity work are better to keep up with play. The match activities differ significantly between referees and assistant referees, which should be considered in training and testing procedures.

  11. Animal-Assisted Activities for Students with Disabilities: Obtaining Stakeholders' Approval and Planning Strategies for Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumgartner, Erin; Cho, Jeong-il

    2014-01-01

    Animal-human interactions have been found to have positive influences on children across the world. In particular, research supports the benefits of animal-assisted activities in addressing students' social and behavioral problems within the classroom environment. The general information about animal-assisted activities provided in this…

  12. Animal-Assisted Activities for Students with Disabilities: Obtaining Stakeholders' Approval and Planning Strategies for Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumgartner, Erin; Cho, Jeong-il

    2014-01-01

    Animal-human interactions have been found to have positive influences on children across the world. In particular, research supports the benefits of animal-assisted activities in addressing students' social and behavioral problems within the classroom environment. The general information about animal-assisted activities provided in this…

  13. Risk factors for prolonged mechanical ventilation for children on ventricular assist device support.

    PubMed

    Prodhan, Parthak; Kalikivenkata, Giridhar; Tang, Xinyu; Thomas, Kassandra; Byrnes, Jonathan; Imamura, Michiaki; Jaquiss, Robert D B; Garcia, Xiomara; Frazier, Elizabeth A; Bhutta, Adnan T; Dyamenahalli, Umesh

    2015-05-01

    Patients with end-stage heart failure possess many attributes that place them at risk for prolonged mechanical ventilation (MV). However, there are only limited data on MV support among children after ventricular assist device (VAD) implantation. We report the duration of MV after VAD placement, indications for respiratory support in the postimplantation period, and associated patient factors. This single-center retrospective study included 43 consecutive children (aged <18 years) with end-stage heart failure who were supported with a VAD as a bridge to transplantation from January 2005 to December 2011. Multivariable analysis was performed using the multiple Poisson regression model for the duration of MV. Overall, 33% (n = 14) remained on MV until heart transplant or death. Of those requiring pre-VAD extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support, 63% (n = 12 of 19) remained on MV until heart transplant or death compared with 8% (n = 2 of 24) among those not on ECMO before VAD (p < 0.001). Patients with moderate or severe mitral regurgitation while on VAD support had 1.7-times more MV days compared with those with none or trivial on-VAD mitral regurgitation. In addition, previous support on ECMO, those with moderate or severe tricuspid regurgitation, and those with only left VAD implants had an increased risk of prolonged MV. Our results suggest that VAD recipients previously supported on ECMO, those with moderate or severe mitral regurgitation, moderate or severe tricuspid regurgitation, and those with only left VAD implants had an increased risk of prolonged MV. Future studies in larger cohorts are necessary to confirm the findings from this single-institutional experience. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Anchoring in Destination-Therapy Left Ventricular Assist Device Decision Making: A Mechanical Turk Survey.

    PubMed

    Paine, Arcadia M; Allen, Larry A; Thompson, Jocelyn S; McIlvennan, Colleen K; Jenkins, Amy; Hammes, Andrew; Kroehl, Miranda; Matlock, Daniel D

    2016-11-01

    People with end-stage heart failure may have to decide about destination-therapy left ventricular assist device (DT-LVAD). Individuals facing difficult decisions often rely on heuristics, such as anchoring, which predictably bias decision outcomes. We aimed to investigate whether showing a larger historical Heartmate XVE creates an anchoring effect, making the smaller Heartmate II (HMII) appear more favorable. With the use of Amazon Mechanical Turk, participants watched videos asking them to imagine themselves dying of end-stage heart failure, then were presented the option of LVAD as potentially life-prolonging therapy. Participants were randomized to a control group who were only shown the HMII device, and the intervention group who saw the XVE device before the HMII. Participants then completed surveys. A total of 487 participants completed the survey (control = 252; intervention = 235); 79% were <40 years of age, 84% were white, and 55% were male. The intervention group was not more likely to accept the LVAD therapy (68% vs 61%; P = .37). However, participants in the intervention group were more likely (51% vs 17%; P < .01) to agree or strongly agree with the statement that the HMII was "smaller than expected." Participants in the intervention group were also more likely to rate the size of the device as "important" or "very important" in their decision (61% vs 46%; P < .01). Although the XVE anchor did not affect likelihood of accepting the LVAD, it did affect device perception. This article highlights an important point with clinical implications: factors such as anchoring have the potential to inappropriately influence perceptions and decisions and should be carefully considered in research and practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization and growth mechanisms of boron nitride films synthesized by ion-beam-assisted deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burat, O.; Bouchier, D.; Stambouli, V.; Gautherin, G.

    1990-09-01

    We have studied boron nitride films deposited at room temperature by ion-beam-assisted deposition in an ultrahigh vacuum apparatus, with ion accelerating voltages ranging between 0.25 and 2 kV. By using complementarily in situ Auger electron spectrometry and ex situ nuclear analyses to determine the respective surface and bulk N concentrations in the deposited films, we were able to identify the different phases of the mechanism leading to the nitridation of evaporated boron by nitrogen ions. For low nitrogen/boron flux ratios, the incorporation of nitrogen seems to be only governed by ion implantation, and, with respect to the depth of the deposit, the surface is found largely depleted in nitrogen, while the N-incorporation yield remains close to one whatever the ion energy. Such a behavior is well verified as long as a critical bulk nitrogen concentration close to 5.5×1022 cm-3 has not been achieved. For concentrations greater than this, superstoichiometric material is obtained up to a saturation which corresponds to a bulk N incorporation ranging from 6 to 7×1022 cm-3. Further increase of the N/B flux ratio induces a strong diffusion process from N-rich bulk to N-depleted surface, which results in the nitridation of surface boron atoms and a loss of nitrogen by sputtering or desorption. The density measurements seem to indicate that the synthesized phase is close to h-BN. However, the density of B-rich layers ([N]/[B]≊0.2-0.3) is found to be very close to that calculated for a mixture of pure boron and c-BN. The transparency and microhardness of the synthesized BN have satisfying values for its application as a wear-resistant optical coating, but it is not c-BN.

  16. Characterization and x-ray absorption spectroscopy of ilmenite nanoparticles derived from natural ilmenite ore via acid-assisted mechanical ball-milling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phoohinkong, Weerachon; Pavasupree, Sorapong; Wannagon, Anucha; Sanguanpak, Samunya; Boonyarattanakalin, Kanokthip; Mekprasart, Wanichaya; Pecharapa, Wisanu

    2017-09-01

    In this work activated ilmenite nanoparticles were prepared by chemical-assisted in mechanical ball-milling process from ilmenite ore as starting raw material. The effect of milling process on their phase composition, particle size, surface morphology and local structure were investigated. Phase identification and crystalline structure of ilmenite mineral, milled samples and subsequent leached residues were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD). Meanwhile, the distorted octahedral structure and the oxidation state of relevant elements in ilmenite ore and activated ilmenite obtained by different process conditions were analyzed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Particle size and morphologies of the samples were monitored by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Three dominant peaks of TiO2 rutile, FeTiO3, and Fe2TiO4 are obviously adulterated in XRD patterns after mechanical milling with water and acid solution when comparing to precursor mineral. However, the contaminated phase of FeTiO3 and Fe2TiO4 was readily decreased by acid-assisted mechanical ball-milling. The enhancement in leaching process of ilmenite residue after milling can be obtained with sulfuric acid. This result suggests that iron contaminated phase could be leached from the sample resulting to the decrease in Fe environment around Ti atom. Invited talk at 5th Thailand International Nanotechnology Conference (Nano Thailand-2016), 27-29 November 2016, Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand.

  17. Effect of cadence regulation on muscle activation patterns during robot assisted gait: a dynamic simulation study.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Shahid; Xie, Sheng Q; Jamwal, Prashant K

    2013-03-01

    Cadence or stride frequency is an important parameter being controlled in gait training of neurologically impaired subjects. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of cadence variation on muscle activation patterns during robot assisted unimpaired gait using dynamic simulations. A twodimensional (2-D) musculoskeletal model of human gait was developed considering eight major muscle groups along with existing ground contact force (GCF) model. A 2-D model of a robotic orthosis was also developed which provides actuation to the hip, knee and ankle joints in the sagittal plane to guide subjects limbs on reference trajectories. A custom inverse dynamics algorithm was used along with a quadratic minimization algorithm to obtain a feasible set of muscle activation patterns. Predicted patterns of muscle activations during slow, natural and fast cadence were compared and the mean muscle activations were found to be increasing with an increase in cadence. The proposed dynamic simulation provide important insight into the muscle activation variations with change in cadence during robot assisted gait and provide the basis for investigating the influence of cadence regulation on neuromuscular parameters of interest during robot assisted gait.

  18. Mechanical properties of active polyacrylonitrile gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, Steven P.; Ramesh, Kaliat T.; Douglas, Andrew S.

    1999-05-01

    The ability of some polymeric gels to shrink and swell with changes in their environment makes them of interest in many applications such as artificial muscles and drug delivery systems. While much work has been done to study the behavior and properties of these gels, little information is available regarding the full constitutive description of the mechanical and actuation properties. This work is focused on developing constitutive descriptions of the mechanical properties of such gels, and to determine how these properties change due to changes in the environment. Since these gels can undergo finite elastic deformations, uniaxial tests do not provide sufficient property information and a combination of loading conditions must be used. A biaxial testing system has been developed to test thin sheets of these films, and includes the ability to monitor and change the environmental conditions around the specimen. Initial tests were performed on latex to determine the quality of the testing apparatus. Preliminary results on a polyacrylonitrile gel are presented.

  19. Computer-Assisted Hip and Knee Arthroplasty. Navigation and Active Robotic Systems

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The Medical Advisory Secretariat undertook a review of the evidence on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of computer assisted hip and knee arthroplasty. The two computer assisted arthroplasty systems that are the topics of this review are (1) navigation and (2) robotic-assisted hip and knee arthroplasty. The Technology Computer-assisted arthroplasty consists of navigation and robotic systems. Surgical navigation is a visualization system that provides positional information about surgical tools or implants relative to a target bone on a computer display. Most of the navigation-assisted arthroplasty devices that are the subject of this review are licensed by Health Canada. Robotic systems are active robots that mill bone according to information from a computer-assisted navigation system. The robotic-assisted arthroplasty devices that are the subject of this review are not currently licensed by Health Canada. Review Strategy The Cochrane and International Network of Agencies for Health Technology Assessment databases did not identify any health technology assessments on navigation or robotic-assisted hip or knee arthroplasty. The MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched for articles published between January 1, 1996 and November 30, 2003. This search produced 367 studies, of which 9 met the inclusion criteria. Summary of Findings Navigation-Assisted Arthroplasty Five studies were identified that examined navigation-assisted arthroplasty. A Level 1 evidence study from Germany found a statistically significant difference in alignment and angular deviation between navigation-assisted and free-hand total knee arthroplasty in favour of navigation-assisted surgery. However, the endpoints in this study were short-term. To date, the long-term effects (need for revision, implant longevity, pain, functional performance) are unknown.(1) A Level 2 evidence short-term study found that navigation-assisted total knee arthroplasty was

  20. Fundamental Mechanisms, Predictive Modeling, and Novel Aerospace Applications of Plasma Assisted Combustion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-04

    intrusive diagnostics • Task 2: Laminar Flow Reactor and Nanoparticle Studies at Low to Intermediate Temperatures (Radar REMPI and Filtered Rayleigh...using counterflow flames Thrust 2. Intermediate Species Measurements at Elevated Pressures by Using a Plasma Assisted Jet Stirred Reactor with...Molecular Beam Sampling – Task 1: Development of plasma assisted a jet stirred reactor Task 2: Measurements of intermediate species of fuel oxidation

  1. Stagnation pressure activated fuel release mechanism for hypersonic projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Cartland, Harry E.; Hunter, John W.

    2003-01-01

    A propulsion-assisted projectile has a body, a cowl forming a combustion section and a nozzle section. The body has a fuel reservoir within a central portion of the body, and a fuel activation system located along the central axis of the body and having a portion of the fuel activation system within the fuel reservoir. The fuel activation system has a fuel release piston with a forward sealing member where the fuel release piston is adapted to be moved when the forward sealing member is impacted with an air flow, and an air-flow channel adapted to conduct ambient air during flight to the fuel release piston.

  2. Some considerations about the possible mechanisms of lead assisted stress corrosion cracking of steam generator tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Helie, M.; Lambert, I.; Santarini, G.

    1995-12-31

    A number of experimental studies have been performed since the examination of tubes pulled from nuclear power plants revealed the presence of lead associated with secondary side mixed Inter/Trans-Granular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IG/TG SCC). Various testing methods were employed on Alloys 600, 690, and 800, and the available studies involve Constant Elongation Rate Tests (CERTs), constant deformation tests in caustic, neutral, or acidic solutions, as well as electrochemical tests and surface layer analyses. Complementary tests are presented on the influence of the solution temperature, and of the elongation rate in CERTS. An analysis of the various results obtained is interpreted in the framework of a mechanism involving both anodic dissolution and fracture events. This analysis indicates that such a mechanism can account for the influence of lead by considering a lowering of the global activation energy of the repassivation processes without changes in the apparent activation energy of the crack growth rate. Comparison to in-service cracking also indicates that the influence of lead seems more predominant in neutral pH solutions than in caustic or acidic ones.

  3. Toward a quantum-mechanical description of metal-assisted phosphoryl transfer in pyrophosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Heikinheimo, P.; Tuominen, V.; Ahonen, A.-K.; Teplyakov, A.; Cooperman, B. S.; Baykov, A. A.; Lahti, R.; Goldman, A.

    2001-01-01

    The wealth of kinetic and structural information makes inorganic pyrophosphatases (PPases) a good model system to study the details of enzymatic phosphoryl transfer. The enzyme accelerates metal-complexed phosphoryl transfer 1010-fold: but how? Our structures of the yeast PPase product complex at 1.15 Å and fluoride-inhibited complex at 1.9 Å visualize the active site in three different states: substrate-bound, immediate product bound, and relaxed product bound. These span the steps around chemical catalysis and provide strong evidence that a water molecule (Onu) directly attacks PPi with a pKa vastly lowered by coordination to two metal ions and D117. They also suggest that a low-barrier hydrogen bond (LBHB) forms between D117 and Onu, in part because of steric crowding by W100 and N116. Direct visualization of the double bonds on the phosphates appears possible. The flexible side chains at the top of the active site absorb the motion involved in the reaction, which may help accelerate catalysis. Relaxation of the product allows a new nucleophile to be generated and creates symmetry in the elementary catalytic steps on the enzyme. We are thus moving closer to understanding phosphoryl transfer in PPases at the quantum mechanical level. Ultra-high resolution structures can thus tease out overlapping complexes and so are as relevant to discussion of enzyme mechanism as structures produced by time-resolved crystallography. PMID:11248042

  4. Activity Recognition in Individuals Walking With Assistive Devices: The Benefits of Device-Specific Models

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Aakash; Deems-Dluhy, Susan; Hoppe-Ludwig, Shenan; Kording, Konrad; Jayaraman, Arun

    2017-01-01

    Background Wearable sensors gather data that machine-learning models can convert into an identification of physical activities, a clinically relevant outcome measure. However, when individuals with disabilities upgrade to a new walking assistive device, their gait patterns can change, which could affect the accuracy of activity recognition. Objective The objective of this study was to assess whether we need to train an activity recognition model with labeled data from activities performed with the new assistive device, rather than data from the original device or from healthy individuals. Methods Data were collected from 11 healthy controls as well as from 11 age-matched individuals with disabilities who used a standard stance control knee-ankle-foot orthosis (KAFO), and then a computer-controlled adaptive KAFO (Ottobock C-Brace). All subjects performed a structured set of functional activities while wearing an accelerometer on their waist, and random forest classifiers were used as activity classification models. We examined both global models, which are trained on other subjects (healthy or disabled individuals), and personal models, which are trained and tested on the same subject. Results Median accuracies of global and personal models trained with data from the new KAFO were significantly higher (61% and 76%, respectively) than those of models that use data from the original KAFO (55% and 66%, respectively) (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, P=.006 and P=.01). These models also massively outperformed a global model trained on healthy subjects, which only achieved a median accuracy of 53%. Device-specific models conferred a major advantage for activity recognition. Conclusions Our results suggest that when patients use a new assistive device, labeled data from activities performed with the specific device are needed for maximal precision activity recognition. Personal device-specific models yield the highest accuracy in such scenarios, whereas models trained on

  5. Activity Recognition in Individuals Walking With Assistive Devices: The Benefits of Device-Specific Models.

    PubMed

    Lonini, Luca; Gupta, Aakash; Deems-Dluhy, Susan; Hoppe-Ludwig, Shenan; Kording, Konrad; Jayaraman, Arun

    2017-08-10

    Wearable sensors gather data that machine-learning models can convert into an identification of physical activities, a clinically relevant outcome measure. However, when individuals with disabilities upgrade to a new walking assistive device, their gait patterns can change, which could affect the accuracy of activity recognition. The objective of this study was to assess whether we need to train an activity recognition model with labeled data from activities performed with the new assistive device, rather than data from the original device or from healthy individuals. Data were collected from 11 healthy controls as well as from 11 age-matched individuals with disabilities who used a standard stance control knee-ankle-foot orthosis (KAFO), and then a computer-controlled adaptive KAFO (Ottobock C-Brace). All subjects performed a structured set of functional activities while wearing an accelerometer on their waist, and random forest classifiers were used as activity classification models. We examined both global models, which are trained on other subjects (healthy or disabled individuals), and personal models, which are trained and tested on the same subject. Median accuracies of global and personal models trained with data from the new KAFO were significantly higher (61% and 76%, respectively) than those of models that use data from the original KAFO (55% and 66%, respectively) (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, P=.006 and P=.01). These models also massively outperformed a global model trained on healthy subjects, which only achieved a median accuracy of 53%. Device-specific models conferred a major advantage for activity recognition. Our results suggest that when patients use a new assistive device, labeled data from activities performed with the specific device are needed for maximal precision activity recognition. Personal device-specific models yield the highest accuracy in such scenarios, whereas models trained on healthy individuals perform poorly and should not be

  6. The novel mechanism of lenalidomide activity.

    PubMed

    Fink, Emma C; Ebert, Benjamin L

    2015-11-19

    Lenalidomide acts by a novel drug mechanism-modulation of the substrate specificity of the CRL4(CRBN) E3 ubiquitin ligase. In multiple myeloma, lenalidomide induces the ubiquitination of IKZF1 and IKZF3 by CRL4(CRBN). Subsequent proteasomal degradation of these transcription factors kills multiple myeloma cells. In del(5q) myelodysplastic syndrome, lenalidomide induces the degradation of CK1α, which preferentially affects del(5q) cells because they express this gene at haploinsufficient levels. In the future, modulation of ubiquitin ligase function may enable us to target previously "undruggable" proteins.

  7. Optimal Control of Active Recoil Mechanisms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-02-01

    forces from 25 to 2.5% for lower zones and cavitation was avoided for zone 8. Tachometer feedback was shown to be effective for low zones. The...concept of feedback control system coupled with optimization procedure to design recoil mechanisms was demonstrated to be an efficient and very effective ...122o •nl260 .01300 .01340 .01380 • ouzo #01460 •01500 •01540 •01580 •0162" .0166 i 309o,6 504P.6 9964.5 10075,9 39121.5 75397.3

  8. Physiologic mechanism of the ultrasonically activated scalpel.

    PubMed

    McCarus, S D

    1996-08-01

    An ultrasonically activated scalpel was developed and used clinically to provide hemostatic cutting in laparoscopic surgery. Results of experimental work with the ultrasonic scalpel blades were compared with those of electrosurgery and lasers. Some features that distinguish this energy form may confer specific advantages in various surgical procedures.

  9. 25-Gauge active aspiration silicon tip-assisted removal of glass and other intraocular foreign bodies.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ramandeep; Kumar, Abiraj; Gupta, Vishali; Dogra, Mangat R

    2016-04-01

    To describe the use of 25-gauge active aspiration silicon tip in removal of intraocular foreign bodies, including glass. Retrospective, noncomparative, interventional study. Eleven eyes of 11 patients who underwent the procedure between January 2013 and April 2015. The study included 10 males and 1 female with a mean age of 31.27 ± 9.64 years (range 12-45 years). All eyes in which 25-gauge active aspiration silicon tip-assisted removal of intraocular foreign body (IOFB) was done in a sutureless vitrectomy setup, irrespective of the nature of IOFB, were included. We excluded the participants with less than 6 months of postoperative follow-up. The primary outcome of the study was to assess the feasibility and reproducibility of 25-gauge active aspiration silicon tip-assisted removal of IOFB. The secondary outcome measures included change in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), and intraoperative and postoperative complications. There were iron (6), glass (2), wooden (1), pellet (1), and stone (1) IOFBs, for which 25-gauge active aspiration silicon tip-assisted removal was done successfully. The mean BCVA in Snellen's decimal equivalent improved significantly from 0.14 ± 0.16 to 0.34 ± 0.36 with a mean follow-up of 12 months (range 6-24 months). Intraoperatively, drop of IOFB because of loss of vacuum was observed in 2 eyes. Postoperatively, cystoid macular edema with epiretinal membrane was seen in 1 eye. There were no other intraoperative and postoperative complications. Use of 25-gauge active aspiration silicon tip to assist removal of magnetic and nonmagnetic IOFBs is a feasible and reproducible procedure, and required instrumentation is readily available in present-day vitrectomy era. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Ophthalmological Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Near-infrared spectroscopy can reveal increases in brain activity related to animal-assisted therapy.

    PubMed

    Morita, Yuka; Ebara, Fumio; Morita, Yoshimitsu; Horikawa, Etsuo

    2017-08-01

    [Purpose] Previous studies have indicated that animal-assisted therapy can promote recovery of psychological, social, and physiological function in mental disorders. This study was designed as a pilot evaluation of the use of near-infrared spectroscopy to objectively identify changes in brain activity that could mediate the effect of animal-assisted therapy. [Subjects and Methods] The participants were 20 healthy students (10 males and 10 females; age 19-21 years) of the Faculty of Agriculture, Saga University. Participants were shown a picture of a Tokara goat or shack (control) while prefrontal cortical oxygenated haemoglobin levels (representing neural activity) were measured by near-infrared spectroscopy. [Results] The prefrontal cortical near-infrared spectroscopy signal was significantly higher during viewing of the animal picture than during a rest condition or during viewing of the control picture. [Conclusion] Our results suggest that near-infrared spectroscopy can be used to objectively identify brain activity changes during human mentation regarding animals; furthermore, these preliminary results suggest the efficacy of animal-assisted therapy could be related to increased activation of the prefrontal cortex.

  11. Novel view on the mechanism of water-assisted proton transfer in the DNA bases: bulk water hydration.

    PubMed

    Furmanchuk, Al'ona; Isayev, Olexandr; Gorb, Leonid; Shishkin, Oleg V; Hovorun, Dmytro M; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2011-03-14

    In the present work, the conventional static ab initio picture of a water-assisted mechanism of the tautomerization of Nucleic Acid Bases (NABs) in an aqueous environment is enhanced by the classical and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations. The inclusion of the dynamical contribution is vital because the formation and longevity of the NAB-water bridge complexes represent decisive factors for further tautomerization. The results of both molecular dynamic techniques indicate that the longest time when such complexes exist is significantly shorter than the time required for proton transfer suggested by the static ab initio level of theory. New rate constants of tautomerization corrected for the dynamic effect of environment are proposed based on the first principles molecular dynamics data. Those values are used for the evaluation of a water-assisted mechanism that is feasible in such biological systems as E. coli cell.

  12. Resident-Assisted Montessori Programming (RAMP): training persons with dementia to serve as group activity leaders.

    PubMed

    Camp, Cameron J; Skrajner, Michael J

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an activity implemented by means of Resident-Assisted Montessori Programming (RAMP). Four persons with early-stage dementia were trained to serve as leaders for a small-group activity played by nine persons with more advanced dementia. Assessments of leaders' ability to learn the procedures of leading a group, as well as their satisfaction with this role, were taken, as were measures of players' engagement and affect during standard activities programming and RAMP activities. Leaders demonstrated the potential to fill the role of group activity leader effectively, and they expressed a high level of satisfaction with this role. Players' levels of positive engagement and pleasure during the RAMP activity were higher than during standard group activities. This study suggests that to the extent that procedural learning is available to persons with early-stage dementia, especially when they are assisted with external cueing, these individuals can successfully fill the role of volunteers when working with persons with more advanced dementia. This can provide a meaningful social role for leaders and increase access to high quality activities programming for large numbers of persons with dementia. Copyright 2004 The Gerontological Society of America

  13. Pathologic von Willebrand factor degradation with a left ventricular assist device occurs via two distinct mechanisms: mechanical demolition and enzymatic cleavage.

    PubMed

    Bartoli, Carlo R; Restle, David J; Zhang, David M; Acker, Michael A; Atluri, Pavan

    2015-01-01

    Bleeding is an important source of morbidity in patients with a left ventricular assist device. Evidence suggests a major role for von Willebrand factor. However, limited data exist to explain the mechanism(s) of von Willebrand factor degradation during left ventricular assist device support. We investigated whether left ventricular assist device-related shear stress and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with a thrombospondin type 1 motif, member 13 (ADAMTS-13, the von Willebrand factor protease) altered von Willebrand factor metabolism. Whole blood was collected from patients (n = 8) with a left ventricular assist device. von Willebrand factor multimers and degradation fragments were characterized with electrophoresis and immunoblotting. To investigate mechanisms, an in vitro model was developed to generate the supraphysiologic shear stress of a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device. Normal human blood (n = 8) was cycled in a laboratory vortexer (∼2400 rpm, shear stress ∼175 dyne/cm(2), 4 hours) to reproduce the pathologic degradation of von Willebrand factor that occurs during left ventricular assist device support. To investigate the specific mechanistic roles of shear stress and ADAMTS-13 in von Willebrand factor degradation, purified von Willebrand factor protein ± ADAMTS-13 protease were exposed to supraphysiologic shear stress in the vortexer. von Willebrand factor multimers and 11 von Willebrand factor degradation fragments were characterized with electrophoresis and immunoblotting. Left ventricular assist device support reduced large von Willebrand factor multimers and significantly increased 10/11 von Willebrand factor degradation fragments (P < .05). Normal human blood exposed to supraphysiologic shear stress in the vortexer demonstrated the same profile of von Willebrand factor degradation fragments as in a patient with a left ventricular assist device. Supraphysiologic shear stress alone caused modest mechanical demolition of

  14. Mechanism of Ras Activation by TGFBeta

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-07-01

    factor-ß induces collagenase-3 expression by human gingival fibroblast via p38 mitogen- activated protein kinase. J Biol Chem 274, 37292-37300. Ray, L...fibroblasts. JBiol Chem 272, 9769-9777. van der Wal, E. A., Gomez-Pinilla, F., & Cotman, C. W. (1993). Trans- forming growth factor-beta 1 is in plaques in...interactions between phosphorylated receptors and library-expressed proteins were detected by autoradiography. Positive plaques were picked and

  15. Lipid Dependent Mechanisms of Protein Pump Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-23

    properties which result form the colligative interactions of many lipid molecules. Important materials properties include . . . i I I II II I i I 1 the...d identify by olock number) *This project is aime at investigating if a lipid elastic property , known as the spontaneous radius of curvature Ro’, is...a regulated membrane property and if its value modulates membrane protein activity. Specific aims reported on here include: 1) Correlation of ion pump

  16. U.K. physicians' attitudes toward active voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, George E; Lancaster, Carol J; Clark, David; Ahmedzai, Sam H; Noble, William

    2002-01-01

    A comparison of the views of geriatric medicine physicians and intensive care physicians in the United Kingdom on the topics of active voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide revealed rather different attitudes. Eighty percent of geriatricians, but only 52% of intensive care physicians, considered active voluntary euthanasia as never justified ethically. Gender and age did not play a major part in attitudinal differences of the respondents. If the variability of attitudes of these two medical specialties are anywhere near illustrative of other physicians in the United Kingdom, it would be difficult to formulate and implement laws and policies concerning euthanasia and assisted suicide. In addition, ample safeguards would be required to receive support from physicians regarding legalization.

  17. Development of the Assistance to Participate Scale (APS) for children's play and leisure activities.

    PubMed

    Bourke-Taylor, H; Law, M; Howie, L; Pallant, J F

    2009-09-01

    This paper describes the development and psychometric evaluation of the Assistance to Participate Scale (APS). The APS measures the assistance that a school-aged child with a disability requires to participate in play and leisure activities from the primary carer's perspective. Mixed methodology using an instrument design model was used to complete two studies. First, a qualitative research design was used to generate items and scoring criteria for the APS. Second, a quantitative study evaluated the instrument using data collected from 152 mothers with children aged 5-18 years. Statistical analysis assessed the underlying structure, internal consistency and construct validity of the APS. Exploratory factor analysis revealed two correlated components, reflecting home-based and community-based play activities. Both subscales and the total APS scale showed good internal consistency. The APS correlated as predicted with individual domains and overall scores for other validated measures (Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory caregiver scales and Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory) with correlations ranging from rho = 0.42 to rho = 0.77. The APS was able to discriminate between groups of children based on type of schooling (regular or segregated), need for equipment/assistive devices, frequency of lifting and disability. The APS provides professionals with a brief psychometrically sound tool that measures the amount of caregiver assistance provided to a child with a disability to participate in play and recreation. The APS may be used as an outcome measure and to evaluate and predict the amount and type of additional assistance families need to facilitate their child's participation in an important aspect of the child's daily life and development: play and recreation.

  18. AMPK activators: mechanisms of action and physiological activities

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joungmok; Yang, Goowon; Kim, Yeji; Kim, Jin; Ha, Joohun

    2016-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a central regulator of energy homeostasis, which coordinates metabolic pathways and thus balances nutrient supply with energy demand. Because of the favorable physiological outcomes of AMPK activation on metabolism, AMPK has been considered to be an important therapeutic target for controlling human diseases including metabolic syndrome and cancer. Thus, activators of AMPK may have potential as novel therapeutics for these diseases. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of both indirect and direct AMPK activators and their modes of action in relation to the structure of AMPK. We discuss the functional differences among isoform-specific AMPK complexes and their significance regarding the development of novel AMPK activators and the potential for combining different AMPK activators in the treatment of human disease. PMID:27034026

  19. Microwave-assisted biosynthesis of zinc nanoparticles and their cytotoxic and antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Salari, Zeinab; Ameri, Atefeh; Forootanfar, Hamid; Adeli-Sardou, Mahboubeh; Jafari, Mandana; Mehrabani, Mitra; Shakibaie, Mojtaba

    2017-01-01

    The present study was designed for microwave assisted synthesis of zinc nanoparticles (Zn NPs) using Lavandula vera leaf extract in the presence of ZnSO4 (1mM). The biogenic Zn NPs were then characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD), UV-visible spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques. Thereafter, the cytotoxic effect of ZnSO4 and Zn NPs on different cell lines was investigated by MTT-based cytotoxicity assay and their antioxidant properties were assessed using DPPH scavenging activity and reducing power assay. The SEM micrograph showed that the Zn NPs had spherical shape with the size range of 30-80nm. For A549, MCF-7, HT-29, and Caco-2 cell lines treated with Zn NPs, the concentration necessary causing 50% cell death (IC50) was found to be 22.3±1.1μgmL(-1), 86±3.7μgmL(-1), 10.9±0.5μgmL(-1), and 56.2±2.8μgmL(-1), respectively. In the case of ZnSO4, the same results (IC50) were observed at concentration of 81.6±1.3μgmL(-1) (A549), 121.0±2.4μgmL(-1) (MCF-7), 43.0±1.4μgmL(-1) (HT-29), and 85.7±2.3μgmL(-1) (Caco-2). The obtained results of antioxidant activity showed that the IC50 values of butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and Zn NPs were 44μgmL(-1)and 65.3μgmL(-1), respectively, while ZnSO4 at concentration of 200μgmL(-1) exhibited only 10.9% DPPH radical scavenging effect. Moreover, the reducing power of Zn NPs and BHA were significantly higher than ZnSO4 (p<0.05). To sum up, application of L. vera leaf extract combined with microwave heating energy led to simple and fast formation of Zn nanostructures exhibited higher antioxidant and cytotoxic activity compared to soluble Zn(+2) ions. However, identification of the related mechanisms merit further studies. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  20. Home Accidents and Assistance in Daily Activities of Older Women in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erkal, Sibel; Sahin, Hande

    2010-01-01

    This study analyzed the relation between incidents of at-home accidents and the assistance in daily activities of women age of 65+ living in the area of Dikmen Akpinar Health Care Unit in Ankara-Turkey. Of the women, 49.2% had experienced a home accident in the last 12 months. More than half of these accidents were caused by falling. Women over…

  1. Biomolecule-assisted synthesis of single-crystalline selenium nanowires and nanoribbons via a novel flake-cracking mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Ye, Xingchen; Dai, Wei; Hou, Weiyi; Zuo, Fan; Xie, Yi

    2006-01-01

    Recently, the biomolecule-assisted synthesis method has been a new and promising focus in the preparation of various nanomaterials. But current works mainly focus on the synthesis of metal nanoparticles and nanowires using macro-biomolecules (e.g. virus, protein and DNA) as templates in the presence of a reducing agent. Beta-carotene, one of the most common bio-antioxidants, can be oxidized to form species with both hydrophilic and hydrophobic ends, which can provide an in situ soft template for the synthesis of nanomaterials. Herein, a simple beta-carotene-assisted method was developed for the first time to synthesize t-Se nanowires and nanoribbons with high crystallinity. We demonstrate that beta-carotene serves as not only the reducing agent, but also an in situ template in the preparation of Se one-dimensional nanostructures. It is found that the growth mechanism of Se nanomaterials is different from the familiar sphere-wire process. A novel flake-cracking mechanism is proposed. By this biomolecule-assisted route, Te one-dimensional nanostructures and Pd nanowires were also fabricated. The assisted-biomolecule in our method may be spread to carotenoids and other antioxidants, and thus broaden the application fields of biomolecules. Our preliminary investigations have shown that the facile, solution-phase biomolecule-assisted method can be potentially extended to the preparation of other low-dimensional nanostructures. The synthesized t-Se nanowires and nanoribbons may serve as templates to generate other tubular functional nanomaterials and find applications in the studies of structure-property relationships as well as in the fabrication of nanoscale optoelectronic devices.

  2. Experimental investigation on the mechanism of chelation-assisted, copper(II) acetate-accelerated azide-alkyne cycloaddition.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Gui-Chao; Guha, Pampa M; Brotherton, Wendy S; Simmons, J Tyler; Stankee, Lisa A; Nguyen, Brian T; Clark, Ronald J; Zhu, Lei

    2011-09-07

    A mechanistic model is formulated to account for the high reactivity of chelating azides (organic azides capable of chelation-assisted metal coordination at the alkylated azido nitrogen position) and copper(II) acetate (Cu(OAc)(2)) in copper(II)-mediated azide-alkyne cycloaddition (AAC) reactions. Fluorescence and (1)H NMR assays are developed for monitoring the reaction progress in two different solvents, methanol and acetonitrile. Solvent kinetic isotopic effect and premixing experiments give credence to the proposed different induction reactions for converting copper(II) to catalytic copper(I) species in methanol (methanol oxidation) and acetonitrile (alkyne oxidative homocoupling), respectively. The kinetic orders of individual components in a chelation-assisted, copper(II)-accelerated AAC reaction are determined in both methanol and acetonitrile. Key conclusions resulting from the kinetic studies include (1) the interaction between copper ion (either in +1 or +2 oxidation state) and a chelating azide occurs in a fast, pre-equilibrium step prior to the formation of the in-cycle copper(I)-acetylide, (2) alkyne deprotonation is involved in several kinetically significant steps, and (3) consistent with prior experimental and computational results by other groups, two copper centers are involved in the catalysis. The X-ray crystal structures of chelating azides with Cu(OAc)(2) suggest a mechanistic synergy between alkyne oxidative homocoupling and copper(II)-accelerated AAC reactions, in which both a bimetallic catalytic pathway and a base are involved. The different roles of the two copper centers (a Lewis acid to enhance the electrophilicity of the azido group and a two-electron reducing agent in oxidative metallacycle formation, respectively) in the proposed catalytic cycle suggest that a mixed valency (+2 and +1) dinuclear copper species be a highly efficient catalyst. This proposition is supported by the higher activity of the partially reduced Cu(OAc)(2) in

  3. Experimental Investigation on the Mechanism of Chelation-Assisted, Copper(II) Acetate-Accelerated Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Gui-Chao; Guha, Pampa M.; Brotherton, Wendy S.; Simmons, J. Tyler; Stankee, Lisa A.; Nguyen, Brian T.; Clark, Ronald J.; Zhu, Lei

    2011-01-01

    A mechanistic model is formulated to account for the high reactivity of chelating azides (organic azides capable of chelation-assisted metal coordination at the alkylated azido nitrogen position) and copper(II) acetate (Cu(OAc)2) in copper(II)-mediated azide-alkyne cycloaddition (AAC) reactions. Fluorescence and 1H NMR assays are developed for monitoring the reaction progress in two different solvents – methanol and acetonitrile. Solvent kinetic isotopic effect and pre-mixing experiments give credence to the proposed different induction reactions for converting copper(II) to catalytic copper(I) species in methanol (methanol oxidation) and acetonitrile (alkyne oxidative homocoupling), respectively. The kinetic orders of individual components in a chelation-assisted, copper(II)-accelerated AAC reaction are determined in both methanol and acetonitrile. Key conclusions resulting from the kinetic studies include (1) the interaction between copper ion (either in +1 or +2 oxidation state) and a chelating azide occurs in a fast, pre-equilibrium step prior to the formation of the in-cycle copper(I)-acetylide, (2) alkyne deprotonation is involved in several kinetically significant steps, and (3) consistent with prior experimental and computational results by other groups, two copper centers are involved in the catalysis. The X-ray crystal structures of chelating azides with Cu(OAc)2 suggest a mechanistic synergy between alkyne oxidative homocoupling and copper(II)-accelerated AAC reactions, in which both a bimetallic catalytic pathway and a base are involved. The different roles of the two copper centers (a Lewis acid to enhance the electrophilicity of the azido group and a two-electron reducing agent in oxidative metallacycle formation, respectively) in the proposed catalytic cycle suggest that a mixed valency (+2 and +1) dinuclear copper species be a highly efficient catalyst. This proposition is supported by the higher activity of the partially reduced Cu(OAc)2 in

  4. Mechanism for Clastogenic Activity of Naphthalene

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, Bruce A.

    2016-06-24

    Naphthalene incubations form DNA adducts in vitro in a dose dependent manner in both mouse and rat tissues. Rodent tissue incubations with naphthalene indicate that naphthalene forms as many DNA adducts as Benzo(a)pyrene, a known DNA binding carcinogen. The mouse airway has the greatest number of DNA adducts, corresponding to the higher metabolic activation of naphthalene in this location. Both rat tissues, the rat olfactory (tumor target) and the airways (non-tumor target), have similar levels of NA-DNA adducts, indicating that short term measures of initial adduct formation do not directly correlate with sites of tumor formation in the NTP bioassays.

  5. Mechanism for Clastogenic Activity of Naphthalene

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, Bruce A.

    2015-09-29

    Naphthalene incubations form DNA adducts in vitro in a dose dependent manner in both mouse and rat tissues. Rodent tissue incubations with naphthalene indicate that naphthalene forms as many DNA adducts as Benzo(a)pyrene, a known DNA binding carcinogen. The mouse airway has the greatest number of DNA adducts, corresponding to the higher metabolic activation of naphthalene in this location. Both rat tissues, the rat olfactory (tumor target) and the airways (non-tumor target), have similar levels of NA-DNA adducts, indicating that short term measures of initial adduct formation do not directly correlate with sites of tumor formation in the NTP bioassays.

  6. Ultrasonic-assisted enzymolysis to improve the antioxidant activities of peanut (Arachin conarachin L.) antioxidant hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lina; Sun, Jie; Liu, Shaofang; Bi, Jie; Zhang, Chushu; Yang, Qingli

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work is to provide a theoretical basis for preparing peanut antioxidant hydrolysate in order to improve its antioxidant activities. Therefore, response surface methodology (RSM) based on the Box-Behnken design was used to optimize ultrasonic-assisted enzymolysis for the purpose of preparing peanut antioxidant hydrolysate. Results indicated that the DPPH free radical scavenging activity of peanut hydrolysate could reach 90.06% under the following optimum conditions: ultrasonic power of 150.0 w, reaction temperature of 62.0 °C, incubation time of 25.0 min, and initial pH value of 8.5. The DPPH free radical scavenging rate of peanut hydrolysate from ultrasonic-assisted enzymolysis improved comparing with that of peanut hydrolysate from protease hydrolysis alone. The peanut antioxidant hydrolysate was found to display eight improved kinds of antioxidant activities. In conclusion, the optimal ultrasonic-assisted enzymolysis technology conditions described in this paper, appear to be beneficial for preparing peanut antioxidant hydrolysate.

  7. Ultrasonic-Assisted Enzymolysis to Improve the Antioxidant Activities of Peanut (Arachin conarachin L.) Antioxidant Hydrolysate

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lina; Sun, Jie; Liu, Shaofang; Bi, Jie; Zhang, Chushu; Yang, Qingli

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work is to provide a theoretical basis for preparing peanut antioxidant hydrolysate in order to improve its antioxidant activities. Therefore, response surface methodology (RSM) based on the Box-Behnken design was used to optimize ultrasonic-assisted enzymolysis for the purpose of preparing peanut antioxidant hydrolysate. Results indicated that the DPPH free radical scavenging activity of peanut hydrolysate could reach 90.06% under the following optimum conditions: ultrasonic power of 150.0 w, reaction temperature of 62.0 °C, incubation time of 25.0 min, and initial pH value of 8.5. The DPPH free radical scavenging rate of peanut hydrolysate from ultrasonic-assisted enzymolysis improved comparing with that of peanut hydrolysate from protease hydrolysis alone. The peanut antioxidant hydrolysate was found to display eight improved kinds of antioxidant activities. In conclusion, the optimal ultrasonic-assisted enzymolysis technology conditions described in this paper, appear to be beneficial for preparing peanut antioxidant hydrolysate. PMID:22942751

  8. Mechanism of antibacterial activity of copper nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Arijit Kumar; Chakraborty, Ruchira; Basu, Tarakdas

    2014-04-01

    In a previous communication, we reported a new method of synthesis of stable metallic copper nanoparticles (Cu-NPs), which had high potency for bacterial cell filamentation and cell killing. The present study deals with the mechanism of filament formation and antibacterial roles of Cu-NPs in E. coli cells. Our results demonstrate that NP-mediated dissipation of cell membrane potential was the probable reason for the formation of cell filaments. On the other hand, Cu-NPs were found to cause multiple toxic effects such as generation of reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and DNA degradation in E. coli cells. In vitro interaction between plasmid pUC19 DNA and Cu-NPs showed that the degradation of DNA was highly inhibited in the presence of the divalent metal ion chelator EDTA, which indicated a positive role of Cu2+ ions in the degradation process. Moreover, the fast destabilization, i.e. the reduction in size, of NPs in the presence of EDTA led us to propose that the nascent Cu ions liberated from the NP surface were responsible for higher reactivity of the Cu-NPs than the equivalent amount of its precursor CuCl2; the nascent ions were generated from the oxidation of metallic NPs when they were in the vicinity of agents, namely cells, biomolecules or medium components, to be reduced simultaneously.

  9. Mechanism of antibacterial activity of copper nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Arijit Kumar; Chakraborty, Ruchira; Basu, Tarakdas

    2014-04-04

    In a previous communication, we reported a new method of synthesis of stable metallic copper nanoparticles (Cu-NPs), which had high potency for bacterial cell filamentation and cell killing. The present study deals with the mechanism of filament formation and antibacterial roles of Cu-NPs in E. coli cells. Our results demonstrate that NP-mediated dissipation of cell membrane potential was the probable reason for the formation of cell filaments. On the other hand, Cu-NPs were found to cause multiple toxic effects such as generation of reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and DNA degradation in E. coli cells. In vitro interaction between plasmid pUC19 DNA and Cu-NPs showed that the degradation of DNA was highly inhibited in the presence of the divalent metal ion chelator EDTA, which indicated a positive role of Cu(2+) ions in the degradation process. Moreover, the fast destabilization, i.e. the reduction in size, of NPs in the presence of EDTA led us to propose that the nascent Cu ions liberated from the NP surface were responsible for higher reactivity of the Cu-NPs than the equivalent amount of its precursor CuCl2; the nascent ions were generated from the oxidation of metallic NPs when they were in the vicinity of agents, namely cells, biomolecules or medium components, to be reduced simultaneously.

  10. Mechanism of photodynamic activity of pheophorbides.

    PubMed

    Tanielian, C; Kobayashi, M; Wolff, C

    2001-04-01

    Plasmid DNA is efficiently photocleaved by sodium pheophorbides (Na-Phdes) a and b in the absence of oxygen as well as in the presence of oxygen. Fluorescence microscopic observation shows a rapid incorporation of Na-Phde a into nuclei, mitochondria, and lysosome of human oral mucosa cells. In contrast Na-Phde b is incorporated only into the plasma membrane. The photodynamic activity of these pigments in living tissues is probably determined by the monomeric pigment molecules formed in hydrophobic cellular structures and involves two types of reactions: (i) direct electron transfer between DNA bases (especially guanine) and pheophorbide singlet excited state, and (ii) indirect reactions mediated by reactive oxygen species, including singlet oxygen whose production from molecular oxygen is sensitized by the Na-Phdes triplet state. A preliminary report has appeared in "Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer II," Proc. SPIE 2325, 416-424 (1994).

  11. Evidence for a novel affinity mechanism of motor-assisted transport along microtubules.

    PubMed

    Wada, Y; Hamasaki, T; Satir, P

    2000-01-01

    In microtubule (MT) translocation assays, using colloidal gold particles coupled to monoclonal tubulin antibodies to mark positions along MTs, we found that relative motion is possible between the gold particle and an MT, gliding on dynein or kinesin. Such motion evidently occurred by an affinity release and rebinding mechanism that did not require motor activity on the particle. As the MTs moved, particles drifted to the trailing edge of the MT and then were released. Sometimes the particles transferred from one MT to another, moving orthogonally. Although motion of the particles was uniformly rearward, movement was toward the (-) or (+) end of the MT, depending on whether dynein or kinesin, respectively, was used in the assay. These results open possibilities for physiological mechanisms of organelle and other movement that, although dependent on motor-driven microtubule transport, do not require direct motor attachment between the organelle and the microtubule. Our observations on the direction of particle drift and time of release may also provide confirmation in a dynamic system for the conclusion that beta tubulin is exposed at the (+) end of the MT.

  12. Mechanism of aneurysm formation after 830-nm diode-laser-assisted microarterial anastomosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jing; Godlewski, Guilhem; Rouy, Simone

    1998-01-01

    A series of 830 nm diode laser assisted longitudinal aortorrhophy with a condition of 400 to 500 J/mm2 for one cm length of anastomosis versus conventional manual anastomoses were performed in 90 Wistar rats. With comparing with normal media process, a histologic examination of aneurysm formation was conducted. The results show that there are two important factors to cause aneurysm formation after laser assisted anastomosis: (1) vessel wall is damaged by laser heating; (2) proliferation of collagen fiber at adventitia is absent when media reconstruction.

  13. Low cost assistive technology to support educational activities for adolescents with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Alan Patricio; Bulle Oliveira, Acary Souza; Pinheiro Bezerra, Italla Maria; Pedrozo Campos Antunes, Thaiany; Guerrero Daboin, Blanca Elena; Raimundo, Rodrigo Daminello; Dos Santos, Vagner Rogério; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos

    2017-08-30

    The concept of assistive technology covers several areas of action; one of them is communication with the elaboration of accessible solutions to overcome daily difficulties. It contributes to the resumption of functional abilities, expanding and facilitating inclusion and independent living. To analyze the usability of a low cost prototype device to support educational activities of adolescents with cerebral palsy. A descriptive observational study. The evaluation of a prototype device was made through a validated questionnaire, Quest Version 2.0, on the level of the user's satisfaction with an assistive technology, composed of 12 evaluation items. The questionnaire was filled out by the educator based on the observation of four wheelchair-bound participants diagnosed with cerebral palsy according to the international classification of diseases and health-related problems, ICD-10, who attend a coexistence and teaching institution in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. The device developed was considered an assistive technology, which provided an experience with a positive level of satisfaction for the participants. The tested prototype contributes to communication and interaction allowing adolescents with cerebral palsy to participate in educational activities. Implications for Rehabilitation The device assists the individual in the educational activities and can positively influence their development, observe the individual number 5, who has an important limitation in coordination and fine movements, placing the role of the task in the vertical position offers a new perspective to perform the task, this stimulates him to try to perform the work, so the challenge was adjusted to the demands of each individual which can contribute to its neuromotor development, the amplitude of the distal movements and the manual ability, since it must look for alternatives to complete the task requested.

  14. Influences of Duration of Inspiratory Effort, Respiratory Mechanics, and Ventilator Type on Asynchrony With Pressure Support and Proportional Assist Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Renata S; Sales, Raquel P; Melo, Luíz H de P; Marinho, Liégina S; Bastos, Vasco Pd; Nogueira, Andréa da Nc; Ferreira, Juliana C; Holanda, Marcelo A

    2017-05-01

    Pressure support ventilation (PSV) is often associated with patient-ventilator asynchrony. Proportional assist ventilation (PAV) offers inspiratory assistance proportional to patient effort, minimizing patient-ventilator asynchrony. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of respiratory mechanics and patient effort on patient-ventilator asynchrony during PSV and PAV plus (PAV+). We used a mechanical lung simulator and studied 3 respiratory mechanics profiles (normal, obstructive, and restrictive), with variations in the duration of inspiratory effort: 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 s. The Auto-Trak system was studied in ventilators when available. Outcome measures included inspiratory trigger delay, expiratory trigger asynchrony, and tidal volume (VT). Inspiratory trigger delay was greater in the obstructive respiratory mechanics profile and greatest with a effort of 2.0 s (160 ms); cycling asynchrony, particularly delayed cycling, was common in the obstructive profile, whereas the restrictive profile was associated with premature cycling. In comparison with PSV, PAV+ improved patient-ventilator synchrony, with a shorter triggering delay (28 ms vs 116 ms) and no cycling asynchrony in the restrictive profile. VT was lower with PAV+ than with PSV (630 mL vs 837 mL), as it was with the single-limb circuit ventilator (570 mL vs 837 mL). PAV+ mode was associated with longer cycling delays than were the other ventilation modes, especially for the obstructive profile and higher effort values. Auto-Trak eliminated automatic triggering. Mechanical ventilation asynchrony was influenced by effort, respiratory mechanics, ventilator type, and ventilation mode. In PSV mode, delayed cycling was associated with shorter effort in obstructive respiratory mechanics profiles, whereas premature cycling was more common with longer effort and a restrictive profile. PAV+ prevented premature cycling but not delayed cycling, especially in obstructive respiratory mechanics profiles

  15. Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction and Biological Activities of Extracts of Brassica oleracea var. capitata

    PubMed Central

    Dal Prá, Valéria; Dolwitsch, Carolina Bolssoni; Lima, Fernanda Oliveira; Amaro de Carvalho, Camilo; Viana, Carine; do Nascimento, Paulo Cícero

    2015-01-01

    Summary In this work, the antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of Brassica oleracea var. capitata extracts obtained through ultrasound-assisted extraction are evaluated. The extracts obtained using the best extraction conditions were subjected to different hydrolysis conditions before their use in the biological tests. The crude and hydrolysed extracts were characterized using gas chromatography coupled with a mass detector. The use of ultrasound at 30 °C with 60% (by volume) solvent enabled obtaining a richer extract. All extracts had antioxidant activities against DPPH (13.0–80.0%), superoxide (35.2–63.2%) and peroxyl (89.3–99.5%) radicals, but the use of hydrolysed extracts considerably improved the antioxidant activities. Antimicrobial activities only of the hydrolysed extracts of Brassica oleracea var. capitata were detected. It was confirmed that antioxidant activity of vegetable extracts can be considerably increased when hydrolysis is applied as a pretreatment to their extraction. PMID:27904339

  16. A Profile of Adults Needing Assistance with Activities of Daily Living, 1991-1992. Disability Statistics Report 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Jae; LaPlante, Mitchell P.

    This report uses data from the 1990 and 1991 samples of the Survey of Income and Program Participation to construct a profile of the U.S. noninstitutionalized adult population needing assistance with activities of daily living (ADL) and to estimate the size of the population eligible for federal personal assistance services (PAS) under different…

  17. Contrasting Grading Approaches in Introductory Physics and Quantum Mechanics: The Case of Graduate Teaching Assistants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshman, Emily; Sayer, Ryan; Henderson, Charles; Singh, Chandralekha

    2017-01-01

    At large research universities, physics graduate teaching assistants (TAs) are often responsible for grading in courses at all levels. However, few studies have focused on TAs' grading practices in introductory and advanced physics courses. This study was designed to investigate whether physics graduate TAs grade students in introductory physics…

  18. [Anesthesia during video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy using laryngeal ductwork and auxiliary mechanical ventilation].

    PubMed

    Porkhanov, V A; Polyakov, I S; Danilov, V V; Kononenko, V B; Zhikharev, V A

    2016-01-01

    The article presents the experience of video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomies in patients without endotracheal intubation and sparing of spontaneous breathing. The results of intraoperative monitoring and laboratory data of all perioperative period are described. In view of these data it was concluded that such approach can decline the severity of stress-response against surgical aggression in this group of patients.

  19. Effect of acoustically assisted treatments on vitamins, antioxidant activity, organic acids and drying kinetics of pineapple.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Óscar; Gomes, Wesley; Rodrigues, Sueli; Fernandes, Fabiano A N

    2017-03-01

    The effects of the application of an acoustically assisted treatment on the vitamins (C, B1, B2, B3, and B5), the antioxidant activity (DPPH, FRAP), the polyphenol and flavonoid contents, the organic acid contents (citric and malic) and drying kinetics of pineapple (Ananas comosus var. Perola) have been studied. Treatments were carried out using two different soaking media: distilled water and pineapple juice at 30°C during 10, 20 and 30min without and with acoustic assistance (23.2W/L). After treatment, samples were dried at 60°C and 0.5m/s during 8h. The quality parameters were determined in untreated, treated, and treated-dried samples. The acoustic assistance promoted an increment of vitamins B1, B2, B3 and B5, total flavonoid and malic acid contents, and a reduction of vitamin C, total polyphenol content, antioxidant activity and citric acid content in treated samples. However, in all treated-dried samples the final content of those quality parameters was higher than the observed in the untreated dried sample.

  20. Microwave-assisted organic acid extraction of lignin from bamboo: structure and antioxidant activity investigation.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming-Fei; Sun, Shao-Ni; Xu, Feng; Sun, Run-Cang

    2012-10-01

    Microwave-assisted extraction in organic acid aqueous solution (formic acid/acetic acid/water, 3/5/2, v/v/v) was applied to isolate lignin from bamboo. Additionally, the structural features of the extracted lignins were thoroughly investigated in terms of C₉ formula, molecular weight distribution, FT-IR, (1)H NMR and HSQC spectroscopy. It was found that with an increase in the severity of microwave-assisted extraction, there was an increase of phenolic hydroxyl content in the lignin. In addition, an increase of the severity resulted in a decrease of the bound carbohydrate content as well as molecular weight of the lignin. Antioxidant activity investigation indicated that the radical scavenging index of the extracted lignins (0.35-1.15) was higher than that of BHT (0.29) but lower than that of BHA (3.85). The results suggested that microwave-assisted organic acid extraction provides a promising way to prepare lignin from bamboo with good antioxidant activity for potential application in the food industry. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. MECHANISMS OF BIOELECTRIC ACTIVITY IN ELECTRIC TISSUE

    PubMed Central

    Altamirano, Mario; Coates, Christopher W.; Grundfest, Harry; Nachmansohn, David

    1953-01-01

    1. A preparation is described consisting of one or several layers of innervated cells of the electric organ of Electrophorus electricus. 2. Each plaque is multiply innervated and only at its caudal face. The nerve fibers may derive from two or more different nerve trunks. 3. During activity the innervated face becomes negative relative to the non-innervated. 4. The first electrical response of the cell to an increasing neural volley is graded and has the character of a prepotential. At a critical size of the prepotential the cell discharges with an all-or-nothing spike. 5. Both responses have durations of about 2 msec. 6. A neural volley which does not cause the spike discharge facilitates the discharge of the cell by a second subsequent volley in the same nerve (temporal facilitation). 7. The period of facilitation lasts ca. 900 msec. During the first 100 msec., the facilitation is large enough to cause a spike. In the later portion only the prepotential is facilitated. No electrical concomitant has been detected. 8. Neural volleys reaching the plaque from different trunks interact at the cell to produce a period of facilitation lasting only about 2 msec. This interaction is interpreted as spatial summation. 9. In a population of cells, simultaneous stimulation of 2 nerves causes a smaller discharge than the sum of the two isolated responses (occlusion). 10. Cells denervated for 7 weeks or more can be excited directly, but only by a current flow outward through the caudal face. 11. Weak direct stimulation causes a prepotential in the denervated plaque. On increasing the stimulus the prepotential increases to a critical size when a spike develops. The duration of both responses is about 2 msec. 12. The absolutely refractory period of the denervated cell is about 1.5 msec. and relative refractoriness lasts about 15 msec. 13. Direct stimulation causes slight facilitation lasting as long as 200 msec. 14. Repetitive stimulation of the nerve at low frequencies (2 to 3

  2. Gamma Band Activity in the RAS-intracellular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rill, E.; Kezunovic, N.; D’Onofrio, S.; Luster, B.; Hyde, J.; Bisagno, V.; Urbano, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma band activity participates in sensory perception, problem solving, and memory. This review considers recent evidence showing that cells in the reticular activating system (RAS) exhibit gamma band activity, and describes the intrinsic membrane properties behind such manifestation. Specifically, we discuss how cells in the mesopontine pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), intralaminar parafascicular nucleus (Pf), and pontine Subcoeruleus nucleus dorsalis (SubCD) all fire in the gamma band range when maximally activated, but no higher. The mechanisms involve high threshold, voltage-dependent P/Q-type calcium channels or sodium-dependent subthreshold oscillations. Rather than participating in the temporal binding of sensory events as in the cortex, gamma band activity in the RAS may participate in the processes of preconscious awareness, and provide the essential stream of information for the formulation of many of our actions. We address three necessary next steps resulting from these discoveries, an intracellular mechanism responsible for maintaining gamma band activity based on persistent G-protein activation, separate intracellular pathways that differentiate between gamma band activity during waking vs during REM sleep, and an intracellular mechanism responsible for the dysregulation in gamma band activity in schizophrenia. These findings open several promising research avenues that have not been thoroughly explored. What are the effects of sleep or REM sleep deprivation on these RAS mechanisms? Are these mechanisms involved in memory processing during waking and/or during REM sleep? Does gamma band processing differ during waking vs REM sleep after sleep or REM sleep deprivation? PMID:24309750

  3. Mechanisms to enhance the effectiveness of allied health and social care assistants in community-based rehabilitation services: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Moran, Anna; Nancarrow, Susan A; Enderby, Pamela

    2015-07-01

    This research aims to describe the factors associated with successful employment of allied health and social care assistants in community-based rehabilitation services (CBRS) in England. The research involved the thematic analysis of interviews and focus groups with 153 professionally qualified and assistant staff from 11 older people's interdisciplinary community rehabilitation teams. Data were collected between November 2006 and December 2008. Assistants were perceived as a focal point for care delivery and conduits for enabling a service to achieve goals within interdisciplinary team structures. Nine mechanisms were identified that promoted the successful employment of assistants: (i) Multidisciplinary team input into assistant training and support; (ii) Ensuring the timely assessment of clients by qualified staff; (iii) Establishing clear communication structures between qualified and assistant staff; (iv) Co-location of teams to promote communication and skill sharing; (v) Removing barriers that prevent staff working to their full scope of practice; (vi) Facilitating role flexibility of assistants, while upholding the principles of reablement; (vii) Allowing sufficient time for client-staff interaction; (viii) Ensuring an appropriate ratio of assistant to qualified staff to enable sufficient training and supervision of assistants; and (ix) Appropriately, resourcing the role for training and reimbursement to reflect responsibility. We conclude that upholding these mechanisms may help to optimise the efficiency and productivity of assistant and professionally qualified staff in CBRS.

  4. Catalytic activity of noble metals for metal-assisted chemical etching of silicon

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Metal-assisted chemical etching of silicon is an electroless method that can produce porous silicon by immersing metal-modified silicon in a hydrofluoric acid solution without electrical bias. We have been studying the metal-assisted hydrofluoric acid etching of silicon using dissolved oxygen as an oxidizing agent. Three major factors control the etching reaction and the porous silicon structure: photoillumination during etching, oxidizing agents, and metal particles. In this study, the influence of noble metal particles, silver, gold, platinum, and rhodium, on this etching is investigated under dark conditions: the absence of photogenerated charges in the silicon. The silicon dissolution is localized under the particles, and nanopores are formed whose diameters resemble the size of the metal nanoparticles. The etching rate of the silicon and the catalytic activity of the metals for the cathodic reduction of oxygen in the hydrofluoric acid solution increase in the order of silver, gold, platinum, and rhodium. PMID:22738277

  5. Field-Activated, Pressure-Assisted Synthesis of Ultra-hard, Super-Abrasive AlMgB14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen; Wu, Yin-tao; Mao, Shu-hong; Pan, Rui-li; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Tie-ming

    2013-04-01

    Mechanical alloying (MA) and the field-activated and pressure-assisted in situ synthesis (FAPAS) were combined to prepare the ultra-hard and super-abrasive AlMgB14 with the characteristics of fast heating-up, high efficiency, and low energy cost. Such preparations using the elemental constituents, such as Al, Mg, and B, were performed at a vacuum annealed temperature of 1500 °C under a pressure of 60 MPa. The resultant ceramics were characterized by SEM, EDS, and XRD. It was shown that the samples contained uniform AlMgB14, and the maximum hardness on the sample surface may reach 32.5 GPa. Furthermore, a second experiment was performed, in which MgH2 was used as one of the starting materials instead of elemental Mg, but this approach did not produce AlMgB14.

  6. Investigation of oxidation process of mechanically activated ultrafine iron powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lysenko, E. N.; Nikolaev, E. V.; Vlasov, V. A.; Zhuravkov, S. P.

    2016-02-01

    The oxidation of mechanically activated ultrafine iron powders was studied using X- ray powder diffraction and thermogravimetric analyzes. The powders with average particles size of 100 nm were made by the electric explosion of wire, and were subjected to mechanical activation in planetary ball mill for 15 and 40 minutes. It was shown that a certain amount of FeO phase is formed during mechanical activation of ultrafine iron powders. According to thermogravimetric analysis, the oxidation process of non-milled ultrafine iron powders is a complex process and occurs in three stages. The preliminary mechanical activation of powders considerably changes the nature of the iron powders oxidation, leads to increasing in the temperature of oxidation onset and shifts the reaction to higher temperatures. For the milled powders, the oxidation is more simple process and occurs in a single step.

  7. Mechanical Activation of Construction Binder Materials by Various Mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fediuk, R. S.

    2016-04-01

    The paper deals with the mechanical grinding down to the nano powder of construction materials. During mechanical activation a composite binder active molecules cement minerals occur in the destruction of the molecular defects in the areas of packaging and breaking metastable phase decompensation intermolecular forces. The process is accompanied by a change in the kinetics of hardening of portland cement. Mechanical processes during grinding mineral materials cause, along with the increase in their surface energy, increase the Gibbs energy of powders and, respectively, their chemical activity, which also contributes to the high adhesion strength when contacting them with binders. Thus, the set of measures for mechanical activation makes better use of the weight of components filled with cement systems and adjust their properties. At relatively low cost is possible to provide a spectacular and, importantly, easily repeatable results in a production environment.

  8. Ghost peaks observed after atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization experiments may disclose new ionization mechanism of matrix-assisted hypersonic velocity impact ionization.

    PubMed

    Moskovets, Eugene

    2015-08-30

    Understanding the mechanisms of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) promises improvements in the sensitivity and specificity of many established applications in the field of mass spectrometry. This paper reports a serendipitous observation of a significant ion yield in a post-ionization experiment conducted after the sample had been removed from a standard atmospheric pressure (AP)-MALDI source. This post-ionization is interpreted in terms of collisions of microparticles moving with a hypersonic velocity into a solid surface. Calculations show that the thermal energy released during such collisions is close to that absorbed by the top matrix layer in traditional MALDI. The microparticles, containing both the matrix and analytes, could be detached from a film produced inside the inlet capillary during the sample ablation and accelerated by the flow rushing through the capillary. These observations contribute some new perspective to ion formation in both laser and laser-less matrix-assisted ionization. An AP-MALDI ion source hyphenated with a three-stage high-pressure ion funnel system was utilized for peptide mass analysis. After the laser had been turned off and the MALDI sample removed, ions were detected during a gradual reduction of the background pressure in the first funnel. The constant-rate pressure reduction led to the reproducible appearance of different singly and doubly charged peptide peaks in mass spectra taken a few seconds after the end of the MALDI analysis of a dried-droplet spot. The ion yield as well as the mass range of ions observed with a significant delay after a completion of the primary MALDI analysis depended primarily on the background pressure inside the first funnel. The production of ions in this post-ionization step was exclusively observed during the pressure drop. A lower matrix background and significant increase in relative yield of double-protonated ions are reported. The observations were partially consistent

  9. Photosynthetic pigments and peroxidase activity of Lepidium sativum L. during assisted Hg phytoextraction.

    PubMed

    Smolinska, Beata; Leszczynska, Joanna

    2017-04-06

    The study was conducted to evaluate metabolic answer of Lepidium sativum L. on Hg, compost, and citric acid during assisted phytoextraction. The chlorophyll a and b contents, total carotenoids, and activity of peroxidase were determined in plants exposed to Hg and soil amendments. Hg accumulation in plant shoots was also investigated. The pot experiments were provided in soil artificially contaminated by Hg and/or supplemented with compost and citric acid. Hg concentration in plant shoots and soil substrates was determined by cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-AAS) method after acid mineralization. The plant photosynthetic pigments and peroxidase activity were measured by standard spectrophotometric methods. The study shows that L. sativum L. accumulated Hg in its aerial tissues. An increase in Hg accumulation was noticed when soil was supplemented with compost and citric acid. Increasing Hg concentration in plant shoots was correlated with enhanced activation of peroxidase activity and changes in total carotenoid concentration. Combined use of compost and citric acid also decreased the chlorophyll a and b contents in plant leaves. Presented study reveals that L. sativum L. is capable of tolerating Hg and its use during phytoextraction assisted by combined use of compost and citric acid lead to decreasing soil contamination by Hg.

  10. Using assistive technology adaptations to include students with learning disabilities in cooperative learning activities.

    PubMed

    Bryant, D P; Bryant, B R

    1998-01-01

    Cooperative learning (CL) is a common instructional arrangement that is used by classroom teachers to foster academic achievement and social acceptance of students with and without learning disabilities. Cooperative learning is appealing to classroom teachers because it can provide an opportunity for more instruction and feedback by peers than can be provided by teachers to individual students who require extra assistance. Recent studies suggest that students with LD may need adaptations during cooperative learning activities. The use of assistive technology adaptations may be necessary to help some students with LD compensate for their specific learning difficulties so that they can engage more readily in cooperative learning activities. A process for integrating technology adaptations into cooperative learning activities is discussed in terms of three components: selecting adaptations, monitoring the use of the adaptations during cooperative learning activities, and evaluating the adaptations' effectiveness. The article concludes with comments regarding barriers to and support systems for technology integration, technology and effective instructional practices, and the need to consider technology adaptations for students who have learning disabilities.

  11. Robot-assisted motor activation monitored by time-domain optical brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkellner, O.; Wabnitz, H.; Schmid, S.; Steingräber, R.; Schmidt, H.; Krüger, J.; Macdonald, R.

    2011-07-01

    Robot-assisted motor rehabilitation proved to be an effective supplement to conventional hand-to-hand therapy in stroke patients. In order to analyze and understand motor learning and performance during rehabilitation it is desirable to develop a monitor to provide objective measures of the corresponding brain activity at the rehabilitation progress. We used a portable time-domain near-infrared reflectometer to monitor the hemodynamic brain response to distal upper extremity activities. Four healthy volunteers performed two different robot-assisted wrist/forearm movements, flexion-extension and pronation-supination in comparison with an unassisted squeeze ball exercise. A special headgear with four optical measurement positions to include parts of the pre- and postcentral gyrus provided a good overlap with the expected activation areas. Data analysis based on variance of time-of-flight distributions of photons through tissue was chosen to provide a suitable representation of intracerebral signals. In all subjects several of the four detection channels showed a response. In some cases indications were found of differences in localization of the activated areas for the various tasks.

  12. Mechanism insight of PFOA degradation by ZnO assisted-photocatalytic ozonation: Efficiency and intermediates.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Li, Xukai; Tang, Yiming; Lu, Ping; Chen, Weirui; Xu, Xiaoting; Li, Laisheng

    2017-04-03

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods were prepared by a directly pyrolysis method and employed as catalyst for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) degradation. Comparative experiments were conducted to discuss the catalytic activity and flexibility of ZnO. After ZnO addition, the best PFOA degradation efficiency (70.5%) was achieved by ZnO/UV/O3 system, only 9.5% by sole ozonation and 18.2% by UV254 light irradiation. PFOA degradation was sensitive with pH value and temperature. The better PFOA removal efficiency was achieved at acidic condition. A novel relationship was found among PFOA degradation efficiency with hydroxyl radicals and photo-generated holes. Hydroxyl radicals generated on the surfaces of ZnO nanorods played dominant roles in PFOA degradation. PFOA degradation was found to follow the photo-Kolbe reaction mechanism. C2-C7 shorter-chain perfluorocarboxylic acids and fluoride ion were detected as main intermediates during PFOA degradation process. Based on the results, a proposal degradation pathway was raised.

  13. Distant Activation of Transcription: Mechanisms of Enhancer Action

    PubMed Central

    Kulaeva, Olga I.; Nizovtseva, Ekaterina V.; Polikanov, Yury S.; Ulianov, Sergei V.

    2012-01-01

    Enhancers are regulatory DNA sequences that activate transcription over long distances. Recent studies revealed a widespread role of distant activation in eukaryotic gene regulation and in development of various human diseases, including cancer. Genomic and gene-targeted studies of enhancer action revealed novel mechanisms of transcriptional activation over a distance. They include formation of stable, inactive DNA-protein complexes at the enhancer and target promoter before activation, facilitated distant communication by looping of the spacer chromatin-covered DNA, and promoter activation by mechanisms that are different from classic recruiting. These studies suggest the similarity between the looping mechanisms involved in enhancer action on DNA in bacteria and in chromatin of higher organisms. PMID:23045397

  14. Leg muscle activity during walking with assistive devices at varying levels of weight bearing.

    PubMed

    Clark, Brian C; Manini, Todd M; Ordway, Nathaniel R; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L

    2004-09-01

    To evaluate the muscle activation patterns at varying levels of weight-bearing forces during assisted walking with an axillary crutch and a recently designed device that allows weight transfer through the pelvic girdle (ED Walker). Descriptive, repeated measures. University-based research laboratory. Twelve healthy volunteers (age, 39.6+/-13.6 y). Not applicable. Electromyographic activity was recorded from the anterior tibialis, soleus, biceps femoris, and vastus lateralis muscles on a test leg during assisted axillary crutch and ED Walker ambulation. Force platform readings measured weight-bearing load (non, light, heavy). These values were normalized to normal walking gait. In the vastus lateralis and soleus muscles, both devices allowed for approximately 50% and 65% reductions in electromyographic activity during the non-weight-bearing condition. During crutch ambulation, electromyographic activity of the soleus was significantly reduced compared with that required for normal walking at all levels of weight-bearing load. In the vastus lateralis for the weight-bearing conditions, the ED Walker required significantly higher electromyographic activity than crutch ambulation (light: 105.0%+/-12.3% vs 72.7%+/-10.1%; heavy: 144.8%+/-23.5% vs 100.0%+/-13.5%). Both devices required similar peak vertical ground reaction forces during the heavy weight-bearing conditions (crutch: 75%+/-1.6%; ED Walker: 73%+/-1.8%), whereas axillary crutch gait produced less force than the ED Walker in the light condition (32%+/-2.0% vs 48%+/-1.6%). During walking with assistive devices, muscle activation patterns varied with weight-bearing load. The leg extensor muscles appeared to incur a greater reduction in muscle activity when compared with their flexor counterparts. Additionally, the ED Walker and axillary crutch differed with respect to their muscle activity levels and weight-bearing characteristics. Clinically, knowledge of these muscle activity and force characteristics may aid in

  15. A Study of a Handrim-Activated Power-Assist Wheelchair Based on a Non-Contact Torque Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Ki-Tae; Jang, Dae-Jin; Kim, Yong Chol; Heo, Yoon; Hong, Eung-Pyo

    2016-01-01

    Demand for wheelchairs is increasing with growing numbers of aged and disabled persons. Manual wheelchairs are the most commonly used assistive device for mobility because they are convenient to transport. Manual wheelchairs have several advantages but are not easy to use for the elderly or those who lack muscular strength. Therefore, handrim-activated power-assist wheelchairs (HAPAW) that can aid driving power with a motor by detecting user driving intentions through the handrim are being researched. This research will be on HAPAW that judge user driving intentions by using non-contact torque sensors. To deliver the desired motion, which is sensed from handrim rotation relative to a fixed controller, a new driving wheel mechanism is designed by applying a non-contact torque sensor, and corresponding torques are simulated. Torques are measured by a driving wheel prototype and compared with simulation results. The HAPAW prototype was developed using the wheels and a driving control algorithm that uses left and right input torques and time differences are used to check if the non-contact torque sensor can distinguish users’ driving intentions. Through this procedure, it was confirmed that the proposed sensor can be used effectively in HAPAW. PMID:27509508

  16. Voice-Activated Lightweight Reacher to Assist with Upper Extremity Movement Limitations: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Umer; Conti, Gerry E; Erlandson, Robert F; Ellis, Richard D; Brown, Vince; Pandya, Abhilash K

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this research was to design a functional and user-friendly reacher for people with spinal cord injuries (SCIs). Engineering advancements have taken assistive robotics to new dimensions. Technologies such as wheelchair robotics and myo-electronically controlled systems have opened up a wide range of new applications to assist people with physical disabilities. Similarly, exo-skeletal limbs and body suits have provided new foundations from which technologies can aid function. Unfortunately, these devices have issues of usability, weight, and discomfort with donning. The Smart Assistive Reacher Arm (SARA) system, developed in this research, is a voice-activated, lightweight, mobile device that can be used when needed. SARA was built to help overcome daily reach challenges faced by individuals with limited arm and hand movement capability, such as people with cervical level 5-6 (C5-6) SCI. This article shows that a functional reacher arm with voice control can be beneficial for this population. Comparison study with healthy participants and an SCI participant shows that, when using SARA, a person with SCI can perform simple reach and grasp tasks independently, without someone else's help. This suggests that the interface is intuitive and can be easily used to a high level of proficiency by a SCI individual.

  17. Combined feedforward and model-assisted active disturbance rejection control for non-minimum phase system.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Li, Donghai; Gao, Zhiqiang; Yang, Zhao; Zhao, Shen

    2016-09-01

    Control of the non-minimum phase (NMP) system is challenging, especially in the presence of modelling uncertainties and external disturbances. To this end, this paper presents a combined feedforward and model-assisted Active Disturbance Rejection Control (MADRC) strategy. Based on the nominal model, the feedforward controller is used to produce a tracking performance that has minimum settling time subject to a prescribed undershoot constraint. On the other hand, the unknown disturbances and uncertain dynamics beyond the nominal model are compensated by MADRC. Since the conventional Extended State Observer (ESO) is not suitable for the NMP system, a model-assisted ESO (MESO) is proposed based on the nominal observable canonical form. The convergence of MESO is proved in time domain. The stability, steady-state characteristics and robustness of the closed-loop system are analyzed in frequency domain. The proposed strategy has only one tuning parameter, i.e., the bandwidth of MESO, which can be readily determined with a prescribed robustness level. Some comparative examples are given to show the efficacy of the proposed method. This paper depicts a promising prospect of the model-assisted ADRC in dealing with complex systems.

  18. Prospective trial of equine-assisted activities in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Kern, Janet K; Fletcher, Charles L; Garver, Carolyn R; Mehta, Jyutika A; Grannemann, Bruce D; Knox, Kandice R; Richardson, Theresia A; Trivedi, Madhukar H

    2011-01-01

    Anecdotal reports and some studies suggest that equine-assisted activities may be beneficial in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). To examine the effects ofequine-assisted activities on overall severity of autism symptoms using the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS) and the quality ofparent-child interactions using the Timberlawn Parent-Child Interaction Scale. In addition, this study examined changes in sensory processing, quality of life, and parental treatment satisfaction. Children with ASD were evaluated at four time points: (1) before beginning a 3-to-6 month waiting period, (2) before starting the riding treatment, and (3) after 3 months and (4) 6 months of riding. Twenty-four participants completed the waiting list period and began the riding program, and 20 participants completed the entire 6 months of riding. Pretreatment was compared to posttreatment with each child acting as his or her own control. A reduction in the severity of autism symptoms occurred with the therapeutic riding treatment. There was no change in CARS scores during the pretreatment baseline period; however, there was a significant decrease after treatment at 3 months and 6 months of riding. The Timberlawn Parent-Child Interaction Scale showed a significant improvement in Mood and Tone at 3 months and 6 months of riding and a marginal improvement in the reduction of Negative Regard at 6 months of riding. The parent-rated quality of life measure showed improvement, including the pretreatment waiting period. All of the ratings in the Treatment Satisfaction Survey were between good and very good. These results suggest that children with ASD benefit from equine-assisted activities.

  19. Adsorption mechanisms and the effect of oxytetracycline on activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiancai; Liu, Dongfang; Zhang, Guowei; Frigon, Matthew; Meng, Xianrong; Li, Kexun

    2014-01-01

    The adsorption mechanisms and the effect of Oxytetracycline (OTC) onto activated sludge were studied. The results show that the adsorption of Oxytetracycline (OTC) onto activated sludge was coincident with the Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherm models. The Freundlich model had the best fit which suggested that chemical adsorption mechanism was dominant. The influences including pH and metal ions on the OTC were examined. It was demonstrated that the adsorption process was highly pH-dependant, which indicate that cationic exchange mechanisms may play an important role in the adsorption process. Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and Cd(2+) ions more or less inhibited the adsorption of OTC on activated sludge while Cu(2+) enhanced the adsorption ability. The phenomenon may reflect the result that a surface complexation mechanism could involved in the adsorption. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Synthesis of ZnO Nanocrystal-Graphene Composite by Mechanical Milling and Sonication-Assisted Exfoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Sweety; Srivastava, Chandan

    2017-02-01

    A ZnO nanocrystal-graphene composite was synthesized by a two-step method involving mechanical milling and sonication-assisted exfoliation. Zn metal powder was first ball-milled with graphite powder for 30 h in water medium. This ball-milled mixture was then subjected to exfoliation by sonication in the presence of sodium lauryl sulfate surfactant to produce graphene decorated with spherical agglomerates of ultrafine nanocrystalline ZnO. The presence of a few layers of graphene was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy measurements. The size, phase identity and composition of the ZnO nanocrystals was determined by transmission electron microscopy measurements.

  1. Tractor Mechanics: Learning Activity Packages 1-19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    Learning activity packages are presented for teaching tractor mechanics. The first of two sections deals with miscellaneous tasks and contains learning activity packages on cleaning the tractor and receiving new tractor parts. Section 2 is concerned with maintaining and servicing the electrical system, and it includes the following learning…

  2. Tractor Mechanics: Learning Activity Packages 1-19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    Learning activity packages are presented for teaching tractor mechanics. The first of two sections deals with miscellaneous tasks and contains learning activity packages on cleaning the tractor and receiving new tractor parts. Section 2 is concerned with maintaining and servicing the electrical system, and it includes the following learning…

  3. User-centric design of a personal assistance robot (FRASIER) for active aging.

    PubMed

    Padir, Taşkin; Skorinko, Jeanine; Dimitrov, Velin

    2015-01-01

    We present our preliminary results from the design process for developing the Worcester Polytechnic Institute's personal assistance robot, FRASIER, as an intelligent service robot for enabling active aging. The robot capabilities include vision-based object detection, tracking the user and help with carrying heavy items such as grocery bags or cafeteria trays. This work-in-progress report outlines our motivation and approach to developing the next generation of service robots for the elderly. Our main contribution in this paper is the development of a set of specifications based on the adopted user-centered design process, and realization of the prototype system designed to meet these specifications.

  4. Select clinical recommendations for military medical practitioners conducting humanitarian and civic assistance activities.

    PubMed

    Hollon, Justin R; Hickey, Patrick W

    2010-09-01

    Training and planning for stability, security, transition, and reconstruction, to include humanitarian and civic assistance activities, has taken on new importance for today's military forces. Deployed medical forces providing medical care to local populations are presented with the challenge of limited resources, complex public health needs, and complex cultural and linguistic barriers to care. In this article, we review some of the clinical situations commonly encountered during these operations and provide an evidence-based rationale for proposed courses of action. This report is timely given expanding operations in Afghanistan and the stand-up of the U.S. African Command (AFRICOM).

  5. Hydrogen-bond-assisted activation of allylic alcohols for palladium-catalyzed coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Gumrukcu, Yasemin; de Bruin, Bas; Reek, Joost N H

    2014-03-01

    We report direct activation of allylic alcohols using a hydrogen-bond-assisted palladium catalyst and use this for alkylation and amination reactions. The novel catalyst comprises a palladium complex based on a functionalized monodentate phosphoramidite ligand in combination with urea additives and affords linear alkylated and aminated allylic products selectively. Detailed kinetic analysis show that oxidative addition of the allyl alcohol is the rate-determining step, which is facilitated by hydrogen bonds between the alcohol, the ligand functional group, and the additional urea additive.

  6. Microwave-assisted extraction of polysaccharides from Yupingfeng powder and their antioxidant activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dan; Zhang, Bi-Bo; Qu, Xiao-Xia; Gao, Feng; Yuan, Min-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Microwave-assisted reflux extraction of polysaccharides YPF-P from the famous Chinese traditional drug, Yupingfeng powder, optimization of extracting conditions and evaluation of their antioxidant activity were conducted in this study. Results: Single factor effect trends were achieved through yields and contends of YPF-P obtained from different extracting conditions. Then through a three-level, four-variable Box-Behnken design of response surface methodology adopting yield as response, the optimal conditions were determined as follows: Material/solvent ratio 1:23.37, microwave power 560 W, Extraction temperature 64°C, and extraction time 9.62 min. Under the optimal conditions, the YPF-P extraction yield was 3.23%, and its content was detected as 38.52%. In antioxidant assays, the YPF-P was tested to possess 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activities with an IC50 value of 0.262 mg/ml. In addition, YPF-P was also proved to have relatively low ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), compared to Vc, through FRAP assay. Conclusion: In the microwave assisted reflux extraction research, good YPF-P yield was achieved from materials with relatively low YPF-P content. And for the first time, both DPPH and FRAP assays were conducted on YPF-P, which proved that the antioxidant activity of YPF-P contributed to the functions of this medicine. PMID:26246730

  7. Microwave assisted solvent-free synthesis and biological activities of novel imines (Schiff bases).

    PubMed

    Kundu, Aditi; Shakil, Najam Akhtar; Saxena, Dinesh B; Kumar, Jitendra; Walia, Suresh

    2009-06-01

    Twelve new ortho-Hydroxyketimines were synthesized by conventional as well as microwave method and evaluated for their antinemic activity against Meloidogyne incognita [(Kofoid and White) Chitwood]. Conventional methods for synthesis of Schiff bases require refluxing at 140 degrees C of the reactants in different solvents for at least 24 h or more, where as the microwave-assisted synthesis has brought down the reaction time from 24 h to 1 minute. The procedure reported is simple as it does not require any organic solvents and the time has been reduced to only 1 minute. Comparative yields of all compounds by different methods revealed that the yield was low in conventional method (79-87%) as compared to microwave assisted synthesis (94-97%). The bioassay revealed that all the test compounds exhibited promising nematicidal activity; N-propyl-2-hydroxypropiophenonimine being the most effective with LC(50) value of 74.46 mgL(-1) followed by N-hexyl-2-hydroxyacetophenonimine with LC(50) value of 99.60 mgL(-1) after 72 h of exposure. The results obtained from bioassay indicated that this class of compounds has not only given a lead with regard to potential of Schiff bases in pest control, but has suggested that a carbon chain length of 6 atoms in the side chain is optimum on the basis of structure activity relationship (SAR).

  8. Health-Promoting Physical Activity of Children Who Use Assistive Mobility Devices: A Scoping Review.

    PubMed

    Jirikowic, Tracy L; Kerfeld, Cheryl I

    2016-01-01

    Children with physical disabilities who use assistive mobility devices (AMDs) are at risk for obesity and other secondary health conditions. Habitual physical activity is one lifestyle factor that may prevent obesity and contribute to overall health, and an active lifestyle in childhood improves prospects for lifelong healthy behaviors. Child, family, and environmental facilitators and barriers influence health-promoting physical activity (HPPA) for children without disabilities, but comparable models and levels of understanding for children who use AMDs are lacking. In this scoping review, we identified a similar set of child, family, and environmental facilitators and barriers relevant to HPPA participation among children who use AMDs. Noted gaps in the literature included limited reporting of AMD use, inconsistent HPPA definitions, and inadequate measurement tools for children who are nonambulatory. The identified child, family, and environmental factors provide a framework for occupational therapy practitioners and interprofessional teams to develop HPPA opportunities and interventions for an underserved population.

  9. Promotion of progressive mobility activities with ventricular assist and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation devices in a cardiothoracic intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Chavez, Jennifer; Bortolotto, Shannon Johnson; Paulson, Martha; Huntley, Nicole; Sullivan, Breandan; Babu, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Progressive mobility (PM) is a clinical intervention that influences complications experienced throughout critical illness. Early PM is a relevant topic in critical care practice literature and was principle to introducing a PM care guideline in an acute cardiothoracic/cardiovascular intensive care unit. A noted challenge in the cardiothoracic/cardiovascular intensive care unit is caring for acute cardiac and pulmonary failure. Often, these patients require prolonged mechanical circulatory support via extracorporeal mechanical oxygenation or a ventricular assist device. This article describes safe and effective progressive mobilization for patients experiencing MCS in a case study format. This article also highlights how a multidisciplinary clinical team supports mobility practice in specific critical care roles. Post-intensive care syndrome is composed of various health implications that occur following critical illness. Recent data suggest improved care outcomes when critically ill patients are awake and participate in active physical rehabilitation as early as clinically possible. The case studies presented indicate that mobility, to the point of ambulation, is a feasible clinical expectation when patients present with substantial acute respiratory and cardiac failure and are managed with MCS. Development of a PM guideline uses a critical appraisal of practice evidence, highlights multidisciplinary collaboration, and increases progression to ambulation. Mobility for complex patients is attainable, as demonstrated in the postguideline outcomes. The PM guideline provides structure to primary caregivers and promotes safe practices. The PM guideline facilitates an advanced level of care, promotes safe practices, champions holistic recovery, and encourages active patient involvement, goals satisfying to both patients and staff.

  10. Mechanisms of Non-canonical Activation of Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated.

    PubMed

    Khoronenkova, S V

    2016-12-01

    ATM is a master regulator of the cellular response to DNA damage. The classical mechanism of ATM activation involves its monomerization in response to DNA double-strand breaks, resulting in ATM-dependent phosphorylation of more than a thousand substrates required for cell cycle progression, DNA repair, and apoptosis. Here, new experimental evidence for non-canonical mechanisms of ATM activation in response to stimuli distinct from DNA double-strand breaks is discussed. It includes cytoskeletal changes, chromatin modifications, RNA-DNA hybrids, and DNA single-strand breaks. Noncanonical ATM activation may be important for the pathology of the multisystemic disease Ataxia Telangiectasia.

  11. Aspirin Has Limited Ability to Modulate Shear-Mediated Platelet Activation Associated with Elevated Shear Stress of Ventricular Assist Devices

    PubMed Central

    Valerio, Lorenzo; Tran, Phat L.; Sheriff, Jawaad; Brengle, William; Ghosh, Ram; Chiu, Wei-Che; Redaelli, Alberto; Fiore, Gianfranco B.; Pappalardo, Federico; Bluestein, Danny; Slepian, Marvin J.

    2016-01-01

    Continuous flow ventricular assist devices (cfVADs) while effective in advanced heart failure, remain plagued by thrombosis related to abnormal flows and elevated shear stress. To limit cfVAD thrombosis, patients utilize complex anti-thrombotic regimens built upon a foundation of aspirin (ASA). While much data exists on ASA as a modulator of biochemically-mediated platelet activation, limited data exists as to the efficacy of ASA as a means of limiting shear-mediated platelet activation, particularly under elevated shear stress common within cfVADs. We investigated the ability of ASA (20, 25 and 125 μM) to limit shear-mediated platelet activation under conditions of: 1) constant shear stress (30 dyne/cm2 and 70 dyne/cm2); 2) dynamic shear stress, and 3) initial high shear exposure (70 dyne/cm2) followed by low shear exposure – i.e. a platelet sensitization protocol, utilizing a hemodynamic shearing device providing uniform shear stress in vitro. The efficacy of ASA to limit platelet activation mediated via passage through a clinical cfVAD system (DeBakey Micromed) in vitro was also studied. ASA reduced platelet activation only under conditions of low shear stress (38% reduction compared to control, n = 10, p < 0.004), with minimal protection at higher shear stress and under dynamic conditions (n = 10, p > 0.5) with no limitation of platelet sensitization. ASA had limited ability (25.6% reduction in platelet activation rate) to modulate shear-mediated platelet activation induced via cfVAD passage. These findings, while performed under “deconstructed” non-clinical conditions by utilizing purified platelets alone in vitro, provide a potential contributory mechanistic explanation for the persistent thrombosis rates experienced clinically in cfVAD patients despite ASA therapy. An opportunity exists to develop enhanced pharmacologic strategies to limit shear-mediated platelet activation at elevated shear levels associated with mechanical circulatory support

  12. Mechanism of cholesterol-assisted oligomeric channel formation by a short Alzheimer β-amyloid peptide.

    PubMed

    Di Scala, Coralie; Troadec, Jean-Denis; Lelièvre, Clément; Garmy, Nicolas; Fantini, Jacques; Chahinian, Henri

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides can self-organize into oligomeric ion channels with high neurotoxicity potential. Cholesterol is believed to play a key role in this process, but the molecular mechanisms linking cholesterol and amyloid channel formation have so far remained elusive. Here, we show that the short Aβ22-35 peptide, which encompasses the cholesterol-binding domain of Aβ, induces a specific increase of Ca(2+) levels in neural cells. This effect is neither observed in calcium-free medium nor in cholesterol-depleted cells, and is inhibited by zinc, a blocker of amyloid channel activity. Double mutations V24G/K28G and N27R/K28R in Aβ22-35 modify cholesterol binding and abrogate channel formation. Molecular dynamic simulations suggest that cholesterol induces a tilted α-helical topology of Aβ22-35. This facilitates the establishment of an inter-peptide hydrogen bond network involving Asn-27 and Lys-28, a key step in the octamerization of Aβ22-35 which proceeds gradually until the formation of a perfect annular channel in a phosphatidylcholine membrane. Overall, these data give mechanistic insights into the role of cholesterol in amyloid channel formation, opening up new therapeutic options for Alzheimer's disease. Aβ22-35 peptide, which encompasses the cholesterol binding domain of Aβ, induces a specific increase of Ca(2+) level in neural cells. Double mutations V24G/K28G and N27R/K28R modify cholesterol binding and abrogate channels formation. Molecular dynamic simulations suggest that cholesterol induces a tilted α-helical peptide topology facilitating the formation of annular octameric channels, as schematically shown in the graphic (with a hydrogen bond shown in green for two vicinal peptides). Overall, the data give insights into the role of cholesterol in amyloid channel formation and open up new therapeutic options for Alzheimer's disease.

  13. Electronic transport mechanism in polydiacetylene crystals — variable range hopping or phonon-assisted tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipinys, Povilas; Kiveris, Antanas

    2007-03-01

    Experimental results on the current-voltage characteristics of polydiacetylene (PDA) single crystals reported by Aleshin et al [Phys. Rev. Vol. B 69, (2004) art. 214203] are reinterpreted in terms of the phonon-assisted electron tunnelling model. It is shown that the experimental results, measured in the temperature range from 1.8 K to 300 K are consistent with the tunnelling rate dependence on field strength, computed for the same range of temperatures. An advantage of this model over that of Aleshin et al, using the variable range hopping (VRH) model, is the possibility of describing the behaviour of I — V data measured at both high and low temperatures with the same set of parameters characterizing this material. This assertion is confirmed by comparison of the temperature-dependent current-voltage data extracted from Aleshin et al’s work with tunnelling rate dependence on temperature, computed using two different expressions of the phonon-assisted tunnelling theory. The temperature dependence of the conductivity of an ion implanted PDA crystals [B. S. Elman et al, Appl. Phys. Lett., Vol. 46, (1985) p. 100] and polypyrrole [P. Dutta et al, Synth. Met., Vol. 139 (2003) p. 201] are also explained on the basis of this model.

  14. Electronic transport mechanism in polydiacetylene crystals — variable range hopping or phonon-assisted tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipinys, Povilas; Kiveris, Antanas

    2007-03-01

    Experimental results on the current-voltage characteristics of polydiacetylene (PDA) single crystals reported by Aleshin et al [Phys. Rev. Vol. B 69, (2004) art. 214203] are reinterpreted in terms of the phonon-assisted electron tunnelling model. It is shown that the experimental results, measured in the temperature range from 1.8 K to 300 K are consistent with the tunnelling rate dependence on field strength, computed for the same range of temperatures. An advantage of this model over that of Aleshin et al, using the variable range hopping (VRH) model, is the possibility of describing the behaviour of I — V data measured at both high and low temperatures with the same set of parameters characterizing this material. This assertion is confirmed by comparison of the temperature-dependent current-voltage data extracted from Aleshin et al's work with tunnelling rate dependence on temperature, computed using two different expressions of the phonon-assisted tunnelling theory. The temperature dependence of the conductivity of an ion implanted PDA crystals [B. S. Elman et al, Appl. Phys. Lett., Vol. 46, (1985) p. 100] and polypyrrole [P. Dutta et al, Synth. Met., Vol. 139 (2003) p. 201] are also explained on the basis of this model.

  15. Mechanical properties that influence antimicrobial peptide activity in lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Marín-Medina, Nathaly; Ramírez, Diego Alejandro; Trier, Steve; Leidy, Chad

    2016-12-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are small amphiphilic proteins found in animals and plants as essential components of the innate immune system and whose function is to control bacterial infectious activity. In order to accomplish their function, antimicrobial peptides use different mechanisms of action which have been deeply studied in view of their potential exploitation to treat antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections. One of the main mechanisms of action of these peptides is the disruption of the bacterial membrane through pore formation, which, in some cases, takes place via a monomer to oligomer cooperative transition. Previous studies have shown that lipid composition, and the presence of exogenous components, such as cholesterol in model membranes or carotenoids in bacteria, can affect the potency of distinct antimicrobial peptides. At the same time, considering the membrane as a two-dimensional material, it has been shown that membrane composition defines its mechanical properties which might be relevant in many membrane-related processes. Nevertheless, the correlation between the mechanical properties of the membrane and antimicrobial peptide potency has not been considered according to the importance it deserves. The relevance of these mechanical properties in membrane deformation due to peptide insertion is reviewed here for different types of pores in order to elucidate if indeed membrane composition affects antimicrobial peptide activity by modulation of the mechanical properties of the membrane. This would also provide a better understanding of the mechanisms used by bacteria to overcome antimicrobial peptide activity.

  16. Application of flexure structures to active and adaptive opto-mechanical mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zago, Lorenzo; Genequand, Pierre M.; Kjelberg, Ivar; Morschel, Joseph

    1997-03-01

    Active and adaptive structures, also commonly called 'smart' structures, combine in one integrated system various functions such as load carrying and structural function, mechanical (cinematic) functions, sensing, control and actuating. Originally developed for high accuracy opto-mechanical applications, CSEM's technology of flexure structures and flexible mechanisms is particularly suited to solve many structural and mechanical issues found in such active/adaptive mechanisms. The paper illustrates some recent flexure structures developments at CSEM and outlines the comprehensive know-how involved in this technology. This comprises in particular the elaboration of optimal design guidelines, related to the geometry, kinematics and dynamics issues (for instance, the minimization of spurious high frequency effects), the evaluation and predictability of all performance quantities relevant to the utilization of flexure structures in space (reliability, fatigue, static and dynamic modeling, etc.). material issues and manufacturing procedures.

  17. Development of a Smartphone Application to Measure Physical Activity Using Sensor-Assisted Self-Report

    PubMed Central

    Dunton, Genevieve Fridlund; Dzubur, Eldin; Kawabata, Keito; Yanez, Brenda; Bo, Bin; Intille, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Despite the known advantages of objective physical activity monitors (e.g., accelerometers), these devices have high rates of non-wear, which leads to missing data. Objective activity monitors are also unable to capture valuable contextual information about behavior. Adolescents recruited into physical activity surveillance and intervention studies will increasingly have smartphones, which are miniature computers with built-in motion sensors. Methods: This paper describes the design and development of a smartphone application (“app”) called Mobile Teen that combines objective and self-report assessment strategies through (1) sensor-informed context-sensitive ecological momentary assessment (CS-EMA) and (2) sensor-assisted end-of-day recall. Results: The Mobile Teen app uses the mobile phone’s built-in motion sensor to automatically detect likely bouts of phone non-wear, sedentary behavior, and physical activity. The app then uses transitions between these inferred states to trigger CS-EMA self-report surveys measuring the type, purpose, and context of activity in real-time. The end of the day recall component of the Mobile Teen app allows users to interactively review and label their own physical activity data each evening using visual cues from automatically detected major activity transitions from the phone’s built-in motion sensors. Major activity transitions are identified by the app, which cues the user to label that “chunk,” or period, of time using activity categories. Conclusion: Sensor-driven CS-EMA and end-of-day recall smartphone apps can be used to augment physical activity data collected by objective activity monitors, filling in gaps during non-wear bouts and providing additional real-time data on environmental, social, and emotional correlates of behavior. Smartphone apps such as these have potential for affordable deployment in large-scale epidemiological and intervention studies. PMID:24616888

  18. Development of a smartphone application to measure physical activity using sensor-assisted self-report.

    PubMed

    Dunton, Genevieve Fridlund; Dzubur, Eldin; Kawabata, Keito; Yanez, Brenda; Bo, Bin; Intille, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Despite the known advantages of objective physical activity monitors (e.g., accelerometers), these devices have high rates of non-wear, which leads to missing data. Objective activity monitors are also unable to capture valuable contextual information about behavior. Adolescents recruited into physical activity surveillance and intervention studies will increasingly have smartphones, which are miniature computers with built-in motion sensors. This paper describes the design and development of a smartphone application ("app") called Mobile Teen that combines objective and self-report assessment strategies through (1) sensor-informed context-sensitive ecological momentary assessment (CS-EMA) and (2) sensor-assisted end-of-day recall. The Mobile Teen app uses the mobile phone's built-in motion sensor to automatically detect likely bouts of phone non-wear, sedentary behavior, and physical activity. The app then uses transitions between these inferred states to trigger CS-EMA self-report surveys measuring the type, purpose, and context of activity in real-time. The end of the day recall component of the Mobile Teen app allows users to interactively review and label their own physical activity data each evening using visual cues from automatically detected major activity transitions from the phone's built-in motion sensors. Major activity transitions are identified by the app, which cues the user to label that "chunk," or period, of time using activity categories. Sensor-driven CS-EMA and end-of-day recall smartphone apps can be used to augment physical activity data collected by objective activity monitors, filling in gaps during non-wear bouts and providing additional real-time data on environmental, social, and emotional correlates of behavior. Smartphone apps such as these have potential for affordable deployment in large-scale epidemiological and intervention studies.

  19. Effects of classroom animal-assisted activities on social functioning in children with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    O'Haire, Marguerite E; McKenzie, Samantha J; McCune, Sandra; Slaughter, Virginia

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to implement and evaluate a classroom-based Animal-Assisted Activities (AAA) program on social functioning in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This was a multisite, control-to-intervention design study. The study was conducted in 41 classrooms in 15 schools in Brisbane, Australia. Sixty-four (64) 5- to 12-year-old children diagnosed with ASD comprised the study group. The AAA program consisted of 8 weeks of animal exposure in the school classroom in addition to 16 20-minute animal-interaction sessions. Teacher- and parent-reported child behavior and social functioning were assessed through standardized instruments at three time points: upon study entry (Time 1), after an 8-week waiting period during the week prior to the AAA program (Time 2), and during the week following the 8-week AAA program (Time 3). Significant improvements were identified in social functioning, including increases in social approach behaviors and social skills, and decreases in social withdrawal behaviors, from before to after the AAA program, but not during the waitlist period. Over half of parents also reported that participants demonstrated an increased interest in attending school during the program. Results demonstrate the feasibility and potential efficacy of a new classroom-based Animal-Assisted Activities model, which may provide a relatively simple and cost-effective means of helping educators and families to improve the social functioning of children with ASD.

  20. The Loud Surgeon Behind the Console: Understanding Team Activities During Robot-Assisted Surgery.

    PubMed

    Tiferes, Judith; Hussein, Ahmed A; Bisantz, Ann; Kozlowski, Justen D; Sharif, Mohamed A; Winder, Nathalie M; Ahmad, Nabeeha; Allers, Jenna; Cavuoto, Lora; Guru, Khurshid A

    2016-01-01

    To design a data collection methodology to capture team activities during robot-assisted surgery (RAS) (team communications, surgical flow, and procedural interruptions), and use relevant disciplines of Industrial Engineering and Human Factors Engineering to uncover key issues impeding surgical flow and guide evidence-based strategic changes to enhance surgical performance and improve outcomes. Field study, to determine the feasibility of the proposed methodology. Recording the operating room (OR) environment during robot-assisted surgeries (RAS). The data collection system included recordings from the console and 3 aerial cameras, in addition to 8 lapel microphones (1 for each OR team member). Questionnaires on team familiarity and cognitive load were collected. In all, 37 patients and 89 OR staff members have consented to participate in the study. Overall, 37 RAS procedures were recorded (130 console hours). A pilot procedure was evaluated in detail. We were able to characterize team communications in terms of flow, mode, topic, and form. Surgical flow was evaluated in terms of duration, location, personnel involved, purpose, and if movements were avoidable or not. Procedural interruptions were characterized according to their duration, cause, mode of communication, and personnel involved. This methodology allowed for the capture of a wide variety of team activities during RAS that would serve as a solid platform to improve nontechnical aspects of RAS. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Antiproliferative activity of Curcuma phaeocaulis Valeton extract using ultrasonic assistance and response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqin; Jiang, Ying; Hu, Daode

    2017-01-02

    The objective of the study was to optimize the ultrasonic-assisted extraction of curdione, furanodienone, curcumol, and germacrone from Curcuma phaeocaulis Valeton (Val.) and investigate the antiproliferative activity of the extract. Under the suitable high-performance liquid chromatography condition, the calibration curves for these four tested compounds showed high levels of linearity and the recoveries of these four compounds were between 97.9 and 104.3%. Response surface methodology (RSM) combining central composite design and desirability function (DF) was used to define optimal extraction parameters. The results of RSM and DF revealed that the optimum conditions were obtained as 8 mL g(-1) for liquid-solid ratio, 70% ethanol concentration, and 20 min of ultrasonic time. It was found that the surface structures of the sonicated herbal materials were fluffy and irregular. The C. phaeocaulis Val. extract significantly inhibited the proliferation of RKO and HT-29 cells in vitro. The results reveal that the RSM can be effectively used for optimizing the ultrasonic-assisted extraction of bioactive components from C. phaeocaulis Val. for antiproliferative activity.

  2. [The use of assistive technology in the daily activities of children with disabilities].

    PubMed

    Varela, Renata Cristina Bertolozzi; Oliver, Fátima Corrêa

    2013-06-01

    The scope of this study is to understand the use of assistive technology in the everyday life of children with disabilities, based on the concept of everyday life as a space for expression of particularity and generality of individuals. It was developed from documentary research of medical records, application of a form, observation of daily activities of children and their families and semi-structured interviews. Five children were studied, representatives in age, sex, diagnosis and use of technological resources, who were attended in primary healthcare units in São Paulo. The resources are used in homes, schools and other environments and their use is influenced by family and social relations and by the possibility of accessing products and services. It was established that the everyday activities and the use of resources are organized according to the time, space, ways in which children and, mainly, their caregivers act, showing the presence of pragmatism, economy and spontaneity typical of everyday life. The results revealed elements that can guide the practice of professionals working with assistive technology and can contribute to enable the appraisal of providing equipment in the Unified Health System.

  3. Mechanical Unloading Activates FoxO3 to Trigger Bnip3‐Dependent Cardiomyocyte Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Dian J.; Jiang, Nan; Blagg, Andrew; Johnstone, Janet L.; Gondalia, Raj; Oh, Misook; Luo, Xiang; Yang, Kai‐Chun; Shelton, John M.; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Gillette, Thomas G.; Dorn, Gerald W.; Hill, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Mechanical assist device therapy has emerged recently as an important and rapidly expanding therapy in advanced heart failure, triggering in some patients a beneficial reverse remodeling response. However, mechanisms underlying this benefit are unclear. Methods and Results In a model of mechanical unloading of the left ventricle, we observed progressive myocyte atrophy, autophagy, and robust activation of the transcription factor FoxO3, an established regulator of catabolic processes in other cell types. Evidence for FoxO3 activation was similarly detected in unloaded failing human myocardium. To determine the role of FoxO3 activation in cardiac muscle in vivo, we engineered transgenic mice harboring a cardiomyocyte‐specific constitutively active FoxO3 mutant (caFoxO3flox;αMHC‐Mer‐Cre‐Mer). Expression of caFoxO3 triggered dramatic and progressive loss of cardiac mass, robust increases in cardiomyocyte autophagy, declines in mitochondrial biomass and function, and early mortality. Whereas increases in cardiomyocyte apoptosis were not apparent, we detected robust increases in Bnip3 (Bcl2/adenovirus E1B 19‐kDa interacting protein 3), an established downstream target of FoxO3. To test the role of Bnip3, we crossed the caFoxO3flox;αMHC‐Mer‐Cre‐Mer mice with Bnip3‐null animals. Remarkably, the atrophy and autophagy phenotypes were significantly blunted, yet the early mortality triggered by FoxO3 activation persisted. Rather, declines in cardiac performance were attenuated by proteasome inhibitors. Consistent with involvement of FoxO3‐driven activation of the ubiquitin‐proteasome system, we detected time‐dependent activation of the atrogenes program and sarcomere protein breakdown. Conclusions In aggregate, these data point to FoxO3, a protein activated by mechanical unloading, as a master regulator that governs both the autophagy‐lysosomal and ubiquitin‐proteasomal pathways to orchestrate cardiac muscle atrophy. PMID:23568341

  4. Mechanical unloading activates FoxO3 to trigger Bnip3-dependent cardiomyocyte atrophy.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dian J; Jiang, Nan; Blagg, Andrew; Johnstone, Janet L; Gondalia, Raj; Oh, Misook; Luo, Xiang; Yang, Kai-Chun; Shelton, John M; Rothermel, Beverly A; Gillette, Thomas G; Dorn, Gerald W; Hill, Joseph A

    2013-04-08

    Mechanical assist device therapy has emerged recently as an important and rapidly expanding therapy in advanced heart failure, triggering in some patients a beneficial reverse remodeling response. However, mechanisms underlying this benefit are unclear. In a model of mechanical unloading of the left ventricle, we observed progressive myocyte atrophy, autophagy, and robust activation of the transcription factor FoxO3, an established regulator of catabolic processes in other cell types. Evidence for FoxO3 activation was similarly detected in unloaded failing human myocardium. To determine the role of FoxO3 activation in cardiac muscle in vivo, we engineered transgenic mice harboring a cardiomyocyte-specific constitutively active FoxO3 mutant (caFoxO3(flox);αMHC-Mer-Cre-Mer). Expression of caFoxO3 triggered dramatic and progressive loss of cardiac mass, robust increases in cardiomyocyte autophagy, declines in mitochondrial biomass and function, and early mortality. Whereas increases in cardiomyocyte apoptosis were not apparent, we detected robust increases in Bnip3 (Bcl2/adenovirus E1B 19-kDa interacting protein 3), an established downstream target of FoxO3. To test the role of Bnip3, we crossed the caFoxO3(flox);αMHC-Mer-Cre-Mer mice with Bnip3-null animals. Remarkably, the atrophy and autophagy phenotypes were significantly blunted, yet the early mortality triggered by FoxO3 activation persisted. Rather, declines in cardiac performance were attenuated by proteasome inhibitors. Consistent with involvement of FoxO3-driven activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, we detected time-dependent activation of the atrogenes program and sarcomere protein breakdown. In aggregate, these data point to FoxO3, a protein activated by mechanical unloading, as a master regulator that governs both the autophagy-lysosomal and ubiquitin-proteasomal pathways to orchestrate cardiac muscle atrophy.

  5. EBSD-Assisted Slip Trace Analysis During In Situ SEM Mechanical Testing: Application to Unravel Grain Size Effects on Plasticity of Pure Mg Polycrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cepeda-Jiménez, C. M.; Molina-Aldareguia, J. M.; Pérez-Prado, M. T.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to highlight the unique capabilities of electron backscattered diffraction-assisted trace analysis during in situ SEM mechanical testing of metals in order to get a better understanding of plasticity at the microscale. The technique allows for the direct observation of different deformation mechanisms, such as slip and twinning activity, at the microscale. Moreover, and contrary to other methods, it can provide statistically sound evidence of the role of the local microstructure, such as the local texture and grain boundary network, on the activation of the different deformation modes. The power of the technique is demonstrated by reviewing recent work that has been key to solving several remaining controversies regarding the role of grain size, strain rate and temperature on the plasticity of Mg polycrystals. In particular, it was found that, with decreasing grain size, at room temperature, a clear transition from non-basal- to basal-slip-dominated flow takes place under tension and a transition from twinning to basal slip takes place under compression. On the other hand, a similar transition from twinning to basal slip takes place with increasing temperature and decreasing strain rate. The emergence of basal slip as a dominant mechanism is shown to be due to increasing levels of connectivity between favorably oriented grains, which facilitate slip transfer across grain boundaries.

  6. Active vibration control using mechanical and electrical analogies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Perez, A.; Hassan, A.; Kaczmarczyk, S.; Picton, P.

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical-electrical analogous circuit models are widely used in electromechanical system design as they represent the function of a coupled electrical and mechanical system using an equivalent electrical system. This research uses electrical circuits to establish a discussion of simple active vibration control principles using two scenarios: an active vibration isolation system and an active dynamic vibration absorber (DVA) using a voice coil motor (VCM) actuator. Active control laws such as gain scheduling are intuitively explained using circuit analysis techniques. Active vibration control approaches are typically constraint by electrical power requirements. The electrical analogous is a fast approach for specifying power requirements on the experimental test platform which is based on a vibration shaker that provides the based excitation required for the single Degree- of-Freedom (1DoF) vibration model under study.

  7. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms Underpinning Macrophage Activation during Remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Amy F.; Miron, Veronique E.

    2016-01-01

    Remyelination is an example of central nervous system (CNS) regeneration, whereby myelin is restored around demyelinated axons, re-establishing saltatory conduction and trophic/metabolic support. In progressive multiple sclerosis, remyelination is limited or fails altogether which is considered to contribute to axonal damage/loss and consequent disability. Macrophages have critical roles in both CNS damage and regeneration, such as remyelination. This diverse range in functions reflects the ability of macrophages to acquire tissue microenvironment-specific activation states. This activation is dynamically regulated during efficient regeneration, with a switch from pro-inflammatory to inflammation-resolution/pro-regenerative phenotypes. Although, some molecules and pathways have been implicated in the dynamic activation of macrophages, such as NFκB, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning plasticity of macrophage activation are unclear. Identifying mechanisms regulating macrophage activation to pro-regenerative phenotypes may lead to novel therapeutic strategies to promote remyelination in multiple sclerosis. PMID:27446913

  8. Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support (INTERMACS) analysis of pump thrombosis in the HeartMate II left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Kirklin, James K; Naftel, David C; Kormos, Robert L; Pagani, Francis D; Myers, Susan L; Stevenson, Lynne W; Acker, Michael A; Goldstein, Daniel L; Silvestry, Scott C; Milano, Carmelo A; Baldwin, J T; Timothy Baldwin, J; Pinney, Sean; Eduardo Rame, J; Miller, Marissa A

    2014-01-01

    Pump thrombosis remains an uncommon but potentially catastrophic complication of durable continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (LVAD). A perceived increase in the incidence of pump thrombosis in the HeartMate II (HMII) LVAD (Thoratec, Pleasanton, CA) by clinicians prompted this analysis of the Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support (INTERMACS) database. Between 2006 and June 2013, 8,988 United States patients aged older than 18 years received a durable LVAD. Of these, 6,910 adult patients from 132 institutions who received a HMII LVAD were entered in the INTERMACS database and constitute the study group for this analysis. Overall survival (with censoring at transplant or explant for recovery) with the HMII LVAD was 80% at 1 year and 69% at 2 years and was not significantly different when stratified by era of implant. Freedom from device exchange or death due to thrombosis decreased from 99% at 6 months in 2009 to 94% in 2012 (p < 0.0001). Multivariable hazard function analysis showed risk factors for pump thrombosis included later implant year (p < 0.0001), younger age (p < 0.0001), higher creatinine (p = 0.002), larger body mass index (p = 0.004), white race (p = 0.0004), left ventricular ejection fraction above 20% (p = 0.02), and higher lactate dehydrogenase level at 1 month (p < 0.0001). Survival (p < 0.0001) and freedom from infection (p = 0.008) and cerebrovascular accident (p < 0.0001) were lower after pump exchange than after primary implant. Pump exchange or death due to pump thrombosis increased during 2011 and 2012, but the magnitude of the increase remained relatively small. Survival remains high (80% at 1 year) with the HMII LVAD. Risk factor analysis suggests that a number of patient-related factors contribute to the risk of thrombosis. Markedly elevated lactate dehydrogenase in the first month is a predictor of pump thrombosis. This analysis could not examine the potential role of technical factors during implant

  9. Computer-assisted mechanistic structure-activity studies: application to diverse classes of chemical carcinogens.

    PubMed Central

    Loew, G H; Poulsen, M; Kirkjian, E; Ferrell, J; Sudhindra, B S; Rebagliati, M

    1985-01-01

    In the first part of this paper we have indicated how the techniques and capabilities of theoretical chemistry, together with experimental results, can be used in a mechanistic approach to structure-activity studies of toxicity. In the second part, we have illustrated how this computer-assisted approach has been used to identify and calculate causally related molecular indicators of relative carcinogenic activity in five classes of chemical carcinogens: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and their methyl derivatives, aromatic amines, chloroethanes, chloroalkenes and dialkyl nitrosamines. In each class of chemicals studied, candidate molecular indicators have been identified that could be useful in predictive screening of unknown compounds. In addition, further insights into some mechanistic aspects of chemical carcinogenesis have been obtained. Finally, experiments have been suggested to both verify the usefulness of the indicators and test their mechanistic implications. PMID:3905382

  10. Engagement in elderly persons with dementia attending animal-assisted group activity.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Christine; Pedersen, Ingeborg; Bergland, Astrid; Enders-Slegers, Marie-José; Ihlebæk, Camilla

    2016-09-02

    The need for meaningful activities that enhance engagement is very important among persons with dementia (PWDs), both for PWDs still living at home, as well as for PWDs admitted to a nursing home (NH). In this study, we systematically registered behaviours related to engagement in a group animal-assisted activity (AAA) intervention for 21 PWDs in NHs and among 28 home-dwelling PWDs attending a day care centre. The participants interacted with a dog and its handler for 30 minutes, twice a week for 12 weeks. Video-recordings were carried out early (week 2) and late (week 10) during the intervention period and behaviours were categorized by the use of an ethogram. AAA seems to create engagement in PWDs, and might be a suitable and health promoting intervention for both NH residents and participants of a day care centre. Degree of dementia should be considered when planning individual or group based AAA.

  11. Cellulase-assisted extraction and antibacterial activity of polysaccharides from the dandelion Taraxacum officinale.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Bin

    2014-03-15

    In the present study, we investigated the cellulase-assisted extraction and antibacterial activity of water-soluble polysaccharides from the dandelion Taraxacum officinale. The extraction conditions, optimized for improving yield, were as follows: time, 46.11 min; temperature, 54.87 °C; pH, 4.51 and cellulase enzyme, 4000 U/g. Under these conditions, the yield of polysaccharides from dandelion (PD) reached 20.67% (w/w). The sugar content of PD was 95.6% (w/w), and it displayed high antibacterial activity at a concentration of 100mg/mL against Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. These results indicate that PD may be a viable option for use as a food preservative. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Innovative Application of Mechanical Activation for Rare Earth Elements Recovering: Process Optimization and Mechanism Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Quanyin; Deng, Chao; Li, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    With the rapidly expanding use of fluorescent lamps (FLs) and increasing interest in conservation and sustainable utilization of critical metals such as rare earth elements (REEs), the recovering of REEs from phosphors in waste FLs is becoming a critical environmental and economic issue. To effectively recycle REEs with metallurgical methods, mechanical activation by ball milling was introduced to pretreat the waste phosphors. This current study put the emphasis on the mechanical activation and leaching processes for REEs, and explored the feasibility of the method from both theoretical and practical standpoints. Results showed physicochemical changes of structural destruction and particle size reduction after mechanical activation, leading to the easy dissolution of REEs in the activated samples. Under optimal conditions, dissolution yields of 89.4%, 93.1% and 94.6% for Tb, Eu and Y, respectively, were achieved from activated waste phosphors using hydrochloric acid as the dissolution agent. The shrinking core model proved to be the most applicable for the leaching procedure, with an apparent activation energy of 10.96 ± 2.79 kJ/mol. This novel process indicates that mechanical activation is an efficient method for recovering REEs from waste phosphors, and it has promising potential for REE recovery with low cost and high efficiency. PMID:26819083

  13. Innovative Application of Mechanical Activation for Rare Earth Elements Recovering: Process Optimization and Mechanism Exploration.

    PubMed

    Tan, Quanyin; Deng, Chao; Li, Jinhui

    2016-01-28

    With the rapidly expanding use of fluorescent lamps (FLs) and increasing interest in conservation and sustainable utilization of critical metals such as rare earth elements (REEs), the recovering of REEs from phosphors in waste FLs is becoming a critical environmental and economic issue. To effectively recycle REEs with metallurgical methods, mechanical activation by ball milling was introduced to pretreat the waste phosphors. This current study put the emphasis on the mechanical activation and leaching processes for REEs, and explored the feasibility of the method from both theoretical and practical standpoints. Results showed physicochemical changes of structural destruction and particle size reduction after mechanical activation, leading to the easy dissolution of REEs in the activated samples. Under optimal conditions, dissolution yields of 89.4%, 93.1% and 94.6% for Tb, Eu and Y, respectively, were achieved from activated waste phosphors using hydrochloric acid as the dissolution agent. The shrinking core model proved to be the most applicable for the leaching procedure, with an apparent activation energy of 10.96 ± 2.79 kJ/mol. This novel process indicates that mechanical activation is an efficient method for recovering REEs from waste phosphors, and it has promising potential for REE recovery with low cost and high efficiency.

  14. Innovative Application of Mechanical Activation for Rare Earth Elements Recovering: Process Optimization and Mechanism Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Quanyin; Deng, Chao; Li, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    With the rapidly expanding use of fluorescent lamps (FLs) and increasing interest in conservation and sustainable utilization of critical metals such as rare earth elements (REEs), the recovering of REEs from phosphors in waste FLs is becoming a critical environmental and economic issue. To effectively recycle REEs with metallurgical methods, mechanical activation by ball milling was introduced to pretreat the waste phosphors. This current study put the emphasis on the mechanical activation and leaching processes for REEs, and explored the feasibility of the method from both theoretical and practical standpoints. Results showed physicochemical changes of structural destruction and particle size reduction after mechanical activation, leading to the easy dissolution of REEs in the activated samples. Under optimal conditions, dissolution yields of 89.4%, 93.1% and 94.6% for Tb, Eu and Y, respectively, were achieved from activated waste phosphors using hydrochloric acid as the dissolution agent. The shrinking core model proved to be the most applicable for the leaching procedure, with an apparent activation energy of 10.96 ± 2.79 kJ/mol. This novel process indicates that mechanical activation is an efficient method for recovering REEs from waste phosphors, and it has promising potential for REE recovery with low cost and high efficiency.

  15. Development of an Active-Learning Program About Mechanical Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogetsu, Hisashi; Taniguchi, Kazunari

    In our preliminary survey of students' conceptual understanding of a mechanical wave with Wave Diagnostic Test, we found that Japanese students have "particle pulses mental model" such that the wave speed changes depending on frequency and/or amplitude of the wave source. We have developed an active-learning program about the mechanical wave based on instructional strategies used by Physics Education Group to improve students' mental model.

  16. Mechanisms of Activation of Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Grizel, A. V.; Glukhov, G. S.; Sokolova, O. S.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium ion channels (Kv) play an important role in a variety of cellular processes, including the functioning of excitable cells, regulation of apoptosis, cell growth and differentiation, the release of neurotransmitters and hormones, maintenance of cardiac activity, etc. Failure in the functioning of Kv channels leads to severe genetic disorders and the development of tumors, including malignant ones. Understanding the mechanisms underlying Kv channels functioning is a key factor in determining the cause of the diseases associated with mutations in the channels, and in the search for new drugs. The mechanism of activation of the channels is a topic of ongoing debate, and a consensus on the issue has not yet been reached. This review discusses the key stages in studying the mechanisms of functioning of Kv channels and describes the basic models of their activation known to date. PMID:25558391

  17. Nucleation mechanism of gallium-assisted molecular beam epitaxy growth of gallium arsenide nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Fontcuberta i Morral, A.; Colombo, C.; Abstreiter, G.; Arbiol, J.; Morante, J. R.

    2008-02-11

    Molecular beam epitaxy Ga-assisted synthesis of GaAs nanowires is demonstrated. The nucleation and growth are seen to be related to the presence of a SiO{sub 2} layer previously deposited on the GaAs wafer. The interaction of the reactive gallium with the SiO{sub 2} pinholes induces the formation of nanocraters, found to be the key for the nucleation of the nanowires. With SiO{sub 2} thicknesses up to 30 nm, nanocraters reach the underlying substrate, resulting into a preferential growth orientation of the nanowires. Possibly related to the formation of nanocraters, we observe an incubation period of 258 s before the nanowires growth is initiated.

  18. Chelate assisted phytoextraction of heavy metals from soil. Effect, mechanism, toxicity, and fate of chelating agents.

    PubMed

    Evangelou, Michael W H; Ebel, Mathias; Schaeffer, Andreas

    2007-06-01

    The low-cost, plant-based phytoextraction technique has often been described as a promising technique to remediate heavy metal contaminated agricultural land. The application of chelating agents has shown positive effects in increasing the solubility of heavy metals in soil and therefore in enhancing phytoextraction. This paper gives an overview of the chelating agents applied in recent studies. Various synthetic aminopolycarboxylic acids, such as ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid, and natural ones such as, ethylene diamine disuccinate and nitrilotriacetic acid, are described. Additionally, results of the application of natural low molecular weight organic acids, such as citric and tartaric acid are given. The effectiveness of these different chelating agents varies according to the plant and the heavy metals used. Furthermore, a focus is laid on the chelating agents fate after application and on its toxicity to plants and soil microorganisms, as well as it degradation. The rate of degradation is of great importance for the future of chelate assisted phytoextraction as it has a direct impact on the leaching probability. An effective prevention of leaching will be crucial for the acceptance and the economic breakthrough of enhanced phytoextraction, but a satisfactory solution to this key issue has so far not been found. Possibly further experiments in the field of enhanced phytoextraction will be able to solve this major problem, but over decades various greenhouse experiments and recently field experiments have resulted in different observations. Therefore, it is questionable if further research in this direction will lead to a promising solution. Phytoextraction has possibly reached a turning point in which it should distance itself from chelate assisted phytoextraction and focus on alternative options.

  19. Jahn-Teller assisted polaronic hole hopping as a charge transport mechanism in CuO nanograins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younas, M.; Nadeem, M.; Idrees, M.; Akhtar, M. J.

    2012-04-01

    Impedance spectroscopy has been employed to investigate the dielectric and electric transport phenomena in sol-gel synthesized CuO nanograins. Semiconducting features of the grains and grain boundaries have been endorsed to the thermal activation of the localized charge carriers. On cooling below 303 K, a transition from Jahn-Teller polaron hopping mechanism to the Mott's variable range hopping mechanism has been observed owing to random potential fluctuations among localized sites. Activation energies for conduction and relaxation processes at grain boundaries provide strong signatures for the involvement of Jahn-Teller adiabatic small polarons as a charge transport mechanism in CuO nanograins.

  20. The mechanical and tribological properties of UHMWPE loaded ALN after mechanical activation for joint replacements.

    PubMed

    Gong, Kemeng; Qu, Shuxin; Liu, Yumei; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Yongchao; Jiang, Chongxi; Shen, Ru

    2016-08-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) loaded with alendronate sodium (ALN) has tremendous potential as an orthopeadic biomaterial for joint replacements. However, poor mechanical and tribological properties of UHMWPE-ALN are still obstacle for further application. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect and mechanism of mechanical activation on mechanical and tribological properties of 1wt% ALN-loaded UHMWPE (UHMWPE-ALN-ma). In this study, tensile test, small punch test and reciprocating sliding wear test were applied to characterize the mechanical and tribological properties of UHMWPE-ALN-ma. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were employed to characterize UHMWPE-ALN-ma. Tensile test and small punch test showed that Young׳s modulus, tensile strength and work-to-failure (WTF) of UHMWPE-ALN-ma increased significantly compared to those of UHMWPE-ALN. The friction coefficients and wear factors of UHMWPE-ALN-ma both decreased significantly compared to those of UHMWPE-ALN. Mechanical activation obviously reduced type 1 (void) and type 2 (the disconnected and dislocated machining marks) fusion defects of UHMWPE-ALN-ma, which were revealed by SEM images of freeze fracture surfaces after etching and lateral surfaces of specimens after extension to fracture, respectively. It was attributed to peeled-off layers and chain scission of molecular chains of UHMWPE particles after mechanical activation, which were revealed by SEM images and FTIR spectra of UHMWPE-ALN-ma and UHMWPE-ALN, respectively. Moreover, EDS spectra revealed the more homogeneous distribution of ALN in UHMWPE-ALN-ma compared to that of UHMWPE-ALN. The present results showed that mechanical activation was a potential strategy to improve mechanical and tribological properties of UHMWPE-ALN-ma as an orthopeadic biomaterial for joint replacements. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Modulation of bone remodeling via mechanically activated ion channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Randall L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    A critical factor in the maintenance of bone mass is the physical forces imposed upon the skeleton. Removal of these forces, such as in a weightless environment, results in a rapid loss of bone, whereas application of exogenous mechanical strain has been shown to increase bone formation. Numerous flight and ground-based experiments indicate that the osteoblast is the key bone cell influenced by mechanical stimulation. Aside from early transient fluctuations in response to unloading, osteoclast number and activity seem unaffected by removal of strain. However, bone formation is drastically reduced in weightlessness and osteoblasts respond to mechanical strain with an increase in the activity of a number of second messenger pathways resulting in increased anabolic activity. Unfortunately, the mechanism by which the osteoblast converts physical stimuli into a biochemical message, a process we have termed biochemical coupling, remains elusive. Prior to the application of this grant, we had characterized a mechanosensitive, cation nonselective channel (SA-cat) in osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells that we proposed is the initial signalling mechanism for mechanotransduction. During the execution of this grant, we have made considerable progress to further characterize this channel as well as to determine its role in the osteoblastic response to mechanical strain. To achieve these goals, we combined electrophysiologic techniques with cellular and molecular biology methods to examine the role of these channels in the normal function of the osteoblast in vitro.

  2. Understanding Cytokine and Growth Factor Receptor Activation Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Atanasova, Mariya; Whitty, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of the detailed mechanism of action of cytokine and growth factor receptors – and particularly our quantitative understanding of the link between structure, mechanism and function – lags significantly behind our knowledge of comparable functional protein classes such as enzymes, G protein-coupled receptors, and ion channels. In particular, it remains controversial whether such receptors are activated by a mechanism of ligand-induced oligomerization, versus a mechanism in which the ligand binds to a pre-associated receptor dimer or oligomer that becomes activated through subsequent conformational rearrangement. A major limitation to progress has been the relative paucity of methods for performing quantitative mechanistic experiments on unmodified receptors expressed at endogenous levels on live cells. In this article we review the current state of knowledge on the activation mechanisms of cytokine and growth factor receptors, critically evaluate the evidence for and against the different proposed mechanisms, and highlight other key questions that remain unanswered. New approaches and techniques have led to rapid recent progress in this area, and the field is poised for major advances in the coming years, which promises to revolutionize our understanding of this large and biologically and medically important class of receptors. PMID:23046381

  3. Small molecules reveal an alternative mechanism of Bax activation.

    PubMed

    Brahmbhatt, Hetal; Uehling, David; Al-Awar, Rima; Leber, Brian; Andrews, David

    2016-04-15

    The pro-apoptotic protein Bax commits a cell to death by permeabilizing the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). To obtain small-molecule probes for elucidating the molecular mechanism(s) of Bax activation, we screened for compounds that induced Bax-mediated liposome permeabilization. We identified five structurally different small molecules that promoted both Bax targeting to and oligomerization at membranes. All five compounds initiated Bax oligomerization in the absence of membranes by a mechanism unlike Bax activation by Bcl-2 homology 3 domain (BH3) proteins. Some of the compounds induced Bax/Bak-dependent apoptosis in cells. Activation of Bax by the most active compound was poorly inhibited by the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-XL and requires a cysteine residue at position 126 of Bax that is not required for activation by BH3 proteins. Our results reveal a novel pathway for Bax activation independent of pro-apoptotic BH3 proteins that may have important implications for the regulation of Bax activity in cells. © 2016 The Author(s).

  4. Small molecules reveal an alternative mechanism of Bax activation

    PubMed Central

    Brahmbhatt, Hetal; Uehling, David; Al-awar, Rima; Leber, Brian; Andrews, David

    2016-01-01

    The pro-apoptotic protein Bax commits a cell to death by permeabilizing the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). To obtain small-molecule probes for elucidating the molecular mechanism(s) of Bax activation, we screened for compounds that induced Bax-mediated liposome permeabilization. We identified five structurally different small molecules that promoted both Bax targeting to and oligomerization at membranes. All five compounds initiated Bax oligomerization in the absence of membranes by a mechanism unlike Bax activation by Bcl-2 homology 3 domain (BH3) proteins. Some of the compounds induced Bax/Bak-dependent apoptosis in cells. Activation of Bax by the most active compound was poorly inhibited by the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-XL and requires a cysteine residue at position 126 of Bax that is not required for activation by BH3 proteins. Our results reveal a novel pathway for Bax activation independent of pro-apoptotic BH3 proteins that may have important implications for the regulation of Bax activity in cells. PMID:26916338

  5. Ultrasound-assisted extraction of polysaccharides from Rhododendron aganniphum: Antioxidant activity and rheological properties.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiao; Shang, Xiaofei; Zhou, Xuzheng; Zhao, Baotang; Zhang, Jiyu

    2017-09-01

    In this study, we aimed to optimize the extraction of polysaccharides from the leaves of Rhododendron aganniphum and investigate its rheological properties and antioxidant activity. After optimizing the operating parameters using a Box-Behnken design (BBD), the results showed that the optimal ultrasound-assisted extraction conditions were as follows: extraction temperature, 55°C; liquid-solid ratio, 25:1; extraction time, 2.2h; and ultrasound treatment power, 200W. The optimized experimental yield of polysaccharides by ultrasound-assisted extraction (PUAE) was 9.428%, higher than that obtained by hot water extraction (PHWE) for 12h at the same liquid-solid ratio and extraction temperature. In the in vitro antioxidant activity tests, PUAE had higher positive radical scavenging activity for hydroxyl, superoxide and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals than PHWE. However, PUAE and PHWE solutions had similar intermolecular interactions in the steady-shear flow and dynamic viscoelasticity tests, resulting in similar macroscopic behaviour. With respect to the apparent viscosity, storage modulus (G') and loss modulus (G″) of PUAE were lower at the same shear rate or angular frequency. All PUAE solutions exhibited non-Newtonian shear-thinning pseudoplastic behaviour that was accurately described by the Carreau model but was better fit by the power-law model at high shear rates (≥1/s), which demonstrated that the variation in the apparent viscosity dependence was greater at higher concentrations and shear rates. The G' and G″ of the solutions increased as the experimental frequency increased from 0.05 to 500rad/s under all experimental concentrations, and the modulus crossover point decreased gradually with increasing PUAE concentration. The above results demonstrated that the ultrasound-assisted extraction methods gave a higher yield of polysaccharides from the leaves of R. aganniphum with a shorter extraction time than the hot water extraction method

  6. Assistive devices utilisation in activities of everyday life--a proposed framework of understanding a user perspective.

    PubMed

    Krantz, Oskar

    2012-05-01

    This theoretical article proposes a framework of understanding a user perspective of assistive devices utilisation in everyday life. Utilising the MPT model (Matching Person and Technology) and the ValMO model (Values and Meaning in Human Occupations), a framework of understanding is proposed. Main components are person, assistive device, and activity, connected by the person's expectations and experiences concerning the doability/doworthiness (possible to do/worth doing) of an activity, and the usability/useworthiness (possible to use/worth using) of an assistive device. Expectations may differ based on not only earlier experiences (habitus), but also situational and environmental variations, and result in differing experiences. In general, the purpose of an assistive device is to increase a person's repertoire of doable activities. For a person, this can be a function of the evaluation of possible gains, in terms of correlation between investments (in terms of time and energy), and the (expected) result of the activity. The only person able to estimate the useworthiness/usability of a device and the doworthiness/doability of an activity is the user her/himself, assessing the degree at which a specific assistive device enhances the value of an activity, in turn affecting the habitus of the (presumptive) user. [Box: see text].

  7. Mechanisms of Ca2+-dependent calcineurin activation in mechanical stretch-induced hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Zobel, Carsten; Rana, Obaida R; Saygili, Erol; Bölck, Birgit; Saygili, Esra; Diedrichs, Holger; Reuter, Hannes; Frank, Konrad; Müller-Ehmsen, Jochen; Pfitzer, Gabriele; Schwinger, Robert H G

    2007-01-01

    Pressure overload is the major stimulus for cardiac hypertrophy. Accumulating evidence suggests an important role for calcium-induced activation of calcineurin in mediating hypertrophic signaling. Hypertrophy is an important risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. We therefore employed an in vitro mechanical stretch model of cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes to evaluate proposed mechanisms of calcium-induced calcineurin activation in terms of inhibition of calcineurin activity and hypertrophy. The protein/DNA ratio and ANP gene expression were used as markers for stretch-induced hypertrophy. Stretch increased the calcineurin activity, MCIP1 gene expression and DNA binding of NFATc as well as the protein/DNA ratio and ANP mRNA in a significant manner. The specific inhibitor of calcineurin, cyclosporin A, inhibited the stretch-induced increase in calcineurin activity, MCIP1 gene expression and hypertrophy. The L-type Ca2+ channel blocker nifedipine and a blocker of the Na+/H+ exchanger (cariporide) both suppressed stretch-dependent enhanced calcineurin activity and hypertrophy. Also application of a blocker of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (KB-R7943) was effective in preventing calcineurin activation and increases in the protein/DNA ratio. Inhibition of capacitative Ca2+ entry with SKF 96365 was also sufficient to abrogate calcineurin activation and hypertrophy. The blocker of stretch-activated ion channels, streptomycin, was without effect on stretch-induced hypertrophy and calcineurin activity. The present work suggests that of the proposed mechanisms for the calcium-induced activation of calcineurin (L-type Ca2+ channels, capacitative Ca2+ entry, Na+/H+ exchanger, Na+/Ca2+ exchanger and stretch-activated channels) all but stretch-activated channels are possible targets for the inhibition of hypertrophy. 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel

  8. Activation and fluoride-assisted phosphating of aluminum-silicon-coated steel.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Paul; Sigel, Reinhard; Lange, Miriam M; Beier, Frank; Renner, Frank U; Erbe, Andreas

    2013-05-22

    Phosphating is a crucial process in the corrosion protection of metals. Here, activation and fluoride-assisted tricationic phosphating is investigated on aluminum-silicon (AS) coated steel surfaces. Dynamic light scattering results from the activation bath show a bimodal size distribution, with hydrodynamic radii of ~400 nm and ~10 μm. For the smaller particle fraction, static light scattering results are consistent with the interpretation of disklike particles as scattering objects. Particles of the larger fraction sediment with time. In the presence of electrolyte, the scattering intensity from the larger particle fraction increases. Coagulation with time is suggested to be related to the decrease in activity of the activation bath. Scanning Auger microscopy (SAM) shows a higher phosphorus concentration after titanium phosphate activation in the Al-rich areas compared to the Si-rich areas of the AS coatings. There is no correlation between the size of the species in the activation bath, and the size of the phosphate-containing regions on the activated surface. Phosphating was performed in the presence of hexafluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, ammonium hydrogen difluoride, NH4HF2, and both, at an initial pH of 2.5. The absence of crystals after phosphating with H2SiF6 is an indication that SiF6(2-) is the final product of the oxide dissolution in the presence of fluoride. In the presence of NH4HF2, the Si-rich regions of the surface are phosphated before the Si-poor (Al-rich) regions. Hence, the phosphate distribution after activation and after phosphating are opposite. These results show that a high surface concentration of phosphate after activation is not sufficient for a high coverage with phosphate crystals after phosphating.

  9. Committee-Based Active Learning for Surrogate-Assisted Particle Swarm Optimization of Expensive Problems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Handing; Jin, Yaochu; Doherty, John

    2017-09-01

    Function evaluations (FEs) of many real-world optimization problems are time or resource consuming, posing a serious challenge to the application of evolutionary algorithms (EAs) to solve these problems. To address this challenge, the research on surrogate-assisted EAs has attracted increasing attention from both academia and industry over the past decades. However, most existing surrogate-assisted EAs (SAEAs) either still require thousands of expensive FEs to obtain acceptable solutions, or are only applied to very low-dimensional problems. In this paper, a novel surrogate-assisted particle swarm optimization (PSO) inspired from committee-based active learning (CAL) is proposed. In the proposed algorithm, a global model management strategy inspired from CAL is developed, which searches for the best and most uncertain solutions according to a surrogate ensemble using a PSO algorithm and evaluates these solutions using the expensive objective function. In addition, a local surrogate model is built around the best solution obtained so far. Then, a PSO algorithm searches on the local surrogate to find its optimum and evaluates it. The evolutionary search using the global model management strategy switches to the local search once no further improvement can be observed, and vice versa. This iterative search process continues until the computational budget is exhausted. Experimental results comparing the proposed algorithm with a few state-of-the-art SAEAs on both benchmark problems up to 30 decision variables as well as an airfoil design problem demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is able to achieve better or competitive solutions with a limited budget of hundreds of exact FEs.

  10. Proanthocyanidins Extracted from Rhododendron pulchrum Leaves as Source of Tyrosinase Inhibitors: Structure, Activity, and Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Wei-Ming; Wang, Rui; Wei, Man-Kun; Zou, Zheng-Rong; Deng, Rong-Gen; Liu, Wei-Sheng; Peng, Yi-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the structure, anti-tyrosinase activity, and mechanism of proanthocyanidins extracted from Rhododendron pulchrum leaves. Results obtained from mass spectra of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and high performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS) revealed that proanthocyanidins were complex mixtures of procyanidins, prodelphinidins, propelargonidins, and their derivatives, among which procyanidins were the main components. The anti-tyrosinase analysis results indicated that the mixtures were reversible and mixed competitive inhibitors of tyrosinase. Interactions between proanthocyanidins with substrate (L-tyrosine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) and with copper ions were the important molecular mechanisms for explaining their efficient inhibition. This research would provide scientific evidence for the use of R. pulchrum leaf proanthocyanidins as new novel tyrosinase inhibitors. PMID:26713623

  11. The Antiviral Activities and Mechanisms of Marine Polysaccharides: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Shi-Xin; Guan, Hua-Shi

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the studies on the antiviral activities of marine natural products, especially marine polysaccharides, are attracting more and more attention all over the world. Marine-derived polysaccharides and their lower molecular weight oligosaccharide derivatives have been shown to possess a variety of antiviral activities. This paper will review the recent progress in research on the antiviral activities and the mechanisms of these polysaccharides obtained from marine organisms. In particular, it will provide an update on the antiviral actions of the sulfated polysaccharides derived from marine algae including carrageenans, alginates, and fucans, relating to their structure features and the structure–activity relationships. In addition, the recent findings on the different mechanisms of antiviral actions of marine polysaccharides and their potential for therapeutic application will also be summarized in detail. PMID:23235364

  12. Mechanisms of CaMKII Activation in the Heart.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Jeffrey R

    2014-01-01

    Calcium/calmodulin (Ca(2+)/CaM) dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) has emerged as a key nodal protein in the regulation of cardiac physiology and pathology. Due to the particularly elegant relationship between the structure and function of the kinase, CaMKII is able to translate a diverse set of signaling events into downstream physiological effects. While CaMKII is typically autoinhibited at basal conditions, prolonged rapid Ca(2+) cycling can activate the kinase and allow post-translational modifications that depend critically on the biochemical environment of the heart. These modifications result in sustained, autonomous CaMKII activation and have been associated with pathological cardiac signaling. Indeed, improved understanding of CaMKII activation mechanisms could potentially lead to new clinical therapies for the treatment or prevention of cardiovascular disease. Here we review the known mechanisms of CaMKII activation and discuss some of the pathological signaling pathways in which they play a role.

  13. Biological effects related to geomagnetic activity and possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Krylov, Viacheslav V

    2017-06-21

    This review presents contemporary data on the biological effects of geomagnetic activity. Correlations between geomagnetic indices and biological parameters and experimental studies that used simulated geomagnetic storms to detect possible responses of organisms to these events in nature are discussed. Possible mechanisms by which geomagnetic activity influences organisms are also considered. Special attention is paid to the idea that geomagnetic activity is perceived by organisms as a disruption of diurnal geomagnetic variation. This variation, in turn, is viewed by way of a secondary zeitgeber for biological circadian rhythms. Additionally, we discuss the utility of cryptochrome as a biological detector of geomagnetic storms. The possible involvement of melatonin and protein coding by the CG8198 gene in the biological effects of geomagnetic activity are discussed. Perspectives for studying mechanisms by which geomagnetic storms affect organisms are suggested. Bioelectromagnetics. 2017;9999:1-14. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A computer-assisted assessment of lifetime physical activity: reliability and validity of the QUANTAP software.

    PubMed

    Vuillemin, A; Guillemin, F; Denis, G; Huot, J; Jeandel, C

    2000-04-01

    This study investigated the reliability and the validity of the QUANTAP (QUANTification de l'Activité Physique) interview-administered survey, a new computer-assisted tool designed to determine physical activity over a lifetime. The tool was used to assess lifetime exercise habits in four dimensions (sport at school, leisure sport, occupation, daily activities) in 419 men and women aged 13-90 years. Physical activity indicators (time spent and energy expenditure) were calculated for 20-year periods. The inter-observer and intra-observer reliability of the tool was studied in two subgroups of 30 subjects. Intraclass correlation coefficients for intra-observer and inter-observer reliability varied from 0.56 to 0.96 and from 0.42 to 0.99 respectively according to the dimensions and indicators considered. Energy expenditure was not statistically significantly different from recommended nutritional intake in either males or females. Percent body fat at the time of the survey correlated with leisure sport (particularly in recent periods of practice): age-adjusted correlation coefficients varied from - 0.23 to - 0.45 among males, and from - 0.19 to - 0.31 among females. The results indicate that QUANTAP is reliable and valid to assess lifetime physical activity. It therefore provides a tool with which the long-term effects of physical activity on current health may be studied.

  15. Examining indirect associations between physical activity, function, and disability in independent- and assisted-living residents.

    PubMed

    Hall, Katherine S; McAuley, Edward

    2011-07-01

    Few studies have examined physical activity behavior and its associated outcomes in older adults living in retirement communities. Guided by the disablement model and social cognitive theory, we tested a cross-sectional model in which physical activity was hypothesized to influence disability indirectly through self-efficacy, functional performance, and functional limitations. One hundred six older men and women residing in independent-living (ILF) assisted-living (ALF) facilities completed self-report measures of self-efficacy, function, and disability. Objective assessments of physical activity and functional performance were conducted using waist-mounted accelerometers and the short physical performance battery (SPPB), respectively. Path analysis was used to examine the proposed associations among constructs. Older adults who were more active were also more efficacious and had better physical function and fewer functional limitations. Only higher levels of self-efficacy were associated with less disability. The effects of individual-level covariates were also examined. This cross-sectional study is among the first to examine the associations between physical activity, function, and disability among older adults residing in ILFs and ALFs. Future research addressing the physical and psychological needs of this growing population is warranted.

  16. A novel mechanical lung model of pulmonary diseases to assist with teaching and training

    PubMed Central

    Chase, J Geoffrey; Yuta, Toshinori; Mulligan, Kerry J; Shaw, Geoffrey M; Horn, Beverley

    2006-01-01

    Background A design concept of low-cost, simple, fully mechanical model of a mechanically ventilated, passively breathing lung is developed. An example model is built to simulate a patient under mechanical ventilation with accurate volumes and compliances, while connected directly to a ventilator. Methods The lung is modelled with multiple units, represented by rubber bellows, with adjustable weights placed on bellows to simulate compartments of different superimposed pressure and compliance, as well as different levels of lung disease, such as Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). The model was directly connected to a ventilator and the resulting pressure volume curves recorded. Results The model effectively captures the fundamental lung dynamics for a variety of conditions, and showed the effects of different ventilator settings. It was particularly effective at showing the impact of Positive End Expiratory Pressure (PEEP) therapy on lung recruitment to improve oxygenation, a particulary difficult dynamic to capture. Conclusion Application of PEEP therapy is difficult to teach and demonstrate clearly. Therefore, the model provide opportunity to train, teach, and aid further understanding of lung mechanics and the treatment of lung diseases in critical care, such as ARDS and asthma. Finally, the model's pure mechanical nature and accurate lung volumes mean that all results are both clearly visible and thus intuitively simple to grasp. PMID:16919173

  17. DNA sequence-dependent mechanics and protein-assisted bending in repressor-mediated loop formation.

    PubMed

    Boedicker, James Q; Garcia, Hernan G; Johnson, Stephanie; Phillips, Rob

    2013-12-01

    As the chief informational molecule of life, DNA is subject to extensive physical manipulations. The energy required to deform double-helical DNA depends on sequence, and this mechanical code of DNA influences gene regulation, such as through nucleosome positioning. Here we examine the sequence-dependent flexibility of DNA in bacterial transcription factor-mediated looping, a context for which the role of sequence remains poorly understood. Using a suite of synthetic constructs repressed by the Lac repressor and two well-known sequences that show large flexibility differences in vitro, we make precise statistical mechanical predictions as to how DNA sequence influences loop formation and test these predictions using in vivo transcription and in vitro single-molecule assays. Surprisingly, sequence-dependent flexibility does not affect in vivo gene regulation. By theoretically and experimentally quantifying the relative contributions of sequence and the DNA-bending protein HU to DNA mechanical properties, we reveal that bending by HU dominates DNA mechanics and masks intrinsic sequence-dependent flexibility. Such a quantitative understanding of how mechanical regulatory information is encoded in the genome will be a key step towards a predictive understanding of gene regulation at single-base pair resolution.

  18. DNA sequence-dependent mechanics and protein-assisted bending in repressor-mediated loop formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boedicker, James Q.; Garcia, Hernan G.; Johnson, Stephanie; Phillips, Rob

    2013-12-01

    As the chief informational molecule of life, DNA is subject to extensive physical manipulations. The energy required to deform double-helical DNA depends on sequence, and this mechanical code of DNA influences gene regulation, such as through nucleosome positioning. Here we examine the sequence-dependent flexibility of DNA in bacterial transcription factor-mediated looping, a context for which the role of sequence remains poorly understood. Using a suite of synthetic constructs repressed by the Lac repressor and two well-known sequences that show large flexibility differences in vitro, we make precise statistical mechanical predictions as to how DNA sequence influences loop formation and test these predictions using in vivo transcription and in vitro single-molecule assays. Surprisingly, sequence-dependent flexibility does not affect in vivo gene regulation. By theoretically and experimentally quantifying the relative contributions of sequence and the DNA-bending protein HU to DNA mechanical properties, we reveal that bending by HU dominates DNA mechanics and masks intrinsic sequence-dependent flexibility. Such a quantitative understanding of how mechanical regulatory information is encoded in the genome will be a key step towards a predictive understanding of gene regulation at single-base pair resolution.

  19. Arraying single microbeads in microchannels using dielectrophoresis-assisted mechanical traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirapu-Azpiroz, Jaione; Temiz, Yuksel; Delamarche, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    Manipulating and immobilizing single microbeads in flowing fluids is relevant for biological assays and chemical tests but typically requires expensive laboratory equipment and trapping mechanisms that are not reversible. In this paper, we present a highly efficient and reversible mechanism for trapping microbeads by combining dielectrophoresis (DEP) with mechanical traps. The integration of planar electrodes and mechanical traps in a microchannel enables versatile manipulation of microbeads via DEP for their docking in recessed structures of mechanical traps. By simulating the combined effects of the hydrodynamic drag and DEP forces on microbeads, we explore a configuration of periodic traps where the beads are guided by the electrodes and immobilized in recess areas of the traps. The design of the electrode layout and operating configuration are optimized for the efficient trapping of single microbeads. We demonstrated the predicted guiding and trapping effectiveness of the design as well as the reversibility of the system on 10 μm polystyrene beads. Experimental verification used an array of 96 traps in an area of 420 × 420 μm2, reaching a trapping efficiency of 63% when 7 Vpp is applied to the electrodes under 80 nl min-1 flow rate conditions, and 98% of bead release when the voltage is turned off.

  20. Chaperone-like activities of {alpha}-synuclein: {alpha}-Synuclein assists enzyme activities of esterases

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Misun; Kim, SeungBum; Kang, Mira; Ryu, Yeonwoo . E-mail: ywryu@ajou.ac.kr; Doohun Kim, T. . E-mail: doohunkim@ajou.ac.kr

    2006-08-11

    {alpha}-Synuclein, a major constituent of Lewy bodies (LBs), has been implicated to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD), although the physiological function of {alpha}-synuclein has not yet been known. Here we have shown that {alpha}-synuclein, which has no well-defined secondary or tertiary structure, can protect the enzyme activity of microbial esterases against stress conditions such as heat, pH, and organic solvents. In particular, the flexibility of {alpha}-synuclein and its C-terminal region seems to be important for complex formation, but the structural integrity of the C-terminal region may not be required for stabilization of enzyme activity. In addition, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and in vivo enzyme assays showed highly specific interactions of esterases with {alpha}-synuclein. Our results indicate that {alpha}-synuclein not only protects the enzyme activity of microbial esterases in vitro, but also can stabilize the active conformation of microbial esterases in vivo.

  1. A System for Delivering Mechanical Stimulation and Robot-Assisted Therapy to the Rat Whisker Pad during Facial Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, James T.; Knox, Christopher; Malo, Juan; Kobler, James B.; Hadlock, Tessa A.

    2013-01-01

    Functional recovery is typically poor after facial nerve transection and surgical repair. In rats, whisking amplitude remains greatly diminished after facial nerve regeneration, but can recover more completely if the whiskers are periodically mechanically stimulated during recovery. Here we present a robotic “whisk assist” system for mechanically driving whisker movement after facial nerve injury. Movement patterns were either pre-programmed to reflect natural amplitudes and frequencies, or movements of the contralateral (healthy) side of the face were detected and used to control real-time mirror-like motion on the denervated side. In a pilot study, twenty rats were divided into nine groups and administered one of eight different whisk assist driving patterns (or control) for 5–20 minutes, five days per week, across eight weeks of recovery after unilateral facial nerve cut and suture repair. All rats tolerated the mechanical stimulation well. Seven of the eight treatment groups recovered average whisking amplitudes that exceeded controls, although small group sizes precluded statistical confirmation of group differences. The potential to substantially improve facial nerve recovery through mechanical stimulation has important clinical implications, and we have developed a system to control the pattern and dose of stimulation in the rat facial nerve model. PMID:23475376

  2. UNDERSTANDING THE MECHANISMS CONTROLLING ENVIRONMENTALLY-ASSISTED INTERGRANULAR CRACKING OF NICKEL-BASE ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Was

    2004-02-13

    Creep and IG cracking of nickel-base alloys depend principally on two factors--the deformation behavior and the effect of the environment. We have shown that both contribute to the observed degradation in primary water. The understanding of cracking does not lie wholly within the environmental effects arena, nor can it be explained only by intrinsic mechanical behavior. Rather, both processes contribute to the observed behavior in primary water. In this project, we had three objectives: (1) to verify that grain boundaries control deformation in Ni-16Cr-9Fe at 360 C, (2) to identify the environmental effect on IGSCC, and (3) to combine CSLBs and GBCs to maximize IGSCC resistance in Ni-Cr-Fe in 360 C primary water. Experiments performed in hydrogen gas at 360 C confirm an increase in the primary creep rate in Ni-16Cr-9Fe at 360 C due to hydrogen. The creep strain transients caused by hydrogen are proposed to be due to the collapse of dislocation pile-ups, as confirmed by observations in HVEM. The observations only partially support the hydrogen-enhanced plasticity model, but also suggest a potential role of vacancies in the accelerate creep behavior in primary water. In high temperature oxidation experiments designed to examine the potential for selective internal oxidation in the IGSCC process, cracking is greatest in the more oxidizing environments compared to the low oxygen potential environments where nickel metal is stable. In Ni-Cr-Fe alloys, chromium oxides form preferentially along the grain boundaries, even at low oxygen potential, supporting a potential role in grain boundary embrittlement due to preferential oxidation. Experiments designed to determine the role of grain boundary deformation on intergranular cracking have established, for the first time, a cause-and-effect relationship between grain boundary deformation and IGSCC. That is, grain boundary deformation in Ni-16Cr-9Fe in 360 C primary water leads to IGSCC of the deformed boundaries. As well

  3. Mechanisms of active control for noise inside a vibrating cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, Harold C.; Fuller, Chris R.

    1987-01-01

    The active control of propeller-induced noise fields inside a flexible cylinder is studied with attention given to the noise reduction mechanisms inherent in the present coupled acoustic shell model. The active noise control model consists of an infinitely long aluminum cylinder with a radius of 0.4 m and a thickness of 0.001 m. Pressure maps are shown when the two external sources are driven in-phase at a frequency corresponding to Omega = 0.22.

  4. Mechanisms of active control for noise inside a vibrating cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lester, Harold C.; Fuller, Chris R.

    The active control of propeller-induced noise fields inside a flexible cylinder is studied with attention given to the noise reduction mechanisms inherent in the present coupled acoustic shell model. The active noise control model consists of an infinitely long aluminum cylinder with a radius of 0.4 m and a thickness of 0.001 m. Pressure maps are shown when the two external sources are driven in-phase at a frequency corresponding to Omega = 0.22.

  5. Multivariable Dynamic Ankle Mechanical Impedance With Active Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunglae; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Hogan, Neville

    2015-01-01

    Multivariable dynamic ankle mechanical impedance in two coupled degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) was quantified when muscles were active. Measurements were performed at five different target activation levels of tibialis anterior and soleus, from 10% to 30% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) with increments of 5% MVC. Interestingly, several ankle behaviors characterized in our previous study of the relaxed ankle were observed with muscles active: ankle mechanical impedance in joint coordinates showed responses largely consistent with a second-order system consisting of inertia, viscosity, and stiffness; stiffness was greater in the sagittal plane than in the frontal plane at all activation conditions for all subjects; and the coupling between dorsiflexion–plantarflexion and inversion–eversion was small—the two DOF measurements were well explained by a strictly diagonal impedance matrix. In general, ankle stiffness increased linearly with muscle activation in all directions in the 2-D space formed by the sagittal and frontal planes, but more in the sagittal than in the frontal plane, resulting in an accentuated “peanut shape.” This characterization of young healthy subjects’ ankle mechanical impedance with active muscles will serve as a baseline to investigate pathophysiological ankle behaviors of biomechanically and/or neurologically impaired patients. PMID:25203497

  6. A simple and rapid infrared-assisted self enzymolysis extraction method for total flavonoid aglycones extraction from Scutellariae Radix and mechanism exploration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liping; Duan, Haotian; Jiang, Jiebing; Long, Jiakun; Yu, Yingjia; Chen, Guiliang; Duan, Gengli

    2017-07-20

    A new, simple, and fast infrared-assisted self enzymolysis extraction (IRASEE) approach for the extraction of total flavonoid aglycones (TFA) mainly including baicalein, wogonin, and oroxylin A from Scutellariae Radix is presented to enhance extraction yield. Extraction enzymolysis temperature, enzymolysis liquid-to-solid ratio, enzymolysis pH, enzymolysis time and infrared power, the factors affecting IRASEE procedure, were investigated in a newly designed, temperature-controlled infrared-assisted extraction (TC-IRAE) system to acquire the optimum analysis conditions. The results illustrated that IRASEE possessed great advantages in terms of efficiency and time compared with other conventional extraction techniques. Furthermore, the mechanism of IRASEE was preliminarily explored by observing the microscopic change of the samples surface structures, studying the main chemical compositions change of the samples before and after extraction and investigating the kinetics and thermodynamics at three temperature levels during the IRASEE process. These findings revealed that IRASEE can destroy the surface microstructures to accelerate the mass transfer and reduce the activation energy to intensify the chemical process. This integrative study presents a simple, rapid, efficient, and environmental IRASEE method for TFA extraction which has promising prospects for other similar herbal medicines. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  7. Ultrasonic-assisted extraction, structure and antitumor activity of polysaccharide from Polygonum multiflorum.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Weili; Xue, Xiaoping; Zhang, Zhanjun

    2016-10-01

    Polygonum multiflorum is a popular Chinese herbal medicine with various pharmacological functions. In this study, the ultrasonic-assisted extraction condition, structural characterization and antitumor activity of a polysaccharide from roots of P. multiflorum were investigated. The ultrasonic-assisted extraction condition was optimized by single-factor experiments and response surface methodology. Results showed that the maximum extraction yield (5.49%) was obtained at ultrasonic power 158W, extraction temperature 62°C, extraction time 80min and ratio of water to material 20mL/g. The obtained crude polysaccharides were further purified to afford a neutral and an acidic fraction. The structure of the main neutral polysaccharide (named PPS with molecular weight of 3.26×10(5)Da) was characterized as a linear (1→6)-α-d-glucan by gas chromatography, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, methylation analysis, 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance. At the concentration of 400μg/mL, the inhibitory ratios of PPS on HepG-2 and BGC-823 cells were 53.35% and 38.58%, respectively. Results suggested this polysaccharide could be a potential natural antitumor agent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Neonatal and neurodevelopmental outcome of children aged 3-10 years born following assisted oocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Vanden Meerschaut, Frauke; D'Haeseleer, Evelien; Gysels, Hannelore; Thienpont, Ylenia; Dewitte, Griet; Heindryckx, Björn; Oostra, An; Roeyers, Herbert; Van Lierde, Kristiane; De Sutter, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Assisted oocyte activation (AOA) using a calcium ionophore has been used for more than a decade following intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) fertilization failure. However, since AOA does not mimic precisely the physiological fertilization process, concerns exist about its use in human assisted reproduction. This study assessed the neonatal and neurodevelopmental outcome of children aged ≥ 3 years who had been born following AOA in our centre. Twenty-one children participated in the study (81% response rate; mean age 63.6 ± 21.07 months). Neonatal data were collected via questionnaires. Neurodevelopmental outcome was tested using the Reynell Developmental Language Scales or Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals, Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence or Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, and the Movement Assessment Battery for Children III. Behaviour was scored by the Social Communication Questionnaire, the Child Behaviour Checklist and the Teachers Report Form. For all tests and questionnaires, the mean outcomes lay within the expected ranges. These are first data on the developmental outcome of AOA children. The high response rate and the robustness of the tests support the data, which are reassuring although still considered preliminary. Therefore, AOA should still be performed only in selected couples.

  9. Natural healers: a review of animal assisted therapy and activities as complementary treatment for chronic conditions.

    PubMed

    Reed, Reiley; Ferrer, Lilian; Villegas, Natalia

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of this review is to synthesize the existing literature on the use of animal-assisted therapy and activity (AAT/A) as complementary treatment among people living with chronic disease and to discuss the possible application of this practice among children living with HIV. Relevant databases were searched between March 10 and April 11, 2011, using the words: animal assisted therapy or treatment and chronic conditions or diseases. Thirty-one articles were found and 18 followed the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Research suggests that AAT/A is effective for different patient profiles, particularly children. Interaction with dogs has been found to increase positive behaviors, such as sensitivity and focus, in children with social disabilities. Decreased levels of pain have also been reported among child patients as a result of AAT/A. More research should be done in the area of children living with chronic diseases that require strict adherence to treatment, such as HIV, and on AAT/A's prospective use as an educational tool to teach children about the importance of self-care for their medical conditions.

  10. Functional capacity and assistance from the caregiver during daily activities in Brazilian children with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cerebral Palsy (CP) presents changes in posture and movement as a core characteristic, which requires multiprofessional clinical treatments during children’s habilitation or rehabilitation. Besides clinical treatment, it is fundamental that professionals use evaluation systems to quantify the difficulties presented to the individual and their families in their daily lives. We aimed to investigate the functional capacity of individuals with CP and the amount of assistance required by the caregiver in day-to-day activities. Methods Twenty patients with CP, six-year-old on average, were evaluated. The Pediatric Evaluation Inventory of Incapacities was used (PEDI - Pediatric Evaluation Disability Inventory), a system adapted for Brazil that evaluates child's dysfunction in three 3 dimensions: self-care, mobility and social function. To compare the three areas, repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used. Results We found the following results regarding the functional capacity of children: self-care, 27.4%, ±17.5; mobility, 25.8%, ±33.3 and social function, 36.3%, ±27.7. The results of the demand of aid from the caregiver according to each dimension were: self-care, 9.7%, ±19.9; mobility, 14.1%, ± 20.9 and social function, 19.8%, ±26.1. Conclusion We indicated that there was no difference between the performance of the subjects in areas of self-care, mobility and social function considering the functional skills and assistance required by the caregiver. PMID:23302576

  11. Coordinating Federal Assistance in the Community; Use of Selected Mechanisms for Planning and Coordinating Federal Programs. Community Development Evaluation Series No. 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Housing and Urban Development, Washington, DC.

    The objective of the professional consultants conducting the study was to examine local chief executive use of ten Federally assisted mechanism (planning and coordinating procedures which have developed independently in various Federal offices and departments) for local-level planning and coordination of Federal programs. The mechanisms are:…

  12. 34 CFR 642.11 - What activities does the Secretary assist?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... TRIO programs. (2) Assisting students to receive adequate financial aid from programs assisted under... operation of projects funded under the Federal TRIO programs. (5) Strategies for recruiting and serving hard...

  13. Differential MSC activation leads to distinct mononuclear leukocyte binding mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kota, Daniel J.; Dicarlo, Bryan; Hetz, Robert A.; Smith, Philippa; Cox, Charles S.; Olson, Scott D.

    2014-04-01

    Advances in the field of Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal cell (MSC) biology have demonstrated that MSCs can improve disease outcome when `activated' to exert immunomodulatory effects. However, the precise mechanisms modulating MSC-immune cells interactions remain largely elusive. In here, we activated MSC based on a recent polarization paradigm, in which MSCs can be polarized towards a pro- or anti-inflammatory phenotype depending on the Toll-like receptor stimulated, to dissect the mechanisms through which MSCs physically interact with and modulate leukocytes in this context. Our data show that MSCs activated through the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 pathway increased VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 dependent binding of leukocytes. On the other hand, TLR3 stimulation strongly increases leukocytes affinity to MSC comparatively, through the formation of cable-like hyaluronic acid structures. In addition, TLR4 activation elicited secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators by MSCs, whereas TLR3-activated MSCs displayed a milder pro-inflammatory phenotype, similar to inactivated MSCs. However, the differently activated MSCs maintained their ability to suppress leukocyte activation at similar levels in our in vitro model, and this immunomodulatory property was shown here to be partially mediated by prostaglandin. These results reinforce the concept that alternate activation profiles control MSC responses and may impact the therapeutic use of MSCs.

  14. Mechanical Circulatory Support for the Failing Heart: Continuous-Flow Left Ventricular Assist Devices

    PubMed Central

    Englert, Joseph A. R.; Davis, Jennifer A.; Krim, Selim R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Heart transplantation remains the definitive therapy for patients with advanced heart failure; however, owing to limited donor organ availability and long wait times, continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have become standard therapy. Methods: This review summarizes the history, progression, function, and basic management of LVADs. Additionally, we provide some clinical pearls and important caveats for managing this unique patient population. Results: Currently, the most common LVADs being implanted in the United States are second- and third-generation devices, the HeartMate II (Thoratec Corp., St. Jude Medical) and the HeartWare HVAD (HeartWare International, Inc.). A newer third-generation pump, the HeartMate III (Thoratec Corp., St. Jude Medical), is designed to create an artificial pulse and is currently under investigation in the United States. Conclusion: LVAD use is promising, will continue to grow, and has become standard therapy for advanced heart failure as a bridge to recovery, as destination therapy, and as a bridge to transplantation. PMID:27660575

  15. Optical-response properties in an atom-assisted optomechanical system with a mechanical pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xue-Jian; Chen, Hao; Liu, Wen-Xiao; Li, Hong-Rong

    2017-05-01

    We investigate the optical-response properties of a coherent-mechanical pumped optomechanical system (OMS) coupled to a Λ-type three-level atomic ensemble. Due to the optomechanical and the cavity-atom couplings, the optomechanically induced transparency (OMIT) and electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) phenomena could both be observed from our proposal. In the presence of a coherent mechanical pump, we show that the OMIT behavior of the probe field exhibits a phase-dependent effect, leading to the switch from OMIT to optomechanically induced absorption or amplification, while the feature of EIT remains unchanged. The distinctly different effects of the mechanical pump on OMIT and EIT behavior assure us that the absorption (amplification) and transparency of the output probe field can be simultaneously observed. Moreover, a tunable switch from slow to fast light can also be realized by tuning the phase and amplitude of the mechanical pump. In particular, the presence of the atomic ensemble can further adjust the group delay, providing additional flexibility for achieving the tunable switch.

  16. Condensed Tannins from Ficus virens as Tyrosinase Inhibitors: Structure, Inhibitory Activity and Molecular Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Wei-Ming; Feng, Hui-Ling; Zhuang, Jiang-Xing; Chen, Qing-Xi

    2014-01-01

    Condensed tannins from Ficus virens leaves, fruit, and stem bark were isolated and their structures characterized by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry, high performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The results showed that the leaves, fruit, and stem bark condensed tannins were complex mixtures of homo- and heteropolymers of B-type procyanidins and prodelphinidins with degrees of polymerization up to hexamer, dodecamer, and pentadecamer, respectively. Antityrosinase activities of the condensed tannins were studied. The results indicated that the condensed tannins were potent tyrosinase inhibitors. The concentrations for the leaves, fruit, and stem bark condensed tannins leading to 50% enzyme activity were determined to be 131.67, 99.89, and 106.22 μg/ml on monophenolase activity, and 128.42, 43.07, and 74.27 μg/ml on diphenolase activity. The inhibition mechanism, type, and constants of the condensed tannins on the diphenolase activity were further investigated. The results indicated that the condensed tannins were reversible and mixed type inhibitors. Fluorescence quenching, copper interacting, and molecular docking techniques were utilized to unravel the molecular mechanisms of the inhibition. The results showed that the hydroxyl group on the B ring of the condensed tannins could chelate the dicopper irons of the enzyme. Moreover, the condensed tannins could reduce the enzyme product o-quinones into colourless compounds. These results would contribute to the development and design of antityrosinase agents. PMID:24637701

  17. Effect of surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion on masticatory muscle activity: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Sverzut, Cássio E.; Martorelli, Karinna; Jabur, Roberto; Petri, Alice D.; Trivellato, Alexandre E.; Siéssere, Selma; Regalo, Simone C. H.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aim of the present study was to analyze the electromyographic (EMG) activity of masseter and temporal muscles of adult patients submitted to surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion (SARME) before and after the surgery. Materials and Methods: The sample consisted of 19 adults, with ages ranging from 20 to 47 years (mean 25.4 years), with bilateral posterior cross bite requiring SARME treatment. The electromyographic activity of masseter and temporal muscles was analyzed before treatment (T1) and after the surgical procedure (T2). The mean interval between the two electromyographic analyses was 15 days. Results: The muscular active was electromyographically analyzed during the clinical situation of habitual gum chewing (10 sec), dental clenching (4 sec), mouth opening and closing (10 sec), rest (10 sec), protrusion (10 sec), and right and left laterality (10 sec). The measured differences between T1 and T2 data were evaluated using the paired t-test (SPSS 17.0 for Windows). The electromyographic analysis showed that the activity of the masseter and temporal muscles decreased significantly after the SARME in all the clinical situations after the surgery. Conclusion: According to the results of the present study, individuals after SARME surgery presented patterns of electromyographic contraction similar to those developed by dentate individuals during the movements of mandibular excursion. PMID:23482404

  18. Active in-database processing to support ambient assisted living systems.

    PubMed

    de Morais, Wagner O; Lundström, Jens; Wickström, Nicholas

    2014-08-12

    As an alternative to the existing software architectures that underpin the development of smart homes and ambient assisted living (AAL) systems, this work presents a database-centric architecture that takes advantage of active databases and in-database processing. Current platforms supporting AAL systems use database management systems (DBMSs) exclusively for data storage. Active databases employ database triggers to detect and react to events taking place inside or outside of the database. DBMSs can be extended with stored procedures and functions that enable in-database processing. This means that the data processing is integrated and performed within the DBMS. The feasibility and flexibility of the proposed approach were demonstrated with the implementation of three distinct AAL services. The active database was used to detect bed-exits and to discover common room transitions and deviations during the night. In-database machine learning methods were used to model early night behaviors. Consequently, active in-database processing avoids transferring sensitive data outside the database, and this improves performance, security and privacy. Furthermore, centralizing the computation into the DBMS facilitates code reuse, adaptation and maintenance. These are important system properties that take into account the evolving heterogeneity of users, their needs and the devices that are characteristic of smart homes and AAL systems. Therefore, DBMSs can provide capabilities to address requirements for scalability, security, privacy, dependability and personalization in applications of smart environments in healthcare.

  19. Carbon nanotube-assisted optical activation of TGF-β signalling by near-infrared light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liang; Liu, Ling; Zhao, Bing; Xie, Ran; Lin, Wei; Li, He; Li, Yaya; Shi, Minlong; Chen, Ye-Guang; Springer, Timothy A.; Chen, Xing

    2015-05-01

    Receptor-mediated signal transduction modulates complex cellular behaviours such as cell growth, migration and differentiation. Although photoactivatable proteins have emerged as a powerful tool for controlling molecular interactions and signalling cascades at precise times and spaces using light, many of these light-sensitive proteins are activated by ultraviolent or visible light, which has limited tissue penetration. Here, we report a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-assisted approach that enables near-infrared light-triggered activation of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signal transduction, an important signalling pathway in embryonic development and cancer progression. The protein complex of TGF-β and its latency-associated peptide is conjugated onto SWCNTs, where TGF-β is inactive. Upon near-infrared irradiation, TGF-β is released through the photothermal effect of SWCNTs and becomes active. The released TGF-β activates downstream signal transduction in live cells and modulates cellular behaviours. Furthermore, preliminary studies show that the method can be used to mediate TGF-β signalling in living mice.

  20. Microwave-assisted synthesis and antifungal activity of novel fused Osthole derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming-Zhi; Zhang, Rong-Rong; Wang, Jia-Qun; Yu, Xiang; Zhang, Ya-Ling; Wang, Qing-Qing; Zhang, Wei-Hua

    2016-11-29

    Based on the microwave-assisted synthetic protocol developed in our previous work, we have synthesized a series of novel furo[3,2-c]coumarins as fused Osthole derivatives, via the reaction of 4-hydroxycoumarins and β-ketoesters catalyzed by DMAP. All the target compounds were evaluated in vitro for their antifungal activity against six phytopathogenic fungi, some compounds exhibited potential activity in the primary assays. Especially compounds 6c, 7b, 8b and 8c (shown in Fig. 1) were the most active ones, EC50 values of these four compounds against Colletotrichum capsica, Botrytis cinerea and Rhizoctonia solani were further investigated. 6c was identified as the most promising candidate with the EC50 value at 0.110 μM against Botrytis cinerea and 0.040 μM against Colletotrichum capsica, respectively, representing better antifungal activity than that of the commonly used fungicide Azoxystrobin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Active In-Database Processing to Support Ambient Assisted Living Systems

    PubMed Central

    de Morais, Wagner O.; Lundström, Jens; Wickström, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    As an alternative to the existing software architectures that underpin the development of smart homes and ambient assisted living (AAL) systems, this work presents a database-centric architecture that takes advantage of active databases and in-database processing. Current platforms supporting AAL systems use database management systems (DBMSs) exclusively for data storage. Active databases employ database triggers to detect and react to events taking place inside or outside of the database. DBMSs can be extended with stored procedures and functions that enable in-database processing. This means that the data processing is integrated and performed within the DBMS. The feasibility and flexibility of the proposed approach were demonstrated with the implementation of three distinct AAL services. The active database was used to detect bed-exits and to discover common room transitions and deviations during the night. In-database machine learning methods were used to model early night behaviors. Consequently, active in-database processing avoids transferring sensitive data outside the database, and this improves performance, security and privacy. Furthermore, centralizing the computation into the DBMS facilitates code reuse, adaptation and maintenance. These are important system properties that take into account the evolving heterogeneity of users, their needs and the devices that are characteristic of smart homes and AAL systems. Therefore, DBMSs can provide capabilities to address requirements for scalability, security, privacy, dependability and personalization in applications of smart environments in healthcare. PMID:25120164

  2. Ag/Ag2O/TiO2 nanocomposites: microwave-assisted synthesis, characterization, and photosonocatalytic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakoso, S. P.; Taufik, A.; Saleh, Rosari

    2017-04-01

    Nanocomposites of Ag/Ag2O/TiO2 were synthesized using a microwave-assisted method. As-prepared samples were systematically characterized by X-ray diffraction, electron spin resonance, and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The photosonocatalytic performance was investigated under both UV and visible light and ultrasonic irradiation in terms of degradation of methylene blue (MB) dye in aqueous solution. Compared with the pure TiO2 nanoparticles and Ag/Ag2O nanocomposites, the Ag/Ag2O/TiO2 nanocomposites presented more responsive photosonocatalytic activity in the wide range of light wavelengths. It is believed that defect states in TiO2 nanoparticles, which were observed by ESR measurements, played an important role in trapping the charge carrier in the photosonocatalytic process. In addition, the degradation process was studied in terms of the influence of several experimental parameters, and a reasonable mechanism of photosonocatalysis with Ag/Ag2O/TiO2 nanocomposites was proposed by correlating the active radical species involved with the physical properties of the as-synthesized samples.

  3. A simulation environment for assisting system design of coherent laser doppler wind sensor for active wind turbine pitch control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Leilei; Pham Tran, Tuan Anh; Beuth, Thorsten; Umesh Babu, Harsha; Heussner, Nico; Bogatscher, Siegwart; Danilova, Svetlana; Stork, Wilhelm

    2013-05-01

    In order to assist a system design of laser coherent Doppler wind sensor for active pitch control of wind turbine systems (WTS), we developed a numerical simulation environment for modeling and simulation of the sensor system. In this paper we present this simulation concept. In previous works, we have shown the general idea and the possibility of using a low cost coherent laser Doppler wind sensing system for an active pitch control of WTS in order to achieve a reduced mechanical stress, increase the WTS lifetime and therefore reduce the electricity price from wind energy. Such a system is based on a 1.55μm Continuous-Wave (CW) laser plus an erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) with an output power of 1W. Within this system, an optical coherent detection method is chosen for the Doppler frequency measurement in megahertz range. A comparatively low cost short coherent length laser with a fiber delay line is used for achieving a multiple range measurement. In this paper, we show the current results on the improvement of our simulation by applying a Monte Carlo random generation method for positioning the random particles in atmosphere and extend the simulation to the entire beam penetrated space by introducing a cylindrical co-ordinate concept and meshing the entire volume into small elements in order to achieve a faster calculation and gain more realistic simulation result. In addition, by applying different atmospheric parameters, such as particle sizes and distributions, we can simulate different weather and wind situations.

  4. Signaling Mechanisms for Activation of Extracytoplasmic Function (ECF) Sigma Factors

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Benjamin E.; Buchanan, Susan K.

    2008-01-01

    Summary A variety of mechanisms are used to signal extracytoplasmic conditions to the cytoplasm. These mechanisms activate extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors which recruit RNA-polymerase to specific genes in order to express appropriate proteins in response to the changing environment. The two best understood ECF signaling pathways regulate σE-mediated expression of periplasmic stress response genes in Escherichia coli and FecI-mediated expression of iron-citrate transport genes in E. coli. Homologues from other Gram-negative bacteria suggest that these two signaling mechanisms and variations on these mechanisms may be the general schemes by which ECF sigma factors are regulated in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:17673165

  5. Kinetic mechanism of the activation of human plasminogen by streptokinase.

    PubMed

    Kosow, D P

    1975-10-07

    A method of determining the initial rate of plasminogen activation has been developed. The method has been used to investigate the mechanism of activation of human plasminogen by streptokinase. Plasmin formation follows saturation kinetics. Inhibition of plasmin formation by epsilon-aminocaproic acid is uncompetitive with a Ki of 0.6 mM. A model consistent with the data is that streptokinase induces a conformational change in the plasminogen molecule, producing an active center which cleaves an internal peptide bond to produce plasmin. Thus, streptokinase functions as a catalytic allosteric effector.

  6. Peer assisted learning in the clinical setting: an activity systems analysis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Deirdre; O'Flynn, Siun; Kelly, Martina

    2015-08-01

    Peer assisted learning (PAL) is a common feature of medical education. Understanding of PAL has been based on processes and outcomes in controlled settings, such as clinical skills labs. PAL in the clinical setting, a complex learning environment, requires fresh evaluation. Socio-cultural theory is proposed as a means to understand educational interventions in ways that are practical and meaningful. We describe the evaluation of a PAL intervention, introduced to support students' transition into full time clinical attachments, using activity theory and activity systems analysis (ASA). Our research question was How does PAL transfer to the clinical environment? Junior students on their first clinical attachments undertook a weekly same-level, reciprocal PAL activity. Qualitative data was collected after each session, and focus groups (n = 3) were held on completion. Data was analysed using ASA. ASA revealed two competing activity systems on clinical attachment; Learning from Experts, which students saw as the primary function of the attachment and Learning with Peers, the PAL intervention. The latter took time from the first and was in tension with it. Tensions arose from student beliefs about how learning takes place in clinical settings, and the importance of social relationships, leading to variable engagement with PAL. Differing perspectives within the group were opportunities for expansive learning. PAL in the clinical environment presents challenges specific to that context. Using ASA helped to describe student activity on clinical attachment and to highlight tensions and contradictions relating PAL in that setting. Planning learning opportunities on clinical placements, must take account of how students learn in workplaces, and the complexity of the multiple competing activity systems related to learning and social activities.

  7. Antioxidant activity and phenolic content of microwave-assisted Solanum melongena extracts.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Loredana; Modica, Maria N; Pittalà, Valeria; Romeo, Giuseppe; Siracusa, Maria A; Di Giacomo, Claudia; Sorrenti, Valeria; Acquaviva, Rosaria

    2014-01-01

    Eggplant fruit is a very rich source of polyphenol compounds endowed with antioxidant properties. The aim of this study was to extract polyphenols from eggplant entire fruit, pulp, or skin, both fresh and dry, and compare results between conventional extraction and microwave-assisted extraction (MAE). The effects of time exposure (15, 30, 60, and 90 min) and solvent (water 100% or ethanol/water 50%) were also evaluated. The highest amount of polyphenols was found in the extract obtained from dry peeled skin treated with 50% aqueous ethanol, irradiated with microwave; this extract contained also high quantity of flavonoids and showed good antioxidant activity expressed by its capacity to scavenge superoxide anion and to inhibit lipid peroxidation.

  8. Antioxidant Activity and Phenolic Content of Microwave-Assisted Solanum melongena Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Modica, Maria N.; Pittalà, Valeria; Siracusa, Maria A.; Sorrenti, Valeria; Acquaviva, Rosaria

    2014-01-01

    Eggplant fruit is a very rich source of polyphenol compounds endowed with antioxidant properties. The aim of this study was to extract polyphenols from eggplant entire fruit, pulp, or skin, both fresh and dry, and compare results between conventional extraction and microwave-assisted extraction (MAE). The effects of time exposure (15, 30, 60, and 90 min) and solvent (water 100% or ethanol/water 50%) were also evaluated. The highest amount of polyphenols was found in the extract obtained from dry peeled skin treated with 50% aqueous ethanol, irradiated with microwave; this extract contained also high quantity of flavonoids and showed good antioxidant activity expressed by its capacity to scavenge superoxide anion and to inhibit lipid peroxidation. PMID:24683354

  9. Perceptions of equine-assisted activities and therapies by parents and children with spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Lemke, Danielle; Rothwell, Erin; Newcomb, Tara M; Swoboda, Kathryn J

    2014-01-01

    To identify the physical and psychosocial effects of equine-assisted activities and therapies (EAATs) on children with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) from the perspective of the children and their parents. The families of all eligible children with SMA, who reported participation in EAAT, from a Western metropolitan academic center were contacted and invited to participate. This study implemented qualitative, semistructured interviews of children with SMA and their parents. Three themes emerged from the qualitative content analysis: physical/psychosocial benefits; relationship development with the horses, instructors, and children; and barriers to continued EAAT engagement. The data suggest that the overall EAAT experience was a source of enjoyment, self-confidence, and normalcy for the children with SMA. The results of this study provide preliminary support for the use of EAAT among children with SMA.

  10. [Protocol of the animal assisted activity program at a university hospital].

    PubMed

    Silveira, Isa Rodrigues; Santos, Nanci Cristiano; Linhares, Daniela Ribeiro

    2011-03-01

    Animal-Assisted Activity (AAA) consists in visitation and recreation through contact with animals, aiming at entertainment and improving the interpersonal relationship between patients and staff. Permission for the animals to visit an Institution requires a protocol with rules and safety routines to avoid accidents and zoonoses. The objective of this study is to describe the important points of the protocol to implement the AAA program. The protocol includes: introduction, objectives, inclusion and exclusion criteria for animals, drivers and patients; recommendations to the handlers and the health team, responsibilities of the Nosocomial Infection Control Committee, zoonoses posters, vaccination schedule for dogs and cats, free-informed consent to take part in the program and records with behavioral analysis of the animals. We believe that disclosing the protocol, based on scientific studies, favors the implementation of new programs in institutions considering the lack of national publications.

  11. Force-Based Puncture Detection and Active Position Holding for Assisted Retinal Vein Cannulation.

    PubMed

    Gonenc, Berk; Tran, Nhat; Riviere, Cameron N; Gehlbach, Peter; Taylor, Russell H; Iordachita, Iulian

    2015-09-01

    Retinal vein cannulation is a demanding procedure proposed to treat retinal vein occlusion by direct therapeutic agent delivery methods. Challenges in identifying the moment of venous puncture, achieving cannulation and maintaining cannulation during drug delivery currently limit the feasibility of the procedure. In this study, we respond to these problems with an assistive system combining a handheld micromanipulator, Micron, with a force-sensing microneedle. The integrated system senses the instant of vein puncture based on measured forces and the position of the needle tip. The system actively holds the cannulation device securely in the vein following cannulation and during drug delivery. Preliminary testing of the system in a dry phantom, stretched vinyl membranes, demonstrates a significant improvement in the total time the needle could be maintained stably inside of the vein. This was especially evident in smaller veins and is attributed to decreased movement of the positioned cannula following venous cannulation.

  12. Perceptions of Equine Assisted Activities and Therapies by Parents and Children with Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lemke, Danielle; Rothwell, Erin; Newcomb, Tara M.; Swoboda, Kathryn J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To identify the physical and psychosocial effects of equine assisted activities and therapies (EAAT) on children with Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) from the perspective of the child and their parents. Methods The families of all eligible children with SMA, who reported participation in EAAT, from a western metropolitan academic center were contacted and invited to participate. This study implemented qualitative, semi-structured interviews of children with SMA and their parents. Results Three themes emerged from the qualitative content analysis: physical/psychosocial benefits; relationship development with the horses, instructors, and children; and barriers to continued EAAT engagement. Conclusions The data suggest the overall EAAT experience was a source of enjoyment, self-confidence, and normalcy for the children with SMA. The results of this study provide preliminary support for the use of EAAT among children with SMA. PMID:24675128

  13. Microwave assisted extraction of sulfated polysaccharides (fucoidan) from Ascophyllum nodosum and its antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuan; Macquarrie, Duncan

    2015-09-20

    Sulfated polysaccharides (fucoidan) from brown seaweed Ascophyllum nodosum were extracted by microwave assisted extraction (MAE) technology. Different conditions of temperature (90-150°C), extraction time (5-30 min) were evaluated and optimal fucoidan yield was 16.08%, obtained from 120°C for 15 min's extraction. Compositional analysis, GPC, HPAEC and IR analysis were employed for characterization of extracted sulfated polysaccharides. Fucose was the main monosaccharide of fucoidan extracted at 90°C while glucuronic acid was the main monosaccharide of fucoidan extracted at 150°C. Both the molecular weight and sulfate content of extracted fucoidan increased with decreasing extraction temperature. All fucoidans exhibited antioxidant activities as measured by DPPH scavenging and reducing power, among which fucoidan extracted at 90°C was highest. This study shows that MAE is an efficient technology to extract sulfated polysaccharides from seaweed and Ascophyllum nodosum could potentially be a resource for natural antioxidants.

  14. Force-Based Puncture Detection and Active Position Holding for Assisted Retinal Vein Cannulation*

    PubMed Central

    Gonenc, Berk; Tran, Nhat; Riviere, Cameron N.; Gehlbach, Peter; Taylor, Russell H.; Iordachita, Iulian

    2016-01-01

    Retinal vein cannulation is a demanding procedure proposed to treat retinal vein occlusion by direct therapeutic agent delivery methods. Challenges in identifying the moment of venous puncture, achieving cannulation and maintaining cannulation during drug delivery currently limit the feasibility of the procedure. In this study, we respond to these problems with an assistive system combining a handheld micromanipulator, Micron, with a force-sensing microneedle. The integrated system senses the instant of vein puncture based on measured forces and the position of the needle tip. The system actively holds the cannulation device securely in the vein following cannulation and during drug delivery. Preliminary testing of the system in a dry phantom, stretched vinyl membranes, demonstrates a significant improvement in the total time the needle could be maintained stably inside of the vein. This was especially evident in smaller veins and is attributed to decreased movement of the positioned cannula following venous cannulation. PMID:27127804

  15. Active translocation of a semiflexible polymer assisted by an ATP-based molecular motor.

    PubMed

    Fiasconaro, A; Mazo, J J; Falo, F

    2017-06-23

    In this work we study the assisted translocation of a polymer across a membrane nanopore, inside which a molecular motor exerts a force fuelled by the hydrolysis of ATP molecules. In our model the motor switches to its active state for a fixed amount of time, while it waits for an ATP molecule which triggers the motor, during an exponentially distributed time lapse. The polymer is modelled as a beads-springs chain with both excluded volume and bending contributions, and moves in a stochastic three dimensional environment modelled with a Langevin dynamics at a fixed temperature. The resulting dynamics shows a Michaelis-Menten translocation velocity that depends on the chain flexibility. The scaling behavior of the mean translocation time with the polymer length for different bending values is also investigated.

  16. Insights into the Thiamine Diphosphate Enzyme Activation Mechanism: Computational Model for Transketolase Using a Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical Method.

    PubMed

    Nauton, Lionel; Hélaine, Virgil; Théry, Vincent; Hecquet, Laurence

    2016-04-12

    We propose the first computational model for transketolase (TK), a thiamine diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent enzyme, using a quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical method on the basis of crystallographic TK structures from yeast and Escherichia coli, together with experimental kinetic data reported in the literature with wild-type and mutant TK. This model allowed us to define a new route for ThDP activation in the enzyme environment. We evidenced a strong interaction between ThDP and Glu418B of the TK active site, itself stabilized by Glu162A. The crucial point highlighted here is that deprotonation of ThDP C2 is not performed by ThDP N4' as reported in the literature, but by His481B, involving a HOH688A molecule bridge. Thus, ThDP N4' is converted from an amino form to an iminium form, ensuring the stabilization of the C2 carbanion or carbene. Finally, ThDP activation proceeds via an intermolecular process and not by an intramolecular one as reported in the literature. More generally, this proposed ThDP activation mechanism can be applied to some other ThDP-dependent enzymes and used to define the entire TK mechanism with donor and acceptor substrates more accurately.

  17. Active mechanics and geometry of adherent cells and cell colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shiladitya

    2014-03-01

    Measurements of traction stresses exerted by adherent cells or cell colonies on elastic substrates have yielded new insight on how the mechanical and geometrical properties of the substrate regulate cellular force distribution, mechanical energy, spreading, morphology or stress ber architecture. We have developed a generic mechanical model of adherent cells as an active contractile gel mechanically coupled to an elastic substrate and to neighboring cells in a tissue. The contractile gel model accurately predicts the distribution of cellular and traction stresses as observed in single cell experiments, and captures the dependence of cell shape, traction stresses and stress ber polarization on the substrate's mechanical and geometrical properties. The model further predicts that the total strain energy of an adherent cell is solely regulated by its spread area, in agreement with recent experiments on micropatterned substrates with controlled geometry. When used to describe the behavior of colonies of adherent epithelial cells, the model demonstrates the crucial role of the mechanical cross-talk between intercellular and extracellular adhesion in regulating traction force distribution. Strong intercellular mechanical coupling organizes traction forces to the colony periphery, whereas weaker intercellular coupling leads to the build up of traction stresses at intercellular junctions. Furthermore, in agreement with experiments on large cohesive keratinocyte colonies, the model predicts a linear scaling of traction forces with the colony size. This scaling suggests the emergence of an effective surface tension as a scale-free material property of the adherent tissue, originating from actomyosin contractility.

  18. Platelet activation through a Bi-leaflet mechanical heart valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedayat, Mohammadali; Borazjani, Iman

    2016-11-01

    Platelet activation is one of the major drawbacks of the Mechanical Heart Valves (MHVs) which can increase the risk of thrombus formation in patients. The platelet activation in MHVs can be due to the abnormal shear stress during the systole, the backward leakage flow during the diastole, and the flow through the hinge region. We investigate the contribution of each of the above mechanism to the activation of platelets in MHVs by performing simulations of the flow through the MHV and in the hinge region. The large scale heart valve simulations are performed in a straight aorta using a sharp interface curvilinear immersed boundary method along with a strong-coupling algorithm under physiological flow conditions. In addition, in order to perform the simulation of hinge region the flow field boundary conditions are obtained from the largescale simulations during a whole cardiac cycle. In order to investigate the role of hinge flow on platelet activation in MHVs, a 23mm St. Jude Medical Regent valve hinge with three different gap sizes is tested along with different platelet activation models to ensure the consistency of our results with different activation models. We compare the platelet activation of the hinge region against the bulk of the flow during one cardiac cycle. This work is supported by the American Heart Association Grant 13SDG17220022, and the computational resources were partly provided by Center for Computational Research (CCR) at University at Buffalo.

  19. Mechanisms of specificity in neuronal activity-regulated gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Michelle R.; West, Anne E.

    2011-01-01

    The brain is a highly adaptable organ that is capable of converting sensory information into changes in neuronal function. This plasticity allows behavior to be accommodated to the environment, providing an important evolutionary advantage. Neurons convert environmental stimuli into long-lasting changes in their physiology in part through the synaptic activity-regulated transcription of new gene products. Since the neurotransmitter-dependent regulation of Fos transcription was first discovered nearly 25 years ago, a wealth of studies have enriched our understanding of the molecular pathways that mediate activity-regulated changes in gene transcription. These findings show that a broad range of signaling pathways and transcriptional regulators can be engaged by neuronal activity to sculpt complex programs of stimulus-regulated gene transcription. However, the shear scope of the transcriptional pathways engaged by neuronal activity raises the question of how specificity in the nature of the transcriptional response is achieved in order to encode physiologically relevant responses to divergent stimuli. Here we summarize the general paradigms by which neuronal activity regulates transcription while focusing on the molecular mechanisms that confer differential stimulus-, cell-type-, and developmental-specificity upon activity-regulated programs of neuronal gene transcription. In addition, we preview some of the new technologies that will advance our future understanding of the mechanisms and consequences of activity-regulated gene transcription in the brain. PMID:21620929

  20. Molecular mechanism for Rabex-5 GEF activation by Rabaptin-5

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Zhang, Tianlong; Wang, Shanshan; Gong, Zhou; Tang, Chun; Chen, Jiangye; Ding, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Rabex-5 and Rabaptin-5 function together to activate Rab5 and further promote early endosomal fusion in endocytosis. The Rabex-5 GEF activity is autoinhibited by the Rabex-5 CC domain (Rabex-5CC) and activated by the Rabaptin-5 C2-1 domain (Rabaptin-5C21) with yet unknown mechanism. We report here the crystal structures of Rabex-5 in complex with the dimeric Rabaptin-5C21 (Rabaptin-5C212) and in complex with Rabaptin-5C212 and Rab5, along with biophysical and biochemical analyses. We show that Rabex-5CC assumes an amphipathic α-helix which binds weakly to the substrate-binding site of the GEF domain, leading to weak autoinhibition of the GEF activity. Binding of Rabaptin-5C21 to Rabex-5 displaces Rabex-5CC to yield a largely exposed substrate-binding site, leading to release of the GEF activity. In the ternary complex the substrate-binding site of Rabex-5 is completely exposed to bind and activate Rab5. Our results reveal the molecular mechanism for the regulation of the Rabex-5 GEF activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02687.001 PMID:24957337

  1. Two Major Medicinal Honeys Have Different Mechanisms of Bactericidal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kwakman, Paulus H. S.; te Velde, Anje A.; de Boer, Leonie; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; Zaat, Sebastian A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Honey is increasingly valued for its antibacterial activity, but knowledge regarding the mechanism of action is still incomplete. We assessed the bactericidal activity and mechanism of action of Revamil® source (RS) honey and manuka honey, the sources of two major medical-grade honeys. RS honey killed Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa within 2 hours, whereas manuka honey had such rapid activity only against B. subtilis. After 24 hours of incubation, both honeys killed all tested bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, but manuka honey retained activity up to higher dilutions than RS honey. Bee defensin-1 and H2O2 were the major factors involved in rapid bactericidal activity of RS honey. These factors were absent in manuka honey, but this honey contained 44-fold higher concentrations of methylglyoxal than RS honey. Methylglyoxal was a major bactericidal factor in manuka honey, but after neutralization of this compound manuka honey retained bactericidal activity due to several unknown factors. RS and manuka honey have highly distinct compositions of bactericidal factors, resulting in large differences in bactericidal activity. PMID:21394213

  2. Mechanisms of Xenobiotic Receptor Activation: Direct vs. Indirect

    PubMed Central

    Mackowiak, Bryan; Wang, Hongbing

    2016-01-01

    The so-called xenobiotic receptors (XRs) have functionally evolved into cellular sensors for both endogenous and exogenous stimuli by regulating the transcription of genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters, as well as those involving energy homeostasis, cell proliferation, and/or immune responses. Unlike prototypical steroid hormone receptors, XRs are activated through both direct ligand-binding and ligand-independent (indirect) mechanisms by a plethora of structurally unrelated chemicals. This review covers research literature that discusses direct vs. indirect activation of XRs. A particular focus is centered on the signaling control of the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), the pregnane X receptor (PXR) and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We expect that this review will shed light on both the common and distinct mechanisms associated with activation of these three XRs. PMID:26877237

  3. Fundamental Mechanisms, Predictive Modeling, and Novel Aerospace Applications of Plasma Assisted Combustion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    rich low temperature chemistry Pressure: 1 atm DME model: Zhao et al., Int. J. Chem. Kinet ., (40) 2008 37 Flow tube experiments DME : rich low... Kinetic enhancement Fuel fragmentsTemperature increase Transport enhancementThermal enhancement Radicals H2, CO CH4 Understanding: Good poor O, NO O2(a∆g...plasma flame kinetic mechanism Develop numerical methods to achieve efficient modeling of detailed plasma flame chemistry 5 Outline 1. Background 2

  4. The Influence of Robotic Assistance on Reducing Neuromuscular Effort and Fatigue during Extravehicular Activity Glove Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, Kaci E.; Deshpande, Ashish D.; Peters, Benjamin J.; Rogers, Jonathan M.; Laske, Evan A.; McBryan, Emily R.

    2017-01-01

    The three-layered, pressurized space suit glove worn by Extravehicular Activity (EVA) crew members during missions commonly causes hand and forearm fatigue. The Spacesuit RoboGlove (SSRG), a Phase VI EVA space suit glove modified with robotic grasp-assist capabilities, has been developed to augment grip strength in order to improve endurance and reduce the risk of injury in astronauts. The overall goals of this study were to i) quantify the neuromuscular modulations that occur in response to wearing a conventional Phase VI space suit glove (SSG) during a fatiguing task, and ii) determine the efficacy of Spacesuit RoboGlove (SSRG) in reversing the adverse neuromuscular modulations and restoring altered muscular activity to barehanded levels. Six subjects performed a fatigue sequence consisting of repetitive dynamic-gripping interspersed with isometric grip-holds under three conditions: barehanded, wearing pressurized SSG, and wearing pressurized SSRG. Surface electromyography (sEMG) from six forearm muscles (flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS), flexor carpi radialis (FCR), flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU), extensor digitorum (ED), extensor carpi radialis longus (ECRL), and extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU)) and subjective fatigue ratings were collected during each condition. Trends in amplitude and spectral distributions of the sEMG signals were used to derive metrics quantifying neuromuscular effort and fatigue that were compared across the glove conditions. Results showed that by augmenting finger flexion, the SSRG successfully reduced the neuromuscular effort needed to close the fingers of the space suit glove in more than half of subjects during two types of tasks. However, the SSRG required more neuromuscular effort to extend the fingers compared to a conventional SSG in many subjects. Psychologically, the SSRG aided subjects in feeling less fatigued during short periods of intense work compared to the SSG. The results of this study reveal the promise of the SSRG as a

  5. Ultrasound-assisted polyol method for the preparation of SBA-15-supported ruthenium nanoparticles and the study of their catalytic activity on the partial oxidation of methane.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongliang; Wang, Renzhang; Hong, Qi; Chen, Luwei; Zhong, Ziyi; Koltypin, Yuri; Calderon-Moreno, J; Gedanken, Aharon

    2004-09-14

    Metallic Ru nanoparticles have been successfully produced and incorporated into the pores of SBA-15 in situ employing a simple ultrasound-assisted polyol method. The product has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, where ultrasound provides both the energy for the reduction of the Ru(III) ion and the driving force for the loading of the Ru(0) nanoparticles into the SBA-15 pores. An ultrasound-assisted insertion mechanism has been proposed based on the microjets and shake-wave effect of the collapsed bubbles. The catalytic properties of the SBA-15-supported Ru nanoparticles have been tested by the partial oxidization of methane and show very high activity and high CO selectivity.

  6. [Advances in the research of application of vacuum-assisted closure in wound healing and its mechanism].

    PubMed

    Xie, S L; Guo, G H; Min, D H

    2017-06-20

    As a new generation of negative pressure drainage technology, vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) can provide stable and persistent negative pressure, and there are several modes to choose from. VAC plays an important role in closing wounds quickly, controlling infection, promoting angiogenesis, increasing blood flow, and promoting granulation tissue growth of wounds. It is now widely applied in all kinds of acute, chronic, and special wounds in clinic with good therapeutic results. However, we need to pay attention to contraindications and complications of VAC when it is used, avoiding secondary damage due to improper treatment. In this review, we summarize VAC dressings, treating pressure and mode choice, mechanism in promoting wound healing, and clinical application of VAC.

  7. Walnut-like In2S3 microspheres: ionic liquid-assisted solvothermal synthesis, characterization and formation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Bo; Zeng, Peng; Zhang, Xiaohu; Mao, Jin; Zan, Ling; Peng, Tianyou

    2012-03-01

    Walnut-like In2S3 microspheres were synthesized through an ionic liquid-assisted solvothermal method for the first time. The crystal structure and morphology of the as-synthesized products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS) and nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurement. It was found that the additional amount of ionic liquid, solvothermal temperature and time played crucial roles in controlling the structure and morphology of the In2S3 microspheres. A possible formation mechanism of the walnut-like In2S3 microsphere was proposed on the basis of the experimental results.

  8. Walnut-like In2S3 microspheres: ionic liquid-assisted solvothermal synthesis, characterization and formation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chai, Bo; Zeng, Peng; Zhang, Xiaohu; Mao, Jin; Zan, Ling; Peng, Tianyou

    2012-04-07

    Walnut-like In(2)S(3) microspheres were synthesized through an ionic liquid-assisted solvothermal method for the first time. The crystal structure and morphology of the as-synthesized products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS) and nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurement. It was found that the additional amount of ionic liquid, solvothermal temperature and time played crucial roles in controlling the structure and morphology of the In(2)S(3) microspheres. A possible formation mechanism of the walnut-like In(2)S(3) microsphere was proposed on the basis of the experimental results.

  9. Platelet activation of mechanical versus bioprosthetic heart valves during systole.

    PubMed

    Hedayat, Mohammadali; Asgharzadeh, Hafez; Borazjani, Iman

    2017-03-11

    Thrombus formation is a major concern for recipients of mechanical heart valves (MHVs), which requires them to take anticoagulant drugs for the rest of their lives. Bioprosthetic heart valves (BHVs) do not require life-long anticoagulant therapy but deteriorate after 10-15years. The thrombus formation is initiated by the platelet activation which is thought to be mainly generated in MHVs by the flow through the hinge and the leakage flow during the diastole. However, our results show that the activation in the bulk flow during the systole phase might play an essential role as well. This is based on our results obtained by comparing the thrombogenic performance of a MHV and a BHV (as control) in terms of shear induced platelet activation under exactly the same conditions. Three different mathematical activation models including linear level of activation, damage accumulation, and Soares model are tested to quantify the platelet activation during systole using the previous simulations of the flow through MHV and BHV in a straight aorta under the same physiologic flow conditions. Results indicate that the platelet activation in the MHV at the beginning of the systole phase is slightly less than the BHV. However, at the end of the systole phase the platelet activation by the bulk flow for the MHV is several folds (1.41, 5.12, and 2.81 for linear level of activation, damage accumulation, and Soares model, respectively) higher than the BHV for all tested platelet activation models.

  10. Outcomes following implantation of mechanical circulatory support in adults with congenital heart disease: An analysis of the Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support (INTERMACS).

    PubMed

    VanderPluym, Christina J; Cedars, Ari; Eghtesady, Pirooz; Maxwell, Bryan G; Gelow, Jill M; Burchill, Luke J; Maltais, Simon; Koehl, Devin A; Cantor, Ryan S; Blume, Elizabeth D

    2017-03-07

    Adults with congenital heart disease represent an expanding and unique population of patients with heart failure (HF) in whom the use of mechanical circulatory support (MCS) has not been characterized. We sought to describe overall use, patient characteristics, and outcomes of MCS in adult congenital heart disease (ACHD). All patients entered into the Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support (INTERMACS) between June 23, 2006, and December 31, 2015, were included. Patients with ACHD were identified using pre-operative data and stratified by ventricular morphology. Mortality was compared between ACHD and non-ACHD patients, and multivariate analysis was performed to identify predictors of death after device implantation. Of 16,182 patients, 126 with ACHD stratified as follows: systemic morphologic left ventricle (n = 63), systemic morphologic right ventricle (n = 45), and single ventricle (n = 17). ACHD patients were younger (42 years ± 14 vs 56 years ± 13; p < 0.0001) and were more likely to undergo device implantation as bridge to transplant (45% vs 29%; p < 0.0001). A higher proportion of ACHD patients had biventricular assist device (BiVAD)/total artificial heart (TAH) support compared with non-ACHD patients (21% vs 7%; p < 0.0001). More ACHD patients on BiVAD/TAH support were INTERMACS profile 1 compared with patients on systemic left ventricular assist device (LVAD) support (35% vs 15%; p = 0.002). ACHD and non-ACHD patients with LVADs had similar survival; survival was worse for patients on BIVAD/TAH support. BiVAD/TAH support was the only variable independently associated with mortality (early phase hazard ratio 4.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.8-11.1; p = 0.001). For ACHD patients receiving MCS, ventricular morphology was not associated with mortality. ACHD patients with LVADs have survival similar to non-ACHD patients. Mortality is higher for patients requiring BiVAD/TAH support, potentially owing to higher INTERMACS profile. These

  11. Development of a novel technique to assess the vulnerability of micro-mechanical system components to environmentally assisted cracking.

    SciTech Connect

    Enos, David George; Goods, Steven Howard

    2006-11-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) will play an important functional role in future DOE weapon and Homeland Security applications. If these emerging technologies are to be applied successfully, it is imperative that the long-term degradation of the materials of construction be understood. Unlike electrical devices, MEMS devices have a mechanical aspect to their function. Some components (e.g., springs) will be subjected to stresses beyond whatever residual stresses exist from fabrication. These stresses, combined with possible abnormal exposure environments (e.g., humidity, contamination), introduce a vulnerability to environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). EAC is manifested as the nucleation and propagation of a stable crack at mechanical loads/stresses far below what would be expected based solely upon the materials mechanical properties. If not addressed, EAC can lead to sudden, catastrophic failure. Considering the materials of construction and the very small feature size, EAC represents a high-risk environmentally induced degradation mode for MEMS devices. Currently, the lack of applicable characterization techniques is preventing the needed vulnerability assessment. The objective of this work is to address this deficiency by developing techniques to detect and quantify EAC in MEMS materials and structures. Such techniques will allow real-time detection of crack initiation and propagation. The information gained will establish the appropriate combinations of environment (defining packaging requirements), local stress levels, and metallurgical factors (composition, grain size and orientation) that must be achieved to prevent EAC.

  12. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Ultrafine-Grained Copper Produced Using Intermittent Ultrasonic-Assisted Equal-Channel Angular Pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jianxun; Wu, Xiaoyu; Liu, Zhiyuan; Chen, Xiaoqiang; Xu, Bin; Wu, Zhaozhi; Ruan, Shuangchen

    2016-09-01

    We proposed intermittent ultrasonic-assisted equal-channel angular pressing (IU-ECAP) and used it to produce ultrafine-grained copper. The main aim of this work was to investigate the microstructure and mechanical properties of copper processed by IU-ECAP. We performed experiments with two groups of specimens: group 1 used conventional ECAP, and group 2 combined ECAP with intermittent ultrasonic vibration. The extrusion forces, microstructure, mechanical properties, and thermal stability of the two groups were compared. It was revealed that more homogeneous microstructure with smaller grains could be obtained by IU-ECAP compared with copper obtained using the traditional ECAP method. Mechanical testing showed that IU-ECAP significantly reduced the extrusion force and increased both the hardness and ultimate tensile stress owing to the higher dislocation density and smaller grains. IU-ECAP promotes conversion from low-angle grain boundaries to high-angle grain boundaries, and it increases the fractions of subgrains and dynamic recrystallized grains. Group 2 statically recrystallized at a higher temperature or longer duration than group 1, showing that group 2 had better thermal stability.

  13. Universal Hydrodynamic Mechanisms for Crystallization in Active Colloidal Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rajesh; Adhikari, R.

    2016-11-01

    The lack of detailed balance in active colloidal suspensions allows dissipation to determine stationary states. Here we show that slow viscous flow produced by polar or apolar active colloids near plane walls mediates attractive hydrodynamic forces that drive crystallization. Hydrodynamically mediated torques tend to destabilize the crystal but stability can be regained through critical amounts of bottom heaviness or chiral activity. Numerical simulations show that crystallization is not nucleational, as in equilibrium, but is preceded by a spinodal-like instability. Harmonic excitations of the active crystal relax diffusively but the normal modes are distinct from an equilibrium colloidal crystal. The hydrodynamic mechanisms presented here are universal and rationalize recent experiments on the crystallization of active colloids.

  14. Structure and Mechanism of the Phosphotyrosyl Phosphatase Activator

    SciTech Connect

    Chao,Y.; Xing, Y.; Chen, Y.; Xu, Y.; Lin, Z.; Li, Z.; Jeffrey, P.; Stock, J.; Shi, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activator (PTPA), also known as PP2A phosphatase activator, is a conserved protein from yeast to human. Here we report the 1.9 {angstrom} crystal structure of human PTPA, which reveals a previously unreported fold consisting of three subdomains: core, lid, and linker. Structural analysis uncovers a highly conserved surface patch, which borders the three subdomains, and an associated deep pocket located between the core and the linker subdomains. The conserved surface patch and the deep pocket are responsible for binding to PP2A and ATP, respectively. PTPA and PP2A A-C dimer together constitute a composite ATPase. PTPA binding to PP2A results in a dramatic alteration of substrate specificity, with enhanced phosphotyrosine phosphatase activity and decreased phosphoserine phosphatase activity. This function of PTPA strictly depends on the composite ATPase activity. These observations reveal significant insights into the function and mechanism of PTPA and have important ramifications for understanding PP2A function.

  15. Mechanisms underlying spontaneous patterned activity in developing neural circuits

    PubMed Central

    Blankenship, Aaron G.; Feller, Marla B.

    2010-01-01

    Patterned, spontaneous activity occurs in many developing neural circuits, including the retina, the cochlea, the spinal cord, the cerebellum and the hippocampus, where it provides signals that are important for the development of neurons and their connections. Despite differences in adult architecture and output across these various circuits, the patterns of spontaneous network activity and the mechanisms that generate it are remarkably similar and can include a depolarizing action of GABA, transient synaptic connections, extrasynaptic transmission, gap junction coupling and the presence of pacemaker-like neurons. Interestingly, spontaneous activity is robust; if one element of a circuit is disrupted another will generate similar activity. This research suggests that developing neural circuits exhibit transient and tunable features that maintain a source of correlated activity during critical stages of development. PMID:19953103

  16. A quantized mechanism for activation of pannexin channels

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Yu-Hsin; Jin, Xueyao; Medina, Christopher B.; Leonhardt, Susan A.; Kiessling, Volker; Bennett, Brad C.; Shu, Shaofang; Tamm, Lukas K.; Yeager, Mark; Ravichandran, Kodi S.; Bayliss, Douglas A.

    2017-01-01

    Pannexin 1 (PANX1) subunits form oligomeric plasma membrane channels that mediate nucleotide release for purinergic signalling, which is involved in diverse physiological processes such as apoptosis, inflammation, blood pressure regulation, and cancer progression and metastasis. Here we explore the mechanistic basis for PANX1 activation by using wild type and engineered concatemeric channels. We find that PANX1 activation involves sequential stepwise sojourns through multiple discrete open states, each with unique channel gating and conductance properties that reflect contributions of the individual subunits of the hexamer. Progressive PANX1 channel opening is directly linked to permeation of ions and large molecules (ATP and fluorescent dyes) and occurs during both irreversible (caspase cleavage-mediated) and reversible (α1 adrenoceptor-mediated) forms of channel activation. This unique, quantized activation process enables fine tuning of PANX1 channel activity and may be a generalized regulatory mechanism for other related multimeric channels. PMID:28134257

  17. Does benign paroxysmal positional vertigo explain age and gender variation in patients with vertigo by mechanical assistance maneuvers?

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Chi, Fang-Lu; Jia, Xian-Hao; Tian, Liang; Richard-Vitton, Th

    2014-11-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is one of the most common peripheral vestibular diseases. The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence of BPPV in vertigo patients and the characteristics of BPPV in diagnosis and repositioning using mechanical assistance maneuvers and to analyze and summarize the reasons showing these characteristics. Seven hundred and twenty-six patients with vertigo were enrolled in this study. All patients were inspected by TRV armchair (SYNAPSYS, model TRV, France). BPPV patients were identified by the examination results. The characteristics and results using TRV armchair in diagnosis and treatment of BPPV were compared and analyzed. Of 726 vertigo patients, 209 BPPV patients were diagnosed, including 58 men and 151 women, aged from 16 to 87 (mean 52.90 ± 11.93) years. There were significant differences in the proportion of BPPV in male and female vertigo patients (P = 0.0233), but no differences among all age groups (P = 0.3201). Of 209 BPPV patients, 208 cases were repositioned by TRV armchair and no one appeared to have otolithic debris relocated into another canal in the repositioning procedures. 202 cases (97.12 %) were successful and six cases (2.87 %) were effective. None of them failed. This study suggests that BPPV is one of the most common diseases in the young vertigo patients, just like that in the old ones. Female of the species has predilection for BPPV and the site of predilection is the right posterior semicircular canals (PC-BPPV). The results of repositioning are perfect using mechanical assistance maneuvers.

  18. Enzyme-assisted processing increases antimicrobial and antioxidant activity of bilberry.

    PubMed

    Puupponen-Pimiä, Riitta; Nohynek, Liisa; Ammann, Sabine; Oksman-Caldentey, Kirsi-Marja; Buchert, Johanna

    2008-02-13

    The effects of nine cell wall-degrading enzymes on the antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of bilberry were studied. Antimicrobial activity was measured using the human pathogens Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium and Staphylococcus aureus as test strains. Enzyme treatments liberated phenolics from the cell wall matrix, which clearly increased the antimicrobial activity of berry juices, press cakes, and berry mashes on the basis of plate counts. Antibacterial effects were stronger against Salmonella than against Staphylococcus bacteria. In general, the increase in activity measured as colony-forming units per milliliter was 3-5 logarithmic units against Salmonella and 1-2 units against Staphylococcus bacteria. Increase in antimicrobial activity was observed only in acidic conditions, which is also the natural environment in various berry products, such as juices. The activity profile of the pectinase preparation affected the chemistry of the phenolics due to the presence of deglycosylating activities in some preparations. The difference in phenolic profiles was reflected in the antimicrobial effects. Bilberry mashes treated with Pectinex Ultra SP-L, Pectinex 3 XL, and Pectinex BE XXL were most efficient against Salmonella bacteria, whereas mashes treated with Pectinex Smash, Pectinex BE 3-L, and Biopectinase CCM showed the strongest antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus bacteria. Due to the liberation of phenolics from the cell wall matrix the antioxidant activity measured as radical scavenging activity was also increased on average about 30% by the enzymatic treatments. The highest increase in phenolic compounds was about 40%. Highest increases in anthocyanins and in antioxidant activity were observed in berry mash treated with Pectinex Smash XXL enzyme, and the lowest increase was observed after treatment with Pectinex BE 3-L. Enzyme-assisted processing is traditionally used to improve berry and fruit juice yields. However, enzymatic treatments also

  19. Shape effect on the antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles synthesized via a microwave-assisted method.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xuesen; Wen, Junjie; Xiong, Xuhua; Hu, Yongyou

    2016-03-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are used as sustained-release bactericidal agents for water treatment. Among the physicochemical characteristics of AgNPs, shape is an important parameter relevant to the antibacterial activity. Three typically shaped AgNPs, nanocubes, nanospheres, and nanowires, were prepared via a microwave-assisted method and characterized by TEM, UV-vis, and XRD. The antibacterial activity of AgNPs was determined by OD growth curves tests, MIC tests, and cell viability assay against Escherichia coli. The interaction between AgNPs and bacterial cells was observed by TEM. The results showed that the three differently shaped AgNPs were nanoscale, 55 ± 10 nm in edge length for nanocubes, 60 ± 15 nm in diameter for nanospheres, 60 ± 10 nm in diameter and 2-4 μm in length for nanowires. At the bacterial concentration of 10(4) CFU/mL, the MIC of nanocubes, nanospheres, and nanowires were 37.5, 75, and 100 μg/mL, respectively. Due to the worst contact with bacteria, silver nanowires exhibited the weakest antibacterial activity compared with silver nanocubes and silver nanospheres. Besides, silver nanocubes mainly covered by {100} facets showed stronger antibacterial activity than silver nanospheres covered by {111} facets. It suggests that the shape effect on the antibacterial activity of AgNPs is attributed to the specific surface areas and facets reactivity; AgNPs with larger effective contact areas and higher reactive facets exhibit stronger antibacterial activity.

  20. Lower rotation speed stimulates sympathetic activation during continuous-flow left ventricular assist device treatment.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Teruhiko; Kinugawa, Koichiro; Nitta, Daisuke; Fujino, Takeo; Inaba, Toshiro; Maki, Hisataka; Hatano, Masaru; Kinoshita, Osamu; Nawata, Kan; Kyo, Shunei; Ono, Minoru

    2015-03-01

    Although the suppression of sympathetic activity is an essential mission for the current heart failure treatment strategy, little is known about the relationship between the rotation speed setting and autonomic nervous activity during continuous-flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD) treatment. We evaluated 23 adult patients with sinus rhythm (36 ± 13 years) who had received continuous-flow LVAD and been followed at our institute between March 2013 and August 2014. Heart rate variability measurement was executed along with hemodynamic study at 3 rotation speeds (low, middle, and high) at 5 weeks after LVAD implantation. Lower rotation speed was associated with higher ratio of low-frequency over high-frequency spectral level (LF/HF), representing enhanced sympathetic activation (p < 0.05 by repeated analyses of variance). Among hemodynamic parameters, cardiac index was exclusively associated with LFNU = LF/(LF + HF), representing relative sympathetic activity over parasympathetic one (p < 0.05). After 6 months LVAD support at middle rotation speed, 19 patients with higher LFNU eventually had higher plasma levels of B-type natriuretic peptide and achieved less LV reverse remodeling. A logistic regression analysis demonstrated that lower LFNU was significantly associated with improvement of LV reverse remodeling (p = 0.021, odds ratio 0.903) with a cut-off level of 55 % calculated by the ROC analysis (AUC 0.869). In conclusion, autonomic activity can vary in various rotation speeds. Patients with higher LFNU may better be controlled at higher rotation speed with the view point to suppress sympathetic activity and achieve LV reverse remodeling.

  1. Ultrastructure and mechanical activity expressed by striated muscle in culture.

    PubMed

    Coleman, A W; Siegel, R; Coleman, J R

    1978-01-01

    Newly devised assay procedures for quantitating the mechanical capabilities of striated muscle fibers grown in cell culture have permitted the correlation of cytological features with the ability to respond mechanically to electrical and chemical stimuli during development. By developmental timing and by physiological characteristics, three distinct mechanical activities can be distinguished: : TWITCH, contracture and wave propagation (escalation). Parallel electron microscopy studies suggest that contracture and escalation require significantly greater internal membrane development than twitch. The assay procedures have revealed that fibers developed in culture from genetically dystrophic chick muscle cells display a heightened electrical threshold for a twich response, but are otherwise similar to normal fibers. Cultured chick fibers, whether of leg or breast origin, exhibit similar ultrastructural and mechanical properties; yet these are different from those of in vivo adult muscle and may represent the avian striated muscle archetype expressed in the absence of innervation. Primary or cell line cultures of rat muscle produce far fewer mechanically active fibers than do avian cell cultures. The influence of culture conditions and cell source, whether avian or mammalian, on the extent of differentiation expressed in culture is so great that our understanding of studies on cultured muscle fibers would benefit from some characterization of both morphological and contractile properties of the fibers being used.

  2. The diverse effects of mechanical loading on active hair bundles

    PubMed Central

    Ó Maoiléidigh, Dáibhid; Nicola, Ernesto M.; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Hair cells in the auditory, vestibular, and lateral-line systems of vertebrates receive inputs through a remarkable variety of accessory structures that impose complex mechanical loads on the mechanoreceptive hair bundles. Although the physiological and morphological properties of the hair bundles in each organ are specialized for detecting the relevant inputs, we propose that the mechanical load on the bundles also adjusts their responsiveness to external signals. We use a parsimonious description of active hair-bundle motility to show how the mechanical environment can regulate a bundle’s innate behavior and response to input. We find that an unloaded hair bundle can behave very differently from one subjected to a mechanical load. Depending on how it is loaded, a hair bundle can function as a switch, active oscillator, quiescent resonator, or low-pass filter. Moreover, a bundle displays a sharply tuned, nonlinear, and sensitive response for some loading conditions and an untuned or weakly tuned, linear, and insensitive response under other circumstances. Our simple characterization of active hair-bundle motility explains qualitatively most of the observed features of bundle motion from different organs and organisms. The predictions stemming from this description provide insight into the operation of hair bundles in a variety of contexts. PMID:22308449

  3. Mechanism of activity and toxicity of Nystatin-Intralipid.

    PubMed

    Semis, Rita; Kagan, Sarah; Berdicevsky, Israela; Polacheck, Itzhack; Segal, Esther

    2013-05-01

    A novel lipid formulation of Nystatin (NYT), Nystatin-Intralipid (NYT-IL), which was found to be more active and less toxic in vitro and in vivo, was developed in our laboratory. The aim of the present study was to explore the possible mechanisms underlying its biological activity. To assess mechanisms affecting fungal cells we conducted the following experiments: killing kinetics, scanning and transmission electron microscopy (EM), measurements of potassium ion leakage and susceptibility in the presence of ergosterol. To study mechanisms affecting mammalian cells, we evaluated the effect of NYT-IL on a kidney cell line, with respect to viability, metabolic activity, potassium leakage and internalization of FITC-labeled human transferrin. NYT-IL exhibited killing kinetics patterns against Candida albicans similar to those of NYT and caused disruption of fungal cells and potassium ion leakage. Susceptibility tests showed that NYT-IL had lower antifungal activity in the presence of ergosterol. Thus, NYT-IL acts apparently by damaging fungal membrane, possibly through interaction with ergosterol, and maybe by additional modes of action. NYT-IL did not cause potassium leakage from mammalian kidney cells at any tested concentration and was not cytotoxic, whereas NYT, at high concentrations, led to K(+) leakage and was cytotoxic. Furthermore, the high NYT concentration interfered in the internalization process of human transferrin receptor (hTfnR) while NYT-IL did not. In summary, the Intralipid formulation of NYT diminishes the mechanisms responsible for toxicity to mammalian cells but preserves mechanisms of action against fungi, thereby suggesting superiority of NYT-IL as compared to NYT as an antifungal agent.

  4. Mechanism of the lanthanum bromide assisted electrochemical aldolization of. alpha. -bromo ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, A.J.; Susla, M. )

    1989-04-26

    Linear sweep voltammetry, preparative electrolyses under a variety of experimental conditions, and trapping experiments have been used to explore the mechanism of the formation of the aldol 2-benzoyl-1-phenylpropanol by electrochemical reduction of {alpha}-bromopropiophenone in the presence of benzaldehyde and lanthanum bromide. The aldol condensation occurs by reaction of the free (lithio) enolate with a lanthanum bromide-benzaldehyde-tetrahydrofuran complex. Electrochemical reduction of the bromo ketone forms the Z enolate highly stereospecifically. The erythro aldol is formed stereoselectively initially, but the condensation is reversible, and the equilibrium mixture of aldols, containing mostly the threo isomer, is isolated from the electrolysis.

  5. Isatin-β-thiocarbohydrazones: Microwave-assisted synthesis, antitumor activity and structure-activity relationship.

    PubMed

    Gabr, Moustafa T; El-Gohary, Nadia S; El-Bendary, Eman R; El-Kerdawy, Mohamed M; Ni, Nanting

    2017-03-10

    A new series of isatin-β-thiocarbohydrazones was synthesized based on the pharmacophoric features of triapine required for metal chelation. Our strategy involved the modifications of triapine basic skeleton by replacing pyridinyl moiety with isatin which retains the tridentate feature of triapine needed for metal chelation. The new compounds were esteemed for their antitumor efficacy against cervical cancer (Hela) and kidney fibroblast cancer (COS-7) cell lines. Compounds 4c, 4d, 5c and 5e exhibited remarkable efficacy against Hela cell line. In addition, compounds 4c, 4k, 4e, 5c and 5e displayed an outstanding efficacy against COS-7 cell line. Compounds 4c, 4k, 4e, 5c and 5e were examined for their in vivo antitumor efficacy against Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) in mice. Pharmacophore mapping was performed to study the structural features of the synthesized compounds compared to triapine and to identify the essential moieties required for potent and selective antitumor activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Robot- and computer-assisted craniotomy (CRANIO): from active systems to synergistic man-machine interaction.

    PubMed

    Cunha-Cruz, V; Follmann, A; Popovic, A; Bast, P; Wu, T; Heger, S; Engelhardt, M; Schmieder, K; Radermacher, K

    2010-01-01

    Computer and robot assistance in craniotomy/craniectomy procedures is intended to increase precision and efficiency of the removal of calvarial tumours, enabling the preoperative design and manufacturing of the corresponding implant. In the framework of the CRANIO project, an active robotic system was developed to automate the milling processes based on a predefined resection planning. This approach allows for a very efficient milling process, but lacks feedback of the intra-operative process to the surgeon. To better integrate the surgeon into the process, a new teleoperated synergistic architecture was designed. This enables the surgeon to realize changes during the procedure and use their human cognitive capabilities. The preoperative planning information is used as guidance for the user interacting with the system through a master-slave architecture. In this article, the CRANIO system is presented together with this new synergistic approach. Experiments have been performed to evaluate the accuracy of the system in active and synergistic modes for the bone milling procedure. The laboratory studies showed the general feasibility of the new concept for the selected medical procedure and determined the accuracy of the system. Although the integration of the surgeon partially reduces the efficiency of the milling process compared with a purely active (automatic) milling, it provides more feedback and flexibility to the user during the intra-operative procedure.

  7. Ultrasonic-assisted extraction, antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of Cyclocarya paliurus (Batal.) Iljinskaja polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jian-Hua; Shen, Ming-Yue; Xie, Ming-Yong; Nie, Shao-Ping; Chen, Yi; Li, Chang; Huang, Dan-Fei; Wang, Yuan-Xing

    2012-06-05

    Recently, renewed interest has grown in the use of ultrasonic-assisted extraction as an alternative approach to the traditional extraction methods. In this study, this novel extraction method was used to isolate polysaccharides from Cyclocarya paliurus (Batal.) Iljinskaja, and response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to optimize the extraction conditions. The optimal conditions for the extraction of polysaccharides were determined to be the ratio of liquid to solid of 8, extraction time of 59 min and extraction temperature of 58 °C. Under these optimal conditions, the yield of polysaccharides obtained was 4.91 ± 0.11%, which was well matched with the value predicted by the model. In vitro antioxidant assays showed that the polysaccharides exhibited strong DPPH radicals (92.09% at 0.25 mg/ml) and self-oxidation of 1,2,3-phentriol (37.22% at 1 mg/ml) scavenging activities, moderate hydroxyl radicals (43.18% at 1 mg/ml) scavenging activity and lipid peroxidation inhibitory effect (31.66% at 1 mg/ml). In addition, the polysaccharides showed moderate antimicrobial activity.

  8. Ultrathin Palladium Membranes Prepared by a Novel Electric Field Assisted Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Samhun; Ko, Joon Ho; Oyama, S. Ted

    2011-03-01

    Ultra-thin Pd composite membranes with a thickness of 1 μm were prepared by a novel electric-field assisted activation technique followed by electroless deposition of Pd on a hollow-fiber α-alumina support. The novel activation method places Pd precursors and a reducing agent on opposite sides of a porous substrate and uses an electric field to cause migration of Pd ions to the outer surface where they are reduced to form seeds in high density in a narrow spatial region. The resulting membranes showed a high hydrogen permeance in the range of 4.0–5.0 × 10{sup −6} mol m{sup −2} s{sup −1} Pa{sup −1} and stable H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivity of 3000–9000 during stability tests for 150 h at 733 K with H{sub 2} flow. The formation of the thin, defect-less and robust Pd layer can be ascribed to the evenly distributed Pd seeds on the support layer and the enhanced bonding between the Pd layer and the support layer resulting from the strong anchoring of the Pd seeds onto the support in the new activation step.

  9. Ultrasound-assisted enzymatic extraction and antioxidant activity of polysaccharides from pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata).

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Zhu, Junxiang; Diao, Wenchao; Wang, Chengrong

    2014-11-26

    An efficient ultrasound-assisted enzymatic extraction (UAEE) of Cucurbita moschata polysaccharides (CMCP) was established and the CMCP antioxidant activities were studied. The UAEE operating parameters (extraction temperature, ultrasonic power, pH, and liquid-to-material ratio) were optimized using the central composite design (CCD) and the mass transfer kinetic study in UAEE procedure was used to select the optimal extraction time. Enzymolysis and ultrasonication that were simultaneously conducted was selected as the UAEE synergistic model and the optimum extraction conditions with a maximum polysaccharide yield of 4.33 ± 0.15% were as follows: extraction temperature, 51.5 °C; ultrasonic power, 440 W; pH, 5.0; liquid-to-material ratio, 5.70:1 mL/g; and extraction time, 20 min. Evaluation of the antioxidant activity in vitro suggested that CMCP has good potential as a natural antioxidant used in the food or medicine industry because of their high reducing power and positive radical scavenging activity for DPPH radical. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Ultrasonic-assisted extraction and antioxidant activities of polysaccharides from Camellia oleifera leaves.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shiling; Cheng, Haoran; Fu, Liang; Ding, Chunbang; Zhang, Li; Yang, Ruiwu; Zhou, Yonghong

    2014-07-01

    Polysaccharides from Camellia oleifera leaves were extracted by ultrasonic-assisted extraction and optimized with response surface methodology. The optimal conditions of the extraction of polysaccharides were determined to be the extraction time of 1.6h, extraction temperature of 88°C and ratio of liquid to raw material of 20, which contributed to the highest yield of 3.77%. The crude polysaccharide was purified and three fractions (CLP-1, CLP-2 and CLP-3) were obtained. Their physicochemical properties were investigated with chemical method. The results indicated that the uronic acid content of CLP-2 was significantly higher than those of CLP-1 and CLP-3, and CLPs were mainly composed of glucose and galactose residue. In vitro antioxidant assay indicated that three polysaccharide fractions showed remarkable antioxidant activities in a concentration-dependent manner. Compared with CLP-1 and CLP-2, CLP-3 exhibited higher iron chelating activity. CLP-2 possessed significant higher hydroxyl radial and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrydrazy (DPPH) radical scavenging activities than those of CLP-1 and CLP-3. Overall, the polysaccharides derived from C. oleifera leaves might be explored as potential natural antioxidant.

  11. Optimization of cellulase-assisted extraction process and antioxidant activities of polysaccharides from Tricholoma mongolicum Imai.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong-Ming; Song, Jin-Hui; Wang, Jin; Yang, Jian-Ming; Wang, Zhi-Bao; Liu, Ying-Hui

    2016-10-01

    Tricholoma mongolicum Imai is a well-known edible and medicinal mushroom which in recent years has attracted increasing attention because of its bioactivities. In this study, water-soluble polysaccharides were extracted from T. mongolicum Imai by cellulase-assisted extraction and their antioxidant activities were investigated. In order to improve the yield of polysaccharides, four variables, cellulase amount (X1 ), pH (X2 ), temperature (X3 ) and extraction time (X4 ), were investigated with a Box-Behnken design. The optimal conditions were predicted to be cellulase amount of 20 g kg(-1) , pH of 4.0, temperature of 50 °C and extraction time of 127 min, with a predicted polysaccharide yield of 190.1 g kg(-1) . The actual yield of polysaccharides under these conditions was 189.6 g kg(-1) , which matched the predicted value well. The crude polysaccharides were purified to obtain four fractions, and characterization of each was carried out. In addition, antioxidant properties of four polysaccharides assessed by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryldydrazyl (DPPH) and hydroxyl radical-scavenging assays indicated that polysaccharides from T. mongolicum Imai (TMIPs) possessed antioxidant activity in a dose-dependent manner. TMIPs show moderate antioxidant activities in vitro. Therefore it is suggested that TMIPs are potential natural antioxidants for use in functional foods. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Collaborative Storytelling Experiences in Social Media: Influence of Peer-Assistance Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Chen-Chung; Liu, Kuo-Ping; Chen, Wei-Hong; Lin, Chiu-Pin; Chen, Gwo-Dong

    2011-01-01

    Collaborative storytelling activities in social media environments are generally developed in a linear way in which all participants collaborate on a shared story as it is passed from one to another in a relay form. Difficulties with this linear approach arise when collecting the contributions of participants in to a coherent story. This study…

  13. Collaborative Storytelling Experiences in Social Media: Influence of Peer-Assistance Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Chen-Chung; Liu, Kuo-Ping; Chen, Wei-Hong; Lin, Chiu-Pin; Chen, Gwo-Dong

    2011-01-01

    Collaborative storytelling activities in social media environments are generally developed in a linear way in which all participants collaborate on a shared story as it is passed from one to another in a relay form. Difficulties with this linear approach arise when collecting the contributions of participants in to a coherent story. This study…

  14. Class I Microcins: Their Structures, Activities, and Mechanisms of Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severinov, Konstantin; Semenova, Ekaterina; Kazakov, Teymur

    Microcin J25, microcin B17, and microcin C7-C51 are the three known members of class I posttranslationally modified microcins (heavily posttranslationally modified antibacterial peptides produced by Enterobacteriaceae with molecular weights of less than 5 kDa). The three microcins are unrelated to each other; they have structures that are highly atypical for ribosomally synthesized peptides and target essential molecular machines that are validated drug targets. In this chapter, available data on mechanisms of action, structure-activity relationships, and immunity mechanisms for class I microcins and related compounds are discussed.

  15. Circadian patterns of gastric electrical and mechanical activity in dogs.

    PubMed

    Aviv, R; Policker, S; Brody, F; Bitton, O; Haddad, W; Kliger, A; Sanmiguel, C P; Soffer, E E

    2008-01-01

    Gastric motor function assessment, in humans and animals, is typically performed for short recording periods. The aim of this article was to monitor gastric electrical and motor activity in the antrum and fundus simultaneously, for long periods, using a new implantable system. Ten dogs were implanted with fundic and antral electrodes for assessment of impedance and electrical activity. Dogs were studied while in cages, for periods of 22-26 h. From late evening and until feeding on the next day, slow wave (SW) rhythm demonstrated a distinct pattern of intermittent pauses (mean duration = 22.8 +/-4.1 s) that delineated groups of SW's. Phasic increases in fundic tone were seen mostly in association with SW pauses, and were highly correlated with antral contractions, R(2) = 0.652, P < 0.05. The SW rate (events per minute) in the postprandial period, fasting and night time was 4.2 +/- 0.2, 5 +/- 0.2 and 4.7 +/- 0.3, respectively, P < 0.05 postprandial vs other periods. Antral and fundic mechanical activities were highly correlated during fasting, particularly at night. This novel method of prolonged gastric recording provides valuable data on the mechanical and electrical activity of the stomach, not feasible by current methods of recording. During fasting, fundic and antral motor activities are highly correlated and are associated with periodic pauses in electrical activity.

  16. Mechanisms of spontaneous activity in developing spinal networks.

    PubMed

    O'Donovan, M J; Chub, N; Wenner, P

    1998-10-01

    Developing networks of the chick spinal cord become spontaneously active early in development and remain so until hatching. Experiments using an isolated preparation of the spinal cord have begun to reveal the mechanisms responsible for this activity. Whole-cell and optical recordings have shown that spinal neurons receive a rhythmic, depolarizing synaptic drive and experience rhythmic elevations of intracellular calcium during spontaneous episodes. Activity is expressed throughout the neuraxis and can be produced by different parts of the cord and by the isolated brain stem, suggesting that it does not depend upon the details of network architecture. Two factors appear to be particularly important for the production of endogenous activity. The first is the predominantly excitatory nature of developing synaptic connections, and the second is the presence of prolonged activity-dependent depression of network excitability. The interaction between high excitability and depression results in an equilibrium in which episodes are expressed periodically by the network. The mechanism of the rhythmic bursting within an episode is not understood, but it may be due to a "fast" form of network depression. Spontaneous embryonic activity has been shown to play a role in neuron and muscle development, but is probably not involved in the initial formation of connections between spinal neurons. It may be important in refining the initial connections, but this possibility remains to be explored.

  17. Physical activity and cancer prevention: etiologic evidence and biological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Friedenreich, Christine M; Orenstein, Marla R

    2002-11-01

    Scientific evidence is accumulating on physical activity as a means for the primary prevention of cancer. Nearly 170 observational epidemiologic studies of physical activity and cancer risk at a number of specific cancer sites have been conducted. The evidence for decreased risk with increased physical activity is classified as convincing for breast and colon cancers, probable for prostate cancer, possible for lung and endometrial cancers and insufficient for cancers at all other sites. Despite the large number of studies conducted on physical activity and cancer, most have been hampered by incomplete assessment of physical activity and a lack of full examination of effect modification and confounding. Several plausible hypothesized biological mechanisms exist for the association between physical activity and cancer, including changes in endogenous sexual and metabolic hormone levels and growth factors, decreased obesity and central adiposity and possibly changes in immune function. Weight control may play a particularly important role because links between excess weight and increased cancer risk have been established for several sites, and central adiposity has been particularly implicated in promoting metabolic conditions amenable to carcinogenesis. Based on existing evidence, some public health organizations have issued physical activity guidelines for cancer prevention, generally recommending at least 30 min of moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity on > or =5 d/wk. Although most research has focused on the efficacy of physical activity in cancer prevention, evidence is increasing that exercise also influences other aspects of the cancer experience, including cancer detection, coping, rehabilitation and survival after diagnosis.

  18. Forcing Open TRP channels: mechanical gating as a unifying activation mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Montell, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) proteins are cation channels that comprise a superfamily of molecular sensors that enable animals to detect a wide variety of environmental stimuli. This versatility enables vertebrate and invertebrate TRP channels to function in a diversity of senses, ranging from vision to taste, smell, touch, hearing, proprioception and thermosensation. Moreover, many individual TRP channels are activated through a surprising range of sensory stimuli. The multitasking nature of TRP channels raises the question as to whether seemingly disparate activators gate TRPs through common strategies. In this regard, a recent major advance is the discovery that a phospholipase C (PLC)-dependent signaling cascade activates the TRP channels in Drosophila photoreceptor cells through generation of force in the lipid-bilayer. The premise of this review is that mechanical force is a unifying, common strategy for gating TRP channels. In addition to several TRP channels that function in mechanosensation and are gated by force applied to the cells, changes in temperature and in the concentration of lipophilic second messengers through stimulation of signaling cascades, cause architectural modifications of the cell membrane, which in turn activate TRP channels through mechanical force. Consequently, TRPs are capable of functioning as stretch-activated channels, even in cases in which the stimuli that initiate the signaling cascades are not mechanical. We propose that most TRPs are actually mechanosensitive channels (MSCs), which undergo conformational changes in response to tension imposed on the lipid bilayer, resulting in channel gating. PMID:25998730

  19. Assisted Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... Recreational activities Security Transportation How to Choose a Facility A good match between a facility and a resident's needs depends as much on the philosophy and services of the assisted living facility as it does on the quality of care. ...

  20. Assistive devices in activities of daily living used by persons with age-related macular degeneration: a population study of 85-year-olds living at home.

    PubMed

    Dahlin Ivanoff, S; Sonn, U

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the overall use of assistive devices among persons with age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) and how it is related to dependence in daily activities. This was a retrospective, descriptive, cross-sectional population study of 85-year-olds. The most common category of assistive devices was bathing devices followed by mobility devices. The overall use of assistive devices was 82%, and around 80% of the device users were independent in activities of daily living. They were multiple device users (57%) and used more mobility devices and personal assistance in mobility. In conclusion, the ARMD group comprises very frequent users of assistive devices and uses assistive devices to remain independent. This implies that health services should provide assistive devices at an early stage in the disablement process to avoid the development of dependence and should consider the likelihood of multiple health problems when assessing the needs of assistive devices among persons with ARMD.